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Sample records for albany ca pacific

  1. 75 FR 11224 - Albany & Eastern Railroad Company-Acquisition and Operation Exemption-Union Pacific Railroad...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-10

    ... acquire and operate the exclusive rail freight easement between milepost 682.25, near Greenberry, OR, and...; and (2) take assignment of UP's lease with Willamette & Pacific Railroad, Inc. (WPRR), the current operator on the Line, and any and all of WPRR's remaining operating rights and obligations with respect...

  2. Brighter Choices in Albany

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Peter

    2009-01-01

    During much of the previous nine years, Tom Carroll had overseen the launch of eight charter schools in Albany. All of Tom Carroll's Albany charter schools made Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP). Not only that, they had become the best schools in the city. Tom Carroll now runs the Foundation for Education Reform & Accountability (FERA), which…

  3. Albany v 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-14

    The Albany code is a general purpose finite element code for solving partial differential equations (PDEs). Albany is a research code that demonstrates how a PDE code can be built by interfacing many of the open-source software libraries that are released under Sandia's Trilinos project. Part of the mission of Albany is to be a testbed for new Trilinos libraries, to refine their methods, usability, and interfaces. Albany also serves as a demonstration code on how to build an application code against an installed Trilinos project. Because of this, Albany is a desirable starting point for new code development efforts that wish to make heavy use of Trilinos. The physics solved in Albany are currently only very academic problems, such as heat transfer, linear elasticity, and nonlinear elasticity. Albany includes hooks to optimization and uncertainty quantification algorithms, including those in the Dakota toolkit.

  4. 3. Photocopy of historic photograph of completed concrete snowshed, ca. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Photocopy of historic photograph of completed concrete snowshed, ca. 1917. From the Fee-Murphy Collection, American Heritage Center, University of Wyoming. UNKNOWN ANGLE VIEW - Rock River Union Pacific Snowshed Plant, .6 Mile North of Rock River, Rock River, Albany County, WY

  5. Albany v. 3.0

    SciTech Connect

    Salinger, Andrew; Phipps, Eric; Ostien, Jakob; Hansen, Glen; Mota, Alejandro; Foulk, James; Jones, Reese; Littlewood, David; Muller, Richard; Nielsen, Erik; Gao, Xujiao; Tezaur, Irina K.; Perego, Mauro; Bradley, Andrew M.; Foucar, James; Robbins, Joshua; Voth, Thomas E.; Spotz, William; Demeshko, Irina; Siefert, Christopher; Overfelt, James R.; Bova, Steven W.; Smith, Tom; Tuminaro, Ray; Granzow, Brian; Ibanez, Dan; Seol, Seegyoung; Bloomfield, Max; Sun, WaiChing; Chen, Qiushi; Cortial, Julien

    2016-01-13

    The Albany code is a general-purpose finite element code for solving partial differential equations (PDEs). Albany is a research code that demonstrates how a PDE code can be built by interfacing many of the open-source software libraries that are released under Sandia's Trilinos project. Part of the mission of Albany is to be a testbed for new Trilinos libraries, to refine their methods, usability, and interfaces. Albany includes hooks to optimization and uncertainty quantification algorithms, including those in Trilinos as well as those in the Dakota toolkit. Because of this, Albany is a desirable starting point for new code development efforts that wish to make heavy use of Trilinos. Albany is both a framework and the host for specific finite element applications. These applications have project names, and can be controlled by configuration option when the code is compiled, but are all developed and released as part of the single Albany code base, These include LCM, QCAD, FELIX, Aeras, and ATO applications.

  6. 33 CFR 165.T11-577 - Security Zone; Naval Exercise; Pacific Ocean, Coronado, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Security Zone; Naval Exercise; Pacific Ocean, Coronado, CA. 165.T11-577 Section 165.T11-577 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 165.T11-577 Security Zone; Naval Exercise; Pacific Ocean, Coronado, CA. (a) Location. The limits...

  7. 75 FR 20874 - Union Pacific Railroad Company-Abandonment Exemption-in Orange County, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board Union Pacific Railroad Company--Abandonment Exemption--in Orange County, CA... to milepost 508.65 near the City of Brea, in Orange County, CA. The line traverses United...

  8. 49 CFR 372.201 - Albany, NY.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Albany, N.Y., within which transportation by motor vehicle, in interstate or foreign commerce, not under... combined areas defined in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section, and (e) All of any municipality...

  9. 78 FR 7394 - Foreign-Trade Zone 121-Albany, NY; Authorization of Production Activity; Albany Molecular...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 121--Albany, NY; Authorization of Production Activity; Albany Molecular Research, Inc.; Subzone 121A (Pharmaceutical Chemicals Production); Rensselaer, NY On September...

  10. Tropical Pacific Mg/Ca paleo-thermometry: A contribution to the core top calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, S.; Mekik, F.; Kienast, M.; Groeneveld, J.

    2009-12-01

    The magnesium to calcium ratio in foraminifera is widely used as a proxy to estimate ocean temperatures in Earth’s past. However, studies have shown that both dissolution within the sediments and seawater salinity influence the Mg/Ca in the shells of tropical foraminifera and skew paleo-temperature estimates. We measured Mg/Ca and d18O in shells of mixed layer-dwelling species (Globigernoides ruber sensu stricto, Globigernoides ruber sensu lato, and Globigerinoides sacculifer) from a series of core tops in the eastern equatorial Pacific. We specifically chose these three taxa because they are most commonly used for sea surface temperature estimates, particularly in down core work. We compared our results with global core top data from which paleo-temperature equations have already been derived and published (e.g. Brown and Elderfield, 1996; Lea et al., 2000; Dekens et al., 2002). We find that at the same surface ocean temperature, Mg/Ca values can range as much as 1.5 mmol/mol, and we find no influence of salinity on outliers from the expected exponential relationship between Mg/Ca and temperature. Nor do we see dissolution as the cause of this variation. Most samples used for core top calibration work are well above the calcite saturation horizon and show no evidence of dissolution. We demonstrate this both with carbonate dissolution proxies, like data using the Globorotalia menardii Fragmentation Index (MFI) (Mekik et al., 2002) from our same core tops, and with estimates of bottom water carbonate ion concentration. Potential other influences which cause these variations could include seasonality, differences in analytical methods, and potential differences among morphotypes of G. ruber. Brown S. and H. Elderfield, 1996. Variations in Mg/Ca in Sr/Ca ratios of planktonic foraminifera caused by postdepositional dissolution: Evidence of shallow Mg-dependant dissolution, Paleoceanography, 11,5,543-551. Dekens P., D. Lea, D. Pak, and H. Spero, 2002. Core top

  11. Variability in Pacific trade winds inferred from coral Mn/Ca: Implications for the rate of global warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, D. M.; Cole, J. E.; Shen, G. T.; Tudhope, A. W.; Meehl, G. A.

    2014-12-01

    Zonal wind strength and direction are fundamental components of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and likely play an important role in global temperature modulation. However, historical observations of tropical Pacific winds are limited, and existing datasets disagree on long-term trends, emphasizing the need for independent data to assess zonal wind variability. Earlier work using a 17-year dataset from Tarawa Atoll suggests that Mn/Ca in corals near west-facing lagoons record westerly winds associated with the onset and maintenance of El Niño events. These westerly wind anomalies trigger strong physical mixing and release of Mn from the Mn-enriched lagoonal sediments, which is incorporated into the coral skeleton. Here we present a new ~90 year Mn/Ca record from Tarawa that allows us to assess westerly wind anomalies before the mid-20th century, when instrumental data from the tropical Pacific are scarce. We compare this new Mn/Ca record with 20th-century reanalysis zonal wind and demonstrate a strong association between the frequency of westerly winds and Tarawa Mn/Ca from 1890-1982. This new wind reconstruction also corroborates and extends the idea, developed from models and analyses of the well-observed late 20th century, that periods of strong Pacific trade winds are associated with cooler equatorial Pacific SSTs and a slower rate of global warming, and vice versa. By adding Mn/Ca to the suite of coral tracers measured for paleoclimate reconstructions from appropriate sites, we can expand our view of past climate variability to include westerly winds, along with the more commonly reconstructed variables of SST and salinity. Development of additional Mn/Ca records from other equatorial atolls with westerly facing lagoons will be used to obtain a broader multivariate perspective on the dynamics of recent climate variability.

  12. The Giant Pacific Oyster (Crassostrea gigas) as a modern analog for fossil ostreoids: Isotopic (Ca, O, C) and elemental (Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca, Mn/Ca) proxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullmann, Clemens V.; Böhm, Florian; Rickaby, Rosalind E. M.; Wiechert, Uwe; Korte, Christoph

    2013-10-01

    Modern analogs are an essential part of palaeoclimate studies, because they provide the basis for the understanding of geochemical signatures of fossils. Ostreoids are common in many sedimentary sequences and because of their fast growth, high temporal resolution sampling of past seasonal variability is possible. Here, two shell structures of modern Giant Pacific Oysters (Crassostrea gigas), the chalky substance and foliate layers, have been sampled for trace element distributions (Mg, Sr, Mn) and stable isotope variability (C, O, Ca). Oxygen isotopes exhibit a clear seasonal signature. Mean carbon isotope values of different oysters agree within 0.1‰, but ontogenic variability is complicated by shell growth patterns and potential small vital effects. The calcium isotope ratios are found to be constant throughout ontogeny within analytical precision at a value of δ44/40Ca = 0.68 ± 0.16‰ (2 sd) SRM-915a which is consistent with other bivalve species. Calcium isotope ratios in oyster shell material might thus be a possible proxy for palaeo seawater calcium isotope ratios. Element/Ca ratios are significantly higher in the chalky substance than in the foliate layers and especially high Sr/Ca and Mn/Ca ratios are observed for the first growth season of the oysters. Mg/Ca ratios in the chalky substance show a negative correlation with δ18O values, compatible with a temperature dependence, whereas this correlation is absent in the foliate layers. Seasonal changes of Sr/Ca are controlled by metabolic processes, whereas for Mn/Ca an additional environmental control is evident.

  13. Comparison of Equatorial Pacific Sea Surface Variability and Trends with Sr/Ca Records from Multiple Corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpert, A.; Cohen, A. L.; Oppo, D.; Gove, J.; Young, C.; Decarlo, T. M.

    2015-12-01

    The short duration of instrumental SST records makes it difficult to reliably separate anthropogenic-related trends from natural variability, especially in the tropical Pacific. The Sr/Ca ratio of massive corals has been used to lengthen the record and fill data gaps but its reliability has been questioned because different coral colonies on the same reef can have different Sr/Ca-temperature relationships and yield opposing derived SST trends. We exploited a unique multi-year dataset of in situ temperature data to assess whether inter-colony differences are attributable to small-scale oceanographic variability or "vital effects" and to quantify the effect of these differences on temperature estimates and uncertainties. Sr/Ca records from four massive Porites colonies growing on the east and west sides of Jarvis Island, central equatorial Pacific, were compared with temperature data from in situ loggers also placed on the east and west sides. In general, Sr/Ca captured - albeit inconsistently - the occurrence of inter-annual SST events but their amplitude was not consistently recorded by any of the corals. However, the Sr/Ca-temperature regressions derived from the four different colonies were statistically distinct. Assuming these relationships represent the full range of Sr/Ca-temperature calibrations in Jarvis Porites, we assessed how well Sr/Ca of a fossil coral with an unknown Sr/Ca-temperature relationship can constrain past temperatures. Our results indicate that the standard error of prediction methods underestimate the actual error as we could not reliably reconstruct the amplitude or frequency of ENSO events as large as ±2°C. Further, Sr/Ca of one coral implied a statistically significant cooling trend while that of its neighbor implied a warming trend whereas no long-term trend was identified in the instrumental data. This observation of a derived trend where none exists is consistent with observations made independently at other coral reef sites in the

  14. Comparison of equatorial Pacific sea surface temperature variability and trends with Sr/Ca records from multiple corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpert, Alice E.; Cohen, Anne L.; Oppo, Delia W.; DeCarlo, Thomas M.; Gove, Jamison M.; Young, Charles W.

    2016-02-01

    Coral Sr/Ca is widely used to reconstruct past ocean temperatures. However, some studies report different Sr/Ca-temperature relationships for conspecifics on the same reef, with profound implications for interpretation of reconstructed temperatures. We assess whether these differences are attributable to small-scale oceanographic variability or "vital effects" associated with coral calcification and quantify the effect of intercolony differences on temperature estimates and uncertainties. Sr/Ca records from four massive Porites colonies growing on the east and west sides of Jarvis Island, central equatorial Pacific, were compared with in situ logger temperatures spanning 2002-2012. In general, Sr/Ca captured the occurrence of interannual sea surface temperature events but their amplitude was not consistently recorded by any of the corals. No long-term trend was identified in the instrumental data, yet Sr/Ca of one coral implied a statistically significant cooling trend while that of its neighbor implied a warming trend. Slopes of Sr/Ca-temperature regressions from the four different colonies were within error, but offsets in mean Sr/Ca rendered the regressions statistically distinct. Assuming that these relationships represent the full range of Sr/Ca-temperature calibrations in Jarvis Porites, we assessed how well Sr/Ca of a nonliving coral with an unknown Sr/Ca-temperature relationship can constrain past temperatures. Our results indicate that standard error of prediction methods underestimate the actual error as we could not reliably reconstruct the amplitude or frequency of El Niño-Southern Oscillation events as large as ± 2°C. Our results underscore the importance of characterizing the full range of temperature-Sr/Ca relationships at each study site to estimate true error.

  15. RadNet Air Data From Albany, NY

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page presents radiation air monitoring and air filter analysis data for Albany, NY from EPA's RadNet system. RadNet is a nationwide network of monitoring stations that measure radiation in air, drinking water and precipitation.

  16. 77 FR 63290 - Foreign-Trade Zone 121-Albany, NY; Notification of Proposed Production Activity; Albany Molecular...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-16

    ...; Albany Molecular Research, Inc., Subzone 121A, (Pharmaceutical Chemicals Production), Rensselaer, NY... originally approved by the Board in 1994 for the production of bulk pharmaceutical chemicals and... an active pharmaceutical ingredient, dexpramipexole dihydrochloride monohydrate, under...

  17. Mn/Ca and Fe/Ca data from multiple species of planktonic foraminifers from the equatorial Pacific and subtropical South Atlantic: Indicators of surface ocean productivity, diagenesis of the shells, or both?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howlett, J.; Mekik, F.

    2015-12-01

    Mn/Ca ratios in planktonic foraminifers have been purported to be indicators of terrestrial input, marine oxidation-reduction reactions and sea surface productivity in the eastern tropical Pacific. We investigated this hypothesis using Mn/Ca and Fe/Ca data from five species of planktonic foraminifers in 32 core tops from the eastern equatorial Pacific (EEP), five species from 12 core tops in the western equatorial Pacific, and two species from 15 core tops on the Rio Grande Rise. We present Mn/Ca and Fe/Ca data from Neogloboquadrina dutertrei, Globorotalia menardii, Globigerina bulloides, Pulleniatina obliquiloculata and Globorotalia tumida from the eastern and western equatorial Pacific and from Globorotalia truncatulinoides and Globorotalia inflata on the Rio Grande Rise. We find that the environmental parameter depicted by Mn/Ca and Fe/Ca ratios depends on the species of foraminifer from which the data was derived. Fe/Ca from N. dutertrei in the EEP have statistically significant and quantifiable relationships with apparent oxygen utilization, dissolved phosphate concentration and dissolved oxygen concentration in the habitat depths of this species. The Mn/Ca ratio from P. obliquiloculata and G. tumida are highest in regions of greatest productivity in the EEP. On the Rio Grande Rise, we explored the effect of dissolution in the sediments on Mn/Ca and Fe/Ca ratios from planktonic foraminifers. We used the G. menardii fragmentation index as our sedimentary dissolution indicator, and found that dissolution does not have a strong effect on the Mn/Ca and Fe/Ca ratios measured from foraminifers tests.

  18. Geology of the Albany West quadrangle, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wait, Robert L.

    1962-01-01

    The Albany West Quadrangle is near the east edge of the Dougherty Plain of southwestern Georgia, an area of karst topography. The Ocala limestone (uppoer Eocene) underlies the quadrangle and crops out along the Flint River and its tributaries and sinkholes. Sinkholes of two ages are developed in the limestone. A gravelly argillaceous sand of Pliocene(?) age is exposed in ditches near the Flint River and in a sinkhole in the western part of the quadrangle. Reddish brown, argillaceous, older Pleistocene sand, believed to be part of a marine terrace deposit above altitude 160 feet, overlies the Pliocene(?) and is exposed in a sinkhole. River terraces are present along the Flint River at altitudes of 175 and 200 feet. Accumulations of dune sand east of the Flint River are believed to have been derived from the earliest river-terrace deposit. The quadrangle is covered by a mixture of reddish-brown, argillaceous, older Pleistocene sand, and residuum containing siliceous boulders from the Ocala limestone, which has been mapped as residuum.

  19. Reduced-dimension reconstruction of the equatorial Pacific SST and zonal wind fields over the past 10,000 years using Mg/Ca and alkenone records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Emily C.; Rajagopalan, Balaji; Molnar, Peter; Marchitto, Thomas M.

    2016-07-01

    We develop a multiproxy, reduced-dimension methodology to blend magnesium-calcium (Mg/Ca) and alkenone (U37k) paleo sea surface temperature (SST) records from the eastern and western equatorial Pacific, to recreate snapshots of full field SSTs and zonal winds from 10 to 2 ka B.P. in 2000 year increments. Single-proxy reconstructions (Mg/Ca only versus U37K' only) reveal differences in the timing and duration of maximum cooling across the east-central equatorial Pacific. The largest zonal temperature differences (average west Pacific SST minus average east Pacific SST) occur at 6 ka B.P. for the Mg/Ca-only reconstruction (0.61°C) and at 10 and 4 ka for the U37K'-only reconstruction (0.55°C and 0.47°C, respectively). Disagreements between SST trends suggested by each proxy call for methods that can resolve the common patterns between each and have motivated the work presented in this study. In combining inferences from these proxies, we treat both Mg/Ca and U37K' reconstructions of SST as annual average values, but we recognize that they may be sensitive to different seasons. In the multiproxy reconstruction, the zonal SST difference is largest at 10 ka (0.26°C), with coldest SST anomalies of ˜ -0.9°C in the eastern equatorial Pacific and concurrent easterly maximum zonal wind anomalies of 7 m s-1 throughout the central Pacific. From 10 to 2 ka, the entire equatorial Pacific warms, but at a faster rate in the east than the west, and the average central Pacific easterly winds weaken gradually to approximately 2 m s-1. These patterns are broadly consistent with previous inferences of reduced El Niño-Southern Oscillation variability associated with a "La Niña-like" state during the early to middle Holocene.

  20. 78 FR 37971 - Security Zone; Naval Exercise; Pacific Ocean, Coronado, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-25

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA87 Security Zone; Naval Exercise; Pacific Ocean, Coronado... speed zone from an anchored naval high value unit vessel during a Naval exercise, which will be... this rule because an NPRM would have been impracticable. Logistical details surrounding this...

  1. Water Column Study of Planktonic Foraminiferal Cd/Ca Temperature-Nutrient Dependency: Plankton tow Results From the NE Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Boti, M. A.; Mortyn, P.; Vance, D.

    2006-12-01

    The Cd/Ca ratio of foraminiferal calcite has long been relied upon as a nutrient tracer, as Cd and [PO4] are coupled in the world's oceans. This link has been especially useful with benthic foraminifera to estimate time since surface ventilation and changes in thermohaline circulation, both of which have important impacts on the links between ocean and climate. Planktonic foraminiferal Cd/Ca studies have been relatively rare however, due to the lower nutrient compositions of surface waters, and therefore lower Cd/Ca ratios compositions in foraminifera as well. Recent analytical developments have advanced the potential for this kind of work, but the link between Cd/Ca and [PO4] has been assumed more than tested. Rickaby and Elderfield (1999) explicitly evaluated the controls on Globigerina bulloides Cd/Ca ratios from a suite of N. Atlantic core-top samples, and concluded that temperature (T), rather than [PO4], was the predominant influence. Furthermore, Elderfield and Rickaby (2000), applying a temperature correction to the partition coefficient (DCd) for incorporation of Cd into calcite, made an attempt to reconstruct past surface water [PO4] using planktonic foraminiferal Cd/Ca. Here, we test this temperature influence from a NE Pacific water column perspective, using depth-restricted (Ca correspondence with T than [PO4]. We calculate partition coefficients (DCd) using the published core-top approach, and obtain higher DCd values -as a result of higher original Cd/Ca ratios-, as well as an enhanced sensitivity to T, both of which are then confirmed with independent data from sediment-trap G. bulloides that were also recovered from the same study region. We also evaluate other species

  2. Studies of New Albany shale in western Kentucky. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Schwalb, H.R.; Norris, R.L.

    1980-02-01

    The New Albany (Upper Devonian) Shale in western Kentucky can be zoned by using correlative characteristics distinguishable on wire-line logs. Wells drilled through the shale which were logged by various methods provided a basis for zonation of the subsurface members and units of the Grassy Creek, Sweetland Creek, and Blocher. Structure and isopach maps and cross sections were prepared. The Hannibal Shale and Rockford Limestone were found in limited areas; isopach maps were not made for these members. Samples of cuttings from selected wells were studied in order to identify the contact of the shale with underlying and overlying rock units. A well-site examination of cuttings through the shale section was conducted, and the presence of natural gas was observed in the field. The New Albany Shale has the potential for additional commercially marketable natural gas production. Exploratory drilling is needed to evaluate the reservoir characteristics of the New Albany Shale.

  3. Detecting the progression of ocean acidification from the saturation state of CaCO3 in the subtropical South Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murata, Akihiko; Hayashi, Kazuhiko; Kumamoto, Yuichiro; Sasaki, Ken-ichi

    2015-04-01

    Progression of ocean acidification in the subtropical South Pacific was investigated by using high-quality data from trans-Pacific zonal section at 17°S (World Ocean Circulation Experiment section P21) collected in 1994 and 2009. During this 15 year period, the CaCO3 saturation state of seawater with respect to calcite (Ωcal) and aragonite (Ωarg) in the upper water column (<400 dbar) decreased at rates of 0.037 a-1 and 0.025 a-1, respectively, east of 145°W longitude; these rates are among the fastest in the world's oceans. In contrast, at longitudes 170°E-145°W, Ωcal and Ωarg decreased relatively slowly, at 0.008 a-1 and 0.005 a-1, respectively. The Ωarg saturation horizon occurred at a depth of about 1200 dbar at the westernmost end of the section and shoaled eastward to about 20 dbar. From 1994 to 2009, it migrated upward at a rate of 5.2 dbar a-1 west of 145°W. Decomposition of the temporal changes of Ω (ΔΩ) showed that the accumulation of anthropogenic CO2 in the ocean accounted for more than half of ΔΩ. The more rapid rate of decline of Ω in the eastern section was attributable to a relatively large contribution of organic matter remineralization, whereas the slower rate in the central section was attributed to a decrease of anthropogenic CO2 uptake caused by rising water temperatures. An important finding of this study was that acidification of the upper water column was enhanced by processes related to the oxygen minimum zone in the eastern subtropical South Pacific Ocean.

  4. 77 FR 35366 - Albany-Eugene Transmission Line Rebuild Project

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-13

    ... Administration (BPA), Department of Energy (DOE). ACTION: Notice of Availability of Record of Decision (ROD..., based on the Albany-Eugene Transmission Line Rebuild Project (DOE/EIS-0457, March 2012). BPA has decided... will continue to operate at 115 kV. ADDRESSES: Copies of the ROD and EIS may be obtained by calling...

  5. Albany-Laramie Counties Health Manpower and Education Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callen, John; And Others

    The profile is a concise description of the demographic and economic characteristics, existing health manpower employed, and health education programs for the Albany-Laramie Counties area of Wyoming, one of seven surveyed in the Mountain States region (Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, and Nevada). The first section of the profile provides general…

  6. Ba/Ca Ratios in North Pacific Bamboo Corals Record Changes in Intermediate Water Biogeochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrato Marks, G.; LaVigne, M.; Hill, T. M.; Sauthoff, W.; Guilderson, T. P.; Roark, E. B.; Dunbar, R. B.

    2015-12-01

    Trace elemental ratios preserved in the skeleton of bamboo corals, which live for hundreds of years at >500m depth, have been utilized as archives of deep-ocean conditions. However, it was previously unclear whether trace element data from these corals were internally reproducible and could therefore be used as reliable climate proxies. This study tests the internal reproducibility of Ba/Ca in the calcite of nine bamboo corals to further develop a new proxy for dissolved Ba in seawater (BaSW). Trace element LA-ICP-MS data were collected along three replicate radii of varying lengths of the calcitic internodes of well-dated corals collected live from the Gulf of Alaska (720m and 643m) and the California Margin (870m, 1012m, 1295m, 1500m, 1521m, 1954m, and 2054m; samples from 1295-1521m are not yet dated). Data were aligned using visible bands measured with a petrographic microscope to account for irregular growth. Ba/Ca data filtered with a 50μm (1.5-2 year) moving average were reproducible within each coral to 2.9 ± 2.1% (n=3 radii/coral, 9 corals), suggesting that regional geochemical signals are recorded as reproducible Ba/Ca signals on >annual timescales. Coral Ba/Ca presents an excellent proxy for BaSW, which has been found to be correlated with refractory nutrients (e.g. silicate) and oxygen minima. Increasing BaSW with depth and increased variability near 1000m suggests that BaSW is not constant with depth or with time. Several factors, including barite saturation state, particulate organic carbon (POC) remineralization rate, and particle sinking time, may be involved in the observed changes in BaSW. Further examination of such mechanisms could provide new insights into modern changes in deep-sea biogeochemistry.

  7. Bottom water variability in the subtropical northwestern Pacific from 26 kyr BP to present based on Mg / Ca and stable carbon and oxygen isotopes of benthic foraminifera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubota, Y.; Kimoto, K.; Itaki, T.; Yokoyama, Y.; Miyairi, Y.; Matsuzaki, H.

    2015-06-01

    To understand bottom water variability in the subtropical northwestern Pacific, bottom water temperatures (BWTs), carbon isotopes (δ13C), and oxygen isotopes of seawater (δ18Ow) at a water depth of 1166 m were reconstructed from 26 kyr BP to present. A new regional Mg / Ca calibration for the benthic foraminifera Cibicidoides wuellerstorfi (type B) was established to convert the benthic Mg / Ca value to BWT, based on 26 surface sediment samples and two core-top samples retrieved around Okinawa Island. During the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), the δ18Ow in the intermediate water in the northwestern South Pacific was ~0.4‰ lower than in the deep South Pacific, indicating a greater vertical salinity gradient than at present. This salinity (and probably density) structure would have led to stratification in the intermediate and deep Pacific, which would, in turn, have greatly influenced carbon storage during the glacial time. The benthic Mg / Ca and δ18Ow records suggest changes that seem to follow Heinrich event 1 (H1) and the Bølling-Alleød (B/A) and Younger Dryas (YD) intervals, with BWT higher during H1 (~17 kyr BP) and YD (~12 kyr BP) and lower during B/A (~14 kyr BP). The warming in the bottom water during H1 suggests increased contribution of North Pacific Intermediate Water (NPIW) to the subtropical northwestern Pacific and decreased upwelling of cooler waters from the abyssal North Pacific. During the interval from 17 to 14.5 kyr BP, the BWT tended to decrease successively in association with a decrease in δ13C values, presumably as a result of increased upwelling of the abyssal waters to the intermediate depths of the North Pacific caused by shoaling and enhancement of the southward return flow of Pacific Deep Water (PDW). During the Holocene, the millennial- to sub-millennial-scale variations in the BWT generally correlate with the sea surface temperatures in the Okhotsk Sea, the source region of the NPIW, suggesting that changes in the BWT are linked

  8. Decadal changes in the CaCO3 saturation state along 179°E in the Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murata, Akihiko; Saito, Shu

    2012-06-01

    To assess degrees of ocean acidification, we mainly investigated decadal changes in the saturation state of seawater with respect to aragonite (Ωarg), which is a more vulnerable mineral form of CaCO3, along the 179°E meridian (WOCE P14N) in the Pacific Ocean. We found a maximum decrease of Ωarg of -0.48 (-0.034 a-1) at 200-300 dbar (isopycnal surfaces of 24.0-25.8 kg m-3) at 20°N. Between 1993 and 2007, the saturation horizon rose by 17 dbar (1.2 dbar a-1) at latitudes 10°N-50°N. Although ΔΩarg mostly reflected changes in normalized dissolved inorganic carbon (ΔnCT), it was larger than could be explained by anthropogenic CO2 storage alone. Decomposition of ΔnCT revealed that ΔΩarg was enhanced by approximately 50% by a non-anthropogenic CO2 contribution represented by changes in apparent oxygen utilization. Our results suggest that ocean acidification can be temporarily accelerated by temporal changes in oceanic conditions.

  9. How Dramatic is the Unrest at Colli Albani, the Volcanic District 20 km from Rome (Italy)? Insights from SAR Interferometry and Gravimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trasatti, E.; Di Filippo, M.; Di Nezza, M.; Florindo, F.; Marra, F.; Moro, M.; Polcari, M.; Stramondo, S.; Ventura, G.

    2015-12-01

    Colli Albani (Italy) is an alkali-potassic volcanic district located about 20 km SE of Rome (3 M inhabitants) and lastly erupted 36 ka ago. Its eruptive activity is characterized by well-clustered, regularly spaced time cycles, with an average recurrence time of 45±5 ka. Since the modern volcanic activity at Colli Albani seems not particularly intense, scientists have interpreted this volcano to be quiescent. Therefore, unlike other Italian volcanoes, the area has not undergone extensive monitoring. However, a seismic swarm during 1989-1990 has been related to a local uplift of ca. 30 cm since the 1950's along a line crossing the western side of the volcano, giving rise to a debate about its possible interpretation in terms of unrest. Furthermore, recent geological investigations indicate a coupling of eruption history, uplift history, and changes in the regional stress field, pointing to the conclusion that Colli Albani is in unrest. As a result, an evaluation of the volcanic hazard of such a strongly inhabited and vulnerable area is needed. We present the results from the analysis of 20 years of SAR interferometry. The time series show a linear trending displacement (3 mm/yr maximum ground velocity) affecting the western flank of the volcano. In addition, results from gravimetric surveys conducted during 2005-2007 reveal a different behavior between the eastern and western sectors. In an attempt of understanding the dynamics of Colli Albani from the available geodetic and gravimetric data, we build a finite element model incorporating local structural and lithological features, such as mapped faults and elastic discontinuities. Our results suggest that magma is accumulating beneath the Colli Albani western flank, where uplift and positive microgravity anomalies are observed and where the recent seismic swarm took place. Our model constrains the location and geometry of the magmatic source, which is below the vents responsible for the last eruptive activity

  10. Oxygen isotopes of Pacific seawater, 0-40 kyr, based on d18O and Mg/Ca of benthic and planktic foraminifera: relation to deglacial sealevel rise.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mix, A. C.; Klinkhammer, G. P.

    2007-12-01

    Combining high resolution (~200 year sample resolution) oxygen and carbon isotope measurements and Mg/Ca analyses in planktic (G. ruber and N. dutertrei) and benthic foraminifera (Uvigerina sp.; use of infaunal benthics minimizes likely CO3= effects) from the mid-depth eastern Pacific provides for detailed estimates of changing d18O of seawater over the past 40 kyr at ODP Site 1242. The key to this analysis is improved precision of the Mg/Ca analyses based on a new generation of high precision flow-through time-resolved analysis (FT-TRA) (e.g., average internal precision for Mg/Ca is now +/-0.005 benthic, and +/-0.015 planktic). This method is relatively insensitive to mild dissolution of heterogeneous shells, and thus requires no corrections for preservation. The change in seawater d18O (at 1364 m depth) between the Holocene and Last Glacial Maximum is 1.2 +/- 0.04 permil when averaged over the stages, consistent with pore-water diffusion estimates; however, millennial scale events (which the pore-water data cannot detect) bring the total range up to about 1.6 permil. Are such short-term events related to sealevel change, or do they reflect changing watermasses? Measurements of d13C data (C. wuellerstorfi), sensitive to modern subsurface watermass gradients, are not highly correlated to short- term changes in d18Oseawater suggesting a transient response to ice volume changes. Glacial weakening of AAIW (salty, high d18O, high d13C) relative to north Pacific watermasses (fresher, lower d18O, low d13C) suggest that the benthic d18Oseawater may underestimate total local changes related to ice volume (with a caveat regarding proper scaling of benthic Mg/Ca to temperature). Benthic d18Oseawater falls through the deglaciation in steps, starting at 18 cal ka, with maximum rates of change at 14-15 ka, and with secondary rapid steps at 16-17 ka and 10-11 kar. Planktic foraminifera yield smaller glacial-interglacial d18Oseawater values, with Holocene-to-LGM stage- average

  11. Eocene sea temperatures for the mid-latitude southwest Pacific from Mg/Ca ratios in planktonic and benthic foraminifera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creech, John B.; Baker, Joel A.; Hollis, Christopher J.; Morgans, Hugh E. G.; Smith, Euan G. C.

    2010-11-01

    We have used laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) to measure elemental (Mg/Ca, Al/Ca, Mn/Ca, Zn/Ca, Sr/Ca, and Ba/Ca) ratios of 13 species of variably preserved early to middle Eocene planktonic and benthic foraminifera from New Zealand. The foraminifera were obtained from Ashley Mudstone, mid-Waipara River, South Island, which was deposited at bathyal depth ( ca. 1000 m) on the northern margin of the east-facing Canterbury Basin at a paleo-latitude of ca. 55°S. LA-ICP-MS data yield trace element depth profiles through foraminifera test walls that can be used to identify and exclude zones of surficial contamination and infilling material resulting from diagenetic coatings, mineralisation and detrital sediment. Screened Mg/Ca ratios from 5 species of foraminifera are used to calculate sea temperatures from late Early to early Middle Eocene ( ca. 51 to 46.5 Ma), a time interval that spans the termination of the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (EECO). During this time, sea surface temperatures (SST) varied from 30 to 24 °C, and bottom water temperatures (BWT) from 21 to 14 °C. Comparison of Mg/Ca sea temperatures with published δ 18O and TEX 86 temperature data from the same samples (Hollis et al., 2009) shows close correspondence, indicating that LA-ICP-MS can provide reliable Mg/Ca sea temperatures even where foraminiferal test preservation is variable. Agreement between the three proxies also implies that Mg/Ca-temperature calibrations for modern planktonic and benthic foraminifera can generally be applied to Eocene species, although some species (e.g., V. marshalli) show significant calibration differences. The Mg/Ca ratio of the Eocene ocean is constrained by our data to be 35-50% lower than the modern ocean depending on which TEX 86 - temperature calibration (Kim et al., 2008; Liu et al., 2009) - is used to compare with the Mg/Ca sea temperatures. Sea temperatures derived from δ 18O analysis of foraminifera from Waipara show

  12. 10. Photocopy of photograph (original print from Southern Pacific Transportation ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Photocopy of photograph (original print from Southern Pacific Transportation Company) ca. 1916, photographer unknown VIEW OF ORIGINAL PACIFIC ELECTRIC RAILWAY LYNWOOD SHELTER SHED - Lynwood Pacific Electric Railway Depot, 11453 Long Beach Boulevard, Lynwood, Los Angeles County, CA

  13. Deck view, west approach; former Western Pacific (now Union Pacific) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Deck view, west approach; former Western Pacific (now Union Pacific) Railroad at left; wind turbine generators atop hill in background; view to northeast; 90mm lens - Carroll Overhead Bridge, Altamont Pass Road, Livermore, Alameda County, CA

  14. Ground-Water Conditions and Studies in the Albany Area of Dougherty County, Georgia, 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gordon, Debbie W.

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has been working with the Albany Water, Gas, and Light Commission to monitor ground-water quality and availability since 1977. This report presents an overview of ground-water conditions and studies in the Albany area of Dougherty County, Georgia, during 2007. Historical data are also presented for comparison with 2007 data. Ongoing monitoring activities include continuous water-level recording in 24 wells and monthly water-level measurements in 5 wells. During 2007, water levels in 21 of the continuous-recording wells were below normal, corresponding to lower than average rainfall. Ground-water samples collected from the Upper Floridan aquifer indicate that nitrate levels have decreased or remained about the same since 2006. Water samples were collected from the Flint River and wells at the Albany wellfield, and data were plotted on a trilinear diagram to show the percent composition of selected major cations and anions. Ground-water constituents (major cations and anions) of the Upper Floridan aquifer at the Albany wellfield are distinctly different from those in the water of the Flint River. To improve the understanding of the ground-water flow system and nitrate movement in the Upper Floridan aquifer, the USGS is developing a ground-water flow model in the southwestern Albany area of Georgia. The model is being calibrated to simulate periods of dry (October 1999) and relatively wet (March 2001) hydrologic conditions. Preliminary water-level simulations indicate a generally good fit to measured water levels.

  15. 76 FR 75602 - Hilton & Albany Railroad, Inc.-Lease and Operation Exemption-Norfolk Southern Railway Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-02

    ... TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board Hilton & Albany Railroad, Inc.--Lease and Operation Exemption-- Norfolk Southern Railway Company Hilton & Albany Railroad, Inc. (HAL), a noncarrier, has filed a verified notice of exemption under 49 CFR 1150.31 to lease from Norfolk Southern Railway Company (NSR) and...

  16. High temperature corrosion research at the Albany Research Center

    SciTech Connect

    Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Russell, James H.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Ziomek-Moroz, Margaret; Matthes, Steven A.; Chinn, R.E.

    2002-01-01

    The Severe Environment Corrosion and Erosion Research Facility (SECERF) at the Albany Research Center is operational. SECERF consists of 6 modules that share the availability of up to 10 different gases to produce environments for high temperature corrosion and erosion research. Projects to be conducted in the modules include: corrosion sensors for fossil energy systems, thermal gradient effects on high temperature corrosion, the development of sulfidation resistant alloys, determination of the effects of ash on the corrosion of metals and alloys in coal and waste combustion and coal gasification environments, high temperature erosion-corrosion of metals, and molten slag effects on refractories. Results from two areas, the effect of ash deposits on alloy corrosion and thermal gradient effects on the corrosion of metals, will be highlighted. Ash produced in coal gasifiers, coal combustors, and waste combustors, when deposited on metal surfaces, provides sites for corrosion attack and contributes chemical species that participate in the corrosion reaction. Results are presented for the corrosion of 304L stainless steel, that was either uncoated or coated with ash or with ash containing NaCl or Na2SO4, in air-water vapor mixtures at 600 C. The presence of high heat fluxes and temperature gradients in many fossil energy systems creates the need for an understanding of their effects on corrosion and oxidation. Such information would be useful for both improved alloy design and for better translation of isothermal laboratory results to field use. Temperature gradients in a solid oxide result in two changes that modify diffusion within the oxide. The first is when a gradient in point defect concentration is created within the oxide, for example, where more vacancies are expected at a higher temperature. The second change is when the presence of a temperature gradient biases the diffusion jump of an atom. Results of tests are presented for cobalt with metal surface

  17. 77 FR 73648 - Town of Stuyvesant, NY; Albany Engineering Corporation; Notice of Availability of Final...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-11

    ... [Federal Register Volume 77, Number 238 (Tuesday, December 11, 2012)] [Notices] [Page 73648] [FR Doc No: 2012-29846] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Project No. 2696-033-NY] Town of Stuyvesant, NY; Albany Engineering Corporation; Notice of Availability of Final...

  18. Test-sites for earthquake prediction experiments within the Colli Albani region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quattrocchi, F.; Calcara, M.

    In this paper we discuss some geochemical data gathered by discrete and continuous monitoring during the 1995-1996 period, carried out for earthquake prediction test-experiments throughout the Colli Albani quiescent volcano, seat of seismicity, selecting some gas discharge sites with peri-volcanic composition. In particular we stressed the results obtained at the continuous geochemical monitoring station (GMS I, BAR site), designed by ING for geochemical surveillance of seismic events. The 12/6/1995 (M=3.6-3.8) Roma earthquake together with the 3/11/1995 (M=3.1) Tivoli earthquake was the most energetic events within the Colli Albani - Roma area, after the beginning of the continuous monitoring (1991) up today: strict correlation between these seismic events and fluid geochemical anomalies in groundwater has been discovered (temperature, Eh, 222Rn, CO 2, NH 3). Separation at depth of a vapour phase, rich in reducing-acidic gases (CO 2, H 2S, etc...), from a hyper-saline brine, within the deep geothermal reservoir is hypothesised to explain the geochemical anomalies: probably the transtensional episodes accompanying the seismic sequences caused an increasing and/or triggering of the phase-separation process and fluid migration, on the regional scale of the Western sector of the Colli Albani, beyond the seismogenic depth (2-4 Km) up to surface. We draw the state of art of GMS II monitoring prototype and the selection criteria of test-sites for earthquake prediction experiments in the Colli Albani region.

  19. Science Fiction: An Annotated Bibliography of Selected Resources in the University Libraries SUNY/Albany.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osielski, Mary Y., Comp.

    This bibliography is a guide to sources of information in the field of science fiction which are available in the University Libraries at the State University of New York (SUNY) at Albany. Other libraries may find it useful as a reference tool for expanding their science fiction collections. Emphasis is on works which deal primarily with science…

  20. 76 FR 79271 - Genesee & Wyoming Inc.-Continuance in Control Exemption-Hilton & Albany Railroad, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-21

    ... Surface Transportation Board Genesee & Wyoming Inc.--Continuance in Control Exemption-Hilton & Albany Railroad, Inc. AGENCY: Surface Transportation Board. ACTION: Notice of exemption. SUMMARY: The Board is... original and 10 copies of all pleadings referring to Docket No. FD 35568, to: Surface Transportation...

  1. DOE Closeout Report from SUNY Albany High Energy Physics to Department of Energy Office of Science.

    SciTech Connect

    Ernst, Jesse; Jain, Vivek

    2014-08-15

    A report from the SUNY Albany Particle Physics Group summarizing our activities on the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. We summarize our work: on data analysis projects, on efforts to improve detector performance, and on service work to the experiment.

  2. Budgeting for Nonconsumable Items at Marine Corps Logistics Base, Albany, Georgia.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-03-01

    15 1. Piimary Inventory Control Activity . 15 2. Secondary Inventory Control Activity . 16 *F BUDGETING 16 G. SUMMAFY...Marine Corps, the Inventory Control Point, Marine Corps Logistics Base, Albany, Georgia has been desig- nated as the proqram manager for the...concerning control systems was conducted. D. THESIS ORGAN IZATION Chapter II provides a description of the Nonconsumable Items Program. Included is the

  3. Groundwater Conditions and Studies in the Albany Area of Dougherty County, Georgia, 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gordon, Debbie W.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey has been working cooperatively with the Albany Water, Gas, and Light Commission to monitor groundwater quality and availability since 1977. This report presents an overview of groundwater conditions and studies in the Albany area of Dougherty County, Georgia, during 2008. Historical data also are presented for comparison with 2008 data. Ongoing monitoring activities include continuous water-level recording in 24 wells and periodic water-level measurements in 5 wells. During 2008, water levels in 10 of the continuous-recording wells were below normal, corresponding to lower than average rainfall. Groundwater samples collected from 25 wells in the Upper Floridan aquifer indicate that nitrate levels during 2008 were similar to values from 2007, with a maximum of 12.5 milligrams per liter at one well. Water samples collected from the Flint River and wells at the Albany well field were analyzed and plotted on a trilinear diagram to show the percent composition of selected major cations and anions. Groundwater constituents (major cations and anions) of the Upper Floridan aquifer at the Albany well field remain distinctly different from those in the water of the Flint River. To improve the understanding of the groundwater-flow system and nitrate movement in the Upper Floridan aquifer, the U.S. Geological Survey is developing a groundwater-flow model in the Albany area of southwestern Georgia. The model is being calibrated to simulate periods of dry (October 1999) hydrologic conditions. Preliminary results of particle tracking indicate that water flows to the well field from the northwest.

  4. Decadal to Multi-centennial SST Reconstructions From the Anthropocene Into the Last 2 Millennia: Planktonic Foraminiferal Mg/Ca Evidence From San Lazaro Basin (NE Pacific)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortyn, P. G.; Martínez-Botí, M. À.; Herguera, J. C.

    2009-04-01

    On inter-annual time scales, the El Niño / Southern Oscillation (ENSO) climatic phenomenon is the largest driver of change in the ocean-atmosphere system. Significant impacts also arise from longer-term phenomena at decadal to centennial timescales, such as the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO). It is a primary interest to understand how modern global warming has impacted such drivers of significant climatic impacts, and how the marine sedimentary archive records this linkage in the southern California Current (CC). This would allow detailed comparison against other high-resolution archives, such as corals, and an improved ability to interpret past events as potential analogs for the future of ENSO and PDO. Furthermore, such reconstructions in recent millennia are crucial, since they record pre-anthropogenic climates under interglacial (warm) boundary conditions that allow us to characterize the nature of modern influence on this system. Here we present sub-decadal reconstructions of sea surface temperature (SST), derived from the Mg/Ca ratio of the shallow-dwelling planktonic foraminifera Globigerinoides ruber. The samples come from San Lázaro Basin in the southern Baja California continental margin (25°N; 112°W), situated beneath the dynamic boundary of the cool eastern Pacific boundary CC of northern origin, and the warm subtropical water masses of southern origin. The bottom of this coastal basin (maximum depth of 540m) is bathed by oxygen-depleted waters that flow over a shallow sill at 370m. High levels of primary production and export of biogenic particles to depth ensue from strong seasonal upwelling processes during spring to early summer. This combination of high sediment production and preservation in an area very sensitive to ENSO and PDO impacts allows for a high-resolution reconstruction of inter-annual climatic phenomena in this unique eastern boundary current setting. For our highest temporal detail, we examine 2 cores at interannual resolution

  5. Calibration and Natural Variability of Skeletal Stable Isotopes and Sr/Ca in two species of Pacific sclerosponges (Acanthocheatetes wellsi and Astroclera welleyana)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grottoli, A. G.; Adkins, J. F.; Moots, K.

    2005-12-01

    Sclerosponges are reef organisms that deposit a calcium carbonate exoskeleton in layers and can live for centuries. Increasingly, the isotopic and elemental compositions of their skeletons are being used to reconstruct tropical paloeceanographic records. Here preliminary data on the in situ calibration of the skeletal stable carbon (δ13C), stable oxygen (δ18O), and strontium to calcium ratios (Sr/Ca) in the Pacific sclerosponges Acanthocheatetes wellsi and Astroclera welleyana are presented. Further, the natural variability underlying these calibrations was evaluated by analyzing the skeletal δ13C, δ18O, Sr/Ca, and maximum linear growth in multiple specimens of A. wellsi (high-Mg calcite) and A. welleyana (aragonite) sclerosponges grown between 8.2 and 11 m depth at The Grotto in Saipan (15oN, 145oE) and Short Drop Off Reef in Palau (7oN, 134oE). Each sclerosponge was stained in situ with Alizarin Red in July 2001, cemented onto the reef, and collected in July 2003. Near-weekly seawater samples were collected during the two year interval and analyzed for DI-δ13C and δ18O of seawater. Hourly seawater temperature was recorded in situ throughout. Growth was measured from the stain line to the growing edge. Bulk skeletal samples were extracted from the same interval. In addition, high-resolution skeletal samples were extracted at 0.1 mm increment (~monthly). The stable isotopic and Sr/Ca values were measured in all skeletal samples. Based on the bulk skeletal analyses, intraspecific variation in δ13C and δ18O was below analytical detection limits at a given site. This implies that a proxy record from one specimen per site is sufficient. δ18O and growth did not differ between species. A difference in δ13C between species was due primarily to calcite-aragonite fractionation effects. However, growth did vary enough among individuals that age estimates for a hypothetical 5 cm tall A. wellsi or A. welleyana specimen could differ by up to 34 and 6 years

  6. Volcanology, history and myths of the Lake Albano maar (Colli Albani volcano, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Benedetti, A. A.; Funiciello, R.; Giordano, G.; Diano, G.; Caprilli, E.; Paterne, M.

    2008-10-01

    The polygenetic Albano maar is the most recent centre of the Colli Albani volcano, located just few kilometres to the south-east of Roma. Presently the maar hosts a 167.5 m deep crater lake, the deepest in Europe. The maar is to be considered quiescent, as phreatic activity is documented throughout the Holocene. This paper illustrates the close relationships between the activity of the maar and the history of settlement in the Roman region as recorded in the geology, archaeology, history and legends of the area. Severe fluctuations of the groundwater table and catastrophic overflows of the Lake Albano from the maar rim had occurred prior to and after the early prehistoric settlements dated in the maar area at the Eneolithic times (ca. III millennium B.C.). Repeated lahars occurred along the northwestern slope of the maar filling in the paleodrainage network and forming a vast plain. Paleohydraulic analyses on fluvial and lahar deposits originated from the Holocene phreatic activity of the Albano maar indicate sediment-water flows in excess of hundreds of cubic metres per second. Absolute age determinations of the paleosoil underlying one of the most recent deposits of the lahar succession at 5800 ± 100 yr B.P. ( 14C CAL) are in perfect agreement with the age of the overlying Eneolithic age settlements. The last catastrophic overflow is described in the Roman literature as a consequence of the anger of Poseidon against the Romans in 398 B.C. for their war against the Etruscans. In 394 B.C. the Romans decided to prevent the repetition of such events by the excavation through the maar crater wall of a 1.5 km long drain tunnel, which is still operational, keeping the lake 70 m below the lowest point of the maar rim. This tunnel drain may be regarded as the first prevention device for volcanic hazard in history and shows an unprecedented development of the engineering technology under the pressure of hazard perception. The surprising and still largely unknown results

  7. 4. 'Ring Stones & Tunnel Sections, Tunnel #33,' Southern Pacific ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. 'Ring Stones & Tunnel Sections, Tunnel #33,' Southern Pacific Standard Double-Track Tunnel, ca. 1913. Compare to photos in documentation sets for Tunnel 18 (HAER No. CA-197), Tunnel 34 (HAER No. CA-206), and Tunnel 1 (HAER No. CA-207). - Central Pacific Transcontinental Railroad, Sacramento to Nevada state line, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  8. Results of the radiological survey at 1052 Central Avenue, Albany, New York (AL208)

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, S.C.; Marley, J.L.

    1987-11-01

    A number of properties in the Albany/Colonie area have been identified as being potentially contaminated with uranium originating from the former National Lead Company's uranium forming plant in Colonie, New York. The property at 1052 Central Avenue in Albany, New York, was the subject of a radiological investigation initiated August 26, 1986. The residential property consists of a two-story block and frame house with a separate garage located on a rectangular lot. An asphalt driveway connects the garage to the street. A diagram of the property showing the approximate boundaries and a 6-m grid network established for measurements outside the house is shown. The lot included in the radiological survey was /approximately/17.5 m wide by 43.5 m deep. Front and side views of the property are shown. 13 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. Results of the radiological survey at 1054 Central Avenue, Albany, New York (AL211)

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, S.C.; Marley, J.L.

    1987-11-01

    A number of properties in the Albany/Colonie area have been identified as being potentially contaminated with uranium originating from the former National Lead Company's uranium forming plant in Colonie, New York. The property at 1054 Central Avenue in Albany, New York was the subject of a radiological investigation initiated August 27, 1986. The commercial property consists of a two-story frame and block building located on a rectangular lot. An asphalt drive connects the working areas to the street. A diagram of the property showing the approximate boundaries and the 5-m grid network established for measurements outside the building is shown. The lot included in the radiological survey was /approximately/13 m wide by 43 m deep. Front and side views of the property are shown. 13 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. Results of the radiological survey at 1110 Central Avenue, Albany, New York (AL215)

    SciTech Connect

    Marley, J.L.; Carrier, R.F.

    1988-02-01

    A number of properties in the Albany/Colonie area have been identified as being potentially contaminated with uranium originating from the former National Lead Company's uranium forming plant in Colonie, New York. The property at 1110 Central Avenue in Albany, New York (AL215) was the subject of a radiological investigation initiated May 4, 1987. This commercial property consists of a one-story concrete block office building (Building 1), a one-story concrete block warehouse (Building 2), and four connected storage buildings constructed variously of wood, metal, or concrete block. The structures are situated on an irregularly shaped lot. A diagram of the property showing the approximate boundaries and the 10-m grid network established for measurements outside the buildings is shown. The lot included in the radiological survey was /approximately/45 m wide by 98 m deep. Two views of the property are shown. 13 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  11. Results of the radiological survey at 7 Pansy Street, Albany, New York (AL162)

    SciTech Connect

    Espegren, M.L.; Marley, J.L.

    1987-12-01

    A number of properties in the Albany/Colonie area have been identified as being potentially contaminated with uranium originating from the former National Lead Company's uranium forming plant in Colonie, New York. The property at 7 Pansy Street in Albany, New York, was the subject of a radiological investigation initiated July 16, 1986. The residential property consists of a two-story frame and stone house and a separate garage located on an irregular shaped lot. An asphalt driveway connects the garage to the street. A diagram of the property showing the approximate boundaries and the 6-m grid network established for measurements outside the house is shown. The lot included in the radiological survey was /approximately/30 m wide by 35 m deep. Front and rear views of the property are shown. 13 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  12. 7. 'Tunnel No 14, Concrete Lining,' Southern Pacific Standard SingleTrack ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. 'Tunnel No 14, Concrete Lining,' Southern Pacific Standard Single-Track Tunnel, ca. 1909. Under current numbering, this is now Tunnel 29 (HAER No. CA-205). - Central Pacific Transcontinental Railroad, Sacramento to Nevada state line, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  13. Two-Dimensional Flood-Inundation Model of the Flint River at Albany, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Musser, Jonathan W.; Dyar, Thomas R.

    2007-01-01

    Potential flow characteristics of future flooding along a 4.8-mile reach of the Flint River in Albany, Georgia, were simulated using recent digital-elevation-model data and the U.S. Geological Survey finite-element surface-water modeling system for two-dimensional flow in the horizontal plane (FESWMS-2DH). Simulated inundated areas, in 1-foot (ft) increments, were created for water-surface altitudes at the Flint River at Albany streamgage (02352500) from 192.5-ft altitude with a flow of 123,000 cubic feet per second (ft3/s) to 179.5-ft altitude with a flow of 52,500 ft3/s. The model was calibrated to match actual floods during July 1994 and March 2005 and Federal Emergency Management Administration floodplain maps. Continuity checks of selected stream profiles indicate the area near the Oakridge Drive bridge had lower velocities than other areas of the Flint River, which contributed to a rise in the flood-surface profile. The modeled inundated areas were mapped onto monochrome orthophoto imagery for use in planning for future floods. As part of a cooperative effort, the U.S. Geological Survey, the City of Albany, and Dougherty County, Georgia, conducted this study.

  14. Hydrogeology, chemical quality, and availability of ground water in the Upper Floridan aquifer, Albany area, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hicks, D.W.; Gill, H.E.; Longsworth, S.A.

    1987-01-01

    Large withdrawals of groundwater in the 1500 sq mi Albany area of southwestern Georgia have lowered water levels in deep aquifers as much as 140 ft. This study was conducted to evaluate the development potential of the shallow Upper Floridan aquifer as an alternate source of groundwater, especially for public supply. The Upper Floridan stores and transmits large quantities of water, mainly in a zone of high permeability in the lower part of the aquifer. The transmissivity of the aquifer ranges from < 10,000 sq ft/day northwest of Albany, to as much as 150 ,000 sq ft/day south and southeast of Albany. Twenty-eight years of agricultural and industrial pumping has not produced a long-term decline of the water level in the Upper Floridan; the aquifer system remains at equilibrium. The Upper Floridan yields hard, calcium bicarbonate-type water but concentrations do not exceed State drinking water standards. In most of the study area , contaminants applied to or spilled on the land surface eventually can be expected to percolate through the overburden and reach the aquifer. Thus, it is important that wells be sited away from areas that have been used for the storage and disposal of potential contaminants and, probably to a lesser extent, the application of agricultural chemicals. In the area of greatest development potential east of the Flint River, wells may penetrate major groundwater conduits. By limiting drawdown during well development and during production, the likelihood of causing sinkholes to form can be minimized. Closed depressions, or sinks, throughout the Dougherty Plain probably are unsuitable as well sites, because (1) they are subject to flooding, (2) they collect water from upgradient areas and could concentrate potential contaminants, (3) water probably percolates through their bottoms and could transport contaminants into the aquifer, and (4) the depressions may overlie limestone cavities filled with sand or clay that could interfere with well yield

  15. Building America Case Study: Trade-Friendly Retrofit Insulated Panels for Existing Buildings, Albany, New York

    SciTech Connect

    2016-03-01

    This project evaluated the effectiveness and affordability of integrating retrofit insulated panels into a re-siding project. The Partnership for Home Innovation (PHI) teamed with New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA), the Albany Housing Authority (AHA), and the New York State Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) administered by Albany Community Action Partnership to demonstrate an energy retrofit and siding upgrade on a two-story, seven unit, multifamily building in Albany New York (CZ 5). The project focused on accomplishing three goals - doubling the existing wall thermal resistance (from approximately R-13 to a weighted average of R-27), reduction of building air leakage, and completion of the retrofit within a budget where the additional cost for upgrading wall's thermal resistance is equal to the cost of the standard re-siding effort (i.e., the total cost of the energy efficient re-siding scope of work is not more than double the cost of the standard re-siding effort). Lessons learned from the project strongly indicate that the retrofit panel technology can be installed using common installation practices and with minimal training. Other lessons learned include limitation on the use of standard air sealing materials during cold weather installations and the need to develop better installation guidance for trades working with the level of tolerances that may be present in the existing structure. This technology demonstration showed that exterior retrofit panels provide a viable and reasonable option for the siding trades to increase market opportunities and achieve synergistic benefits for aesthetic upgrades to a building's exterior.

  16. Material-balance assessment of the New Albany-Chesterian petroleum system of the Illinois basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lewan, M.D.; Henry, M.E.; Higley, D.K.; Pitman, J.K.

    2002-01-01

    The New Albany-Chesterian petroleum system of the Illinois basin is a well-constrained system from which petroleum charges and losses were quantified through a material-balance assessment. This petroleum system has nearly 90,000 wells penetrating the Chesterian section, a single New Albany Shale source rock accounting for more than 99% of the produced oil, well-established stratigraphic and structural frameworks, and accessible source rock samples at various maturity levels. A hydrogen index (HI) map based on Rock-Eval analyses of source rock samples of New Albany Shale defines the pod of active source rock and extent of oil generation. Based on a buoyancy-drive model, the system was divided into seven secondary-migration catchments. Each catchment contains a part of the active pod of source rock from which it derives a petroleum charge, and this charge is confined to carrier beds and reservoirs within these catchments as accountable petroleum, petroleum losses, or undiscovered petroleum. A well-constrained catchment with no apparent erosional or leakage losses is used to determine an actual petroleum charge from accountable petroleum and residual migration losses. This actual petroleum charge is used to calibrate the other catchments in which erosional petroleum losses have occurred. Petroleum charges determined by laboratory pyrolysis are exaggerated relative to the actual petroleum charge. Rock-Eval charges are exaggerated by a factor of 4-14, and hydrouspyrolysis charges are exaggerated by a factor of 1.7. The actual petroleum charge provides a more meaningful material balance and more realistic estimates of petroleum losses and remaining undiscovered petroleum. The total petroleum charge determined for the New Albany-Chesterian system is 78 billion bbl, of which 11.4 billion bbl occur as a accountable in place petroleum, 9 billion bbl occur as residual migration losses, and 57.6 billion bbl occur as erosional losses. Of the erosional losses, 40 billion bbl

  17. National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Albany Quadrangle, Massachusetts, New York, Connecticut, Vermont, and New Hampshire

    SciTech Connect

    Field, M T; Truesdell, D B

    1982-09-01

    The Albany 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ Quadrangle, Massachusetts, New York, Connecticut, Vermont, and New Hampshire, was evaluated to a depth of 1500 m for uranium favorability using National Uranium Resource Evaluation criteria. Areas of favorable geology and aeroradioactivity anomalies were examined and sampled. Most Triassic and Jurassic sediments in the Connecticut Basin, in the central part of the quadrangle, were found to be favorable for sandstone uranium deposits. Some Precambrian units in the southern Green Mountains of Vermont were found favorable for uranium deposits in veins in metamorphic rocks.

  18. Report of the USGS Coastal and Marine Geology Modeling Workshop, Pacific Marine Science Center, Santa Cruz, CA, March 22-23, 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherwood, Christopher R.

    2006-01-01

    A U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Coastal and Marine Geology (CMG) Modeling Workshop was held to discuss the general topic of coastal modeling, defined broadly to include circulation, waves, sediment transport, water quality, ecology, sediment diagenesis, morphology change, and coastal evolution, on scales ranging from seconds and a few centimeters (individual ripples) to centuries (coastal evolution) and thousands of kilometers (tsunami propagation). The workshop was convened at the suggestion of CMG Program Management to improve communication among modelers and model users, assess modeling-related activities being conducted at the three centers (Florida Integrated Science Center, FISC; Pacific Marine Science Center; PMSC; and Woods Hole Science Center; WHSC), and develop goals, strategies, and plans for future modeling activities. The workshop represents a step toward developing a five-year strategic plan, and was timed to provide input for the FY06 prospectus. The workshop was held at the USGS Pacific Marine Science Center in Santa Cruz on March 22-23, 2005.

  19. Ground-water-quality data for Albany and surrounding areas, Southwest Georgia, 1951-99

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warner, Debbie; Easoz, Jamie A.; Priest, Sherlyn

    2002-01-01

    This report presents ground-water-quality data from the surficial, Upper Floridan, Claiborne, Clayton, and Upper Cretaceous aquifers in the Albany and surrounding areas of southwest Georgia. Water-quality data from about 186 wells in Baker, Calhoun, Dougherty, Lee, Mitchell, Terrell, and Worth Counties are presented for the period from 1951 through 1999. The data include field water-quality parameters collected during 1951-99, volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds collected during 1981-97, inorganic compounds collected during 1951-99, trace metals collected during 1964-99, radiochemicals collected during 1993-95, herbicides and insecticides collected during 1980-97, and recovery data for laboratory surrogate compounds (used for quality control and quality assurance for organic samples) collected during 1993-97. Ground-water quality data are presented in tables by data type and arranged by well number. Illustrations in this report contain information about study area location, well location, stratigraphy, and formation water-bearing properties. Ground-water-quality data are presented in text files and in a data base that includes geographic and tabular data. Data presented in this report provide a base with which to better define and interpret the quality of ground water in Albany, Ga., and surrounding areas. Although some of these data may have been published in previous reports associated with water-resources investigations, water-quality data are compiled as a useful resource.

  20. 77 FR 60418 - Town of Stuyvesant, New York and Albany Engineering Corporation; Notice of Availability of Draft...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Town of Stuyvesant, New York and Albany Engineering Corporation; Notice of Availability of Draft Environmental Assessment In accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of...

  1. 76 FR 38383 - Albany Engineering Corporation, Town of Stuyvesant, NY; Notice of Site Visit and Technical Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Albany Engineering Corporation, Town of Stuyvesant, NY; Notice of Site Visit and Technical Meeting On July 12, 2011, Office of Energy Projects staff will participate in a...

  2. 76 FR 74116 - Alabama & Florida Railway Co., Inc. d/b/a Ripley & New Albany Railroad Co.-Acquisition and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-30

    ... Tennessee Railroad, LLC Alabama & Florida Railway Co., Inc. d/b/a Ripley & New Albany Railroad Co. (RNA), a... Ripley, a distance of 22.54 miles in Union and Tippah Counties, Miss. RNA states that it proposes to... amended notice was filed on November 14, 2011. RNA certifies that its projected annual revenues as...

  3. 75 FR 34049 - FM Table of Allotments (The Dalles, Tualatin, Eugene, Albany, Lebanon, Paisley, and Diamond Lake...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 FM Table of Allotments (The Dalles, Tualatin, Eugene, Albany, Lebanon, Paisley, and Diamond Lake, Oregon and Goldendale, WA) AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission ACTION: Final...

  4. A Selected Bibliography of Books on Women in the Libraries of the State University of New York at Albany.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salzer, Elizabeth M., Comp.; Applebaum, Hannah B., Comp.

    This bibliography is limited to books, cataloged government documents, and whole or special issues of periodicals on women in the University Libraries of the State University of New York at Albany. The selection of items for inclusion in the bibliography has been as broad as possible except in the areas specified below. Books in the area of…

  5. 8. Historic American Buildings Survey Southern Pacific Railroad Coll. Taken ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Historic American Buildings Survey Southern Pacific Railroad Coll. Taken in 1890's OAKLAND LONG WHARF FROM GOAT ISLAND Oakland Mole in Background - Southern Pacific Mole & Pier, Seventh Street, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  6. Weathering of the New Albany Shale, Kentucky: II. Redistribution of minor and trace elements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tuttle, M.L.W.; Breit, G.N.; Goldhaber, M.B.

    2009-01-01

    During weathering, elements enriched in black shale are dispersed in the environment by aqueous and mechanical transport. Here a unique evaluation of the differential release, transport, and fate of Fe and 15 trace elements during progressive weathering of the Devonian New Albany Shale in Kentucky is presented. Results of chemical analyses along a weathering profile (unweathered through progressively weathered shale to soil) describe the chemically distinct pathways of the trace elements and the rate that elements are transferred into the broader, local environment. Trace elements enriched in the unweathered shale are in massive or framboidal pyrite, minor sphalerite, CuS and NiS phases, organic matter and clay minerals. These phases are subject to varying degrees and rates of alteration along the profile. Cadmium, Co, Mn, Ni, and Zn are removed from weathered shale during sulfide-mineral oxidation and transported primarily in aqueous solution. The aqueous fluxes for these trace elements range from 0.1 g/ha/a (Cd) to 44 g/ha/a (Mn). When hydrologic and climatic conditions are favorable, solutions seep to surface exposures, evaporate, and form Fe-sulfate efflorescent salts rich in these elements. Elements that remain dissolved in the low pH (<4) streams and groundwater draining New Albany Shale watersheds become fixed by reactions that increase pH. Neutralization of the weathering solution in local streams results in elements being adsorbed and precipitated onto sediment surfaces, resulting in trace element anomalies. Other elements are strongly adsorbed or structurally bound to solid phases during weathering. Copper and U initially are concentrated in weathering solutions, but become fixed to modern plant litter in soil formed on New Albany Shale. Molybdenum, Pb, Sb, and Se are released from sulfide minerals and organic matter by oxidation and accumulate in Fe-oxyhydroxide clay coatings that concentrate in surface soil during illuviation. Chromium, Ti, and V are

  7. Ground water in the Corvallis-Albany area, central Willamette Valley, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frank, Frank J.

    1974-01-01

    The Corvallis-Albany area is part of the alluvial plain that lies between the Cascade and Coast Ranges in the central Willamette Valley in northwestern Oregon. As used in this report, the Corvallis-Albany area consists of approximately 210 square miles and includes a part of the lower foothills of the Coast and Cascade Ranges. Volcanic and marine sedimentary units exposed in the foothills range in age from Eocene to Oligocene or Miocene. The volcanic rocks are primarily pillow lavas and basalt flows, which yield only small quantities of water generally adequate for domestic and stock use. Marine-deposited sandstone, siltstone, and shale of the older sedimentary units are fine grained, poorly permeable, and generally yield small volumes of water to wells. In the valley plain the older units are overlain by Pleistocene and Holocene alluvial deposits. The alluvial deposits (sand and gravel) of the valley plain contain the most productive aquifers in the area and are considered to be the only units feasible for large-scale development of ground-water supplies. Aquifers in the area are recharged principally by direct infiltration of precipitation. Most of the precipitation (about 38 in. per yr avg) occurs during late autumn and winter. Ground water is discharged naturally from the area by seepage and spring flow to streams, by evapotranspiration, by underflow, and artificially through wells. During 1971 the seasonal decline of water levels from winter to late summer averaged about 10 feet for the alluvial deposits. The seasonal change of storage in that year was estimated to be about 130,000 acre-feet. Of this volume, about 14,000 acre-feet was pumped from wells; the rest (about 116,000 acre-feet) was discharged through seeps and springs by evapotranspiration. The difference between pumpage and natural discharge indicates that a great quantity of additional water is available for development. The storage capacity of the alluvial aquifers in the area is estimated to be

  8. Characterization of the oil shale of the New Albany Shale in Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leininger, R.K.; Hailer, J.G.; Shaffer, N.R.

    1984-01-01

    In the 1920's chemical and mineralogic characterization of the New Albany Shale (Mississippian-Devonian) in Indiana showed the dark shale to be rich in organic material and have commercial possibilities. Projects in the 1960's resulted in disparaging descriptions of exiguous fossil record, monotonous mineralogy, and intractable chemistry. Since 1978 expanded efforts have yielded much new information but new problems as well. Although organic carbon and total sulfur show positive correlation, two nearly exclusive populations exist. Material high in organic carbon is more depleted in C13 than material with less organic carbon. A bed usually at the top of the unit hosts anomalous accumulations of heavy metals and contains concentrations in similar ratios to those of sea water except for Mo and Pb and shows very negative ??S34. Heat content as Btu/lb, organic carbon (total less inorganic), and Fischer assay oil-yields generally correlate, but one is not an accurate predictor of the others.

  9. "An Event Of No Ordinary Interest" - The Inauguration of Albany's Dudley Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartky, Ian R.; Rice, Norman S.; Bain, Christine A.

    1999-06-01

    The inauguration of the Dudley Observatory was a watershed in mid-nineteenth-century American science; most American scientists of any note attended the event, which took place in Albany in 1856 August at the close of the Annual Meeting of the AAAS. New York artist Tompkins Matteson's painting of the event, which includes more than 160 portraits, has been widely reproduced; however, an accompanying identification key created decades later is quite erroneous and misleading. A new key, which identifies 58 of the country's leading scientists and New York business and political figures, has been prepared, and, in conjunction with what is currently known about the painting's history, is detailed. Dudley Observatory's plan to sell time to New York cities and railroads was highlighted at the inauguration ceremony; an engraved marble tablet linking the electrical clock depicted in Matteson's painting to the facility's mean-time distribution system is discussed.

  10. Correlation of natural gas content to iron species in the New Albany shale group

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shiley, R.H.; Cluff, R.M.; Dickerson, D.R.; Hinckley, C.C.; Smith, Gerard V.; Twardowska, H.; Saporoschenko, Mykola

    1981-01-01

    Mo??ssbauer parameters were obtained for four Illinois Basin shales and their corresponding < 2??m clay fractions from wells drilled through the New Albany Shale Group in Henderson, Tazewell, and Effingham counties in Illinois and Christian County in Kentucky. Off-gas analysis indicated that the Illinois cores were in an area of low gas potential, while the Kentucky core was in an area of moderate-to-good potential. Iron-rich dolomite (ankerite) was found in the Kentucky core but not in the Illinois cores. In the Kentucky core, gas content could be correlated with the ankerite in the bulk sample, the Mo??ssbauer M (2) species in the clay fraction, and a ferrous iron species in the clay fraction. The location of the greatest concentration of natural gas in the Kentucky core could be predicted by following the changes in percentage concentration of these iron species when plotted against the depth of burial of the core sample. ?? 1981.

  11. Hydrogeology and water quality of the upper Floridan aquifer, western Albany area, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stewart, Lisa M.; Warner, Debbie; Dawson, Barbara J.

    1999-01-01

    Geologic, hydrologic, and water-quality data were collected to refine the hydrogeologic framework conceptual model of the Upper Floridan aquifer, and to qualitatively evaluate the potential of human activities to impact water quality in the Upper Floridan aquifer in the western Albany area, Georgia. Ground-water age dating was conducted by using chlorofluorocarbons (CFC) and tritium concentrations in water from the Upper Floridan aquifer to determine if recharge and possible contaminant migration to the aquifer is recent or occurred prior to the introduction of CFCs and tritium in the early 1950's into the global natural water system. Data were collected from core holes and wells installed during this study and previously existing wells in the Albany area. Hydrogeologic data collected during this study compare well to the regional hydrogeologic conceptual model developed during previous studies. However, the greater data density available from this study shows the dynamic and local variability in the hydrologic character of the Upper Floridan aquifer in more detail. The occurrence of sediment sizes from clay to gravel in the overburden, the absence of overburden because of erosion or sinkhole collapse, and large areas lacking surface drainage west of the Flint River provide potential areas for recharge and contaminant migration from the surface to the Upper Floridan aquifer throughout the study area. Ground-water ages generally range from 9 to 34 years, indicating that recharge consisting of 'modern' water (post early-1950's) is present in the aquifer. Ground-water ages and hydraulic heads in the Upper Floridan aquifer have an irregular distribution, indicating that localized areas of recharge to the aquifer are present in the study area. Generally, water in the Upper Floridan aquifer is calcium-bicarbonate rich, having low concentrations of magnesium, potassium, sodium, chloride, and sulfate. Water in the Upper Floridan aquifer is oxygenated, having dissolved

  12. Rapid ascent and emplacement of basaltic lava during the 2005-06 eruption of the East Pacific Rise at ca. 9°51‧N as inferred from CO2 contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, J. E.; Jackson, B. A.; Gonnermann, H.; Soule, S. A.

    2016-11-01

    Eruption rates at the mid-ocean ridges (MORs) are believed to strongly control the morphology and length of lava flows emplaced along the ridge axis, and thus the structure and porosity of the upper oceanic crust. Eruption rate also represents one of the few tools to gain insight into the driving pressures within sub-ridge magmatic systems. As eruption rate is inferred to vary systematically along the global mid-ocean ridge system, understanding of how to assess eruption rate in submarine systems and how it maps to observable features of the ridge axis would provide a powerful tool to understand Earth's largest magmatic system. Eruption rates at MORs are poorly constrained, however, because of a lack of direct observations, preventing the duration of an eruption to be quantified. This study uses decompression experiments of MORB samples and numerical modeling of CO2 degassing to reconstruct the timescales for magma ascent and lava emplacement during the 2005-06 eruption of the East Pacific Rise at ca. 9°51‧N. Samples collected from the lava flow are all supersaturated in dissolved CO2 contents, but CO2 decreases with distance from the vent, presumably as a consequence of progressive CO2 diffusion into growing bubbles. Samples collected at the vent contain ∼105 vesicles per cm3. Pieces of these samples were experimentally heated to 1225 °C at high pressure and then decompressed at controlled rates. Results, plus those from numerical modeling of diffusive bubble growth, indicate that magma rose from the axial magma chamber to the seafloor in ≤1 h and at a rate of ≥2-3 km h-1. Our modeling, as validated by experimental decompression of MORB samples with ∼106 vesicles cm-3, also suggests that CO2 degassed from the melt within ∼10-100 min as the vesicular lava traveled ∼1.7 km along the seafloor, implying a volumetric flow rate on order of 103-4 m3 s-1. Given an ascent rate of ≥0.2 m s-1, the width of a rectangular dike feeding the lava would have been

  13. ENSO- and PDO-modulated SST Reconstructions From the Anthropocene Into the Last 2 Millennia: Planktonic Foraminiferal Mg/Ca Evidence at Inter-annual Resolution From San Lázaro Basin (NE Pacific)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortyn, P.; Martinez-Boti, M. A.; Herguera, J. C.

    2008-12-01

    On inter-annual time scales, the El Niño / Southern Oscillation (ENSO) climatic phenomenon is the largest driver of change in the ocean-atmosphere system. As such, it is a primary interest to understand how modern global warming has impacted ENSO, and how the marine sedimentary archive records this linkage in the southern California Current (CC). This would allow detailed comparison against other high-resolution archives, such as corals, and an improved ability to interpret past events as potential analogs for the future of ENSO. Furthermore, such reconstructions in recent millennia are crucial, since they record pre- anthropogenic climates under interglacial (warm) boundary conditions that allow us to characterize the nature of modern influence on this system. Here we present sub-decadal reconstructions of sea surface temperature (SST), derived from the Mg/Ca ratio of the shallow-dwelling planktonic foraminifera Globigerinoides ruber. The samples come from San Lázaro Basin in the southern Baja California continental margin (25° N; 112° W), situated beneath the dynamic boundary of the cool eastern Pacific boundary CC of northern origin, and the warm subtropical water masses of southern origin. The bottom of this coastal basin (maximum depth of 540m) is bathed by oxygen-depleted waters that flow over a shallow sill at 370m. High levels of primary production and export of biogenic particles to depth ensue from strong seasonal upwelling processes during spring to early summer. This combination of high sediment production and preservation in an area very sensitive to ENSO impact allows for a high-resolution reconstruction of inter-annual climatic phenomena in this unique eastern boundary current setting. For our highest temporal detail, we examine 2 cores at interannual resolution for the past ~90 years, which we use to validate our proxy against instrumental SSTs. This variability is effectively traced by Mg/Ca in G. ruber, which has an affinity for warmer waters

  14. Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-141- Salem Albany #2)

    SciTech Connect

    Barndt, Shawn L.

    2003-04-04

    Vegetation Management for the Salem Albany #2 115 kV transmission line from Salem Substation to Albany Substation. BPA proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along the right-of-way, access roads, switch platforms, microwave beam paths, and around tower structures of the subject transmission line corridor that may impede the operation and maintenance of the identified transmission lines. BPA plans to conduct vegetation control with the goal of removing tall growing vegetation that is currently or will soon be a hazard to the transmission line. BPA’s overall goal is to have low-growing plant communities along the rights-of-way to control the development of potentially threatening vegetation.

  15. Hydrologic conditions, groundwater quality, and analysis of sink hole formation in the Albany area of Dougherty County, Georgia, 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gordon, Debbie W.; Painter, Jaime A.; McCranie, John M.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Albany Water, Gas, and Light Commission has conducted water resources investigations and monitored groundwater conditions and availability in the Albany, Georgia, area since 1977. This report presents an overview of hydrologic conditions, water quality, and groundwater studies in the Albany area of Dougherty County, Georgia, during 2009. Historical data also are presented for comparison with 2009 data. During 2009, groundwater-level data were collected in 29 wells in the Albany area to monitor water-level trends in the surficial, Upper Floridan, Claiborne, Clayton, and Providence aquifers. Groundwater-level data from 21 of the 29 wells indicated an increasing trend during 2008–09. Five wells show no trend due to lack of data and three wells have decreasing trends. Period-of-record water levels (period of record ranged between 1957–2009 and 2003–2009) declined slightly in 10 wells and increased slightly in 4 wells tapping the Upper Floridan aquifer; declined in 1 well and increased in 2 wells tapping the Claiborne aquifer; declined in 4 wells and increased in 2 wells tapping the Clayton aquifer; and increased in 1 well tapping the Providence aquifer. Analyses of groundwater samples collected during 2009 from 12 wells in the Upper Floridan aquifer in the vicinity of a well field located southwest of Albany indicate that overall concentrations of nitrate plus nitrite as nitrogen increased slightly from 2008 in 8 wells. A maximum concentration of 12.9 milligrams per liter was found in a groundwater sample from a well located upgradient from the well field. The distinct difference in chemical constituents of water samples collected from the Flint River and samples collected from wells located in the well-field area southwest of Albany indicates that little water exchange occurs between the Upper Floridan aquifer and Flint River where the river flows adjacent to, but downgradient of, the well field. Water

  16. Geologic and geochemical studies of the New Albany Shale Group (Devonian-Mississippian) in Illinois. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bergstrom, R.E.; Shimp, N.F.

    1980-06-30

    The Illinois State Geological Survey is conducting geological and geochemical investigations to evaluate the potential of New Albany Group shales as a source of hydrocarbons, particularly natural gas. Geological studies include stratigraphy and structure, mineralogic and petrographic characterization; analyses of physical properties; and development of a computer-based resources evaluation system. Geochemical studies include organic carbon content and trace elements; hydrocarbon content and composition; and adsorption/desorption studies of gas through shales. Separate abstracts have been prepared for each task reported.

  17. Growth Rates, Stable Oxygen Isotopes (18O), and Strontium (Sr/Ca) Composition in Two Species of Pacific Sclerosponges (Acanthocheatetes wellsi and Astrosclera willeyana) with 18O Calibration and Application to Paleoceanography

    SciTech Connect

    Grottoli, A.; Adkins, J; Panero, W; Reaman, D; Moots, K

    2010-01-01

    The isotopic and elemental composition of sclerosponge skeletons is used to reconstruct paleoceanographic records. Yet few studies have systematically examined the natural variability in sclerosponge skeletal {delta}{sup 18}O, growth, and Sr/Ca, and how that may influence the interpretation of sclerosponge proxy records. Here, we analyzed short records in seven specimens of Acanthocheatetes wellsi (high-Mg calcite, 21 mol% Mg) from Palau, four A. wellsi (high-Mg calcite, 21 mol% Mg) from Saipan, and three Astrosclera willeyana (aragonite) sclerosponges from Saipan, as well as one long record in an A. wellsi specimen from Palau spanning 1945-2001.5. In Saipan, species-specific and mineralogical effects appear to have a negligible effect on sclerosponge {delta}{sup 18}O, facilitating the direct comparison of {delta}{sup 18}O records between species at a given location. At both sites, A. wellsi {delta}{sup 18}O and growth rates were sensitive to environmental conditions, but Sr/Ca was not sensitive to the same conditions. High-resolution {delta}{sup 18}O analyses confirmed this finding as both A. wellsi and A. willeyana deposited their skeleton in accordance with the trends in isotopic equilibrium with seawater, though with a 0.27{per_thousand} offset in the case of A. willeyana. In the high-Mg-calcite species A. wellsi, Mg may be interfering with Sr incorporation into the skeleton. On multidecadal timescales, A. wellsi sclerosponge {delta}{sup 18}O in Palau tracked the Southern Oscillation Index variability post-1977, but not pre-1977, coincident with the switch in the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) at {approx}1976. This suggests that water mass circulation in the region is influenced by El Nino-Southern Oscillation variability during positive PDO phases, but not during negative ones.

  18. Prevalence of Salmonella enterica serovar Albany in captive zoo wild animals in the Culiacán Zoo in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Silva-Hidalgo, Gabriela; López-Moreno, Héctor Samuel; Ortiz-Navarrete, Vianney Francisco; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia; Rendón-Maldonado, José Guadalupe; López-Valenzuela, José Angel; López-Valenzuela, Martin; Juárez-Barranco, Felipe

    2013-03-01

    Salmonellosis is an important zoonotic disease but little is known about the role that free-living animals play as carriers of this pathogen. Moreover, the primary route of infection in the wild needs to be elucidated. The aim of this study was to determine the source and the route of transmission of Salmonella enterica serovar Albany (S. Albany) infection in captive zoo wild animals in the Culiacán Zoo. A total of 267 samples were analyzed including 220 fecal samples from zoo animals, 15 fecal samples from rodents, 5 pooled samples each of two insects (Musca domestica and Periplaneta americana), and 22 samples of animal feed. We detected S. Albany in 28 (10.5%) of the samples analyzed, including in samples from raw chicken meat. Characterization of isolates was performed by serotyping and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. All isolates shared a single pulsed-field gel electrophoresis profile, indicating a possible common origin. These data suggest that the infected meat consumed by the wild felines was the primary source of infection in this zoo. It is likely that the pathogen was shed in the feces and disseminated by insects and rats to other locations in the zoo.

  19. Organic geochemical characterization of the New Albany Shale group in the Illinois Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chou, I.-Ming; Dickerson, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    Benzene extractable aliphatic hydrocarbons from the New Albany Shale in the Illinois Basin were characterized by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry, and the total organic matter of the shale was characterized by solid state carbon-13 cross polarization magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance. Core samples from a northwest-trending cross-section of the Illinois Basin were studied. Gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometric analysis (GC/MS) data indicate a regional variation of the aliphatic composition of the shale extracts. A positive, linear relationship between the two ratios, pristane/n-C17 and phytane/n-C18, is indicated. The NMR results indicated that organic matter deposited in northwestern Illinois shale is relatively high in aliphatic hydrocarbon content while, in contrast, organic matter found in southeastern Illinois shale is relatively low in aliphatic hydrocarbon content. Our findings suggest that the organic variation of the shale is mainly due to the differences in thermal maturity of the shale organic matter and the use of pristane/n-C17 ratio as a thermal parameter in the study of oil may be extended to the study of the ancient sediments. ?? 1985.

  20. Refractory Research Group - U.S. DOE, Albany Research Center [Institution Profile

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, James P.

    2004-09-01

    The refractory research group at the Albany Research Center (ARC) has a long history of conducting materials research within the U.S. Bureau of Mines, and more recently, within the U.S. Dept. of Energy. When under the U.S. Bureau of Mines, research was driven by national needs to develop substitute materials and to conserve raw materials. This mission was accomplished by improving refractory material properties and/or by recycling refractories using critical and strategic materials. Currently, as a U.S. Dept of Energy Fossil Energy field site, research is driven primarily by the need to assist DOE in meeting its vision to develop economically and environmentally viable technologies for the production of electricity from fossil fuels. Research at ARC impacts this vision by: • Providing information on the performance characteristics of materials being specified for the current generation of power systems; • Developing cost-effective, high performance materials for inclusion in the next generation of fossil power systems; and • Solving environmental emission and waste problems related to fossil energy systems. A brief history of past refractory research within the U.S. Bureau of Mines, the current refractory research at ARC, and the equipment and capabilities used to conduct refractory research at ARC will be discussed.

  1. New aromatic biomarkers and possible maturity indicators found in New Albany Shale extracts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chou, I.-Ming; Wood, K.V.

    1986-01-01

    Aromatic hydrocarbons from benzene extracts of New Albany Shale were characterized. A biomarker that has a molecular weight of 546 and a structural configuration consistent with that of an alkyl-aromatic hydrocarbon (C40H66) was tentatively identified. It was found that the relative concentrations of the biomarker are indicative of differing levels of thermal maturity of the shale organic matter. A 40-carbon bicyclic carotenoid (C40H48) is proposed as the geochemical precursor of this biomarker. Thermal maturity of the shale organic matter can also be differentiated by observing differences in "fingerprints" as obtained by field-ionization mass spectrometry on the aromatic hydrocarbon fraction. Using this technique, we found that the more mature shale samples from southeastern Illinois contain more low molecular weight extractable aromatic hydrocarbons and the less mature shale samples from northwestern Illinois contain more high molecular weight extractable aromatic hydrocarbons. It was demonstrated that field-ionization and tandem mass spectrometric techniques through fingerprint and individual compound identification, are useful for shale aromatic hydrocarbon fraction characterization and for thermal maturation interpretation. ?? 1986.

  2. Ground-water data in the Corvallis-Albany area, central Willamette Valley, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frank, F.J.; Johnson, N.A.

    1972-01-01

    THE CORVALLIS-ALBANY AREA IS PART OF THE ALLUVIAL PLAIN THAT LIES BETWEEN THE CASCADE AND COAST RANGES IN THE CENTRAL WILLAMETTE VALLEY IN NORTHWESTERN OREGON. THE ALLUVIAL DEPOSITS (SAND AND GRAVEL) OF THE VALLEY PLAIN CONTAIN THE MOST PRODUCTIVE AQUIFERS IN THE AREA AND ARE CONSIDERED TO BE THE ONLY UNITS FEASIBLE FOR LARGE-SCALE DEVELOPMENT OF GROUNDWATER SUPPLIES. DURING 1971 THE SEASONAL DECLINE OF WATER LEVELS FROM WINTER TO LATE SUMMER AVERAGED ABOUT 10 FEET FOR THE ALLUVIAL DEPOSITS. THE SEASONAL CHANGE OF STORAGE WAS ESTIMATED TO BE ABOUT 130,000 ACRE-FEET. OF THIS VOLUME, ABOUT 14,000 ACRE-FEET WAS PUMPED FROM WELLS; THE REST WAS DISCHARGED THROUGH SEEPS AND SPRINGS BY EVAPOTRANSPIRATION. THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN PUMPAGE AND NATURAL DISCHARGE INDICATES THAT A GREAT QUANTITY OF ADDITIONAL WATER IS AVAILABLE FOR DEVELOPMENT. THE STORAGE CAPACITY OF THE ALLUVIAL AQUIFERS IS ESTIMATED TO BE ABOUT 750,000 ACRE-FEET BETWEEN DEPTHS OF 10 AND 100 FEET. WATER FROM THE ALLUVIAL DEPOSITS IS CHEMICALLY SUITABLE FOR ALL USES, AS IS MOST OF THE WATER FROM PERCHED-WATER BODIES IN THE OLDER SEDIMENTARY AND VOLCANIC ROCKS.

  3. Training the public health workforce from Albany to Zambia: technology lessons learned along the way.

    PubMed

    Waltz, Edward C; Maniccia, Dayna M; Bryde, Regina L; Murphy, Kristin; Harris, Brett R; Waldenmaier, Mark N

    2010-01-01

    This article describes lessons learned by the University at Albany Center for Public Health Preparedness (UA-CPHP) in using three technologies to deliver preparedness training for public health professionals in New York State. These three technologies are: 1. Audience response system (ARS, or the "clicker" system)--Purchased to improve engagement of all participants in heterogeneous training audiences, it also markedly reduces staff time while improving training evaluation (cost: $4,500). 2. Satellite broadcast programs--UA-CPHP produced more than 50 broadcasts, which remain available as videostreams and/or podcasts. Viewership of archived programs sometimes surpasses that of the live event (cost estimate: $23,000 to $39,000). 3. Interactive online courses--Seventeen courses have registered more than 44,000 learners worldwide. The Pandemic Influenza course alone has reached more than 16,000 registrants from all 50 U.S. states and at least 56 other countries (cost estimate: $30,000 to $65,000). UA-CPHP's experience as a preparedness training center has confirmed that contemporary technology can be employed to improve and increase the reach of these training efforts. An additional finding was that, quite unintentionally, the intensive use of distance-based educational modalities designed to reach public health practitioners in New York State has afforded UA-CPHP a substantial national and international audience as well, and at no additional cost.

  4. Geothermal Heat Pump System for New Student Housing Project at the University at Albany Main Campus

    SciTech Connect

    Lnu, Indumathi

    2015-08-27

    University at Albany successfully designed, constructed and is operating a new student housing building that utilizes ground source heat pump (GSHP) for heating and cooling the entire 191,500SF building. The installed system consists of a well field with 150 bores, 450 feet deep and (189) terminal heat pump units for a total capacity of 358 Tons cooling and 4,300 MBtu/h heating. The building opened in Fall 2012. The annual energy use and cost intensity of the building, after the changes made during the first 2 years’ of operation is 57kBtu/SF/Year and $1.30/SF/Year respectively. This is approximately 50% lower than the other residential quads on campus, despite the fact that the quads are not air-conditioned. The total project cost from design through 3-years of operations is approximately $6 Million, out of which $5.7 Million is for construction of the GSHP system including the well field. The University received a $2.78 Million grant from the Department of Energy. The estimated utility cost savings, compared to a baseline building with conventional HVAC system, is approximately $185,000. The estimated simple payback, after grant incentives, is 15 years. Additionally, the project has created 8.5FTE equivalent jobs.

  5. The flora of the New Albany shale; Part 2, The Calamopityeae and their relationships

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Read, Charles B.

    1937-01-01

    Material referable to Calamopitys americana, Calamopitys foerstei, Stenomyelon muratum, Kalymma lirata, Kalymma resinosa, and Kalymma auriculata, from the upper portion of the New Albany shale in central Kentucky, is described. All these species are based on the internal structure of stems and petioles. The suggestion is made that the genus Stenomyelon should be included in the family Calamopityeae rather than in a separate family. Relationships of the several species and genera belonging to the Calamopityeae are discussed, and it is recommended that the name Calamopitys be restricted to manoxylic forms (C. saturni Unger, etc.), that Eristophyton be used for the pycnoxylic species which have in the past been placed in Calamopitys, and that Sphenoxylon be adopted for the American species which has been called Calamopitys eupunctata. It is pointed out that the Calamopityeae may be divided, naturally, into two major groups-a manoxylic, protostelic group and a pycnoxylic, medullated group. Stenomyelon is probably in the lineage of the more primitive Calamopityeae, and Endoxylon is presumably the most advanced type now known.

  6. Case Study for the ARRA-funded GSHP Demonstration at University at Albany

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiaobing; Malhotra, Mini; Xiong, Zeyu

    2015-03-01

    High initial costs and lack of public awareness of ground-source heat pump (GSHP) technology are the two major barriers preventing rapid deployment of this energy-saving technology in the United States. Under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), 26 GSHP projects have been competitively selected and carried out to demonstrate the benefits of GSHP systems and innovative technologies for cost reduction and/or performance improvement. This report highlights the findings of a case study of one of the ARRA-funded GSHP demonstration projects—a distributed GSHP system at a new 500-bed apartment-style student residence hall at the University at Albany. This case study is based on the analysis of detailed design documents, measured performance data, published catalog data of heat pump equipment, and actual construction costs. Simulations with a calibrated computer model are performed for both the demonstrated GSHP system and a baseline heating, ventilation, and airconditioning (HVAC) system to determine the energy savings and other related benefits achieved by the GSHP system. The evaluated performance metrics include the energy efficiency of the heat pump equipment and the overall GSHP system, as well as the pumping performance, energy savings, carbon emission reductions, and cost-effectiveness of the demonstrated GSHP system compared with the baseline HVAC system. This case study also identifies opportunities for improving the operational efficiency of the demonstrated GSHP system.

  7. 17. 'Southern Pacific Company Pacific System, 3 180'61/2' ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. 'Southern Pacific Company - Pacific System, 3 - 180'-6-1/2' c. to c. end pins S. Tr. Thro. Spans, 10th, 11th and 13th Crossings of Sacramento River, also for 1 - 180'-6-1/2' c. to c. end pins S. Tr. Thro. Span, 8th Crossing Sacramento River, The Phoenixville Bridge Co., Phoenixville Pa., Apr. 9th, 1901.' - Southern Pacific Railroad Shasta Route, Bridge No. 310.58, Milepost 310.58, Sims, Shasta County, CA

  8. New Albany shale flash pyrolysis under hot-recycled-solid conditions: Chemistry and kinetics, II

    SciTech Connect

    Coburn, T.T.; Morris, C.J.

    1990-11-01

    The authors are continuing a study of recycle retorting of eastern and western oil shales using burnt shale as the solid heat carrier. Stripping of adsorbed oil from solid surfaces rather than the primary pyrolysis of kerogen apparently controls the release rate of the last 10--20% of hydrocarbons. Thus, the desorption rate defines the time necessary for oil recovery from a retort and sets the minimum hold-time in the pyrolyzer. A fluidized-bed oil shale retort resembles a fluidized-bed cat cracker in this respect. Recycled burnt shale cokes oil and reduces yield. The kerogen H/C ratio sets an upper limit on yield improvements unless external hydrogen donors are introduced. Steam can react with iron compounds to add to the H-donor pool. Increased oil yield when New Albany Shale pyrolyzes under hot-recycled-solid, steam-fluidization conditions has been confirmed and compared with steam retorting of acid-leached Colorado oil shale. In addition, with retorted, but unburnt, Devonian shale present at a recycle ratio of 3, the authors obtain 50% more oil-plus-gas than with burnt shale present. Procedures to make burnt shale more like unburnt shale can realize some increase in oil yield at high recycle ratios. Reduction with H{sub 2} and carbon deposition are possibilities that the authors have tested in the laboratory and can test in the pilot retort. Also, eastern spent shale burned at a high temperature (775 C, for example) cokes less oil than does spent shale burned at a low temperature (475 C). Changes in surface area with burn temperature contribute to this effect. 15 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Type specimens in the Port Elizabeth Museum, South Africa, including the historically important Albany Museum collection. Part 1: Amphibians.

    PubMed

    Conradie, Werner; Branch, William R; Watson, Gillian

    2015-03-18

    The Port Elizabeth Museum houses the consolidated herpetological collections of three provincial museums of the Eastern Cape, South Africa: the Port Elizabeth Museum (Port Elizabeth), the Amatole (previously Kaffarian) Museum (King Williams Town), and the Albany Museum (Grahamstown). Under John Hewitt, Albany Museum was the main centre of herpetological research in South Africa from 1910-1940, and he described numerous new species, many based on material in the museum collection. The types and other material from the Albany Museum are now incorporated into the Port Elizabeth Museum Herpetology collection (PEM). Due to the vague typification of much of Hewitt's material, the loss of the original catalogues in a fire and the subsequent deterioration of specimen labels, the identification of this type material is often troublesome. Significant herpetological research has been undertaken at the PEM in the last 35 years, and the collection has grown to be the third largest in Africa. During this period, numerous additional types have been deposited in the PEM collection, generated by active taxonomic research in the museum. As a consequence, 43 different amphibian taxa are represented by 37 primary and 151 secondary type specimens in the collection. This catalogue provides the first documentation of these types. It provides the original name, the original publication date, journal number and pagination, reference to illustrations, current name, museum collection number, type locality, notes on the type status, and photographs of all holotypes and lectotypes. Where necessary to maintain nomenclatural stability, and where confused type series are housed in the PEM collection, lectotypes and paralectotypes are nominated.

  10. The New Albany Shale Petroleum System, Illinois Basin - Data and Map Image Archive from the Material-Balance Assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Higley, Debra K.; Henry, M.E.; Lewan, M.D.; Pitman, J.K.

    2003-01-01

    The data files and explanations presented in this report were used to generate published material-balance approach estimates of amounts of petroleum 1) expelled from a source rock, and the sum of 2) petroleum discovered in-place plus that lost due to 3) secondary migration within, or leakage or erosion from a petroleum system. This study includes assessment of cumulative production, known petroleum volume, and original oil in place for hydrocarbons that were generated from the New Albany Shale source rocks.More than 4.00 billion barrels of oil (BBO) have been produced from Pennsylvanian-, Mississippian-, Devonian-, and Silurian-age reservoirs in the New Albany Shale petroleum system. Known petroleum volume is 4.16 BBO; the average recovery factor is 103.9% of the current cumulative production. Known petroleum volume of oil is 36.22% of the total original oil in place of 11.45 BBO. More than 140.4 BBO have been generated from the Upper Devonian and Lower Mississippian New Albany Shale in the Illinois Basin. Approximately 86.29 billion barrels of oil that was trapped south of the Cottage Grove fault system were lost by erosion of reservoir intervals. The remaining 54.15 BBO are 21% of the hydrocarbons that were generated in the basin and are accounted for using production data. Included in this publication are 2D maps that show the distribution of production for different formations versus the Rock-Eval pyrolysis hydrogen-indices (HI) contours, and 3D images that show the close association between burial depth and HI values.The primary vertical migration pathway of oil and gas was through faults and fractures into overlying reservoir strata. About 66% of the produced oil is located within the generative basin, which is outlined by an HI contour of 400. The remaining production is concentrated within 30 miles (50 km) outside the 400 HI contour. The generative basin is subdivided by contours of progressively lower hydrogen indices that represent increased levels of

  11. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 4): T, H, Agriculture and Nutrition Site, Operable Unit 1, Albany, GA, May 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-21

    This decision document (Record of Decision), presents the selected remedial action for Operable Unit One for the T H Agriculture and Nutrition (THAN) Site, Albany, Georgia. This operable unit is the first of two that are planned for the Site. The first operable unit addresses the source of the contamination on the western parcel of the Site as well as the principle threat of groundwater contamination across the entire Site. While this remedy does address the principal threats at the Site, the second operable unit will involve continued study and remediation of a second source of contamination on the eastern parcel of the Site.

  12. Thermal maturity of type II kerogen from the New Albany Shale assessed by 13C CP/MAS NMR.

    PubMed

    Werner-Zwanziger, Ulrike; Lis, Grzegorz; Mastalerz, Maria; Schimmelmann, Arndt

    2005-01-01

    Thermal maturity of oil and gas source rocks is typically quantified in terms of vitrinite reflectance, which is based on optical properties of terrestrial woody remains. This study evaluates 13C CP/MAS NMR parameters in kerogen (i.e., the insoluble fraction of organic matter in sediments and sedimentary rocks) as proxies for thermal maturity in marine-derived source rocks where terrestrially derived vitrinite is often absent or sparse. In a suite of samples from the New Albany Shale (Middle Devonian to the Early Mississippian, Illinois Basin) the abundance of aromatic carbon in kerogen determined by 13C CP/MAS NMR correlates linearly well with vitrinite reflectance.

  13. The Albany Two-Way Radio Conferences, 1955-1981: a retrospective look at a program providing interactive continuing medical education at a distance.

    PubMed

    Tulgan, Henry

    2014-01-01

    Despite early widespread recognition of the necessity of continuing medical education (CME) for practicing physicians and surgeons, medical schools and national medical organizations were slow to mobilize to address the need. One pioneering program, developed by the Albany Medical College in New York, not only provided CME, but did so in a live distance education format that allowed for interaction between the participants and the faculty presenters. The Albany Program commenced in 1955 using what was then state-of-the-art technology; it exemplified principles and practices that can be seen as the precursors for the distance education approaches used to reach physicians today. This short article describes the contributions of the Albany Two-Way Radio Conferences and places them in the context of developments in national organizations and policies in the 20th century.

  14. Gas hazard assessment in a densely inhabited area of Colli Albani Volcano (Cava dei Selci, Roma)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carapezza, M. L.; Badalamenti, B.; Cavarra, L.; Scalzo, A.

    2003-04-01

    The northwestern flank of the Colli Albani, a Quaternary volcanic complex near Rome, is characterised by high pCO 2 values and Rn activities in the groundwater and by the presence of zones with strong emission of gas from the soil. The most significant of these zones is Cava dei Selci where many houses are located very near to the gas emission site. The emitted gas consists mainly of CO 2 (up to 98 vol%) with an appreciable content of H 2S (0.8-2%). The He and C isotopic composition indicates, as for all fluids associated with the Quaternary Roman and Tuscany volcanic provinces, the presence of an upper mantle component contaminated by crustal fluids associated with subducted sediments and carbonates. An advective CO 2 flux of 37 tons/day has been estimated from the gas bubbles rising to the surface in a small drainage ditch and through a stagnant water pool, present in the rainy season in a topographically low central part of the area. A CO 2 soil flux survey with an accumulation chamber, carried out in February-March 2000 over a 12 000 m 2 surface with 242 measurement points, gave a total (mostly conductive) flux of 61 tons/day. CO 2 soil flux values vary by four orders of magnitude over a 160-m distance and by one order of magnitude over several metres. A fixed network of 114 points over 6350 m 2 has been installed in order to investigate temporal flux variations. Six surveys carried out from May 2000 to June 2001 have shown large variations of the total CO 2 soil flux (8-25 tons/day). The strong emission of CO 2 and H 2S, which are gases denser than air, produces dangerous accumulations in low areas which have caused a series of lethal accidents to animals and one to a man. The gas hazard near the houses has been assessed by continuously monitoring the CO 2 and H 2S concentration in the air at 75 cm from the ground by means of two automatic stations. Certain environmental parameters (wind direction and speed; atm P, T, humidity and rainfall) were also

  15. 6. 'Tunnel No. 6, Concrete Lining,' Southern Pacific Standard SingleTrack ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. 'Tunnel No. 6, Concrete Lining,' Southern Pacific Standard Single-Track Tunnel, ca. 1909. Compare to photos in documentation set for Tunnel 27 (HAER No. CA-203). - Central Pacific Transcontinental Railroad, Sacramento to Nevada state line, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  16. Inorganic ground-water chemistry at an experimental New Albany Shale (Devonian-Mississippian) in situ gasification site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Branam, T.D.; Comer, J.B.; Shaffer, N.R.; Ennis, M.V.; Carpenter, S.H.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental in situ gasification of New Albany Shale (Devonian-Mississippian) has been conducted in Clark County. Analyses of ground water sampled from a production well and nine nearby monitoring wells 3 months after a brief in situ gasification period revealed changes in water chemistry associated with the gasification procedure. Dissolved iron, calcium and sulphate in ground water from the production well and wells as much as 2 m away were significantly higher than in ground water from wells over 9 m away. Dissolved components in the more distant wells are in the range of those in regional ground water. Thermal decomposition of pyrite during the gasification process generated the elevated levels of iron and sulphate in solution. High concentrations of calcium indicate buffering by dissolution of carbonate minerals. While iron quickly precipitates, calcium and sulphate remain in the ground water. Trends in the concentration of sulphate show that altered ground water migrated mostly in a south-westerly direction from the production well along natural joints in the New Albany Shale. ?? 1991.

  17. Hydrogeologic evaluation of the Upper Floridan aquifer in the southwestern Albany area, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warner, Debbie

    1997-01-01

    A cooperative study by the Albany Water, Gas, and Light Commission and the U.S. Geological Survey was conducted to evaluate the hydrogeology of the Upper Floridan aquifer in an area southwest of Albany and west of the Flint River in Dougherty County, Ga. The study area lies in the Dougherty Plain district of the Coastal Plain physiographic province. In this area, the Upper Floridan aquifer is comprised of the upper Eocene Ocala Limestone, confined below by the middle Eocene Lisbon Formation, and semiconfined above by the undifferentiated Quaternary overburden. The overburden ranges in thickness from about 30 to 50 feet and consists of fine to coarse quartz sand, clayey sand, sandy clay, and clay. The Upper Floridan aquifer has been subdivided into an upper water-bearing zone and a lower water-bearing zone based on differences in lithology and yield. In the study area, the upper water-bearing zone generally consists of dense, highly weathered limestone of low permeability and ranges in thickness from 40 to 80 feet. The lower water-bearing zone consists of hard, slightly weathered limestone that exhibits a high degree of secondary permeability that has developed along fractures and joints, and ranges in thickness from about 60 to 80 feet. Borehole geophysical logs and borehole video surveys indicate two areas of high permeability in the lower water-bearing zone-one near the top and one near the base of the zone. A wellfield consisting of one production well and five observation-well clusters (one deep, intermediate, and shallow well in each cluster) was constructed for this study. Spinner flowmeter tests were conducted in the production well between the depths of 110 and 140 feet below land surface to determine the relative percentages of water contributed by selected vertical intervals of the lower water-bearing zone. Pumping rates during these tests were 1,080, 2,200, and 3,400 gallons per minute. The results of these pumping tests show that the interval between

  18. A Study to Determine the Interest in the Establishment of Catholic Two-Year Colleges for Laymen in the Diocese of Albany, New York.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, William Francis

    To determine the degree of interest in the establishment of 2-year Catholic lay colleges in the area of Albany, New York, (1) the literature pertaining to 2-year colleges was reviewed, (2) conferences were held with local, state, and national 2-year college officials, (3) interviews were conducted with the administrators of the six existing…

  19. Thermal maturity of type II kerogen from the New Albany Shale assessed by13C CP/MAS NMR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Werner-Zwanziger, U.; Lis, G.; Mastalerz, Maria; Schimmelmann, A.

    2005-01-01

    Thermal maturity of oil and gas source rocks is typically quantified in terms of vitrinite reflectance, which is based on optical properties of terrestrial woody remains. This study evaluates 13C CP/MAS NMR parameters in kerogen (i.e., the insoluble fraction of organic matter in sediments and sedimentary rocks) as proxies for thermal maturity in marine-derived source rocks where terrestrially derived vitrinite is often absent or sparse. In a suite of samples from the New Albany Shale (Middle Devonian to the Early Mississippian, Illinois Basin) the abundance of aromatic carbon in kerogen determined by 13C CP/MAS NMR correlates linearly well with vitrinite reflectance. ?? 2004 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 4): T H Agriculture and Nutrition Site, Dougherty County, Albany, GA, April 26, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-01

    This decision document (Record of Decision), presents the selected Remedial Action for the Operable Unit Two for the T H Agriculture & Nutrition (THAN) Site, Albany, Georgia. The second operable unit addresses the source of the contamination on the eastern parcel of the Site. The major components of the selected remedy for operable unit two include: the excavation of all soil contaminated with organics necessary to meet performance standards; the staging and preconditioning of soil for low temperature thermal desorption treatment; the treatment of excavated soil by low temperature thermal desorption; the placement of treated, decontaminated soil back to the site; periodic sampling of treated soil during the treatment process to verify the effectiveness of the remedy; air monitoring to ensure safety of nearby residents and workers; groundwater monitoring to ensure that metals contaminated remaining in the subsurface soil will not result in contaminated groundwater migrating offsite in concentrations which exceed groundwater protection standards; and deed restrictions to prevent residential use of the property.

  1. Geohydrology and evaluation of water-resource potential of the upper Floridan Aquifer in the Albany area, southwestern Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Torak, L.J.; Davis, G.S.; Strain, G.A.; Herndon, J.G.

    1993-01-01

    In the Albany area of southwestern Georgia, the Upper Floridan aquifer lies entirely within the Dougherty Plain district of the Coastal Plain physiographic province, and consists of the Ocala Limestone of late Eocene age. The aquifer is divided throughout most of the study area into an upper and a lower lithologic unit, which creates an upper and a lower water-bearing zone. The lower waterbearing zone consists of alternating layers of sandy limestone and medium-brown, recrystallized dolomitic limestone, and ranges in thickness from about 50 ft to 100 ft. It is highly fractured and exhibits well-developed permeability by solution features that are responsible for transmitting most of the ground water in the aquifer. Transmissivity of the lower water-bearing zone ranges from about 90,000 to 178,000 ft2/d. The upper water-bearing zone is a finely crystallized-to-oolitic, locally dolomitic limestone having an average thickness of about 60 ft. Transmissivities are considerably less in the upper water-bearing zone than in the lower water-bearing zone. The Upper Floridan aquifer is overlain by about 20-120 ft of undifferentiated overburden consisting of fine-to-coarse quartz sand and noncalcareous clay. A clay zone about 10-30 ft thick may be continuous throughout the southwestern part of the Albany area and, where present, causes confinement of the Upper Floridan aquifer and creates perched ground water after periods of heavy rainfall. The Upper Floridan aquifer is confined below by the Lisbon Formation, a mostly dolomitic limestone that contains trace amounts of glauconite. The Lisbon Formation is at least 50 ft thick in the study area and acts as an impermeable base to the Upper Floridan aquifer. The quality of ground water in the Upper Floridan aquifer is suitable for most uses; wells generally yield water of the hard, calcium-bicarbonate type that meets the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Primary or Secondary Drinking-Water Regulations. The water

  2. Ground-water flow and water quality in the Upper Floridan aquifer, southwestern Albany area, Georgia, 1998-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warner, Debbie; Lawrence, Stephen J.

    2005-01-01

    During 1997, the Dougherty County Health Department sampled more than 700 wells completed in the Upper Floridan aquifer in Dougherty County, Georgia, and determined that nitrate as nitrogen (hereinafter called nitrate) concentrations were above 10 milligrams per liter (mg/L) in 12 percent of the wells. Ten mg/L is the Georgia primary drinking-water standard. The ground-water flow system is complex and poorly understood in this predominantly agricultural area. Therefore, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) - in cooperation with Albany Water, Gas and Light Commission - conducted a study to better define ground-water flow and water quality in the Upper Florida aquifer in the southwestern Albany area, Georgia. Ground-water levels were measured in the southwestern Albany area, Georgia, during May 1998 and March 1999 (spring), and October 1998 and September 1999 (fall). Groundwater levels measured in 75 wells open only to the Upper Floridan aquifer were used to construct potentiometric-surface maps for those four time periods. These maps show that ground water generally flows from northwest to southeast at gradients ranging from about 2 to greater than 10 feet per mile. During spring and fall 1998, ground-water levels were high and mounding of the potentiometric surface occurred in the central part of the study area, indicating a local recharge area. Water levels declined from December through February, and by March 1999 the mound in the potentiometric surface had dissipated. Of the 75 wells in the potentiometric network, 24 were selected for a water-quality network. These 24 wells and 1 spring were sampled during fall 1998 and spring 1999. Samples were analyzed for major chemical constituents, selected minor constituents, selected nutrients, and chlorofluorocarbons (CFC). Water-quality field measurements - such as water temperature, pH, specific conductance (SC), and dissolved oxygen (DO) - were taken at each well. During August 2000, a ground-water sample was collected

  3. Geochemical constraints on the origin and volume of gas in the New Albany Shale (Devonian-Mississippian), eastern Illinois Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Strapoc, D.; Mastalerz, Maria; Schimmelmann, A.; Drobniak, A.; Hasenmueller, N.R.

    2010-01-01

    This study involved analyses of kerogen petrography, gas desorption, geochemistry, microporosity, and mesoporosity of the New Albany Shale (Devonian-Mississippian) in the eastern part of the Illinois Basin. Specifically, detailed core analysis from two locations, one in Owen County, Indiana, and one in Pike County, Indiana, has been conducted. The gas content in the locations studied was primarily dependent on total organic carbon content and the micropore volume of the shales. Gas origin was assessed using stable isotope geochemistry. Measured and modeled vitrinite reflectance values were compared. Depth of burial and formation water salinity dictated different dominant origins of the gas in place in the two locations studied in detail. The shallower Owen County location (415-433 m [1362-1421 ft] deep) contained significant additions of microbial methane, whereas the Pike County location (832-860 m [2730-2822 ft] deep) was characterized exclusively by thermogenic gas. Despite differences in the gas origin, the total gas in both locations was similar, reaching up to 2.1 cm3/g (66 scf/ton). Lower thermogenic gas content in the shallower location (lower maturity and higher loss of gas related to uplift and leakage via relaxed fractures) was compensated for by the additional generation of microbial methane, which was stimulated by an influx of glacial melt water, inducing brine dilution and microbial inoculation. The characteristics of the shale of the Maquoketa Group (Ordovician) in the Pike County location are briefly discussed to provide a comparison to the New Albany Shale. Copyright ??2010. The American Association of Petroleum Geologists. All rights reserved.

  4. Late-stage magmatic processes at Albano Maar, Colli Albani, Italy: insights from FTIR analysis of leucites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, J. K.; Roberge, J.; Smith, V.; Giordano, G.; Tomlinson, E.; Menzies, M. A.

    2011-12-01

    The recently erupted Albano Maar, one of the Via dei Laghi phreatomagmatic eruptions of Colli Albani, Italy have eruptive deposits that are K-foiditic (9wt% K2O) and silica under-saturated (48-52wt% SiO2). These compositions suggest the melts are low viscosity [1, 2], but they fuelled very explosive eruptions, namely the widespread large Peperino ignimbrite (phreato-Plinian) deposits. Therefore a question asked by researchers is how could these melts explode and would they, if they had not interacted with groundwater? Experimental work has shown that the melt chemistries at Colli Albani require a volatile saturated system [3]. Consequently the CO2 and H2O content of the melts are critical to understanding the petrogenetic processes at Albano Maar. Since the juvenile tephra clasts exhibit extensive late stage micro-crystallization (mainly leucite), analysis of glass is difficult and not representative as the majority of the volatile components may have exsolved from the melt. Melt inclusions are also commonly recrystallized and often leaky so here we unravel the complex volatile histories of the melts using the abundant leucite crystals, which have been shown to contain magmatic water in recent studies [4]. FTIR analysis of leucite phenocrysts and microcrysts within juvenile tephra clasts (syn-eruptive) of all the erupted units at Albano Maar provide an interesting insight into volatile variations and record a late stage CO2 fluxing event, which would have contributed to the explosive nature of the eruptions. This study has also allowed for an increased understanding of the nominally anhydrous minerals (NAMs) that crucially record volatile speciation and fluxing in high level magmatic systems. [1] Freda et al., 2006, Bul Vol, 68, pp567-591 [2] Cross et al., 2011 IUGG abs [3] Freda et al., 2008, Lithos, pp397-415 [4] Ventura et al., 2008, Am Min, 93, pp1538-1544

  5. Pacific HYCOM

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-08-21

    Pacific HYCOM E. Joseph Metzger†, Harley E. Hurlburt†, Alan J. Wallcraft†, Luis Zamudio ‡ and Patrick J. Hogan† †Naval Research Laboratory, Stennis...Simulations • HYCOM code upgrade: v2.0.02 v2.1.09 • Thin deep isopycnal layer capability • PLM vertical remapping for fixed coordinate layers • COARE 2.6 heat...flux (flxflg = 4) vs. Kara et al. (flxflg = 2) • Bug- fixed ice model • Longwave SST correction • Monthly shortwave attenuation coefficients - turbidity

  6. View along alignment of former Southern Pacific Railroad right of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View along alignment of former Southern Pacific Railroad right of way; note collision walls, provision for two tracks; view to north-northeast; 90mm lens - Carroll Overhead Bridge, Altamont Pass Road, Livermore, Alameda County, CA

  7. 77 FR 70424 - Pacific Gas and Electric Company; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing, Soliciting Comments...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-26

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Pacific Gas and Electric Company; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing...: Amendment of License. b. Project No.: 1121-112. c. Date Filed: November 13, 2012. d. Applicant: Pacific Gas... Coordinator, Pacific Gas and Electric Company, 245 Market Street, San Francisco, CA 94105. Tel: (415)...

  8. Reappraisal of the geothermal potential at Colli Albani volcano (Italy): a new approach to the volume method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordano, G.; De Benedetti, A. A.; Ramazzotti, P.; Bonamico, A.; Mattei, M.

    2012-04-01

    High enthalpy geothermal reservoirs are usually associated with fractured rocks. Secondary permeability is however difficult to be predicted thus making it difficult to locate the most productive volumes of the reservoirs. The calculation of the energetic potential in geothermal areas suffers of the large uncertainties associated with secondary permeability issues, facing the task of the interplay between stratification and fracturing on the anisotropic distribution of secondary permeability. The object of this work is the research and informatization of available data for the Colli Albani (Latium, Central Italy) geothermal system, in order to propose a qualitative approach and quantitative identification and description of geothermal systems, applied to the Colli Albani area as a case history. The identification of the rock volumes most promising in terms of industrial exploitation needs the definition of an evaluation matrix. The considered data can be placed in a three dimensional matrix with A axis that accounts for the modeling of the depth of the top of the reservoirs based on geophysical and direct data, and a B axis that accounts for the thermal modeling of the crust (i.e. T with depth) based on measured thermal gradients. Both A and B data are strongly influenced by the geological model therefore, as for the case of Colli Albani, there is certainly a lot of scope into revising existing geological reconstructions of the reservoirs in Central Italy and accordingly reconsidering the interpolation and modeling of both thermal and geophysical data. For the scope of this work, we have taken into account the maps descriptive the thermal structure and the deep distribution of the top of the geothermal reservoirs produced by ENEL and AGIP between the 1970s and 1990s for Cental Italy, and we have detailed the internal structure of the substrate, considering more recent direct and indirect data on the nature of the substratum. Finally, we discuss the implementation

  9. U.S. Geological Survey Georgia Water Science Center and Albany Water, Gas, and Light Commission Cooperative Water Program-Summary of Activities, July 2005 through June 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gordon, Debbie W.

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has been working with the Albany Water, Gas, and Light Commission to monitor ground-water quality and availability since 1977. This report presents the findings for July 2005 through June 2006 and summarizes the ground-water and surface-water conditions for 2005. Water levels in 14 wells were continuously monitored in Dougherty County, Georgia. Water levels in 12 of those wells were above normal, one was normal, and one was below normal. Ground-water samples collected from the Upper Floridan aquifer indicate that nitrate levels have increased in 13 wells and decreased in two wells from a year earlier. A sample also was collected from the Flint River. A trilinear diagram showing the percent composition of selected major cations and anions indicates that the ground-water quality of the Upper Floridan aquifer at the Albany wellfield is distinctly different from the water quality of the Flint River. To improve the understanding of the ground-water flow system and nitrate movement in the Upper Floridan aquifer, the USGS is developing a ground-water flow model in the southwest Albany area, Georgia.

  10. Pacific Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakatsu, H.; Takeo, A.; Isse, T.; Nishida, K.; Shiobara, H.; Suetsugu, D.

    2014-12-01

    Based on our recent results on broadband ocean bottom seismometry, we propose a next generation large-scale array experiment in the ocean. Recent advances in ocean bottom broadband seismometry (e.g., Suetsugu & Shiobara, 2014, Annual Review EPS), together with advances in the seismic analysis methodology, have now enabled us to resolve the regional 1-D structure of the entire lithosphere/asthenosphere system, including seismic anisotropy (both radial and azimuthal), with deployments of ~10-15 broadband ocean bottom seismometers (BBOBSs) (namely "ocean-bottom broadband dispersion survey"; Takeo et al., 2013, JGR; Kawakatsu et al., 2013, AGU; Takeo, 2014, Ph.D. Thesis; Takeo et al., 2014, JpGU). Having ~15 BBOBSs as an array unit for 2-year deployment, and repeating such deployments in a leap-frog way (an array of arrays) for a decade or so would enable us to cover a large portion of the Pacific basin. Such efforts, not only by giving regional constraints on the 1-D structure, but also by sharing waveform data for global scale waveform tomography, would drastically increase our knowledge of how plate tectonics works on this planet, as well as how it worked for the past 150 million years. International collaborations might be sought.

  11. Liquid Metal Processing and Casting Experiences at the U.S. Department of Energy's Albany Research Center

    SciTech Connect

    Jablonski, Paul D.; Turner, Paul C.

    2005-09-01

    In this paper we will discuss some of the early pioneering work as well as some of our more recent research. The Albany Research Center (ARC) has been involved with the melting and processing of metals since it was established in 1942. In the early days, hardly anything was known about melting refractory or reactive metals and as such, virtually everything had to be developed in-house. Besides the more common induction heated air-melt furnaces, ARC has built and/or utilized a wide variety of furnaces including vacuum arc remelt ingot and casting furnaces, cold wall induction furnaces, electric arc furnaces, cupola furnaces and reverberatory furnaces. The melt size of these furnaces range from several grams to a ton or more. We have used these furnaces to formulate custom alloys for wrought applications as well as for such casting techniques as spin casting, investment casting and lost foam casting among many. Two early spin-off industrializations were Wah Chang (wrought zirconium alloys for military and commercial nuclear applications) and Oremet (both wrought and cast Ti). Both of these companies are now part of the ATI Allegheny Ludlum Corporation.

  12. Measuring evapotranspiration using an eddy covariance system over the Albany Thicket of the Eastern Cape, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwate, O.; Mantel, Sukhmani K.; Palmer, Anthony R.; Gibson, Lesley A.

    2016-10-01

    Determining water and carbon fluxes over a vegetated surface is important in a context of global environmental changes and the fluxes help in understanding ecosystem functioning. Pursuant to this, the study measured evapotranspiration (ET) using an eddy covariance (EC) system installed over an intact example of the Albany Thicket (AT) vegetation in the Eastern Cape, South Africa. Environmental constraints to ET were also assessed by examining the response of ET to biotic and abiotic factors. The EC system comprised of an open path Infrared Gas Analyser and Sonic anemometer and an attendant weather station to measure bi-meteorological variables. Post processing of eddy covariance data was conducted using EddyPro software. Quality assessment of fluxes was also performed and rejected and missing data were filled using the method of mean diurnal variations (MDV). Much of the variation in ET was accounted for by the leaf area index (LAI, p < 0.001, 41%) and soil moisture content (SWC, p < 0.001, 32%). Total measured ET during the experiment was greater than total rainfall received owing to the high water storage capacity of the vegetation and the possibility of vegetation accessing ground water. Most of the net radiation was consumed by sensible heat flux and this means that ET in the area is essentially water limited since abundant energy was available to drive turbulent transfers of energy. Understanding the environmental constraints to ET is crucial in predicting the ecosystem response to environmental forces such as climate change.

  13. Fate of perchlorate in a man-made reflecting pond following a fireworks display in Albany, New York, USA.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qian; Oldi, John F; Kannan, Kurunthachalam

    2011-11-01

    Perchlorate is a widespread contaminant in aquatic environments. Despite this, the aquatic environmental fate of perchlorate released from fireworks displays is not well known. In the present study, we examined the fate of perchlorate in man-made reflecting ponds, from 2008 to 2010, following three fireworks displays in Albany, New York, USA. Immediately after the fireworks display, perchlorate in pond waters increased significantly, with concentrations from 30 to 1,480 times higher than the baseline values. Perchlorate concentrations in pond water increased from 0.11 µg/L to up to 519 µg/L, following the fireworks display in 2008. Perchlorate concentrations in pond water decreased at a first-order kinetic degradation rate, with a mean k(obs) value of 0.026 d⁻¹ and an average half-life of 29 d. The rate of perchlorate deposition into water bodies following fireworks displays was estimated to range from 670 to 2,620 g/ha. We also estimated the perchlorate ingestion rate by the inhalation of aerosols of pond water by people frequently near the ponds. The estimated daily intake of perchlorate through the ingestion of aerosols was 32% (226 ng/kg body wt), 13% (92 ng/kg body wt), and 6% (42 ng/kg body wt) of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's reference dose for infants, children, and adults, respectively.

  14. Peat landforms along the Albany River, northern Ontario. An ecological study of peat landforms in Canada and Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaser, P. H.

    1985-01-01

    During the summer of 1985 a field investigation was started in the Hudson Bay lowland region of northern Ontario, which represents the largest expanse of peatland in North America and is an important sink in the global carbon cycle. A key area in the lowlands is situated along the Albany River near the confluence of the Chepay River. Here the striking vegetation-landforms are transitional between those found on the bed of Glacial Lake Agassiz in northern Minnesota and southern Manitoba and the more northern peatlands in the Hudson Bay lowland region. In peatland studies elsewhere the landform patterns have been used not only to classify different peatland types but also as an indicator of potential developmetnal trends. The study area is generally defined by that covered by the TM scene E-40062-15532 taken on Sept. 16, 1982. The purpose of the field work is to acquire sufficent information to interpret the TM imagery and test various hypotheses on peatland development on the gasis of the pattern transitions.

  15. Tectonic and flexural significance of Middle Devonian graben-fill sequence in new Albany shale, central Kentucky

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, S.F.; Ettensohn, F.R.; Mellon, C. )

    1989-08-01

    The third tectonic phase of the Acadian orogeny began in the late Middle Devonian, and the sedimentary record of that event is largely restricted to the deeper, more proximal portions of the Appalachian foreland and Illinois intercratonic basins. Much of the intervening area, on and near the Cincinnati arch, was uplifted and subjected to erosion by movement on the peripheral bulge accompanying the initiation of the third tectonic phase. However, bulge movement also reactivated basement fault systems in Kentucky and created a series of grabens that were filled with eroded sediments and debris flows from adjacent horsts. Although rarely preserved, a buried Devonian graben along Carpenter Fork in Boyle County, central Kentucky, reveals such a sequence. The graben is bounded by upthrown blocks of Middle Devonian Boyle Dolomite, which also floors the graben. Within the graben a black-shale unit, apparently absent elsewhere, conformably overlies the Boyle and grades upward into debris-flow deposits represented by the Duffin breccia facies of the New Albany Shale. The Duffin contains clasts of the shale, as well as of chert, silicified fossils, and fine to boulder-size dolostone clasts eroded from the Boyle high on the flanks of the graben. The underlying shale also exhibits evidence of penecontemporaneous soft-sediment deformation related to the debris-flow emplacement of Boyle residue in the graben and due to later loading by the Duffin.

  16. Evolution of Seawater 44Ca/40Ca Through the Late Cretaceous and Cenozoic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, P. R.; Gopalan, K.; Norris, R. D.; MacIsaac, C.; Liu, X.; MacDougall, J. D.

    2009-12-01

    We analyzed the Ca concentrations and 44Ca/40Ca ratios of surface ocean planktonic (Morozovella, Acarinina, Dentoglobigerina) and benthic (Gavelinella) foraminifera of Late Cretaceous to Late Oligocene ages from DSDP and ODP sites in the Pacific, Atlantic and Indian oceans in order to fill a major gap in the Phanerozoic seawater 44Ca/40Ca curve (Farkass et al., Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 71, 2007). Our new 44Ca/40Ca data indicate a general increase in foraminiferan-based seawater 44Ca/40Ca from ~-1.3 ‰ δ44Ca/40CaSW in Late Cretaceous to ~0.0 ‰ δ44Ca/40CaSW in Early Miocene (Heuser et al., Paleocean. 20, 2005; Sime et al., Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 71, 2007). In detail, the 44Ca/40Ca ratio stepped abruptly from ~-1.3 ‰ δ44Ca/40CaSW to a slightly higher value of ~-1.1 ‰ δ44Ca/40CaSW across the Cretaceous-Tertiary (K/T) boundary. A slight positive excursion of ~0.2 ‰ above the background value occurred after the Paleocene Thermal Maximum (55 Ma) but otherwise, the Paleocene to Middle Eocene ratio is relatively stable at ~-1.0 ‰ δ44Ca/40CaSW. The most prominent increase in foraminiferan-based seawater 44Ca/40Ca occurred from Late Eocene to Late Oligocene, roughly coincident with the initial phase of the rapid and steady rise of marine carbonate 87Sr/86Sr ratio in the Tertiary (e.g., DePaolo and Ingram, Science 227, 1985).

  17. Hydrogeology of the upper Floridan Aquifer in the vicinity of the Marine Corps Logistics Base near Albany, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McSwain, Kristen Bukowski

    1999-01-01

    In 1995, the U.S. Navy requested that the U.S. Geological Survey conduct an investigation to describe the hydrogeology of the Upper Floridan aquifer in the vicinity of the Marine Corps Logistics Base, southeast and adjacent to Albany, Georgia. The study area encompasses about 90 square miles in the Dougherty Plain District of the Coastal Plain physiographic province, in Dougherty and Worth Counties-the Marine Corps Logistics Base encompasses about 3,600 acres in the central part of the study area. The Upper Floridan aquifer is the shallowest, most widely used source of drinking water for domestic use in the Albany area. The hydrogeologic framework of this aquifer was delineated by description of the geologic and hydrogeologic units that compose the aquifer; evaluation of the lithologic and hydrologic heterogeneity of the aquifer; comparison of the geologic and hydrogeologic setting beneath the base with those of the surrounding area; and determination of ground-water-flow directions, and vertical hydraulic conductivities and gradients in the aquifer. The Upper Floridan aquifer is composed of the Suwannee Limestone and Ocala Limestone and is divided into an upper and lower water-bearing zone. The aquifer is confined below by the Lisbon Formation and is semi-confined above by a low-permeability clay layer in the undifferentiated overburden. The thickness of the aquifer ranges from about 165 feet in the northeastern part of the study area, to about 325 feet in the southeastern part of the study area. Based on slug tests conducted by a U.S. Navy contractor, the upper water-bearing zone has low horizontal hydraulic conductivity (0.0224 to 2.07 feet per day) and a low vertical hydraulic conductivity (0.0000227 to 0.510 feet per day); the lower water-bearing zone has a horizontal hydraulic conductivity that ranges from 0.0134 to 2.95 feet per day. Water-level hydrographs of continuously monitored wells on the Marine Corps Logistics Base show excellent correlation between

  18. Characterization of fractures and flow zones in a contaminated shale at the Watervliet Arsenal, Albany County, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, John H.; Paillet, Frederick L.

    2002-01-01

    Flow zones in a fractured shale in and near a plume of volatile organic compounds at the Watervliet Arsenal in Albany County, N. Y. were characterized through the integrated analysis of geophysical logs and single- and cross-hole flow tests. Information on the fracture-flow network at the site was needed to design an effective groundwater monitoring system, estimate offsite contaminant migration, and evaluate potential containment and remedial actions. Four newly drilled coreholes and four older monitoring wells were logged and tested to define the distribution and orientation of fractures that intersected a combined total of 500 feet of open hole. Analysis of borehole-wall image logs obtained with acoustic and optical televiewers indicated 79 subhorizontal to steeply dipping fractures with a wide range of dip directions. Analysis of fluid resistivity, temperature, and heat-pulse and electromagnetic flowmeter logs obtained under ambient and short-term stressed conditions identified 14 flow zones, which consist of one to several fractures and whose estimated transmissivity values range from 0.1 to more than 250 feet squared per day. Cross-hole flow tests, which were used to characterize the hydraulic connection between fracture-flow zones intersected by the boreholes, entailed (1) injection into or extraction from boreholes that penetrated a single fracture-flow zone or whose zones were isolated by an inflatable packer, and (2) measurement of the transient response of water levels and flow in surrounding boreholes. Results indicate a wellconnected fracture network with an estimated transmissivity of 80 to 250 feet squared per day that extends for at least 200 feet across the site. This interconnected fracture-flow network greatly affects the hydrology of the site and has important implications for contaminant monitoring and remedial actions.

  19. Modelling evapotranspiration using the modified Penman-Monteith equation and MODIS data over the Albany Thicket in South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwate, O.; Mantel, Sukhmani K.; Palmer, Anthony R.; Gibson, Lesley A.

    2016-10-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) is one of the least understood components of the water cycle, particularly in data scarce areas. In a context of climate change, evaluating water vapour fluxes of a particular area is crucial to help understand dynamics in water balance. In data scarce areas, ET modelling becomes vital. The study modelled ET using the Penman-Monteith- Leuning (PML) equation forced by Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) leaf area index (LAI) and MODIS albedo with ancillary meteorological data from an automatic weather station. The study area is located on the Albany Thicket (AT) biome of South Africa and the dominant plant species is Portulacaria afra. The biggest challenge to the implementation of the PML is the parameterisation of surface and stomatal conductance. We tested the use of volumetric soil water content (fswc), precipitation and equilibrium evaporation ratio (fzhang) and soil drying after precipitation (f) approaches to account for the fraction (f) of evaporation from the soil. ET from the model was validated using an eddy covariance system (EC). Post processing of eddy covariance data was implement using EddyPro software. The fdrying method performed better with a root mean square observations standard deviation ratio (RSR) of 0.97. The results suggest that modelling ET over the AT vegetation is delicate owing to strong vegetation phenological control of the ET process. The convergent evolution of the vegetation has resulted in high plant available water than the model can detect. It is vital to quantify plant available water in order to improve ET modelling in thicket vegetation.

  20. Geochemical and isotopic evidence for paleoredox conditions during deposition of the Devonian-Mississippian New Albany Shale, southern Indiana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beier, J. A.; Hayes, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    The upper part of the New Albany Shale is divided into three members. In ascending order, these are (1) the Morgan Trail Member, a laminated brownish-black shale; (2) the Camp Run Member, an interbedded brownish-black and greenish-gray shale; and (3) the Clegg Creek Member, also a laminated brownish-black shale. The Morgan Trail and Camp Run Members contain 5% to 6% total organic carbon (TOC) and 2% sulfide sulfur. Isotopic composition of sulfide in these members ranges from -5.0% to -20.0%. C/S plots indicate linear relationships between abundances of these elements, with a zero intercept characteristic of sediments deposited in a non-euxinic marine environment. Formation of diagenetic pyrite was carbon limited in these members. The Clegg Creek Member contains 10% to 15% TOC and 2% to 6% sulfide sulfur. Isotopic compositions of sulfide range from -5.0% to -40%. The most negative values occur in the uppermost Clegg Creek Member and are characteristic of syngenetic pyrite, formed within an anoxic water column. Abundances of carbon and sulfur are greater and uncorrelated in this member, consistent with deposition in as euxinic environment. In addition, DOP (degree of pyritization) values suggest that formation of pyrite was generally iron limited throughout Clegg Creek deposition, but sulfur isotopes indicate that syngenetic (water-column) pyrite becomes an important component in the sediment only in the upper part of the member. At the top of the Clegg Creek Member, a zone of phosphate nodules and trace-metal enrichment coincides with maximal TOC values. During euxinic deposition, phosphate and trace metals accumulated below the chemocline because of limited vertical circulation in the water column. Increased productivity would have resulted in an increased flux of particulate organic matter to the sediment, providing an effective sink for trace metals in the water column. Phosphate and trace metals released from organic matter during early diagenesis resulted in

  1. Weathering of the New Albany Shale, Kentucky, USA: I. Weathering zones defined by mineralogy and major-element composition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tuttle, M.L.W.; Breit, G.N.

    2009-01-01

    Comprehensive understanding of chemical and mineralogical changes induced by weathering is valuable information when considering the supply of nutrients and toxic elements from rocks. Here minerals that release and fix major elements during progressive weathering of a bed of Devonian New Albany Shale in eastern Kentucky are documented. Samples were collected from unweathered core (parent shale) and across an outcrop excavated into a hillside 40 year prior to sampling. Quantitative X-ray diffraction mineralogical data record progressive shale alteration across the outcrop. Mineral compositional changes reflect subtle alteration processes such as incongruent dissolution and cation exchange. Altered primary minerals include K-feldspars, plagioclase, calcite, pyrite, and chlorite. Secondary minerals include jarosite, gypsum, goethite, amorphous Fe(III) oxides and Fe(II)-Al sulfate salt (efflorescence). The mineralogy in weathered shale defines four weathered intervals on the outcrop-Zones A-C and soil. Alteration of the weakly weathered shale (Zone A) is attributed to the 40-a exposure of the shale. In this zone, pyrite oxidization produces acid that dissolves calcite and attacks chlorite, forming gypsum, jarosite, and minor efflorescent salt. The pre-excavation, active weathering front (Zone B) is where complete pyrite oxidation and alteration of feldspar and organic matter result in increased permeability. Acidic weathering solutions seep through the permeable shale and evaporate on the surface forming abundant efflorescent salt, jarosite and minor goethite. Intensely weathered shale (Zone C) is depleted in feldspars, chlorite, gypsum, jarosite and efflorescent salts, but has retained much of its primary quartz, illite and illite-smectite. Goethite and amorphous FE(III) oxides increase due to hydrolysis of jarosite. Enhanced permeability in this zone is due to a 14% loss of the original mass in parent shale. Denudation rates suggest that characteristics of Zone C

  2. Longitudinal Trends in Tobacco Availability, Tobacco Advertising, and Ownership Changes of Food Stores, Albany, New York, 2003–2015

    PubMed Central

    Done, Douglas H.; Michaels, Isaac H.; Guarasi, Diana C.; Kammer, Jamie R.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Frequency of visiting convenience and corner grocery stores that sell tobacco is positively associated with the odds of ever smoking and the risk of smoking initiation among youth. We assessed 12-year trends of tobacco availability, tobacco advertising, and ownership changes in various food stores in Albany, New York. Methods Eligible stores were identified by multiple government lists and community canvassing in 2003 (n = 107), 2009 (n = 117), 2012 (n = 135), and 2015 (n = 137). Tobacco availability (all years) and advertising (2009, 2012, and 2015) were directly measured; electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) were included in 2015. Results Percentage of stores selling tobacco peaked at 83.8% in 2009 and declined to 74.5% in 2015 (P for trend = .11). E-cigarettes were sold by 63.7% of tobacco retailers. The largest decline in tobacco availability came from convenience stores that went out of business (n = 11), followed by pharmacies that dropped tobacco sales (n = 4). The gain of tobacco availability mostly came from new convenience stores (n = 24) and new dollar stores (n = 8). Significant declining trends (P < .01) were found in tobacco availability and any tobacco advertising in pharmacies and in low (<3 feet) tobacco advertising in convenience stores and stores overall. Only one-third of stores that sold tobacco in 2003 continued to sell tobacco with the same owner in 2015. Conclusion The observed subtle declines in tobacco availability and advertising were explained in part by local tobacco control efforts, the pharmacy industry’s self-regulation of tobacco sales, and an increase in the state’s tobacco retailer registration fee. Nonetheless, overall tobacco availability remained high (>16 retailers per 10,000 population) in this community. The high store ownership turnover rate suggests that a moratorium of new tobacco retailer registrations would be an integral part of a multi-prong policy strategy to reduce tobacco availability and

  3. Characterization of fractures and flow zones in a contaminated shale at the Watervliet Arsenal, Albany County, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, John H.; Paillet, Frederick L.

    2002-01-01

    Flow zones in a fractured shale in and near a plume of volatile organic compounds at the Watervliet Arsenal in Albany County, N. Y. were characterized through the integrated analysis of geophysical logs and single- and cross-hole flow tests. Information on the fracture-flow network at the site was needed to design an effective groundwater monitoring system, estimate offsite contaminant migration, and evaluate potential containment and remedial actions.Four newly drilled coreholes and four older monitoring wells were logged and tested to define the distribution and orientation of fractures that intersected a combined total of 500 feet of open hole. Analysis of borehole-wall image logs obtained with acoustic and optical televiewers indicated 79 subhorizontal to steeply dipping fractures with a wide range of dip directions. Analysis of fluid resistivity, temperature, and heat-pulse and electromagnetic flowmeter logs obtained under ambient and short-term stressed conditions identified 14 flow zones, which consist of one to several fractures and whose estimated transmissivity values range from 0.1 to more than 250 feet squared per day.Cross-hole flow tests, which were used to characterize the hydraulic connection between fracture-flow zones intersected by the boreholes, entailed (1) injection into or extraction from boreholes that penetrated a single fracture-flow zone or whose zones were isolated by an inflatable packer, and (2) measurement of the transient response of water levels and flow in surrounding boreholes. Results indicate a wellconnected fracture network with an estimated transmissivity of 80 to 250 feet squared per day that extends for at least 200 feet across the site. This interconnected fracture-flow network greatly affects the hydrology of the site and has important implications for contaminant monitoring and remedial actions.

  4. Ground-water quality of the Upper Floridan Aquifer near an abandoned manufactured gas plant in Albany, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chapman, M.J.

    1993-01-01

    Manufactured gas plants produced gas for heating and lighting in the United States from as early as 1816 into the 1960's. By-products including, but not limited to, oil residues and tar, were generated during the gas-manufacturing process. Organic compounds (hydrocarbons) were detected in water in the upper water-bearing zone of the Upper Floridan aquifer near an abandoned manufactured gas plant (MGP) in Albany, Georgia, during an earlier investigation in 1990. Chemical analyses of ground-water samples collected from five existing monitoring wells in 1991 verify the presence of hydrocarbons and metals in the upper water-beating zone of the Upper Floridan aquifer. One well was drilled into the lower water-beating zone of the Upper Floridan aquifer in 1991 for water-quality sampling and water-level monitoring. Analyses of ground water sampled from this well did not show evidence of benzene, toluene, xylene, napthalene, acenaphthlene, or other related compounds detected in the upper water-bearing zone in the study area. Low concentrations of tetrachloroethane, trichloromethane, and l,2-cisdichloroethene were detected in a water sample from the deeper well; however, these compounds were not detected in the upper water-bearing zone in the study area. Inorganic constituent concentrations also were substantially lower in the deeper well. Overall, ground water sampled from the lower water-bearing zone had lower specific conductance and alkalinity; and lower concentrations of dissolved solids, iron, and manganese compared to ground water sampled from the upper water-bearing zone. Water levels for the upper and lower water-bearing zones were similar throughout the study period.

  5. 33 CFR 80.1152 - Crescent City Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Crescent City Harbor, CA. 80.1152... NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1152 Crescent City Harbor, CA. A line drawn from Crescent City Entrance Light to the southeasternmost extremity of Whaler Island....

  6. 33 CFR 80.1146 - Albion River, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Albion River, CA. 80.1146 Section 80.1146 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1146 Albion River, CA. A line drawn on an...

  7. 33 CFR 80.1122 - Channel Islands Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Channel Islands Harbor, CA. 80... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1122 Channel Islands Harbor, CA. (a) A line drawn from Channel Islands Harbor South Jetty Light 2 to Channel Islands Harbor...

  8. 33 CFR 80.1122 - Channel Islands Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Channel Islands Harbor, CA. 80... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1122 Channel Islands Harbor, CA. (a) A line drawn from Channel Islands Harbor South Jetty Light 2 to Channel Islands Harbor...

  9. 33 CFR 80.1122 - Channel Islands Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Channel Islands Harbor, CA. 80... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1122 Channel Islands Harbor, CA. (a) A line drawn from Channel Islands Harbor South Jetty Light 2 to Channel Islands Harbor...

  10. 33 CFR 80.1122 - Channel Islands Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Channel Islands Harbor, CA. 80... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1122 Channel Islands Harbor, CA. (a) A line drawn from Channel Islands Harbor South Jetty Light 2 to Channel Islands Harbor...

  11. 33 CFR 80.1122 - Channel Islands Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Channel Islands Harbor, CA. 80... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1122 Channel Islands Harbor, CA. (a) A line drawn from Channel Islands Harbor South Jetty Light 2 to Channel Islands Harbor...

  12. 33 CFR 80.1118 - Marina Del Rey, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Marina Del Rey, CA. 80.1118 Section 80.1118 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1118 Marina Del Rey, CA. (a) A line drawn from Marina Del Rey Breakwater South Light...

  13. 33 CFR 80.1102 - Santa Catalina Island, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Santa Catalina Island, CA. 80... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1102 Santa Catalina Island, CA. The 72 COLREGS shall apply to the harbors on Santa Catalina Island....

  14. 33 CFR 80.1102 - Santa Catalina Island, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Santa Catalina Island, CA. 80... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1102 Santa Catalina Island, CA. The 72 COLREGS shall apply to the harbors on Santa Catalina Island....

  15. 33 CFR 80.1102 - Santa Catalina Island, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Santa Catalina Island, CA. 80... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1102 Santa Catalina Island, CA. The 72 COLREGS shall apply to the harbors on Santa Catalina Island....

  16. 33 CFR 80.1102 - Santa Catalina Island, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Santa Catalina Island, CA. 80... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1102 Santa Catalina Island, CA. The 72 COLREGS shall apply to the harbors on Santa Catalina Island....

  17. 33 CFR 80.1102 - Santa Catalina Island, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Santa Catalina Island, CA. 80... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1102 Santa Catalina Island, CA. The 72 COLREGS shall apply to the harbors on Santa Catalina Island....

  18. 33 CFR 80.1126 - Santa Barbara Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Santa Barbara Harbor, CA. 80.1126... NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1126 Santa Barbara Harbor, CA. A line drawn from Santa Barbara Harbor Light 4 to Santa Barbara Harbor Breakwater Light....

  19. 33 CFR 80.1138 - Santa Cruz Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Santa Cruz Harbor, CA. 80.1138... NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1138 Santa Cruz Harbor, CA. A line drawn from the seaward extremity of the Santa Cruz Harbor East Breakwater to Santa Cruz Harbor West...

  20. 33 CFR 80.1142 - San Francisco Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false San Francisco Harbor, CA. 80.1142 Section 80.1142 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1142 San Francisco Harbor, CA. A straight...

  1. 33 CFR 80.1142 - San Francisco Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false San Francisco Harbor, CA. 80.1142 Section 80.1142 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1142 San Francisco Harbor, CA. A straight...

  2. 33 CFR 80.1142 - San Francisco Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false San Francisco Harbor, CA. 80.1142 Section 80.1142 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1142 San Francisco Harbor, CA. A straight...

  3. 33 CFR 80.1142 - San Francisco Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false San Francisco Harbor, CA. 80.1142 Section 80.1142 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1142 San Francisco Harbor, CA. A straight...

  4. 33 CFR 80.1142 - San Francisco Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false San Francisco Harbor, CA. 80.1142 Section 80.1142 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1142 San Francisco Harbor, CA. A straight...

  5. 33 CFR 80.1130 - San Luis Obispo Bay, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false San Luis Obispo Bay, CA. 80.1130 Section 80.1130 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1130 San Luis Obispo Bay, CA. A line drawn...

  6. 33 CFR 80.1130 - San Luis Obispo Bay, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false San Luis Obispo Bay, CA. 80.1130 Section 80.1130 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1130 San Luis Obispo Bay, CA. A line drawn...

  7. 33 CFR 80.1130 - San Luis Obispo Bay, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false San Luis Obispo Bay, CA. 80.1130 Section 80.1130 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1130 San Luis Obispo Bay, CA. A line drawn...

  8. 33 CFR 80.1130 - San Luis Obispo Bay, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false San Luis Obispo Bay, CA. 80.1130 Section 80.1130 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1130 San Luis Obispo Bay, CA. A line drawn...

  9. 33 CFR 80.1130 - San Luis Obispo Bay, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false San Luis Obispo Bay, CA. 80.1130 Section 80.1130 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1130 San Luis Obispo Bay, CA. A line drawn...

  10. 33 CFR 80.1124 - Ventura Marina, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Ventura Marina, CA. 80.1124... NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1124 Ventura Marina, CA. A line drawn from Ventura Marina South Jetty Light 6 to Ventura Marina Breakwater South Light 3; thence to Ventura...

  11. 33 CFR 80.1118 - Marina Del Rey, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Marina Del Rey, CA. 80.1118... NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1118 Marina Del Rey, CA. (a) A line drawn from Marina Del Rey Breakwater South Light 1 to Marina Del Rey Light 4. (b) A line drawn from Marina Del...

  12. 33 CFR 80.1136 - Moss Landing Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Moss Landing Harbor, CA. 80.1136... NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1136 Moss Landing Harbor, CA. A line drawn from the seaward extremity of the pier located 0.3 mile south of Moss Landing Harbor Entrance to...

  13. 33 CFR 80.1136 - Moss Landing Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Moss Landing Harbor, CA. 80.1136... NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1136 Moss Landing Harbor, CA. A line drawn from the seaward extremity of the pier located 0.3 mile south of Moss Landing Harbor Entrance to...

  14. 33 CFR 80.1136 - Moss Landing Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Moss Landing Harbor, CA. 80.1136... NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1136 Moss Landing Harbor, CA. A line drawn from the seaward extremity of the pier located 0.3 mile south of Moss Landing Harbor Entrance to...

  15. 33 CFR 80.1136 - Moss Landing Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Moss Landing Harbor, CA. 80.1136... NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1136 Moss Landing Harbor, CA. A line drawn from the seaward extremity of the pier located 0.3 mile south of Moss Landing Harbor Entrance to...

  16. 33 CFR 80.1136 - Moss Landing Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Moss Landing Harbor, CA. 80.1136... NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1136 Moss Landing Harbor, CA. A line drawn from the seaward extremity of the pier located 0.3 mile south of Moss Landing Harbor Entrance to...

  17. The United States and the Southwest Pacific: Policy Options for a Changing Region.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-03-01

    moved to try and change that policy so that the extraterritorial reach of the legislation relating to tuna boats is halted. [9:11 The Pacific Islands...AD-AU69 721 THE UNITED STATES AND THE SOUTHWEST PACIFIC: POLICY / OPTIONS FOR A CHANGING REGION(U) NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY CA T W SHUBERT...POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL Monterey, California THESIS THE UNITED STATES AND THE SOUTHWEST PACIFIC: POLICY OPTIONS FOR A CHANGING REGION by - 7W Thomas Walter

  18. PACIFIC NORTHWEST CYBER SUMMIT

    SciTech Connect

    Lesperance, Ann M.; Matlock, Gordon W.; Becker-Dippmann, Angela S.; Smith, Karen S.

    2013-08-07

    On March 26, 2013, the Snohomish County Public Utility District (PUD) and the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) jointly hosted the Pacific Northwest Cyber Summit with the DOE’s Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, the White House, Washington State congressional delegation, Washington State National Guard, and regional energy companies.

  19. 10. 'Southern Pacific Company, 6th Crossing of Sacramento River, One ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. 'Southern Pacific Company, 6th Crossing of Sacramento River, One 208'-10-1/2' C. to C. End Pins S. Tr. Thro. Skew Span, Scale 1' = 10', The Phoenix Bridge Co., Phoenixville, Pa., April 12, 1901, Drg. 45' - Southern Pacific Railroad Shasta Route, Bridge No. 301.85, Milepost 301.85, Pollard Flat, Shasta County, CA

  20. 15. 'Southern Pacific R.R., One 236'0' Bet. End Pins S. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. 'Southern Pacific R.R., One 236'-0' Bet. End Pins S. Tr. Thro'. Draw Bridge over Sacramento River at Tehama, The Phoenix Bridge Co., Phoenixville, Pa., Jan'y 19th 98, Dwg. 585.' - Southern Pacific Railroad Shasta Route, Bridge No. 210.52, Milepost 210.52, Tehama, Tehama County, CA

  1. The carpenter fork bed, a new - and older - Black-shale unit at the base of the New Albany shale in central Kentucky: Characterization and significance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnett, S.F.; Ettensohn, F.R.; Norby, R.D.

    1996-01-01

    Black shales previously interpreted to be Late Devonian cave-fill or slide deposits are shown to be much older Middle Devonian black shales only preserved locally in Middle Devonian grabens and structural lows in central Kentucky. This newly recognized - and older -black-shale unit occurs at the base of the New Albany Shale and is named the Carpenter Fork Bed of the Portwood Member of the New Albany Shale after its only known exposure on Carpenter Fork in Boyle County, central Kentucky; two other occurrences are known from core holes in east-central Kentucky. Based on stratigraphic position and conodont biostratigraphy, the unit is Middle Devonian (Givetian: probably Middle to Upper P. varcus Zone) in age and occurs at a position represented by an unconformity atop the Middle Devonian Boyle Dolostone and its equivalents elsewhere on the outcrop belt. Based on its presence as isolated clasts in the overlying Duffin Bed of the Portwood Member, the former distribution of the unit was probably much more widespread - perhaps occurring throughout western parts of the Rome trough. Carpenter Fork black shales apparently represent an episode of subsidence or sea-level rise coincident with inception of the third tectophase of the Acadian orogeny. Deposition, however, was soon interrupted by reactivation of several fault zones in central Kentucky, perhaps in response to bulge migration accompanying start of the tectophase. As a result, much of central Kentucky was uplifted and tilted, and the Carpenter Fork Bed was largely eroded from the top of the Boyle, except in a few structural lows like the Carpenter Fork graben where a nearly complete record of Middle to early Late Devonian deposition is preserved.

  2. Pacific Southwest Lead-Based Paint Tips & Complaints

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Information about submitting a complaint about improper removal or storage of lead-based paint in renovations or repairs, as well as disclosure of lead-based paint in real estate transactions in AZ, CA, NV, HI, and Pacific Island Territories.

  3. 26. BUILDING PLANS FOR MENTONE POWER HOUSE, PACIFIC LIGHT AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. BUILDING PLANS FOR MENTONE POWER HOUSE, PACIFIC LIGHT AND POWER CO., OCT. 7, 1903. R.S. MASSON, CONSULTING ELECTRICAL ENGINEER, SAN FRANCISCO AND LOS ANGELES. SCE drawing no. 52306. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, SAR-3 Powerhouse, San Bernardino National Forest, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  4. Gulf of Alaska and California bamboo corals: Ba/Ca and Sr/Ca records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauthoff, W.; LaVigne, M.; Hill, T. M.; Roark, E.; Dunbar, R. B.; Guilderson, T. P.; Spero, H. J.

    2012-12-01

    Deep-sea bamboo coral communities form on seamounts and along continental margins with near global distribution. Bamboo [Isididae] corals record surrounding ocean geochemistry presenting reliable proxy records of changes in seawater conditions, including productivity and nutrient content. Here we investigate bamboo coral specimens from the California margin and Gulf of Alaska (634-1288 m water depth; ~37oN-48oN), to provide insight into latitudinal and temporal differences in eastern Pacific Ocean climate processes. Past oceanic conditions were reconstructed in this investigation by trace element analyses (Ba/Ca, Sr/Ca) using laser ablation ICP-MS, using a 85 μm spot size at 10 μm/s, 4.45 J/cm2 fluence, and 10 Hz repetition rate. Two California specimens show differences in mean Ba/Ca content: 13.73 compared to 18.55 μmol/mol, which we attribute to differences in collection depth (T1104 A10: 833 m and T1100 A04: 1288 m, respectively). Gulf of Alaska corals show a more subdued nutrient signal with lower mean Ba/Ca values of 10.56 and 10.05 μmol/mol across a narrower depth range (ALV3803 #3: 720 m; ALV3803 #5: 634 m, respectively). This trend of increasing Ba/Ca with depth is in consensus with eastern Pacific dissolved barium and California margin bamboo coral depth transects. Sr/Ca content was uniform between four coral specimens with values ranging from 3.01 to 3.06 mmol/mol. Coral chronologies were compared against indices of climate oscillations, including El Niño Southern Oscillation and Pacific Decadal Oscillation, using time series based upon radiocarbon dating. The corals investigated here show a limited connection with El Niño Southern Oscillation; longer-term changes related Pacific Decadal Oscillation may be evidenced in this climate archive.

  5. Pacific Southwest Media Center

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    News media, state and local officials, and others can find press releases, media events and contacts in EPA's Pacific Southwest. Additional resources include newsletters, annual reports, and library services that support regional activities.

  6. 78 FR 6313 - Pacific Gas and Electric Company; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing, Soliciting Comments...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-30

    ... Licensing, Pacific Gas and Electric Company, P.O. Box 770000, ] San Francisco, CA 94177-0001, Telephone No... Electric Company, P.O. Box 7442, San Francisco, CA, Telephone No. (415) 973-7145, Email: ARF3@pge.com . i... agency. k. Description of proposed amendment: The licensee is requesting approval to delete from...

  7. Stroke and Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Population Profiles > Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander > Stroke Stroke and Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders Native Hawaiians/Pacific ... non-Hispanic white adults to die from a stroke in 2010. In general, Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander ...

  8. Three-dimensional crustal structure of a craton rim: Preliminary results from passive seismic imaging of the eastern Albany-Fraser Orogen, Western Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sippl, Christian; Tkalčić, Hrvoje; Kennett, Brian L. N.; Spaggiari, Catherine V.; Gessner, Klaus

    2014-05-01

    Western Australia consists of two Archaean cratons (Yilgarn and Pilbara) and a number of Proterozoic orogens surrounding them that attest to past continental collisions. While the former feature seismically fast crust of average thickness (around 35 km) and a usually well defined Moho overlying a thick mantle lithospheric keel, the latter have been significantly less well studied and appear to be less uniform in terms of their crustal architecture. Thicker crust and a more fuzzy Moho are two common characteristics of these belts. The Albany-Fraser orogen, situated at the south-eastern margin of the Yilgarn craton, has been interpreted as an old suture zone from the collision of the West Australian craton (Yilgarn and Pilbara already welded together) with the Mawson craton (southern Australia and part of Antarctica today). Newer evidence, however, might point at an original rift or backarc setting of the units. It is a complex amalgam of different structures that vary significantly along its strike, featuring heavily reworked parts of the outermost Yilgarn craton as well as younger units accreted or intruded significantly later. Two major deformation stages at 1345-1260 Ma and 1214-1140 Ma have been deduced for these, the first of which has been associated with the aforementioned collision/backarc rifting itself, while the second phase is commonly interpreted as intracratonic reworking due to a major thermal event. No large-scale tectonic overprint has occurred in the region since the second deformation phase, which means that the originally emplaced units have been unusually well preserved until the present day. However, surface outcrops of rocks are very rare, so that most knowledge about extent and geometric configuration of different rock suites comes from the interpretation of magnetic and gravity data. The eastern end of the Albany-Fraser orogen, in all likelihood corresponding to the Mawson craton's westernmost edge, is hidden beneath the limestones of the

  9. Eastern Pacific Ocean Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The promotion of interaction among investigators of all oceanographic disciplines studying the eastern Pacific Ocean was the goal of the 1990 Eastern Pacific Ocean Conference (EPOC), held October 17-19 on the snow-covered slopes of Mt. Hood, Oreg. Thirty oceanographers representing all disciplines attended.Dick Barber, Duke University Marine Lab, Beaufort, N.C., chaired a session on the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean, emphasizing issues related to biological activity. Steve Ramp of the Naval Postgraduate School in Montery, Calif., chaired a session on recent results from northern and central California experiments. On October 19, following an early morning earthquake, a business meeting and discussions regarding a collaboration in future experiments were held.

  10. Evaluation of Floodplain Modifications to Reduce the Effect of Floods Using a Two-Dimensional Hydrodynamic Model of the Flint River at Albany, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Musser, Jonathan W.

    2008-01-01

    Potential flow characteristics of future flooding along a 4.8-mile reach of the Flint River in Albany, Georgia, were simulated using recent digital-elevation-model data and the U.S. Geological Survey finite-element surface-water modeling system for two-dimensional flow in the horizontal plane (FESWMS-2DH). The model was run at four water-surface altitudes at the Flint River at Albany streamgage (02352500): 181.5-foot (ft) altitude with a flow of 61,100 cubic feet per second (ft3/s), 184.5-ft altitude with a flow of 75,400 ft3/s, 187.5-ft altitude with a flow of 91,700 ft3/s, and 192.5-ft altitude with a flow of 123,000 ft3/s. The model was run to measure changes in inundated areas and water-surface altitudes for eight scenarios of possible modifications to the 4.8-mile reach on the Flint River. The eight scenarios include removing a human-made peninsula located downstream from Oglethorpe Boulevard, increasing the opening under the Oakridge Drive bridge, adding culverts to the east Oakridge Drive bridge approach, adding culverts to the east and west Oakridge Drive bridge approaches, adding an overflow across the oxbow north of Oakridge Drive, making the overflow into a channel, removing the Oakridge Drive bridge, and adding a combination of an oxbow overflow and culverts on both Oakridge Drive bridge approaches. The modeled inundation and water-surface altitude changes were mapped for use in evaluating the river modifications. The most effective scenario at reducing inundated area was the combination scenario. At the 187.5-ft altitude, the inundated area decreased from 4.24 square miles to 4.00 square miles. The remove-peninsula scenario was the least effective with a reduction in inundated area of less than 0.01 square miles. In all scenarios, the inundated area reduction increased with water-surface altitude, peaking at the 187.5-ft altitude. The inundated area reduction then decreased at the gage altitude of 192.5 ft.

  11. Little and Large: Implications for Preservation of Radiogenic-Pb in Titanite. An example from the Albany-Fraser Orogen, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkland, C.

    2015-12-01

    Titanite typically contains more non-radiogenic Pb than zircon, nonetheless it can preserve useful age information that complements geochronology from other datable phases. Titanite is more reactive than zircon and it interacts more readily with other major phases. As a result titanite dates frequently indicate the time of cooling below a blocking temperature (in reality an interval). The role of titanite grain size is important as it has a bearing on the extent to which titanite U-Pb ages reflect diffusive Pb loss or pristine formation ages. We demonstrate that titanite collected through the Albany-Fraser Orogen, across an uplifted refractory lower crustal block, can record thermal overprints apparently lacking in the zircon record. Two zones of the Albany-Fraser Orogen are the Biranup and Fraser Zones, each with a distinctive Proterozoic history but unequivocally part of the reworked margin of the Archean Yilgarn Craton. A dichotomy exists in the zircon geochronology record of this area, in that within the older Biranup Zone, Stage II overprinting (1225-1140 Ma) is widespread whereas in the younger Fraser Zone, Stage I (1345-1260 Ma) is dominant, with Stage II apparently absent. Although, most metamorphic titanite in the Fraser Zone records an age of 1307 ± 17 Ma, reflecting closure to radiogenic-Pb mobility after Stage I metamorphism, small titanite grains reveal Stage II overprinting with a mean reset age of 1205 ± 16 Ma. In contrast, titanite from metasediments within the Biranup Zone principally record ages of 1203 ± 6 Ma and 1153 ± 27 Ma reflecting cooling after prolonged Stage II metamorphism. Thermochronological modelling indicates that small titanite grains in the Fraser Zone would be reset during Stage II overprinting at temperatures of 695-725°C. Larger titanite crystals would not be reset by this thermal overprint. This result is similar to phase equilibrium modelling from the Biranup Zone that indicates temperatures of 670-680 °C during Stage II

  12. Fiji in the South Pacific.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Rosalind; Semaan, Leslie

    This text introduces Fiji and other island nations located in the Pacific, the world's largest ocean. Cut off from the world by vast expanses of water, these people developed a unique culture. Contents include: Teacher Overview, Geography of the South Pacific Islands, History of the South Pacific, Fiji, Traditional Village Life, Yaquna Ceremony,…

  13. Photocopy of aerial photograph, Pacific Air Industries, Flight 123V, June ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of aerial photograph, Pacific Air Industries, Flight 123V, June 29, 1960 (University of California, Santa Barbara, Map and Imagery Collection) PORTION OF IRVINE RANCH SHOWING SITE CA-2275-A IN LOWER LEFT QUADRANT AND SITE CA-2275-B IN UPPER RIGHT QUADRANT (see separate photograph index for 2275-B) - Irvine Ranch Agricultural Headquarters, Carillo Tenant House, Southwest of Intersection of San Diego & Santa Ana Freeways, Irvine, Orange County, CA

  14. The Pacific Rim.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Paul F., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    The articles in this special edition were compiled to provide information to Canadian social studies teachers about Pacific Rim countries. Section 1, entitled "The Big Picture and Future Interests," contains: (1) "Social Studies for the 21st Century" (J. Tucker); (2) "Culture and Communication: A Perspective on Asian…

  15. OCLC in Asia Pacific.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Min-min

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) and the changing Asia Pacific library scene under the broad headings of the three phases of technology innovation. Highlights include WorldCat and the OCLC shared cataloging system; resource sharing and interlibrary loan; enriching OCLC online catalog with Asian collections; and future outlooks.…

  16. On the scalability of the Albany/FELIX first-order Stokes approximation ice sheet solver for large-scale simulations of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets

    DOE PAGES

    Tezaur, Irina K.; Tuminaro, Raymond S.; Perego, Mauro; ...

    2015-01-01

    We examine the scalability of the recently developed Albany/FELIX finite-element based code for the first-order Stokes momentum balance equations for ice flow. We focus our analysis on the performance of two possible preconditioners for the iterative solution of the sparse linear systems that arise from the discretization of the governing equations: (1) a preconditioner based on the incomplete LU (ILU) factorization, and (2) a recently-developed algebraic multigrid (AMG) preconditioner, constructed using the idea of semi-coarsening. A strong scalability study on a realistic, high resolution Greenland ice sheet problem reveals that, for a given number of processor cores, the AMG preconditionermore » results in faster linear solve times but the ILU preconditioner exhibits better scalability. A weak scalability study is performed on a realistic, moderate resolution Antarctic ice sheet problem, a substantial fraction of which contains floating ice shelves, making it fundamentally different from the Greenland ice sheet problem. Here, we show that as the problem size increases, the performance of the ILU preconditioner deteriorates whereas the AMG preconditioner maintains scalability. This is because the linear systems are extremely ill-conditioned in the presence of floating ice shelves, and the ill-conditioning has a greater negative effect on the ILU preconditioner than on the AMG preconditioner.« less

  17. Small-Angle and Ultrasmall-Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS/USANS) Study of New Albany Shale: A Treatise on Microporosity

    SciTech Connect

    Bahadur, Jitendra; Radlinski, Andrzej P.; Melnichenko, Yuri B.; Mastalerz, Maria; Schimmelmann, Arndt

    2014-12-17

    We applied small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and ultrasmall-angle neutron scattering (USANS) techniques to study the microstructure of several New Albany shales of different maturity. It has been established that the total porosity decreases with maturity and increases somewhat for post-mature samples. A new method of SANS data analysis was developed, which allows the extraction of information about the size range and number density of micropores from the relatively flat scattering intensity observed in the limit of the large scattering vector Q. Macropores and significant number of mesopores are surface fractals, and their structure can be described in terms of the polydisperse spheres (PDSP) model. The model-independent Porod invariant method was employed to estimate total porosity, and the results were compared with the PDSP model results. It has been demonstrated that independent evaluation of incoherent background is crucial for accurate interpretation of the scattering data in the limit of large Q-values. Moreover, pore volumes estimated by the N2 and CO2 adsorption, as well as via the mercury intrusion technique, have been compared with those measured by SANS/USANS, and possible reasons for the observed discrepancies are discussed.

  18. Albany/FELIX: a parallel, scalable and robust, finite element, first-order Stokes approximation ice sheet solver built for advanced analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tezaur, I. K.; Perego, M.; Salinger, A. G.; Tuminaro, R. S.; Price, S. F.

    2015-04-01

    This paper describes a new parallel, scalable and robust finite element based solver for the first-order Stokes momentum balance equations for ice flow. The solver, known as Albany/FELIX, is constructed using the component-based approach to building application codes, in which mature, modular libraries developed as a part of the Trilinos project are combined using abstract interfaces and template-based generic programming, resulting in a final code with access to dozens of algorithmic and advanced analysis capabilities. Following an overview of the relevant partial differential equations and boundary conditions, the numerical methods chosen to discretize the ice flow equations are described, along with their implementation. The results of several verification studies of the model accuracy are presented using (1) new test cases for simplified two-dimensional (2-D) versions of the governing equations derived using the method of manufactured solutions, and (2) canonical ice sheet modeling benchmarks. Model accuracy and convergence with respect to mesh resolution are then studied on problems involving a realistic Greenland ice sheet geometry discretized using hexahedral and tetrahedral meshes. Also explored as a part of this study is the effect of vertical mesh resolution on the solution accuracy and solver performance. The robustness and scalability of our solver on these problems is demonstrated. Lastly, we show that good scalability can be achieved by preconditioning the iterative linear solver using a new algebraic multilevel preconditioner, constructed based on the idea of semi-coarsening.

  19. Small-Angle and Ultrasmall-Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS/USANS) Study of New Albany Shale: A Treatise on Microporosity

    DOE PAGES

    Bahadur, Jitendra; Radlinski, Andrzej P.; Melnichenko, Yuri B.; ...

    2014-12-17

    We applied small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and ultrasmall-angle neutron scattering (USANS) techniques to study the microstructure of several New Albany shales of different maturity. It has been established that the total porosity decreases with maturity and increases somewhat for post-mature samples. A new method of SANS data analysis was developed, which allows the extraction of information about the size range and number density of micropores from the relatively flat scattering intensity observed in the limit of the large scattering vector Q. Macropores and significant number of mesopores are surface fractals, and their structure can be described in terms of themore » polydisperse spheres (PDSP) model. The model-independent Porod invariant method was employed to estimate total porosity, and the results were compared with the PDSP model results. It has been demonstrated that independent evaluation of incoherent background is crucial for accurate interpretation of the scattering data in the limit of large Q-values. Moreover, pore volumes estimated by the N2 and CO2 adsorption, as well as via the mercury intrusion technique, have been compared with those measured by SANS/USANS, and possible reasons for the observed discrepancies are discussed.« less

  20. Creating Larger and Better Connected Protected Areas Enhances the Persistence of Big Game Species in the Maputaland-Pondoland-Albany Biodiversity Hotspot

    PubMed Central

    Di Minin, Enrico; Hunter, Luke T. B.; Balme, Guy A.; Smith, Robert J.; Goodman, Peter S.; Slotow, Rob

    2013-01-01

    The ideal conservation planning approach would enable decision-makers to use population viability analysis to assess the effects of management strategies and threats on all species at the landscape level. However, the lack of high-quality data derived from long-term studies, and uncertainty in model parameters and/or structure, often limit the use of population models to only a few species of conservation concern. We used spatially explicit metapopulation models in conjunction with multi-criteria decision analysis to assess how species-specific threats and management interventions would affect the persistence of African wild dog, black rhino, cheetah, elephant, leopard and lion, under six reserve scenarios, thereby providing the basis for deciding on a best course of conservation action in the South African province of KwaZulu-Natal, which forms the central component of the Maputaland-Pondoland-Albany biodiversity hotspot. Overall, the results suggest that current strategies of managing populations within individual, small, fenced reserves are unlikely to enhance metapopulation persistence should catastrophic events affect populations in the future. Creating larger and better-connected protected areas would ensure that threats can be better mitigated in the future for both African wild dog and leopard, which can disperse naturally, and black rhino, cheetah, elephant, and lion, which are constrained by electric fences but can be managed using translocation. The importance of both size and connectivity should inform endangered megafauna conservation and management, especially in the context of restoration efforts in increasingly human-dominated landscapes. PMID:23977144

  1. Creating larger and better connected protected areas enhances the persistence of big game species in the maputaland-pondoland-albany biodiversity hotspot.

    PubMed

    Di Minin, Enrico; Hunter, Luke T B; Balme, Guy A; Smith, Robert J; Goodman, Peter S; Slotow, Rob

    2013-01-01

    The ideal conservation planning approach would enable decision-makers to use population viability analysis to assess the effects of management strategies and threats on all species at the landscape level. However, the lack of high-quality data derived from long-term studies, and uncertainty in model parameters and/or structure, often limit the use of population models to only a few species of conservation concern. We used spatially explicit metapopulation models in conjunction with multi-criteria decision analysis to assess how species-specific threats and management interventions would affect the persistence of African wild dog, black rhino, cheetah, elephant, leopard and lion, under six reserve scenarios, thereby providing the basis for deciding on a best course of conservation action in the South African province of KwaZulu-Natal, which forms the central component of the Maputaland-Pondoland-Albany biodiversity hotspot. Overall, the results suggest that current strategies of managing populations within individual, small, fenced reserves are unlikely to enhance metapopulation persistence should catastrophic events affect populations in the future. Creating larger and better-connected protected areas would ensure that threats can be better mitigated in the future for both African wild dog and leopard, which can disperse naturally, and black rhino, cheetah, elephant, and lion, which are constrained by electric fences but can be managed using translocation. The importance of both size and connectivity should inform endangered megafauna conservation and management, especially in the context of restoration efforts in increasingly human-dominated landscapes.

  2. Local Wood Demand, Land Cover Change and the State of Albany Thicket on an Urban Commonage in the Eastern Cape, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stickler, M. M.; Shackleton, C. M.

    2015-02-01

    Understanding the rates and causes of land-use change is crucial in identifying solutions, especially in sensitive landscapes and ecosystems, as well as in places undergoing rapid political, socioeconomic or ecological change. Despite considerable concern at the rate of transformation and degradation of the biodiversity-rich Albany Thicket biome in South Africa, most knowledge is gleaned from private commercial lands and state conservation areas. In comparison, there is limited work in communal areas where land uses include biomass extraction, especially for firewood and construction timber. We used aerial photographs to analyze land use and cover change in the high- and low-use zones of an urban commonage and an adjacent protected area over almost six decades, which included a major political transition. Field sampling was undertaken to characterize the current state of the vegetation and soils of the commonage and protected area and to determine the supply and demand for firewood and construction timber. Between the 1950s and 1980s, there was a clear increase in woody vegetation cover, which was reversed after the political transition in the mid-1990s. However, current woody plant standing stocks and sustainable annual production rates are well above current firewood demand, suggesting other probable causes for the decline in woody plant cover. The fragmentation of woody plant cover is paralleled by increases in grassy areas and bare ground, an increase in soil compaction, and decreases in soil moisture, carbon, and nutrients.

  3. Albany/FELIX: A parallel, scalable and robust, finite element, first-order Stokes approximation ice sheet solver built for advanced analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Tezaur, I. K.; Perego, M.; Salinger, A. G.; Tuminaro, R. S.; Price, S. F.

    2015-04-27

    This paper describes a new parallel, scalable and robust finite element based solver for the first-order Stokes momentum balance equations for ice flow. The solver, known as Albany/FELIX, is constructed using the component-based approach to building application codes, in which mature, modular libraries developed as a part of the Trilinos project are combined using abstract interfaces and template-based generic programming, resulting in a final code with access to dozens of algorithmic and advanced analysis capabilities. Following an overview of the relevant partial differential equations and boundary conditions, the numerical methods chosen to discretize the ice flow equations are described, along with their implementation. The results of several verification studies of the model accuracy are presented using (1) new test cases for simplified two-dimensional (2-D) versions of the governing equations derived using the method of manufactured solutions, and (2) canonical ice sheet modeling benchmarks. Model accuracy and convergence with respect to mesh resolution are then studied on problems involving a realistic Greenland ice sheet geometry discretized using hexahedral and tetrahedral meshes. Also explored as a part of this study is the effect of vertical mesh resolution on the solution accuracy and solver performance. The robustness and scalability of our solver on these problems is demonstrated. Lastly, we show that good scalability can be achieved by preconditioning the iterative linear solver using a new algebraic multilevel preconditioner, constructed based on the idea of semi-coarsening.

  4. Albany/FELIX: A parallel, scalable and robust, finite element, first-order Stokes approximation ice sheet solver built for advanced analysis

    DOE PAGES

    Tezaur, I. K.; Perego, M.; Salinger, A. G.; ...

    2015-04-27

    This paper describes a new parallel, scalable and robust finite element based solver for the first-order Stokes momentum balance equations for ice flow. The solver, known as Albany/FELIX, is constructed using the component-based approach to building application codes, in which mature, modular libraries developed as a part of the Trilinos project are combined using abstract interfaces and template-based generic programming, resulting in a final code with access to dozens of algorithmic and advanced analysis capabilities. Following an overview of the relevant partial differential equations and boundary conditions, the numerical methods chosen to discretize the ice flow equations are described, alongmore » with their implementation. The results of several verification studies of the model accuracy are presented using (1) new test cases for simplified two-dimensional (2-D) versions of the governing equations derived using the method of manufactured solutions, and (2) canonical ice sheet modeling benchmarks. Model accuracy and convergence with respect to mesh resolution are then studied on problems involving a realistic Greenland ice sheet geometry discretized using hexahedral and tetrahedral meshes. Also explored as a part of this study is the effect of vertical mesh resolution on the solution accuracy and solver performance. The robustness and scalability of our solver on these problems is demonstrated. Lastly, we show that good scalability can be achieved by preconditioning the iterative linear solver using a new algebraic multilevel preconditioner, constructed based on the idea of semi-coarsening.« less

  5. The South Pacific superswell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNutt, Marcia K.; Fischer, Karen M.

    Seafloor depths in a broad area of French Polynesia are 250 to 750 m shallower than lithosphere of the same age in the North Pacific and the North Atlantic. The area of shallow seafloor also correlates with a region of high density of volcanoes, low seismic velocity in the upper mantle, and a reduction in the thickness of the elastic plate supporting the volcanoes. The Marquesas fracture zone marks an abrupt transition between normal lithosphere to the north which follows the thermal subsidence curve for a 125-km-thick plate and shallow lithosphere to the south which behaves as though it is only 75-km thick. This age dependence in the French Polynesian depth anomalies, the low elastic plate thickness, and the change in depth at the Marquesas fracture zone, a lithospheric discontinuity, require elevated temperatures in the lithosphere. The pattern and amplitude of the depth anomaly is not consistent with the notion that it results from lithospheric thinning beneath a number of overlapping hot spot swells. Rather, we propose that hot spot traces cluster in this region because the lithosphere is already thinner and more vulnerable to magma penetration. The reduction in the thickness of the thermal plate is presumably due to enhanced small-scale convection resulting from the thermal and/or chemical effect of a broad mantle up welling beneath the South Pacific as imaged by seismic tomography. The morphologic and petrologic characteristics of this superswell resemble those that existed in the mid-Cretaceous over H. W. Menard's Darwin Rise, a region of the Pacific which includes the Mid-Pacific Mountains, the Marshall Islands, Magellan Seamounts, and Wake Guyots. We propose that the South Pacific superswell is the modern-day equivalent of the Darwin Rise, and that it may be merely an extreme example of global variability in lithospheric thermal structure as a function of temperature, chemistry, and/or state-of-stress in the upper mantle.

  6. 76 FR 33641 - Safety Zone; The Pacific Grove Feast of Lanterns, Fireworks Display, Pacific Grove, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-09

    ... within a radius of 1,000 feet. At 9:45 p.m., the safety zone shall terminate. The fireworks launch site... fireworks launch site off of Lovers Point within a radius of 1,000 feet. At 9:45 p.m., the safety zone shall... Coast Guard is establishing a temporary safety zone in the navigable waters of Monterey Bay, off...

  7. 46 CFR 7.120 - Mexican/United States border to Point Fermin, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Mexican/United States border to Point Fermin, CA. 7.120 Section 7.120 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC BOUNDARY LINES Pacific Coast § 7.120 Mexican/United States border to Point Fermin, CA. (a) A line...

  8. 46 CFR 7.120 - Mexican/United States border to Point Fermin, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Mexican/United States border to Point Fermin, CA. 7.120 Section 7.120 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC BOUNDARY LINES Pacific Coast § 7.120 Mexican/United States border to Point Fermin, CA. (a) A line...

  9. 46 CFR 7.120 - Mexican/United States border to Point Fermin, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Mexican/United States border to Point Fermin, CA. 7.120 Section 7.120 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC BOUNDARY LINES Pacific Coast § 7.120 Mexican/United States border to Point Fermin, CA. (a) A line...

  10. 46 CFR 7.120 - Mexican/United States border to Point Fermin, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Mexican/United States border to Point Fermin, CA. 7.120 Section 7.120 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC BOUNDARY LINES Pacific Coast § 7.120 Mexican/United States border to Point Fermin, CA. (a) A line...

  11. 46 CFR 7.120 - Mexican/United States border to Point Fermin, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Mexican/United States border to Point Fermin, CA. 7.120 Section 7.120 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC BOUNDARY LINES Pacific Coast § 7.120 Mexican/United States border to Point Fermin, CA. (a) A line...

  12. Genetic isolation between the Western and Eastern Pacific populations of pronghorn spiny lobster Panulirus penicillatus.

    PubMed

    Chow, Seinen; Jeffs, Andrew; Miyake, Yoichi; Konishi, Kooichi; Okazaki, Makoto; Suzuki, Nobuaki; Abdullah, Muhamad F; Imai, Hideyuki; Wakabayasi, Toshie; Sakai, Mitsuo

    2011-01-01

    The pronghorn spiny lobster, Panulirus penicillatus, is a circumtropical species which has the widest global distribution among all the species of spiny lobster, ranging throughout the entire Indo-Pacific region. Partial nucleotide sequences of mitochondrial DNA COI (1,142-1,207 bp) and 16S rDNA (535-546 bp) regions were determined for adult and phyllosoma larval samples collected from the Eastern Pacific (EP)(Galápagos Islands and its adjacent water), Central Pacific (CP)(Hawaii and Tuamotu) and the Western Pacific (WP)(Japan, Indonesia, Fiji, New Caledonia and Australia). Phylogenetic analyses revealed two distinct large clades corresponding to the geographic origin of samples (EP and CP+WP). No haplotype was shared between the two regional samples, and average nucleotide sequence divergence (Kimura's two parameter distance) between EP and CP+WP samples was 3.8±0.5% for COI and 1.0±0.4% for 16S rDNA, both of which were much larger than those within samples. The present results indicate that the Pacific population of the pronghorn spiny lobster is subdivided into two distinct populations (Eastern Pacific and Central to Western Pacific), with no gene flow between them. Although the pronghorn spiny lobster have long-lived teleplanic larvae, the vast expanse of Pacific Ocean with no islands and no shallow substrate which is known as the East Pacific Barrier appears to have isolated these two populations for a long time (c.a. 1MY).

  13. Tactical Ground Robotics Research and Development at SPAWAR Systems Center Pacific

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-01

    Tactical Ground Robotics Research and Development at SPAWAR Systems Center Pacific San Diego, CA Hoa G. Nguyen, Head, Unmanned Systems... Robotics Research and Development at SPAWAR Systems Center Pacific 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d...release; distribution unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES USASOC Tactical Ground Robotics conference, Fayetteville, NC, February 28-29, 2012 14. ABSTRACT

  14. North Pacific Bloom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Many images are made of relatively bright phytoplankton blooms. However, not all such blooms reflect more light than they absorb. SeaWiFS collected this image of a patch in the north Pacific that had been darkened because the photosynthetic pigments of the phytoplankton living there had absorbed more of the incoming solar radiation than the relatively phytoplankton-poor surrounding waters. The Hawaiian islands can be seen through the clouds about 1000 kilometers to the southwest of the patch.

  15. The Pacific RANET Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postawko, S.; Ah Poe, A.; Morrissey, M.

    2004-12-01

    There are few places in the world more vulnerable to the effects of climate variability and change than the island nations of the tropical Pacific Ocean. The region also faces great challenges in communicating the issues related to climate to the general population. Lack of communications infrastructure, multiple languages, and knowledgeable personnel to deliver information, are all challenges for these countries. However, a recently developed international consortium is taking the first steps to addressing these challenges. The RANET (RAdio and interNET communications) project was originally developed for the countries of Africa, with initial funding from NOAA, to make weather, climate, and other environmental information more accessible to remote and resource-poor communities. The program is now expanding into Asia and the Pacific. RANET works to build telecommunication bridges between scientific-based products and remote communities that could benefit from such information.?The RANET project in the Pacific is a consortium of partners from the Pacific Island nations, the U.S., New Zealand, Australia, and others. Coordination of the project is loosely overseen by a Steering Committee, made up of representatives from the various interested partners. For regions where the appropriate technology exists (which includes the capital cities of nearly all of the island states of the Pacific), information is downloaded via a digital satellite receiver. This can then be broadcast within a country by many means, including Community FM Radio stations. The information distributed includes technical information needed by meteorological and related services to improve their own products and services, as well as a second level of information designed to serve communities, including weather forecasts, bulletins, warnings, etc. The primary challenge at this time is developing content that is both relevant and understandable to these remote communities. While some information will

  16. Characterization of DOE reference oil shales: Mahogany Zone, Parachute Creek Member, Green River Formation Oil Shale, and Clegg Creek Member, New Albany Shale

    SciTech Connect

    Miknis, F. P.; Robertson, R. E.

    1987-09-01

    Measurements have been made on the chemical and physical properties of two oil shales designated as reference oil shales by the Department of Energy. One oil shale is a Green River Formation, Parachute Creek Member, Mahogany Zone Colorado oil shale from the Exxon Colony mine and the other is a Clegg Creek Member, New Albany shale from Kentucky. Material balance Fischer assays, carbon aromaticities, thermal properties, and bulk mineralogic properties have been determined for the oil shales. Kerogen concentrates were prepared from both shales. The measured properties of the reference shales are comparable to results obtained from previous studies on similar shales. The western reference shale has a low carbon aromaticity, high Fischer assay conversion to oil, and a dominant carbonate mineralogy. The eastern reference shale has a high carbon aromaticity, low Fischer assay conversion to oil, and a dominant silicate mineralogy. Chemical and physical properties, including ASTM distillations, have been determined for shale oils produced from the reference shales. The distillation data were used in conjunction with API correlations to calculate a large number of shale oil properties that are required for computer models such as ASPEN. There was poor agreement between measured and calculated molecular weights for the total shale oil produced from each shale. However, measured and calculated molecular weights agreed reasonably well for true boiling point distillate fractions in the temperature range of 204 to 399/sup 0/C (400 to 750/sup 0/F). Similarly, measured and calculated viscosities of the total shale oils were in disagreement, whereas good agreement was obtained on distillate fractions for a boiling range up to 315/sup 0/C (600/sup 0/F). Thermal and dielectric properties were determined for the shales and shale oils. The dielectric properties of the reference shales and shale oils decreased with increasing frequency of the applied frequency. 42 refs., 34 figs., 24

  17. Empowerment at Pacific Gas & Electric.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Steven B.

    1991-01-01

    Pacific Gas and Electric's employee involvement program aggressively focuses on customer service, performance measurement tied to management bonuses, and commitment to change in the organizational culture. (SK)

  18. Pacific Southwest Tribal Program Newsletters

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Pacific Southwest Tribal Program newsletters contain news and events of interest to tribal communities including: environmental news, upcoming meetings, webinars and training, grants, jobs and internships.

  19. Decadal changes in South Pacific sea surface temperatures and the relationship to the Pacific decadal oscillation and upper ocean heat content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linsley, Braddock K.; Wu, Henry C.; Dassié, Emilie P.; Schrag, Daniel P.

    2015-04-01

    Decadal changes in Pacific sea surface temperatures (SSTs) and upper ocean heat content (OHC) remain poorly understood. We present an annual average composite coral Sr/Ca-derived SST time series extending back to 1791 from Fiji, Tonga, and Rarotonga (FTR) in the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) sensitive region of the southwest Pacific. Decadal SST maxima between 1805 and 1830 Common Era (C.E.) indicate unexplained elevated SSTs near the end of the Little Ice Age. The mean period of decadal SST variability in this region has a period near 25 years. Decades of warmer (cooler) FTR SST co-occur with PDO negative (positive) phases since at least ~1930 C.E. and positively correlate with South Pacific OHC (0-700 m). FTR SST is also inversely correlated with decadal changes in equatorial Pacific SST as measured by coral Sr/Ca. Collectively, these results support the fluctuating trade wind-shallow meridional overturning cell mechanism for decadal modulation of Pacific SSTs and OHC.

  20. Multiproxy Reconstruction of Tropical Pacific Holocene Mean State Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbuszewski, J. A.; Oppo, D.; Huang, K. F.; Galy, V.; Dubois, N.; Mohtadi, M.; Herbert, T.; Rosenthal, Y.; Linsley, B. K.; Lynch-Stieglitz, J.; Koutavas, A.; Rustic, G. T.

    2014-12-01

    The El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is the most prominent mode of tropical Pacific climate variability, significantly impacting both regional and global climate. In the past, the mean state of the Pacific Ocean has differed from today as evidenced by variability in the zonal water column structure. Recent paleoproxy based studies of tropical Pacific hydrology and surface temperature variability have hypothesized that observed climatological changes over the Holocene are directly linked to ENSO and/or mean state variability, complementing studies that dynamically relate centennial scale ENSO variability to mean state changes. These studies have suggested that mid Holocene ENSO variability was low and the mean state was more "La Niña" like. In the late Holocene, data have been interpreted as indicating an increase in ENSO variability with a more moderate mean state. Here, we test the hypothesis that observed climatological changes in the eastern tropical Pacific are related to mean state or ENSO variability during the Holocene. We focus our study on three sediment core locations from the equatorial Pacific: the Indo-Pacific Warm Pool (BJ803-119 GGC, 117MC), the Line Islands in the central Pacific (ML1208-18GC) and the Galapagos Islands in the Eastern Cold Tongue (KNR195-5 43 GGC, 42MC). These sites lie in regions poised to provide evidence of basin-wide equatorial water column structure changes in response to mean state and/or long-term ENSO variability. We use a multiproxy approach with data from both organic (sterol abundances) and inorganic proxies (Mg/Ca and δ18O of 4 planktonic foraminiferal species, % G. bulloides) to reconstruct zonal tropical Pacific (sub)surface temperature and stratification gradients over the Holocene. This approach enables us to combine the strengths of each individual proxy to derive more robust records. To put our data in the context of the broader Pacific and Indo-Pacific regions, we compare our new data to published records.

  1. Classifying Pacific islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunn, Patrick D.; Kumar, Lalit; Eliot, Ian; McLean, Roger F.

    2016-12-01

    An earth-science-based classification of islands within the Pacific Basin resulted from the preparation of a database describing the location, area, and type of 1779 islands, where island type is determined as a function of the prevailing lithology and maximum elevation of each island, with an island defined as a discrete landmass composed of a contiguous land area ≥1 ha (0.01 km2) above mean high-water level. Reefs lacking islands and short-lived (<20 years) transient islands are not included. The principal aim of the classification is to assess the spatial diversity of the geologic and geomorphic attributes of Pacific islands. It is intended to be valid at a regional scale and based on two attributes: five types of lithology (volcanic, limestone, composite, continental, surficial) and a distinction between high and low islands. These attributes yielded eight island types: volcanic high and low islands; limestone high and low islands; composite high and low islands; reef (including all unconsolidated) islands; and continental islands. Most common are reef islands (36 %) and volcanic high islands (31 %), whereas the least common are composite low islands (1 %). Continental islands, 18 of the 1779 islands examined, are not included in maps showing the distribution of island attributes and types. Rationale for the spatial distributions of the various island attributes is drawn from the available literature and canvassed in the text. With exception of the few continental islands, the distribution of island types is broadly interpretable from the proximity of island-forming processes. It is anticipated the classification will become the basis for more focused investigation of spatial variability of the climate and ocean setting as well as the biological attributes of Pacific islands. It may also be used in spatial assessments of second-order phenomena associated with the islands, such as their vulnerability to various disasters, coastal erosion, or ocean pollution as

  2. Pacific Northwest election results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qamar, Anthony

    Six AGU members have been elected members of the Regional Committee of the AGU Pacific Northwest Region. Their terms are July 1, 1986, to June 30, 1988. The Regional Committee, which directs the activities of the branch, is composed of a representative of each of the AGU sections taking part in branch activities.Those elected are Robert M. Ellis, Tectonophysics Section; Stephen L. Gillett, Geomagnetism and Paleomagnetism Section; Tark S. Hamilton, Volcanology, Geochemistry, and Petrology Section; Renner B. Hofmann, Seismology Section; Charles W. Slaughter, Hydrology Section; and Richard E. Thomson, Ocean Sciences Section.

  3. A Western Pacific Hotspot?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacPherson, C. G.; Hall, R.

    2002-12-01

    The petrology of volcanic rocks from the St. Andrew Strait and helium isotope ratios of backarc lavas from the Manus Basin have been used to propose the existence of an active hotspot beneath the eastern Bismarck Sea [1,2]. The possible influence of this hotspot can be assessed by mapping its present location onto a plate tectonic reconstruction of the western Pacific [3,4]. During the Middle Eocene the nascent Izu-Bonin-Mariana (IBM) arc lay above the hotspot. The volume of magma emplaced at the IBM arc at that time substantially exceeds the average magma production rate for mature island arcs. Furthermore, the ultramafic (boninitic) character of much of this magmatism requires elevated temperatures in the mantle. The geochemistry of contemporaneous magmatism in the backarc resembles melts usually found at ocean islands and much of the backarc region experienced significant uplift at that time. All of these features can be explained by the influx of hot, buoyant, chemically distinct mantle beneath the IBM and its hinterland. The plates lying above the hotspot during the later Eocene were subsequently subducted, but plate reconstruction suggests that during the Oligo-Miocene it was crossed by parts of the Caroline Plate where the Euripik Rise is found. This is an aseismic rise that possesses the geophysical characteristics of thickened oceanic crust formed by excess, basaltic magmatism and is the type of structure that would result from the passage of relatively young oceanic lithosphere over a mantle hotspot. Plate reconstruction for the western Pacific predicts a hotspot trail that is consistent with the Middle Eocene and Oligo-Miocene geology of the IBM and Caroline Plates, respectively. Parts of the trail have been disrupted by subsequent sea-floor spreading or lost through subduction but the remaining vestiges are consistent with the action of a thermal anomaly throughout much of the Cenozoic. More speculatively, the difference in buoyancy between the IBM

  4. About the REL Pacific Region

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regional Educational Laboratory Pacific, 2014

    2014-01-01

    REL Pacific is one of ten Regional Educational Laboratories established and funded by the U.S. Department of Education's Institute of Education Sciences. Their region encompasses approximately 4.9 million square miles and serves seven Pacific island entities, including American Samoa; the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands; the Federated…

  5. Pacific Educational Research Journal, 1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, Kathleen F., Ed.; Lai, Morris K., Ed.

    1996-01-01

    This first issue of the new "Pacific Educational Research Journal" offers articles covering diverse subjects and using diverse research methods. The new journal represents a rejuvenation of a previous publication to address educational issues specific to the Pacific region. Ethnic groups specifically addressed include Hawaiians,…

  6. Pleistocene dynamics of the Pacific South Equatorial Countercurrent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuernberg, D.; Raddatz, J.; Rippert, N.; Tiedemann, R.

    2014-12-01

    The Western Pacific Warm Pool (WPWP) with extremely high sea-surface-temperatures (SST) is a key area for global climate. It also acts as a crossroad for mode and intermediate water masses such as the South Equatorial Countercurrent (SECC) transporting water masses originating from higher latitudes. The SECC flows above the main thermocline and strongly interacts with the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) and South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ). To constrain changes in sea-surface and subsurface water mass dynamics affecting thermocline depth, we reconstruct SST, subSST and salinity conditions using combined δ18O and Mg/Ca signals of surface (Globigerinoides ruber, Globigerinoides sacculifer) and subsurface dwelling (Globorotalia tumida) planktonic foraminifera. Our study is based on RV SONNE SO-225 piston cores retrieved from Manihiki plateau, which is located at the southeastern margin of the WPWP (between ~ 5°S-15°S and 170-160°W). The proxy records cover the last ~ 3 Myr SSTMg/Ca remained nearly constant throughout the entire Pleistocene varying between ~30 to 32 (°C), while the subSSTMg/Ca reconstructions reveal pronounced variations from ~10 to 16 (°C). Our results imply that the WPWP thermocline depth has undergone significant vertical movements throughout the Pleistocene. Notably, thermocline depth is continuously decreasing from the early to the late Pleistocene, and coincides with the change from the 41 kyr to a dominant 100 kyr climate periodicity between 1 and 1.7 Ma. We hypothesize that the repeated change in thermocline depth is due to either 1) changes in mode or intermediate water masses advection from Southern Ocean sources via "ocean tunneling", 2) changes in the tropical Pacific wind regime, and/or 3) changes in the Western Pacific Monsoon sytem.

  7. Using benthic foraminiferal B/Ca to constrain the effect of dissolution on key Pliocene Mg/Ca temperature records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, S. M.; Ravelo, A. C.

    2015-12-01

    The state of the Pliocene tropical Pacific is currently the subject of heated debate. The debate hinges on the veracity of planktic foraminiferal Mg/Ca temperatures from the west Pacific warm pool (WPWP) and the eastern equatorial Pacific (EEP) that show Pliocene WPWP temperatures similar to today but a warmer Pliocene EEP, resulting in a much reduced east-west gradient [Wara et al., 2005]. These findings form the basis of the "permanent El Niño-like state" paradigm of Pliocene climate. However, recent studies using organic biomarker proxies produce temperature records that indicate a WPWP cooling trend since the Pliocene that differs markedly from Mg/Ca-temperature records [O'Brien et al., 2014; Zhang et al., 2014]. Though much of the debate has focused on changes in seawater Mg/Ca, spatial variations in proxy agreement point to dissolution as a key factor. Dissolution, which imparts a cool bias to Mg/Ca temperatures, varies across ocean basins depending on Δ[CO32-], the difference from the carbonate ion concentration needed for calcite saturation. By necessity, dissolution corrections use the modern value of Δ[CO32-] for the entire record, so it is possible that Pliocene proxy discrepancies could stem from varying Δ[CO32-] over time. Here we present benthic foraminiferal B/Ca data (a proxy for Δ[CO32-]) from the EEP and WEP spanning the past 5 Myr, to constrain the effect of dissolution on Pliocene Mg/Ca records. To account for possible changes in seawater B/Ca, we present paired epifaunal-infaunal B/Ca data. Infaunal species are much less sensitive to Δ[CO32-] than epifaunal species, but would still record long-term changes in seawater B/Ca. The true Δ[CO32-] can thus be calculated from the epifaunal-infaunal B/Ca difference [Brown et al., 2011]. Our study is the first to apply this approach downcore; by accounting for long-term changes in seawater, it greatly expands use of the B/Ca proxy and enables a first attempt at correcting for time

  8. Temperature effects on Ca2+ cycling in scombrid cardiomyocytes: a phylogenetic comparison

    PubMed Central

    Galli, Gina L. J.; Lipnick, Michael S.; Shiels, Holly A.; Block, Barbara A.

    2011-01-01

    Specialisations in excitation–contraction coupling may have played an important role in the evolution of endothermy and high cardiac performance in scombrid fishes. We examined aspects of Ca2+ handling in cardiomyocytes from Pacific bonito (Sarda chiliensis), Pacific mackerel (Scomber japonicus), yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares) and Pacific bluefin tuna (Thunnus orientalis). The whole-cell voltage-clamp technique was used to measure the temperature sensitivity of the L-type Ca2+ channel current (ICa), density, and steady-state and maximal sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ content (ssSRload and maxSRload). Current–voltage relations, peak ICa density and charge density of ICa were greatest in mackerel and yellowfin at all temperatures tested. ICa density and kinetics were temperature sensitive in all species studied, and the magnitude of this response was not related to the thermal preference of the species. SRload was greater in atrial than in ventricular myocytes in the Pacific bluefin tuna, and in species that are more cold tolerant (bluefin tuna and mackerel). ICa and SRload were particularly small in bonito, suggesting the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger plays a more pivotal role in Ca2+ entry into cardiomyocytes of this species. Our comparative approach reveals that the SR of cold-tolerant scombrid fishes has a greater capacity for Ca2+ storage. This specialisation may contribute to the temperature tolerance and thermal niche expansion of the bluefin tuna and mackerel. PMID:21389190

  9. A Western Pacific Hotspot?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacPherson, C. G.; Hall, R.

    2003-04-01

    The petrology of volcanic rocks from the St. Andrew Strait and helium isotope ratios of backarc lavas from the Manus Basin have been used to propose the existence of an active hotspot beneath the eastern Bismarck Sea (Johnson et al., 1978; Macpherson et al., 1998). The past influence of this hotspot can be assessed by mapping its present location onto a plate tectonic reconstruction of the western Pacific (Macpherson and Hall, 2001). During the Middle Eocene the nascent Izu-Bonin-Mariana (IBM) arc lay above the hotspot. The volume of magma emplaced at the IBM arc at that time substantially exceeds the average magma production rate for mature island arcs. Furthermore, the ultramafic (boninitic) character of much of this magmatism requires elevated temperatures. The geochemistry of contemporaneous magmatism in the backarc resembles ocean island basalts and much of the backarc region experienced significant uplift at that time. All of these features can be explained by the influx of hot, buoyant, chemically distinct mantle beneath the IBM and its hinterland. The lithosphere lying above the hotspot during the later Eocene was subsequently subducted. During the Oligo-Miocene the hotspot was traversed by parts of the Caroline Plate where the Euripik Rise is found. This is an aseismic rise that possesses the geophysical characteristics of thickened oceanic crust formed by excess, basaltic magmatism and is the type of structure that would result from the passage of relatively young oceanic lithosphere over a mantle hotspot. Plate reconstruction for the western Pacific predicts a hotspot trail that is consistent with the Middle Eocene and Oligo-Miocene geology of the IBM and Caroline Plates, respectively (Macpherson and Hall, 2001). Parts of the trail have been disrupted by subsequent sea-floor spreading or lost through subduction but the remaining vestiges are consistent with the action of a thermal anomaly throughout much of the Cenozoic. More speculatively, buoyancy

  10. High precision calcium isotope analysis using 42Ca-48Ca double-spike TIMS technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, L.; Zhou, L.; Gao, S.; Tong, S. Y.; Zhou, M. L.

    2014-12-01

    Double spike techniques are widely used for determining calcium isotopic compositions of natural samples. The most important factor controlling precision of the double spike technique is the choice of appropriate spike isotope pair, the composition of double spikes and the ratio of spike to sample(CSp/CN). We propose an optimal 42Ca-48Ca double spike protocol which yields the best internal precision for calcium isotopic composition determinations among all kinds of spike pairs and various spike compositions and ratios of spike to sample, as predicted by linear error propagation method. It is suggested to use spike composition of 42Ca/(42Ca+48Ca) = 0.44 mol/mol and CSp/(CN+ CSp)= 0.12mol/mol because it takes both advantages of the largest mass dispersion between 42Ca and 48Ca (14%) and lowest spike cost. Spiked samples were purified by pass through homemade micro-column filled with Ca special resin. K, Ti and other interference elements were completely separated, while 100% calcium was recovered with negligible blank. Data collection includes integration time, idle time, focus and peakcenter frequency, which were all carefully designed for the highest internal precision and lowest analysis time. All beams were automatically measured in a sequence by Triton TIMS so as to eliminate difference of analytical conditions between samples and standards, and also to increase the analytical throughputs. The typical internal precision of 100 duty cycles for one beam is 0.012‒0.015 ‰ (2δSEM), which agrees well with the predicted internal precision of 0.0124 ‰ (2δSEM). Our methods improve internal precisions by a factor of 2‒10 compared to previous methods of determination of calcium isotopic compositions by double spike TIMS. We analyzed NIST SRM 915a, NIST SRM 915b and Pacific Seawater as well as interspersed geological samples during two months. The obtained average δ44/40Ca (all relative to NIST SRM 915a) is 0.02 ± 0.02 ‰ (n=28), 0.72±0.04 ‰ (n=10) and 1

  11. Palaeotsunamis in the Pacific Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goff, J.; Chague-Goff, C.; Dominey-Howes, D.; McAdoo, B.; Cronin, S.; Bonte-Grapetin, Michael; Nichol, S.; Horrocks, M.; Cisternas, M.; Lamarche, G.; Pelletier, B.; Jaffe, B.; Dudley, W.

    2011-01-01

    The recent 29 September 2009 South Pacific and 27 February 2010 Chilean events are a graphic reminder that the tsunami hazard and risk for the Pacific Ocean region should not be forgotten. Pacific Islands Countries (PICs) generally have short (<150 years) historic records, which means that to understand their tsunami hazard and risk researchers must study evidence for prehistoric events. However, our current state of knowledge of palaeotsunamis in PICs as opposed to their circum-Pacific counterparts is minimal at best. We briefly outline the limited extent of our current knowledge and propose an innovative methodology for future research in the Pacific. Each PIC represents a point source of information in the Pacific Ocean and this would allow their palaeotsunami records to be treated akin to palaeo-DART?? (Deep-ocean Assessment and Reporting of Tsunamis) buoys. Contemporaneous palaeotsunamis from local, regional and distant sources could be identified by using the spatial distribution of island records throughout the Pacific Ocean in conjunction with robust event chronologies. This would be highly innovative and, more importantly, would help provide the building blocks necessary to achieve more meaningful disaster risk reduction for PICs. ?? 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  12. Pacific Northwest AGU Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engebretson, David C.; Beck, Myrl E., Jr.

    1984-04-01

    The 30th AGU Pacific Northwest Regional Meeting was held September 29 to October 1, 1983, on the campus of Western Washington University, Bellingham, Wash. Approximately 125 attended the meeting, and 36 papers were presented. The meeting included two fields trips, five special symposia, and a banquet where keynote speaker Don Swanson presented “Dome building on Mt. St. Helens.”The meeting highlights included a symposium on Tertiary sedimentary basins of Washington and Oregon which revealed the importance of sedimentological studies for deciphering the timing and nature of accretionary processes in tectonically active areas. Geological and geophysical studies on the recent tectonics of the Juan de Fuca plate and nearby continent were presented by workers from the United States and Canada as well as ongoing studies for the evolution and character of the crystalline North Cascades of Washington and British Columbia.

  13. Ventilation changes in the northeast Pacific during the last deglaciation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    VanGeen, A.; Fairbanks, R.G.; Dartnell, P.; McGann, M.; Gardner, J.V.; Kashgarian, Michaele

    1996-01-01

    Under present climate conditions, convection at high latitudes of the North Pacific is restricted to shallower depths than in the North Atlantic. To what extent this asymmetry between the two ocean basins was maintained over the past 20 kyr is poorly known because there are few unambiguous proxy records of ventilation from the North Pacific. We present new data for two sediment cores from the California margin at 800 and 1600 m depth to argue that the depth of ventilation shifted repeatedly in the northeast Pacific over the course of deglaciation. The evidence includes benthic foraminiferal Cd/Ca, 18O/16O, and 13C/12C data as ell as radiocarbon age differences between benthic and planktonic foraminifera. A number of features in the shallower of the two cores, including an interval of laminated sediments, are consistent with changes in ventilation over the past 20 kyr suggested by alternations between laminated and bioturbated sediments in the Santa Barbara Basin and the Gulf of California [Keigwin and Jones, 1990; Kennett and Ingram, 1995; Behl and Kennett, 1996]. Data from the deeper of the two California margin cores suggest that during times of reduced ventilation at 800 m, ventilation was enhanced at 1600 m depth, and vice versa. This pronounced depth dependence of ventilation needs to be taken into account when exploring potential teleconnections between the North Pacific and the North Atlantic.

  14. Secretory patterns of catecholamines in Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Miwa; Nozawa, Aoi; Ueda, Keiichi; Bungo, Takashi; Terao, Hiromi; Asahina, Kiyoshi

    2012-05-15

    Catecholamines (CAs), namely adrenaline (A), noradrenaline (NA), and dopamine (DA), are secreted by the sympathoadrenal system and participate in a diverse array of functions, e.g., heat production, cardiovascular regulation, stress response and so on. However, little is known regarding peripheral CA fluctuations in cetaceans; nevertheless aquatic animals like them have needed to modify their physiological response especially for thermoregulation in water and oxygen economy during diving. To understand CA dynamism in cetaceans, diurnal changes in serum A, NA, and DA concentrations were measured during the winter and summer solstices in four Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops aduncus). The average serum NA concentration was much higher than the average A and DA concentrations, and all concentrations were higher than those reported in other cetacean species. No distinct diurnal fluctuations were observed in CA concentrations in either solstice, suggesting inhibition of the decrease in CA concentrations during nocturnal periods by the unique sleep pattern of dolphins. All the serum CA concentrations were negatively correlated with water temperature as body temperatures were, indicating that the sympathoadrenal system might be more active during winter than in summer season, suggesting a role of CA in thermoregulation.

  15. April 2016 Pacific Southwest Newsletter

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA Pacific Southwest Newsletter for April 2016: University of Arizona Reduces Food Waste, Cleaning Up Underground Fuel Tanks in Fresno, The Argonaut Mine, Ensuring Clean Water in Nevada,Cleaning Up Groundwater in Whittier, California, and more!

  16. Cenozoic reconstruction of southwest Pacific

    SciTech Connect

    Chun, Y.Y.; Kroenke, L.W.

    1986-07-01

    Poles of opening and spreading rates for some of the well-studied marginal basins in the southwest Pacific have been redetermined. Times of opening range from Late Cretaceous-Paleocene in the Tasman basin to middle Pliocene in the Bismarck Sea. The observed magnetic lineations in most of these basins show a relatively short duration of opening and relatively small area of total opening. Most of the smaller basins are bounded by troughs and arcuate island chains, some of which are inferred to be trenches and volcanic arcs situated along paleoconvergent boundaries. At least four successive paleoconvergent boundaries are believed to have formed between the Pacific and the Indian-Australian plates during the Cenozoic. Combining the newly determined poles of opening, spreading rates, and paleoplate boundary locations, a series of palinspastic maps of the southwest Pacific have been constructed for these times, relative to a fixed hot-spot frame of reference for both the Pacific and Indian-Australian plates.

  17. Mid-pacific mountains revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroenke, Loren W.; Kellogg, James N.; Nemoto, Kenji

    1985-06-01

    The Mid-Pacific Mountains are guyots whose volcanic pedestals have been constructed on a broad basement plateau, the flanks of which are downfaulted. Edifice construction may have been controlled by an orthogonal system of intersecting faults trending roughly ENE and NNW. Low amplitude gravity anomalies observed over the Mid-Pacific Mountains indicate complete Airy-Heiskanen isostatic compensation, crustal thickening, and eruption on thin elastic lithosphere. Tholeiites of the Mid-Pacific Mountains resemble lavas of Iceland and the Galapagos Islands. The orthogonal fault system, low gravity anomalies, and lava chemistry of the Mid-Pacific Mountains can be explained by eruption on or near a great ENE-trending rift system.

  18. Wave energy: a Pacific perspective.

    PubMed

    Paasch, Robert; Ruehl, Kelley; Hovland, Justin; Meicke, Stephen

    2012-01-28

    This paper illustrates the status of wave energy development in Pacific rim countries by characterizing the available resource and introducing the region's current and potential future leaders in wave energy converter development. It also describes the existing licensing and permitting process as well as potential environmental concerns. Capabilities of Pacific Ocean testing facilities are described in addition to the region's vision of the future of wave energy.

  19. Rehabilitation services for the Pacific.

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, M H; Barker, J C

    1993-01-01

    The Pacific Basin Rehabilitation Research and Training Center was created to help meet the challenges of rehabilitating people in rural remote communities in the United States-associated Pacific. We describe the center, the special region it serves, some of its many programs, and some of the ways it is helping communities in this region provide services that are appropriate and sensitive to the culture, the environment, and the disability. PMID:8351905

  20. Biogeography of the deep-sea galatheid squat lobsters of the Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macpherson, Enrique; Richer de Forges, Bertrand; Schnabel, Kareen; Samadi, Sarah; Boisselier, Marie-Catherine; Garcia-Rubies, Antoni

    2010-02-01

    We analyzed the distribution patterns of the galatheid squat lobsters (Crustacea, Decapoda, Galatheidae) of the Pacific Ocean. We used the presence/absence data of 402 species along the continental slope and continental rise (200-2000 m) obtained from 54 cruises carried out in areas around the Philippines, Indonesia, Solomon, Vanuatu, New Caledonia, Fiji, Tonga, Wallis and Futuna and French Polynesia. The total number of stations was ca. 3200. We also used published data from other expeditions carried out in the Pacific waters, and from an exhaustive search of ca. 600 papers on the taxonomy and biogeography of Pacific species. We studied the existence of biogeographic provinces using multivariate analyses, and present data on latitudinal and longitudinal patterns of species richness, rate of endemism and the relationship between body sizes with the size of the geographic ranges. Latitudinal species richness along the Western and Eastern Pacific exhibited an increase from higher latitudes towards the Equator. Longitudinal species richness decreased considerably from the Western to the Central Pacific. Size frequency distribution for body size was strongly shifted toward small sizes and endemic species were significantly smaller than non-endemics. This study concludes that a clear separation exists between the moderately poor galatheid fauna of the Eastern Pacific and the rich Western and Central Pacific faunas. Our results also show that the highest numbers of squat lobsters are found in the Coral Sea (Solomon-Vanuatu-New Caledonia islands) and Indo-Malay-Philippines archipelago (IMPA). The distribution of endemism along the Pacific Ocean indicates that there are several major centres of diversity, e.g. Coral Sea, IMPA, New Zealand and French Polynesia. The high proportion of endemism in these areas suggests that they have evolved independently.

  1. Molecular Cloning and Characterization of Full-Length cDNA of Calmodulin Gene from Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xing-Xia; Yu, Wen-Chao; Cai, Zhong-Qiang; He, Cheng; Wei, Na

    2016-01-01

    The shell of the pearl oyster (Pinctada fucata) mainly comprises aragonite whereas that of the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) is mainly calcite, thereby suggesting the different mechanisms of shell formation between above two mollusks. Calmodulin (CaM) is an important gene for regulating the uptake, transport, and secretion of calcium during the process of shell formation in pearl oyster. It is interesting to characterize the CaM in oysters, which could facilitate the understanding of the different shell formation mechanisms among mollusks. We cloned the full-length cDNA of Pacific oyster CaM (cgCaM) and found that the cgCaM ORF encoded a peptide of 113 amino acids containing three EF-hand calcium-binding domains, its expression level was highest in the mantle, hinting that the cgCaM gene is probably involved in shell formation of Pacific oyster, and the common ancestor of Gastropoda and Bivalvia may possess at least three CaM genes. We also found that the numbers of some EF hand family members in highly calcified species were higher than those in lowly calcified species and the numbers of these motifs in oyster genome were the highest among the mollusk species with whole genome sequence, further hinting the correlation between CaM and biomineralization. PMID:27703977

  2. Molecular Cloning and Characterization of Full-Length cDNA of Calmodulin Gene from Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Li, Xing-Xia; Yu, Wen-Chao; Cai, Zhong-Qiang; He, Cheng; Wei, Na; Wang, Xiao-Tong; Yue, Xi-Qing

    2016-01-01

    The shell of the pearl oyster (Pinctada fucata) mainly comprises aragonite whereas that of the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) is mainly calcite, thereby suggesting the different mechanisms of shell formation between above two mollusks. Calmodulin (CaM) is an important gene for regulating the uptake, transport, and secretion of calcium during the process of shell formation in pearl oyster. It is interesting to characterize the CaM in oysters, which could facilitate the understanding of the different shell formation mechanisms among mollusks. We cloned the full-length cDNA of Pacific oyster CaM (cgCaM) and found that the cgCaM ORF encoded a peptide of 113 amino acids containing three EF-hand calcium-binding domains, its expression level was highest in the mantle, hinting that the cgCaM gene is probably involved in shell formation of Pacific oyster, and the common ancestor of Gastropoda and Bivalvia may possess at least three CaM genes. We also found that the numbers of some EF hand family members in highly calcified species were higher than those in lowly calcified species and the numbers of these motifs in oyster genome were the highest among the mollusk species with whole genome sequence, further hinting the correlation between CaM and biomineralization.

  3. Eastern Pacific and central Pacific types of ENSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kao, Hsun-Ying

    In this study, I identify and contrast two types of El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO): one located in the eastern Pacific near the South American coast (i.e. EP-ENSO), and the other in the central Pacific close to the date line (i.e. CP-ENSO). The EP-ENSO possesses the properties of the canonical ENSO and is related to thermocline variations. It is characterized by basin-wide surface and subsurface evolution, coupled with Southern Oscillation and dominated by 2 to 4 year timescale. In contrast, the CP-ENSO is characterized by in-situ evolution and local atmosphere-ocean coupling, and is likely driven by atmospheric forcing. From an upper-ocean heat budget analysis, the CP-ENSO is found to be related to the trade wind forcing associated with the variations of the northern subtropical high. Wind-induced surface heat flux forcing first warms up the upper ocean temperature in the Northeastern Subtropical Pacific. The SST anomalies later spread toward the central equatorial Pacific through heat-flux forcing and vertical advection processes, are further enhanced by zonal advection, and eventually terminate by surface heat flux. The budget results suggest a possible interaction pathway between the north-eastern subtropics and central equatorial Pacific. The CP-ENSO is dominated by a quasi-biennial (˜2.5 yr) periodicity that is also found in subtropical high and Asian-Australian monsoon variability. The possible linkage between CP-ENSO and monsoon variability is demonstrated by an Indian Ocean-decoupled experiment using a coupled GCM. The biennial CP-ENSO in the model is significantly reduced when the Indian Ocean coupling is turned off to weaken the biennial monsoon variability. This study suggests the existence of a distinct CP-ENSO that is a result of interactions among Asian-Australian monsoon, northern subtropical Pacific and central equatorial Pacific.

  4. Apollo 12 Pacific Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Sitting in the life raft, during the Apollo 12 Pacific recovery, are the three mission astronauts; Alan L. Bean, pilot of the Lunar Module (LM), Intrepid; Richard Gordon, pilot of the Command Module (CM), Yankee Clipper; and Spacecraft Commander Charles Conrad. The second manned lunar landing mission, Apollo 12 launched from launch pad 39-A at Kennedy Space Center in Florida on November 14, 1969 via a Saturn V launch vehicle. The Saturn V vehicle was developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) under the direction of Dr. Wernher von Braun. The LM, Intrepid, landed astronauts Conrad and Bean on the lunar surface in what's known as the Ocean of Storms, while astronaut Richard Gordon piloted the CM, Yankee Clipper, in a parking orbit around the Moon. Lunar soil activities included the deployment of the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package (ALSEP), finding the unmanned Surveyor 3 that landed on the Moon on April 19, 1967, and collecting 75 pounds (34 kilograms) of rock samples. Apollo 12 safely returned to Earth on November 24, 1969.

  5. Modelling Changes of the Paleogene Ca Budget Using Benthic Foraminifera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pabich, S.; Gussone, N. C.; Vollmer, C.; Palike, H.; Rabe, K.; Teichert, B. M.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the earth's climate as well as the oceanic chemical and isotopic evolution in the past is one of the main aims in earth science. Ca as one of the major elements in the ocean is especially important. Its variation in concentration are controlled by different factors including the CO2 concentration of the atmosphere, continental weathering and Ca carbonate sedimentation. We used samples from IODP Exp. 320/321 to establish a δ44/40Ca paleo-seawater record between 45 and 25 Ma and model changes in the Ca budget through time. Our results show differences in the Eocene and Oligocene Ca isotope record of benthic foraminifers. The δ44/40Ca values during the Eocene are relatively constant with no significant fluctuations during phases of large short term CCD fluctuations[1]. The Oligocene is characterized by sediments with uniformly high carbonate content and increasing δ44/40Ca towards the late Oligocene. Past seawater δ44/40Ca values (Fig. 1) were calculated from the measured benthic foraminifer record applying the calibration for Gyroidinoides spp.[2]. The Ca budget during the Eocene is relatively constant and not affected by short term CCD fluctuations, indicating that they are too small to alter the isotopic Ca budget. The Oligocene, in contrast is characterized by a general increase in δ44/40Ca seawater values and a continuously deep CCD[1]. This is consistent with a massive long term (>1Ma) CaCO3 deposition and decreasing Ca concentration in the ocean water. To examine the preservation (dissolution and recrystallization) of the foraminifer test through time, we studied additionally the changes in the crystallographic orientations trough time by Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) analysis and Raman spectroscopy. As a final step we use our δ44/40Ca seawater record to run a combined Ca and C model showing the effect of Ca weathering input, carbonate remobilization and dolomitization on the Ca and carbonate system of seawater [1]. [1]Pälike H

  6. Tropospheric Ozone Over the North Pacific from Ozonesdonde Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oltmans, S. J.; Johnson, B. J.; Harris, J. M.; Thompson, A. M.; Liu, H. Y.; Voemel, H.; Chan, C. Y.; Fujimoto, T.; Brackett, V. G.; Chang, W. L.

    2003-01-01

    As part of the TRACE-P mission, ozone vertical profile measurements were made at a number of locations in the North Pacific. At most of the sites there is also a multi-year record of ozonesonde observations. From seven locations in the western Pacific (Hong Kong; Taipei; Jeju Island, Korea; and Naha, Kagoshima, Tsukuba, and Sapporo, Japan), a site in the central Pacific (Hilo, HI), and a site on the west coast of the U.S. (Trinidad Head, CA) both a seasonal and event specific picture of tropospheric ozone over the North Pacific emerges. At all of the sites there is a pronounced spring maximum through the troposphere. There are, however, differences in the timing and strength of this feature. Over Japan the northward movement of the jet during the spring and summer influences the timing of the seasonal maximum. The ozone profiles suggest that transport of ozone rich air from the stratosphere plays a strong role in the development of this maximum. During March and April at Hong Kong ozone is enhanced in a layer that extends from the lower free troposphere into the upper troposphere that likely has its origin in biomass burning in northern Southeast Asia and equatorial Africa. During the winter the Pacific subtropical sites (latitude -25N) are dominated by air with a low-latitude, marine source that gives low ozone amounts particularly in the upper troposphere. In the summer in the boundary layer at all of the sites marine air dominates and ozone amounts are generally quite low (less than 25 ppb). The exception is near large population centers (Tokyo and Taipei but not Hong Kong) where pollution events can give amounts in excess of 80 ppb. During the TRACE-P intensive campaign period (February-April 2001) tropospheric ozone amounts were rather typical of those seen in the long-term records of the stations with multi-year soundings.

  7. Genetic Isolation between the Western and Eastern Pacific Populations of Pronghorn Spiny Lobster Panulirus penicillatus

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Seinen; Jeffs, Andrew; Miyake, Yoichi; Konishi, Kooichi; Okazaki, Makoto; Suzuki, Nobuaki; Abdullah, Muhamad F.; Imai, Hideyuki; Wakabayasi, Toshie; Sakai, Mitsuo

    2011-01-01

    The pronghorn spiny lobster, Panulirus penicillatus, is a circumtropical species which has the widest global distribution among all the species of spiny lobster, ranging throughout the entire Indo-Pacific region. Partial nucleotide sequences of mitochondrial DNA COI (1,142–1,207 bp) and 16S rDNA (535–546 bp) regions were determined for adult and phyllosoma larval samples collected from the Eastern Pacific (EP)(Galápagos Islands and its adjacent water), Central Pacific (CP)(Hawaii and Tuamotu) and the Western Pacific (WP)(Japan, Indonesia, Fiji, New Caledonia and Australia). Phylogenetic analyses revealed two distinct large clades corresponding to the geographic origin of samples (EP and CP+WP). No haplotype was shared between the two regional samples, and average nucleotide sequence divergence (Kimura's two parameter distance) between EP and CP+WP samples was 3.8±0.5% for COI and 1.0±0.4% for 16S rDNA, both of which were much larger than those within samples. The present results indicate that the Pacific population of the pronghorn spiny lobster is subdivided into two distinct populations (Eastern Pacific and Central to Western Pacific), with no gene flow between them. Although the pronghorn spiny lobster have long-lived teleplanic larvae, the vast expanse of Pacific Ocean with no islands and no shallow substrate which is known as the East Pacific Barrier appears to have isolated these two populations for a long time (c.a. 1MY). PMID:22195038

  8. Assessing the volcanic hazard for Rome: 40Ar/39Ar and In-SAR constraints on the most recent eruptive activity and present-day uplift at Colli Albani Volcanic District

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marra, F.; Gaeta, M.; Giaccio, B.; Jicha, B. R.; Palladino, D. M.; Polcari, M.; Sottili, G.; Taddeucci, J.; Florindo, F.; Stramondo, S.

    2016-07-01

    We present new 40Ar/39Ar data which allow us to refine the recurrence time for the most recent eruptive activity occurred at Colli Albani Volcanic District (CAVD) and constrain its geographic area. Time elapsed since the last eruption (36 kyr) overruns the recurrence time (31 kyr) in the last 100 kyr. New interferometric synthetic aperture radar data, covering the years 1993-2010, reveal ongoing inflation with maximum uplift rates (>2 mm/yr) in the area hosting the most recent (<200 ka) vents, suggesting that the observed uplift might be caused by magma injection within the youngest plumbing system. Finally, we frame the present deformation within the structural pattern of the area of Rome, characterized by 50 m of regional uplift since 200 ka and by geologic evidence for a recent (<2000 years) switch of the local stress-field, highlighting that the precursors of a new phase of volcanic activity are likely occurring at the CAVD.

  9. The Ca(2+)/Calmodulin/CaMKK2 Axis: Nature's Metabolic CaMshaft.

    PubMed

    Marcelo, Kathrina L; Means, Anthony R; York, Brian

    2016-10-01

    Calcium (Ca(2+)) is an essential ligand that binds its primary intracellular receptor calmodulin (CaM) to trigger a variety of downstream processes and pathways. Central to the actions of Ca(2+)/CaM is the activation of a highly conserved Ca(2+)/CaM kinase (CaMK) cascade that amplifies Ca(2+) signals through a series of subsequent phosphorylation events. Proper regulation of Ca(2+) flux is necessary for whole-body metabolism and disruption of Ca(2+) homeostasis has been linked to various metabolic diseases. Here we provide a synthesis of recent advances that highlight the roles of the Ca(2+)/CaMK axis in key metabolic tissues. An appreciation of this information is critical to understanding the mechanisms by which Ca(2+)/CaM-dependent signaling contributes to metabolic homeostasis and disease.

  10. Early twentieth-century warming linked to tropical Pacific wind strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Diane M.; Cole, Julia E.; Shen, Glen T.; Tudhope, Alexander W.; Meehl, Gerald A.

    2015-02-01

    Of the rise in global atmospheric temperature over the past century, nearly 30% occurred between 1910 and 1940 when anthropogenic forcings were relatively weak. This early warming has been attributed to internal factors, such as natural climate variability in the Atlantic region, and external factors, such as solar variability and greenhouse gas emissions. However, the warming is too large to be explained by external factors alone and it precedes Atlantic warming by over a decade. For the late twentieth century, observations and climate model simulations suggest that Pacific trade winds can modulate global temperatures, but instrumental data are scarce in the early twentieth century. Here we present a westerly wind reconstruction (1894-1982) from seasonally resolved measurements of Mn/Ca ratios in a western Pacific coral that tracks interannual to multidecadal Pacific climate variability. We then reconstruct central Pacific temperatures using Sr/Ca ratios in a coral from Jarvis Island, and find that weak trade winds and warm temperatures coincide with rapid global warming from 1910 to 1940. In contrast, winds are stronger and temperatures cooler between 1940 and 1970, when global temperature rise slowed down. We suggest that variations in Pacific wind strength at decadal timescales significantly influence the rate of surface air temperature change.

  11. Current and potential ant impacts in the Pacific region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Loope, Lloyd L.; Krushelnycky, Paul D.

    2007-01-01

    Worldwide, ants are a powerful ecological force, and they appear to be dominant components of animal communities of many tropical and temperate ecosystems in terms of biomass and numbers of individuals (Bluthgen et al. 2000). For example, ants comprise up to 94% of arthropod individuals in fogging samples taken from diverse lowland tropical rainforest canopies, and 86% of the biomass (Davidson et al. 2003). The majority of these ant species and individuals obtain carbohydrates either from extrafloral nectaries or from sap-feeding Hemiptera that pass carbohydrate-rich “honeydew” to attending ants while concentrating nitrogen (N) from N-poor plant sap (Davidson et al. 2003). Honeydew and nectar represent key resources for arboreal ant species, although most ant species are at least partly carnivorous or scavengers (Bluthgen et al. 2004). In contrast to most of the terrestrial world, the biotas of many Pacific islands evolved without ants. Whereas endemic ant species are found in New Zealand (ca. 10 spp.), Tonga (ca. 10 spp.), and Samoa (ca. 12 spp.), other islands of Polynesia and parts of Micronesia likely lack native ants (Wilson and Taylor 1967, Wetterer 2002, Wetterer and Vargo 2003). About 20 Indo-Australian and western Pacific ant species range to the east and north of Samoa, but it is unclear how many of these were transported there by humans at some time (Wilson and Taylor 1967). Most of the remainder of the ant species currently found on Pacific islands are widespread species that fall in the category of “tramp species,” dispersed by recent human commerce and generally closely tied to human activity and urban areas (Wilson and Taylor 1967, McGlynn 1999). In Pacific island situations, some of these tramp ant species are able to thrive beyond areas of human activity. Relatively few ant species have been successful invaders of native communities on continents, and these include most of the species that pose the greatest problems for Pacific islands

  12. Desulfurizing Ability of the CaOsatd.-CaCl2-CaF2 Slags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiazhan; Kobayashi, Yoshinao

    2017-04-01

    Desulfurizing ability of the CaO-CaCl2-CaF2 slags saturated with CaO has been investigated from the viewpoint of the sulfide capacity and CaO solubility. The CaO-CaCl2-CaF2 slags containing small amounts of Cu2O and CaS were inserted in a CaO crucible with metallic copper. The CaO crucible was sealed in a nickel holder to prevent the evaporation of CaCl2, then heated up and kept at temperatures from 1573 K (1300 °C) to 1673 K (1400 °C) for 24 hours, which enabled the system inside the CaO crucible to reach the equilibrium. As expected, the sulfide capacity derived from the data obtained as well as CaO solubility of the slag increase with an increase in temperature at a constant ratio of CaCl2/CaF2. The solubility of CaO increases by the replacement of CaF2 with CaCl2, whereas the sulfide capacity slightly decreases and the activity coefficient of CaS ( γ CaS) increases. This suggests that CaF2 has stronger interaction with CaS than CaCl2. The sulfur distribution ratio between carbon-saturated iron melts and the CaO-CaCl2 slag has been calculated to be about 10 000 at 1573 K (1300 °C) using the sulfide capacity obtained, which value is still large enough even with the replacement of CaF2 by CaCl2.

  13. Desulfurizing Ability of the CaOsatd.-CaCl2-CaF2 Slags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiazhan; Kobayashi, Yoshinao

    2016-12-01

    Desulfurizing ability of the CaO-CaCl2-CaF2 slags saturated with CaO has been investigated from the viewpoint of the sulfide capacity and CaO solubility. The CaO-CaCl2-CaF2 slags containing small amounts of Cu2O and CaS were inserted in a CaO crucible with metallic copper. The CaO crucible was sealed in a nickel holder to prevent the evaporation of CaCl2, then heated up and kept at temperatures from 1573 K (1300 °C) to 1673 K (1400 °C) for 24 hours, which enabled the system inside the CaO crucible to reach the equilibrium. As expected, the sulfide capacity derived from the data obtained as well as CaO solubility of the slag increase with an increase in temperature at a constant ratio of CaCl2/CaF2. The solubility of CaO increases by the replacement of CaF2 with CaCl2, whereas the sulfide capacity slightly decreases and the activity coefficient of CaS (γ CaS) increases. This suggests that CaF2 has stronger interaction with CaS than CaCl2. The sulfur distribution ratio between carbon-saturated iron melts and the CaO-CaCl2 slag has been calculated to be about 10 000 at 1573 K (1300 °C) using the sulfide capacity obtained, which value is still large enough even with the replacement of CaF2 by CaCl2.

  14. The last interglacial period on the Pacific Coast of North America: Timing and paleoclimate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muhs, D.R.; Simmons, K.R.; Kennedy, G.L.; Rockwell, T.K.

    2002-01-01

    New, high-precision U-series ages of solitary corals (Balanophyllia elegans) coupled with molluscan faunal data from marine terraces on the Pacific Coast of North America yield information about the timing and warmth of the last interglacial sea-level highstand. Balanophyllia elegans takes up U in isotopic equilibrium with seawater during growth and shortly after death. Corals from the second terrace on San Clemente Island (offshore southern California), the third terrace on Punta Banda (on the Pacific Coast of northern Baja California), and the Discovery Point Formation on Isla de Guadalupe (in the Pacific Ocean offshore Baja California) date to the peak of the last interglacial period and have U-series ages ranging from ca. 123 to 114 ka. The first terrace on Punta Banda has corals with ages ranging from ca. 83 to 80 ka, which corresponds to a sea-level highstand formed in the late last interglacial period. U-series analyses of corals from the Cayucos terrace (central California) and the Nestor terrace at Point Loma (southern California) show that these fossils have evidence of open-system history, similar to what has been reported by other workers for the same localities. Nevertheless, a model of continuous, secondary U and Th uptake shows that two ages of corals are likely present at these localities, representing the ca. 105 and ca. 120 ka sea-level highstands reported elsewhere. U-series ages of last interglacial corals from the Pacific Coast overlap with, but are on average younger than the ages of corals from Barbados, the Bahamas, and Hawaii. This age difference is explained by the nature of the geomorphic response to sea-level change: fringing or barrier reefs on low-latitude coastlines have an accretionary growth style that keeps pace with rising sea level, whether on a tectonically rising or stable coastline. In contrast, midlatitude, high-energy coastlines are sites of platform cutting during the early part of a sea-level high stand and terrace

  15. CA-125 blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... above 35 U/mL is considered abnormal. Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Some ... 125 usually does not mean ovarian cancer is present. Most healthy women with an elevated CA-125 ...

  16. Climate proxies from Sr/Ca of coccolith calcite: calibrations from continuous culture of Emiliania huxleyi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoll, Heather M.; Rosenthal, Yair; Falkowski, Paul

    2002-03-01

    Continuous culture of the coccolithophorid Emiliania huxleyi reveals that coccolith Sr/Ca ratios depend on temperature and growth rate. At a constant temperature of 18°C, coccolith Sr/Ca ratios increased nearly 15% as growth rate increased from 0.1 to 1.5 divisions per day and calcification rate increased from 1.5 to 50 pg calcite per cell per day. When temperature increased from 7 to 26°C, Sr/Ca ratios increased by more than 25% (i.e., 1%/1°C), although the range in growth and calcification rates was the same as for experiments at constant temperature. The temperature dependence of Sr/Ca ratios in coccoliths is consistent with that observed in planktonic foraminifera and abiogenic calcites, suggesting that it is controlled by thermodynamic processes. However, the positive correlation of coccolith Sr/Ca with temperature contrasts with field studies in the equatorial Pacific, where Sr/Ca ratios are highest at the locus of maximum upwelling and productivity despite depressed temperatures. This paradox may reflect different calcification rate effects between E. huxleyi and the other species dominating assemblages in the equatorial Pacific sediments, which may be resolved by new techniques for separation of monospecific coccolith samples from sediments. Models of crystal growth indicate that kinetic effects on Sr partitioning in calcite due to surface enrichment could explain the Sr/Ca variations observed in constant temperature experiments but not the larger amplitude calcification rate effects observed in equatorial Pacific sediments. Despite the dual influence of temperature and growth rate on coccolith Sr/Ca, coccolith Sr/Ca correlates with "b," the slope of the dependence of carbon isotope fractionation in biomarkers (ɛ p) on CO 2(aq) at a range of growth rates and temperatures. Consequently, using coccolith Sr/Ca in combination with alkenone ɛ p may improve paleo-CO 2 determinations.

  17. Decadal changes in Pacific carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabine, Christopher L.; Feely, Richard A.; Millero, Frank J.; Dickson, Andrew G.; Langdon, Chris; Mecking, Sabine; Greeley, Dana

    2008-07-01

    This paper uses the extended multiple linear regression (eMLR) technique to investigate changes over the last decade in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) inventories on a meridional line (P16 along 152°W) up the central Pacific and on a zonal line (P02 along 30°N) across the North Pacific. Maximum changes in the total DIC concentrations along P02 are 15-20 μmol kg-1 over 10 years, somewhat higher than the ˜1 μmol kg-1 a-1 increase in DIC expected based on the rate of atmospheric CO2 increase. The maximum changes of 15-20 μmol kg-1 along the P16 line over the 14/15-year time frame fit with the expected magnitude of the anthropogenic signal, but there is a deeper than expected penetration of the signal in the North Pacific compared to the South Pacific. The effect of varying circulation on the total DIC change, based on decadal alterations of the apparent oxygen utilization rate, is estimated to be greater than 10 μmol kg-1 in the North Pacific, accounting for as much as 80% of the total DIC change in that region. The average anthropogenic CO2 inventory increase along 30°N between 1994 and 2004 was 0.43 mol m-2 a-1, with much higher inventories in the western Pacific. Along P16, the average Northern Hemisphere increase was 0.25 mol m-2 a-1 between 1991/1992 and 2006 compared to an average Southern Hemisphere anthropogenic CO2 inventory increase between 1991 and 2005 of 0.41 mol m-2 a-1.

  18. Ag-Al-Ca

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carow-Watamura, U.; Louzguine, D. V.; Takeuchi, A.

    This document is part of Part 1 http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/97.etType="URL"/> 'Systems from Ag-Al-Ca to Au-Pd-Si' of Subvolume B 'Physical Properties of Ternary Amorphous Alloys' of Volume 37 'Phase Diagrams and Physical Properties of Nonequilibrium Alloys' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III 'Condensed Matter'. It contains the Chapter 'Ag-Al-Ca' with the content:

  19. Home Reef, South Pacific

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    In the South Pacific, south of Late Island along the Tofua volcanic arc in Tonga, a new volcanic island Home Reef is being re-born. The island is thought to have emerged after a volcanic eruption in mid-August that has also spewed large amounts of floating pumice into Tongan waters and sweeping across to Fiji about 350 km (220 miles) to the west of where the new island has formed. In 2004 a similar eruption created an ephemeral island about 0.5 by 1.5 km (0.3 by 0.9 miles) in size; it was no longer visible in an ASTER image acquired November 2005. This simulated natural color image shows the vegetation-covered stratovolcanic island of Late in the upper right. Home Reef is found in the lower left. The two bluish plumes are hot seawater that is laden with volcanic ash and chemicals; the larger one can be traced for more than 14 km (8.4 miles) to the east. The image was acquired October 10, 2006 and covers an area of 24.3 by 30.2 km. It is located at 18.9 degrees South latitude, 174.7 degrees west longitude.

    With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation

  20. Photographic copy of photograph, ca. 1920's (original print located at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photographic copy of photograph, ca. 1920's (original print located at the Office of the 24th Wing Historian, Howard Air Force Base, Republic of Panama). Photographer unknown. View of U.S. Army Air Corps over Fort Amador. - Fort Amador, Pacific entrance to Panama Canal, Panama City, Former Panama Canal Zone, CZ

  1. Inter-annual Variations and Decadal Trends in Surface Equatorial Pacific Phosphate Concentrations: Coral Records from the Line Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinclair, D. J.; Sherrell, R. M.; LaVigne, M.; Tudhope, A. W.; Cobb, K.

    2011-12-01

    Coralline P/Ca is a newly-calibrated proxy for oceanic phosphate concentration (LaVigne et al. 2010, Anagnostuou et al. 2011). This proxy is an important tool for reconstructing tropical ocean nutrient dynamics, especially in remote regions, such as the equatorial Pacific Ocean, which are poorly covered by instrumental records. Here we present P/Ca records in 4 Porites corals from the Line Islands in the central Equatorial Pacific spanning the last ~ 30 years. The coral from Jarvis Island (0°22'S) has a significantly higher P/Ca concentration than two independent coral records from Christmas Island (1°53'N), and a coral from Fanning Island (3°51'N). This is consistent with the strong meridional gradient in surface phosphate in the central equatorial Pacific. All corals record a long-term 2-fold decrease in phosphate concentration from the mid 1970s to the mid 1990s, in agreement with observed slowing of the Pacific Meridional Overturning Circulation (McPhadden and Zhang 2002). On inter-annual time scales, the corals all capture strong El Niño events as a decrease in surface phosphate consistent with deepening of the eastern Pacific thermocline. The magnitude of this suppression is significantly larger in the Jarvis Island coral, again consistent with its location in the high phosphate tongue in the equatorial Pacific. The Jarvis Island coral record shows hints of a decadal oscillation in P which so far does not appear to be captured by the Christmas Island coral. Further analyses are underway to extend these records and to study P dynamics in other Line Island corals. Our preliminary results suggest that Porites corals are recording P variations in the central Pacific which accord with known oceanographic changes. This study demonstrates the potential for reconstructing nutrient dynamics at annual to multidecadal resolutions. Citations LaVigne M., Matthews K. A., Grottoli A. G., Cobb K. M., Anagnostou E., Cabioch G., and Sherrell R. M. (2010) Coral skeleton P/Ca

  2. 75 FR 5541 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Vessels Catching Pacific Cod...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-03

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Vessels Catching Pacific Cod for Processing by the Inshore...; closure. SUMMARY: NMFS is prohibiting directed fishing for Pacific cod by vessels catching Pacific cod for... Pacific cod apportioned to vessels catching Pacific cod for processing by the inshore component of...

  3. 75 FR 10441 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Vessels Catching Pacific Cod...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-08

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Vessels Catching Pacific Cod for Processing by the Offshore...; closure. SUMMARY: NMFS is prohibiting directed fishing for Pacific cod by vessels catching Pacific cod for... Pacific cod apportioned to vessels catching Pacific cod for processing by the offshore component of...

  4. 75 FR 8839 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Vessels Catching Pacific Cod...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-26

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Vessels Catching Pacific Cod for Processing by the Offshore...; closure. SUMMARY: NMFS is prohibiting directed fishing for Pacific cod by vessels catching Pacific cod for... Pacific cod apportioned to vessels catching Pacific cod for processing by the offshore component of...

  5. 75 FR 7976 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Vessels Catching Pacific Cod...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-23

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Vessels Catching Pacific Cod for Processing by the Inshore...; closure. SUMMARY: NMFS is prohibiting directed fishing for Pacific cod by vessels catching Pacific cod for... Pacific cod apportioned to vessels catching Pacific cod for processing by the inshore component of...

  6. Pacific Educational Research Journal, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, Kathleen, Ed.; Lai, Morris, Ed.

    2000-01-01

    This journal features theoretical, empirical, and applied research with implications for and relevance to education in the Pacific area. This volume contains: (1) "Community Perceptions of Culture and Education on Moloka'i" (Lois A. Yamauchi, William L. Greene, Katherine T. Ratliffe, and Andrea K. Ceppi); (2) "Academic Performance…

  7. Profile of Pacific Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Research and Development Cadre, Honolulu, HI.

    Comparative data concerning institutions of higher education in the Pacific Islands are tabulated and summarized to aid in program planning, development, and implementation in that region. The jurisdictions covered are: American Samoa; Palau; the Northern Mariana Islands; Micronesia; Kosrae; Pohnpei; Truk; Yap; Guam; Hawaii; and the Marshall…

  8. PREL Pacific Region Language Cards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacific Region Educational Lab., Honolulu, HI.

    This collection of 10 cue cards presents English translations of common English words and expressions into 10 Pacific Region languages: Palauan, Samoan, Chamorro, Hawaiian, Carolinian, Chuukese, Pohnpeian, Marshallese, Yapese, and Kosraean. The cards translate the following: hello, good morning, good afternoon, good night, thank you, you're…

  9. Sustainable Fisheries Management: Pacific Salmon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knudsen, E. Eric; Steward, C.R.; MacDonald, Donald; Williams, J.E.

    2000-01-01

    What has happened to the salmon resource in the Pacific Northwest? Who is responsible and what can be done to reverse the decline in salmon populations? The responsibly falls on everyone involved - fishermen, resource managers and concerned citizens alike - to take the steps necessary to ensure that salmon populations make a full recovery. This collection of papers examines the state of the salmon fisheries in the Pacific Northwest. They cover existing methods and supply model approaches for alternative solutions. The editors stress the importance of input from and cooperation with all parties involved to create a viable solution. Grass roots education and participation is the key to public support - and ultimately the success - of whatever management solutions are developed. A unique and valuable scientific publication, Sustainable Fisheries Management: Pacific Salmon clearly articulates the current state of the Pacific salmon resource, describes the key features of its management, and provides important guidance on how we can make the transition towards sustainable fisheries. The solutions presented in this book provide the basis of a strategy for sustainable fisheries, requiring society and governmental agencies to establish a shared vision, common policies, and a process for collaborative management.

  10. Trade in the Pacific Rim.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dollar, David

    1988-01-01

    States that international trade is a prime factor linking the Pacific Rim nations. Discusses the differences in each nation's productive factors (land, labor, capital) and examines the emerging technological competition. Concludes that if U.S. firms cannot meet the challenge of foreign competition, then protectionism might limit further economic…

  11. Routes of Ca2+ Shuttling during Ca2+ Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Pecze, László; Blum, Walter; Schwaller, Beat

    2015-01-01

    In some cell types, Ca2+ oscillations are strictly dependent on Ca2+ influx across the plasma membrane, whereas in others, oscillations also persist in the absence of Ca2+ influx. We observed that, in primary mesothelial cells, the plasmalemmal Ca2+ influx played a pivotal role. However, when the Ca2+ transport across the plasma membrane by the “lanthanum insulation method” was blocked prior to the induction of the serum-induced Ca2+ oscillations, mitochondrial Ca2+ transport was found to be able to substitute for the plasmalemmal Ca2+ exchange function, thus rendering the oscillations independent of extracellular Ca2+. However, in a physiological situation, the Ca2+-buffering capacity of mitochondria was found not to be essential for Ca2+ oscillations. Moreover, brief spontaneous Ca2+ changes were observed in the mitochondrial Ca2+ concentration without apparent changes in the cytosolic Ca2+ concentration, indicating the presence of a mitochondrial autonomous Ca2+ signaling mechanism. In the presence of calretinin, a Ca2+-buffering protein, the amplitude of cytosolic spikes during oscillations was decreased, and the amount of Ca2+ ions taken up by mitochondria was reduced. Thus, the increased calretinin expression observed in mesothelioma cells and in certain colon cancer might be correlated to the increased resistance of these tumor cells to proapoptotic/pronecrotic signals. We identified and characterized (experimentally and by modeling) three Ca2+ shuttling pathways in primary mesothelial cells during Ca2+ oscillations: Ca2+ shuttled between (i) the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria, (ii) the ER and the extracellular space, and (iii) the ER and cytoplasmic Ca2+ buffers. PMID:26396196

  12. Staphylococcus aureus 'Down Under': contemporary epidemiology of S. aureus in Australia, New Zealand, and the South West Pacific.

    PubMed

    Williamson, D A; Coombs, G W; Nimmo, G R

    2014-07-01

    The clinical and molecular epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus disease has changed considerably over the past two decades, particularly with the emergence and spread of community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA) clones. Indeed, some of the first global descriptions of CA-MRSA were from remote indigenous communities in Western Australia, and from Pacific Peoples in New Zealand. The epidemiology of S. aureus infections in the South West Pacific has several unique features, largely because of the relative geographical isolation and unique indigenous communities residing in this region. In particular, a number of distinct CA-MRSA clones circulate in Australia and New Zealand, such as sequence type (ST) 93 methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) (Queensland clone) and clonal complex 75 S. aureus (Staphylococcus argenteus) in Australia, and ST30 MRSA (Southwest Pacific clone) in New Zealand. In addition, there is a disproportionate burden of S. aureus disease in indigenous paediatric populations, particularly in remote Aboriginal communities in Australia, and in Pacific Peoples and Maori in New Zealand. In this review, we provide a contemporary overview of the clinical and molecular epidemiology of S. aureus disease in the South West Pacific region, with a particular focus on features distinct to this region.

  13. Indian Ocean warming modulates Pacific climate change.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jing-Jia; Sasaki, Wataru; Masumoto, Yukio

    2012-11-13

    It has been widely believed that the tropical Pacific trade winds weakened in the last century and would further decrease under a warmer climate in the 21st century. Recent high-quality observations, however, suggest that the tropical Pacific winds have actually strengthened in the past two decades. Precise causes of the recent Pacific climate shift are uncertain. Here we explore how the enhanced tropical Indian Ocean warming in recent decades favors stronger trade winds in the western Pacific via the atmosphere and hence is likely to have contributed to the La Niña-like state (with enhanced east-west Walker circulation) through the Pacific ocean-atmosphere interactions. Further analysis, based on 163 climate model simulations with centennial historical and projected external radiative forcing, suggests that the Indian Ocean warming relative to the Pacific's could play an important role in modulating the Pacific climate changes in the 20th and 21st centuries.

  14. 77 FR 24561 - Union Pacific Railroad Company-Abandonment of Freight Easement Exemption-in Alameda and Santa...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-24

    ..., CA (San Jose Industrial Lead) On April 4, 2012, Union Pacific Railroad Company (UP) and Santa Clara... petition under 49 U.S.C. 10502 for exemption from the provisions of 49 U.S.C. 10903 for UP to abandon its... obligation for, a portion of the San Jose Industrial Lead between milepost 7.35 near Warm Springs...

  15. Ca2+ signaling and intracellular Ca2+ binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Niki, I; Yokokura, H; Sudo, T; Kato, M; Hidaka, H

    1996-10-01

    Changes in cytosolic Ca2+ concentrations evoke a wide range of cellular responses and intracellular Ca(2+)-binding proteins are the key molecules to transduce Ca2+ signaling via enzymatic reactions or modulation of protein/protein interations (Fig.1). The EF hand proteins, like calmodulin and S100 proteins, are considered to exert Ca(2+)-dependent actions in the nucleus or the cytoplasm. The Ca2+/phospholipid binding proteins are classified into two groups, the annexins and the C2 region proteins. These proteins, distributed mainly in the cytoplasm, translocate to the plasma membrane in response to an increase in cytosolic Ca2+ and function in the vicinity of the membrane. Ca2+ storage proteins in the endoplasmic or sarcoplasmic reticulum provide the high Ca2+ capacity of the Ca2+ store sites, which regulate intracellular Ca2+ distribution. The variety and complexity of Ca2+ signaling result from the cooperative actions of specific Ca(2+)-binding proteins. This review describes biochemical properties of intracellular Ca(2+)-binding proteins and their proposed roles in mediating Ca2+ signaling.

  16. Reconstruction of the Eastern Equatorial Pacific circulation over the last 160 kyr using foraminiferal Nd isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, R.; Piotrowski, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    The deep Pacific holds the largest oceanic reservoir of carbon which interchanges with the atmosphere on climatologically important timescales. However, the history of Pacific deep and intermediate circulation, as well as its role in regulating atmospheric CO2 concentration during glacial-interglacial cycles, is poorly constrained because of low sedimentation rates and local high productivity affecting nutrient-based water mass proxies preferentially in sluggish circulation regimes. We reconstruct water mass circulation changes in deep (ODP 846, 03°5.80' S, 90°49.07' W, 3296 m) and intermediate (ODP 1241, 05°50.57'N, 86°26.68'W, 2027 m) cores from the Eastern Equatorial Pacific (EEP) near Galapagos Island over the last 160,000 years using Nd isotopes on foraminiferal coatings allowing comparison with other paleocean proxy records (e.g. δ13C, Cd/Ca, CaCO3%, Δ14C and δ11B) during MIS 1-6. The deeper ODP 846 Nd isotope record shows little to no variability over major glacial-interglacial cycles, but significant radiogenic peaks during each deglaciation which coincide with benthic Cd/Ca and δ11B peaks in Pacific cores in the same water mass. The intermediate-depth ODP 1241 Nd isotope record has relatively unradiogenic glacials and radiogenic interglacials. We propose that this Nd isotope record is monitoring changes in the amount of Southern Ocean-sourced intermediate water, propagated to the EEP during MIS 2 and 6, which is further supported by less carbonate dissolution and nutricline shoaling. Taken together, Nd isotopes of these two records allow the investigation of the Eastern Equatorial Pacific circulation and its association with nutrient and carbon cycling over time.

  17. Release of CO2 from the subarctic Pacific Ocean over the last deglaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, W. R.; Rae, J. W. B.; Shevenell, A.; Lear, C. H.; Foster, G. L.; Wilson, K. E.; Sarnthein, M.

    2014-12-01

    The ~90 ppmv increase in atmospheric CO2 over the last deglaciation was most likely driven by changes in the way the high latitude oceans regulate the exchange of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) between the ocean and atmosphere, however the mechanisms involved in this repartitioning remain unclear. The subarctic Pacific Ocean is currently a significant source of CO2 to the atmosphere due to mixing of DIC-rich intermediate waters into the surface ocean and incomplete nutrient utilisation. It is hypothesised that during the last glacial period, greater stratification in the high latitudes, including the subarctic Pacific, reduced CO2 outgassing and increased DIC storage within the deep ocean. During deglaciation, a breakdown in ocean stratification returned the deeply sequestered DIC back to the surface ocean and atmosphere. We present a new deglacial record of carbonate ion concentration [CO32-] and bottom water temperature from the intermediate to deep subarctic Pacific Ocean based on paired Li/Ca and Mg/Ca ratios in benthic foraminifera Uvigerina senticosa from marine sediment core MD01-2416 (51.268°N, 167.725°E, 2317 m water depth). The data indicate a decrease in [CO32-] within the intermediate-deep waters of ~40 µmol/kg during glacial times, equivalent to a ~150 µmol/kg increase in DIC using modern alkalinity. At ~16 ka, an increase in [CO32-], coeval with warmer bottom waters and an increase in benthic ∆14C, denotes a transfer of DIC out of the intermediate-deep subarctic Pacific Ocean. Boron isotopes measured on planktonic foraminifera Neogloboquadrina pachyderma (s) in the same core show surface waters in the subarctic Pacific had a higher pH during glacial times, and a reduction in pH over deglaciation. This trend supports the hypothesis that CO2 outgassing from the subarctic Pacific was reduced during the last glacial and increased during deglaciation.

  18. Reconciling coral-based reconstructions of tropical Pacific SST and salinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, D. M.; Cole, J. E.; Tudhope, A. W.

    2012-12-01

    Large uncertainties remain in the response of the tropical Pacific to future climate change, in part due to the disagreement among historical observations and climate models regarding changes over the 20th century. Extending the instrumental record, high-resolution coral proxy records improve our understanding of low-frequency climate variability and trends within the tropical Indo-Pacific. In particular, paired records of δ18O and Sr/Ca from annually banded corals provide detailed reconstructions of past temperature and salinity variability. However, the network of paired δ18O and Sr/Ca records remains sparse, and a lack of local temperature data for calibration of the Sr/Ca thermometer adds considerable uncertainty to the resulting salinity reconstructions. Here we present new temperature and salinity reconstructions from Onotoa Atoll (2°S, 175°E), Maiana Atoll (1°N, 173°E), and Jarvis Island (0.4°S, 160°W) and compare these reconstructions with other published records from the Indo-Pacific. We find that the reconstructed salinity trends are very heterogeneous and sensitive to the assumptions of Sr/Ca-SST calibrations, which vary greatly among published records. We tested the sensitivity of the Sr/Ca-SST slope to the regression method used (simple linear vs. reduced major axis), time period covered, temporal resolution (monthly to annual), removal of the seasonal cycle, and SST dataset used. Using a unified approach, we attempt to reconcile the wide range of slopes for the Sr/Ca-SST calibration and 20th-century salinity trends, and discuss implications for changes in mean state and ENSO variability within the basin.

  19. Persistently anomalous Pacific geomagnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Catherine L.; Constable, Catherine G.

    A new average geomagnetic field model for the past 3kyr (ALS3K) helps bridge a large temporal sampling gap between historical models and more traditional paleomagnetic studies spanning the last 5 Myr. A quasi-static feature seen historically in the central Pacific has the opposite sign in ALS3K; its structure is similar to, but of larger amplitude than, that in the time-averaged geomagnetic field for the last 5 Myr. Anomalous geomagnetic fields exist beneath the Pacific over timescales ranging from 10²-106 years. It is unlikely that bias over such long time scales arises from electromagnetic screening, but conceivable that the Lorentz force is influenced by long wavelength thermal variations and/or localized regions of increased electrical conductivity (associated with compositional anomalies and possibly partial melt). This is consistent with recent seismic observations of the lower mantle.

  20. Southwest Pacific Ocean response to a warmer world: Insights from Marine Isotope Stage 5e

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortese, G.; Dunbar, G. B.; Carter, L.; Scott, G.; Bostock, H.; Bowen, M.; Crundwell, M.; Hayward, B. W.; Howard, W.; Martínez, J. I.; Moy, A.; Neil, H.; Sabaa, A.; Sturm, A.

    2013-09-01

    Paleoceanographic archives derived from 17 marine sediment cores reconstruct the response of the Southwest Pacific Ocean to the peak interglacial, Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 5e (ca. 125 ka). Paleo-Sea Surface Temperature (SST) estimates were obtained from the Random Forest model—an ensemble decision tree tool—applied to core-top planktonic foraminiferal faunas calibrated to modern SSTs. The reconstructed geographic pattern of the SST anomaly (maximum SST between 120 and 132 ka minus mean modern SST) seems to indicate how MIS 5e conditions were generally warmer in the Southwest Pacific, especially in the western Tasman Sea where a strengthened East Australian Current (EAC) likely extended subtropical influence to ca. 45°S off Tasmania. In contrast, the eastern Tasman Sea may have had a modest cooling except around 45°S. The observed pattern resembles that developing under the present warming trend in the region. An increase in wind stress curl over the modern South Pacific is hypothesized to have spun-up the South Pacific Subtropical Gyre, with concurrent increase in subtropical flow in the western boundary currents that include the EAC. However, warmer temperatures along the Subtropical Front and Campbell Plateau to the south suggest that the relative influence of the boundary inflows to eastern New Zealand may have differed in MIS 5e, and these currents may have followed different paths compared to today.

  1. APL - North Pacific Acoustic Laboratory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-04

    Acoustic Lab” Encl: (1) Final Technical Report for Subject Grant (2) SF298 for Enclosure Enclosure (1) is the Final Technical Report for the subject...Laboratory (hard copy with SF 298) Defense Technical Information Center (electronic files with SF298) APL - North Pacific Acoustic ...speed perturbations and the characteristics of the ambient acoustic noise field. Scattering and diffraction resulting from internal waves and other

  2. Conservation of North Pacific shorebirds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gill, Robert E.; Butler, Robert W.; Tomkovich, Pavel S.; Mundkur, Taej; Handel, Colleen M.

    1994-01-01

    In his introduction to the 1979 Symposium proceedings entitled “Shorebirds in Marine Environments," Frank Pitelka stressed the need for studies and conservation programs that spanned the western hemisphere (Pitelka 1979). In the 15 years since Pitelka's call to arms, the locations of many important migratory and wintering sites for shorebirds have been identified in the Americas (Senner and Howe 1984, Morrison and Ross 1989, Morrison and Butler 1994) and in the East Asian-Australasian flyway (Lane and Parish 1991, Mundkur 1993, Watkins 1993). However, assessments for Central America, the Russian Far East and most of Oceania remain incomplete or lacking.The recognition that shorebird conservation required the protection of habitats throughout the birds' range (e.g., Morrison 1984, Davidson and Evans 1989 in Ens et al. 1990) prompted the establishment of the Western Hemisphere Shorebird Reserve Network (WHSRN) in the Americas in 1985 (Joyce 1986). This program complemented the 1971 Convention on Wetlands of International Importance Especially for Waterbirds (Ramsar Convention, Smart 1987), recognized by more that 50 countries world-wide.Our purpose for writing this paper is to: (1) describe the distribution of North Pacific shorebirds throughout their annual cycle; (2) review the locations of and threats to important sites used by North Pacific shorebirds during the breeding, migration, and wintering periods, and (3) outline a program for international conservation of Pacific shorebirds.

  3. Central Equatorial Pacific Experiment (CEPEX)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The Earth's climate has varied significantly in the past, yet climate records reveal that in the tropics, sea surface temperatures seem to have been remarkably stable, varying by less than a few degrees Celsius over geologic time. Today, the large warm pool of the western Pacific shows similar characteristics. Its surface temperature always exceeds 27[degree]C, but never 31[degree]C. Heightened interest in this observation has been stimulated by questions of global climate change and the exploration of stabilizing climate feedback processes. Efforts to understand the observed weak sensitivity of tropical sea surface temperatures to climate forcing has led to a number of competing ideas about the nature of this apparent thermostat. Although there remains disagreement on the processes that regulate tropical sea surface temperature, most agree that further progress in resolving these differences requires comprehensive field observations of three-dimensional water vapor concentrations, solar and infrared radiative fluxes, surface fluxes of heat and water vapor, and cloud microphysical properties. This document describes the Central Equatorial Pacific Experiment (CEPEX) plan to collect such observations over the central equatorial Pacific Ocean during March of 1993.

  4. Coral Cd/Ca and Mn/Ca records of ENSO variability in the Gulf of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carriquiry, J. D.; Villaescusa, J. A.

    2010-06-01

    We analyzed the trace element ratios Cd/Ca and Mn/Ca in three coral colonies (Porites panamensis (1967-1989), Pavona clivosa (1967-1989) and Pavona gigantea (1979-1989)) from Cabo Pulmo reef, Southern Gulf of California, Mexico, to assess the oceanographic changes caused by El Niño - Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events in the Eastern Tropical North Pacific (ETNP). Interannual variations in the coral Cd/Ca and Mn/Ca ratios showed clear evidence that incorporation of Cd and Mn in the coral skeleton was influenced by ENSO conditions, but the response for each metal was controlled by different processes. The Mn/Ca ratios were significantly higher during ENSO years (p<0.05) relative to non-ENSO years for the three species of coral. In contrast, the Cd/Ca was systematically lower during ENSO years, but the difference was significant (p<0.05) only in Pavona gigantea. A decrease in the incorporation of Cd and a marked increase in Mn indicated strongly reduced vertical mixing in the Gulf of California during the mature phase of El Niño. The oceanic warming during El Niño events produces a relaxation of upwelling and a stabilization of the thermocline, which may act as a physical barrier limiting the transport of Cd from deeper waters into the surface layer. In turn, this oceanic condition can increase the residence time of particulate-Mn in surface waters, allowing an increase in the photo-reduction of particulate-Mn and the release of available Mn into the dissolved phase. These results support the use of Mn/Ca and Cd/Ca ratios in biogenic carbonates as tracers of increases in ocean stratification and trade wind weakening and/or collapse in the ETNP during ENSO episodes.

  5. Paleoceanography of the tropical eastern pacific ocean.

    PubMed

    Grigg, R W; Hey, R

    1992-01-10

    The East Pacific Barrier (EPB) is the most effective marine barrier to dispersal of tropical shallow-water fauna in the world today. The fossil record of corals in the eastern Pacific suggests this has been true throughout the Cenozoic. In the Cretaceous, the EPB was apparently less effective in limiting dispersal. Equatorial circulation in the Pacific then appears to have been primarily east to west and the existence of oceanic atolls (now drowned guyots) in the eastern Pacific probably aided dispersal. Similarly, in the middle and early Mesozoic and late Paleozoic, terranes in the central tropical Pacific likely served as stepping stones to dispersal of tropical shelf faunas, reducing the isolating effect of an otherwise wider Pacific Ocean (Panthalassa).

  6. Dissolution kinetics of calcium carbonate in equatorial Pacific sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berelson, William M.; Hammond, Douglas E.; McManus, James; Kilgore, Tammy E.

    1994-06-01

    Benthic chambers were deployed in the equatorial eastern Pacific Ocean on a transect along the equator between 103°W and 140°W and on a transect across the equator at 140°W in order to establish the rate of calcium carbonate dissolution on the seafloor. Dissolution was determined from the rate of alkalinity increase within an incubation chamber, measured over an 80-120 hour incubation period. Dissolution rates were lowest at eastern Pacific sites (0.2-0.4 mmol CaCO3/m2/d) and highest at the equatorial, 140°W sites (0.5-0.7 mmol/m2/d). Both oxygen consumption rates and the degree of bottom water saturation govern dissolution rates. Measured dissolution and oxygen consumption rates are used with a numerical model to constrain the value of the dissolution rate constant k, formulated according to the equation developed by Keir [1980]: dissolution rate = kγ(1-Ω)n. The observed dissolution fluxes are predicted by the model when k = 5 to 100%/d and n = 4.5. This range of k values has important implications regarding the type of carbonate dissolving and its location within the sediment column. At low values of k, organic carbon rain rates to the seafloor become the dominant driving force of carbonate dissolution. At higher values of k, the degree of bottom water undersaturation becomes more important. Dissolution of carbonate within equatorial Pacific sediments can be adequately described with k = 20 ± 10%/d, a rate constant much lower than some previously used values. Dissolution rates do not vary significantly over chamber boundary layer thicknesses between 200 and 800 μm, indicating that dissolution is not controlled by hydrodynamic conditions. Chambers acidified with HCl yield very large dissolution rates, but for a given degree of acidification the dissolution rate was constant for sites ranging from water depths of 3300-4400 m. This implies that there are not more and less easily dissolved forms of CaCO3 arriving on the seafloor between these depths. A budget

  7. Panoramic view of the Mexican Pacific Coastline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    In this scenic panoramic view, the orbiter tail points toward the Mexican Pacific coastline (18.0N, 103.0W) near the international resort of Acapulco on the nearly cloud free eastern Pacific Ocean. Almost all of southern Mexico can be seen from Puerto Vallarta in the north to the Isthmus of Tehuantepec in the south. The cloud covered Gulf of Mexico at the horizon contrasts sharply with the blue Pacific.

  8. Wetland Plants of the Pacific Northwest.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-09-01

    Ownbey and J.V.. Thompson, 1969. Vascular Plants Of The Pacific Northwest. Five Volumes. Universi, / of Washington Press. A comprehensive flora of the Pacific...Northwest. Nomenclature used in this guide is from this treatise. Hitchcock, C. Leo and Arthur Cronquist, 1973. Flora Of The Pacific Northwest...States. Volumes I and /I. Dover Publications Inc. An exhaustive flora of the grasses. Horowitz, Elinor Lander, 1978. Our Nations Wetlands. An

  9. Ca2+ current vs. Ca2+ channel cooperativity of exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Matveev, Victor; Bertram, Richard; Sherman, Arthur

    2009-01-01

    Recently there has been significant interest and progress in the study of spatio-temporal dynamics of Ca2+ that triggers exocytosis at a fast chemical synapse, which requires understanding the contribution of individual calcium channels to the release of a single vesicle. Experimental protocols provide insight into this question by probing the sensitivity of exocytosis to Ca2+ influx. While varying extracellular or intracellular Ca2+ concentration assesses the intrinsic biochemical Ca2+ cooperativity of neurotransmitter release, varying the number of open Ca2+ channels using pharmacological channel block or the tail current titration probes the cooperativity between individual Ca2+ channels in triggering exocytosis. Despite the wide use of these Ca2+ sensitivity measurements, their interpretation often relies on heuristic arguments. Here we provide a detailed analysis of the Ca2+ sensitivity measures probed by these experimental protocols, present simple expressions for special cases, and demonstrate the distinction between the Ca2+ current cooperativity, defined by the relationship between exocytosis rate and the whole-terminal Ca2+ current magnitude, and the underlying Ca2+ channel cooperativity, defined as the average number of channels involved in the release of a single vesicle. We find simple algebraic expressions that show that the two are different but linearly related. Further, we use 3D computational modeling of buffered Ca2+ diffusion to analyze these distinct Ca2+ cooperativity measures, and demonstrate the role of endogenous Ca2+ buffers on such measures. We show that buffers can either increase or decrease the Ca2+ current cooperativity of exocytosis, depending on their concentration and the single-channel Ca2+ current. PMID:19793978

  10. 76 FR 66196 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Vessels Harvesting Pacific...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-26

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Vessels Harvesting Pacific Cod for Processing by the Inshore...; closure. SUMMARY: NMFS is prohibiting directed fishing for Pacific cod by vessels harvesting Pacific cod... to vessels harvesting Pacific cod for processing by the inshore component of the Western...

  11. 75 FR 64957 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Vessels Catching Pacific Cod...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-21

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Vessels Catching Pacific Cod for Processing by the Offshore...; closure. ] SUMMARY: NMFS is prohibiting directed fishing for Pacific cod by vessels catching Pacific cod... to vessels catching Pacific cod for processing by the offshore component of the Western...

  12. 75 FR 56016 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Vessels Catching Pacific Cod...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-15

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Vessels Catching Pacific Cod for Processing by the Inshore...; closure. SUMMARY: NMFS is prohibiting directed fishing for Pacific cod by vessels catching Pacific cod for... catching Pacific cod for processing by the inshore component of the Central Regulatory Area of the...

  13. 75 FR 63402 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Vessels Catching Pacific Cod...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-15

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Vessels Catching Pacific Cod for Processing by the Inshore...; closure. SUMMARY: NMFS is prohibiting directed fishing for Pacific cod by vessels catching Pacific cod for... catching Pacific cod for processing by the inshore component of the Western Regulatory Area of the...

  14. 76 FR 9693 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Vessels Harvesting Pacific...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-22

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Vessels Harvesting Pacific Cod for Processing by the Inshore...; closure. SUMMARY: NMFS is prohibiting directed fishing for Pacific cod by vessels harvesting Pacific cod... allowable catch (TAC) apportioned to vessels harvesting Pacific cod for processing by the inshore...

  15. 76 FR 5718 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Vessels Harvesting Pacific...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-02

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Vessels Harvesting Pacific Cod for Processing by the Inshore...; closure. SUMMARY: NMFS is prohibiting directed fishing for Pacific cod by vessels harvesting Pacific cod... allowable catch (TAC) apportioned to vessels harvesting Pacific cod for processing by the inshore...

  16. 75 FR 64956 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Vessels Catching Pacific Cod...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-21

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Vessels Catching Pacific Cod for Processing by the Offshore...; closure. SUMMARY: NMFS is prohibiting directed fishing for Pacific cod by vessels catching Pacific cod for... catching Pacific cod for processing by the offshore component of the Central Regulatory Area of the...

  17. Measurement of CA1P and CA in leaves

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, B.d.; Kobza, J.; Seemann, J.R. )

    1990-05-01

    Carboxyarabinitol-1-phosphate (CA1P) and carboxyarabinitol (CA) were assayed in leaves by isotope dilution. {sup 14}C-labeled standards were synthesized from (2-{sup 14}C) CABP using acid (CA1P) or alkaline (CA) phosphatase. Either was added to boiling 80% EtOH along with liquid N{sub 2}-killed leaves. Each was largely purified by anion exchange chromatography. CA1P samples were subjected to 2D-TLE/TLC. The specific activity of the {sup 14}C-containing spot was measured using alkaline phosphatase. CA samples were run on an HPLC and the specific activity was determined using a UV monitor and a flow-through radioisotope detector. In 3 of the tested species, light/dark amount of CA1P (nmol/mg Chl) were kidney bean, 0.7/67; sugar beet, 0.8/33; and Alocasia, 0/3.4. Light/dark CA levels (nmol/mg Chl) in these respective species were 897/653, 3.2/3.5, and 5.7/4.6. These results support the hypothesis that CA is a product of CA1P metabolism in vivo under high light, but also indicate that CA is not the only intermediate involved in CA1P synthesis under low light/dark conditions.

  18. Sediment Evaluation Framework for the Pacific Northwest

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Sediment Evaluation Framework provides a regional framework for assessment, characterization and management of sediments in the Pacific Northwest to determine suitability for unconfined in-water disposal.

  19. Contact EPA Region 9 (Pacific Southwest)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Contact EPA Region 9, Pacific Southwest: 24-hour report of violations and emergencies, environmental complaint tip line, Environmental Information Center, Library, Reception, Employee Locator, Media, Press, Public Affairs.

  20. Amazon Deforestation Impacts on Pacific Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsey, L. A.; Randall, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    Variability in eastern Pacific sea surface temperature (SST) associated with the El Niño Southern Oscillation is known to affect Amazonian precipitation, but to what extent does changing Amazonian vegetation and rainfall impact eastern Pacific SST? Correlations between Amazonian rainfall rates and other atmospheric parameters (e.g. global precipitation, surface air temperature, vertical velocity, etc.) over the eastern Pacific indicate a strong relationship between these processes, but it does not show causality. In order to investigate the impact on the Pacific climate, the Community Earth System Model is used to test an extreme case of deforestation where broadleaf evergreen trees over the Amazon are replaced by C4 grass.

  1. On the scalability of the Albany/FELIX first-order Stokes approximation ice sheet solver for large-scale simulations of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Tezaur, Irina K.; Tuminaro, Raymond S.; Perego, Mauro; Salinger, Andrew G.; Price, Stephen F.

    2015-01-01

    We examine the scalability of the recently developed Albany/FELIX finite-element based code for the first-order Stokes momentum balance equations for ice flow. We focus our analysis on the performance of two possible preconditioners for the iterative solution of the sparse linear systems that arise from the discretization of the governing equations: (1) a preconditioner based on the incomplete LU (ILU) factorization, and (2) a recently-developed algebraic multigrid (AMG) preconditioner, constructed using the idea of semi-coarsening. A strong scalability study on a realistic, high resolution Greenland ice sheet problem reveals that, for a given number of processor cores, the AMG preconditioner results in faster linear solve times but the ILU preconditioner exhibits better scalability. A weak scalability study is performed on a realistic, moderate resolution Antarctic ice sheet problem, a substantial fraction of which contains floating ice shelves, making it fundamentally different from the Greenland ice sheet problem. Here, we show that as the problem size increases, the performance of the ILU preconditioner deteriorates whereas the AMG preconditioner maintains scalability. This is because the linear systems are extremely ill-conditioned in the presence of floating ice shelves, and the ill-conditioning has a greater negative effect on the ILU preconditioner than on the AMG preconditioner.

  2. Water depth-composition trends in ferromanganese crusts adjacent to the California margin compared to those in equatorial Pacific crusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, T. A.; Hein, J. R.

    2013-12-01

    Ferromanganese (Fe-Mn) crusts have been used as proxies for paleo-seawater chemistry; however, element concentrations and growth rates in crusts can vary depending on the region, latitude, and water depth. Here we will look at 130 Fe-Mn crusts from seven seamounts adjacent to the California (CA) margin to explore trends in composition with water depth and latitude. Crusts were collected by ROV, resulting in a dataset with exact water depth and location coordinates. Water depth ranges from 570 to 3,934 m along a 700-km transect running roughly parallel to the CA margin. Crust samples used for comparison were collected by dredging along transects following the Gilbert Ridge and Tokelau Seamounts in the western equatorial Pacific, with water depths ranging from about 1,500 to 4,800 m. In addition to variations with latitude and water depth, element concentrations in CA margin crusts are influenced by high primary productivity in surface waters, terrestrial input, and upwelling along the continental margin. Elements associated with terrestrial input, including Na, Si, Al, K, Pb, and particularly Th, are enriched in CA margin crusts relative to crusts from the equatorial Pacific transects. Si is also associated with the biogenic phase, as are P, Ba, and Cu but these elements are lower in CA margin crusts. Ba is a proxy for primary productivity. CA margin crusts show Ba increasing with increasing water depth, while equatorial Pacific crusts show the inverse trend. In equatorial Pacific crusts, Ba correlates with decreasing latitude, which reflects increasing proximity to the high productivity zone of equatorial upwelling; additionally, local obstructional upwelling associated with primary productivity around seamounts and islands enhances the productivity signal. Cu, which is associated with the manganese oxide phase, in addition to the biogenic phase, also increases with water depth along the CA margin; this is consistent with the seawater profile for dissolved Cu. In

  3. Automation of the University of the South Pacific Library and the Pacific Information Centre. A Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrer, Daniel

    The Pacific Information Center (PIC) was established in 1983 to identify, collect, and record information about materials from and relating to the South Pacific region. The project involves sharing access and information among countries in this region. PIC, which works in conjunction with the University of the South Pacific (USP) Library, receives…

  4. 78 FR 18323 - Pacific Halibut Fishery; Guideline Harvest Levels for the Guided Sport Fishery for Pacific...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-26

    ... Levels for the Guided Sport Fishery for Pacific Halibut in International Pacific Halibut Commission... 2013 Pacific halibut guideline harvest levels (GHLs) for the guided sport fishery in International... to inform the public about the 2013 GHLs for the guided sport fishery for halibut. The GHLs...

  5. 76 FR 54739 - Pacific Halibut Fishery; Guideline Harvest Levels for the Guided Sport Fishery for Pacific...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-02

    ... Levels for the Guided Sport Fishery for Pacific Halibut in International Pacific Halibut Commission... 2011 Pacific halibut guideline harvest levels (GHLs) for the guided sport fishery in International... to inform the public about the 2011 GHLs for the guided sport fishery for halibut. The GHLs...

  6. Parental Involvement in Education: What Works in the Pacific? Promising Practices in the Pacific Region.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koki, Stan; Lee, Harvey

    Increasing parent involvement in the Pacific region requires an understanding of the traditional system of Pacific education. While historically Pacific education involved parents and community members as children's first teachers, the American model of education virtually ignores this tradition. The school assumes the entire responsibility for…

  7. 78 FR 77659 - Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-24

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XD038 Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public... (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: The Pacific Fishery Management Council's (Pacific Council) Ad Hoc Trawl Groundfish Electronic Monitoring Technical Advisory Committee (GEMTAC)...

  8. 78 FR 26616 - Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-07

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC660 Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public... (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: The Pacific Fishery Management Council's (Pacific Council) Groundfish Management Team (GMT) will hold a webinar to discuss the...

  9. Cloud water composition over the southeastern Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beem, K. B.; Lee, T.; Shen, X.; Li, Y.; Collett, J. L., Jr.

    2010-07-01

    Cloud water was collected over the remote southeastern Pacific off the coast of northern Chile in October and November 2008. Samples were collected with an axial-flow cloud water collector aboard the NSF/NCAR C-130 aircraft. Multiple samples were collected during each flight in a wing pod canister. Sample pH was measured on-site after each flight while samples for peroxide, formaldehyde, a suite of organic acids, total organic carbon, sulfur (IV), trace metals and major ions (Cl-, NO3-, SO42-, Na+, NH4+, K+, Ca2+, and Mg2+) were preserved on-site and analyzed after the field campaign. Over the 5 week study period there were 14 flights and 73 samples collected. Our work provides a set of key cloud chemistry measurements for this remote region of the world. The results presented here will address the chemical composition of marine clouds present in the study region, examine spatial variability in cloud composition, and address the relative importance and rates of aqueous S(IV) oxidation by hydrogen peroxide, by ozone, and by oxygen (catalyzed by iron and manganese). Sample pH varied somewhat significantly over the course of the campaign, the highest pH measured was 7.2 while the lowest was 2.9. Concentrations of major anions and cations also varied significantly from flight to flight and on some flights from sample to sample. Unsurprisingly, an average of all samples indicates that Na+ and Cl comprised the largest fraction of measured anions and cations followed by SO42-, Mg2+, NH4+, Ca2+, NO3-, and K+. In addition, total mass was dominated by inorganic species with organic matter contributing only 4% of the mass. The majority of organic species have not been identified. Of the identified organic species formaldehyde, oxalate, formate, and acetate contributed the most to the mass and combined account for 10% mass of organics. Cloud processing is an important pathway for oxidation of SO2 to sulfate. Aqueous S(IV) oxidation by hydrogen peroxide, by ozone, and by trace

  10. Temperature and [CO3 ] Effects on Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca in the Benthic Foraminifera Species of Hoeglundina Elegans and Cibicidoides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lear, C. H.; Rosenthal, Y.; Oppo, D. W.; Linsley, B. K.

    2005-12-01

    Current core-top calibrations suggest that the temperature sensitivity of Mg/Ca in Cibicidoides sp. tests is essentially identical with the 10% increase in Mg/Ca per 1°C observed in many planktonic species. However, there is also evidence suggesting that non temperature-related effects may exert additional control on Mg/Ca in foraminiferal calcite. Here we use core-top samples from Atlantic (Little Bahama Banks, LBB; Arctic) and Pacific (Hawaii, and Indonesia) depth transects to assess the influence of bottom water temperature (BWT) and carbonate saturation levels on metal/Ca ratios in the aragonitic benthic foraminifer Hoeglundina elegans and calcitic Cibicidoides sp. We find that in situ CO3 ion concentrations play an important role in determining the Mg/Ca ratios in Cibicidoides sp. and Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca in H. elegans. The CO3 ion effect is limited, however, only to relatively low saturation levels, whereas at over-saturated levels, temperature exert the dominant effect on these metal ratios. Because we find no significant difference between results obtained on ``live'' and ``dead'' specimens, we propose that these differences are due to primary effects on metal uptake during test formations and not because of dissolution. Based on the new results we reappraise the Mg/Ca-temperature relationship of Cibicidoides sp. and propose a new calibration. We also propose that Sr/Ca and Mg/Ca in H. elegans tests can be used to reconstruct thermocline temperatures. Sr/Ca-thermometry in H. elegans may be especially useful in cases where the use of Mg/Ca thermometry in calcitic foraminfera has been compromised by contamination issues. In both cases, temperature estimates in low carbonate saturation levels may be grossly inaccurate.

  11. 76 FR 9001 - Pacific Fishery Management Council (Pacific Council); March 4-10, 2011 Pacific Council Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-16

    ... Council); March 4-10, 2011 Pacific Council Meetings AGENCY: NMFS, National Oceanic and Atmospheric...- 10, 2011. The Pacific Council meeting will begin on Saturday, March 5, 2011 at 8 a.m., reconvening each day through Thursday, March 10, 2011. All meetings are open to the public, except a closed...

  12. Tectonic Evolution of the Jurassic Pacific Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakanishi, M.; Ishihara, T.

    2015-12-01

    We present the tectonic evolution of the Jurassic Pacific plate based on magnetic anomly lineations and abyssal hills. The Pacific plate is the largest oceanic plate on Earth. It was born as a microplate aroud the Izanagi-Farallon-Phoenix triple junction about 192 Ma, Early Jurassic [Nakanishi et al., 1992]. The size of the Pacific plate at 190 Ma was nearly half that of the present Easter or Juan Fernandez microplates in the East Pacific Rise [Martinez et at, 1991; Larson et al., 1992]. The plate boundary surrounding the Pacific plate from Early Jurassic to Early Cretaceous involved the four triple junctions among Pacific, Izanagi, Farallon, and Phoenix plates. The major tectonic events as the formation of oceanic plateaus and microplates during the period occurred in the vicinity of the triple junctions [e.g., Nakanishi and Winterer, 1998; Nakanishi et al., 1999], implying that the study of the triple junctions is indispensable for understanding the tectonic evolution of the Pacific plate. Previous studies indicate instability of the configuration of the triple junctions from Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous (155-125 Ma). On the other hand, the age of the birth of the Pacific plate was determined assuming that all triple junctions had kept their configurations for about 30 m.y. [Nakanishi et al., 1992] because of insufficient information of the tectonic history of the Pacific plate before Late Jurassic.Increase in the bathymetric and geomagnetic data over the past two decades enables us to reveal the tectonic evolution of the Pacific-Izanagi-Farallon triple junction before Late Jurassic. Our detailed identication of magnetic anomaly lineations exposes magnetic bights before anomaly M25. We found the curved abyssal hills originated near the triple junction, which trend is parallel to magnetic anomaly lineations. These results imply that the configuration of the Pacific-Izanagi-Farallon triple junction had been RRR before Late Jurassic.

  13. Asia-Pacific energy database

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    Statistical data is presented in graphic and tabular form on the petroleum market in Asia and Pacific nations. Seven major categories are reported: (1) primary energy production and consumption; (2) historical petroleum product demand and forecasts; (3) crude oil production and exports; (4) import dependence; (5) crude and product pricing assumptions; (6) market share of refined products by suppliers in selected countries; and (7) refining margins. Petroleum demand and forecasts and crude oil production and exports are reported by country. Historical data are presented from 1970 through 1996, and forecasts are made through 2010.

  14. Flower scents from the Pacific.

    PubMed

    Joulain, Daniel

    2008-06-01

    For a long time, exotic scents from the islands of the South Pacific have universally been appreciated. Most frequently, fragrant flowers (e.g., frangipani, jasmine sambac, tiaré, pua kenikeni) are used locally for ornamental purposes such as flower garlands (leis). Despite their powerful and delightful fragrance, very few of these flowers have been commercially employed in this part of the world for perfume manufacturing. Creative perfumers are nevertheless strongly interested to better understand these fragrances and to use them, either genuine or artificially reconstituted. Analytical results on the fragrance of these flowers are reported, together with some economical considerations.

  15. Pacific Northwest Resources Inventory Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, J. D.

    1976-01-01

    The Pacific Northwest Land Resource Inventory Demonstration project is designed to demonstrate to users from state and local agencies in Washington, Oregon, and Idaho the cost effective role that Landsat derived information can play in natural resource planning and management when properly supported by ground and aircraft data. The project has been organized into five main phases: (1) maps and overlays, (2) early digital image analysis, (3) demonstration of applications using interactive image analysis, (4) Landsat products and land resources information systems, and (5) documentation. The demonstration project has been applied to Washington forestry, water inventory in southern Idaho, and monitoring of tansy ragwort in western Oregon.

  16. 78 FR 39583 - Fisheries in the Western Pacific; Fishing in the Marianas Trench, Pacific Remote Islands, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-02

    ... Pacific; Fishing in the Marianas Trench, Pacific Remote Islands, and Rose Atoll Marine National Monuments... reports to fish in the Marianas Trench, Pacific Remote Islands, and Rose Atoll Marine National...

  17. Pacific Standards for Excellence in Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacific Region Educational Lab., Honolulu, HI.

    The Pacific Mathematics and Science Regional Consortium has developed standards for excellence in mathematics and science education appropriate to the Pacific regions. These standards are presented in three volumes, and the series is firmly based upon the research findings of scientists, teachers, curriculum developers, and others. This volume…

  18. Unity and Diversity in the Pacific Islands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wesley-Smith, Terence

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the three Pacific cultural areas of Polynesia, Melanesia, and Micronesia and identifies the differences within and between the groups. States that a regionwide sense of identity has emerged because these small nations have gained independence from colonizing countries and joined regional institutions such as the South Pacific Forum. (GEA)

  19. Pacific Educational Computer Network Study. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawaii Univ., Honolulu. ALOHA System.

    The Pacific Educational Computer Network Feasibility Study examined technical and non-technical aspects of the formation of an international Pacific Area computer network for higher education. The technical study covered the assessment of the feasibility of a packet-switched satellite and radio ground distribution network for data transmission…

  20. Genetic variation and distribution of Pacific crabapple

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Pacific crabapple (Malus fusca (Raf.) C.K. Schneid.) is found in moist coastal habitats in the Pacific Northwest. It is one of four apple species native to North America. Malus fusca is culturally important to First Nations of the region who value and use the fruits of this species as food, bark...

  1. We, the Asian and Pacific Islander Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Dwight L.; And Others

    Demographic data are presented about the people who have immigrated to the United States from Asia and the Pacific Islands. Twelve figures (pie charts, bar graphs, and maps), and eight tables provide detailed, statistical information on such things as (1) distribution of Asians and Pacific Islanders in the United States, (2) states with the…

  2. 33 CFR 165.2030 - Pacific Area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... of the United States within the boundaries of the U.S. Coast Guard Pacific Area, which includes the... boundaries of the U.S. Coast Guard Pacific Area and the Eleventh, Thirteenth, Fourteenth, and Seventeenth U.S... defensive sea area. (c) The Navigation Rules shall apply at all times within a naval vessel protection...

  3. 33 CFR 165.2030 - Pacific Area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... of the United States within the boundaries of the U.S. Coast Guard Pacific Area, which includes the... boundaries of the U.S. Coast Guard Pacific Area and the Eleventh, Thirteenth, Fourteenth, and Seventeenth U.S... defensive sea area. (c) The Navigation Rules shall apply at all times within a naval vessel protection...

  4. 33 CFR 165.2030 - Pacific Area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... of the United States within the boundaries of the U.S. Coast Guard Pacific Area, which includes the... boundaries of the U.S. Coast Guard Pacific Area and the Eleventh, Thirteenth, Fourteenth, and Seventeenth U.S... defensive sea area. (c) The Navigation Rules shall apply at all times within a naval vessel protection...

  5. 33 CFR 165.2030 - Pacific Area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... of the United States within the boundaries of the U.S. Coast Guard Pacific Area, which includes the... boundaries of the U.S. Coast Guard Pacific Area and the Eleventh, Thirteenth, Fourteenth, and Seventeenth U.S... defensive sea area. (c) The Navigation Rules shall apply at all times within a naval vessel protection...

  6. On the Timing of Glacial Terminations in the Equatorial Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khider, D.; Ahn, S.; Lisiecki, L. E.; Lawrence, C.; Kienast, M.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the mechanisms through which the climate system responds to orbital insolation changes requires establishing the timing of events imprinted on the geological record. In this study, we investigate the relative timing of the glacial terminations across the equatorial Pacific in order to identify a possible mechanism through which the tropics may have influenced a global climate response. The relative termination timing between the eastern and western equatorial Pacific was assessed from 15 published SST records based on Globigerinoides ruber Mg/Ca or alkenone thermometry. The novelty of our study lies in the accounting of the various sources of uncertainty inherent to paleoclimate reconstruction and timing analysis. Specifically, we use a Monte-Carlo process allowing sampling of possible realizations of the time series that are functions of the uncertainty of the benthic δ18O alignment to a global benthic curve, of the SST uncertainty, and of the uncertainty in the change point, which we use as a definition for the termination timing. We find that the uncertainty on the relative timing estimates is on the order of several thousand years, and stems from age model uncertainty (60%) and the uncertainty in the change point detection (40%). Random sources of uncertainty are the main contributor, and, therefore, averaging over a large datasets and/or higher resolution records should yield more precise and accurate estimates of the relative lead-lag. However, at this time, the number of records is not sufficient to identify any significant differences in the timing of the last three glacial terminations in SST records from the Eastern and Western Tropical Pacific.

  7. The Tertiary Arc Chain in the Western Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honza, E.

    1991-02-01

    The arcs bordering the Pacific Plate on the Western and Southwestern Pacific rim are reconstructed since their initiation in the Eocene and Oligocene. They occur in a zone forming an arc chain from the Western Pacific tropics to the eastern margin of Australia. They are the Bonin, Mariana, Yap, Palau, Halmahera, North New Guinea-West Melanesia, Solomon, Vanuatu, and Tonga-Kermadec Arcs, designated here the Tertiary Arc Chain. They are associated with the formation and consumption of backarc basins. Reversals of arc polarity and episodic subduction has occurred in some of them. The Tertiary Arc Chain is characterized by four major stages in its evolution which can be seen characteristically in some of the arcs. The first stage is the occurrence of the arc chain from the middle Eocene to earliest Oligocene. The second stage is the formation of the backarc basins from the early to late Oligocene. The third stage is the occurrence of double arcs on the inner side of the arc chain in the early to middle Miocene and the fourth stage is the reversal of arc polarities due to collisions since the late Miocene. The backarc basins associated with the arcs of the Tertiary Arc Chain have fixed limits of duration in their evolution. The backarc basins initially form 15 million years after the initiation of the volcanic arc. Several to 10 million years after the initial opening, backarc spreading terminates. Approximately 20 million years after the cessation of the backarc spreading, a second phase of opening occurs in the backarc region. In the case of arc collision, reversal of the arc polarity occurs if there is oceanic crust on the backarc side, and opening of a backarc basin occurs within several million years. These occurrences and durations have a variation of ca. 3-5 million years.

  8. Ca isotope variations in Allende

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jungck, M. H. A.; Shimamura, T.; Lugmair, G. W.

    1984-01-01

    Ca-isotope measurements of Allende Ca-Al-rich inclusions (CAIs), together with those on an apatite-enriched fraction from Orgueil, indicate the existence of widespread excesses on the neutron-rich isotope Ca-48. Isotopic anomalies are noted in 7 out of 11 CAIs analyzed. This abundance of isotopic excesses places Ca alongside Ti and O, although no clear correlation has yet been found between Ca-48 and Ti-50, which are thought to be coproduced by neutron-rich nucleosynthetic processes within stars. It is suggested that the higher volatility of Ca, by comparison with Ti compounds, led to a variable dilution with isotopically normal Ca in vaporization and recondensation processes in stellar envelopes, the interstellar medium, and/or the solar nebula.

  9. Modeling North Pacific Time Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overland, J. E.; Percival, D. B.; Mofjeld, H. O.

    2002-05-01

    We present a case study in modeling the North Pacific (NP) index, a time series of the wintertime Aleutian low sea level pressure from 1900 to 1999. We consider three statistical models, namely, a Gaussian stationary autoregressive process, a Gaussian fractionally difference (FD) or ``long-memory" process, and a ``signal plus noise" process consisting of a square wave oscillation with a pentadecadal period embedded in Gaussian white noise. Each model depends upon three parameters, so all three models are equally simple. The shortness of the time series makes it unrealistic to formally prefer one model over the other: we estimate it would take a 300 year record to differentiate between the models. Although the models fit equally well, they have quite different implications for the long-term behavior of the NP index, e.g. generation of regimes of characteristic lengths. Additional information and physical arguments may add support for a particular model. The FD - ``long memory" process suggests multiple physical contributions with different damping constants many North Pacific biological time series which are influenced by atmospheric and oceanic processes, show regime-like ecosystem reorganizations.

  10. Central East Pacific Flight Routing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grabbe, Shon; Sridhar, Banavar; Kopardekar, Parimal; Cheng, Nadia

    2006-01-01

    With the introduction of the Federal Aviation Administration s Advanced Technology and Oceanic Procedures system at the Oakland Oceanic Center, a level of automation now exists in the oceanic environment to potentially begin accommodating increased user preferred routing requests. This paper presents the results of an initial feasibility assessment which examines the potential benefits of transitioning from the fixed Central East Pacific routes to user preferred routes. As a surrogate for the actual user-provided routing requests, a minimum-travel-time, wind-optimal dynamic programming algorithm was developed and utilized in this paper. After first describing the characteristics (e.g., origin airport, destination airport, vertical distribution and temporal distribution) of the westbound flights utilizing the Central East Pacific routes on Dec. 14-16 and 19-20, the results of both a flight-plan-based simulation and a wind-optimal-based simulation are presented. Whereas the lateral and longitudinal distribution of the aircraft trajectories in these two simulations varied dramatically, the number of simulated first-loss-of-separation events remained relatively constant. One area of concern that was uncovered in this initial analysis was a potential workload issue associated with the redistribution of traffic in the oceanic sectors due to thc prevailing wind patterns.

  11. Unlocking the Secrets of the Geodynamo: the Southwest Pacific Key

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, G. M.; Greve, A.; Kinger, R.; de Gelder, G.; Fitzsimons, S.; Howarth, J. D.; Hill, M. J.; Nilsson, A.; Sheppard, P.

    2014-12-01

    Three years ago we embarked on a project to boost the coverage of palaeosecular variation data from the Southwest Pacific region, and so to provide the means to enhance global and regional field models, dating tools derived from them, and understanding of features of the geodynamo, particularly beneath this region of the Earth's surface. Here we present our progress to date, including lake sediment records covering the entire Holocene, archaeomagnetic data from Maori cooking ("hangi") stones dating back to the earliest occupation of New Zealand, archaeointensities from Lapita pottery from the Pacific Islands (Fiji, Tonga and Papua New Guinea) dating back to ca 3000 BP, and palaeomagnetic directions and intensities from volcanic rocks and lava flows of the North Island of New Zealand. Central to the project is a composite lake sediment record, constrained by a high-resolution radiocarbon-based chronology, which provides a complete record of declination, inclination and relative palaeointensity for New Zealand through the Holocene. This is complemented by directions and absolute intensities from archaeological materials, most of which have associated radiocarbon age control, and lavas with 40Ar-39Ar age constraints, the rock magnetism and analytical details of which are discussed in accompanying posters. The overall picture reveals several large amplitude directional swings in the early Holocene magnetic field, followed by relatively low amplitude secular variation for several thousand years leading to the present trend to increasingly easterly declination and steep inclination as the south magnetic pole moves further off the Antarctic continent towards New Zealand.

  12. Western Pacific thermocline variability in orbital- and millennial-timescale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagawa, T.; Timmermann, A.; Tigchelaar, M.; Murayama, M.; Okamura, K.

    2015-12-01

    The western tropical Pacific is a region where sea surface temperature (SST) is warmest in the world ocean. Thickness of surface warm water as well as SST is expected to have an influence on regulating global climate because of its potential to provide heat to atmosphere. A number of paleoceanographic studies have reconstructed SST in this region and revealed that changes in SST is very similar to atmospheric CO2 in glacial-interglacial timescale. However, little is known about changes surface warm water thickness, i.e. thermocline depth, in the past. For better understanding the heat content of ocean surface, changes in depth of thermocline is investigated. Here, we reconstruct sub-surface water temperature in the western tropical Pacific for the last 380 kyr. The sub-surface temperature reconstruction is done by Mg/Ca-thermometry of thermocline dweller planktonic foraminifer, Pulleniatina obliquiloculata. This species dwells around the depth of thermocline, and its temperature record is expected to reflect vertical migration of thermocline. The glacial-interglacial amplitude of sub-surface temperature is larger than that of SST. The precessional cycle is dominant in the sub-surface temperature variability. Such features are well consistent with model output by EMIC LOVECLIM although amplitudes are much smaller in model. Concomitant changes of sub-surface temperature and terrestrial input suggests that thermocline change is closely related to precessional controlled ITCZ movement. The high frequent variability during the MIS3 implies D-O oscillation related thermocline change in the millennial timescale.

  13. Two new species and a remarkable record of the genus Dendronotus from the North Pacific and Arctic oceans (Nudibranchia)

    PubMed Central

    Korshunova, Tatiana; Sanamyan, Nadezhda; Zimina, Olga; Fletcher, Karin; Martynov, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Two new species of the nudibranch genus Dendronotus, Dendronotus arcticus sp. n. and Dendronotus robilliardi sp. n., are described from the Arctic and North Pacific oceans respectively, based on morphological and molecular data, and the North Pacific Dendronotus albus is revealed to be a species complex. The species Dendronotus robilliardi sp. n. is described from the northwestern Pacific (Kamchatka) differing from the northeastern Pacific Dendronotus albus by molecular and morphological data. The synonymy of Dendronotus diversicolor with Dendronotus albus is confirmed by analysis of their original descriptions. An endemic Arctic species Dendronotus arcticus sp. n. is also described here, differing substantially from all species of the genus Dendronotus using morphological and molecular data. An unusual record of the recently described Dendronotus kamchaticus Ekimova, Korshunova, Schepetov, Neretina, Sanamyan, Martynov, 2015 is also presented, the first from the northeastern Pacific, geographically separated from the type locality of this species in the northwestern Pacific by a distance ca. 6000 km; molecular data show them to belong to the same species. PMID:27917040

  14. Subplasma membrane Ca2+ signals.

    PubMed

    McCarron, John G; Chalmers, Susan; Olson, Marnie L; Girkin, John M

    2012-07-01

    Ca(2+) may selectively activate various processes in part by the cell's ability to localize changes in the concentration of the ion to specific subcellular sites. Interestingly, these Ca(2+) signals begin most often at the plasma membrane space so that understanding subplasma membrane signals is central to an appreciation of local signaling. Several experimental procedures have been developed to study Ca(2+) signals near the plasma membrane, but probably the most prevalent involve the use of fluorescent Ca(2+) indicators and fall into two general approaches. In the first, the Ca(2+) indicators themselves are specifically targeted to the subplasma membrane space to measure Ca(2+) only there. Alternatively, the indicators are allowed to be dispersed throughout the cytoplasm, but the fluorescence emanating from the Ca(2+) signals at the subplasma membrane space is selectively measured using high resolution imaging procedures. Although the targeted indicators offer an immediate appeal because of selectivity and ease of use, their limited dynamic range and slow response to changes in Ca(2+) are a shortcoming. Use of targeted indicators is also largely restricted to cultured cells. High resolution imaging applied with rapidly responding small molecule Ca(2+) indicators can be used in all cells and offers significant improvements in dynamic range and speed of response of the indicator. The approach is technically difficult, however, and realistic calibration of signals is not possible. In this review, a brief overview of local subplasma membrane Ca(2+) signals and methods for their measurement is provided.

  15. Coachella Valley, CA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    These band composites, acquired on June 4, 2000, cover a 11 by 13.5 km sub-scene in the Coachella Valley, CA. The area is shown by the yellow box on the full scene in the LOWER RIGHT corner, northwest of the Salton Sea. This is a major agricultural region of California, growing fruit and produce throughout the year. Different combinations of ASTER bands help identify the different crop types. UPPER LEFT: bands 3, 2, 1 as red, green, and blue (RGB); UPPER RIGHT: bands 4, 2, 1 as RGB; LOWER LEFT: bands 4, 3, 2 as RGB. The image is centered at 33.6 degrees north latitude, 116.1 degrees west longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  16. Local Aqueous Solvation Structure Around Ca2+ During Ca2+---Cl– Pair Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, Marcel D.; Mundy, Christopher J.

    2016-03-03

    The molecular details of single ion solvation around Ca2+ and ion-pairing of Ca2--Cl- are investigated using ab initio molecular dynamics. The use of empirical dispersion corrections to the BLYP functional are investigated by comparison to experimentally available extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements, which probes the first solvation shell in great detail. Besides finding differences in the free-energy for both ion-pairing and the coordination number of ion solvation between the quantum and classical descriptions of interaction, there were important differences found between dispersion corrected and uncorrected density functional theory (DFT). Specifically, we show significantly different free-energy landscapes for both coordination number of Ca2+ and its ion-pairing with Cl- depending on the DFT simulation protocol. Our findings produce a self-consistent treatment of short-range solvent response to the ion and the intermediate to long-range collective response of the electrostatics of the ion-ion interaction to produce a detailed picture of ion-pairing that is consistent with experiment. MDB is supported by MS3 (Materials Synthesis and Simulation Across Scales) Initiative at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. It was conducted under the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program at PNNL, a multiprogram national laboratory operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy. CJM acknowledges support from US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. This research used resources of the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center, a DOE Office of Science User Facility supported by the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. Additional computing resources were generously allocated by PNNL's Institutional Computing program. The authors thank Prof. Tom Beck for discussions regarding

  17. Pacific Northwest Laboratory CALIOPE overview

    SciTech Connect

    McDowell, R.S.; Kelly, J.F.; Sharpe, S.W.

    1995-03-01

    This overview covers progress in the following areas in which Pacific Northwest Laboratory contributes to the CALIOPE Program: (1) Fabrication of electro-optic modulators to generate FM-coding on IR lasers in the 8-12 and 3-5 {mu}m regions. (2) IR spectroscopy of signature species, abnormal isotopic distributions, hydrolysis and kinetics of effluents interacting with the atmosphere, and reflectance measurements of natural surfaces. (3) Systems analysis of FM-DIAL concepts, including lateral phase coherence and MTF measurements, and laboratory tests of detector technology and demodulation methods. (4) Field tests of FM-DIAL, covering field validation of portable diode laser concepts, FM-CO{sub 2} interrogation of Hanford sites, and signal returns from natural specular surfaces. (5) Ancillary matters: ground-truthing at Hanford (and RSTR?), countermeasures, and new laser design concepts.

  18. Salinity fronts in the tropical Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Kao, Hsun-Ying; Lagerloef, Gary S E

    2015-02-01

    This study delineates the salinity fronts (SF) across the tropical Pacific, and describes their variability and regional dynamical significance using Aquarius satellite observations. From the monthly maps of the SF, we find that the SF in the tropical Pacific are (1) usually observed around the boundaries of the fresh pool under the intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ), (2) stronger in boreal autumn than in other seasons, and (3) usually stronger in the eastern Pacific than in the western Pacific. The relationship between the SF and the precipitation and the surface velocity are also discussed. We further present detailed analysis of the SF in three key tropical Pacific regions. Extending zonally around the ITCZ, where the temperature is nearly homogeneous, we find the strong SF of 1.2 psu from 7° to 11°N to be the main contributor of the horizontal density difference of 0.8 kg/m(3). In the eastern Pacific, we observe a southward extension of the SF in the boreal spring that could be driven by both precipitation and horizontal advection. In the western Pacific, the importance of these newly resolved SF associated with the western Pacific warm/fresh pool and El Niño southern oscillations are also discussed in the context of prior literature. The main conclusions of this study are that (a) Aquarius satellite salinity measurements reveal the heretofore unknown proliferation, structure, and variability of surface salinity fronts, and that (b) the fine-scale structures of the SF in the tropical Pacific yield important new information on the regional air-sea interaction and the upper ocean dynamics.

  19. Temperature and carbonate ion effects on Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios in benthic foraminifera: Aragonitic species Hoeglundina elegans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenthal, Yair; Lear, Caroline H.; Oppo, Delia W.; Linsley, Braddock K.

    2006-03-01

    Core top samples from Atlantic (Little Bahama Banks (LBB)) and Pacific (Hawaii and Indonesia) depth transects have been analyzed in order to assess the influence of bottom water temperature (BWT) and aragonite saturation levels on Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios in the aragonitic benthic foraminifer Hoeglundina elegans. Both the Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios in H. elegans tests show a general decrease with increasing water depth. Although at each site the decreasing trends are consistent with the in situ temperature profile, Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios in LBB are substantially higher than in Indonesia and Hawaii at comparable water depths with a greater difference observed with increasing water depth. Because we find no significant difference between results obtained on "live" and "dead" specimens, we propose that these differences are due to primary effects on the metal uptake during test formation. Evaluation of the water column properties at each site suggests that in situ CO3 ion concentrations play an important role in determining the H. elegans Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios. The CO3 ion effect is limited, however, only to aragonite saturation levels ([ΔCO3]aragonite) below 15 μmol kg-1. Above this level, temperature exerts a dominant effect. Accordingly, we propose that Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca in H. elegans tests can be used to reconstruct thermocline temperatures only in waters oversaturated with respect to the mineral aragonite using the following relationships: Mg/Ca = (0.034 ± 0.002)BWT + (0.96 ± 0.03) and Sr/Ca = (0.060 ± 0.002)BWT + (1.53 ± 0.03) (for [ΔCO3]aragonite > 15 μmol kg-1). The standard error associated with these equations is about ±1.1°C. Reconstruction of deeper water temperatures is complicated because in undersaturated waters, changes in Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios reflect a combination of changes in [CO3] and BWT. Overall, we find that Sr/Ca, rather than Mg/Ca, in H. elegans may be a more accurate proxy for reconstructing paleotemperatures.

  20. Teaching about the Pacific Rim. ERIC Digest No. 43.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wojtan, Linda S.

    This ERIC Digest examines: (1) the meaning of the term "Pacific Rim"; (2) reasons for emphasizing the Pacific Rim in the social studies curriculum; and (3) useful strategies for teaching about this part of the world. The terms, Pacific Rim and Pacific Basin, are used. interchangeably; however, the "Rim" refers to those nations…

  1. Changing Trends and Variance in Eastern Equatorial Pacific Sea Surface Temperatures over the Twentieth Century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez, G.; Cole, J. E.; Thompson, D. M.; Tudhope, A. W.

    2015-12-01

    Global climate models and instrumental datasets often disagree regarding sea surface temperature (SST) trends in the tropical Pacific. Coral Sr/Ca records with sub-seasonal resolution provide SST proxies that complement and extend limited instrumental records. We present a new partially replicated Sr/Ca-SST record from two Galápagos corals (Isla Wolf, at 1°24'N, 91°48'W), that spans 1937-2010. The record shows high SST variance in the region, which increases nearly twofold after the late 1970s. Similarly, there is little trend in the mean until 1976, after which SSTs warm during all seasons. Both the increase in variance and the trend are strongest during the warm season, leading to progressively more anomalous conditions during El Niño events. To investigate recent changes in the eastern equatorial Pacific since the 1976/1977 climate transition, we compare the Galápagos record to a published coral Sr/Ca-SST record from Clipperton Atoll (10°18'N, 109°13'W, spanning 1874-1993; Wu et al., 2014, Palaeogeogr. Palaeoclimatol. Palaeoecol.). As in the Galápagos, Clipperton corals show increasing SSTs in all seasons after 1976. The trend at Clipperton is greater than in the Galápagos, though the variance is smaller and does not change significantly throughout the record. Finally, the north-south temperature gradient between Clipperton and Galápagos has increased slightly over the interval in which the two records overlap (1937-1993). Gridded instrumental SST data generally agree with the coral Sr/Ca-SST results, though the gridded data suggest lower variance at both sites. In sum, we show that an increase in the mean and variance of SSTs in the eastern equatorial Pacific is associated with an enhanced meridional SST gradient over the twentieth century, and especially since 1976. These results contrast with recent suggestions that a weakened meridional SST gradient in the equatorial Pacific may be leading to stronger El Niño events. Our results support the

  2. Underestimated risks of recurrent long-range ash dispersal from northern Pacific Arc volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourne, A. J.; Abbott, P. M.; Albert, P. G.; Cook, E.; Pearce, N. J. G.; Ponomareva, V.; Svensson, A.; Davies, S. M.

    2016-07-01

    Widespread ash dispersal poses a significant natural hazard to society, particularly in relation to disruption to aviation. Assessing the extent of the threat of far-travelled ash clouds on flight paths is substantially hindered by an incomplete volcanic history and an underestimation of the potential reach of distant eruptive centres. The risk of extensive ash clouds to aviation is thus poorly quantified. New evidence is presented of explosive Late Pleistocene eruptions in the Pacific Arc, currently undocumented in the proximal geological record, which dispersed ash up to 8000 km from source. Twelve microscopic ash deposits or cryptotephra, invisible to the naked eye, discovered within Greenland ice-cores, and ranging in age between 11.1 and 83.7 ka b2k, are compositionally matched to northern Pacific Arc sources including Japan, Kamchatka, Cascades and Alaska. Only two cryptotephra deposits are correlated to known high-magnitude eruptions (Towada-H, Japan, ca 15 ka BP and Mount St Helens Set M, ca 28 ka BP). For the remaining 10 deposits, there is no evidence of age- and compositionally-equivalent eruptive events in regional volcanic stratigraphies. This highlights the inherent problem of under-reporting eruptions and the dangers of underestimating the long-term risk of widespread ash dispersal for trans-Pacific and trans-Atlantic flight routes.

  3. Underestimated risks of recurrent long-range ash dispersal from northern Pacific Arc volcanoes

    PubMed Central

    Bourne, A. J.; Abbott, P. M.; Albert, P. G.; Cook, E.; Pearce, N. J. G.; Ponomareva, V.; Svensson, A.; Davies, S. M.

    2016-01-01

    Widespread ash dispersal poses a significant natural hazard to society, particularly in relation to disruption to aviation. Assessing the extent of the threat of far-travelled ash clouds on flight paths is substantially hindered by an incomplete volcanic history and an underestimation of the potential reach of distant eruptive centres. The risk of extensive ash clouds to aviation is thus poorly quantified. New evidence is presented of explosive Late Pleistocene eruptions in the Pacific Arc, currently undocumented in the proximal geological record, which dispersed ash up to 8000 km from source. Twelve microscopic ash deposits or cryptotephra, invisible to the naked eye, discovered within Greenland ice-cores, and ranging in age between 11.1 and 83.7 ka b2k, are compositionally matched to northern Pacific Arc sources including Japan, Kamchatka, Cascades and Alaska. Only two cryptotephra deposits are correlated to known high-magnitude eruptions (Towada-H, Japan, ca 15 ka BP and Mount St Helens Set M, ca 28 ka BP). For the remaining 10 deposits, there is no evidence of age- and compositionally-equivalent eruptive events in regional volcanic stratigraphies. This highlights the inherent problem of under-reporting eruptions and the dangers of underestimating the long-term risk of widespread ash dispersal for trans-Pacific and trans-Atlantic flight routes. PMID:27445233

  4. Underestimated risks of recurrent long-range ash dispersal from northern Pacific Arc volcanoes.

    PubMed

    Bourne, A J; Abbott, P M; Albert, P G; Cook, E; Pearce, N J G; Ponomareva, V; Svensson, A; Davies, S M

    2016-07-21

    Widespread ash dispersal poses a significant natural hazard to society, particularly in relation to disruption to aviation. Assessing the extent of the threat of far-travelled ash clouds on flight paths is substantially hindered by an incomplete volcanic history and an underestimation of the potential reach of distant eruptive centres. The risk of extensive ash clouds to aviation is thus poorly quantified. New evidence is presented of explosive Late Pleistocene eruptions in the Pacific Arc, currently undocumented in the proximal geological record, which dispersed ash up to 8000 km from source. Twelve microscopic ash deposits or cryptotephra, invisible to the naked eye, discovered within Greenland ice-cores, and ranging in age between 11.1 and 83.7 ka b2k, are compositionally matched to northern Pacific Arc sources including Japan, Kamchatka, Cascades and Alaska. Only two cryptotephra deposits are correlated to known high-magnitude eruptions (Towada-H, Japan, ca 15 ka BP and Mount St Helens Set M, ca 28 ka BP). For the remaining 10 deposits, there is no evidence of age- and compositionally-equivalent eruptive events in regional volcanic stratigraphies. This highlights the inherent problem of under-reporting eruptions and the dangers of underestimating the long-term risk of widespread ash dispersal for trans-Pacific and trans-Atlantic flight routes.

  5. Geological history of the western North Pacific

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fischer, A.G.; Heezen, B.C.; Boyce, R.E.; Bukry, D.; Douglas, R.G.; Garrison, R.E.; Kling, S.A.; Krasheninnikov, V.; Lisitzin, A.P.; Pimm, A.C.

    1970-01-01

    A considerable portion of the abyssal floor of the western North Pacific was already receiving pelagic sediment in late Jurassic time. Carbonate sediments were later replaced by abyssal clays as the basin deepened and bottom waters became more aggressive. The resulting facies boundary, which can be recognized on seismic profiles, is broadly transgressive; it ranges in age from mid-Cretaceous in the western Pacific to Oligocene in the central Pacific. Cherts are encountered at and below the major facies boundary and appear to have been formed by postdepositional processes.

  6. Trans-Pacific Astronomy Experiment Project Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, Eddie

    2000-01-01

    The Trans-Pacific Astronomy Experiment is Phase 2 of the Trans-Pacific High Data Rate Satcom Experiments following the Trans-Pacific High Definition Video Experiment. It is a part of the Global Information Infrastructure-Global Interoperability for Broadband Networks Project (GII-GIBN). Provides global information infrastructure involving broadband satellites and terrestrial networks and access to information by anyone, anywhere, at any time. Collaboration of government, industry, and academic organizations demonstrate the use of broadband satellite links in a global information infrastructure with emphasis on astronomical observations, collaborative discussions and distance learning.

  7. Decline of surface temperature and salinity in the western tropical Pacific Ocean in the Holocene epoch.

    PubMed

    Stott, Lowell; Cannariato, Kevin; Thunell, Robert; Haug, Gerald H; Koutavas, Athanasios; Lund, Steve

    2004-09-02

    In the present-day climate, surface water salinities are low in the western tropical Pacific Ocean and increase towards the eastern part of the basin. The salinity of surface waters in the tropical Pacific Ocean is thought to be controlled by a combination of atmospheric convection, precipitation, evaporation and ocean dynamics, and on interannual timescales significant variability is associated with the El Niño/Southern Oscillation cycles. However, little is known about the variability of the coupled ocean-atmosphere system on timescales of centuries to millennia. Here we combine oxygen isotope and Mg/Ca data from foraminifers retrieved from three sediment cores in the western tropical Pacific Ocean to reconstruct Holocene sea surface temperatures and salinities in the region. We find a decrease in sea surface temperatures of approximately 0.5 degrees C over the past 10,000 yr, whereas sea surface salinities decreased by approximately 1.5 practical salinity units. Our data imply either that the Pacific basin as a whole has become progressively less salty or that the present salinity gradient along the Equator has developed relatively recently.

  8. Pliocene climate change of the Southwest Pacific and the impact of ocean gateways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karas, Cyrus; Nürnberg, Dirk; Tiedemann, Ralf; Garbe-Schönberg, Dieter

    2011-01-01

    The transition from the early Pliocene “Warmhouse” towards the present “Icehouse” climate and the role of Gateway dynamics are intensively debated. Both, the constrictions of the Central American Seaway and the Indonesian Gateway affected ocean circulation and climate during the Pliocene epoch. Here, we use combined δ18O and Mg/Ca ratios of planktonic foraminifera (marine protozoa) from surface and subsurface levels to reconstruct the thermal structure and changes in salinities from the Southwest Pacific Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) Site 590B from 6.5 to 2.5 Ma. Our data suggest a gradual cooling of ~ 2 °C and freshening of the sea surface during ~ 4.6-4 Ma with an increased meridional temperature gradient between the West Pacific Warm Pool and the Southwest Pacific when the closing of the Central American Seaway reached a critical threshold. After ~ 3.5 Ma, the restricted Indonesian Gateway might have amplified the East Australian Current, allowing enhanced heat transport towards the Southwest Pacific with reduced meridional temperature gradients when the global climate gradually cooled. At the same time our data suggest a cooling and freshening of Subantarctic Mode Water (SAMW) or/and an increased northward flow of SAMW towards Site 590B, possibly a first step towards the present Antarctic Frontal System.

  9. The age and origin of the Pacific islands: a geological overview.

    PubMed

    Neall, Vincent E; Trewick, Steven A

    2008-10-27

    The Pacific Ocean evolved from the Panthalassic Ocean that was first formed ca 750 Ma with the rifting apart of Rodinia. By 160 Ma, the first ocean floor ascribed to the current Pacific plate was produced to the west of a spreading centre in the central Pacific, ultimately growing to become the largest oceanic plate on the Earth. The current Nazca, Cocos and Juan de Fuca (Gorda) plates were initially one plate, produced to the east of the original spreading centre before becoming split into three. The islands of the Pacific have originated as: linear chains of volcanic islands on the above plates either by mantle plume or propagating fracture origin, atolls, uplifted coralline reefs, fragments of continental crust, obducted portions of adjoining lithospheric plates and islands resulting from subduction along convergent plate margins. Out of the 11 linear volcanic chains identified, each is briefly described and its history summarized. The geology of 10 exemplar archipelagos (Japan, Izu-Bonin, Palau, Solomons, Fiji, New Caledonia, New Zealand, Society, Galápagos and Hawaii) is then discussed in detail.

  10. Magnitude and timing of temperature change in the Indo-Pacific warm pool during deglaciation.

    PubMed

    Visser, Katherine; Thunell, Robert; Stott, Lowell

    2003-01-09

    Ocean-atmosphere interactions in the tropical Pacific region have a strong influence on global heat and water vapour transport and thus constitute an important component of the climate system. Changes in sea surface temperatures and convection in the tropical Indo-Pacific region are thought to be responsible for the interannual to decadal climate variability observed in extra-tropical regions, but the role of the tropics in climate changes on millennial and orbital timescales is less clear. Here we analyse oxygen isotopes and Mg/Ca ratios of foraminiferal shells from the Makassar strait in the heart of the Indo-Pacific warm pool, to obtain synchronous estimates of sea surface temperatures and ice volume. We find that sea surface temperatures increased by 3.5-4.0 degrees C during the last two glacial-interglacial transitions, synchronous with the global increase in atmospheric CO2 and Antarctic warming, but the temperature increase occurred 2,000-3,000 years before the Northern Hemisphere ice sheets melted. Our observations suggest that the tropical Pacific region plays an important role in driving glacial-interglacial cycles, possibly through a system similar to how El Niño/Southern Oscillation regulates the poleward flux of heat and water vapour.

  11. Mid-Pliocene equatorial Pacific sea surface temperature reconstruction: a multi-proxy perspective

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dowsett, Harry J.; Robinson, Marci M.

    2009-01-01

    The Mid-Pliocene is the most recent interval of sustained global warmth, which can be used to examine conditions predicted for the near future. An accurate spatial representation of the low-latitude Mid-Pliocene Pacific surface ocean is necessary to understand past climate change in the light of forecasts of future change. Mid-Pliocene sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies show a strong contrast between the western equatorial Pacific (WEP) and eastern equatorial Pacific (EEP) regardless of proxy (faunal, alkenone and Mg/Ca). All WEP sites show small differences from modern mean annual temperature, but all EEP sites show significant positive deviation from present-day temperatures by as much as 4.4°C. Our reconstruction reflects SSTs similar to modern in the WEP, warmer than modern in the EEP and eastward extension of the WEP warm pool. The east-west equatorial Pacific SST gradient is decreased, but the pole to equator gradient does not change appreciably. We find it improbable that increased greenhouse gases (GHG) alone would cause such a heterogeneous warming and more likely that the cause of Mid-Pliocene warmth is a combination of several forcings including both increased meridional heat transport and increased GHG.

  12. Mid-Pliocene equatorial Pacific sea surface temperature reconstruction: A multi-proxy perspective

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dowsett, H.J.; Robinson, M.M.

    2009-01-01

    The Mid-Pliocene is the most recent interval of sustained global warmth, which can be used to examine conditions predicted for the near future. An accurate spatial representation of the low-latitude Mid-Pliocene Pacific surface ocean is necessary to understand past climate change in the light of forecasts of future change. Mid-Pliocene sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies show a strong contrast between the western equatorial Pacific (WEP) and eastern equatorial Pacific (EEP) regardless of proxy (faunal, alkenone and Mg/Ca). All WEP sites show small differences from modern mean annual temperature, but all EEP sites show significant positive deviation from present-day temperatures by as much as 4.4??C. Our reconstruction reflects SSTs similar to modern in the WEP, warmer than modern in the EEP and eastward extension of the WEP warm pool. The east-west equatorial Pacific SST gradient is decreased, but the pole to equator gradient does not change appreciably. We find it improbable that increased greenhouse gases (GHG) alone would cause such a heterogeneous warming and more likely that the cause of Mid-Pliocene warmth is a combination of several forcings including both increased meridional heat transport and increased GHG. ?? 2008 The Royal Society.

  13. Linkages between the North Pacific Oscillation and central tropical Pacific SSTs at low frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furtado, Jason C.; Di Lorenzo, Emanuele; Anderson, Bruce T.; Schneider, Niklas

    2012-12-01

    The North Pacific Oscillation (NPO) recently (re-)emerged in the literature as a key atmospheric mode in Northern Hemisphere climate variability, especially in the Pacific sector. Defined as a dipole of sea level pressure (SLP) between, roughly, Alaska and Hawaii, the NPO is connected with downstream weather conditions over North America, serves as the atmospheric forcing pattern of the North Pacific Gyre Oscillation (NPGO), and is a potential mechanism linking extratropical atmospheric variability to El Niño events in the tropical Pacific. This paper explores further the forcing dynamics of the NPO and, in particular, that of its individual poles. Using observational data and experiments with a simple atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM), we illustrate that the southern pole of the NPO (i.e., the one near Hawaii) contains significant power at low frequencies (7-10 years), while the northern pole (i.e., the one near Alaska) has no dominant frequencies. When examining the low-frequency content of the NPO and its poles separately, we discover that low-frequency variations (periods >7 years) of the NPO (particularly its subtropical node) are intimately tied to variability in central equatorial Pacific sea surface temperatures (SSTs) associated with the El Niño-Modoki/Central Pacific Warming (CPW) phenomenon. This result suggests that fluctuations in subtropical North Pacific SLP are important to monitor for Pacific low-frequency climate change. Using the simple AGCM, we also illustrate that variability in central tropical Pacific SSTs drives a significant fraction of variability of the southern node of the NPO. Taken together, the results highlight important links between secondary modes (i.e., CPW-NPO-NPGO) in Pacific decadal variability, akin to already established relationships between the primary modes of Pacific climate variability (i.e., canonical El Niño, the Aleutian Low, and the Pacific Decadal Oscillation).

  14. Springtime trans-Pacific transport of Asian pollutants characterized by the Western Pacific (WP) pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Ja-Ho; Kim, Jaemin; Kim, Jhoon; Lee, Hanlim; Noh, Young Min; Lee, Yun Gon

    2016-12-01

    Springtime trans-Pacific transport of Asian air pollutants has been investigated in many ways to figure out its mechanism. Based on the Western Pacific (WP) pattern, one of climate variabilities in the Northern Hemisphere known to be associated with the pattern of atmospheric circulation over the North Pacific Ocean, in this study, we characterize the pattern of springtime trans-Pacific transport using long-term satellite measurements and reanalysis datasets. A positive WP pattern is characterized by intensification of the dipole structure between the northern Aleutian Low and the southern Pacific High over the North Pacific. The TOMS/OMI Aerosol Index (AI) and MOPITT CO show the enhancement of Asian pollutant transport across the Pacific during periods of positive WP pattern, particularly between 40 and 50°N. This enhancement is confirmed by high correlations of WP index with AI and CO between 40 and 50°N. To evaluate the influence of the WP pattern, we examine several cases of trans-Pacific transport reported in previous research. Interestingly, most trans-Pacific transport cases are associated with the positive WP pattern. During the period of negative WP pattern, reinforced cyclonic wave breaking is consistently found over the western North Pacific, which obstructs zonal advection across the North Pacific. However, some cases show the trans-Pacific transport of CO in the period of negative WP pattern, implying that the WP pattern is more influential on the transport of particles mostly emitted near ∼40°N. This study reveals that the WP pattern can be utilized to diagnose the strength of air pollutant transport from East Asia to North America.

  15. 76 FR 63564 - Pacific Cod by Vessels Harvesting Pacific Cod for Processing by the Inshore Component in the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-13

    ... Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 679 [Docket No. 101126522-0640-02] RIN 0648-XA759 Pacific Cod by Vessels Harvesting Pacific Cod for Processing by the Inshore Component in the Central Regulatory Area of... for Pacific cod by vessels harvesting Pacific cod for processing by the inshore component in...

  16. 76 FR 80266 - Pacific Cod by Vessels Catching Pacific Cod for Processing by the Inshore Component of the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-23

    ... Administration 50 CFR Part 679 [Docket No. 101126522-0640-02] RIN 0648-XA886 Pacific Cod by Vessels Catching Pacific Cod for Processing by the Inshore Component of the Central Regulatory Area of the Gulf of Alaska... Pacific cod by vessels catching Pacific cod for processing by the inshore component in the...

  17. Reconstructing the South Pacific upper water column structure during the Late Quaternary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapia, R. I.; Nuernberg, D.; Frank, M.

    2011-12-01

    The Antarctic Circumpolar Current system (ACCs) is the most important current system in the Southern Ocean, characterized by strong zonal variations in specific surface water properties, variations used to classify regions whose edges are defined by fronts. The past changes in the strength and latitudinal position of the ACC frontal system are supposed to play a major role on the global oceanic circulation and thus the Earth's climate through their impact on atmospheric CO2 contents by changes in water stratification conditions, Therefore the study of variability in the surface characteristics of the ACCs provides crucial information to understand and to reconstruct the global climate evolution. The dynamics of the upper-ocean vertical structure, primarily defined by vertical changes in salinity and temperature from the mixed layer down to the seasonal and permanent thermocline, can be tracked using the differences in stable oxygen isotopes (Δδ18O) and Mg/Ca-based temperatures (ΔT) recorded in the test of planktic foraminifera. Only Mg/Ca thermometry coupled with δ18O can guarantee a common source of signal, averaging the same environmental conditions (season and spatial habitat), where, the combined measurements of Mg/Ca and δ18O allow to extract the δ18O record of past upper ocean water, and accordingly salinity variations In this study we present paired measurements of Mg/Ca and stable oxygen isotopes of shallow-living and deeper-living planktic foraminifera preserved in core top and downcore samples from the South Pacific (36° to 45° S) retrieved during the SOPATRA cruise (South Pacific Paleoceanographic Transect) Chile-New Zealand. The total Mg/Ca values preserved in the foraminiferal calcite from 31 core top samples ranged from ~2 to 1.3 mmol/mol, allowing estimate SSTs between 16° and 12° C. Additionally, to evaluate the reliability of the Mg/Ca signal paleothermometry for long term reconstruction we determined the effect of calcite saturation

  18. Immunizations and Asians and Pacific Islanders

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1.0 1.0 At a glance – Children (Polio) Percentage of children aged 19 to 35 months ... received the universally recommended vaccination – 3 doses of polio, 2014 Asian Only Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders Non- ...

  19. Agriculture and biotechnology in Pacific countries.

    PubMed

    Shigaki, Toshiro

    2014-01-01

    The Pacific countries are small in land mass and therefore represent one of the most fragile ecosystems. Due to the isolation of these island counties, these are home to unique species of plants and animals as well as crop varieties and landraces. Biosafety issues in the Pacific countries, therefore, require special attention to take these factors into account. The issues are shared with other small island nations such as the Caribbean countries. Although most Pacific countries do not have scientific capacity to develop genetically modified organisms (GMOs), they are inadvertently introduced from the developed world. As the countries do not have appropriate capacity to monitor the introduction and commerce of GMO's, it is imperative to establish biosafety legislation and capacity by pooling the resources within the Pacific countries.

  20. Acid Precipitation in the Pacific Northwest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, John; Kozak, David

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the causes, sources, and problems associated with acid deposition in the Pacific Northwest. Includes a learning activity about acid rain, "Deadly Skies," which was adapted from the Project WILD Aquatic Supplement. (TW)

  1. Pacific Islands Mass Communications; Selected Information Sources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richstad, Jim; McMillan, Michael

    1977-01-01

    Presents a bibliography of materials on such area of mass communications in the Pacific Islands as broadcasting, radio and television, cinema, communication research, mass media in education, Honululu Media Council, newspapers and newspapermen, and printing and satellite communication. (JEG)

  2. Pacific Basin Communication Study, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, E. L.; Hurd, J. N.

    1981-01-01

    Users' meeting summary report, chronology of visits, economic data for forum countries, techniques used in the study, communication choices, existing resources in the Pacific Basin, and warc 79 region 3 rules and regulations were presented in volume 2.

  3. Tropical Storm Gilma in Eastern Pacific

    NASA Video Gallery

    An animation of satellite observations shows the progression of Tropical Storm Gilma from August 7-10, 2012, along the coast of the Eastern Pacific Ocean. This visualization was created by the NASA...

  4. 1994 Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1994-12-01

    The 1994 Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study presented herein establishes a picture of how the agency is positioned today in its loads and resources balance. It is a snapshot of expected resource operation, contractual obligations, and rights. This study does not attempt to present or analyze future conservation or generation resource scenarios. What it does provide are base case assumptions from which scenarios encompassing a wide range of uncertainties about BPA`s future may be evaluated. The Loads and Resources Study is presented in two documents: (1) this summary of Federal system and Pacific Northwest region loads and resources and (2) a technical appendix detailing the loads and resources for each major Pacific Northwest generating utility. This analysis updates the 1993 Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study, published in December 1993. In this loads and resources study, resource availability is compared with a range of forecasted electricity consumption. The Federal system and regional analyses for medium load forecast are presented.

  5. Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... the health of groups can result from: Genetics Environmental factors Access to care Cultural factors On this page, you'll find links to health issues that affect Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders.

  6. Educational Radio: Directions in the Pacific.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reddy, Sachida

    1986-01-01

    This personal perspective on developments in educational radio broadcasting in some small island nations of the South Pacific discusses radio as a powerful teaching aid, curriculum development, educational communicators, printed support materials, costs, facilities duplication, and future trends. (MBR)

  7. Satellite Tracks Double Eastern Pacific Hurricanes

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation of NOAA's GOES-West satellite imagery from Aug. 27 to Aug. 30, 2016, shows the movement of Category 4 Hurricane Madeline approaching Hawaii in the Central Pacific Ocean and Category ...

  8. Western Pacific Basin: A Climatological Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-08-29

    Heat) Low. From May to early October, this low anchors the eastern end of a broad, low-level thermal trough that extends from northwestern India ...occasionally develops over India during the northeast monsoon season because of cold surges from the western Himalayas. Even at its strongest, it is relatively...Pacific Ocean are 2-5 degrees below normal. These lower temperatures are linked to changes in the monsoon over India and the western Pacific Basin

  9. 1993 Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1993-12-01

    The Loads and Resources Study is presented in three documents: (1) this summary of Federal system and Pacific Northwest region loads and resources; (2) a technical appendix detailing forecasted Pacific Northwest economic trends and loads, and (3) a technical appendix detailing the loads and resources for each major Pacific Northwest generating utility. In this loads and resources study, resource availability is compared with a range of forecasted electricity consumption. The forecasted future electricity demands -- firm loads -- are subtracted from the projected capability of existing and {open_quotes}contracted for{close_quotes} resources to determine whether Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the region will be surplus or deficit. If resources are greater than loads in any particular year or month, there is a surplus of energy and/or capacity, which BPA can sell to increase revenues. Conversely, if firm loads exceed available resources, there is a deficit of energy and/or capacity, and additional conservation, contract purchases, or generating resources will be needed to meet load growth. The Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study analyzes the Pacific Northwest`s projected loads and available generating resources in two parts: (1) the loads and resources of the Federal system, for which BPA is the marketing agency; and (2) the larger Pacific Northwest regional power system, which includes loads and resource in addition to the Federal system. The loads and resources analysis in this study simulates the operation of the power system under the Pacific Northwest Coordination Agreement (PNCA) produced by the Pacific Northwest Coordinating Group. This study presents the Federal system and regional analyses for five load forecasts: high, medium-high, medium, medium-low, and low. This analysis projects the yearly average energy consumption and resource availability for Operating Years (OY) 1994--95 through 2003--04.

  10. Pacific salmonines in the Great Lakes Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Claramunt, Randall M.; Madenjian, Charles P.; Clapp, David; Taylor, William W.; Lynch, Abigail J.; Leonard, Nancy J.

    2012-01-01

    Pacific salmon (genus Oncorhynchus) are a valuable resource, both within their native range in the North Pacific rim and in the Great Lakes basin. Understanding their value from a biological and economic perspective in the Great Lakes, however, requires an understanding of changes in the ecosystem and of management actions that have been taken to promote system stability, integrity, and sustainable fisheries. Pacific salmonine introductions to the Great Lakes are comprised mainly of Chinook salmon, coho salmon, and steelhead and have accounted for 421, 177, and 247 million fish, respectively, stocked during 1966-2007. Stocking of Pacific salmonines has been effective in substantially reducing exotic prey fish abundances in several of the Great Lakes (e.g., lakes Michigan, Huron, and Ontario). The goal of our evaluation was to highlight differences in management strategies and perspectives across the basin, and to evaluate policies for Pacific salmonine management in the Great Lakes. Currently, a potential conflict exists between Pacific salmonine management and native fish rehabilitation goals because of the desire to sustain recreational fisheries and to develop self-sustaining populations of stocked Pacific salmonines in the Great Lakes. We provide evidence that suggests Pacific salmonines have not only become naturalized to the food webs of the Great Lakes, but that their populations (specifically Chinook salmon) may be fluctuating in concert with specific prey (i.e., alewives) whose populations are changing relative to environmental conditions and ecosystem disturbances. Remaining questions, however, are whether or not “natural” fluctuations in predator and prey provide enough “stability” in the Great Lakes food webs, and even more importantly, would a choice by managers to attempt to reduce the severity of predator-prey oscillations be antagonistic to native fish restoration efforts. We argue that, on each of the Great Lakes, managers are pursuing

  11. Schools of the Pacific rainfall climate experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Postawko, S. E.; Morrissey, M. L.; Taylor, G. J.; Mouginis-Mark, P.

    1993-01-01

    The SPaRCE program is a cooperative rainfall climate field project involving high school and college level students and teachers from various Pacific island and atoll nations. The goals of the SPaRCE program are: (1) to foster interest and increase understanding among Pacific-area students and teachers of climate and climate change; (2) to educate the students and teachers as to the importance of rainfall in the Pacific area to climate studies; (3) to provide the students and teachers an opportunity of making a major contribution to the global climate research effort by collecting and analyzing Pacific rainfall data; and (4) to incorporate collected rainfall observations into a comprehensive Pacific daily rainfall data base to be used for climate research purposes. Schools participating in SPaRCE have received standard raingauges with which to measure rainfall at their sites. Students learned to site and use their raingauges by viewing a video produced at the University of Oklahoma. Four more videos will be produced which will include information on Earth's atmosphere, global climate and climate change, regional climate and implications of climate change, and how to analyze and use the rainfall data they are collecting. The videos are accompanied by workbooks which summarize the main points of each video, and contain concrete learning activities to help the student better understand climate and climate change. Following each video, interactive sessions are held with the students using the PEACESAT (Pan-Pacific Education And Communication Experiments by Satellite) satellite radio communication system.

  12. 1997 Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1997-12-01

    The 1997 White Book is presented in two documents: (1) this summary of Federal system and Pacific Northwest region loads and resources; and (2) a technical appendix detailing the loads and resources for each major Pacific Northwest generating utility. Data detailing Pacific Northwest non-utility generating (NUG) resources is also available upon request. This analysis updates the 1996 pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study, published in December 1996. In this loads and resources study, resource availability is compared with a medium forecast of electricity consumption. This document analyzes the Pacific Northwest`s projected loads and available generating resources in two parts: (1) the loads and resources of the Federal system, for which BPA is the marketing agency; and (2) the larger Pacific Northwest regional power system which includes loads and resources in addition to the Federal system. This study presents the Federal system and regional analyses for the medium load forecast. This analysis projects the yearly average energy consumption and resource availability for Operating Years (OY) 1998--99 through 2007--08.

  13. The dynamics of mitochondrial Ca2+ fluxes.

    PubMed

    de la Fuente, Sergio; Montenegro, Pablo; Fonteriz, Rosalba I; Moreno, Alfredo; Lobatón, Carmen D; Montero, Mayte; Alvarez, Javier

    2010-10-01

    We have investigated the kinetics of mitochondrial Ca(2+) influx and efflux and their dependence on cytosolic [Ca(2+)] and [Na(+)] using low-Ca(2+)-affinity aequorin. The rate of Ca(2+) release from mitochondria increased linearly with mitochondrial [Ca(2+)] ([Ca(2+)](M)). Na(+)-dependent Ca(2+) release was predominant al low [Ca(2+)](M) but saturated at [Ca(2+)](M) around 400muM, while Na(+)-independent Ca(2+) release was very slow at [Ca(2+)](M) below 200muM, and then increased at higher [Ca(2+)](M), perhaps through the opening of a new pathway. Half-maximal activation of Na(+)-dependent Ca(2+) release occurred at 5-10mM [Na(+)], within the physiological range of cytosolic [Na(+)]. Ca(2+) entry rates were comparable in size to Ca(2+) exit rates at cytosolic [Ca(2+)] ([Ca(2+)](c)) below 7muM, but the rate of uptake was dramatically accelerated at higher [Ca(2+)](c). As a consequence, the presence of [Na(+)] considerably reduced the rate of [Ca(2+)](M) increase at [Ca(2+)](c) below 7muM, but its effect was hardly appreciable at 10muM [Ca(2+)](c). Exit rates were more dependent on the temperature than uptake rates, thus making the [Ca(2+)](M) transients to be much more prolonged at lower temperature. Our kinetic data suggest that mitochondria have little high affinity Ca(2+) buffering, and comparison of our results with data on total mitochondrial Ca(2+) fluxes indicate that the mitochondrial Ca(2+) bound/Ca(2+) free ratio is around 10- to 100-fold for most of the observed [Ca(2+)](M) range and suggest that massive phosphate precipitation can only occur when [Ca(2+)](M) reaches the millimolar range.

  14. Changes in opal flux and the rain ratio during the last 50,000 years in the equatorial Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richaud, Mathieu; Loubere, Paul; Pichat, Sylvain; Francois, Roger

    2007-03-01

    Changes in the orgC/CaCO 3 ratio in particles sinking from the surface to the deep ocean have the potential to alter the atmospheric pCO 2 over the span of a glacial/interglacial cycle. Recent paleoceanographic and modern observational studies suggest that silica is a key factor in the global carbon biogeochemical cycle that can influence the flux ratio, especially at low latitudes, through "silicic acid leakage" [Brzezinski, M., Pride, C., Franck, M., Sigman, D., Sarmiento, J., Matsumoto, K., Gruber, N., Rau, R., Coale, K., 2002. A switch from Si(OH) 4 to NO3- depletion in the glacial Southern Ocean. Geophysical Research Letters 29, 5]. To test this hypothesis, we reconstruct biogenic fluxes of CaCO 3, orgC and Si for three equatorial Pacific cores. We find evidence that a floral shift from a SiO 2-based community to a CaCO 3-based occurred, starting in mid-marine isotope stage (MIS) 3 (24-59 cal. ka) and declining toward MIS 2 (19-24 cal. ka). This could reflect the connection of the Peru upwelling system to the subantarctic region, and we postulate that excess silica was transported from the subantarctic via the deep Equatorial Undercurrent to the eastern equatorial Pacific. In the eastern equatorial Pacific only, we document a significant decrease in rain ratio starting mid-MIS 3 toward MIS 2. This decrease is concomitant with a significant decrease in silica accumulation rates at the seabed. This pattern is not observed in the Pacific influenced by equatorial divergence and shallow upwelling, where all reconstructed fluxes (CaCO 3, orgC, and opal) increase during MIS 2. We conclude that the overall calcium carbonate pump weakened in the EEP under Peru upwelling influence.

  15. Can Diploastrea heliopora be an Alternate Coral Climate Archive in the Indo-Pacific?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, R. D. P.; Goodkin, N.; Siringan, F. P.; Hughen, K. A.

    2015-12-01

    While climate events in the climatically important Indo-Pacific have been captured in Porites geochemical proxies, very few of these records extend more than 100 years, thus preventing reconstruction of multi-centennial climate variability. Century scale paleoclimate records may be stored in Diploastrea heliopora, a massive slow-growing long-lived coral prevalent in the region. Thus far, Diploastrea's δ18O has revealed multi-decadal to multi-century long records in the region. However, since δ18O is a combined proxy for sea surface temperature (SST) and salinity, an independent SST proxy would be more advantageous. To evaluate the geochemistry of Diploastrea, adjacent Porites and Diploastrea cores were collected from Palaui Island, Philippines, and analyzed for Sr/Ca. An offset of about 0.20 mmol/mol is observed between the colonies, likely due to the greater Sr uptake of the slow-growing coral. Least-squares linear regressions of monthly Diploastrea and Porites Sr/Ca to SST reveal significant correlations (p-values < 0.0001). The Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) is one of the climatically important processes impacting SST in the region. Winter Sr/Ca for both corals significantly correlates with PDO (p-values = 0.02) indicating promise for Diploastrea as a climate archive, particularly in the absence of multi-century long records from Porites.

  16. AIDS education reaches Pacific atolls.

    PubMed

    1994-01-01

    The Republic of Kiribati consists of 33 islands and 69,000 inhabitants dispersed over a large area of the Central Pacific. It includes the former Gilbert Islands, which were linked as British colonies with the Ellice Islands until the latter declared themselves independent as Tuvalu. Kiribati became independent from Britain in 1979 and joined WHO [the World Health Organization] in 1984. Launched in 1988, the national AIDS program is now implementing its second medium-term plan. As part of this plan, the program recently held its first AIDS awareness workshop for hotel workers, health care workers and youth. The workshop was held on Kiritimati, the world's largest atoll. Also known as Christmas Island, the atoll of 2650 inhabitants has excellent bird-watching and fishing opportunities, which have drawn growing numbers of tourists in recent years. Although neither of the two HIV infections identified in Kiribati by March 1994 were on Kiritimati, the prevalence of other sexually transmitted diseases there has been on the rise. Meeting in a traditional thatched building, the workshop participants proved eager to learn about HIV and STDs [sexually transmitted diseases]. They received instruction in prevention skills, including a demonstration of proper condom use led by the national AIDS coordinator. At the close of the workshop, condoms were provided to hotel staff for distribution.

  17. Aerosol in the Pacific troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Antony D.

    1989-01-01

    The use of near real-time optical techniques is emphasized for the measurement of mid-tropospheric aerosol over the Central Pacific. The primary focus is on measurement of the aerosol size distribution over the range of particle diameters from 0.15 to 5.0 microns that are essential for modeling CO2 backscatter values in support of the laser atmospheric wind sounder (LAWS) program. The measurement system employs a LAS-X (Laser Aerosol Spectrometer-PMS, Boulder, CO) with a custom 256 channel pulse height analyzer and software for detailed measurement and analysis of aerosol size distributions. A thermal preheater system (Thermo Optic Aerosol Descriminator (TOAD) conditions the aerosol in a manner that allows the discrimination of the size distribution of individual aerosol components such as sulfuric acid, sulfates and refractory species. This allows assessment of the relative contribution of each component to the BCO2 signal. This is necessary since the different components have different sources, exhibit independent variability and provide different BCO2 signals for a given mass and particle size. Field activities involve experiments designed to examine both temporal and spatial variability of these aerosol components from ground based and aircraft platforms.

  18. A Bayesian, multivariate calibration for Globigerinoides ruber Mg/Ca

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khider, D.; Huerta, G.; Jackson, C.; Stott, L. D.; Emile-Geay, J.

    2015-09-01

    The use of Mg/Ca in marine carbonates as a paleothermometer has been challenged by observations that implicate salinity as a contributing influence on Mg incorporation into biotic calcite and that dissolution at the sea-floor alters the original Mg/Ca. Yet, these factors have not yet been incorporated into a single calibration model. We introduce a new Bayesian calibration for Globigerinoides ruber Mg/Ca based on 186 globally distributed core top samples, which explicitly takes into account the effect of temperature, salinity, and dissolution on this proxy. Our reported temperature, salinity, and dissolution (here expressed as deep-water ΔCO32-) sensitivities are (±2σ) 8.7±0.9%/°C, 3.9±1.2%/psu, and 3.3±1.3%/μmol.kg-1 below a critical threshold of 21 μmol/kg in good agreement with previous culturing and core-top studies. We then perform a sensitivity experiment on a published record from the western tropical Pacific to investigate the bias introduced by these secondary influences on the interpretation of past temperature variability. This experiment highlights the potential for misinterpretations of past oceanographic changes when the secondary influences of salinity and dissolution are not accounted for. Multiproxy approaches could potentially help deconvolve the contributing influences but this awaits better characterization of the spatio-temporal relationship between salinity and δ18Osw over millennial and orbital timescales.

  19. Inter-Decadal to Multi-Decadal Sea Surface Temperature Variability in the Southwest Tropical Pacific Since AD 1648

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delong, K. L.; Quinn, T. M.; Taylor, F. W.; Lin, K.; Shen, C.

    2008-12-01

    The southwest tropical Pacific is a region with temporally and spatially sparse sea surface temperature (SST) records that limit investigations of climate variability on interannual to centennial time scales for this region. We present a monthly resolved coral Sr/Ca record from 1648 to 1999 from Amédée Island, New Caledonia (22.48°S, 166.47°E), and reconstruct SST variability in the southwest Pacific for the past 350 years. The coral Sr/Ca record was assembled from two 3-m long coeval cores from the same massive Porites lutea coral colony. The chronology is based on annual density-band counting, cross- correlation of the two intracolony coral Sr/Ca records, and 11 230Th dates with 2σ precision of ±1.1 to 16.5 years. The intracolony coral Sr/Ca variations are reproducible for more than three centuries (average monthly misfit error = ±0.015 mmol/mol; ~0.28°C), and the intracolony variations are coherent from interannual to centennial periodicities. The SST reconstructed from coral Sr/Ca shows a cooling trend from AD 1740 to 1815, a cold 19th century (~0.6°C with respect to AD 1967 to 1992), followed by a warming trend into the 20th century. Many of the cold events in the coral Sr/Ca record coincide with large volcanic eruptions (e.g., Tambora AD 1815 and Krakatau AD 1883). Spectral analysis reveals the record is dominated by modulating inter-decadal (14 to 21 years) periodicities and quasi-persistent multi-decadal (24 to 38 years) periodicities that do not exhibit coherence with the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) or the Inter-decadal Pacific Oscillation (IPO). Wavelet analysis reveals that the inter-decadal periodicities coincide with large volcanic eruptions, and the 55- to 70-year periodicities are coeval with volcanic cooling and warming trends in the 19th and 20th centuries. The multi-decadal periodicities may be a harmonic of the modulating inter-decadal periodicities or may represent an independent mode not previously recognized in the southwest

  20. Exploring the 'cultural' in cultural competencies in Pacific mental health.

    PubMed

    Samu, Kathleen Seataoai; Suaalii-Sauni, Tamasailau

    2009-02-01

    Cultural competency is about the ability of individuals and systems to respond respectfully and effectively to the cultural needs of peoples of all cultures. Its general attributes include knowledge, attitudes, skills and professional judgment. In Pacific mental health, 'the cultural' is generally understood to be ethnic culture. Accordingly, Pacific cultural competencies assume ethnic specific markers. In mental health Pacific cultural competencies has seen a blending of cultural and clinical beliefs and practices. This paper provides an overview of five key theme areas arising from Auckland-based ethnic-specific Pacific workshop data: language, family, tapu relationships, skills and organisation policy. Workshop participants comprised of Pacific mental health providers, Pacific consumers, family members of Pacific consumers and members of the Pacific community members. This paper purports that identifying the perceptions of different Pacific groups on ethnic-specific elements of cultural competencies are necessary to build and strengthen the capacity and capability of mental health services to provide culturally relevant services.

  1. 77 FR 34381 - Pacific Northwest-Pacific Southwest Intertie Project-Rate Order No. WAPA-157

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-11

    ... Area Power Administration Pacific Northwest-Pacific Southwest Intertie Project--Rate Order No. WAPA-157... Project (Intertie) transmission service rates. The current rates, under Rate Schedules INT-FT4 and INT... cover all annual costs, including interest expense, and to repay capital investment obligations...

  2. Species Profiles. Life Histories and Environmental Requirements of Coastal Fishes and Invertebrates (Pacific Northwest). Pacific Herring

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-01

    these times are salmon, seals, abnormalities developed in the lower jaws of sea lions, killer whales, dogfish , and birds larvae from eggs incubated at 4.0...offshore, important predators include Optimal temperatures for juvenile and adult hake, sablefish, dogfish , Pacific cod, and salmon. Pacific herring

  3. 77 FR 54575 - Pacific Northwest-Pacific Southwest Intertie Project-Rate Order No. WAPA-159

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-05

    ...-54576] [FR Doc No: 2012-21806] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Western Area Power Administration Pacific Northwest-Pacific Southwest Intertie Project--Rate Order No. WAPA-159 AGENCY: Western Area Power Administration, DOE... the Secretary of Energy the power marketing functions of the Secretary of the Department of...

  4. PacNET: Pacific Lightning Detection Network to Continuously Monitor Convective Storms Over the Pacific Ocean

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-09-30

    support investigations at the University of Hawaii of tropical and subtropical cyclogenesis, cyclone track forecasting, and forecasting flash - flood events... flash - flood events over the Pacific. TRANSITIONS Data from the Pacific lightning detection NETwork (PacNET) will be streamed via the Internet

  5. 78 FR 33240 - International Fisheries; Pacific Tuna Fisheries; Fishing Restrictions in the Eastern Pacific Ocean

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-04

    ... the overall EPO tuna catch. The number of purse seine vessels that have landed tuna in California...; Pacific Tuna Fisheries; Fishing Restrictions in the Eastern Pacific Ocean AGENCY: National Marine... rule. SUMMARY: NMFS is issuing regulations under the Tuna Conventions Act of 1950 to...

  6. The Features of Development in the Pacific Countries of the African, Caribbean and Pacific Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuenca Garcia, Eduardo; Rodriguez Martin, Jose Antonio; Navarro Pabsdorf, Margarita

    2010-01-01

    In this article we present a new proposal for the measurement of development, applied to the Pacific Countries of the African, Caribbean and Pacific Group (ACP), conditional on their insularity, and with privileged relations with the European Union. Our index has been constructed attending to the criteria defined in the Goals of the Millennium…

  7. Selected Bibliography on Asian and Pacific American Children and Families. Asian Pacific American Education Occasional Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association for Asian and Pacific American Education, Berkeley, CA.

    This is an annotated bibliography of recent articles, books, and scholarly papers on Asian and Pacific American children and families. Works are divided by topical area, with a primary focus on literature related to the education of Asian/Pacific American children. There are four main topical divisions: (1) education; (2) family; (3) mental…

  8. Trace Elemental Geochemistry of Pacific Margin Seep and Non-seep Benthic Foraminifera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkett, A. M.; Rathburn, A. E.; De Deckker, P.; Perez, M. E.

    2015-12-01

    As part of a continued effort to evaluate factors that influence carbonate biogeochemistry of living foraminifera, stable isotopic and trace elemental analyses of epibenthic and infaunal species of benthic foraminifera collected from the Pacific margin revealed clues for assessment of the presence, history and origin of cold and hydrothermal methane seepage sites. Hydrothermal seeps have only recently been discovered, prioritizing their recognition and assessments of the origins/sources of these anomalously warm environments. Trace elements were analyzed with a laser ablation ICP-MS at the Australian National University, avoiding contamination and allowing measurements of recently generated chambers. Living Cibicidoides wuellerstorfi and Uvigerina peregrina collected from active methane seeps on the east Pacific margin (Costa Rica, Alaska and Hydrate Ridge) have a wider range in both stable isotopic signals and some trace elemental values (e.g., Mg/Ca) compared to nearby inactive areas. Comparisons of additional trace elemental values (e.g., Li/Ca, Cd/Ca, B/Ca, and Ba/Ca) from living Cibicidoides wuellerstorfi and Uvigerina peregrina from these unique seafloor environments provide additional information in the geochemical influences of cold and hydrothermal seepage on foraminiferal calcite geochemistry. Seep environments are often the result of complex tectonic processes, have implications in past rapid climatic shifts and in future climate change predictions and models, and can influence modern ecosystems and biogeochemical cycles in ways which are not fully understood. Benthic foraminiferal geochemistry provides a potential means to identify seep fluid origins, elucidate seep fluid records and recognize hydrothermal seeps and their spatial and temporal history.

  9. Prevalence of Ca2+-ATPase-Mediated Carbonate Dissolution among Cyanobacterial Euendoliths

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-Reinat, E. L.

    2012-01-01

    Recent physiological work has shown that the filamentous euendolithic cyanobacterium Mastigocoleus testarum (strain BC008) is able to bore into solid carbonates using Ca2+-ATPases to take up Ca2+ from the medium at the excavation front, promoting dissolution of CaCO3 there. It is not known, however, if this is a widespread mechanism or, rather, a unique capability of this model strain. To test this, we undertook a survey of multispecies euendolithic microbial assemblages infesting natural carbonate substrates in marine coastal waters of the Caribbean, Mediterranean, South Pacific, and Sea of Cortez. Microscopic examination revealed the presence of complex assemblages of euendoliths, encompassing 3 out of the 5 major cyanobacterial orders. 16S rRNA gene clone libraries detected even greater diversity, particularly among the thin-filamentous forms, and allowed us to categorize the endoliths in our samples into 8 distinct phylogenetic clades. Using real-time Ca2+ imaging under a confocal laser scanning microscope, we could show that all communities displayed light-dependent formation of Ca2+-supersaturated zones in and around boreholes, a staple of actively boring phototrophs. In 3 out of 4 samples, boring activity was sensitive to at least one of two inhibitors of Ca2+-ATPase transporters (thapsigargin or tert-butylhydroquinone), indicating that the Ca2+-ATPase mechanism is widespread among cyanobacterial euendoliths but perhaps not universal. Function-community structure correlations point to one particular clade of baeocyte-forming euendoliths as the potential exception. PMID:22038600

  10. Eastern Tropical Pacific Mean State and Variability During the Past 1000 Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rustic, G. T.; Koutavas, A.; Marchitto, T. M., Jr.; Linsley, B. K.

    2014-12-01

    Dynamical changes in the tropical Pacific are hypothesized to have exerted an important influence on climate of the past millennium. However, direct proxy evidence in support of this hypothesis from the Eastern Tropical Pacific remains sparse. Here we present a unique 1000+ year continuous record of oceanic mixed layer temperature and its variability from a sediment multi-core collected in 2009 near the Galápagos Islands. The study location sits in the center of action of the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO), a major driver of tropical and global climate variability. We analyzed Mg/Ca ratios of multiple specimens of the mixed-layer dwelling foraminifera Globigerinoides ruber to reconstruct mean sea surface temperature (SST) over the past 1000 years. We also analyzed δ18O from individual specimens of G. ruber from the same samples to assess mixed layer temperature variability during the same period. Both the multi-shell Mg/Ca and single-shell δ18O reveal statistically significant and systematic changes during the past millennium. The Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA, ~1100-1400 CE) features a sustained period of ~1°C cooler mean surface temperatures and reduced variability (by up to 35%) compared to the late 20th century. Little Ice Age (LIA) mean mixed layer temperatures were comparatively warmer and much more variable than the MCA. Intervals with greater variability than modern, as well as intervals with lower than modern variability are both present in the LIA. The most recent sediment interval corresponding to the period 1985-2009 CE has the highest mean SST of the past 1000 years, although it is within error of temperatures from ~1000 CE. An estimate of the zonal SST gradient of the tropical Pacific based on this Mg/Ca data and similar data from the western Pacific supports a pattern of enhanced zonal gradient during the MCA and reduced gradient during the LIA. We explore the implications of these results for tropical Pacific dynamics in the context of

  11. Drought variability in the Pacific Northwest from a 6,000-yr lake sediment record.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Daniel B; Abbott, Mark B; Steinman, Byron; Polissar, Pratigya J; Stansell, Nathan D; Ortiz, Joseph D; Rosenmeier, Michael F; Finney, Bruce P; Riedel, Jon

    2011-03-08

    We present a 6,000-yr record of changing water balance in the Pacific Northwest inferred from measurements of carbonate δ(18)O and grayscale on a sediment core collected from Castor Lake, Washington. This subdecadally resolved drought record tracks the 1,500-yr tree-ring-based Palmer Drought Severity Index reconstructions of Cook et al. [Cook ER, Woodhouse CA, Eakin CM, Meko DM, Stahle DW (2004) Science 306:1015-1018] in the Pacific Northwest and extends our knowledge back to 6,000 yr B.P. The results demonstrate that low-frequency drought/pluvial cycles, with occasional long-duration, multidecadal events, are a persistent feature of regional climate. Furthermore, the average duration of multidecadal wet/dry cycles has increased since the middle Holocene, which has acted to increase the amplitude and impact of these events. This is especially apparent during the last 1,000 yr. We suggest these transitions were driven by changes in the tropical and extratropical Pacific and are related to apparent intensification of the El Niño Southern Oscillation over this interval and its related effects on the Pacific Decadal Oscillation. The Castor Lake record also corroborates the notion that the 20th century, prior to recent aridity, was a relatively wet period compared to the last 6,000 yr. Our findings suggest that the hydroclimate response in the Pacific Northwest to future warming will be intimately tied to the impact of warming on the El Niño Southern Oscillation.

  12. Age differences between Atlantic and Pacific benthic d18O change at terminations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisiecki, L. E.; Raymo, M. E.

    2007-12-01

    Because a large fraction of benthic δ18O change is due to global ice volume change, benthic δ18O is often used as stratigraphic tool to place marine records on a common age model and as a proxy for the timing of ice volume/sea level change. These applications require the assumptions that δ18O change is rapidly transmitted throughout the deep ocean and that the effects of hydrographic changes are in phase with ice volume. Recently, Skinner and Shackleton [2005] found that the timing of benthic δ18O change at the last termination differed by 4500 years between two sites in the Atlantic and Pacific. Based on Mg/Ca paleothermometry, they argued that these age discrepancies resulted from a late temperature increase in the Pacific and millennial-scale circulation changes in the Atlantic. Do these results imply that benthic δ18O change may not accurately record the timing of terminations? We compare benthic δ18O records from 34 sites in the Atlantic and Pacific to evaluate the impact of ocean mixing rates and deep water changes on the relative timing of terminations recorded in benthic δ18O. Statistical analysis of sedimentation rates derived from the alignment of benthic δ18O suggests an Atlantic lead over Pacific benthic δ18O change for all terminations of the last 600 kyr. The magnitude of sedimentation rate change suggests an average termination age difference of 1000-1500 years between the Atlantic and Pacific, consistent with or slightly greater than the delay expected due to ocean mixing rates, given that most glacial meltwater probably enters the North Atlantic.

  13. Measuring past changes in ENSO variance using Mg/Ca measurements on individual planktic foraminifera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchitto, T. M.; Grist, H. R.; van Geen, A.

    2013-12-01

    Previous work in Soledad Basin, located off Baja California Sur in the eastern subtropical Pacific, supports a La Niña-like mean-state response to enhanced radiative forcing at both orbital and millennial (solar) timescales during the Holocene. Mg/Ca measurements on the planktic foraminifer Globigerina bulloides indicate cooling when insolation is higher, consistent with an ';ocean dynamical thermostat' response that shoals the thermocline and cools the surface in the eastern tropical Pacific. Some, but not all, numerical models simulate reduced ENSO variance (less frequent and/or less intense events) when the Pacific is driven into a La Niña-like mean state by radiative forcing. Hypothetically the question of ENSO variance can be examined by measuring individual planktic foraminiferal tests from within a sample interval. Koutavas et al. (2006) used d18O on single specimens of Globigerinoides ruber from the eastern equatorial Pacific to demonstrate a 50% reduction in variance at ~6 ka compared to ~2 ka, consistent with the sense of the model predictions at the orbital scale. Here we adapt this approach to Mg/Ca and apply it to the millennial-scale question. We present Mg/Ca measured on single specimens of G. bulloides (cold season) and G. ruber (warm season) from three time slices in Soledad Basin: the 20th century, the warm interval (and solar low) at 9.3 ka, and the cold interval (and solar high) at 9.8 ka. Each interval is uniformly sampled over a ~100-yr (~10-cm or more) window to ensure that our variance estimate is not biased by decadal-scale stochastic variability. Theoretically we can distinguish between changing ENSO variability and changing seasonality: a reduction in ENSO variance would result in narrowing of both the G. bulloides and G. ruber temperature distributions without necessarily changing the distance between their two medians; while a reduction in seasonality would cause the two species' distributions to move closer together.

  14. 78 FR 39992 - Safety Zone; Feast of Lanterns Fireworks Display, Pacific Grove, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-03

    ... rule, call or email Lieutenant Junior Grade Joshua Dykman, U.S. Coast Guard Sector San Francisco... (adjusted for inflation) or more in any one year. Though this rule will not result in such an...

  15. Resonance Meeting, May 11-15, 1997, Asilomar Conference Center, Pacific Grove, CA. Volume 2. Transparencies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-05-01

    tensor (as complete as the model) Strong electron- spin -lattice effects in CMR- Jahn-Teller etc 1 RUS primer 2 Sample - preparation and analysis 3...TRANSPARENCY 38 3’ Ifl ao- resonances |f/| = 4C/C/ Ifl coincidence enhancement Pv—i 20 40 60 BO 100 form function for thin SS304 spherical shell

  16. Evidence for the non-influence of salinity variability on the Porites coral Sr/Ca palaeothermometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreau, M.; Corrège, T.; Dassié, E. P.; Le Cornec, F.

    2015-03-01

    Porites coral-based sea surface temperature (SST) reconstructions are obtained from the measurement of skeleton Sr/Ca ratio. However, the influence of salinity in the incorporation of these trace elements in the Porites aragonitic skeleton is still poorly documented. Laboratory experiments indicate that in three different coral species (not including the widely used Porites genus), salinity does not influence the Sr/Ca thermometer. In this study, we test the salinity effect on Porites Sr/Ca-based SST reconstructions at monthly and interannual timescales in open-ocean environmental conditions. We use a large spatial compilation of published Porites data from the Red Sea and Pacific and Indian oceans. Additionally to those published records, we add a new eastern Pacific coral Sr/Ca record from Clipperton Atoll. Using two different salinity products (Simple Ocean Data Assimilation (SODA) SSS reanalyses version 2.2.4, Carton and Giese, 2008; and instrumental SSS from the Institut de Recherche pour le Développement, France (IRD) Delcroix et al., 2011), we find no evidence of salinity bias on the Sr/Ca SST proxy at monthly and interannual timescales. We conclude that Porites Sr/Ca is a reliable palaeothermometer that is not influenced by salinity variability.

  17. CaPTC Biennial Meetings

    Cancer.gov

    CaPTC hosts the 'Biennial Science of Global Prostate Cancer Disparities in Black Men' conference to address the growing global public health problem of prostate cancer among Black men in industrialized and developing countries.

  18. Insights into Symbiont Population Structure among Three Vestimentiferan Tubeworm Host Species at Eastern Pacific Spreading Centers

    PubMed Central

    Juniper, S. Kim

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The symbiotic relationship between vestimentiferan tubeworms and their intracellular chemosynthetic bacteria is one of the more noteworthy examples of adaptation to deep-sea hydrothermal vent environments. The tubeworm symbionts have never been cultured in the laboratory. Nucleotide sequences from the small subunit rRNA gene suggest that the intracellular symbionts of the eastern Pacific vent tubeworms Oasisia alvinae, Riftia pachyptila, Tevnia jerichonana, and Ridgeia piscesae belong to the same phylotype of gammaproteobacteria, “Candidatus Endoriftia persephone.” Comparisons of symbiont genomes between the East Pacific Rise tubeworms R. pachyptila and T. jerichonana confirmed that these two hosts share the same symbionts. Two Ridgeia symbiont genomes were assembled from trophosome metagenomes from worms collected from the Juan de Fuca Ridge (one and five individuals, respectively). We compared these assemblies to those of the sequenced Riftia and Tevnia symbionts. Pangenome composition, genome-wide comparisons of the nucleotide sequences, and pairwise comparisons of 2,313 orthologous genes indicated that “Ca. Endoriftia persephone” symbionts are structured on large geographical scales but also on smaller scales and possibly through host specificity. IMPORTANCE Remarkably, the intracellular symbionts of four to six species of eastern Pacific vent tubeworms all belong to the same phylotype of gammaproteobacteria, “Candidatus Endoriftia persephone.” Understanding the structure, dynamism, and interconnectivity of “Ca. Endoriftia persephone” populations is important to advancing our knowledge of the ecology and evolution of their host worms, which are often keystone species in vent communities. In this paper, we present the first genomes for symbionts associated with the species R. piscesae, from the Juan de Fuca Ridge. We then combine these genomes with published symbiont genomes from the East Pacific Rise tubeworms R. pachyptila and T

  19. Cathodic behavior of molten CaCl2-CaO and CaCl2-NaCl-CaO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shu-Lan; Wang, Wei; Li, Shi-Chao; Cao, Shan-Hui

    2010-12-01

    The cathodic behavior of molten CaCl2, CaCl2-CaO and equimolar CaCl2-NaCl-CaO was studied by cyclic voltammograms and constant potential polarization at temperatures of 1123 to 1173 K on molybdenum and titanium electrodes. The diffusion coefficient of Ca2+ (CaO) in molten CaCl2-CaO was calculated from the linear relationship between the square root of scan rate and the peak current density. The deposition potentials and the potential temperature coefficient of CaO in molten CaCl2-0.5mol%CaO and CaCl2-NaCl-0.5mol%CaO were also obtained from their cyclic voltammograms. The result shows that CaO is more easily reduced than CaCl2. The addition of NaCl in molten CaCl2-CaO induces the underpotential electrodeposition of CaO.

  20. Chemical and mechanical bioerosion of boring sponges from Mexican Pacific coral reefs.

    PubMed

    Nava, Héctor; Carballo, José Luis

    2008-09-01

    Species richness (S) and frequency of invasion (IF) by boring sponges on living colonies of Pocillopora spp. from National Park Isla Isabel (México, East Pacific Ocean) are presented. Twelve species belonging to the genera Aka, Cliona, Pione, Thoosa and Spheciospongia were found, and 56% of coral colonies were invaded by boring sponges, with Cliona vermifera Hancock 1867 being the most abundant species (30%). Carbonate dissolution rate and sediment production were quantified for C. vermifera and Cliona flavifodina Rützler 1974. Both species exhibited similar rates of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) dissolution (1.2+/-0.4 and 0.5+/-0.2 kg CaCO3 m(-2) year(-1), respectively, mean +/- s.e.m.), and sediment production (3.3+/-0.6 and 4.6+/-0.5 kg CaCO3 m(-2) year(-1)), resulting in mean bioerosion rates of 4.5+/-0.9 and 5.1+/-0.5 kg CaCO3 m(-2) year(-1), respectively. These bioerosion rates are close to previous records of coral calcification per unit of area, suggesting that sponge bioerosion alone can promote disequilibrium in the reef accretion/destruction ratio in localities that are heavily invaded by boring sponges. The proportion of dissolved material by C. vermifera and C. flavifodina (27 and 10.2%, respectively) confirms that chemical bioerosion plays an important role in sponge bioerosion and in the CaCO3 cycle in coral reefs.

  1. The Pacific Island Health Care Project

    PubMed Central

    Person, Donald Ames

    2014-01-01

    Introduction/Background: US Associated/Affiliated Pacific Islands (USAPI) include three freely associated states: Marshall Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Palau, and three Territories: American Samoa, Guam, and Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands. Objective: The Pacific Island Health Care Project (PIHCP) provides humanitarian medical referral/consultation/care to >500,000 indigenous people of these remote islands. Methods: In the mid-1990s, we developed a simple store-and-forward program to link the USAPI with Tripler Army Medical Center. This application allowed image attachment to email consultations. Results: More than 8000 Pacific Islanders have benefited from the program. Three thousand Pacific Islanders prior to telemedicine (1990–1997) and since store-and-forward telemedicine (1997-present), the PIHCP has helped an additional 5000. Records post dynamically and are stored in an archival database. Conclusion: The PIHCP is the longest running telemedicine program in the world delivering humanitarian medical care. It has bridged the Developing World of the remote Pacific Islands with advanced medical and surgical care available at a major US military teaching hospital. (The opinions expressed here are those of the author and not that of the Army, Department of Defense, or the US Government.) PMID:25353012

  2. Building operational research capacity in the Pacific.

    PubMed

    Bissell, K; Viney, K; Brostrom, R; Gounder, S; Khogali, M; Kishore, K; Kool, B; Kumar, A M V; Manzi, M; Marais, B; Marks, G; Linh, N N; Ram, S; Reid, S; Roseveare, C; Tayler-Smith, K; Van den Bergh, R; Harries, A D

    2014-06-21

    Operational research (OR) in public health aims to investigate strategies, interventions, tools or knowledge that can enhance the quality, coverage, effectiveness or performance of health systems. Attention has recently been drawn to the lack of OR capacity in public health programmes throughout the Pacific Islands, despite considerable investment in implementation. This lack of ongoing and critical reflection may prevent health programme staff from understanding why programme objectives are not being fully achieved, and hinder long-term gains in public health. The International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease (The Union) has been collaborating with Pacific agencies to conduct OR courses based on the training model developed by The Union and Médecins Sans Frontières Brussels-Luxembourg in 2009. The first of these commenced in 2011 in collaboration with the Fiji National University, the Fiji Ministry of Health, the World Health Organization and other partners. The Union and the Secretariat of the Pacific Community organised a second course for participants from other Pacific Island countries and territories in 2012, and an additional course for Fijian participants commenced in 2013. Twelve participants enrolled in each of the three courses. Of the two courses completed by end 2013, 18 of 24 participants completed their OR and submitted papers by the course deadline, and 17 papers have been published to date. This article describes the context, process and outputs of the Pacific courses, as well as innovations, adaptations and challenges.

  3. Building operational research capacity in the Pacific

    PubMed Central

    Viney, K.; Brostrom, R.; Gounder, S.; Khogali, M.; Kishore, K.; Kool, B.; Kumar, A. M. V.; Manzi, M.; Marais, B.; Marks, G.; Linh, N. N.; Ram, S.; Reid, S.; Roseveare, C.; Tayler-Smith, K.; Van den Bergh, R.; Harries, A. D.

    2014-01-01

    Operational research (OR) in public health aims to investigate strategies, interventions, tools or knowledge that can enhance the quality, coverage, effectiveness or performance of health systems. Attention has recently been drawn to the lack of OR capacity in public health programmes throughout the Pacific Islands, despite considerable investment in implementation. This lack of ongoing and critical reflection may prevent health programme staff from understanding why programme objectives are not being fully achieved, and hinder long-term gains in public health. The International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease (The Union) has been collaborating with Pacific agencies to conduct OR courses based on the training model developed by The Union and Médecins Sans Frontières Brussels-Luxembourg in 2009. The first of these commenced in 2011 in collaboration with the Fiji National University, the Fiji Ministry of Health, the World Health Organization and other partners. The Union and the Secretariat of the Pacific Community organised a second course for participants from other Pacific Island countries and territories in 2012, and an additional course for Fijian participants commenced in 2013. Twelve participants enrolled in each of the three courses. Of the two courses completed by end 2013, 18 of 24 participants completed their OR and submitted papers by the course deadline, and 17 papers have been published to date. This article describes the context, process and outputs of the Pacific courses, as well as innovations, adaptations and challenges. PMID:26477282

  4. Changes in South Pacific anthropogenic carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waters, Jason F.; Millero, Frank J.; Sabine, Christopher L.

    2011-12-01

    The changes in anthropogenic CO2 are evaluated in the South Pacific, along the meridional line P18 (110°W) and the zonal line P06 (32°S), using the extended multiple linear regression (eMLR) method. The structure of the column inventory of anthropogenic CO2 on P18 is similar to the southern section of P16 in the central South Pacific (150°W), but the overall increase is greater by approximately 5-10 μmol kg-1. The value of the anthropogenic CO2 inventory on P18 is in agreement at the crossover point of an earlier evaluation of P06. Subsequent changes in pH due to the increase in anthropogenic CO2 are also evaluated. The change in pH is determined from the changes in anthropogenic CO2 and do not reflect variability in other decadal signals. For both cruise tracks, the average annual change in pH is -0.0016 mol kg-1 yr-1. This value is in good agreement with the average decrease in pH in the North Pacific, at the Hawaii Times Series and the subtropical North Atlantic. The uptake rates of anthropogenic CO2 are within reasonable agreement with similar studies in the South Pacific. There is evidence for greater uptake of anthropogenic CO2 in the western South Pacific and is attributed to the formation of subtropical Mode Water in the region.

  5. Multiproxy reconstruction of tropical Pacific Holocene temperature gradients and water column structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbuszewski, J. A.; Oppo, D.; Huang, K.; Dubois, N.; Galy, V.; Mohtadi, M.; Herbert, T.; Rosenthal, Y.; Linsley, B. K.

    2012-12-01

    consider records from organic (sterol abundances) and inorganic proxies (Mg/Ca and δ18O of 3 planktonic foraminiferal species, % G. bulloides) to reconstruct zonal tropical Pacific (sub)surface temperature and stratification gradients over the Holocene. A benefit of using this approach is that it enables us to combine the strengths of each individual proxy to derive more robust records. We will compare our records with published paleoproxy and model studies in the Pacific and Indo-Pacific regions. Armed with this information, we aim to better understand mean state changes in the tropical Pacific over the Holocene. 1 Ropelewski, C. F. & Halpert, M. S. Monthly Weather Review 115, 1606-1626 (1987). 2 Collins, M. et al. Nature Geoscience 3, doi: 10.1038/NGEO1868 (2010). 3 Koutavas, A., Lynch-Steiglitz, J., Marchitto, T. & Sachs, J. Science 297, 226-230 (2002). 4 Moy, C. M., Seltzer, G. O., Rodbell, D. T. & Anderson, D. M. Nature 420, 162-165 (2002). 5 Conroy, J. L., Overpeck, J. T., Cole, J. E., Shanahan, T. M. & Steinitz-Kannan, M. Quaternary Science Reviews 27, 1166-1180 (2008). 6 Makou, M. C., Eglinton, T. I., Oppo, D. W. & Hughen, K. A. Geology 38, 43-46 (2010). 7 Karnauskas, K., Smerdon, J., Seager, R. & Gonzalez-Rouco, J. Journal of Climate, doi: 10.1178/JCLI-D-1111-00421.00421 (2012 (in press)). 8 Clement, A., Seager, R. & Cane, M. Paleoceanography 14, 441-456 (2000).

  6. The East Pacific Rise current: Topographic enhancement of the interior flow in the South Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zilberman, N. V.; Roemmich, D. H.; Gille, S. T.

    2017-01-01

    Observations of absolute velocity based on Argo float profiles and trajectories in the ocean interior show evidence for an equatorward current, the East Pacific Rise current, between 42°S and 30°S, along the western flank of the East Pacific Rise. The East Pacific Rise current carries predominantly intermediate water masses, including Subantarctic Mode Water and Antarctic Intermediate Water, and deeper waters, from the southern edge of the subtropical gyre toward the Equator. The 2004 to 2014 mean East Pacific Rise current transport extrapolated through the 0-2600 m depth range is 8.1 ± 1.6 sverdrup (Sv) (1 Sv = 106 m3 s-1), consistent with a wind-driven interior transport influenced by the East Pacific Rise topography. While deep ocean mixing and geothermal heating can both create pressure gradients that support geostrophic flows in the deep ocean, this study indicates that about half of the East Pacific Rise current transport is associated with topographic steering of the deep flow over the East Pacific Rise.

  7. The parasite Ichthyophonus sp. in Pacific herring from the coastal NE Pacific

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hershberger, Paul K.; Gregg, Jacob L.; Hart, Lucas M.; Moffitt, Steve; Brenner, Richard L.; Stick, K.; Coonradt, Eric; Otis, E. O.; Vollenweider, Johanna J.; Garver, Kyle A.; Lovy, Jan; Meyers, Tilden R.

    2016-01-01

    The protistan parasite Ichthyophonus occurred in populations of Pacific herring Clupea pallasii Valenciennes throughout coastal areas of the NE Pacific, ranging from Puget Sound, WA north to the Gulf of Alaska, AK. Infection prevalence in local Pacific herring stocks varied seasonally and annually, and a general pattern of increasing prevalence with host size and/or age persisted throughout the NE Pacific. An exception to this zoographic pattern occurred among a group of juvenile, age 1+ year Pacific herring from Cordova Harbor, AK in June 2010, which demonstrated an unusually high infection prevalence of 35%. Reasons for this anomaly were hypothesized to involve anthropogenic influences that resulted in locally elevated infection pressures. Interannual declines in infection prevalence from some populations (e.g. Lower Cook Inlet, AK; from 20–32% in 2007 to 0–3% during 2009–13) or from the largest size cohorts of other populations (e.g. Sitka Sound, AK; from 62.5% in 2007 to 19.6% in 2013) were likely a reflection of selective mortality among the infected cohorts. All available information for Ichthyophonus in the NE Pacific, including broad geographic range, low host specificity and presence in archived Pacific herring tissue samples dating to the 1980s, indicate a long-standing host–pathogen relationship.

  8. Coral Cd/Ca and Mn/Ca records of El Niño variability in the Gulf of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carriquiry, J. D.; Villaescusa, J. A.

    2010-02-01

    We analyzed the trace element ratios Cd/Ca and Mn/Ca in three coral colonies (Pavona gigantea, Pavona clivosa and Porites panamensis) from Cabo Pulmo reef, Southern Gulf of California, Mexico, to assess the oceanographic changes caused by El Niño - Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events in the Eastern Tropical North Pacific (ETNP). The interannual variations in the coral Cd/Ca and Mn/Ca ratios show clear evidence that incorporation of Cd and Mn in the coral skeleton are influenced by ENSO conditions, but the response for each metal is controlled by different process. The Mn/Ca ratios were significantly higher during ENSO years (p<0.05) relative to non-ENSO years for the three species of coral. In contrast, the Cd/Ca was systematically lower during ENSO years, but it was significant (p<0.05) only in P. gigantea. The decrease in the incorporation of Cd, and the marked increase in Mn during the mature phase of El Niño indicate strongly reduced vertical mixing in the Gulf of California. The oceanic warming during El Niño events produces a relaxation of upwelling and a stabilization of the thermocline which acts as a physical barrier limiting the transport of Cd from deeper waters into the surface layer. In turn, this oceanic condition can increase the residence time of particulate-Mn in surface waters, which in turn increases the photo-reduction of particulate-Mn and the release of the available Mn into the dissolved phase. These results provide validation for using Mn/Ca and Cd/Ca in biogenic carbonates as tracers of changes in ocean stratification and trade wind weakening and/or collapse in the ETNP during ENSO episodes.

  9. Pacific Islanders—Migration and Health

    PubMed Central

    Fitzpatrick-Nietschmann, Judith

    1983-01-01

    Native Hawaiians and peoples from American Samoa, Guam and the Trust Territories of the Pacific Islands are all recipients of US subsidized health care. Categorized as Pacific Islanders they are a heterogeneous group with differences in biology, cultural adaptation to varied ecological settings, historical influences resulting from colonialism and present-day political factionalism. Yet, westernization on home islands and migration to Hawaii and the western United States have created similarities in disease patterns among these culturally diverse peoples. They have high rates of the chronic diseases of civilization: cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus and hypertension. Obesity, associated with these ailments, has become a major health problem among Pacific Islanders and may be attributed to changes in local food production and consumption in conjunction with sedentarization. Culturally and linguistically distinct from the American mainstream, these people as migrants or residents are marginal within the US social structure and find if difficult to obtain adequate medical treatment. PMID:6364574

  10. Tropical Pacific climate trends since 1960

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Posmentier, Eric S.; Cane, Mark A.; Zebiak, Stephen E.

    1989-01-01

    Merchant ship observations appear to indicate an increase in the strength of the surface winds in the tropical Pacific and elsewhere in recent decades. Here, trends in tropical Pacific sea surface temperature and sea level, which has repeatedly been shown to be closely related to the winds, are investigated. The results suggest that sea levels since 1960 have been rising oceanwide at about 3.5 cm/decade, while simultaneously tilting about 2 cm/decade higher in the east and lower in the west, and that surface temperatures have been rising about 0.6 C/decade. These results are not consistent with the apparent wind change; rather, they support the contention that the apparent wind changes are an artifact introduced by changes in measurement technique, and suggest that tropical Pacific winds may have actually decreased in strength.

  11. 14. Interior, Machine Shop, Roundhouse Machine Shop Extension, Southern Pacific ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Interior, Machine Shop, Roundhouse Machine Shop Extension, Southern Pacific Railroad Carlin Shops, view to north (90mm lens). - Southern Pacific Railroad, Carlin Shops, Roundhouse Machine Shop Extension, Foot of Sixth Street, Carlin, Elko County, NV

  12. 78 FR 54240 - North Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-03

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC844 North Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The North Pacific...

  13. 78 FR 25955 - Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-03

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC657 Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; public meeting. SUMMARY: The Pacific Fishery Management...

  14. 77 FR 2961 - North Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-20

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA945 North Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Meeting of the North Pacific Fishery Management Council Golden King...

  15. 77 FR 65535 - North Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-29

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC314 North Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of public meetings. SUMMARY: The North Pacific Fishery...

  16. 76 FR 13360 - North Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-11

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA283 North Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of public meetings. SUMMARY: The North Pacific Fishery...

  17. 76 FR 6402 - Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-04

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA193 Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: The Pacific Fishery Management...

  18. 76 FR 55363 - Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-07

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA682 Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: The Pacific Fishery Management...

  19. 77 FR 67633 - North Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-13

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC349 North Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of public meetings. SUMMARY: The North Pacific Fishery...

  20. 77 FR 31327 - Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-25

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC039 Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of public meetings. SUMMARY: The Pacific Fishery Management...

  1. 78 FR 54239 - North Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-03

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC845 North Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of public meetings. SUMMARY: The North Pacific Fishery...

  2. 76 FR 80890 - Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-27

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA895 Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Pacific Fishery Management...

  3. 76 FR 49453 - North Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-10

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA624 North Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of public meetings. SUMMARY: The North Pacific Fishery...

  4. 76 FR 26252 - Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-06

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA416 Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Pacific Fishery Management...

  5. 77 FR 31329 - Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-25

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC046 Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Pacific Fishery Management...

  6. 78 FR 4131 - Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-18

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC450 Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Pacific Fishery Management...

  7. 76 FR 76387 - Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-07

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA856 Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Pacific Fishery Management...

  8. 77 FR 46408 - Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-03

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC143 Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Pacific Fishery Management...

  9. The University of the South Pacific: Context, Purpose and Prospect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCall, Grant

    1984-01-01

    The history, development, and administration of the University of the South Pacific--a decade-old, multinational, Third World university serving the south Pacific region--are outlined, and issues of academic freedom and institutional purpose are discussed. (MSE)

  10. 78 FR 49253 - Pacific Southwest Recreation Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-13

    ... Forest Service Pacific Southwest Recreation Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Pacific Southwest Recreation Resource Advisory Committe will meet in Sacramento, California. The Committee is authorized under the Federal Lands Recreation...

  11. 78 FR 8110 - North Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-05

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC483 North Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public workshop. SUMMARY: The North Pacific...

  12. 78 FR 4391 - North Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-22

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC447 North Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Meetings of the North Pacific Fishery Management Council and...

  13. 77 FR 55193 - Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-07

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC182 Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: Members of the Pacific Fishery...

  14. 78 FR 27190 - Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-09

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC662 Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Pacific Fishery Management...

  15. 77 FR 7135 - Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-10

    ... public listening station at the Pacific Council offices. DATES: The conference call will be held Tuesday, February 28, 2012, from 10:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. Pacific Time. ADDRESSES: A listening station will...

  16. 78 FR 59657 - Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE... (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: The Pacific Fishery Management Council (Pacific Council) will hold a work session for the Groundfish Electronic Monitoring Policy...

  17. 78 FR 47675 - Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE... (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: The Pacific Fishery Management Council's (Pacific Council) Ad Hoc Groundfish Electronic Monitoring Committee and Ad Hoc Trawl Groundfish...

  18. 1. FORMER DENVER, SOUTH PARK AND PACIFIC RAILROAD BRIDGE OVER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. FORMER DENVER, SOUTH PARK AND PACIFIC RAILROAD BRIDGE OVER CHALK CREEK, NEAR MT. PRINCETON HOT SPRINGS. VIEW DOWNSTREAM - Denver South Park & Pacific Railroad Bridge, Spanning Chalk Creek, near Mount Princeton Hot Spring, Romley (historical), Chaffee County, CO

  19. 2. FORMER DENVER, SOUTH PARK AND PACIFIC RAILROAD BRIDGE OVER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. FORMER DENVER, SOUTH PARK AND PACIFIC RAILROAD BRIDGE OVER CHALK CREEK, NEAR MT. PRINCETON HOT SPRINGS. VIEW UPSTREAM - Denver South Park & Pacific Railroad Bridge, Spanning Chalk Creek, near Mount Princeton Hot Spring, Romley (historical), Chaffee County, CO

  20. 2. Oil House, Southern Pacific Railroad Carlin Shops, northwest elevation, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Oil House, Southern Pacific Railroad Carlin Shops, northwest elevation, view to southeast (135mm lens). - Southern Pacific Railroad, Carlin Shops, Oil House, Foot of Sixth Street, Carlin, Elko County, NV

  1. 4. Oil House, Southern Pacific Railroad Carlin Shops, southeast elevation, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Oil House, Southern Pacific Railroad Carlin Shops, southeast elevation, view to northwest (90mm lens). - Southern Pacific Railroad, Carlin Shops, Oil House, Foot of Sixth Street, Carlin, Elko County, NV

  2. 1. Oil House, Southern Pacific Railroad Carlin Shops, southwest facade, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Oil House, Southern Pacific Railroad Carlin Shops, southwest facade, view to northeast (135mm lens). - Southern Pacific Railroad, Carlin Shops, Oil House, Foot of Sixth Street, Carlin, Elko County, NV

  3. 6. Interior oblique view from doorway, Oil House, Southern Pacific ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Interior oblique view from doorway, Oil House, Southern Pacific Railroad Carlin Shops, view to north (90mm lens). - Southern Pacific Railroad, Carlin Shops, Oil House, Foot of Sixth Street, Carlin, Elko County, NV

  4. 7. Interior oblique view toward doorway, Oil House, Southern Pacific ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Interior oblique view toward doorway, Oil House, Southern Pacific Railroad Carlin Shops, view to south (90mm lens). - Southern Pacific Railroad, Carlin Shops, Oil House, Foot of Sixth Street, Carlin, Elko County, NV

  5. 3. Oil House, Southern Pacific Railroad Carlin, northeast elevation, view ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Oil House, Southern Pacific Railroad Carlin, northeast elevation, view to southwest (135mm lens). - Southern Pacific Railroad, Carlin Shops, Oil House, Foot of Sixth Street, Carlin, Elko County, NV

  6. Chronic Liver Disease and Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islanders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander > Chronic Liver Disease Chronic Liver Disease and Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander Native Hawaiian/ ... times more likely to be diagnosed with chronic liver disease in 2006. American Samoans were 8 times ...

  7. Mg/Ca composition of benthic foraminifera Miliolacea as a new tool of paleoceanography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadekov, Aleksey Yu.; Bush, Flora; Kerr, Joanna; Ganeshram, Raja; Elderfield, Henry

    2014-10-01

    The Mg/Ca compositions of benthic foraminifera from the superfamily Miliolacea have been studied to explore the use of these high-Mg foraminifera as a proxy for deep ocean conditions. Taxonomic analyses, relative abundance, and depth distributions of different Miliolacea species were carried out on a collection of core top samples, covering a depth range of 131 m to 2530 m, along the Australian coast of the Timor Sea. Pyrgo sp., composed of Pyrgo sarsi and Pyrgo murrhina, was found to be the most suitable for proxy studies. Mg/Ca values of this group of foraminifera show a strong correlation with bottom water temperatures and carbonate ion saturation described by the linear relationship: Mg/Ca = 2.53(±0.22) × BWT + 0.129(±0.023) × Δ[CO32-] + 4.63(±0.53), within the -1°C to 8°C temperature range. Absolute Mg/Ca values of Pyrgo sp. calcite and their temperature sensitivity are similar to those observed for inorganic calcite, suggesting that Mg composition of Pyrgo sp. calcite is mainly controlled by inorganic processes. The Mg/Ca composition of Pyrgo sp. calcite provides a new tool for reconstructing both water temperature and carbonate ion saturation when combined with other proxies for one of these parameters. A down core record from the Eastern Equatorial Pacific has been generated to illustrate how Mg/Ca values can be used for paleoclimate studies. This down core record shows large changes in Pacific bottom waters [CO32-] across glacial-interglacial transition, implying an increase in [CO32-] during the glacial period.

  8. Pacific Basin Communications Study, Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, E. L.; Hurd, J. N.

    1981-01-01

    The Pacific Basin Communications Study describes and assesses extent telecommunications systems in the Pacific Islands region. The study examines user needs in terms of the development of social services and commercial activities. Alternative technological solutions to communications problems are proposed and described. Recommendations include the augmentation and improvement of existing systems allowing for increased communications capacity. Regional cooperation will be required to accommodate the specific, unique requirements of individual nations. Questions of financing, implementation, management, costs and benefits of a regional telecommunications system are discussed.

  9. Effect of calcium-binding peptide from Pacific cod (Gadus macrocephalus) bone on calcium bioavailability in rats.

    PubMed

    Peng, Zhe; Hou, Hu; Zhang, Kai; Li, Bafang

    2017-04-15

    Bone collagen peptide with high affinity to Ca was extracted from Pacific cod (Gadus macrocephalus) bone. FTIR spectra of calcium-binding bone collagen peptide showed that band at 3381cm(-1) shifted to 3361cm(-1), 1455cm(-1) moved to 1411cm(-1), and amide II became deeper valley, compared with that of bone collagen peptide. This peptide was sequenced by Q-TOF-MS and sequences of Gly-Pro-Glu-Gly, Gly-Glu-Lys, Gly-Pro-Leu-Gly and Gly-Leu-Pro-Gly appeared repeatedly in some peptides. From SEM, after chelated with calcium, the loose and porous structure turned into granular structure. From the animal experiment, Ca apparent absorption rate, Ca retention rate and femur Ca content of calcium-binding bone collagen peptide group were significantly higher than those of model and CaCO3 groups (P<0.05), while serum ALP was significantly lower than model group (P<0.05) and similar to control group. The results suggested that calcium-binding bone collagen peptide could improve bioavailability of Ca and thus prevented Ca deficiency.

  10. P/Ca in Gastropod Shells as a Nutrient Proxy in Tropical Marine Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossman, E. L.; Tao, K.; Robbins, J.; O'Dea, A.

    2013-12-01

    Nutrient status and its stability play key roles in the maintenance of marine ecosystems, both in modern and ancient oceans. Modern coral reef communities in the Caribbean are being threatened by anthropogenic input of nutrients whereas one to two million years ago, communities in this same region experienced dramatic overturn of corals and mollusks with the uplift of the Central American Isthmus and subsequent reduction of upwelling-derived nutrients. Thus the ability to record past and present nutrient delivery is paramount for understanding the role of environmental change in controlling past and future biodiversity. To test trace element chemistries in gastropod shells as nutrient proxies, we measured the trace element (Mg, Sr, Ba, Mn, Fe, P, and U ) and stable isotopic (δ18O, δ13C) compositions of 11 modern Conus specimens collected from upwelling and non-upwelling regions in the Caribbean and Pacific coasts of Panama. Four Caribbean shells represent non-upwelling conditions, while seven Pacific shells record conditions of seasonal upwelling (Gulf of Panama) or shoaling of the thermocline (Gulf of Chiriquí). Shells were serially sampled around the spire at 2-3 mm intervals, providing roughly monthly resolution. Shallow-dwelling Pacific specimens show large seasonal range in δ18O (>2‰) reflecting upwelling during the dry season and freshening during the rainy season. In contrast, shallow-dwelling Caribbean specimens show small δ18O range (mostly ≤1‰) indicating limited seasonal upwelling and freshening. For trace element analyses, about 100 μg of carbonate powder was dissolved in 2 ml of 2% HNO3 and analyzed on a high resolution, inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometer (HR-ICP-MS). Among the wide array of trace elements analyzed, only Sr/Ca shows a significant correlation with upwelling intervals, as indicated by high δ18O. This reflects the positive relationship between Sr/Ca and temperature in Conus shells (Sosdian et al., 2006, G3, Q11023

  11. 78 FR 13641 - Pacific Fishery Management Council (Pacific Council); March 5-11, 2013 Pacific Council Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-28

    ... understanding various issues and objectives associated with developing a new management process for groundfish... Fisheries and Summary of 2013 Stock Abundance Forecasts 2. Identification of Management Objectives and... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC527 Pacific Fishery Management Council...

  12. THE FUTURE OF PACIFIC NORTHWEST SALMON: ANATOMY OF A CRISIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Salmon are categorized biologically into two groups: Pacific salmon or Atlantic salmon. All seven species of Pacific salmon on both sides of the North Pacific Ocean have declined substantially from historic levels, but large runs still occur in northern British Columbia, Yukon,...

  13. The Future of the Pacific Basin: A Keynote Address.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleveland, Harlan

    People of the Pacific Basin must decide how to manage the Pacific Ocean commons, who does what in a changing industrial structure, and how to adapt to the new technological revolution. Although the United Nations' Law of the Sea moved into national jurisdiction many of the ocean resources of the Pacific Region, there is one new major…

  14. Asian and Pacific American Education: Directions for the 1980s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin State Dept. of Public Instruction, Madison. Bureau for Food and Nutrition Services.

    The overall themes of the papers given at the 1979 Conference on Asian and Pacific American Education are summarized here. Topics are equal educational opportunities for Asian and Pacific Americans; the educational needs of Pacific American communities; school district policymaking; the responsiveness of postsecondary education to Asian and…

  15. 1980 Resolutions: National Association for Asian and Pacific American Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association for Asian and Pacific American Education, Berkeley, CA.

    This paper contains nineteen resolutions adopted by the National Association for Asian and Pacific American Education (NAAPAE). The resolutions concern (1) the maintenance of Asian/Pacific American linguistic and cultural traditions by educational institutions, (2) the support of Asian/Pacific American studies programs, (3) NAAPAE support of…

  16. 50 CFR 660.131 - Pacific whiting fishery management measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... first receivers during the primary season. (b) Pacific whiting seasons—(1) Primary seasons. The primary seasons for the Pacific whiting fishery are: (i) For the Shorebased IFQ Program, Pacific whiting IFQ fishery, the period(s) of the large-scale target fishery is conducted after the season start date;...

  17. 75 FR 30756 - FM Table of Allotments, Pacific Junction, Iowa

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 FM Table of Allotments, Pacific Junction, Iowa AGENCY: Federal Communications... Channel 299C2 at Pacific Junction, Iowa. The reference coordinates for Channel 299C2 at Pacific...

  18. 77 FR 38773 - North Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-29

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration North Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting...), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of committee meeting. SUMMARY: The North Pacific Fishery Management Council's.... through 5 p.m. Pacific time. ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at the Alaska Fishery Science...

  19. Response of Juvenile Pacific Lamprey to Turbine Passage

    SciTech Connect

    Dauble, D.

    2009-09-14

    To help determine the Pacific lamprey’s ability to survive turbine passage, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory scientists conducted laboratory tests designed to simulate a fish’s passage through the turbine environment. Juvenile Pacific lamprey were subjected to two of three aspects of passage: pressure drop and shear stress. The third aspect, blade strike, was not tested.

  20. 76 FR 24465 - Pacific Gas and Electric Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-02

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Pacific Gas and Electric Company Notice of Application Tendered for Filing....: 2310-193. c. Date Filed: April 12, 2011. d. Applicant: Pacific Gas and Electric Company. e. Name of... Contact: Steve Peirano, Relicensing Project Manager, Pacific Gas and Electric Company, P.O. Box...

  1. PALM: Pacific Area Language Materials. [CD-ROM].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacific Resources for Education and Learning, Honolulu, HI.

    This CD-ROM provides a resource for anyone interested in the diverse languages of the Pacific. It contains a digital archive of approximately 700 booklets in 11 Pacific languages. The original booklets were produced several years ago by the PALM project in order to record Pacific regional languages and to serve as teaching tools. This digital PALM…

  2. 50 CFR 600.1102 - Pacific Coast groundfish fee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pacific Coast groundfish fee. 600.1102... Fishing Capacity Reduction Regulations § 600.1102 Pacific Coast groundfish fee. (a) Purpose. This section implements the fee for repaying the reduction loan financing the Pacific Coast Groundfish Program...

  3. 50 CFR 660.518 - Pacific Coast Treaty Indian Rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pacific Coast Treaty Indian Rights. 660... ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES OFF WEST COAST STATES Coastal Pelagics Fisheries § 660.518 Pacific Coast Treaty Indian Rights. (a) Pacific Coast treaty Indian...

  4. 50 CFR 660.50 - Pacific Coast treaty Indian fisheries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Pacific Coast treaty Indian fisheries... ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES OFF WEST COAST STATES West Coast Groundfish Fisheries § 660.50 Pacific Coast treaty Indian fisheries. (a) Pacific Coast treaty Indian...

  5. 50 CFR 660.518 - Pacific Coast Treaty Indian Rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Pacific Coast Treaty Indian Rights. 660... ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES OFF WEST COAST STATES Coastal Pelagics Fisheries § 660.518 Pacific Coast Treaty Indian Rights. (a) Pacific Coast treaty Indian...

  6. 50 CFR 660.706 - Pacific Coast Treaty Indian rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pacific Coast Treaty Indian rights. 660... ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES OFF WEST COAST STATES Highly Migratory Fisheries § 660.706 Pacific Coast Treaty Indian rights. (a) Pacific Coast treaty Indian...

  7. 50 CFR 660.706 - Pacific Coast Treaty Indian rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Pacific Coast Treaty Indian rights. 660... ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES OFF WEST COAST STATES Highly Migratory Fisheries § 660.706 Pacific Coast Treaty Indian rights. (a) Pacific Coast treaty Indian...

  8. 50 CFR 660.518 - Pacific Coast Treaty Indian Rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Pacific Coast Treaty Indian Rights. 660... ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES OFF WEST COAST STATES Coastal Pelagics Fisheries § 660.518 Pacific Coast Treaty Indian Rights. (a) Pacific Coast treaty Indian...

  9. 50 CFR 660.518 - Pacific Coast Treaty Indian Rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Pacific Coast Treaty Indian Rights. 660... ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES OFF WEST COAST STATES Coastal Pelagics Fisheries § 660.518 Pacific Coast Treaty Indian Rights. (a) Pacific Coast treaty Indian...

  10. 50 CFR 600.1102 - Pacific Coast groundfish fee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Pacific Coast groundfish fee. 600.1102... Fishing Capacity Reduction Regulations § 600.1102 Pacific Coast groundfish fee. (a) Purpose. This section implements the fee for repaying the reduction loan financing the Pacific Coast Groundfish Program...

  11. 50 CFR 600.1102 - Pacific Coast groundfish fee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Pacific Coast groundfish fee. 600.1102... Fishing Capacity Reduction Regulations § 600.1102 Pacific Coast groundfish fee. (a) Purpose. This section implements the fee for repaying the reduction loan financing the Pacific Coast Groundfish Program...

  12. 50 CFR 660.50 - Pacific Coast treaty Indian fisheries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Pacific Coast treaty Indian fisheries... ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES OFF WEST COAST STATES West Coast Groundfish Fisheries § 660.50 Pacific Coast treaty Indian fisheries. (a) Pacific Coast treaty Indian...

  13. 50 CFR 600.1102 - Pacific Coast groundfish fee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Pacific Coast groundfish fee. 600.1102... Fishing Capacity Reduction Regulations § 600.1102 Pacific Coast groundfish fee. (a) Purpose. This section implements the fee for repaying the reduction loan financing the Pacific Coast Groundfish Program...

  14. 50 CFR 660.50 - Pacific Coast treaty Indian fisheries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pacific Coast treaty Indian fisheries. 660... ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES OFF WEST COAST STATES West Coast Groundfish Fisheries § 660.50 Pacific Coast treaty Indian fisheries. (a) Pacific Coast treaty Indian...

  15. 50 CFR 660.324 - Pacific Coast treaty Indian fisheries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pacific Coast treaty Indian fisheries. 660... ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES OFF WEST COAST STATES West Coast Groundfish Fisheries § 660.324 Pacific Coast treaty Indian fisheries. (a) Pacific Coast treaty Indian...

  16. 50 CFR 660.50 - Pacific Coast treaty Indian fisheries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Pacific Coast treaty Indian fisheries... ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES OFF WEST COAST STATES West Coast Groundfish Fisheries § 660.50 Pacific Coast treaty Indian fisheries. (a) Pacific Coast treaty Indian...

  17. 50 CFR 660.706 - Pacific Coast Treaty Indian rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Pacific Coast Treaty Indian rights. 660... ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES OFF WEST COAST STATES Highly Migratory Fisheries § 660.706 Pacific Coast Treaty Indian rights. (a) Pacific Coast treaty Indian...

  18. 50 CFR 660.706 - Pacific Coast Treaty Indian rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Pacific Coast Treaty Indian rights. 660... ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES OFF WEST COAST STATES Highly Migratory Fisheries § 660.706 Pacific Coast Treaty Indian rights. (a) Pacific Coast treaty Indian...

  19. 50 CFR 600.1102 - Pacific Coast groundfish fee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Pacific Coast groundfish fee. 600.1102... Fishing Capacity Reduction Regulations § 600.1102 Pacific Coast groundfish fee. (a) Purpose. This section implements the fee for repaying the reduction loan financing the Pacific Coast Groundfish Program...

  20. 76 FR 54217 - Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-31

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA663 Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public... (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: The Pacific Fishery Management Council (Pacific Council) will convene a meeting of the Stock Assessment Review (STAR) Panel, to consider...

  1. Crossing the impassable: genetic connections in 20 reef fishes across the eastern Pacific barrier.

    PubMed

    Lessios, H A; Robertson, D R

    2006-09-07

    The 'impassable' Eastern Pacific Barrier (EPB), ca 5000 km of deep water separating the eastern from the central Pacific, is the World's widest marine biogeographic barrier. Sequencing of mitochondrial DNA in 20 reef fish morphospecies encountered on both sides of the barrier revealed cryptic speciation in two. Among the other 18 species only two showed significant differentiation (as revealed by haplotype networks and FST statistics) between the eastern and the central Pacific. Coalescence analyses indicated that genetic similarity in the 18 truly transpacific species resulted from different combinations of ages of most recent invasion and of levels of recurrent gene flow, with estimated times of initial separation ranging from approximately 30000 to 1 Myr (ago). There is no suggestion of simultaneous interruptions of gene flow among the species. Migration across the EPB was previously thought to be exclusively eastward, but our evidence showed two invasions from east to west and eight cases in which subsequent gene flow possibly proceeded in the same direction. Thus, the EPB is sporadically permeable to propagules originating on either side.

  2. Crossing the impassable: genetic connections in 20 reef fishes across the eastern Pacific barrier

    PubMed Central

    Lessios, H.A; Robertson, D.R

    2006-01-01

    The ‘impassable’ Eastern Pacific Barrier (EPB), ca 5000 km of deep water separating the eastern from the central Pacific, is the World's widest marine biogeographic barrier. Sequencing of mitochondrial DNA in 20 reef fish morphospecies encountered on both sides of the barrier revealed cryptic speciation in two. Among the other 18 species only two showed significant differentiation (as revealed by haplotype networks and FST statistics) between the eastern and the central Pacific. Coalescence analyses indicated that genetic similarity in the 18 truly transpacific species resulted from different combinations of ages of most recent invasion and of levels of recurrent gene flow, with estimated times of initial separation ranging from approximately 30 000 to 1 Myr (ago). There is no suggestion of simultaneous interruptions of gene flow among the species. Migration across the EPB was previously thought to be exclusively eastward, but our evidence showed two invasions from east to west and eight cases in which subsequent gene flow possibly proceeded in the same direction. Thus, the EPB is sporadically permeable to propagules originating on either side. PMID:16901840

  3. Oligocene sea-level falls recorded in mid-Pacific atoll and archipelagic apron settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlanger, S. O.; Premoli Silva, I.

    1986-05-01

    Drilling results from mid-Pacific atoll and archipelagic apron sites in the Line Islands and Marshall Islands provinces lead to the conclusion that Oligocene sea-level falls detected in Atlantic passive margin sequences are also recorded in a mid-plate-tectonic setting in the Pacific Basin. The mid-Pacific sea-level falls are recorded by (a) the presence of distinct, coarse-grained, graded beds of turbidite origin, rich in reef-derived skeletal debris of Oligocene, Eocene, and Cretaceous age, that were redeposited in deep-water archipelagic apron carbonate sequences of middle and late Oligocene age now flanking the atolls and (b) a marked stratigraphic hiatus and solution unconformity in the subsurface of Enewetak atoll which dates an Oligocene period of atoll emergence correlative with both the deposition of the turbidites and the coastal offlap events discerned in Atlantic passive margins. Correlation of the subsidence path of Enewetak atoll with the development of the Oligocene solution unconformity shows that ca. 30 Ma sea level was as much as 100 m lower than at present.

  4. Indo-Pacific Warm Pool variability during the Holocene and Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jian; Kuhnt, Wolfgang; Holbourn, Ann; Regenberg, Marcus; Andersen, Nils

    We measured oxygen isotopes and Mg/Ca ratios in the surface-dwelling planktonic foraminifer Globigerinoides ruber (white s.s.) and the thermocline dweller Pulleniatina obliquiloculata to investigate upper ocean spatial variability in the Indo-Pacific Warm Pool (IPWP). We focused on three critical time intervals: the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM; 18-21.5 ka), the early Holocene (8-9 ka), and the late Holocene (0-2 ka). Our records from 24 stations in the South China Sea, Timor Sea, Indonesian seas, and western Pacific indicate overall dry and cool conditions in the IPWP during the LGM with a low thermal gradient between surface and thermocline waters. During the early Holocene, sea surface temperatures increased by ˜3°C over the entire region, indicating intensification of the IPWP. However, in the eastern Indian Ocean (Timor Sea), the thermocline gradually shoaled from the LGM to early Holocene, reflecting intensification of the subsurface Indonesian Throughflow (ITF). Increased surface salinity in the South China Sea during the Holocene appears related to northward displacement of the monsoonal rain belt over the Asian continent together with enhanced influx of saltier Pacific surface water through the Luzon Strait and freshwater export through the Java Sea. Opening of the freshwater portal through the Java Sea in the early Holocene led to a change in the vertical structure of the ITF from surface- to thermocline-dominated flow and to substantial freshening of Timor Sea thermocline waters.

  5. Faunal re-evaluation of Mid-Pliocene conditions in the western equatorial Pacific

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dowsett, H.

    2007-01-01

    Mid-Pliocene low-latitude Pacific faunal (planktic foraminifer) sea surface temperature (SST) estimates are normally based upon the Modern Analog Technique (MAT). In the Eastern equatorial Pacific (EEP), where upwelling of cool water predominates, MAT can be used to discern both cooling and warming in Neogene records. SST today is ???30??C in the western equatorial Pacific (WEP) warm pool, the upper limit of the modern calibration data, and past warming above that level is difficult to assess using faunal methods. Mid-Pliocene fossil samples from the WEP have been analyzed using several variations of MAT with different outcomes and associated levels of confidence. While SST above ???30??C in the WEP during the mid-Pliocene cannot be ruled out due to the limitations of the method, temperatures this warm seem unlikely. In addition to the mid-Pliocene, planktic foraminifer assemblages from the coretop, last glacial maximum, last interglacial and the penultimate glacial (Marine Isotope Stage 6) show striking similarity to each other which suggests little to no change in the region between times of global climate extremes. There is generally good agreement between the Mg/Ca paleothermometer and MAT derived faunal SST estimates. Both suggest stability of the WEP warm pool.

  6. The site of net absorption of Ca from the intestinal tract of growing pigs and effect of phytic acid, Ca level and Ca source on Ca digestibility.

    PubMed

    González-Vega, J Caroline; Walk, Carrie L; Liu, Yanhong; Stein, Hans H

    2014-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to test the hypothesis that the standardised digestibility of Ca in calcium carbonate and Lithothamnium calcareum Ca is not different regardless of the level of dietary Ca, and that phytic acid affects the digestibility of Ca in these two ingredients to the same degree. The objectives were to determine where in the intestinal tract Ca absorption takes place and if there are measurable quantities of basal endogenous Ca fluxes in the stomach, small intestine or large intestine. Diets contained calcium carbonate or L. calcareum Ca as the sole source of Ca, 0% or 1% phytic acid and 0.4% or 0.8% Ca. A Ca-free diet was also formulated and used to measure endogenous fluxes and losses of Ca. Nine growing pigs (initial body weight 23.8 ± 1.3 kg) were cannulated in the duodenum and in the distal ileum, and faecal, ileal and duodenal samples were collected. Duodenal endogenous fluxes of Ca were greater (p < 0.05) than ileal endogenous fluxes and total tract endogenous losses of Ca, but ileal endogenous fluxes were less (p < 0.05) than total tract endogenous losses. Standardised digestibility of Ca was not affected by the level of phytic acid, but decreased (p < 0.05) as Ca level increased in L. calcareum Ca diets, but that was not the case if calcium carbonate was the source of Ca (interaction, p < 0.05). The standardised duodenal digestibility (SDD), standardised ileal digestibility (SID) and standardised total tract digestibility (STTD) of Ca were not different if calcium carbonate was the source of dietary Ca. However, the STTD of Ca in L. calcareum Ca was greater (p < 0.05) than the SID and SDD of Ca. The SDD, SID and STTD of Ca in calcium carbonate were greater (p < 0.05) than those of L. calcareum Ca. In conclusion, under the conditions of this experiment, standardised digestibility of Ca is not affected by the level of phytic acid, but may be affected by dietary Ca level depending on the Ca source. Calcium from calcium carbonate is mostly

  7. 76 FR 28422 - Fisheries of the Pacific Region; Western Pacific Region

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-17

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notification of determination of overfishing or an overfished condition... Fishery Management Council (Western Pacific Council), is subject to overfishing. NMFS notifies the appropriate fishery management council (Council) whenever it determines that; overfishing is occurring,...

  8. 78 FR 66695 - Loveland Area Projects, Colorado River Storage Project, Pacific Northwest-Pacific Southwest...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-06

    ... Area Power Administration Loveland Area Projects, Colorado River Storage Project, Pacific Northwest..., Colorado River Storage Project Manager, Colorado River Storage Project Management Center, 150 East Social.... Thomas Hackett, Rates Team Lead, Colorado River Storage Project Management Center, 150 East Social...

  9. 78 FR 61839 - Pacific Fishery Management Council (Pacific Council); Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-04

    ... Pacific Council Chair. ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held by web-based media, with attendance information... to people with disabilities. Requests for sign language interpretation or other auxiliary aids...

  10. Equatorial Pacific Productivity Events and Intervals in the Middle and late Miocene through XRF-Scanned Bulk Sediment Composition Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyle, M. W.; Stepanova, A.; Wilson, J. K.; Marcantonio, F.

    2014-12-01

    The equatorial Pacific is the largest open ocean productivity center, responsible for nearly half of global marine new production and about 40% of CaCO3 burial. Understanding how the equatorial Pacific upwelling system has evolved over the Neogene is critical to understand the evolution of the global carbon cycle. We know from reconnaissance studies that productivity in equatorial Pacific surface waters as well as dissolution driven by deep waters have strongly affected the sediment record. We have used calibrated XRF scanning to capture anomalies in equatorial Pacific upwelling and productivity at Milankovitch-resolving resolution since the early Miocene. The 8 elements calibrated in the XRF scans can be used to distinguish intervals of high carbonate dissolution from those of high productivity. Carbonate dissolution intervals are recorded by a drop of CaCO3 relative to Aeolian clays, with little change in the ratio between estimated opal and clay (estimated by TiO2). In contrast, high production intervals have high opal/TiO2 and low CaCO3. Low CaCO3 contents are caused partly by dilution, since high production skews tropical particulate rain to be more opal-rich relative to carbonate, and additional C-org rain can help to increase CaCO3 dissolution within near-surface sediments. We observe long-lived high production anomalies modulated by orbitally-driven climate variability. Prominent intervals are found at the end of the Miocene climate optimum (~ 14 Ma), interspersed with dissolution intervals in the Carbonate Crash interval (~9-11 Ma), and in the Biogenic Bloom interval (8-4.5 Ma). Using relationships among biogenic fluxes in modern equatorial sediment trap studies, especially the positive correlations between biogenic Ba , C-org, and CaCO3 fluxes, we find that the highest production intervals have much higher opal/C-org in the particulate rain, implying an inefficient carbon pump to the deep ocean. If confirmed, productivity was not as strong a feedback to

  11. 76 FR 58414 - Pacific Cod by Non-American Fisheries Act Crab Vessels Harvesting Pacific Cod for Processing by...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-21

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 679 RIN 0648-XA715 Pacific Cod by Non-American Fisheries Act Crab Vessels Harvesting Pacific Cod for Processing by the Inshore Component in the Central... directed fishing for Pacific cod by non- American Fisheries Act (AFA) crab vessels that are subject...

  12. 76 FR 59922 - Pacific Cod by Non-American Fisheries Act Crab Vessels Harvesting Pacific Cod for Processing by...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-28

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 679 RIN 0648-XA729 Pacific Cod by Non-American Fisheries Act Crab Vessels Harvesting Pacific Cod for Processing by the Inshore Component in the Western... directed fishing for Pacific cod by non- American Fisheries Act (AFA) crab vessels that are subject...

  13. Use of ICT in Education in the South Pacific: Findings of the Pacific eLearning Observatory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whelan, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The Pacific eLearning Observatory at the University of the South Pacific (USP) conducted an online survey of educational technologists (n = 60) to assess levels of access to information and communication technologies (ICT) in education and identify ways of lowering the barriers to ICT in the Pacific region. Almost half of USP's 22,000 students are…

  14. Mapping Distant Continental Influences in the Remote Pacific Atmosphere; Simulations of CO Relevant to the Photochemistry of Oxidants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatfield Robert B.; Guo, Z.; Sachse, G.; Singh, H.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    An animated sequence of maps of simulated carbon monoxide concentrations graphically portrays the extent of residual continental influence upon the tropical Pacific Ocean as studied by NASA aircraft during the PEM-Tropics B intensive sampling campaign. We used the MM5 at a 90 km resolution in a globally wrapped grid to simulate the meteorology of transport, and our GRACES model to follow the basic chemistry. The CO we simulate derives from different sources, and so we distinguish anthropogenic, natural terpenoid oxidation, biomass burning, and pervasive CH4-oxidation influences. "Influence" is always judged with an implicit timescale, and these maps describe influence on the 15-45 day timescale appropriate for CO oxidation. In consequence, the maps are useful in assessing the origins of slowly reacting compounds like acetone, methanol, and the lightest hydrocarbons. At 8 km altitude, The Eastern South Pacific to ca. 130 W (eastern Polynesia) was frequently affected by continental influences but NASA's DC-8's flight path did not happen to take it into these regions very often. Near the surface, continentally influenced air crossed into t he Western South Pacific, in the region northwest of the Southern Pacific Convergence Zone but south of the Intertropical Convergence Zone. This air originated from the NE Pacific, and partly from North America. Comparisons are made to CO and other compounds measured aboard the DC-8 and the P-3 aircraft. We will also use tracers to describe the influence of marine convection in the upper troposphere. As time allows, we will discuss the "age" of ozone within the very cleanest region sampled in portions of the near-equatorial Western South Pacific, using a simple chemical mechanism for ozone levels. These simulations describe the chemistry of an atmosphere with very low ozone.

  15. The Pacific northwest stream quality assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Metre, Peter C.; Morace, Jennifer L.; Sheibley, Rich W.

    2015-01-01

    The Pacific Northwest study will be the third regional study by the NAWQA program, and it will be of similar design and scope as the first two—the Midwest in 2013 and the Southeast in 2014 (Van Metre and others, 2012, 2014).

  16. Agricultural Education in the South Pacific.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutherland, J. A.

    This document is an English-language abstract (approximately 1,500 words) of a paper presenting the results of a survey conducted in 1967 by the Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO) of the United Nations at the request of the South Pacific Commission. The survey included existing facilities for agricultural education in the several territories…

  17. The Third Pacific Basin Biofuels Workshop: Proceedings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Among the many compelling reasons for the development of biofuels on remote Pacific islands, several of the most important include: (1) a lack of indigenous fossil fuels necessitates their import at great economic loss to local island economics, (2) ideal conditions for plant growth exist on many Pacific islands to produce yields of biomass feedstocks, (3) gaseous and liquid fuels such as methane, methanol and ethanol manufactured locally from biomass feedstocks are the most viable alternatives to gasoline and diesel fuels for transportation, and (4) the combustion of biofuels is cleaner than burning petroleum products and contributes no net atmospheric CO2 to aggravate the greenhouse effect and the subsequent threat of sea level rise to low islands. Dr. Vic Phillips, HNEI Program Manager of the Hawaii Integrated Biofuels Research Program welcomed 60 participants to the Third Pacific Basin Biofuels Workshop at the Sheraton Makaha Hotel, Waianae, Oahu, on March 27 and 28, 1989. The objectives of the workshop were to update progress since the Second Pacific Basin Biofuels Workshop in April 1987 and to develop a plan for action for biofuels R and D, technology transfer, and commercialization now (immediate attention), in the near-term (less than two years), in the mid-term (three to five years), and in the long-term (more than six years). An emerging theme of the workshop was how the production, conversion, and utilization of biofuels can help increase environmental and economic security locally and globally. Individual papers are processed separately for the data base.

  18. Pacific Coastal Ecology Branch: Research Overview

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Pacific Coastal Ecology Branch, Newport, Oregon is part of the Western Ecology Division of the National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory of the U.S. EPA. The Branch conducts research and provides scientific technical support to Headquarters and Regional O...

  19. African and Pacific Literature: A Comparative Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Kristine L.

    Literary writing in Africa and the Pacific addresses themes that reflect colonial experience and the struggles of newly independent nations to cope with change and conflicts between traditional and modern existence. The novels of Chinua Achebe of Nigeria and Ngugi Wa Thiong'o of Kenya illustrate many dominant themes of African literature. Achebe…

  20. Education Indicators for East Asia and Pacific.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acedo, Clementina; Uemura, Mitsue

    This set of education indicators for the World Bank's East Asia and Pacific Region is designed to provide key policy-oriented data for World Bank staff and clients. The framework is divided into six main chapters: (1) the demographic, social and economic context of education; (2) financial and human resources invested in education; (3) access to…

  1. Environmental Education in Asia and the Pacific.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bulletin of the Unesco Regional Office for Education in Asia and the Pacific, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Environmental education issues and programs in Asian and Pacific countries are examined in four sections. Section One presents a general overview of environmental education in the region. Topics discussed include environmental problems, goals and objectives for environmental education, legislation, the nature of environmental education, curriculum…

  2. Diseases of Pacific Coast conifers. Agriculture handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Scharpf, R.F.

    1993-06-01

    The handbook provides basic information needed to identify the common diseases of Pacific Coast conifers. Hosts, distribution, disease cycles, and identifying characteristics are described for more than 150 diseases, including cankers, diebacks, galls, rusts, needle diseases, root diseases, mistletoes, and rots. Diseases in which abiotic factors are involved are also described. For some groups of diseases, a descriptive key to field identification is included.

  3. Geologic maps of Pacific basin and rim

    SciTech Connect

    Craddock, C.

    1986-07-01

    A major component of the Circum-Pacific Map Project is to compile five regional geologic maps at a scale of 1:10 million and a final map of the Pacific Ocean basin at a scale of 1:17 million. The Geologic Map of the Northeast Quadrant was published in 1983, and the Geologic Map of the Southeast Quadrant in 1985. The Geologic Maps of the Northwest Quadrant, the Southwest Quadrant, and the Antarctic Region are expected to reach publication during 1986. The Geologic Map of the Pacific Basin, with energy and mineral resources, is scheduled for publication in 1989. Each geologic map is a synthesis of a large amount of information. The land areas portray rock types by patterns and ages by colors; major faults are shown if they form the boundaries for map units. The oceanic areas include bathymetric contours, 13 sea-floor sediment types, all Deep Sea Drilling Program (DSDP) sites, selected DSDP columns, and selected sites of pre-Quaternary bedrock or sediment recovery. A correlation diagram on each map shows stratigraphic columns for the five regional maps, map units, geologic ages, and a time scale. An inset map shows presently active tectonic plates. The principal information sources for each sheet are given in a reference list, and each map is accompanied by explanatory notes. This map series represents the first integrated set of geologic maps of the entire Pacific Ocean basin and rim, including the Antarctic continent- altogether more than half the surface area of planet Earth.

  4. Bibliographic Resources on Pacific/Asian Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Endo, Russell

    This bibliographic listing of sources on Pacific/Asian American groups provides titles of existing bibliographies and literature reviews. Over 100 entries are included in the document. Most of the entries were published during the 1970's, with a few dating from the late 1960's and several from 1980 and 1981. The objective is to offer researchers,…

  5. INTELSAT et al. in the South Pacific.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelton, Joseph N.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses services provided to the island countries of the South Pacific Basin by the International Telecommunications Satellite Organization (INTELSAT), a 110 member-country cooperative that operates a global satellite system. The services include provision of basic satellite communications facilities, technical assistance and training, and free…

  6. SCIENCE, POLITICS, AND PACIFIC NORTHWEST SALMON RECOVERY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Throughout the Pacific Northwest, since 1850, all wild salmon runs have declined and some have disappeared. Billions of dollars have been spent in a so-far failed attempt to reverse the long-term decline. Each year, hundreds of millions of dollars continue to be spent in variou...

  7. SCIENCE, POLICY, AND PACIFIC NORTHWEST SALMON RECOVERY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Throughout the Pacific Northwest, since 1850, all wild salmon runs have declined and some have disappeared. Billions of dollars have been spent in a so-far failed attempt to reverse the long-term decline. Each year, hundreds of millions of dollars continue to be spent in variou...

  8. Rebalance to the Pacific: Resourcing the Strategy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    concern is the geophysical stability of the ocean floor. Plate tectonics are shifting the sea floor daily, creating constant seismic activity. Known...countriesandterritories/northkorea/ index.html. 13 The Pacific Plate is unstable and always shifting, causing plates to slide underneath each other thus creating energy

  9. Culturally Sustaining Leadership: A Pacific Islander's Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hattori, Mary Therese Perez

    2016-01-01

    Social justice in educational settings can be advanced through culturally sustaining leadership development programs for indigenous students, faculty, and administrators. The state of Hawai'i has been a fertile ground for culture-based development experiences for emerging leaders from islands throughout the Pacific. These opportunities arise from…

  10. Endangered Species in the Pacific Northwest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clearing: Nature and Learning in the Pacific Northwest, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Suggests that students can learn how society works by studying threatened and endangered plant and animal species which occur in the local environments. Pictures, descriptions, habitats, and niche information are given for 21 threatened or endangered species of the Pacific Northwest. (DH)

  11. Solar Energy for Pacific Northwest Buildings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, John S.

    Data presented in this report indicate that solar space and water heating are possible in the Pacific Northwest. The first section of the report contains solar records from several stations in the region illustrating space heating needs that could be met, on an average daily basis, by solar energy. The data are summarized, and some preliminary…

  12. Verticillium wilt in the Pacific Northwest

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Verticillium wilt is a serious disease of many economically important agricultural and horticultural crops in the Pacific Northwest (PNW). The disease affects herbaceous annuals and perennials as well as woody trees and shrubs. Plants affected by Verticillium wilt exhibit chlorosis, wilting, defolia...

  13. Pacific Regional Solar Heating Handbook. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Writers' Development Trust, Toronto (Ontario).

    This handbook is intended as a guide for engineers, architects, and individuals familiar with heating and ventilating applications who wish to design a solar heating system for a residential or small commercial building in the Pacific Coast Region. The climate of the region is discussed by selected cities in terms of the effect of climate on solar…

  14. Pulse crop diseases in the Pacific Northwest

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The United Nations declared that 2016 is the International Year of Pulses (IYP). This UN declaration of IYP will certainly increase awareness of pulses and likely position pulses as a primary source of protein and other essential nutrients for human diets. The US Pacific Northwest region (Idaho, Or...

  15. Multimedia Transforms Union Pacific's Training Strategy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cantwell, Steve

    1993-01-01

    Describes a multimedia training program developed for Union Pacific to help improve management-worker relations and to improve service reliability by improving morale and motivating employees for training. Courses are described; multimedia interactivity is explained, including decision making and problem solving; and future plans are reviewed.…

  16. We, the Asians and Pacific Islander Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Dwight L.; And Others

    This booklet, fifth in a series of six, presents a descriptive statistical profile of the Asian and Pacific Islander Americans based on data from the 1980 U.S. Census. The census identifies more than 20 specific population groups, and growth in terms of numbers and diversity is highlighted. Total population for these groups numbered 3.7 million…

  17. Pacific Crude Oil Demands: An International Concern.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The Pacific Area as a whole has a great deficit in crude oil resources and, like much of the world, is heavily dependent upon the Middle East. In...spite of the great growth of industrial bases and refining capabilities, with their commensurate increase in requirements, crude oil production has not

  18. Ca2+ waves in the heart

    PubMed Central

    Izu, Leighton T.; Xie, Yuanfang; Sato, Daisuke; Bányász, Tamás; Chen-Izu, Ye

    2013-01-01

    Ca2+ waves were probably first observed in the early 1940s. Since then Ca2+ waves have captured the attention of an eclectic mixture of mathematicians, neuroscientists, muscle physiologists, developmental biologists, and clinical cardiologists. This review discusses the current state of mathematical models of Ca2+ waves, the normal physiological functions Ca2+ waves might serve in cardiac cells, as well as how the spatial arrangement of Ca2+ release channels shape Ca2+ waves, and we introduce the idea of Ca2+ phase waves that might provide a useful framework for understanding triggered arrhythmias. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled ‘Calcium Signaling in Heart’. PMID:23220129

  19. Pacific Lamprey Research and Restoration : Annual Report 1997.

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Aaron D.; Hatch, Douglas R.; Close, David A.

    1998-08-05

    The once abundant stocks of Pacific lamprey (Lampetra tridentata) above Bonneville Dam are currently depressed (Close et al. 1995). It is likely that many of the same factors that led to the decline of wild stocks of Columbia River Pacific salmon and steelhead have impacted Pacific lamprey populations as well. The Pacific Lamprey Research and Restoration Project, funded by Bonneville Power Administration, is a cooperative effort between the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, the Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission, and Oregon State University with the goal to increase Pacific lamprey stocks above Bonneville Dam.

  20. Large Ca2+-dependent facilitation of CaV2.1 channels revealed by Ca2+ photo-uncaging

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Shin-Rong; Adams, Paul J; Yue, David T

    2015-01-01

    Key points CaV2.1 channels constitute a dominant Ca2+ entry pathway into brain neurons, triggering downstream Ca2+-dependent processes such as neurotransmitter release. CaV2.1 is itself modulated by Ca2+, resulting in activity-dependent enhancement of channel opening termed Ca2+-dependent facilitation (CDF). Real-time Ca2+ imaging and Ca2+ uncaging here reveal that CDF turns out to be strikingly faster, more Ca2+ sensitive, and larger than anticipated on previous grounds. Robust resolution of the quantitative profile of CDF enables deduction of a realistic biophysical model for this process. These results suggest that CaV2.1 CDF would figure most prominently in short-term synaptic plasticity and cerebellar Purkinje cell rhythmicity. Abstract CaV2.1 (P-type) voltage-gated Ca2+ channels constitute a major source of neuronal Ca2+ current, strongly influencing rhythmicity and triggering neurotransmitter release throughout the central nervous system. Fitting with such stature among Ca2+ entry pathways, CaV2.1 is itself feedback regulated by intracellular Ca2+, acting through calmodulin to facilitate channel opening. The precise neurophysiological role of this calcium-dependent facilitation (CDF) remains uncertain, however, in large measure because the very magnitude, Ca2+ dependence and kinetics of CDF have resisted quantification by conventional means. Here, we utilize the photo-uncaging of Ca2+ with CaV2.1 channels fluxing Li+ currents, so that voltage-dependent activation of channel gating is no longer conflated with Ca2+ entry, and CDF is then driven solely by light-induced increases in Ca2+. By using this strategy, we now find that CDF can be unexpectedly large, enhancing currents by as much as twofold at physiological voltages. CDF is steeply Ca2+ dependent, with a Hill coefficient of approximately two, a half-maximal effect reached by nearly 500 nm Ca2+, and Ca2+ on/off kinetics in the order of milliseconds to tens of milliseconds. These properties were