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Sample records for alba patera mars

  1. Geomorphology and stratigraphy of Alba Patera, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneeberger, Dale M.; Pieri, David C.

    1991-01-01

    Geomorphic and stratigraphic analysis of Alba Patera suggests a volcanic construct built by lavas with rheologic properties similar to basalts. A series of evolving eruptive styles is suggested by changes in morphology and inferred progressive reductions in flow volume with higher stratigraphic position. Alba Patera's volcanic history has been summarized into four main phases. The first is characterized by extensive flood like flows presumably erupted from fissures associated with the initial intrusion of magma into the region. The second phase is associated with the emplacement of pyroclastic rock, a more speculative interpretation. The third phase produced the voluminous tabular, crested, and undifferentiated flows, probably from a more centralized vent source. The fourth and last phase is marked the effusion of levee like flows and the collapse of the summit calderas and final graben formation.

  2. Lava Tube Flow Models at Alba Patera, Mars: Topographic Constraints on Eruption Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riedel, S. J.; Sakimoto, S. E. H.; Bradley, B. A.; DeWet, A.

    2001-01-01

    Alba Patera has some of the longest lava tubes over some of the shallowest slopes on Mars. We use Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) topography to model eruption rates for several Alba Patera lava tubes and compare them within Alba and with flows from other martian volcanic regions. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  3. Alba Patera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 22 April 2002) The Science This image, centered near 46.5 N and 119.3 W (240.7 E), is on the northwestern flank of a large, broad shield volcano called Alba Patera. This region of Mars has a number of unique valley features that at first glance look dendritic much in the same pattern that rivers and tributaries form on Earth. A closer look reveals that the valleys are quite discontinuous and must form through a different process than surface runoff of liquid water that is common on Earth. A number of processes might have taken place at some point in the Martian past to form these features. Some of the broad valley features bear some resemblance to karst topography, where material is removed underground by melting or dissolving in groundwater causing the collapse of the surface above it. The long narrow valleys resemble surfaces where groundwater sapping has occurred. Sapping happens when groundwater reaches the surface and causes headward erosion, forming long valleys with fewer tributaries than is seen with valleys formed by surface water runoff. The volcano itself might have been a source of heat and energy, which played a role in producing surfaces that indicate an active groundwater system. The Story Fluid, oozing lava poured somewhat lazily over this area long ago. It happened perhaps thousands of times, over hundreds of thousands of Martian years, creating the nearly smooth, plaster-of-Paris-looking terrain seen today. (Small craters also dent the area, though they may deceive you and look like raised bumps instead. That's just a trick of the eye and the lighting - tilt your head to your left shoulder, and you should see the craters pit the surface as expected.) The lava flows came from a Martian 'shield' volcano named Alba Patera. Shield volcanoes get their name from their appearance: from above, they look like large battle shields lying face up to the sky as if a giant, geological warrior had lain them down. Perhaps one did if you think of a

  4. Alba Patera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 22 April 2002) The Science This image, centered near 46.5 N and 119.3 W (240.7 E), is on the northwestern flank of a large, broad shield volcano called Alba Patera. This region of Mars has a number of unique valley features that at first glance look dendritic much in the same pattern that rivers and tributaries form on Earth. A closer look reveals that the valleys are quite discontinuous and must form through a different process than surface runoff of liquid water that is common on Earth. A number of processes might have taken place at some point in the Martian past to form these features. Some of the broad valley features bear some resemblance to karst topography, where material is removed underground by melting or dissolving in groundwater causing the collapse of the surface above it. The long narrow valleys resemble surfaces where groundwater sapping has occurred. Sapping happens when groundwater reaches the surface and causes headward erosion, forming long valleys with fewer tributaries than is seen with valleys formed by surface water runoff. The volcano itself might have been a source of heat and energy, which played a role in producing surfaces that indicate an active groundwater system. The Story Fluid, oozing lava poured somewhat lazily over this area long ago. It happened perhaps thousands of times, over hundreds of thousands of Martian years, creating the nearly smooth, plaster-of-Paris-looking terrain seen today. (Small craters also dent the area, though they may deceive you and look like raised bumps instead. That's just a trick of the eye and the lighting - tilt your head to your left shoulder, and you should see the craters pit the surface as expected.) The lava flows came from a Martian 'shield' volcano named Alba Patera. Shield volcanoes get their name from their appearance: from above, they look like large battle shields lying face up to the sky as if a giant, geological warrior had lain them down. Perhaps one did if you think of a

  5. Tectonic histories between Alba Patera and Syria Planum, Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, R.C.; Dohm, J.M.; Haldemann, A.F.C.; Hare, T.M.; Baker, V.R.

    2004-01-01

    Syria Planum and Alba Patera are two of the most prominent features of magmatic-driven activity identified for the Tharsis region and perhaps for all of Mars. In this study, we have performed a Geographic Information System-based comparative investigation of their tectonic histories using published geologic map information and Mars Orbiter Laser Altimetry (MOLA) data. Our primary objective is to assess their evolutional histories by focusing on their extent of deformation in space and time through stratigraphic, paleotectonic, topographic, and geomorphologic analyses. Though there are similarities among the two prominent features, there are several distinct differences, including timing deformational extent, and tectonic intensity of formation. Whereas Alba Patera displays a major pulse of activity during the Late Hesperian/Early Amazonian, Syria Planum is a long-lived center that displays a more uniform distribution of simple graben densities ranging from the Noachian to the Amazonian, many of which occur at greater distances away from the primary center of activity. The histories of the two features presented here are representative of the complex, long-lived evolutional history of Tharsis. ?? 2004 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Tectonic Extension and Bulging in Southern Alba Patera Region, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baioni, D.; Borraccini, F.; Lanci, L.; Wezel, F. C.

    2004-12-01

    We investigated the Alba Patera area, south of the Alba Patera Volcano, in order to obtain quantitative information on the tectonic extension affecting this area. Tectonic structures of Alba Patera area have been previously described using Viking images and interpreted as extensional structures. Digital Elevation Model made using altimetry data (MOLA) can be used to quantitatively investigate these structures with a better resolution. We proceeded by constructing E-W oriented profiles and used techniques commonly employed in Structural Geology to estimate the tectonic extension. We investigated the presence of mechanical discontinuities by calculating the maximum depths reached by the graben structures. This has been estimated using the lost-area balancing method (Groshong, 1996) and the crossing depth of the border faults assuming planar fault surfaces, which gave similar results. The extension calculated in the studied area (up to 12%) cannot be explained only with the observed doming of the topographic surface and require a significant amount of horizontal stretching.

  7. Volcanic input to the atmosphere from Alba Patera on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Lionel; Mouginis-Mark, Peter J.

    1987-01-01

    Estimates are presented of the amount of water vapor and/or CO2 released from specific volcanic deposits on a relatively young Martian volcanic construct, Alba Patera. Estimates for the corresponding release rates are also given. Values for the constraints on water-supply-driving eruptions are presented and discussed.

  8. MOLA Topographic Constraints on Lava Tube Effusion Rates for Alba Patera, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riedel, S. J.; Sakimoto, S. E. H.

    2002-01-01

    Using high resolution MOLA (Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter) topographic data to accurately model flow rates, we find that Alba Patera tube-fed flows within the mid to lower flanks could accommodate flow rates between 10 Pa s to 1.308 x 10(exp 6) Pa s. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  9. Estimates of Lava Eruption Rates at Alba Patera, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baloga, S. M.; Pieri, D. C.

    1985-01-01

    The Martian volcanic complex Alba Patera exhibits a suite of well-defined, long and relatively narrow lava flows qualitatively resembling those found in Hawaii. Even without any information on the duration of the Martian flows, eruption rates (total volume discharge/duration of the extrusion) estimates are implied by the physical dimensions of the flows and the likely conjecture that Stephan-Boltzmann radiation is the dominating thermal loss mechanism. The ten flows in this analysis emanate radially from the central vent and were recently measured in length, plan areas, and average thicknesses by shadow measurement techniques. The dimensions of interest are shown. Although perhaps morphologically congruent to certain Hawaiian flows, the dramatically expanded physical dimensions of the Martian flows argues for some markedly distinct differences in lava flow composition for eruption characteristics.

  10. Alba Patera Windstreaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Windstreaks are features caused by the interaction of wind and topographic landforms. The raised rims and bowls of impact craters causes a complex interaction such that the wind vortex in the lee of the crater can both scour away the surface dust and deposit it back in the center of the lee. If you look closely, you will see evidence of this in a darker 'rim' enclosing a brighter interior.

    These windstreaks are located northeast of Olympus Mons and southwest of Alba Patera. The lava flows the windstreaks occur on most likely originated from Alba Patera.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 31.3, Longitude 235.1 East (124.9 West). 36 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  11. Fluvial valleys on Alba Patera, Mars, viewed by HRSC/MEx camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansan, V.; Mangold, N.; Masson, P. L.; Neukum, G.

    2009-12-01

    Alba Patera is the northernmost shield volcano of the Tharsis bulge, on which valley networks have been identified in Viking images. Valleys are mainly distributed on the northern side of volcano, with a parallel to dendritic pattern associated with a very high drainage density of 2.3 km-1, comparable to those observed on Hawaiian volcanoes (Gulick and Baker, Nature 341, 1989; and JGR 95, 1990). They are older than sets of normal faults cutting Alba Patera, and dated of the Amazonian Period, but the age of the volcano itself (Late Hesperian-Early Amazonian) implies an age for valleys younger than that of classical valley networks formed during early Mars. These valley networks have been revisited by the HRSC stereo camera enable to generate Digital Elevation Models (DEM) with a spatial gridding of <100 m and a height accuracy of < 20 m. The depth of the deepest valleys detected in the HRSC DEM is around 30 m, whereas most of them are much shallower. Although these valley networks are relatively young in the Mars History, their original morphology is partially smoothened by a dust mantle in high resolution images, but this mantling does not seem to have filled these valleys significantly. Images also confirm that valleys located to the north are likely the result of hydrologic erosion in volcanic ash as proposed previously by Gulick and Baker (1990). Previously unrecognized valley networks have been observed on the eastern and southeastern sides of Alba Patera, where volcanic flows are well developed and less blanketed by dust or ash deposits. They are shallower than northern ones, and some prints of seepage at the front of lava flows have been identified indicating that liquid water percolation was an active process in this lithology. In summary, 3D characteristics of valleys on Alba Patera do not suggest a sustained fluvial activity unlike what could be derived by their 2D properties such as the high drainage density. Episodic snowmelt following snow deposition

  12. Comparative Investigation of the Geological Histories Among Alba Patera and Syria Planum, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, R. C.; Dohm, J. M.; Haldemann, A. F. C.; Hare, T.

    2002-01-01

    To better understand the evolution of the Tharsis magmatic complex, we performed a comparative investigation of the geological histories among two of the largest centers observed for Tharsis, Syria Planum and Alba Patera. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  13. Major Martian Volcanoes from MOLA - Alba Patera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Two views of Alba Patera with topography draped over a Viking image mosaic. MOLA data have clarified the relationship between fault location and topography on and surrounding the Alba construct, providing insight into the volcanological and geophysical processes that shaped the edifice. The vertical exaggeration is 10:1.

  14. Unveiling the origin of radial grabens on Alba Patera volcano by finite element modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cailleau, Beatrice; Walter, Thomas R.; Janle, Peter; Hauber, Ernst

    2005-07-01

    The Tharsis region is an 8000-km-wide structural dome that incorporates a concentration of the main volcanic and tectonic activity on the Planet Mars. The area of structural doming is characterised by giant radial graben-dike systems. Nested on a set of these giant dikes to the northern side of Tharsis, is Alba Patera, one of the largest volcanoes in the planetary system. The regional dikes there are in arcuate arrangement and imply an E-W to NW-SE regional extension at Alba Patera. To assess the influence of regional and local tectonics, we studied the dike orientations on the volcano with Viking mosaic data and simulated plausible stress fields with finite element modelling. We found that the influence of a NW-SE regional extension was strong near the volcano centre but decreased rapidly in importance towards the northern pole, i.e., far from the Tharsis centre. By combining this regional stress with a broad uplift that is due to a buoyancy zone of about 1400 km in lateral extent and centred under Alba Patera, we reproduced the radial pattern of dike swarms that diverge from the Tharsis trend. Regional tectonics may have dominated the early stages of dike injection. During the evolution of Alba Patera, however, local updoming controlled the dike pattern, supporting the idea of a hotspot under Alba Patera. The well-expressed dike geometry and characteristics of Alba Patera provide an ideal example for comparative study with analogue hotspots on Earth where plate tectonics and active erosion may complicate the reconstruction of volcanic and tectonic history and the understanding of involved geodynamic processes.

  15. Fractal geometry of some Martian lava flow margins: Alba Patera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kauhanen, K.

    1993-01-01

    Fractal dimension for a few lava flow margins on the gently sloping flanks of Alba Patera were measured using the structured walk method. Fractal behavior was observed at scales ranging from 20 to 100 pixels. The upper limit of the linear part of log(margin length) vs. log(scale) profile correlated well to the margin length. The lower limit depended on resolution and flow properties.

  16. Mapping Tyrrhena Patera and Hesperia Planum, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crown, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Hesperia Planum, characterized by a high concentration of mare-type wrinkle ridges and ridge rings [1-4], encompasses > 2 million sq km in the southern highlands of Mars (Fig. 1). The most common interpretation is that the plains were emplaced as "flood" lavas with total thicknesses of <3 km [4-10]. The wrinkle ridges on its surface make Hesperia Planum the type locale for "Hesperian-aged ridged plains" on Mars [e.g., 9], and recent investigations reveal that wrinkle-ridge formation occurred in more than one episode [4]. Hesperia Planum?s stratigraphic position and crater-retention age [e.g., 9, 11-12] define the base of the Hesperian System. However, results of geologic mapping reveal that the whole of Hesperia Planum is unlikely to be composed of the same materials, emplaced at the same geologic time. To unravel these complexities, we are generating a 1:1.5M-scale geologic map of Hesperia Planum and its surroundings (Fig. 1). We have identified 4 distinct plains units within Hesperia Planum and are attempting to determine the nature and relative ages of these materials (Fig. 2) [13, 14]. The volcano Tyrrhena Patera (22degS, 104degE) is located within Hesperia Planum. Its products are both embayed by, and superpose, Hesperia Planum materials [15, 16]. We were previously funded to generate a 1:1 million scale map of Mars Transverse Mercator (MTM) quadrangles -15257 and -20257, which include the Tyrrhena Patera materials north and west of the Tyrrhena Patera summit. The goal for these maps was to constrain the nature and extent of the Tyrrhena Patera deposits, and to determine the relationship between Tyrrhena Patera materials, Hesperia Planum, and the adjacent highlands [16].

  17. Candidate Mars Surveyor Landing Sites Near Apollinaris Patera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulick, Virginia C.

    1999-01-01

    Regions near Apollinaris Patera are proposed for consideration as Mars Surveyor landing sites. Gulick (1998) proposed this region at the First Mars Surveyor Landing Site workshop; Bulmer and Gregg (1998) provided additional support.

  18. The geological history of Nili Patera, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fawdon, P.; Skok, J. R.; Balme, M. R.; Vye-Brown, C. L.; Rothery, D. A.; Jordan, C. J.

    2015-05-01

    Nili Patera is a 50 km diameter caldera at the center of the Syrtis Major Planum volcanic province. The caldera is unique among Martian volcanic terrains in hosting: (i) evidence of both effusive and explosive volcanism, (ii) hydrothermal silica, and (iii) compositional diversity from olivine-rich basalts to silica-enriched units. We have produced a new geological map using three mosaicked 18 m/pixel Context Camera digital elevation models, supplemented by Compact Remote Imaging Spectrometer for Mars Hyperspectral data. The map contextualizes these discoveries, formulating a stratigraphy in which Nili Patera formed by trapdoor collapse into a volcanotectonic depression. The distinctive bright floor of Nili Patera formed either as part of a felsic pluton, exposed during caldera formation, or as remnants of welded ignimbrite(s) associated with caldera formation—both scenarios deriving from melting in the Noachian highland basement. After caldera collapse, there were five magmatic episodes: (1) a basaltic unit in the caldera's north, (2) a silica-enriched unit and the associated Nili Tholus cone, (3) an intrusive event, forming a ~300 m high elliptical dome; (4) an extrusive basaltic unit, emplaced from small cones in the east; and (5) an extreme olivine-bearing unit, formed on the western caldera ring fault. The mapping, together with evidence for hydrated materials, implies magmatic interaction with subsurface volatiles. This, in an area of elevated geothermal gradient, presents a possible habitable environment (sampled by the hydrothermal deposits). Additionally, similarities to other highland volcanoes imply similar mechanisms and thus astrobiological potential within those edifices.

  19. Insights into Highland Patera Volcanism using Mars Express HRSC Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, D. A.; Greeley, R.; Zuschneid, W.; Werner, S.; Neukum, G.; Gwinner, K.; Hauber, E.; Crown, D. A.; Gregg, T. K.; Raitala, J.

    2005-12-01

    We have used images obtained by the High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) on the ESA Mars Express orbiter to assess geologic activity at two of Mars' highland volcanoes: Hadriaca Patera and Tyrrhena Patera. HRSC images cover wide swaths at consistent lighting conditions and resolutions, making them ideal resources for assessing surfaces ages using crater statistics. Additionally, multi-channel HRSC images are processed to produce Digital Terrain Models (DTMs) that are of greater spatial resolution than MOLA-derived DTMs, which are useful to assess regional and local topographic variations. Crater size-frequency analyses and cratering model age estimates show both Hadriaca and Tyrrhena Paterae have complex surfaces shaped by volcanic, fluvial, and eolian processes. These ancient shields were formed early in martian history, 3.7-4.0 Ga. At Hadriaca Patera, the earliest detectable caldera activity occurred at 3.5 Ga, followed by explosive volcanic and fluvial activity on the flanks at 3.3-3.4 Ga. Later caldera activity occurred at 2.2-2.5 Ga and again at 1.1-1.6 Ga. At Tyrrhena Patera, explosive volcanic activity and emplacement of pyroclastic deposits occurred 3.5-3.6 Ga, with later fluvial erosional activity at 1.9-2.0 Ga and again at 1.2-1.5 Ga. Slopes on Tyrrhena Patera are generally shallower (0.09-0.4 degrees) than those on Hadriaca Patera (up to 0.7 degrees). Hadriaca's north flank trends uphill, suggesting that Hadriaca Patera settled due to removal of material during formation of Dao Vallis. Further study is underway to use HRSC topographic data and computer modeling to better understand pyroclastic volcanism at these two volcanoes.

  20. Geology of the small Tharsis volcanoes: Jovis Tholus, Ulysses Patera, Biblis Patera, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plescia, J. B.

    1994-01-01

    Jovis Tholus, Ulysses Patera, and Biblis Patera, three small volcanoes in the Tharsis area of Mars, provide important insight into the evolution of volcanism on Mars. All three are interpreted to be shield volcanoes, indicating that shield volcansim was present from the outset in Tharsis. Jovis Tholus is the least complex with simple repeated outpouring of lavas and caldera-forming events. Ulysses Patera is dominated by a giant caldera within which is a line of cinder cones or domes suggesting terminal stages of volcanism in which the magma had either significant volatiles or increased viscosity. Biblis Patera is characterized by nested calderas which have expanded by block faulting of the flank; it also exhibits lava flows erupted onto the flanks from events along concentric fractures. These shields are different from the younger Tharsis Montes shields only in terms of the volume of erupted material. The limited shield volume suggests that the magma source which fed the shields was rapidly depleted. The relatively large size ofthe calderas probably results from relatively large, shallow magma bodies rather than significant burial of the flanks by younger lavas. Eruption rates consistent with typical terrestrial basaltic eruptiuon rates suggest that these volcanoes were probably built over time spans of 10(exp 4) to 10(exp 5) years. Stratigraphic ages range from Early to Upper Hesperian; absolute ages range from 1.9 to 3.4 Ga.

  1. Strain Histories Among Alba and Syria Planum, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, R. C.; Dohm, J. M.; Hare, T.; Haldemann, A. F. C.; Baker, V.

    2003-01-01

    The centers work of Anderson et al. (2001) [1] identified two prominent centers in the Tharsis region, Syria Planum and Alba Patera (Stage 2 and Stage 4 respectively). Because of their perceived influence on the geologic and possible paleoclimatic histories of Mars, Mars Orbiter Laser Altimetry (MOLA) along with published stratigraphic and paleotectonic information (including the centers information) were analyzed using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to perform a comparative investigation of their strain histories through time. This investigation highlights their similarities and distinctions, including their topographic and morphologic signatures, deformational extent, and intensities and durations of activity.

  2. The Unique Formation of the Nili Patera Caldera on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skok, J. R.; Karunatillake, S.; Fawdon, P.

    2014-12-01

    Caldera formation is common on the large volcanoes of Mars. Of these, the Nili Patera caldera in Syrtis Major appears unique. Set at one end of a 200 km long depression, the caldera manifests both extrusive [Christensen et al., 2005] and potentially intrusive [Wray et al., 2013] evolved silica-rich units, hydrothermal systems [Skok et al., 2010], and other post-caldera-formation volcanic structures such as the Nili Tholus cone. Nili Patera distinguishes itself by the depth of collapse. While other Martian caldera collapse less than thickness of the volcanics, Nili Patera's floor lies ~1800 m below the plains elevations: ~1300 m below the estimated 500 m mean thickness of Syrtis Major [Hiesinger and Head, 2004]. Other calderas lack morphologic evidence of late-stage volcanic constructs, while dust cover precludes spectroscopic evidence of evolved compositions in many calderas. If Nili Patera is unique, the question then is why? We examine the qualities that distinguish Nili Patera not just from calderas on other volcanoes but also from the neighboring Meroe Patera, due south within the same elongate depression. The Noachian-aged material below Syrtis Major have been observed to be altered and phyllosilicate-rich [Ehlmann et al., 2009, Marzo et al., 2010]. Access to this water-rich substrate could have driven the surface hydrothermal system. The eruption of evolved lavas would not be caused by the substrate composition, but could instead result from the collapse. Basaltic volcanoes on Earth often have evolved plutons created by repeated partial melting. The massive collapse of Nili Patera could have provided a mechanism for this unit to erupt, while remaining buried in other volcanoes. We examine multiple hypotheses for why this deep collapse is only observed in Nili Patera and how the observed lithologies here may relate to the evolution of other Martian volcanoes. The regional-scale compositional signature, that the Syrtis Major province shares with other major

  3. Volcanic geology of Hadriaca Patera and the eastern Hellas region of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crown, D. A.; Greeley, R.

    1993-02-01

    A detailed examination of the geomorphology of Hadriaca Patera, a low-relief volcano in the southern highlands of Mars northeast of the Hellas basin, is presented, and the surrounding eastern Hellas region is considered in order to assess whether the volcanic geology of Hadriaca Patera is consistent with previous characterizations and highland paterae. The morphologic characteristics of the channels suggest erosion by groundwater sapping and surface runoff. The erosional morphology of the volcano, the lack of lava flow features, and the friable nature of the flank materials indicate that Hadriaca Patera consists predominantly of pyroclastic deposits. From the predominance of hydrovolcanic eruptions in the development of Hadriaca and Tyrrhena patera, it is inferred that the transition in volcanic eruption style can be attributed to a volatile depletion of the crust, whereas magmatic eruptions at the paterae would be indicative of temporal changes in Martian magmas.

  4. Volcanic geology of Hadriaca Patera and the eastern Hellas region of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crown, David A.; Greeley, Ronald

    1993-01-01

    A detailed examination of the geomorphology of Hadriaca Patera, a low-relief volcano in the southern highlands of Mars northeast of the Hellas basin, is presented, and the surrounding eastern Hellas region is considered in order to assess whether the volcanic geology of Hadriaca Patera is consistent with previous characterizations and highland paterae. The morphologic characteristics of the channels suggest erosion by groundwater sapping and surface runoff. The erosional morphology of the volcano, the lack of lava flow features, and the friable nature of the flank materials indicate that Hadriaca Patera consists predominantly of pyroclastic deposits. From the predominance of hydrovolcanic eruptions in the development of Hadriaca and Tyrrhena patera, it is inferred that the transition in volcanic eruption style can be attributed to a volatile depletion of the crust, whereas magmatic eruptions at the paterae would be indicative of temporal changes in Martian magmas.

  5. Evolution and Erosion of Tyrrhena and Hadriaca Paterae, Mars: New Insights from MOC and MOLA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, T. K. P.; Crown, D. A.; Sakimoto, S. E. H.

    2001-01-01

    Investigation of Hadriaca and Tyrrhena Paterae, Mars, using MOC and MOLA data reveals new information about caldera formation, channel development, and lava flow-field emplacement. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  6. Physical properties of lava flows on the southwest flank of Tyrrhena Patera, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crown, David A.; Porter, Tracy K.; Greeley, Ronald

    1991-01-01

    Tyrrhena Patera (TP) (22 degrees S, 253.5 degrees W), a large, low-relief volcano located in the ancient southern highlands of Mars, is one of four highland paterae thought to be structurally associated with the Hellas basin. The highland paterae are Hesperian in age and among the oldest central vent volcanoes on Mars. The morphology and distribution of units in the eroded shield of TP are consistent with the emplacement of pyroclastic flows. A large flank unit extending from TP to the SW contains well-defined lava flow lobes and leveed channels. This flank unit is the first definitive evidence of effusive volcanic activity associated with the highland paterae and may include the best preserved lava flows observed in the Southern Hemisphere of Mars. Flank flow unit averages, channelized flow, flow thickness, and yield strength estimates are discussed. Analysis suggests the temporal evolution of Martian magmas.

  7. Timing and formation of wrinkle ridges in the Tyrrhena Patera Region of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, Tracy K.; Crown, David A.; Greeley, Ronald

    1991-01-01

    Wrinkle ridges are distinctive linear to curvilinear arches topped by crenulated ridges and have been identified on the Moon, Mercury, and Mars. The presence of wrinkle ridges on other planetary surfaces has been used as a criterion for identifying volcanic plains. Recently, due to the presence of lava flow lobes and leveed channels, Greeley and Crown identified an area within Hesperia Planum as a flank flow unit associated with Tyrrhena Patera. Hesperia Planum surrounds Tyrrhena Patera and embays the eroded shield of the volcano to the north and south. The Tyrrhena Patera flank flow unit extends approx. 1000 km from the summit caldera to the southwest. More than 55 wrinkle ridges have been identified on this flank flow unit. The relationships between the lava flows and wrinkle ridges within the flank flow unit allow relative ages to be determined. Wrinkle ridges are classified as post flow if flow lobes appear to arch over the rises undeformed, with no evidence of flow ponding on the upstream side of the ridge, or of flows breaching the rises. Wrinkle ridges within Hesperia Planum and Tyrrhena Patera flank flow unit that trend NW-SE appear younger than the flank flow unit.

  8. Temporal Evolution of Volcanic Eruption, Fluvial Drainage Systems and Faulting on the Northwest Flank of Alba Patera as Revealed by Photogeological Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Diya

    2013-01-01

    Although Alba Patera is the largest volcano in aerial extent in the solar system (˜6.8 km high and >1000 km in radius), the geologic processes responsible for shaping its exceedingly low-angle flanks remain poorly constrained. These flanks are covered in lava flows, valleys and both radial and annular grabens. Previous attempts, limited by the resolution of the satellite images, assume that the annular grabens formed during the terminal stage of volcanic development whereas surface water flow occurred in the early stage of volcanic construction. In this study, we analyze high-resolution CTX satellite images in conjunction with digital topographic data from MOLA. Our work reveals complex cross cutting relationships between faults, drainage network development and lava flows on the northwestern flank of Alba Patera. We observe a minimum of three generations of lava flows, three generations of drainage channels and three generations of faults. Mutual and successive cross-cutting relationships between drainage channels and faults indicate that the tectonic processes responsible for creating grabens on the volcano flank operated continuously and were coeval with drainage formation. The lava flows are observed to be the oldest geomorphic features and the third generation of faults as the youngest geomorphic features in our mapped region. Crater counting indicates that the surface within the mapped region is Amazonian in age. An analysis of the crater densities reveals a decline in crater densities from the south to the north section of the mapped region. This could be attributed to resurfacing in the north due to sediments deposited by northward flowing drainage channels. Crater counting age estimates for the south section yield a result of ˜ 1.74 Ga, +/- 0.12 Ga and ˜ 1.35 Ga, +/- 0.26 Ga for the north section. Hence, the younger age estimates of the northern surface could help further constrain the age of the drainage channels and faults on the northwest flank of

  9. The Martian highland paterae: Evidence for explosive volcanism on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crown, David A.; Greeley, Ronald

    1988-01-01

    The Martian surface exhibits numerous volcanic landforms displaying great diversity in size, age, and morphology. Most research regarding Martian volcanology has centered around effusive basaltic volcanism, including analyses of individual lava flows, extensive lava plains, and large shield volcanoes. These studies were hindered by a lack of definitive morphologic criteria for the remote identification of ash deposits. Knowledge of the abundances, ages, and geologic settings of explosive volcanic deposits on Mars is essential to a comprehensive understanding of the evolution of the Martian surface, with implications for the evolution of the lithosphere and atmosphere as well as the histories of specific volcanic centers and provinces.

  10. Deep Basalt Aquifers in Orcus Patera, Elysium Basin Mars: Perspectives for Exobiology Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grin, E. A.; Cabrol, N. A.

    1998-01-01

    Direct indicators of shorelines, spillways, and terraces allowed to determine the extent of the Elysium Paleolake between the contour-lines 1000 and 500 m below the Martian datum. The Elysium Paleolake is bordered north by Orcus Patera (14N/181W), which lies west of the Tartarus Montes and Tartarus Colles. The Orcus Patera displays an ellipse-shaped collapsed caldera of 360-km long and 100-km wide. Viking topographic data show that the bottom of the caldera is located at 2500 below the Martian datum, and surrounded by a steep-walled ram art which crest is located at about 0 m elevation. Considering the localization of Orcus Patera in the Elysium paleolake, its altimetry, and the magmatic origin of this caldera, we propose the existence of a paleolake in Orcus Patera generated (a) by juvenile water from magma during the Noachian period, and (b) by intermittent influx of the Elysium Basin from Hesperian to Amazonian. Results are encouraging to consider this site as a potential high-energy source environment for microbial communities. are circumscribed by a 50-km wide lava field mapped as Noachian material. The structure of Orcus Patera represents the record of material erupted from a magmatic reservoir. The caldera is enclosed by steep inner walls (25% measured from topographic data), values which could be in agreement with the presence of a deep magmatic reservoir, as suggested by the typology of Crumpler et.al. The depth of the caldera might be due to the collapse of the magma reservoir, and the release of gases accompanying the magma thermal evolution. Origins of water for the paleolake(s): The water that generated a paleolake in Orcus Patera may have come from two origins: (1) Juvenile water: Plescia and Crips estimated a magma H20 content by weight between 0.5% and 1.5% using for the first value a comparison with terrestrial basalt, and for the second values from a Martian meteorite. The amount of H20 can be estimated by the volume of erupted lava, and the lava

  11. The Crustal Dichotomy Boundary West of Tempe Terra: Speculation on Where it Lies Beneath Alba Patera Based on Mola Topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, H.; Roark, J.; Sakimoto, S.; McGovern, P.

    1999-01-01

    MOLA gridded data based on profiles collected during the Aerobraking Hiatus and Science Phasing Operations suggest the crustal dichotomy boundary west of Tempe continues beneath Alba volcanics, at least to 105 W at about 50 N. A broad shelf-like region in the Alba units is continuous with a similar region of Tempe in which Hesperian volcanics overlie Noachian cratered terrain. Perspective views show significant changes in the sloping character of the flanks of Alba east and west of 105W, with much more continuous steep topography to the west. We suggest that Alba sits astride the ancient crustal dichotomy boundary, not adjacent to it, and that its eastern half lies on old cratered terrain. If true, this would significantly affect the estimate of Alba volcanics volumes, and might also explain some of the observed asymmetries in the structure and the distribution of faults associated with this immense feature.

  12. Areal Distribution of Potential Felsic Material in Nili Patera at Syrtis Major, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggers, G. L.; Wray, J. J.; Dufek, J.

    2015-12-01

    For decades, studies of the exposed igneous Martian crust via remote sensing and landed observation have concluded that it is predominantly basaltic. However, new analyses of meteorites and mission data indicate a wider range of primary rock composition. Nili Patera in the Syrtis Major region provides one of the best exposures of evolved compositions. Recently, Wray et al. (2013) identified a new unit in the caldera with very high feldspar abundance but unusually low mafic abundance and interpreted it as a felsic unit (as opposed to spectrally similar anorthosite) based on its proximity to a dacite unit. We investigate the summit calderas of Syrtis Major by defining and mapping distinct compositional units using mineralogies inferred from the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) instrument on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO). The study focuses on the areal extent of potential felsic material, identified based on a broad absorption feature centered at ~1.25-1.3 μm, a unique feature of feldspars attributed to minor Fe2+ substitution. These mapping efforts are put in geologic context using images from the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) instrument on MRO and existing mapping efforts in the area, as well as spectral context using laboratory generated spectra of feldspar and mafic mixtures. While further work understanding this potential felsic unit is warranted, if it is truly felsic it implies a more complicated Martian magmatic history than previously thought. As the diversity of known geologic materials on Mars grows, it is necessary that we understand how to recognize and characterize those materials using the instruments available on current and upcoming missions, such as MRO or the Mars 2020 Rover. Through modeling and data analysis, our ongoing work seeks to understand the geophysical and petrologic context in which the potential felsic materials were generated, and thus to infer their implications for Martian

  13. Scalloped terrains in the Peneus and Amphitrites Paterae region of Mars as observed by HiRISE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefort, A.; Russell, P. S.; Thomas, N.

    2010-01-01

    The Peneus and Amphitrites Paterae region of Mars displays large areas of smooth, geologically young terrains overlying a rougher and older topography. These terrains may be remnants of the mid-latitude mantle deposit, which is thought to be composed of ice-rich material originating from airfall deposition during a high-obliquity period less than 5 Ma ago. Within these terrains, there are several types of potentially periglacial features. In particular, there are networks of polygonal cracks and scalloped-shaped depressions, which are similar to features found in Utopia Planitia in the northern hemisphere. This area also displays knobby terrain similar to the so-called "basketball terrains" of the mid and high martian latitudes. We use recent high resolution images from the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) along with data from previous Mars missions to study the small-scale morphology of the scalloped terrains, and associated polygon network and knobby terrains. We compare these with the features observed in Utopia Planitia and attempt to determine their formation process. While the two sites share many general features, scallops in Peneus/Amphitrites Paterae lack the diverse polygon network (i.e. there is little variation in the polygon sizes and shapes) and large curvilinear ridges observed in Utopia Planitia. This points to a more homogeneous ice content within the substrate in the Peneus/Amphitrites Paterae region and implies that scallop formation is independent of polygon formation. This work shows that, as in Utopia Planitia, sublimation of interstitial ice is a likely process explaining the formation of the scalloped depressions in the region of Peneus/Amphitrites Paterae. Therefore, we provide a simplified scallop formation model based on sublimation of interstitial ice as proposed for Utopia Planitia. We also show that the differences in scallop morphologies between the two regions may be explained by differences in near-surface ice

  14. Circumferential graben and the structural evolution of Alba Mons, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öhman, Teemu; McGovern, Patrick J.

    2014-05-01

    Alba Mons is a unique, very extensive but shallow volcanotectonic construct in northern Tharsis, Mars. Numerous models have been presented to explain the formation of Alba Mons and its most characteristic feature, a wristwatch-like pattern of radial and circumferential graben. We used a wide selection of topographic datasets to characterize the fault throw variation on nine topographic transects across the circumferential graben in order to provide observational constraints for the different formation models, and to gain further insight into the evolution of Alba Mons. In most of the transects, summed throws from outwards-facing (away from the center of the volcano) faults are larger than from the inwards-facing (towards the center) ones. Only the very gently sloping western transects show the opposite, emphasizing the east-west-asymmetry of Alba Mons. 10-40% of the observed topographic relief of Alba Mons along the nine transects can be accounted for by this throw difference between the inwards- and outwards-facing faults. These results are consistent with predictions of models suggesting an uplift mechanism to explain the formation of the circumferential graben, but not with models invoking central subsidence. Horizontal extensional strain along the transects varies between 0.5% and 2%, consistent with strain predictions of the late-stage sill complex inflation model of McGovern et al. (McGovern, P.J., Solomon, S.C., Head J.W. III, Smith, D.E., Zuber M.T., Neumann, G.A. [2001]. J. Geophys. Res. 106(E10), 23769-23809).

  15. Hadriaca Patera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 17 May 2002) The Science Although the largest volcanoes on Mars (and the solar system) are located in the geologically young Tharsis region, there are many other martian volcanoes that display equally interesting features, such as Hadriaca Patera, shown in this image. Hadriaca Patera is located to the northeast of the Hellas Planitia impact basin in the southern hemisphere. Unlike the Tharsis volcanoes, Hadriaca Patera has very low relief, standing only about 1-2 km above the surrounding plains. Many scientists believe that Hadriaca Patera and other patera volcanoes (e.g., Tyrrhena) had significant interaction with subsurface water that produced mostly explosive ash deposits (pyroclastic flows), rather than just lava flows. Nearby sources of water might have included Dao Vallis on the southern flank of the volcano. The upper portion of this image shows relatively smooth terrain located in the central caldera, which has been nearly filled in with late-stage lava flows. The lower half of the image shows lobate flows as well as furrows in the ash deposits that make up the volcano's southern flank; these erosional furrows may have formed by surface runoff or sapping by groundwater. Just below the center of the image, a few small sinuous troughs are visible, and may be collapsed lava tubes or collapse features related to subsurface water. The number of impact craters on a planetary surface is commonly used as a proxy for the age of the surface -- an old surface has had time to accumulate more craters than a young surface. The relatively small number of large craters in the image indicates that the surface in this area is younger than the nearby heavily cratered ancient terrains outside the Hellas basin, but there are more craters on this surface than would be found on the average volcanic surface in Tharsis (there are some very large old craters on the volcano's flank to the southeast of this image). Paterae in general are older than the Tharsis volcanoes. At

  16. Silica Deposits in the Nili Patera Volcanic Caldera, Syrtis Major, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skok, J. R.; Mustard, J. F.; Ehlmann, B. L.; Milliken, R.; Murchie, S. L.

    2009-12-01

    of the silica may result from exposure to the Martian environment [3], though silica deposits elsewhere on Mars remain hydrated [4,5]. The Nili Patera deposits are significant because they show a hydrothermal environment in original geological context, are evidence of Hesperian or younger active hydrothermal environments, and are correlated with one of the very few possible examples of evolved lavas on Mars. [1]Christensen et al. (2005) Nature. 436. 504-509. [2]Wyatt, M. B. and H. Y. McSween (2002) Nature. 417, 263-266 [4]Milliken et al (2008). Geology, v.36 p847-850 [3]Cloutis et al. (2009) Workshop on Modeling Martian Hydrous Environments. Abstract #4002. [5]Elhmann et al. (2009) J. Geophys. Res. In Press

  17. Apollinaris Patera Erosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    18 September 2004 Apollinaris Patera is an ancient volcano located northwest of Gusev Crater, the landing site of the Mars Exploration Rover, Spirit. Apollinaris Patera, being rather old, is covered with craters, mantles of dust, and a wind-scoured covering of indurated, fine material. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a small portion of the Apollinaris Patera volcano, revealing the exhumation of older surfaces from beneath a relatively thin, wind-scoured material. This view is located on the upper south slope of the volcano, near 9.5oS, 186.4oW. The image covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) across and is illuminated by sunlight from the upper left.

  18. Deep Basalt Aquifers in Orcus Patera, Elysium Basin Mars: Perspectives for Exobiology Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grin, E. A.; Cabrol, N. A.

    1998-01-01

    Direct indicators of shorelines, spillways, and terraces allowed to determine the extent of the Elysium Paleolake between the contour-lines 1000 and 500 m below the Martian datum. The Elysium Paleolake is bordered north by Orcus Patera (14N/181W), which lies west of the Tartarus Montes and Tartarus Colles. The Orcus Patera displays an ellipse-shaped collapsed caldera of 360-km long and 100-km wide. Viking topographic data show that the bottom of the caldera is located at 2500 below the Martian datum, and surrounded by a steep-walled ram art which crest is located at about 0 m elevation. Considering the localization of Orcus Patera in the Elysium paleolake, its altimetry, and the magmatic origin of this caldera, we propose the existence of a paleolake in Orcus Patera generated (a) by juvenile water from magma during the Noachian period, and (b) by intermittent influx of the Elysium Basin from Hesperian to Amazonian. Results are encouraging to consider this site as a potential high-energy source environment for microbial communities. are circumscribed by a 50-km wide lava field mapped as Noachian material. The structure of Orcus Patera represents the record of material erupted from a magmatic reservoir. The caldera is enclosed by steep inner walls (25% measured from topographic data), values which could be in agreement with the presence of a deep magmatic reservoir, as suggested by the typology of Crumpler et.al. The depth of the caldera might be due to the collapse of the magma reservoir, and the release of gases accompanying the magma thermal evolution. Origins of water for the paleolake(s): The water that generated a paleolake in Orcus Patera may have come from two origins: (1) Juvenile water: Plescia and Crips estimated a magma H20 content by weight between 0.5% and 1.5% using for the first value a comparison with terrestrial basalt, and for the second values from a Martian meteorite. The amount of H20 can be estimated by the volume of erupted lava, and the lava

  19. Nili Patera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 14 May 2003

    At the summit of the low-relief shield volcano Syrtis Major, the caldera known as Nili Patera hosts a remarkable field of barchan-like dunes. The rugged knob to the north of the dunes is probably a breached volcanic cone representing one of the last eruptive events from this caldera.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 9, Longitude 67.4East (292.6). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  20. Meroe Patera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    This image is located in Meroe Patera (longitude: 292W/68E, latitude: 7.01), which is a small region within Syrtis Major Planitia. Syrtis Major is a low-relief shield volcano whose lava flows make up a plateau more than 1000 km across. These flows are of Hesperian age (Martian activity of intermediate age) and are believed to have originated from a series of volcanic depressions, called calderas. The caldera complex lies on extensions of the ring faults associated with the Isidis impact basin toward the northeast - thus Syrtis Major volcanism may be associated with post-impact adjustments of the Martian crust.

    The most striking feature in this image is the light streaks across the image that lead to dunes in the lower left region. Wind streaks are albedo markings interpreted to be formed by aeolian action on surface materials. Most are elongate and allow an interpretation of effective wind directions. Many streaks are time variable and thus provide information on seasonal or long-term changes in surface wind directions and strengths. The wind streaks in this image are lighter than their surroundings and are the most common type of wind streak found on Mars. These streaks are formed downwind from crater rims (as in this example), mesas, knobs, and other positive topographic features.

    The dune field in this image is a mixture of barchan dunes and transverse dunes. Dunes are among the most distinctive aeolian feature on Mars, and are similar in form to barchan and transverse dunes on Earth. This similarity is the best evidence to indicate that martian dunes are composed of sand-sized material, although the source and composition of the sand remain controversial. Both the observations of dunes and wind streaks indicate that this location has a windy environment - and these winds are persistent enough to product dunes, as sand-sized material accumulates in this region. These features also indicate that the

  1. Nili Patera Dunes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    6 July 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows dark, windblown sand dunes in the caldera of Nili Patera, a volcanic crater in Syrtis Major. The dunes were formed by winds blowing from the northeast (upper right).

    Location near: 9.0oN, 292.9oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season Northern Autumn

  2. Ulysses Patera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] (Released 18 July 2002) It is helpful to look at the context for this THEMIS image, which covers a large area over the summit of Ulysses Patera. Ulysses Patera is one of the many volcanoes that make up the giant Tharsis volcanic province, although Ulysses itself is fairly small in comparison to the other volcanoes in this area. In the context image, there are 3 circular features near the top of the volcano. The large, central feature is called a 'caldera', and is the result of volcanic activity at Ulysses. The other two circular features are impact craters. The THEMIS image primarily spans across the central caldera, but also covers a portion of the northernmost impact crater. We know that the large central caldera must have formed earlier than the two craters, because its circular form has been cut by the smaller crater rims. In the THEMIS image, there are stair-stepping plateaus in the northern portion of the image. These are part of the rim of the northern crater, and are caused by collapse or subsidence after the impact event. Just to the south of this crater, 'rayed' patterns can be seen on part of the caldera floor. The rayed pattern is most likely due to a landslide of material down the crater rim slope. Another possibility is that the impact that formed the northern crater caused material to be ejected radially, and then parts of the ejecta have either been buried or eroded away. Other signs of mass movement events in this image are dark streaks, caused by dust avalanches, visible in the caldera's northern wall. In the central portion of the image, there are two lobe-shaped features-one overlaps the other-that appear to have flowed westward. It is likely that these features are ejecta lobes, because they are located adjacent to the southeastern crater (see context image). The fluidized appearance of these ejecta lobes is probably due to a significant amount of ice or water being present in the soil at the time

  3. The Keck "Mars 2000" Project: Using Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter Data to Assess Geological Processes and Regional Stratigraphy Near Orcus Patera and Marte Vallis on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosfils, E. B.; Sakimoto, S. E. H.; Mendelson, C. V.; Bleacher, J. E.

    2001-01-01

    During the Keck 'Mars 2000' summer project 10 undergraduates (rising juniors) used Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) data to study a 19x14 degree region they identified as a potential Mars 2003 landing site. Here we introduce the project science and organization. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  4. Outflow activity near Hadriaca Patera, Mars: Fluid-tectonic interaction investigated with High Resolution Stereo Camera stereo data and finite element modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musiol, S.; Cailleau, B.; Platz, T.; Kneissl, T.; Dumke, A.; Neukum, G.

    2011-08-01

    We investigate the formation of the outflow channels Dao and Niger Valles near the eastern rim of the Hellas impact basin, Mars. Methods used include image and topography analysis, surface age determination, and finite element modeling. Observations show that deep depressions, source regions for Dao and Niger Valles, are located in an area of shallow subsidence to the south and east of the volcano Hadriaca Patera. Cratering model ages allow for fluvial processes triggered by volcanic loading. Based on the observations, we develop a numerical model of volcanic loading on top of a poroelastic plate leading to flexure and fracturing of the lithosphere. Modeling results show that fracturing may occur up to a depth of about 6 km within an area of shallow subsidence, i.e., the moat surrounding the volcano. Depending on initial aquifer pressurization, groundwater could have reached the surface. Model discharges and channel morphometry suggest that the Dao Vallis channel never reached bankfull flow and that the wetted channel perimeter may have formed during multiple outflow events. The following scenario is proposed: (1) emplacement of a volcanic load on top of a confined, overpressurized aquifer in the early Hesperian, (2) fracturing around the load, possibly reactivated during various stages of volcanic activity, (3) channeling of groundwater to the surface along fractures and outflow channel formation during several events in the Hesperian, and (4) collapse, mass wasting and modification of depressions in the Amazonian.

  5. Inversion of Gravity and Magnetic Field Data for Tyrrhena Patera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milbury, C.; Schubert, G.; Raymond, C. A.; Smrekar, S. E.

    2011-01-01

    Tyrrhena Patera is located to the southeast/northeast of the Isidis/Hellas impact basin. It was geologically active into the Late Amazonian, although the main edifice was formed in the Noachian(approximately 3.7-4.0 Ga). Tyrrhena Patera and the surrounding area contain gravity and magnetic anomalies that appear to be correlated. The results presented here are for the anomalies 1a and 1b (closest to Tyrrhena Patera), however other anomalies in this region have been modeled and will be presented at the conference.The Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) free-air gravity signature of Tyrrhena Patera has been studied by Kiefer, who inferred the existence of an extinct magma chamber below it. The magnetic signature has been mapped by Lillis R. J. et al., who compared electron reflectometer data, analogous to the total magnetic field, for Syrtis Major and Tyrrhena Patera and argued for demagnetization of both volcanoes.

  6. Nili Patera Dune Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Our topic for the weeks of April 4 and April 11 is dunes on Mars. We will look at the north polar sand sea and at isolated dune fields at lower latitudes. Sand seas on Earth are often called 'ergs,' an Arabic name for dune field. A sand sea differs from a dune field in two ways: 1) a sand sea has a large regional extent, and 2) the individual dunes are large in size and complex in form.

    This VIS image shows a dune field within Nili Patera, the northern caldera of a large volcanic complex in Syrtis Major.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 9, Longitude 67 East (293 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  7. Tyrrhena Patera Mosaic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image of Tyrrhena Patera is a mosaic of daytime thermal infrared images colorized with a mosaic of nighttime temperature images (purple/blue is coldest, yellow/red is warmest).

    The colder nighttime temperatures (blue hues) in the caldera and on the flanks of the volcano indicate that this area is likely covered with finer-grained materals. This contrasts strongly against the warm (red) area to the northwest. These warmer temperatures indicate a rockier surface, possibly even exposed bedrock. This is especially probably where the red hues conform with the topography.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  8. Formation and evolution of paterae on Jupiter's moon Io

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radebaugh, Jani

    2005-11-01

    Paterae (volcano-tectonic depressions) are among the most prominent topographic features on Io. They are unique, yet in some aspects they resemble calderas known and studied on Earth, Mars, and Venus. They have steep walls, flat floors, and arcuate margins, typical of terrestrial and Martian basalt shield calderas. However, they are much larger (2 km-202 km diameter, mean 42 km +/- 3 km) and typically lack obvious shields. They are often angular in shape or are found adjacent to mountains, suggesting tectonic influences on their formation. A preferential clustering of paterae at the equatorial sub- and anti-jovian regions is likely a surface expression of tidal massaging and convection in the asthenosphere. Paterae adjacent to mountains have a mean diameter 14 km +/- 9 km larger than that for all paterae, which may indicate paterae grow larger in the fractured crust near mountains. Nightside and eclipse observations of Pele Patera by the Cassini and Galileo spacecraft reveal that much of Pele's visible thermal emission comes from lava fountains within a topographically confined lava body, most likely a lava lake. Multiple filter images provided color temperatures of 1500 +/- 80 K from Cassini ISS data, and 1420 +/- 100 K from Galileo SSI data. Hotspots found within paterae (79% of all hotspots) exhibit a wide range of thermal behaviors in global eclipse images. Some hotspots are similar to Pele, consistently bright and confined; others, such as Loki, brighten or dim between observations and move to different locations within their patera. A model for patera formation begins with heating and convection within a high-temperature, low-viscosity asthenosphere. Magma rises through the cold, dense lithosphere either as diapirs [for thermal softening of the lithosphere and sufficiently large diapirs (20 km-40 km diameter, >5 km thickness)] or through dikes. Magma reaches zones of neutral buoyancy and forms magma chambers that feed eruptions. Collapse over high

  9. Lava Lakes in Io's Paterae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radebaugh, J.; McEwen, A. S.; Milazzo, M.; Davies, A. G.; Keszthelyi, L. P.; Geissler, P.

    2002-05-01

    New Galileo images and Galileo and Cassini temperature data lend credence to previous proposals that some of the paterae on Io contain lava lakes, similar in some ways to those observed on Earth. Galileo's October 2001 I32 flyby produced spectacular new high resolution observations of Io's paterae, their margins, and floors. Images reveal where lavas have filled Emakong Patera and overtopped its margins. Landslides from the peaks of Tohil Mons are not present on the adjacent floor of a dark patera, perhaps because they have slumped into a molten lava pit. Dark lavas have filled and drained back from colorful Tupan Patera, leaving a ring of material on its walls. This patera also shows evidence of interaction between molten sulfur and silicate lavas, a relationship observed at the terrestrial Poas Volcano (Francis et al., 1980, Nature 283, 754-756; Oppenheimer and Stevenson, 1990, La Recherche 21,1088-1090). The extremely uniformly dark materials in many other paterae could also be lava lakes. Pele Volcano on Io, in particular, has previously been considered a lava lake based on several characteristics (Davies et al., 2001, JGR 106,33,079-33,103). Recent analyses of eclipse images of Pele from Cassini reveal average temperatures of 1375 K, with variations on short (~10 minute) timescales, consistent with active fountaining in a lava lake. Similar oscillations around high temperatures over these time scales are seen in terrestrial lava lakes, such as at Kupaianaha (Flynn et al., GRL, 19,6461-6476, 1993) and Erta Ale (Bessard, Caillet and others, in progress). Nightside high resolution (60 m/pixel) images from Galileo I32 reveal a region of overturning and convection, with some areas reaching in excess of 1800 K, verifying very high-temperature components identified in high-resolution NIMS data (Lopes et al., 2001, JGR, 106, 33,053-33,078). This region is ringed with small hotspots, comparable to locations of breakup and fountaining at the margins of many terrestrial

  10. Assessment of antipodal-impact terrains on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, David A.; Greeley, Ronald

    1994-01-01

    The regions anitpodal to Mars' three largest impact basins, Hellas, Isidis, and Argyre, were assessed for evidence of impact-induced disrupted terrains. Photogeology and computer modeling using the Simplified Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (SALE) finite element code suggest that such terrains could have been found by the Hellas impact. Maximum antipodal pressures are 1100 MPa for Hellas, 520 MPa for Isidis, and 150 MPa for Argyre. The results suggest that if antipodal fracturing were associated with later volcanism, then Alba Patera may be related to the Hellas event, as proposed by Peterson (1978). Alba Patera is a unique volcano in the solar system, being a shield volcano which emitted large volume lava flows. This volcanism could be the result of the focusing of seismic energy which created a fractured region that served as a volcanic conduit for the future release of large volumes of magma. No disrupted terrain features are observed antipodal to the Isidis or Argyre basins, although some of the old fractures in Noctis Labyrinthus could have originated in response to the Isidis impact, and later have been reactivated by the Tharsis tectonics assumed to have produced Noctis. If the lower calculated antipodal pressures for Argyre were capable of producing disrupted terrains, then the terrains have been covered subsequently by volcanic or aeolian material, or modified beyond recognition.

  11. Rheological analyses of lava flows on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, H. J.; Davis, P. A.

    1991-01-01

    Researchers obtained 183 profiles of lava flows on Mars using photoclinometry. These photoclinometric profiles were leveled by adjusting them until the levee crests or bases had the same elevations (depending on the situation). Here, researchers report some of the results of their analysis of 27 flows on the flanks of Alba Patera (3 flows), near the summit of Ascraeus Mons (6 flows), the flanks of Arsia Mons (3 flows), and the flanks of Olympus Mons (15 flows). Results suggest that the flows examined to date are not felsic or ultramafic; rather, they probably range from basalts to basaltic andesites. Thus, the suggestion that flows on Olympus Mons and elsewhere may be more silicic than Hawaiian basalts is supported by the researchers' results. These suggestions are testable with suitable measurements of silica contents of the flows.

  12. The Seasonal Behavior of Water Ice Clouds in the Tharsis and Valles Marineris Regions of Mars: Mars Orbiter Camera Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, J. L.; Bonev, B. P.; James, P. B.; Shan, K. J.; Cantor, B. A.; Caplinger, M. A.

    2003-01-01

    The Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) was used to obtain global maps of the Martian surface. The maps used were acquired between March 15, 1999 (LS = 110 ) and July 31, 2001 (L(sub s) = 110), corresponding to approximately one and a quarter martian years. In this work we focused on water ice clouds associated with the surface features of Olympus Mons, Ascraeus Mons, Pavonis Mons, Arsia Mons, Alba Patera, and the Valles Marineris canyon system. Using these data, we have made three types of quantitative measurements to characterize the cloud activity: 1) cloud area and location, 2) cloud height, and 3) cloud optical depth. We have also searched for short period variations in the cloud areas.

  13. Topography of Apollinaris Patera and Ma'adim Vallis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornhill, G. D.; Rothery, D. A.; Murray, J. B.; Day, T.; Cook, A.; Muller, J.-P.; Iliffe, J. C.

    1992-12-01

    Digital elevation models of the northern part of Ma'adim Vallis (603a41 607m/pix, 639a91 721m/pix), and Apollinaris Patera (603a42 612m/pix, 639a92 717m/pix), covering the area between 180 degrees to 190 degrees long and -2 degrees to -20 degrees lat. were obtained using a method described here. The results for the Ma'adim Vallis area show broad agreement with the United States Geological Survey (USGS) topographic map of the area with a channel depth of 1 to 2 km. A detailed study of the variations in the channel depth along its course and calculations of its discharge rate from channel cross section and slope are currently being undertaken. Results for Apollinaris Patera have been obtained, although the absolute heights relative to the Mars datum are not well constrained. However, the relative heights are sufficient for some analysis. Again, the topographic map is in reasonable agreement with the USGS map of the area, although there are significant differences.

  14. Topography of Apollinaris Patera and Ma'adim Vallis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornhill, G. D.; Rothery, D. A.; Murray, J. B.; Day, T.; Cook, A.; Muller, J.-P.; Iliffe, J. C.

    1992-01-01

    Digital elevation models of the northern part of Ma'adim Vallis (603a41 607m/pix, 639a91 721m/pix), and Apollinaris Patera (603a42 612m/pix, 639a92 717m/pix), covering the area between 180 degrees to 190 degrees long and -2 degrees to -20 degrees lat. were obtained using a method described here. The results for the Ma'adim Vallis area show broad agreement with the United States Geological Survey (USGS) topographic map of the area with a channel depth of 1 to 2 km. A detailed study of the variations in the channel depth along its course and calculations of its discharge rate from channel cross section and slope are currently being undertaken. Results for Apollinaris Patera have been obtained, although the absolute heights relative to the Mars datum are not well constrained. However, the relative heights are sufficient for some analysis. Again, the topographic map is in reasonable agreement with the USGS map of the area, although there are significant differences.

  15. Venus - Sag Caldera 'Sachs Patera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This image of Sachs Patera on Venus is centered at 49 degrees north, 334 degrees east. Defined as a sag-caldera, Sachs is an elliptical depression 130 meters (81 feet) in depth, spanning 40 kilometers (25 miles) in width along its longest axis. The morphology implies that a chamber of molten material drained and collapsed, forming a depression surrounded by concentric scarps spaced 2-to-5 kilometers (1.2- to-3 miles) apart. The arc-shaped set of scarps, extending out to the north from the prominent ellipse, is evidence for a separate episode of withdrawal; the small lobe-shaped extension to the southwest may represent an additional event. Solidified lava flows 10-to-25 kilometers (6-to-16 miles) long, give the caldera its flower-like appearance. The flows are a lighter tone of gray in the radar data because the lava is blockier in texture and consequently returns more radar waves. Much of the lava, which was evacuated from the chamber, probably traveled to other locations underground, while some of it may have surfaced further south. This is unlike calderas on Earth, where a rim of lava builds up in the immediate vicinity of the caldera.

  16. Io: Loki Patera as a Magma Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matson, Dennis L.; Davies, Ashley Gerard; Veeder, Glenn J.; Rathbun, Julie A.; Johnson, Torrence V.; Castillo, Julie C.

    2006-01-01

    We develop a physical model for Loki Patera as a magma sea. We calculate the total volume of magma moving through the Loki Patera volcanic system every resurfacing cycle (approx.540 days) and the resulting variation in thermal emission. The rate of magma solidification at times reaches 3 x 10(exp 6) kg per second, with a total solidified volume averaging 100 cu km per year. A simulation of gas physical chemistry evolution yields the crust porosity profile and the timescale when it will become dense enough to founder in a manner consistent with observations. The Loki Patera surface temperature distribution shows that different areas are at different life cycle stages. On a regional scale, however, there can be coordinated activity, indicated by the wave of thermal change which progresses from Loki Patera's SW quadrant toward the NE at a rate of approx.1 km per day. Using the observed surface temperature distribution, we test several mechanisms for resurfacing Loki Patera, finding that resurfacing with lava flows is not realistic. Only the crustal foundering process is consistent with observations. These tests also discovered that sinking crust has a 'heat deficit' which promotes the solidification of additional magma onto the sinking plate ("bulking up"). In the limiting case, the mass of sinking material can increase to a mass of approx.3 times that of the foundering plate. With all this solid matter sinking, there is a compensating upward motion in the liquid magma. This can be in excess of 2 m per year. In this manner, solid-liquid convection is occurring in the sea.

  17. Tharsis Binucleus-Type Vortex Structure (TBVS) on Mars: Implications for Differential Rotation of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Z.; Birnbaum, S.; Zhu, M.; Xie, H.; Liu, L.; Yang, W.

    2006-12-01

    Large, arcuate faults in the Tharsis region of Mars are here interpreted to be a Giant Binucleus-Type Vortex Structure. Centered in Tharsis Montes (247.4°E, 0.9°N) with a radius of ~3500 km, and here named the Tharsis Binucleus-Type Vortex Structure (TBVS), it extends into both the southern and northern hemispheres of Mars. The pattern of the major extensional faults related to the TBVS includes a northern portion and a southern portion and is characterized by a sigmoid structure. In the northern portion adjacent to the Alba Patera summit cone (Tantalus Fossae), extensional faults trend northeast or north-east-north while faults found south of Alba Patera (Ceraunius Fossae) trend north-south. The extensional faults sited south to southwest of Tharsis Montes mainly trend to the southwest. As a typical feature the faults located south-east-south of Tharsis Montes (Claritas Fossae) show an obvious curved shape: the northern part trends northwest and north- west-north while the southern part trends north-east-north and northeast. Turbine-like extensional faults around Tharsis Montes are distinguished. Five examples of binucleus-type vortex structures on Earth were found and researched by Zuoxun Zeng and Lilin Liu (1990, 1992 and 1993). The TBVS is similar to the Yegezikala binucleus-type vortex structure (Zuoxun Zeng, 1990) in terms of the nuclear column: two cores linking together as one magma body. Physical modeling and numerical modeling using finite-element analysis indicate that the formation of the TBVS is related to torsional shear around the center of Tharsis Montes. The torsional shear is possibly a result of the twist of the Martian crust about its axis due to differential rotation between the two hemispheres. The earlier twist of the Martian crust controlled the northeast-trending fractures, magma bodies and volcano chains. The cooled and fixed northeast-trending magma bodies in the Tharsis area played the role of nuclear columns during the formation of

  18. Primary centers and secondary concentrations of tectonic activity through time in the western hemisphere of Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, R.C.; Dohm, J.M.; Golombek, M.P.; Haldemann, A.F.C.; Franklin, B.J.; Tanaka, K.L.; Lias, J.; Peer, B.

    2001-01-01

    Five main stages of radial and concentric structures formed around Tharsis from the Noachian through the Amazonian as determined by geologic mapping of 24,452 structures within the stratigraphic framework of Mars and by testing their radial and concentric orientations. Tectonic activity peaked in the Noachian (stage 1) around the largest center, Claritas, an elongate center extending more than 20?? in latitude and defined by about half of the total grabens which are concentrated in the Syria Planum, Thaumasia, and Tempe Terra regions. During the Late Noachian and Early Hesperian (stage 2), extensional structures formed along the length of present-day Valles Marineris and in Thaumasia (with a secondary concentration near Warrego Vallis) radial to a region just to the south of the central margin of Valles Marineris. Early Hesperian (stage 3) radial grabens in Pavonis, Syria, Ulysses, and Tempe Terra and somewhat concentric wrinkle ridges in Lunae and Solis Plana and in Thaumasia, Sirenum, Memnonia, and Amazonis are centered northwest of Syria with secondary centers at Thaumasia, Tempe Terra, Ulysses Fossae, and western Valles Marineris. Late Hesperian/Early Amazonian (stage 4) structures around Alba Patera, the northeast trending alignment of Tharsis Montes, and Olympus Mons appears centered on Alba Patera. Stage 5 structures (Middle-Late Amazonian) represent the last pulse of Tharsis-related activity and are found around the large shield volcanoes and are centered near Pavonis Mons. Tectonic activity around Tharsis began in the Noachian and generally decreased through geologic time to the Amazonian. Statistically significant radial distributions of structures formed during each stage, centered at different locations within the higher elevations of Tharsis. Secondary centers of radial structures during many of the stages appear related to previously identified local magmatic centers that formed at different times and locations throughout Tharsis. Copyright 2001 by

  19. Loki Patera: A Magma Sea Story

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veeder, G. J.; Matson, D. L.; Rathbun, A. G.

    2005-01-01

    We consider Loki Patera on Io as the surface expression of a large uniform body of magma. Our model of the Loki magma sea is some 200 km across; larger than a lake but smaller than an ocean. The depth of the magma sea is unknown, but assumed to be deep enough that bottom effects can be ignored. Edge effects at the shore line can be ignored to first order for most of the interior area. In particular, we take the dark material within Loki Patera as a thin solidified lava crust whose hydrostatic shape follows Io's isostatic surface (approx. 1815 km radius of curvature). The dark surface of Loki appears to be very smooth on both regional and local (subresolution) scales. The thermal contrast between the low and high albedo areas within Loki is consistent with the observed global correlation. The composition of the model magma sea is basaltic and saturated with dissolved SO2 at depth. Its average, almost isothermal, temperature is at the liquidus for basalt. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  20. Two New Brightening Events at Io's Loki Patera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Kleer, K.; De Pater, I.

    2015-12-01

    Loki Patera is one of the most dramatically time-variable volcanic features on Io, exhibiting periodic brightening events every 1-2 years that constitute over 15% of Io's global heat flow when active. We obtained new near-infrared (2-5 μm) observations of Loki Patera on 37 nights during and after two such brightening events using adaptive optics at the Keck and Gemini North telescopes in 2013-2015. We modify the Matson et al. (2006) model for Loki Patera as an overturning basaltic magma sea to model our observations, and find an overturn front propagation velocity of 0.85-0.95 km/day. The 445±45 day interval between the two events is 100 days shorter than the 540-day period calculated by Rathbun et al. (2002) for events prior to 2001. The overturn front appears to propagate around the patera in the clockwise direction, opposite to what has been inferred for these past brightening events, and may include irregular propagation patterns and multiple simultaneous fronts. Based on the anomalously-low intensities when Loki Patera is viewed at high emission angle, we find evidence for a topographic barrier to the west of the patera, which may be a raised region or the edge of a depression in which the magma sea resides.

  1. Dielectric properties of lava flows west of Ascraeus Mons, Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carter, L.M.; Campbell, B.A.; Holt, J.W.; Phillips, R.J.; Putzig, N.E.; Mattei, S.; Seu, R.; Okubo, C.H.; Egan, A.F.

    2009-01-01

    The SHARAD instrument on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter detects subsurface interfaces beneath lava flow fields northwest of Ascraeus Mons. The interfaces occur in two locations; a northern flow that originates south of Alba Patera, and a southern flow that originates at the rift zone between Ascraeus and Pavonis Montes. The northern flow has permittivity values, estimated from the time delay of echoes from the basal interface, between 6.2 and 17.3, with an average of 12.2. The southern flow has permittivity values of 7.0 to 14.0, with an average of 9.8. The average permittivity values for the northern and southern flows imply densities of 3.7 and 3.4 g cm-3, respectively. Loss tangent values for both flows range from 0.01 to 0.03. The measured bulk permittivity and loss tangent values are consistent with those of terrestrial and lunar basalts, and represent the first measurement of these properties for dense rock on Mars. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  2. The shape of Mars before global surveyor: Results from reanalysis of the Viking control point network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeitler, Wolfgang; Oberst, Jürgen

    1999-06-01

    Three-dimensional coordinates of 3739 globally distributed control points derived from photogrammetric analysis of Viking Orbiter image data are studied with respect to the shape and large-scale morphology of Mars. Spheres, spheroids, spherical functions, and a Digital Terrain Model (DTM) of 50 km grid spacing are fitted to the data. Prominent topographic features in the terrain model include the Tharsis volcanoes, Olympus Mons, Alba Patera and prominent mare and highland regions as well as the major impact basins. While the global dichotomy is clearly visible in our data, our model does not reveal any distinct signature associated with the presumed dichotomy boundary at this global scale. Rather, it suggests a smooth topographic transition from southern to northern hemisphere. This model is unique among existing topographic data sets for Mars, as it combines global coverage, a spatial resolution sufficient to resolve regional topography, and absolute elevation data more accurate than in previous control point network analyses. Formal errors and a comparison with the first released topographic profiles obtained by Mars Global Surveyor's Laser Altimeter (MOLA) suggest that 70% and 90% of the DTM grid elements represent the topography of the planet to better than 1000 m and 2000 m, respectively.

  3. NIMS Observes Increased Activity at Loki Patera, Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Loki Patera, historically the most active and persistent hot spot on Io, is located on the hemisphere of Io always facing Jupiter. Loki Patera was the site of two plumes during the Voyager encounters, which were not seen during the early orbits of Galileo. Ground-based observers reported Loki Patera to be unusually dim during this time, marking a period of low volcanic activity.

    On 21 February 1997, during Galileo's sixth orbit, the Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) on the Galileo spacecraft observed Io in daylight from a range of approximately 703,000 km (440,000 miles). The image on the left shows Io at a wavelength of 2.95 microns. Loki Patera is seen to be relatively quiescent (at longer wavelengths which are more sensitive to thermal emission, Loki Patera is more noticeable).

    A few weeks later, on March 12th 1997, ground based observers using the Infra-Red Telescope Facility (IRTF) on Mauna Kea, Hawaii, observed an intense brightening in the Loki region, so much that Loki was contributing 75% of Io's in-eclipse flux for this hemisphere. A large eruption was taking place! Other ground-based observations through March, April and May tracked the course of the activity and confirmed its location at Loki Patera.

    On 4 April 1997, NIMS again observed Io during the seventh orbit from a range of 556,000 km (348,000 miles), with Loki Patera positioned in darkness, close to the limb. The image on the right shows the increase in activity at Loki Patera, again at 2.95 microns. A preliminary single temperature fit to NIMS orbit seven Loki Patera hot spot data yields a temperature of 500 K and an area of over 800 square kilometers. That the image is so bright at this wavelength is an indication of the areal extent of the activity. It is also probable that some part of the volcanic material being erupted or exposed is at considerably higher temperatures than that of the 500 K single-temperature fit.

    Io is under observation by ground-based observers under

  4. An Impact Genesis for Loki Patera?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorsos, I. E.; Davies, A. G.

    2005-01-01

    What happens when a large impact event takes place on a satellite with a thin crust and lithosphere? In the early Solar System impact cratering and volcanism were the dominate processes shaping the surfaces of the terrestrial planets. Impact events may have triggered additional volcanism by uplifting partially molten mantle material to the surface, where it melts due to pressure release. Subsequently, the shattered crust may have provided pathways for magma to reach the surface creating a longer term hot spot. As the crusts of the terrestrial planets thickened, the ability of impacts to trigger volcanism diminished [1]. However, the highly-volcanic jovian satellite Io is located in a "high-impact" area of the Solar System [2], a victim of material attracted by Jupiter s gravitational field. In 1994 huge impacts were observed when fragments of comet Shoemaker- Levy 9 impacted Jupiter. The large icy satellites of Jupiter (Europa, Ganymede and Callisto) are pockmarked with many impact craters. Yet no impact features have been found on Io [3]. This is because of rapid resurfacing of Io due to volcanism, estimated at approx.1 cm/year [4] which over short geological time erases evidence of impacts. Io, however, has a lithosphere over a molten or partially-molten mantle [e.g., 5], and the effects of a sufficiently large impact may extend far beyond the evolution of the impact crater alone. At least one example of impact-triggered volcanism may exist in the Solar System today: the Loki Patera complex on Io.

  5. Ionian Paterae: New Insights from Observations, Numerical Modeling and Laboratory Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregg, T. K.; Lopes, R. M.; Black, S. M.; Lougen, J.

    2006-12-01

    To constrain the behavior of Ionian volcanic paterae in general, and Loki Patera in particular, we have used the following techniques in concert: 1) geologic mapping and analyses; 2) laboratory simulations; and 3) mathematical modeling. Here, we present preliminary results from the synthesis of these data. Loki Patera (310°W, 12°°N) is significantly different from the rest of the Ionian paterae for the following reasons: 1) its surface area falls 6 s outside the range for other Ionian paterae; 2) it is the only patera containing a bright "island" that is cut by dark lineaments; 3) at times of a thermal brightening event, it emits up to 15% of Io's global heat flux. Debate continues over whether Loki Paterae is an overturning lava lake, or a depression whose floor is periodically resurfaced by lava flows. Laboratory simulations, in which corn syrup or polyethylene glycol wax (PEG) were extruded into a square tank through 1 or 2 floor vents at a constant rate, were conducted to provide insight into Loki Patera's behavior. Results from both sets of experiments suggest that a single convection cell would be difficult to establish at Loki Patera. Crustal foundering of a lava lake may be possible under special conditions. Given the unique nature of Loki Patera and its island, we propose that the island may be similar to a resurgent dome in a terrestrial caldera complex composed primarily of evolved lavas, such as Long Valley Caldera, California. We examined other paterae that contain bright "islands" on their floors in an effort to constrain their origins. Geologic mapping, and shape analyses of the paterae and the islands they contain, suggest that most paterae islands are patches of cooled lava on the paterae floor. Only about 8% of paterae islands have morphologies and geologic relations that are consistent with a tectonic origin.

  6. Seeking Signs of Life in Nili Patera with Icelandic Sinter Field Exploration.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skok, J. R.; Farmer, J. D.; Parente, M.; Gaskin, J.; Kaasalainen, H.; Tobler, D.; Jerman, G.

    2015-12-01

    The past decade of Martian orbital and surface exploration has made it clear that the planet could have supported life as we know it in many places throughout much of it's history. The next step in exploration will be to find the evidence for and characterize any preserved Martian life. The jump from confirming habitability to finding life will be difficult and likely require a systemic surface exploration of multiple, specific sites. One site, the sinter mounds of the Nili Patera caldera, provides the ideal combination of hot, neutral to alkaline waters that can develop or support life and the sinter precipitation to preserve it. Nili Patera also provides deposits that are well mapped from orbit allowing a mission to pinpoint the target rocks. With this target known, we can develop the mission, the payload and the science to fit the goals. Several sinter field sites in Iceland were selected for mission testing. They were selected to provide diversity in scale, chemistry and complexity. At each site, we asked the same questions that would drive a mission to Mars. Was there life? What are its preserved properties? What are the environmental history of the sinters and the volcanic history of the local terrain? These questions were investigated with spectral, compositional and morphological analysis. By investigating these questions in Iceland, we will determine which observations, in terms of terrain access and instrument selection are required for mission success on Mars. We report the results from the August 2015 expedition, the first of two planned field seasons. This summer was focused on finalizing the field locations, acquiring mapping data and an initial sampling campaign to determine expected composition and calibrate instruments for year two. With this information, we will determine an investigation plan consistent with a range of mission types from robotic lander to sample return to human exploration. We will also determine the instruments required by the

  7. Loki Patera as the Surface of a Magma Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matson, D. L.; Davies, A. G.; Veeder, G. J.; Rathbun, J. A.; Johnson, T. V.

    2004-01-01

    Inspired by the finding of Schubert et al that Io's figure is consistent with a hydrostatic shape, we explore the consequences of modeling Loki Patera as the surface of a large magma sea. This model is attractive because of its sheer simplicity and its usefulness in interpreting and predicting observations. Here, we report on that work.

  8. Cleopatra Patera on Venus: Venera 15/16 evidence for a volcanic origin.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaber, G.G.; Kozak, R.C.; Masursky, H.

    1987-01-01

    The non-concentric nature, anomalous depth, and terraced morphology of the nested craters that compose Cleopatra Patera are more closely analogous to volcanic craters (calderas) than multi-ring impact structures. Associated deposits northeast and downslope of the Patera first recognized on Venera 15/16 radar images are interpreted as volcanic plains related to, and perhaps cogenetic with, Cleopatra. A volcanic origin not only is easily reconciled with the tectonic setting of the Patera, it is almost required by the correlation between the Patera and regional structural trend. -from Authors

  9. Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McSween, H. Y., Jr.

    2003-12-01

    More than any other planet, Mars has captured our attention and fueled our speculations. Much of this interest relates to the possibility of martian life, as championed by Percival Lowell in the last century and subsequently in scientific papers and science fiction. Lowell's argument for life on Mars was based partly on geochemistry, in that his assessmentof the planet's hospitable climate was dependent on the identification of H2O ice rather than frozen CO2 in the polar caps. Although this reasoning was refuted by Alfred Wallace in 1907, widespread belief in extant martian life persisted within the scientific community until the mid-twentieth century (Zahnle, 2001). In 1965 the Mariner 4 spacecraft flyby suddenly chilled this climate, by demonstrating that the martian atmosphere was thin and the surface was a cratered moonscape devoid of canals. This view of Mars was overturned again in 1971, when the Mariner 9 spacecraft discovered towering volcanoes and dry riverbeds, implying a complex geologic history. The first geochemical measurements on Mars, made by two Viking landers in 1976, revealed soils enriched in salts suggesting exposure to water, but lacking organic compounds which virtually ended discussion of martian life.The suggestion that a small group of achondritic meteorites were martian samples (McSween and Stolper, 1979; Walker et al., 1979; Wasson and Wetherill, 1979) found widespread acceptance when trapped gases in them were demonstrated to be compositionally similar to the Mars atmosphere ( Bogard and Johnson, 1983; Becker and Pepin, 1984). The ability to perform laboratory measurements of elements and isotopes present in trace quantities in meteorites has invigorated the subject of martian geochemistry. Indeed, because of these samples, we now know more about the geochemistry of Mars than of any other planet beyond the Earth-Moon system. Some studies of martian meteorites have prompted a renewed search for extraterrestrial life using chemical

  10. Geologic map of the Sappho Patera Quadrangle (V-20), Venus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGill, George E.

    2000-01-01

    The Sappho Patera quadrangle (V–20) of Venus is bounded by 0° and 30° East longitude, 0° and 25° North latitude. It is one of 62 quadrangles covering the entire planet at a scale of 1:5,000,000. The quadrangle derives its name from Sappho Patera, a large rimmed depression (diameter about 225 km) lying on top of a shield-shaped mountain named Irnini Mons. Sappho, a noted Greek poet born about 612 B.C., spent most of her life on the island of Lesbos. All of her works were burned in 1073 by order of ecclesiastical authorities in Rome and Constantinople. What little survives was discovered in 1897 as parts of papier mâché coffins in the Fayum (Durant, 1939). The Sappho Patera quadrangle includes the central portion of Eistla Regio, an elongated, moderately elevated (relief ~1 km) region extending for about 7,500 km west-northwestward from the west end of Aphrodite Terra. It is generally interpreted to be the surface manifestation of one or more mantle plumes (Phillips and Malin, 1983; Stofan and Saunders, 1990; Kiefer and Hager, 1991; Senske and others, 1992; Grimm and Phillips, 1992; Solomon and others, 1992). Eistla Regio is dominated by several large volcanic features. All or parts of four of these occur within the Sappho Patera quadrangle: the eastern flank of Gula Mons, Irnini Mons, Anala Mons, and Kali Mons. The quadrangle also includes eight named coronae: Nehalennia, Sunrta, Libera, Belet-Ili, Gaia, Asomama, Rabzhima, and Changko. A major rift extends from Gula Mons in the northwestern corner of the quadrangle to Libera Corona near the east border. East of Irnini and Anala Montes this rift is named Guor Linea; west of the montes it is named Virtus Linea. In addition to these major features, the Sappho Patera quadrangle includes numerous smaller volcanic flows and constructs, several unnamed coronae and corona-like features, a complex array of faults, fractures, and wrinkle ridges, and extensive plains that are continuous with the regional plains that

  11. Paterae on Io: Volcanic Activity Observed by Galileo's NIMS and SSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopes, Rosaly; Kamp, Lucas; Smythe, W. D.; Carlson, R.; Radebaugh, Jani; Gregg, Tracy K.

    2003-01-01

    Paterae are the most ubiquitous volcanic construct on Io s surface. Paterae are irregular craters, or complex craters with scalloped edges, interpreted as calderas or pit craters. Data from Galileo has shown that the activity of Ionian paterae is often confined to its interior and that generally lava flows are not seen spilling out over the edges. We use observations from Galileo s Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) to study the thermal emission from several Ionian paterae and compare them with images in visible wavelengths obtained by Galileo s Solid State Imaging System (SSI). Galileo s close fly-bys of Io from 1999 to 2001 have allowed NIMS to image the paterae at high spatial resolution (1-30 km pixel). At these scales, several of these features reveal greater thermal emission around the edges, which can be explained as the crust of a lava lake breaking up against the paterae walls. Comparisons with imaging data show that lower albedo areas (which are indicative of young lavas) coincide with higher thermal emission areas on NIMS data. Other paterae, however, show thermal emission and features in the visible that are more consistent with lava flows over a solid patera floor. Identifying eruption styles on Io is important for constraining eruption and interior models on Io.

  12. Geomorphologic and mineralogic characterization of the northern plains of Mars at the Phoenix Mission candidate landing sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seelos, K. D.; Arvidson, R. E.; Cull, S. C.; Hash, C. D.; Heet, T. L.; Guinness, E. A.; McGuire, P. C.; Morris, R. V.; Murchie, S. L.; Parker, T. J.; Roush, T. L.; Seelos, F. P.; Wolff, M. J.

    2008-09-01

    A suite of remote sensing data is used to evaluate both geomorphology and mineralogy of the candidate landing sites for the 2007 Phoenix Mission. Three candidate landing site boxes are situated in the northern plains of Mars on the distal flank of Alba Patera in the region from 67°N to 72°N and from ~230°E to 260°E. Geomorphology is mapped at subkilometer spatial scales using Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) visible and Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) topographic data, supplemented by images from the High-Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) and Context Imager (CTX). Mineralogy and spectral properties are examined using Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) visible and near-infrared multispectral mapping and targeted hyperspectral data at ~200 and ~20 m/pixel, respectively. Geomorphic mapping supports the idea that terrains along the boundary between the Amazonian Scandia region and Vastitas Borealis marginal geologic units have undergone extensive modification. Intercrater plains are disrupted to form mesas and interlocking blocks, while irregular depressions and knobby terrain are consistent with erosion/subsidence and local deposition. Despite the varied morphology, the present-day surface is nearly homogeneous with spectral signatures dominated by nanophase iron oxides and basaltic sand and rocks, similar to that of the Gusev crater plains at the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) landing site. The compilation of geomorphic and spectral information for the candidate Phoenix landing sites provides a framework for the mission's in situ observations to be extrapolated to the northern plains as a whole.

  13. 3D morphometry of valley networks on Mars from HRSC/MEX DEMs: Implications for climatic evolution through time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansan, V.; Mangold, N.

    2013-09-01

    valley networks have been identified mainly in the Noachian heavily cratered uplands. Eight dense branching valley networks were studied in Noachian terrains of Huygens, Newcomb and Kepler craters, south Tyrrhena Terra, and Thaumasia, in Hesperian terrains of Echus Plateau and west Eberswalde craters, and in Amazonian terrains of Alba Patera, using images and digital elevation models from the Mars Express High Resolution Stereo Camera to determine 2D and 3D morphometric parameters. Extracted geomorphic parameters show similar geometry to terrestrial valleys: drainage densities, organization from bifurcation ratios and lengths ratios, Hack exponent consistent with terrestrial values of ~0.6, and progressive deepening of valleys with increasing Strahler order. In addition, statistics on valley depths indicate a deeper incision of Noachian valleys compared to younger post-Noachian valleys (<25 m for Amazonian ones compared to >100 m for Noachian ones), showing a strong difference in fluvial erosion. These characteristics show that dense Martian valley networks formed by overland flows in relation to a global atmospheric water cycle in Noachian epoch and confirm that the later stages of activity may be related to shorter duration of activity, distinct climatic conditions, and/or regional processes, or conditions.

  14. Viking radio occultation measurements of the atmosphere and topography of Mars - Data acquired during 1 Martian year of tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindal, G. F.; Hotz, H. B.; Sweetnam, D. N.; Shippony, Z.; Brenkle, J. P.; Hartsell, G. V.; Spear, R. T.

    1979-01-01

    The results of one Martian year of radio occultation measurements of the atmosphere and topography of Mars obtained using the Viking Orbiters are briefly summarized. Determinations of the vertical distribution of tropospheric gas refractivity and ionospheric electron density obtained from atmospheric Doppler frequency perturbations of the S and X band radio tracking frequencies indicate large meteorological variations, with near-surface temperatures ranging from 150 to 250 K, 5-km atmospheric pressure ranging from 3.5 to 4.8 mbar, inversion layers over the polar caps and dust storms, and seasonal pressure variations. Double- and single-layered upper atmospheric electron density profiles were observed on the sunlit and dark sides of the planet, respectively. A topographic map of the Martian surface, obtained from the limb diffraction effects observed at ingress and egress, is found to agree well with the elevation contours of US Geological survey map M 25M 3 RMC, with the exception of the south polar and Alba Patera regions.

  15. Geology and Topography of Ra Patera, Io, in the Voyager era: Prelude to Eruption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schenk, Paul M.; McEwen, Alfred; Davies, A. G.; Davenport, Trevor; Jones, Kevin; Fessler, Brian

    1997-01-01

    Voyager era stereo images are used to map the geology and topography of Ra Patera (a major active volcanic center and possible site of sulfur eruptions on Io). The summit of Ra Patera reaches only approx.1 km above the surrounding plains. Pre-Voyager-era lava flows occur on slopes of 0.1-0.3 deg, comparable to the lunar mare. These flows were emplaced at either low viscosities, high eruption rates, or both. A 600- km-long ridged mountain unit (rising to approx. 8 km near Carancho Patera) forms a 60 by 90 km wide plateau approx. 0.5 km high 50 km east of Ra Patera. The new lava flows observed by Galileo flowed around the southern edge of this plateau.

  16. Cleopatra Patera on Venus - Venera 15/16 evidence for a volcanic origin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaber, Gerald G.; Kozak, Richard C.; Masursky, Harold

    1987-01-01

    The nonconcentric nature, anomalous depth, and terraced morphology of the nested craters that compose Cleopatra Patera are more closely analogous to volcanic craters (calderas) than multiring impact structures. Associated deposits northeast and downslope of the Patera first recognized on Venera 15/16 radar images are interpreted as volcanic plains related to, and perhaps cogenetic with, Cleopatra. The plains lavas probably originated as effusions from a radial rift zone or ring fissures. Rim deposits surrounding Cleopatra are asymmetric along the structural fabric of the region, also indicating fissure-type eruptions. Finally, a volcanic origin not only is easily reconciled with the tectonic setting of the Patera, it is almost required by the correlation between the Patera and regional structural trend.

  17. Patera in Aere. Symbols of the goddess of health on coins and medals.

    PubMed

    Pearn, J

    2000-06-01

    The numismatic record, coins and medals, portrays many of the symbols of health. The oldest symbol which portrays health, as a positive state of physical well-being, is the patera. First associated with Hygeia, it extended to that of the Roman Goddess of Health, Salus, imparting to the concept of health the additional themes of safety and security. Ancient and modern coins and medals, which portray the patera, are included in this account. PMID:11624589

  18. Massive Resurfacing of the Ionian Volcano Ra Patera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Four views of the volcano Ra Patera on Jupiter's moon Io showing changes seen on June 27th, 1996 by the Galileo spacecraft as compared to views seen by the Voyager spacecraft during the 1979 flybys. Clockwise from upper left is a Voyager 1 high resolution image, a Voyager 1 color image, a Galileo color image, and a Voyager 2 color image. North is to the top of the picture. Observations obtained by J. Spencer and others with the Hubble Space Telescope had indicated a major change in recent years. The Galileo images reveal the detailed morphology of new deposits. Dark materials, previously confined to a summit caldera, appear to have overflowed the caldera walls to produce a small flow to the south and a larger flow to the southeast. New bright deposits covering an area of about 40,000 square kilometers (the size of New Jersey) surround the dark materials. The morphology of the bright materials suggests emplacement as lava flows rather than pyroclastics. Notice the lobate margins and how the bright materials embay a plateau in the upper left. The Voyager 1 images also reveal relatively bright lava flows emanating from Ra Patera, especially to the northeast. The colors of the flows match those of sulfur plus SO2 frost. Images are 953 km wide. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  19. MOLA Global map of surface gradients on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Absolute slopes on 30-km baselines indicate the magnitude of typical regional tilts of that scale. The Northern hemisphere is flatter than the South, and shows some linear slope breaks, for example north of Alba Patera (40N, 250E) and the Tharsis province. The major volcanos display flanks slopes of 2.5-5 degrees, comparable to Hawaiian shields. The southwest rim of the Hellas impact basin appears relatively eroded, with shallower typical slopes. A shaded relief map of the topography is overlaid is monochrome.

  20. Topography of closed depressions, scarps, and grabens in the North Tharsis region of Mars: implications for shallow crustal discontinuities and graben formation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, Philip A.; Tanaka, Kenneth L.; Golombek, Matthew P.

    1995-01-01

    Using Viking Orbiter images, detailed photoclinometric profiles were obtained across 10 irregular depressions, 32 fretted fractures, 49 troughs and pits, 124 solitary scarps, and 370 simple grabens in the north Tharsis region of Mars. These data allow inferences to be made on the shallow crustal structure of this region. The frequency modes of measured scarp heights correspond with previous general thickness estimates of the heavily cratered and ridged plains units. The depths of the flat-floored irregular depressions (55-175 m), fretted fractures (85-890 m), and troughs and pits (60-1620 m) are also similar to scarp heights (thicknesses) of the geologic units in which these depressions occur, which suggests that the depths of these flat-floored features were controlled by erosional base levels created by lithologic contacts. Although the features have a similar age, both their depths and their observed local structural control increase in the order listed above, which suggests that the more advanced stages of associated fracturing facilitated the development of these depressions by increasing permeability. If a ground-ice zone is a factor in development of these features, as has been suggested, our observation that the depths of these features decrease with increasing latitude suggests that either the thickness of the ground-ice zone does not increase poleward or the depths of the depressions were controlled by the top of the ground-ice zone whose depth may decrease with latitude. Deeper discontinuities are inferred from fault-intersection depths of 370 simple grabens (assuming 60° dipping faults that initiate at a mechanical discontinuity) in Tempe Terra and Alba Patera and from the depths of the large, flat-floored troughs in Tempe Terra. The frequency distributions of these fault-intersection and large trough depths show a concentration at 1.0-1.6 km depth, similar to data obtained for Syria, Sinai, and Lunae Plana. The consistency of these depth data over

  1. Two new, rare, high-effusion outburst eruptions at Rarog and Heno Paterae on Io

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pater, Imke; Davies, Ashley Gerard; Ádámkovics, Máté; Ciardi, David R.

    2014-11-01

    Observations obtained with the near-infrared camera NIRC2, coupled to the adaptive optics system on the 10-m W.M. Keck II telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii, on 15 August 2013 at ∼15:30 UT revealed two large "Outburst"-class volcanic eruptions on Io. Follow-up observations five days later showed that both eruptions had substantially faded. The most energetic eruption was at Rarog Patera, at a location near 305°W, 42°S; a smaller one occurred further south at ∼310°W and ∼57°S, close to Heno Patera. Total radiant fluxes at Rarog Patera on August 15 were of order ∼500 GW/sr/μm at wavelengths between 2 and 4 μm, and close to 250 GW/sr/μm at 1.6 μm, indicative of an effective temperature of ∼1040 K over an area of ∼120 km2, and a total thermal emission of nearly 8 TW. At Heno Patera the 4-μm flux measured ∼250 GW/sr/μm, and ∼90 GW/sr/μm at 2.2 μm, suggestive of an effective temperature of ∼720 K over an area of more than 300 km2, and a total thermal emission of ∼5-6 TW. Fits of the Davies (Davies, A.G. [1996]. Icarus 124(1), 45-61) Io Flow Model indicate that these two eruptions are vigorous and the exposed surfaces are mostly very young, no older than 4-5 min at Rarog Patera and a few hours at Heno Patera. The model fits suggest that in both locations lava fountaining is taking place, a highly-energetic style of volcanism. Using follow-up observations taken between August 20 and September 7 we estimate peak effusion rates between 5 × 104 and 105 m3/s.

  2. The Alba protein family: Structure and function.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Manish; Banerjee, Chinmoy; Nag, Shiladitya; Bandyopadhyay, Uday

    2016-05-01

    Alba family proteins are small, basic, dimeric nucleic acid-binding proteins, which are widely distributed in archaea and a number of eukaryotes. This family of proteins bears the distinct features of regulation through acetylation/deacetylation, hence named as acetylation lowers binding affinity (Alba). Alba family proteins bind DNA cooperatively with no apparent sequence specificity. Besides DNA, Alba proteins also interact with diverse RNA species and associate with ribonucleo-protein complexes. Initially, Alba proteins were recognized as chromosomal proteins and supposed to be involved in the maintenance of chromatin architecture and transcription repression. However, recent studies have shown increasing evidence of functional plasticity among Alba family of proteins that widely range from genome packaging and organization, transcriptional and translational regulation, RNA metabolism, and development and differentiation processes. In recent years, Alba family proteins have attracted growing interest due to their widespread occurrence in large number of organisms. Presence in multiple copies, functional crosstalk, differential binding affinity, and posttranslational modifications are some of the key factors that might regulate the biological functions of Alba family proteins. In this review article, we present an overview of the Alba family proteins, their salient features and emphasize their functional role in different organisms reported so far. PMID:26900088

  3. Explosive volcanic deposits on Mars: Preliminary investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crown, D. A.; Leshin, L. A.; Greeley, Ronald

    1987-01-01

    Two investigations were undertaken to examine possible large scale explosive volcanic deposits on Mars. The first includes an analysis of Viking Infrared Thermal Mapper (IRTM) data covering the vast deposits in the Amazonis, Memnonia, and Aeolis regions. These postulated ignimbrites have been previously mapped, and at least five high resolution nighttime IRTM data tracks cross the deposits. Preliminary analysis of the data covering Amazonis Planitia show that local features have anomalous thermal inertias but the ignimbrites as a whole do not consistently have significantly different thermal inertias from their surroundings. Preliminary photogeologic and IRTM studies of the large and small highland paterae have also begun. The purpose of IRTM studies of postulated Martian explosive volcanic deposits is to determine the physical properties of the proposed ignimbrites. If volcanic deposits are exposed at the surface, high thermal inertias, as are observed for Apollinaris Patera, should be present.

  4. Tracking Topographic Changes from Multitemporal Stereo Images, Application to the Nili Patera Dune Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avouac, J.; Ayoub, F.; Bridges, N. T.; Leprince, S.; Lucas, A.

    2012-12-01

    The High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) in orbit around Mars provides images with a nominal ground resolution of 25cm. Its agility allows imaging a same scene with stereo view angles thus allowing for for Digital elevation Model (DEM) extraction through stereo-photogrammetry. This dataset thus offers an exceptional opportunity to measure the topography with high precision and track its eventual evolution with time. In this presentation, we will discuss how multi-temporal acquisitions of HiRISE images of the Nili Patera dune field allow tracking ripples migration, assess sand fluxes and dunes activity. We investigated in particular the use of multi-temporal DEMs to monitor the migration and morphologic evolution of the dune field. We present here the methodology used and the various challenges that must be overcome to best exploit the multi-temporal images. Two DEMs were extracted from two stereo images pairs acquired 390 earth days apart in 2010-2011 using SOCET SET photogrammetry software, with a 1m post-spacing and a vertical accuracy of few tens of centimeters. Prior to comparison the DEMs registration, which was not precise enough out of SOCET-SET, was improved by wrapping the second DEM onto the first one using the bedrock only as a support for registration. The vertical registration residual was estimated at around 40cm RMSE and is mostly due to CCD misalignment and uncorrected spacecraft attitudes. Changes of elevation over time are usually determined from DEMs differentiation: provided that DEMs are perfectly registered and sampled on the same grid, this approach readily quantifies erosion and deposition processes. As the dunes have moved horizontally, they are not physically aligned anymore in the DEMs, and their morphologic evolution cannot be recovered easily from differentiating the DEMs. In this particular setting the topographic evolution is best recovered from correlation of the DEMs. We measure that the fastest dunes have migrated by

  5. Sulfur "Bergs" and Sulfur Pools: Loki and Tupan Patera on Io

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, R. R.; Lopes, R. M.; Landis, C. E.; Allen, D. R.

    2012-12-01

    Loki and Tupan Patera on Io show numerous features related to the presence of volatiles. There are both striking similarities and distinct differences in the way the volatiles have acted at these two sites. At Loki numerous small bright features, colloquially known as sulfur "bergs", are distributed across the dark patera surface. We map their spatial distribution and spectral properties (Landis et al., this conference) and model sulfur vapor transport processes (Allen et al. this conference) to determine if those bright features are consistent with sulfur fumarole deposits. Alternatively, the "bergs" may represent topographic highs (kipukas) left un-resurfaced by the recurrent activity at Loki. To test this we examine Voyager, Galileo, and New Horizons images to determine if any changes in their spatial distribution have occurred over the 1979 through 2007 period. We also discuss further a statistical analysis of their size and spectral reflectance. Tupan shows an overall morphology similar to Loki, with a central island and one straight margin. It also shows linear features extending across the island. However instead of the dark eastern portion of the patera containing a myriad of small bright features like the Loki "bergs" which avoid the margins, Tupan shows higher albedo deposits concentrated at the margins. And in the higher albedo western portion of Tupan Patera numerous low albedo features can be interpreted as dark silicates erupting or eating through a volatile rich crust. Unlike Loki, these intra-patera features at Tupan clearly have sharply defined edges, indicating surface flow processes rather than possible vapor effects. However both outside the main Tupan Patera walls and on the island there are more diffuse patterns consistent with vapor transport. A detailed comparison of reflectance at violet through very near infrared wavelengths helps elucidate these effects. As also found at Loki, a low violet reflectance indicates that sulfur is abundant on

  6. Absence of silicic volcanism on Mars - Implications for crustal composition and volatile abundance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Francis, P. W.; Wood, C. A.

    1982-01-01

    It is believed that explosive basic to ultrabasic eruptions may be responsible for small cinder conelike features on Mars and perhaps for the ancient flank-scoured paterae. Eruptions of this type may have been driven by near-surface water/ice-magma interactions or volatile rich magmas. Noting that the paterae represent a unique style of volcanism that stopped approximately 2 b.y. ago, it is suggested that the volatiles associated with these features were derived from mantle sources and that the cessation of patera formation may coincide with the termination of the period of maximum planetary degassing. Since approximately 2 b.y. ago volcanism has been dominantly effusive, except for such minor explosive ash events as those that blanketed part of the summit of Hecates Tholus. It is proposed that such eruptions were driven by volatiles generated by differentiation of a magma chamber, similar to Icelandic explosive eruptions.

  7. The environmental model of Mars; Proceedings of the 2nd COSPAR Colloquium, Sopron, Hungary, Jan. 22-26, 1990

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szego, K.

    Consideration is given to Mars boundary layer simulations, Moessbauer spectroscopy of SNC meteorites, the NASA environmental models of Mars, exploration of the atmosphere and climate system of Mars by balloon, an algorithm for stereo pair matching, landing site selection for the Mars 94 mission, a technique for measuring the electric properties of planetary clouds, and the scientific rationale and technical elements of future Mars exploration in ESA. Attention is also given to the thermal environment of Mars, regolith formation on Phobos and Deimos, small mobile apparatus for Mars surface studies, accretion of meteoritic material onto Mars, exploration of the DAO Vallis-Hadriaca Patera region on Mars by a Mars balloon exploration vehicle, the robotic exploration missions at Mars, and the impact of Mars surface characteristics on rover design.

  8. Geologic Map of the Thaumasia Region, Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dohm, Janes M.; Tanaka, Kenneth L.; Hare, Trent M.

    2001-01-01

    ). The medium-resolution Viking images used for mapping and base preparation also formed the basis of the 1:2,000,000 scale subquadrangle series. Earlier geologic maps of all or parts of the region include: (1) maps of the Phoenicis Lacus, Coprates, Thaumasia, and Argyre quadrangles at 1:5,000,000 scale based mainly on Mariner 9 images (respectively, Masursky and others, 1978; McCauley, 1978; McGill, 1978; and Hodges, 1980), (2) the global map of Mars at 1:25,000,000 (Scott and Carr, 1978) compiled largely from the 1:5,000,000 scale geologic maps, (3) maps showing lava flows in the Tharsis region at 1:2,000,000 scale compiled from Viking and Mariner 9 images (Scott, 1981; Scott and Tanaka, 1981a, b; Scott and others, 1981), (4) the map of the western equatorial region of Mars at 1:15,000,000 scale based on Viking images (Scott and Tanaka, 1986), and (5) the map of the Valles Marineris region at 1:2,000,000 scale compiled from Viking images (Witbeck and others, 1991). The previous maps have described the overall geology and geomorphology of the region but have not unraveled the detailed stratigraphy and complex evolution of this unique and geologically diverse martian province. The main purpose of this comprehensive mapping project is to reconstruct the stratigraphic, structural, and erosional histories of the Thaumasia region. The region is the last major province of the Tharsis region to undergo detailed structural mapping using Viking images; its history is essential to documenting the overall tectonic history of Tharsis. Other provinces of Tharsis that have been structurally mapped include Syria Planum (Tanaka and Davis, 1988), Tempe Terra and Ulysses Patera (Scott and Dohm, 1990b), and Alba Patera (Tanaka, 1990). Another primary mapping objective is to determine the region's volcanic history and assess the relations among fault systems and volcanoes (Wise and others, 1979; Scott and Tanaka, 1980; Whitford-Stark, 1982; Scott and Dohm, 1990a). A secondary mapping

  9. Potential Mars Exploration Rover Landing Sites West and South of Apollinaris Patera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulick, Virginia C.

    2001-01-01

    Apollinaris provides an exceptional site for astrobiological, geological, and climatalogical purposes. Fluvial (including ground water sapping) and associated processes were likely pervasive from the late Noachian, through the Hesperian, and into the Amazonian. Long-lived and large scale hydrothermal systems were certainly present throughout much if not all of this period. Thermal springs likely persisted for long periods. Water from the highlands via Ma'adim Valles and other smaller valley networks deposited highland-derived material in the area. In short, Apollinaris provides an excellent variety of rock types and ages and may preserve evidence of biologic or pre-biologic processes in associated thermal spring deposits.

  10. "Active" and "Passive" Lava Resurfacing Processes on Io: A Comparative Study of Loki Patera and Prometheus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, A. G.; Matson, D. L.; Leone, G.; Wilson, L.; Keszthelyi, L. P.

    2004-01-01

    Studies of Galileo Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) data and ground based data of volcanism at Prometheus and Loki Patera on Io reveal very different mechanisms of lava emplacement at these two volcanoes. Data analyses show that the periodic nature of Loki Patera s volcanism from 1990 to 2001 is strong evidence that Loki s resurfacing over this period resulted from the foundering of a crust on a lava lake. This process is designated passive , as there is no reliance on sub-surface processes: the foundering of the crust is inevitable. Prometheus, on the other hand, displays an episodicity in its activity which we designate active . Like Kilauea, a close analog, Prometheus s effusive volcanism is dominated by pulses of magma through the nearsurface plumbing system. Each system affords views of lava resurfacing processes through modelling.

  11. Iowa's oldest oaks. [Quercus alba

    SciTech Connect

    Duvick, D.N.; Blasing, T.J.

    1983-01-01

    Tree-ring analysis revealed 33 living white oaks (Quercus alba) in Iowa that began growing before 1700. Core of wood 4 mm in diameter, each extracted from a radius of a tree trunk were analyzed. The oldest white oak, found in northeastern Warren County, began growing about 1570 and is thus over 410 years old. A chinkapin oak (Quercus muehlenbergii) was also found which was more than 300 years old. Ring widths from the white oaks are well correlated with total precipitation for the twelve months preceding completion of ring formation in July. Reconstructions of annual (August-July) precipitation for 1680-1979, based on the tree rings, indicate that the driest annual period in Iowa was August 1799-July 1800, and that the driest decade began about 1816. Climatic information of this kind, pre-dating written weather records, can be used to augment those records and provide a longer baseline of information for use by climatologists and hydrologic planners.

  12. Global Near-IR Maps of Io from Gemini-N and Keck Observations in 2010, with a Specific Emphasis on Kanehekili Fluctus, Janus Patera, and Loki Patera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Pater, I.; Davies, A. G.; Adamkovics, M.; McGregor, A.; Observing Team, G.

    2013-12-01

    We have constructed global maps of Io from observations obtained at 1-5 μm in 2010 using the adaptive optics systems on the Keck and Gemini telescopes. We compare these maps with those obtained in 2001 [1]. Although the total emission from all hot spots combined at each wavelength is similar for the two years, the spatial brightness distribution is very different, a reflection of evolving style and magnitude of volcanic activity. In 2010 thermal emission in the near-infrared was dominated by Loki Patera and Kanehekili Fluctus. We also present new timelines of thermal emission from Kanehekili Fluctus and Loki and Janus Paterae, updating timelines in recent publications [2, 3] with additional Keck adaptive optics data obtained between 2003 and 2010. These new timelines are the most comprehensive plots ever produced of the volcanic thermal emission variability for these or any other locations on Io, utilizing data from multiple ground- and space-based assets. The timeline plot shows that in 2010 Kanehekili Fluctus (as seen by Gemini) was briefly exceptionally brighter than ever seen before, evidence of a short-lived but highly-energetic eruption episode. Acknowledgements: AGD is supported by a grant from the NASA OPR Program. References: [1] Marchis et al. (2005) Icarus, 176, 96-122. [2] Davies et al. (2012) Icarus, 221, 466-470. [3] Rathbun and Spencer (2010) Icarus, 209, 625-630.

  13. Polar wandering history of Mars: triggered by giant impact and mantle super-plume?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, L.; Huang, Q.; Wang, D.

    2012-12-01

    Polar wander is not an unusual phenomenon for many terrestrial planets, but the history, processes and triggers are complexity and little is well understood. Mars may be the best planets for studying this process, because most geological history was well preserved. Much evidence indicates that the present spin axis of Mars is not the same as that in its ancient and recent time. Many authors have discussed the polar wander history based on magnetic anomalies (e.g. Arkani-Hamed, 2001; Hood and Zacharian, 2001; Hood et al., 2005; Arkani-Hamed and Boutin, 2004; Boutin and Arkani-Hamed, 2006), topography and sediments (Murray and Malin, 1973; ) , geoid (Sprenke et al., 2005), and giant impact basins (Schultz and Lutz-Garihan, 1982; Arkani-Hamed, 2009) respectively. These studies suggest that the martian spin axis has wandered about 10o-20o in the past 100myr (Murray and Malin, 1973), 15-90o polar motion in the past 4.2Ga due to load of Tharsis bulge (Sprenke et al., 2005), and a combined model suggests forming of Alba Patera and Elysium Rise caused spin axis rotating counterclockwise to equator and subsequent volcanism and giant impacts deduced mass concentrations caused further clockwise rotation to its present position during 4.2-3.9Ga. However, most of these hypotheses are model-dependent and have not well correlated to geological records, especially unique polar deposits and geomorphology. There are many unanswered questions about paleopole deposits, paleo-magnetic poles locations, polar wander, true polar wander, obliquity, and their relation with external and internal force driven events, such as giant impact, mantle plume and it caused volcanic mass loading. By examining possible ancient polar deposits, combining with giant impact history, orientation of magnetic field and compared with previously suggested polar wander models, this study proposed a comprehensive hypothesis that could explain major polar wander events and suggest that giant impacts and volcanism

  14. Lithospheric Structure and Patera Formation on Io: Implications for Future Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeger, W. L.; Davies, A. G.

    2008-12-01

    On Jupiter's moon Io, the interaction between volcanism and tectonism is strongly modulated by the structure of the lithosphere. Previous work has shown that Io's prodigious volcanism leads to the rapid burial of its surface and, consequently, the global subsidence of the materials that compose its lithosphere. This, in turn, generates large horizontal compressive stresses, which drive the thick-skinned thrust faulting that uplifts Io's mountains. Because horizontal compression is an ongoing process that proceeds ever more rapidly with increasing depth, we assume in our model that the lithosphere is pervasively fractured and its stress state is governed by frictional sliding. The result is that pore space within the crust disappears rapidly with depth, and SO2 (which is the dominant volatile species and which melts at a relatively low pressure) is confined to the near-surface region. Thus, Io's lithosphere is compositionally stratified, with a low-density SO2-dominated layer up to a few kilometers thick overlying a denser mafic or ultramafic silicate layer a few tens of kilometers thick. Rising magma should achieve neutral buoyancy near the interface between these two layers, and if that interface is abrupt, the magma may spread laterally there for purely mechanical reasons as well. The heat from these shallow sill-like intrusions is expected to mobilize the overlying volatiles, eventually unroofing the sill or lava lake. The overburden can be removed both by the melting and lateral flow of the volatiles and by their sublimation. (SO2 atop warm silicate lavas is predicted to sublimate at a rate of ~100 m/yr.) Hence, ionian paterae may be more analogous to the depressions formed in ice during terrestrial subglacial eruptions than to true volcanic calderas. These models for Io's lithospheric structure and its patera formation should be tested by future spacecraft missions. Three observations that would be particularly useful are (a) height and slope measurements of

  15. Explosive mafic volcanism on Earth and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, Tracy K. P.; Williams, Stanley N.

    1993-01-01

    Deposits within Amazonia Planitia, Mars, have been interpreted as ignimbrite plains on the basis of their erosional characteristics. The western flank of Hecates Tholus appears to be mantled by an airfall deposit, which was produced through magma-water interactions or exsolution of magmatic volatiles. Morphologic studies, along with numerical and analytical modeling of Martian plinian columns and pyroclastic flows, suggest that shield materials of Tyrrhena and Hadriaca paterae are composed of welded pyroclastic flows. Terrestrial pyroclastic flows, ignimbrites, and airfall deposits are typically associated with silicic volcanism. Because it is unlikely that large volumes of silicic lavas have been produced on Mars, we seek terrestrial analogs of explosives, mafic volcanism. Plinian basaltic airfall deposits have been well-documented at Masaya, Nicaragua, and basaltic ignimbrite and surge deposits also have been recognized there. Ambrym and Yasour, both in Vanuatu, are mafic stratovolcanioes with large central calderas, and are composed of interbedded basaltic pyrocalstic deposits and lava flows. Zavaritzki, a mafic stratovolcano in the Kurile Islands, may have also produced pyroclastic deposits, although the exact nature of these deposits in unknown. Masaya, Ambrym and Yasour are known to be located above tensional zones. Hadriaca and Tyrrhena Paterae may also be located above zones of tension, resulting from the formation and evolution of Hellas basin, and, thus, may be directly analogous to these terrestrial mafic, explosive volcanoes.

  16. Channels and valley networks. [of planet Mars surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Victor R.; Carr, Michael H.; Gulick, Virginia C.; Williams, Cameron R.; Marley, Mark S.

    1992-01-01

    Attention is given to Martian channels and valley networks, since they have become a principal element of evidence to the effect that the Martian atmosphere evolved from an early volatile-rich state to its present condition. The outflow channels are relatively young, later Hesperian or Amazonian in age. They formed by immense outbursts of fluid from subsurface sources. Complexity in outflow-channel morphology was generated by varying amounts of sediment and ice in the aqueous-fluid flow systems. The overall cataclysmic-flood morphology may thus be locally transitional to morphologies generated by ice and debris flowage. Although local areas of valley networks, such as on Alba Patera, formed coevally with outflow channel activity, regionally extensive networks dominate in the heavily cratered terrains. The morphology of many valleys suggests genesis by ground-water sapping; for some valleys, surface runoff may have been more important.

  17. Volcanic history, geologic analysis and map of the Prometheus Patera region on Io

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leone, Giovanni; Davies, Ashley G.; Wilson, Lionel; Williams, David A.; Keszthelyi, Laszlo P.; Jaeger, Windy L.; Turtle, Elizabeth P.

    2009-01-01

    Data from Jupiter's moon Io returned by the Galileo spacecraft have been used to create a geologic map of Prometheus Patera, its associated flow field, and nearby features. We have identified the location of the vent that fed the Prometheus flow field during the Galileo epoch in the north-eastern portion of the main Prometheus flow field. This vent is the probable source of a small sulphur-rich plume. Previous studies suggested that the vent may be atop a tectonic fault but we find that the vent is offset from the putative fault. It is plausible that, in the past, magma exploited the fault to reach the surface at Prometheus Patera, but subsequent magma cooling in the conduit could have caused an obstruction preventing further eruptions from providing significant contributions to the Prometheus flow field. We also speculate on how a new Prometheus plumbing system may be fed by mafic magmas after melt stalls in magma reservoirs during its ascent through the lithosphere from the mantle.

  18. Volcanic history, geologic analysis and map of the Prometheus Patera region on Io

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leone, G.; Gerard, Davies A.; Wilson, L.; Williams, D.A.; Keszthelyi, L.P.; Jaeger, W.L.; Turtle, E.P.

    2009-01-01

    Data from Jupiter's moon Io returned by the Galileo spacecraft have been used to create a geologic map of Prometheus Patera, its associated flow field, and nearby features. We have identified the location of the vent that fed the Prometheus flow field during the Galileo epoch in the north-eastern portion of the main Prometheus flow field. This vent is the probable source of a small sulphur-rich plume. Previous studies suggested that the vent may be atop a tectonic fault but we find that the vent is offset from the putative fault. It is plausible that, in the past, magma exploited the fault to reach the surface at Prometheus Patera, but subsequent magma cooling in the conduit could have caused an obstruction preventing further eruptions from providing significant contributions to the Prometheus flow field. We also speculate on how a new Prometheus plumbing system may be fed by mafic magmas after melt stalls in magma reservoirs during its ascent through the lithosphere from the mantle. ?? 2009 Elsevier B.V.

  19. Earth-like sand fluxes on Mars.

    PubMed

    Bridges, N T; Ayoub, F; Avouac, J-P; Leprince, S; Lucas, A; Mattson, S

    2012-05-17

    Strong and sustained winds on Mars have been considered rare, on the basis of surface meteorology measurements and global circulation models, raising the question of whether the abundant dunes and evidence for wind erosion seen on the planet are a current process. Recent studies showed sand activity, but could not determine whether entire dunes were moving--implying large sand fluxes--or whether more localized and surficial changes had occurred. Here we present measurements of the migration rate of sand ripples and dune lee fronts at the Nili Patera dune field. We show that the dunes are near steady state, with their entire volumes composed of mobile sand. The dunes have unexpectedly high sand fluxes, similar, for example, to those in Victoria Valley, Antarctica, implying that rates of landscape modification on Mars and Earth are similar. PMID:22596156

  20. A Case of Extensive Pityriasis Alba

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Ju Hyun; Kim, Sang Hyun; Seo, Jong Keun; Sung, Ho Suk; Hwang, Seon Wook

    2008-01-01

    Pityriasis alba (PA) is a common benign disease, characterized by hypopigmented macules or patches on the face, usually seen in children. However, two uncommon variants exist, a pigmenting type and an extensive type. Extensive PA is rare. The lesions tend to be less scaly, more persistent, more generalized, more symmetrical, and more frequently seen over the trunk and less so over the face. We report a child who had extensive PA lesions. PMID:27303180

  1. Gish Bar Patera, Io: Geology and Volcanic Activity, 1996-2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Jason; Radebaugh, Jani; Lopes, Rosaly; McEwen, Alfred; Keszthelyi, Laszlo

    2003-01-01

    Since the two Voyagers passed by Jupiter in 1979, it has been known that volcanic activity is ubiquitous on the surface of Io. With over 400 volcanic centers, Io is even more volcanically active than the earth with massive flood basalt-style eruptions and komatitite lavas a common occurrence. Additionally, some volcanoes appear to be giant lava lakes, with violent activity churning the crust of the lake for periods of 20 years or more. Finally, sulfur is believed to play a large role in Io's volcanism, be it as a primary lava or as a secondary product of large, high-temperature eruptions. By studying one volcano in particular, Gish Bar Patera, one can observe many of these characteristics in one volcanic center.

  2. Relationships Between Paterae, Mountains, and Hotspots on Io from a Global Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radebaugh, J.; Jaeger, W. L.; Keszthelyi, L. P.; Turtle, E. P.; Milazzo, M. P.; Perry, J.; McEwen, A. S.; Lopes, R.; Davies, A. G.; Geissler, P.

    2004-01-01

    Now that the Galileo spacecraft s tour of the Jupiter system is over, we seek to integrate all available datasets in the hopes of understanding Io as completely as possible. We have compiled information about the morphologies and locations of paterae (volcano-tectonic depressions), mountains, and hotspots on Io in a single database. It is our hope that an analysis of the spatial and temporal relationships between these features will provide more indications of the nature of the crust of Io and the mechanisms leading to these features formation. Since Io s tidal heat escapes through its crust, more knowledge about the crust will lead to an understanding of internal processes, such as magma generation and delivery to the surface, and magnitude and orientation of internal stresses.

  3. Chronology, Eruption Duration, and Atmospheric Contribution of the Martian Volcano Apollinaris Patera

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, M.S.; Mouginis-Mark, P. J.; Zimbelman, J.R.; Wu, S.S.C.; Ablin, K.K.; Howington-Kraus, A. E.

    1993-01-01

    Geologic mapping, thermal inertia measurements, and an analysis of the color (visual wavelengths) of the martian volcano Apollinaris Patera indicate the existence of two different surface materials, comprising an early, easily eroded edifice, and a more recent, competent fan on the southern flank. A chronology of six major events that is consistent with the present morphology of the volcano has been identified. We propose that large scale explosive activity occurred during the formation of the main edifice and that the distinctive fan on the southern flank appears to have been formed by lavas of low eruptive rate similar to those that form compound pahoehoe flow fields on Earth. A basal escarpment typically 500 m in relief and morphologically similar to the one surrounding Olympus Mons was produced between the formation of the main edifice and the fan, indicating multistage eruptions over a protracted period of time. Contact relations between the volcanic units and the adjacent chaotic material indicate that formation of the chaotic material occurred over an extended period of time and may be related to the volcanic activity that formed Apollinaris Patera. Stereophotogrammetric measurements permit the volume of the volcano to be estimated at 105 km3. From this volume measurement and an inferred eruption rate (1.5 ?? 10-2 km3 yr-1) we estimate the total eruption duration for the main edifice to be ???107 yrs. Plausible estimates of the exsolved volatile content of the parent magma imply that greater than 1015 kg of water vapor was released into the atmosphere as a consequence of this activity. This large amount of water vapor as well as other exsolved gases must have had a significant impact on local, and possibly global, climatic conditions. ?? 1993 Academic Press. All rights reserved.

  4. Channel geometry and discharge estimates for Dao and Niger Valles, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musiol, S.; van Gasselt, S.; Neukum, G.

    2008-09-01

    Introduction The outflow channels Dao and Niger Valles are located at the eastern rim of the 2000-km diameter Hellas Planitia impact basin, in a transition zone with ancient cratered terrain and the volcanoes Hadriaca and Tyrrhena Patera (Hesperia Planum) on the one hand and fluvial, mass-wasting and aeolian deposits on the other hand [1]. Dao and Niger have alcove-shaped source regions similar to the chaotic terrains found in the Margaritifer Terra region, with flat floors, landslide morphologies and small, chaotically distributed isolated mounds. As [2] pointed out, the intrusion of volcanic material could be responsible for the release of pressurized water that can carry loose material away. This process could than have created a depression and an associated outflow channel. In contrast to [2] who made their calculations for Aromatum Chaos and Ravi Vallis, we have focused on Dao and Niger Valles for investigation, since they are spatially related to the nearby Hadriaca Patera. Heat-triggered outflow events seem likely. We follow the generally accepted assumption that water was the main erosional agent [3]. Furthermore we take into account that multiple floods with different volumes are more likely than a single event because of repressurization of an aquifer [4]. Background Hadriaca Patera Hadriaca Patera is among the oldest central-vent volcanoes on Mars, a low-relief volcano with a central caldera complex which consists predominantly of pyroclastic material. The erosional structure of degraded valleys on its flanks is indicative of dissection by a combination of groundwater sapping and surface runoff, attributed to a hydromagmatic eruption scenario [5]. Dao Vallis Dao Vallis is interpreted as collapse region of volcanic and sedimentary plains that have been eroded by surface and subsurface flow [5]. The approximately radial alignment to Hellas is interpreted as following deep-seated structural weakness zones generated by the impact. Small grabens and fractures

  5. Supervolcanoes within an ancient volcanic province in Arabia Terra, Mars.

    PubMed

    Michalski, Joseph R; Bleacher, Jacob E

    2013-10-01

    Several irregularly shaped craters located within Arabia Terra, Mars, represent a new type of highland volcanic construct and together constitute a previously unrecognized Martian igneous province. Similar to terrestrial supervolcanoes, these low-relief paterae possess a range of geomorphic features related to structural collapse, effusive volcanism and explosive eruptions. Extruded lavas contributed to the formation of enigmatic highland ridged plains in Arabia Terra. Outgassed sulphur and erupted fine-grained pyroclastics from these calderas probably fed the formation of altered, layered sedimentary rocks and fretted terrain found throughout the equatorial region. The discovery of a new type of volcanic construct in the Arabia volcanic province fundamentally changes the picture of ancient volcanism and climate evolution on Mars. Other eroded topographic basins in the ancient Martian highlands that have been dismissed as degraded impact craters should be reconsidered as possible volcanic constructs formed in an early phase of widespread, disseminated magmatism on Mars. PMID:24091975

  6. Supervolcanoes Within an Ancient Volcanic Province in Arabia Terra, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michalski, Joseph. R.; Bleacher, Jacob E.

    2014-01-01

    Several irregularly shaped craters located within Arabia Terra, Mars represent a new type of highland volcanic construct and together constitute a previously unrecognized martian igneous province. Similar to terrestrial supervolcanoes, these low-relief paterae display a range of geomorphic features related to structural collapse, effusive volcanism, and explosive eruptions. Extruded lavas contributed to the formation of enigmatic highland ridged plains in Arabia Terra. Outgassed sulfur and erupted fine-grained pyroclastics from these calderas likely fed the formation of altered, layered sedimentary rocks and fretted terrain found throughout the equatorial region. Discovery of a new type of volcanic construct in the Arabia volcanic province fundamentally changes the picture of ancient volcanism and climate evolution on Mars. Other eroded topographic basins in the ancient Martian highlands that have been dismissed as degraded impact craters should be reconsidered as possible volcanic constructs formed in an early phase of widespread, disseminated magmatism on Mars.

  7. Classification of volcanoes of the Kane Patera Quadrangle of Io: Proportions of lava flows and pyroclastic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elston, W. E.

    1984-01-01

    Voyager 1 images show 14 volcanic centers wholly or partly within the Kane Patera quadrangle of Io, which are divided into four major classes: (1) shield with parallel flows; (2) shield with early radial fan shapd flows; (3) shield with radial fan shaped flows, surfaces of flows textured with longitudinal ridges; and (4) depression surrounded by plateau-forming scarp-bounded, untextured deposits. The interpretation attempted here hinges largely on the ability to distinguish lava flows from pyroclastic flows by remote sensing.

  8. Charting thermal emission variability at Pele, Janus Patera and Kanehekili Fluctus with the Galileo NIMS Io Thermal Emission Database (NITED)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Ashley Gerard; Veeder, Glenn J.; Matson, Dennis L.; Johnson, Torrence V.

    2012-09-01

    Using the NIMS Io Thermal Emission Database (NITED), a collection of over 1000 measurements of radiant flux from Io’s volcanoes (Davies, A.G. et al. [2012]. Geophys. Res. Lett. 39, L01201. doi:10.1029/2011GL049999), we have examined the variability of thermal emission from three of Io’s volcanoes: Pele, Janus Patera and Kanehekili Fluctus. At Pele, the 5-μm thermal emission as derived from 28 night time observations is remarkably steady at 37 ± 10 GW μm-1, re-affirming previous analyses that suggested that Pele an active, rapidly overturning silicate lava lake. Janus Patera also exhibits relatively steady 5-μm thermal emission (≈20 ± 3 GW μm-1) in the four observations where Janus is resolved from nearby Kanehekili Fluctus. Janus Patera might contain a Pele-like lava lake with an effusion rate (QF) of ≈40-70 m3 s-1. It should be a prime target for a future mission to Io in order to obtain data to determine lava eruption temperature. Kanehekili Fluctus has a thermal emission spectrum that is indicative of the emplacement of lava flows with insulated crusts. Effusion rate at Kanehekili Fluctus dropped by an order of magnitude from ≈95 m3 s-1 in mid-1997 to ≈4 m3 s-1 in late 2001.

  9. Measuring sand flux on Mars using HiRISE Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayoub, F.; Bridges, N. T.; Avouac, J.; Leprince, S.; Lucas, A.; Mattson, S.

    2011-12-01

    As wind is the major agent of sediment transport on Mars, a quantitative estimate of aeolian processes is therefore essential to assess recent geological evolution and current climate. We adapted the Co-registration of Optically Sensed Image and Correlation (COSI-Corr) toolbox to the MRO HiRISE imager specifications to produce a dense map of the ripples migration on the surface of the Martian dunes on the Nili Patera area. The ripple migration rate, along with an estimate of the ripple height, were used to derive the sand flux, a key quantity that controls the style and rate of landscape evolution. Using the dunes shape, size, and height, which were extracted from a DEM of the dune field, we show that the dunes are near steady state, and we observe that dune migration rate varies inversely with size and position within the dune field. The time scale associated with the formation and evolution of the Nili Patera dune field, estimated from comparing the sand volume with the sand flux and the dunes migration rates with the length scale of the dune field, is on the order of 10s to 100s of thousands Earth years. However, sand fluxes at the dune crests are 0.7 - 4.8 m3 m-1 per Earth year, which is comparable to that of dunes in Victoria Valley, Antarctica. This implies that rates of landscape modification from aeolian abrasion on Mars may be comparable to that on Earth.

  10. Temperature, age and crust thickness distributions of Loki Patera on Io: implications for resurfacing mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, A. G.

    2003-01-01

    A high-spatial-resolution, multi-wavelength observation by the Galileo NIMS instrument has been analysed to determine the temperature and area distribution of a large portion of the ionian volcano Loki Patera. The temperatures of the cooler components from a two-temperature fit to the data can be used to determine ages of the surface. The age of the floor along a profile across the floor of the caldera ranges from 10 to 80 days. This puts the start of the resurfacing in July/early August 2001, yielding a resurfacing rate of approximately 1 km/day, with the new lava spreading from the SW corner of the caldera in a NE direction. This rate is consistent with resurfacing by foundering of the crust on a lava lake. However,the temperature distribution may also result from the emplacement of flows. Implied crust thicknesses (derived using a lava cooling model) range from 2.6 to 0.9 m.

  11. Search for Mars lander/rover/sample-return sites: A status review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masursky, Harold; Dial, A. L., Jr.; Morris, E. C.; Strobell, M. E.; Applebee, D. J.; Chapman, M. G.

    1988-01-01

    Ten Mars sites were studied in the USA for four years. The sites are the Chasma Boreale (North Pole), Planum Australe (South Pole), Olympus Rupes, Mangala Valles, Memnonia Sulci, Candor Chasma, Kasel Valles, Nilosyrtis Mensae, Elysium Montes, and Apollinaris Patera. Seven sites are being studied by the USSR; their prime sites are located at the east mouth of Kasel Valles and near Uranius Patera. Thirteen geological maps of the first six USA sites are compiled and in review. Maps of the Mangala East and West sites at 1:1/2 million scale and a 1:2 million scale map show evidence of three episodes of small-channel formation interspersed with episodes of volcanism and tectonism that span the period from 3.5 to 0.6 b.y. ago. The tectonic and geological history of Mars, both ancient and modern, can be elucidated by sampling volcanic and fluvial geologic units at equatorial sites and layered deposits at polar sites. The evidence appears clear for multiple episodes of fluvial channeling, including some that are quite recent; this evidence contrasts with the theses of Baker and Partridge (1986) and many others that all channels are ancient. Verification of this hypothesis by Mars Observer will be an important step forward in the perception of the history of Mars.

  12. In vitro regeneration of Basella alba L

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edney, Norris Allen; Rizvi, Muhammad A.; Rizvi, Narjis F.

    1989-01-01

    Basella alba L. is a tropical vine used as a vegetable in some Asian and African countries. It has potential as a nontraditional crop for small family farms. A short day plant, it blooms during the fall, provided the temperatures are mild. In the southeastern U.S., the short days of fall are associated with subfreezing temperatures, and plants are killed before blooming. Attempts were made to regenerate the plant using tissue culture techniques. Several trials were conducted with different media, hormones, and explants. It was found that nodal segments on Gamborg medium regenerated shoots. Interaction studies of auxins and cytokinins indicated that its endogeneous auxin content might be high because callus proliferated in almost all treatments and roots initiated even when the medium was not supplemented with an auxin.

  13. Antioxidant Effect of Lippia alba (Miller) N. E. Brown

    PubMed Central

    Chies, Claire E.; Branco, Cátia S.; Scola, Gustavo; Agostini, Fabiana; Gower, Adriana E.; Salvador, Mirian

    2013-01-01

    Lippia alba is a shrub found in all regions of Brazil and other countries in South and Central America. L. alba exhibits variability among its different accessions, showing differences in morphology and in the composition of its essential oil. This study evaluated the phenolic profiles and the antioxidant activities of seven different accessions of L. alba. The seven accessions of L. alba studied exhibited an important phenolic content, and all accessions demonstrated antioxidant activity with different efficacies. The main flavonoids in all accessions were apigenin, luteolin, naringin and rutin. The Santa Vitória do Palmar accession exhibited higher naringin and total phenolic content. This extract was able to reduce hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative damage in tissue homogenates of cerebellum, cerebral cortex, hippocampus and liver of Wistar rats. PMID:26784458

  14. Tidal Dissipation in Basalt Magma Chambers - Implications for Io's Loki Patera and Icy Satellite Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, J. C.; Matson, D. L.; Davies, A. G.; Johnson, T. V.; Veeder, G. J.

    2006-05-01

    We discuss tidal dissipation in molten basaltic magma and the results from model application to Io and Enceladus. Magma is a non-newtonian liquid with a complex rheology dependent on interactions between different phases: liquid, crystals and bubbles, resulting in a slurry with each component responding differently to temperature and stress. This study is based on results obtained for terrestrial basalts. For example, the evolution of crystal content as a function of temperature has been described for basalts [e.g., 1]. The behavior of cyclically stressed basalt has been observed in laboratory for frequencies corresponding to seismic waves between 1 and 200 sec. [e.g., 2-5]. While this frequency range is outside the range of dynamical frequencies considered in planetary sciences, these results show variations of the response as a function of the wavelength of the structure involved in the response. From the trend observed at low frequencies we extrapolate these data to tidal frequencies encountered at Io and Enceladus. We apply this result to a silicate magma chamber deep in Enceladus's core. Such a magma body has been proposed by Matson et al. [6, 7] as a heat source for keeping Enceladus warm over geological time and ultimately powering the observed volcanism [8]. We also apply the model to the 'magma sea' at Loki Patera [9] the source of 10-20% of Io's heat flow. In both cases we evaluate how much tidal dissipation can be produced. Our objectives are to chart the development and long-term evolution of magma chambers on bodies heavily influenced by tidal dissipation. From consideration of the relevant processes taking place over appropriate timescales, results show that self- regulation mechanisms are in place, such that crystal content and heat production remain in equilibrium over geological time. Our preliminary results support long-term preservation of a magma chamber in Enceladus' core. Coupled thermal-orbital modeling also indicates consistency between this

  15. Observations and temperatures of Io's Pele Patera from Cassini and Galileo spacecraft images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Radebaugh, J.; McEwen, A.S.; Milazzo, M.P.; Keszthelyi, L.P.; Davies, A.G.; Turtle, E.P.; Dawson, D.D.

    2004-01-01

    Pele has been the most intense high-temperature hotspot on Io to be continuously active during the Galileo monitoring from 1996-2001. A suite of characteristics suggests that Pele is an active lava lake inside a volcanic depression. In 2000-2001, Pele was observed by two spacecraft, Cassini and Galileo. The Cassini observations revealed that Pele is variable in activity over timescales of minutes, typical of active lava lakes in Hawaii and Ethiopia. These observations also revealed that the short-wavelength thermal emission from Pele decreases with rotation of Io by a factor significantly greater than the cosine of the emission angle, and that the color temperature becomes more variable and hotter at high emission angles. This behavior suggests that a significant portion of the visible thermal emission from Pele comes from lava fountains within a topographically confined lava body. High spatial resolution, nightside images from a Galileo flyby in October 2001 revealed a large, relatively cool (< 800 K) region, ringed by bright hotspots, and a central region of high thermal emission, which is hypothesized to be due to fountaining and convection in the lava lake. Images taken through different filters revealed color temperatures of 1500 ?? 80 K from Cassini ISS data and 1605 ?? 220 and 1420 ?? 100 K from small portions of Galileo SSI data. Such temperatures are near the upper limit for basaltic compositions. Given the limitations of deriving lava eruption temperature in the absence of in situ measurement, it is possible that Pele has lavas with ultramafic compositions. The long-lived, vigorous activity of what is most likely an actively overturning lava lake in Pele Patera indicates that there is a strong connection to a large, stable magma source region. ?? 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Alba from Thermoplasma volcanium belongs to α-NAT's: An insight into the structural aspects of Tv Alba and its acetylation by Tv Ard1.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chao; Pathak, Chinar; Lee, Sang Jae; Lee, Ki-Young; Jang, Sun-Bok; Nam, Minjoo; Im, Hookang; Yoon, Hye-Jin; Lee, Bong-Jin

    2016-01-15

    The Alba superfamily proteins have been regarded as a conserved group of proteins in archaea and eukarya, which have shown to be important in nucleic acid binding, chromatic organization and gene regulation. These proteins often belong to the N-acetyltransferase (NAT) category (N(α)-acetyltransferases or N(ε)-acetyltransferases) and undergo post-translational modifications. Here, we report the crystal structure of Alba from Thermoplasma volcanium (Tv Alba) at 2.4 Å resolution. The acetylation of Tv Alba was monitored and the N-terminal of Tv Alba has been shown to interact with acetyl coenzyme A (Ac-CoA). The chemical shift perturbation experiments of Tv Alba were performed in the presence of Ac-CoA and/or Tv Ard1, another T. volcanium protein that treats Tv Alba as a substrate. To examine the DNA binding capabilities of Tv Alba alone and in the presence of Ac-CoA and/or Tv Ard1, EMSA experiments were carried out. It is shown that although Tv Alba binds to Ac-CoA, the acetylation of Tv Alba is not related with its binding to dsDNA, and the involvement of the N-terminus in Ac-CoA binding demonstrates that Tv Alba belongs to the N(α)-acetyltransferase family. PMID:26657068

  17. The Summer 1997 Eruption at Pillan Patera on Io: Implications for Ultrabasic Lava Flow Emplacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, David A.; Davies, Ashley G.; Keszthelyi, Laszlo P.; Greeley, Ronald

    2001-01-01

    Galileo data and numerical modeling were used to investigate the summer 1977 eruption at Pillan Patera on Io. This event, now defined as "Pillanian" eruption style, included a high-temperature (greater than 1600 C), possible ultrabasic , 140-km-high plume eruption that deposited dark, orthopyroxene-rich pyroclastic material over greater than 125,000 sq km, followed by emplacement of dark flow-like material over greater than 3100 sq km to the north of the caldera. We estimate that the high-temperature, energetic episode of this eruption had a duration of 52 - 167 days between May and September 1997, with peak eruption temperatures around June 28, 1997. Galileo 20 m/pixel images of part of the Pillan flow field show a wide-spread, rough, pitted surface that is unlike any flow surface we have seen before. We suggest that this surface may have resulted from: 1. A fractured lava crust formed during rapid, low-viscosity lava surging, perhaps including turbulent flow emplacement. 2. Disruption of the lava flow by explosive interaction with a volatile-rich substrate. or 3. A combination of 1 and 2 with or without accumulation of pyroclastic material on the surface. Well-developed flow lobes are observed, suggesting that this is a relatively distant part of the flow field.Shadow measurements at flow margins indicate a thickness of-8 - 10 m. We have modeled the emplacement of putative ultrabasic flow from the summer 1997 Pillan eruption using constraints from new Galileo data. Results suggest that either laminar sheet flows or turbulent channelized flows could have traveled 50 - 150 km on a flat, unobstructed surface, which is consistent with the estimated length of the Pillan flow field (approx. 60 km). Our modeling suggests low thermal erosion rates (less than 4.1 m/d), and that the formation of deep (greater than 20 m) erosion channels was unlikely, especially distal to the source. We calculate a volumetric flow rate of approx. 2 - 7 x 10(exp 3)cu m/s, which is greater

  18. The Summer 1997 Eruption at Pillan Patera on Io: Implications for Ultrabasic Lava Flow Emplacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, David A.; Davies, Ashley G.; Keszthelyi, Laszlo; Greeley, Ronald

    2001-01-01

    Galileo data and numerical modeling were used to investigate the summer 1997 eruption at Pillan Patera on Io. This event, now defined as 'Pillanian' eruption style, included a high-temperature (greater than 1600 C), possibly ultrabasic, 140-km-high plume eruption that deposited dark, orthopyroxene-rich pyroclastic material over greater than 125,000 sq km, followed by emplacement of dark flow-like material over greater than 3100 sq km to the north of the caldera. We estimate that the high-temperature, energetic episode of this eruption had a duration of 52- 167 days between May and September 1997, with peak eruption temperatures around June 28, 1997. Galileo 20 m/pixel images of part of the Pillan flow field show a widespread, rough, pitted surface that is unlike any flow surface we have seen before. We suggest that th.s surface may have resulted from (1) a fractured lava crust formed during rapid, low-viscosity lava surging, perhaps including turbulent flow emplacement; (2) disruption of the lava flow by explosive interaction with a volatile-rich substrate: or (3) a combination of 1 and 2 with or without accumulation of pyroclastic materials on the surface. Well-developed flow lobes are observed, suggesting that this is a relatively distal part of the flow field. Shadow measurements at flow margins indicate a thickness of approx. 8-10 m. We have modeled the emplacement of putative ultrabasic flows from the summer 1997 Pillan eruption using constraints from new Galileo data. Results suggest that either laminar sheet flows or turbulent channelized flows could have traveled 50-150 km on a flat. unobstructed surface, which is consistent with the estimated length of the Pillan flow field (approx. 60 km). Our modeling suggests low thermal erosion rates (less than 0.1 m/d), and that the formation of deep (greater than 20 m) erosion channels was unlikely, especially distal to the source. We calculate a volumetric flow rate of approx. 2-7 x l0(exp 3) cu m/s, which is

  19. Uniaxial and biaxial mechanical properties of porcine linea alba.

    PubMed

    Cooney, Gerard M; Moerman, Kevin M; Takaza, Michael; Winter, Des C; Simms, Ciaran K

    2015-01-01

    Incisional hernia is a severe complication post-laparoscopic/laparotomy surgery that is commonly associated with the linea alba. However, the few studies on the mechanical properties of the linea alba in the literature appear contradictory, possible due to challenges with the physical dimensions of samples and variations in protocol. This study focuses on the tensile mechanical characterisation of the porcine linea alba, as determined by uniaxial and equi-load biaxial testing using image-based strain measurement methods. Results show that the linea alba demonstrated a non-linear elastic, anisotropic behaviour which is often observed in biological soft tissues. The transverse direction (parallel to fibres) was found to be approximately eight times stiffer than the longitudinal (cross-fibre) direction under both uniaxial and equi-load biaxial loading. The equi-load biaxial tensile tests revealed that contraction could occur in the transverse direction despite increasing load, probably due to the anisotropy of the tissue. Optical surface marker tracking and digital image correlation methods were found to greatly improve the accuracy of stretch measurement, resulting in a 75% change in the apparent stiffness compared to using strain derived from machine cross-head displacement. Additionally, a finite element model of the experiments using a combination of an Ogden and fibre exponential power law model for the linea alba was implemented to quantify the effect of clamping and tissue dimensions (which are suboptimal for tensile testing) on the results. The preliminary model results were used to apply a correction factor to the uniaxial experimental data prior to inverse optimisation to derive best fit material parameters for the fibre reinforced Ogden model. Application of the model to the equi-load biaxial case showed some differences compared to the experimental data, suggesting a more complex anisotropic model may be necessary to capture biaxial behaviour. These

  20. The crystallography stations at the Alba synchrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauth, François; Boer, Roeland; Gil-Ortiz, Fernando; Popescu, Catalin; Vallcorba, Oriol; Peral, Inma; Fullà, Daniel; Benach, Jordi; Juanhuix, Jordi

    2015-08-01

    Alba is a 3rd-generation 3 GeV synchrotron facility with an emittance of 4.6nm·rad which has been operational since 2011 and has recently started top-up operation. Photons in a broad energy range of 0.08-80 keV are served to seven beamlines dedicated to a large variety of scientific fields. The portfolio includes two beamlines, XALOC and MSPD, fully dedicated to X-ray crystallography. BL13-XALOC is currently the only macromolecular crystallography beamline. The end-station includes a high-accuracy single-axis diffractometer with a removable minikappa stage, a sample-mounting robot and a large-area, photon-counting detector. The beamline optics, fed by an in-vacuum undulator, deliver a tunable photon beam between 5.5 and 22 keV. The beam size at the sample position can be adjusted by defocusing the mirrors in a range of 50-300μm in the horizontal direction and 5.5-300μm in the vertical direction. Beamline BL04-MSPD, which is fed by a superconducting wiggler, has two in-line end-stations. The first station is devoted to high-pressure/microdiffraction. It offers a μm beam in the range 20-50 keV, particularly suited for powder diffraction studies requiring a very small beam, e.g. mapping of cultural heritage samples and high-pressures studies. The second station is dedicated to high-resolution/high-throughput powder diffraction. It covers the 8-50 keV range and includes a heavy-duty 3-circle diffractometer equipped with a 13-channel multianalyzer detector with high-angular resolution ( FWHM) and a high-throughput, position-sensitive detector spanning in 2 range allowing millisecond data acquisitions.

  1. A new endornavirus species infecting Malabar spinach (Basella alba L.).

    PubMed

    Okada, Ryo; Kiyota, Eri; Moriyama, Hiromitsu; Toshiyuki, Fukuhara; Valverde, Rodrigo A

    2014-04-01

    A putative new endornavirus was isolated from Malabar spinach (Basella alba). The viral dsRNA consisted of 14,027 nt with a single ORF that coded for a polyprotein of 4,508 aa. The genome organization was similar to that of four other endornaviruses. Conserved domains for helicase-1, capsular synthase, UDP-glucose-glycosyltransferase (UGT), and RdRp were detected. Infected plants were phenotypically undistinguishable from healthy ones. The name Basella alba endornavirus is proposed for the virus isolated from Malabar spinach. PMID:24122112

  2. Mars Landscapes

    NASA Video Gallery

    Spacecraft have studied the Martian surface for decades, giving Earthlings insights into the history, climate and geology of our nearest neighbor, Mars. These images are from "Mars Landscapes," a v...

  3. Spatial Distribution of Volcanic Hotspots and Paterae on Io: Implications for Tidal Heating Models and Magmatic Pathways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, C. W.; Beggan, C. D.; Lopes, R.; Williams, D. A.; Radenbaugh, J.

    2011-01-01

    Io, the innermost of Jupiter's Galilean satellites, is the most volcanically active body in the Solar. System. Io's global mean heat flow is approximately 2 W/square m, which is approximately 20 times larger than on Earth. High surface temperatures concentrate within "hotspots" and, to date, 172 Ionian hotspots have been identified by spacecraft and Earth-based telescopes. The Laplace resonance between Io, Europa, and Ganymede maintains these satellites in noncircular orbits and causes displacement of their tidal bulges as the overhead position of Jupiter changes for each moon. Gravitational interactions between Jupiter and Io dominate the orbital evolution of the Laplacian system and generate enormous heat within to as tidal energy is dissipated. If this energy were transferred out of Io at the same rate as it is generated, then the associated surface heat flux would be 2.24 +/- 0.45 W/square m. This estimate is in good agreement with observed global heat flow, but to better constrain tidal dissipation mechanisms and infer how thermal energy is transferred to Io's surface, it is critical to closely examine the spatial distribution of volcanic features. End-member tidal dissipation models either consider that heating occurs completely in the mantle, or completely in the asthenosphere. Mixed models typically favor one-third mantle and two-thirds asthenosphere heating. Recent models also consider the effects of mantle-asthenosphere boundary permeability and asthenospheric instabilities. Deep-mantle heating models predict maximum surface heat flux near the poles, whereas asthenosphere heating models predict maxima near the equator-particularly in the Sub-Jovian and Anti-Jovian hemispheres, with smaller maxima occurring at orbit tangent longitudes. Previous studies have examined the global distribution of Ionian hotspots and patera (i.e., irregular or complex craters with scalloped edges that are generally interpreted to be volcanic calderas), but in this study, we

  4. Mars geologic mapping program: Review and highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, David H.

    1991-01-01

    The Mars Geologic Mapping (MGM) Program was introduced by NASA in 1987 as a new initiative in the Planetary Geology and Geophysics (PGG) Program. The overall purpose of the program is to support research on topical science problems that address specific questions. Among the objectives of the project are: (1) to produce highly detailed geologic maps that will greatly increase the knowledge of the materials and processes that have contributed to the evolutionary history of Mars; (2) to define areas of special interest for possible future investigation by planned missions (Mars Observer, Mars Sample Return); and (3) to maintain the interest of the planetary community in the development of new concepts and the re-evaluation of Martian geology as new data in usable form become available. Some interesting highlights of the geologic mapping indicate that multiple flood episodes occurred at different times during the Hesperian Period in both Kasei and Maja Valles. Studies of small channels in the Memnonia, Mangala, and Tharsis regions show that fluvial events appear to have occurred during the Amazonian Period at equatorial latitudes. Flood waters occurred during the Amazonian Period at equatorial latitudes. Flood waters from Mangala Valles may have seeped into surficial materials with the subsequent development of numerous sapping channels and debris flows; this suggests that the ancient highland terrain consists of relatively unconsolidated materials. Multiple layers were observed for the first time in the ridged plains lava flows covering large areas of Lunae Planum; some wrinkle ridges in this area are associated with grabens and collapse volcanic units at Hadriaca and Tyrrhena Paterae indicates that the units may have been emplaced by gravity-driven pyroclastic flows. Unlike the north polar layered deposits, those in the south polar region show no angular unconformities or evidence of faulting and folding. Water ice in the south polar layered deposits may be protected

  5. Chemical composition and antigenotoxic properties of Lippia alba essential oils

    PubMed Central

    López, Molkary Andrea; Stashenko, Elena E.; Fuentes, Jorge Luis

    2011-01-01

    The present work evaluated the chemical composition and the DNA protective effect of the essential oils (EOs) from Lippia alba against bleomycin-induced genotoxicity. EO constituents were determined by Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometric (GC-MS) analysis. The major compounds encountered being citral (33% geranial and 25% neral), geraniol (7%) and trans-β-caryophyllene (7%) for L. alba specimen COL512077, and carvone (38%), limonene (33%) and bicyclosesquiphellandrene (8%) for the other, COL512078. The genotoxicity and antigenotoxicity of EO and the compounds citral, carvone and limonene, were assayed using the SOS Chromotest in Escherichia coli. The EOs were not genotoxic in the SOS chromotest, but one of the major compound (limonene) showed genotoxicity at doses between 97 and 1549 mM. Both EOs protected bacterial cells against bleomycin-induced genotoxicity. Antigenotoxicity in the two L. alba chemotypes was related to the major compounds, citral and carvone, respectively. The results were discussed in relation to the chemopreventive potential of L. alba EOs and its major compounds. PMID:21931523

  6. Phytochemistry, pharmacology, and clinical trials of Morus alba.

    PubMed

    Chan, Eric Wei-Chiang; Lye, Phui-Yan; Wong, Siu-Kuin

    2016-01-01

    The present review is aimed at providing a comprehensive summary on the botany, utility, phytochemistry, pharmacology, and clinical trials of Morus alba (mulberry or sang shu). The mulberry foliage has remained the primary food for silkworms for centuries. Its leaves have also been used as animal feed for livestock and its fruits have been made into a variety of food products. With flavonoids as major constituents, mulberry leaves possess various biological activities, including antioxidant, antimicrobial, skin-whitening, cytotoxic, anti-diabetic, glucosidase inhibition, anti-hyperlipidemic, anti-atherosclerotic, anti-obesity, cardioprotective, and cognitive enhancement activities. Rich in anthocyanins and alkaloids, mulberry fruits have pharmacological properties, such as antioxidant, anti-diabetic, anti-atherosclerotic, anti-obesity, and hepatoprotective activities. The root bark of mulberry, containing flavonoids, alkaloids and stilbenoids, has antimicrobial, skin-whitening, cytotoxic, anti-inflammatory, and anti-hyperlipidemic properties. Other pharmacological properties of M. alba include anti-platelet, anxiolytic, anti-asthmatic, anthelmintic, antidepressant, cardioprotective, and immunomodulatory activities. Clinical trials on the efficiency of M. alba extracts in reducing blood glucose and cholesterol levels and enhancing cognitive ability have been conducted. The phytochemistry and pharmacology of the different parts of the mulberry tree confer its traditional and current uses as fodder, food, cosmetics, and medicine. Overall, M. alba is a multi-functional plant with promising medicinal properties. PMID:26850343

  7. Onion and weed response to mustard (Sinapis alba) seed meal

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weed control in organic onion production is often difficult and expensive, requiring numerous cultivations and extensive hand-weeding. Onion safety and weed control with mustard seed meal (MSM) derived from Sinapis alba was evaluated in greenhouse and field trials. MSM applied at 110, 220, and 440 g...

  8. Mining area environmental mercury assessment using Abias alba

    SciTech Connect

    Barghigiani, C.; Bauleo, R.

    1992-07-01

    Several Hg biomonitors are used for environmental mercury assessment in mining areas. Among these, lichens are those most studied but other vegetal organisms are also employed, such as brooms, pine needles, and many other species. This paper reports the results of a mercury assessment at Mt. Amiata (Italy) based on the metal concentration in needles of Abies alba. Mt. Amiata is an area of Tuscany characterized by the presence of cinnabar deposits. The mercury extraction activity was ended in 1975, but the environment is still contaminated by the metal. Albies alba is a widespread conifer tree in Italy whose needles live about fourteen years. It is present not only in the woods but also in many parks and gardens. 11 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Multihued Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image taken at JPL shows the panoramic camera used onboard both Mars Exploration Rovers. The panel to the lower right highlights the multicolored filter wheel that allows the camera to see a rainbow of colors, in addition to infrared bands of light. By seeing Mars in all its colors, scientists can gain insight into the different minerals that constitute its rocks and soil.

  10. Volcano Flank Structures on Earth and Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Wyk de Vries, B.; Byrne, P. K.; Mathieu, L.; Murray, J. B.; Troll, V. R.

    2007-12-01

    Shield volcanoes on Earth and Mars share common features, including calderas and pit crater chains. A set of structures present on the sides of several of the large shields on Mars are not regarded as having Earth analogues, however. Flank terraces are topographically subtle structures, characterised by a gentle convex profile and a distinctive "fish scale" imbricate distribution pattern. Magma chamber inflation, lithospheric flexure, flank relaxation, or gravitational slumping have been suggested as terrace formation mechanisms. Terraces on both Mars and Earth are clearly visible only in slope maps, and may thus escape visual detection in the field. We show that both Mauna Loa (Hawaii) and Etna (Sicily) display the same characteristic "fish scale" terrace pattern. This pattern delineates structures that we contend are terrestrial flank terraces. Heterogeneities in volcano geometry, due to buttressing or extension, result in terrace distributions that are not as evenly circumferential as those on Mars. Plan and cross-sectional profiles, however, parallel those of the Martian structures. These structures may also be present on Alayta (Ethiopia), Santa Cruz (Galapagos), and Tendürek Dagi (Turkey). Another type of structure, larger and steeper than flank terraces but sharing a similar plan-view morphology, is also present on Mauna Lau and Etna. These "flank bulges" appear to correlate with structures on Piton de la Fournaise (La Réunion), Cosiguina (Nicaragua), and Karthala (Comoros) on Earth, and Apollinaris Patera and Tharsis Tholus on Mars. Elsewhere (Paul K. Byrne et al., this volume) we argue that lithospheric flexure is a likely formation mechanism for Martian terraces. Flexure is active beneath Mauna Loa, and possibly under Etna, and so may also be responsible for terrestrial flank terraces. Scaled analogue models suggest that the larger flank bulges are due to magma intrusions derived from large chambers within these edifices. There is thus a strong

  11. Rippled Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    29 July 2004 Hundreds of large ripples or small dunes cover the landscape in the Terra Tyrrhena region of Mars in this Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image. The winds responsible for these dunes blew from the north-northwest (top/upper left). This scene is located near 8.8oS, 252.8oW, and covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the terrain from the left.

  12. Mars Underground News.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edgett, K.

    Contents: Next entry to Mars (Mars Pathfinder and the microrover Sojourner). Hello, Mars, we're back! Mars Global Surveyor update. The Mars program - 2001 and beyond. Schedule of missions to Mars (as of June 11, 1997). Mars on the Web.

  13. Mars Bowling

    NASA Video Gallery

    More than 140 fourth and fifth graders from Kraft Elementary School in Hampton learned how Newton's laws of motion apply to bowling and the Mars Curiosity rover during "The Science of Bowling," an ...

  14. Mars Pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    First of NASA's Discovery missions. Launched in December 1996 and arrived at Mars on 4 July 1997. Mainly intended as a technology demonstration mission. Used airbags to cushion the landing on Mars. The Carl Sagan Memorial station returned images of an ancient flood plain in Ares Vallis. The 10 kg Sojourner rover used an x-ray spectrometer to study the composition of rocks and travelled about 100 ...

  15. Mars resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duke, Michael B.

    1986-01-01

    The most important resources of Mars for the early exploration phase will be oxygen and water, derived from the Martian atmosphere and regolith, which will be used for propellant and life support. Rocks and soils may be used in unprocessed form as shielding materials for habitats, or in minimally processed form to expand habitable living and work space. Resources necessary to conduct manufacturing and agricultural projects are potentially available, but will await advanced stages of Mars habitation before they are utilized.

  16. Exploring Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breuil, Stéphanie

    2016-04-01

    Mars is our neighbour planet and has always fascinated humans as it has been seen as a potential abode for life. Knowledge about Mars is huge and was constructed step by step through numerous missions. It could be difficult to describe these missions, the associated technology, the results, the questions they raise, that's why an activity is proposed, that directly interests students. Their production is presented in the poster. Step 1: The main Mars feature and the first Mars explorations using telescope are presented to students. It should be really interesting to present "Mars Canals" from Percival Lowell as it should also warn students against flawed interpretation. Moreover, this study has raised the big question about extra-terrestrial life on Mars for the first time. Using Google Mars is then a good way to show the huge knowledge we have on the planet and to introduce modern missions. Step 2: Students have to choose and describe one of the Mars mission from ESA and NASA. They should work in pairs. Web sites from ESA and NASA are available and the teacher makes sure the main missions will be studied. Step 3: Students have to collect different pieces of information about the mission - When? Which technology? What were the main results? What type of questions does it raise? They prepare an oral presentation in the form they want (role play, academic presentation, using a poster, PowerPoint). They also have to produce playing cards about the mission that could be put on a timeline. Step 4: As a conclusion, the different cards concerning different missions are mixed. Groups of students receive cards and they have to put them on a timeline as fast as possible. It is also possible to play the game "timeline".

  17. Parasiticidal effects of Morus alba root bark extracts against Ichthyophthirius multifiliis infecting grass carp

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ichthyophthirius multifiliis (Ich) is an important fish parasite that can result in significant losses in aquaculture. In order to find efficacious drugs to control Ich, the root bark of Morus alba, a traditional Chinese medicine, was evaluated for its antiprotozoal activity. The M. alba root bark w...

  18. Proposal to reject the name Juglans alba (Juglandaceae), thereby retaining the name Carya tomentosa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For most of the last 60 years the Linnaean name Juglans alba L. and its homotypic counterpart Carya alba (L.) Nutt. have not been in use, being a continued source of confusion through their former application to at least two distinct species, the mockernut hickory and the shagbark hickory. Both are ...

  19. Counter-Hegemonic Regionalism and Higher Education for All: Venezuela and the ALBA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muhr, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    This paper employs new regionalism theory and regulatory regionalism theory in its analysis and theorisation of the Bolivarian Alliance for the Peoples of Our America (ALBA) as a counter-hegemonic Latin American and Caribbean (LAC) regionalism. As (initially) the regionalisation of Venezuela's Bolivarian Revolution, ALBA is centred around the idea…

  20. Mars Exploration Program and Mars Technology Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whetsel, Charles W.

    2002-01-01

    The Mars Exploration Program and constituent Mars Technology Program are described. Current, ongoing and future NASA-led missions are presented, including discussions of scientific accomplishments and objectives as well as technology validations accomplished and technological enablers for future missions. The missions summarized include (in order of actual or planned launch): Mars Global Surveyor, Mars Pathfinder, 2001 Mars Odyssey, Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, Mars 'Smart' Lander, Mars Scouts, Mars Sample Return. Key technology areas hdiscussed include: Navigation, Entry, Descent and Landing, Science and Surface Operations, Orbital Transport and Sample Return Technologies.

  1. Fungicidal activity of Artemisia herba alba Asso (Asteraceae).

    PubMed

    Saleh, Mahmoud A; Belal, Mohamed H; el-Baroty, Gamal

    2006-01-01

    The antifungal activity of Artemisia herba alba was found to be associated with two major volatile compounds isolated from the fresh leaves of the plant. Carvone and piperitone were isolated and identified by GC/MS, GC/IR, and NMR spectroscopy. Antifungal activity was measured against Penicillium citrinum (ATCC 10499) and Mucora rouxii (ATCC 24905). The antifungal activity (IC50) of the purified compounds was estimated to be 5 microg/ml, 2 microg/ml against Penicillium citrinum and 7 microg/ml, 1.5 microg/ml against Mucora rouxii carvone and piperitone, respectively. PMID:16484084

  2. Fluid loss control materials increase production at Alba

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, S.; McGinn, P.; Fitzpatrick, H.

    1996-05-01

    High-permeability formations are susceptible to formation damage. Drilling or completion fluids can cause permanent damage to the formation and may never be recovered once they leak into formation sand. Downhole processes, such as running in screens and pulling out guns, can also easily lead to damage in an unconsolidated formation. As describes here, Chevron recently used a crosslinkable HEC polymer gel pill and a viscous linear biopolymer prepack fluid to improve drilling and production performance at Alba field in the North Sea.

  3. Installation, commissioning and performance of IDs installed at ALBA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campmany, J.; Marcos, J.; Massana, V.; Becheri, F.; Gigante, J. V.; Colldelram, C.; Ribó, Ll

    2013-03-01

    The new synchrotron light source ALBA is currently starting regular operation. Up to 6 beamlines are using light produced by Insertion Devices. There are up to four types of IDs: 2 Apple-II undulators (EU62 and EU71) operating at low energies, one conventional wiggler (MPW80) operating in the range of 2 - 20 keV, two in-vacuum undulators (IVU21) operating in the range 5 - 30 keV and a superconducting wiggler (SCW30) operating in the range of (up to) 40 keV. The main IDs characteristics, their influence on the beam dynamics and a first characterization of their light will be presented.

  4. Differential Subcellular Localization of Leishmania Alba-Domain Proteins throughout the Parasite Development

    PubMed Central

    Dupé, Aurélien; Dumas, Carole; Papadopoulou, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Alba-domain proteins are RNA-binding proteins found in archaea and eukaryotes and recently studied in protozoan parasites where they play a role in the regulation of virulence factors and stage-specific proteins. This work describes in silico structural characterization, cellular localization and biochemical analyses of Alba-domain proteins in Leishmania infantum. We show that in contrast to other protozoa, Leishmania have two Alba-domain proteins, LiAlba1 and LiAlba3, representative of the Rpp20- and the Rpp25-like eukaryotic subfamilies, respectively, which share several sequence and structural similarities but also important differences with orthologs in other protozoa, especially in sequences targeted for post-translational modifications. LiAlba1 and LiAlba3 proteins form a complex interacting with other RNA-binding proteins, ribosomal subunits, and translation factors as supported by co-immunoprecipitation and sucrose gradient sedimentation analysis. A higher co-sedimentation of Alba proteins with ribosomal subunits was seen upon conditions of decreased translation, suggesting a role of these proteins in translational repression. The Leishmania Alba-domain proteins display differential cellular localization throughout the parasite development. In the insect promastigote stage, Alba proteins co-localize predominantly to the cytoplasm but they translocate to the nucleolus and the flagellum upon amastigote differentiation in the mammalian host and are found back to the cytoplasm once amastigote differentiation is completed. Heat-shock, a major signal of amastigote differentiation, triggers Alba translocation to the nucleolus and the flagellum. Purification of the Leishmania flagellum confirmed LiAlba3 enrichment in this organelle during amastigote differentiation. Moreover, partial characterization of the Leishmania flagellum proteome of promastigotes and differentiating amastigotes revealed the presence of other RNA-binding proteins, as well as differences in

  5. Ectomycorrhizal fungal assemblages of Abies alba Mill. outside its native range in Poland.

    PubMed

    Rudawska, Maria; Pietras, Marcin; Smutek, Iwona; Strzeliński, Paweł; Leski, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    Abies alba (Mill.) is an important forest tree species, native to the mountainous regions of Europe but has been also widely introduced in the lowlands outside its native range. Like most forest tree species, A. alba forms obligate mutualisms with ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi. This investigation sought to examine ECM fungal communities of A. alba when the species grows 400 km north of its native range in the region of Pomerania in Poland. We surveyed for ECM fungi by sampling live roots from four mature forest stands where the A. alba component ranged from 20 to 100%. Ectomycorrhizal fungal symbionts were identified based on morphotyping and sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA). Thirty-five ECM fungal taxa were distinguished on root tips of A. alba from all tested stands with 22 to 27 ECM fungal taxa in the individual stand. The diversity and similarity metrics revealed a lack of statistical differences in the structure of the ECM fungal community between stands varying in overstory tree composition. Cenococcum geophilum was the most common fungal species at all investigated A. alba stands, with an abundance of 50 to 70%. The ECM community was characterized by the lack of Abies-specific fungal symbionts and a rich and diverse suite of host-generalist mycobionts that seem to be sufficient for successful growth and development of A. alba outside of its native range. PMID:26071873

  6. Hypocholesterolemic and Antiatherosclerotic Potential of Basella alba Leaf Extract in Hypercholesterolemia-Induced Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Baskaran, Gunasekaran; Salvamani, Shamala; Azlan, Azrina; Ahmad, Siti Aqlima; Yeap, Swee Keong; Shukor, Mohd Yunus

    2015-01-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is the major risk factor that leads to atherosclerosis. Nowadays, alternative treatment using medicinal plants gained much attention since the usage of statins leads to adverse health effects, especially liver and muscle toxicity. This study was designed to investigate the hypocholesterolemic and antiatherosclerotic effects of Basella alba (B. alba) using hypercholesterolemia-induced rabbits. Twenty New Zealand white rabbits were divided into 5 groups and fed with varying diets: normal diet, 2% high cholesterol diet (HCD), 2% HCD + 10 mg/kg simvastatin, 2% HCD + 100 mg/kg B. alba extract, and 2% HCD + 200 mg/kg B. alba extract, respectively. The treatment with B. alba extract significantly lowered the levels of total cholesterol, LDL, and triglycerides and increased HDL and antioxidant enzymes (SOD and GPx) levels. The elevated levels of liver enzymes (AST and ALT) and creatine kinase were noted in hypercholesterolemic and statin treated groups indicating liver and muscle injuries. Treatment with B. alba extract also significantly suppressed the aortic plaque formation and reduced the intima: media ratio as observed in simvastatin-treated group. This is the first in vivo study on B. alba that suggests its potential as an alternative therapeutic agent for hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis. PMID:26697097

  7. Hypocholesterolemic and Antiatherosclerotic Potential of Basella alba Leaf Extract in Hypercholesterolemia-Induced Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Baskaran, Gunasekaran; Salvamani, Shamala; Azlan, Azrina; Ahmad, Siti Aqlima; Yeap, Swee Keong; Shukor, Mohd Yunus

    2015-01-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is the major risk factor that leads to atherosclerosis. Nowadays, alternative treatment using medicinal plants gained much attention since the usage of statins leads to adverse health effects, especially liver and muscle toxicity. This study was designed to investigate the hypocholesterolemic and antiatherosclerotic effects of Basella alba (B. alba) using hypercholesterolemia-induced rabbits. Twenty New Zealand white rabbits were divided into 5 groups and fed with varying diets: normal diet, 2% high cholesterol diet (HCD), 2% HCD + 10 mg/kg simvastatin, 2% HCD + 100 mg/kg B. alba extract, and 2% HCD + 200 mg/kg B. alba extract, respectively. The treatment with B. alba extract significantly lowered the levels of total cholesterol, LDL, and triglycerides and increased HDL and antioxidant enzymes (SOD and GPx) levels. The elevated levels of liver enzymes (AST and ALT) and creatine kinase were noted in hypercholesterolemic and statin treated groups indicating liver and muscle injuries. Treatment with B. alba extract also significantly suppressed the aortic plaque formation and reduced the intima: media ratio as observed in simvastatin-treated group. This is the first in vivo study on B. alba that suggests its potential as an alternative therapeutic agent for hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis. PMID:26697097

  8. Mars 2003

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-402, 25 June 2003

    The Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) experiment consists of 3 different cameras: a narrow angle imager that provides the black-and-white high resolution views (up to 1.4 meters per pixel) of Mars, and 2 wide angle cameras, observing in red and blue wavelengths, from which color views of the entire planet are assembled each day. The wide angle cameras provide a daily record of changes in martian weather and surface frost as the seasons progress. MGS MOC has obtained a record of martian weather spanning a little over 2 martian years since it began systematic observations in March 1999.

    The view of Mars shown here was assembled from MOC daily global images obtained on May 12, 2003. At that time, the northern hemisphere was in early autumn, and the southern hemisphere in early spring. At the left/center of this view are the four large Tharsis volcanoes: Olympus Mons, Ascraeus Mons, Pavonis Mons, and Arsia Mons. Stretching across the center of the globe is the 5,000 kilometers (3,000 miles) long Valles Marineris trough system. The seasonal south polar carbon dioxide frost cap is visible at the bottom of this view. A dust storm sweeps across the plains of northern Acidalia at the upper right. North is up, east is right, sunlight illuminates the planet from the left.

  9. Geologic Mapping of MTM -30247, -35247 and -40247 Quadrangles, Reull Vallis Region, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mest, S. C.; Crown, D. A.

    2009-01-01

    Geologic mapping of MTM -30247, -35247, and -40247 quadrangles is being used to characterize Reull Vallis (RV) and to determine the history of the eastern Hellas region of Mars. Studies of RV examine the roles and timing of volatile-driven erosional and depositional processes and provide constraints on potential associated climatic changes. This study complements earlier investigations of the eastern Hellas region, including regional analyses [1-6], mapping studies of circum-Hellas canyons [7-10], and volcanic studies of Hadriaca and Tyrrhena Paterae [11-13]. Key scientific objectives include 1) characterizing RV in its "fluvial zone," 2) analysis of channels in the surrounding plains and potential connections to and interactions with RV, 3) examining young, presumably sedimentary plains along RV, and 4) determining the nature of the connection between the segments of RV.

  10. Geologic Mapping of MTM -30247, -35247 and -40247 Quadrangles, Reull Vallis Region of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mest, S. C.; Crown, D. A.

    2008-01-01

    Geologic mapping and stratigraphic analyses of MTM -30247, -35247, and -40247 quadrangles are being used to characterize the Reull Vallis (RV) system and to determine the history of the eastern Hellas region of Mars. Studies of RV examine the roles and timing of volatile-driven erosional and depositional processes and provide constraints on potential associated climatic changes. This study complements earlier investigations of the eastern Hellas region, including regional analyses [1-6], mapping studies of circum-Hellas canyons [7-10], and volcanic studies of Hadriaca and Tyrrhena Paterae [11-13]. Key scientific objectives for these quadrangles include 1) characterization of RV in its "fluvial zone," 2) analysis of channels in the surrounding plains and potential connections to and interactions with RV, 3) examination of young (?), presumably sedimentary plains along RV that embay the surrounding highlands, and 4) determination of the nature of the connection between segments 1 and 2 of RV.

  11. Feldspathic rocks on Mars: Compositional constraints from infrared spectroscopy and possible formation mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, A. Deanne; Nekvasil, Hanna

    2015-04-01

    Rare feldspar-dominated surfaces on Mars were previously reported based on near-infrared (NIR) spectral data and were interpreted to consist of anorthosite or felsic rocks. Using thermal infrared (TIR) data over the feldspar detections with the largest areal extent in Nili Patera and Noachis Terra, we rule out felsic interpretations. Basaltic or anorthositic compositions are consistent with TIR measurements, but the geologic contexts for these regions do not support a plutonic origin. Laboratory NIR spectral measurements demonstrate that large plagioclase crystals (>~840 µm) can be detected in mixtures with as much as 50 vol % mafics, which is higher than the previously stated requirement of no more than 15% mafics. Thus, anorthositic or felsic interpretations need not be invoked for all NIR-based feldspar detections. Plagioclase-enriched basaltic eruptive products can be formed from Martian basalts through partial crystallization at the base of a thick crust, followed by low-pressure crystallization of the residual liquids.

  12. Progress in the Scandia Region Geologic Map of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanaka, K. L.; Rodriguez, J. A. P.

    2010-01-01

    We are in the second year of a four year project to produce a geologic map of the Scandia region of Mars at 1:3,000,000 scale for publication in the USGS Scientific Investigations Map series. The primary objective of the map is to analyze and reconstruct the resurfacing history of this region in much greater detail than achieved by the previous northern plainswide mapping effort. This region includes (1) a broad swath of the Vastitas Borealis plains that includes various Scandia landforms and the Phoenix lander site; (2) part of the margin of the north polar plateau, Planum Boreum; and (3) the northern margin of the immense Alba Mons volcanic shield. We rely mostly on Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) digital elevation models, Thermal Emission Imaging Spectrometer infrared and visual range, and Context Camera images for mapping and topographic analysis.

  13. Ethnopharmacological Significance of Eclipta alba (L.) Hassk. (Asteraceae)

    PubMed Central

    Jahan, Rownak; Al-Nahain, Abdullah

    2014-01-01

    Eclipta alba can be found growing wild in fallow lands of Bangladesh where it is considered as a weed by farmers. Traditional medicinal systems of the Indian subcontinent countries as well as tribal practitioners consider the plant to have diverse medicinal values and use it commonly for treatment of gastrointestinal disorders, respiratory tract disorders (including asthma), fever, hair loss and graying of hair, liver disorders (including jaundice), skin disorders, spleen enlargement, and cuts and wounds. The plant has several phytoconstituents like wedelolactone, eclalbasaponins, ursolic acid, oleanolic acid, luteolin, and apigenin. Pharmacological activities of plant extracts and individual phytoconstituents have revealed anticancer, hepatoprotective, snake venom neutralizing, anti-inflammatory, and antimicrobial properties. Phytoconstituents like wedelolactone and ursolic and oleanolic acids as well as luteolin and apigenin can form the basis of new drugs against cancer, arthritis, gastrointestinal disorders, skin diseases, and liver disorders. PMID:27355071

  14. Chemical Diversity in Lippia alba (Mill.) N. E. Brown Germplasm

    PubMed Central

    Camêlo, Lídia Cristina Alves; Pinheiro, José Baldin; Andrade, Thiago Matos; Alves, Péricles Barreto

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to perform chemical characterization of Lippia alba accessions from the Active Germplasm Bank of the Federal University of Sergipe. A randomized block experimental design with two replications was applied. The analysis of the chemical composition of the essential oils was conducted using a gas chromatograph coupled to a mass spectrometer. The chemical composition of the essential oils allowed the accessions to be allocated to the following six groups: group 1: linalool, 1,8-cineole, and caryophyllene oxide; group 2: linalool, geranial, neral, 1,8-cineol, and caryophyllene oxide; group 3: limonene, carvone, and sabinene; group 4: carvone, limonene, g-muurolene, and myrcene; group 5: neral, geranial, and caryophyllene oxide; and group 6: geranial, neral, o-cymene, limonene, and caryophyllene oxide. PMID:26075292

  15. Mars habitat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ayers, Dale; Barnes, Timothy; Bryant, Woody; Chowdhury, Parveen; Dillard, Joe; Gardner, Vernadette; Gregory, George; Harmon, Cheryl; Harrell, Brock; Hilton, Sherrill

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a conceptual design for a permanently manned, self-sustaining Martian facility, to accommodate a crew of 20 people. The goal is to incorporate the major functions required for long term habitation in the isolation of a barren planet into a thriving ecosystem. These functions include living, working, service, and medical facilities as well as a green house. The main design task was to focus on the internal layout while investigating the appropriate structure, materials, and construction techniques. The general concept was to create a comfortable, safe living environment for the crew members for a stay of six to twelve months on Mars. Two different concepts were investigated, a modular assembly reusable structure (MARS) designated Lavapolis, and a prefabricated space frame structure called Hexamars. Both models take into account factors such as future expansion, radiation shielding, and ease of assembly.

  16. Enhanced Mulberroside A Production from Cell Suspension and Root Cultures of Morus alba Using Elicitation.

    PubMed

    Komaikul, Jukrapun; Kitisripanya, Tharita; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Sritularak, Boonchoo; Putalun, Waraporn

    2015-07-01

    Morus alba L. has been used in Asian traditional medicine as an anti-inflammatory, anti-asthmatic, anthelmintic and as a whitening agent in cosmetic products. Mulberroside A is the major active compound from M. alba root bark. In this study, cell suspension and root cultures of M. alba were established, and the effect of the elicitors on the enhancement of mulberroside A production in M. alba was investigated. The cell suspension and root cultures of M. alba were exposed to elicitors and then mulberroside A contents were determined by an indirect competitive ELISA method. High levels of mulberroside A were obtained by addition of 100 and 200 μM salicylic acid with 24 h exposure time in cell suspension cultures (37.9 ± 1.5 and 34.0 ± 4.7 mg/g dry wt., respectively). Furthermore, addition of yeast extract at 2 mg/mL with 24 h exposure time can significantly increase mulberroside A contents from both cell suspension (3.2-fold) and root cultures (6.6-fold). Mulberroside A contents from both cell suspension and root cultures after treatment with elicitors are similar or higher than those found in the intact root and root bark of several years old M. alba. These results indicate that mulberry tissue cultures using the elicitation method are interesting alternative sources for mulberroside A production. PMID:26411024

  17. NASA Mars Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Reiber, D.B.

    1988-01-01

    Papers about Mars and Mars exploration are presented, covering topics such as Martian history, geology, volcanism, channels, moons, atmosphere, meteorology, water on the planet, and the possibility of life. The unmanned exploration of Mars is discussed, including the Phobos Mission, the Mars Observer, the Mars Aeronomy Observer, the seismic network, Mars sample return missions, and the Mars Ball, an inflatable-sectored-tire rover concept. Issues dealing with manned exploration of Mars are examined, such as the reasons for exploring Mars, mission scenarios, a transportation system for routine visits, technologies for Mars expeditions, the human factors for Mars missions, life support systems, living and working on Mars, and the report of the National Commission on Space.

  18. Mars @ ASDC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carraro, Francesco

    "Mars @ ASDC" is a project born with the goal of using the new web technologies to assist researches involved in the study of Mars. This project employs Mars map and javascript APIs provided by Google to visualize data acquired by space missions on the planet. So far, visualization of tracks acquired by MARSIS and regions observed by VIRTIS-Rosetta has been implemented. The main reason for the creation of this kind of tool is the difficulty in handling hundreds or thousands of acquisitions, like the ones from MARSIS, and the consequent difficulty in finding observations related to a particular region. This led to the development of a tool which allows to search for acquisitions either by defining the region of interest through a set of geometrical parameters or by manually selecting the region on the map through a few mouse clicks The system allows the visualization of tracks (acquired by MARSIS) or regions (acquired by VIRTIS-Rosetta) which intersect the user defined region. MARSIS tracks can be visualized both in Mercator and polar projections while the regions observed by VIRTIS can presently be visualized only in Mercator projection. The Mercator projection is the standard map provided by Google. The polar projections are provided by NASA and have been developed to be used in combination with APIs provided by Google The whole project has been developed following the "open source" philosophy: the client-side code which handles the functioning of the web page is written in javascript; the server-side code which executes the searches for tracks or regions is written in PHP and the DB which undergoes the system is MySQL.

  19. Mars habitat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The College of Engineering & Architecture at Prairie View A&M University has been participating in the NASA/USRA Advanced Design Program since 1986. The interdisciplinary nature of the program allowed the involvement of students and faculty throughout the College of Engineering & Architecture for the last five years. The research goal for the 1990-1991 year is to design a human habitat on Mars that can be used as a permanent base for 20 crew members. The research is being conducted by undergraduate students from the Department of Architecture.

  20. Mars Albedo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    These two views of Mars are derived from the MGS Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) measurements of global broadband (0.3 - 3.0 microns) visible and near-infrared reflectance, also known as albedo. The range of colors are in dimensionless units. The values are the ratio of the amount of electromagnetic energy reflected by the surface to the amount of energy incident upon it from the sun (larger values are brighter surfaces).

    The TES instrument was built by Santa Barbara Remote Sensing and is operated by Philip R. Christensen, of Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ.

  1. Mars Exploration Program and Mars Technology Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whetsel, C. W.

    2002-01-01

    The Mars Exploration Program and constituent Mars Technology Program are described. Current ongoing and future NASA-led missions are presented, including discussions of scientific accomplishments and objectives as well as technology validations accomplished and technological enablers for future missions.

  2. History of plains resurfacing in the Scandia region of Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tanaka, Kenneth L.; Fortezzo, Corey M.; Hayward, Rosalyn K.; Rodriguez, J. Alexis P.; Skinner, James A.

    2011-01-01

    We present a preliminary photogeologic map of the Scandia region of Mars with the objective of reconstructing its resurfacing history. The Scandia region includes the lower section of the regional lowland slope of Vastitas Borealis extending about 500–1800 km away from Alba Mons into the Scandia sub-basin below −4800 m elevation. Twenty mapped geologic units express the diverse stratigraphy of the region. We particularly focus on the materials making up the Vastitas Borealis plains and its Scandia sub-region, where erosional processes have obscured stratigraphic relations and made the reconstruction of the resurfacing history particularly challenging. Geologic mapping implicates the deposition, erosion, and deformation/degradation of geologic units predominantly during Late Hesperian and Early Amazonian time (~3.6–3.3 Ga). During this time, Alba Mons was active, outflow channels were debouching sediments into the northern plains, and basal ice layers of the north polar plateau were accumulating. We identify zones of regional tectonic contraction and extension as well as gradation and mantling. Depressions and scarps within these zones indicate collapse and gradation of Scandia outcrops and surfaces at scales of meters to hundreds of meters. We find that Scandia Tholi display concentric ridges, rugged peaks, irregular depressions, and moats that suggest uplift and tilting of layered plains material by diapirs and extrusion, erosion, and deflation of viscous, sedimentary slurries as previously suggested. These appear to be long-lived features that both pre-date and post-date impact craters. Mesa-forming features may have similar origins and occur along the southern margin of the Scandia region, including near the Phoenix Mars Lander site. Distinctive lobate materials associated with local impact craters suggest impact-induced mobilization of surface materials. We suggest that the formation of the Scandia region features potentially resulted from crustal heating

  3. History of plains resurfacing in the Scandia region of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Kenneth L.; Fortezzo, Corey M.; Hayward, Rosalyn K.; Rodriguez, J. Alexis P.; Skinner, James A.

    2011-09-01

    We present a preliminary photogeologic map of the Scandia region of Mars with the objective of reconstructing its resurfacing history. The Scandia region includes the lower section of the regional lowland slope of Vastitas Borealis extending about 500-1800 km away from Alba Mons into the Scandia sub-basin below -4800 m elevation. Twenty mapped geologic units express the diverse stratigraphy of the region. We particularly focus on the materials making up the Vastitas Borealis plains and its Scandia sub-region, where erosional processes have obscured stratigraphic relations and made the reconstruction of the resurfacing history particularly challenging. Geologic mapping implicates the deposition, erosion, and deformation/degradation of geologic units predominantly during Late Hesperian and Early Amazonian time (˜3.6-3.3 Ga). During this time, Alba Mons was active, outflow channels were debouching sediments into the northern plains, and basal ice layers of the north polar plateau were accumulating. We identify zones of regional tectonic contraction and extension as well as gradation and mantling. Depressions and scarps within these zones indicate collapse and gradation of Scandia outcrops and surfaces at scales of meters to hundreds of meters. We find that Scandia Tholi display concentric ridges, rugged peaks, irregular depressions, and moats that suggest uplift and tilting of layered plains material by diapirs and extrusion, erosion, and deflation of viscous, sedimentary slurries as previously suggested. These appear to be long-lived features that both pre-date and post-date impact craters. Mesa-forming features may have similar origins and occur along the southern margin of the Scandia region, including near the Phoenix Mars Lander site. Distinctive lobate materials associated with local impact craters suggest impact-induced mobilization of surface materials. We suggest that the formation of the Scandia region features potentially resulted from crustal heating

  4. Plains Style Caldera Complexes: Evidence for Ancient, Explosive Volcanism on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalski, J. R.; Bleacher, J. E.

    2014-12-01

    One of the mysteries of Mars' geology is the origin of widespread, layered, friable deposits that likely formed through air fall deposition. The enigmatic chaos terrains are largely composed of such deposits, as are many of the most intriguing layered, clay- and sulfate-bearing deposits of astrobiological interest. Such deposits are most likely of volcanic origin, but lack an obvious source, based on comparison with well-known volcanic provinces [1]. We suggest that these deposits may have been sourced from previously unrecognized explosive volcanoes in Arabia Terra. While Arabia is not traditionally considered to be a volcanic region, we propose that several of the large depressions in the area are in fact calderas that formed through a combination of structural collapse and explosive volcanism. These features are characterized by the observation of sets of nested depressions, association with ridged plains, development of ring fractures and faults, the presence of interior slump blocks, and direct association, in some cases, with friable deposits, lavas and evidence for lava lakes. Eden Patera is the type example and shows evidence for three nested calderas with >4000 km3 of collapse volume. Siloe Patera also contains a set of nested collapse features that occur within a zone of demagnetized crust that might indicate the presence of a magma chamber at shallow depth [2]. It is not yet clear why explosive volcanoes may have formed in Arabia Terra, but we suggest that they might represent the rapid rise of mafic magmas through a thin crust. They might represent more silicic or volatile-rich magmas, but these scenarios do not appear to be necessary [3]. We suggest that explosive mafic volcanism was an important aspect of early Martian geological processes. [1] Kerber, L., Head III, J., Madeleine, J. B., Forget, F. & Wilson, L. The dispersal of pyroclasts from ancient explosive volcanoes on Mars: Implications for the friable layered deposits. Icarus 219, 358-381 (2012

  5. Chronology of glaciation in the Hellas region of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, N.; Kargel, Jeffrey S.; Strom, Roger G.; Knight, Christine

    1991-01-01

    The Hellas Impact Basin is one of the oldest features on Mars, as indicated by the high density of large impact craters in parts of the basin. The highly degraded condition of Hellas seems consistent with great antiquity. However, many of the most strikingly modified landscapes in the basin, believed to be glaciogenic, also appear to be geologically youthful. Stratigraphic relations suggest two episodes of glaciation. Chronologic constraints are imposed on glaciation based on the impact cratering record, the focus of which is the southwestern portion of Hellas. Major terrain units are mapped. The lineated terrain and ridged plains form the summit and flanks of a large shield volcano, Amphitrites Patera, which was superimposed over the southwestern rim of Hellas toward the end of heavy bombardment. The ridged plains and lineated terrain are crossed by numerous wrinkle ridges. The lineated terrain is distinguished by a pervasive system of deep erosional troughs and sharp ridges thought to have been glacially sculpted by the Hellas Lobe. It is concluded that glaciation in Hellas occurred during the Middle Amazonian, roughly coeval with glaciation in Argyre.

  6. Radar, visual and thermal characteristics of Mars - Rough planar surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaber, G. G.

    1980-01-01

    High-resolution Viking Orbiter images contain significant information on Martian surface roughness at 25- to 100-m lateral scales, while earth-based radar observations of Mars are sensitive to roughness at lateral scales of 1 to 30 m or more. High-rms slopes predicted for the Tharsis-Memnonia-Amazonis volcanic plains from extremely weak radar returns are qualitatively confirmed by the Viking image data. Large-scale, curvilinear ridges on lava flows in the Memnonia Fossae region are interpreted as innate flow morphology caused by compressional foldover of moving lava sheets of possible rhyolite-dacite composition. The presence or absence of a recent mantle of fine-grained eolian material on the volcanic surfaces studied was determined by the visibility of fresh impact craters with diameters less than 50 m. Lava flows with surfaces modified by eolian erosion and deposition occur west-northwest of Apollinaris Patera at the border of the cratered equatorial uplands and southern Elysium Planitia. Nearby yardangs, for which radar observations indicate very high-rms slopes, are similar to terrestrial features of similar origin.

  7. Mars Exploration Rovers: 4 Years on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.

    2008-01-01

    This January, the Mars Exploration Rovers "Spirit" and "Opportunity" are starting their fifth year of exploring the surface of Mars, well over ten times their nominal 90-day design lifetime. This lecture discusses the Mars Exploration Rovers, presents the current mission status for the extended mission, some of the most results from the mission and how it is affecting our current view of Mars, and briefly presents the plans for the coming NASA missions to the surface of Mars and concepts for exploration with robots and humans into the next decade, and beyond.

  8. Multiple paternity in polyandrous barn owls (Tyto alba).

    PubMed

    Henry, Isabelle; Antoniazza, Sylvain; Dubey, Sylvain; Simon, Céline; Waldvogel, Céline; Burri, Reto; Roulin, Alexandre

    2013-01-01

    In polyandrous species females produce successive clutches with several males. Female barn owls (Tyto alba) often desert their offspring and mate to produce a 2(nd) annual brood with a second male. We tested whether copulating during chick rearing at the 1(st) annual brood increases the male's likelihood to obtain paternity at the 2(nd) annual breeding attempt of his female mate in case she deserts their brood to produce a second brood with a different male. Using molecular paternity analyses we found that 2 out of 26 (8%) second annual broods of deserting females contained in total 6 extra-pair young out of 15 nestlings. These young were all sired by the male with whom the female had produced the 1(st) annual brood. In contrast, none of the 49 1(st) annual breeding attempts (219 offspring) and of the 20 2(nd) annual breeding attempts (93 offspring) of non-deserting females contained extra-pair young. We suggest that female desertion can select male counter-strategies to increase paternity and hence individual fitness. Alternatively, females may copulate with the 1(st) male to derive genetic benefits, since he is usually of higher quality than the 2(nd) male which is commonly a yearling individual. PMID:24244622

  9. Mars Public Engagement Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Christine

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the Mars public engagement goal to understand and protect our home planet, explore the Universe and search for life, and to inspire the next generation of explorers. Teacher workshops, robotics education, Mars student imaging and analysis programs, MARS Student Imaging Project (MSIP), Russian student participation, MARS museum visualization alliance, and commercialization concepts are all addressed in this project.

  10. Evaluation of hepatoprotective activity of aqueous extracts of leaves of Basella alba in albino rats.

    PubMed

    Das, Saibal; Bandyopadhyay, Sanjib; Ramasamy, Anand; Mondal, Somnath

    2015-01-01

    This study was done to evaluate possible hepatoprotective effects of aqueous leaf extracts of Basella alba in comparison with silymarin in paracetamol-induced hepatotoxicity in albino rats. Six groups of six albino rats each received orally for 6 weeks, vehicle, paracetamol (2 g/kg/day), paracetamol (2 g/kg/day) plus silymarin (50 mg/kg/day), paracetamol (2 g/kg/day) plus B. alba extract (60 mg/kg/day), paracetamol (2 g/kg/day) plus B. alba extract (80 mg/kg/day) and paracetamol (2 g/kg/day) plus B. alba extract (100 mg/kg/day). Hepatoprotective effect was evaluated by comparing serum bilirubin, serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase, serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase, proteins, alkaline phosphatase and liver histopathology. Results were represented as mean ± SEM. One-way ANOVA was done followed by post hoc Tukey's test with a highly significance level of P < 0.001. Aqueous leaf extracts of B. alba 100 mg/kg/day orally had significant hepatoprotective effect in paracetamol-induced hepatotoxicity in albino rats. The results were well comparable and even in some respects superior to standard drug silymarin. PMID:25347929

  11. Investigation of Antiarthritic Potential of Plumeria alba L. Leaves in Acute and Chronic Models of Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vipin; Gupta, Pankaj; Singh, Surender

    2014-01-01

    Aim. The present investigation was designed to evaluate antiarthritic potential of fractions of hydroalcoholic extract from leaves of P. alba. Materials and Methods. Plumeria alba L. leaves were extracted with hydroalcohol (30 : 70) to obtain hydroalcoholic extract of P. alba. This extract was further fractionated with solvents ethyl acetate and n-butanol to obtain EAPA and BPA, respectively. These fractions were tested against formaldehyde and Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA) induced arthritis. Arthritis assessment, paw volume, body weight, motor incoordination, and nociceptive threshold were measured. On day 21, the animals were sacrificed and histopathology was done. Results. The 100 and 200 mg/kg doses of EAPA and BPA caused a significant (P ≤ 0.05–0.01) reduction in paw swelling in both models. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and spleen weight decreased significantly (P < 0.01) in arthritic rats treated with extracts. There was significant (P < 0.05) improvement in thymus weight in EAPA treated rats whereas significant (P < 0.01) improvement was also seen in haemoglobin level (Hb) in diclofenac treated group. Motor incoordination and nociceptive threshold were also significantly (P ≤ 0.05–0.01) improved. Conclusion. The present study suggests that Plumeria alba L. has protective activity against arthritis and supports the traditional use of P. alba for rheumatism and other inflammatory diseases. PMID:25025056

  12. Anxiolytic activity of Nymphaea alba Linn. in mice as experimental models of anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Thippeswamy, B.S.; Mishra, Brijesh; Veerapur, V.P.; Gupta, Gourav

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present work was to evaluate the anxiolytic effect of an ethanolic extract of Nymphaea alba Linn. in mice. Materials and Methods: The elevated plus maze test (EPMT), light and dark test (L and DT) and open field test (OFT) were used to assess the anxiolytic activity of the ethanolic extract of N. alba Linn. in mice. In addition, aggressive behavior and motor coordination was also assessed by foot shock induced aggression test (FSIAT) and rota rod test (RRT). Diazepam 1 mg/kg served as a standard anxiolytic drug, administered orally. Results: The ethanolic extract of N. alba (100 and 200 mg/kg, p.o.) significantly increased the percentage of time spent and number of entries in open arm in EPMT. In L and DT, the extract produced significant increase in time spent, number of crossing and decrease in the duration of immobility in light box. In OFT, the extract showed significant increase in number of rearings, assisted rearings and number of square crossed, all of which are demonstrations of exploratory behavior. In FSIAT, N. alba extract attenuated aggressive behavior related to anxiolytic activity, such as number of vocalization, leaps, rearing, biting/attacks and facing each other in paired mice. Furthermore, the extract produced skeletal muscle relaxant effect assessed by RRT. Conclusion: The results of the present study suggest that an ethanolic extract of N. alba may possess anxiolytic activity and provide a scientific evidence for its traditional claim. PMID:21455422

  13. Antihyperglycemic activity of Eclipta alba leaf on alloxan-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed Central

    Ananthi, J.; Prakasam, A.; Pugalendi, K. V.

    2003-01-01

    Eclipta alba, an indigenous medicinal plant, has a folk (Siddha and Ayurvedha) reputation in rural southern India as a hypoglycemic agent. In order to confirm this claim, the present study was carried out to evaluate the antihyperglycemic effect of E. alba and to study the activities of liver hexokinase and gluconeogenic enzymes such as glucose-6-phosphatase and fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase in the liver of control and alloxan-diabetic rats. Oral administration of leaf suspension of E. alba (2 and 4 g/kg body weight) for 60 days resulted in significant reduction in blood glucose (from 372.0 +/- 33.2 to 117.0 +/- 22.8), glycosylated hemoglobin HbA(1)c, a decrease in the activities of glucose-6 phosphatase and fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase, and an increase in the activity of liver hexokinase. E. alba at dose of 2 g/kg body weight exhibited better sugar reduction than 4 g/kg body weight. Thus, the present study clearly shows that the oral administration of E. alba possess potent antihyperglycemic activity. PMID:15369623

  14. Mars Observer Laser Altimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuber, Maria T.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this study was to support the rebuild and implementation of the Mars Orbiter Laser Aftimeter (MOLA) investigation and to perform scientific analysis of current Mars data relevant to the future investigation. The instrument is part of the payload of the NASA Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) mission. The instrument is a rebuild of the Mars Observer Laser Altimeter that was originally flown on the ill-fated Mars Observer mission.

  15. Identification and effect of two flavonoids from root bark of Morus alba against Ichthyophthirius multifiliis in grass carp

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Morus alba is an important plant for sericulture and has a high medicinal value. In this study, two flavonoids (kuwanons G and O) with antiparasitic activity were isolated from the root bark of M. alba by bioassay-guided fractionation. The chemical structures were determined by pectroscopic analys...

  16. Nicaragua Re-Visited: From Neo-Liberal "Ungovernability" to the Bolivarian Alternative for the Peoples of Our America (ALBA)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muhr, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    In this paper I conduct a historical analysis of the emergence of ALBA in Nicaragua prior to Daniel Ortega's return to the presidency and the country's official membership in the initiative from January 2007 on. I argue that ALBA is a rival structure that evolved from the contradictions inherent in hegemonic globalisation. Within the framework of…

  17. Mars Observer Lecture: Mars Orbit Insertion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodd, Suzanne R. (Personal Name)

    1993-01-01

    The Mars Observer mission spacecraft was primarily designed for exploring Mars and the Martian environment. The Mars Observer was launched on September 25, 1992. The spacecraft was lost in the vicinity of Mars on August 21, 1993 when the spacecraft began its maneuvering sequence for Martian orbital insertion. This videotape shows a lecture by Suzanne R. Dodd, the Mission Planning Team Chief for the Mars Observer Project. Ms Dodd begins with a brief overview of the mission and the timeline from the launch to orbital insertion. Ms Dodd then reviews slides showing the trajectory of the spacecraft on its trip to Mars. Slides of the spacecraft being constructed are also shown. She then discusses the Mars orbit insertion and the events that will occur to move the spacecraft from the capture orbit into a mapping orbit. During the trip to Mars, scientists at JPL had devised a new strategy, called Power In that would allow for an earlier insertion into the mapping orbit. The talk summarizes this strategy, showing on a slide the planned transition orbits. There are shots of the Martian moon, Phobos, taken from the Viking spacecraft, as Ms Dodd explains that the trajectory will allow the orbiter to make new observations of that moon. She also explains the required steps to prepare for mapping after the spacecraft has achieved the mapping orbit around Mars. The lecture ends with a picture of Mars from the Observer on its approach to the planet.

  18. Uniaxial and biaxial tensile stress-stretch response of human linea alba.

    PubMed

    Cooney, Gerard M; Lake, Spencer P; Thompson, Dominic M; Castile, Ryan M; Winter, Des C; Simms, Ciaran K

    2016-10-01

    There are few studies on the stress-stretch behaviour of human linea alba, yet understanding the mechanics of this tissue is important for developing better methods of abdominal wound closure. Published data focuses mainly on porcine linea alba and for human tissue there are conflicting results and no bi-axial data available. This variability is likely due to challenges with the physical dimensions of the tissue and differences in experimental methodology. This study focussed on the tensile mechanical characterisation of the human linea alba using uniaxial and equi-load biaxial testing performed using image-based strain measurement methods. Thirteen freshly frozen human cadaveric abdominal walls were obtained and used to prepare 7 samples in both the transverse and longitudinal directions for uniaxial testing, and 13 square samples for bi-axial testing. The results showed significant anisotropy and for the equi-load biaxial tests the deformation was heavily biased in the longitudinal direction. In comparison with similar tests on porcine tissue from a previous study, it was found that the response of porcine linea alba to uniaxial loading is similar to that of human linea alba, with no statistically significant differences observed. Under biaxial loading human and porcine linea showed no statistical significance in the difference between their means in the transverse direction. However, a significant difference was observed in the longitudinal direction, and further study of the respective tissue structures is needed to better understand this result. These results provide the first data on the biaxial tensile properties of human linea alba and can aid in an improved assessment of wound closure mechanics. PMID:27367944

  19. Purification and biochemical characterization of phytocystatin from Brassica alba.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Azaj; Shamsi, Anas; Bano, Bilqees

    2016-05-01

    Phytocystatins belong to the family of cysteine proteinases inhibitors. They are ubiquitously found in plants and carry out various significant physiological functions. These plant derived inhibitors are gaining wide consideration as potential candidate in engineering transgenic crops and in drug designing. Hence it is crucial to identify these inhibitors from various plant sources. In the present study a phytocystatin has been isolated and purified by a simple two-step procedure using ammonium sulfate saturation and gel filtration chromatography on Sephacryl S-100HR from Brassica alba seeds (yellow mustard seeds).The protein was purified to homogeneity with 60.3% yield and 180-fold of purification. The molecular mass of the mustard seed cystatin was estimated to be nearly 26,000 Da by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis as well as by gel filtration chromatography. The stokes radius and diffusion coefficient of the mustard cystatin were found to be 23A° and 9.4 × 10(-7)  cm(2) s(-1) respectively. The isolated phytocystatin was found to be stable in the pH range of 6-8 and is thermostable up to 60 °C. Kinetic analysis revealed that the phytocystatin exhibited non-competitive type of inhibition and inhibited papain more efficiently (K(i)  = 3 × 10(-7)  M) than ficin (K(i)  = 6.6 × 10(-7)  M) and bromelain (K(i) = 7.7 × 10(-7)  M respectively). CD spectral analysis shows that it possesses 17.11% alpha helical content. PMID:26748819

  20. Properties of a laccase produced by Phanerochaete flavido-alba induced by vanillin.

    PubMed

    de la Rubia, Teresa; Ruiz, Esteban; Pérez, Juana; Martínez, José

    2002-12-01

    Phanerochaete flavido-alba is able to remove simple and polymeric phenols from the recalcitrant wastes of the olive oil industry, in a process in which a laccase is involved. This report describes the characterization of a laccase produced by P. flavido-alba and induced by vanillin. Although the amino acid composition of the purified enzyme is typical for laccases, other molecular characteristics show that it is quite different from fungal laccases. The purified laccase oxidized preferably o- and p-biphenols. PMID:12471507

  1. Anaerobic reduction of elemental sulfur by Chromatium vinosum and Beggiatoa alba

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, T. M.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of sulfur globules on the buoyant density of Chromatium vinosum and Beggiatoa alba was examined. The potential use of sulfur as a terminal electron acceptor in the anaerobic metabolism of Beggiatoa alba is also examined. The effect of the reduction of intracellular sulfur was investigated during dark metabolism on the buoyant density of C. vinosum. It is hypothesized from the results that the sulfur reduction to sulfide is part of an anaerobic energy operating system. Carbon stored as PHB can be oxidized with the concomitant reduction of sulfur to sulfide.

  2. Antioxidant and neurosedative properties of polyphenols and iridoids from Lippia alba.

    PubMed

    Hennebelle, Thierry; Sahpaz, Sevser; Gressier, Bernard; Joseph, Henry; Bailleul, François

    2008-02-01

    The neurosedative and antioxidative properties of some major compounds isolated from a citral chemotype of Lippia alba were investigated. Binding assays were performed on two CNS inhibitory targets: benzodiazepine and GABA(A) receptors. The most active compound was luteolin-7-diglucuronide, with half maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC(50)) of 101 and 40 microm, respectively. Fifteen compounds isolated from Lippia alba were tested for their radical scavenging capacities against DPPH. Four of the major compounds (verbascoside, calceolarioside E, luteolin-7-diglucuronide and theveside) were also tested for their antioxidant activity against superoxide radical-anion in cell-free (hypoxanthine-xanthine oxidase) and cellular (PMA-stimulated neutrophil granulocytes) systems. PMID:17705148

  3. Mars scouts: an overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matousek, S.

    2001-01-01

    The Mars program institutes the Mars Scout Missions in order to address science goals in the program not otherwise covered in the baseline Mars plan. Mars Scout Missions will be Principle-Investigator (PI) led science missions. Analogous to the Discovery Program, PI led investigations optimize the use of limited resources to accomplish the best focused science and allow the flexibility to quickly respond to discoveries at Mars. Scout missions also require unique investments in technology and reliance upon Mars-based infrastructure such as telecom relay orbiters.

  4. Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuber, Maria T.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this study was to support the rebuild and implementation of the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) investigation and to perform scientific analysis of current Mars data relevant to the investigation. The instrument is part of the payload of the NASA Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) mission. The instrument is a rebuild of the Mars Observer Laser Altimeter that was originally flown on the ill-fated Mars Observer mission. The instrument is currently in orbit around Mars and has so far returned remarkable data.

  5. Mars integrated transportation system multistage Mars mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    In accordance with the objective of the Mars Integrated Transport System (MITS) program, the Multistage Mars Mission (MSMM) design team developed a profile for a manned mission to Mars. The purpose of the multistage mission is to send a crew of five astronauts to the martian surface by the year 2019. The mission continues man's eternal quest for exploration of new frontiers. This mission has a scheduled duration of 426 days that includes experimentation en route as well as surface exploration and experimentation. The MSMM is also designed as a foundation for a continuing program leading to the colonization of the planet Mars.

  6. MAVEN's Trajectory to Mars

    NASA Video Gallery

    This movie shows the cruise trajectory of NASA's Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) mission, which was launched on Nov. 18, 2013. It will arrive at Mars on Sept. 21, 2014, to explore th...

  7. The Mars Chamber

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Mars chamber is a box about the size of a refrigerator that re-creates the temperatures, pressures, and atmosphere of the Martian surface, essentially creating a Mars environment on Earth! Scie...

  8. Saltation transport on Mars.

    PubMed

    Parteli, Eric J R; Herrmann, Hans J

    2007-05-11

    We present the first calculation of saltation transport and dune formation on Mars and compare it to real dunes. We find that the rate at which grains are entrained into saltation on Mars is 1 order of magnitude higher than on Earth. With this fundamental novel ingredient, we reproduce the size and different shapes of Mars dunes, and give an estimate for the wind velocity on Mars. PMID:17677662

  9. Threshold for sand mobility on Mars calibrated from seasonal variations of sand flux.

    PubMed

    Ayoub, F; Avouac, J-P; Newman, C E; Richardson, M I; Lucas, A; Leprince, S; Bridges, N T

    2014-01-01

    Coupling between surface winds and saltation is a fundamental factor governing geological activity and climate on Mars. Saltation of sand is crucial for both erosion of the surface and dust lifting into the atmosphere. Wind tunnel experiments along with measurements from surface meteorology stations and modelling of wind speeds suggest that winds should only rarely move sand on Mars. However, evidence for currently active dune migration has recently accumulated. Crucially, the frequency of sand-moving events and the implied threshold wind stresses for saltation have remained unknown. Here we present detailed measurements of Nili Patera dune field based on High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment images, demonstrating that sand motion occurs daily throughout much of the year and that the resulting sand flux is strongly seasonal. Analysis of the seasonal sand flux variation suggests an effective threshold for sand motion for application to large-scale model wind fields (1-100 km scale) of τ(s)=0.01±0.0015 N m(-2). PMID:25268931

  10. Geologic Map of the Hellas Region of Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leonard, Gregory J.; Tanaka, Kenneth L.

    2001-01-01

    INTRODUCTION This geologic map of the Hellas region focuses on the stratigraphic, structural, and erosional histories associated with the largest well-preserved impact basin on Mars. Along with the uplifted rim and huge, partly infilled inner basin (Hellas Planitia) of the Hellas basin impact structure, the map region includes areas of ancient highland terrain, broad volcanic edifices and deposits, and extensive channels. Geologic activity recorded in the region spans all major epochs of martian chronology, from the early formation of the impact basin to ongoing resurfacing caused by eolian activity. The Hellas region, whose name refers to the classical term for Greece, has been known from telescopic observations as a prominent bright feature on the surface of Mars for more than a century (see Blunck, 1982). More recently, spacecraft imaging has greatly improved our visual perception of Mars and made possible its geologic interpretation. Here, our mapping at 1:5,000,000 scale is based on images obtained by the Viking Orbiters, which produced higher quality images than their predecessor, Mariner 9. Previous geologic maps of the region include those of the 1:5,000,000-scale global series based on Mariner 9 images (Potter, 1976; Peterson, 1977; King, 1978); the 1:15,000,000-scale global series based on Viking images (Greeley and Guest, 1987; Tanaka and Scott, 1987); and detailed 1:500,000-scale maps of Tyrrhena Patera (Gregg and others, 1998), Dao, Harmakhis, and Reull Valles (Price, 1998; Mest and Crown, in press), Hadriaca Patera (D.A. Crown and R. Greeley, map in preparation), and western Hellas Planitia (J.M. Moore and D.E. Wilhelms, map in preparation). We incorporated some of the previous work, but our map differs markedly in the identification and organization of map units. For example, we divide the Hellas assemblage of Greeley and Guest (1987) into the Hellas Planitia and Hellas rim assemblages and change the way units within these groupings are identified

  11. The Alba field - a middle Eocene deepwater channel in the UK North Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Mattingly, G.A.; Bretthauser, H.H. )

    1990-09-01

    The Alba field is located in the Witch Ground Graben between the Fladen Ground Spur to the north and the Renee Ridge to the south, entirely in UKCS in Block 16/26. In 1985, oil was discovered in the middle Eocene sandstones of the Horda Formation at a depth of 6,100 ft subsea. Twelve additional wells, including sidetracks, have been drilled to appraise the discovery. This drilling indicates the Alba field is a stratigraphic trap covering an area of 3,400 ac. The Alba sands represent a brief interruption in the hemipelagic sedimentation that dominated this part of the Witch Ground Graben during the middle Eocene. Sediment was supplied intermittently from a shelf to the northwest into a deep-water environment. Well correlations, seismic facies analysis, and core analysis indicate that these sands were deposited as part of a constructional channel/levee complex within a mudrich, shelf-sourced submarine fan system. The cap, updip, and lateral seals to the reservoir are shale. The Alba reservoir is predominantly a homogeneous, fine-grained, unconsolidated sandstone. The average reservoir porosity is 33% and the average permeability is 2.8 d. Oil in place is estimated to be 1.1 billion bbl of 20{degree} API crude.

  12. Alba field - middle Eocene deep-water channel in U. K. North Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, S.R.; Bretthauer, H.H.; Mattingly, G.A.

    1989-03-01

    The Alba field is located in the Witch Ground graben between the Fladen Ground spur to the north and the Renee Ridge to the south, entirely in UKCS Block 16/26. In 1985, oil was discovered in the middle Eocene sands of the Horda formation at a depth of 6100 ft subsea. Twelve additional wells, including sidetracks, have been drilled appraise the discovery. This drilling indicates the Alba field is a stratigraphic trap covering an area of 3600 ac. The Alba sands represent a brief interruption in the hemipelagic sedimentation that dominated this part of the Witch Ground graben during the middle Eocene. Sediment was supplied intermittently from a shelf area to the northwest into a deep-water environment. Well correlations, seismic facies analysis, and core analysis indicate that these sands were deposited as part of a constructional channel/levee complex within a mud-rich, shelf-sourced submarine fan system. The cap and the updip and lateral seals to the reservoir are shale. The Alba reservoir is predominantly a homogeneous, fine-grained, unconsolidated sand. The average reservoir porosity is 33% and the average permeability is 2.8 darcys. Oil in place is estimated to be 1.1 billion bbl of 20/degrees/ API crude.

  13. RESPONSE OF CONIFER SEEDLINGS TO MEADOWFOAM (LIMNANTHES ALBA L.) SEED MEAL

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Meadowfoam (Limnanthes alba L.) is grown in Oregon because of its high quality seed oil used in cosmetics and lubricants. The seed meal (MSM) remaining after oil extraction has been shown to have plant growth-stimulating properties as well as glucosinolates that can release biocidal breakdown produ...

  14. Microsatellite markers for the invasive plant species white sweetclover (Melilotus alba) and yellow sweetclover (Melilotus officinalis)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We describe specific primers and conditions to amplify eight tetranucleotide, one trinucleotide, and one dinucleotide microsatellite DNA loci isolated from an enriched genomic library of Melilotus alba, an invasive plant species throughout North America. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 2...

  15. BBC ALBA's Contributions to Gaelic Language Planning Efforts for Reversing Language Shift

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milligan, Lindsay; Chalmers, Douglas; Danson, Mike; Lang, Alison

    2011-01-01

    BBC ALBA is the first dedicated Gaelic-medium television channel in history. It launched in September 2008 and, in late 2010, announced that it would be carried on Freeview, in addition to Sky, Freesat, and BBC iPlayer, thereby widening access to Gaelic throughout Scotland. The channel is a BBC-licensed service that is presently operated as a…

  16. Pacific Northwest Condiment Yellow Mustard (Sinapis alba L.) Grower Guide: 2000-2002

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, J.; Davis, J. B.; Esser, A.

    2005-07-01

    This report is a grower guide for yellow mustard. Yellow mustard (Sinapis alba L.), synonymous with white mustard, is a spring annual crop and well adapted to hot, dry growing conditions. It has shown potential as an alternative crop in rotations with small grain cereals and has fewer limitations compared to other traditional alternative crops.

  17. Activity of meadowfoam (Limnanthes alba) seed meal glucolimnanthin degradation products against soilborne pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Meadowfoam (Limnanthes alba L.) is a herbaceous winter-spring annual grown as a commercial oilseed crop. The meal remaining after oil extraction from the seed contains up to 4% of the glucosinolate glucolimnanthin. Degradation of glucolimnanthin yields toxic breakdown products, and therefore the mea...

  18. On the Dangers of Rosy Lenses: Reply to Alba, Kasinitz and Waters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haller, William; Portes, Alejandro; Lynch, Scott M.

    2011-01-01

    This article responds to the Alba, Kasinitz and Waters' commentary on the authors' article. The authors state that not all kids are doing "all right," and the substantial number at risk of social and economic stagnation or downward mobility looms as a significant social problem. They contend it is true that right-wing commentators may pick on…

  19. Rejoinder: On the Dangers of Rosy Lenses--"Reply to Alba, Kasinitz and Waters"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haller, William; Portes, Alejandro; Lynch, Scott M.

    2011-01-01

    We commend the measured tone and clearly stated arguments in Alba, Kasinitz and Waters' commentary on our article. It is particularly welcome because, in combination with our own conclusions, it lays out before the relevant audiences the substance of the debate in this field. Based on the commentary's opening statement, it would appear that there…

  20. Chemical characterization of Lippia alba essential oil: an alternative to control green molds

    PubMed Central

    Glamočlija, Jasmina; Soković, Marina; Tešević, Vele; Linde, Giani Andrea; Colauto, Nelson Barros

    2011-01-01

    The essential oil of Lippia alba is reported as an antifungal against human pathogenic microorganisms but few articles report its use as an alternative to synthetic fungicides on green mould control. The objective of this study was to determine chemical characteristics of L. alba essential oil and its antifungal activity against green molds as an alternative to synthetic fungicides. Essential oil was extracted by Clevenger hydrodistillation, characterized by GC-MS analysis, and the structure of the main compounds confirmed by 1H and 13C-NMR spectroscopy. Microdilution assays evaluated the essential oil minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC). Commercial fungicides Ketoconazole and Bifonazole were used as control. Essential oil yield is of 0.15% and the major components are neral (33.32%) and geranial (50.94%). The L. alba essential oil has MIC of 0.300–1.250 mg/mL and MFC of 0.600–1.250 mg/mL. Ketoconazole and Bifonazole show MIC ranging from 0.025–0.500 to 0.100–0.200 mg/mL, and MFC ranging from 0.250–0.100 to 0.200–0.250 mg/mL, respectively. L. alba essential oil is classified as citral type and the results indicate that it is a potential alternative to synthetic fungicides. PMID:24031788

  1. You Need Company in the Dark: Building the House of Bernarda Alba at HMP Holloway Prison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Rachel Marie-Crane

    2003-01-01

    This article is about the production of The House of Bernarda Alba in Her Majesty's Prison Holloway in London England. It is written from a personal perspective and focuses on the following topics, collaboration, a brief comparison of prison life in the US and the UK, the successful and unsuccessful experiences of participants, and their insights…

  2. Mustard (Sinapis alba) Seed Meal Suppresses Weeds in Container Grown Ornamentals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mustard seed meal is a byproduct of mustard (Sinapis alba L.) grown and oil production. Developing new uses for mustard seed meal could increase the profitability of growing mustard. Seed meal of mustard, var. ‘IdaGold’ was applied to the soil surface to evaluate its effect on several common weeds...

  3. Diversity in seed production characteristics within the USDA-ARS Limnanthes alba germplasm collection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Meadowfoam (L. alba) seeds are a source of long chain fatty acids which are stable under diverse environmental conditions. The fatty acid composition makes the oil valuable for use in cosmetics, lubricants, rubber additives, and plastics. While a few meadowfoam cultivars have been developed, high se...

  4. Chemical characterization of Lippia alba essential oil: an alternative to control green molds.

    PubMed

    Glamočlija, Jasmina; Soković, Marina; Tešević, Vele; Linde, Giani Andrea; Colauto, Nelson Barros

    2011-10-01

    The essential oil of Lippia alba is reported as an antifungal against human pathogenic microorganisms but few articles report its use as an alternative to synthetic fungicides on green mould control. The objective of this study was to determine chemical characteristics of L. alba essential oil and its antifungal activity against green molds as an alternative to synthetic fungicides. Essential oil was extracted by Clevenger hydrodistillation, characterized by GC-MS analysis, and the structure of the main compounds confirmed by (1)H and (13)C-NMR spectroscopy. Microdilution assays evaluated the essential oil minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC). Commercial fungicides Ketoconazole and Bifonazole were used as control. Essential oil yield is of 0.15% and the major components are neral (33.32%) and geranial (50.94%). The L. alba essential oil has MIC of 0.300-1.250 mg/mL and MFC of 0.600-1.250 mg/mL. Ketoconazole and Bifonazole show MIC ranging from 0.025-0.500 to 0.100-0.200 mg/mL, and MFC ranging from 0.250-0.100 to 0.200-0.250 mg/mL, respectively. L. alba essential oil is classified as citral type and the results indicate that it is a potential alternative to synthetic fungicides. PMID:24031788

  5. Biodiesel from Meadowfoam (Limnanthes alba L.) Seed Oil: Exceptional Oxidative Stability and Unusual Fatty Acid Composition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Meadowfoam (Limnanthes alba L.) seed oil methyl esters (MFME), prepared by a standard transesterification procedure using methanol and sodium methoxide catalyst from refined meadowfoam oil (MFO), were evaluated as a potential biodiesel fuel. MFME contains the unusual 5(Z)-eicosenoate (64.2 wt %) an...

  6. [In vitro evaluation of antileishmania activity of Artemisia herba alba Asso].

    PubMed

    Hatimi, S; Boudouma, M; Bichichi, M; Chaib, N; Idrissi, N G

    2001-03-01

    Aqueous extract and essential oil of Artemisia herba-alba Asso were tested for their antileshmanial activity again Leishmania tropica and Leishmania major. The strongest leishmanicidal activity was observed with the essential oil at 2 micrograms/ml as versus the other two strains tested. The aqueous extract showed an antileshmanial activity at 4 micrograms/ml. PMID:11346978

  7. Channel geometry and discharge estimates for Dao and Niger Valles, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musiol, S.; van Gasselt, S.; Neukum, G.

    2008-09-01

    Introduction The outflow channels Dao and Niger Valles are located at the eastern rim of the 2000-km diameter Hellas Planitia impact basin, in a transition zone with ancient cratered terrain and the volcanoes Hadriaca and Tyrrhena Patera (Hesperia Planum) on the one hand and fluvial, mass-wasting and aeolian deposits on the other hand [1]. Dao and Niger have alcove-shaped source regions similar to the chaotic terrains found in the Margaritifer Terra region, with flat floors, landslide morphologies and small, chaotically distributed isolated mounds. As [2] pointed out, the intrusion of volcanic material could be responsible for the release of pressurized water that can carry loose material away. This process could than have created a depression and an associated outflow channel. In contrast to [2] who made their calculations for Aromatum Chaos and Ravi Vallis, we have focused on Dao and Niger Valles for investigation, since they are spatially related to the nearby Hadriaca Patera. Heat-triggered outflow events seem likely. We follow the generally accepted assumption that water was the main erosional agent [3]. Furthermore we take into account that multiple floods with different volumes are more likely than a single event because of repressurization of an aquifer [4]. Background Hadriaca Patera Hadriaca Patera is among the oldest central-vent volcanoes on Mars, a low-relief volcano with a central caldera complex which consists predominantly of pyroclastic material. The erosional structure of degraded valleys on its flanks is indicative of dissection by a combination of groundwater sapping and surface runoff, attributed to a hydromagmatic eruption scenario [5]. Dao Vallis Dao Vallis is interpreted as collapse region of volcanic and sedimentary plains that have been eroded by surface and subsurface flow [5]. The approximately radial alignment to Hellas is interpreted as following deep-seated structural weakness zones generated by the impact. Small grabens and fractures

  8. Tectonic Evolution of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Roger J.

    1992-01-01

    The Final Technical Report on tectonic evolution of Mars is presented. Two papers and an abstract are included. Topics addressed include: scientific rationale and requirements for a global seismic network on Mars, permanent uplift in magmatic systems with application to the Tharsis Region of Mars, and the geophysical signal of the Martian global dichotomy.

  9. Rotorcraft as Mars Scouts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, L. A.; Aiken, E. W.; Gulick, V.; Mancinelli, R.; Briggs, G. A.; Rutkowski, Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A new approach for the robotic exploration of Mars is detailed in this paper: the use of small, ultralightweight, autonomous rotary-wing aerial platforms. Missions based on robotic rotorcraft could make excellent candidates for NASA Mars Scout program. The paper details the work to date and future planning required for the development of such 'Mars rotorcraft.'

  10. 1 Main Street, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Located outside StenniSphere, the visitor center at John C. Stennis Space Center, 1 Main Street Mars is a model of how a habitat on Mars might look. Complete with thermometers, scales and clocks set to Martian equivalents, this exhibit shows how very different life on Mars can be.

  11. Mars: The Viking Discoveries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    French, Bevan M.

    This booklet describes the results of NASA's Viking spacecraft on Mars. It is intended to be useful for the teacher of basic courses in earth science, space science, astronomy, physics, or geology, but is also of interest to the well-informed layman. Topics include why we should study Mars, how the Viking spacecraft works, the winds of Mars, the…

  12. Mars: 2010 - 2020

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Fuk K.

    2006-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the Mars Exploration program for the current decade and beyond. The potential items for procurements for the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) are discussed, as well as future technology investments to enable to continued development of exploration of Mars by rovers and orbiters that are planned and envisioned for future missions.

  13. Are sinuous ridges in the equatorial Rahway Vallis region of Mars fluvioglacial in origin?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsdale, Jason D.; Balme, Matt R.; Conway, Susan J.; Gallagher, Colman

    2013-04-01

    A suite of elongate, branching positive relief landforms has been observed around Rahway Vallis, south-west of Orcus Patera, Mars. They are typically 10 to 150 metres across, and several to tens of kilometres in length. We have observed that these forms occur both individually and as part of complex systems incorporating various cross-cutting, anastomosing and branching patterns. This study forms part of a larger debate as to whether fluvioglacial processes, as opposed to igneous activity, shaped the landscapes in the Elysium Planitia region. The similarity of some of these positive relief branching forms to inverted channels, or perhaps even relict sub-glacial fluvial systems (eskers) suggests an alternative fluvioglacial hypothesis to formation by volcanic processes. Interestingly, if these are esker-like forms then glacial activity in this region was "wet-based", so there should be other characteristic landforms visible. To address this idea, we are conducting a new mapping study of sinuous ridges in the region around Rahway Vallis to assess whether they are more consistent in morphology with formation by igneous or fluvioglacial processes. The survey is being performed using orbital images from the Context Camera (CTX) on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter and elevation data from the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA). Our mapping has shown that many of the ridges form convergent, contributory networks. The ridges are spatially associated with kilometre-wide shallow channels and are found at a nearly constant elevation of -3000m above Mars Datum. Our preliminary interpretation is that these ridges are depositional landforms with multiple sources, and therefore could be sub-glacial (eskers), or inverted fluvial channels. The associated larger channels could be higher order fluvial channels, with the ridges and wide-channels together forming part of a larger drainage network.

  14. Mars Drilling Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandell, Humboldt, C., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the current status of work to explore Mars beneath the surface of planet. One of the objective of this work is to enable further exploration of Mars by humans. One of the requirements for this is to find water on Mars. The presences of water is critical for Human Exploration and a permanent presence on Mars. If water is present beneath the surface it is the best chance of finding life on Mars. The presentation includes a timeline showing the robotic missions, those that have already been on Mars, and planned missions, an explanation of why do we want to drill on Mars, and some of the challenges, Also include are reviews of a missions that would drill 200 and 4,000 to 6,000 meters into the Martian bedrock, and a overview description of the drill. There is a view of some places where we have hopes of finding water.

  15. Solar Power on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This chart illustrates the variation in available solar power for each of NASA's twin Mars Exploration Rovers over the course of approximately two Mars years. Two factors affect the amount of available power: the tilt of Mars' axis and the eccentricity of the Mars' orbit about the sun.

    The horizontal scale is the number of Martian days (sols) after the Jan. 4, 2004, (Universal Time) landing of Spirit at Mars' Gusev Crater. The vertical scale on the right indicates the amount of available solar power as a ratio of the amount available at the equator when Mars is closest to the sun (perihelion). The red line indicates power availability at Spirit's landing site (Gusev). The blue line indicates power availability at Opportunity's landing site (Meridiani).

    The vertical scale on the right applies to the dotted line, indicating the latitude north or south of Mars' equator where the noon sun is overhead at different times of the Martian year.

  16. Mars transportation system synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Archie C.; Mulqueen, John A.; Emrich, William J.

    Performance and requirements synthesized to support the manned Mars mission of the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) are presented. Emphasis is placed on the Mars transportation system (MTS), which uses nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) propulsion technology associated with accomplishing the manned Mars mission. Data are also presented for a propulsion system options comparison of chemical/aerobrake and nuclear electric propulsion systems. Vehicle- and weight-scaling are used to determine the MTS mass, size, and performance range required for different Mars mission durations. The split sprint, opposition, and conjunction class mission modes are employed to determine the MTS requirements envelope. MTS sensitivity to Mars surface payload, crew size, Mars orbit payload, NTR engine thrust level, engine specific impulse, and NTR engine thrust-to-weight ratio are synthesized. A suggested NTR technology level to accomplish both cargo and piloted Mars missions is discussed.

  17. Small-scale volcanoes on Mars: distribution and types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broz, Petr; Hauber, Ernst

    2015-04-01

    Volcanoes differ in sizes, as does the amount of magma which ascends to a planetary surface. On Earth, the size of volcanoes is anti-correlated with their frequency, i.e. small volcanoes are much more numerous than large ones. The most common terrestrial volcanoes are scoria cones (Mars is a planet which was volcanically active over most (if not all) of its history, a similar distribution of volcano size might be expected. Martian small-scale volcanoes were not intensely studied for a long time due to a lack of high-resolution data enabling their proper identification; however their existence and basic characteristics were predicted on theoretical grounds. Streams of new high-resolution images now enable discovering and studying kilometer-size volcanoes with various shapes in unprecedented detail. Several types of small-scale volcanoes in various regions on Mars were recently described. Scoria cones provide a record of magmatic volatile content and have been identified in Tharsis (Ulysses Colles), on flanks of large volcanoes (e.g., Pavonis Mons), in the caldera of Ulysses Patera, in chaotic terrains or other large depressions (Hydraotes Colles, Coprates Chasma) and in the northern lowlands. Tuff rings and tuff cones, formed as a result of water-magma interaction, seem to be relatively rare on Mars and were only tentatively identified in three locations (Nepenthes/Amenthes region, Arena Colles and inside Lederberg crater), and alternative interpretations (mud volcanoes) seem possible. Other relatively rare volcanoes seem to be lava domes, reported only from two regions (Acracida Planitia and Terra Sirenum). On the other hand, small shields and rootless cones (which are not primary volcanic landforms) represent widely spread phenomena recognized in Tharsis and Elysium. Based on these new observations, the distribution of small volcanoes on Mars seems to be much more widespread than anticipated a decade

  18. Enhancement of Shelf Life of Button Mushroom, Agaricus bisporus (Higher Basidiomycetes) by Fumigant Application of Lippia alba Essential Oil.

    PubMed

    Vishwakarma, Pratima; Pandey, Abhay K; Mishra, Priyanka; Singh, Pooja; Tripathi, N N

    2015-01-01

    Eleven essential oils isolated from higher plant species were assessed against the four isolates of Verticillium fungicola found on fruiting bodies of Agaricus bisporus. Eucalyptus citriodora and Lippia alba oils were more efficacious and completely inhibited the mycelial growth of fungal isolates. L. alba oil was fungistatic and fungicidal at 10- and 20-µL concentrations against all of the isolates, respectively, and was more potent than E. citriodora oil as well as some prevalent synthetic fungicides such as benomyl, ethylene dibromide, and phosphine. Eighty microliters of L. alba oil protected 500 g of fruiting bodies of A. bisporus for up to 7 d from infection of the fungus under in vivo conditions. The findings strengthen the possibility of L. alba oil as a plant-based protectant to enhance the shelf life of A. bisporus fruiting bodies. PMID:25746409

  19. Arecibo radar imagery of Mars: The major volcanic provinces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmon, John K.; Nolan, Michael C.; Husmann, Diana I.; Campbell, Bruce A.

    2012-08-01

    We present Earth-based radar images of Mars obtained with the upgraded Arecibo S-band (λ = 12.6 cm) radar during the 2005-2012 oppositions. The imaging was done using the same long-code delay-Doppler technique as for the earlier (pre-upgrade) imaging but at a much higher resolution (˜3 km) and, for some regions, a more favorable sub-Earth latitude. This has enabled us to make a more detailed and complete mapping of depolarized radar reflectivity (a proxy for small-scale surface roughness) over the major volcanic provinces of Tharsis, Elysium, and Amazonis. We find that vast portions of these regions are covered by radar-bright lava flows exhibiting circular polarization ratios close to unity, a characteristic that is uncommon for terrestrial lavas and that is a likely indicator of multiple scattering from extremely blocky or otherwise highly disrupted flow surfaces. All of the major volcanoes have radar-bright features on their shields, although the brightness distribution on Olympus Mons is very patchy and the summit plateau of Pavonis Mons is entirely radar-dark. The older minor shields (paterae and tholi) are largely or entirely radar-dark, which is consistent with mantling by dust or pyroclastic material. Other prominent radar-dark features include: the "fan-shaped deposits", possibly glacial, associated with the three major Tharsis Montes shields; various units of the Medusae Fossae Formation; a region south and west of Biblis Patera where "Stealth" deposits appear to obscure Tharsis flows; and a number of "dark-halo craters" with radar-absorbing ejecta blankets deposited atop surrounding bright flows. Several major bright features in Tharsis are associated with off-shield lava flows; these include the Olympus Mons basal plains, volcanic fields east and south of Pavonis Mons, the Daedalia Planum flows south of Arsia Mons, and a broad expanse of flows extending east from the Tharsis Montes to Echus Chasma. The radar-bright lava plains in Elysium are

  20. Cars on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.

    2002-01-01

    Mars is one of the most fascinating planets in the solar system, featuring an atmosphere, water, and enormous volcanoes and canyons. The Mars Pathfinder, Global Surveyor, and Odyssey missions mark the first wave of the Planet Earth's coming invasion of the red planet, changing our views of the past and future of the planet and the possibilities of life. Scientist and science-fiction writer Geoffrey A. Landis will present experiences on the Pathfinder mission, the challenges of using solar power on the surface of Mars, and present future missions to Mars such as the upcoming Mars Twin Rovers, which will launch two highly-capable vehicles in 2003 to explore the surface of Mars.

  1. Sample Analysis At Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinckerhoff, W. B.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Cabane, M.; Atreya, S. K.; Coll, P.; Cornish, T. J.; Harpold, D. N.; Israel, G.; Niemann, H. B.; Owen, T.

    2003-01-01

    The next landed missions to Mars, such as the planned Mars Science Laboratory and ExoMars, will require sample analysis capabilities refined well beyond what has been flown to date. A key science objective driving this requirement is the determination of the carbon inventory of Mars, and particularly the detection of organic compounds. While the gas chromatograph mass spectrometers (GCMS) on the Viking landers did not detect any indigenous organics in near surface fines, it is possible that these measurements were not representative of Mars on the whole. That is, those compounds to which the GC/MS was sensitive would likely not have survived the strong oxidative decomposition in the regolith at the landing sites in question. The near surface fines could very well contain a significant quantity of refractory compounds that would not have been volatilized in the sample ovens on Viking. It is also possible that volatile organics exist on Mars in sedimentary, subsurface, or polar niches.

  2. Sample Analysis at Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinckerhoff, W. B.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Cabane, M.; Atreya, S. K.; Coll, P.; Cornish, T. J.; Harpold, D. N.; Israel, G.; Niemann, H. B.; Owen, T.

    2003-01-01

    The next landed missions to Mars, such as the planned Mars Science Laboratory and ExoMars, will require sample analysis capabilities refined well beyond what has been flown to date. A key science objective driving this requirement is the determination of the carbon inventory of Mars, and particularly the detection of organic compounds. While the gas chromatograph mass spectrometers (GC/MS) on the Viking landers did not detect any indigenous organics in near surface fines, it is possible that these measurements were not representative of Mars on the whole. That is, those compounds to which the GC/MS was sensitive would likely not have survived the strong oxidative decomposition in the regolith at the landing sites in question. The near surface fines could very well contain a significant quantity of refractory compounds that would not have been volatilized in the sample ovens on Viking. It is also possible that volatile organics exist on Mars in sedimentary, subsurface, or polar niches.

  3. Mars Surface Habitability Options

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, A. Scott; Simon, Matthew; Smitherman, David; Howard, Robert; Toups, Larry; Hoffman, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on current habitability concepts for an Evolvable Mars Campaign (EMC) prepared by the NASA Human Spaceflight Architecture Team (HAT). For many years NASA has investigated alternative human Mars missions, examining different mission objectives, trajectories, vehicles, and technologies; the combinations of which have been referred to as reference missions or architectures. At the highest levels, decisions regarding the timing and objectives for a human mission to Mars continue to evolve while at the lowest levels, applicable technologies continue to advance. This results in an on-going need for assessments of alternative system designs such as the habitat, a significant element in any human Mars mission scenario, to provide meaningful design sensitivity characterizations to assist decision-makers regarding timing, objectives, and technologies. As a subset of the Evolvable Mars Campaign activities, the habitability team builds upon results from past studies and recommends options for Mars surface habitability compatible with updated technologies.

  4. Mars Solar Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Kerslake, Thomas W.; Jenkins, Phillip P.; Scheiman, David A.

    2004-01-01

    NASA missions to Mars, both robotic and human, rely on solar arrays for the primary power system. Mars presents a number of challenges for solar power system operation, including a dusty atmosphere which modifies the spectrum and intensity of the incident solar illumination as a function of time of day, degradation of the array performance by dust deposition, and low temperature operation. The environmental challenges to Mars solar array operation will be discussed and test results of solar cell technology operating under Mars conditions will be presented, along with modeling of solar cell performance under Mars conditions. The design implications for advanced solar arrays for future Mars missions is discussed, and an example case, a Martian polar rover, are analyzed.

  5. Mars elevation distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Sherman S. C.; Howington-Kraus, Annie E.; Ablin, Karyn K.

    1991-01-01

    A Digital Terrain Model (DTM) of Mars was derived with both Mercator and Sinusoidal Equal-Area projections from the global topographic map of Mars (scale 1:15 million, contour interval 1 km). Elevations on the map are referred to Mars' topographic datum that is defined by the gravity field at a 6.1-millibar pressure surface with respect to the center of mass of Mars. The DTM has a resolution at the equator of 1/59.226 degrees (exactly 1 km) per pixel. By using the DTM, the volumetric distribution of Mars topography above and below the datum has previously been calculated. Three types of elevation distributions of Mars' topography were calculated from the same DTM: (1) the frequency distribution of elevations at the pixel resolution; (2) average elevations in increments of 6 degrees in both longitude and latitude; and (3) average elevations in 36 separate blocks, each covering 30 degrees of latitude and 60 degrees of longitude.

  6. Quick trips to Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornung, R.

    1991-01-01

    The design of a Mars Mission Vehicle that would have to be launched by two very heavy lift launch vehicles is described along with plans for a mission to Mars. The vehicle has three nuclear engine for rocket vehicle application (NERVA) boosters with a fourth in the center that acts as a dual mode system. The fourth generates electrical power while in route, but it also helps lift the vehicle out of earth orbit. A Mars Ascent Vehicle (MAV), a Mars transfer vehicle stage, and a Mars Excursion Vehicle (MEV) are located on the front end of this vehicle. Other aspects of this research including aerobraking, heat shielding, nuclear thermal rocket engines, a mars mission summary, closed Brayton cycle with and without regeneration, liquid hydrogen propellant storage, etc. are addressed.

  7. Mars: The Viking discoveries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    French, B. M.

    1977-01-01

    An overview of the Viking Mars probe is presented. The Viking spacecraft is described and a brief history of the earlier observations and exploration of Mars is provided. A number of the Viking photographs of the Martian surface are presented and a discussion of the experiments Viking performed including a confirmation of the general theory of relativity are reported. Martian surface chemistry is discussed and experiments to study the weather on Mars are reported.

  8. Mars at Opposition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riddle, Bob

    2010-01-01

    On January 29, Mars will reach opposition, a point along its orbit around the Sun where Mars will be directly opposite from the Sun in a two-planet and Sun line-up with the Earth in between. At this opposition, the Earth and Mars will be separated by nearly 100 million km. An opposition is similar to a full Moon in that the planet at opposition…

  9. Evidence for explosive volcanism in Arabia Terra, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalski, Joseph; Bleacher, Jacob

    2014-05-01

    Several irregularly shaped craters located within Arabia Terra, Mars, represent a new type of volcanic construct and together constitute a previously unrecognized Martian igneous province. Similar to terrestrial supervolcanoes, these low-relief paterae exhibit a range of geomorphic features related to structural collapse, effusive volcanism and explosive eruptions. They were likely active in the Late Noachian or Early Hesperian and would have affected the climate, atmospheric composition, and regional surface geology at that time. Lavas extruded from these calderas contributed to the formation of enigmatic highland ridged plains in Arabia Terra, but these volcanoes do not exhibit shield-like topographic profiles related to the sustained, localized effusive eruption of basaltic lava. We suggest that the lack of a single edifice, the large volume of collapse within an associated with the calderas, and the association of the calderas with vast deposits friable clastic deposits all indicate that these volcanoes were dominated by explosive activity. Layered, friable deposits found throughout Arabia Terra have enigmatic origins, though these materials have been suggested to represent volcanic ash. Attempts to link the locations of various friable deposits in equatorial regions to known volcanic sources have demonstrated that this hypothesis is plausible, but a link between friable deposits and known volcanic sources in this particular region (Arabia Terra) has yet to emerge. We suggest that some of the layered, friable materials were sourced from calderas in Arabia Terra. Outgassed sulphur and water from these calderas would have contributed to the alteration of layered clastic materials in Arabia Terra, and perhaps throughout the equatorial region.

  10. Radar, visual and thermal characteristics of Mars: Rough planar surfaces

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaber, G.G.

    1980-01-01

    High-resolution Viking Orbiter images (10 to 15 m/pixel) contain significant information on Martian surface roughness at 25- to 100-m lateral scales, whereas Earth-based radar observations of Mars are sensitive to roughness at lateral scales of 1 to 30 m, or more. High-rms slopes predicted for the Tharsis-Memnonia-Amazonis volcanic plains from extremely weak radar returns (low peak radar cross section) are qualitatively confirmed by the Viking image data. Large-scale, curvilinear (but parallel) ridges on lava flows in the Memnonia Fossae region are interpreted as innate flow morphology caused by compressional foldover of moving lava sheets of possible rhyolite-dacite composition. The presence or absence of a recent mantle of fine-grained eolian material on the volcanic surfaces studied was determined by the visibility of fresh impact craters with diameters less than 50 m. Lava flows south and west of Arsia Mons, and within the large region of low thermal inertia centered on Tharsis Montes (H. H. Kieffer et al., 1977, J. Geophys. Res.82, 4249-4291), were found to possess such a recent mantle. At predawn residual temperatures ??? -10K (south boundary of this low-temperature region), lava flows are shown to have relatively old eolian mantles. Lava flows with surfaces modified by eolian erosion and deposition occur west-northwest of Apollinaris Patera at the border of the cratered equatorial uplands and southern Elysium Planitia. Nearby yardangs, for which radar observations indicate very high-rms slopes, are similar to terrestrial features of similar origin. ?? 1980.

  11. Three New Isoprenylated Flavonoids from the Root Bark of Morus alba.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jae-Woo; Park, Ji-Hae; Lee, Yeong-Geun; Seo, Kyeong-Hwa; Oh, Eun-Ji; Lee, Dae-Young; Lim, Dong-Wook; Han, Daeseok; Baek, Nam-In

    2016-01-01

    Phytochemical investigation of the root bark of Morus alba has led to the isolation and identification of three new isoprenylated flavonoids, namely sanggenon U (1), sanggenon V (2), and sanggenon W (3), along with four known isoprenylated flavonoids: euchrenone a₇ (4), sanggenon J (5), kuwanon E (6), and kuwanon S (7). All compounds were isolated by repeated silica gel (SiO₂), octadecyl SiO₂ (ODS), and Sephadex LH-20 open column chromatography. The structure of the compounds were determined based on spectroscopic analyses, including nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), mass spectrometry (MS), circular dichroism (CD), and infrared (IR). In addition, compounds 1-4 were isolated for the first time from the root bark of M. alba in this study. PMID:27563860

  12. Therapeutic activity of crude ethanolic extract of Artemisia herba alba against Trypanosoma evansi in rabbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awad, Fathy M.; Hasan, Zainal Abidin Abu; Osman, Abdinasir Yusuf; Ibrahim, Nazlina

    2013-11-01

    The present work was conducted to evaluate the antitrypanosomal efficacy of crude ethanolic extract (CEE) of the aerial parts of Artemisia herba alba against Trypanosoma evansi infection in an animal model. The results indicated low levels of parasitaemia in rabbits administered with crude ethanolic extract (CEE) compared to those from the negative control group. Similarly, there was also haematologically significant difference (p<0.05) where low mean levels of packed cell volume (PCV) was observed in Groups 1-4 respectively. In contrast, there was no statistically significant difference in almost all investigated parameters between positive control and treatment groups of animals. In conclusion, both CEE of A. herba-alba and Berenil® showed relatively a parasitaemia and normal haematological values in infected rabbits, thereby confirming their antiparasitic properties.

  13. The ALBA spectroscopic LEEM-PEEM experimental station: layout and performance

    PubMed Central

    Aballe, Lucia; Foerster, Michael; Pellegrin, Eric; Nicolas, Josep; Ferrer, Salvador

    2015-01-01

    The spectroscopic LEEM-PEEM experimental station at the CIRCE helical undulator beamline, which started user operation at the ALBA Synchrotron Light Facility in 2012, is presented. This station, based on an Elmitec LEEM III microscope with electron imaging energy analyzer, permits surfaces to be imaged with chemical, structural and magnetic sensitivity down to a lateral spatial resolution better than 20 nm with X-ray excited photoelectrons and 10 nm in LEEM and UV-PEEM modes. Rotation around the surface normal and application of electric and (weak) magnetic fields are possible in the microscope chamber. In situ surface preparation capabilities include ion sputtering, high-temperature flashing, exposure to gases, and metal evaporation with quick evaporator exchange. Results from experiments in a variety of fields and imaging modes will be presented in order to illustrate the ALBA XPEEM capabilities. PMID:25931092

  14. Isolation and identification of (3-methoxyphenyl)acetonitrile as a phytotoxin from meadowfoam (Limnanthes alba) seedmeal.

    PubMed

    Vaughn, S F; Boydston, R A; Mallory-Smith, C A

    1996-10-01

    Ethyl ether, ethanol, and water extracts of meadowfoam (Limnanthes alba Hartweg ex. Benth.) seedmeal were prepared and bioassayed against velvetleaf (Abutilon theophrasti Medicus) and wheat (Triticum aestivum L. "Cardinal"). Both the ethyl ether and ethanol fractions, but not the water extract, inhibited velvetleaf and wheat radicle elongation. Fractionation of the extracts indicated that (3-methoxyphenyl)acetonitrile (3-MPAN) was the active compound from both extracts, comprising >97% of the active ethanol fraction. 3-Methoxybenzyl isothiocyanate, which had been previously shown to be the major breakdown product of glucolimnanthin, the majorL. alba glucosinolate, was not detected in either extract. Radicle elongation of velvetleaf and wheat were inhibited by 3-MPAN with I50 (the concentration required to inhibit growth by 50%) values of approximately 4 × 10(-4) M (velvetleaf) and 7×10(-4) M (wheat). PMID:24227117

  15. Antibacterial activity of Phyllantus emblica, Coriandrum sativum, Culinaris medic, Lawsonia alba and Cucumis sativus.

    PubMed

    Khan, Dawood Ali; Hassan, Fouzia; Ullah, Hanif; Karim, Sabiha; Baseer, Abdul; Abid, Mobasher Ali; Ubaidi, Muhammad; Khan, Shujaat Ali; Murtaza, Ghulam

    2013-01-01

    Present study deals with the demonstration of the antibacterial activity of very common medicinal plants of Pakistani origin i.e., Phyllantus emblica, Coriandrum sativum, Culinaris medic, Lawsonia alba and Cucumis sativus. The extracts were prepared in crude form by the use of hydro-alcoholic solution and were screened for antibacterial activity against various bacterial species by disk diffusion method. Assay was performed using clinical isolates of B. cereus, S. aureus, P. aeruginosa and E. coli. Crude extract of Phyllantus emblica fruit exhibited strong activity against standard cultures of all studied bacteria. Lawsonia alba showed good activity against standard cultures of all the used microorganisms. Coriandrum sativum was effective only against Bacillus cereus, while Cucumis sativus and Culinaris medic showed poor activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa only. Hence, Phyllantus emblica exhibited strong antibacterial activity against a wide range of bacteria it means that Phyllantus emblica extract contains some compounds which have broad spectrum of bactericidal activity. PMID:24147363

  16. Derivation of uranium residual radioactive material guidelines for the former Alba Craft Laboratory site, Oxford, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Nimmagadda, M.; Faillace, E.; Yu, C.

    1994-01-01

    Residual radioactive material guidelines for uranium were derived for the former Alba Craft Laboratory site in Oxford, Ohio. This site has been identified for remedial action under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) of the US Department of Energy (DOE). Single nuclide and total uranium guidelines were derived on the basis of the requirement that the 50-year committed effective dose equivalent to a hypothetical individual who lives or works in the immediate vicinity of the former Alba Craft Laboratory site should not exceed a dose of 30 mrem/yr following remedial action for the current use and likely future use scenarios or a dose of 100 mrem/yr for less likely future use scenarios (Yu et al. 1993). The DOE residual radioactive material guideline computer code, RESRAD, which implements the methodology described in the DOE manual for implementing residual radioactive material guidelines, was used in this evaluation.

  17. Options for Mars exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchard, E. B.; Harrison, E. F.; Moore, J. W.

    1974-01-01

    The many possible post-Viking 1975 Mars mission options are explored. These include small atmospheric probe/landers (adaptations of the Venus Pioneer to Mars), repeat Vikings with and without science changes, long-life orbiters to provide coverage of both hemispheres for a full Martian year, small rovers deployed from the Viking lander with ranges of up to 1 km from it, large autonomous rovers, Mars sample-return missions and, finally, missions to the satellites of Mars, including sample return. The examination includes energy requirements and time frames.

  18. Mars Stratigraphy Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budney, C. J.; Miller, S. L.; Cutts, J. A.

    2000-01-01

    The Mars Stratigraphy Mission lands a rover on the surface of Mars which descends down a cliff in Valles Marineris to study the stratigraphy. The rover carries a unique complement of instruments to analyze and age-date materials encountered during descent past 2 km of strata. The science objective for the Mars Stratigraphy Mission is to identify the geologic history of the layered deposits in the Valles Marineris region of Mars. This includes constraining the time interval for formation of these deposits by measuring the ages of various layers and determining the origin of the deposits (volcanic or sedimentary) by measuring their composition and imaging their morphology.

  19. Alluvial Fans on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraal, E. R.; Moore, J. M.; Howard, A. D.; Asphaug, E. A.

    2005-01-01

    Moore and Howard [1] reported the discovery of large alluvial fans in craters on Mars. Their initial survey from 0-30 S found that these fans clustered in three distinct regions and occurred at around the +1 km MOLA defined Mars datum. However, due to incomplete image coverage, Moore and Howard [1]could not conduct a comprehensive survey. They also recognized, though did not quantitatively address, gravity scaling issues. Here, we briefly discuss the identification of alluvial fans on Mars, then consider the general equations governing the deposition of alluvial fans and hypothesize a method for learning about grain size in alluvial fans on Mars.

  20. Digital cartography of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batson, R. M.

    1987-01-01

    A medium-resolution Digital Image Model (DIM) of Mars is being compiled. A DIM is a mosaic of radiometrically corrected, photometrically modelled spacecraft images displaying accurate reflectance properties at uniform resolution, and geometrically tied to the best available control. The Mars medium-resolution DIM contains approximately 4700 Viking Orbiter image frames that were used to compile the recently completed 1:2,000,000-scale controlled photomosaic series of Mars. This DIM provides a planimetric control base to which all other Mars maps will be registered. A similar control base of topographic elevations (Digital Terrain Model, or DTM) is also being compiled. These products are scheduled for completion in 1989.

  1. A Mars base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soule, Veronique

    1989-01-01

    This study was initiated to provide an approach to the development of a permanently manned Mars base. The objectives for a permanently manned Mars base are numerous. Primarily, human presence on Mars will allow utilization of new resources for the improvement of the quality of life on Earth, allowing for new discoveries in technologies, the solar system, and human physiology. Such a mission would also encourage interaction between different countries, increasing international cooperation and leading to a stronger unification of mankind. Surface studies of Mars, scientific experiments in the multiple fields, the research for new minerals, and natural resource production are more immediate goals of the Mars mission. Finally, in the future, colonization of Mars will ensure man's perpetual presence in the universe. Specific objectives of this study were: (1) to design a Mars habitat that minimizes the mass delivered to the Mars surface, provides long-stay capability for the base crew, and accommodates future expansion and modification; (2) to develop a scenario of the construction of a permanently manned Mars base; and (3) to incorporate new and envisioned technologies.

  2. New Improvements in Magnetic Measurements Laboratory of the ALBA Synchrotron Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campmany, Josep; Marcos, Jordi; Massana, Valentí

    ALBA synchrotron facility has a complete insertion devices (ID) laboratory to characterize and produce magnetic devices needed to satisfy the requirements of ALBA's user community. The laboratory is equipped with a Hall-probe bench working in on-the-fly measurement mode allowing the measurement of field maps of big magnetic structures with high accuracy, both in magnetic field magnitude and position. The whole control system of this bench is based on TANGO. The Hall probe calibration range extends between sub-Gauss to 2 Tesla with an accuracy of 100 ppm. Apart from the Hall probe bench, the ID laboratory has a flipping coil bench dedicated to measuring field integrals and a Helmholtz coil bench specially designed to characterize permanent magnet blocks. Also, a fixed stretched wire bench is used to measure field integrals of magnet sets. This device is specifically dedicated to ID construction. Finally, the laboratory is equipped with a rotating coil bench, specially designed for measuring multipolar devices used in accelerators, such as quadrupoles, sextupoles, etc. Recent improvements of the magnetic measurements laboratory of ALBA synchrotron include the design and manufacturing of very thin 3D Hall probe heads, the design and manufacturing of coil sensors for the Rotating coil bench based on multilayered PCB, and the improvement of calibration methodology in order to improve the accuracy of the measurements. ALBA magnetic measurements laboratory is open for external contracts, and has been widely used by national and international institutes such as CERN, ESRF or CIEMAT, as well as magnet manufacturing companies, such as ANTEC, TESLA and I3 M. In this paper, we will present the main features of the measurement benches as well as improvements made so far.

  3. Cloning and Analysis of the Planosporicin Lantibiotic Biosynthetic Gene Cluster of Planomonospora alba

    PubMed Central

    Sherwood, Emma J.; Hesketh, Andrew R.

    2013-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of antibiotic resistance in bacterial pathogens has renewed focus on natural products with antimicrobial properties. Lantibiotics are ribosomally synthesized peptide antibiotics that are posttranslationally modified to introduce (methyl)lanthionine bridges. Actinomycetes are renowned for their ability to produce a large variety of antibiotics, many with clinical applications, but are known to make only a few lantibiotics. One such compound is planosporicin produced by Planomonospora alba, which inhibits cell wall biosynthesis in Gram-positive pathogens. Planosporicin is a type AI lantibiotic structurally similar to those which bind lipid II, the immediate precursor for cell wall biosynthesis. The gene cluster responsible for planosporicin biosynthesis was identified by genome mining and subsequently isolated from a P. alba cosmid library. A minimal cluster of 15 genes sufficient for planosporicin production was defined by heterologous expression in Nonomuraea sp. strain ATCC 39727, while deletion of the gene encoding the precursor peptide from P. alba, which abolished planosporicin production, was also used to confirm the identity of the gene cluster. Deletion of genes encoding likely biosynthetic enzymes identified through bioinformatic analysis revealed that they, too, are essential for planosporicin production in the native host. Reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) analysis indicated that the planosporicin gene cluster is transcribed in three operons. Expression of one of these, pspEF, which encodes an ABC transporter, in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) conferred some degree of planosporicin resistance on the heterologous host. The inability to delete these genes from P. alba suggests that they play an essential role in immunity in the natural producer. PMID:23475977

  4. Sinalbins A and B, phytoalexins from Sinapis alba: elicitation, isolation, and synthesis.

    PubMed

    Pedras, M S; Zaharia, I L

    2000-10-01

    The chemical structure and synthesis of sinalbin A is described. This cruciferous phytoalexin is produced by white mustard (Sinapis alba) after treatment with biotic and abiotic elicitors. In addition, a related metabolite, named sinalbin B, is present in extracts from elicited plants, but not in those from non-elicited controls. Sinalbin B, which was also synthesized, appears to be both a phytoalexin and a biosynthetic precursor of sinalbin A. PMID:11142844

  5. Influence of ultrasounds on some mechanical properties of fir wood (Abies alba Mill). Microscopic sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parpala, V.; Pastirnac, A.; Paraschiv, N.

    1974-01-01

    It was found that as a result of ultrasonic treatment fir wood (Abies alba Mill) shows the effects of homogenization, and the modulus of elasticity for static flexure drops on an average by 50% for 45 min of treatment. The drop is more pronounced for test pieces with 8 to 12 annual rings. Study of microscopic sections disclosed that early wood with one annual ring undergoes the most powerful effect.

  6. Exobiology and Future Mars Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckay, Christopher P. (Editor); Davis, Wanda, L. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    Scientific questions associated with exobiology on Mars were considered and how these questions should be addressed on future Mars missions was determined. The mission that provided a focus for discussions was the Mars Rover/Sample Return Mission.

  7. Characterization of a New Flavone and Tyrosinase Inhibition Constituents from the Twigs of Morus alba L.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Long; Tao, Guanjun; Chen, Jie; Zheng, Zong-Ping

    2016-01-01

    The twigs of Morus alba L. were found to show strong tyrosinase inhibition activity, and the responsible active components in the extract were further investigated in this study. A flavone, named morusone (1), and sixteen known compounds 2-17 were isolated from M. alba twigs and their structures were identified by interpretation of the corresponding ESI-MS and NMR spectral data. In the tyrosinase inhibitory test, the compounds steppogenin (IC50 0.98 ± 0.01 µM), 2,4,2',4'-tetrahydroxychalcone (IC50 0.07 ± 0.02 µM), morachalcone A (IC50 0.08 ± 0.02 µM), oxyresveratrol (IC50 0.10 ± 0.01 µM), and moracin M (8.00 ± 0.22 µM) exhibited significant tyrosinase inhibition activities, much stronger than that of the positive control kojic acid. These results suggest that M. alba twig extract should served as a good source of natural tyrosinase inhibitors for use in foods as antibrowning agents or in cosmetics as skin-whitening agents. PMID:27598113

  8. Odisolane, a Novel Oxolane Derivative, and Antiangiogenic Constituents from the Fruits of Mulberry (Morus alba L.).

    PubMed

    Lee, Seoung Rak; Park, Jun Yeon; Yu, Jae Sik; Lee, Sung Ok; Ryu, Ja-Young; Choi, Sang-Zin; Kang, Ki Sung; Yamabe, Noriko; Kim, Ki Hyun

    2016-05-18

    Mulberry, the fruit of Morus alba L., is known as an edible fruit and commonly used in Chinese medicines as a warming agent and as a sedative, tonic, laxative, odontalgic, expectorant, anthelmintic, and emetic. Systemic investigation of the chemical constituents of M. alba fruits led to the identification of a novel oxolane derivative, (R*)-2-((2S*,3R*)-tetrahydro-2-hydroxy-2-methylfuran-3-yl)propanoic acid (1), namely, odisolane, along with five known heterocyclic compounds (2-6). The structure of the new compound was elucidated on the basis of HR-MS, 1D and 2D NMR ((1)H-(1)H COSY, HSQC, HMBC, and NOESY) data analysis. Compound 1 has a novel skeleton that consists of 8 carbon units with an oxolane ring, which until now has never been identified in natural products. The isolated compounds were subjected to several activity tests to verify their biological function. Among them, compounds 1, 3, and 5 significantly inhibited cord formation in HUVECs. The action mechanism of compound 3, which had the strongest antiangiogenic activity, was mediated by decreasing VEGF, p-Akt, and p-ERK protein expression. These results suggest that compounds isolated from M. alba fruits might be beneficial in antiangiogenesis therapy for cancer treatment. PMID:27115720

  9. Flour from Prosopis alba cotyledons: A natural source of nutrient and bioactive phytochemicals.

    PubMed

    Cattaneo, F; Costamagna, M S; Zampini, I C; Sayago, J; Alberto, M R; Chamorro, V; Pazos, A; Thomas-Valdés, S; Schmeda-Hirschmann, G; Isla, M I

    2016-10-01

    The Prosopis alba seed is a waste material in the process to produce pod flour. To suggest a potential use of these seeds it is necessary to determine the nutritional, phytochemical and functional quality of cotyledon flour from Prosopis alba. This flour showed high level of proteins (62%), low content of total carbohydrate and fat. Free polyphenol (1150±20mg GAE/100g flour) and carotenoids (10.55±0.05mg β-CE/100g flour) compounds were the dominant compounds. The main identified constituents in the polyphenolic extracts were C- glycosyl flavones, including schaftoside, isoschaftoside, vicenin II, vitexin and isovitexin. The extract enriched in polyphenolic compounds exhibited ABTS(+) reducing capacity and scavenging activity of H2O2; and was able to inhibit phospholipase, lipoxygenase and cyclooxygenase, three pro-inflammatory enzymes. According to our results, the P. alba cotyledon flour could be considered as a new alternative in the formulation of functional foods or food supplements. PMID:27132827

  10. Improved Chemotherapeutic Activity by Morus alba Fruits through Immune Response of Toll-Like Receptor 4

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Bo Yoon; Kim, Seon Beom; Lee, Mi Kyeong; Park, Hyun; Kim, Sung Yeon

    2015-01-01

    Morus alba L. fruits have long been used in traditional medicine by many cultures. Their medicinal attributes include cardiovascular, hepatoprotective, neuroprotective and immunomodulatory actions. However, their mechanism of macrophage activation and anti-cancer effects remain unclear. The present study investigated the molecular mechanisms of immune stimulation and improved chemotherapeutic effect of M. alba L. fruit extract (MFE). MFE stimulated the production of cytokines, nitric oxide (NO) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and tumoricidal properties of macrophages. MFE activated macrophages through the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPKinase) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling pathways downstream from toll-like receptor (TLR) 4. MFE was shown to exhibit cytotoxicity of CT26 cells via the activated macrophages, even though MFE did not directly affect CT26 cells. In a xenograft mouse model, MFE significantly enhanced anti-cancer activity combined with 5-fluorouracil and markedly promoted splenocyte proliferation, natural killer (NK) cell activity, cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activity and IFN-γ production. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody levels were significantly increased. These results indicate the indirect anti-cancer activity of MFE through improved immune response mediated by TLR4 signaling. M. alba L. fruit extract might be a potential anti-tumor immunomodulatory candidate chemotherapy agent. PMID:26473845

  11. Composition, anti-quorum sensing and antimicrobial activity of essential oils from Lippia alba

    PubMed Central

    Olivero-Verbel, Jesus; Barreto-Maya, Ana; Bertel-Sevilla, Angela; Stashenko, Elena E.

    2014-01-01

    Many Gram-negative pathogens have the ability to produce N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs) as signal molecules for quorum sensing (QS). This cell-cell communication system allows them to coordinate gene expression and regulate virulence. Strategies to inhibit QS are promising for the control of infectious diseases or antibiotic resistant bacterial pathogens. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the anti-quorum sensing (anti-QS) and antibacterial potential of five essential oils isolated from Lippia alba on the Tn-5 mutant of Chromobacterium violaceum CV026, and on the growth of the gram-positive bacteria S. aureus ATCC 25923. The anti-QS activity was detected through the inhibition of the QS-controlled violacein pigment production by the sensor bacteria. Results showed that two essential oils from L. alba, one containing the greatest geranial:neral and the other the highest limonene:carvone concentrations, were the most effective QS inhibitors. Both oils also had small effects on cell growth. Moreover, the geranial/neral chemotype oil also produced the maximum zone of growth inhibition against S. aureus ATCC 25923. These data suggest essential oils from L. alba have promising properties as QS modulators, and present antibacterial activity on S. aureus. PMID:25477905

  12. [Optimization of extraction technology from Paeoniae Radix Alba using response surface methodology].

    PubMed

    Jin, Lin; Zhao, Wan-shun; Guo, Qiao-sheng; Zhang, Wen-sheng; Ye, Zheng-liang

    2015-08-01

    To ensure the stability of chemistry components and the convenience of operation, ultrasound method was chosen to study in this investigation. As the total common peaks area in chromatograms was set to be evaluation index, the influence on the technology caused by extraction time, ethanol concentration and liquid-to-solid ratio was studied by using single factor methodology, and the extraction technology of Paeoniae Radix Alba was optimized by using response surface methodology. The results showed that the extracting results were most affected by ethanol concentration; liquid-to-solid ratio came the second and extraction time thirdly. The optimum ultrasonic-assisted extraction conditions were as follow: the ultrasonic extraction time was 20.06 min, the ethanol concentration in solvent was 72.04%, and the liquid-to-solid ratio was 53.38 mL · g(-1), the predicted value of total common peaks area was 2.1608 x 10(8). Under the extraction conditions after optimization, the total common peaks area was 2.1422 x 10(8), and the relative deviation between the measured and predicted value was 0.86%, so the optimized extraction technology for Paeoniae Radix Alba is suitable and feasible. Besides, for the purpose of extracting more sufficiently and completely, the optimized extraction technology had more advantages than the extraction method recorded in the monogragh of Paeoniae Radix Alba in Chinese Pharmacopoeia, which will come true the assessment and utilization comprehensively. PMID:26677698

  13. Review of NASA's Planned Mars Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Contents include the following: Executive Summary; Introduction; Scientific Goals for the Exploration of Mars; Overview of Mars Surveyor and Others Mars Missions; Key Issues for NASA's Mars Exploration Program; and Assessment of the Scientific Potential of NASA's Mars Exploration Program.

  14. Mars exploration planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eppler, Dean B.; Buoni, Corinne; Niehoff, John

    1993-01-01

    Mars exploration planning is discussed which is based on three scientific objectives: to understand Mars' geologic and geophysical evolution; to understand the present state and past evolution of Martian climate, and to determine the state of present biological activity and past life. The plan assumes a 25-year planning horizon, from 1995-2020, and includes both broad-scale and local exploration capabilities.

  15. Viking Mars encounter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Various phases of planetary operations related to the Viking mission to Mars are described. Topics discussed include: approach phase, Mars orbit insertion, prelanding orbital activities, separation, descent and landing, surface operations, surface sampling and operations starting, orbiter science and radio science, Viking 2, Deep Space Network and data handling.

  16. Landing on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manning, Robert M.; Adler, Mark

    2005-01-01

    here have been five fully successful robotic landings on Mars. The systems used to deliver these robots to the surface have shown large design diversity and continue to evolve. How will future Mars landing systems evolve to eventually deliver precious human cargo? We do not yet know the answers, but current trends tell us an interesting and daunting tale.

  17. Plasma engineering for MARS

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, G.A.; Baldwin, D.E.; Barr, W.L.

    1983-03-24

    The two-year Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (MARS) has resulted in the conceptual design of a commercial, electricity-producing fusion reactor based on tandem mirror confinement. The physics basis for the MARS reactor was developed through work in two highly coupled areas of plasma engineering: magnetics and plasma performance.

  18. Volatiles on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jakosky, Bruce M.

    1988-01-01

    The long-term evolution of both the atmosphere and the surface of Mars can be understood by examining the history of volatiles in the Mars atmosphere, their non-atmospheric reservoirs, and the processes of exchange between the two. Clearly, the present state of both the surface and the atmosphere can only be seen, so that any inferences about the evolution of the climate system are just that, inferences. The processes which control the atmosphere and surface on a seasonal basis, however, are the same processes which can act on longer timescales; only the specific solar and atmospheric forcing will differ. Once the ability of each process to affect the seasonal behavior is understood, the long-timescale forcing may be applied to the various processes in order to clearly identify the ability of the processes to act over the entire history of Mars. The areas of surface-atmospheric interaction of Mars are addressed in the ongoing research. The climate system on Mars is controlled by processes involving the exchange between the surface and atmosphere, so it is important to understand the current behavior of those processes. This is especially so in light of the current interest in understanding Mars; the upcoming Mars Observer mission, and the potential for a future sample-return or human-exploration mission will focus emphasis on this area of Mars science.

  19. Moessbauer on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image taken at Meridiani Planum, Mars, by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows the rover's Moessbauer spectrometer (circular device in center), located on its instrument deployment device, or 'arm.' The image was acquired on the ninth martian day or sol of the rover's mission.

  20. Is Mars Red Hot?

    NASA Video Gallery

    What would it feel like if you could stand on Mars – toasty warm, or downright chilly? Find out more about the temperature on Mars in this 60-second video from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  1. Mars transfer vehicle studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodcock, Gordon

    1993-01-01

    Earth-to-Mars distances vary from 60 to 400 million kilometers over a 14-year cycle. This complicates Mars mission design as a function of calendar time. Stay times at Mars are also strongly driven by opportunities for a return flight path which are within the limits of delta-V associated with practical space vehicles. The biggest difference between Mars and lunar transfer missions is mission time, which grows from a few days for the moon, to as much as a few hundred days for Mars missions. As a result, modules for similarly sized crews must be much larger for Mars missions that for transfer to lunar orbit. Technology challenges for one Mars mission scenario analyzed by Boeing include aerobrakes, propulsion, and life support systems. Mission performance is very sensitive to aerobrake weight fraction and, as a result, there is an incentive to use high performance materials such as advanced composites and thermal protection systems. Lander aerobrake would be used twice (for both planetary capture and descent to the Mars surface), and it would need to survive temperatures up to 3500 degrees.

  2. Mars Exploratory Vehicles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canizo, Thea L.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Presents an activity in which students learn about the characteristics of the planet Mars. Challenges students to design and build a model of a robotic vehicle that can travel on the surface of Mars and accomplish an assigned task that will provide information useful for future manned trips to the planet. Outlines mission task cards and progress…

  3. Mars transfer vehicle studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodcock, Gordon

    1993-02-01

    Earth-to-Mars distances vary from 60 to 400 million kilometers over a 14-year cycle. This complicates Mars mission design as a function of calendar time. Stay times at Mars are also strongly driven by opportunities for a return flight path which are within the limits of delta-V associated with practical space vehicles. The biggest difference between Mars and lunar transfer missions is mission time, which grows from a few days for the moon, to as much as a few hundred days for Mars missions. As a result, modules for similarly sized crews must be much larger for Mars missions that for transfer to lunar orbit. Technology challenges for one Mars mission scenario analyzed by Boeing include aerobrakes, propulsion, and life support systems. Mission performance is very sensitive to aerobrake weight fraction and, as a result, there is an incentive to use high performance materials such as advanced composites and thermal protection systems. Lander aerobrake would be used twice (for both planetary capture and descent to the Mars surface), and it would need to survive temperatures up to 3500 degrees.

  4. Microscope on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image taken at Meridiani Planum, Mars by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows the rover's microscopic imager (circular device in center), located on its instrument deployment device, or 'arm.' The image was acquired on the ninth martian day or sol of the rover's mission.

  5. The Mars Millennium Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    The countdown to a new century provides a unique opportunity to engage America's youth in charting a course for the future. The Mars Millennium Project challenges students across the nation to design a community yet to be imagined for the planet Mars. This interdisciplinary learning project aims to encourage K-12 students in classrooms and youth…

  6. Rat on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image taken on Mars by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows the rover's rock abrasion tool, also known as 'rat' (circular device in center), located on its instrument deployment device, or 'arm.' The image was acquired on the ninth martian day or sol of the rover's mission.

  7. Mars Underground News.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edgett, K.

    Contents: Ten years Underground. Rover roundup (International Conference on Mobile Planetary Robots and Rover Roundup, Santa Monica, CA (USA), 29 Jan - 4 Feb 1997). Reaching the Red. Schedule of missions to Mars (as of April 1, 1997). Mars on the Web.

  8. The channels of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Victor R.

    1988-01-01

    The geomorphology of Mars is discussed, focusing on the Martian channels. The great flood channels of Mars, the processes of channel erosion, and dendritic channel networks, are examined. The topography of the Channeled Scabland region of the northwestern U.S. is described and compared to the Martian channels. The importance of water in the evolution of the channel systems is considered.

  9. Mars Human Exploration Objectives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, Geoff

    1998-01-01

    This paper reviews the objectives and other considerations of Human exploration of Mars. The objectives of human exploration of Mars are: (1) to learn how Mars is similar to, and different from, Earth; (2) to explore possible life, past and present; (3) to discover what Mars is like now from the perspective of Geoscience and geologic history; and (4) how did Mars form and how did its formation differ from Earth. Considerations of human Martian exploration involve: (1) having a capable base laboratory; (2) having long range transportation; (3) having operational autonomy of the crew, and the requirement of the crew to possess a range of new cognitive processes along with easy communications with terrestrial colleagues; and finally (4) creating the human habitat along with human factors which involve more than just survivability.

  10. Ionosphere of Mars observed by Mars Express.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubinin, Eduard; Fraenz, Markus; Andrews, Dave; Morgan, Dave

    2016-04-01

    The Martian ionosphere is studied at different solar zenith angles using the local electron number densities and total electron content (TEC) derived from the observations by MARSIS onboard Mars Express. The data are complemented by the ASPERA-3 observations which provide us with the information about upward/downward velocity of the low-energy ions and electron precipitation. We consider the Mars Express observations at different solar cycle intervals. Different factors which influence the ionosphere dynamics are analyzed. The focus is made on a role of the crustal magnetic field on the Martian ionosphere and its influence on ion escape.

  11. ESA's Mars Program: European Plans for Mars Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forget, Francois

    2005-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on the European Space Agency Mars Exploration Program is shown. The topics include: 1) History:Mars Exploration in Europe; 2) A few preliminary results from Mars Express; 3) A new instrument:Radar MARSIS; and 4) European Mars Exploration in the future?

  12. The influence of phosphorus nutritional status on the uptake of germanium in Panicum miliaceum and Brassica alba

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaden, Ute Susanne; Székely, Balázs; Wiche, Oliver

    2015-04-01

    In order to investigate the influence of the phosphorus nutritional status on the uptake of germanium (Ge) in biomass two species, white millet (Panicum miliaceum) and white mustard (Brassica alba) were grown and sampled in a greenhouse experiment. The cultivation took place on two different substrates. The plants were fertilized with different nutrient solutions which differed in their phosphate content, and artificial addition of Ge was held via the casting solution. During the test period, measurements of the pH value, electric conductivity, and phosphate content of the soil solution were conducted. To transfer germanium from soil and plant material in solution, melting and microwave digestion processes were done. The experiment showed that in both species the additional Ge supply also leads to an increasing germanium content in the aboveground plant material. The two species, however, behave differently in response to this Ge supply. Panicum miliaceum accumulates Ge in the above-ground parts of plants stem, leaf and fruit to a much greater extent than Brassica alba. On the other hand the Ge accumulation in the roots of both B. alba and P. miliaceum was very high. In case of B. alba the root content was found by far higher as compared to the other parts of the plant. The addition of phosphate in the system changes the behavior. Without additional Ge its natural uptake from soil decreases in both species but in B. alba it is more characteristic. Increasing Ge supply (for both species) leads to an increased Ge uptake, until it reaches a maximum, regardless of the presence of phosphate addition. Phosphate, on the other hand, has positive effects on Ge uptake only in the case of B. alba roots, and to a limited extent in roots of P. miliaceum. In addition, for Panicum miliaceum an increase of germanium mainly in the underground parts was achieved. A further addition of phosphate did not have a positive effect on a greater enrichment of germanium. Whereas in Brassica

  13. Ignimbrites of Amazonis Planitia region of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, D. H.; Tanaka, K. L.

    1982-01-01

    The terms ignimbrite and ash flow tuff are used to describe relatively thin but extensive sheets of material interpreted to be of pyroclastic origin and to consist of volcanic ash or pumice fragments. Criteria for distinguishing ignimbrites from other geologic materials are considered, and characteristics observed for rock units interpreted as ignimbrites in Amazonis Planitia are discussed. A series of rock units which are thought to represent ignimbrites have been mapped along an east-west border zone between the highland plateau and lowland plains of Amazonis Planitia. The area is roughly bounded by a triangle whose apices are the volcanoes Apollinaris Patera, Biblis Patera, and Olympus Mons. Attention is given to aspects of general geology, morphology and stratigraphy, and thickness and volume estimates. Correlations with other data are considered and some theoretical aspects of Martian ignimbrite emplacement are discussed.

  14. Growth rates of the infaunal bivalve Soletellina alba (Lamarck, 1818) (Bivalvia: Psammobiidae) in an intermittent estuary of southern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Ty G.; Fairweather, Peter G.

    2003-12-01

    Caging and a mark-recapture design were used to estimate the growth rate of the brittle, infaunal bivalve Soletellina alba in the Hopkins River estuary. The growth of both caged and uncaged individuals was monitored at three sites near the mouth of the estuary over 180 days. Growth rates did not differ for caged and uncaged bivalves, or for bivalves subject to different amounts of handling, or between sites. Growth did differ between consecutive time intervals, which was attributable to negligible growth occurring during the colder months of autumn/winter. Comparisons of the condition (as indicated by total mass for length 3) of S. alba were inconsistent between sites for caged and uncaged bivalves and for those subject to different amounts of handling. Soletellina alba is a rapidly growing bivalve with mean growth rates for the three time intervals being 0.04±0.002 mm day-1 in summer, 0.02±0.001 mm day-1 in autumn and 0.03±0.001 mm day-1 from summer to winter. Using existing literature, it was shown that a significant relationship exists between maximum shell length and onset of sexual maturity in bivalve molluscs. This relationship predicts that S. alba should reach the onset of sexual maturity at 15.8 mm length. Therefore, it appears that it may be possible for juvenile S. alba (<1 mm) to grow, reach sexual maturity and reproduce in between annual mass-mortality events caused by winter flooding.

  15. Third International Colloquium on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Abstracts of papers concerning the geology and geophysics of Mars, volcanism on Mars, the Mars atmosphere, and the long term history of the atmosphere-cap-regolith volatile regime are presented. Formation of the Mars surface, climatology, gravity and magnetism, atmospheric boundary layers, and interpretation of Viking imagery and Earth-based observations are considered.

  16. Geology and landscape evolution of the Hellas region of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanaka, Kenneth L.; Leonard, Gregory J.

    1995-01-01

    Hellas basin on Mars has been the site of volcanism, tectonism, and modification by fluvial, mass-wasting, and eolian processes over its more than 4-b.y. existence. Our detailed geologic mapping and related studies have resulted in the following new interpretations. The asymmetric distribution of highland massifs and other structures that define the uplifted basin rim suggest a formation of the basin by the impact of a low-angle bolide having a trajectory heading S60E. During the Late Noachian, the basin was infilled, perhaps by lava flows, that were sufficiently thick (greater than 1 km) to produce wrinkle ridges on the fill material and extensional faulting along the west rim of the basin. At about the same time, deposits buried northern Malea Planum, which are interpreted to be pyroclastic flows from Amphitrites and Peneus Paterae on the basis of their degraded morphology, topology, and the application of a previous model for pyroclastic volcanism on Mars. Peneus forms a distinctive caldera structure that indicates eruption of massive volumes of magma, whereas Amphitrites is a less distinct circular feature surrounded by a broad, low, dissected shield that suggests generally smaller volume eruptions. During the Early Hesperian, an approximately 1-to 2km-thick sequence of primarily fined-grained, eolian material was deposited on the floor of Hellas basin. Subsequently, the deposit was deeply eroded, except where armored by crater ejecta, and it retreated as much as 200-300 km along its western margin, leaving behind pedestal craters and knobby outliers of the deposit. Local debris flows within the deposit attest to concentrations of groundwater, perhaps in part brought in by outflow floods along the east rim of the basin. These floods may have deposited approximately 100-200m of sediment, subduing wrinkle ridges in the eastern part of the basin floor. During the Late Hesperian and Amazonian, eolian mantles were emplaced on the basin rim and floor and surrounding

  17. Geology and landscape evolution of the Hellas region of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanaka, Kenneth L.; Leonard, Gregory J.

    1995-01-01

    Hellas basin on Mars has been the site of volcanism, tectonism, and modification by fluvial, mass-wasting, and eolian processes over its more than 4-b.y. existence. Our detailed geologic mapping and related studies have resulted in the following new interpretations. The asymmetric distribution of highland massifs and other structures that define the uplifted basin rim suggest a formation of the basin by the impact of a low-angle bolide having a trajectory heading S 60 deg E. During the Late Noachian, the basin was infilled, perhaps by lava flows, that were sufficiently thick (>1 km) to produce wrinkle ridges on the fill material and extensional faulting along the west rim of the basin. At about the same time, deposits buried northern Malea Planum, which are interpreted to be pyroclastic flows from Amphitrites and Peneus Paterae on the basis of their degraded morphology, topography, and the application of a previous model for pyroclastic volcanism on Mars. Peneus forms a distinctive caldera structure that indicates eruption of massive volumes of magma, whereas Amphitrites is a less distinct circular feature surrounded by a broad, low, dissected shield that suggests generally smaller volume eruptions. During the Early Hesperian, an approx. 1- to 2-km-thick sequence of primarily fined-grained, eolian material was deposited on the floor of Hellas basin. Subsequently, the deposit was deeply eroded, except where armored by crater ejecta, and it retreated as much as 200-300 km along its western margin, leaving behind pedestal craters and knobby outliers of the deposit. Local debris flows within the deposit attest to concentrations of groundwater, perhaps in part brought in by outflow floods along the east rim of the basin. These floods may have deposited approx. 100-200 m of sediment, subduing wrinkle ridges in the eastern part of the basin floor. During the Late Hesperian and Amazonian, eolian mantles were emplaced on the basin rim and floor and surrounding highlands

  18. Mars Equipment Transport System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorrells, Cindy; Geiger, Michelle; Ohanlon, Sean; Pieloch, Stuart; Brogan, Nick

    1993-12-01

    Mechanical Engineering Senior Design Project 1 (ME4182) is a part of the NASA/University Advanced Design Program. Under this program, NASA allocates money and resources to students to be used in design work for a specified topic. The current topic is the exploration and colonization of Mars. The specific area in which we are to work is the transportation of the modules in which astronauts will live while on Mars. NASA is concerned about the weight of the module transferring system, as the shipping cost to Mars is quite expensive. NASA has specified that the weight of the system is to be minimized in order to reduce the shipping costs.

  19. Mars Equipment Transport System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorrells, Cindy; Geiger, Michelle; Ohanlon, Sean; Pieloch, Stuart; Brogan, Nick

    1993-01-01

    Mechanical Engineering Senior Design Project 1 (ME4182) is a part of the NASA/University Advanced Design Program. Under this program, NASA allocates money and resources to students to be used in design work for a specified topic. The current topic is the exploration and colonization of Mars. The specific area in which we are to work is the transportation of the modules in which astronauts will live while on Mars. NASA is concerned about the weight of the module transferring system, as the shipping cost to Mars is quite expensive. NASA has specified that the weight of the system is to be minimized in order to reduce the shipping costs.

  20. Mars tectonics and volcanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, Sean C.

    1990-01-01

    The focus of this research was on three broad areas: (1) the relation between lithospheric stress in the vicinity of a growing volcano and the evolution of eruption characteristics and tectonic faulting; (2) the relation between elastic lithosphere thickness and thermal structure; and (3) a synthesis of constraints on heat flow and internal dynamics on Mars. The two reports presented are: (1) Heterogeneities in the Thickness of the Elastic Lithosphere of Mars--Constraints on Heat Flow and Internal Dynamics; and (2) State of Stress, Faulting, and Eruption Characteristics of Large Volcanoes on Mars.

  1. Mars Observer's costly solitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Travis, John

    1993-09-01

    An evaluation is presented of the ramifications of the loss of contact with the Mars Observer spacecraft in August, 1993; the Observer constituted the first NASA mission to Mars in 17 years. It is noted that most, if not all of the scientists involved with the mission will have to find alternative employment within 6 months. The loss of the Observer will leave major questions concerning the geologic history of Mars, and its turbulent atmospheric circulation, unanswered. A detailed account of the discovery of the loss of communications, the unsuccessful steps taken to rectify the problem, and the financial losses incurred through the failure of the mission, are also given.

  2. Exobiology on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devincenzi, D. L. (Editor); Marshall, J. R. (Editor); Andersen, D. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    Descriptions of several instrument concepts that were generated during a workshop entitled, Exobiology Instrument Concepts for a Soviet Mars 94/94 Mission, held at NASA Ames Research Center in 1989 are presented. The objective was to define and describe instrument concepts for exobiology and related science that would be compatible with the mission types under discussion for the 1994 and 1996 Soviet Mars missions. Experiments that use existing technology were emphasized. The concepts discussed could also be used on U.S. missions that follow Mars Observer.

  3. Solar radiation on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appelbaum, Joseph; Flood, Dennis J.

    1989-01-01

    Detailed information on solar radiation characteristics on Mars are necessary for effective design of future planned solar energy systems operating on the surface of Mars. Presented here is a procedure and solar radiation related data from which the diurnally, hourly and daily variation of the global, direct beam and diffuse insolation on Mars are calculated. The radiation data are based on measured optical depth of the Martian atmosphere derived from images taken of the sun with a special diode on the Viking cameras; and computation based on multiple wavelength and multiple scattering of the solar radiation.

  4. Spectroscopic observation of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, R. B.

    1985-01-01

    A review is given of what is known about the surface of Mars from reflectance spectroscopy, including some new results and providing an overview of the principles involved. While some form of bound water and/or OH has been known on Mars for many years, a new result presented is the identification of structural OH in a dilute or poorly crystalline magnesian clay. The detection of water ice in the residual north polar cap is noted. Also considered is the role that reflectance spectroscopy will play in the future, from earth and as an important part of the NASA Mars Geosciences/Climatology Orbiter mission.

  5. Mars Aerocapture Systems Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Henry S.; Oh, David Y.; Westhelle, Carlos H.; Fisher, Jody L.; Dyke, R. Eric; Edquist, Karl T.; Brown, James L.; Justh, Hilary L.; Munk, Michelle M.

    2006-01-01

    Mars Aerocapture Systems Study (MASS) is a detailed study of the application of aerocapture to a large Mars robotic orbiter to assess and identify key technology gaps. This study addressed use of an Opposition class return segment for use in the Mars Sample Return architecture. Study addressed mission architecture issues as well as system design. Key trade studies focused on design of aerocapture aeroshell, spacecraft design and packaging, guidance, navigation and control with simulation, computational fluid dynamics, and thermal protection system sizing. Detailed master equipment lists are included as well as a cursory cost assessment.

  6. Airbag Tracks on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The circular shapes seen on the martian surface in these images are 'footprints' left by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's airbags during landing as the spacecraft gently rolled to a stop. Opportunity landed at approximately 9:05 p.m. PST on Saturday, Jan. 24, 2004, Earth-received time. The circular region of the flower-like feature on the right is about the size of a basketball. Scientists are studying the prints for more clues about the makeup of martian soil. The images were taken at Meridiani Planum, Mars, by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity.

  7. Solar radiation on Mars

    SciTech Connect

    Appelbaum, J.; Flood, D.J. )

    1990-01-01

    Detailed information on solar radiation characteristics on Mars are necessary for effective design of future planned solar energy systems operating on the surface of Mars. In this paper the authors present a procedure and solar radiation related data from which the diurnally, hourly and daily variation of the global, direct beam and diffuse insolation on Mars are calculated. The radiation data are based on measured optical depth of the Martian atmosphere derived from images taken of the sun with a special diode on the Viking cameras; and computation based on multiple wavelength and multiple scattering of the solar radiation.

  8. Human Exploration of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwynne, Owen; McKay, Chris; Zubrin, Robert

    1991-06-01

    Novel approaches to the human exploration of Mars are considered with emphasis on a space suit design, extraterrestrial surface mobility, and water supply. A possible way of transporting personnel on the surface of Mars uses a suborbital rocket that will hop from one site to the next, refuelling each time it lands and giving the Martian explorers effective global mobility. Telepresence could be used to avoid limiting the people on Mars to a small exploration area as a result of a lack of transportation infrastructure. Drawings and photographs are included.

  9. Comparison of polyglactin-910 and polydioxanone for closure of the linea alba following caudal ventral midline laparotomy in sheep

    PubMed Central

    Rousseau, Marjolaine; Anderson, David E.; Rozell, Timothy G.; Hand, Jacqelyn M.; Faris, Brian R.

    2015-01-01

    This study compared incisional complications after ventral midline laparotomy using 2 absorbable suture materials for apposition of the linea alba in sheep. The linea alba of 93 yearling sheep was sutured by 3 veterinarians in a simple continuous pattern using either polyglactin 910 (PG910; group PG) or polydioxanone (PDS; group PD). A blinded observer assessed surgical sites at the time of suture removal. Multivariate logistic regression was used to assess the association between incisional complications and variables (suture material used, veterinarian, skin suture removal time). The odds of incisional complications did not vary significantly with the type of suture material used (P = 0.11), veterinarian (P = 0.61) or skin suture removal time (P = 0.36). Most incisional complications were cutaneous suture sinus formation. Either PG910 or PDS may be used for linea alba closure in sheep. PMID:26345301

  10. Annotation and re-sequencing of genes from de novo transcriptome assembly of Abies alba (Pinaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Roschanski, Anna M.; Fady, Bruno; Ziegenhagen, Birgit; Liepelt, Sascha

    2013-01-01

    • Premise of the study: We present a protocol for the annotation of transcriptome sequence data and the identification of candidate genes therein using the example of the nonmodel conifer Abies alba. • Methods and Results: A normalized cDNA library was built from an A. alba seedling. The sequencing on a 454 platform yielded more than 1.5 million reads that were de novo assembled into 25149 contigs. Two complementary approaches were applied to annotate gene fragments that code for (1) well-known proteins and (2) proteins that are potentially adaptively relevant. Primer development and testing yielded 88 amplicons that could successfully be resequenced from genomic DNA. • Conclusions: The annotation workflow offers an efficient way to identify potential adaptively relevant genes from the large quantity of transcriptome sequence data. The primer set presented should be prioritized for single-nucleotide polymorphism detection in adaptively relevant genes in A. alba. PMID:25202477

  11. Uncorrected land-use planning highlighted by flooding: the Alba case study (Piedmont, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luino, F.; Turconi, L.; Petrea, C.; Nigrelli, G.

    2012-07-01

    Alba is a town of over 30 000 inhabitants located along the Tanaro River (Piedmont, northwestern Italy) and is famous for its wine and white truffles. Many important industries and companies are based in Alba, including the famous confectionery group Ferrero. The town suffered considerably from a flood that occurred on 5-6 November 1994. Forty-eight percent of the urban area was inundated, causing severe damage and killing nine people. After the flood, the Alba area was analysed in detail to determine the reasons for its vulnerability. Information on serious floods in this area since 1800 was gathered from official records, state technical office reports, unpublished documents in the municipal archives, and articles published in local and national newspapers. Maps, plans and aerial photographs (since 1954) were examined to reconstruct Alba's urban development over the last two centuries and the planform changes of the Tanaro River. The results were compared with the effects of the November 1994 flood, which was mapped from aerial photographs taken immediately after the flood, field surveys and eyewitness reports. The territory of Alba was subdivided into six categories: residential; public service; industrial, commercial and hotels; sports areas, utilities and standards (public gardens, parks, athletics grounds, private and public sport clubs); aggregate plants and dumps; and agriculture and riverine strip. The six categories were then grouped into three classes with different flooding-vulnerability levels according to various parameters. Using GIS, the three river corridors along the Tanaro identified by the Autorità di Bacino del Fiume Po were overlaid on the three classes to produce a final map of the risk areas. This study shows that the historic floods and their dynamics have not been duly considered in the land-use planning of Alba. The zones that were most heavily damaged in the 1994 flood were those that were frequently affected in the past and sites of

  12. Bassanite on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaniman, D. T.; Bish, D. L.; Chipera, S. J.

    2009-03-01

    There are several ways to desiccate gypsum on Mars and form bassanite but rehydration in presence of ice at cold, dry conditions tends to form only bassanite or gypsum plus bassanite. This product may provide a paleoclimate or paleogeothermal marker.

  13. Mars Balance Challenge

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Challenge is to develop ideas for how NASA can turn available entry, descent, and landing balance mass on a future Mars mission into a scientific or technological payload. Proposed concepts sho...

  14. Mars planimetric mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batson, R. M.; Bridges, P. M.; Lee, E. M.

    1985-04-01

    The 1:5,000,000 scale shaded relief maps of Mars originally compiled from Mariner 9 pictures are being upgraded by adding details visible on Viking Orbiter images. This work is done by modifying the original airbrush drawings; no attempt is made to reposition features according to the latest control nets. Thirteen of these maps have been published to date, two are in compilation, and two are in press. A hard cover atlas containing reduced scale versions of all Mars cartographic products will be published upon completion of the revisions of the 1:5,000,000 scale maps, the 1:2,000,000 scale photomosaics, and Mars color albedo mapping tasks. This atlas will supersede the existing Atlas of Mars prepared by Batson and others.

  15. Environment of Mars, 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, David I. (Compiler)

    1988-01-01

    A compilation of scientific knowledge about the planet Mars is provided. Information is divided into three categories: atmospheric data, surface data, and astrodynamic data. The discussion of atmospheric data includes the presentation of nine different models of the Mars atmosphere. Also discussed are Martian atmospheric constituents, winds, clouds, and solar irradiance. The great dust storms of Mars are presented. The section on Mars surface data provides an in-depth examination of the physical and chemical properties observed at the two Viking landing sites. Bulk densities, dielectric constants, and thermal inertias across the planet are then described and related back to those specific features found at the Viking landing sites. The astrodynamic materials provide the astronomical constants, time scales, and reference coordinate frames necessary to perform flightpath analysis, navigation design, and science observation design.

  16. Mars Exploration Zones

    NASA Video Gallery

    This concept animation shows just one of many potential concepts for how the first human landing site on Mars might evolve throughout the course of multiple human expeditions to the Red Planet over...

  17. Walking on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavagna, G. A.; Willems, P. A.; Heglund, N. C.

    1998-06-01

    Sometime in the near future humans may walk in the reduced gravity of Mars. Gravity plays an essential role in walking. On Earth, the body uses gravity to `fall forwards' at each step and then the forward speed is used to restore the initial height in a pendulum-like mechanism. When gravity is reduced, as on the Moon or Mars, the mechanism of walking must change. Here we investigate the mechanics of walking on Mars onboard an aircraft undergoing gravity-reducing flight profiles. The optimal walking speed on Mars will be 3.4 km h-1 (down from 5.5 km h-1 on Earth) and the work done per unit distance to move the centre of mass will be half that on Earth.

  18. Future Mars outpost architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, T. D.; Owens, J.; Easter, R. W.; Mireles, O. R.; Ramsey, S. A.; Palko, C. W.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes an outpost designed with the JPL Mars Long Range Planning Team's goals in mind. The design focuses on subsurface mapping and characterization, accomplished through seismic mapping and deep drilling.

  19. NASA's Mars Landings

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video shows the landing sites of all six NASA spacecraft to reachMars—Viking 1, Viking 2, Pathfinder, Spirit, Opportunity, Phoenix—and thetarget location where Curiosity will touch down ...

  20. Methane Plumes on Mars

    NASA Video Gallery

    Spectrometer instruments attached to several telescopes detect plumes of methane emitted from Mars during its summer and spring seasons. High levels of methane are indicated by warmer colors. The m...

  1. Mars Acoustic Anemometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banfield, D. J.

    2012-12-01

    We have developed a very high performance anemometer (wind gauge) for use at Mars. This instrument has great scientific as well as strategic reasons to be included on all future missions to the surface of Mars. We will discuss why we set out to develop this instrument, as well as why the previous wind sensors for Mars are insufficient to meet the scientific and strategic needs at Mars. We will also discuss how the instrument works, and how it differs from terrestrial counterparts. Additionally, we will discuss the current status of the instrument. Measuring winds at Mars is important to better understand the atmospheric circulation at Mars, as well as exchange between the surface and atmosphere. The main conduit of transport of water, and hence its current stability at any particular location on Mars is controlled by these atmospheric motions and the exchange between surface and atmosphere. Mars' large-scale winds are moderately well understood from orbital observations, but the interaction with the surface can only be addressed adequately in situ. Previous anemometers have been 2-D (with the exception of REMS on MSL) and slow response (typically <1Hz), and relatively low sensitivity/accuracy (>1 m/s). Our instrument is capable of fully 3-D measurements, with fast response (>20 Hz) and great sensitivity/accuracy (~3 cm/s). This significant step forward in performance is important for the surface-atmosphere exchanges of heat, momentum and volatiles. In particular, our instrument could directly measure the heat and momentum fluxes between surface and atmosphere using eddy-flux techniques proven terrestrially. When combined with a fast response volatile analysis instrument (e.g., a TLS) we can also measure eddy fluxes of volatile transport. Such a study would be nearly impossible to carry out with preceding anemometers sent to Mars with insufficient response time and sensitivity to adequately sample the turbulent eddies. Additionally, our instrument, using acoustics

  2. Mars Exploration Rover Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Barbara A.

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the Mars Exploration Rover Mission. The design of the Rover along with the Athena science payload is also described. Photographs of the Gusev Crater and Meridiani rocks are also shown.

  3. Mars Express & Co

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgeest, Ulf; Staude, Jakob; Kratzenber-Annies, Volker; Coradini, Marcello; Flury, Walter; Jaumann, Ralf; Neukum, Gerhard; Ongaro, Franco; Lemke, Dietrich; Althaus, Tilmann; Fuhrmeister, Birgit

    Contents: Europa und der übrige Kosmos. Der Weltraum und das öffentliche Interesse an ihm. Europa besucht Mars. INTEGRAL - Blick ins Herz der Galaxis. ISO - Von der Idee zum Instrument. Dienstreisen ins All. ENVISAT.

  4. Retrograde Motion of Mars.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knappenberger, Paul H.

    1979-01-01

    Presents an activity whereby students describe the path of Mars through a background starfield. Includes purpose, materials, pre-lab, and procedure. Also provides guidelines for making a dial-a-planet wheel. (MA)

  5. The conquest of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, L. W.

    1984-08-01

    Concepts for a manned mission to Mars have been examined as early as 1962. In 1969, NASA studies showed Apollo moon technology to be adequate for a 600-day flight with a proposed landing for 1982. However, financial drain, shifting economic priorities and a downgrading of the 'space race' in the late 1960s contributed to the downfall of the project. The successful Mariner and Viking missions of the 1970s have enhanced understanding of the planet, and in the wake of these flights, numerous studies have been made for future unmanned missions. Some suggested projects include a Mars Orbiter, sensor outposts, a mobile lander, A Mars' Air Force', and a return sample mission. Following a full unmanned reconnaissance of the planet, advances in space propulsion, refuelling and large scale construction, a manned voyage to Mars could be achieved.

  6. Environment of Mars, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, D.I.

    1988-10-01

    A compilation of scientific knowledge about the planet Mars is provided. Information is divided into three categories: atmospheric data, surface data, and astrodynamic data. The discussion of atmospheric data includes the presentation of nine different models of the Mars atmosphere. Also discussed are Martian atmospheric constituents, winds, clouds, and solar irradiance. The great dust storms of Mars are presented. The section on Mars surface data provides an in-depth examination of the physical and chemical properties observed at the two Viking landing sites. Bulk densities, dielectric constants, and thermal inertias across the planet are then described and related back to those specific features found at the Viking landing sites. The astrodynamic materials provide the astronomical constants, time scales, and reference coordinate frames necessary to perform flightpath analysis, navigation design, and science observation design.

  7. Mars' Inner Core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This figure shows a cross-section of the planet Mars revealing an inner, high density core buried deep within the interior. Dipole magnetic field lines are drawn in blue, showing the global scale magnetic field that one associates with dynamo generation in the core. Mars must have one day had such a field, but today it is not evident. Perhaps the energy source that powered the early dynamo has shut down. The differentiation of the planet interior - heavy elements like iron sinking towards the center of the planet - can provide energy as can the formation of a solid core from the liquid.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mars Surveyor Operations Project operates the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft with its industrial partner, Lockheed Martin Astronautics, from facilities in Pasadena, CA and Denver, CO. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  8. Internal constitution of Mars.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. L.

    1972-01-01

    Models of the internal structure of Mars consistent with the mass, radius and moment of inertia of the planet are constructed. The models assume that the radius of the core is between 0.36 and 0.60 of the radius of the planet, that the zero-pressure density of the mantle is between 3.54 and 3.49 g/cu cm, and that the planet contains 25 to 28% iron. Meteorite models of Mars containing 25 wt % iron and 12 wt % core are also proposed. It is maintained that Mars in contrast to the earth is an incompletely differentiated planet with a core substantially richer in sulfur than the core of the earth. The absence of a magnetic field on Mars is possibly linked with lack of lunar precessional torque and the small size and high resistivity of the Martian core.

  9. Explore Mars With Curiosity

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation shows the approximate true position of NASA’s Curiosityrover on Mars. A 3-D virtual model of Curiosity is shown inside GaleCrater, near Mount Sharp, Curiosity’s ultimate destin...

  10. The Cruise to Mars

    NASA Video Gallery

    The long journey to Mars through the harsh environment of spaceconfronts the Curiosity navigation team with a long list of challengesto get the spacecraft safely to its destination.› Mission site

  11. Protective effects of the Morus alba L. leaf extracts on cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in rat

    PubMed Central

    Nematbakhsh, M; Hajhashemi, V; Ghannadi, A; Talebi, A; Nikahd, M

    2013-01-01

    Cisplatin (CP) as an important anti-tumor drug causes nephrotoxicity mainly by oxidative stress and renin-angiotensin system (RAS). Since flavonoids have high antioxidant activity and probable role in the inhibition of RAS, this study was designed to investigate the protective effect of hydroalcoholic extract and flavonoid fraction of Morus alba leaves on cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in rat. Extracts of Morus alba leaves were prepared and analyzed Phytochemically. Male rats (160-200 g) were used in this study (n=7-9). Normal group received 0.2 ml normal saline intraperitoneally (i.p.) once daily for ten days. Control animals received CP on the third day and saline in the remaining days. Other groups received either hydroalcoholic extract (200, 400 and 600 mg/kg, i.p.) or flavonoid fraction (50, 100 and 200 mg/kg, i.p.) for two days before CP administration and thereafter until tenth day. Serum concentrations of blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine (Cr) and nitric oxide were measured using standard methods. Also left kidneys were prepared for pathological study. The serum levels of BUN and Cr increased in animals received CP. Hydroalcoholic extract was ineffective in reversing these alterations but flavonoid fraction (50 and 100 mg/kg) significantly inhibited CP-induced increases of BUN and Cr. None of the treatments could affect serum concentration of nitric oxide. Flavonoid fraction could also prevent CP-induced pathological damage of the kidney. It seems that concurrent use of flavonoid fraction of Morus alba with CP can protect kidneys from CP-induced nephrotoxicity. PMID:24019816

  12. Structural identification and bioactivities of red-violet pigments present in Basella alba fruits.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shu-Mei; Lin, Bo-Hong; Hsieh, Wan-Mei; Ko, Huey-Jiun; Liu, Chi-Dong; Chen, Lih-Geeng; Chiou, Robin Y-Y

    2010-10-13

    Mature Basella alba L. fruit, with dark blue skin and deep red-violet flesh, is a potential source of natural colorants. Its pigment components and bioactivities deserve particular attention and investigation. In this study, fruit flesh was extracted with 80% methanol (containing 0.2% formic acid) and subjected to solid-phase extraction, semipreparative HPLC isolation, mass spectrophotometric analysis, and structural elucidation. The major red pigment was identified as gomphrenin I. Its quantity increased with the increase of fruit maturity. The gomphrenin I extract yield from ripe fruits was 36.1 mg/100 g of fresh weight. In addition to gomphrenin I, betanidin-dihexose and isobetanidin-dihexose were also detected. The antioxidant activities of gomphrenin I determined by Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC), α,α-diphenyl-β-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity, reducing power, and antioxidative capacity assays were equivalent to 534 μM Trolox, 103 μM butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), 129 μM ascorbic acid, and 68 μM BHT at 180, 23, 45, and 181 μM, respectively. The anti-inflammatory function was tested at concentrations of 25, 50, and 100 μM in murine macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The results revealed that gomphrenin I suppressed LPS-induced nitric oxide (NO) production in a dose-dependent manner and decreased PGE(2) and IL-1β secretions at the highest concentration tested. The transcriptional inhibitory activities of gomphrenin I on the expression of inflammatory genes encoding iNOS, COX-2, IL-1β, TNF-α, and IL-6 were also observed. It is of merit to identify gomphrenin I as a principal pigment of B. alba fruits and as a potent antioxidant and inflammatory inhibitor. These findings suggest that B. alba fruit is a rich source of betalains and has value-added potential for use in the development of food colorants and nutraceuticals. PMID:20839771

  13. Mars Express - Over 10 Years in Orbit Around Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chicarro, Agustin; Svedhem, Hakan

    2014-05-01

    The ESA Mars Express mission was launched more than a decade ago, reaching its working orbit around Mars in January 2004. All the instruments and subsystems onboard the spacecraft are still in working order. As the first European planetary mission, Mars Express has been providing exciting new scientific results on all fields of Mars science, including the interior structure of the planet, its surface mineralogy and geological processes, its atmospheric dynamics and chemistry, the interaction of its upper atmosphere with the solar wind, as well as the geodesy of its satellite Phobos. Also, Mars Express has contributed to pave the way for future European Mars Exploration, including the Trace Gas Orbiter to be launched in 2016, the ExoMars rover in 2018 and further exploration in 2020 and beyond. Among the abundant Mars Express scientific results, the Top-10 scientific highlights of the mission will be presented, addressing all areas of Mars investigation from orbit.

  14. Status of MARS Code

    SciTech Connect

    N.V. Mokhov

    2003-04-09

    Status and recent developments of the MARS 14 Monte Carlo code system for simulation of hadronic and electromagnetic cascades in shielding, accelerator and detector components in the energy range from a fraction of an electronvolt up to 100 TeV are described. these include physics models both in strong and electromagnetic interaction sectors, variance reduction techniques, residual dose, geometry, tracking, histograming. MAD-MARS Beam Line Build and Graphical-User Interface.

  15. A Mars 1984 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Mission objectives are developed for the next logical step in the investigation of the local physical and chemical environments and the search for organic compounds on Mars. The necessity of three vehicular elements: orbiter, penetrator, and rover for in situ investigations of atmospheric-lithospheric interactions is emphasized. A summary report and committee recommendations are included with the full report of the Mars Science Working Group.

  16. Mars Ice Age, Simulated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    December 17, 2003

    This simulated view shows Mars as it might have appeared during the height of a possible ice age in geologically recent time.

    Of all Solar System planets, Mars has the climate most like that of Earth. Both are sensitive to small changes in orbit and tilt. During a period about 2.1 million to 400,000 years ago, increased tilt of Mars' rotational axis caused increased solar heating at the poles. A new study using observations from NASA's Mars Global Surveyor and Mars Odyssey orbiters concludes that this polar warming caused mobilization of water vapor and dust into the atmosphere, and buildup of a surface deposit of ice and dust down to about 30 degrees latitude in both hemispheres. That is the equivalent of the southern Unites States or Saudi Arabia on Earth. Mars has been in an interglacial period characterized by less axial tilt for about the last 300,000 years. The ice-rich surface deposit has been degrading in the latitude zone of 30 degrees to 60 degrees as water-ice returns to the poles.

    In this illustration prepared for the December 18, 2003, cover of the journal Nature, the simulated surface deposit is superposed on a topography map based on altitude measurements by Global Surveyor and images from NASA's Viking orbiters of the 1970s.

    Mars Global Surveyor and Mars Odyssey are managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, for the NASA Office of Space Science, Washington.

  17. 2001 Mars Odyssey Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varghese, Philip

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the 2001 Mars Odyssey Mission. The contents include: 1) Mission Overview; 2) Current Scope of Work: 3) Facilities; 4) Critical Role of DSN; 5) Relay as Mission Supplement; 6) Current Mars Telecom Infrastructure; 7) PHX EDL Comm Overview; 8) EDL Geometry (Entry through Landing); 9) Phoenix Support; 10) Preparations for Phoenix; 11) EDL Support Timeline; 12) One Year Rolling Schedule; 13) E3 Rationale; and 14) Spacecraft Status.

  18. Mars Pathfinder [foldout].

    PubMed

    1997-12-01

    The following foldout present images and analysis from the Mars Pathfinder Mission that are discussed in seven subsequent Reports. The center is a four-page panorama of the surface of Mars around the lander (Plate 1). The back of the foldout contains surface images (Plate 7), a different perspective of the landing site (Plate 2), rover targets (Plate 3), locations of rocks and other features (Plate 6) and data analysis (Plates 4, 4, 8, 9, and 10). PMID:9411794

  19. Salt weathering on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, M. C.

    1974-01-01

    Mariner 9 photographs of Mars indicate that significant erosion has occurred on that planet. Although several possible erosion mechanisms have been proposed, most terrestrial weathering mechanisms cannot function in the present Martian environment. Salt weathering, believed to be active in the Antarctic dry valleys, is especially suited to Mars, given the presence of salts and small amounts of water. Volcanic salts are probably available, and the association of salts and water is likely from both thermodynamic and geologic considerations.

  20. Discovery concepts for Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luhmann, J. G.; Russell, C. T.; Brace, L. H.; Nagy, A. F.; Jakosky, B. M.; Barth, C. A.; Waite, J. H.

    1992-01-01

    Two focused Mars missions that would fit within the guidelines for the proposed Discovery line are discussed. The first mission would deal with the issue of the escape of the atmosphere (Mars') to space. A complete understanding of this topic is crucial to deciphering the evolution of the atmosphere, climate change, and volatile inventories. The second mission concerns the investigation of remanent magnetization of the crust and its relationship to the ionosphere and the atmosphere.

  1. Human colon cancer HT-29 cell death responses to doxorubicin and Morus Alba leaves flavonoid extract.

    PubMed

    Fallah, S; Karimi, A; Panahi, G; Gerayesh Nejad, S; Fadaei, R; Seifi, M

    2016-01-01

    The mechanistic basis for the biological properties of Morus alba flavonoid extract (MFE) and chemotherapy drug of doxorubicin on human colon cancer HT-29 cell line death are unknown. The effect of doxorubicin and flavonoid extract on colon cancer HT-29 cell line death and identification of APC gene expression and PARP concentration of HT-29 cell line were investigated. The results showed that flavonoid extract and doxorubicin induce a dose dependent cell death in HT-29 cell line. MFE and doxorubicin exert a cytotoxic effect on human colon cancer HT-29 cell line by probably promoting or induction of apoptosis. PMID:27064876

  2. De novo Transcriptome Analysis of Sinapis alba in Revealing the Glucosinolate and Phytochelatin Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaohui; Liu, Tongjin; Duan, Mengmeng; Song, Jiangping; Li, Xixiang

    2016-01-01

    Sinapis alba is an important condiment crop and can also be used as a phytoremediation plant. Though it has important economic and agronomic values, sequence data, and the genetic tools are still rare in this plant. In the present study, a de novo transcriptome based on the transcriptions of leaves, stems, and roots was assembled for S. alba for the first time. The transcriptome contains 47,972 unigenes with a mean length of 1185 nt and an N50 of 1672 nt. Among these unigenes, 46,535 (97%) unigenes were annotated by at least one of the following databases: NCBI non-redundant (Nr), Swiss-Prot, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway, Gene Ontology (GO), and Clusters of Orthologous Groups of proteins (COGs). The tissue expression pattern profiles revealed that 3489, 1361, and 8482 unigenes were predominantly expressed in the leaves, stems, and roots of S. alba, respectively. Genes predominantly expressed in the leaf were enriched in photosynthesis- and carbon fixation-related pathways. Genes predominantly expressed in the stem were enriched in not only pathways related to sugar, ether lipid, and amino acid metabolisms but also plant hormone signal transduction and circadian rhythm pathways, while the root-dominant genes were enriched in pathways related to lignin and cellulose syntheses, involved in plant-pathogen interactions, and potentially responsible for heavy metal chelating, and detoxification. Based on this transcriptome, 14,727 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) were identified, and 12,830 pairs of primers were developed for 2522 SSR-containing unigenes. Additionally, the glucosinolate (GSL) and phytochelatin metabolic pathways, which give the characteristic flavor and the heavy metal tolerance of this plant, were intensively analyzed. The genes of aliphatic GSLs pathway were predominantly expressed in roots. The absence of aliphatic GSLs in leaf tissues was due to the shutdown of BCAT4, MAM1, and CYP79F1 expressions. Glutathione was extensively

  3. Transferability and characterization of nine microsatellite markers for the tropical tree species Tabebuia roseo-alba.

    PubMed

    Feres, Juliana Massimino; Martinez, Marcelo L L; Martinez, Carlos A; Mestriner, Moacyr A; Alzate-Marin, Ana Lilia

    2009-01-01

    Microsatellite loci that were previously developed in the tropical tree Tabebuia aurea were used for the genetic analysis of Tabebuia roseo-alba populations. Nine of 10 simple sequence repeat markers were amplified, and the polymorphism was assessed in 58 individuals sampled from two stands in southeastern Brazil. All loci were polymorphic with Mendelian inheritance. The allele numbers were high, ranging from 5 to 13 in population I and 3 to 7 in population II, with means of 8.9 and 5.5, respectively. We conclude that these markers can be efficiently used for parentage and gene-flow studies. PMID:21564672

  4. Four New Flavonoids with α-Glucosidase Inhibitory Activities from Morus alba var. tatarica.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ya-Long; Luo, Jian-Guang; Wan, Chuan-Xing; Zhou, Zhong-Bo; Kong, Ling-Yi

    2015-11-01

    Four new flavonoids, mortatarins A-D (1-4, resp.), along with eight known flavonoids (5-12) were isolated from the root bark of Morus alba var. tatarica. Their structures were established on the basis of spectroscopic data analysis, and the absolute configuration of 4 was determined by analysis of its CD spectrum. All isolates were tested for inhibitory activities against α-glucosidase. Compounds 4, 7, and 8 exhibited a significant degree of inhibition with IC50 values of 5.0 ± 0.3, 7.5 ± 0.5, and 5.9 ± 0.2 μM, respectively. PMID:26567954

  5. Optimization of the soft x-ray transmission microscopy beamline at the ALBA light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorrentino, Andrea; Pereiro, Eva; Valcárcel, Ricardo; Ferrer, Salvador; Nicolas, Josep

    2013-09-01

    Mistral is the soft X-ray full field microscopy beamline at the ALBA light source. The beamline is designed to have large source acceptance and to provide constant magnification at the exit slit for photon energies between 270 and 2600 eV. The monochromator is a variation of the Petersen plane grating monochromator in which a variable line spacing grating is used to maintain the beam focused at the exit slit, independently of the fixed focus constant, and to cancel aberrations. We present the alignment strategy used to compensate errors of the optical elements, and report about the commissioning results.

  6. De novo Transcriptome Analysis of Sinapis alba in Revealing the Glucosinolate and Phytochelatin Pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaohui; Liu, Tongjin; Duan, Mengmeng; Song, Jiangping; Li, Xixiang

    2016-01-01

    Sinapis alba is an important condiment crop and can also be used as a phytoremediation plant. Though it has important economic and agronomic values, sequence data, and the genetic tools are still rare in this plant. In the present study, a de novo transcriptome based on the transcriptions of leaves, stems, and roots was assembled for S. alba for the first time. The transcriptome contains 47,972 unigenes with a mean length of 1185 nt and an N50 of 1672 nt. Among these unigenes, 46,535 (97%) unigenes were annotated by at least one of the following databases: NCBI non-redundant (Nr), Swiss-Prot, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway, Gene Ontology (GO), and Clusters of Orthologous Groups of proteins (COGs). The tissue expression pattern profiles revealed that 3489, 1361, and 8482 unigenes were predominantly expressed in the leaves, stems, and roots of S. alba, respectively. Genes predominantly expressed in the leaf were enriched in photosynthesis- and carbon fixation-related pathways. Genes predominantly expressed in the stem were enriched in not only pathways related to sugar, ether lipid, and amino acid metabolisms but also plant hormone signal transduction and circadian rhythm pathways, while the root-dominant genes were enriched in pathways related to lignin and cellulose syntheses, involved in plant-pathogen interactions, and potentially responsible for heavy metal chelating, and detoxification. Based on this transcriptome, 14,727 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) were identified, and 12,830 pairs of primers were developed for 2522 SSR-containing unigenes. Additionally, the glucosinolate (GSL) and phytochelatin metabolic pathways, which give the characteristic flavor and the heavy metal tolerance of this plant, were intensively analyzed. The genes of aliphatic GSLs pathway were predominantly expressed in roots. The absence of aliphatic GSLs in leaf tissues was due to the shutdown of BCAT4, MAM1, and CYP79F1 expressions. Glutathione was extensively

  7. Why exobiology on Mars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brack, A.

    1996-11-01

    Processing of organic molecules by liquid water was probably an essential requirement towards the emergence of terrestrial primitive life. According to Oparin's hypothesis, organic building blocks required for early life were produced from simple organic molecules formed in a primitive reducing atmosphere. Geochemists favour now a less reducing atmosphere dominated by carbon dioxide. In such an atmosphere very few building blocks are formed. Import of extra-terrestrial organic molecules may represent an alternative supply. Experimental support for such an alternative scenario is examined in comets, meteorites and micrometeorites. The early histories of Mars and Earth clearly show similarities. Liquid water was once stable on the surface of Mars attesting the presence of an atmosphere capable of deccelerating C-rich micrometeorites. Therefore, primitive life may have developed on Mars as well. Liquid water disappeared from the surface of Mars very early, about 3.8 Ga ago. The Viking missions did not find, at the surface of the Martian soil, any organic molecules or clear-cut evidence for microbial activities such as photo-synthesis, respiration or nutrition. The results can be explained referring to an active photochemistry of Martian soil driven by the high influx of solar UV. These experiments do not exclude the existence of organic molecules and fossils of micro-organisms which developed on early Mars until liquid water disappeared. Mars may store below its surface some well preserved clues of a still hypothetical primitive life.

  8. Paleolakes on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wharton, R. A. Jr; Crosby, J. M.; McKay, C. P.; Rice, J. W. Jr; Wharton RA, ,. J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    Observational evidence such as outflow channels and valley networks suggest that in the past there was flowing water on Mars. The images of fluvial features on Mars logically suggest that there must exist downstream locations in which the water pooled and the sediment load deposited (i.e. lakes). Sediments and morphological features associated with the martian paleolakes are believed to occur in Valles Marineris, and several large basins including Amazonis, Chryse and Elysium planitia. As Mars became progressively colder over geological time, any lakes on its surface would have become seasonally, and eventually perennially ice-covered. We know from polar lakes on Earth that ice-covered lakes can persist even when the mean annual temperature falls below freezing. Thus, the most recent lacustrine sediments on Mars were probably deposited in ice-covered lakes. While life outside of the Earth's atmosphere has yet to be observed, there is a general consensus among exobiologists that the search for extraterrestrial life should be based upon liquid water. The inference that there was liquid water on Mars during an earlier epoch is the primary motivation for considering the possibility of life during this time. It would be of enormous interest from both an exobiological and paleolimnological perspective to discover lakes or the evidence of former lakes on another planet such as Mars. Limnology would then become an interplanetary science.

  9. The Mars Observer database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albee, Arden L.

    1988-01-01

    Mars Observer will study the surface, atmosphere, and climate of Mars in a systematic way over an entire Martian year. The observations of the surface will provide a database that will be invaluable to the planning of a future Mars sample return mission. Mars Observer is planned for a September 1992 launch from the Space Shuttle, using an upper-stage. After the one year transit the spacecraft is injected into orbit about Mars and the orbit adjusted to a near-circular, sun-synchronous low-altitude, polar orbit. During the Martian year in this mapping orbit the instruments gather both geoscience data and climatological data by repetitive global mapping. The scientific objectives of the mission are to: (1) determine the global elemental and mineralogical character of the surface material; (2) define globally the topography and gravitational field; (3) establish the nature of the magnetic field; (4) determine the time and space distribution, abundance, sources, and sinks of volatile material and dust over a seasonal cycle; and (5) explore the structure and aspects of the circulation of the atmosphere. The science investigations and instruments for Mars Observer have been chosen with these objectives in mind. These instruments, the principal investigator or team leader and the objectives are discussed.

  10. Transportation: Destination Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eoff, Bill

    1998-01-01

    As the agency space transportation lead center, Marshall Space Flight Center has been conducting transportation assessments for future robotic and human Mars missions to identify critical technologies. Five human Mars options are currently under assessment with each option including all transportation requirements from Earth to Mars and return. The primary difference for each option is the propulsion source from Earth to Mars. In case any of the options require heavy launch capability that is not currently projected as available, an in-house study has been initiated to determine the most cost effective means of providing such launch capability. This assessment is only considering launch architectures that support the overall human Mars mission cost goal of $25B. The guidelines for the launch capability study included delivery of 80 metric ton (176 KLB) payloads, 25 feet diameter x 92 feet long, to 220 nmi orbits at 28.5 degrees. The launch vehicle concept of the study was designated "Magnum" to differentiate from prior heavy launch vehicle assessments. This assessment along with the assessment of options for all transportation phases of a Mars mission are on-going.

  11. Life on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, Christopher P.; Cuzzi, Jeffrey (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Although the Viking results may indicate that Mars has no life today, the possibility exists that Mars may hold the best record of the events that led to the origin of life. There is direct geomorphological evidence that in the past Mars had large amounts of liquid water on its surface. Atmospheric models would suggest that this early period of hydrological activity was due to the presence of a thick atmosphere and the resulting warmer temperatures. From a biological perspective the existence of liquid water, by itself motivates the question of the origin of life on Mars. From studies of the Earth's earliest biosphere we know that by 3.5 Gyr. ago, life had originated on Earth and reached a fair degree of biological sophistication. Surface activity and erosion on Earth make it difficult to trace the history of life before the 3.5 Gyr timeframe. If Mars did maintain a clement environment for longer than it took for life to originate on Earth, then the question of the origin of life on Mars follows naturally.

  12. Mars Rover RTG Study

    SciTech Connect

    Schock, Alfred

    1989-11-27

    This report summarizes the results of a Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) design study conducted by Fairchild Space Company at the direction of the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Special Applications, in support of the Mars Rover and Sample Return mission under investigation at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Presented at the 40th Congress of the IAF, Oct. 7-13, 1989 in Torremolinos, Malaga-Spain. The paper describes the design and analysis of Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) for powering the Mars Rover vehicle, which is a critical element of the unmanned Mars Rover and Sample Return mission (MRSR). The RTG design study was conducted by Fairchild Space for the U.S. DOE in support of the JPL MRSR Project. The paper briefly describes a reference mission scenario, an illustrative Rover design and activity pattern on Mars, and its power system requirements and environmental constraints, including the RTG cooling requirements during transit to Mars. It summarizes the baseline RTG's mass breakdown, and presents a detailed description of its thermal, thermoelectric, and electrical analysis. The results presented show the RTG performance achievable with current technology, and the performance improvements that would be achievable with various technology developments. It provides a basis for selecting the optimum strategy for meeting the Mars Rover design goals with minimal programmatic risk and cost. Cross Reference CID #7135 dated 10/1989. There is a duplicate copy. This document is not relevant to the OSTI Library. Do not send.

  13. Syrtis Major, Mars: Geology, Morphology and Topography Based on new MOLA and MOC Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiesinger, H.; Head, J. W.

    2001-05-01

    The circular shape of Syrtis Major has been interpreted to be impact related [1] but the topography of the structure is more consistent with a low shield volcano [2, 3]. The low relief of Syrtis Major is very different from other Martian shield volcanos (e.g., Tharsis) and may be related to changes in composition, differentiation history, eruptive styles or differences in crustal thickness [2]. Individual lava flows of Syrtis Major are among the thinnest on Mars (25-30 m; [3]), are up to 120-150 km long [2], and ISM data suggest a SNC-like [4] composition. Slopes of northern Syrtis Major are ~0.13°, to the south slopes are ~0.02°, and to the west are on the order of 0.4°. We observe steeper slopes of ~0.5 to the east. According to Schaber [2] and Hodges and Moore [5] Syrtis Major is ~1100 km in diameter and has an estimated maximum height of only 0.5 km. E-W profiles based on MOLA data show that the height of the shield is ~0.5 km, consistent with previous estimates. However, MOLA N-S profiles indicate a significantly higher edifice of ~1 km. Nili Patera (caldera C1 of [2]) and Meroe Patera (caldera C2 of [2]) are located within a complex large N-S elongated depression [2, 6] and their floors are at an elevation of ~100-200 m and 180-250 m, respectively. The caldera floors are at about the same elevation as the cratered highlands immediately north of Syrtis Major and at significantly lower elevation than the cratered highlands west and south of Syrtis Major. The highest point of the shield is NW of Nili Patera at about 2300 m. The terrain southwest, west and north of the calderas is noticeably higher ( ~2000-2300 m) than east of the calderas ( ~1500-1700 m), hence forming a crescent-like summit with steeper slopes into the summit depression and gentler slopes away from the summit. A MOLA map of kilometer-scale surface roughness shows that the Syrtis Major Formation is rougher at all wavelengths (0.6-19.2 km) compared to other investigated Martian volcanic units

  14. Photogeologic mapping and the geologic history of the Hellas basin floor, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhardt, H.; Hiesinger, H.; Ivanov, M. A.; Ruesch, O.; Erkeling, G.; Reiss, D.

    2016-01-01

    The Hellas basin on Mars is the second-largest topographically well-defined impact structure in the Solar System and has repeatedly been interpreted as a major sink of volcanic, glacio-fluvial and eolian materials. Based on established guidelines for planetary mapping, we compiled a comprehensive photogeological map of Hellas Planitia, i.e., the Hellas basin floor (1:2,000,000; ∼1.8 × 106 km2; see Supplementary online material), using the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS-IR) day-time mosaic as basemap (supplemented by several other datasets). We identified 33 units, which were categorized into a "Rim Assemblage", containing "Dissected units", a "Layered rim sequence", and "Other basin rim units", as well as a "Floor Assemblage", containing the "Honeycomb formation", an "Interior formation", and a "Plains sequence". Relative dating of units was performed wherever contacts revealed stratigraphic relationships and was complemented by absolute model ages (AMAs) of all units that lend themselves to reliable crater-size frequency distribution (CSFDs) measurements. On the basis of our results, as well as AMAs of circum-Hellas volcanic provinces by previous authors, we compiled a chronostratigraphic model of the Hellas basin floor. The northern basin rim shows evidence (vast layered, hydrous mineral-bearing deposits containing meandering, channel-like valleys), that the early history of the basin until ∼3.8 Ga ago experienced extended periods of low-energy fluvial, and possibly lacustrine, activity. Superposing the layered rim sequence, the majority of the Hellas basin infill (∼1.5-1.7 × 106 km3) consists of volcanic material (a lower and an upper wrinkle-ridged plains unit), which was shortened by a compressive stress field relatively soon after its emplacement. Based on their ages and stratigraphic considerations, we identified Malea Patera (and possibly also Tyrrhena Patera) as a suitable source for the older, lower plains (∼3.8 Ga), and Hadriaca and

  15. The MARS2013 Mars analog mission.

    PubMed

    Groemer, Gernot; Soucek, Alexander; Frischauf, Norbert; Stumptner, Willibald; Ragonig, Christoph; Sams, Sebastian; Bartenstein, Thomas; Häuplik-Meusburger, Sandra; Petrova, Polina; Evetts, Simon; Sivenesan, Chan; Bothe, Claudia; Boyd, Andrea; Dinkelaker, Aline; Dissertori, Markus; Fasching, David; Fischer, Monika; Föger, Daniel; Foresta, Luca; Fritsch, Lukas; Fuchs, Harald; Gautsch, Christoph; Gerard, Stephan; Goetzloff, Linda; Gołebiowska, Izabella; Gorur, Paavan; Groemer, Gerhard; Groll, Petra; Haider, Christian; Haider, Olivia; Hauth, Eva; Hauth, Stefan; Hettrich, Sebastian; Jais, Wolfgang; Jones, Natalie; Taj-Eddine, Kamal; Karl, Alexander; Kauerhoff, Tilo; Khan, Muhammad Shadab; Kjeldsen, Andreas; Klauck, Jan; Losiak, Anna; Luger, Markus; Luger, Thomas; Luger, Ulrich; McArthur, Jane; Moser, Linda; Neuner, Julia; Orgel, Csilla; Ori, Gian Gabriele; Paternesi, Roberta; Peschier, Jarno; Pfeil, Isabella; Prock, Silvia; Radinger, Josef; Ramirez, Barbara; Ramo, Wissam; Rampey, Mike; Sams, Arnold; Sams, Elisabeth; Sandu, Oana; Sans, Alejandra; Sansone, Petra; Scheer, Daniela; Schildhammer, Daniel; Scornet, Quentin; Sejkora, Nina; Stadler, Andrea; Stummer, Florian; Taraba, Michael; Tlustos, Reinhard; Toferer, Ernst; Turetschek, Thomas; Winter, Egon; Zanella-Kux, Katja

    2014-05-01

    We report on the MARS2013 mission, a 4-week Mars analog field test in the northern Sahara. Nineteen experiments were conducted by a field crew in Morocco under simulated martian surface exploration conditions, supervised by a Mission Support Center in Innsbruck, Austria. A Remote Science Support team analyzed field data in near real time, providing planning input for the management of a complex system of field assets; two advanced space suit simulators, four robotic vehicles, an emergency shelter, and a stationary sensor platform in a realistic work flow were coordinated by a Flight Control Team. A dedicated flight planning group, external control centers for rover tele-operations, and a biomedical monitoring team supported the field operations. A 10 min satellite communication delay and other limitations pertinent to human planetary surface activities were introduced. The fields of research for the experiments were geology, human factors, astrobiology, robotics, tele-science, exploration, and operations research. This paper provides an overview of the geological context and environmental conditions of the test site and the mission architecture, in particular the communication infrastructure emulating the signal travel time between Earth and Mars. We report on the operational work flows and the experiments conducted, including a deployable shelter prototype for multiple-day extravehicular activities and contingency situations. PMID:24823799

  16. Mars Telecommunications Orbiter, Artist's Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This illustration depicts a concept for NASA's Mars Telecommunications Orbiter in flight around Mars. The orbiter is in development to be the first spacecraft with a primary function of providing communication links while orbiting a foreign planet. The project's plans call for launch in September 2009, arrival at Mars in August 2010 and a mission of six to 10 years while in orbit. Mars Telecommunication Orbiter would serve as the Mars hub for an interplanetery Internet, greatly increasing the information payoff from other future Mars missions. The mission is designed to orbit Mars more than 10 times farther from the planet than orbiters dedicated primarily to science. The high-orbit design minimizes the time that Mars itself blocks the orbiter from communicating with Earth and maximizes the time that the orbiter is above the horizon -- thus capable of communications relay -- for rovers and stationary landers on Mars' surface.

  17. Mars - Pathway to the stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelo, J. A., Jr.; Buden, D.

    Mars has and will continue to play a key role in our exploration and conquest of the Solar System. Within the context of the creation of humanity's extraterrestrial civilization, the major technical features of the following Mars programs are reviewed: the Mars Geoscience/Climatology Orbiter; the Mars Aeronomy Orbiter; the Mars airplane; the Mars Penetrator Network; Mars surface rovers and mobility systems; human exploration of Mars; and permanent Martian bases and settlements. Mars properly explored and utilized opens the way to the resources of the asteroid belt and the outer planets; supports the creation of smart machines for space exploration and exploitation; and encourages the creation of autonomous niches of intelligent life within heliocentric space. All of these developments, in turn, establish the technological pathway for the first interstellar missions.

  18. Examining Mars with SPICE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acton, Charles H.; Bachman, Nathaniel J.; Bytof, Jeff A.; Semenov, Boris V.; Taber, William; Turner, F. Scott; Wright, Edward D.

    1999-01-01

    The International Mars Conference highlights the wealth of scientific data now and soon to be acquired from an international armada of Mars-bound robotic spacecraft. Underlying the planning and interpretation of these scientific observations around and upon Mars are ancillary data and associated software needed to deal with trajectories or locations, instrument pointing, timing and Mars cartographic models. The NASA planetary community has adopted the SPICE system of ancillary data standards and allied tools to fill the need for consistent, reliable access to these basic data and a near limitless range of derived parameters. After substantial rapid growth in its formative years, the SPICE system continues to evolve today to meet new needs and improve ease of use. Adaptations to handle landers and rovers were prototyped on the Mars pathfinder mission and will next be used on Mars '01-'05. Incorporation of new methods to readily handle non-inertial reference frames has vastly extended the capability and simplified many computations. A translation of the SPICE Toolkit software suite to the C language has just been announced. To further support cartographic calculations associated with Mars exploration the SPICE developers at JPL have recently been asked by NASA to work with cartographers to develop standards and allied software for storing and accessing control net and shape model data sets; these will be highly integrated with existing SPICE components. NASA specifically supports the widest possible utilization of SPICE capabilities throughout the international space science community. With NASA backing the Russian Space Agency and Russian Academy of Science adopted the SPICE standards for the Mars 96 mission. The SPICE ephemeris component will shortly become the international standard for agencies using the Deep Space Network. U.S. and European scientists hope that ESA will employ SPICE standards on the Mars Express mission. SPICE is an open set of standards, and

  19. Lippia alba essential oil promotes survival of silver catfish (Rhamdia quelen) infected with Aeromonas sp.

    PubMed

    Sutili, Fernando J; Cunha, Mauro A; Ziech, Rosangela E; Krewer, Carina C; Zeppenfeld, Carla C; Heldwein, Clarissa G; Gressler, Leticia T; Heinzmann, Berta M; Vargas, Agueda C; Baldisserotto, Bernardo

    2015-03-01

    In vitro and in vivo activity of the Lippia alba essential oil (EO) against Aeromonas sp. was evaluated. In the in vitro assay the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and a minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of EO for Aeromonas cells were determined using the microdilution method. Twenty five strains of Aeromonas sp. isolated from infected fish obtained from local fish farms were used. MIC and MBC values were 2862 and 5998 µg mL-1 for L. alba EO and 0.5 and 1.2 µg mL-1 for gentamicin, respectively. In the in vivo assay silver catfish juveniles (Rhamdia quelen) (7.50 ± 1.85 g and 10.0 ± 1.0 cm) with typical injuries associated to Aeromonas infection were divided into four treatments (in triplicate n=10): untreated fish (negative control), 10 mg L-1 of gentamicin, and 20 or 50 µL L-1 of EO. Fish were maintained in aerated 20 L plastic boxes. After 10 days survival of silver catfish infected with Aermonas sp. and treated with essential oil (50 µL L-1) was greater than 90%. PMID:25789790

  20. Hair growth promoting activity of Eclipta alba in male albino rats.

    PubMed

    Roy, R K; Thakur, Mayank; Dixit, V K

    2008-08-01

    Alopecia is a dermatological disorder with psychosocial implications on patients with hair loss. Eclipta alba Hassk. is a well-known Ayurvedic herb with purported claims of hair growth promotion. In the reported work attempts were undertaken to evaluate petroleum ether and ethanol extract of E. alba Hassk. for their effect on promoting hair growth in albino rats. The extracts were incorporated into oleaginous cream (water in oil cream base) and applied topically on shaved denuded skin of albino rats. The time (in days) required for hair growth initiation as well as completion of hair growth cycle was recorded. Minoxidil 2% solution was applied topically and served as positive control for comparison. Hair growth initiation time was significantly reduced to half on treatment with the extracts, as compared to control animals. The time required for complete hair growth was also significantly reduced. Quantitative analysis of hair growth after treatment with petroleum ether extract (5%) exhibited greater number of hair follicles in anagenic phase (69 +/- 4) which were higher as compared to control (47 +/- 13). The result of treatment with 2 and 5% petroleum ether extracts were better than the positive control minoxidil 2% treatment. PMID:18478241

  1. Acute and Sub-Acute Toxicity Studies of Plumeria alba Linn. (Apocynaceae) Hydroalcoholic Extract in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Tessou, K. Z.; Lawson-Evi, P.; Metowogo, K.; Diallo, A.; Eklu-Gadegkeku, K.; Aklikokou, K.; Gbeassor, M.

    2013-01-01

    Plumeria alba Linn (Apocynaceae) is used in Togolese traditional medicine to treat diabetes mellitus and wounds. The present investigation was carried out to evaluate the toxicity of hydroalcoholic extract of Plumeria alba roots in Sprague Dawley rats. The acute toxicity test was conducted by administering orally dose of 5 g/Kg. General behavior and mortality were examined for up to 14 days. The sub-acute toxicity test was performed by daily gavage at 250, 500 and 1000 mg/Kg for 28 days. Body weight and blood glucose were measured weekly. Hematological and biochemical parameters, relative organ weight were determined at the end of the 28 days administration. In acute study, no adverse effect of the extract was observed at 5.0 g/Kg. Sub-acute oral administration of the extract at the dose up to 1000 mg/Kg did not induce death or significant changes in body weight, relative weight of vital organs, hematological parameters and was not associated with liver and kidney toxicity. PMID:24711763

  2. Telecommunications systems evolution for Mars Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noreen, Gary; De Paula, Ramon P.; Edwards, Charles D. Jr; Komarek, Thomas; Edwards, Bernard L.; Edwards, Bernard L.; Kerridge, Stuart J.; Diehl, Roger; Franklin, Stephen F.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the evolution of telecommunication systems at Mars. It reviews the telecommunications capabilities, technology and limiting factors of current and planned Mars orbiters from Mars Global Surveyor to the planned Mars Telecommunications Orbiter (MTO).

  3. Downflow width behavior of Martian and terrestrial lava flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peitersen, Matthew N.; Crown, David A.

    1999-04-01

    Examination of the downflow width behavior of 59 terrestrial lava flows at Puu Oo (Hawaii) and Glass Mountain (California) and 86 Martian flows at Alba Patera, Tyrrhena Patera, Elysium, and Olympus Mons was completed using aerial photographs, topographic maps, previously published flow maps, and Viking Orbiter images. The examined lava flows exhibit diverse width behavior, from which information about flow processes and conditions was assessed. For Puu Oo flows, no significant correlation was found between the average width of a flow and flow length or average underlying slope. A significant, but weak relationship was found between average width and average flow thickness. In analyses of the downflow width behavior of individual flows, no consistent correlations were observed between width and thickness or underlying slope. When width was analyzed as a function of distance from the source for all flows, a variety of flow width behavioral trends were recognized and quantitatively classified. The most common behavior observed on Earth and Mars involved variations of width (sometimes significant) about a mean without a significant downflow narrowing or widening trend. The distributions of width behavior trends for the Alba Patera and Puu Oo flows examined were similar, with this type of ``constant'' behavior dominating. In contrast, Tyrrhena Patera flows showed a tendency to widen with distance downflow, and silicic flows at Glass Mountain were more likely to narrow. Flows were also subdivided by distance from the vent, and the width behavior of each division classified. Subdivision of flows resulted in significant changes in the classification of width behavior. While width behavior in the medial regions of flows was similar to that over entire flow lengths, proximal regions show more variability (possibly due to greater fluidity of lavas near the vent) and distal regions tend to uniformly narrow (possibly due to limited supply). In certain cases, classification and

  4. Mars Rover RTG Study

    SciTech Connect

    Schock, Alfred

    1989-10-01

    Presented at the 40th Congress of the IAF, Oct. 7-13, 1989 in Torremolinos, Malaga-Spain. The paper describes the design and analysis of Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) for powering the Mars Rover vehicle, which is a critical element of the unmanned Mars Rover and Sample Return mission (MRSR). The RTG design study was conducted by Fairchild Space for the U.S. DOE in support of the JPL MRSR Project. The paper briefly describes a reference mission scenario, an illustrative Rover design and activity pattern on Mars, and its power system requirements and environmental constraints, including the RTG cooling requirements during transit to Mars. It summarizes the baseline RTG's mass breakdown, and presents a detailed description of its thermal, thermoelectric, and electrical analysis. The results presented show the RTG performance achievable with current technology, and the performance improvements that would be achievable with various technology developments. It provides a basis for selecting the optimum strategy for meeting the Mars Rover design goals with minimal programmatic risk and cost. There is a duplicate copy and three copies in the file.

  5. Mars Climate Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The Mars Surveyor '98 Climate Orbiter is shown here during acoustic tests that simulate launch conditions. The orbiter was to conduct a two year primary mission to profile the Martian atmosphere and map the surface. To carry out these scientific objectives, the spacecraft carried a rebuilt version of the pressure modulated infrared radiometer, lost with the Mars Observer spacecraft, and a miniaturized dual camera system the size of a pair of binoculars, provided by Malin Space Science Systems, Inc., San Diego, California. During its primary mission, the orbiter was to monitor Mars atmosphere and surface globally on a daily basis for one Martian year (two Earth years), observing the appearance and movement of atmospheric dust and water vapor, as well as characterizing seasonal changes of the planet's surface. Imaging of the surface morphology would also provide important clues about the planet's climate in its early history. The mission was part of NASA's Mars Surveyor program, a sustained program of robotic exploration of the red planet, managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. Lockheed Martin Astronautics was NASA's industrial partner in the mission. Unfortunately, Mars Climate Orbiter burned up in the Martian atmosphere on September 23, 1999, due to a metric conversion error that caused the spacecraft to be off course.

  6. Simulating "Mars on Earth"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clancey, William J.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    By now, everyone who's heard of the Haughton-Mars Project knows that we travel to Devon Island to learn how people will live and work on Mars. But how do we learn about Mars operations from what happens in the Arctic? We must document our experience--traverses, life in the hab, instrument deployment, communications, and so on. Then we must analyze and formally model what happens. In short, while most scientists are studying the crater, other scientists must be studying the expedition itself. That's what I have done in the past four field seasons. I study field science, both as it naturally occurs at Haughton (unconstrained by a "Mars Sam") and as a constrained experiment using the Flashline Mars Arctic Research Station. During the second week of July 2001, I lived and worked in the hab as part of the Phase 2 crew of six. Besides participating in all activities, I took many photographs and time lapse video. The result of my work will be a computer simulation of how we lived and worked in the hab. It won't be a model of particular people or even my own phase per se, but a pastiche that demonstrates (a proof of concept) that we have appropriate tools for simulating the layout of the hab and daily routines followed by the group and individual scientists. Activities-how people spend their time-are the focus of my observations for building such a simulation model.

  7. Mars atmospheric water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clancy, R. T.; Grossman, A. W.; Muhleman, D. O.

    1992-01-01

    We indicate the Dec. 3-4 spectrum averaged over the morning limb of Mars. Two synthetic spectra indicate the expected line emission for 3 precipitable microns of water with a uniform vertical distribution (dotted) and a vertical distribution in which water decreases rapidly above 20 km altitude if Mars atmospheric temperatures are approximately 20 K cooler than implied by the Viking Infrared Thermal Mapping (IRTM) and lander descent observations. Such cooler atmospheric temperatures have been argued on the basis of ground-based microwave observations of Mars atmospheric CO. Our 3 pr micron column abundance for water can be compared to the global value of approximately 6 pr microns, observation for the same season with the Viking MAWD experiment in 1977. We will investigate the latitude and diurnal variations when the data corresponding to the second day of observations are reduced. We also plan to compare these VLA water observations with a very complementary set of Hubble Space Telescope ozone observations. Ultraviolet (220-330 nm) spectra and imates of Mars were obtained on Dec. 13 1990 as part of a general Mars observing program with the Hubble Space Telescope.

  8. Autonomous Aerobraking at Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanna, Jill L.; Tolson, Robert; Cianciolo, Alicia Dwyer; Dec, John

    2002-01-01

    Aerobraking has become a proven approach for orbital missions at Mars. A launch of a 1000 kg class spacecraft on a Delta class booster saves 90% of the post-MOI fuel otherwise required to circularize the orbit. In 1997, Mars Global Surveyor demonstrated the feasibility and Mars 2001 Odyssey completed a nearly trouble free aerobraking phase in January 2002. In 2006, Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter will also utilize aerobraking. From the flight operations standpoint, however, aerobraking is labor intensive and high risk due to the large density variability in the Mars thermosphere. The maximum rate of aerobraking is typically limited by the maximum allowable temperature of the solar array which is the primary drag surface. Prior missions have used a surrogate variable, usually maximum free stream heat flux, as a basis for performing periapsis altitude corridor control maneuvers. This paper provides an adaptive sequential method for operationally relating measured temperatures to heat flux profile characteristics and performing maneuvers based directly on measured temperatures and atmospheric properties derived from the heat flux profiles. Simulations of autonomous aerobraking are performed using Odyssey mission data.

  9. The Mars Technology Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayati, Samad A.

    2002-01-01

    Future Mars missions require new capabilities that currently are not available. The Mars Technology Program (MTP) is an integral part of the Mars Exploration Program (MEP). Its sole purpose is to assure that required technologies are developed in time to enable the baselined and future missions. The MTP is a NASA-wide technology development program managed by JPL. It is divided into a Focused Program and a Base Program. The Focused Program is tightly tied to the proposed Mars Program mission milestones. It involves time-critical deliverables that must be developed in time for infusion into the proposed Mars 2005, and, 2009 missions. In addition a technology demonstration mission by AFRL will test a LIDAR as part of a joint NASNAFRL experiment. This program bridges the gap between technology and projects by vertically integrating the technology work with pre-project development in a project-like environment with critical dates for technology infusion. A Base Technology Program attacks higher riskhigher payoff technologies not in the critical path of missions.

  10. Mars digital terrain model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Sherman S. C.; Howington, Annie-Elpis

    1987-01-01

    The Mars Digital Terrain Model (DTM) is the result of a new project to: (1) digitize the series of 1:2,000,000-scale topographic maps of Mars, which are being derived photogrammetically under a separate project, and (2) reformat the digital contour information into rasters of elevation that can be readily registered with the Digital Image Model (DIM) of Mars. Derivation of DTM's involves interpolation of elevation values into 1/64-degree resolution and transformation of them to a sinusoidal equal-area projection. Digital data are produced in blocks corresponding with the coordinates of the original 1:2,000,000-scale maps, i.e., the dimensions of each block in the equatorial belt are 22.5 deg of longitude and 15 deg of latitude. This DTM is not only compatible with the DIM, but it can also be registered with other data such as geologic units or gravity. It will be the most comprehensive record of topographic information yet compiled for the Martian surface. Once the DTM's are established, any enhancement of Mars topographic information made with updated data, such as data from the planned Mars Observer Mission, will be by mathematical transformation of the DTM's, eliminating the need for recompilation.

  11. Gas chromatograph analysis on closed air and nitrogen oxide storage atmospheres of recalcitrant seeds of Quercus Alba

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Storage of recalcitrant seeds remains an unsolved problem. This study investigated the quantitative gas analysis of nitrous oxide (N2O) and air atmospheres on the recalcitrant seeds of Quercus alba by using gas chromatograph. Ten seeds were placed in each sealed atmospheric system of air and 98/2% N...

  12. Phanerochaete flavido-alba Laccase Induction and Modification of Manganese Peroxidase Isoenzyme Pattern in Decolorized Olive Oil Mill Wastewaters

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, J.; de la Rubia, T.; Hamman, O. Ben; Martínez, J.

    1998-01-01

    Lignin-degrading enzymes were partially purified from supernatant solutions obtained from Phanerochaete flavido-alba-decolorized olive oil mill wastewaters (OMW). The dominant enzymes, manganese peroxidases, exhibited different isoform patterns in decolorized OMW-containing cultures than in residue-free samples. Laccase induction was also detected in OMW-containing cultures but not in control cultures. PMID:9647858

  13. Mars penetrator: Subsurface science mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lumpkin, C. K.

    1974-01-01

    A penetrator system to emplace subsurface science on the planet Mars is described. The need for subsurface science is discussed, and the technologies for achieving successful atmospheric entry, Mars penetration, and data retrieval are presented.

  14. Journey of a Lifetime -- Mars

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA wants you to be part of the Journey to Mars. Today, NASA is pushing the boundaries of technology and innovation. NASA’s fleet of robotic scientific explorers at Mars are paving the way for hu...

  15. UBV photometry of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, A. T.

    1974-01-01

    A critical analysis of selected high-quality photometric observations of Mars indicates that: (1) the phase function is concave upward out to at least 40-deg phase. No sudden brightening occurs at opposition, but the curvature increases at small phase; (2) large systematic differences (0.1-0.2 mag.) exist between different observers' data. However, the small random scatter attributable to Mars (0.01-0.02 mag.) in the better series suggests that these differences represent systematic errors in data reduction, not variations in the planet's brightness; (3) the disentangling of seasonal, diurnal, and phase effects leaves considerable ambiguity; more observations are needed, over a long time, with a stable instrumental system. However, even the present data are sufficient to expose substantial errors in published phase curves of Mars (and consequently, in interpretations based on them).

  16. Remanent magnetism at Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, S. A.; Ness, N. F.

    1988-01-01

    It is shown that a strong case can be made for an intrinsic magnetic field of dynamo origin for Mars earlier in its history. The typical equatorial magnetic field intensity would have been equal to about 0.01-0.1 gauss. The earlier dynamo activity is no longer extant, but a significant remanent magnetic field may exist. A highly non-dipole magnetic field could result from the remanent magnetization of the surface. Remanent magnetization may thus play an important role in the Mars solar wind interactions, in contrast to Venus with its surface temperatures above the Curie point. The anomalous characteristics of Mars'solar wind interaction compared to that of Venus may be explicable on this basis.

  17. Spiders from Mars?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-426, 19 July 2003

    No, this is not a picture of a giant, martian spider web. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a plethora of polygonal features on the floor of a northern hemisphere impact crater near 65.6oN, 327.7oW. The picture was acquired during spring, after the seasonal carbon dioxide frost cap had largely migrated through the region. At the time the picture was taken, remnants of seasonal frost remained on the crater rim and on the edges of the troughs that bound each of the polygons. Frost often provides a helpful hint as to where polygons and patterned ground occur. The polygons, if they were on Earth, would indicate the presence of freeze-thaw cycles in ground ice. Although uncertain, the same might be true of Mars. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  18. VR for Mars Pathfinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackmon, Theodore

    1998-01-01

    Virtual reality (VR) technology has played an integral role for Mars Pathfinder mission, operations Using an automated machine vision algorithm, the 3d topography of the Martian surface was rapidly recovered fro -a the stereo images captured. by the Tender camera to produce photo-realistic 3d models, An advanced, interface was developed for visualization and interaction with. the virtual environment of the Pathfinder landing site for mission scientists at the Space Flight Operations Facility of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The VR aspect of the display allowed mission scientists to navigate on Mars in Bud while remaining here on Earth, thus improving their spatial awareness of the rock field that surrounds the lenders Measurements of positions, distances and angles could be easily extracted from the topographic models, providing valuable information for science analysis and mission. planning. Moreover, the VR map of Mars has also been used to assist with the archiving and planning of activities for the Sojourner rover.

  19. Mars transportation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrard, William; Vano, Andrew; Rutherford, Dave

    1992-01-01

    The University of Minnesota Advanced Space Design Program has developed a sample Mars exploration scenario. The purpose of the design project is to enhance NASA and university interaction, to provide fresh ideas to NASA, and to provide real world design problems to engineering students. The Mars Transportation System in this paper is designed to transport a crew of six astronauts to the Martian surface and return them to Low Earth Orbit (LEO) starting in the year 2016. The proposed vehicle features such advanced technologies as nuclear propulsion, nuclear power generation, and aerobraking. Three missions are planned. Orbital trajectories are of the conjunction class with an inbound Venus swingby providing a 60-day surface stay at Mars and an average total trip time of 520 days.

  20. Manned Mars mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Terrapin Technologies proposes a Manned Mars Mission design study. The purpose of the Manned Mars Mission is to transport ten people and a habitat with all required support systems and supplies from low Earth orbit (LEO) to the surface of Mars and, after an expedition of three months to return the personnel safely to LEO. The proposed hardware design is based on systems and components of demonstrated high capability and reliability. The mission design builds on past mission experience but incorporates innovative design approaches to achieve mission priorities. These priorities, in decreasing order of importance, are safety, reliability, minimum personnel transfer time, minimum weight, and minimum cost. The design demonstrates the feasibility and flexibility of a waverider transfer module. Information is given on how the plan meets the mission requirements.

  1. Mars Umbilical Technology Demonstrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houshangi, Nasser

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a autonomous umbilical mating for the mars umbilical technology demonstrator. The Mars Umbilical Technology Demonstrator (MUTD) shall provide electrical power and fiber optic data cable connections between two simulated mars vehicles. The Omnibot is used to provide the mobile base for the system. The mate to umbilical plate is mounted on a three axis Cartesian table, which is installed on the Omnibot mobile base. The Omnibot is controlled in a teleoperated mode. The operator using the vision system will guide the Omnibot to get close to the mate to plate. The information received from four ultrasonic sensors is used to identify the position of mate to plate and mate the umbilical plates autonomously. A successful experimentation verifies the approach.

  2. Mars Spark Source Prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichenberg, Dennis J.; Lindamood, Glenn R.; Weiland, Karen J.; VanderWal, Randall L.

    1999-01-01

    The Mars Spark Source Prototype (MSSP) hardware has been developed as part of a proof of concept system for the detection of trace metals such as lead, cadmium, and arsenic in Martian dusts and soils. A spark discharge produces plasma from a soil sample and detectors measure the optical emission from metals in the plasma that will allow their identification and quantification. Trace metal measurements are vital for the assessment of the potential toxicity of the Martian environment for human exploration. The current method of X-ray fluorescence can yield concentrations only of major species. Other instruments are incompatible with the volume, weight, and power constraints for a Mars mission. The instrument will be developed primarily for use in the Martian environment, but would be adaptable for terrestrial use in environmental monitoring. This paper describes the Mars Spark Source Prototype hardware, the results of the characterization tests, and future plans for hardware development.

  3. Mars Rover Studies Soil on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Both out on the plains of Gusev Crater and in the 'Columbia Hills,' NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit has encountered a thin (approximately 1 millimeter or 0.04 inch thick), light-colored, fine-grained layer of material on top of a dark-colored, coarser layer of soil. In the hills, Spirit stopped to take a closer look at soil compacted by one of the rover's wheels. Spirit took this image with the front hazard-avoidance camera during the rover's 314th martian day, or sol (Nov. 19, 2004).

  4. Methane on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnopolsky, V. A.

    Detection of methane on Mars has been claimed by Krasnopolsky Maillard Owen 2004 using FTS CFHT Formisano et al 2004 using PFS MEX and Mumma et al in preparation using CSHELL IRTF and Phoenix Gemini The measured abundances are 10 pm 3 ppb in Krasnopolsky et al 10 pm 5 ppb varying from 0 to 40 ppb in Formisano et al and 80 ppb varying from 30 to 300 ppb in Mumma et al The methane lifetime is sim 300 yr and its production loss is 300 tons yr -1 based on gas-phase chemistry Two basic questions are 1 why are the mean abundances so different and 2 how can methane vary if its lifetime is so long Variations of methane on Mars require a very effective heterogeneous loss of methane which is higher than that on Earth by a factor of ge 1000 although the expected efficiency on Earth is stronger than that on Mars because of the liquid ocean and the abundant oxygen Thermodynamic and kinetic data on the catalysis of methane do not also support variations of methane on Mars Production of methane on Mars by impacts of comets meteorites and interplanetary dust is sim 15 t yr -1 A probability that the observed methane on Mars came from impact of a single comet is 0 001 The lack of current volcanism hydrothermal activity hot spots and very low seepage of gases from the interior are not favorable for geologic methane Some weak points in the suggested geologic sources are discussed Though the geologic sources are not completely ruled out methanogenesis by living subterranean organisms is a plausible

  5. PERCIVAL mission to Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, David W.; Lilley, Stewart; Sirman, Melinda; Bolton, Paul; Elliott, Susan; Hamilton, Doug; Nickelson, James; Shelton, Artemus

    1992-01-01

    With the downturn of the world economy, the priority of unmanned exploration of the solar system has been lowered. Instead of foregoing all missions to our neighbors in the solar system, a new philosophy of exploration mission design has evolved to insure the continued exploration of the solar system. The 'Discovery-class' design philosophy uses a low cost, limited mission, available technology spacecraft instead of the previous 'Voyager-class' design philosophy that uses a 'do-everything at any cost' spacecraft. The Percival Mission to Mars was proposed by Ares Industries as one of the new 'Discovery-class' of exploration missions. The spacecraft will be christened Percival in honor of American astronomer Percival Lowell who proposed the existence of life on Mars in the early twentieth century. The main purpose of the Percival mission to Mars is to collect and relay scientific data to Earth suitable for designing future manned and unmanned missions to Mars. The measurements and observations made by Percival will help future mission designers to choose among landing sites based on the feasibility and scientific interest of the sites. The primary measurements conducted by the Percival mission include gravity field determination, surface and atmospheric composition, sub-surface soil composition, sub-surface seismic activity, surface weather patterns, and surface imaging. These measurements will be taken from the orbiting Percival spacecraft and from surface penetrators deployed from Mars orbit. The design work for the Percival Mission to Mars was divided among four technical areas: Orbits and Propulsion System, Surface Penetrators, Gravity and Science Instruments, and Spacecraft Structure and Systems. The results for each of the technical areas is summarized and followed by a design cost analysis and recommendations for future analyses.

  6. Six Landing Sites on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The landing site chosen for NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander, at about 68 degrees north latitude, is much farther north than the sites where previous spacecraft have landed on Mars.

    Color coding on this map indicates relative elevations based on data from the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter on NASA's Mars Global Surveyor. Red is higher elevation; blue is lower elevation. In longitude, the map extends from 70 degrees (north) to minus 70 degrees (south).

  7. Searching for ``Home Plates'' Near Gusev Crater, Mars: Spirit's Regional Context in an Area of Explosive Volcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, M. S.; Batista, A. E.; Bell, J. F.; Watters, W. A.

    2010-12-01

    The Mars Exploration Rover (MER) Spirit has spent the last 4.5 years of its mission exploring the vicinity of a feature called Home Plate in the Columbia Hills of Gusev Crater, Mars. Home Plate is an 80m-wide plateau of layered, light-toned rocks interpreted to be a pyroclastic deposit based on its composition of altered alakali basaltic clastics, its enrichment in volatiles, and the presence of a bomb-sag. Discoveries of sulfate- and silica-rich soils and outcrops near Home Plate, as well as a geochemical gradient across Home Plate, suggest that alteration by hydrothermal fluids occurred at this site. However, probable source vents have not been found along Spirit’s traverse, and the spatial and temporal extents of pyroclastic activity in Gusev Crater are currently unknown. In this work, we test the hypothesis that explosive volcanism was widespread in the Gusev Crater region. We have performed a comprehensive photomorphologic survey of a 300km square region that includes Gusev Crater and the southern flank of Apollinaris Patera. Using images from the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) and Context Camera (CTX) onboard Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO), and from the Mars Orbital Camera (MOC) onboard Mars Global Surveyor (MGS), we have searched for “Home Plates,” possible vents, and other morphologic indicators of hydrovolcanic activity. We have identified 80+ quasi-circular, light-toned, layered features similar to Home Plate in hill structures above the Gusev lava plains, in the hummocky terrain SE of Thira Crater, and NW of Gusev in Zephyria Mensae. In some locations, these “Home Plates” are paired with conical structures (similar to the “von Braun” or “Goddard” features in the Columbia Hills). We have also performed a visible to near-infrared hyperspectral survey of the same region using data from the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) instrument on MRO. Seven high-resolution (18 m/pix) CRISM

  8. Mars Says 'hi'!

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    12 October 2004 Although one might argue that most of the 'i' is missing, and part of the 'h' has been eroded away, this Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows light-toned sedimentary rock outcrops in northern Sinus Meridiani that almost seem to spell out the word, 'hi'. This natural graffiti is all that remains of a suite of sedimentary rock that once covered the area shown here. The 400 meter scale bar is about 437 yards long. The features are located near 1.8oN, 357.2oW. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  9. The stratigraphy of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanaka, Kenneth L.

    1986-01-01

    A global stratigraphy of Mars was developed from a global geologic map series derived from Viking images; the stratigraphy is composed of three maps. A new chronostratigraphic classification system which consists of lower, middle, and upper Noachian, Hesperian, and Amazonian systems is described. The crater-density boundaries of the chronostratigraphic units and the absolute ages of the Martian epochs aer estimated. The relative ages of major geologic units and featues are calculated and analyzed. The geologic history of Mars is summarized on the maps in terms of epochs.

  10. Ferric sulfates on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Roger G.

    1987-01-01

    Evidence is presented for the possible existence of ferric sulfato complexes and hydroxo ferric sulfate minerals in the permafrost of Mars. A sequential combination of ten unique conditions during the cooling history of Mars is suggested which is believed to have generated an environment within Martian permafrost that has stabilized Fe(3+)-SO4(2-)-bearing species. It is argued that minerals belonging to the jarosite and copiapite groups could be present in Martian regolith analyzed in the Viking XRF measurements at Chryse and Utopia, and that maghemite suspected to be coating the Viking magnet arrays is a hydrolysate of dissolved ferric sulfato complexes from exposed Martian permafrost.

  11. Mars sample return - Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, Douglas P.

    1988-01-01

    The possible scientific goals of a Mars sample return mission are reviewed, including the value of samples and the selection of sampling sites. The fundamental questions about Mars which could be studied using samples are examined, including planetary formation, differentiation, volcanism and petrogenesis, weathering, and erosion. Scenarios are presented for sample acquisition and analysis. Possible sampling methods and tools are discussed, including drilling techniques, types of rovers, and processing instruments. In addition, the possibility of aerocapture out of elliptical or circular orbit is considered.

  12. Mars mission research center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The Mars Mission Research Center is one of nine University Space Engineering Research Centers established by NASA to broaden the nation's engineering capability to meet the critical needs of the civilian space program. It has the goal of focusing on research and training technologies for planetary exploration with particular emphasis on Mars. The research combines: (1) composite materials and fabrication, (2) light weight structures and controls, and (3) hypersonic aerodynamics and propulsion in a cross disciplined program directed towards the development of the space transportation system for planetary travel.

  13. Iron Meteorite on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity has found an iron meteorite on Mars, the first meteorite of any type ever identified on another planet. The pitted, basketball-size object is mostly made of iron and nickel. Readings from spectrometers on the rover determined that composition. Opportunity used its panoramic camera to take the images used in this approximately true-color composite on the rover's 339th martian day, or sol (Jan. 6, 2005). This composite combines images taken through the panoramic camera's 600-nanometer (red), 530-nanometer (green), and 480-nanometer (blue) filters.

  14. Frost on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image shows bluish-white frost seen on the Martian surface near NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander. The image was taken by the lander's Surface Stereo Imager on the 131st Martian day, or sol, of the mission (Oct. 7, 2008). Frost is expected to continue to appear in images as fall, then winter approach Mars' northern plains.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  15. Gossans on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Roger G.

    1988-01-01

    The appearance of rusty iron-rich oxidized cappings over sulfide-bearing rocks on earth indicates that similar gossans may have formed on the surface of Mars. Electrochemical processes and thermodynamic relationships linking acidity to oxidation-reduction reactions between primary sulfide minerals and their oxidative weathering products present in the regolith of Mars are discussed. Remote-sensed visible spectra of the Martian surface are in keeping with the presence of poorly-crystalline FeOOH, jarosite, silica, and clay silicates found in gossans, while incompletely weathered pyrrhotite may represent the magnetic material observed in Martian regolith.

  16. Terraforming earth and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Joel S.

    1992-01-01

    The uncontrolled character of current earth environment changes ascribable to anthropogenic pollutants is presently contrasted with the prospects for a controlled, long-term program of 'terraforming' for Mars, whose culmination could be the introduction of organisms able to thrive in the new Martian environment in carefully designed ways. A detailed discussion is conducted concerning the chemical building-blocks available on Mars for this manner of 'environmental engineering', with frequent reference to comparable and contrasting features of the terrestrial surface, hydrosphere and atmosphere.

  17. Antidiabetic Effects of Aqueous Infusions of Artemisia herba-alba and Ajuga iva in Alloxan-Induced Diabetic Rats.

    PubMed

    Boudjelal, Amel; Siracusa, Laura; Henchiri, Cherifa; Sarri, Madani; Abderrahim, Benkhaled; Baali, Faiza; Ruberto, Giuseppe

    2015-06-01

    The aqueous infusions of the aerial parts of Artemisia herba-alba Asso and Ajuga iva Schreber, prepared in accordance with the traditional procedure used in the local folk medicine, have been analysed for their composition and content of phytochemical constituents and examined for their antidiabetic effectiveness in alloxan-induced diabetic rats. Oral administration of A. herba-alba and A. iva infusions was studied in normal and alloxan-induced diabetic rats, which were randomly divided into nine groups, each group consisting of six animals. The drug preparations (100, 200, and 300 mg/kg b. w.) of each plant were given orally to the rats of each group twice daily for 15 days. Compositional analysis of the aqueous infusions revealed the presence of several polyphenols as main components. A. herba-alba infusion was characterised by mono- and di-cinnamoylquinic acids, with 5-caffeoylquinic (chlorogenic) acid being the main compound, followed by 3,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid. Vicenin-2 (apigenin 6,8-di-C-glucoside) appeared to be the most abundant among flavonoids. On the other hand, A. iva showed the exclusive presence of flavonoids, with the flavanone naringin present in relatively high levels together with several apigenin (flavone) derivatives. Oral administration of 300 mg/kg b. w. of the aqueous infusions of A. herba-alba and A. iva exhibited a significant reduction in blood glucose content, showing a much more efficient antidiabetic activity compared to glibenclamide, the oral hypoglycaemic agent used as a positive control in this study. These results suggest that A. herba-alba and A. iva possess significant antidiabetic activity, as they were able to improve the biochemical damage in alloxan-induced diabetes in rats. PMID:26018915

  18. Exogenous stimulation with Eclipta alba promotes hair matrix keratinocyte proliferation and downregulates TGF-β1 expression in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Begum, Shahnaz; Lee, Mi Ra; Gu, Li Juan; Hossain, Jamil; Sung, Chang Keun

    2015-02-01

    Eclipta alba (L.) Hassk (E. alba) is a traditionally acclaimed medicinal herb used for the promotion of hair growth. However, to the best of our knowledge, no report has been issued to date on its effects on genetically distorted hair follicles (HFs). In this study, we aimed to identify an agent (stimuli) that may be beneficial for the restoration of human hair loss and which may be used as an alternative to synthetic drugs. We investigated the effects of petroleum ether extract (PEE) and different solvent fractions of E. alba on HFs of nude mice. Treatment was performed by topical application on the backs of nude mice and the changes in hair growth patterns were evaluated. Histological analysis was carried out to evaluate the HF morphology and the structural differences. Immunohistochemical (IHC) staining was performed to visualize follicular keratinocyte proliferation. The histological assessments revealed that the PEE-treated skin specimens exhibited prominent follicular hypertrophy. Subsequently, IHC staining revealed a significant increase (p<0.001) in the number of follicular keratinocytes in basal epidermal and matrix cells. Our results also demonstrated that PEE significantly (p<0.001) reduced the levels of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) expression during early anagen and anagen-catagen transition. Our results suggest that PEE of E. alba acts as an important exogenous mediator that stimulates follicular keratinocyte proliferation and delays terminal differentiation by downregulating TGF-β1 expression. Thus, this study highlights the potential use of PEE of E. alba in the treatment of certain types of alopecia. PMID:25484129

  19. Pre-sedation and transport of Rhamdia quelen in water containing essential oil of Lippia alba: metabolic and physiological responses.

    PubMed

    Becker, Alexssandro G; Parodi, Thaylise V; Zeppenfeld, Carla C; Salbego, Joseânia; Cunha, Mauro A; Heldwein, Clarissa G; Loro, Vania L; Heinzmann, Berta M; Baldisserotto, Bernardo

    2016-02-01

    The effects of transporting silver catfish (Rhamdia quelen) for 6 h in plastic bags containing 0 (control), 30 or 40 µL/L of essential oil (EO) from Lippia alba leaves were investigated. Prior to transport, the fish in the two experimental groups were sedated with 200 µL/L of EO for 3 min. After transport, dissolved oxygen, carbon dioxide, alkalinity, water hardness, pH, temperature and un-ionized ammonia levels in the transport water did not differ significantly among the groups. However, total ammonia nitrogen levels and net Na(+), Cl(-) and K(+) effluxes were significantly lower in the groups transported with EO of L. alba than those in the control group. PvO2, PvCO2 and HCO3(-) were higher after transporting fish in 40 µL/L of EO of L. alba, but there were no significant differences between groups regarding blood pH or hematocrit. Cortisol levels were significantly higher in fish transported in 30 µL/L of EO of L. alba compared to those of the control group. The metabolic parameters (glycogen, lactate, total amino acid, total ammonia and total protein) showed different responses after adding EO to the transport water. In conclusion, while the EO of L. alba is recommended for fish transport in the conditions tested in the present study because it was effective in reducing waterborne total ammonia levels and net ion loss, the higher hepatic oxidative stress in this species with the same EO concentrations reported by a previous study led us to conclude that the 10-20 µL/L concentration range of EO and lack of pre-sedation before transport are more effective. PMID:26297516

  20. Mars exploration: follow the water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Young Ho

    2004-01-01

    Over the centuries, the red planet Mars has been a subject of imagination as well as intense scientific interest. As the overwhelming success of two Mars Exploration Rovers unfolds before us, this article provides an overview of and rationale for NASA's Mars exploration program.

  1. Sand and Dust on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, Ronald; Haberle, Robert M.

    1991-01-01

    Mars is a planet of high scientific interest. Various studies are currently being made that involve vehicles that have landed on Mars. Because Mars is known to experience frequent wind storms, mission planners and engineers require knowledge of the physical and chemical properties of Martian windblown sand and dust, and the processes involved in the origin and evolution of sand and dust storms.

  2. Mars Pathfinder and Mars Global Surveyor Outreach Compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This videotape is a compilation of the best NASA JPL (Jet Propulsion Laboratory) videos of the Mars Pathfinder and Mars Global Surveyor missions. The mission is described using animation and narration as well as some actual footage of the entire sequence of mission events. Included within these animations are the spacecraft orbit insertion; descent to the Mars surface; deployment of the airbags and instruments; and exploration by Sojourner, the Mars rover. JPL activities at spacecraft control during significant mission events are also included at the end. The spacecraft cameras pan the surrounding Mars terrain and film Sojourner traversing the surface and inspecting rocks. A single, brief, processed image of the Cydonia region (Mars face) at an oblique angle from the Mars Global Surveyor is presented. A description of the Mars Pathfinder mission, instruments, landing and deployment process, Mars approach, spacecraft orbit insertion, rover operation are all described using computer animation. Actual color footage of Sojourner as well as a 360 deg pan of the Mars terrain surrounding the spacecraft is provided. Lower quality black and white photography depicting Sojourner traversing the Mars surface and inspecting Martian rocks also is included.

  3. Giant saltation on Mars

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Murilo P.; Parteli, Eric J. R.; Andrade, José S.; Herrmann, Hans J.

    2008-01-01

    Saltation, the motion of sand grains in a sequence of ballistic trajectories close to the ground, is a major factor for surface erosion, dune formation, and triggering of dust storms on Mars. Although this mode of sand transport has been matter of research for decades through both simulations and wind tunnel experiments under Earth and Mars conditions, it has not been possible to provide accurate measurements of particle trajectories in fully developed turbulent flow. Here we calculate the motion of saltating grains by directly solving the turbulent wind field and its interaction with the particles. Our calculations show that the minimal wind velocity required to sustain saltation on Mars may be surprisingly lower than the aerodynamic minimal threshold measurable in wind tunnels. Indeed, Mars grains saltate in 100 times higher and longer trajectories and reach 5-10 times higher velocities than Earth grains do. On the basis of our results, we arrive at general expressions that can be applied to calculate the length and height of saltation trajectories and the flux of grains in saltation under various physical conditions, when the wind velocity is close to the minimal threshold for saltation. PMID:18443302

  4. Oxalate minerals on Mars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Applin, D. M.; Izawa, M. R. M.; Cloutis, E. A.; Goltz, D.; Johnson, J. R.

    2015-06-01

    Small amounts of unidentified organic compounds have only recently been inferred on Mars despite strong reasons to expect significant concentrations and decades of searching. Based on X-ray diffraction and reflectance spectroscopic analyses we show that solid oxalic acid and its most common mineral salts are stable under the pressure and ultraviolet irradiation environment of the surface of Mars, and could represent a heretofore largely overlooked reservoir of organic carbon in the martian near-surface. In addition to the delivery to Mars by carbonaceous chondrites, oxalate minerals are among the predicted breakdown products of meteoritic organic matter delivered to the martian surface, as well as any endogenic organic carbon reaching the martian surface from the interior. A reinterpretation of pyrolysis experiments from the Viking, Phoenix, and Mars Science Laboratory missions shows that all are consistent with the presence of significant concentrations of oxalate minerals. Oxalate minerals could be important in numerous martian geochemical processes, including acting as a possible nitrogen sink (as ammonium oxalate), and contributing to the formation of “organic” carbonates, methane, and hydroxyl radicals.

  5. Reconstructing Glaciers on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, A., II; Brough, S.; Hubbard, B. P.

    2015-12-01

    Mars' mid-latitudes host a substantial volume of ice, equivalent to a ~1 - 2.5 m-thick global layer or the sum of Earth's glaciers and ice caps outside of Antarctica and Greenland. These deposits are the remnants of what is believed to have been a once far larger 'ice age', culminating in a last martian glacial maximum. Despite the identification of >1,300 glacier-like forms (GLFs) - the first order component of Mars' glacial landsystem - in Mars' mid-latitudes, little is known about their composition, dynamics or former extent. Here, we reconstruct the former 3D extent of a well-studied GLF located in eastern Hellas Planitia. We combine high-resolution geomorphic and topographic data, obtained from the High-Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera, to reconstruct the GLF's former limits. We then apply a perfect plasticity rheological model, to generate multiple flow-parallel ice-surface transects. These are combined with the GLF's boundary to guide interpolation using ArcGIS' 'Topo to Raster' function to produce a continuous 3D surface for the reconstructed former GLF. Our results indicate that, since its reconstructed 'recent maximum' extent, the GLF's volume has reduced by 0.31 km3 and its area by 6.85 km2, or 70%. On-going research is addressing the degree to which this change is typical of Mars' full GLF population.

  6. Mars rover RTG study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schock, A.; Hamrick, T.; Or, T.; Sankarankandath, V.; Skrabek, E.; Shirbacheh, M.

    1989-01-01

    The paper describes the design and analysis of radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) for powering the Mars rover vehicle, which is a critical element of the unmanned Mars Rover and Sample Return mission (MRSR). A brief description is given of a reference mission scenario, an illustrative rover design and activity pattern on Mars, power system requirements, and environmental constraints, including the RTG cooling requirements during transit to Mars. The key RTG design problem, i.e. venting the helium generated by the fuel's alpha decay without intrusion of the Martian atmosphere into the RTG, is identified and a design approach to solve that problem is proposed. The study's primary objective is to quantify the performance improvements achievable in new successfully developed technologies, to estimate the required time, effort, success probability, and programmatic risk in developing these new technologies, and thus to help identify the best strategy for meeting the MRSR system goals. Finally, the paper compares the RTGs' specific powers for different power levels (250W vs 125W), different thermoelectric element designs (standard vs short unicouples vs multicouples), and different thermoelectric figures of merit (0.00058K to the -1 to 0.00140K to the -1).

  7. Giant saltation on Mars.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Murilo P; Parteli, Eric J R; Andrade, José S; Herrmann, Hans J

    2008-04-29

    Saltation, the motion of sand grains in a sequence of ballistic trajectories close to the ground, is a major factor for surface erosion, dune formation, and triggering of dust storms on Mars. Although this mode of sand transport has been matter of research for decades through both simulations and wind tunnel experiments under Earth and Mars conditions, it has not been possible to provide accurate measurements of particle trajectories in fully developed turbulent flow. Here we calculate the motion of saltating grains by directly solving the turbulent wind field and its interaction with the particles. Our calculations show that the minimal wind velocity required to sustain saltation on Mars may be surprisingly lower than the aerodynamic minimal threshold measurable in wind tunnels. Indeed, Mars grains saltate in 100 times higher and longer trajectories and reach 5-10 times higher velocities than Earth grains do. On the basis of our results, we arrive at general expressions that can be applied to calculate the length and height of saltation trajectories and the flux of grains in saltation under various physical conditions, when the wind velocity is close to the minimal threshold for saltation. PMID:18443302

  8. Mars landing site catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, Ronald (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    The catalog was compiled from material provided by the planetary community for areas on Mars that are of potential interest for future exploration. The catalog has been edited for consistency insofar as practical; however, the proposed scientific objectives and characteristics have not been reviewed. This is a working catalog that is being revised, updated, and expanded continually.

  9. Darwin to Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, R.; Kolb, V.

    2003-04-01

    The search for life on Mars will be greatly facilitated if some insights are provided into the following questions: would prebiotic chemical evolution on Mars produce the same or reasonably similar types of life as we have on Earth and if not, can we anticipate what non-Earth biosignatures would look like? To answer these questions, we examine the applicability of Darwinian principles to prebiotic evolution and discuss the application of algorithms to Darwinian selection. We utilize both a bottom-up, philosophical approach, and a top-down approach, in which we attempt to extend different concepts of biotic evolution. These include a gradual transition, quantum evolution, and punctuated equilibrium to a "transition" zone of inorganic to prebiotic chemistry and to early biotic transitions. We suggest a new definition of life that may be useful for the search for life on Mars. We apply this definition to a complex inorganic-organic-biotic system on Earth, commonly called desert varnish. We then apply what we have learned to develop a protocol for the search for biotic components in desert varnishes on Earth, as a control, and on Mars, where varnish coatings may exist.

  10. Footprints on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, Bret G.

    2013-01-01

    The first three human missions to Mars should be to three different geographic sites. Maximize mobility to extend the reach of human exploration beyond the landing site. Maximize the amount of time that the astronauts spend exploring the planet. Provide subsurface access. Return a minimum of 250 kg of samples to Earth.

  11. The Phoenix Mars Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tamppari, Leslie K.; Smith, Peter H.

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation details the Phoenix Mission which was designed to enhance our understanding of water and the potential for habitability on the north polar regions of Mars. The slides show the instruments and the robotics designed to scrape Martian surface material, and analyze it in hopes of identifying water in the form of ice, and other chemicals.

  12. Fission Xenon on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathew, K. J.; Marti, K.; Marty, B.

    2002-01-01

    Fission Xe components due to Pu-244 decay in the early history of Mars have been identified in nakhlites; as in the case of ALH84001 and Chassigny the fission gas was assimilated into indigenous solar-type Xe. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  13. Mars brine formation experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Jeffrey M.; Bullock, Mark A.; Stoker, Carol R.

    1992-01-01

    Evaporites, particularly carbonates, nitrates, and sulfates, may be major sinks of volatiles scavenged from the martian atmosphere. Mars is thought to have once had a denser, warmer atmosphere that permitted the presence of liquid surface water. The conversion of atmospheric CO2 into carbonate is hypothesized to have degraded the martian climate to its present state of a generally subfreezing, desiccated desert. The rate for such a conversion under martian conditions is poorly known, so the time scale of climate degradation by this process cannot be easily evaluated. If some models are correct, carbonate formation may have been fast at geological time scales. The experiments of Booth and Kieffer also imply fast (10(exp 6) - 10(exp 7) yr) removal of the missing CO2 inventory, estimated to be 1 - 5 bar, by means of carbonate formation. The timing of formation of many of the fluvial features observed on Mars is, in large part, dependent on when and how fast the atmosphere changed. A knowledge of the rate at which carbonates and nitrates formed is also essential for assessing the probability that life, or its chemical precursors, could have developed on Mars. No previous experiments have quantitatively evaluated the rate of solution for a suite of mobile anions and cations from unaltered minerals and atmospheric gases into liquid water under Mars-like conditions. Such experiments are the focus of this task.

  14. Mars Communication Protocols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazz, G. J.; Greenberg, E.

    2000-01-01

    Over the next decade, international plans and commitments are underway to develop an infrastructure at Mars to support future exploration of the red planet. The purpose of this infrastructure is to provide reliable global communication and navigation coverage for on-approach, landed, roving, and in-flight assets at Mars. The claim is that this infrastructure will: 1) eliminate the need of these assets to carry Direct to Earth (DTE) communications equipment, 2) significantly increase data return and connectivity, 3) enable small mission exploration of Mars without DTE equipment, 4) provide precision navigation i.e., 10 to 100m position resolution, 5) supply timing reference accurate to 10ms. This paper in particular focuses on two CCSDS recommendations for that infrastructure: CCSDS Proximity-1 Space Link Protocol and CCSDS File Delivery Protocol (CFDP). A key aspect of Mars exploration will be the ability of future missions to interoperate. These protocols establish a framework for interoperability by providing standard communication, navigation, and timing services. In addition, these services include strategies to recover gracefully from communication interruptions and interference while ensuring backward compatibility with previous missions from previous phases of exploration.

  15. Near-Mars space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luhmann, J. G.; Brace, L. H.

    1991-01-01

    The prevalent attributes of near-Mars space are described: the ambient interplanetary environment, the ionosphere, the upper atmosphere, and more remote regions that are affected by the presence of Mars. The descriptions are based on existing Martian data and/or models constructed from measurements made near Venus. Specific attention is given to the features of solar wind interaction with magnetospheric and ionospheric obstacles. The high-altitude plasma and field environment, the energetic particle environment, the ionosphere environment, and the neutral upper atmosphere environment are described with extensive graphic information, based on existing measurements collected from nine Martian missions. The ionospheric obstacle is assumed to prevail as a mechanism for describing the scenario. Martian perturbation of solar wind is theorized to be of a relatively small order. A distinctive local energetic particle population of planetary origin is shown to result from the direct interaction of solar wind plasma. This phenomenon is considered evidence of the important scavenging of planetary elements from Mars. The absence of a planetary dipole field around Mars, like its low gravity and distance from the sun, is considered important in determining the environment of this earthlike laboratory.

  16. Mars manned transportation vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Davis, M.E.; Faymon, K.A.

    1987-07-01

    A viable power system technology for a surface transportation vehicle to explore the planet Mars is presented. A number of power traction systems were investigated, and it was found that a regenerative hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell appears to be attractive for a manned Mars rover application. Mission requirements were obtained from the Manned Mars Mission Working Group. Power systems weights, power, and reactants requirements were determined as a function of vehicle weights for vehicles weighing from 6,000 to 16,000 lb (2,722 to 7,257 kg), (Earth weight). The vehicle performance requirements were: velocity, 10 km/hr; range, 100 km; slope climbing capability, 30 deg uphill for 50 km; mission duration, 5 days; and crew, 5. Power requirements for the operation of scientific equipment and support system capabilities were also specified and included in this study. The concept developed here would also be applicable to a Lunar based vehicle for Lunar exploration. The reduced gravity on the Lunar surface, (over that on the Martian surface), would result in an increased range or capability over that of the Mars vehicle since many of the power and energy requirements for the vehicle are gravity dependent.

  17. Hidden carbon dioxide on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberle, M. R.

    1985-12-01

    A recent proposal that much of the outgassed CO2 on Mars is tied up in the planet's crust in the form of carbonate mineral is discussed. According to this hypothesis, carbonate formation on Mars continued after open bodies of liquid water became unstable. A consequence of the hypothesis is that, in the absence of a recycling mechanism for CO2, the surface pressure on Mars will monotonically decrease until it reaches the minimum atmospheric overburden pressure required for liquid water to form. The theory explains Mars' low surface pressure, and also implies that the climate of Mars has evolved linearly over geologic time, rather than cyclically.

  18. Hidden carbon dioxide on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haberle, R. M.

    1985-01-01

    A recent proposal that much of the outgassed CO2 on Mars is tied up in the planet's crust in the form of carbonate mineral is discussed. According to this hypothesis, carbonate formation on Mars continued after open bodies of liquid water became unstable. A consequence of the hypothesis is that, in the absence of a recycling mechanism for CO2, the surface pressure on Mars will monotonically decrease until it reaches the minimum atmospheric overburden pressure required for liquid water to form. The theory explains Mars' low surface pressure, and also implies that the climate of Mars has evolved linearly over geologic time, rather than cyclically.

  19. The Mars Pathfinder Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golombek, Matthew P.

    1997-01-01

    Mars Pathfinder, one of the first Discovery-class missions (quick, low-cost projects with focused science objectives), will land a single spacecraft with a microrover and several instruments on the surface of Mars in 1997. Pathfinder will be the first mission to use a rover, carrying a chemical analysis instrument, to characterize the rocks and soils in a landing area over hundreds of square meters on Mars, which will provide a calibration point or "ground truth" for orbital remote sensing observations. In addition to the rover, which also performs a number of technology experiments, Pathfinder carries three science instruments: a stereoscopic imager with spectral filters on an extendable mast, an alpha proton X ray spectrometer, and an atmospheric structure instrument/meteorology package. The instruments, the rover technology experiments, and the telemetry system will allow investigations of the surface morphology and geology at submeter to a hundred meters scale, the petrology and geochemistry of rocks and soils, the magnetic properties of dust, soil mechanics and properties, a variety of atmospheric investigations, and the rotational and orbital dynamics of Mars. Landing downstream from the mouth of a giant catastrophic outflow channel, Ares Vallis at 19.5 deg N, 32.8 deg W, offers the potential of identifying and analyzing a wide variety of crustal materials, from the ancient heavily cratered terrain, intermediate-aged ridged plains, and reworked channel deposits, thus allowing first-order scientific investigations of the early differentiation and evolution of the crust, the development of weathering products, and tile early environments and conditions on Mars.

  20. Mars Surface Environmental Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charles, John

    2002-01-01

    Planetary exploration by astronauts will require extended periods of habitation on a planet's surface, under the influence of environmental factors that are different from those of Earth and the spacecraft that delivered the crew to the planet. Human exploration of Mars, a possible near-term planetary objective, can be considered a challenging scenario. Mission scenarios currently under consideration call for surface habitation periods of from 1 to 18 months on even the earliest expeditions. Methods: Environmental issues associated with Mars exploration have been investigated by NASA and the National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) as part of the Bioastronautics Critical Path Roadmap Project (see http ://criticalpath.jsc.nasa.gov). Results: Arrival on Mars will immediately expose the crew to gravity only 38% of that at Earth's surface in possibly the first prolonged exposure to gravity other than the 1G of Earth's surface and the zero G of weightless space flight, with yet unknown effects on crew physiology. The radiation at Mars' surface is not well documented, although the planet's bulk and even its thin atmosphere may moderate the influx of galactic cosmic radiation and energetic protons from solar flares. Secondary radiation from activated components of the soil must also be considered. Ultrafine and larger respirable and nonrespirable particles in Martian dust introduced into the habitat after surface excursions may induce pulmonary inflammation exacerbated by the additive reactive and oxidizing nature of the dust. Stringent decontamination cannot eliminate mechanical and corrosive effects of the dust on pressure suits and exposed machinery. The biohazard potential of putative indigenous Martian microorganisms may be assessed by comparison with analog environments on Earth. Even in their absence, human microorganisms, if not properly controlled, can be a threat to the crew's health. Conclusions: Mars' surface offers a substantial challenge to the

  1. [MaRS Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aruljothi, Arunvenkatesh

    2016-01-01

    The Space Exploration Division of the Safety and Mission Assurances Directorate is responsible for reducing the risk to Human Space Flight Programs by providing system safety, reliability, and risk analysis. The Risk & Reliability Analysis branch plays a part in this by utilizing Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) and Reliability and Maintainability (R&M) tools to identify possible types of failure and effective solutions. A continuous effort of this branch is MaRS, or Mass and Reliability System, a tool that was the focus of this internship. Future long duration space missions will have to find a balance between the mass and reliability of their spare parts. They will be unable take spares of everything and will have to determine what is most likely to require maintenance and spares. Currently there is no database that combines mass and reliability data of low level space-grade components. MaRS aims to be the first database to do this. The data in MaRS will be based on the hardware flown on the International Space Stations (ISS). The components on the ISS have a long history and are well documented, making them the perfect source. Currently, MaRS is a functioning excel workbook database; the backend is complete and only requires optimization. MaRS has been populated with all the assemblies and their components that are used on the ISS; the failures of these components are updated regularly. This project was a continuation on the efforts of previous intern groups. Once complete, R&M engineers working on future space flight missions will be able to quickly access failure and mass data on assemblies and components, allowing them to make important decisions and tradeoffs.

  2. Phoenix Lander on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander monitors the atmosphere overhead and reaches out to the soil below in this artist's depiction of the spacecraft fully deployed on the surface of Mars.

    Phoenix has been assembled and tested for launch in August 2007 from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla., and for landing in May or June 2008 on an arctic plain of far-northern Mars. The mission responds to evidence returned from NASA's Mars Odyssey orbiter in 2002 indicating that most high-latitude areas on Mars have frozen water mixed with soil within arm's reach of the surface.

    Phoenix will use a robotic arm to dig down to the expected icy layer. It will analyze scooped-up samples of the soil and ice for factors that will help scientists evaluate whether the subsurface environment at the site ever was, or may still be, a favorable habitat for microbial life. The instruments on Phoenix will also gather information to advance understanding about the history of the water in the icy layer. A weather station on the lander will conduct the first study Martian arctic weather from ground level.

    The vertical green line in this illustration shows how the weather station on Phoenix will use a laser beam from a lidar instrument to monitor dust and clouds in the atmosphere. The dark 'wings' to either side of the lander's main body are solar panels for providing electric power.

    The Phoenix mission is led by Principal Investigator Peter H. Smith of the University of Arizona, Tucson, with project management at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and development partnership with Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver. International contributions for Phoenix are provided by the Canadian Space Agency, the University of Neuchatel (Switzerland), the University of Copenhagen (Denmark), the Max Planck Institute (Germany) and the Finnish Meteorological institute. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  3. Mars Observer Orbit Insertion Briefing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    For the first part of this briefing, see NONP-NASA-VT-2000081556. Marvin Traxler continues his discussion on signal tracking from the Mars Observer. Julie Webster, Lead Engineer, Telecommunications Subsystem, is introduced. She explains how signals coming back from Mars are detected. Dr. Pasquale Esposito talks about flyby orbits and capture orbits. He says that frequencies coming from the spacecraft can determine if the spacecraft has flown by Mars, or if a capture orbit has occurred. Charles Whetsel, System Engineer Spacecraft Team, presents a computer program. He shows where the signal will appear on the computer from the Spacecraft. Suzanne Dodd presents orbit insertion geometry. Dr. Arden Albee, Project Scientist Mars Observer Project, Cal Tech tech, says that Mars is studied to get more data to confirm their hypotheses derived from previous Mars Missions such as the Viking Mars Program and the Mariner Program. Dr. Albee also describes instrumentation on the Mars Observer such as the Ultra Stable Oscillator, Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter, and Magnetometer. The camera on the spacecraft is similar to a fax machine because it scans one line at a time as the spacecraft orbits Mars. Dr. Michael Malin, Principle Investigator Mars Observer Camera, Malin Space Science Systems, Inc., describe this process.

  4. Pityriasis alba

    MedlinePlus

    ... your child has patches of hypopigmented skin. Images Skin layers References Habif TP. Light-related diseases and disorders of pigmentation. In: Habif TP, ed. Clinical Dermatology: A Color Guide to ... Skin Pathology . 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Churchill Livingstone; ...

  5. Pityriasis Alba

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sections of the JAOCD JAOCD Archive Published Members Online Dermatology Journals Edit This Favorite Name: Category: Share: Yes ... 2/2017 2017 AOCD Spring Current Concepts in Dermatology Meeting more Latest News ... Surveys About AOCD The AOCD was recognized in ...

  6. Pityriasis Alba

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2006-2013 Logical Images, Inc. All rights reserved. Advertising Notice This Site and third parties who place ... would like to obtain more information about these advertising practices and to make choices about online behavioral ...

  7. Potential pancreatic lipase inhibitory activity of phenolic constituents from the root bark of Morus alba L.

    PubMed

    Ha, Manh Tuan; Tran, Manh Hung; Ah, Kim Jeong; Jo, Kyung-Jin; Kim, Jaewang; Kim, Wook Dong; Cheon, Woo Jae; Woo, Mi Hee; Ryu, Sung Ho; Min, Byung Sun

    2016-06-15

    Detailed phytochemical investigation from the root bark of Morus alba resulted in the isolation of eleven new compounds, including seven 2-arylbenzofuran derivatives (morusalfurans A-G), three flavonoids (morusalnols A-C), and one geranylated stilbene (morusibene A), as well as 22 known compounds. The structures of the identified compounds were elucidated based on a comprehensive analysis of spectroscopic data and Mosher's method. Compounds 2, 3, 6-8, 11, 23, 24, and 29 showed potent inhibition of PL in comparison with the positive control treatment (orlistat, IC50=0.012μM), with IC50 values ranging from 0.09 to 0.92μM. PMID:27156775

  8. Laser effects on the growth and photosynthesis process in mustard plants (Sinapis Alba)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anghel, Sorin; Stanescu, Constantin S.; Giosanu, Dana; Flenacu, Monica; Iorga-Siman, Ion

    2001-06-01

    In this paper we present the results of our experiments concerning the influence of the low energy laser (LEL) radiation on the germination, growth and photosyntheses processes in mustard plants (sinapis alba). We used a He-Ne laser ((lambda) equals 632.8 nm, P equals 6 mW) to irradiate the mustard seeds with different exposure times. The seeds were sowed and some determinations (the germination and growth intensity, chlorophyll quantity, and respiration intensity) were made on the plant culture. We ascertained that the germination and growth of the plants are influenced by the irradiation. Also, the chlorophyll quantity is the same for both plants from irradiated and non-irradiated seeds but the respiration and photosynthesis processes are influenced by the irradiation.

  9. Trends in North American small mammals found in common barn-owl (Tyto alba) dietary studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, D.R., Jr.; Bunck, C.M.

    1991-01-01

    Data on mammals were compiled from published studies of common barn-owl (Tyto alba) pellets. Mammalian composition of pellet samples was analyzed within geographic regions in regard to year, mean annual precipitation, latitude, and number of individual mammals in the sample. Percentages of individuals in pellets that were shrews increased whereas the percentages of rodents decreased with greater mean annual precipitation, especially in northern and western areas of North America. From the 1920s through 1980s, in northern and eastern areas the percentage of species that was shrews decreased, and in northern and central areas the percentage of individuals that was murid rats and mice increased. Human alterations of habitats during these seven decades are postulated to have caused changes in available small mammals, leading to changes in the barn-owl diet.

  10. UV-B Inhibition of Phytochrome-Mediated Anthocyanin Formation in Sinapis alba L. Cotyledons 1

    PubMed Central

    Wellmann, Eckard; Schneider-Ziebert, Ulricke; Beggs, Christopher J.

    1984-01-01

    An action spectrum was measured for ultraviolet (UV) radiation-induced damage to (inhibition of) phytochrome-induced anthocyanin formation in cotyledons of 40-hour-old Sinapis alba L. seedlings. The action spectrum showed maximum effectiveness in the 260 to 280 nanometer waveband with little effect above 295 nanometers. The damaging effect of UV could be photorepaired by subsequent exposure to sunlight or to long wavelength (360 nanometers) UV radiation. Because this form of damage is subject to photorepair (photoreactivation), it is probably due to the formation of pyrimidine dimers, and the results suggest that it would not be ecologically relevant even if there was an increase in solar UV due to a decrease in stratospheric ozone levels of about 30%. If a dark period of more than 1 hour is interspersed between the phytochrome induction and the UV irradiation, the inhibition of the phytochrome induction gradually decreases with increasing dark period. PMID:16663776

  11. A soft X-ray beamline for transmission X-ray microscopy at ALBA.

    PubMed

    Pereiro, E; Nicolás, J; Ferrer, S; Howells, M R

    2009-07-01

    The MISTRAL beamline is one of the seven phase-I beamlines at the ALBA synchrotron light source (Barcelona, Spain) that will be opened to users at the end of 2010. MISTRAL will be devoted to cryotomography in the water window and multi-keV spectral regions for biological applications. The optics design consists of a plane-grating monochromator that has been implemented using variable-line-spacing gratings to fulfil the requirements of X-ray microscopy using a reflective condenser. For instance, a fixed-focus condition independent of the included angle, constant magnification as well as coma and spherical aberration corrections are achieved with this system. The reported design is of wider use. PMID:19535865

  12. Effects of the Methanol Extract of Basella alba L (Basellaceae) on Steroid Production in Leydig Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nantia, Edouard Akono; Travert, Carine; Manfo, Faustin-Pascal T.; Carreau, Serge; Monsees, Thomas K.; Moundipa, Paul Fewou

    2011-01-01

    In this study, Leydig cells were purified from 70 day-old Sprague Dawley male rats and incubated with 10 and 100 μg/mL of methanol extract of Basella alba (MEBa) for 4 hours followed by the evaluation of cell viability, steroid (testosterone and estradiol) production, and the level of aromatase mRNA. Results showed that MEBa did not affect Leydig cell viability. At the concentration of 10 μg/mL, MEBa significantly stimulated testosterone and estradiol production (p < 0.01 and p < 0.03, respectively), and enhanced aromatase mRNA level (p < 0.04). These observations suggest that MEBa directly stimulated testosterone, estradiol and aromatase mRNA levels in isolated Leydig cells. PMID:21339992

  13. Effects of the methanol extract of Basella alba L (Basellaceae) on steroid production in Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Nantia, Edouard Akono; Travert, Carine; Manfo, Faustin-Pascal T; Carreau, Serge; Monsees, Thomas K; Moundipa, Paul Fewou

    2011-01-01

    In this study, Leydig cells were purified from 70 day-old Sprague Dawley male rats and incubated with 10 and 100 μg/mL of methanol extract of Basella alba (MEBa) for 4 hours followed by the evaluation of cell viability, steroid (testosterone and estradiol) production, and the level of aromatase mRNA. Results showed that MEBa did not affect Leydig cell viability. At the concentration of 10 μg/mL, MEBa significantly stimulated testosterone and estradiol production (p < 0.01 and p < 0.03, respectively), and enhanced aromatase mRNA level (p < 0.04). These observations suggest that MEBa directly stimulated testosterone, estradiol and aromatase mRNA levels in isolated Leydig cells. PMID:21339992

  14. Fatty acids composition of Spanish black (Morus nigra L.) and white (Morus alba L.) mulberries.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Salcedo, Eva M; Sendra, Esther; Carbonell-Barrachina, Ángel A; Martínez, Juan José; Hernández, Francisca

    2016-01-01

    This research has determined qualitatively and quantitatively the fatty acids composition of white (Morus alba) and black (Morus nigra) fruits grown in Spain, in 2013 and 2014. Four clones of each species were studied. Fourteen fatty acids were identified and quantified in mulberry fruits. The most abundant fatty acids were linoleic (C18:2), palmitic (C16:0), oleic (C18:1), and stearic (C18:0) acids in both species. The main fatty acid in all clones was linoleic (C18:2), that ranged from 69.66% (MN2) to 78.02% (MA1) of the total fatty acid content; consequently Spanish mulberry fruits were found to be rich in linoleic acid, which is an essential fatty acid. The fatty acid composition of mulberries highlights the nutritional and health benefits of their consumption. PMID:26213011

  15. Antidiabetic and Antioxidant Effects and Phytochemicals of Mulberry Fruit (Morus alba L.) Polyphenol Enhanced Extract

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yihai; Xiang, Limin; Wang, Chunhua; Tang, Chao; He, Xiangjiu

    2013-01-01

    The antidiabetic and antioxidant activities of the ethyl acetate-soluble extract (MFE) of mulberry fruit (Morus alba L.) were investigated. In vitro, MFE showed potent α-glucosidase inhibitory activity and radical-scavenging activities against DPPH and superoxide anion radicals. In vivo, MFE could significantly decrease fasting blood glucose (FBG) and glycosylated serum protein (GSP), and increase antioxidant enzymatic activities (SOD, CAT, GSH-Px) in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice. Bioactivity-guided fractionation of the MFE led to the isolation of 25 phenolic compounds, and their structures were identified on the basis of MS and NMR data. All the 25 compounds were isolated from mulberry fruit for the first time. Also, the α-glucosidase inhibitory activity and antioxidant activity of the phenolics were evaluated. Potent α-glucosidase inhibitory and radical-scavenging activities of these phenolics suggested that they may be partially responsible for the antidiabetic and antioxidant activities of mulberry fruit. PMID:23936259

  16. Mars Science Laboratory at Sunset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    December 2, 2003

    Sunset on Mars catches NASA's Mars Science Laboratory in the foreground in this artist's concept. The mission is under development for launch in 2009 and a precision landing on Mars in 2010.

    Once on the ground, the Mars Science Laboratory would analyze dozens of samples scooped up from the soil and cored from rocks as it explores with greater range than any previous Mars rover. It would investigate the past or present ability of Mars to support life. NASA is considering nuclear energy for powering the rover to give it a long operating lifespan.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is managing development of the Mars Smart Laboratory for the NASA Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C.

  17. Mars Science Laboratory at Canyon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    December 2, 2003

    NASA's Mars Science Laboratory travels near a canyon on Mars in this artist's concept. The mission is under development for launch in 2009 and a precision landing on Mars in 2010.

    Once on the ground, the Mars Science Laboratory would analyze dozens of samples scooped up from the soil and cored from rocks as it explores with greater range than any previous Mars rover. It would investigate the past or present ability of Mars to support life. NASA is considering nuclear energy for powering the rover to give it a long operating lifespan.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is managing development of the Mars Smart Laboratory for the NASA Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C.

  18. Life sciences and space research XXIII(2): Planetary biology and origins of life; Proceedings of the Topical Meeting and Workshops XX, XXI and XXIII of the 27th COSPAR Plenary Meeting, Espoo, Finland, July 18-29, 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, A. W. (Editor); Dose, K. (Editor); Raup, D. M. (Editor); Klein, H. P. (Editor); Devincenzi, D. L. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    This volume includes chapters on exobiology in space, chemical and early biochemical evolution, life without oxygen, potential for chemical evolution in the early environment of Mars, planetary protection issues and sample return missions, and the modulation of biological evolution by astrophysical phenomena. Papers are presented on the results of spaceflight missions, the action of some factors of space medium on the abiogenic synthesis of nucleotides, early peptidic enzymes, microbiology and biochemistry of the methanogenic archaeobacteria, and present-day biogeochemical activities of anaerobic bacteria and their relevance to future exobiological investigations. Consideration is also given to the development of the Alba Patera volcano on Mars, biological nitrogen fixation under primordial Martian partial pressures of dinitrogen, the planetary protection issues in advance of human exploration of Mars, and the difficulty with astronomical explanations of periodic mass extinctions.

  19. Radical Scavenging Activity of the Essential Oil of Silver Fir (Abies alba)

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Seun-Ah; Jeon, Sang-Kyung; Lee, Eun-Jung; Im, Nam-Kyung; Jhee, Kwang-Hwan; Lee, Sam-Pin; Lee, In-Seon

    2009-01-01

    The essential oil of silver fir (Abies alba) is known to help respiratory system and have easing and soothing effect for muscle. In the present study, we investigated the chemical composition, cytotoxicity and its biological activities of silver fir (Abies alba) essential oil. The composition of the oil was analyzed by GC-MS and bornyl acetate (30.31%), camphene (19.81%), 3-carene (13.85%), tricyclene (12.90%), dl-limonene (7.50%), α-pinene (2.87%), caryophyllene (2.18%), β-phellandrene (2.13%), borneol (1.74%), bicyclo[2.2.1]hept-2-ene,2,3-dimethyl (1.64%) and α-terpinene (1.24%) were the major components in the oil. The results tested by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay indicated that the oil showed no cytotoxic effect, at concentrations of 1 and 5%, for as long as 24 and 3 h, respectively. The antiradical capacity was evaluated by measuring the scavenging activity of the essential oil on the 2,20-diphenylpicrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and 2,2'-azino-bis 3-ethyl benzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS) radicals. The oil was able to reduce the both radicals dose-dependently, and the concentration required for 50% reduction (RC50) against DPPH radicals (2.7 ± 0.63%) was lower than ABTS radicals (8.5 ± 0.27%). The antibacterial activity of the oil was also evaluated using disc diffusion method against Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus mutans, Listeria monocytogenes, Acinetobacter baumannii, Escherichia coli, and Vibrio parahaemolyticcus. The oil exhibited no antibacterial activity against all the bacterial strains tested except S. aureus of mild activity. PMID:19430614

  20. Radical Scavenging Activity of the Essential Oil of Silver Fir (Abies alba).

    PubMed

    Yang, Seun-Ah; Jeon, Sang-Kyung; Lee, Eun-Jung; Im, Nam-Kyung; Jhee, Kwang-Hwan; Lee, Sam-Pin; Lee, In-Seon

    2009-05-01

    The essential oil of silver fir (Abies alba) is known to help respiratory system and have easing and soothing effect for muscle. In the present study, we investigated the chemical composition, cytotoxicity and its biological activities of silver fir (Abies alba) essential oil. The composition of the oil was analyzed by GC-MS and bornyl acetate (30.31%), camphene (19.81%), 3-carene (13.85%), tricyclene (12.90%), dl-limonene (7.50%), alpha-pinene (2.87%), caryophyllene (2.18%), beta-phellandrene (2.13%), borneol (1.74%), bicyclo[2.2.1]hept-2-ene,2,3-dimethyl (1.64%) and alpha-terpinene (1.24%) were the major components in the oil. The results tested by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay indicated that the oil showed no cytotoxic effect, at concentrations of 1 and 5%, for as long as 24 and 3 h, respectively. The antiradical capacity was evaluated by measuring the scavenging activity of the essential oil on the 2,20-diphenylpicrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and 2,2'-azino-bis 3-ethyl benzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS) radicals. The oil was able to reduce the both radicals dose-dependently, and the concentration required for 50% reduction (RC(50)) against DPPH radicals (2.7 +/- 0.63%) was lower than ABTS radicals (8.5 +/- 0.27%). The antibacterial activity of the oil was also evaluated using disc diffusion method against Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus mutans, Listeria monocytogenes, Acinetobacter baumannii, Escherichia coli, and Vibrio parahaemolyticcus. The oil exhibited no antibacterial activity against all the bacterial strains tested except S. aureus of mild activity. PMID:19430614

  1. Parasiticidal effects of Morus alba root bark extracts against Ichthyophthirius multifiliis infecting grass carp.

    PubMed

    Fu, YaoWu; Zhang, QiZhong; Xu, De-Hai; Xia, Huan; Cai, XinXing; Wang, Bin; Liang, Jinghan

    2014-02-19

    Ichthyophthirius multifiliis (Ich), an important fish parasite, can cause significant losses in aquaculture. To find efficacious drugs to control Ich, the root bark of white mulberry Morus alba was evaluated for its antiprotozoal activity. Bark was powdered and extracted with 1 of 5 organic solvents: petroleum ether, chloroform, ethyl acetate, acetone, or methanol. The extracts were concentrated, dissolved in 0.1% (v/v) DMSO, and used for anti-Ich trials. Acetone and ethyl acetate extracts significantly reduced the survival of Ich tomonts and theronts. In vitro, acetone extract at 25 mg l-1 killed all non-encysted tomonts, at 50 mg l-1 eradicated all encysted tomonts, and at 8 mg l-1 caused mortality of all theronts. Ethyl acetate extract at 50 mg l-1 eliminated all non-encysted tomonts, at 100 mg l-1 killed all encysted tomonts and terminated tomont reproduction, and at 8 mg l-1 killed all theronts. Low concentrations (2 and 4 mg l-1) of acetone and ethyl acetate extracts could not kill all theronts after 4 h exposure, but a significant decrease in theront infectivity was observed following 30 min of pretreatment with the extracts. The 96 h LC(50) values of acetone and ethyl acetate extracts to grass carp were 79.46 and 361.05 mg l-1, i.e. much higher than effective doses for killing Ich theronts (8 mg l-1 for both extracts) and non-encysted tomonts (12.5 and 25 mg l-1, respectively). Thus M. alba extract may be a potential new, safe, and efficacious drug to control Ich. PMID:24553418

  2. Effects of aqueous extracts of Hibiscus macranthus and Basella alba in mature rat testis function.

    PubMed

    Moundipa, F P; Kamtchouing, P; Koueta, N; Tantchou, J; Foyang, N P; Mbiapo, F T

    1999-05-01

    Mature male albino Wistar rats (180-220 g) were given by gastric intubation Hibiscus macranthus Hochst A ex Rich (Malvaceae) and Basella alba L. (Basellaceae) aqueous extract from both fresh and dry leaves, at a dose equivalent to 0.720 or 0.108 g of plant, respectively per kg body weight. This was to evaluate their effects on male reproductive function. Control groups were treated equally, but given water instead of the extract. After the treatment periods, animals were killed, their blood collected, the testes and some annex glands removed for histological and biochemical analysis. Results showed that the extract from fresh leaves significantly increased the body weight of rats by 17% from day 7 as compared to controls, whereas the increase was less pronounced (4%) when the rats were given dry leaf extract. The weight of seminal vesicles of rats given the extracts also increased after 15 days. The histological analysis of testis showed abundant spermatozoa in the lumen of the seminiferous tubulus from day 7 in rats fed with the extract when compared to the controls. The serum level of testosterone was significantly increased on the 15th day by 80% in rats given both types of extracts compared to the controls. Testis of treated rats showed high testosterone production in vitro (136 and 62%, respectively for treated and control after 15 days, compared to those of 3 days). Activity of prostatic acid phosphatase was high in prostate, testis and serum of treated rats in all experimental period. From these findings and observation, it was concluded that the aqueous extract of H. macranthus and B. alba had anabolizing and virilizing effects. PMID:10465653

  3. Postremediation dose assessment for the former Alba Craft Laboratory site, Oxford, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Kamboj, S.; Nimmagadda, M.; Yu, C.

    1996-04-01

    Potential maximum radiation dose rates were calculated for the former Alba Craft Laboratory site in Oxford, Ohio, which was involved in machining of uranium metal in the 1950s for the U.S. atomic energy program. The site is not currently being used. The residual radioactive material guidelines (RESRAD) computer code, which implements the methodology described in the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) manual for establishing residual radioactive material guidelines, was sued in this evaluation. Three potential land use scenarios were considered for the former Alba Craft site; the scenarios vary with regard to the type of site use, time spent at the site by the exposed individual, and sources of food consumed. Scenario A (a possible land use scenario) assumed industrial use of the site; Scenario B (a likely future land use scenario) assumed residential use of the site; and Scenario C (a possible but unlikely land use scenario) assumed the presence of a resident farmer. For scenario A, it was assumed that any water used for domestic or industrial activities would be from uncontaminated off-site municipal sources. The water used for drinking, household purposes, and irrigation was assumed to be from uncontaminated municipal sources in Scenario B; groundwater drawn from a well located at the downgradient edge of the contaminated zone would be the only source of water for drinking, irrigation, and raising livestock in Scenario C. The results of the evaluation indicated that the DOE dose limit of 100 mrem/yr would not be exceeded for any of the scenarios analyzed. The potential maximum dose rates for Scenarios A, B, and C are 0.64, 2.0, and 11 mrem/yr, respectively.

  4. Variations in Crustal Structure, Lithospheric Flexural Strength, and Isostatic Compensation Mechanisms of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, M.; Lin, J.; Zuber, M. T.

    2014-12-01

    We analyze gravity and topography of Mars to investigate the spatial variations in crustal thickness, lithospheric strength, and mechanisms of support of prominent topographic features on Mars. The latest gravity model JGMRO110c (released in 2012) from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter mission has a spatial block size resolution of ~97 km (corresponding to degree-110), enabling us to resolve crustal structures at higher spatial resolution than those determined from previous degree-80 and 85 gravity models [Zuber et al., 2000; McGovern et al., 2002, 2004; Neumann et al., 2004; Belleguic et al., 2005]. Using the latest gravity data, we first inverted for a new version of crustal thickness model of Mars assuming homogeneous crust and mantle densities of 2.9 and 3.5 g/cm3. We calculated "isostatic" topography for the Airy local isostatic compensation mechanism, and "non-isostatic" topography after removing the isostatic part. We find that about 92% of the Martian surface is in relatively isostatic state, indicating either relatively small lithospheric strength and/or small vertical loading. Relatively isostatic regions include the hemispheric dichotomy, Hellas and Argyre Planitia, Noachis and Arabia Terra, and Terra Cimmeria. In contrast, regions with significant amount of non-isostatic topography include the Olympus, Ascraeus, Arsia, Pavonis, Alba, and Elysium Mons, Isidis Planitia and Valles Marineris. Their relatively large "non-isostatc topography" implies relatively strong lithospheric strength and large vertical loading. Spectral analysis of the admittance and correlation relationship between gravity and topography were conducted for the non-isostatic regions using the localized spectra method [Wieczorek and Simons, 2005, 2007] and thin-shell lithospheric flexural approximation [Forsyth, 1985; McGovern et al., 2002, 2004]. The best-fitting models reveal significant variations in the effective lithospheric thickness with the greatest values for the Olympus Mon

  5. Life on Mars: Past, Present, and Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, Chris

    2006-01-01

    Mars has evidence for past liquid water, presence of an atmosphere with CO2 and N2, and potential for preservation of evidence of life. Composition of the Martian atmosphere is 95.3% Carbon dioxide, 2.7% Nitrogen, 1.6% Argon, 0.3-0.1% Water Vapor, 0.13% Oxygen, and 0.07% Carbon Monoxide. Current Mars missions include: Mars Global Surveyor, Mars Odyssey, Mars Exploration Rovers, Mars Express, and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter,

  6. The aqueous stability of a Mars salt analog: Instant Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuding, D. L.; Davis, R. D.; Gough, R. V.; Tolbert, M. A.

    2015-03-01

    Due to their stability in low-temperature conditions, aqueous salt solutions are the favored explanation for potential fluid features observed on present-day Mars. A salt analog was developed to closely match the individual cation and anion concentrations at the Phoenix landing site as reported by the Wet Chemistry Laboratory instrument. "Instant Mars" closely replicates correct relative concentrations of magnesium, calcium, potassium, sodium, perchlorate, chloride, and sulfate ions. A Raman microscope equipped with an environmental cellprobed liquid water uptake and loss by Instant Mars particles in a Mars relevant temperature and relative humidity (RH) environment. Our experiments reveal that Instant Mars particles can form stable, aqueous solutions starting at 56 ± 5% RH between 235 K and 243 K and persist as a metastable, aqueous solution at or above 13 ± 5% RH. Particle levitation using an optical trap examined the phase state and morphology of suspended Instant Mars particles exposed to changing water vapor conditions at room temperature. Levitation experiments indicate that water uptake began at 42 ± 8% RH for Instant Mars particles at 293 K. As RH is decreased at 293 K, the aqueous Instant Mars particles transition into a crystalline solid at 18 ± 7% RH. These combined results demonstrate that Instant Mars can take up water vapor from the surrounding environment and transition into a stable, aqueous solution. Furthermore, this aqueous Instant Mars solution can persist as a metastable, supersaturated solution in low-RH conditions.

  7. Mars Odyssey in the Context of NASA's Mars Exploration Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garvin, J. B.

    2002-05-01

    The NASA Mars ODYSSEY Orbiter is the second step in NASA's scientific strategy for Mars Exploration during the present decade. ODYSSEY is intended to produce global scale inventories of key elemental characteristics of the uppermost surface layer, as well as the first 100m scale mineralogical assessment of another planet using middle-IR multispectral imaging. In addition, ODYSSEY will provide the first quantitative assessment of the galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) environment in the vicinity of Mars, one of the key steps in preparing the knowledge base necessary to plan for eventual human scientific exploration of the Red Planet. In the context of NASA's restructured Mars Exploration Program (MEP), ODYSSEY will provide new vantage points from which to identify localities on the surface of Mars where liquid water may have been persistent in the past, or where there are existing deposits of near-surface ice. In addition, with its THEMIS middle-IR imaging system, ODYSSEY will search for "thermal anomalies" at 100 m scales in an effort to discover landing sites for future missions. Together with the ongoing Mars Global Surveyor (MGS), ODYSSEY is part of a sustained reconaissance of Mars using a variety of remote sensing approaches, that will culminate with the 2005 Mars Reconaissance Orbiter (MRO). Both MGS and ODYSSEY will help target MRO's high resolution instruments so that the large trade-space of scientifically compelling landing sites for Mars can be prioritized to a top few. ODYSSEY will direct MRO, and subsequently MRO will direct the 2009 Mars Smart Lander (aka Mobile Surface Laboratory) to conduct surface-based reconaissance and definitive in situ measurements of key constituents of the "Mars System". Thus, ODYSSEY will provide both context and direction in the near-term scientific exploration of Mars. Most immediately, data from ODYSSEY will contribute to the landing site assessments that are ongoing in support of the early 2004 landings of the twin Mars

  8. Merry Christmas from Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-12-01

    This morning, after a journey lasting 205 days and covering 400 million km, the European Mars Express space probe fired its main engine at 03:47 CET for a 37-minute burn in order to enter an orbit around the Mars. This firing gave the probe a boost so that it could match the higher speed of the planet on its orbit around the Sun and be captured by its gravity field, quite like climbing in a spinning merry-go-round. This orbit insertion manoeuvre was a complete success. This is a great achievement for Europe on its first attempt to send a space probe into orbit around another planet. At approximately the same time, the Beagle 2 lander, protected by a thermal shield, entered the Martian atmosphere at high velocity and is expected to have reached the surface at about 03:52 CET. However, the first attempt to communicate with Beagle 2, three hours after landing, via NASA’s Mars Odyssey orbiter, did not establish radio contact. The next contact opportunity will be tonight at 23h40 CET. The tiny lander was released from the orbiter six days ago on a collision course towards the planet. Before separation, its onboard computer was programmed to operate the lander as from its arrival on the surface, by late afternoon (Martian time). According to the schedule, the solar panels must deploy to recharge the onboard batteries before sunset. The same sequence also tells Beagle 2 to emit a signal in a specific frequency for which the Jodrell Bank Telescope, UK, will be listening late tonight. Further radio contacts are scheduled in the days to come. In the course of the coming week, the orbit of Mars Express will be gradually adjusted in order to prepare for its scientific mission. Mars Express is currently several thousand kilometres away from Mars, in a very elongated equatorial orbit. On 30 December, ESA's ground control team will send commands to fire the spacecraft's engines and place it in a polar, less elongated orbit (about 300 km pericenter, 10000 apocenter, 86

  9. Noachian Megabreccia on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEwen, A. S.; Tornabene, L.; Grant, J.; Wray, J.; Mustard, J.

    2008-12-01

    Megabreccia consists of randomly oriented angular blocks, many larger than 1 m diameter, which forms suddenly in energetic environments such as impact events. Megaregolith is a related term for unconsolidated material resulting from heavy cratering, but megabreccia may be indurated. We have, to date, identified megabreccia in more than 50 locations on Mars from HiRISE images, generally in the form of indurated bedrock. It is commonly found in the central uplifts of large craters in or near Noachian (>3.8 Ga) terrains, near the rims of large basins such as Isidis, and in deep exposures such as the floor of Uzboi Valles and in parts of Valles Marineris. Well-exposed rock outcrops are required to identify megabreccia, in particular from the diversity of colors and textures indicating diverse lithologies. CRISM has identified hydrated minerals, especially clays, in many of these locations and perhaps alteration will be found in nearly all of the deposits once the data are acquired and analyzed, but they also appear to contain unaltered clasts. These may be among the very oldest rocks exposed on the surface of Mars, dating back to the time of heavy bombardment. In some cases megabreccia with relatively small (1-5 m) clasts probably formed by post Noachian cratering, particularly when found in the pitted and ponded material filling the crater floors, which may be analogous to suevite. The indurated megabreccia with large (>10 m) blocks is only found in locations consistent with deep bedrock, such as the central uplifts, although further brecciation and alteration may have occurred in the crater that exposed the rocks. It has long been assumed that Mars has a ~2 km thick layer of porous and permeable megaregolith, but we suggest that it may be largely cemented by melt and hydrothermal alteration. Heavy bombardment of the ice-rich crust of Mars could have produced a very different surface layer than on the dry Moon. Life on Earth may have begun during the period of heavy

  10. Icebergs on early Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uceda, E.; Fairen, A.; Woodworth-Lynas, C.; Palmero Rodriguez, A.

    2015-12-01

    The smooth topography of the Martian northern lowlands has been classically equated to an ancient ocean basin. The High-Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) is providing unprecedented images of the Martian surface at scales of 25 to 32 cm per pixel. The analysis of this high-resolution imaging reveals the presence of three differentiated geomorphologies throughout the northern lowlands of Mars and the Hellas basin, which are informative of the presence of icebergs floating in ancient oceans and/or seas. These morphologies are: (i) scattered scour marks, including curvilinear furrows several km long and some meters deep; (ii) boulders ranging in size from 0.5 m to ~2 m in diameter, distributed forming clusters with sizes from several hundred meters to 1-2 km; and (iii) flat-topped and conical circular fractured mounds. The association of plough marks, clusters of boulders and mounds on the northern plains of Mars can be related to the dual processes of ice keel scouring and ice rafting of both glacial and non-glacial detritus by a floating ice canopy and icebergs. These processes are well documented on Earth and result in distinct morphologies on the ocean floor, which are analogous to features observed in the Martian basins. Importantly, the features are located in elevated areas of the northern plains and Hellas, near the dichotomy boundary and on local topographic highs. Such distribution is expected, as these relatively shoal areas are where the iceberg-related features should occur on Mars: these areas had shallow water depths, less than the iceberg's keel depth, and therefore keels reached through the full depth of the water column to impinge on the sediments below. The presence of icebergs floating in cold oceans early in Mars' history imply the occurrence of continental glaciers forming in the highlands and streaming northward towards the lowlands, and towards the Hellas and Argyre Basins. Glacier

  11. Neotectonics on Mars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, A.; Fueten, F.; Spagnuolo, M.; Hauber, E.; Pondrelli, M.; Quantin Nataf, C.

    2012-12-01

    Mars has experienced significant tectonic activity; the majority of which appears to have taken place during the Noachian/Hesperian. There is now growing evidence that volcanic activity on Mars may have continued until very recent times. Similarly, the first evidence of very young (< 2 My) tectonics on Mars has now been identified (Spagnuolo et al., 2011; Roberts et al, 2012). We present a first compilation of possible recent (extensional) tectonic activity on Mars, far from the Tharsis volcanoes and concentrated in chasmata and chaos areas, affecting Interior Layered Deposits (ILDs), dunes and mass wasting deposits within those basins. Their morphology and morphometry have been characterized using high resolution imagery and stereo-derived topography. Several steep scarps have been identified. They border certain sections of Martian ILDs in both chasmata and chaotic terrains (e.g. Aureum, Aram). They tend to have a linear or curvilinear plan outline and they are characterized by an actual dip higher than that of the local slope. We interpret them as normal faults. These scarps are associated with major, degraded cliffs and aprons at their base. Absolute dating is difficult, but in some cases, the observable evidence suggests an age of only a few million years. Late-stage subsidence and collapse might be responsible for the initial formation and sustained activity of these faults, deforming already emplaced ILDs. We do not exclude that these structures might be the surface expressions of larger ones, potentially partially reactivated. We suggest that at least some of these faults might have been active in the last few million years and possibly still now. Whether related to regional stresses or, more likely, to some residual subsidence or collapse linked to very late-stage processes acting on Valles Marineris and Chaotic Terrains, these recent faults offer unique windows into the recent endogenic activity of Mars. Although most of the structures identified so far

  12. Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) : the US 2009 Mars rover mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palluconi, Frank; Tampari, Leslie; Steltzner, Adam; Umland, Jeff

    2003-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory mission is the 2009 United States Mars Exploration Program rover mission. The MSL Project expects to complete its pre-Phase A definition activity this fiscal year (FY2003), investigations in mid-March 2004, launch in 2009, arrive at Mars in 2010 during Northern hemisphere summer and then complete a full 687 day Mars year of surface exploration. MSL will assess the potential for habitability (past and present) of a carefully selected landing region on Mars by exploring for the chemical building blocks of life, and seeking to understand quantitatively the chemical and physical environment with which these components have interacted over the geologic history of the planet. Thus, MSL will advance substantially our understanding of the history of Mars and potentially, its capacity to sustain life.

  13. Geophysics of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    A physical model of Mars is presented on the basis of light-scattering observations of the Martian atmosphere and surface and interior data obtained from observations of the geopotential field. A general description of the atmosphere is presented, with attention given to the circulation and the various cloud types, and data and questions on the blue haze-clearing effect and the seasonal darkening wave are summarized and the Mie scattering model developed to explain these observations is presented. The appearance of the planet from earth and spacecraft through Mariner 9 is considered, and attention is given to the preparation of topographical contour maps, the canal problem and large-scale lineaments observed from Mariner 9, the gravity field and shape of the planet and the application of Runcorn's geoid/convection theory to Mars. Finally, a summary of Viking results is presented and their application to the understanding of Martian geophysics is discussed.

  14. The soils of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banin, A.

    1988-01-01

    A mineralogical model for the Mars fine soil that includes as major components smectite clays absorbed and coated with amorphous iron oxyhydroxides and perhaps mixed with small amounts of better-crystalized iron oxides as separate phases is proposed. Also present as accessory minerals are sulfate minerals such as kieserite (MgSO4.H2O) and/or anhydrite (CaSO4), rutile (TiO2), and maghemite (Fe2O3) or magnetite (Fe3O4), the last two as magnetic components. Carbonates may be present at low concentrations only (less than 1 to 2 pct). However, a prime question to be addressed by a Mars Sample Return Mission shall be related to the mineralogical composition of the soil, and its spatial variability.

  15. Fossil life on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, M. R.

    1989-01-01

    Three major problems beset paleontologists searching for morphological evidence of life on early Earth: selecting a prospective site; finding biogenic structures; and distinguishing biogenic from abiogenic structures. The same problems arise on Mars. Terrestrial experience suggests that, with the techniques that can be employed remotely, ancient springs, including hot springs, are more prospective than lake deposits. If, on the other hand, the search is for chemical evidence, the strategy can be very different, and lake deposits are attractive targets. Lakes and springs frequenly occur in close proximity, and therefore a strategy that combines the two would seem to maximize the chance of success. The strategy for a search for stromatolite on Mars is discussed.

  16. Happy Mars Solstice!

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image was acquired by NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Surface Stereo Imager (SSI) in the late afternoon of the 30th Martian day of the mission, or Sol 30 (June 25, 2008). This is hours after the beginning of Martian northern summer. SSI used its natural-color filters, therefore the color is the color you would see on Mars. The image shows shadows from the SSI (left) and from the meteorological station mast (right) stretching toward the east as the sun dropped low in the west.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is led by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver

  17. Seismology on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. L.; Miller, W. F.; Latham, G. V.; Nakamura, Y.; Toksoz, M. N.; Dainty, A. M.; Duennebier, F. K.; Lazarewicz, A. R.; Kovach, R. L.; Knight, T. C. D.

    1977-01-01

    High-quality data (uncontaminated by lander or wind noise) obtained with a three-axis short-period seismometer operating on Mars in the Utopia Planitia region are analyzed. No large events have been detected during the first five months of operation covered in the present paper. This indicates that Mars is less seismically active than the earth. Winds, and therefore a seismic background, began to intrude into the nighttime hours, starting with sol 119 (sol is a Martian day). The seismic background correlates well with wind velocity, and is proportional to the square of the wind velocity, as is appropriate for turbulent flow. A local seismic event of a magnitude of 3 and a distance of 110 km was detected on sol 80. It is interpreted as a natural seismic event.

  18. Chemical composition of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, J. W.; Anders, E.

    1979-01-01

    The chemical composition of Mars is estimated from the cosmochemical model of Ganapathy and Anders (1974) with additional petrological and geophysical constraints. The model assumes that planets and chondrites underwent the same fractionation processes in the solar nebula, and constraints are imposed by the abundance of the heat-producing elements, U, Th and K, the volatile-rich component and the high density of the mantle. Global abundances of 83 elements are presented, and it is noted that the mantle is an iron-rich garnet wehrlite, nearly identical to the bulk moon composition of Morgan at al. (1978) and that the core is sulfur poor (3.5% S). The comparison of model compositions for the earth, Venus, Mars, the moon and a eucrite parent body suggests that volatile depletion correlates mainly with size rather than with radial distance from the sun.

  19. Mars Microprobe Entry Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, Robert D.; Mitcheltree, Robert A.; Cheatwood, F. McNeil

    1998-01-01

    The Mars Microprobe mission will provide the first opportunity for subsurface measurements, including water detection, near the south pole of Mars. In this paper, performance of the Microprobe aeroshell design is evaluated through development of a six-degree-of-freedom (6-DOF) aerodynamic database and flight dynamics simulation. Numerous mission uncertainties are quantified and a Monte-Carlo analysis is performed to statistically assess mission performance. Results from this 6-DOF Monte-Carlo simulation demonstrate that, in a majority of the cases (approximately 2-sigma), the penetrator impact conditions are within current design tolerances. Several trajectories are identified in which the current set of impact requirements are not satisfied. From these cases, critical design parameters are highlighted and additional system requirements are suggested. In particular, a relatively large angle-of-attack range near peak heating is identified.

  20. MARS Mission research center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Mars Mission Research Center (M2RC) is one of nine University Space Engineering Research Centers established by NASA in June 1988. It is a cooperative effort between NCSU and A&T in Greensboro. The goal of the Center is to focus on research and educational technologies for planetary exploration with particular emphasis on Mars. The research combines Mission Analysis and Design, Hypersonic Aerodynamics and Propulsion, Structures and Controls, Composite Materials, and Fabrication Methods in a cross-disciplined program directed towards the development of space transportation systems for lunar and planetary travel. The activities of the students and faculty in the M2RC for the period 1 Jul. 1990 to 30 Jun. 1991 are described.

  1. Bright dunes on mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, P.C.; Malin, M.C.; Carr, M.H.; Danielson, G.E.; Davies, M.E.; Hartmann, W.K.; Ingersoll, A.P.; James, P.B.; McEwen, A.S.; Soderblom, L.A.; Veverka, J.

    1999-01-01

    Seasonal changes observed on the surface of Mars can in part be attributed to the transport of geological materials by wind. Images obtained by orbiting spacecraft in the 1970s showed large wind-formed features such as dunes, and revealed regional time-varying albedos that could be attributed to the effects of dust erosion and deposition. But the resolution of these images was insufficient to identify different types and sources of aeolian materials, nor could they reveal aeolian deposits other than large dunes or extensive surface coverings that were redistributed by dust storms. Here we present images of Mars with up to 50 times better resolution. These images show that martian dunes include at least two distinct components, the brighter of which we interpret to be composed of relatively soft minerals, possibly sulphates. We also find large areas of the martian surface that have several metres or more of aeolian mantle lacking obvious bedforms.

  2. Mars Climate Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this mission is to study the climate history and the water distribution of Mars. Beautiful panoramic views of the shuttle on the launch pad, engine ignition, Rocket launch, and the separation and burnout of the Solid Rocket Boosters are shown. The footage also includes an animation of the mission. Detailed views of the path that the Orbiter traversed were shown. Once the Orbiter lands on the surface of Mars, it will dig a six to eight inch hole and collect samples from the planets' surface. The animation also included the prospective return of the Orbiter to Earth over the desert of Utah. The remote sensor on the Orbiter helps in finding the exact location of the Orbiter so that scientists may collect the sample and analyze it.

  3. Mars Science Laboratory Drill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okon, Avi B.

    2010-01-01

    The Drill for the Mars Science Laboratory mission is a rotary-percussive sample acquisition device with an emphasis on toughness and robustness to handle the harsh environment on Mars. The unique challenges associated with autonomous drilling from a mobile robot are addressed. A highly compressed development schedule dictated a modular design architecture that satisfies the functional and load requirements while allowing independent development and testing of the Drill subassemblies. The Drill consists of four actuated mechanisms: a spindle that rotates the bit, a chuck that releases and engages bits, a novel voice-coil-based percussion mechanism that hammers the bit, and a linear translation mechanism. The Drill has three passive mechanisms: a replaceable bit assembly that acquires and collects sample, a contact sensor / stabilizer mechanism, and, lastly a flex harness service loop. This paper describes the various mechanisms that makeup the Drill and discusses the solutions to their unique design and development challenges.

  4. The politics of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, Harrison H.

    1986-01-01

    A discussion is presented comparing past and present major accomplishments of the U.S. and the Soviet Union in space. It concludes that the Soviets are presently well ahead of the U.S. in several specific aspects of space accomplishment and speculates that the Soviet strategy is directed towards sending a man to the vicinity of Mars by the end of this century. A major successful multinational space endeavor, INTELSAT, is reviewed and it is suggested that the manned exploration of Mars offers a unique opportunity for another such major international cooperative effort. The current attitude of U.S. leadership and the general public is assessed as uniformed or ambivalent about the perceived threat of Soviet dominance in space.

  5. Mars global surveyor

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-01

    The design and performance of a highly reliable, 20 volt nickel hydrogen battery compatible with existing NiCad Mars observer based spacecraft components and an 800 psi, zirconium wall wick Common Pressure Vessel (CPV) are discussed. The objectives of the design process are: to meet or exceed all PD requirements by using existing technologies; to have high reliability hardware and parallel fabrication of components; and low schedule risk configurations. This paper discusses the tests performed on the batteries (capacity, charge retention, random vib., pyro shock, energy density, and packing factor) and the results of the tests. In addition to the design discussion, a brief introduction on Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Satellite objectives (NASA`s next interplanetary mission) is also presented.

  6. The Exploration of Mars by Humans: Why Mars? Why Humans?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Joel S.

    2011-01-01

    As we commemorate the 50th anniversary of Yuri Gagarin's historic flight in 1961, the first flight of a human in space, plans are underway for another historic human mission. Plans are being developed for a human mission to Mars. Once we reach Mars, the human species will become the first two-planet species. Both the Bush Administration (in 2004) and the Obama Administration (in 2010) proposed a human mission to Mars as a national goal of the United States.

  7. Mars Rover RTG Study

    SciTech Connect

    Schock, Alfred

    1989-08-25

    This report summarizes the results of a Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) design study conducted by Fairchild Space Company at the direction of the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of SpecialApplications, in suppport of the Mars Rover and Sample Return mission under investigation at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The report is a rearranged, updated, and significantly expanded amalgam of three interrelated papers presented at the 24th Intersocity Energy Conversion Engineering Conference (IECEC) at Arlington, Virginia, on August 10, 1989.

  8. Cryptic Terrain on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1

    There is an enigmatic region near the south pole of Mars known as the 'cryptic' terrain. It stays cold in the spring, even as its albedo darkens and the sun rises in the sky.

    This region is covered by a layer of translucent seasonal carbon dioxide ice that warms and evaporates from below. As carbon dioxide gas escapes from below the slab of seasonal ice it scours dust from the surface. The gas vents to the surface, where the dust is carried downwind by the prevailing wind.

    The channels carved by the escaping gas are often radially organized and are known informally as 'spiders' (figure 1).

    Observation Geometry Image PSP_003179_0945 was taken by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft on 01-Apr-2007. The complete image is centered at -85.4 degrees latitude, 104.0 degrees East longitude. The range to the target site was 245.9 km (153.7 miles). At this distance the image scale is 49.2 cm/pixel (with 2 x 2 binning) so objects 148 cm across are resolved. The image shown here has been map-projected to 50 cm/pixel . The image was taken at a local Mars time of 06:19 PM and the scene is illuminated from the west with a solar incidence angle of 78 degrees, thus the sun was about 12 degrees above the horizon. At a solar longitude of 210.8 degrees, the season on Mars is Northern Autumn.

  9. Powering Mars Rovers

    SciTech Connect

    Stewert, Robin

    2010-01-01

    INL scientists are doing their best to help solve our energy problems here on Earth. But did you know the lab is playing a key role in the exploration of other worlds, too? Meet INL Engineer Robin Stewart helps build and test generators that power NASA missions to Pluto and Mars. You can learn more about INL projects at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  10. Mars Miniature Science Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Soon Sam; Hayati, Samad; Lavery, David; McBrid, Karen

    2006-01-01

    For robotic Mars missions, all the science information is gathered through on-board miniature instruments that have been developed through many years of R&D. Compared to laboratory counterparts, the rover instruments require miniaturization, such as low mass (1-2 kg), low power (> 10 W) and compact (1-2 liter), yet with comparable sensitivity. Since early 1990's, NASA recognized the need for the miniature instruments and launched several instrument R&D programs, e.g., PIDDP (Planetary Instrument Definition and Development). However, until 1998, most of the instrument R&D programs supported only up to a breadboard level (TRL 3, 4) and there is a need to carry such instruments to flight qualifiable status (TU 5, 6) to respond to flight AOs (Announcement of Opportunity). Most of flight AOs have only limited time and financial resources, and can not afford such instrument development processes. To bridge the gap between instrument R&D programs and the flight instrument needs, NASA's Mars Technology Program (MTP) created advanced instrumentation program, Mars Instrument Development Project (MIDP). MIDP candidate instruments are selected through NASA Research Announcement (NRA) process [l]. For example, MIDP 161998-2000) selected and developed 10 instruments, MIDP II (2003-2005) 16 instruments, and MIDP III (2004-2006) II instruments.Working with PIs, JPL has been managing the MIDP tasks since September 1998. All the instruments being developed under MIDP have been selected through a highly competitive NRA process, and employ state-of-the-art technology. So far, four MIDP funded instruments have been selected by two Mars missions (these instruments have further been discussed in this paper).

  11. Climate Change on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haberle, R. M.; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Today, Mars is cold and dry. With a 7 mbar mean surface pressure, its thin predominantly CO2 atmosphere is not capable of raising global mean surface temperatures significantly above its 217K effective radiating temperature, and the amount of water vapor in the atmosphere is equivalent to a global ocean only 10 microns deep. Has Mars always been in such a deep freeze? There are several lines of evidence that suggest it has not. First, there are the valley networks which are found throughout the heavily cratered terrains. These features are old (3.8 Gyr) and appear to require liquid water to form. A warm climate early in Mars' history has often been invoked to explain them, but the precise conditions required to achieve this have yet to be determined. Second, some of the features seen in orbiter images of the surface have been interpreted in terms of glacial activity associated with an active hydrological cycle some several billion years ago. This interpretation is controversial as it requires the release of enormous quantities of ground water and enough greenhouse warming to raise temperatures to the melting point. Finally, there are the layered terrains that characterize both polar regions. These terrains are geologically young (10 Myr) and are believed to have formed by the slow and steady deposition of dust and water ice from the atmosphere. The individual layers result from the modulation of the deposition rate which is driven by changes in Mars' orbital parameters. The ongoing research into each of these areas of Martian climate change will be reviewed, and similarities to the Earth's climate system will be noted.

  12. Artificial gravity Mars spaceship

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Benton C.

    1989-01-01

    Experience gained in the study of artificial gravity for a manned trip to Mars is reviewed, and a snowflake-configured interplanetary vehicle cluster of habitat modules, descent vehicles, and propulsion systems is presented. An evolutionary design is described which permits sequential upgrading from five to nine crew members, an increase of landers from one to as many a three per mission, and an orderly, phased incorporation of advanced technologies as they become available.

  13. MARS Flight Engineering Status

    SciTech Connect

    Fast, James E.; Dorow, Kevin E.; Morris, Scott J.; Thompson, Robert C.; Willett, Jesse A.

    2010-04-06

    The Multi-sensor Airborne Radiation Survey Flight Engineering project (MARS FE) has designed a high purity germanium (HPGe) crystal array for conducting a wide range of field measurements. In addition to the HPGe detector system, a platform-specific shock and vibration isolation system and environmental housing have been designed to support demonstration activities in a maritime environment on an Unmanned Surface Vehicle (USV). This report describes the status of the equipment as of the end of FY09.

  14. Organics on Mars?

    PubMed

    ten Kate, Inge L

    2010-01-01

    Organics are expected to exist on Mars based on meteorite infall, in situ production, and any possible biological sources. Yet they have not been detected on the martian surface; are they there, or are we not capable enough to detect them? The Viking gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer did not detect organics in the headspace of heated soil samples with a detection limit of parts per billion. This null result strongly influenced the interpretation of the reactivity seen in the Viking biology experiments and led to the conclusion that life was not present and, instead, that there was some chemical reactivity in the soil. The detection of perchlorates in the martian soil by instruments on the Phoenix lander and the reports of methane in the martian atmosphere suggest that it may be time to reconsider the question of organics. The high-temperature oxidizing properties of perchlorate will promote combustion of organics in pyrolytic experiments and may have affected the ability of both Phoenix's organic analysis experiment and the Viking mass spectrometer experiments to detect organics. So the question of organics on Mars remains open. A primary focus of the upcoming Mars Science Laboratory will be the detection and identification of organic molecules by means of thermal volatilization, followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry--as was done on Viking. However, to enhance organic detectability, some of the samples will be processed with liquid derivatization agents that will dissolve organics from the soil before pyrolysis, which may separate them from the soil perchlorates. Nonetheless, the problem of organics on Mars is not solved, and for future missions other organic detection techniques should therefore be considered as well. PMID:20735250

  15. Powering Mars Rovers

    ScienceCinema

    Stewert, Robin;

    2013-05-28

    INL scientists are doing their best to help solve our energy problems here on Earth. But did you know the lab is playing a key role in the exploration of other worlds, too? Meet INL Engineer Robin Stewart helps build and test generators that power NASA missions to Pluto and Mars. You can learn more about INL projects at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  16. MSATT Workshop on Chemical Weathering on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Roger (Editor); Banin, Amos (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    The topics covered with respect to chemical weathering on Mars include the following: Mars soil, mineralogy, spectroscopic analysis, clays, silicates, oxidation, iron oxides, water, chemical reactions, geochemistry, minerals, Mars atmosphere, atmospheric chemistry, salts, planetary evolution, volcanology, Mars volcanoes, regolith, surface reactions, Mars soil analogs, carbonates, meteorites, and reactivity.

  17. Sustainable Mars Sample Return

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alston, Christie; Hancock, Sean; Laub, Joshua; Perry, Christopher; Ash, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The proposed Mars sample return mission will be completed using natural Martian resources for the majority of its operations. The system uses the following technologies: In-Situ Propellant Production (ISPP), a methane-oxygen propelled Mars Ascent Vehicle (MAV), a carbon dioxide powered hopper, and a hydrogen fueled balloon system (large balloons and small weather balloons). The ISPP system will produce the hydrogen, methane, and oxygen using a Sabatier reactor. a water electrolysis cell, water extracted from the Martian surface, and carbon dioxide extracted from the Martian atmosphere. Indigenous hydrogen will fuel the balloon systems and locally-derived methane and oxygen will fuel the MAV for the return of a 50 kg sample to Earth. The ISPP system will have a production cycle of 800 days and the estimated overall mission length is 1355 days from Earth departure to return to low Earth orbit. Combining these advanced technologies will enable the proposed sample return mission to be executed with reduced initial launch mass and thus be more cost efficient. The successful completion of this mission will serve as the next step in the advancement of Mars exploration technology.

  18. Mars Rocket Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zubrin, Robert; Harber, Dan; Nabors, Sammy

    2008-01-01

    A report discusses the methane and carbon monoxide/LOX (McLOx) rocket for ascent from Mars as well as other critical space propulsion tasks. The system offers a specific impulse over 370 s roughly 50 s higher than existing space-storable bio-propellants. Current Mars in-situ propellant production (ISPP) technologies produce impure methane and carbon monoxide in various combinations. While separation and purification of methane fuel is possible, it adds complexity to the propellant production process and discards an otherwise useful fuel product. The McLOx makes such complex and wasteful processes unnecessary by burning the methane/CO mixtures produced by the Mars ISPP systems without the need for further refinement. Despite the decrease in rocket-specific impulse caused by the CO admixture, the improvement offered by concomitant increased propellant density can provide a net improvement in stage performance. One advantage is the increase of the total amount of propellant produced, but with a decrease in mass and complexity of the required ISPP plant. Methane/CO fuel mixtures also may be produced by reprocessing the organic wastes of a Moon base or a space station, making McLOx engines key for a human Lunar initiative or the International Space Station (ISS) program. Because McLOx propellant components store at a common temperature, very lightweight and compact common bulkhead tanks can be employed, improving overall stage performance further.

  19. On Target to Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Yang

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the use of Descent Image Motion Estimation System (DIMES) for the descent of a spacecraft onto the surface of Mars. In the past this system was used to assist in the landing of the MER spacecraft. The overall algorithm is reviewed, and views of the hardware, and views from Spirit's descent are shown. On Spirit, had DIMES not been used, the impact velocity would have been at the limit of the airbag capability and Spirit may have bounced into Endurance Crater. By using DIMES, the velocity was reduced to well within the bounds of the airbag performance and Spirit arrived safely at Mars. Views from Oppurtunity's descent are also shown. The system to avoid and detect hazards is reviewed next. Landmark Based Spacecraft Pinpoint Landing is also reviewed. A cartoon version of a pinpoint landing and the various points is shown. Mars s surface has a large amount of craters, which are ideal landmarks . According to literatures on Martian cratering, 60 % of Martian surface is heavily cratered. The ideal (craters) landmarks for pinpoint landing will be between 1000 to 50 meters in diagonal The ideal altitude for position estimation should greater than 2 km above the ground. The algorithms used to detect and match craters are reviewed.

  20. Unsteady saltation on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ping; Zheng, Xiaojing

    2015-11-01

    Saltation is an important process on Mars, as it contributes to dust raising, bedform dynamics, and aeolian abrasion. Lander measurements and mesoscale meteorological models suggest that winds in the Martian atmosphere rarely exceed the fluid threshold value that is necessary to aerodynamically initiate saltation, a fact in stark contrast to the existence of dunes and ripples on the planet, many of which are in an active state of migration. In an attempt to reconcile these observations, we perform an unsteady simulation with a simple turbulence model to calculate the saltation transport rate. Sinusoidal wind variations are imposed on the saltation layer. The numerical simulations verify that gusty transport is one of the main manifestations of Martian sediment transport events. A formula for the saltation transport rate is reported, Qm ∼(u∗ -u∗it) p , where u∗ and u∗it are the friction velocity and impact threshold friction velocity. The power p varies in the range of 0.7-1.8 on Mars and ∼1.5 on Earth, depending on the period and amplitude of the gusty inflow wind. Our results show that the law of Martian and terrestrial transport rate are not universal, and hence one should be cautious when trying to extrapolate existing terrestrial results to Mars.

  1. Measuring Mars Sand Flux Seasonality from a Time Series of Hirise Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayoub, F.; Avouac, J.; Bridges, N. T.; Leprince, S.; Lucas, A.

    2012-12-01

    The volumetric transport rate of sand, or flux, is a fundamental quantity that relates to the rate of landscape evolution through surface deposition and erosion. Measuring this quantity on Mars is particularly relevant as wind is the dominant geomorphic agent active at present on the planet. Measuring sand flux on Mars has been made possible thanks to the availability of times series of high resolution images acquired by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) and precise image registration and correlation methods which permits the quantification of movement to sub-pixel precision. In this study, focused on the Nili Patera dune field, we first measured the migration rate of sand ripples and dune lee fronts over 105 days, using a pair of HiRISE images acquired in 2007, correlated and co-registered with COSI-Corr. From these measurements and the estimation of the ripple and dune heights, we derived the reptation and saltation sand fluxes. We next applied the same methodology to a time-series of eight images acquired in 2010-2011 covering one Mars year. Pairs of sequential images, were processed with COSI-Corr yielding a times series of 8 displacement maps. A Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was applied to the time-series to quantify more robustly the time evolution of the signal and filter out noise, in particular due to misalignment of CCDs. Using the first two components, which account for 84% of the variance, the seasonal variation of the ripple migration rate was estimated. We clearly observe continuously active migration throughout the year with a strong seasonal quasi-sinusoidal variation which peaks at perihelion. Ripple displacement orientation is stable in time, toward ~N115°E. The wind direction is thus relatively constant in this area, a finding consistent with the barchan morphology and orientation of the dunes. The dataset require that sand moving winds must occur daily to weekly throughout the year. The amplitude of the seasonal

  2. A validated HPLC method for the analysis of herbal teas from three chemotypes of Brazilian Lippia alba.

    PubMed

    Timóteo, Patrícia; Karioti, Anastasia; Leitão, Suzana G; Vincieri, Franco Francesco; Bilia, Anna Rita

    2015-05-15

    Infusions and decoctions of three chemotypes of Lippia alba (Mill.) N. E. Brown (Verbenaceae) were investigated for their quantitative profiles by HPLC-DAD-ESI-MS analyses. An RP-HPLC method was developed which permitted the quality control of the preparations. The correct choice of the column allowed the detailed characterization of the constituents in a total analysis time of 35 min. The HPLC method was accordingly validated for linearity range, LOD, LOQ, accuracy and precision. For the quantitative analysis the three major phytochemical groups were taken into consideration, namely iridoids, phenylpropanoids and flavonoids. Comparative quantitative analyses revealed significant differences among the chemotypes that should be taken into account in the uses of the herbal teas. The developed HPLC-UV assay proved to be an efficient and alternative method for the discrimination of the three chemotypes. This is the first report of detailed analysis of the chemical composition of the constituents of L. alba chemotypes' teas. PMID:25577093

  3. Gene expression profiling of Sinapis alba leaves under drought stress and rewatering growth conditions with Illumina deep sequencing.

    PubMed

    Dong, Cai-Hua; Li, Chen; Yan, Xiao-Hong; Huang, Shun-Mou; Huang, Jin-Yong; Wang, Li-Jun; Guo, Rui-Xing; Lu, Guang-Yuan; Zhang, Xue-Kun; Fang, Xiao-Ping; Wei, Wen-Hui

    2012-05-01

    Sinapis alba has many desirable agronomic traits including tolerance to drought. In this investigation, we performed the genome-wide transcriptional profiling of S. alba leaves under drought stress and rewatering growth conditions in an attempt to identify candidate genes involved in drought tolerance, using the Illumina deep sequencing technology. The comparative analysis revealed numerous changes in gene expression level attributable to the drought stress, which resulted in the down-regulation of 309 genes and the up-regulation of 248 genes. Gene ontology analysis revealed that the differentially expressed genes were mainly involved in cell division and catalytic and metabolic processes. Our results provide useful information for further analyses of the drought stress tolerance in Sinapis, and will facilitate molecular breeding for Brassica crop plants. PMID:22207172

  4. The investigation of moving dunes over Mars using very high resolution topography and sub pixel co-registration method.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.; Baik, H.; Seol, H.

    2015-12-01

    Although the origins and processes of Martian aeolian features, especially dunes, have not been fully identified yet, it has been better understood by the orbital observation method which has led to the identification of Martian dune migration such as a case in Nili Patera (Bridges, 2012), and the numerical model employing advanced computational fluid dynamics. Specifically, the recent introduction of very high-resolution image products, such as 25 cm-resolution HiRISE imagery and its precise photogrammetric processor, allows us to trace the estimated, although tiny, dune migration over the Martian surface. In this study, we attempted to improve the accuracy of active dune migration measurements by 1) the introduction of very high resolution ortho images and stereo analysis based on the hierarchical geodetic control (Kim and Muller, 2009) for better initial point settings; and 2) the improved sub-pixel co-registration algorithms using optical flow with a refinement stage based on a least squares correlation conducted on a pyramidal processor. Consequently, this scheme not only measured Martian dune migration more precisely, but it also achieved the extension of 3D observations combining stereo analysis and photoclinometry. The established algorithms have been tested using the HiRISE time series images over several dune fields, such as the Kaiser, Procter, and Rabe craters, which were reported by the Mars Global Digital Dune Database (Hayward et al., 2013). The detected dune migrations were significantly larger than previously reported values. The outcomes in our study will be demonstrated with the quantified values in 2D and volumetric direction. In the future, the method will be further applied to the dune fields in the Mars Global dune database comprehensively and can be compared with the improved General Circulation Model and the numerical simulation.

  5. Workshop on Mars Telescopic Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, J. F., III (Editor); Moersch, J. E. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    The Mars Telescopic Observations Workshop, held August 14-15, 1995, at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, was organized and planned with two primary goals in mind: The first goal was to facilitate discussions among and between amateur and professional observers and to create a workshop environment fostering collaborations and comparisons within the Mars observing community. The second goal was to explore the role of continuing telescopic observations of Mars in the upcoming era of increased spacecraft exploration. The 24 papers presented at the workshop described the current NASA plans for Mars exploration over the next decade, current and recent Mars research being performed by professional astronomers, and current and past Mars observations being performed by amateur observers and observing associations. The workshop was divided into short topical sessions concentrating on programmatic overviews, groundbased support of upcoming spacecraft experiments, atmospheric observations, surface observations, modeling and numerical studies, and contributions from amateur astronomers.

  6. Electrical power systems for Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giudici, Robert J.

    1986-01-01

    Electrical power system options for Mars Manned Modules and Mars Surface Bases were evaluated for both near-term and advanced performance potential. The power system options investigated for the Mission Modules include photovoltaics, solar thermal, nuclear reactor, and isotope power systems. Options discussed for Mars Bases include the above options with the addition of a brief discussion of open loop energy conversion of Mars resources, including utilization of wind, subsurface thermal gradients, and super oxides. Electrical power requirements for Mission Modules were estimated for three basic approaches: as a function of crew size; as a function of electric propulsion; and as a function of transmission of power from an orbiter to the surface of Mars via laser or radio frequency. Mars Base power requirements were assumed to be determined by production facilities that make resources available for follow-on missions leading to the establishment of a permanently manned Base. Requirements include the production of buffer gas and propellant production plants.

  7. Mars solar conjunction prediction modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Vineet K.; Kumar, Jai; Kulshrestha, Shivali; Kushvah, Badam Singh

    2016-01-01

    During the Mars solar conjunction, telecommunication and tracking between the spacecraft and the Earth degrades significantly. The radio signal degradation depends on the angular separation between the Sun, Earth and probe (SEP), the signal frequency band and the solar activity. All radiometric tracking data types display increased noise and signatures for smaller SEP angles. Due to scintillation, telemetry frame errors increase significantly when solar elongation becomes small enough. This degradation in telemetry data return starts at solar elongation angles of around 5° at S-band, around 2° at X-band and about 1° at Ka-band. This paper presents a mathematical model for predicting Mars superior solar conjunction for any Mars orbiting spacecraft. The described model is simulated for the Mars Orbiter Mission which experienced Mars solar conjunction during May-July 2015. Such a model may be useful to flight projects and design engineers in the planning of Mars solar conjunction operational scenarios.

  8. Mars periglacial punctual features analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machado, Adriane; Barata, Teresa; Ivo Alves, E.; Cunha, Pedro P.

    2012-11-01

    The presence of patterned grounds on Mars has been reported in several papers, especially the study of polygons distribution, size and formation processes. In the last years, the presence of basketball terrains has been noticed on Mars. Studies were made to recognize these terrains on Mars through the analysis of Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) images. We have been developing an algorithm that recognizes automatically and extracts the hummocky patterns on Mars related to landforms generated by freeze-thaw cycles such as mud boils features. The algorithm is based on remote sensing data that establishes a comparison between the hummocks and mud boils morphology and size from Adventdalen at Longyearbyen (Svalbard - Norway) and hummocky patterns on Mars using High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) imagery.

  9. Electrical power systems for Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giudici, Robert J.

    1986-05-01

    Electrical power system options for Mars Manned Modules and Mars Surface Bases were evaluated for both near-term and advanced performance potential. The power system options investigated for the Mission Modules include photovoltaics, solar thermal, nuclear reactor, and isotope power systems. Options discussed for Mars Bases include the above options with the addition of a brief discussion of open loop energy conversion of Mars resources, including utilization of wind, subsurface thermal gradients, and super oxides. Electrical power requirements for Mission Modules were estimated for three basic approaches: as a function of crew size; as a function of electric propulsion; and as a function of transmission of power from an orbiter to the surface of Mars via laser or radio frequency. Mars Base power requirements were assumed to be determined by production facilities that make resources available for follow-on missions leading to the establishment of a permanently manned Base. Requirements include the production of buffer gas and propellant production plants.

  10. Did Mars once have martians?

    PubMed

    McKay, C P

    1993-09-01

    Pictures of Mars from the Viking and Mariner 9 missions provide evidence of liquid water in Mars' past, indicating a warmer climate. It is speculated that outflow channels and valley networks were formed 3.5 to 4 billions years ago, at the same time life was developing on Earth. Current theories suggest that chemical reactions in Mars' early atmosphere depleted the original amounts of carbon dioxide with no mechanism to recycle it back into the atmosphere. Ecosystems in the cold, dry Antarctic valleys provide models of Mars on Earth and indicate that if life evolved on Mars there may be organic or fossil evidence under the surface. Lake beds on Mars surface are considered to be the best place to hunt for fossils. PMID:11540045

  11. Mars, Europa and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rummel, J. D.

    2004-07-01

    The two other solar system bodies thought to be most compatible with "life as we know it" are the planet Mars and Europa, a natural satellite of the planet Jupiter. These worlds appear to harbor the potential for past and/or present-day liquid water, biologically useful energy sources, and a significant and rich organic chemistry. Such traits are under active investigation both through ongoing, targeted, solar system exploration missions and from the extensive analysis of data from previous missions and astronomical observations. And both bodies are the subject of astrobiologically inspired future missions. The nature of both Mars and Europa fuels speculation about the prospects for life, and the established facts about each of them, added to more recent observations, can explain their astrobiological interest. Nonetheless, such data can only form a circumstantial case for that interest, and further investigations of water (in all of its forms), energy, and organic chemistry are sure to be required before astrobiological investigations can be further targeted-and data from any biological observations can be properly interpreted. Most important will be a dedication to understanding both Mars and Europa for the environments that they possess-and the nature and distribution of those environments in space and time-rather than trying to understand these worlds by simple analogy to the modern Earth. It is clear that both Mars and Europa have characteristics that may be similar to those of Earth when studied over its entire history, but it is equally true that each of them have characteristics that are unlike anything presented by the Earth system at any single time in its past. The same can be said of Saturn's moon, Titan, which presents a compelling mix of organic chemistry, water ice, and atmosphere-but must represent a significant departure from any historical Earth. This is not necessarily a disadvantage. In fact, through the study of Mars, Europa, and Titan we may

  12. Mars Aqueous Processing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berggren, Mark; Wilson, Cherie; Carrera, Stacy; Rose, Heather; Muscatello, Anthony; Kilgore, James; Zubrin, Robert

    2012-01-01

    The goal of the Mars Aqueous Processing System (MAPS) is to establish a flexible process that generates multiple products that are useful for human habitation. Selectively extracting useful components into an aqueous solution, and then sequentially recovering individual constituents, can obtain a suite of refined or semi-refined products. Similarities in the bulk composition (although not necessarily of the mineralogy) of Martian and Lunar soils potentially make MAPS widely applicable. Similar process steps can be conducted on both Mars and Lunar soils while tailoring the reaction extents and recoveries to the specifics of each location. The MAPS closed-loop process selectively extracts, and then recovers, constituents from soils using acids and bases. The emphasis on Mars involves the production of useful materials such as iron, silica, alumina, magnesia, and concrete with recovery of oxygen as a byproduct. On the Moon, similar chemistry is applied with emphasis on oxygen production. This innovation has been demonstrated to produce high-grade materials, such as metallic iron, aluminum oxide, magnesium oxide, and calcium oxide, from lunar and Martian soil simulants. Most of the target products exhibited purities of 80 to 90 percent or more, allowing direct use for many potential applications. Up to one-fourth of the feed soil mass was converted to metal, metal oxide, and oxygen products. The soil residue contained elevated silica content, allowing for potential additional refining and extraction for recovery of materials needed for photovoltaic, semiconductor, and glass applications. A high-grade iron oxide concentrate derived from lunar soil simulant was used to produce a metallic iron component using a novel, combined hydrogen reduction/metal sintering technique. The part was subsequently machined and found to be structurally sound. The behavior of the lunar-simulant-derived iron product was very similar to that produced using the same methods on a Michigan iron

  13. Global View of Mars Topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Annotated Version

    This global map of Mars is based on topographical information collected by the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter instrument on NASA's Mars Global Surveyor orbiter. Illumination is from the upper right. The image width is approximately 18,000 kilometers (11,185 miles). Candor Chasma forms part of the large Martian canyon system named Valles Marineris. The location of Southwest Candor Chasma is indicated in the annotated version.

  14. Evaluation of hydro-alcoholic extract of Eclipta alba for its multidrug resistance reversal potential: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Harshita; Jena, Prasant Kumar; Seshadri, Sriram

    2013-01-01

    The development of multidrug resistance (MDR) causes problems in the chemotherapy of human cancer. The present study was designed to evaluate and establish the role of Eclipta alba as MDR reversal agent using multidrug resistant hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (DR-HepG2). To develop DR-HepG2, hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (HepG2) was transfected with 2-Acetylaminofluorene (AAF) and Aflatoxin B1 (AFB). Cytotoxic effects of the Eclipta alba hydroalcoholic extract (EAE) and standard anti-ancer drug Doxorubicin (DOX) were determined in DR-HepG2 and the parental cells HepG2 using MTT assay. The expression level of MDR1 gene and P-glycoprotein (P-gp) level was analyzed by RT-PCR and western blotting. From the present investigation, it was found that EAE (10 and 20 μg/ml) could significantly inhibit cell proliferation in DR-HepG2 whereas DOX (0.5 μg/ml) could not because of enhancement effect of MDR1/P-gp. This study demonstrated for the first time the antiproliferative activities of EAE in multidrug resistant DR-HepG2 cells. The findings revealed that Eclipta alba components are effective inhibitors of MDR1/P-gp. PMID:23859045

  15. Life history and vertical distribution of the mesopelagic fish Cyclothone alba (family Gonostomatidae) in Sagami Bay, Central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miya, Masaki; Nemoto, Takahisa

    1986-08-01

    Life history and vertical distribution of the mesopelagic fish Cyclothone alba (family Gonostomatidae) are described on the basis of over 4000 specimens taken during a series of 15 cruises from December 1982 to December 1984 at a station near the center of Sagami Bay, Central Japan. C. alba does not undertake diel vertical migrations, being concentrated in the mesopelagic zone between 300 and 500 m, with peak abundance at 350 m both day and night. Spawning occurs mainly during the late spring and summer months in Sagami Bay. C. alba is semelparous, releasing about 200-650 eggs at the end of its life. Duration of the egg and larval stages is estimated to be about 2-3 months. Many males and some females mature at 1 year, and all individuals mature by 2 years of age. Sexual dimorphism in smaller males and larger females results from an earlier decline of growth rate in males: on the average, males reach 17.5 mm SL (standard length) in 1 year and 21 mm SL in 2 years, whereas females reach 19 mm SL in 1 year and 26 mm SL in 2 years. It is suggested that such precocious maturation, together with its small larvalized form, is attained through progenesis.

  16. Assessment of the repellent effect of Lippia alba essential oil and major monoterpenes on the cattle tick Rhipicephalus microplus.

    PubMed

    DA Silva Lima, A; DE Carvalho, J F; Peixoto, M G; Blank, A F; Borges, L M F; Costa Junior, L M

    2016-03-01

    The control of Rhipicephalus microplus (Ixodida: Ixodidae) is achieved using synthetic acaricides. However, resistant tick populations are widespread around the world. Plant essential oils can act as repellents, keeping ticks away from hosts and decreasing the selection pressure on synthetic acaricides. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro repellent effect of Lippia alba essential oil on R. microplus larvae. Leaves from two L. alba genotypes maintained under the same agronomic and environmental conditions were collected. Essential oil was extracted by hydrodistillation and analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The major monoterpenes detected in the chemical analysis were commercially acquired and tested. For the repellency test, a glass rod was vertically fixed to measure active climbing of approximately 30 R. microplus larvae aged 14-21 days in response to essential oils and monoterpenes. Repellency was evaluated at 1 h, 3 h and 5 h after treatment. Variation in repellent action was detected between the genotypes. The major monoterpenes identified in the essential oils (limonene and carvone) showed low repellent effects in comparison with intact essential oils. Thus, the present results showed that L. alba essential oil contains bioactive compounds with great repellent activity against ticks that varies according to the plant genotype. PMID:26471008

  17. Potential for phytoextraction of copper by Sinapis alba and Festuca rubra cv. Merlin grown hydroponically and in vineyard soils.

    PubMed

    Malagoli, Mario; Rossignolo, Virginia; Salvalaggio, Nico; Schiavon, Michela

    2014-03-01

    The extensive use of copper-bearing fungicides in vineyards is responsible for the accumulation of copper (Cu) in soils. Grass species able to accumulate Cu could be cultivated in the vineyard inter-rows for copper phytoextraction. In this study, the capacity of Festuca rubra cv Merlin and Sinapis alba to tolerate and accumulate copper (Cu) was first investigated in a hydroponic system without the interference of soil chemical-physical properties. After the amendment of Cu (5 or 10 mg Cu l-(1)) to nutrient solution, shoot Cu concentration in F. rubra increased up to 108.63 mg Cu kg(-1) DW, more than three times higher than in S. alba (31.56 mg Cu kg(-1) DW). The relationship between Cu concentration in plants and external Cu was dose-dependent and species specific. Results obtained from the hydroponic experiment were confirmed by growing plants in pots containing soil collected from six Italian vineyards. The content of soil organic matter was crucial to enhance Cu tolerance and accumulation in the shoot tissues of both plant species. Although S. alba produced more biomass than F. rubra in most soils, F. rubra accumulated significantly more Cu (up to threefold to fourfold) in the shoots. Given these results, we recommended that F. rubra cv Merlin could be cultivated in the vineyard rows to reduce excess Cu in vineyard soils. PMID:24234763

  18. Basella alba rubra spinach pigment-sensitized TiO2 thin film-based solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gokilamani, N.; Muthukumarasamy, N.; Thambidurai, M.; Ranjitha, A.; Velauthapillai, Dhayalan

    2015-03-01

    Nanocrystalline TiO2 thin films have been prepared by sol-gel dip coating method. The X-ray diffraction results showed that TiO2 thin films annealed at 400, 450 and 500 °C are of anatase phase and the peak corresponding to the (101) plane is present in all the samples. The grain size of TiO2 thin films was found to increase with increasing annealing temperature. The grain size is found to be 20, 25 and 33 nm for the films annealed at 400, 450 and 500 °C. The structure of the TiO2 nanocrystalline thin films have been examined by high-resolution transmission electron microscope, Raman spectroscopy and FTIR spectroscopy. TiO2 thin films were sensitized by natural dyes extracted from basella alba rubra spinach. It was found that the absorption peak of basella alba rubra extract is at about 665 nm. The dye-sensitized TiO2-based solar cell sensitized using basella alba rubra exhibited a J sc of 4.35 mA cm-2, V oc of 0.48 V, FF of 0.35 and efficiency of 0.70 %. Natural dyes as sensitizers for dye-sensitized solar cells are promising because of their environmental friendliness, low-cost production and fully biodegradable.

  19. Winter Storm Zones on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollingsworth, J. L.; Haberle, R. M.; Barnes, J. R.; Bridger, A. F. C.; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Preferred regions of weather activity in Mars' winter middle latitudes-so called 'storm zones' are found in a general circulation model of Mars' atmospheric circulation. During northern winter, these storm zones occur in middle latitudes in the major planitia (low-relief regions) of the western and eastern hemisphere. In contrast, the highlands of the eastern hemisphere are mostly quiescent. Compared to Earth's storm zones where diabatic heating associated with land-sea thermal contrasts is crucial, orography on Mars is fundamental to the regionalization of weather activity. Future spacecraft missions aimed at assessing Mars' climate and its variability need to include such regions in observation strategies.

  20. Instrument Deployment for Mars Rovers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pedersen, Liam; Bualat, Maria; Kunz, C.; Lee, Susan; Sargent, Randy; Washington, Rich; Wright, Anne; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Future Mars rovers, such as the planned 2009 MSL rover, require sufficient autonomy to robustly approach rock targets and place an instrument in contact with them. It took the 1997 Sojourner Mars rover between 3 and 5 communications cycles to accomplish this. This paper describes the technologies being developed and integrated onto the NASA Ames K9 prototype Mars rover to both accomplish this in one cycle, and to extend the complexity and duration of operations that a Mars rover can accomplish without intervention from mission control.

  1. French Participation in Mars Sample Return (and MARS Exploration)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Counil, Jean-Louis

    2000-10-01

    This presentation focused on high level contribution to the first MARS Sample Return mission. It further discusses leadership of the European Netlander project, Payload Instruments on the ESA-mission MARS-Express, Contribution to US Micro-missions, Instruments on Landers (PALOMA, Ma-FLUX), and Co-Is.

  2. Mars penetrator umbilical. [to study geophysical properties of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barns, C. E.

    1979-01-01

    The device proposed to gather subsurface data on the planet Mars is a ballistic probe which penetrates the soil after a free fall through the Martian atmosphere. Highlights of the design, development, and testing of several features of the Mars Surface Penetration Probe are outlined.

  3. Additions to Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justus, C. G.

    1991-01-01

    Three major additions or modifications were made to the Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM): (1) in addition to the interactive version, a new batch version is available, which uses NAMELIST input, and is completely modular, so that the main driver program can easily be replaced by any calling program, such as a trajectory simulation program; (2) both the interactive and batch versions now have an option for treating local-scale dust storm effects, rather than just the global-scale dust storms in the original Mars-GRAM; and (3) the Zurek wave perturbation model was added, to simulate the effects of tidal perturbations, in addition to the random (mountain wave) perturbation model of the original Mars-GRAM. A minor modification has also been made which allows heights to go below local terrain height and return realistic pressure, density, and temperature (not the surface values) as returned by the original Mars-GRAM. This feature will allow simulations of Mars rover paths which might go into local valley areas which lie below the average height of the present, rather coarse-resolution, terrain height data used by Mars-GRAM. Sample input and output of both the interactive and batch version of Mars-GRAM are presented.

  4. Additions to Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (MARS-GRAM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justus, C. G.; James, Bonnie

    1992-01-01

    Three major additions or modifications were made to the Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM): (1) in addition to the interactive version, a new batch version is available, which uses NAMELIST input, and is completely modular, so that the main driver program can easily be replaced by any calling program, such as a trajectory simulation program; (2) both the interactive and batch versions now have an option for treating local-scale dust storm effects, rather than just the global-scale dust storms in the original Mars-GRAM; and (3) the Zurek wave perturbation model was added, to simulate the effects of tidal perturbations, in addition to the random (mountain wave) perturbation model of the original Mars-GRAM. A minor modification was also made which allows heights to go 'below' local terrain height and return 'realistic' pressure, density, and temperature, and not the surface values, as returned by the original Mars-GRAM. This feature will allow simulations of Mars rover paths which might go into local 'valley' areas which lie below the average height of the present, rather coarse-resolution, terrain height data used by Mars-GRAM. Sample input and output of both the interactive and batch versions of Mars-GRAM are presented.

  5. New studies of Martian volcanoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mouginis-Mark, P. J.; Robinson, M. S.; Zisk, S. H.

    1991-01-01

    To investigate the morphology, topography, and evolution of volcanic constructs on Mars, researchers have been studying the volcanoes Olympus Mons, Tyrrhena Patera, and Apollinaris Patera. These studies relied upon the analysis of digital Viking orbiter images to measure the depth and slopes of the summit area of Olympus Mons, upon new Earth-based radar measurements for the analysis of the slopes of Tyrrhena Patera, and upon the color characteristics of the flanks of Apollinaris Patera for information regarding surface properties.

  6. Wide Ranging Insect Infestation of the Pioneer Mangrove Sonneratia alba by Two Insect Species along the Kenyan Coast.

    PubMed

    Jenoh, Elisha Mrabu; Robert, Elisabeth M R; Lehmann, Ingo; Kioko, Esther; Bosire, Jared O; Ngisiange, Noah; Dahdouh-Guebas, Farid; Koedam, Nico

    2016-01-01

    Insect infestation of mangroves currently threatens mangrove forest health and management. In the Western Indian Ocean region, little is known about insect damage to mangroves despite the fact that numerous infestations have occurred. In Kenya, infestations of Sonneratia alba have persisted for almost two decades, yet the taxonomic identity of the infesting pest(s), the extent of infestation, the pests' biology, the impacts of infestation on host and the ecosystem, the host's defensive strategies to the infestation are poorly understood. S. alba is a ubiquitous, pioneer mangrove species of the Indo-Pacific, occurring along the waterfront in a variety of mangrove ecosystem settings. Our main objectives were to identify the pest(s) responsible for the current dieback of S. alba in Kenya, and to determine the extent of infestation. To identify the pests responsible for infestation, we trapped emergent insects and reared larvae in the laboratory. To determine the overall extent of infestation within the S. alba zone, we assessed nine sites along the entire Kenyan coastline for the presence or absence of infested mangroves. Insect infestation in two mangrove embayments (Gazi and Mida) was quantified in depth. Two wood-boring insects were identified: a metarbelid moth (Lepidoptera, Cossoidea) of undescribed genus and the beetle Bottegia rubra (Cerambycidae, Lamiinae).The metarbelid moth infests mangroves in both northern (from Ngomeni to Kiunga) and southern regions (from Vanga to Mtwapa) of the Kenyan coast. B. rubra appeared in low density in Gazi, and in high density in Mida, Kilifi, and Ngomeni, with densities gradually decreasing northward. Insect infestation levels reached 18% in Gazi and 25% of S. alba stands in Mida. Our results indicate that B. rubra has the ability to infest young mangrove trees and expand its range, posing a danger to rehabilitation efforts where plantations have been established. Thus, there is great need for forest managers to address the

  7. Wide Ranging Insect Infestation of the Pioneer Mangrove Sonneratia alba by Two Insect Species along the Kenyan Coast

    PubMed Central

    Jenoh, Elisha Mrabu; Robert, Elisabeth M. R.; Lehmann, Ingo; Kioko, Esther; Bosire, Jared O.; Ngisiange, Noah; Dahdouh-Guebas, Farid; Koedam, Nico

    2016-01-01

    Insect infestation of mangroves currently threatens mangrove forest health and management. In the Western Indian Ocean region, little is known about insect damage to mangroves despite the fact that numerous infestations have occurred. In Kenya, infestations of Sonneratia alba have persisted for almost two decades, yet the taxonomic identity of the infesting pest(s), the extent of infestation, the pests’ biology, the impacts of infestation on host and the ecosystem, the host’s defensive strategies to the infestation are poorly understood. S. alba is a ubiquitous, pioneer mangrove species of the Indo-Pacific, occurring along the waterfront in a variety of mangrove ecosystem settings. Our main objectives were to identify the pest(s) responsible for the current dieback of S. alba in Kenya, and to determine the extent of infestation. To identify the pests responsible for infestation, we trapped emergent insects and reared larvae in the laboratory. To determine the overall extent of infestation within the S. alba zone, we assessed nine sites along the entire Kenyan coastline for the presence or absence of infested mangroves. Insect infestation in two mangrove embayments (Gazi and Mida) was quantified in depth. Two wood-boring insects were identified: a metarbelid moth (Lepidoptera, Cossoidea) of undescribed genus and the beetle Bottegia rubra (Cerambycidae, Lamiinae).The metarbelid moth infests mangroves in both northern (from Ngomeni to Kiunga) and southern regions (from Vanga to Mtwapa) of the Kenyan coast. B. rubra appeared in low density in Gazi, and in high density in Mida, Kilifi, and Ngomeni, with densities gradually decreasing northward. Insect infestation levels reached 18% in Gazi and 25% of S. alba stands in Mida. Our results indicate that B. rubra has the ability to infest young mangrove trees and expand its range, posing a danger to rehabilitation efforts where plantations have been established. Thus, there is great need for forest managers to address

  8. The Mars Exploration Rovers : hitting the road on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Nagin

    2005-01-01

    Since the beginning of time, people have been fascinated by Mars. From the earliest mission to now-Mars has been (and is) a challenging destination. The Rovers were developed at a breakneck pace in 3 years and landed successfully on Mars in January 2004. This paper will discuss how the Mars Rover mission fits into the overall Mars Program and NASA's program of planetary exploration. Building the rovers in such a short time period created some difficult design challenges that were mainly schedule driven. in addition, it will cover the process of selecting the rover landing sites as well as the engineering challenges faced in the entry, descent and landing process. The rovers have a great deal of autonomous control ability on the surface and the process of developing and testing those was part of the challenge of doing this in 3 years.

  9. Mars aqueous chemistry experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Benton C.; Mason, Larry W.

    1993-01-01

    The Mars Aqueous Chemistry Experiment (MACE) is designed to conduct a variety of measurements on regolith samples, encompassing mineral phase analyses, chemical interactions with H2O, and physical properties determinations. From these data, much can be learned or inferred regarding the past weathering environment, the contemporaneous soil micro-environments, and the general chemical and physical state of the Martian regolith. By analyzing both soil and duricrust samples, the nature of the latter may become more apparent. Sites may be characterized for comparative purposes and criteria could be set for selection of high priority materials on future sample return missions. Progress for the first year MACE PIDDP is reported in two major areas of effort: (1) fluids handling concepts, definition, and breadboard fabrication and (2) aqueous chemistry ion sensing technology and test facility integration. A fluids handling breadboard was designed, fabricated, and tested at Mars ambient pressure. The breadboard allows fluid manipulation scenarios to be tested under the reduced pressure conditions expected in the Martian atmosphere in order to validate valve operations, orchestrate analysis sequences, investigate sealing integrity, and to demonstrate efficacy of the fluid handling concept. Additional fluid manipulation concepts have also been developed based on updated MESUR spacecraft definition. The Mars Aqueous Chemistry Experiment Ion Selective Electrode (ISE) facility was designed as a test bed to develop a multifunction interface for measurements of chemical ion concentrations in aqueous solution. The interface allows acquisition of real time data concerning the kinetics and heats of salt dissolution, and transient response to calibration and solubility events. An array of ion selective electrodes has been interfaced and preliminary calibration studies performed.

  10. Subsurface properties of Lucus Planum, Mars, as seen by MARSIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orosei, Roberto; Rossi, Angelo Pio; Cantini, Federico; Caprarelli, Graziella; Carter, Lynn; Papiano, Irene

    2016-04-01

    Lucus Planum, extending for a radius of approximately 500 km around 181°E, 5°S, is part of the Medusae Fossae Formation (MFF), a set of several discontinuous deposits of fine-grained, friable material straddling across the Martian highland-lowland boundary. Parts of the MFF have been probed through radar sounding by MARSIS and SHARAD, synthetic-aperture, low-frequency radars carried respectively by ESA's Mars Express and NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. They transmit low-frequency radar pulses that are capable of penetrating below the surface, and are reflected by any dielectric discontinuity present in the subsurface. The dielectric permittivity of the MFF material, estimated from data of both radars, is consistent with either a substantial component of water ice or a low-density, ice-poor material. There is no evidence for internal layering in SHARAD data, despite the fact that layering at scales of tens of meters has been reported in many parts of the MFF. This lack of detection can be the result of one or more factors, such as high interface roughness, low dielectric contrast between materials, or discontinuity of the layers. After more than 10 years of observations, MARSIS has acquired about 240 orbits across Lucus Planum, making it possible to map the presence and depth of subsurface interfaces to a much greater detail than in previous works. The positions and strengths of subsurface echoes were extracted manually from radargrams and mapped across Lucus Planum, converting echo time delay to apparent depth. The strongest subsurface echoes, resulting from weak internal attenuation, strong subsurface reflectivity, or both, are found within the deposits located NW of Apollinaris Patera, while no subsurface echoes could be detected in the central section of Lucus Planum, in spite of several high-SNR observations. Subsurface reflections are common in the Eastern and Northwestern sectors, in some cases to depths of more than 2000 m assuming a dielectric

  11. Mars aerobrake assembly simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filatovs, G. J.; Lee, Gordon K. F.; Garvey, John

    1992-01-01

    On-orbit assembly operation simulations in neutral buoyancy conditions are presently undertaken by a partial/full-scale Mars mission aerobrake mockup, whose design, conducted in the framework of an engineering senior students' design project, involved several levels of constraints for critical physical and operational features. Allowances had to be made for the auxiliary constraints introduced by underwater testing, as well as the subsegmenting required for overland shipment to the neutral-buoyancy testing facility. This mockup aerobrake's fidelity is determined by the numerous, competing design objectives.

  12. Mars base buildup scenarios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blacic, J. D.

    1986-01-01

    Two Mars surface based build-up scenarios are presented in order to help visualize the mission and to serve as a basis for trade studies. In the first scenario, direct manned landings on the Martian surface occur early in the missions and scientific investigation is the main driver and rationale. In the second senario, Earth development of an infrastructure to exploit the volatile resources of the Martian moons for economic purposes is emphasized. Scientific exploration of the surface is delayed at first in this scenario relative to the first, but once begun develops rapidly, aided by the presence of a permanently manned orbital station.

  13. Mars Surface Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nørnberg, Per; Merrison, Jonathan P.; Gunnlaugsson, Haraldur P.

    2010-05-01

    Laboratory simulations of the Martian surface are of importance to broaden scientific understanding of the physical processes, but also in order to develop the technology necessary for exploration of the planet. The Mars Simulation Laboratory at Aarhus University [1] has been involved in such simulations for around ten years and has developed several experimental facilities for carrying out science or instrument testing under conditions similar to those at the Martian surface, specifically low pressure, low temperature and importantly recreating the wind flow environment and dust suspension (reproducing the Martian dusty aerosol) using Mars analogue material [2]. The science involved in this simulation work has covered a broad spectrum including, erosion induced mineralogy/chemistry, particulate electrification, magnetic properties of Martian dust, biological survival, UV induced chemistry/mineralogy (using a solar simulator), adhesion/cohesion processes and the wind driven transport of dust and sand [3,4]. With regard to technology the wind tunnel facilities have been used in the development of the latest wind and dust sensing instrumentation [5,6]. With support from the European Space Agency (ESA) and Danish national funding an advanced Mars simulation facility has recently been constructed (2009). This wind tunnel facility has a cross section of 2 x 1 m and a length of 8 m, a temperature range down to below -120C, wind speeds in excess of 20m/s, and automated dust control. With a range of (specialised) sensing instrumentation it provides the opportunity to perform a new generation of scientific experiments and allow testing and technology development in the most realistic and rigorous environment. As well as being available for the space agencies, this facility will be open to all potential scientific collaborators. Also European planetary scientists may benefit from support through the EU Europlanet FP7 networking programme. For more information on access

  14. Mars and Syrtis Major

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Taking advantage of Mars's closest approach to Earth in eight years, astronomers using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope have taken the space- based observatory's sharpest views yet of the Red Planet. The telescope's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 snapped these images between April 27 and May 6, when Mars was 54 million miles (87 million kilometers) from Earth. From this distance the telescope could see Martian features as small as 12 miles (19 kilometers) wide. The telescope obtained four images, which, together, show the entire planet. Each view depicts the planet as it completes one quarter of its daily rotation. In these views the north polar cap is tilted toward the Earth and is visible prominently at the top of each picture. The images were taken in the middle of the Martian northern summer, when the polar cap had shrunk to its smallest size. During this season the Sun shines continuously on the polar cap. Previous telescopic and spacecraft observations have shown that this summertime 'residual' polar cap is composed of water ice, just like Earth's polar caps. These Hubble telescope snapshots reveal that substantial changes in the bright and dark markings on Mars have occurred in the 20 years since the NASA Viking spacecraft missions first mapped the planet. The Martian surface is dynamic and ever changing. Some regions that were dark 20 years ago are now bright red; some areas that were bright red are now dark. Winds move sand and dust from region to region, often in spectacular dust storms. Over long timescales many of the larger bright and dark markings remain stable, but smaller details come and go as they are covered and then uncovered by sand and dust. The dark feature known as Syrtis Major was first seen telescopically by the astronomer Christiaan Huygens in the 17th century. Many small, dark, circular impact craters can be seen in this region, attesting to the Hubble telescope's ability to reveal fine detail on the planet's surface. To the south of

  15. Mars rover 1988 concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pivirotto, Donna Shirley; Penn, Thomas J.; Dias, William C.

    1989-01-01

    Results of FY88 studies of a sample-collecting Mars rover are presented. A variety of rover concepts are discussed which include different technical approaches to rover functions. The performance of rovers with different levels of automation is described and compared to the science requirement for 20 to 40 km to be traversed on the Martian surface and for 100 rock and soil samples to be collected. The analysis shows that a considerable amount of automation in roving and sampling is required to meet this requirement. Additional performance evaluation shows that advanced RTG's producing 500 W and 350 WHr of battery storage are needed to supply the rover.

  16. Astrobiology on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horvath, A.; Ganti, T.; Pocs, T.; Berczi, S.; Szathmary, E.

    Complex petrologic studies of the ALHA 84001 Martian meteorite (age 4,6 Gyear) showed lithified nanobacteria-like structures pseudomorphosed in calcium carbonate inclusion region. Both the Nakhla (age 1.3 Gyear) and Shergottite (0.3 Gyear) Martian meteorites were claimed to contain lithified bacteria. These observations may provide evidence of the continuous existence and adaptation of Martian bacterial life forms, despite of the decreasing comfort for life in the Martian atmosphere and surface. In search for terrestrial bacterial in hard extreme condition we studied the cryptobiotic crust (CBC). This type of cover forms in very or reasonably dry desert regions in Earth, and we suggest that similar form of life may probably exist on Mars, too. Based on our analyses of surface defrosting and the Mars Odyssey's water observations we suggest four probable candidate places of Martian CBC where the possibility of recently or earlier existing bacteria is worth for search. The two Polar Regions are the main candidates. The two other sites are the "considerable water" regions (compared to their environments) in the equatorial belt, where the two MERs landed. Our observations of defrosting processes in the southern and northern Polar Regions resulted in a biological model of this complex phenomenon. The suggested Martian Surface Organisms (MSOs) are important agents in this defrosting process model. MSOs form culture spots which use the sunlight and some water of the frost layer and from the soil (where it was measured by Mars Odyssey). These biologically active spots give rise to the dark dune spots (DDSs) during the defrosting process. After their springtime activity these MSO cultures seem to dry -out and wait for the next spring (i.e. the revitalizing period) in this desiccated state. Thinking on other candidates for recent or remnant living activity on Mars we suggest we found new one. They are apparent in observations of MER Spirit and Opportunity: some bright parts

  17. Dust torus around Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhasz, Antal; Horanyi, Mihaly

    1995-01-01

    We investigate the orbital dynamics of small dust particles generated via the continuous micrometeoroid bombardment of the Martian moons. In addition to Mar's oblateness, we also consider the radiation pressure perturbation that is complicated by the planet's eccentric orbit and tilted rotational axis. Considering the production rates and the lifetimes of dust grains, we show that particles from Deimos with radii of about 15 micrometers are expected to dominate the population of a permanently present and tilted dust torus. This torus has an estimated peak number density of approximately equals 5 x 10(exp -12)/cu cm and an optical depth of approximately equals 4 x 10(exp -8).

  18. MARS15 overview

    SciTech Connect

    Mokhov, N.V.; Striganov, S.I.; /Fermilab

    2007-01-01

    MARS15 is a Monte Carlo code for inclusive and exclusive simulation of three-dimensional hadronic and electromagnetic cascades, muon, heavy-ion, and low-energy neutron transport in accelerator, detector, spacecraft, and shielding components in the energy range from a fraction of an electronvolt up to 100 TeV. Main features of the code are described in this paper with a focus on recent developments and benchmarking. Newest developments concern inclusive and exclusive nuclear event generators, extended particle list in both modes, heavy-ion capability, electromagnetic interactions, enhanced geometry, tracking, histogramming and residual dose modules, improved graphical-user interface, and other external interfaces.

  19. MARS15 Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Mokhov, N. V.; Striganov, S. I.

    2007-03-19

    MARS15 is a Monte Carlo code for inclusive and exclusive simulation of three-dimensional hadronic and electromagnetic cascades, muon, heavy-ion, and low-energy neutron transport in accelerator, detector, spacecraft, and shielding components in the energy range from a fraction of an electron volt up to 100 TeV. Main features of the code are described in this paper with a focus on recent developments and benchmarking. Newest developments concern inclusive and exclusive nuclear event generators, extended particle list in both modes, heavy-ion capability electromagnetic interactions, enhanced geometry, tracking, histograming and residual dose modules, improved graphical-user interface, and other external interfaces.

  20. Mars Life? - Microscopic Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    In the center of this electron microscope image of a small chip from a meteorite are several tiny structures that are possible microscopic fossils of primitive, bacteria-like organisms that may have lived on Mars more than 3.6 billion years ago. A two-year investigation by a NASA research team found organic molecules, mineral features characteristic of biological activity and possible microscopic fossils such as these inside of an ancient Martian rock that fell to Earth as a meteorite. The largest possible fossils are less than 1/100th the diameter of a human hair in size while most are ten times smaller.