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Sample records for albedo land surface

  1. Fire disturbance effects on land surface albedo in Alaskan tundra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, Nancy H. F.; Whitley, Matthew A.; Jenkins, Liza K.

    2016-03-01

    The study uses satellite Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer albedo products (MCD43A3) to assess changes in albedo at two sites in the treeless tundra region of Alaska, both within the foothills region of the Brooks Range, the 2007 Anaktuvuk River Fire (ARF) and 2012 Kucher Creek Fire (KCF). Results are compared to each other and other studies to assess the magnitude of albedo change and the longevity of impact of fire on land surface albedo. In both sites there was a marked decrease of albedo in the year following the fire. In the ARF, albedo slowly increased until 4 years after the fire, when it returned to albedo values prior to the fire. For the year immediately after the fire, a threefold difference in the shortwave albedo decrease was found between the two sites. ARF showed a 45.3% decrease, while the KCF showed a 14.1% decrease in shortwave albedo, and albedo is more variable in the KCF site than ARF site 1 year after the fire. These differences are possibly the result of differences in burn severity of the two fires, wherein the ARF burned more completely with more contiguous patches of complete burn than KCF. The impact of fire on average growing season (April-September) surface shortwave forcing in the year following fire is estimated to be 13.24 ± 6.52 W m-2 at the ARF site, a forcing comparable to studies in other treeless ecosystems. Comparison to boreal studies and the implications to energy flux are discussed in the context of future increases in fire occurrence and severity in a warming climate.

  2. Comparison of MISR and MODIS land surface albedos: Methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taberner, M.; Pinty, B.; Govaerts, Y.; Liang, S.; Verstraete, M. M.; Gobron, N.; Widlowski, J.-L.

    2010-03-01

    The broadband white sky surface albedo (bihemispherical reflectance) products available from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) are compared at regional and continental scales with similar products generated from the Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) land surface bidirectional reflectance factor (BRF) parameters. This paper describes the methodology applied to derive MISR white sky albedos over four spectral broadbands of interest, namely, 0.3-0.7 μm, 0.4-1.1 μm, 0.7-3.0 μm, and 0.3-3.0 μm, as well as an evaluation of the strategy adopted to compare the MODIS and MISR products. The results are very encouraging since the two data sets show very good statistical agreement over large areas and over a full year of measurements, despite the many differences that exist in the suite of algorithms applied to retrieve these surface quantities from each of these instruments separately.

  3. United States Land Cover Land Use Change, Albedo and Surface Radiative Forcing 1973 to 2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, C. A.; Roy, D. P.

    2007-12-01

    This research responds to the recent recommendations made by the U.S. National Research Council for regional forcing studies to better understand climatic responses to land cover land use change. Surface albedo affects the earth's radiative energy balance, by controlling how much incoming solar radiation is absorbed and reflected. It is well established that Land Cover Land Use (LCLU) change results in changes in the surface albedo which has a radiative forcing effect, however, to date, studies have been limited due to data uncertainties. New spatially explicit satellite derived LCLU change and albedo data for the conterminous U.S. are used to study the impact of LCLU change from 1973 to 2000 on surface albedo and radiative forcing. The methodology and preliminary results for 42% of the U.S. processed to date are presented as spatially explicit maps and summary statistics. The results indicate a negative (cooling) radiative forcing effect due to U.S. LCLU change over the last three decades. Data used include USGS Landsat based decadal land cover maps of the conterminous U.S. located using a stratified sampling methodology across 84 ecoregions, mean 2000-2002 MODIS broadband albedo values extracted in each ecoregion for the 10 mapped LCLU classes, and monthly mean surface incoming solar radiation from the recent European Center for Medium Range Weather Forecast 40 year Reanalysis (ERA40) product.

  4. Land Surface Albedo from MERIS Reflectances Using MODIS Directional Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaaf, Crystal L. B.; Gao, Feng; Strahler, Alan H.

    2004-01-01

    MERIS Level 2 surface reflectance products are now available to the scientific community. This paper demonstrates the production of MERIS-derived surface albedo and Nadir Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) adjusted reflectances by coupling the MERIS data with MODIS BRDF products. Initial efforts rely on the specification of surface anisotropy as provided by the global MODIS BRDF product for a first guess of the shape of the BRDF and then make use all of the coincidently available, partially atmospherically corrected, cloud cleared, MERIS observations to generate MERIS-derived BRDF and surface albedo quantities for each location. Comparisons between MODIS (aerosol-corrected) and MERIS (not-yet aerosol-corrected) surface values from April and May 2003 are also presented for case studies in Spain and California as well as preliminary comparisons with field data from the Devil's Rock Surfrad/BSRN site.

  5. Evaluating biases in simulated land surface albedo from CMIP5 global climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yue; Wang, Tao; Zeng, Zhenzhong; Peng, Shushi; Lian, Xu; Piao, Shilong

    2016-06-01

    Land surface albedo is a key parameter affecting energy balance and near-surface climate. In this study, we used satellite data to evaluate simulated surface albedo in 37 models participating in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5). There was a systematic overestimation in the simulated seasonal cycle of albedo with the highest bias occurring during the Northern Hemisphere's winter months. The bias in surface albedo during the snow-covered season was classified into that in snow cover fraction (SCF) and albedo contrast (β1). There was a general overestimation of β1 due to the simulated snow-covered albedo being brighter than the observed value; negative biases in SCF were not always related to negative albedo biases, highlighting the need for realistic representation of snow-covered albedo in models. In addition, models with a lower leaf area index (LAI) tend to produce a higher surface albedo over the boreal forests during the winter, which emphasizes the necessity of improving LAI simulations in CMIP5 models. Insolation weighting showed that spring albedo biases were of greater importance for climate. The removal of albedo biases is expected to improve temperature simulations particularly over high-elevation regions.

  6. Spatially Complete Surface Albedo Data Sets: Value-Added Products Derived from Terra MODIS Land Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moody, Eric G.; King, Michael D.; Platnick, Steven; Schaaf, Crystal B.; Gao, Feng

    2004-01-01

    Spectral land surface albedo is an important parameter for describing the radiative properties of the Earth. Accordingly it reflects the consequences of natural and human interactions, such as anthropogenic, meteorological, and phenological effects, on global and local climatological trends. Consequently, albedos are integral parts in a variety of research areas, such as general circulation models (GCMs), energy balance studies, modeling of land use and land use change, and biophysical, oceanographic, and meteorological studies. Recent observations of diffuse bihemispherical (white-sky) and direct beam directional hemispherical (black-sky ) land surface albedo included in the MOD43B3 product from MODIS instruments aboard NASA's Terra and Aqua satellite platforms have provided researchers with unprecedented spatial, spectral, and temporal characteristics. Cloud and seasonal snow cover, however, curtail retrievals to approximately half the global land surfaces on an annual equal-angle basis, precluding MOD43B3 albedo products from direct inclusion in some research projects and production environments.

  7. Conterminous United States Surface Radiative Forcing due to Contemporary Land Cover Land Use Albedo Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, C. A.; Roy, D. P.

    2012-12-01

    Recently available Landsat land cover land use (LCLU) change information for four epochs, 1973-1980, 1980-1986, 1986-1992 and 1992-2000, and MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) albedo and snow cover data are used to estimate LCLU albedo change surface radiative forcing for the conterminous United States (CONUS) for each epoch and for 1973 to 2000. Landsat 10 × 10 km or 20 × 20 km LCLU classification maps for 1973, 1980, 1986, 1992 and 2000 located using a stratified random sampling methodology with respect to 84 contiguous CONUS ecoregions are used to provide ecoregion and CONUS estimates. A CONUS scale warming (0.0037 Wm-2) due to LCLU albedo change from 1973 to 2000 is estimated associated with decreasing agricultural and forested lands and increasing developed and grassland/shrublands. The 1986 to 1992 period had the highest overall CONUS forcing (0.0093 Wm-2) due to agricultural land conversion, attributed primarily to the 1985 Farm Bill that established the Conservation Reserve Program. The radiative forcing for individual ecoregions varied geographically in sign and magnitude, with the most negative forcings (as low as -0.8630 Wm-2) due to forest loss, and the most positive forcings (up to 0.2640 Wm-2) due to the conversion of grasslands/shrublands. These results make an important contribution to quantifying the role of LCLU change on the climate system, and underscore the need for repeat, wall-to-wall, spatially-explicit national LCLU mapping.

  8. Spatially Complete Global Spectral Surface Albedos: Value-Added Datasets Derived from Terra MODIS Land Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moody, Eric G.; King, Michael D.; Platnick, Steven; Schaaf, Crystal B.; Gao, Feng

    2004-01-01

    Land surface albedo is an important parameter in describing the radiative properties of the earth s surface as it represents the amount of incoming solar radiation that is reflected from the surface. The amount and type of vegetation of the surface dramatically alters the amount of radiation that is reflected; for example, croplands that contain leafy vegetation will reflect radiation very differently than blacktop associated with urban areas. In addition, since vegetation goes through a growth, or phenological, cycle, the amount of radiation that is reflected changes over the course of a year. As a result, albedo is both temporally and spatially dependant upon global location as there is a distribution of vegetated surface types and growing conditions. Land surface albedo is critical for a wide variety of earth system research projects including but not restricted to remote sensing of atmospheric aerosol and cloud properties from space, ground-based analysis of aerosol optical properties from surface-based sun/sky radiometers, biophysically-based land surface modeling of the exchange of energy, water, momentum, and carbon for various land use categories, and surface energy balance studies. These projects require proper representation of the surface albedo s spatial, spectral, and temporal variations, however, these representations are often lacking in datasets prior to the latest generation of land surface albedo products.

  9. Changes in land surface albedo in response of climate change and human activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, S.

    2013-05-01

    Our Earth's environment is experiencing rapid changes due to natural variability and human activities. Albedo is an important indicator of the changes in land surface properties. This presentation will consist of two parts. The first part is on our efforts for generating global long-term high-quality land surface albedo products. In the past few years, we have been actively working on estimation of land surface albedo from multiple satellite data, such as AVHRR, MODIS, and VIIRS. One of our key products is the Global Land Surface Satellite (GLASS) albedo product from both AVHRR (1981-1999) and MODIS (2000-2010) data at 1-5km spatial and 8-day temporal resolutions. The projects, algorithm development, and product validation would be outlined. The second part will be on spatiotemporal analysis of global albedo changes and their attributions. The emphasis will be on the regional "hotspots", such as Greenland, Tibetan plateau, and northern China where albedo changes are associated with climate change, drought, forest fires, reforestation and afforestation, and agricultural irrigation.

  10. Observations of albedo and radiation balance over postforest land surfaces in the eastern Amazon Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Giambelluca, T.W.; Nullet, M.A.; Ziegler, A.D.

    1997-05-01

    Regional climatic change, including significant reductions in Amazon Basin evaporation and precipitation, has been predicted by numerical simulations of total tropical forest removal. These results have been shown to be very sensitive to the prescription of the albedo shift associated with conversion from forest to a replacement land cover. Modelers have so far chosen to use an {open_quotes}impoverished grassland{close_quotes} scenario to represent the postforest land surface. This choice maximizes the shifts in land surface parameters, especially albedo (fraction of incident shortwave radiation reflected by the surface). Recent surveys show secondary vegetation to be the dominant land cover for some deforested areas of the Amazon. This paper presents the results of field measurements of radiation flux over various deforested surfaces on a small farm in the eastern Amazonian state of Para. The albedo of fields in active use was as high as 0.176, slightly less than the 0.180 recently determined for Amazonian pasture and substantially less than the 0.19 commonly used in GCM simulations of deforestation. For 10-yr-old secondary vegetation, albedo was 0.135, practically indistinguishable from the recently published mean primary forest albedo of 0.134. Measurements of surface temperature and net radiation show that, despite similarity in albedo, secondary vegetation differs from primary forest in energy and mass exchange. The elevation of midday surface temperature above air temperature was found to be greatest for actively and recently farmed land, declining with time since abandonment. Net radiation was correspondingly lower for fields in active or recent use. Using land cover analyses of the region surrounding the study area for 1984, 1988, and 1991, the pace of change in regional-mean albedo is estimated to have declined and appears to be leveling at a value less than 0.03 above that of the original forest cover. 41 refs., 3 figs., 8 tabs.

  11. ESTIMATION OF LAND SURFACE BROADBAND ALBEDOS AND LEAF AREA INDEX FROM EO-1 DATA AND VALIDATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Advanced Land Imager (ALI) is a multispectral sensor onboard NASA Earth Observer-1 (EO-1). It has similar spatial resolution to the Landsat-7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+), with three additional spectral bands. We developed new algorithms for estimating both land surface broadband albedo...

  12. Impacts of Satellite-Based Snow Albedo Assimilation on Offline and Coupled Land Surface Model Simulations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Peng, Shushi; Krinner, Gerhard; Ryder, James; Li, Yue; Dantec-Nédélec, Sarah; Ottlé, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Seasonal snow cover in the Northern Hemisphere is the largest component of the terrestrial cryosphere and plays a major role in the climate system through strong positive feedbacks related to albedo. The snow-albedo feedback is invoked as an important cause for the polar amplification of ongoing and projected climate change, and its parameterization across models is an important source of uncertainty in climate simulations. Here, instead of developing a physical snow albedo scheme, we use a direct insertion approach to assimilate satellite-based surface albedo during the snow season (hereafter as snow albedo assimilation) into the land surface model ORCHIDEE (ORganizing Carbon and Hydrology In Dynamic EcosystEms) and assess the influences of such assimilation on offline and coupled simulations. Our results have shown that snow albedo assimilation in both ORCHIDEE and ORCHIDEE-LMDZ (a general circulation model of Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique) improve the simulation accuracy of mean seasonal (October throughout May) snow water equivalent over the region north of 40 degrees. The sensitivity of snow water equivalent to snow albedo assimilation is more pronounced in the coupled simulation than the offline simulation since the feedback of albedo on air temperature is allowed in ORCHIDEE-LMDZ. We have also shown that simulations of air temperature at 2 meters in ORCHIDEE-LMDZ due to snow albedo assimilation are significantly improved during the spring in particular over the eastern Siberia region. This is a result of the fact that high amounts of shortwave radiation during the spring can maximize its snow albedo feedback, which is also supported by the finding that the spatial sensitivity of temperature change to albedo change is much larger during the spring than during the autumn and winter. In addition, the radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere induced by snow albedo assimilation during the spring is estimated to be -2.50 W m-2, the magnitude of

  13. Impacts of Satellite-Based Snow Albedo Assimilation on Offline and Coupled Land Surface Model Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Peng, Shushi; Krinner, Gerhard; Ryder, James; Li, Yue; Dantec-Nédélec, Sarah; Ottlé, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Seasonal snow cover in the Northern Hemisphere is the largest component of the terrestrial cryosphere and plays a major role in the climate system through strong positive feedbacks related to albedo. The snow-albedo feedback is invoked as an important cause for the polar amplification of ongoing and projected climate change, and its parameterization across models is an important source of uncertainty in climate simulations. Here, instead of developing a physical snow albedo scheme, we use a direct insertion approach to assimilate satellite-based surface albedo during the snow season (hereafter as snow albedo assimilation) into the land surface model ORCHIDEE (ORganizing Carbon and Hydrology In Dynamic EcosystEms) and assess the influences of such assimilation on offline and coupled simulations. Our results have shown that snow albedo assimilation in both ORCHIDEE and ORCHIDEE-LMDZ (a general circulation model of Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique) improve the simulation accuracy of mean seasonal (October throughout May) snow water equivalent over the region north of 40 degrees. The sensitivity of snow water equivalent to snow albedo assimilation is more pronounced in the coupled simulation than the offline simulation since the feedback of albedo on air temperature is allowed in ORCHIDEE-LMDZ. We have also shown that simulations of air temperature at 2 meters in ORCHIDEE-LMDZ due to snow albedo assimilation are significantly improved during the spring in particular over the eastern Siberia region. This is a result of the fact that high amounts of shortwave radiation during the spring can maximize its snow albedo feedback, which is also supported by the finding that the spatial sensitivity of temperature change to albedo change is much larger during the spring than during the autumn and winter. In addition, the radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere induced by snow albedo assimilation during the spring is estimated to be -2.50 W m-2, the magnitude of

  14. Generating 30-m land surface albedo by integrating landsat and MODIS data for understanding the disturbance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Land cover change affects climate through both biogeochemical (carbon-cycle) impacts and biogeophysical processes such as changes in surface albedo, temperature, evapotranspiration, atmospheric water vapor, and cloud cover. Previous studies have highlighted that forest loss in high latitudes could c...

  15. Spatially Complete Surface Albedo Data Sets: Value-Added Products Derived from Terra MODIS Land Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moody, E. G.; King, M. D.; Platnick, S.; Schaaf, C. B.; Gao, F.

    2004-01-01

    Spectral land surface albedo is an important parameter for describing the radiative properties of the Earth. Accordingly it reflects the consequences of natural and human interactions, such as anthropogenic, meteorological, and phenological effects, on global and local climatological trends. Consequently, albedos are integral parts in a variety of research areas, such as general circulation models (GCMs), energy balance studies, modeling of land use and land use change, and biophysical, oceanographic, and meteorological studies. The availability of global albedo data over a large range of spectral channels and at high spatial resolution has dramatically improved with the launch of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument aboard NASA s Earth Observing System (EOS) Terra spacecraft in December 1999. However, lack of spatial and temporal coverage due to cloud and snow effects can preclude utilization of official products in production and research studies. We report on a technique used to fill incomplete MOD43 albedo data sets with the intention of providing complete value-added maps. The technique is influenced by the phenological concept that within a certain area, a pixel s ecosystem class should exhibit similar growth cycle events over the same time period. The shape of an area s phenological temporal curve can be imposed upon existing pixel-level data to fill missing temporal points. The methodology will be reviewed by showcasing 2001 global and regional results of complete albedo and NDVl data sets.

  16. Spatially Complete Surface Albedo Data Sets: Value-Added Products Derived From Terra MODIS Land Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moody, E.; King, M. D.; Platnick, S.; Schaaf, C. B.; Gao, F.

    2003-12-01

    Spectral land surface albedo is an important parameter for describing the radia-tive properties of the Earth. Accordingly it reflects the consequences of natural and human interactions, such as anthropogenic, meteorological, and phenological effects, on global and local climatological trends. Consequently, albedos are integral parts in a variety of research areas, such as general circulation models (GCMs), energy balance studies, modeling of land use and land use change, and biophysical, oceanographic, and meteorological studies. The availability of global albedo data over a large range of spectral channels and at high spatial resolution has dramatically improved with the launch of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument aboard NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) Terra spacecraft in December 1999. However, lack of spatial and temporal coverage due to cloud and snow effects can preclude utilization of official products in production and research studies. We report on a technique used to fill incomplete MOD43 albedo data sets with the intention of providing complete value-added maps. The technique is influ-enced by the phenological concept that within a certain area, a pixel's ecosystem class should exhibit similar growth cycle events over the same time period. The shape of an area's phenological temporal curve can be imposed upon existing pixel-level data to fill missing temporal points. The methodology will be reviewed by showcasing 2001 global and regional results of complete albedo and NDVI data sets.

  17. Albedo estimates for land surface models and support for a new paradigm based on foliage nitrogen concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Hollinger, D.; Ollinger, S. V.; Richardson, A. D.; Martin, M. E.; Meyers, T. P.; Dail, D. B.; Scott, N. A.; Arkebauer, T. J.; Baldocchi, D. D.; Clark, K. L.; Curtis, Peter; Davis, K. J.; Desai, Desai Ankur R.; Dragoni, Danilo; Goulden, M. L.; Gu, Lianhong; Katul, G. G.; Pallardy, Stephen G.; Pawu, K. T.; Schmid, H. P.; Stoy, P. C.; Suyker, A. E.; Verma, Shashi

    2009-02-01

    Vegetation albedo is a critical component of the Earth s climate system, yet efforts to evaluate and improve albedo parameterizations in climate models have lagged relative to other aspects of model development. Here, we calculated growing season albedos for deciduous and evergreen forests, crops, and grasslands based on over 40 site-years of data from the AmeriFlux network and compared them with estimates presently used in the land surface formulations of a variety of climate models. Generally, the albedo estimates used in land surface models agreed well with this data compilation. However, a variety of models using fixed seasonal estimates of albedo overestimated the growing season albedo of northerly evergreen trees. In contrast, climatemodels that rely on a common two-stream albedo submodel provided accurate predictions of boreal needle-leaf evergreen albedo but overestimated grassland albedos. Inverse analysis showed that parameters of the two-stream model were highly correlated. Consistent with recent observations based on remotely sensed albedo, the AmeriFlux dataset demonstrated a tight linear relationship between canopy albedo and foliage nitrogen concentration (for forest vegetation: albedo 50.0110.071%N, r250.91; forests, grassland, and maize: albedo50.0210.067%N, r250.80). However, this relationship saturated at the higher nitrogen concentrations displayed by soybean foliage. We developed similar relationships between a foliar parameter used in the two-stream albedo model and foliage nitrogen concentration. These nitrogen-based relationships can serve as the basis for a new approach to land surface albedo modeling that simplifies albedo estimation while providing a link to other important ecosystem processes.

  18. Assessing change in the earth's land surface albedo with moderate resolution satellite imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qingsong

    Land surface albedo describes the proportion of incident solar radiant flux that is reflected from the Earth's surface and therefore is a crucial parameter in modeling and monitoring attempts to capture the current climate, hydrological, and biogeochemical cycles and predict future scenarios. Due to the temporal variability and spatial heterogeneity of land surface albedo, remote sensing offers the only realistic method of monitoring albedo on a global scale. While the distribution of bright, highly reflective surfaces (clouds, snow, deserts) govern the vast majority of the fluctuation, variations in the intrinsic surface albedo due to natural and human disturbances such as urban development, fire, pests, harvesting, grazing, flooding, and erosion, as well as the natural seasonal rhythm of vegetation phenology, play a significant role as well. The development of times series of global snow-free and cloud-free albedo from remotely sensed observations over the past decade and a half offers a unique opportunity to monitor and assess the impact of these alterations to the Earth's land surface. By utilizing multiple satellite records from the MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), the Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) and the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instruments, and developing innovative spectral conversion coefficients and temporal gap-filling strategies, it has been possible to utilize the strengths of the various sensors to improve the spatial and temporal coverage of global land surface albedo retrievals. The availability of these products is particularly important in tropical regions where cloud cover obscures the forest for significant periods. In the Amazon, field ecologists have noted that some areas of the forest ecosystem respond rapidly with foliage growth at the beginning of the dry season, when sunlight can finally penetrate fully to the surface and have suggested this phenomenon can continue until

  19. Global biogeophysical interactions between historical deforestation and climate through land surface albedo and interactive ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ye

    2015-11-01

    Deforestation is expanding and accelerating into the remaining areas of undisturbed forest, and the quality of the remaining forests is declining today. Assessing the climatic impacts of deforestation can help to rectify this alarming situation. In this paper, how historical deforestation may affect global climate through interactive ocean and surface albedo is examined using an Earth system model of intermediate complexity (EMIC). Control and anomaly integrations are performed for 1000 years. In the anomaly case, cropland is significantly expanded since AD 1700. The response of climate in deforested areas is not uniform between the regions. In the background of a global cooling of 0.08 °C occurring with cooler surface air above 0.4 °C across 30° N to 75° N from March to September, the surface albedo increase has a global cooling effect in response to global-scale replacement of forests by cropland, especially over northern mid-high latitudes. The northern mid-latitude (30° N-60° N) suffers a prominent cooling in June, suggesting that this area is most sensitive to cropland expansion through surface albedo. Most regions show a consistent trend between the overall cooling in response to historical deforestation and its resulting cooling due to surface albedo anomaly. Furthermore, the effect of the interactive ocean on shaping the climate response to deforestation is greater than that of prescribed SSTs in most years with a maximum spread of 0.05 °C. This difference is more prominent after year 1800 than that before due to the more marked deforestation. These findings show the importance of the land cover change and the land surface albedo, stressing the necessity to analyze other biogeophysical processes of deforestation using interactive ocean.

  20. Satellite observations of changes in snow-covered land surface albedo during spring in the Northern Hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atlaskina, K.; Berninger, F.; de Leeuw, G.

    2015-05-01

    Thirteen years of MODIS surface albedo data for the Northern Hemisphere during the spring months (March-May) were analysed to determine temporal and spatial changes over snow-covered land surfaces. Tendencies in land surface albedo change north of 50° N were analysed using data on snow cover fraction, air temperature, vegetation index and precipitation. To this end, the study domain was divided into six smaller areas, based on their geographical position and climate similarity. Strong differences were observed between these areas. As expected, snow cover fraction (SCF) has a strong influence on the albedo in the study area and can explain 56% of variation of albedo in March, 76% in April and 92% in May. Therefore the effects of other parameters were investigated only for areas with 100% SCF. The second largest driver for snow-covered land surface albedo changes is the air temperature when it exceeds -15 °C. At monthly mean air temperatures below this value no albedo changes are observed. Enhanced vegetation index (EVI) and precipitation amount and frequency were independently examined as possible candidates to explain observed changes in albedo for areas with 100% SCF. Amount and frequency of precipitation were identified to influence the albedo over some areas in Eurasia and North America, but no clear effects were observed in other areas. EVI is positively correlated with albedo in Chukotka Peninsula and negatively in Eastern Siberia. For other regions the spatial variability of the correlation fields is too high to reach any conclusions.

  1. Generating 30-m land surface albedo by integrating landsat and MODIS data for understanding the disturbance evolution

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Land cover changes affect climate through both biogeochemical (carbon-cycle) impacts and biogeophysical processes such as changes in surface albedo, temperature, evapotranspiration, atmospheric water vapor, and cloud cover. Recent studies have examined both the greenhouse gas and biophysical consequ...

  2. Land Surface Albedo From EPS/AVHRR : Method For Retrieval and Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, G.

    2015-12-01

    The scope of Land Surface Analysis Satellite Applications Facility (LSA-SAF) is to increase benefit from EUMETSAT Satellites (MSG and EPS) data by providing added value products for the meteorological and environmental science communities with main applications in the fields of climate modelling, environmental management, natural hazards management, and climate change detection. The MSG/SEVIRI daily albedo product is disseminated operationally by the LSA-SAF processing centre based in Portugal since 2009. This product so-called MDAL covers Europe and Africa includes in the visible, near infrared and shortwave bands at a resolution of 3km at the equator. Recently, an albedo product at 1km so-called ETAL has been built from EPS/AVHRR observations in order to primarily MDAL product outside the MSG disk, while ensuring a global coverage. The methodology is common to MSG and EPS data and relies on the inversion of the BRDF (Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function) model of Roujean et al. On a given target, ETAL products exploits the variability of viewing angles whereas MDAL looks at the variations of solar illumination. The comparison of ETAL albedo product against MODIS and MSG/SEVIRI products over the year 2015 is instructive in many ways and shows in general a good agreement between them. The dispersion may be accounted by different factors that will be explained The additional information provided by EPS appears to be particularly beneficial for high latitudes during winter and for snow albedo.

  3. Global land surface albedo maps from MODIS using the Google Earth Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitraka, Zina; Benas, Nikolaos; Gorelick, Noel; Chrysoulakis, Nektarios

    2016-04-01

    The land surface albedo (LSA) is a critical physical variable, which influences the Earth's climate by affecting the energy budget and distribution in the Earth-atmosphere system. Its role is highly significant in both global and local scales; hence, LSA measurements provide a quantitative means for better constraining global and regional scale climate modelling efforts. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor, on board NASA's Terra and Aqua platforms, provides the parameters needed for the computation of LSA on an 8-day temporal scale and a variety of spatial scales (ranging between 0.5 - 5 km). This dataset was used here for the LSA estimation and its changes over the study area at 0.5 km spatial resolution. More specifically, the MODIS albedo product was used, which includes both the directional-hemispherical surface reflectance (black-sky albedo) and the bi-hemispherical surface reflectance (white-sky albedo). The LSA was estimated for the whole globe on an 8-day basis for the whole time period covered by MODIS acquisitions (i.e. 2000 until today). To estimate LSA from black-sky and white-sky albedos, the fraction of the diffused radiation is needed, a function of the Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT). Required AOT information was acquired from the MODIS AOT product at 1̊ × 1̊ spatial resolution. Since LSA also depends on solar zenith angle (SZA), 8-day mean LSA values were computed as averages of corresponding LSA values for representative SZAs covering the 24-hour day. The estimated LSA was analysed in terms of both spatial and seasonal characteristics, while LSA changes during the period examined were assessed. All computation were performed using the Google Earth Engine (GEE). The GEE provided access to all the MODIS products needed for the analysis without the need of searching or downloading. Moreover, the combination of MODIS products in both temporal and spatial terms was fast and effecting using the GEE API (Application

  4. Tracking daily land surface albedo and reflectance anisotropy with moderate-resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuai, Yanmin

    A new algorithm provides daily values of land surface albedo and angular reflectance at a 500-m spatial resolution using data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments currently in orbit on NASA's Terra and Aqua satellite platforms. To overcome the day-to-day variance in observed surface reflectance induced by differences in view and solar illumination angles, the algorithm uses the RossThickLiSparse-Reciprocal bidirectional reflectance model, which is fitted to all MODIS observations of a 500-m resolution cell acquired during a 16-day moving window. Individual observations are weighted by their quality, observation coverage, and proximity to the production date of interest. Product quality is measured by (1) the root mean square error (RMSE) of observations against the best model fit; and (2) the ability of the angular sampling pattern of the observations at hand to determine reflectance model parameters accurately. A regional analysis of model fits to data from selected MODIS data tiles establishes the bounds of these quality measures for application in the daily algorithm. The algorithm, which is now available to users of direct broadcast satellite data from MODIS, allows daily monitoring of rapid surface radiation and land surface change phenomena such as crop development and forest foliage cycles. In two demonstrations, the daily algorithm captured rapid change in plant phenology. The growth phases of a winter wheat crop, as monitored at the Yucheng agricultural research station in Yucheng, China, matched MODIS daily multispectral reflectance data very well, especially during the flowering and heading stages. The daily algorithm also captured the daily change in autumn leaf color in New England, documenting the ability of the algorithm to work well over large regions with varying degrees of cloud cover and atmospheric conditions. Daily surface albedos measured using ground-based instruments on towers at the agricultural and

  5. Improving winter leaf area index estimation in coniferous forests and its significance in estimating the land surface albedo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rong; Chen, Jing M.; Pavlic, Goran; Arain, Altaf

    2016-09-01

    Winter leaf area index (LAI) of evergreen coniferous forests exerts strong control on the interception of snow, snowmelt and energy balance. Simulation of winter LAI and associated winter processes in land surface models is challenging. Retrieving winter LAI from remote sensing data is difficult due to cloud contamination, poor illumination, lower solar elevation and higher radiation reflection by snow background. Underestimated winter LAI in evergreen coniferous forests is one of the major issues limiting the application of current remote sensing LAI products. It has not been fully addressed in past studies in the literature. In this study, we used needle lifespan to correct winter LAI in a remote sensing product developed by the University of Toronto. For the validation purpose, the corrected winter LAI was then used to calculate land surface albedo at five FLUXNET coniferous forests in Canada. The RMSE and bias values for estimated albedo were 0.05 and 0.011, respectively, for all sites. The albedo map over coniferous forests across Canada produced with corrected winter LAI showed much better agreement with the GLASS (Global LAnd Surface Satellites) albedo product than the one produced with uncorrected winter LAI. The results revealed that the corrected winter LAI yielded much greater accuracy in simulating land surface albedo, making the new LAI product an improvement over the original one. Our study will help to increase the usability of remote sensing LAI products in land surface energy budget modeling.

  6. Satellite observations of changes in snow-covered land surface albedo during spring in the Northern Hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atlaskina, K.; Berninger, F.; de Leeuw, G.

    2015-09-01

    Thirteen years of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) surface albedo data for the Northern Hemisphere during the spring months (March-May) were analyzed to determine temporal and spatial changes over snow-covered land surfaces. Tendencies in land surface albedo change north of 50° N were analyzed using data on snow cover fraction, air temperature, vegetation index and precipitation. To this end, the study domain was divided into six smaller areas, based on their geographical position and climate similarity. Strong differences were observed between these areas. As expected, snow cover fraction (SCF) has a strong influence on the albedo in the study area and can explain 56 % of variation of albedo in March, 76 % in April and 92 % in May. Therefore the effects of other parameters were investigated only for areas with 100 % SCF. The second largest driver for snow-covered land surface albedo changes is the air temperature when it exceeds a value between -15 and -10 °C, depending on the region. At monthly mean air temperatures below this value no albedo changes are observed. The Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) and precipitation amount and frequency were independently examined as possible candidates to explain observed changes in albedo for areas with 100 % SCF. Amount and frequency of precipitation were identified to influence the albedo over some areas in Eurasia and North America, but no clear effects were observed in other areas. EVI is positively correlated with albedo in Chukotka Peninsula and negatively in eastern Siberia. For other regions the spatial variability of the correlation fields is too high to reach any conclusions.

  7. Albedo and land surface temperature shift in hydrocarbon seepage potential area, case study in Miri Sarawak Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suherman, A.; Rahman, M. Z. A.; Busu, I.

    2014-02-01

    The presence of hydrocarbon seepage is generally associated with rock or mineral alteration product exposures, and changes of soil properties which manifest with bare development and stress vegetation. This alters the surface thermodynamic properties, changes the energy balance related to the surface reflection, absorption and emission, and leads to shift in albedo and LST. Those phenomena may provide a guide for seepage detection which can be recognized inexpensively by remote sensing method. District of Miri is used for study area. Available topographic maps of Miri and LANDSAT ETM+ were used for boundary construction and determination albedo and LST. Three land use classification methods, namely fixed, supervised and NDVI base classifications were employed for this study. By the intensive land use classification and corresponding statistical comparison was found a clearly shift on albedo and land surface temperature between internal and external seepage potential area. The shift shows a regular pattern related to vegetation density or NDVI value. In the low vegetation density or low NDVI value, albedo of internal area turned to lower value than external area. Conversely in the high vegetation density or high NDVI value, albedo of internal area turned to higher value than external area. Land surface temperature of internal seepage potential was generally shifted to higher value than external area in all of land use classes. In dense vegetation area tend to shift the temperature more than poor vegetation area.

  8. Projected Surface Radiative Forcing due to 2000 to 2100 Land Use Land Cover Albedo Change Across the Conterminous United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, C. A.; Sleeter, B. M.

    2013-12-01

    Satellite-derived contemporary land-use land-cover (LULC) change, albedo data, and modeled future LULC changes are used to study potential impacts of LULC change from 2000 to 2100 on surface albedo and radiative forcing across the conterminous United States (CONUS). Downscaled projected LULC change information, consistent with Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special Report on Emission Scenarios (SRES), is provided by incorporating ecoregion-based land use histories, global integrated assessment models, and expert judgment. The downscaled projections span a wide range of future potential socioeconomic conditions across 10 land cover classes and 84 ecoregions. The A2 scenario had the highest overall CONUS forcing (-0.5369 Wm-2) due to projected high demands for developed and agricultural lands, associated with high population growth and low environmental protection. The B1 scenario had the lowest overall CONUS forcing (-0.0114 Wm-2) due primarily to projected low population growth and strong protection of biodiversity. The radiative forcing for individual ecoregions varied geographically in sign and magnitude, with the most negative forcings (as low as -1.8023 Wm-2, A2 scenario) due primarily to the conversion of forest to agriculture, and the most positive forcings (up to 0.9053 Wm-2, B2 scenario) due to the conversion of agriculture to forest. These results make an important contribution to quantifying the potential future role of LULC change on the climate system, and underscore the need for repeat, wall-to-wall, spatially-explicit national land cover mapping.

  9. Projected surface radiative forcing due to 2000--2050 land-cover land-use albedo change over the eastern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnes, Christopher A.; Roy, David P.; Loveland, Thomas R.

    2013-01-01

    Satellite-derived contemporary land-cover land-use (LCLU) and albedo data and modeled future LCLU are used to study the impact of LCLU change from 2000 to 2050 on surface albedo and radiative forcing for 19 ecoregions in the eastern United States. The modeled 2000–2050 LCLU changes indicate a future decrease in both agriculture and forested land and an increase in developed land that induces ecoregion radiative forcings ranging from −0.175 to 0.432 W m−2 driven predominately by differences in the area and type of LCLU change. At the regional scale, these projected LCLU changes induce a net negative albedo decrease (−0.001) and a regional positive radiative forcing of 0.112 W m−2. This overall positive forcing (i.e., warming) is almost 4 times greater than that estimated for documented 1973–2000 LCLU albedo change published in a previous study using the same methods.

  10. Estimation of four land surface essential climate variables (albedo, LAI/FAPAR, and Fcover) from VIIRS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Shunlin

    2016-07-01

    As the successor of MODIS, the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) from the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) and future Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) brings us into a new era of global daily Earth observations. VIIRS was designed to improve upon the capabilities of the operational AVHRR and provide observation continuity with MODIS. This presentation will describe the progress in estimating four Essential Climate Variables (ECV): shortwave albedo (Wang, et al., 2013; Zhou, et al., 2016), leaf area index (LAI) (Xiao et al., 2016), fraction of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (FAPAR) (Xiao et al., 2016), and fractional vegetation coverage (Fcover) (Li, et al., 2016) from VIIRS data. The algorithms have been peer reviewed, and shortwave albedo has been operationally produced by NOAA and accessible to the scientific community. Li, Y., K. Jia, S. Liang, Z. Xiao, X. Wang, L. Yang, (2016), An operational algorithm for estimating fractional vegetation cover from VIIRS reflectance data based on general regression neural networks, Remote Sensing, revised Xiao, Z., S. Liang, T. Wang, and B. Jiang, (2016), Retrieval of Leaf Area Index and Fraction of Absorbed Photosynthetically Active Radiation from VIIRS Time Series Data, Remote Sensing, revised. Wang, D., S. Liang, T. He, and Y. Yu, (2013), Direct Estimation of Land Surface Albedo from VIIRS Data: Algorithm Improvement and Preliminary Validation, Journal of Geophysical Research, 118(22):12,577-12,586 Zhou, Y., D. Wang, S. Liang, Y. Yu, and T. He, (2016), Assessment of the Suomi NPP VIIRS Land Surface Albedo Data Using Station Measurements and High-Resolution Albedo Maps, Remote Sensing, in press.

  11. A simplified treatment of SiB's land surface albedo parameterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koster, Randal D.; Suarez, Max J.

    1991-01-01

    The earlier presented surface albedo parameterization is simplified by assuming that the reflectance of direct solar radiation is a simple function of solar zenith angle. The function chosen contains three parameters that vary with vegetation type, greenness, and leaf area index. Tables of parameter values are presented. Using these tables, SiB's (Simple Biosphere model) absorbances of direct solar radiation can be reproduced with an average relative error of less than 0.5 percent. Finally, the direct reflectance function is integrated over zenith angle to produce an equation for the surface reflectance of diffuse radiation.

  12. The determination of surface albedo from meteorological satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. T.

    1977-01-01

    A surface albedo was determined from visible data collected by the NOAA-4 polar orbiting meteorological satellite. To filter out the major cause of atmospheric reflectivity, namely clouds, techniques were developed and applied to the data resulting in a map of global surface albedo. Neglecting spurious surface albedos for regions with persistent cloud cover, sun glint effects, insufficient reflected light and, at this time, some unresolved influences, the surface albedos retrieved from satellite data closely matched those of a global surface albedo map produced from surface and aircraft measurements and from characteristic albedos for land type and land use.

  13. Operational Derivation of Surface Albedo and Down-Welling Short-Wave Radiation in the Satellite Application Facility for Land Surface Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiger, B.; Carrer, D.; Meurey, C.; Roujean, J.-L.

    2006-08-01

    The Satellite Application Facility for Land Surface Anal- ysis hosted by the Portuguese Meteorological Institute in Lisbon generates and distributes value added satellite products for numerical weather prediction and environ- mental applications in near-real time. Within the project consortium M´et´eo-France is responsible for the land sur- face albedo and down-welling short-wave radiation flux products. Since the beginning of the year 2005 Meteosat Second Generation data are routinely processed by the Land-SAF operational system. In general the validation studies carried out so far show a good consistency with in-situ observations or equivalent products derived from other satellites. After one year of operations a summary of the product characteristics and performances is given. Key words: Surface Albedo; Down-welling Radiation; Land-SAF.

  14. Implementation of a soil albedo scheme in the CABLEv1.4b land surface model and evaluation against MODIS estimates over Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kala, J.; Evans, J. P.; Pitman, A. J.; Schaaf, C. B.; Decker, M.; Carouge, C.; Mocko, D.; Sun, Q.

    2014-09-01

    Land surface albedo, the fraction of incoming solar radiation reflected by the land surface, is a key component of the Earth system. This study evaluates snow-free surface albedo simulations by the Community Atmosphere Biosphere Land Exchange (CABLEv1.4b) model with the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the Satellite Pour L'Observation de la Terre (SPOT) albedo. We compare results from offline simulations over the Australian continent. The control simulation has prescribed background snow-free and vegetation-free soil albedo derived from MODIS whilst the experiments use a simple parameterisation based on soil moisture and colour, originally from the Biosphere Atmosphere Transfer Scheme (BATS), and adopted in the Common Land Model (CLM). The control simulation, with prescribed soil albedo, shows that CABLE simulates overall albedo over Australia reasonably well, with differences compared to MODIS and SPOT albedos within ±0.1. Application of the original BATS scheme, which uses an eight-class soil classification, resulted in large differences of up to -0.25 for the near-infrared (NIR) albedo over large parts of the desert regions of central Australia. The use of a recalibrated 20-class soil colour classification from the CLM, which includes a higher range for saturated and VIS (visible) and NIR soil albedos, reduced the underestimation of the NIR albedo. However, this soil colour mapping is tuned to CLM soil moisture, a quantity which is not necessarily transferrable between land surface models. We therefore recalibrated the soil color map using CABLE's climatological soil moisture, which further reduced the underestimation of the NIR albedo to within ±0.15 over most of the continent as compared to MODIS and SPOT albedos. Small areas of larger differences of up to -0.25 remained within the central arid parts of the continent during summer; however, the spatial extent of these large differences is substantially reduced as compared to the

  15. A Continental United States High Resolution NLCD Land Cover – MODIS Albedo Database to Examine Albedo and Land Cover Change Relationships

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surface albedo influences climate by affecting the amount of solar radiation that is reflected at the Earth’s surface, and surface albedo is, in turn, affected by land cover. General Circulation Models typically use modeled or prescribed albedo to assess the influence of land co...

  16. Satellite Albedo products Validation by Upscaling Multi-nodes in situ Data into a Satellite Pixel Scale over Heterogeneous Land Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, D.; Wen, J.; Wu, X.; Liu, Q.; Peng, J.; Xiao, Q.; Qinhuo, L.

    2015-12-01

    Land surface albedo is a key parameter for energy budgets. There are many available products from remote sensing sensors, such as Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS), and Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) and so on. Their accuracy should be carefully quantified before being used. Most validations directly use a single-point in situ measurement in the relatively homogeneous land surface. However, it is not valid over heterogeneous cases. A multi-scale validation strategy using a high-resolution albedo imagery as a bridge is alternative, with several uncertainties from high-spatial-resolution albedo imagery, geometric registration, and the upscaling process. It results a relative precision. Hence, for more effective validation, the albedo absolute value based on ground measurements is still required, which can be conceptualized as the "truth" value of pixel scale albedo. In this study, a sampling strategy based on using wireless sensor network (WSN) technology to measure albedo at multiple nodes is proposed to capture the land surface heterogeneity in Huailai remote sensing test station, Hebei province, China, which is one station of a Chinese validation network (fig. 1). The nodes are distributed in an optimal layout determined by a sequential selection method using theirs representativeness. The first six nodes with the highest degree of representativeness are finally selected (fig. 2). Upscaling functions with different weights for each node, calculated by the ordinary least squares (OLS) linear regression, are used to upscale them to a coarse pixel scale. Application is exemplified by the validation of the MODIS albedo product (fig. 3), and VIIRS albedo product (fig.4), from Jul. 18, 2013 to Jul. 31, 2014. The RMSEs are 0.025 and 0.020 for MCD43B3 full inversion and magnitude inversion, respectively. The overall accuracy of VIIRS albedo is 0.021 and 0.014 under clear sky and

  17. Effect of including land-use driven radiative forcing of the surface albedo of land on climate response in the 16th-21st centuries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliseev, A. V.; Mokhov, I. I.

    2011-02-01

    A change in ecosystem types, such as through natural-vegetation-agriculture conversion, alters the surface albedo and triggers attendant shortwave radiative forcing (RF). This paper describes numerical experiments performed using the climate model (CM) of the Institute of Atmospheric Physics (IAP), Russian Academy of Sciences, for the 16th-21st centuries; this model simulated the response to a change in the contents of greenhouse gases (tropospheric and stratospheric), sulfate aerosols, solar constant, as well as the response to change in surface albedo of land due to natural-vegetation-agriculture conversion. These forcing estimates relied on actual data until the late 20th century. In the 21st century, the agricultural area was specified according to scenarios of the Land Use Harmonization project and other anthropogenic impacts were specified using SRES scenarios. The change in the surface vegetation during conversion from natural vegetation to agriculture triggers a cooling RF in most regions except for those of natural semiarid vegetation. The global and annual average RF derived from the IAP RAS CM in late 20th century is -0.11 W m-2. Including the land-use driven RF in IAP RAS CM appreciably reconciled the model calculations to observations in this historical period. For instance, in addition to the net climate warming, IAP RAS CM predicted an annually average cooling and reduction in precipitation in the subtropics of Eurasia and North America and in Amazonia and central Africa, as well as a local maximum in annually average and summertime warming in East China. The land-use driven RF alters the sign in the dependence that the amplitude of the annual cycle of the near-surface atmospheric temperature has on the annually averaged temperature. One reason for the decrease in precipitation as a result of a change in albedo due to land use may be the suppression of the convective activity in the atmosphere in the warm period (throughout the year in the tropics

  18. Influence of Dust and Black Carbon on the Snow Albedo in the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System Version 5 Land Surface Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yasunari, Teppei J.; Koster, Randal D.; Lau, K. M.; Aoki, Teruo; Sud, Yogesh C.; Yamazaki, Takeshi; Motoyoshi, Hiroki; Kodama, Yuji

    2011-01-01

    Present-day land surface models rarely account for the influence of both black carbon and dust in the snow on the snow albedo. Snow impurities increase the absorption of incoming shortwave radiation (particularly in the visible bands), whereby they have major consequences for the evolution of snowmelt and life cycles of snowpack. A new parameterization of these snow impurities was included in the catchment-based land surface model used in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Earth Observing System version 5. Validation tests against in situ observed data were performed for the winter of 2003.2004 in Sapporo, Japan, for both the new snow albedo parameterization (which explicitly accounts for snow impurities) and the preexisting baseline albedo parameterization (which does not). Validation tests reveal that daily variations of snow depth and snow surface albedo are more realistically simulated with the new parameterization. Reasonable perturbations in the assigned snow impurity concentrations, as inferred from the observational data, produce significant changes in snowpack depth and radiative flux interactions. These findings illustrate the importance of parameterizing the influence of snow impurities on the snow surface albedo for proper simulation of the life cycle of snow cover.

  19. An approach for the long-term 30-m land surface snow-free albedo retrieval from historic Landsat surface reflectance and MODIS-based a priori anisotropy knowledge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Land surface albedo has been recognized by the Global Terrestrial Observing System (GTOS) as an essential climate variable crucial for accurate modeling and monitoring of the Earth’s radiative budget. While global climate studies can leverage albedo datasets from MODIS, VIIRS, and other coarse-reso...

  20. Prognostic land surface albedo from a dynamic global vegetation model clumped canopy radiative transfer scheme and satellite-derived geographic forest heights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiang, N. Y.; Yang, W.; Ni-Meister, W.; Aleinov, I. D.; Jonas, J.

    2014-12-01

    Vegetation cover was introduced into general circulations models (GCMs) in the 1980's to account for the effect of land surface albedo and water vapor conductance on the Earth's climate. Schemes assigning canopy albedoes by broad biome type have been superceded in 1990's by canopy radiative transfer schemes for homogeneous canopies obeying Beer's Law extinction as a function of leaf area index (LAI). Leaf albedo and often canopy height are prescribed by plant functional type (PFT). It is recognized that this approach does not effectively describe geographic variation in the radiative transfer of vegetated cover, particularly for mixed and sparse canopies. GCM-coupled dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs) have retained these simple canopy representations, with little further evaluation of their albedos. With the emergence lidar-derived canopy vertical structure data, DGVM modelers are now revisiting albedo simulation. We present preliminary prognostic global land surface albedo produced by the Ent Terrestrial Biosphere Model (TBM), a DGVM coupled to the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) GCM. The Ent TBM is a next generation DGVM designed to incorporate variation in canopy heights, and mixed and sparse canopies. For such dynamically varying canopy structure, it uses the Analytical Clumped Two-Stream (ACTS) canopy radiative transfer model, which is derived from gap probability theory for canopies of tree cohorts with ellipsoidal crowns, and accounts for soil, snow, and bare stems. We have developed a first-order global vegetation structure data set (GVSD), which gives a year of satellite-derived geographic variation in canopy height, maximum canopy leaf area, and seasonal LAI. Combined with Ent allometric relations, this data set provides population density and foliage clumping within crowns. We compare the Ent prognostic albedoes to those of the previous GISS GCM scheme, and to satellite estimates. The impact of albedo differences on surface

  1. Greenland surface albedo changes 1981-2012 from satellite observations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Significant melt over Greenland has been observed during the last several decades associated with extreme warming events over the northern Atlantic Ocean. An analysis of surface albedo change over Greenland is presented, using a 32-year consistent satellite albedo product from the Global Land Surfac...

  2. An Approach for the Long-Term 30-m Land Surface Snow-Free Albedo Retrieval from Historic Landsat Surface Reflectance and MODIS-based A Priori Anisotropy Knowledge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuai, Yanmin; Masek, Jeffrey G.; Gao, Feng; Schaaf, Crystal B.; He, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Land surface albedo has been recognized by the Global Terrestrial Observing System (GTOS) as an essential climate variable crucial for accurate modeling and monitoring of the Earth's radiative budget. While global climate studies can leverage albedo datasets from MODIS, VIIRS, and other coarse-resolution sensors, many applications in heterogeneous environments can benefit from higher-resolution albedo products derived from Landsat. We previously developed a "MODIS-concurrent" approach for the 30-meter albedo estimation which relied on combining post-2000 Landsat data with MODIS Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) information. Here we present a "pre-MODIS era" approach to extend 30-m surface albedo generation in time back to the 1980s, through an a priori anisotropy Look-Up Table (LUT) built up from the high quality MCD43A BRDF estimates over representative homogenous regions. Each entry in the LUT reflects a unique combination of land cover, seasonality, terrain information, disturbance age and type, and Landsat optical spectral bands. An initial conceptual LUT was created for the Pacific Northwest (PNW) of the United States and provides BRDF shapes estimated from MODIS observations for undisturbed and disturbed surface types (including recovery trajectories of burned areas and non-fire disturbances). By accepting the assumption of a generally invariant BRDF shape for similar land surface structures as a priori information, spectral white-sky and black-sky albedos are derived through albedo-to-nadir reflectance ratios as a bridge between the Landsat and MODIS scale. A further narrow-to-broadband conversion based on radiative transfer simulations is adopted to produce broadband albedos at visible, near infrared, and shortwave regimes.We evaluate the accuracy of resultant Landsat albedo using available field measurements at forested AmeriFlux stations in the PNW region, and examine the consistency of the surface albedo generated by this approach

  3. Roles of land surface albedo and horizontal resolution on the Indian summer monsoon biases in a coupled ocean-atmosphere tropical-channel model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samson, Guillaume; Masson, Sébastien; Durand, Fabien; Terray, Pascal; Berthet, Sarah; Jullien, Swen

    2016-05-01

    The Indian summer monsoon (ISM) simulated over the 1989-2009 period with a new 0.75° ocean-atmosphere coupled tropical-channel model extending from 45°S to 45°N is presented. The model biases are comparable to those commonly found in coupled global climate models (CGCMs): the Findlater jet is too weak, precipitations are underestimated over India while they are overestimated over the southwestern Indian Ocean, South-East Asia and the Maritime Continent. The ISM onset is delayed by several weeks, an error which is also very common in current CGCMs. We show that land surface temperature errors are a major source of the ISM low-level circulation and rainfall biases in our model: a cold bias over the Middle-East (ME) region weakens the Findlater jet while a warm bias over India strengthens the monsoon circulation over the southern Bay of Bengal. A surface radiative heat budget analysis reveals that the cold bias is due to an overestimated albedo in this desertic ME region. Two new simulations using a satellite-observed land albedo show a significant and robust improvement in terms of ISM circulation and precipitation. Furthermore, the ISM onset is shifted back by 1 month and becomes in phase with observations. Finally, a supplementary set of simulations at 0.25°-resolution confirms the robustness of our results and shows an additional reduction of the warm and dry bias over India. These findings highlight the strong sensitivity of the simulated ISM rainfall and its onset timing to the surface land heating pattern and amplitude, especially in the ME region. It also illustrates the key-role of land surface processes and horizontal resolution for improving the ISM representation, and more generally the monsoons, in current CGCMs.

  4. Climatic effects of surface albedo geoengineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irvine, Peter J.; Ridgwell, Andy; Lunt, Daniel J.

    2011-12-01

    Various surface albedo modification geoengineering schemes such as those involving desert, urban, or agricultural areas have been proposed as potential strategies for helping counteract the warming caused by greenhouse gas emissions. However, such schemes tend to be inherently limited in their potential and would create a much more heterogeneous radiative forcing than propositions for space-based "reflectors" and enhanced stratospheric aerosol concentrations. Here we present results of a series of atmosphere-ocean general circulation model (GCM) simulations to compare three surface albedo geoengineering proposals: urban, cropland, and desert albedo enhancement. We find that the cooling effect of surface albedo modification is strongly seasonal and mostly confined to the areas of application. For urban and cropland geoengineering, the global effects are minor but, because of being colocated with areas of human activity, they may provide some regional benefits. Global desert geoengineering, which is associated with significant global-scale changes in circulation and the hydrological cycle, causes a smaller reduction in global precipitation per degree of cooling than sunshade geoengineering, 1.1% K-1 and 2.0% K-1 respectively, but a far greater reduction in the precipitation over land, 3.9% K-1 compared with 1.0% K-1. Desert geoengineering also causes large regional-scale changes in precipitation with a large reduction in the intensity of the Indian and African monsoons in particular. None of the schemes studied reverse the climate changes associated with a doubling of CO2, with desert geoengineering profoundly altering the climate and with urban and cropland geoengineering providing only some regional amelioration at most.

  5. Comparison of spectral surface albedos and their impact on the general circulation model simulated surface climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roesch, A.; Wild, M.; Pinker, R.; Ohmura, A.

    2002-07-01

    This study investigates the impact of spectrally resolved surface albedo on the total surface albedo. The neglect of albedo variation within the shortwave spectrum may lead to substantial errors as the atmospheric water greatly influences the spectral distribution of the incoming radiation. It is shown that ignoring the spectral dependence of the surface albedo will affect the predicted climate. The study reveals substantial changes in the climate over northern Africa when modifying the surface albedo of the Sahara deserts. Detailed information is given how the European Center/Hamburg General Circulation Model (ECHAM4) can be extended to include surface boundary conditions for both the visible and near-infrared incoming radiation. This comprises global climatologies for both the visible and near-infrared albedo for snow-free conditions, as well as the corresponding albedo values over snow, land-/sea ice and over snow covered forests. Comparisons between several available surface albedo climatologies and a newly compiled albedo data set show substantial scatter in estimated albedos. The largest albedo differences are found in snow covered forest regions as well as in arid and semi-arid terrains.

  6. Interpretation of surface and planetary directional albedos for vegetated regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cess, Robert D.; Vulis, Inna L.

    1989-01-01

    An atmospheric solar radiation model has been coupled with surface reflectance measurements for two vegetation types, pasture land and savannah, in order to address several issues associated with understanding the directional planetary albedo; i.e., the dependence of planetary albedo upon solar zenith angle. These include an elucidation of processes that influence the variation of planetary albedo with solar zenith angle, as well as emphasizing potential problems associated with converting narrowband planetary albedo measurements to broadband quantities. It is suggested that, for vegetated surfaces, this latter task could be somewhat formidable, since the model simulations indicate that narrowband to broadband conversions strongly depend upon vegetation type. A further aspect of this paper is to illustrate a procedure by which reciprocity inconsistencies within a bidirectional reflectance dataset, if they are not too severe, can be circumvented.

  7. Radiative forcing over the conterminous United States due to contemporary land cover land use albedo change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, C. A.; Roy, D. P.

    2009-04-01

    Land cover and land use (LCLU) change affects Earth surface properties including albedo that impose a radiative forcing on the climate. Recently available satellite derived LCLU change data for the conterminous United States (CONUS) are used to study the impact of LCLU change from 1973 to 2000 on surface albedo and radiative forcing for 61 ecoregions covering 73% of the CONUS. Mean monthly broadband Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer snow and snow-free albedo values are derived from decadal Landsat 60m LCLU classification maps located within ecoregions using a stratified random sampling methodology. These data and European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts incoming surface solar radiation reanalysis are used to estimate ecoregion estimates of LCLU induced albedo change and surface radiative forcing. The results illustrate that radiative forcing due to contemporary LCLU albedo change varies geographically in sign and magnitude, with the most positive radiative forcing due to conversion of agriculture to other LCLU types, and the most negative radiative forcing due to forest loss, with snow modifying the results. At the ecoregion level this magnitude of radiative forcing is not insignificant, being similar in magnitude to global radiative forcing estimates due to LCLU change during the twentieth century.

  8. Radiative forcing over the conterminous United States due to contemporary land cover land use albedo change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnes, Christopher; Roy, David P.

    2008-01-01

    Recently available satellite land cover land use (LCLU) and albedo data are used to study the impact of LCLU change from 1973 to 2000 on surface albedo and radiative forcing for 36 ecoregions covering 43% of the conterminous United States (CONUS). Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) snow-free broadband albedo values are derived from Landsat LCLU classification maps located using a stratified random sampling methodology to estimate ecoregion estimates of LCLU induced albedo change and surface radiative forcing. The results illustrate that radiative forcing due to LCLU change may be disguised when spatially and temporally explicit data sets are not used. The radiative forcing due to contemporary LCLU albedo change varies geographically in sign and magnitude, with the most positive forcings (up to 0.284 Wm−2) due to conversion of agriculture to other LCLU types, and the most negative forcings (as low as −0.247 Wm−2) due to forest loss. For the 36 ecoregions considered a small net positive forcing (i.e., warming) of 0.012 Wm−2 is estimated.

  9. Radiative forcing over the conterminous United States due to contemporary land cover land use albedo change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Christopher A.; Roy, David P.

    2008-05-01

    Recently available satellite land cover land use (LCLU) and albedo data are used to study the impact of LCLU change from 1973 to 2000 on surface albedo and radiative forcing for 36 ecoregions covering 43% of the conterminous United States (CONUS). Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) snow-free broadband albedo values are derived from Landsat LCLU classification maps located using a stratified random sampling methodology to estimate ecoregion estimates of LCLU induced albedo change and surface radiative forcing. The results illustrate that radiative forcing due to LCLU change may be disguised when spatially and temporally explicit data sets are not used. The radiative forcing due to contemporary LCLU albedo change varies geographically in sign and magnitude, with the most positive forcings (up to 0.284 Wm-2) due to conversion of agriculture to other LCLU types, and the most negative forcings (as low as -0.247 Wm-2) due to forest loss. For the 36 ecoregions considered a small net positive forcing (i.e., warming) of 0.012 Wm-2 is estimated.

  10. Albedo and color contrasts on asteroid surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degewij, J.; Tedesco, E. F.; Zellner, B.

    1979-01-01

    Asteroids in general display only small or negligible variations in spectrum or albedo during a rotational cycle. Color variations with rotation are described in the literature but are usually comparable to the noise in the measurements. Twenty-four asteroids have been systematically monitored for such color changes. Only 3 Juno, 4 Vesta, 6 Hebe, 71 Niobe, 349 Dembowska, and 944 Hidalgo display color variations larger than 0.03 mag. In each of these cases the asteroid appears redder near maximum brightness. Of seven asteroids monitored polarimetrically, only 4 Vesta shows a convincing variation, attributed to an albedo change with rotation. The lightcurve can be explained by albedo differences alone; Vesta apparently has a nearly spheroidal shape. Nothwithstanding the above results, the degree of uniformity of most asteroid surfaces is remarkable. If asteroids exist with large discrete domains of ferrosilicate, metallic, and/or carbonaceous material together on their surfaces, they have not yet been identified.

  11. Surface Albedo and Spectral Variability of Ceres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian-Yang; Reddy, Vishnu; Nathues, Andreas; Le Corre, Lucille; Izawa, Matthew R. M.; Cloutis, Edward A.; Sykes, Mark V.; Carsenty, Uri; Castillo-Rogez, Julie C.; Hoffmann, Martin; Jaumann, Ralf; Krohn, Katrin; Mottola, Stefano; Prettyman, Thomas H.; Schaefer, Michael; Schenk, Paul; Schröder, Stefan E.; Williams, David A.; Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.; Konopliv, Alexander S.; Park, Ryan S.; Raymond, Carol A.; Russell, Christopher T.

    2016-02-01

    Previous observations suggested that Ceres has active, but possibly sporadic, water outgassing as well as possibly varying spectral characteristics over a timescale of months. We used all available data of Ceres collected in the past three decades from the ground and the Hubble Space Telescope, as well as the newly acquired images by the Dawn  Framing Camera, to search for spectral and albedo variability on Ceres, on both a global scale and in local regions, particularly the bright spots inside the Occator crater, over timescales of a few months to decades. Our analysis has placed an upper limit on the possible temporal albedo variation on Ceres. Sporadic water vapor venting, or any possibly ongoing activity on Ceres, is not significant enough to change the albedo or the area of the bright features in the Occator crater by >15%, or the global albedo by >3% over the various timescales that we searched. Recently reported spectral slope variations can be explained by changing Sun-Ceres-Earth geometry. The active area on Ceres is less than 1 km2, too small to cause global albedo and spectral variations detectable in our data. Impact ejecta due to impacting projectiles of tens of meters in size like those known to cause observable changes to the surface albedo on Asteroid Scheila cannot cause detectable albedo change on Ceres due to its relatively large size and strong gravity. The water vapor activity on Ceres is independent of Ceres’ heliocentric distance, ruling out the possibility of the comet-like sublimation process as a possible mechanism driving the activity.

  12. Surface Albedo and Spectral Variability of Ceres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian-Yang; Reddy, Vishnu; Nathues, Andreas; Le Corre, Lucille; Izawa, Matthew R. M.; Cloutis, Edward A.; Sykes, Mark V.; Carsenty, Uri; Castillo-Rogez, Julie C.; Hoffmann, Martin; Jaumann, Ralf; Krohn, Katrin; Mottola, Stefano; Prettyman, Thomas H.; Schaefer, Michael; Schenk, Paul; Schröder, Stefan E.; Williams, David A.; Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.; Konopliv, Alexander S.; Park, Ryan S.; Raymond, Carol A.; Russell, Christopher T.

    2016-02-01

    Previous observations suggested that Ceres has active, but possibly sporadic, water outgassing as well as possibly varying spectral characteristics over a timescale of months. We used all available data of Ceres collected in the past three decades from the ground and the Hubble Space Telescope, as well as the newly acquired images by the Dawn  Framing Camera, to search for spectral and albedo variability on Ceres, on both a global scale and in local regions, particularly the bright spots inside the Occator crater, over timescales of a few months to decades. Our analysis has placed an upper limit on the possible temporal albedo variation on Ceres. Sporadic water vapor venting, or any possibly ongoing activity on Ceres, is not significant enough to change the albedo or the area of the bright features in the Occator crater by >15%, or the global albedo by >3% over the various timescales that we searched. Recently reported spectral slope variations can be explained by changing Sun–Ceres–Earth geometry. The active area on Ceres is less than 1 km2, too small to cause global albedo and spectral variations detectable in our data. Impact ejecta due to impacting projectiles of tens of meters in size like those known to cause observable changes to the surface albedo on Asteroid Scheila cannot cause detectable albedo change on Ceres due to its relatively large size and strong gravity. The water vapor activity on Ceres is independent of Ceres’ heliocentric distance, ruling out the possibility of the comet-like sublimation process as a possible mechanism driving the activity.

  13. Monitoring surface albedo change with Landsat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otterman, J.

    1977-01-01

    A pronounced decrease of the surface albedo (reflectivity) has been observed in an area in the Northern Sinai, fenced-in in the summer of 1974. Analysis of the Landsat Multispectral Scanner System digital data from an April 1977 pass indicates a reduction in the albedo in the exclosure by 13%, as compared to the outside, which continues to be subjected to overgrazing and anthropogenic pressures. The reduction of reflectivity is approximately the same in all the spectral bands, and is therefore attributable to accumulation of dead plants and plant debris, and not directly to live vegetation.

  14. Quantifying the Impacts of Surface Albedo on Climate Using the WRF Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlosser, C. A.; Xu, L.; Xu, X.; Gregory, J.; Kirchain, R.

    2015-12-01

    Surface albedo is an important part of the energy budget in shaping local and regional climate. It could also be a potential tool to mitigate the anthropogenic effect on climate change. However, the current level of scientific understanding of surface albedo on global warming potential is medium to low. In order to investigate the anthropogenic impact of surface albedo on climate, different scenarios of urban surface albedo over continental US using the WRF model are simulated. In this study, the change in surface albedo applies to rooftops, pavements, and walls of urban land cover grid cells. The two groups of simulations (low and high albedo) were compared to determine the impacts of elevating urban surface albedo and to account for the uncertainty in the errors or noise introduced by the slightly different initial conditions. The results are represented as the differences in surface temperature and the top of the atmosphere radiation between the two scenarios when urban surface albedos are elevated from 0.15 to 0.40. The ensemble mean of all potential outcomes as a whole, instead of individual initial conditions, shows that the impact of elevating surface albedo has a cooling effect that is robust at both local and regional scales during the summer season. More refined analyses of urban areas will provide insights on surface albedo impacts in specific regions. Future analyses may address changes in CO2 equivalence.

  15. Arid land monitoring using Landsat albedo difference images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinove, Charles J.; Chavez, Pat S., Jr.; Gehring, Dale G.; Holmgren, Ralph

    1981-01-01

    The Landsat albedo, or percentage of incoming radiation reflected from the ground in the wavelength range of 0.5 [mu]m to 1.1 [mu]m, is calculated from an equation using the Landsat digital brightness values and solar irradiance values, and correcting for atmospheric scattering, multispectral scanner calibration, and sun angle. The albedo calculated for each pixel is used to create an albedo image, whose grey scale is proportional to the albedo. Differencing sequential registered images and mapping selected values of the difference is used to create quantitative maps of increased or decreased albedo values of the terrain. All maps and other output products are in black and white rather than color, thus making the method quite economical. Decreases of albedo in arid regions may indicate improvement of land quality; increases may indicate degradation. Tests of the albedo difference mapping method in the Desert Experimental Range in southwestern Utah (a cold desert with little long-term terrain change) for a four-year period show that mapped changes can be correlated with erosion from flash floods, increased or decreased soil moisture, and increases or decreases in the density of desert vegetation, both perennial shrubs and annual plants. All terrain changes identified in this test were related to variations in precipitation. Although further tests of this method in hot deserts showing severe "desertification" are needed, the method is nevertheless recommended for experimental use in monitoring terrain change in other arid and semiarid regions of the world.

  16. Space platform albedo measurements as indicators of change in arid lands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinove, C.J.

    1982-01-01

    The change in albedo of arid lands is an indicator of changes in their condition and quality, including density of vegetative cover, erosion, deposition, surficial soil moisture, and man-made change. In general, darkening of an arid land surface indicates an increase in land quality while brightening indicates a decrease in quality, primarily owing to changes in vegetation. Landsat multiband images taken on different dates can be converted to black-and-white albedo images. Subtraction of one image from another, pixel by pixel, results in an albedo change map that can be density sliced to show areas that have brightened or darkened by selected percentages. These maps are then checked in the field to determine the reasons for the changes and to evaluate the changes in land condition and quality. The albedo change mapping technique has been successfully used in the arid lands of western Utah and northern Arizona and has recently been used for detection of coal strip mining activities in northern Alabama. ?? 1983.

  17. Surface albedo darkening from wildfires in northern sub-Saharan Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatebe, C. K.; Ichoku, C. M.; Poudyal, R.; Román, M. O.; Wilcox, E.

    2014-05-01

    Northern sub-Saharan Africa (NSSA) has a wide variety of climate zones or biomes, where albedo dynamics are highly coupled with vegetation dynamics and fire disturbances. Quantifying surface albedo variations due to fire disturbances on time scales of several months to several years is complex and is made worse by lack of accurate and spatially consistent surface albedo data. Here, we estimate the surface albedo effect from wildfires in different land cover types in the NSSA region using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) multi-year observational data (2003-11). The average decrease in albedo after fires at the scale of 1 km MODIS footprint is -0.002 02 ± 0.000 03 for woody savanna and -0.002 22 ± 0.000 03 for savanna. These two land cover types together account for >86% of the total MODIS fire count between 2003 and 2011. We found that only a small fraction of the pixels (≦̸10%) burn in two successive years and about 47% had any fire recurrence in 9 years. The study also derived the trajectories of post-fire albedo dynamics from the percentages of pixels that recover to pre-fire albedo values each year. We found that the persistence of surface albedo darkening in most land cover types in the NSSA region is limited to about 6-7 years, after which at least 99% of the burnt pixels recover to their pre-fire albedo. Our results provide critical information for deriving necessary input to various models used in determining the effects of albedo change due to wild fires in the NSSA region.

  18. Transformation of surface albedo to surface: Atmosphere surface and irradiance, and their spectral and temporal averages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nack, M. L.; Curran, R. J.

    1978-01-01

    The dependence of the albedo at the top of a realistic atmosphere upon the surface albedo, solar zenith angle, and cloud optical thickness is examined for the cases of clear sky, total cloud cover, and fractional cloud cover. The radiative transfer calculations of Dave and Braslau (1975) for particular values of surface albedo and solar zenith angle, and a single value of cloud optical thickness are used as the basis of a parametric albedo model. The question of spectral and temporal averages of albedos and reflected irradiances is addressed, and unique weighting functions for the spectral and temporal albedo averages are developed.

  19. Estimates of ocean and land albedo at two wavelengths from airborne lidar.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terenzi, F.; Cacciani, M.; di Sarra, A.; Fiocco, G.; Meloni, D.; Pace, G.

    2003-04-01

    Daytime backscattering profiles and background radiation measurements obtained by the nadir-looking ABLE (AirBorne Lidar Experiment) instrument have been used to estimate values of the albedo of ocean and land at the wavelengths of 355 and 532 nm. Data obtained during the transfer flight from Ushuaia (54.4°S, 68.2°W) to Porto Alegre (29.9°S, 51.8°W), at the end of the APE-GAIA (Airborne Polar Experiment - Geophysica Aircraft In Antarctica) campaign, were used to determine the surface albedo. In that flight the airplane overflew the Southern Ocean, the East coast of Argentina, and the estuary of the Rio de la Plata. In order to obtain the surface albedo at the two lidar wavelengths, a new method was applied. The background noise measured by the instrument, pointing to the nadir, provided an uncalibrated radiometric measurement of the solar radiation reflected and scattered from the surface and the atmosphere, while the lidar backscattering ratio profiles allowed to identify zones devoid of clouds. A relative calibration of the background noise measurements at 355 and 532 nm was obtained using the nadir radiances simulated by a radiative transfer model (LibRadTran). The model was used to estimate the solar atmospheric radiation observed by the lidar in cloud-free regions as a function of several parameters, in particular of the solar zenith angle and the surface albedo. The estimated open ocean and land albedo in the visible and UV agree with the published values, indicating the reliability of the methodology. During the flight, a significant change of the ocean albedo is observed at the Rio de la Plata estuary.

  20. Surface Albedo Darkening from wildfires in Northern Sub-Saharan Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatebe, C. K.; Ichoku, C. M.; Poudal, R.; Roman, M. O.; Wilcox, E.

    2014-01-01

    Wildfires are recognized as a key physical disturbance of terrestrial ecosystems and a major source of atmospheric trace gases and aerosols. They are known to produce changes in landscape patterns and lead to changes in surface albedo that can persist for long periods. Here, we estimate the darkening of surface albedo due to wildfires in different land cover ecosystems in the Northern Sub-Saharan Africa using data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). We determined a decrease in albedo after fires over most land cover types (e.g. woody savannas: (-0.00352 0.00003) and savannas: (- 0.003910.00003), which together accounted for >86% of the total MODIS fire count between 2003 and 2011). Grasslands had a higher value (-0.00454 0.00003) than the savannas, but accounted for only about 5% of the total fire count. A few other land cover types (e.g. Deciduous broad leaf: (0.00062 0.00015), and barren: 0.00027 0.00019), showed an increase in albedo after fires, but accounted for less than 1% of the total fires. Albedo change due to wildfires is more important during the fire season (October-February). The albedo recovery progresses rapidly during the first year after fires, where savannas show the greatest recovery (>77%) within one year, while deciduous broadleaf, permanent wetlands and barren lands show the least one-year recovery (56%). The persistence of surface albedo darkening in most land cover types is limited to about six to seven years, after which at least 98% of the burnt pixels recover to their pre-fire albedo.

  1. Impact of climate and anthropogenic changes on urban surface albedo assessed from time-series MODIS satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoran, Maria A.; Dida, Adrian I.; Zoran, Liviu Florin V.

    2015-10-01

    Urbanization may be considered the most significant anthropogenic force that has brought about fundamental changes in urban land cover and landscape pattern around the globe, being one of the crucial issues of global change in the 21st century affecting urban ecosystem. In the physical climate system, land surface albedo determines the radiation balance of the surface and affects the surface temperature and boundary-layer structure of the atmosphere. Due to anthropogenic and natural factors, urban land covers changes result is the land surfaces albedo changes. The main aim of this paper is to investigate the albedo patterns dynamics due to the impact of atmospheric pollution and climate variations on land cover of Bucharest metropolitan area, Romania based on satellite remote sensing MODIS Terra/Aqua (Moderate Imaging Spectroradiometer) data over 2000-2014 time period. This study is based on MODIS derived biogeophysical parameters land surface BRDF/albedo products and in-situ monitoring ground data (as air temperature, aerosols distribution, relative humidity, etc.). For urban land cover changes over the same investigated period have been used also IKONOS satellite data. Due to deforestation in the periurban areas albedo changes appear to be the most significant biogeophysical effect in temperate forests. As the physical climate system is very sensitive to surface albedo, urban/periurban vegetation systems could significantly feedback to the projected climate change modeling scenarios through albedo changes.

  2. Spatially Complete Global Surface Albedos Derived from Terra/MODIS Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Michael D.; Moody, Eric G.; Schaaf, Crystal B.; Platnick, Steven

    2006-01-01

    Spectral land surface albedo is an important parameter for describing the radiative properties of the Earth. Accordingly it reflects the consequences of natural and human interactions, such as anthropogenic, meteorological, and phenological effects, on global and local climatological trends. Consequently, albedos are integral parts in a variety of research areas, such as general circulation models (GCMs), energy balance studies, modeling of land use and land use change, and biophysical, oceanographic, and meteorological studies. , Over five years of land surface anisotropy, diffuse bihemispherical (white-sky) albedo and direct beam directional hemispherical (black-sky) albedo from observations acquired by the MODIS instruments aboard NASA s Terra and Aqua satellite platforms have provided researchers with unprecedented spatial, spectral, and temporal information on the land surface s radiative characteristics. However, roughly 30% of the global land surface, on an annual equal-angle basis, is obscured due to persistent and transient cloud cover, while another 207% is obscured due to ephemeral and seasonal snow effects. This precludes the MOD43B3 albedo products from being directly used in some remote sensing and ground-based applications, climate models, and global change research projects. To provide researchers with the requisite spatially complete global snow-free land surface albedo dataset, an ecosystem-dependent temporal interpolation technique was developed to fill missing or lower quality data and snow covered values from the official MOD43B3 dataset with geophysically realistic values. The method imposes pixel-level and local regional ecosystem-dependent phenological behavior onto retrieved pixel temporal data in such a way as to maintain pixel-level spatial and spectral detail and integrity. The phenological curves are derived from statistics based on the MODIS MOD12Q1 IGBP land cover classification product geolocated with the MOD43B3 data.

  3. Asymmetry in the Diurnal Variation of Surface Albedo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayor, S.; Smith, W. L., Jr.; Nguyen, L.; Alberta, T. A.; Minnis, P.; Whitlock, C. H.; Schuster, G. L.

    1996-01-01

    Remote sensing of surface properties and estimation of clear-sky and surface albedo generally assumes that the albedo depends only on the solar zenith angle. The effects of dew, frost, and precipitation as well as evaporation and wind can lead to some systematic diurnal variability resulting in an asymmetric diurnal cycle of albedo. This paper examines the symmetry of both surface-observed albedos and top-of-the-atmosphere (TOA) albedos derived from satellite data. Broadband and visible surface albedos were measured at the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Southern Great Plains Central Facility, at some fields near the ARM site, and over a coniferous forest in eastern Virginia. Surface and wind conditions are available for most cases. GOES-8 satellite radiance data are converted to broadband albedo using bidirectional reflectance functions and an empirical narrowband-to-broadband relationship. The initial results indicate that surface moisture has a significant effect and can change the albedo in the afternoon by 20% relative to its morning counterpart. Such effects may need to be incorporated in mesoscale and even large-scale models of atmospheric processes.

  4. Surface Albedo Variations Across Opportunity's Traverse in Meridiani Planum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Studer-Ellis, G. L.; Rice, M. S.; Johnson, J. R.; Bell, J. F., III

    2015-12-01

    Surface albedo measurements from the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) Opportunity mission can be used to help understand surface-atmosphere interactions at Meridiani Planum. Opportunity has acquired 117 albedo panoramas with the Pancam instrument as of sol 3870, across the first 40 km of its traverse. To date, only the first 32 panoramas have been reported upon in previous studies [1]. Here we present an analysis of the full set of PDS-released albedo observations from Opportunity and correlate our measurements with terrain type and known atmospheric events. To acquire a 360-degree albedo observation, Pancam's L1 ("clear") filter is used to take 27 broad-spectrum images, which are stitched into a mosaic. Pancam images are calibrated to reflectance factor (R*), which is taken as an approximation of the Lambertian albedo. Areas of interest are selected and average albedo calculations are applied to all of the selections. Results include the average albedo of each scene, as well as equal-area corrections where applicable, in addition to measurements of specific classes of surface features (e.g., outcrops, dusty terrain, and rover tracks). Average scene albedo measurements range from 0.11 ± 0.04 to 0.30 ± 0.04, with the highest value observed on sol 1290 (immediately after the planet-encircling dust storm of 2007). We compare these results to distance traveled, surface morphologies, local wind driven events, and dust opacity measurements. Future work will focus on correlating Pancam albedo values with orbital data from cameras such as HiRISE, CTX, MOC, THEMIS-VIS, and MARCI, and completion of the same analysis for the full Pancam albedo dataset from Spirit. References: [1] Bell, J. F., III, M. S. Rice, J. R. Johnson, and T. M. Hare (2008), Surface albedo observations at Gusev Crater and Meridiani Planum, Mars, J. Geophys. Res., 113, E06S18, doi:10.1029/2007JE002976.

  5. Radiative Forcing over the Conterminous United States due to 1973 to 2000 Land Cover Albedo Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, C. A.; Roy, D. P.

    2011-12-01

    Satellite derived land cover land use (LCLU), snow and albedo data, and incoming surface solar radiation reanalysis data, were used to study the impact of LCLU change on surface albedo and radiative forcing for 84 ecoregions across the conterminous United States. A net continental scale negative radiative forcing of -0.008 Wm-2 due to LCLU albedo change from 1973 to 2000 was estimated associated with decreasing agricultural and forested land and increasing developed land. The radiative forcing for individual ecoregions varied geographically in sign and magnitude, with the most negative (as low as -1.303 Wm-2) due to forest loss and the most positive forcings (up to 0.358 Wm-2) due to the conversion of grassland/shrub. In snow prone ecoregions, where the dominant LCLU transitions were between snow-hiding (e.g., forest) and snow-revealing (e.g., agriculture) LCLU classes, the negative and positive ecoregion forcing estimates were amplified. The results make an important contribution to advancing understanding of the role of LCLU change on the climate system.

  6. CLARA-SAL: a global 28-yr timeseries of Earth's black-sky surface albedo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riihelä, A.; Manninen, T.; Laine, V.; Andersson, K.; Kaspar, F.

    2012-09-01

    We present a novel 28-yr dataset of Earth's black-sky surface albedo, derived from AVHRR instruments. The dataset is created using algorithms to separately derive the surface albedo for different land use areas globally. Snow, sea ice, open water and vegetation are all treated independently. The product features corrections for the atmospheric effect in satellite-observed surface radiances, a BRDF correction for the anisotropic reflectance properties of natural surfaces, and a novel topography correction of geolocation and radiometric accuracy of surface reflectance observations over mountainous areas. The dataset is based on a homogenized AVHRR radiance timeseries. The product is validated against quality-controlled in situ observations of clear-sky surface albedo at various BSRN sites around the world. Snow and ice albedo retrieval validation is given particular attention using BSRN sites over Antarctica, Greenland Climate Network stations on the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS), as well as sea ice albedo data from the SHEBA and Tara expeditions. The product quality is found to be comparable to other previous long-term surface albedo datasets from AVHRR.

  7. CLARA-SAL: a global 28 yr timeseries of Earth's black-sky surface albedo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riihelä, A.; Manninen, T.; Laine, V.; Andersson, K.; Kaspar, F.

    2013-04-01

    We present a novel 28 yr dataset of Earth's black-sky surface albedo, derived from AVHRR instruments. The dataset is created using algorithms to separately derive the surface albedo for different land use areas globally. Snow, sea ice, open water and vegetation are all treated independently. The product features corrections for the atmospheric effect in satellite-observed surface radiances, a BRDF correction for the anisotropic reflectance properties of natural surfaces, and a novel topography correction of geolocation and radiometric accuracy of surface reflectance observations over mountainous areas. The dataset is based on a homogenized AVHRR radiance timeseries. The product is validated against quality-controlled in situ observations of clear-sky surface albedo at various BSRN sites around the world. Snow and ice albedo retrieval validation is given particular attention using BSRN sites over Antarctica, Greenland Climate Network stations on the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS), as well as sea ice albedo data from the SHEBA and Tara expeditions. The product quality is found to be comparable to other previous long-term surface albedo datasets from AVHRR.

  8. Correction to "Influence of Dust and Black Carbon on the Snow Albedo in the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System Version 5 Land Surface Model"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yasunari, Teppei J.; Koster, Randal D.; Kau, K. M.; Aoki, Teruo; Sud, Yogesh C.; Yamazaki, Takeshi; Motoyoshi, Hiroki; Kokdama, Yuji

    2012-01-01

    The website information describing the forcing meteorological data used for the land surface model (LSM) simulation, which were observed at an Automated Meteorological Station CAWS) at the Sapporo District Meteorological Observatory maintained by the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA), was missing from the text. The 1-hourly data were obtained from the website of Kisyoutoukeijouhou (Information for available JMA-observed meteorological data in the past) on the website of JMA (in Japanese) (available at: http://www.jma.go.jpijmaimenulreport.html). The measurement height information of 59.5 m for the anemometer at the Sapporo Observatory was also obtained from the website of JMA (in Japanese) (available at: http://www.jma.go.jp/jma/menu/report.html). In addition, the converted 10-m wind speed, based on the AWS/JMA data, was further converted to a 2-m wind speed prior to its use with the land model as a usual treatment of off-line Catchment simulation. Please ignore the ice absorption data on the website mentioned in paragraph [15] which was not used for our calculations (but the data on the website was mostly the same as the estimated ice absorption coefficients by the following method because they partially used the same data by Warren [1984]). We calculated the ice absorption coefficients with the method mentioned in the same paragraph, for which some of the refractive index data by Warren [1984] were used and then interpolated between wavelengths, and also mentioned in paragraph [20] for the visible (VIS) and near-infrared (NIR) ranges. The optical data we used were interpolated between wavelengths as necessary.

  9. Radiative forcing bias of simulated surface albedo modifications linked to forest cover changes at northern latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bright, R. M.; Myhre, G.; Astrup, R.; Antón-Fernández, C.; Strømman, A. H.

    2015-04-01

    In the presence of snow, the bias in the prediction of surface albedo by many climate models remains difficult to correct due to the difficulties of separating the albedo parameterizations from those describing snow and vegetation cover and structure. This can be overcome by extracting the albedo parameterizations in isolation, by executing them with observed meteorology and information on vegetation structure, and by comparing the resulting predictions to observations. Here, we employ an empirical data set of forest structure and daily meteorology for three snow cover seasons and for three case regions in boreal Norway to compute and evaluate predicted albedo to those based on daily MODIS retrievals. Forest and adjacent open area albedos are subsequently used to estimate bias in top-of-the-atmosphere (TOA) radiative forcings (RF) from albedo changes (Δα, Open-Forest) connected to land use and land cover changes (LULCC). As expected, given the diversity of approaches by which snow masking by tall-statured vegetation is parameterized, the magnitude and sign of the albedo biases varied considerably for forests. Large biases at the open sites were also detected, which was unexpected given that these sites were snow-covered throughout most of the analytical time period, therefore eliminating potential biases linked to snow-masking parameterizations. Biases at the open sites were mostly positive, exacerbating the strength of vegetation masking effects and hence the simulated LULCC Δα RF. Despite the large biases in both forest and open area albedos by some schemes in some months and years, the mean Δα RF bias over the 3-year period (November-May) was considerably small across models (-2.1 ± 1.04 Wm-2; 21 ± 11%); four of six models had normalized mean absolute errors less than 20%. Identifying systematic sources of the albedo prediction biases proved challenging, although for some schemes clear sources were identified.

  10. Empirical models of monthly and annual surface albedo in managed boreal forests of Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bright, Ryan M.; Astrup, Rasmus; Strømman, Anders H.

    2013-04-01

    temporal evolution in managed forests throughout the region, which in turn can be used to estimate the contribution from albedo changes across alternative management scenarios to seasonal and inter-annual radiative forcings. Incorporating temporal descriptions of albedo into regional assessments of the climatic effects of alternative forest management strategies would serve to better inform the development of climate protection policy, and furthermore, help to improve albedo parameterizations of forest (and other land use) management in land-surface components of earth system models that currently suffer from poor representations of temporal transitions.

  11. Evaluation of the EUMETSAT Meteosat Surface Albedo Climate Data Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lattanzio, Alessio; Schulz, Joerg; Roebeling, Rob; Fell, Frank; Bennartz, Ralf; Cahill, Brownwyn; Muller, Jan-Peter; Shane, Neville; Trigo, Isabel; Watson, Gill

    2013-04-01

    Understanding the climate system, with its variability and changes, requires a joint long-term international commitment from research and governmental institutions. The Global Climate Observing System (GCOS) formulated scientific requirements for the needed global observations and products including a list of relevant parameters, the so called Essential Climate Variables (ECVs). The Sustained and Coordinated Processing of Environmental Satellite Data for Climate Monitoring (SCOPE-CM) activity, is answering to these requirements by establishing an international network of facilities to ensure a continuous and sustained generation of high-quality Climate Data Records (CDR) from satellite data in compliance with the GCOS principles and guidelines. Currently, SCOPE-CM represents a partnership between operational space agencies to coordinate the generation of CDRs. Within the SCOPE-CM framework the European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT) has generated the Meteosat Surface Albedo (MSA) Climate Data Record that comprises up to 25 years (1982-2010) of continuous surface albedo coverage for large areas of the Earth. As part of the SCOPE-CM activity on land surface albedo, involving the operational meteorological satellite agencies in Europe (EUMETSAT), in Japan (JMA: Japanese Meteorological Agency) and in the USA (NOAA: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration), the MSA CDR contributes to the creation of a global harmonised surface albedo record derived from all satellites in geostationary orbit. This presentation discusses the results of an evaluation study for the MSA CDR that has been performed by independent researchers in Europe and the US. The MSA CDR has been evaluated in terms of its internal consistency, its compatibility to other satellite-derived surface albedo products, its validity against in-situ observations of superior quality, and its temporal homogeneity. The evaluation of the MSA data record has revealed a

  12. Global Monitoring of Martian Surface Albedo Changes from Orbital Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geissler, P.; Enga, M.; Mukherjee, P.

    2013-12-01

    relentlessly in all seasons as bright dust and dark sand battle to dominate the landscape. Elsewhere, gradual processes steadily shift albedo boundaries between bright and dark terrain. Dark terrain near the Spirit rover landing site is gradually spreading to the north, driven by seasonal southerly winds. A bright fringe of newly deposited dust appears ahead of the moving boundary, populated by wind streaks and dust avalanches. Dark terrain at higher latitudes gradually creeps towards the equator by the dust cleaning action of dust devils, for example at Nilosytis (43°N, 85°E). Much less obvious is the deposition and erosion of dust on already bright, dust-covered terrain. Changes in the distribution of fresh dust take place frequently in the region surrounding the Tharsis Montes. Dust in this high altitude zone is constantly on the move as faint dark streaks mark the removal of recently deposited dust that is only slightly brighter than the dust already settled on the surface. Dramatic deposition of dust onto dusty terrain took place at much lower elevations in northwestern Amazonis between 2002 and 2005. Since then, the dust has been energetically eroded by towering dust devils that cluster here each summer.

  13. Investigating the spread of surface albedo in snow covered forests in CMIP5 models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, P. A.; Wang, L.; Cole, J. N.; Verseghy, D. L.; Arora, V.; Derksen, C.; Brown, R.; von Salzen, K.

    2015-12-01

    A persistent spread in winter albedo has been found in Phase 3 and Phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP) simulations, and is particularly pronounced in boreal forest regions. The primary goal of this study is to investigate the role of leaf area index (LAI) specification in the large spread in winter albedo simulated by the CMIP5 models. Simulated LAI and surface albedo from the CMIP5 models are compared with satellite observations. The results show that improper plant functional type specification and erroneous LAI parameterization in some models can explain an observed positive bias in winter albedo over boreal forest regions of the Northern Hemisphere. This contributes to a large intermodel spread in simulated surface albedo in the presence of snow over these regions and is largely responsible for uncertainties in simulated snow-albedo feedback strength. The errors are largest (+20-40 %) in models with large underestimation of LAI and are typically within ±15% when simulated LAI is within the observed range. This is confirmed by sensitivity tests with the Canadian Atmospheric Global Climate Model coupled with the Canadian Land Surface Scheme version 3.6.

  14. Surface albedo observations at Gusev Crater and Meridiani Planum, Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bell, J.F., III; Rice, M.S.; Johnson, J. R.; Hare, T.M.

    2008-01-01

    During the Mars Exploration Rover mission, the Pancam instrument has periodically acquired large-scale panoramic images with its broadband (739??338 nm) filter in order to estimate the Lambert bolometric albedo of the surface along each rover's traverse. In this work we present the full suite of such estimated albedo values measured to date by the Spirit and Opportunity rovers along their traverses in Gusev Crater and Meridiani Planum, respectively. We include estimated bolometric albedo values of individual surface features (e.g., outcrops, dusty plains, aeolian bed forms, wheel tracks, light-toned soils, and crater walls) as well as overall surface averages of the 43 total panoramic albedo data sets acquired to date. We also present comparisons to estimated Lambert albedo values taken from the Mars Global Surveyor Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) along the rovers' traverses, and to the large-scale bolometric albedos of the sites from the Viking Orbiter Infrared Thermal Mapper (IRTM) and Mars Global Surveyor/Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES). The ranges of Pancam-derived albedos at Gusev Crater (0.14 to 0.25) and in Meridiani Planum. (0.10 to 0.18) are in good agreement with IRTM, TES, and MOC orbital measurements. These data sets will be a useful tool and benchmark for future investigations of albodo variations with time, including measurements from orbital instruments like the Context Camera and High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment on Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Long-term, accurate albedo measurements could also be important for future efforts in climate modeling as well as for studies of active surface processes. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  15. Vegetation, land-use and seasonal albedo data sets: Documentation of archived data tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthews, E.

    1984-01-01

    Global data bases of vegetation, land use, and land cover were compiled at a 1 deg latitude x 1 deg longitude resolution, drawing on approximately 100 published sources complemented by a large collection of satellite imagery. Six datasets prepared and archived at NCAR are described: a vegetation data set (VEGTYPE) representing natural (pre-agricultural) vegetation based on the UNESCO classification system; a cultivation intensity data set (CULTINT) defining the areal extent (expressed as %) of presently cultivated land in the 1 x 1 cells; and four integrated surface-albedo data sets (January, April, July, October) for snow-free conditions except for permanently snow-covered continental ice, incorporating natural vegetation and cultivation characteristics from the vegetation and cultivation-intensity data sets. Non-zero data are included for permanent land only, including continental ice. Documentation of the data-tape format as well as descriptions and regional maps of the individual data sets are presented.

  16. Spatially Complete Global Surface Albedos Derived from Terra/MODIS Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Michael D.; Moody, Eric G.; Platnick, Steven; Schaaf, Crystal B.

    2004-01-01

    Spectral land surface albedo is an important parameter for describing the radiative properties of the Earth. Accordingly it reflects the consequences of natural and human interactions, such as anthropogenic, meteorological, and phenological effects, on global and local climatological trends. Consequently, albedos are integral parts in a variety of research areas, such as general circulation models (GCMs), energy balance studies, modeling of land use and land use change, and biophysical, oceanographic, and meteorological studies. Recent production of land surface anisotropy, diffuse bihemispherical (white-sky) albedo and direct beam directional hemispherical (black-sky) albedo from observations acquired by the MODIS instruments aboard NASA s Terra and Aqua satellite platforms have provided researchers with unprecedented spatial, spectral, and temporal information on the land surface's radiative characteristics. Cloud cover, which cutails retrievals, and the presence of ephemeral and seasonal snow limit the snow-free data to approximately half the global land surfaces on an annual equal-angle basis. This precludes the MOD43B3 albedo products from being used in some remote sensing and ground-based applications, climate models, and global change research projects. An ecosystem-dependent temporal interpolation technique is described that has been developed to fill missing or seasonally snow-covered data in the official MOD43B3 albedo product. The method imposes pixel-level and local regional ecosystem-dependent phenological behavior onto retrieved pixel temporal data in such a way as to maintain pixel-level spatial and spectral detail and integrity. The phenological curves are derived from statistics based on the MODIS MOD12Q1 IGBP land cover classification product geolocated with the MOD43B3 data. The resulting snow-free value-added products provide the scientific community with spatially and temporally complete global white- and black-sky surface albedo maps and

  17. Relating MODIS-derived surface albedo to soils and rock types over Northern Africa and the Arabian peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsvetsinskaya, Elena A.; Schaaf, C. B.; Gao, F.; Strahler, A. H.; Dickinson, R. E.; Zeng, X.; Lucht, W.

    2002-05-01

    We use the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard the Terra spacecraft to derive surface albedo for the arid areas of Northern Africa and the Arabian peninsula. Albedo in seven MODIS spectral bands for land and three broad bands (for shortwave, near infrared, and visible portions of the spectrum) is produced. Surface albedo is derived from MODIS observations during a sixteen-day period and is analyzed at 1 km spatial resolution. MODIS data show considerable spatial variability of surface albedo in the study region that is related to soil and geological characteristics of the surface. For example, solar shortwave white-sky albedo varies by a factor of about 2.5 from the darkest volcanic terrains to the brightest sand sheets. Vegetation contribution to surface reflectance is essentially negligible since we only considered pixels with under 10 percent fractional canopy cover. Few, if any, coupled land-atmosphere global or regional models capture this observed spatial variability in surface reflectance or albedo. Here we suggest a scheme that relates soil groups (based on the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization, FAO, soil classification) and rock types (based on the United States Geological Survey, USGS, geological maps) to MODIS derived surface albedo statistics. This approach is a first step towards the incorporation of the observed spatial variability in surface reflective properties into climate models.

  18. Spectral surface albedo derived from GOME-2/Metop measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pflug, Bringfried; Loyola, Diego

    2009-09-01

    Spectral surface albedo is an important input for GOME-2 trace gas retrievals. An algorithm was developed for estimation of spectral surface albedo from top-of-atmosphere (TOA)-radiances measured by the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment GOME-2 flying on-board MetOp-A. The climatologically version of this algorithm estimates Minimum Lambert-Equivalent Reflectivity (MLER) for a fixed time window and can use data of many years in contrast to the Near-real time version. Accuracy of surface albedo estimated by MLER-computation increases with the amount of available data. Unfortunately, most of the large GOME pixels are partly covered by clouds, which enhance the LER-data. A plot of LER-values over cloud fraction is used within this presentation to account for this influence of clouds. This "cloud fraction plot" can be applied over all surface types. Surface albedo obtained using the "cloud fraction plot" is compared with reference surface albedo spectra and with the FRESCO climatology. There is a general good agreement; however there are also large differences for some pixels.

  19. Radiative forcing over the conterminous United States due to contemporary land cover land use change and sensitivity to snow and interannual albedo variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Christopher A.; Roy, David P.

    2010-12-01

    Satellite-derived land cover land use (LCLU), snow and albedo data, and incoming surface solar radiation reanalysis data were used to study the impact of LCLU change from 1973 to 2000 on surface albedo and radiative forcing for 58 ecoregions covering 69% of the conterminous United States. A net positive surface radiative forcing (i.e., warming) of 0.029 Wm-2 due to LCLU albedo change from 1973 to 2000 was estimated. The forcings for individual ecoregions were similar in magnitude to current global forcing estimates, with the most negative forcing (as low as -0.367 Wm-2) due to the transition to forest and the most positive forcing (up to 0.337 Wm-2) due to the conversion to grass/shrub. Snow exacerbated both negative and positive forcing for LCLU transitions between snow-hiding and snow-revealing LCLU classes. The surface radiative forcing estimates were highly sensitive to snow-free interannual albedo variability that had a percent average monthly variation from 1.6% to 4.3% across the ecoregions. The results described in this paper enhance our understanding of contemporary LCLU change on surface radiative forcing and suggest that future forcing estimates should model snow and interannual albedo variation.

  20. Relationship between cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction and cloud albedo, and new surface-based approach for determining cloud albedo

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.; Wu, W.; Jensen, M. P.; Toto, T.

    2011-07-21

    This paper focuses on three interconnected topics: (1) quantitative relationship between surface shortwave cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo; (2) surface-based approach for measuring cloud albedo; (3) multiscale (diurnal, annual and inter-annual) variations and covariations of surface shortwave cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo. An analytical expression is first derived to quantify the relationship between cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo. The analytical expression is then used to deduce a new approach for inferring cloud albedo from concurrent surface-based measurements of downwelling surface shortwave radiation and cloud fraction. High-resolution decade-long data on cloud albedos are obtained by use of this surface-based approach over the US Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiaton Measurement (ARM) Program at the Great Southern Plains (SGP) site. The surface-based cloud albedos are further compared against those derived from the coincident GOES satellite measurements. The three long-term (1997-2009) sets of hourly data on shortwave cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction and cloud albedo collected over the SGP site are analyzed to explore the multiscale (diurnal, annual and inter-annual) variations and covariations. The analytical formulation is useful for diagnosing deficiencies of cloud-radiation parameterizations in climate models.

  1. Detection of light transformations and concomitant changes in surface albedo

    PubMed Central

    Gerhard, Holly E.; Maloney, Laurence T.

    2010-01-01

    We report two experiments demonstrating that (1) observers are sensitive to information about changes in the light field not captured by local scene statistics and that (2) they can use this information to enhance detection of changes in surface albedo. Observers viewed scenes consisting of matte surfaces at many orientations illuminated by a collimated light source. All surfaces were achromatic, all lights neutral. In the first experiment, observers attempted to discriminate small changes in direction of the collimated light source (light transformations) from matched changes in the albedos of all surfaces (non-light transformations). Light changes and non-light changes shared the same local scene statistics and edge ratios, but the latter were not consistent with any change in direction to the collimated source. We found that observers could discriminate light changes as small as 5 degrees with sensitivity d′ > 1 and accurately judge the direction of change. In a second experiment, we measured observers' ability to detect a change in the surface albedo of an isolated surface patch during either a light change or a surface change. Observers were more accurate in detecting isolated albedo changes during light changes. Measures of sensitivity d′ were more than twice as great. PMID:20884599

  2. Direct determination of surface albedos from satellite imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mekler, Y.; Joseph, J. H.

    1983-01-01

    An empirical method to measure the spectral surface albedo of surfaces from Landsat imagery is presented and analyzed. The empiricism in the method is due only to the fact that three parameters of the solution must be determined for each spectral photograph of an image on the basis of independently known albedos at three points. The approach is otherwise based on exact solutions of the radiative transfer equation for upwelling intensity. Application of the method allows the routine construction of spectral albedo maps from satelite imagery, without requiring detailed knowledge of the atmospheric aerosol content, as long as the optical depth is less than 0.75, and of the calibration of the satellite sensor.

  3. A new parameterization of spectral and broadband ocean surface albedo.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhonghai; Qiao, Yanli; Wang, Yingjian; Fang, Yonghua; Yi, Weining

    2011-12-19

    A simple yet accurate parameterization of spectral and broadband ocean surface albedo has been developed. To facilitate the parameterization and its applications, the albedo is parameterized for the direct and diffuse incident radiation separately, and then each of them is further divided into two components: the contributions from surface and water, respectively. The four albedo components are independent of each other, hence, altering one will not affect the others. Such a designed parameterization scheme is flexible for any future update. Users can simply replace any of the adopted empirical formulations (e.g., the relationship between foam reflectance and wind speed) as desired without a need to change the parameterization scheme. The parameterization is validated by in situ measurements and can be easily implemented into a climate or radiative transfer model. PMID:22274228

  4. Climate change due to anthropogenic surface albedo modification

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, G.L.; Ellsaesser, H.W.; MacCracken, M.C.; Ellis, J.S.; Luther, F.M.

    1980-02-01

    Using a statistical dynamic climate model with more realistic surface albedo changes than used in previous experiments, we have conducted a numerical experiment combining desertification of the Sahara and deforestation of the tropical rain forest. Over an area of 9 x 10/sup 6/ km/sup 2/ at 20/sup 0/N the desert albedo was increased from 0.16 to 0.35 and over 7 x 10/sup 6/ km/sup 2/ at the equator and 10/sup 0/S the rain forest albedo was increased from 0.07 to 0.16. While the most significant direct climatic responses were observed in the modified zones, high northern latitudes exhibited the greatest cooling through activation of the ice-albedo feedback process. In contrast to Sagan et al., this experiment suggests that anthropogenic modification of surface albedo over the past few thousand years has had an impact on global climate which is likely quite small and probably undetectable.

  5. Effect of spatial resolution on estimating surface albedo: A case study in Speulderbos forest in The Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weligepolage, K.; Gieske, A. S. M.; Su, Z.

    2013-08-01

    Land surface albedo is one of the most important parameters accountable for the planetary radiative energy budget. It is known that albedo varies in both space and time as a result of various natural processes and human interventions. Especially in forest ecosystems these variations are much more intense due to inherent canopy structural differences and anticipated seasonal changes. In such environments, estimation of spatially distributed surface albedo poses challenges in terms of capturing the spatial variability using a remotely sensed sensor with a finite field of view. This study investigated the stand level surface albedo variability of a patchwork forest in the central part of The Netherlands. The data used for the study included airborne and satellite imageries and tower-based solar radiation measurements acquired through a dedicated field campaign. The imageries were preprocessed and atmospherically corrected to obtain top of the canopy (TOC) reflectance. The TOC reflectance bands in the visible and near-infrared domain were integrated to estimate spatially distributed surface albedo while the tower-based radiation measurements in the solar-reflective region were used to obtain the temporal variation of surface albedo over a needleleaf forest canopy. The diurnal variation of surface albedo is consistent with the previous findings for needleleaf forest canopies. The spatial mean surface albedo values estimated from remote sensing data for needleleaf (pure Douglas fir), broadleaf (pure Beech) and mixed forest classes are 0.09, 0.13 and 0.11, respectively. Both visual characteristics and descriptive statistics indicate that with increased pixel size, the spatial variability of albedo progressively decreases. The semivariogram analysis was more insightful to perceive the nature and causes of albedo spatial variability in different forest classes in relation to sensor spatial resolution.

  6. Potential effects of forest management on surface albedo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, J.; Bréon, F.-M.; Schelhaas, M.-J.; Pinty, B.; Luyssaert, S.

    2012-04-01

    Currently 70% of the world's forests are managed and this figure is likely to rise due to population growth and increasing demand for wood based products. Forest management has been put forward by the Kyoto-Protocol as one of the key instruments in mitigating climate change. For temperate and boreal forests, the effects of forest management on the stand-level carbon balance are reasonably well understood, but the biophysical effects, for example through changes in the albedo, remain elusive. Following a modeling approach, we aim to quantify the variability in albedo that can be attributed to forest management through changes in canopy structure and density. The modelling approach chains three separate models: (1) a forest gap model to describe stand dynamics, (2) a Monte-Carlo model to estimate the probability density function of the optical path length of photons through the canopy and (3) a physically-based canopy transfer model to estimate the interaction between photons and leaves. The forest gap model provides, on a monthly time step the position, height, diameter, crown size and leaf area index of individual trees. The Monte-Carlo model computes from this the probability density function of the distance a photon travels through crown volumes to determine the direct light reaching the forest floor. This information is needed by the canopy transfer model to calculate the effective leaf area index - a quantity that allows it to correctly represent a 3D process with a 1D model. Outgoing radiation is calculated as the result of multiple processes involving the scattering due to the canopy layer and the forest floor. Finally, surface albedo is computed as the ratio between incident solar radiation and calculated outgoing radiation. The study used two time series representing thinning from below of a beech and a Scots pine forest. The results show a strong temporal evolution in albedo during stand establishment followed by a relatively stable albedo once the canopy

  7. Deriving Albedo from Coupled MERIS and MODIS Surface Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Feng; Schaaf, Crystal; Jin, Yu-Fang; Lucht, Wolfgang; Strahler, Alan

    2004-01-01

    MERIS Level 2 surface reflectance products are now available to the scientific community. This paper demonstrates the production of MERIS-derived surface albedo and Nadir Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) adjusted reflectances by coupling the MERIS data with MODIS BRDF products. Initial efforts rely on the specification of surface anisotropy as provided by the global MODIS BRDF product for a first guess of the shape of the BRDF and then make use all of the coincidently available, partially atmospherically corrected, cloud cleared, MERIS observations to generate MERIS-derived BRDF and surface albedo quantities for each location. Comparisons between MODIS (aerosol-corrected) and MERIS (not-yet aerosol-corrected) surface values from April and May 2003 are also presented for case studies in Spain and California as well as preliminary comparisons with field data from the Devil's Rock Surfrad/BSRN site.

  8. Characterizing bidirectional reflectance and spectral albedo of various land cover types in Midwest using GeoTASO Summer-2014 campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wulamu, A.; Fishman, J.; Maimaitiyiming, M.; Leitch, J. W.; Zoogman, P.; Liu, X.; Chance, K.; Marshall, B.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the bi-directional reflectance function (BRDF) and spectral albedo of various land-cover types is critical for retrieval of trace gas measurements from planned geostationary satellites such as the Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO). Radiant energy, which will be measured by these instruments at the top of atmosphere (TOA) at unprecedented spectral resolution, is strongly influenced by how this energy is reflected by the underlying surface. Thus, it is critical that we understand this phenomenon at comparable wavelength resolution. As part of the NASA ESTO-funded Geostationary Trace gas and Aerosol Sensor Optimization (GeoTASO) development project, we carried out synchronous field and airborne data collection campaigns in the St Louis Metro region in Summer 2014. We collected spectral reflectance data of various land cover types on the ground within hours of a GeoTASO overpass using a field-based hyperspectral spectroradiometer (model PSR3500 from Spectral Evolution). Field measurements collecting in-situ spectral albedo and bidirectional reflectance factors were also obtained in July and August of 2015. In this study, we present our preliminary findings from in-situ and airborne GeoTASO derived spectral albedo and BRDF characteristics of major land cover types at TEMPO spectral profiles, which are necessary for the accurate retrieval of tropospheric trace gases and aerosols. First, a spectral database of various targets (e.g., plants, soils, rocks, man-made objects and water) was developed using field measurements. Next, the GeoTASO airborne data were corrected using MODTRAN and field measurements to derive spectral albedo and BRDF. High spatial resolution land-cover types were extracted using satellite images (e.g., Landsat, WorldView, IKONOS, etc.) at resolutions from 2 m - 30 m. Lastly, spectral albedo/BRDFs corresponding to various land cover types were analyzed using both field and GeoTASO measurements.

  9. Atlas of Archived Vegetation, Land-use and Seasonal Albedo Data Sets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthews, E.

    1985-01-01

    Global digital data bases of natural vegetation and land use were compiled, for use in climate studies, at 1 deg resolution from over 100 published sources. A series of 6 data sets, derived from the original compilations, was prepared and archived on tape at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) (Matthews, 1984). The first is a vegetation data set representing natural (pre-agricultural) vegetation based on the UNESCO classification system. The second, derived from the land-use compilation, is a cultivation-intensity data set defining the areal extent of presently-cultivated land in the 1 deg cells. The last four are integrated surface-albedo data sets (January, April, July, October) for snow-free conditions, incorporating natural-vegetation and cultivation characteristics from the vegetation and cultivation-intensity data sets. Each of these data sets covers the entire surface of the earth. They include non-zero data for permanent land only, including continental ice; water, including oceans and lakes, is zero. The present report includes maps, presented by continent, of the complete archived data, with the exception of Antarctica.

  10. Radiative forcing bias of surface albedo modifications linked to simulated forest cover changes at northern latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bright, R. M.; Myhre, G.; Astrup, R.; Antón-Fernández, C.; Strømman, A. H.

    2014-12-01

    Simulated land use/land cover change (LULCC) radiative forcings (RF) from changes in surface albedo (Δα) predicted by land surface schemes of six leading climate models were compared to those based on daily MODIS retrievals for three regions in Norway and for three winter-spring seasons. As expected, the magnitude and sign of the albedo biases varied considerably for forests; unexpectedly, however, biases of equal magnitude were evident in predictions at open area sites. The latter were mostly positive and exacerbated the strength of vegetation masking effects and hence the simulated LULCC Δα RF. RF bias was considerably small across models (-0.08 ± 0.04 W m-2; 21 ± 11%); 4 of 6 models had normalized mean absolute errors less than 20% (3-year regional mean). Identifying systematic sources of the albedo prediction biases proved challenging, although for some schemes clear sources were identified. Our study should provide some reassurance that model improvement efforts of recent years are leading to enhanced LULCC climate predictions.

  11. Long term surface albedo datasets generated with Meteosat images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lattanzio, A.; Govaerts, Y. M.; Theodore, B.

    2009-04-01

    The Global Climate Observing System (GCOS) has recognized the importance and the key-role of the surface albedo in the study of the climate change. This and the other climate variables, called Essential Climate Variables (ECVs), must satisfy the following requirements: (i) a global coverage over long-term periods with adequate spatial and temporal resolution, (ii) reliability and accuracy as well as a (iii) quality control. The Coordination Group for Meteorological Satellites (CGMS) assigned to EUMETSAT an action (T18 (TF7)) in order to prototype and test a new algorithm able to retrieve surface albedo using geostationary satellites as described in the "Implementation plan for the global observing system for climate in support of the UNFCCC" document (WMO/TD No. 1219). In this frame EUMETSAT decided to develop a new specific algorithm, named Meteosat Surface Albedo (MSA), based on a method proposed by Pinty et al. The MSA algorithm is currently running in the operational reprocessing facility of EUMETSAT in order to generate reliable albedo data set starting from 1982. These data have been acquired by six different radiometers. As Meteosat first generation satellites have not been designed for climate monitoring, before proceeding with the interpretation of the complete archive (~ 25 years of data), a detailed temporal consistency analysis of the albedo data set generated with the MSA algorithm has been performed in order to check the compliance with points (ii) and (iii). Specific efforts have been put on the estimation of the measurement error accounting for the observation uncertainties and retrieval method assumptions. Currently 100% of the archive for the prime mission at 0 degree has been processed and the albedo data set can be requested from the EUMETSAT archive facility. This paper will present the method elaborated for the evaluation of the temporal consistency of the MSA data set and illustrate typical problems raising from the processing of old data and

  12. An Algorithm for the Retrieval of 30-m Snow-Free Albedo from Landsat Surface Reflectance and MODIS BRDF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuai, Yanmin; Masek, Jeffrey G.; Gao, Feng; Schaaf, Crystal B.

    2011-01-01

    We present a new methodology to generate 30-m resolution land surface albedo using Landsat surface reflectance and anisotropy information from concurrent MODIS 500-m observations. Albedo information at fine spatial resolution is particularly useful for quantifying climate impacts associated with land use change and ecosystem disturbance. The derived white-sky and black-sky spectral albedos maybe used to estimate actual spectral albedos by taking into account the proportion of direct and diffuse solar radiation arriving at the ground. A further spectral-to-broadband conversion based on extensive radiative transfer simulations is applied to produce the broadband albedos at visible, near infrared, and shortwave regimes. The accuracy of this approach has been evaluated using 270 Landsat scenes covering six field stations supported by the SURFace RADiation Budget Network (SURFRAD) and Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Southern Great Plains (ARM/SGP) network. Comparison with field measurements shows that Landsat 30-m snow-free shortwave albedos from all seasons generally achieve an absolute accuracy of +/-0.02 - 0.05 for these validation sites during available clear days in 2003-2005,with a root mean square error less than 0.03 and a bias less than 0.02. This level of accuracy has been regarded as sufficient for driving global and regional climate models. The Landsat-based retrievals have also been compared to the operational 16-day MODIS albedo produced every 8-days from MODIS on Terra and Aqua (MCD43A). The Landsat albedo provides more detailed landscape texture, and achieves better agreement (correlation and dynamic range) with in-situ data at the validation stations, particularly when the stations include a heterogeneous mix of surface covers.

  13. Spatial and temporal variability in Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer-derived surface albedo over global arid regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsvetsinskaya, Elena A.; Schaaf, Crystal B.; Gao, Feng; Strahler, Alan H.; Dickinson, Robert E.

    2006-10-01

    We derive spectral and broadband surface albedo for global arid regions from data collected by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard the Terra spacecraft, at 1 km spatial resolution for 2001. MODIS data show considerable spatial variability both across various arid regions of the globe (from the bright deserts of northern Africa and the Arabian peninsula to substantially less reflective American and Asian deserts) and within regions (variability related to soil and rock types). For example, over arid northern Africa and the Arabian peninsula, albedo in the visible broadband varies by a factor of over 2, from the brightest sand sheets to the darkest luvisols. Few, if any, global and regional land-atmosphere models capture this observed spatial variability in surface albedo over arid regions. We suggest a scheme that relates soil groups (based on the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) soil classification) to MODIS-derived surface albedo statistics. This approach allows for an efficient representation in climate and weather forecasting models of the observed spatial and temporal variability in surface albedo over global deserts. Observed variability in albedo was reduced to a small (1-13, depending on the region) number of soil-related classes (end-members) that could be used in climate models. We also addressed the temporal evolution of albedo during 2001 over global deserts. Regions/soils of stable albedo with very low temporal variability were identified. For other regions/soils, temporal signals in albedo were related to ephemeral inundation with water or variations in sample size.

  14. Toward a new radiative-transfer-based model for remote sensing of terrestrial surface albedo.

    PubMed

    Cui, Shengcheng; Zhen, Xiaobing; Wang, Zhen; Yang, Shizhi; Zhu, WenYue; Li, Xuebin; Huang, Honghua; Wei, Heli

    2015-08-15

    This Letter formulates a simple yet accurate radiative-transfer-based theoretical model to characterize the fraction of radiation reflected by terrestrial surfaces. Emphasis is placed on the concept of inhomogeneous distribution of the diffuse sky radiation function (DSRF) and multiple interaction effects (MIE). Neglecting DSRF and MIE produces a -1.55% mean relative bias in albedo estimates. The presented model can elucidate the impact of DSRF on the surface volume scattering and geometry-optical scattering components, respectively, especially for slant illuminations with solar zenith angles (SZA) larger than 50°. Particularly striking in the comparisons between our model and ground-based observations is the achievement of the agreement level, indicating that our model can effectively resolve the longstanding issue in accurately estimating albedo at extremely large SZAs and is promising for land-atmosphere interactions studies. PMID:26274674

  15. Surface photometric properties and albedo changes in the central equatorial region of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strickland, Edwin L., III

    1992-01-01

    Comparison of the Viking Orbiter 2 Approach mosaic taken 11 Mars months later provides qualitative information on the photometric properties of the martian albedo features, and the distribution of dust and sand deposits responsible for the atmosphere near the northern summer solstice. The approach mosaic was taken at L (sub s) 106 degrees (early N. summer), phase angle 106 degrees; and airmasses varying from 4.6 at 30 degrees N to 3.3 near 10 degrees S. The apoapsis mosaic was taken in four sequences between L (sub s) 72 degrees and 76 degrees (late N. spring), near phase angles of 47 degrees, and at airmasses near 2.5. Systematic differences in the photometric decalibrations used to generate these mosaics may induce multiplicative errors of 5-10 percent of the observed albedos in comparisons of the mosaics, but they are probably nearer 3 percent of the albedos. In the study area (30 degrees N to 20 degrees S, 57 degrees E to 75 degrees W), scene-average approach Minnaert albedos were about 10 percent greater than apoapsis albedos and slightly less 'red'. The preferred explanation for the observed approach-apoapsis albedo difference is that both Arabia and Meridiani materials are smoother on millimeter and larger scales than other units in the study area. This is in good agreement with preliminary conclusions of Thorpe and (for dark intracrater Meridiani splotches) Regner et al. This is also consistent with reasonable models of these surfaces. 'Dark Blue' Meridiani surfaces are interpreted as consisting of sand dunes and sand sheets, which would be expected to have macroscopically smooth, nonshadowing surfaces. Viking Lander images of the surfaces at both landing sites show that smooth drift area's brightnesses are close to those of adjacent rough soil areas at low phase angles, but drifts become much brighter than rough soils when looking up-sun at high phase angles. Smooth patches of duricrust at both landing sites, interpreted by Strickland as eolian deposits

  16. Surface Albedo/BRDF Parameters (Terra/Aqua MODIS)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Trishchenko, Alexander

    2008-01-15

    Spatially and temporally complete surface spectral albedo/BRDF products over the ARM SGP area were generated using data from two Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensors on Terra and Aqua satellites. A landcover-based fitting (LBF) algorithm is developed to derive the BRDF model parameters and albedo product (Luo et al., 2004a). The approach employs a landcover map and multi-day clearsky composites of directional surface reflectance. The landcover map is derived from the Landsat TM 30-meter data set (Trishchenko et al., 2004a), and the surface reflectances are from MODIS 500m-resolution 8-day composite products (MOD09/MYD09). The MOD09/MYD09 data are re-arranged into 10-day intervals for compatibility with other satellite products, such as those from the NOVA/AVHRR and SPOT/VGT sensors. The LBF method increases the success rate of the BRDF fitting process and enables more accurate monitoring of surface temporal changes during periods of rapid spring vegetation green-up and autumn leaf-fall, as well as changes due to agricultural practices and snowcover variations (Luo et al., 2004b, Trishchenko et al., 2004b). Albedo/BRDF products for MODIS on Terra and MODIS on Aqua, as well as for Terra/Aqua combined dataset, are generated at 500m spatial resolution and every 10-day since March 2000 (Terra) and July 2002 (Aqua and combined), respectively. The purpose for the latter product is to obtain a more comprehensive dataset that takes advantages of multi-sensor observations (Trishchenko et al., 2002). To fill data gaps due to cloud presence, various interpolation procedures are applied based on a multi-year observation database and referring to results from other locations with similar landcover property. Special seasonal smoothing procedure is also applied to further remove outliers and artifacts in data series.

  17. Assessing surface albedo change and its induced radiation budget under rapid urbanization with Landsat and GLASS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yonghong; Jia, Gensuo; Pohl, Christine; Zhang, Xiaoxuan; van Genderen, John

    2016-02-01

    Radiative forcing (RF) induced by land use (mainly surface albedo) change is still not well understood in climate change science, especially the effects of changes in urban albedo due to rapid urbanization on the urban radiation budget. In this study, a modified RF derivation approach based on Landsat images was used to quantify changes in the solar radiation budget induced by variations in surface albedo in Beijing from 2001 to 2009. Field radiation records from a Beijing meteorological station were used to identify changes in RF at the local level. There has been rapid urban expansion over the last decade, with the urban land area increasing at about 3.3 % annually from 2001 to 2009. This has modified three-dimensional urban surface properties, resulting in lower albedo due to complex building configurations of urban centers and higher albedo on flat surfaces of suburban areas and cropland. There was greater solar radiation (6.93 × 108 W) in the urban center in 2009 than in 2001. However, large cropland and urban fringe areas caused less solar radiation absorption. RF increased with distance from the urban center (less than 14 km) and with greater urbanization, with the greatest value being 0.41 W/m2. The solar radiation budget in urban areas was believed to be mainly influenced by urban structural changes in the horizontal and vertical directions. Overall, the results presented herein indicate that cumulative urbanization impacts on the natural radiation budget could evolve into an important driver of local climate change.

  18. ERA-Interim/Land: A global land surface reanalysis dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balsamo, Gianpaolo; Albergel, Clement; Beljaars, Anton; Boussetta, Souhail; Brun, Eric; Cloke, Hannah; Dee, Dick; Dutra, Emanuel; Muñoz-Sabater, Joaquín; Pappenberger, Florian; De Rosnay, Patricia; Stockdale, Tim; Vitart, Frederic

    2015-04-01

    ERA-Interim/Land is a global land-surface reanalysis dataset covering the period 1979-2010 recently made publicly available from ECMWF. It describes the evolution of soil moisture, soil temperature and snowpack. ERA-Interim/Land is the result of a single 32-year simulation with the latest ECMWF land surface model driven by meteorological forcing from the ERA-Interim atmospheric reanalysis and precipitation adjustments based on monthly GPCP v2.1 (Global Precipitation Climatology Project). The horizontal resolution is about 80km and the time frequency is 3-hourly. ERA-Interim/Land includes a number of parameterization improvements in the land surface scheme with respect to the original ERA-Interim dataset, which makes it more suitable for climate studies involving land water resources. The quality of ERA-Interim/Land is assessed by comparing with ground-based and remote sensing observations. In particular, estimates of soil moisture, snow depth, surface albedo, turbulent latent and sensible fluxes, and river discharges are verified against a large number of site measurements. ERA-Interim/Land provides a global integrated and coherent estimate of soil moisture and snow water equivalent, which can also be used for the initialization of numerical weather prediction and climate models. Current plans for the extension and improvements of ERA-Interim/Land in the framework of future reanalyses will be briefly presented. References and dataset download information at: http://www.ecmwf.int/en/research/climate-reanalysis/era-interim/land

  19. Retrievals of Cloud Fraction and Cloud Albedo from Surface-based Shortwave Radiation Measurements: A Comparison of 16 Year Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Yu; Liu, Yangang; Long, Charles N.; Min, Qilong

    2014-07-27

    Ground-based radiation measurements have been widely conducted to gain information on clouds and the surface radiation budget; here several different techniques for retrieving cloud fraction (Long2006, Min2008 and XL2013) and cloud albedo (Min2008, Liu2011 and XL2013) from ground-based shortwave broadband and spectral radiation measurements are examined, and sixteen years of retrievals collected at the Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site are compared. The comparison shows overall good agreement between the retrievals of both cloud fraction and cloud albedo, with noted differences however. The Long2006 and Min2008 cloud fractions are greater on average than the XL2013 values. Compared to Min2008 and Liu2011, the XL2013 retrieval of cloud albedo tends to be greater for thin clouds but smaller for thick clouds, with the differences decreasing with increasing cloud fraction. Further analysis reveals that the approaches that retrieve cloud fraction and cloud albedo separately may suffer from mutual contamination of errors in retrieved cloud fraction and cloud albedo. Potential influences of cloud absorption, land-surface albedo, cloud structure, and measurement instruments are explored.

  20. Cassini VIMS Preliminary Exploration of Titan's Surface Hemispheric Albedo Dichotomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, R. M.; Brown, R. H.; Hapke, B. W.; Smythe, W. D.; Kamp, L.; Boryta, M.; Baines, K. H.; Bellucci, G.; Bibring, J.-P.; Buratti, B. J.

    2005-01-01

    We present preliminary evidence that suggests a hemispheric albedo dichotomy on Titan, the largest planetary satellite in the Solar System. We have also studied the photometric properties of several dark circular features on Titan's surface to test if they might be of impact origin. The evidence is derived from photometric analysis of selected surface regions taken at different Titanian longitudes and solar phase angles using images from the Cassini Saturn Orbiter Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS). The VIMS instrument is able to image Titan's surface at spectral windows (e.g. 2.02 microns) in its atmosphere where methane, the principal atmospheric absorber is transparent. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  1. Albedos. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, F.V.

    1993-07-01

    The albedo of the earth's surface varies dramatically from values of about 3 to 4 percent for calm bodies of water up to about 55 percent for gypsum sands. This rather broad range of reflected incoming solar radiation presents difficulties when attempting to define an average albedo for terrain over a large region from locally determined values. The patchwork, or checkerboard, appearance of the earth's surface as viewed from above is the result of various human activities, such as agriculture, the proliferation of urban sprawl, and road building. Each of these variable appearing surfaces will have individual albedos, rendering any attempt to determine an a real albedo almost an impossibility on the mesoscale. However, a vast data base exists for microscale applications for individual acreages, for example. A compilation of these data is presented.... Albedo, Solar radiation, Crops, Urban areas, Land uses.

  2. Global Albedo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A new sensor aboard NASA?s Terra satellite is now collecting the most detailed and accurate measurements ever made of how much sunlight the Earth?s surface reflects back up into the atmosphere. By quantifying precisely our planet?s reflectivity, or albedo, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) is helping scientists better understand and predict how various surface features influence both short-term weather patterns as well as longer-term climate trends. (Click to read the press release.) The colors in this image emphasize the albedo over the Earth?s land surfaces, ranging from 0.0 to 0.4. Areas colored red show the brightest, most reflective regions; yellows and greens are intermediate values; and blues and violets show relatively dark surfaces. White indicates where no data were available, and no albedo data are provided over the oceans. This image was produced using data composited over a 16-day period, from April 7-22, 2002. Image courtesy Crystal Schaaf, Boston University, based upon data processed by the MODIS Land Science Team

  3. [Temporal and Spatial Characteristics of Lake Taihu Surface Albedo and Its Impact Factors].

    PubMed

    Cao, Chang; Li, Xu-hui; Zhang, Mi; Liu, Shou-dong; Xiao, Wei; Xiao, Qi-tao; Xu, Jia-ping

    2015-10-01

    Lake surface albedo determines energy balance of water-atmospheric interface and water physical environment. Solar elevation angle, cloudiness, wind speed, water quality and other factors can affect lake surface albedo. Using solar radiation, wind speed, and water quality data (turbidity and chlorophyll-a concentration) which were observed in four eddy covariance sites (Meiliangwan, Dapukou, Bifenggang and Xiaoleishan i. e. MLW, DPK, BFG and XLS) in Lake Taihu and clearness index (k(t)), the influence of these factors on Lake Taihu surface albedo and the reasons that led to its spatial difference were investigated. The results showed that solar elevation angle played a leading role in the diurnal and seasonal change of lake surface albedo; lake surface albedo reached two peaks in 0 < k(t) < 0.1 and 0.4 < k(t) < 0.6 respectively, when solar elevation angle was below 35 degrees. The surface albedo increased with the increasing wind speed, turbidity and chlorophyll-a concentration. However, wind could indirectly affect surface albedo through leading to the changes in sediment resuspension and chlorophyll-a distribution. The sequence of albedo in the four sites was XLS > BFG > DPK > MLW. XLS and BFG belonged to the higher albedo group, while DPK and MLW belonged to the lower albedo group. The different biological environments caused by aquatic macrophytes and algae resulting in the spatial variation of Lake Taihu surface albedo. The relationship between albedo and chlorophyll-a concentration was not a very sensitive factor for indicating the outbreak of algae. This study can provide theoretical reference for lake albedo parameterization. PMID:26841592

  4. Multiscale climatological albedo look-up maps derived from moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer BRDF/albedo products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Feng; He, Tao; Wang, Zhuosen; Ghimire, Bardan; Shuai, Yanmin; Masek, Jeffrey; Schaaf, Crystal; Williams, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Surface albedo determines radiative forcing and is a key parameter for driving Earth's climate. Better characterization of surface albedo for individual land cover types can reduce the uncertainty in estimating changes to Earth's radiation balance due to land cover change. This paper presents albedo look-up maps (LUMs) using a multiscale hierarchical approach based on moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF)/albedo products and Landsat imagery. Ten years (2001 to 2011) of MODIS BRDF/albedo products were used to generate global albedo climatology. Albedo LUMs of land cover classes defined by the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme (IGBP) at multiple spatial resolutions were generated. The albedo LUMs included monthly statistics of white-sky (diffuse) and black-sky (direct) albedo for each IGBP class for visible, near-infrared, and shortwave broadband under both snow-free and snow-covered conditions. The albedo LUMs were assessed by using the annual MODIS IGBP land cover map and the projected land use scenarios from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change land-use harmonization project. The comparisons between the reconstructed albedo and the MODIS albedo data product show good agreement. The LUMs provide high temporal and spatial resolution global albedo statistics without gaps for investigating albedo variations under different land cover scenarios and could be used for land surface modeling.

  5. A model-based framework for the quality assessment of surface albedo in situ measurement protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Jennifer; Gobron, Nadine; Widlowski, Jean-Luc; Mio, Corrado

    2016-09-01

    Satellite-based retrievals of land surface albedo are essential for climate and environmental modelling communities. To be of use, satellite-retrievals are required to comply to given accuracy requirements, mainly achieved through comparison with in situ measurements. Differences between in situ and satellite-based retrievals depend on their actual difference and their associated uncertainties. It is essential that these uncertainties can be computed to properly understand the differences between satellite-based and in situ measurements of albedo, however quantifying the individual contributions of uncertainty is difficult. This study introduces a model-based framework for assessing the quality of in situ albedo measurements. A 3D Monte Carlo Ray Tracing (MCRT) radiative transfer model is used to simulate field measurements of surface albedo, and is able to identify and quantify potential sources of error in the field measurement. Compliance with the World Meteorological Organisation (WMO) requirement for 3% accuracy is tested. 8 scenarios were investigated, covering a range of ecosystem types and canopy structures, seasons, illumination angles and tree heights. Results indicate that height of measurement above the canopy is the controlling factor in accuracy, with each canopy scenario reaching the WMO requirement at different heights. Increasing canopy heterogeneity and tree height noticeably reduces the accuracy, whereas changing seasonality from summer to winter in a deciduous forest increases accuracy. For canopies with a row structure, illumination angle can significantly impact accuracy as a result of shadowing effects. Tests were made on the potential use of multiple in situ measurements, indicating considerably increased accuracy if two or more in situ measurements can be made.

  6. Assessing modeled Greenland surface mass balance in the GISS Model E2 and its sensitivity to surface albedo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Patrick; LeGrande, Allegra N.; Koenig, Lora S.; Tedesco, Marco; Moustafa, Samiah E.; Ivanoff, Alvaro; Fischer, Robert P.; Fettweis, Xavier

    2016-04-01

    The surface mass balance (SMB) of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) plays an important role in global sea level change. Regional Climate Models (RCMs) such as the Modèle Atmosphérique Régionale (MAR) have been employed at high spatial resolution with relatively complex physics to simulate ice sheet SMB. Global climate models (GCMs) incorporate less sophisticated physical schemes and provide outputs at a lower spatial resolution, but have the advantage of modeling the interaction between different components of the earth's oceans, climate, and land surface at a global scale. Improving the ability of GCMs to represent ice sheet SMB is important for making predictions of future changes in global sea level. With the ultimate goal of improving SMB simulated by the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) Model E2 GCM, we compare simulated GrIS SMB against the outputs of the MAR model and radar-derived estimates of snow accumulation. In order to reproduce present-day climate variability in the Model E2 simulation, winds are constrained to match the reanalysis datasets used to force MAR at the lateral boundaries. We conduct a preliminary assessment of the sensitivity of the simulated Model E2 SMB to surface albedo, a parameter that is known to strongly influence SMB. Model E2 albedo is set to a fixed value of 0.8 over the entire ice sheet in the initial configuration of the model (control case). We adjust this fixed value in an ensemble of simulations over a range of 0.4 to 0.8 (roughly the range of observed summer GrIS albedo values) to examine the sensitivity of ice-sheet-wide SMB to albedo. We prescribe albedo from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) MCD43A3 v6 to examine the impact of a more realistic spatial and temporal variations in albedo. An age-dependent snow albedo parameterization is applied, and its impact on SMB relative to observations and the RCM is assessed.

  7. Investigating the Impacts of Surface Temperature Anomalies due to Burned Area Albedo in Northern sub-Saharan Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabbert, T.; Matsui, T.; Capehart, W. J.; Ichoku, C. M.; Gatebe, C. K.

    2015-12-01

    The northern Sub-Saharan African region (NSSA) is an area of intense focus due to periodic severe droughts that have dire consequences on the growing population, which relies mostly on rain fed agriculture for its food supply. This region's weather and hydrologic cycle are very complex and are dependent on the West African Monsoon. Different regional processes affect the West African Monsoon cycle and variability. One of the areas of current investigation is the water cycle response to the variability of land surface characteristics. Land surface characteristics are often altered in NSSA due to agricultural practices, grazing, and the fires that occur during the dry season. To better understand the effects of biomass burning on the hydrologic cycle of the sub-Saharan environment, an interdisciplinary team sponsored by NASA is analyzing potential feedback mechanisms due to the fires. As part of this research, this study focuses on the effects of land surface changes, particularly albedo and skin temperature, that are influenced by biomass burning. Surface temperature anomalies can influence the initiation of convective rainfall and surface albedo is linked to the absorption of solar radiation. To capture the effects of fire perturbations on the land surface, NASA's Unified Weather and Research Forecasting (NU-WRF) model coupled with NASA's Land Information System (LIS) is being used to simulate burned area surface albedo inducing surface temperature anomalies and other potential effects to environmental processes. Preliminary sensitivity results suggest an altered surface radiation budget, regional warming of the surface temperature, slight increase in average rainfall, and a change in precipitation locations.

  8. Investigating the spread in surface albedo for snow-covered forests in CMIP5 models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Libo; Cole, Jason N. S.; Bartlett, Paul; Verseghy, Diana; Derksen, Chris; Brown, Ross; Salzen, Knut

    2016-02-01

    This study investigates the role of leaf/plant area index (LAI/PAI) specification on the large spread of winter albedo simulated by climate models. To examine the sensitivity of winter albedo to LAI, we perform a sensitivity analysis using two methods commonly used to compute albedo in snow-covered forests as well as diagnostic calculations within version 4.2 of the Canadian Atmospheric Model for which PAI is systematically varied. The results show that the simulated albedo is very sensitive to negative PAI biases, especially for smaller PAI values. The LAI and surface albedo of boreal forests in the presence of snow simulated by the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) models are evaluated using satellite observations. The evaluation of CMIP5 models suggest that inaccurate tree cover fraction due to improper plant functional type specification or erroneous LAI parameterization in some models explains, in part, an observed positive bias in winter albedo over boreal forest regions of the Northern Hemisphere. This contributes to a large intermodel spread in simulated surface albedo in the presence of snow over these regions and is largely responsible for uncertainties in simulated snow-albedo feedback strength. Errors are largest (+20-40%) in models with large underestimation of LAI but are typically within ±15% when simulated LAI is within the observed range. This study underscores the importance of accurate representation of vegetation distribution and parameters in realistic simulation of surface albedo.

  9. Investigating the spread of surface albedo in snow covered forests in CMIP5 models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Libo; Cole, Jason; Bartlett, Paul; Verseghy, Diana; Derksen, Chris; Brown, Ross; von Salzen, Knut

    2016-04-01

    This study investigates the role of leaf/plant area index (LAI/PAI) specification on the large spread of winter albedo simulated by climate models. To examine the sensitivity of winter albedo to LAI, we perform a sensitivity analysis using two methods commonly used to compute albedo in snow-covered forests as well as diagnostic calculations within version 4.2 of the Canadian Atmospheric Model for which PAI is systematically varied. The results show that the simulated albedo is very sensitive to negative PAI biases, especially for smaller PAI values. The LAI and surface albedo of boreal forests in the presence of snow simulated by the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) models are evaluated using satellite observations. The evaluation of CMIP5 models suggest that inaccurate tree cover fraction due to improper plant functional type specification or erroneous LAI parameterization in some models explains, in part, an observed positive bias in winter albedo over boreal forest regions of the Northern Hemisphere. This contributes to a large intermodel spread in simulated surface albedo in the presence of snow over these regions and is largely responsible for uncertainties in simulated snow-albedo feedback strength. Errors are largest (+20-40 %) in models with large underestimation of LAI but are typically within ±15% when simulated LAI is within the observed range. This study underscores the importance of accurate representation of vegetation distribution and parameters in realistic simulation of surface albedo.

  10. Accounting for radiative forcing from albedo change in future global land-use scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Andrew D.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Collins, William D.; Edmonds, James A.

    2015-08-01

    We demonstrate the effectiveness of a new method for quantifying radiative forcing from land use and land cover change (LULCC) within an integrated assessment model, the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM). The method relies on geographically differentiated estimates of radiative forcing from albedo change associated with major land cover transitions derived from the Community Earth System Model. We find that conversion of 1 km² of woody vegetation (forest and shrublands) to non-woody vegetation (crops and grassland) yields between 0 and –0.71 nW/m² of globally averaged radiative forcing determined by the vegetation characteristics, snow dynamics, and atmospheric radiation environment characteristic within each of 151 regions we consider globally. Across a set of scenarios designed to span a range of potential future LULCC, we find LULCC forcing ranging from –0.06 to –0.29 W/m² by 2070 depending on assumptions regarding future crop yield growth and whether climate policy favors afforestation or bioenergy crops. Inclusion of this previously uncounted forcing in the policy targets driving future climate mitigation efforts leads to changes in fossil fuel emissions on the order of 1.5 PgC/yr by 2070 for a climate forcing limit of 4.5 Wm–2, corresponding to a 12–67 % change in fossil fuel emissions depending on the scenario. Scenarios with significant afforestation must compensate for albedo-induced warming through additional emissions reductions, and scenarios with significant deforestation need not mitigate as aggressively due to albedo-induced cooling. In all scenarios considered, inclusion of albedo forcing in policy targets increases forest and shrub cover globally.

  11. Snow grain size and albedo in Dronning Maud Land, Antarctica: measurements and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirazzini, Roberta; Räisänen, Petri; Vihma, Timo; Johansson, Milla; Tastula, Esa-Matti

    2014-05-01

    Snow grain macro-photos collected near the Finnish Antarctic Station Aboa during summer 2009-2010 were analyzed, and the link between snow grain metamorphism and surface albedo was investigated. Snow grain macro-photos were taken twice a day for a one-month period from four snowpack layers (at the surface and at the depths of 5, 10, and 20 cm). A cave inside the snowpack was used as a cold and dark "laboratory". The dataset also includes vertical profiles of snow temperature and density (twice a day), surface broadband albedo, surface spectral reflectance during clear and overcast days, and ancillary meteorological data. With such an extensive and complete dataset, we studied the snow grain metric that best represents the grain scattering properties at various wavelengths, establishing a direct relationship between measured grain dimensions and optically-equivalent grain size. For this purpose, we analyzed the 2D macro-photos with an image processing software (based on Matlab) that allows the determination of the size distribution of many dimensional quantities. A statistical approach was applied to estimate the representativeness error in the snow grain observations. The distributions of the obtained grain size metrics and the snow density profiles were utilized in the radiative transfer model DISORT to simulate the surface spectral albedo. The comparison of the model results with the observed spectral albedo allowed the identification of the snow grain dimensions that best explain the albedo at each wavelength. The impact of the snow grain shape in the model simulations was addressed utilizing spherical and droxtal grain representations.

  12. Mars: Correcting surface albedo observations for effects of atmospheric dust loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S. W.; Clancy, R. T.

    1992-01-01

    We have developed a radiative transfer model which allows the effects of atmospheric dust loading on surface albedo to be investigated. This model incorporates atmospheric dust opacity, the single scattering albedo and particle phase function of atmospheric dust, the bidirectional reflectance of the surface, and variable lighting and viewing geometry. The most recent dust particle properties are utilized. The spatial and temporal variability of atmospheric opacity (Tan) strongly influences the radiative transfer modelling results. We are currently using the approach described to determine Tan for IRTM mapping sequences of selected regions. This approach allows Tan to be determined at the highest spatial and temporal resolution supported by the IRTM data. Applying the radiative transfer modelling and determination of Tan described, IRTM visual brightness observations can be corrected for the effects of atmospheric dust loading a variety of locations and times. This approach allows maps of 'dust-corrected surface albedo' to be constructed for selected regions. Information on the variability of surface albedo and the amount of dust deposition/erosion related to such variability results. To date, this study indicates that atmospheric dust loading has a significant effect on observations of surface albedo, amounting to albedo corrections of as much as several tens of percent. This correction is not constant or linear, but depends upon surface albedo, viewing and lighting geometry, the dust and surface phase functions, and the atmospheric opacity. It is clear that the quantitative study of surface albedo, especially where small variations in observed albedo are important (such as photometric analyses), needs to account for the effects of the atmospheric dust loading. Maps of 'dust-corrected surface albedo' will be presented for a number of regions.

  13. How well can we estimate areal-averaged spectral surface albedo from ground-based transmission in the Atlantic coastal area?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassianov, Evgueni; Barnard, James; Flynn, Connor; Riihimaki, Laura; Marinovici, Cristina

    2015-10-01

    Areal-averaged albedos are particularly difficult to measure in coastal regions, because the surface is not homogenous, consisting of a sharp demarcation between land and water. With this difficulty in mind, we evaluate a simple retrieval of areal-averaged surface albedo using ground-based measurements of atmospheric transmission alone under fully overcast conditions. To illustrate the performance of our retrieval, we find the areal-averaged albedo using measurements from the Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) at five wavelengths (415, 500, 615, 673, and 870 nm). These MFRSR data are collected at a coastal site in Graciosa Island, Azores supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. The areal-averaged albedos obtained from the MFRSR are compared with collocated and coincident Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) whitesky albedo at four nominal wavelengths (470, 560, 670 and 860 nm). These comparisons are made during a 19-month period (June 2009 - December 2010). We also calculate composite-based spectral values of surface albedo by a weighted-average approach using estimated fractions of major surface types observed in an area surrounding this coastal site. Taken as a whole, these three methods of finding albedo show spectral and temporal similarities, and suggest that our simple, transmission-based technique holds promise, but with estimated errors of about ±0.03. Additional work is needed to reduce this uncertainty in areas with inhomogeneous surfaces.

  14. How Well Can We Estimate Areal-Averaged Spectral Surface Albedo from Ground-Based Transmission in an Atlantic Coastal Area?

    SciTech Connect

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Barnard, James C.; Flynn, Connor J.; Riihimaki, Laura D.; Marinovici, Maria C.

    2015-10-15

    Areal-averaged albedos are particularly difficult to measure in coastal regions, because the surface is not homogenous, consisting of a sharp demarcation between land and water. With this difficulty in mind, we evaluate a simple retrieval of areal-averaged surface albedo using ground-based measurements of atmospheric transmission alone under fully overcast conditions. To illustrate the performance of our retrieval, we find the areal-averaged albedo using measurements from the Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) at five wavelengths (415, 500, 615, 673, and 870 nm). These MFRSR data are collected at a coastal site in Graciosa Island, Azores supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. The areal-averaged albedos obtained from the MFRSR are compared with collocated and coincident Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) white-sky albedo at four nominal wavelengths (470, 560, 670 and 860 nm). These comparisons are made during a 19-month period (June 2009 - December 2010). We also calculate composite-based spectral values of surface albedo by a weighted-average approach using estimated fractions of major surface types observed in an area surrounding this coastal site. Taken as a whole, these three methods of finding albedo show spectral and temporal similarities, and suggest that our simple, transmission-based technique holds promise, but with estimated errors of about ±0.03. Additional work is needed to reduce this uncertainty in areas with inhomogeneous surfaces.

  15. Intercomparison Between in situ and AVHRR Polar Pathfinder-Derived Surface Albedo over Greenland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroeve, Julienne C.; Box, Jason E.; Fowler, Charles; Haran, Terence; Key, Jeffery

    2001-01-01

    The Advanced Very High Resolution (AVHRR) Polar Pathfinder Data (APP) provides the first long time series of consistent, calibrated surface albedo and surface temperature data for the polar regions. Validations of these products have consisted of individual studies that analyzed algorithm performance for limited regions and or time periods. This paper reports on comparisons made between the APP-derived surface albedo and that measured at fourteen automatic weather stations (AWS) around the Greenland ice sheet from January 1997 to August 1998. Results show that satellite-derived surface albedo values are on average 10% less than those measured by the AWS stations. However, the station measurements tend to be biased high by about 4% and thus the differences in absolute albedo may be less (e.g. 6%). In regions of the ice sheet where the albedo variability is small, such as the dry snow facies, the APP albedo uncertainty exceeds the natural variability. Further work is needed to improve the absolute accuracy of the APP-derived surface albedo. Even so, the data provide temporally and spatially consistent estimates of the Greenland ice sheet albedo.

  16. Use of In Situ and Airborne Multiangle Data to Assess MODIS- and Landsat-based Estimates of Surface Albedo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roman, Miguel O.; Gatebe, Charles K.; Shuai, Yanmin; Wang, Zhuosen; Gao, Feng; Masek, Jeff; Schaaf, Crystal B.

    2012-01-01

    The quantification of uncertainty of global surface albedo data and products is a critical part of producing complete, physically consistent, and decadal land property data records for studying ecosystem change. A current challenge in validating satellite retrievals of surface albedo is the ability to overcome the spatial scaling errors that can contribute on the order of 20% disagreement between satellite and field-measured values. Here, we present the results from an uncertain ty analysis of MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Landsat albedo retrievals, based on collocated comparisons with tower and airborne multi-angular measurements collected at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program s (ARM) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site during the 2007 Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLAS33 IC 07). Using standard error propagation techniques, airborne measurements obtained by NASA s Cloud Absorption Radiometer (CAR) were used to quantify the uncertainties associated with MODIS and Landsat albedos across a broad range of mixed vegetation and structural types. Initial focus was on evaluating inter-sensor consistency through assessments of temporal stability, as well as examining the overall performance of satellite-derived albedos obtained at all diurnal solar zenith angles. In general, the accuracy of the MODIS and Landsat albedos remained under a 10% margin of error in the SW(0.3 - 5.0 m) domain. However, results reveal a high degree of variability in the RMSE (root mean square error) and bias of albedos in both the visible (0.3 - 0.7 m) and near-infrared (0.3 - 5.0 m) broadband channels; where, in some cases, retrieval uncertainties were found to be in excess of 20%. For the period of CLASIC 07, the primary factors that contributed to uncertainties in the satellite-derived albedo values include: (1) the assumption of temporal stability in the retrieval of 500 m MODIS BRDF values over extended periods of cloud

  17. ARM Climate Research Facility Spectral Surface Albedo Value-Added Product (VAP) Report

    SciTech Connect

    McFarlane, S; Gaustad, K; Long, C; Mlawer, E

    2011-07-15

    This document describes the input requirements, output data products, and methodology for the Spectral Surface Albedo (SURFSPECALB) value-added product (VAP). The SURFSPECALB VAP produces a best-estimate near-continuous high spectral resolution albedo data product using measurements from multifilter radiometers (MFRs). The VAP first identifies best estimates for the MFR downwelling and upwelling shortwave irradiance values, and then calculates narrowband spectral albedo from these best-estimate irradiance values. The methodology for finding the best-estimate values is based on a simple process of screening suspect data and backfilling screened and missing data with estimated values when possible. The resulting best-estimate MFR narrowband spectral albedos are used to determine a daily surface type (snow, 100% vegetation, partial vegetation, or 0% vegetation). For non-snow surfaces, a piecewise continuous function is used to estimate a high spectral resolution albedo at 1 min temporal and 10 cm-1 spectral resolution.

  18. Biogenic CO2 fluxes, changes in surface albedo and biodiversity impacts from establishment of a miscanthus plantation.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Susanne V; Cherubini, Francesco; Michelsen, Ottar

    2014-12-15

    Depletion in oil resources and environmental concern related to the use of fossil fuels has increased the interest in using second generation biomass as alternative feedstock for fuels and materials. However, the land use and land use change for producing second generation (2G) biomass impacts the environment in various ways, of which not all are usually considered in life cycle assessment. This study assesses the biogenic CO2 fluxes, surface albedo changes and biodiversity impacts for 100 years after changing land use from forest or fallow land to miscanthus plantation in Wisconsin, US. Climate change impacts are addressed in terms of effective forcing, a mid-point indicator which can be used to compare impacts from biogenic CO2 fluxes and albedo changes. Biodiversity impacts are assessed through elaboration on two different existing approaches, to express the change in biodiversity impact from one human influenced state to another. Concerning the impacts from biogenic CO2 fluxes, in the case of conversion from a forest to a miscanthus plantation (case A) there is a contribution to global warming, whereas when a fallow land is converted (case B), there is a climate cooling. When the effects from albedo changes are included, both scenarios show a net cooling impact, which is more pronounced in case B. Both cases reduce biodiversity in the area where the miscanthus plantation is established, though most in case A. The results illustrate the relevance of these issues when considering environmental impacts of land use and land use change. The apparent trade-offs in terms of environmental impacts further highlight the importance of including these aspects in LCA of land use and land use changes, in order to enable informed decision making. PMID:25194521

  19. Regionally Differentiated Scenarios of Future Albedo Forcing from Anthropogenic Land Cover Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, A. D.; Calvin, K. V.; Collins, W.; Edmonds, J.

    2014-12-01

    Using the Community Earth System Model (CESM), we develop geographically differentiated estimates of radiative forcing from albedo change associated with major land cover transitions across 151 regions globally. The regions are formed through the intersectrion of 18 agro-ecological zones with 15 geo-political units, and correspond to the agricultural and land-use decision regions utilized by the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM). Incorporating these forcing factors into GCAM allows us to calculate total radiative forcing associated with alternative scenarios of future anthropogenic land cover change. We find that conversion of 1 km2 of woody vegetation (forest and shrublands) to non-woody vegetation (crops and grassland) yields between 0 to -0.71 nW/m2 of globally averaged radiative forcing, depending on regional vegetation characteristics, snow dynamics, and atmospheric radiation environments. Across a set of scenarios designed to span a range of potential future anthropogenic landcover change, we find albedo forcing ranging from -0.05 to -0.25 W/m2 by 2070. The scenarios vary in terms of assumptions regarding future crop yield growth and climate policies, which could favor either afforestation or bioenergy crops. This range of forcing is similar in magnitude to central estimates for present-day forcing from historical land cover change and to several other forcing agents including nitrous oxide.

  20. Anticipating land surface change

    PubMed Central

    Streeter, Richard; Dugmore, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    The interplay of human actions and natural processes over varied spatial and temporal scales can result in abrupt transitions between contrasting land surface states. Understanding these transitions is a key goal of sustainability science because they can represent abrupt losses of natural capital. This paper recognizes flickering between alternate land surface states in advance of threshold change and critical slowing down in advance of both threshold changes and noncritical transformation. The early warning signals we observe are rises in autocorrelation, variance, and skewness within millimeter-resolution thickness measurements of tephra layers deposited in A.D. 2010 and A.D. 2011. These signals reflect changing patterns of surface vegetation, which are known to provide early warning signals of critical transformations. They were observed toward migrating soil erosion fronts, cryoturbation limits, and expanding deflation zones, thus providing potential early warning signals of land surface change. The record of the spatial patterning of vegetation contained in contemporary tephra layers shows how proximity to land surface change could be assessed in the widespread regions affected by shallow layers of volcanic fallout (those that can be subsumed within the existing vegetation cover). This insight shows how we could use tephra layers in the stratigraphic record to identify “near misses,” close encounters with thresholds that did not lead to tipping points, and thus provide additional tools for archaeology, sustainability science, and contemporary land management. PMID:23530230

  1. A global assessment of forest surface albedo and its relationships with climate and atmospheric nitrogen deposition.

    PubMed

    Leonardi, Stefano; Magnani, Federico; Nolè, Angelo; Van Noije, Twan; Borghetti, Marco

    2015-01-01

    We present a global assessment of the relationships between the short-wave surface albedo of forests, derived from the MODIS satellite instrument product at 0.5° spatial resolution, with simulated atmospheric nitrogen deposition rates (Ndep ), and climatic variables (mean annual temperature Tm and total annual precipitation P), compiled at the same spatial resolution. The analysis was performed on the following five forest plant functional types (PFTs): evergreen needle-leaf forests (ENF); evergreen broad-leaf forests (EBF); deciduous needle-leaf forests (DNF); deciduous broad-leaf forests (DBF); and mixed-forests (MF). Generalized additive models (GAMs) were applied in the exploratory analysis to assess the functional nature of short-wave surface albedo relations to environmental variables. The analysis showed evident correlations of albedo with environmental predictors when data were pooled across PFTs: Tm and Ndep displayed a positive relationship with forest albedo, while a negative relationship was detected with P. These correlations are primarily due to surface albedo differences between conifer and broad-leaf species, and different species geographical distributions. However, the analysis performed within individual PFTs, strengthened by attempts to select 'pure' pixels in terms of species composition, showed significant correlations with annual precipitation and nitrogen deposition, pointing toward the potential effect of environmental variables on forest surface albedo at the ecosystem level. Overall, our global assessment emphasizes the importance of elucidating the ecological mechanisms that link environmental conditions and forest canopy properties for an improved parameterization of surface albedo in climate models. PMID:25044609

  2. Albedo of Surface CO2 Deposits in Mars' Residual South Polar Cap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, P. B.; Wolff, M. J.; Bonev, B.

    2014-12-01

    The albedo of surface CO2 deposits in the Residual South Polar Cap (RSPC) of Mars controls their net condensation / sublimation over a martian year and is therefore a crucial parameter in determining RSPC stability. The albedo used in previous analyses is obtained by dividing I/F, determined from radiometrically calibrated imaging data, by the cosine of the incidence angle. Because of atmospheric aerosols, the albedo calculated from I/F above the atmosphere is not the surface albedo that enters into stability considerations. In order to determine the surface albedo, we interpolate optical depths determined from CRISM EPF measurements to provide estimates of the dust and ice opacities over the RSPC (Wolff et al., 2009) and use these to determine the actual surface albedos from MARCI images using the radiative transport program DISORT (Stamnes et al., 1988). Assuming that dust is the only contributor to atmospheric opacity, the retrieved surface albedos for the longer wavelength MARCI filters in MY 28 and 29 are found to be consistent despite very different dust opacities in the two years (James et al., 2014). However, this model fails to reproduce the short wavelength behavior in early summer. We consider possible modifications of the dust only model that could explain the discrepancy.

  3. Improvement of surface albedo parameterization within a regional climate model (RegCM3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Y.; Lü, S.

    2009-03-01

    A parameterization for calculating surface albedo of Solar Zenith Angel (SZA) dependence with coefficient for each vegetation type determined on the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectro-radiometer (MODIS) reformed by the Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) is incorporated within the latest Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) Regional Climate Model (RegCM3), and evaluated with a high resolution one-way nesting simulation in China using the Climate Research Unit (CRU) data and the observations from the Field Experiment on Interaction between Land and Atmosphere in Arid Region of Northwest China (NWC-ALIEX). The performance of the SZA method modeling surface characteristic is investigated.Results indicate, RegCM with SZA method (RCM_SZA) considerably improve the cold bias of original RegCM (RCM_ORI) in air surface temperature in East Asia with 1.2 degree increased in summer due to the lower albedo produced by SZA method which makes more solar radiation absorbed by the surface and used for heating the atmosphere near to the surface. The simulated diurnal cycle of ground temperature conforms fairly well to the observation in the nesting simulation in Northwest China, especially during the noon time when the SZA has the lowest value. However, the modification can not obviously affect the East Asia summer monsoon precipitation simulation although RCM_SZA produce more evapo-transpiration in surface with more than 2 Wm-2 increases in simulated latent heat fluxes both in East Asia and in Northwest China compared to RCM_ORI.

  4. Temporal and spatial mapping of atmospheric dust opacity and surface albedo on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S. W.; Clancy, R. T.; Gladstone, G. R.; Martin, T. Z.

    1993-01-01

    The Mariner 9 and Viking missions provided abundant evidence that eolian processes are active over much of the surface of Mars. Past studies have demonstrated that variations in regional albedo and wind streak patterns are indicative of sediment transport through a region, while thermal inertia data (derived from the Viking Infrared Thermal Mapper (IRTM) datasets) are indicative of the degree of surface mantling by dust deposits. We are making use of the method developed by T. Z. Martin to determine dust opacity from IRTM thermal observations. We have developed a radiative transfer model that allows corrections for the effects of atmospheric dust loading on observations of surface albedo to be made. This approach to determining 'dust-corrected surface albedo' incorporates the atmospheric dust opacity, the single-scattering albedo and particle phase function of atmospheric dust, the bidirectional reflectance of the surface, and accounts for variable lighting and viewing geometry.

  5. Development of a high spectral resolution surface albedo product for the ARM Southern Great Plains Central Facility

    SciTech Connect

    McFarlane, Sally A.; Gaustad, Krista L.; Mlawer, Eli J.; Long, Charles N.; Delamere, Jennifer

    2011-09-01

    We present a method for identifying dominant surface type and estimating high spectral resolution surface albedo at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) facility at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in Oklahoma for use in radiative transfer calculations. Given a set of 6-channel narrowband visible and near-infrared irradiance measurements from upward and downward looking multi-filter radiometers (MFRs), four different surface types (snow-covered, green vegetation, partial vegetation, non-vegetated) can be identified. A normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) is used to distinguish between vegetated and non-vegetated surfaces, and a scaled NDVI index is used to estimate the percentage of green vegetation in partially vegetated surfaces. Based on libraries of spectral albedo measurements, a piecewise continuous function is developed to estimate the high spectral resolution surface albedo for each surface type given the MFR albedo values as input. For partially vegetated surfaces, the albedo is estimated as a linear combination of the green vegetation and non-vegetated surface albedo values. The estimated albedo values are evaluated through comparison to high spectral resolution albedo measurements taken during several Intensive Observational Periods (IOPs) and through comparison of the integrated spectral albedo values to observed broadband albedo measurements. The estimated spectral albedo values agree well with observations for the visible wavelengths constrained by the MFR measurements, but have larger biases and variability at longer wavelengths. Additional MFR channels at 1100 nm and/or 1600 nm would help constrain the high resolution spectral albedo in the near infrared region.

  6. Development of a high spectral resolution surface albedo product for the ARM Southern Great Plains central facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFarlane, S. A.; Gaustad, K. L.; Mlawer, E. J.; Long, C. N.; Delamere, J.

    2011-05-01

    We present a method for identifying dominant surface type and estimating high spectral resolution surface albedo at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) facility at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in Oklahoma for use in radiative transfer calculations. Given a set of 6-channel narrowband visible and near-infrared irradiance measurements from upward and downward looking multi-filter radiometers (MFRs), four different surface types (snow-covered, green vegetation, partial vegetation, non-vegetated) can be identified. A normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) is used to distinguish between vegetated and non-vegetated surfaces, and a scaled NDVI index is used to estimate the percentage of green vegetation in partially vegetated surfaces. Based on libraries of spectral albedo measurements, a piecewise continuous function is developed to estimate the high spectral resolution surface albedo for each surface type given the MFR albedo values as input. For partially vegetated surfaces, the albedo is estimated as a linear combination of the green vegetation and non-vegetated surface albedo values. The estimated albedo values are evaluated through comparison to high spectral resolution albedo measurements taken during several Intensive Observational Periods (IOPs) and through comparison of the integrated spectral albedo values to observed broadband albedo measurements. The estimated spectral albedo values agree well with observations for the visible wavelengths constrained by the MFR measurements, but have larger biases and variability at longer wavelengths. Additional MFR channels at 1100 nm and/or 1600 nm would help constrain the high resolution spectral albedo in the near infrared region.

  7. Development of a high spectral resolution surface albedo product for the ARM Southern Great Plains central facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFarlane, S. A.; Gaustad, K. L.; Mlawer, E. J.; Long, C. N.; Delamere, J.

    2011-09-01

    We present a method for identifying dominant surface type and estimating high spectral resolution surface albedo at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) facility at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in Oklahoma for use in radiative transfer calculations. Given a set of 6-channel narrowband visible and near-infrared irradiance measurements from upward and downward looking multi-filter radiometers (MFRs), four different surface types (snow-covered, green vegetation, partial vegetation, non-vegetated) can be identified. A normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) is used to distinguish between vegetated and non-vegetated surfaces, and a scaled NDVI index is used to estimate the percentage of green vegetation in partially vegetated surfaces. Based on libraries of spectral albedo measurements, a piecewise continuous function is developed to estimate the high spectral resolution surface albedo for each surface type given the MFR albedo values as input. For partially vegetated surfaces, the albedo is estimated as a linear combination of the green vegetation and non-vegetated surface albedo values. The estimated albedo values are evaluated through comparison to high spectral resolution albedo measurements taken during several Intensive Observational Periods (IOPs) and through comparison of the integrated spectral albedo values to observed broadband albedo measurements. The estimated spectral albedo values agree well with observations for the visible wavelengths constrained by the MFR measurements, but have larger biases and variability at longer wavelengths. Additional MFR channels at 1100 nm and/or 1600 nm would help constrain the high resolution spectral albedo in the near infrared region.

  8. Atmospheric and Surface Contributions to Planetary Albedo and their Relationship to the Total Meridional Energy Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donohoe, A.; Battisti, D. S.

    2010-12-01

    The meridional distribution of incident solar radiation and planetary albedo both contribute to the equator-to-pole gradient in absorbed solar radiation (ASR) in the observed climate system. While the former component is determined by the Earth-Sun geometry and composes 60% of the equator-to-pole gradient in ASR, the latter component makes a significant (40%) contribution to the ASR gradient and is potentially a function of climate state due to its dependence on both atmospheric and surface albedo. In turn, the equator-to-pole gradient in planetary albedo is found to be primarily (86% -89%) dictated by atmospheric albedo with meridional gradients in surface albedo playing a much smaller role in forcing the climate system on the equator-to-pole scale. Simulations of the pre-industrial climate system using the CMIP3 coupled models show large differences in the equator-to-pole gradient in planetary albedo which are mainly due to differences in the simulated cloud distribution, with surface processes playing a much smaller role. The inter-model spread in total meridional heat transport is also primarily (85% of the inter-model spread) due to differences in the simulated cloud distribution. Further model simulations demonstrate that the surface albedo changes associated with moving from the present climate to an ice free climate have a small effect on the equator-to-pole gradient of ASR as compared to the uncertainty in simulated cloud distributions, and hence a small effect on the meridional heat transport.

  9. Near-ground cooling efficacies of trees and high-albedo surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Levinson, R M

    1997-05-01

    Daytime summer urban heat islands arise when the prevalence of dark-colored surfaces and lack of vegetation make a city warmer than neighboring countryside. Two frequently-proposed summer heat island mitigation measures are to plant trees and to increase the albedo (solar reflectivity) of ground surfaces. This dissertation examines the effects of these measures on the surface temperature of an object near the ground, and on solar heating of air near the ground. Near-ground objects include people, vehicles, and buildings. The variation of the surface temperature of a near-ground object with ground albedo indicates that a rise in ground albedo will cool a near-ground object only if the object`s albedo exceeds a critical value. This critical value of object albedo depends on wind speed, object geometry, and the height of the atmospheric thermal boundary layer. It ranges from 0.15 to 0.37 for a person. If an object has typical albedo of 0.3, increasing the ground albedo by.

  10. Experimental evidence that microbial activity lowers the albedo of glacier surfaces: the cryoconite casserole experiment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musilova, M.; Tranter, M.; Takeuchi, N.; Anesio, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    Darkened glacier and ice sheet surfaces have lower albedos, absorb more solar radiation and consequently melt more rapidly. The increase in glacier surface darkening is an important positive feedback to warming global temperatures, leading to ever growing world-wide ice mass loss. Most studies focus primarily on glacial albedo darkening caused by the physical properties of snow and ice surfaces, and the deposition of dark impurities on glaciers. To date, however, the important effects of biological activity have not been included in most albedo reduction models. This study provides the first experimental evidence that microbial activity can significantly decrease the albedo of glacier surfaces. An original laboratory experiment, the cryoconite casserole, was designed to test the microbial darkening of glacier surface debris (cryoconite) under simulated Greenlandic summer conditions. It was found that minor fertilisation of the cryoconite (at nutrient concentrations typical of glacial ice melt) stimulated extensive microbial activity. Microbes intensified their organic carbon fixation and even mined phosphorous out of the glacier surface sediment. Furthermore, the microbial organic carbon production, accumulation and transformation caused the glacial debris to darken further by 17.3% reflectivity (albedo analogue). These experiments are consistent with the hypothesis that enhanced fertilisation by anthropogenic inputs results in substantial amounts of organic carbon fixation, debris darkening and ultimately to a considerable decrease in the ice albedo of glacier surfaces on global scales. The sizeable amounts of microbially produced glacier surface organic matter and nutrients can thus be a vital source of bioavailable nutrients for subglacial and downstream environments.

  11. Mars Express measurements of surface albedo changes over 2004-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincendon, M.; Audouard, J.; Altieri, F.; Ody, A.

    2015-05-01

    The pervasive Mars dust is continually transported between the surface and the atmosphere. When on the surface, dust increases the albedo of darker underlying rocks and regolith, which modifies climate energy balance and must be quantified. Remote observation of surface albedo absolute value and albedo change is however complicated by dust itself when lifted in the atmosphere. Here we present a method to calculate and map the bolometric solar hemispherical albedo of the martian surface using the 2004-2010 OMEGA imaging spectrometer dataset. This method takes into account aerosols radiative transfer, surface photometry, and instrumental issues such as registration differences between visible and near-IR detectors. Resulting albedos are on average 17% higher than previous estimates for bright surfaces while similar for dark surfaces. We observed that surface albedo changes occur mostly during the storm season due to isolated events. The main variations are observed during the 2007 global dust storm and during the following year. A wide variety of change timings are detected such as dust deposited and then cleaned over a martian year, areas modified only during successive global dust storms, and perennial changes over decades. Both similarities and differences with previous global dust storms are observed. While an optically thin layer of bright dust is involved in most changes, this coating turns out to be sufficient to mask underlying mineralogical near-IR spectral signatures. Overall, changes result from apparently erratic events; however, a cyclic evolution emerges for some (but not all) areas over long timescales.

  12. Surface Albedo in Cities: Case Study in Sapporo and Tokyo, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugawara, Hirofumi; Takamura, Tamio

    2014-12-01

    The surface albedo of two large cities in Japan was measured using a pyranometer mounted on a helicopter to avoid the bidirectional reflectance distribution. The daytime albedo was 0.12 in the cities, which was less than that of a nearby forest (0.16). The albedo was dependent on building structure in the cities; the albedo was lower in areas with more buildings, and decreased as the aspect ratio of street canyons increased. There are two reasons for this dependency: the multiple reflection of radiation in the building canopy, as has been shown in many previous studies, and the sparse vegetation in urban areas. These two factors concurrently determine the albedo in a real city, where the vegetation amount decreases as the plan roof ratio increases.

  13. Global climate impacts of bioenergy from forests: implications from biogenic CO2 fluxes and surface albedo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherubini, Francesco; Bright, Ryan; Strømman, Anders

    2013-04-01

    Production of biomass for bioenergy can alter biogeochemical and biogeophysical mechanisms, thus affecting local and global climate. Recent scientific developments mainly embraced impacts from land use changes resulting from area-expanded biomass production, with several extensive insights available. Comparably less attention, however, is given to the assessment of direct land surface-atmosphere climate impacts of bioenergy systems under rotation such as in plantations and forested ecosystems, whereby land use disturbances are only temporary. In this work, we assess bioenergy systems representative of various biomass species (spruce, pine, aspen, etc.) and climatic regions (US, Canada, Norway, etc.), for both stationary and vehicle applications. In addition to conventional greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through life cycle activities (harvest, transport, processing, etc.), we evaluate the contributions to global warming of temporary effects resulting from the perturbation in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration caused by the timing of biogenic CO2 fluxes and in surface reflectivity (albedo). Biogenic CO2 fluxes on site after harvest are directly measured through Net Ecosystem Productivity (NEP) chronosequences from flux towers established at the interface between the forest canopy and the atmosphere and are inclusive of all CO2 exchanges occurring in the forest (e.g., sequestration of CO2 in growing trees, emissions from soil respiration and decomposition of dead organic materials). These primary data based on empirical measurements provide an accurate representation of the forest carbon sink behavior over time, and they are used in the elaboration of high-resolution IRFs for biogenic CO2 emissions. Chronosequence of albedo values from clear-cut to pre-harvest levels are gathered from satellite data (MODIS black-sky shortwave broadband, Collection 5, MCD43A). Following the cause-effect chain from emissions to damages, through radiative forcing and changes

  14. The surface abundance and stratigraphy of lunar rocks from data about their albedo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shevchenko, V. V.

    1977-01-01

    The data pf ground-based studies and surveys of the lunar surface by the Zond and Apollo spacecraft have been used to construct an albedo map covering 80 percent of the lunar sphere. Statistical analysis of the distribution of areas with various albedos shows several types of lunar surface. Comparison of albedo data for maria and continental areas with the results of geochemical orbital surveys allows the identification of the types of surface with known types of lunar rock. The aluminum/silcon and magnesium/silicon ratios as measured by the geochemical experiments on the Apollo 15 and Apollo 16 spacecraft were used as an indication of the chemical composition of the rock. The relationship of the relative aluminum content to the age of crystalline rocks allows a direct dependence to be constructed between the mean albedo of areas and the age of the rocks of which they are composed.

  15. The Effect of Black Carbon and Snow Grain Size on Snow Surface Albedo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadley, O. L.; Kirchstetter, T.; Flanner, M.

    2009-12-01

    Black carbon (BC) has been measured in snow and ice cores at levels that climate models predict are high enough to be the second leading cause in arctic ice melt and glacial retreat after greenhouse gas warming. BC deposited on snow reduces the snow surface albedo; however, in addition to BC content, snow albedo also depends on sky cover, solar angle, snow grain size and shape, surface roughness, and depth. Quantifying the albedo reduction due to BC separately from these other variables is difficult to achieve in field measurements. We are conducting laboratory experiments that isolate the effect of BC and snow grain size on snow albedo. Snow is made by spraying and freezing drops of water; BC contaminated snow is made from BC hydrosol. Snow albedo is measured with a spectrometer equipped with an integrating sphere over the entire visible spectrum (400-1000 nm). Snow grain size distribution and shape are characterized using a digital microscope to calculate the effective radius of the snow. Measured snow albedo is compared to that predicted using the Snow, Ice, and Aerosol Radiative Model. Preliminary results indicate good agreement between measured and modeled albedo for pure and BC contaminated snow.

  16. Albedo of surface CO2 deposits in Mars' Residual South Polar Cap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, P. B.; Wolff, M. J.; Bonev, B.

    2013-12-01

    The albedo of surface CO2 deposits in the Residual South Polar Cap (RSPC) controls their net condensation / sublimation over a martian year and is therefore a crucial parameter in determining RSPC stability. The Lambert albedo used in previous analyses is obtained by dividing I/F, determined from radiometrically calibrated imaging data, by the cosine of the incidence angle. Because of atmospheric dust, this albedo calculated from I/F above the atmosphere is not the surface albedo that enters into stability considerations. In order to investigate the real surface albedo, we interpolate optical depths determined from CRISM EPF measurements to provide estimates of the opacites over the RSPC and use these to determine the actual surface albedos from MARCI images using the radiative transport program DISORT (Stamnes et al., 1988). The assumption that the surface is a Lambertian diffuse reflector can then also be tested. MARCI images acquired in one-day span a significant range of emission angles; the set of images acquired during one sol is similar to EPF observations except that diurnal opacity variations could be important.

  17. Retrieval of surface albedo over the Railroad Valley playa from AVIRIS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, T.; O'Brien, D.; O'Dell, C. W.; kuze, A.

    2011-12-01

    High spatial resolution spectra, measured by the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) in the 0.76, 1.6 and 2.0 micron bands, are used to retrieve albedo over a bright desert surface in support of the GOSAT vicarious calibration campaign. The albedo retrieval consists of a simple, linear least squares (LLS) fitting routine, coupled with a radiative transfer model. The retrieved albedos are used as inputs to a separate radiative transfer code used to model top of the atmosphere (TOA) radiances. These TOA radiances are then compared to those measured by GOSAT, thus providing the basis for the vicarious calibration of the GOSAT sensors.

  18. Subpixel variability of MODIS albedo retrievals and its importance for ice sheet surface melting in southwestern Greenland's ablation zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moustafa, S.; Rennermalm, A. K.; Roman, M. O.; Koenig, L.; Smith, L. C.; Schaaf, C.; Wang, Z.; Mioduszewski, J.

    2013-12-01

    On the Greenland ice sheet, albedo declined across 70% of its surface since 2000, with the greatest reduction in the lower 600 m of the southwestern ablation zone. Because albedo plays a prominent role in the ice sheet surface energy balance, its decline has resulted in near doubling of meltwater production. To characterize ice sheet albedo, Moderate Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) surface albedo products are typically used. However, it is unclear how the spatial variability of albedo within a MODIS pixel influences surface melting and whether it can be considered a linear function of albedo. In this study, high spatiotemporal resolution measurements of spectral albedo and ice sheet surface ablation were collected along a ~ 1.3 km transect during June 2013 within the Akuliarusiarsuup Kuua (AK) River watershed in southwest Greenland. Spectral measurements were made at 325-1075 nm using a Analytical Spectral Devices (ASD) spectroradiometer, fitted with a Remote Cosine Receptor (RCR). In situ albedo measurements are compared with the daily MODIS albedo product (MCD43A) to analyze how space, time, surface heterogeneity, atmospheric conditions, and solar zenith angle geometry govern albedo at different scales. Finally, analysis of sub-pixel albedo and ablation reveal its importance on meltwater production in the lower parts of the ice sheet margin.

  19. Remote sensing albedo product validation over heterogenicity surface based on WSN: preliminary results and its uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaodan; Wen, Jianguang; Xiao, Qing; Peng, Jingjing; Liu, Qiang; Dou, Baocheng; Tang, Yong; Li, Xiuhong

    2014-11-01

    The evaluation of uncertainty in satellite-derived albedo products is critical to ensure their accuracy, stability and consistency for studying climate change. In this study, we assess the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer(MODIS) albedo 8 day standard product MOD43B3 using the ground-based albedometer measurement based on the wireless sensor network (WSN) technology. The experiment have been performed in Huailai, Hubei province. A 1.5 km*2 km area are selected as study region, which locates between 115.78° E-115.80° E and 40.35° N-40.37° N. This area is characterized by its distinct landscapes: bare ground between January and April, corn from May to Octorber. That is, this area is relatively homegeneous from January to Octorber, but in Novermber and December, the surface is very heterogeneous because of straw burning, as well as snow fall and snow melting. It is a big challenge to validate the MODIS albedo products because of the vast difference in spatial resolution between ground measurement and satellite measurement. Here, we use the HJ albedo products as the bridge that link the ground measurement with satellite data. Firstly, we analyses the spatial representativeness of the WSN site under green-up, dormant and snow covered situations to decide whether direct comparison between ground-based measurement and MODIS albedo can be made. The semivariogram is used here to describe the ground hetergeneity around the WSN site. In addition, the bias between the average albedo of the certain neighborhood centered at the WSN site and the center pixel albedo is also calculated.Then we compare the MOD43B3 value with the ground-based value. Result shows that MOD43B3 agree with in situ well during the growing season, however, there are relatively large difference between ground albedos and MCD43B3 albedos during dormant and snow-coverd periods.

  20. Crop growth and development effects on surface albedo for maize and cowpea fields in Ghana, West Africa.

    PubMed

    Oguntunde, Philip G; van de Giesen, Nick

    2004-11-01

    The albedo (alpha) of vegetated land surfaces is a key regulatory factor in atmospheric circulation and plays an important role in mechanistic accounting of many ecological processes. This paper examines the influence of the phenological stages of maize (Zea mays) and cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) fields on observed albedo at a tropical site in Ghana. The crops were studied for the first and second planting dates in the year 2002. Crop management was similar for both seasons and measurements were taken from 10 mx10-m plots within crop fields. Four phenological stages were distinguished: (1) emergence, (2) vegetative, (3) flowering, and (4) maturity. alpha measured from two reference surfaces, short grass and bare soil, were used to study the change over the growing seasons. Surface alpha was measured and simulated at sun angles of 15, 30, 45, 60, and 75 degrees . Leaf area index (LAI) and crop height (CH) were also monitored. Generally, alpha increases from emergence to maturity for both planting dates in the maize field but slightly decreases after flowering in the cowpea field. For maize, the correlation coefficient ( R) between alpha and LAI equals 0.970, and the R between alpha and CH equals 0.969. Similarly, for cowpea these Rs are 0.988 and 0.943, respectively. A modified albedo model adequately predicted the observed alphas with an overall R>0.860. The relative difference in surface alpha with respect to the alpha values measured from the two reference surfaces is discussed. Data presented are expected to be a valuable input in agricultural water management, crop production models, eco-hydrological models and in the study of climate effects of agricultural production, and for the parameterization of land-surface schemes in regional weather and climate models. PMID:15278686

  1. Generating multi-scale albedo look-up maps using MODIS BRDF/Albedo products and landsat imagery

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surface albedo determines radiative forcing and is a key parameter for driving Earth’s climate. Better characterization of surface albedo for individual land cover types can reduce the uncertainty in estimating changes to Earth’s radiation balance due to land cover change. This paper presents a mult...

  2. Impact of drought on surface albedo in Canadian Prairie observed from Terra- MODIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Y.; Trishchenko, A. P.; Wang, S.; Khlopenkov, K. V.

    2009-05-01

    A new technology was developed at the Canada Centre for Remote Sensing (CCRS) for generating Canada wide clear-sky surface albedo data based on observations from MODIS sensor onboard TERRA satellite. The data include all seven MODIS land bands (B1-B7) mapped at 250m spatial resolution and 10-day temporal interval from year 2000 through 2008. The new product presents an important spatial enhancement as well as an improved retrieval of water fraction and snow characteristics relative to the standard MODIS archival products. The regional data for the entire Canadian Prairie region are extracted and aggregated for different ecozones, such as north to south, the boreal transition, aspen parkland, moist mixed grassland, and mixed grassland etc. The preliminary results indicate that in comparison to normal summer conditions (2006-2008), the albedo for the drought years (2000-2003) summer increases up to 20 percent in the visible band (B1) and decreases as low as 10 percent in the near infrared band (B2). In the shortwave infrared band (B6) where a large absorption by leaf water occurs, the albedo increases as much as 15 percent for the drought years due to less leaf water content. The derived Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), which represents a density of healthy vegetation, drops dramatically (up to 30 percent) for the drought period of 2000-2003. Among the different ecozones, the grassland shows the largest response to droughts while the boreal zone shows the least. Further applications of this product include mapping of snow cover (fraction and grain size), the fraction of absorbed photo-synthetically active radiation (fAPAR), ecosystem productivity, water and energy budget, as well as impact of various disturbances, such as wildfires, and long term climate induced trends. This work was conducted at the Canada Centre for Remote Sensing (CCRS), Earth Sciences Sector of the Department of Natural Resources Canada as part of the Project J35 of the Program on

  3. Are the circular, dark features on Comet Borrelly's surface albedo variations or pits?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, R.M.; Soderblom, L.A.; Hapke, B.W.

    2004-01-01

    The highest resolution images of Comet 19P/Borrelly show many dark features which, upon casual inspection, appear to be low albedo markings, but which may also be shadows or other photometric variations caused by a depression in the local topography. In order to distinguish between these two possible interpretations we conducted a photometric analysis of three of the most prominent of these features using six of the highest quality images from the September 22, 2001 Deep Space 1 (DS1) flyby. We find that: 1. The radiance in the darkest parts of each feature increases as phase angle decreases, similarly to the radiance behavior of the higher albedo surrounding terrain. The dark features could be either fully illuminated low albedo spots or, alternatively, they could be depressions. No part of any of the three regions was in full shadow. 2. One of the regions has a radiance profile consistent with a rimmed depression, the second, with a simple depression with no rim, and the third with a low albedo spot. 3. The regolith particles are backscattering and carbon black is one of the few candidate regolith materials that might explain this low albedo. We conclude that Borrelly's surface is geologically complex to the limit of resolution of the images with a combination complex topography, pits, troughs, peaks and ridges, and some very dark albedo markings, perhaps a factor of two to three darker than the average 3-4% albedo of the surrounding terrains. Our technique utilizing measured radiance profiles through the dark regions is able to discriminate between rimmed depressions, rimless depressions and simple albedo changes not associated with topography. ?? 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Albedo Boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-510, 11 October 2003

    The sharp, nearly straight line that runs diagonally across the center of this April 2003 Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image is an albedo boundary. Albedois a term that refers to reflectance of sunlight. A surface with a low albedo is one that appears dark because it reflects less light than a high albedo (bright) surface. On Mars, albedo boundaries occur between two materials of differing texture, particle size, or composition, or some combination of these three factors. The boundary shown here is remarkable because it is so sharp and straight. This is caused by wind. Most likely, the entire surface was once covered with the lower-albedo (darker) material that is now seen in the upper half of the image. At some later time, wind stripped away this darker material from the surfaces in the lower half of the image. The difference in albedo here might be related to composition, and possibly particle size. This picture is located near the southwest rim of Schiaparelli Basin at 5.5oS, 345.9oW. The picture covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and is illuminated by sunlight from the left.

  5. An improved method to derive surface albedo from narrowband AVHRR satellite data : narrowband to broadband conversion.

    SciTech Connect

    Song, J.; Gao, W.; Environmental Research; Northern Illinois Univ.

    1999-02-01

    A method was investigated to estimate broadband surface shortwave albedo from the narrowband reflectances obtained by the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometers (AVHRRs) on board the polar orbiting satellites. Field experiments were conducted to measure simultaneously multispectral narrowband reflectances and broadband albedo over various vegetation and soil surfaces. These data were combined to examine the behavior of narrowband-to-broadband (NTB) conversion factors for different surfaces. Many previous studies have used constant NTB conversion factors for the AVHRR data. The results from this investigation indicate that the optimal NTB conversion factors for AVHRR channels 1 and 2 have a strong dependence on the amount of green vegetation within the field of view. Two conversion factors, f1 and f2, were established to quantify, respectively, (1) the relationship between the reflectance in the narrow red wave band and the total reflectance within the whole visible subregion (0.3-0.685 m) and (2) the relationship between the reflectance in the narrow near-infrared wave band and the total reflectance within the whole near-infrared subregion (0.685-2.8 m). Values of f1 and f2, calculated from field data, correlated well with the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), largely because of the unique characteristics of light absorption and scattering within the red and near-infrared wave bands by green leaves. The f1-NDVI and f2-NDVI relationships developed from this study were used to infer empirical coefficients needed to estimate surface albedo from AVHRR data. The surface albedo values calculated by the new method agreed with ground-based measurements within a root-mean-square error of 0.02, which is better than other methods that use constant empirical coefficients. Testing with albedo measurements made by unmanned aerospace vehicles during a field campaign also indicates that the new method provides an improved estimate of surface albedo.

  6. Spatiotemporal variation of surface shortwave forcing from fire-induced albedo change in interior Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huang, Shengli; Dahal, Devendra; Liu, Heping; Jin, Suming; Young, Claudia J.; Liu, Shuang; Liu, Shu-Guang

    2015-01-01

    The albedo change caused by both fires and subsequent succession is spatially heterogeneous, leading to the need to assess the spatiotemporal variation of surface shortwave forcing (SSF) as a component to quantify the climate impacts of high-latitude fires. We used an image reconstruction approach to compare postfire albedo with the albedo assuming fires had not occurred. Combining the fire-caused albedo change from the 2001-2010 fires in interior Alaska and the monthly surface incoming solar radiation, we examined the spatiotemporal variation of SSF in the early successional stage of around 10 years. Our results showed that while postfire albedo generally increased in fall, winter, and spring, some burned areas could show an albedo decrease during these seasons. In summer, the albedo increased for several years and then declined again. The spring SSF distribution did not show a latitudinal decrease from south to north as previously reported. The results also indicated that although the SSF is usually largely negative in the early successional years, it may not be significant during the first postfire year. The annual 2005-2010 SSF for the 2004 fire scars was -1.30, -4.40, -3.31, -4.00, -3.42, and -2.47 Wm-2. The integrated annual SSF map showed significant spatial variation with a mean of -3.15 Wm-2 and a standard deviation of 3.26 Wm-2, 16% of burned areas having positive SSF. Our results suggest that boreal deciduous fires would be less positive for climate change than boreal evergreen fires. Future research is needed to comprehensively investigate the spatiotemporal radiative and non-radiative forcings to determine the effect of boreal fires on climate.

  7. Titan's 5 micrometers spectral window: carbon monoxide and the albedo of the surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noll, K. S.; Geballe, T. R.; Knacke, R. F.; Pendleton, Y. J.

    1996-01-01

    We have measured the spectrum of Titan near 5 micrometers and have found it to be dominated by absorption from the carbon monoxide 1-0 vibration-rotation band. The position of the band edge allows us to constrain the abundance of CO in the atmosphere and/or the location of the reflecting layer in the atmosphere. In the most likely case, 5 micrometers radiation is reflected from the surface and the mole fraction of CO in the atmosphere is qCO=10(+10/-5) ppm, significantly lower than previous estimates for tropospheric CO. The albedo of the reflecting layer is approximately 0.07(+0.02/-0.01) in the 5 micrometers continuum outside the CO band. The 5 micrometers albedo is consistent with a surface of mixed ice and silicates similar to the icy Galilean satellites. Organic solids formed in simulated Titan conditions can also produce similar albedos at 5 micrometers.

  8. Titan's 5 micrometers spectral window: carbon monoxide and the albedo of the surface.

    PubMed

    Noll, K S; Geballe, T R; Knacke, R F; Pendleton, Y J

    1996-12-01

    We have measured the spectrum of Titan near 5 micrometers and have found it to be dominated by absorption from the carbon monoxide 1-0 vibration-rotation band. The position of the band edge allows us to constrain the abundance of CO in the atmosphere and/or the location of the reflecting layer in the atmosphere. In the most likely case, 5 micrometers radiation is reflected from the surface and the mole fraction of CO in the atmosphere is qCO=10(+10/-5) ppm, significantly lower than previous estimates for tropospheric CO. The albedo of the reflecting layer is approximately 0.07(+0.02/-0.01) in the 5 micrometers continuum outside the CO band. The 5 micrometers albedo is consistent with a surface of mixed ice and silicates similar to the icy Galilean satellites. Organic solids formed in simulated Titan conditions can also produce similar albedos at 5 micrometers. PMID:11539388

  9. Temporal and spatial mapping of surface albedo and atmospheric dust opacity on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S. W.; Clancy, R. T.; Gladstone, G. R.

    1993-01-01

    The Mariner 9 and Viking provided abundant evidence that eolian processes are active over much of the surface of Mars. Past studies have demonstrated that variations in regional albedo and wind-streak patterns are indicative of sediment transport through a region, while thermal inertia data (derived from the Viking Infrared Thermal Mapper (IRTM) dataset) are indicative of the degree of surface mantling by dust deposits. The visual and thermal data are therefore diagnostic of whether net erosion or deposition of dust-storm fallout is taking place currently and whether such processes have been active in a region over the long term. These previous investigations, however, have not attempted to correct for the effects of atmospheric dust loading on observations of the martian surface, so quantitative studies of current sediment transport rates have included large errors due to uncertainty in the magnitude of this 'atmospheric component' of the observations. We have developed a radiative transfer model that allows the atmospheric dust opacity to be determined from IRTM thermal observations. Corrections for the effects of atmospheric dust loading on observations of surface albedo can also be modeled. This approach to determining 'dust-corrected surface albedo' incorporates the atmospheric dust opacity, the single-scattering albedo and particle phase function of atmospheric dust, and the bidirectional reflectance of the surface, and it accounts for variable lighting and viewing geometry.

  10. Quality assessment and improvement of the EUMETSAT Meteosat Surface Albedo Climate Data Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lattanzio, A.; Fell, F.; Bennartz, R.; Trigo, I. F.; Schulz, J.

    2015-10-01

    Surface albedo has been identified as an important parameter for understanding and quantifying the Earth's radiation budget. EUMETSAT generated the Meteosat Surface Albedo (MSA) Climate Data Record (CDR) currently comprising up to 24 years (1982-2006) of continuous surface albedo coverage for large areas of the Earth. This CDR has been created within the Sustained, Coordinated Processing of Environmental Satellite Data for Climate Monitoring (SCOPE-CM) framework. The long-term consistency of the MSA CDR is high and meets the Global Climate Observing System (GCOS) stability requirements for desert reference sites. The limitation in quality due to non-removed clouds by the embedded cloud screening procedure is the most relevant weakness in the retrieval process. A twofold strategy is applied to efficiently improve the cloud detection and removal. The first step consists of the application of a robust and reliable cloud mask, taking advantage of the information contained in the measurements of the infrared and visible bands. Due to the limited information available from old radiometers, some clouds can still remain undetected. A second step relies on a post-processing analysis of the albedo seasonal variation together with the usage of a background albedo map in order to detect and screen out such outliers. The usage of a reliable cloud mask has a double effect. It enhances the number of high-quality retrievals for tropical forest areas sensed under low view angles and removes the most frequently unrealistic retrievals on similar surfaces sensed under high view angles. As expected, the usage of a cloud mask has a negligible impact on desert areas where clear conditions dominate. The exploitation of the albedo seasonal variation for cloud removal has good potentialities but it needs to be carefully addressed. Nevertheless it is shown that the inclusion of cloud masking and removal strategy is a key point for the generation of the next MSA CDR release.

  11. Quality assessment and improvement of the EUMETSAT Meteosat Surface Albedo Climate Data Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lattanzio, A.; Fell, F.; Bennartz, R.; Trigo, I. F.; Schulz, J.

    2015-07-01

    Surface albedo has been identified as an important parameter for understanding and quantifying the Earth's radiation budget. EUMETSAT generated the Meteosat Surface Albedo (MSA) Climate Data Record (CDR) currently comprising up to 24 years (1982-2006) of continuous surface albedo coverage for large areas of the Earth. This CDR has been created within the Sustained and Coordinated Processing of Environmental Satellite Data for Climate Monitoring (SCOPE-CM) framework. The long-term consistency of the MSA CDR is high and meets the Global Climate Observing System (GCOS) stability requirements for desert reference sites. The limitation in quality due to non removed clouds by the embedded cloud screening procedure is the most relevant weakness in the retrieval process. A twofold strategy is applied to efficiently improve the cloud detection and removal. A first step consists on the application of a robust and reliable cloud mask taking advantage of the information contained in the measurements of the infrared and visible bands. Due to the limited information available from old radiometers some clouds can still remain undetected. A second step relies on a post processing analysis of the albedo seasonal variation together with the usage of a background albedo map in order to detect and screen out such outliers. The usage of a reliable cloud mask has a double effect. It enhances the number of high quality retrievals for tropical forest areas sensed under low view angles and removes the most frequently unrealistic retrievals on similar surfaces sensed under high view angles. As expected, the usage of a cloud mask has a negligible impact on desert areas where clear conditions dominate. The exploitation of the albedo seasonal variation for cloud removal has good potentialities but it needs to be carefully addressed. Nevertheless it is shown that the inclusion of cloud masking and removal strategy is a key point for the generation of the next MSA CDR Release.

  12. Land surface interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickinson, Robert E.

    1992-01-01

    The topics covered include the following: land and climate modeling; sensitivity studies; the process of a land model; model-specific parameterizations; water stress; within-canopy resistances; partial vegetation; canopy temperature; and present experience with a land model coupled to a general circulation model.

  13. Preliminary validation of Albedo, FAPAR and LAI Essential Climate Variables products derived from PROBA-V observations in the Copernicus Global Land Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camacho, Fernando; Sanchez, Jorge; Lacaze, Roselyne; Smets, Bruno

    2015-04-01

    From 1st January 2013, the Copernicus Global Land Service is operational, providing in near real time a set of biophysical variables over the globe, including Surface Albedo (SA), Leaf Area Index (LAI) and Fraction of Absorbed Photosynthetically Active Radiation (FAPAR) Essential Climate Variables among other variables such as the Fraction of Vegetation Cover (FCover) are delivered at 1 km resolution and 10-days frequency. These ECVs are also key inputs for land surface applications such as agriculture monitoring, yield estimate, food security, environmental monitoring (e.g. desertification, drought). The first version of these Copernicus Global Land products were based on SPOT/VGT observations (1999-2004). The continuity of the production is currently based on PROBA-V 1 km observations, and the evolution of the services will provide enhanced spatial resolution (333m). This study presents the preliminary validation results of PROBA-V Albedo, FAPAR, LAI and FCover 1 km products, focused on the consistency with SPOT/VGT GEOV1 products during the overlap period (November 2013 - May 2014) and including intercomparison with MODIS C5 equivalent products. The procedure follows as much as possible guidelines and metrics defined by the Land Product Validation (LPV) group of the Committee on Earth Observation Satellite (CEOS) for the validation of satellite-derived land products and propose additional metrics to quantify spatial and temporal consistency among the several products. Several criteria of performance were evaluated including product completeness, spatial consistency, temporal consistency, inter-annual precision and accuracy. Inter-comparison with reference satellite products (SPOT/VGT GEOV1 and MODIS C5) are presented over a network of sites (BELMANIP-2). The accuracy of PROBA-V LAI and FAPAR products was evaluated against a number of agricultural sites using the ImagineS database, whereas for Albedo few homogeneous sites with available ground data were

  14. Improving snow albedo processes in WRF/SSiB regional climate model to assess impact of dust and black carbon in snow on surface energy balance and hydrology over western U.S.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oaida, Catalina M.; Xue, Yongkang; Flanner, Mark G.; Skiles, S. McKenzie; De Sales, Fernando; Painter, Thomas H.

    2015-04-01

    Two important factors that control snow albedo are snow grain growth and presence of light-absorbing impurities (aerosols) in snow. However, current regional climate models do not include such processes in a physically based manner in their land surface models. We improve snow albedo calculations in the Simplified Simple Biosphere (SSiB) land surface model coupled with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) regional climate model (RCM), by incorporating the physically based SNow ICe And Radiative (SNICAR) scheme. SNICAR simulates snow albedo evolution due to snow aging and presence of aerosols in snow. The land surface model is further modified to account for deposition, movement, and removal by meltwater of such impurities in the snowpack. This paper presents model development technique, validation with in situ observations, and preliminary results from RCM simulations investigating the impact of such impurities in snow on surface energy and water budgets. By including snow-aerosol interactions, the new land surface model is able to realistically simulate observed snow albedo, snow grain size, dust in snow, and surface water and energy balances in offline simulations for a location in western U.S. Preliminary results with the fully coupled RCM show that over western U.S., realistic aerosol deposition in snow induces a springtime average radiative forcing of 16 W/m2 due to a 6% albedo reduction, a regional surface warming of 0.84°C, and a snowpack reduction of 11 mm.

  15. Variability of albedo and utility of the MODIS albedo product in forested wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sumner, David M.; Wu, Qinglong; Pathak, Chandra S.

    2011-01-01

    Albedo was monitored over a two-year period (beginning April 2008) at three forested wetland sites in Florida, USA using up- and down-ward facing pyranometers. Water level, above and below land surface, is the primary control on the temporal variability of daily albedo. Relatively low reflectivity of water accounts for the observed reductions in albedo with increased inundation of the forest floor. Enhanced canopy shading of the forest floor was responsible for lower sensitivity of albedo to water level at the most dense forest site. At one site, the most dramatic reduction in daily albedo was observed during the inundation of a highly-reflective, calcareous periphyton-covered land surface. Satellite-based Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) estimates of albedo compare favorably with measured albedo. Use of MODIS albedo values in net radiation computations introduced a root mean squared error of less than 4.7 W/m2 and a mean, annual bias of less than 2.3 W/m2 (1.7%). These results suggest that MODIS-estimated albedo values can reliably be used to capture areal and temporal variations in albedo that are important to the surface energy balance.

  16. Dependence of global radiation on cloudiness and surface albedo in Tartu, Estonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tooming, H.

    The dependence of global and diffuse radiation on surface albedo due to multiple reflection of radiation between the surface and the atmosphere (base of clouds) is found on the basis of data obtained at the Tartu-Tõravere Actinometric Station over the period 1955-2000. It is found that the monthly totals of global radiation increase by up to 1.38-1.88 times, particularly in the winter half-year between November and March, when snow cover albedo may be high. A semi-empirical formula is derived for calculating with sufficient accuracy the monthly totals of global radiation, considering the amount of cloudiness and the surface albedo. In the time series of the monthly total by global radiation a downward trend occurs in winter months. A decrease in global radiation by up to 20% in the past 46 years can be explained primarily by a relatively high negative trend in the snow cover duration and surface albedo (up to -0.24). As a result, days are growing darker, a new phenomenon associated with climate change, which undoubtedly affects human mood to some extent.

  17. Reflected Signal Analysis and Surface Albedo in the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivanov, Anton B.; Muhleman, Duane O.

    2001-01-01

    This work presents results from the analysis of the reflectivity data from the MOLA investigation. We will discuss calculation of the surface albedo using the MGS TES 9 micron opacity. We will also overview reflectivity data collected to date. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  18. Factors affecting projected Arctic surface shortwave heating and albedo change in coupled climate models.

    PubMed

    Holland, Marika M; Landrum, Laura

    2015-07-13

    We use a large ensemble of simulations from the Community Earth System Model to quantify simulated changes in the twentieth and twenty-first century Arctic surface shortwave heating associated with changing incoming solar radiation and changing ice conditions. For increases in shortwave absorption associated with albedo reductions, the relative influence of changing sea ice surface properties and changing sea ice areal coverage is assessed. Changes in the surface sea ice properties are associated with an earlier melt season onset, a longer snow-free season and enhanced surface ponding. Because many of these changes occur during peak solar insolation, they have a considerable influence on Arctic surface shortwave heating that is comparable to the influence of ice area loss in the early twenty-first century. As ice area loss continues through the twenty-first century, it overwhelms the influence of changes in the sea ice surface state, and is responsible for a majority of the net shortwave increases by the mid-twenty-first century. A comparison with the Arctic surface albedo and shortwave heating in CMIP5 models indicates a large spread in projected twenty-first century change. This is in part related to different ice loss rates among the models and different representations of the late twentieth century ice albedo and associated sea ice surface state. PMID:26032318

  19. Factors affecting projected Arctic surface shortwave heating and albedo change in coupled climate models

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Marika M.; Landrum, Laura

    2015-01-01

    We use a large ensemble of simulations from the Community Earth System Model to quantify simulated changes in the twentieth and twenty-first century Arctic surface shortwave heating associated with changing incoming solar radiation and changing ice conditions. For increases in shortwave absorption associated with albedo reductions, the relative influence of changing sea ice surface properties and changing sea ice areal coverage is assessed. Changes in the surface sea ice properties are associated with an earlier melt season onset, a longer snow-free season and enhanced surface ponding. Because many of these changes occur during peak solar insolation, they have a considerable influence on Arctic surface shortwave heating that is comparable to the influence of ice area loss in the early twenty-first century. As ice area loss continues through the twenty-first century, it overwhelms the influence of changes in the sea ice surface state, and is responsible for a majority of the net shortwave increases by the mid-twenty-first century. A comparison with the Arctic surface albedo and shortwave heating in CMIP5 models indicates a large spread in projected twenty-first century change. This is in part related to different ice loss rates among the models and different representations of the late twentieth century ice albedo and associated sea ice surface state. PMID:26032318

  20. Cryosphere Broadband Surface Albedo Derivation with MODIS-to-CERES Conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radkevich, A.; Rose, F. G.; Charlock, T. P.; Kato, S.

    2011-12-01

    Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instruments on NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) Terra and Aqua satellites measure broadband shortwave and longwave radiation reflected and emitted at the Top of the atmosphere (TOA). CERES synthesizes broadband observations with other EOS data streams. The CERES Surface and Atmospheric Radiation Budget (SARB) group matches observations with a radiative transfer code to determine fluxes at several levels. The presentation describes how the next edition of CERES will improve the retrieval of cryosphere surface albedo. Surface albedo is one of the input parameters of numerous models such cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulation, general circulation models (GCMs) and transient climate change simulations. It was recently showed by Park and Wu (2010) that CRM simulation well represents the SW radiative budget during winter because the radiation calculation for the snow-covered period is improved by using prescribed evolving surface albedo. Qu and Hall (2007) analyzed snow albedo feedback (SAF) in several transient climate change models. They stated that high quality observations of albedo of snow-covered surfaces would be extremely useful in reducing SAF spread in the next generation of models. CERES measures radiance and infers flux by applying scene-dependent, empirically based angular distribution models (ADMs). The ADMs are obtained from the complex CERES rotating azimuth plane scan mode to establish BRDF on the scale of 30 km broadband footprints. While CERES has much coarser spatial resolution than MODIS, the CERES measurement-based BRDF provides a keen advantage in accuracy over complex surfaces. CERES SARB retrievals of surface albedo have to date been based on only those 30 km footprints that are completely clear; there are too few (~5%) such footprints over sea ice. The upcoming edition of CERES will include MODIS radiances in 7 SW bands (currently 4), which are point spread function weighted to both a whole

  1. First Retrieval of Surface Lambert Albedos From Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter CRISM Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, P. C.; Arvidson, R. E.; Murchie, S. L.; Wolff, M. J.; Smith, M. D.; Martin, T. Z.; Milliken, R. E.; Mustard, J. F.; Pelkey, S. M.; Lichtenberg, K. A.; Cavender, P. J.; Humm, D. C.; Titus, T. N.; Malaret, E. R.

    2006-12-01

    We have developed a pipeline-processing software system to convert radiance-on-sensor for each of 72 out of 544 CRISM spectral bands used in global mapping to the corresponding surface Lambert albedo, accounting for atmospheric, thermal, and photoclinometric effects. We will present and interpret first results from this software system for the retrieval of Lambert albedos from CRISM data. For the multispectral mapping modes, these pipeline-processed 72 spectral bands constitute all of the available bands, for wavelengths from 0.362-3.920 μm, at 100-200 m/pixel spatial resolution, and ~ 0.006\\spaceμm spectral resolution. For the hyperspectral targeted modes, these pipeline-processed 72 spectral bands are only a selection of all of the 544 spectral bands, but at a resolution of 15-38 m/pixel. The pipeline processing for both types of observing modes (multispectral and hyperspectral) will use climatology, based on data from MGS/TES, in order to estimate ice- and dust-aerosol optical depths, prior to the atmospheric correction with lookup tables based upon radiative-transport calculations via DISORT. There is one DISORT atmospheric-correction lookup table for converting radiance-on-sensor to Lambert albedo for each of the 72 spectral bands. The measurements of the Emission Phase Function (EPF) during targeting will not be employed in this pipeline processing system. We are developing a separate system for extracting more accurate aerosol optical depths and surface scattering properties. This separate system will use direct calls (instead of lookup tables) to the DISORT code for all 544 bands, and it will use the EPF data directly, bootstrapping from the climatology data for the aerosol optical depths. The pipeline processing will thermally correct the albedos for the spectral bands above ~ 2.6 μm, by a choice between 4 different techniques for determining surface temperature: 1) climatology, 2) empirical estimation of the albedo at 3.9 μm from the measured albedo

  2. Simultaneous mapping of Titan's surface albedo and aerosol opacity from Cassini/VIMS massive inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltagliati, L.; Rodriguez, S.; Sotin, C.; Cornet, T.; Rannou, P.; Le Mouelic, S.; Solomonidou, A.; Coustenis, A.; Brown, R.

    2015-10-01

    Titan still lacks information on the cartography of its surface albedo, due to the complications linked to the treatment of the atmospheric contributions on surface observations. We present in this paper the results of our massive inversion method that we developed to treat Cassini/VIMS h yperspectral data of Titan. Our minimization procedure is based on look-up tables (LUTs) we create from a state-of-the-art radiative transfer (RT) model[1]. This allows us to decrease the computational time by a factor of several thousands with respect to the standard radiative transfer applications. We will present the improvements on the RT modeling thanks to the acquisition of new information on Titan's aerosol properties and our results for the simultaneous mapping of Titan's surface albedo and aerosol abundance in some regions of interest.

  3. Satellite measurements of surface albedo and temperatures in semi-desert

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otterman, J.; Tucker, C. J.

    1985-01-01

    Measurements of surface parameters in an arid steppe (the semi-desert of the northern Sinai) were made from the NOAA-6 satellite to assess the effects of the vegetation recovery in a fenced-off area. The radiances measured in the solar wavelengths over the vegetated area were about 25 percent lower than those measured over the surrounding bare sandy soil (where the surface albedo measured from Landsat is about 0.42). This implies a reduction in the albedo by the vegetation also by about 25 percent if both surfaces are regarded as Lambertian, but by as much as 42 percent if the vegetated area is modeled as a plane of soil with vertically protruding plants. The radiation temperatures in the 11 micron channel at approximately 0730 LST measured over the vegetated area were by as much as 2.5 K higher than over the surrounding sands.

  4. Parameterization of albedo, thermal inertia, and surface roughness of desert scrub/sandy soil surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otterman, J.; Mccumber, M.

    1986-01-01

    Spectral albedo, A sub n, for the direct solar beam is defined as A sub n (r sub i,s, theta sub 0) = r sub i exp(-s tan theta sub 0)1-I(s) where I(s) is the integral over all reflection angles describing the interception by the absorbing plants of the flux reflected from the soil, r sub i soil reflectance, assumed Lambertian, S the projection on a vertical plane of plants per unit surface area, and theta sub 0 is the solar zenith angle. Hemispheric reflectance for the direct solar beam equals 1-I(s) times the reflectance to the zenith. The values of s of 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3 respectively quantify sparse, moderately dense, and very dense desert scrub. Thin plants are assumed to be of negligible thermal inertia, and thus directly yield the absorbed insolation to the atmosphere. Surface thermal inertia is therefore effectively reduced. The ratio of surface roughness height to plant height is parameterized for sparse, moderately dense, and very dense desert-scrub as a function of s based on data expressing the dependence of this ratio on plant silhouette.

  5. The sensitivity of numerically simulated climates to land-surface boundary conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mintz, Y.

    1982-01-01

    Eleven sensitivity experiments that were made with general circulation models to see how land-surface boundary conditions can influence the rainfall, temperature, and motion fields of the atmosphere are discussed. In one group of experiments, different soil moistures or albedos are prescribed as time-invariant boundary conditions. In a second group, different soil moistures or different albedos are initially prescribed, and the soil moisture (but not the albedo) is allowed to change with time according to the governing equations for soil moisture. In a third group, the results of constant versus time-dependent soil moistures are compared.

  6. The sensitivity of numerically simulated climates to land-surface boundary conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mintz, Y.

    1984-01-01

    Eleven sensitivity experiments that were made with general circulation models to see how land-surface boundary conditions can influence the rainfall, temperature, and motion fields of the atmosphere are discussed. In one group of experiments, different soil moistures or albedos are prescribed as time-invariant boundary conditions. In a second group, different soil moistures or different albedos are initially prescribed, and the soil moisture (but not the albedo) is allowed to change with time according to the governing equations for soil moisture. In a third group, the results of constant versus time-dependent soil moistures are compared. Previously announced in STAR as N83-27536

  7. Measured and modeled albedos of sea-ice surfaces with implications for Snowball Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carns, Regina C.

    The Snowball Earth episodes were extensive glaciations that occurred during the Neoproterozoic, between 600 and 800 million years ago, during which ice covered much or all of the oceans. These glaciations were a result of ice-albedo feedback, a process likely to occur on any Earthlike planet with oceans covering most of its surface. Modeling shows that sublimation would exceed precipitation over large regions of the ice-covered ocean on a Snowball planet; during the initial stages of the Snowball episode, these areas would be entirely covered by sea ice containing inclusions of brine, and sea ice could remain in smaller regions through the whole episode. At temperatures likely to prevail in the Snowball climate, sodium chloride precipitates within brine inclusions as the hydrated salt hydrohalite (NaCl·2H2O, also known as sodium chloride dehydrate). This work used field measurements, laboratory experiments and modeling to constrain the albedo of sea ice surfaces relevant to Snowball Earth. Field measurements of cold sea ice in McMurdo Sound show an increase in the albedo of natural sea ice with decreasing temperatures. Laboratory experiments on natural sea ice show that brine pockets can become supersaturated with respect to sodium chloride at low temperatures, creating a hysteresis in hydrohalite precipitation and dissolution. Experiments show this effect in laboratory-grown ice of several different compositions: grown from an NaCl solution, grown from artificial seawater, and grown from artificial seawater with added extracellular polysaccharides. Sufficiently cold sea ice in a region of net sublimation will eventually develop a lag deposit of salt as the ice sublimates away from precipitated hydrohalite in brine pockets. No sea ice on modern Earth stays cold and dry long enough for such a deposit to form, so we developed a method for measuring the albedo of ice surfaces in a cold-room laboratory. The method uses a dome with a diffusely reflecting interior

  8. Spatiotemporal NDVI, LAI, albedo, and surface temperature dynamics in the southwest of the Brazilian Amazon forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Querino, Carlos Alexandre Santos; Beneditti, Cristina Aparecida; Machado, Nadja Gomes; da Silva, Marcelo José Gama; da Silva Querino, Juliane Kayse Albuquerque; dos Santos Neto, Luiz Alves; Biudes, Marcelo Sacardi

    2016-04-01

    During the last decades, the Amazon rainforest underwent uncontrolled exploitation that modified its environmental variables. The current paper analyzes the spatiotemporal dynamics of the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), leaf area index (LAI), and surface albedo, and temperature in two different vegetation covers, preserved and deforested areas. We calculated the remote-sensing products using Landsat 5 TM images obtained during the dry season 1984, 1991, 2000, and 2011 of the central region of the State of Rondônia, Brazil. The results showed a reduction of vegetation indexes NDVI (˜0.70 in 1984 to ˜0.27 in 2011) and LAI (˜1.8 in 1984 to ˜0.3 in 2011), with an increase of surface albedo (0.12 in 1984 to 0.20 in 2011) and temperature (˜24°C in 1984 to 30°C in 2011) as the effect of the rainforest converted in grassland during the study period. No changes in any variables were observed in the protected area. Forest conversion into grassland resulted in a decrease of 69% in NDVI and 110% in LAI and a rise of 59% and 24% in albedo and surface temperature, respectively.

  9. Quality assessment and improvement of the EUMETSAT Meteosat Surface Albedo dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lattanzio, Alessio; Fell, Frank; Bennartz, Ralf; Muller, Jan-Peter; Trigo, Isabel; Löw, Alexander; Schulz, Jörg

    2015-04-01

    Surface albedo is an important parameter for quantifying and understanding the nature of the Earth's radiation budget. This study describes a comprehensive validation of the EUMETSAT Meteosat Surface Albedo (MSA) Climate Data Record (CDR) currently comprising up to 24 years (1982-2006) of continuous surface albedo coverage for large areas covering Africa, Europe and western parts of Asia. In addition it is discussing retrieval improvements as a consequence of the validation results. The MSA CDR has been generated within a project of the WMO entitled Sustained and Coordinated Processing of Environmental Satellite Data for Climate Monitoring (SCOPE-CM) initiative. The MSA CDR went into a two step validation process. Firstly, the satellite product has been compared to available in situ and satellite data assessing systematic and random deviations among the products. This also included an assessment of the temporal stability over desert sites that are assumed to remain stable over time. Furthermore impact on product quality due to anisotropic effects or snow covered surfaces has been analysed. The evaluation has revealed a number of specific strengths and weaknesses. The long-term consistency is very high and meets the Global Climate Observing System (GCOS) stability requirements for desert reference sites. The limitation in quality appears to be due primarily to clouds not removed by the embedded cloud screening procedure as the most significant weakness of the retrieval process. Two alternative strategies are followed to efficiently improve the cloud detection and removal. The first is based on the application of a robust and reliable cloud mask during the retrieval taking advantage of the information contained in the measurements of the infrared and visible bands. The second, in order to screen out outlier values, relies on a post processing analysis of the albedo seasonal variation together with the usage of "a priori" information contained in a background albedo

  10. Mean thermal and albedo behavior of the Mars surface and atmosphere over a Martian year

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, T. Z.

    1981-01-01

    A Mars average data set (MADS) has been constructed from thermal and albedo measurements of the Viking Infrared Thermal Mapper; by merging information from all longitudes, and ensuring reasonably complete longitudinal sampling, a representation of mean Mars behavior is obtained. Brightness temperatures at 7, 9, 11, 15, and 20 microns and albedo information in the band 0.3-3.0 microns have been binned using 2 deg latitude strips, 24 times of day, 3 emission angle intervals, and 23 nonoverlapping solar longitude periods covering 1.43 Mars years starting at a solar longitude of 84 deg. The MADS is ideally suited to parametric study of latitudinal, diurnal, angular, and seasonal dependences. Data are presented for surface thermal and albedo behavior in clear and dusty atmospheric conditions; the thermal response of the atmospheric temperature to a major dust storm is found to be consistent with Mariner 9 data from the 1971 storm. Examples of use of the MADS, which is available through the Mars Consortium, indicate how averaged data reveal specific surface and atmospheric phenomena.

  11. Land surface processes and Sahel climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, Sharon

    2000-02-01

    have demonstrated that the net feedback to the atmosphere is positive for both wet and dry surface anomalies. Hence the role of the surface is to reinforce meteorologically induced changes. Recovery from the dry state is slower than from the wet state, suggesting that dry conditions would tend to persist longer, as is actually observed in the Sahel. These simple models suggest that the surface hydrology locks the system into a drought mode that persists for several years, until the system randomly slips into a persistent wet mode. The hypothesis that desertification in the Sahel might likewise be responsible for the persistent drought is found to be untenable. Rather than a progressive encroachment of the desert onto the savanna, the vegetation cover responds dramatically to interannual fluctuations in rainfall. There is little evidence of large-scale denudation of soils, increase in surface albedo, or reduction of the productivity of the land, although degradation has probably occurred in some areas. There has, however, been a steady buildup of dust in the region over the last half a century. Significant radiative effects of the dust have been demonstrated; therefore the dust has probably influenced large-scale climate. The buildup is probably mainly a result of changes in the land surface that accompanied the shift to drier conditions, but it may have been exacerbated by anthropogenic factors. Complex general circulation models nearly universally underscore the importance of feedback processes in the region. Although it has not been unequivocally demonstrated that the rainfall regime of the Sahel is modulated by surface processes, there is recent observational evidence that this is case.

  12. An investigation of surface albedo variations during the recent Sahel drought

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, C. C.; Mosher, F. R.; Hinton, B.

    1979-01-01

    Applications Technology Satellite (ATS) 3 green sensor data are used to measure surface reflectance variations in the Sahara/Sahel during the recent drought period 1967-74. The magnitude of the seasonal reflectance change is shown to be as much as 80% for years of normal precipitation and less than 50% for drought years. Year-to-year comparisons during both wet and dry seasons reveal the existence of a surface reflectance cycle coincident with the drought intensity. The relationship between the green reflectance and solar albedo is examined and estimated to be about 0.6 times the reflectance change observed by the green channel.

  13. An investigation of surface albedo variations during the recent sahel drought. [ats 3 observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, C. C.; Mosher, F. R.; Hinton, B.

    1978-01-01

    Applications Technology Satellite 3 green sensor data were used to measure surface reflectance variations in the Sahara/Sahel during the recent drought period; 1967 to 1974. The magnitude of the seasonal reflectance change is shown to be as much as 80% for years of normal precipitation and less than 50% for drought years. Year to year comparisons during both wet and dry seasons reveal the existence of a surface reflectance cycle coincident with the drought intensity. The relationship between the green reflectance and solar albedo is examined and estimated to be about 0.6 times the reflectance change observed by the green channel.

  14. Lakes representation in a land surface model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutra, E.; Stepanenko, V. M.; Balsamo, G.; Viterbo, P.; Miranda, P. M. A.; Mironov, D.

    2009-04-01

    Lakes and other inland water bodies can, in certain areas, compose a large fraction of the land surface. Inland waters have an important role in determining local and regional climates, primarily because of large differences in albedo, heat capacity, roughness, and energy exchange compared to vegetated land surfaces. Despite the radically different physical characteristics of inland waters when compared to their surrounding, most land surface models put more emphasis on the comparatively weaker differences within continental surface types (such as various types of vegetation and bare soil). Thus so far sub-grid lakes have been largely neglected. The present work describes the incorporation of the lake model FLAKE (Mironov 2008, http://lakemodel.net) into the ECMWF land surface scheme HTESSEL (Balsamo 2008). Results from global offline simulations are presented in order to (i) evaluate the model's performance in different climates and (ii) assess the impact of lakes representation in the surface energy balance. The model was forced by new ECMWF reanalysis product ERA-INTERIM (1989-present) near surface meteorology and surface fluxes (radiation and precipitation) for the entire globe. Model validation includes lake surface temperatures (global) and lake ice duration (Northern Hemisphere). Lake surface temperatures, derived from the TERRA-MODIS satellite (http://oceancolor.gsfc.nasa.gov/), are compared against simulations for the period 2001-2008, while lake ice duration is validated using data from the Global Lake and River Ice Phenology (Benson and Magnunson, 2007). The impact of the snow insulator effect on lake ice cover duration is also discussed and compared with frozen soil duration in neighbouring areas. The sensitivity of the present analysis to the lake depth, which is important and often unknown lake parameter, is also addressed. In addition, the implementation of the lake model within the land surface model allows for sub-grid cover variability. The impact

  15. Areal-averaged and Spectrally-resolved Surface Albedo from Ground-based Transmission Data Alone: Toward an Operational Retrieval

    SciTech Connect

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Barnard, James C.; Flynn, Connor J.; Riihimaki, Laura D.; Michalsky, Joseph; Hodges, G. B.

    2014-08-22

    We present here a simple retrieval of the areal-averaged and spectrally resolved surface albedo using only ground-based measurements of atmospheric transmission under fully overcast conditions. Our retrieval is based on a one-line equation and widely accepted assumptions regarding the weak spectral dependence of cloud optical properties in the visible and near-infrared spectral range. The feasibility of our approach for the routine determinations of albedo is demonstrated for different landscapes with various degrees of heterogeneity using three sets of measurements:(1) spectrally resolved atmospheric transmission from Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) at wavelength 415, 500, 615, 673, and 870 nm, (2) tower-based measurements of local surface albedo at the same wavelengths, and (3) areal-averaged surface albedo at four wavelengths (470, 560, 670 and 860 nm) from collocated and coincident Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) observations. These integrated datasets cover both long (2008-2013) and short (April-May, 2010) periods at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site and the NOAA Table Mountain site, respectively. The calculated root mean square error (RMSE), which is defined here as the root mean squared difference between the MODIS-derived surface albedo and the retrieved area-averaged albedo, is quite small (RMSE≤0.01) and comparable with that obtained previously by other investigators for the shortwave broadband albedo. Good agreement between the tower-based daily averages of surface albedo for the completely overcast and non-overcast conditions is also demonstrated. This agreement suggests that our retrieval originally developed for the overcast conditions likely will work for non-overcast conditions as well.

  16. Average surface albedo measurements in the UV, IR, and TSR on the Holy Mosque and places in Makkah, Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seroji, Abdulaziz R.

    2005-08-01

    Average albedo values were measured at three broad wavebands; UV region (295 - 385 nm), Total Solar Radiation, TSR, (305 - 2800 nm), and IR region (3500 - 50000 nm), over different surfaces in the Holy Mosque and Places in Makkah (21°.25 N, 39°.49 E). The Eppley Laboratory Radiometers of TUVR and PIR were used for UV and IR measurements respectively, while Kipp & Zonen Pyranometer of CM3 was adopted for the TSR observations. Measurements were performed during two different periods (summer 28/7-10/8/2004 at Holy Mosque and winter 18-30/1/2005 at Holy Places). Summer measurements showed that the average surface albedos of the Holy Mosque white marbles were 0.45, 0.70 and 1.14 at UV, TSR and IR regions respectively. These values have decreased to 0.12 and 0.18 at UV and TSR regions respectively over the Holy Mosque brown marbles. However, the average albedo value has increased to 1.38 at IR region due to the large Longwave radiation emission from the brown marble surfaces. The albedo values of the Holy Mosque red carpets were determined. The average albedo values were also measured over the Holy Places surfaces (18 m) of pilgrimage, (Muna and Arafat sites) during winter 2005. The observed average surface albedo values over Arafat selected area were 0.00, 0.22 and 1.18 at UV, TSR and IR regions respectively. The average albedo values over Muna selected area and Muna tents were also presented. The effect of clouds and solar zenith angle (SZA) on the measured albedo were investigated in this study.

  17. Comprehensive study on the influence of evapotranspiration and albedo on surface temperature related to changes in the leaf area index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jiawen; Zeng, Xiaodong

    2015-07-01

    Many studies have investigated the influence of evapotranspiration and albedo and emphasize their separate effects but ignore their interactive influences by changing vegetation status in large amplitudes. This paper focuses on the comprehensive influence of evapotranspiration and albedo on surface temperature by changing the leaf area index (LAI) between 30°-90°N. Two LAI datasets with seasonally different amplitudes of vegetation change between 30°-90°N were used in the simulations. Seasonal differences between the results of the simulations are compared, and the major findings are as follows. (1) The interactive effects of evapotranspiration and albedo on surface temperature were different over different regions during three seasons [March-April-May (MAM), June-July-August (JJA), and September-October-November (SON)], i.e., they were always the same over the southeastern United States during these three seasons but were opposite over most regions between 30°-90°N during JJA. (2) Either evapotranspiration or albedo tended to be dominant over different areas and during different seasons. For example, evapotranspiration dominated almost all regions between 30°-90°N during JJA, whereas albedo played a dominant role over northwestern Eurasia during MAM and over central Eurasia during SON. (3) The response of evapotranspiration and albedo to an increase in LAI with different ranges showed different paces and signals. With relatively small amplitudes of increased LAI, the rate of the relative increase in evapotranspiration was quick, and positive changes happened in albedo. But both relative changes in evapotranspiration and albedo tended to be gentle, and the ratio of negative changes of albedo increased with relatively large increased amplitudes of LAI.

  18. Effects of Surface Albedo on Smoke Detection Through Geostationary Satellite Imagery in the Hazard Mapping System (HMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salemi, A.; Ruminski, M. G.

    2012-12-01

    The Satellite Analysis Branch (SAB) of NOAA/NESDIS uses geostationary and polar orbiting satellite imagery to identify fires and smoke throughout the continental United States. The fires and smoke are analyzed daily on the Hazard Mapping System (HMS) and made available via the internet in various formats. Analysis of smoke plumes generated from wildfires, agricultural and prescribe burns is performed with single channel visible imagery primarily from NOAA's Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) animations. Identification of smoke in visible imagery is complicated by the presence of clouds, the viewing angle produced by the sun, smoke, satellite geometry, and the surface albedo of the ground below the smoke among other factors. This study investigates the role of surface albedo in smoke detection. LIght Detection And Ranging (LIDAR) instruments are capable of detecting smoke and other aerosols. Through the use of ground and space based LIDAR systems in areas of varying albedo a relationship between the subjective analyst drawn smoke plumes versus those detected by LIDAR is established. The ability to detect smoke over regions of higher albedo (brighter surface, such as grassland, scrub and desert) is diminished compared to regions of lower albedo (darker surface, such as forest and water). Users of the HMS smoke product need to be aware of this limitation in smoke detection in areas of higher albedo.

  19. Simultaneous Cartography of Aerosol Opacity and Surface Albedo of Titan by the Massive Inversion of the Cassini/VIMS Dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, S.; Maltagliati, L.; Sotin, C.; Rannou, P.; Cornet, T.; Hirtzig, M.; Appéré, T.; Solomonidou, A.; Le Mouelic, S.; Coustenis, A.; Brown, R. H.

    2015-12-01

    Mapping Titan's surface albedo is a necessary step to give reliable constraints on its composition. However, surface albedo maps of Titan, especially over large regions, are still very rare, the surface windows being strongly affected by atmospheric effects (absorption, scattering). A full radiative transfer model is an essential tool to remove these effects, but too time-consuming to treat systematically the ~40000 hyperspectral images VIMS acquired since the beginning of the mission. We developed a massive inversion of VIMS data based on lookup tables computed from a state-of-the-art radiative transfer model (Hirtzig et al. 2013), updated with new aerosol properties coming from our analysis of the Emission Phase Function observation acquired recently by VIMS. Once the physical properties of gases, aerosols and surface are fixed, the lookup tables are built for the remaining free parameters: the incidence, emergence and azimuth angles, given by navigation; and two products (the aerosol opacity and the surface albedo at all wavelengths). The lookup table grid was carefully selected after thorough testing. The data inversion on these pre-computed spectra (opportunely interpolated) is more than 1000 times faster than recalling the full radiative transfer at each minimization step. We present here the results from selected flybys. We invert mosaics composed by couples of flybys observing the same area at two different times. The composite albedo maps do not show significant discontinuities in any of the surface windows, suggesting a robust correction of the effects of the geometry (and thus the aerosols) on the observations. Maps of aerosol and albedo uncertainties are also provided, with the absolute error on the albedo being approximately between 1 and 3% (depending on the surface window considered). We are thus able to provide for the first time ever reliable surface albedo maps at pixel scale for the whole VIMS spectral range.

  20. Near-Infrared Spectral Geometric Albedos of Charon and Pluto: Constraints on Charon's Surface Composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roush, Ted L.; Cruikshank, Dale P.; Pollack, James B.; Young, Eliot F.; Bartholomew, Mary J.

    1996-01-01

    The spectral geometric albedos of Charon and Pluto are derived at near-infrared wavelengths (1.4-2.5 jAm) from measurements obtained in 1987. Comparisons of these to theoretical calculations are used to place constraints on the identity and relative abundances of surface ices on Charon. These compari- sons suggest that widespread regions of pure CH4 ice do not occur on Charon and that if CH4 is abundant on Charon then it is large grained (-5 mm) and is likely mixed at the granular level with H20 ice, and possibly C02 ice.

  1. A new MRI land surface model HAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosaka, M.

    2011-12-01

    A land surface model HAL is newly developed for MRI-ESM1. It is used for the CMIP simulations. HAL consists of three submodels: SiByl (vegetation), SNOWA (snow) and SOILA (soil) in the current version. It also contains a land coupler LCUP which connects some submodels and an atmospheric model. The vegetation submodel SiByl has surface vegetation processes similar to JMA/SiB (Sato et al. 1987, Hirai et al. 2007). SiByl has 2 vegetation layers (canopy and grass) and calculates heat, moisture, and momentum fluxes between the land surface and the atmosphere. The snow submodel SNOWA can have any number of snow layers and the maximum value is set to 8 for the CMIP5 experiments. Temperature, SWE, density, grain size and the aerosol deposition contents of each layer are predicted. The snow properties including the grain size are predicted due to snow metamorphism processes (Niwano et al., 2011), and the snow albedo is diagnosed from the aerosol mixing ratio, the snow properties and the temperature (Aoki et al., 2011). The soil submodel SOILA can also have any number of soil layers, and is composed of 14 soil layers in the CMIP5 experiments. The temperature of each layer is predicted by solving heat conduction equations. The soil moisture is predicted by solving the Darcy equation, in which hydraulic conductivity depends on the soil moisture. The land coupler LCUP is designed to enable the complicated constructions of the submidels. HAL can include some competing submodels (precise and detailed ones, and simpler ones), and they can run at the same simulations. LCUP enables a 2-step model validation, in which we compare the results of the detailed submodels with the in-situ observation directly at the 1st step, and follows the comparison between them and those of the simpler ones at the 2nd step. When the performances of the detailed ones are good, we can improve the simpler ones by using the detailed ones as reference models.

  2. ENVISAT Land Surface Processes. Phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vandenHurk, B. J. J. M.; Su, Z.; Verhoef, W.; Menenti, M.; Li, Z.-L.; Wan, Z.; Moene, A. F.; Roerink, G.; Jia, I.

    2002-01-01

    This is a progress report of the 2nd phase of the project ENVISAT- Land Surface Processes, which has a 3-year scope. In this project, preparative research is carried out aiming at the retrieval of land surface characteristics from the ENVISAT sensors MERIS and AATSR, for assimilation into a system for Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP). Where in the 1st phase a number of first shot experiments were carried out (aiming at gaining experience with the retrievals and data assimilation procedures), the current 2nd phase has put more emphasis on the assessment and improvement of the quality of the retrieved products. The forthcoming phase will be devoted mainly to the data assimilation experiments and the assessment of the added value of the future ENVISAT products for NWP forecast skill. Referring to the retrieval of albedo, leaf area index and atmospheric corrections, preliminary radiative transfer calculations have been carried out that should enable the retrieval of these parameters once AATSR and MERIS data become available. However, much of this work is still to be carried out. An essential part of work in this area is the design and implementation of software that enables an efficient use of MODTRAN(sub 4) radiative transfer code, and during the current project phase familiarization with these new components has been achieved. Significant progress has been made with the retrieval of component temperatures from directional ATSR-images, and the calculation of surface turbulent heat fluxes from these data. The impact of vegetation cover on the retrieved component temperatures appears manageable, and preliminary comparison of foliage temperature to air temperatures were encouraging. The calculation of surface fluxes using the SEBI concept,which includes a detailed model of the surface roughness ratio, appeared to give results that were in reasonable agreement with local measurements with scintillometer devices. The specification of the atmospheric boundary conditions

  3. Effect of spectrally varying albedo of vegetation surfaces on shortwave radiation fluxes and direct aerosol forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, L.; Martins, J. V.; Yu, H.

    2012-06-01

    This study develops an algorithm for the representation of large spectral variations of albedo over vegetation surfaces based on Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) observations at 7 discrete channels centered at 0.47, 0.55, 0.67, 0.86, 1.24, 1.63, and 2.11 μm. The MODIS 7-channel observations miss several major features of vegetation albedo including the vegetation red edge near 0.7 μm and vegetation absorption features at 1.48 and 1.92 μm. We characterize these features by investigating aerosol forcing in different spectral ranges. We show that the correction at 0.7 μm is the most sensitive and important due to the presence of the red edge and strong solar radiation; the other two corrections are less sensitive due to the weaker solar radiation and strong atmospheric water absorption. Four traditional approaches for estimating the reflectance spectrum and the MODIS enhanced vegetation albedo (MEVA) are tested against various vegetation types: dry grass, green grass, conifer, and deciduous from the John Hopkins University (JHU) spectral library; aspens from the US Geological Survey (USGS) digital spectral library; and Amazon vegetation types. Compared to traditional approaches, MEVA improves the accuracy of the outgoing flux at the top of the atmosphere by over 60 W m-2 and aerosol forcing by over 10 W m-2. Specifically, for Amazon vegetation types, MEVA can improve the accuracy of daily averaged aerosol forcing at equator at equinox by 3.7 W m-2 (about 70% of the aerosol forcing calculated with high spectral resolution surface reflectance). These improvements indicate that MEVA can contribute to vegetation covered regional climate studies, and help to improve understanding of climate processes and climate change.

  4. Modeling Near-Surface Temperatures at Martian Landing Sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, T. Z.; Bridges, N. T.; Murphy, J. R.

    2003-01-01

    We have developed a process for deriving near-surface (approx. 1m) temperatures for potential landing sites, based on observational parameters from MGS TES, Odyssey THEMIS, and a boundary layer model developed by Murphy for fitting Pathfinder meteorological measurements. Minimum nighttime temperatures at the MER landing sites can limit power available, and thus mission lifetime. Temperatures are derived based on thermal inertia, albedo, and opacity estimated for the Hematite site in Sinus Meridiani, using predictions of 1-m air temperatures from a one-dimensional atmospheric model. The Hematite site shows 9 % probability of landing at a location with nighttime temperatures below the 97 C value considered to be a practical limit for operations.

  5. Impacts of surface albedo models on high-resolution AOD retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malakar, Nabin; Gross, Barry; Chowdhury, Nazmi; Moshary, Fred

    2015-10-01

    There is a strong need to improve the resolution of Aerosol Optical depth products as more urbanized areas continue to grow. In particular, localized emission sources are likely to create highly localized pollutants that should be monitored. However, in urbanized areas, the land surface itself is a major difficulty since finding dark vegetation pixels becomes harder. Therefore, in order to determine aerosols, a better estimate of the land surface itself should be attempted and should depend strongly on the land surface classification. In order to see if this is possible, we make use of the high density Dragon Network which was deployed in the Washington DC area for summer 2011. The high density of AERONET monitors makes it possible to assess the 3km MODIS AOD retrievals and explore how the deviations of this product depends critically on land surface properties. We then show that we can use improved land surface spectral properties as a function of the different land classes to improve the retrievals. Finally, we explore extended cases including the Dragon Network experiment over Houston from May 1-Nov 1 2013 and specific nearby dual Aeronet instruments where the assessment of urban land surface can be better isolated from variations in aerosol class and solar/view geometries. In both cases, sensitivity to urban surface type is observed and magnified on the high resolution AOD products.

  6. Surface Temperature Assimilation in Land Surface Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakshmi, Venkataraman

    1999-01-01

    This paper examines the utilization of surface temperature as a variable to be assimilated in offline land surface hydrological models. Comparisons between the model computed and satellite observed surface temperatures have been carried out. The assimilation of surface temperature is carried out twice a day (corresponding to the AM and PM overpass of the NOAA10) over the Red-Arkansas basin in the Southwestern United States (31 degs 50 sec N - 36 degrees N, 94 degrees 30 seconds W - 104 degrees 3 seconds W) for a period of one year (August 1987 to July 1988). The effect of assimilation is to reduce the difference between the surface soil moisture computed for the precipitation and/or shortwave radiation perturbed case and the unperturbed case compared to no assimilation.

  7. Surface Temperature Assimilation in Land Surface Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakshmi, Venkataraman

    1997-01-01

    This paper examines the utilization of surface temperature as a variable to be assimilated in offline land surface hydrological models. Comparisons between the model computed and satellite observed surface temperatures have been carried out. The assimilation of surface temperature is carried out twice a day (corresponding to the AM and PM overpass of the NOAA10) over the Red- Arkansas basin in the Southwestern United States (31 deg 50 min N - 36 deg N, 94 deg 30 min W - 104 deg 30 min W) for a period of one year (August 1987 to July 1988). The effect of assimilation is to reduce the difference between the surface soil moisture computed for the precipitation and/or shortwave radiation perturbed case and the unperturbed case compared to no assimilation.

  8. The Impact of Surface Albedo on the Retrievals of Low-Level Stratus Cloud Properties: An Updated Parameterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dong, Xiquan

    2005-01-01

    An updated version of Dong et al. (1998, hereafter D98) parameterization is developed from a total of 40 hours of data with a broad range of surface albedos (0.1-0.8) during the 2000-2002 winter seasons at the DOE ARM SGP site. The updated parameterization includes the impact of surface albedo on the retrievals of stratus cloud microphysical and radiative properties, and has a significant improvement over D98 when surface albedo is high. Comparing the retrievals, the cloud-droplet effective radii (r(sub e)) calculated from the updated parameterization have a higher correlation coefficient (0.733) and lower Root-Mean-Square (RMS) error (1.74 m or 17.4%) than those (0.602, 4.0 m or 40%) from the D98. The cloud albedos also have a much higher correlation coefficient (0.983) and lower RMS (3%) than those 0.465, 26%) from the D98. The upper limit of surface albedo is 0.3 in applying the D98.

  9. The Effect of Atmospheric Hydrogen on the Albedo and Surface Temperature of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallack, Nicole Lisa; Kaltenegger, Lisa; Ramirez, Ramses

    2016-01-01

    The presence of hydrogen in planetary atmospheres has been shown to have the potential to dramatically effect the temperatures of planets. The collision-induced absorption (CIA) of hydrogen with carbon dioxide or nitrogen has been shown to have a substantial effect on the atmospheric temperature and albedo of a planet, possibly to the point at which life could exist on a planet where without such CIA the planet would be too cold. Using a single-column radiative-convective climate model, we investigated the effect of the presence of hydrogen on planetary temperatures and albedos across different amounts of hydrogen and across host stars of different temperatures using present-day Mars-like planets. We found that the addition of hydrogen in a planet's atmosphere increased the surface temperature of the planet. This effect was stronger for the planets orbiting hotter stars. The water vapor profiles showed that this was the case due to the presence of more water vapor in the atmospheres of planets orbiting hotter stars across all percentages of hydrogen. The water vapor concentrations also varied more with the addition of more hydrogen for the planets orbiting hotter stars.

  10. Retrieval of Surface Lambert Albedos and Aerosols Optical Depths Using OMEGA Near-IR EPF Observations of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincendon, M.; Langevin, Y.; Poulet, F.; Bibring, J.-P.; Gondet, B.

    2007-03-01

    We have analyzed five EPF sequences acquired by OMEGA/Mars Express in the near-IR over ice-free and ice-covered surfaces to retrieve simultaneously the Lambert albedo of the surface and the optical depth of aerosols.

  11. Bacteria increase arid-land soil surface temperature through the production of sunscreens.

    PubMed

    Couradeau, Estelle; Karaoz, Ulas; Lim, Hsiao Chien; Nunes da Rocha, Ulisses; Northen, Trent; Brodie, Eoin; Garcia-Pichel, Ferran

    2016-01-01

    Soil surface temperature, an important driver of terrestrial biogeochemical processes, depends strongly on soil albedo, which can be significantly modified by factors such as plant cover. In sparsely vegetated lands, the soil surface can be colonized by photosynthetic microbes that build biocrust communities. Here we use concurrent physical, biochemical and microbiological analyses to show that mature biocrusts can increase surface soil temperature by as much as 10 °C through the accumulation of large quantities of a secondary metabolite, the microbial sunscreen scytonemin, produced by a group of late-successional cyanobacteria. Scytonemin accumulation decreases soil albedo significantly. Such localized warming has apparent and immediate consequences for the soil microbiome, inducing the replacement of thermosensitive bacterial species with more thermotolerant forms. These results reveal that not only vegetation but also microorganisms are a factor in modifying terrestrial albedo, potentially impacting biosphere feedbacks on past and future climate, and call for a direct assessment of such effects at larger scales. PMID:26785770

  12. Bacteria increase arid-land soil surface temperature through the production of sunscreens

    PubMed Central

    Couradeau, Estelle; Karaoz, Ulas; Lim, Hsiao Chien; Nunes da Rocha, Ulisses; Northen, Trent; Brodie, Eoin; Garcia-Pichel, Ferran

    2016-01-01

    Soil surface temperature, an important driver of terrestrial biogeochemical processes, depends strongly on soil albedo, which can be significantly modified by factors such as plant cover. In sparsely vegetated lands, the soil surface can be colonized by photosynthetic microbes that build biocrust communities. Here we use concurrent physical, biochemical and microbiological analyses to show that mature biocrusts can increase surface soil temperature by as much as 10 °C through the accumulation of large quantities of a secondary metabolite, the microbial sunscreen scytonemin, produced by a group of late-successional cyanobacteria. Scytonemin accumulation decreases soil albedo significantly. Such localized warming has apparent and immediate consequences for the soil microbiome, inducing the replacement of thermosensitive bacterial species with more thermotolerant forms. These results reveal that not only vegetation but also microorganisms are a factor in modifying terrestrial albedo, potentially impacting biosphere feedbacks on past and future climate, and call for a direct assessment of such effects at larger scales. PMID:26785770

  13. The influence of continental ice, atmospheric CO2, and land albedo on the climate of the last glacial maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broccoli, A. J.; Manabe, S.

    1987-02-01

    The contributions of expanded continental ice, reduced atmospheric CO2, and changes in land albedo to the maintenance of the climate of the last glacial maximum (LGM) are examined. A series of experiments is performed using an atmosphere-mixed layer ocean model in which these changes in boundary conditions are incorporated either singly or in combination. The model used has been shown to produce a reasonably realistic simulation of the reduced temperature of the LGM (Manabe and Broccoli 1985b). By comparing the results from pairs of experiments, the effects of each of these environmental changes can be determined. Expanded continental ice and reduced atmospheric CO2 are found to have a substantial impact on global mean temperature. The ice sheet effect is confined almost exclusively to the Northern Hemisphere, while lowered CO2 cools both hemispheres. Changes in land albedo over ice-free areas have only a minor thermal effect on a global basis. The reduction of CO2 content in the atmosphere is the primary contributor to the cooling of the Southern Hemisphere. The model sensitivity to both the ice sheet and CO2 effects is characterized by a high latitude amplification and a late autumn and early winter maximum. Substantial changes in Northern Hemisphere tropospheric circulation are found in response to LGM boundary conditions during winter. An amplified flow pattern and enhanced westerlies occur in the vicinity of the North American and Eurasian ice sheets. These alterations of the tropospheric circulation are primarily the result of the ice sheet effect, with reduced CO2 contributing only a slight amplification of the ice sheet-induced pattern.

  14. Effects of land use/cover change on land surface energy partitioning and climate in Northeast China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fengshan; Tao, Fulu; Liu, Jiyuan; Zhang, Shuai; Xiao, Dengpan; Wang, Meng; Zhang, He; Bai, Huizi

    2016-01-01

    The Simple Biosphere Model (SiB2) and the 2 × 2 km resolution National Land use/Land Cover database were used to investigate the effects of Land Use/Cover Change (LUCC) on land surface energy balance and climate in Jilin Province, northeast China, from 1990 to 2005. The spatial patterns of the components of surface energy balance (i.e., net radiation ( R n), latent heat (LH), sensible heat (SH), and albedo ( α)) and climate (i.e., canopy temperature ( T c), diurnal temperature range (DTR)), as well as the roles of land cover type in variations of energy balance and climate, were investigated. The results showed that there were general similar trends in R n, LH, SH, and α in the LUCC process. The spatial patterns of T c and DTR also showed consistent relationships with LUCC processes. Leaf area index (LAI) and canopy conductance ( g c) were found to be the key factors in controlling the spatial patterns of the components of surface energy balance and T c. Using linear correlation method, the gaps of the components of surface energy balance were well-explained by the differences of LAI and g c, and R n had a better correlation with T c and DTR, in the process of LUCC. The surface energy partitioning of R n into LH and SH could not only dampen or strengthen the temperature difference, but also change the relative size of albedo-based R n when the albedo gap was small, between land cover types.

  15. Statistical dependence of albedo and cloud cover on sea surface temperature for two tropical marine stratocumulus regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oreopoulos, Lazaros; Davies, Roger

    1993-01-01

    The relationship between sea surface temperature (SST) and albedo or cloud cover is examined for two tropical regions with high values of cloud radiative forcing and persistent marine stratocumulus (mSc)-one off the west coast of Peru, the other off the west coast of Angola. The data span five years, from December 1984 to November 1989. Albedos are from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE), cloud covers are from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP), and SSTS are from the Climate Analysis Center. Negative correlation coefficients between albedo and SST are found to be about -0.8 when the seasonal variation of the entire dataset is analyzed. The interannual variation and the spatial variation of individual months also yields correlation coefficients that are negative. The correlation between cloud cover and SST is found to be similar to but weaker than the correlation between albedo and SST, suggesting a decrease in cloud amount and a decrease in cloud albedo with increasing SST for these regions. The corresponding albedo sensitivity averages -0.018/K with local values reaching -0.04/K. These findings are valid from 19 C to 25 C for the Peru mSc and 22 C to 27 C for the Angola mSc. These temperatures approximately bound the domains over which mSc is the prevalent cloud type within each region. These results imply a potential positive feedback to global warming by marine stratocumulus that ranges from approximately 0.14 W/sq m/K to approximately 1 W/sq m/K, depending on whether or not our results apply to all marine stratocumulus. While these values are uncertain to at least +/- 50%, the sensitivity of albedo to sea surface temperature in the present climate may serve as a useful diagnostic tool in monitoring the performance of global climate models.

  16. South American Monsoon and the Land Surface Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Y.; de Sales, F. H.; Li, W.; Mechoso, C. R.; Nobre, C. A.; Juang, H. H.

    2002-12-01

    In this numerical modeling study, the NCEP GCM is applied to investigate the interactions between land surface processes and climate, particularly the effects of land processes on the South American monsoon system (SAMS). A model version with spectral triangular 42 truncation (T42) is used. The corresponding Gaussian grid for T42 is 128 by 64, which is roughly equivalent to 2.8 degrees in latitude and longitude. Two land surface parameterizations are used. One is the Simplified Simple Biosphere Model (SSiB), which includes explicit vegetation representation. The other parameterization is a surface model with two-soil layers (SOIL) and no explicit vegetation scheme. Two 12-month long simulations were performed with the two parameterizations from initial conditions corresponding to May 1, 1987 and identical distributions of soil moisture and surface albedo. The simulations will be referred to as NCEP GCM/SOIL and NCEP GCM/SSiB. The simulations, therefore, differ in the land surface parameterizations and land cover conditions: one with vegetation and the other with only soil layers (but monthly mean vegetation albedo). This experiment aims to test the role of explicit description of vegetation process in the climate model and hence the role of vegetation in the South American hydrometeorology. SAMS starts developing in Central America and then moves southeast towards the Amazons in South America. Afterwards, largest precipitation moves northward and eventually retreats northwest. NCEP GCM/SOIL and NCEP GCM/SSiB produce substantially different evolution and spatial distributions of SAMS. In the NCEP GCM/SOIL, the development of SAMS is too fast and too strong with no clear indication of the southward movement. Rainfall magnitudes are much stronger than in the observation. The NCEP/SSiB, on the other hand, correctly simulates SAMS evolution. To understand the mechanisms that contributed to the differences in the simulations, the surface energy and water balances are

  17. Carbonization in Titan Tholins: implication for low albedo on surfaces of Centaurs and trans-Neptunian objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giri, Chaitanya; McKay, Christopher P.; Goesmann, Fred; Schäfer, Nadine; Li, Xiang; Steininger, Harald; Brinckerhoff, William B.; Gautier, Thomas; Reitner, Joachim; Meierhenrich, Uwe J.

    2016-07-01

    Astronomical observations of Centaurs and trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs) yield two characteristic features - near-infrared (NIR) reflectance and low geometric albedo. The first feature apparently originates due to complex organic material on their surfaces, but the origin of the material contributing to low albedo is not well understood. Titan tholins synthesized to simulate aerosols in the atmosphere of Saturn's moon Titan have also been used for simulating the NIR reflectances of several Centaurs and TNOs. Here, we report novel detections of large polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, nanoscopic soot aggregates and cauliflower-like graphite within Titan tholins. We put forth a proof of concept stating the surfaces of Centaurs and TNOs may perhaps comprise of highly `carbonized' complex organic material, analogous to the tholins we investigated. Such material would apparently be capable of contributing to the NIR reflectances and to the low geometric albedos simultaneously.

  18. Variations of Martian surface albedo: Evidence for yearly dust deposition and removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, Philip R.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose is to determine the degree, spatial distribution and timing of the deposition and removal of dust storm fallout, and to relate the current patterns of dust deposition and removal to the long-term evolution of the Martian surface. Southern Hemisphere dark areas are found to quickly return to close to their pre-storm albedos, suggesting rapid removal of any dust that was deposited. Northern Hemisphere dark regions are brighter post-storm, but gradually darken to pre-storm levels over the Mars year. In doing so they act as local sources of dust during otherwise clear periods. Dust does not appear to be removed from bright regions, resulting in the 1 to 2 m thick deposits observed today.

  19. Mars Albedo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    These two views of Mars are derived from the MGS Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) measurements of global broadband (0.3 - 3.0 microns) visible and near-infrared reflectance, also known as albedo. The range of colors are in dimensionless units. The values are the ratio of the amount of electromagnetic energy reflected by the surface to the amount of energy incident upon it from the sun (larger values are brighter surfaces).

    The TES instrument was built by Santa Barbara Remote Sensing and is operated by Philip R. Christensen, of Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ.

  20. Surface features on Mars: Ground-based albedo and radar compared with Mariner 9 topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, H.

    1973-01-01

    Earth-based albedo maps of Mars were compared with Mariner 9 television data and ground-based radar profiles to investigate the nature of the bright and dark albedo features. Little correlation was found except at the boundaries of classical albedo features, where some topographic control is indicated. Wind-blown dust models for seasonal and secular albedo variations are supported, but it is not clear whether the fines are derived from bright or dark parent rock. Mars, like the Earth and Moon, has probably generated two distinct types of crustal material.

  1. A transitioning Arctic surface energy budget: the impacts of solar zenith angle, surface albedo and cloud radiative forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedlar, Joseph; Tjernström, Michael; Mauritsen, Thorsten; Shupe, Matthew D.; Brooks, Ian M.; Persson, P. Ola G.; Birch, Cathryn E.; Leck, Caroline; Sirevaag, Anders; Nicolaus, Marcel

    2011-10-01

    Snow surface and sea-ice energy budgets were measured near 87.5°N during the Arctic Summer Cloud Ocean Study (ASCOS), from August to early September 2008. Surface temperature indicated four distinct temperature regimes, characterized by varying cloud, thermodynamic and solar properties. An initial warm, melt-season regime was interrupted by a 3-day cold regime where temperatures dropped from near zero to -7°C. Subsequently mean energy budget residuals remained small and near zero for 1 week until once again temperatures dropped rapidly and the energy budget residuals became negative. Energy budget transitions were dominated by the net radiative fluxes, largely controlled by the cloudiness. Variable heat, moisture and cloud distributions were associated with changing air-masses. Surface cloud radiative forcing, the net radiative effect of clouds on the surface relative to clear skies, is estimated. Shortwave cloud forcing ranged between -50 W m-2 and zero and varied significantly with surface albedo, solar zenith angle and cloud liquid water. Longwave cloud forcing was larger and generally ranged between 65 and 85 W m-2, except when the cloud fraction was tenuous or contained little liquid water; thus the net effect of the clouds was to warm the surface. Both cold periods occurred under tenuous, or altogether absent, low-level clouds containing little liquid water, effectively reducing the cloud greenhouse effect. Freeze-up progression was enhanced by a combination of increasing solar zenith angles and surface albedo, while inhibited by a large, positive surface cloud forcing until a new air-mass with considerably less cloudiness advected over the experiment area.

  2. improved vegetation phenology in the JULES land-surface model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Los, S. O.

    2013-12-01

    Sietse Los, Steven Hancock, Peter North, Jose Gomez-Dans Introduction: Land-surface properties such as albedo, soil moisture and vegetation biophysical parameters affect water, energy and carbon fluxes from the land to the atmosphere an this can alter weather patterns. Here we use globally consistent satellite observations to improve modelling of the vegetation seasonal cycle in the JULES land-surface model (LSM) to better represent these fluxes. JULES model: The JULES LSM is the land surface component of the suite of UK MetOffice general circulation models. JULES is used both in operational weather forecasting and for simulations of future climate. Within JULES, seasonal changes in surface albedo are controlled by snow (not covered here) and vegetation dynamics (phenology). Vegetation phenology is controlled by temperature and water availability, with timings and rates set by a number of trigger thresholds and leaf growth/death rates. Satellite data: The ability of JULES to represent vegetation, in terms of its seasonal cycle as well as the interannual variation, was tested on normalised difference vegetation index (NDVI = (near-infrared - red) / (near-infrared + red)) data. JULES uses a 1D radiative transfer model to predict hemispheric surface albedo for a given leaf area whilst satellites measure reflectance from a single view direction and this may not match the hemispheric albedo. To test this, JULES predictions were compared to the FLIGHT (a 3D radiative transfer model) simulations for different view directions. This revealed that either NDVI profiles need to be normalised to allow a direct comparison (as done here) or else the JULES 1D model must be replaced by a full 3D radiative transfer model, which is computationally expensive. Experiments: The original phenology module in JULES was optimised against NDVI observations using a Monte-Carlo Markov chain method. This optimisation was unsuccessful; and we therefore concluded that the JULES phenology cannot

  3. Earth's Reflection: Albedo

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillette, Brandon; Hamilton, Cheri

    2011-01-01

    When viewing objects of different colors, you might notice that some appear brighter than others. This is because light is reflected differently from various surfaces, depending on their physical properties. The word "albedo" is used to describe how reflective a surface is. The Earth-atmosphere has a combined albedo of about 30%, a number that is…

  4. Dynamic Land Surface Classifcations using Microwave Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, H.; Tian, Y.; Peters-Lidard, C. D.; Harrison, K. W.

    2014-12-01

    Land surface emissivity in microwave frequencies is critical to the remote sensing of soil moisture, precipitation, and vegetation. Different land surfaces have different spectral signatures in the microwave portions of the electromagnetic spectrum. Their spatial and temporal behaviors are also highly variable. These properties are yet not well understood in microwave frequencies, despite their capability in detecting water-related variables in the atmosphere and land surface. A classification scheme was developed to stratify the Earth's land surfaces based on their seasonally dynamic microwave signatures. An unsupervised clustering approach was used identify and distinguish data groupings along two microwave based indicies. Land surface data clusters were mapped to determine their spatial relationships to known land cover groupings. Differences in land surface clusters were analyzed in their spatial consistency and their direction and magnitude of land surface change. It was found that vegetation and topography were the predominant contributors to change between seasons. Land surface extremes of sandy desert and closed canopy tropical forest displayed minimal intra-annual variability while transitional zones, such as the Sahel and North American temperate forests, exhibited the most variability. Distinct microwave signatures varied between seasons along a latittudinal gradient. Overall variability in land surface types increased at high lattitudes. This classification will help inform research studies maniputlating the microwave frequencies of the electromagnetic spectrum to better characterize land surface dynamics, and will be very useful in the validation of radiative transfer models and quantification of uncertainty in global precipitation monitoring.

  5. Cloud scattering optical depth and local surface albedo in the Antarctic: Simultaneous retrieval using ground-based radiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricchiazzi, Paul; Gautier, Catherine; Lubin, Dan

    1995-10-01

    We have used solar irradiance measurements from a ground-based multichannel radiometer system deployed at Palmer Station, Antarctica (64°46'S, 64°04'W), during spring 1991 to simultaneously estimate cloud scattering optical depth and surface albedo. Irradiance measurements at 410 and 630 nm, in conjunction with a discrete ordinate radiative transfer (RT) model, enable this simultaneous retrieval by exploiting the wavelength dependence in Rayleigh scattering strength. The RT model is used in an inverse mode to find the values of surface albedo and cloud optical depth that match calculated and measured irradiances at both wavelengths. Under the homogeneous stratiform cloud cover for which the technique applies, surface albedo at 630 nm was consistently retrieved at above 0.9. For most homogeneous, overcast conditions, cloud optical depth (at 630 nm) is found to be in the range 20-50, with a most probable value of 25. This measurement and retrieval technique should be useful for compiling high-latitude cloud opacity and surface albedo climatologies of interest for global change and photobiology research.

  6. Remote sensing of solar radiation absorbed and reflected by vegetated land surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myneni, Ranga B.; Asrar, Ghassem; Tanre, Didier; Choudhury, Bhaskar J.

    1992-01-01

    1D and 3D radiative-transfer models have been used to investigate the problem of remotely sensed determination of vegetated land surface-absorbed and reflected solar radiation. Calculations were conducted for various illumination conditions to determine surface albedo, soil- and canopy-absorbed photosynthetically active and nonactive radiation, and normalized difference vegetation index. Simple predictive models are developed on the basis of the relationships among these parameters.

  7. Land-surface processes and monsoon climate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Yongkang; De Sales, Fernando; Lau, William; Boone, Arron; Mechoso, Carlos

    2015-04-01

    Yongkang Xue, F. De Sales, B. Lau, A. Boone, C. R. Mechoso Differential thermal heating of land and ocean and heat release into the atmosphere are important factors that determine the onset, strength, duration and spatial distribution of large-scale monsoons. A global and seasonal assessment of land surface process (LSP) effects on the monsoon system has been made based on general circulation models (GCM) coupled to different benchmark land models, which physically represent either comprehensive, or partial, or minimal LSP representations. Observed precipitation is applied as constrain and differences in simulation error are used to assess the effect of the LSP with different complexity. The AGCM results indicate that the land/atmosphere interaction has substantial impact on global water cycle, while the monsoon regions have had strongest impact at intraseasonal to decadal scales. Among monsoon regions, West Africa, South Asia, East Asia, and Amazon regions have largest impact while some monsoon regions have less impact due to strong air/sea interactions and narrow land mass there. LSP reduces the annual precipitation error by 58% over global monsoon regions, about 35% observed precipitation. The partial LSP effect (excluding soil moisture and vegetation albedo) reduces annual precipitation error over monsoon region that equals to about 13% of observed precipitation. The LSP affects the monsoon evolution through different mechanisms at different scales. It affects the surface energy balance and energy partitioning in latent and sensible heat, the atmospheric heating rate, and general circulation. The LSP effects have also been assessed in the land use land cover change experiment. Based on recently compiled global land-use data from 1948-2005, the GCM simulation results indicate the degradation in Mexico, West Africa, south and East Asia and South America produce substantial precipitation anomalies, some of which are consistent with observed regional precipitation

  8. The Land Surface Temperature Impact to Land Cover Types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, I.; Abu Samah, A.; Fauzi, R.; Noor, N. M.

    2016-06-01

    Land cover type is an important signature that is usually used to understand the interaction between the ground surfaces with the local temperature. Various land cover types such as high density built up areas, vegetation, bare land and water bodies are areas where heat signature are measured using remote sensing image. The aim of this study is to analyse the impact of land surface temperature on land cover types. The objectives are 1) to analyse the mean temperature for each land cover types and 2) to analyse the relationship of temperature variation within land cover types: built up area, green area, forest, water bodies and bare land. The method used in this research was supervised classification for land cover map and mono window algorithm for land surface temperature (LST) extraction. The statistical analysis of post hoc Tukey test was used on an image captured on five available images. A pixel-based change detection was applied to the temperature and land cover images. The result of post hoc Tukey test for the images showed that these land cover types: built up-green, built up-forest, built up-water bodies have caused significant difference in the temperature variation. However, built up-bare land did not show significant impact at p<0.05. These findings show that green areas appears to have a lower temperature difference, which is between 2° to 3° Celsius compared to urban areas. The findings also show that the average temperature and the built up percentage has a moderate correlation with R2 = 0.53. The environmental implications of these interactions can provide some insights for future land use planning in the region.

  9. Estimation of Arctic Land Surface Conditions and Fluxes via a Suite of Land Surface Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohn, T. J.; Slater, A. G.; Lettenmaier, D. P.; Serreze, M. C.

    2004-12-01

    River runoff from the Arctic terrestrial drainage system is thought to exert a significant influence over global climate, contributing to the global thermohaline circulation via its effects on salinity, sea ice, and surface freshening in the North Atlantic. Changes in these freshwater fluxes, as well as other components of the Arctic terrestrial hydrologic cycle such as snow cover and albedo, have the potential to amplify the Arctic's response to global climate change. However, the extent to which the Arctic terrestrial hydrological cycle is changing or may contribute to change through feedback processes is still not well understood, in part due to the sparseness of observations of such variables as stream flow, soil moisture, soil temperature, snow water equivalent, and energy fluxes. The objective of this project is to assemble the best possible time series (covering a 20+ year period) of these and other prognostic variables for the Arctic terrestrial drainage basin. While these variables can be estimated with a single land surface model (LSM), the predictions are often subject to biases and errors in the input atmospheric forcings and limited by the accuracy of the model physics. To reduce these errors, we have implemented an ensemble of five LSMs: VIC, CLM, ECMWF, NOAH and CHASM, all of which have been used previously to simulate Arctic hydrology under the Project for Intercomparison of Land-surface Parameterization Schemes (PILPS) Experiment 2e. Model predictions of land surface state variables (snow water content, soil moisture, permafrost active layer depth) and fluxes (latent, sensible, and ground heat fluxes; runoff) are averaged both across the ensemble and over multiple runs, using the best available atmospheric forcing data with and without added random perturbations. Here we evaluate the multi-model ensemble averages in comparison with individual model simulations of variables including snow water equivalent, evaporation, total runoff, and soil thaw

  10. On the importance of interpolation schemes for albedo data from local to global grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preuschmann, Swantje; Jacob, Daniela; Löw, Alexander

    2013-04-01

    Surface albedo has a key role in Earth's radiation balance. As vegetation cover is influencing the albedo of solid surfaces, it is clear that land cover changes are leading to changes in the radiation balance and further are influencing the whole Earth's energy budget. It is obvious, that a forested area reflects sunlight differently compared to a sparsely vegetated area of shrubs. Different studies have shown, that certain land cover types (even compounds) have a characteristic annual cycle of the albedo (Moody et al. 2005 and Preuschmann, 2012). An annual cycle for one land cover type might vary in a year about 2%. The difference of the surface albedo of a forested area in summer to an agricultural area at the same time is only about 0.5%. A major question in climate modelling under future conditions is to analyse the impact of land cover changes onto climate. Nevertheless for different reasons it is not easy to describe surface albedo changes due to land cover changes within a climate model. One reason is that differences in the albedo of different surfaces are comparatively small. Another reason is based in the spatial resolution of a climate model. Climate models are operating on grids with horizontal resolutions of 10x10 km² for regional models up to about 200x200 km² for global models with a spectral resolution of T63. This means, that spatial (and also temporal) mean values of surface albedo are taken into account. Therefore one grid box of a climate model is representing a composition of different surface albedos. For model validation, it is of interest to compare the modelled albedo data with observed albedo data, but a comparison is not as trivial as it looks in the first sight. One problematic is the necessity of comparing different data types in the same horizontal and temporal resolution. Commonly used satellite based albedo data are available in 0.05° horizontal resolution, which is about 5 km at the equator, for several-day means and monthly

  11. An evaluation of the schemes of ocean surface albedo parameterization in shortwave radiation estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Hailin; Zhang, Xiaotong; Liu, Qiang; Feng, Youbin; Li, Xiuhong; Zhang, Jialin; Cai, Erli

    2015-12-01

    The ocean surface albedo (OSA) is a deciding factor on ocean net surface shortwave radiation (ONSSR) estimation. Several OSA schemes have been proposed successively, but there is not a conclusion for the best OSA scheme of estimating the ONSSR. On the base of analyzing currently existing OSA parameterization, including Briegleb et al.(B), Taylor et al.(T), Hansen et al.(H), Jin et al.(J), Preisendorfer and Mobley(PM86), Feng's scheme(F), this study discusses the difference of OSA's impact on ONSSR estimation in condition of actual downward shortwave radiation(DSR). Then we discussed the necessity and applicability for the climate models to integrate the more complicated OSA scheme. It is concluded that the SZA and the wind speed are the two most significant effect factor to broadband OSA, thus the different OSA parameterizations varies violently in the regions of both high latitudes and strong winds. The OSA schemes can lead the ONSSR results difference of the order of 20 w m-2. The Taylor's scheme shows the best estimate, and Feng's result just following Taylor's. However, the accuracy of the estimated instantaneous OSA changes at different local time. Jin's scheme has the best performance generally at noon and in the afternoon, and PM86's is the best of all in the morning, which indicate that the more complicated OSA schemes reflect the temporal variation of OWA better than the simple ones.

  12. Titan's 2 micron Surface Albedo and Haze Optical Depth in 1996-2004

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbard, S; de Pater, I; Macintosh, B; Roe, H; Max, C; Young, E; McKay, C

    2004-05-04

    We observed Titan in 1996-2004 with high-resolution 2 {micro}m speckle and adaptive optics imaging at the W.M. Keck Observatory. By observing in a 2 {micro}m broadband filter we obtain images that have contributions from both Titan's surface and atmosphere. We have modeled Titan's atmosphere using a plane-parallel radiative transfer code that has been corrected to agree with 3-D Monte Carlo predictions. We find that Titan's surface albedo ranges from {le} 0:02 in the darkest equatorial region of the trailing hemisphere to {approx_equal} 0:1 in the brightest areas of the leading hemisphere. Over the past quarter of a Saturnian year haze optical depth in Titan's Southern hemisphere has decreased substantially from a value of 0.48 in 1996 down to 0.18 in 2004, while the northern haze has been increasing over the past few years. As a result of these changes, in 2004 the North/South haze asymmetry at K' band has disappeared.

  13. Land-surface processes and monsoon climate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Differential thermal heating of land and ocean and heat release into the atmosphere are important factors that determine the onset, strength, duration and spatial distribution of large-scale monsoons. A global and seasonal assessment of land surface process (LSP) effects on the monsoon system has been made based on general circulation models (GCM) coupled to different benchmark land models, which physically represent either comprehensive, or partial, or minimal LSP representations. Observed precipitation is applied as constrain and differences in simulation error are used to assess the effect of the LSP with different complexity. The AGCM results indicate that the land/atmosphere interaction has substantial impact on global water cycle, while the monsoon regions have had strongest impact at intraseasonal to decadal scales. Among monsoon regions, West Africa, South Asia, East Asia, and Amazon regions have largest impact while some monsoon regions have less impact due to strong air/sea interactions and narrow land mass. LSP reduces the annual precipitation error by 58% over global monsoon regions, about 35% observed precipitation. The partial LSP effect (excluding soil moisture and vegetation albedo) reduces annual precipitation error over monsoon region that equals to about 13% of observed precipitation. It has also been suggested that LSP contribute to the abrupt jump in latitude of the East Asian monsoon as well as general circulation turning in some monsoon regions in its early stages. The LSP effects have also been assessed in the land use land cover change experiment. Based on recently compiled global land-use data from 1948-2005, the GCM simulation results indicate the degradation in Mexico, West Africa, south and East Asia and South America produce substantial precipitation anomalies, some of which are consistent with observed regional precipitation anomalies. More comprehensive studies with multi-models are imperatively necessary.

  14. USGS releases comprehensive land surface data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendel, JoAnna

    2014-04-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has released the latest edition of its National Land Cover Database (NLCD 2011), the nation's most comprehensive look at land surface conditions. The database divides the lower 48 states into 9 billion geographic cells, providing consistent information about land conditions on regional and nationwide scales.

  15. Aircraft Based Remotely Sensed Albedo and Surface Temperatures for Three US Cities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luvall, Jeffrey C.; Rickman, Doug; Quattrochi, Dale; Estes, Maury

    2005-01-01

    High spatial resolution thermal infrared and visible data obtained from aircraft were used to measure, map, and model the surface energy budget characteristics of surfaces typical of the urban landscape for three US cities. Aircraft data collected from the Advanced Thermal and Land Applications Sensor (ATLAS) scanner allowed a detail analysis of the city, determining its surface thermal and visible reflectance properties. These data are critical in providing data that can be used to evaluate the overall "fabric" of the cities in relation to the urban heat island and air quality modeling.

  16. Effects of multiple scattering and surface albedo on the photochemistry of the troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Augustsson, T. R.; Tiwari, S. N.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of treatment of incoming solar radiation on the photochemistry of the troposphere is discussed. A one dimensional photochemical model of the troposphere containing the species of the nitrogen, oxygen, carbon, hydrogen, and sulfur families was developed. The vertical flux is simulated by use of the parameterized eddy diffusion coefficients. The photochemical model is coupled to a radiative transfer model that calculates the radiation field due to the incoming solar radiation which initiates much of the photochemistry of the troposphere. Vertical profiles of tropospheric species were compared with the Leighton approximation, radiative transfer, matrix inversion model. The radiative transfer code includes the effects of multiple scattering due to molecules and aerosols, pure absorption, and surface albedo on the transfer of incoming solar radiation. It is indicated that significant differences exist for several key photolysis frequencies and species number density profiles between the Leighton approximation and the profiles generated with, radiative transfer, matrix inversion technique. Most species show enhanced vertical profiles when the more realistic treatment of the incoming solar radiation field is included

  17. Retrieval of Areal-averaged Spectral Surface Albedo from Transmission Data Alone: Computationally Simple and Fast Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Barnard, James C.; Flynn, Connor J.; Riihimaki, Laura D.; Michalsky, Joseph; Hodges, G. B.

    2014-10-25

    We introduce and evaluate a simple retrieval of areal-averaged surface albedo using ground-based measurements of atmospheric transmission alone at five wavelengths (415, 500, 615, 673 and 870nm), under fully overcast conditions. Our retrieval is based on a one-line semi-analytical equation and widely accepted assumptions regarding the weak spectral dependence of cloud optical properties, such as cloud optical depth and asymmetry parameter, in the visible and near-infrared spectral range. To illustrate the performance of our retrieval, we use as input measurements of spectral atmospheric transmission from Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR). These MFRSR data are collected at two well-established continental sites in the United States supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The areal-averaged albedos obtained from the MFRSR are compared with collocated and coincident Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) white-sky albedo. In particular, these comparisons are made at four MFRSR wavelengths (500, 615, 673 and 870nm) and for four seasons (winter, spring, summer and fall) at the ARM site using multi-year (2008-2013) MFRSR and MODIS data. Good agreement, on average, for these wavelengths results in small values (≤0.01) of the corresponding root mean square errors (RMSEs) for these two sites. The obtained RMSEs are comparable with those obtained previously for the shortwave albedos (MODIS-derived versus tower-measured) for these sites during growing seasons. We also demonstrate good agreement between tower-based daily-averaged surface albedos measured for “nearby” overcast and non-overcast days. Thus, our retrieval originally developed for overcast conditions likely can be extended for non-overcast days by interpolating between overcast retrievals.

  18. Retrieval of areal-averaged spectral surface albedo from transmission data alone: computationally simple and fast approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassianov, Evgueni; Barnard, James; Flynn, Connor; Riihimaki, Laura; Michalsky, Joseph J.; Hodges, Gary

    2014-10-01

    We introduce and evaluate a simple retrieval of areal-averaged surface albedo using ground-based measurements of atmospheric transmission alone at five wavelengths (415, 500, 615, 673 and 870nm), under fully overcast conditions. Our retrieval is based on a one-line semi-analytical equation and widely accepted assumptions regarding the weak spectral dependence of cloud optical properties, such as cloud optical depth and asymmetry parameter, in the visible and near-infrared spectral range. To illustrate the performance of our retrieval, we use as input measurements of spectral atmospheric transmission from the Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR). These MFRSR data are collected at two well-established continental sites in the United States supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The areal-averaged albedos obtained from the MFRSR are compared with collocated and coincident Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) white-sky albedo. In particular, these comparisons are made at four MFRSR wavelengths (500, 615, 673 and 870nm) and for four seasons (winter, spring, summer and fall) at the ARM site using multi-year (2008-2013) MFRSR and MODIS data. Good agreement, on average, for these wavelengths results in small values (≤0.015) of the corresponding root mean square errors (RMSEs) for these two sites. The obtained RMSEs are comparable with those obtained previously for the shortwave albedos (MODIS-derived versus tower-measured) for these sites during growing seasons. We also demonstrate good agreement between tower-based daily-averaged surface albedos measured for "nearby" overcast and non-overcast days. Thus, our retrieval originally developed for overcast conditions likely can be extended for non-overcast days by interpolating between overcast retrievals.

  19. Quantifying surface albedo and other direct biogeophysical climate forcings of forestry activities.

    PubMed

    Bright, Ryan M; Zhao, Kaiguang; Jackson, Robert B; Cherubini, Francesco

    2015-09-01

    By altering fluxes of heat, momentum, and moisture exchanges between the land surface and atmosphere, forestry and other land-use activities affect climate. Although long recognized scientifically as being important, these so-called biogeophysical forcings are rarely included in climate policies for forestry and other land management projects due to the many challenges associated with their quantification. Here, we review the scientific literature in the fields of atmospheric science and terrestrial ecology in light of three main objectives: (i) to elucidate the challenges associated with quantifying biogeophysical climate forcings connected to land use and land management, with a focus on the forestry sector; (ii) to identify and describe scientific approaches and/or metrics facilitating the quantification and interpretation of direct biogeophysical climate forcings; and (iii) to identify and recommend research priorities that can help overcome the challenges of their attribution to specific land-use activities, bridging the knowledge gap between the climate modeling, forest ecology, and resource management communities. We find that ignoring surface biogeophysics may mislead climate mitigation policies, yet existing metrics are unlikely to be sufficient. Successful metrics ought to (i) include both radiative and nonradiative climate forcings; (ii) reconcile disparities between biogeophysical and biogeochemical forcings, and (iii) acknowledge trade-offs between global and local climate benefits. We call for more coordinated research among terrestrial ecologists, resource managers, and coupled climate modelers to harmonize datasets, refine analytical techniques, and corroborate and validate metrics that are more amenable to analyses at the scale of an individual site or region. PMID:25914206

  20. Use of AVHRR-derived spectral reflectances to estimate surface albedo across the Southern Great Plains Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, J.; Gao, W.

    1997-03-01

    Substantial variations in surface albedo across a large area cause difficulty in estimating regional net solar radiation and atmospheric absorption of shortwave radiation when only ground point measurements of surface albedo are used to represent the whole area. Information on spatial variations and site-wide averages of surface albedo, which vary with the underlying surface type and conditions and the solar zenith angle, is important for studies of clouds and atmospheric radiation over a large surface area. In this study, a bidirectional reflectance model was used to inversely retrieve surface properties such as leaf area index and then the bidirectional reflectance distribution was calculated by using the same radiation model. The albedo was calculated by converting the narrowband reflectance to broadband reflectance and then integrating over the upper hemisphere.

  1. Photophysiology and albedo-changing potential of the ice algal community on the surface of the Greenland ice sheet.

    PubMed

    Yallop, Marian L; Anesio, Alexandre M; Perkins, Rupert G; Cook, Joseph; Telling, Jon; Fagan, Daniel; MacFarlane, James; Stibal, Marek; Barker, Gary; Bellas, Chris; Hodson, Andy; Tranter, Martyn; Wadham, Jemma; Roberts, Nicholas W

    2012-12-01

    Darkening of parts of the Greenland ice sheet surface during the summer months leads to reduced albedo and increased melting. Here we show that heavily pigmented, actively photosynthesising microalgae and cyanobacteria are present on the bare ice. We demonstrate the widespread abundance of green algae in the Zygnematophyceae on the ice sheet surface in Southwest Greenland. Photophysiological measurements (variable chlorophyll fluorescence) indicate that the ice algae likely use screening mechanisms to downregulate photosynthesis when exposed to high intensities of visible and ultraviolet radiation, rather than non-photochemical quenching or cell movement. Using imaging microspectrophotometry, we demonstrate that intact cells and filaments absorb light with characteristic spectral profiles across ultraviolet and visible wavelengths, whereas inorganic dust particles typical for these areas display little absorption. Our results indicate that the phototrophic community growing directly on the bare ice, through their photophysiology, most likely have an important role in changing albedo, and subsequently may impact melt rates on the ice sheet. PMID:23018772

  2. A GCM simulation study of the influence of Saharan evapotranspiration and surface-albedo anomalies on July circulation and rainfall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sud, Y. C.; Molod, A.

    1988-01-01

    The influence of surface albedo and evapotranspiration anomalies that could result from the hypothetical semiarid vegetation over North Africa on its July circulation and rainfall is examined using the Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheres GCM. It is shown that increased soil moisture and its dependent evapotranspiration produces a cooler and moister PBL over North Africa that is able to support enhanced moist convection and rainfall in Sahel and southern Sahara. It is found that lower surface albedo yields even higher moist static energy in the PBL and enhances the local moist convection and rainfall. Modifying the rain-evaporation parameterization in the model produces changes in the hydrological cycle and rainfall anomalies in distant regions. The effects of different falling rain parameterizations are discussed.

  3. Photophysiology and albedo-changing potential of the ice algal community on the surface of the Greenland ice sheet

    PubMed Central

    Yallop, Marian L; Anesio, Alexandre M; Perkins, Rupert G; Cook, Joseph; Telling, Jon; Fagan, Daniel; MacFarlane, James; Stibal, Marek; Barker, Gary; Bellas, Chris; Hodson, Andy; Tranter, Martyn; Wadham, Jemma; Roberts, Nicholas W

    2012-01-01

    Darkening of parts of the Greenland ice sheet surface during the summer months leads to reduced albedo and increased melting. Here we show that heavily pigmented, actively photosynthesising microalgae and cyanobacteria are present on the bare ice. We demonstrate the widespread abundance of green algae in the Zygnematophyceae on the ice sheet surface in Southwest Greenland. Photophysiological measurements (variable chlorophyll fluorescence) indicate that the ice algae likely use screening mechanisms to downregulate photosynthesis when exposed to high intensities of visible and ultraviolet radiation, rather than non-photochemical quenching or cell movement. Using imaging microspectrophotometry, we demonstrate that intact cells and filaments absorb light with characteristic spectral profiles across ultraviolet and visible wavelengths, whereas inorganic dust particles typical for these areas display little absorption. Our results indicate that the phototrophic community growing directly on the bare ice, through their photophysiology, most likely have an important role in changing albedo, and subsequently may impact melt rates on the ice sheet. PMID:23018772

  4. Classification of surface units in the equatorial region of Mars based on Viking Orbiter color, albedo, and thermal data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arvidson, R. E.; Guinness, E. A.; Zent, A. P.

    1982-01-01

    Clusters corresponding to mappable surface units are sought in Viking Orbiter color, albedo, and thermal inertia data for the equatorial region of Mars. A principal components analysis indicated that 84% of the variance within the data for this region can be carried along two vector directions which typify the dominant trend of Martian surface materials. These dominant trends were deemphasized by stretching the data from a five-dimensional elliptical swarm into a hypersphere, through the use of principal component techniques. The decorrelated data were then plotted in a triangle diagram with red/violet, albedo and thermal inertia apices to facilitate inherent cluster discrimination. As many as eight clusters can be identified, with important mixing between them. The three major clusters consist of red and grey material extremes, along with intermediate value materials.

  5. Land surface hydrology in the cloud land surface interaction campaign (CLASIC)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A fundamental objective of the Cloud Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC) was to contribute to our understanding of the interactions between the atmosphere and the land surface. It has been observed that land surface characteristics influence the timing and evolution of cumulus convection. The...

  6. Modeling Asteroid Surface Properties Using Radar Albedos and Circular-Polarization Ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virkki, Anne; Muinonen, K.; Penttilä, A.

    2012-10-01

    A basic strategy for observing using radar is to transmit a fully circularly polarized wave in a specific polarization state and to measure the distribution of echo power in the same (SC) and opposite states of circular polarization (OC). The ratio of SC to OC (μ) is an important physical observable when using the radar technique, as it is considered to provide the best indications for wavelength-scale geometric complexity of the surface (positive correlation with the complexity; S. J. Ostro, Rev. Mod. Phys. 65, 1993). The observed values are taxonomic-class dependent to some extent, varying from μ = 0.10 (G class) to μ = 0.83 (E class). The maximum value observed for an asteroid using radar is μ = 1.48 ± 0.4 for 2003 TH2. Circular polarization is studied for aggregates of spheres at backscattering. Exact electromagnetic scattering computations using the superposition T-matrix method are carried out to study how different parameters affect the value of μ, e.g., the size distribution, the size parameters, and the refractive indices. Both scattering and absorption of the electromagnetic waves are treated using various monodisperse and polydisperse sphere aggregates. The simulations show striking interference structure at backscattering for μ as a function of the size parameter and the refractive index of the spherical particles. The structure comprises two sets of bands of maxima: the primary band, following the extinction efficiency of a sphere with the same size parameter as the monomers of the aggregate; and the secondary bands, a result of bi-sphere resonances between the monomers. Our goal is to relate the computed circular-polarization ratios and radar albedos for aggregates of spheres to the observational data of asteroid regoliths measured using radar.

  7. Conceptual Problems in Land Surface Data Assimilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichle, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    A land data assimilation system (LDAS) merges observations (or satellite retrievals) of land surface hydrological conditions, including soil moisture, snow, and terrestrial water storage (TWS), into a numerical model of land surface processes. In theory, the output from such a system is superior to estimates based on the observations or the model alone, thereby enhancing our ability to understand, monitor, and predict key elements of the terrestrial water cycle. In practice, however, several conceptual problems can interfere with realizing the potential improvements from data assimilation. Of particular concern is the frequent mismatch between the assimilated observations and the land surface model variables of interest. The seminar will discuss recent research with the ensemble-based NASA GEOS-S LDAS to address various aspects of this mismatch. These aspects include (i) the assimilation of coarse-scale observations into higher-resolution land surface models, (ii) the partitioning of satellite observations (such as TWS retrievals) into their constituent water cycle components, (iii) the forward modeling of microwave brightness temperatures over land for radiance-based land surface data aSSimilation, and (iv) the selection of the most relevant types of observations for the analysis of a specific water cycle variable (such as root zone soil moisture). At its core, the solution to the above challenges involves the careful construction of an observation operator that maps from the land surface model variables of interest to the space of the assimilated observations.

  8. Improving modeled snow albedo estimates during the spring melt season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, M. Jahanzeb; Velde, Rogier; Vekerdy, Zoltan; Su, Zhongbo

    2014-06-01

    Snow albedo influences snow-covered land energy and water budgets and is thus an important variable for energy and water fluxes calculations. Here, we quantify the performance of the three existing snow albedo parameterizations under alpine, tundra, and prairie snow conditions when implemented in the Noah land surface model (LSM)—Noah's default and ones from the Biosphere-Atmosphere Transfer Scheme (BATS) and the Canadian Land Surface Scheme (CLASS) LSMs. The Noah LSM is forced with and its output is evaluated using in situ measurements from seven sites in U.S. and France. Comparison of the snow albedo simulations with the in situ measurements reveals that the three parameterizations overestimate snow albedo during springtime. An alternative snow albedo parameterization is introduced that adopts the shape of the variogram for the optically thick snowpacks and decreases the albedo further for optically thin conditions by mixing the snow with the land surface (background) albedo as a function of snow depth. In comparison with the in situ measurements, the new parameterization improves albedo simulation of the alpine and tundra snowpacks and positively impacts the simulation of snow depth, snowmelt rate, and upward shortwave radiation. An improved model performance with the variogram-shaped parameterization can, however, not be unambiguously detected for prairie snowpacks, which may be attributed to uncertainties associated with the simulation of snow density. An assessment of the model performance for the Upper Colorado River Basin highlights that with the variogram-shaped parameterization Noah simulates more evapotranspiration and larger runoff peaks in Spring, whereas the Summer runoff is lower.

  9. A comparison to schemes of ocean surface albedo parameterization and their impact on shortwave radiatation estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, H.; Liu, Q.; Zhang, X.; Feng, Y.; Li, X.; Zhang, J.; Cai, E.

    2015-12-01

    The ocean covers 71% of the Earth's surface and plays a pivotal role in the earth radiation energy balance. The ocean surface albedo(OSA) is a deciding factor on ocean net surface shortwave radiation(ONSSR) estimation. Several OSA schemes have been proposed successively, but there is not a conclusion for the best OSA scheme of estimating the ONSSR. This study, on the base of analyzing currently existing OSA parameterization, including Briegleb et al.(B), Taylor et al.(T), Hansen et al.(H), Jin et al.(J), Preisendorfer and Mobley(PM86), Feng's scheme(F), discusses the difference of OSA's impact on ONSSR estimation in condition of actual downward shortwave radiation(DSR). Then we evaluate the necessity and applicability for the climate models to integrate the more complicated OSA scheme. We got some conclusions: The SZA and the wind speed are the two most significant effect factor to broadband OSA, thus the different OSA parameterizations varies violently in the regions of both high latitudes and strong winds. In the summer, the Northern Hemisphere(NH) is high ONSSR, but small deviations compared with Northern Hemisphere(SH),and contrary in the winter. The OSA schemes can lead the ONSSR results difference of the order of 20 w m-2 by the analysis of the ONSSR reanalysis dataset, the Modern Era Retrospective-analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA).The simple scheme of Taylor and the more complicate schemes of Jin and Feng is very similar, and the scheme B and H is close to each other, the PM86 is more close to MERRA. We use the COVE ocean platform observation data to validate the several scheme result, and the RMSE is 10.96 w m-2, 5.24 w m-2, 12.88 w m-2, 6.52 w m-2, 6.33 w m-2, 6.30 w m-2 for B,T,H,J,PM86,F, respectively. The Taylor's scheme shows the best estimate, and Feng's result just following Taylor's. However, the accuracy of the estimated instantaneous OSA changes at different local time. Jin's scheme has the best performance generally at noon and in

  10. Albedo as a modulator of climate response to tropical deforestation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dirmeyer, Paul A.; Shukla, J.

    1994-01-01

    An atmospheric general circulation model with land surface properties represented by the simplified Simple Biosphere model is used to investigate the effects on local climate due to tropical deforestation for the Amazon basin. One control and three anomaly integrations of 4 years' duration are performed. In the anomaly integrations, rain forest in South America is replaced by degraded grassland. The anomaly integrations differ only in the optical properties of the grassland vegetation, with net surface albedos ranging from the same as to 0.09 lighter than that of rain forest. It is found that the change in climate, particularly rainfall, is strongly dependent on the change in surface albedo that accompanies deforestation. Replacement of forest by grass causes a reduction in transpiration and reduces frictional convergence by decreasing surface roughness. However, precipitation averaged over the deforested area is not necessarily reduced. Average precipitation decreases when the increase in albedo is greater than 0.03. If surface albedo is not increased appreciably as a result of deforestation, moisture flux convergence driven by the increase in surface temperature can offset the other effects, and average precipitation increases. As albedo is increased, surface temperature does not change, but surface latent and sensible heat flux decreases due to reduced radiational energy absorbed at the surface, resulting in a reduction in convection and precipitation. A change in the distribution of precipitation due to deforestation that appears to be independent of the albedo is observed.

  11. Albedo as a modulator of climate response to tropical deforestation

    SciTech Connect

    Dirmeyer, P.A.; Shukla, J.

    1994-10-01

    An atmospheric general circulation model with land surface properties represented by the simplified Simple Biosphere model is used to investigate the effects on local climate due to tropical deforestation for the Amazon basin. One control and three anomaly integrations of 4 years` duration are performed. In the anomaly integrations, rain forest in South America is replaced by degraded grassland. The anomaly integrations differ only in the optical properties of the grassland vegetation, with net surface albedos ranging from the same as to 0.09 lighter than that of rain forest. It is found that the change in climate, particularly rainfall, is strongly dependent on the change in surface albedo that accompanies deforestation. Replacement of forest by grass causes a reduction in transpiration and reduces frictional convergence by decreasing surface roughness. However, precipitation averaged over the deforested area is not necessarily reduced. Average precipitation decreases when the increase in albedo is greater than 0.03. If surface albedo is not increased appreciably as a result of deforestation, moisture flux convergence driven by the increase in surface temperature can offset the other effects, and average precipitation increases. As albedo is increased, surface temperature does not change, but surface latent and sensible heat flux decreases due to reduced radiational energy absorbed at the surface, resulting in a reduction in convection and precipitation. A change in the distribution of precipitation due to deforestation that appears to be independent of the albedo is observed.

  12. AVHRR Surface Temperature and Narrow-Band Albedo Comparison with Ground Measurements for the Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haefliger, M.; Steffen, K.; Fowler, C.

    1993-01-01

    An ice-surface temperature retrieval algorithm for the Greenland ice sheet was developed using NOAA 11 thermal radiances from channels 4 and 5. Temperature, pressure and humidity profiles, cloud observations and skin temperatures from the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) camp, located at the equilibrium line altitude at 49 deg17 min W, 69 deg 34 min N, were used in the LOWTRAN 7 model. Through a statistical analysis of daily clear sky profiles, the coefficients that correct for the atmospheric effects were determined for the ETH-Camp field season (May to August). Surface temperatures retrieved by this method were then compared against the in situ observations with a maximum difference of 0.6 K. The NOAA 11 narrow-band planetary albedo values for channels 1 and 2 were calculated using pre-launch calibration coefficients. Scattering and absorption by the atmosphere were modelled with LOWTRAN 7. Then, narrow-band albedo values for the AVHRR visible and near infrared channels were compared with in situ high resolution spectral reflectance measurements. In the visible band (580-680 nm), AVHRR-derived narrow-band albedo and the in situ measurements corrected with radiative transfer model LOWTRAN 7 showed a difference of less than 2%. For the near infrared channel (725-1100 nm) the difference between the measured and modelled narrow-band albedo was 14%. These discrepancies could be either the result of inaccurate aerosol scattering modelling (lack of the in situ observation), or the result of sensor drift due to degradation.

  13. Observations of Surfzone Albedo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinnett, G.; Feddersen, F.

    2014-12-01

    The surfzone environment (where waves break) contains several unique and previously unconsidered processes that affect the heat budget. Entering short-wave radiation is a dominant term in both shelf and surfzone heat budgets. In contrast to the shelf, however, depth limited wave breaking in the surfzone generates spray, whitewater and suspended sediments, elevating the surface albedo (ratio of reflected to incident short-wave radiation). Elevated albedo reduces the level of solar short-wave radiation entering the water, potentially resulting in less heating. Additionally, surfzone water quality is often impacted by fecal bacteria contamination. As bacteria mortality is related to short-wave solar radiation, elevated surfzone albedo could reduce pathogen mortality, impacting human health. Albedo in the open ocean has been frequently studied and parameterizations often consider solar zenith angle, wind speed and ocean chlorophyll concentration, producing albedo values typically near 0.06. However, surfzone albedo observations have been extremely sparse, yet show depth limited wave breaking may increase the albedo by nearly a factor of 10 up to 0.5. Here, we present findings from a field study at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography pier to observe the affect of waves on surfzone albedo. Concurrent measurements were taken with a four-way radiometer (to measure both downwelling and upwelling short-wave and long wave radiation) mounted above the surfzone. A co-located GoPro camera was used to relate visual aspects of the surfzone to measured reflectance, and wave height and period were observed with a bottom mounted pressure sensor in 5 m water depth just outside the surfzone. Wind speed and direction were observed on the pier 10 m above the water surface. Here, we will examine the surfzone albedo dependence on surfzone parameters, such as wave height.

  14. Radiative forcing and temperature response to changes in urban albedos and associated CO2 offsets

    SciTech Connect

    Menon, Surabi; Akbari, Hashem; Mahanama, Sarith; Sednev, Igor; Levinson, Ronnen

    2010-02-12

    The two main forcings that can counteract to some extent the positive forcings from greenhouse gases from pre-industrial times to present-day are the aerosol and related aerosol-cloud forcings, and the radiative response to changes in surface albedo. Here, we quantify the change in radiative forcing and land surface temperature that may be obtained by increasing the albedos of roofs and pavements in urban areas in temperate and tropical regions of the globe by 0.1. Using the catchment land surface model (the land model coupled to the GEOS-5 Atmospheric General Circulation Model), we quantify the change in the total outgoing (outgoing shortwave+longwave) radiation and land surface temperature to a 0.1 increase in urban albedos for all global land areas. The global average increase in the total outgoing radiation was 0.5 Wm{sup -2}, and temperature decreased by {approx}0.008 K for an average 0.003 increase in surface albedo. These averages represent all global land areas where data were available from the land surface model used and are for the boreal summer (June-July-August). For the continental U.S. the total outgoing radiation increased by 2.3 Wm{sup -2}, and land surface temperature decreased by {approx}0.03 K for an average 0.01 increase in surface albedo. Based on these forcings, the expected emitted CO{sub 2} offset for a plausible 0.25 and 0.15 increase in albedos of roofs and pavements, respectively, for all global urban areas, was found to be {approx} 57 Gt CO{sub 2}. A more meaningful evaluation of the impacts of urban albedo increases on global climate and the expected CO{sub 2} offsets would require simulations which better characterizes urban surfaces and represents the full annual cycle.

  15. Albedo patterns and gypsum generation in the central Namib Desert - Land, sea and air interactions on an arid West Coast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkinson, M. J.; Helms, D. R.; Whitehead, V. S.

    1992-01-01

    In the central Namib Desert, dune-free surfaces are separated abruptly from a sea of yellow and red sand dunes at the Kuiseb River canyon. The off-white hues of the dune-free area result from anomalously high surficial gypsum enrichment. Satellite imagery indicates that the gypsum surfaces are associated with lower surface maximum temperatures than those of the darker dune surfaces to the south. One of various sources of sulfate for the gypsum bodies is oceanic H2S, supplied to desert land-surfaces by regular fog incursions. Since fog events are widespread along the coast, the question of anomalous gypsum accumulations north of the dune sea arises. Satellite imagery, in conjunction with more detailed handheld photography from the space shuttle, indicates that the penetration of fog inland is significantly greater over the gypsum surfaces than it is over the dunes. It is postulated that the thermal gradient between these surfaces generates a heat low centered over the northern part of dune sea and that this enhances fog and H2S advection on its north side onto the nearby dune-free zone. In such a system, gypsum/caliche surfaces reinforce advection of fog over themselves in a positive feedback mode.

  16. The CEOS constellation for land surface imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, G. Bryan; Berger, Michael; Jeanjean, Hervé; Gallo, Kevin P.

    2007-10-01

    A constellation of satellites that routinely and frequently images the Earth's land surface in consistently calibrated wavelengths from the visible through the microwave and in spatial detail that ranges from submeter to hundreds of meters would offer enormous potential benefits to society. A well-designed and effectively operated land surface imaging satellite constellation could have great positive impact not only on the quality of life for citizens of all nations, but also on mankind's very ability to sustain life as we know it on this planet long into the future. The primary objective of the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) Land Surface Imaging (LSI) Constellation is to define standards (or guidelines) that describe optimal future LSI Constellation capabilities, characteristics, and practices. Standards defined for a LSI Constellation will be based on a thorough understanding of user requirements, and they will address at least three fundamental areas of the systems comprising a Land Surface Imaging Constellation: the space segments, the ground segments, and relevant policies and plans. Studies conducted by the LSI Constellation Study Team also will address current and shorter-term problems and issues facing the land remote sensing community today, such as seeking ways to work more cooperatively in the operation of existing land surface imaging systems and helping to accomplish tangible benefits to society through application of land surface image data acquired by existing systems. 2007 LSI Constellation studies are designed to establish initial international agreements, develop preliminary standards for a mid-resolution land surface imaging constellation, and contribute data to a global forest assessment.

  17. The CEOS constellation for land surface imaging

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bailey, G.B.; Berger, M.; Jeanjean, H.; Gallo, K.P.

    2007-01-01

    A constellation of satellites that routinely and frequently images the Earth's land surface in consistently calibrated wavelengths from the visible through the microwave and in spatial detail that ranges from sub-meter to hundreds of meters would offer enormous potential benefits to society. A well-designed and effectively operated land surface imaging satellite constellation could have great positive impact not only on the quality of life for citizens of all nations, but also on mankind's very ability to sustain life as we know it on this planet long into the future. The primary objective of the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) Land Surface Imaging (LSI) Constellation is to define standards (or guidelines) that describe optimal future LSI Constellation capabilities, characteristics, and practices. Standards defined for a LSI Constellation will be based on a thorough understanding of user requirements, and they will address at least three fundamental areas of the systems comprising a Land Surface Imaging Constellation: the space segments, the ground segments, and relevant policies and plans. Studies conducted by the LSI Constellation Study Team also will address current and shorter-term problems and issues facing the land remote sensing community today, such as seeking ways to work more cooperatively in the operation of existing land surface imaging systems and helping to accomplish tangible benefits to society through application of land surface image data acquired by existing systems. 2007 LSI Constellation studies are designed to establish initial international agreements, develop preliminary standards for a mid-resolution land surface imaging constellation, and contribute data to a global forest assessment.

  18. Black Carbon in Arctic Snow and its Effect on Surface Albedo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doherty, S. J.; Warren, S. G.; Grenfell, T. C.; Hegg, D.; Clarke, A. D.

    2009-12-01

    A survey of the black carbon (BC) content of arctic snow is underway, updating and expanding the 1983/84 survey of Clarke and Noone. Samples of snow are collected in spring when the entire winter snowpack is accessible. The samples are melted and filtered, and the filters are analyzed for absorptive impurities. To date over one thousand snow samples have been collected from across the arctic, including sites in Svalbard, Greenland, Canada, across northern Russia and the North Pole region. The filters are examined with a spectrophotometer (420-750 nm wavelengths). The relative contributions of BC and non-BC species (e.g. soil dust and organics) to the absorption can be estimated from the spectral dependence of transmission. Calibration is achieved with use of a set of standard filters containing measured amounts of commercial soot with a known mass absorption cross-section. These BC concentrations can then be used to determine the affect on snow albedo. Because the effect of natural amounts of BC on snow albedo is small and depends on the vertical variation of snow grain size, it is computed with a radiative transfer model rather than measured. However, some coincident measurements of spectral albedo and BC content are essential to test assumptions made in the modeling. Therefore, experiments are underway with artificial uniform snowpacks containing large amounts of soot, to obtain a large measurable reduction of albedo. Finally, chemical analyses of filters and melt-water, input to a receptor model, are used to determine the sources of the soot from some of these samples. The results of this study to date and next steps will be discussed in this presentation.

  19. Hydrologic Remote Sensing and Land Surface Data Assimilation

    PubMed Central

    Moradkhani, Hamid

    2008-01-01

    Accurate, reliable and skillful forecasting of key environmental variables such as soil moisture and snow are of paramount importance due to their strong influence on many water resources applications including flood control, agricultural production and effective water resources management which collectively control the behavior of the climate system. Soil moisture is a key state variable in land surface–atmosphere interactions affecting surface energy fluxes, runoff and the radiation balance. Snow processes also have a large influence on land-atmosphere energy exchanges due to snow high albedo, low thermal conductivity and considerable spatial and temporal variability resulting in the dramatic change on surface and ground temperature. Measurement of these two variables is possible through variety of methods using ground-based and remote sensing procedures. Remote sensing, however, holds great promise for soil moisture and snow measurements which have considerable spatial and temporal variability. Merging these measurements with hydrologic model outputs in a systematic and effective way results in an improvement of land surface model prediction. Data Assimilation provides a mechanism to combine these two sources of estimation. Much success has been attained in recent years in using data from passive microwave sensors and assimilating them into the models. This paper provides an overview of the remote sensing measurement techniques for soil moisture and snow data and describes the advances in data assimilation techniques through the ensemble filtering, mainly Ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) and Particle filter (PF), for improving the model prediction and reducing the uncertainties involved in prediction process. It is believed that PF provides a complete representation of the probability distribution of state variables of interests (according to sequential Bayes law) and could be a strong alternative to EnKF which is subject to some limitations including the linear

  20. Spatial assessment of land surface temperature and land use/land cover in Langkawi Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu Bakar, Suzana Binti; Pradhan, Biswajeet; Salihu Lay, Usman; Abdullahi, Saleh

    2016-06-01

    This study investigates the relationship between Land Surface Temperature and Land Use/Land Cover in Langkawi Island by using Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), Normalized Difference Build-Up Index (NDBI) and Modified Normalized Difference Water Index (MNDWI) qualitatively by using Landsat 7 ETM+ and Landsat 8 (OLI/TIRS) over the period 2002 and 2015. Pixel-based classifiers Maximum Likelihood (MLC) and Support Vector Machine (SVM), has been performed to prepare the Land Use/ Land Cover map (LU/LC) and the result shows that Support Vector Machine (SVM) achieved maximum accuracy with 90% and 90.46% compared to Maximum Likelihood (MLC) classifier with 86.62% and 86.98% respectively. The result revealed that as the impervious surface (built-up /roads) increases, the surface temperature of the area increased. However, land surface temperature decreased in the vegetated areas. Based from the linear regression between LST and NDVI, NDBI and MNDWI, these indices can be used as an indicator to monitor the impact of Land Use/Land Cover on Land Surface Temperature.

  1. Photometric properties of Titan's surface from Cassini VIMS: Relevance to titan's hemispherical albedo dichotomy and surface stability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, R.M.; Brown, R.H.; Hapke, B.W.; Smythe, W.D.; Kamp, L.; Boryta, M.D.; Leader, F.; Baines, K.H.; Bellucci, G.; Bibring, J.-P.; Buratti, B.J.; Capaccioni, F.; Cerroni, P.; Clark, R.N.; Combes, M.; Coradini, A.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Drossart, P.; Formisano, V.; Jaumann, R.; Langevin, Y.; Matson, D.L.; McCord, T.B.; Mennella, V.; Nicholson, P.D.; Sicardy, B.; Sotin, C.

    2006-01-01

    The Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) instrument on the Cassini Saturn Orbiter returned spectral imaging data as the spacecraft undertook six close encounters with Titan beginning 7 July, 2004. Three of these flybys each produced overlapping coverage of two distinct regions of Titan's surface. Twenty-four points were selected on approximately opposite hemispheres to serve as photometric controls. Six points were selected in each of four reflectance classes. On one hemisphere each control point was observed at three distinct phase angles. From the derived phase coefficients, preliminary normal reflectances were derived for each reflectance class. The normal reflectance of Titan's surface units at 2.0178 ??m ranged from 0.079 to 0.185 for the most absorbing to the most reflective units assuming no contribution from absorbing haze. When a modest haze contribution of ??=0.1 is considered these numbers increase to 0.089-0.215. We find that the lowest three reflectance classes have comparable normal reflectance on either hemisphere. However, for the highest brightness class the normal reflectance is higher on the hemisphere encompassing longitude 14-65?? compared to the same high brightness class for the hemisphere encompassing 122-156?? longitude. We conclude that an albedo dichotomy observed in continental sized units on Titan is due not only to one unit having more areal coverage of reflective material than the other but the material on the brighter unit is intrinsically more reflective than the most reflective material on the other unit. This suggests that surface renewal processes are more widespread on Titan's more reflective units than on its less reflective units. We note that one of our photometric control points has increased in reflectance by 12% relative to the surrounding terrain from July of 2004 to April and May of 2005. Possible causes of this effect include atmospheric processes such as ground fog or orographic clouds; the suggestion of

  2. Greenland Glacier Albedo Variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The program for Arctic Regional Climate Assessment (PARCA) is a NASA-funded project with the prime goal of addressing the mass balance of the Greenland ice sheet. Since the formal initiation of the program in 1995, there has been a significant improvement in the estimates of the mass balance of the ice sheet. Results from this program reveal that the high-elevation regions of the ice sheet are approximately in balance, but the margins are thinning. Laser surveys reveal significant thinning along 70 percent of the ice sheet periphery below 2000 m elevations, and in at least one outlet glacier, Kangerdlugssuaq in southeast Greenland, thinning has been as much as 10 m/yr. This study examines the albedo variability in four outlet glaciers to help separate out the relative contributions of surface melting versus ice dynamics to the recent mass balance changes. Analysis of AVHRR Polar Pathfinder albedo shows that at the Petermann and Jakobshavn glaciers, there has been a negative trend in albedo at the glacier terminus from 1981 to 2000, whereas the Stor+strommen and Kangerdlugssuaq glaciers show slightly positive trends in albedo. These findings are consistent with recent observations of melt extent from passive microwave data which show more melt on the western side of Greenland and slightly less on the eastern side. Significance of albedo trends will depend on where and when the albedo changes occur. Since the majority of surface melt occurs in the shallow sloping western margin of the ice sheet where the shortwave radiation dominates the energy balance in summer (e.g. Jakobshavn region) this region will be more sensitive to changes in albedo than in regions where this is not the case. Near the Jakobshavn glacier, even larger changes in albedo have been observed, with decreases as much as 20 percent per decade.

  3. Meso-scale cooling effects of high albedo surfaces: Analysis of meteorological data from White Sands National Monument and White Sands Missile Range

    SciTech Connect

    Fishman, B.; Taha, H.; Akbari, H.

    1994-05-20

    Urban summer daytime temperatures often exceed those of the surrounding rural areas. Summer ``urban heat islands`` are caused by dark roofs and paved surfaces as well as the lack of vegetation. Researchers at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory are interested in studying the effects of increasing the albedo of roof tops and paved surfaces in order to reduce the impacts of summer urban heat islands. Increasing the albedo of urban surfaces may reduce this heat island effect in two ways, directly and indirectly. The direct effect involves reducing surface temperature and, therefore, heat conduction through the building envelope. This effect of surface albedo on surface temperatures is better understood and has been quantified in several studies. The indirect effect is the impact of high albedo surfaces on the near surface air temperatures. Although the indirect effect has been modeled for the Los Angeles basin by Sailor, direct field observations are required. The objective of this report is to investigate the meso-scale climate of a large high albedo area and identify the effects of albedo on the near surface air temperature. To accomplish this task, data from several surface weather stations at White Sands, New Mexico were analyzed. This report is organized into six sections in addition to this introduction. The first gives the general geological, topographic, and meteorological background of White Sands. The second is a discussion of the basic surface meteorology of the White Sands region. This section is followed by a general discussion of the instrumentation and available data. The fourth section is a description of the method used for data analyis. The fifth section which presents the results of this analysis. Finally, the last section is the summary and conclusion, where a discussion of the results is presented.

  4. Upscaling and downscaling of land surface fluxes with surface temperature

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Land surface temperature (LST) is a key surface boundary condition that is significantly correlated to surface flux partitioning between latent and sensible heat. The spatial and temporal variation in LST is driven by radiation, wind, vegetation cover and roughness as well as soil moisture status ...

  5. Land Surface Hydrology during the Cloud Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC) in 2007

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fundamental to the objectives of Cloud Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC) is the understanding of the interactions between the atmosphere and the land surface. In addition, CLASIC observations and monitoring will be used to validate the multiple remote sensing products retrieved during the s...

  6. Senegalese land surface change analysis and biophysical parameter estimation using NOAA AVHRR spectral data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vukovich, Fred M.; Toll, David L.; Kennard, Ruth L.

    1989-01-01

    Surface biophysical estimates were derived from analysis of NOAA Advanced Very High Spectral Resolution (AVHRR) spectral data of the Senegalese area of west Africa. The parameters derived were of solar albedo, spectral visible and near-infrared band reflectance, spectral vegetative index, and ground temperature. Wet and dry linked AVHRR scenes from 1981 through 1985 in Senegal were analyzed for a semi-wet southerly site near Tambacounda and a predominantly dry northerly site near Podor. Related problems were studied to convert satellite derived radiance to biophysical estimates of the land surface. Problems studied were associated with sensor miscalibration, atmospheric and aerosol spatial variability, surface anisotropy of reflected radiation, narrow satellite band reflectance to broad solar band conversion, and ground emissivity correction. The middle-infrared reflectance was approximated with a visible AVHRR reflectance for improving solar albedo estimates. In addition, the spectral composition of solar irradiance (direct and diffuse radiation) between major spectral regions (i.e., ultraviolet, visible, near-infrared, and middle-infrared) was found to be insensitive to changes in the clear sky atmospheric optical depth in the narrow band to solar band conversion procedure. Solar albedo derived estimates for both sites were not found to change markedly with significant antecedent precipitation events or correspondingly from increases in green leaf vegetation density. The bright soil/substrate contributed to a high albedo for the dry related scenes, whereas the high internal leaf reflectance in green vegetation canopies in the near-infrared contributed to high solar albedo for the wet related scenes. The relationship between solar albedo and ground temperature was poor, indicating the solar albedo has little control of the ground temperature. The normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and the derived visible reflectance were more sensitive to antecedent

  7. The Continuing Evolution of Land Surface Parameterizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koster, Randal; Houser, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Land surface models (LSMs) play a critical role in the simulation of climate, for they determine the character of a large fraction of the atmosphere's lower boundary. The LSM partitions the net radiative energy at the land surface into sensible heat, latent heat, and energy storage, and it partitions incident precipitation water into evaporation, runoff, and water storage. Numerous modeling experiments and the existing (though very scant) observational evidence suggest that variations in these partitionings can feed back on the atmospheric processes that induce them. This land-atmosphere feedback can in turn have a significant impact on the generation of continental precipitation. For this and other reasons (including the role of the land surface in converting various atmospheric quantities, such as precipitation, into quantities of perhaps higher societal relevance, such as runoff), many modeling groups are placing a high emphasis on improving the treatment of land surface processes in their models. LSMs have evolved substantially from the original bucket model of Manabe et al. This evolution, which is still ongoing, has been documented considerably. The present paper also takes a look at the evolution of LSMs. The perspective here, though, is different - the evolution is considered strictly in terms of the 'balance' between the formulations of evaporation and runoff processes. The paper will argue that a proper balance is currently missing, largely due to difficulties in treating subgrid variability in soil moisture and its impact on the generation of runoff.

  8. Observed impacts of wind farms on land surface temperature in Inner Mongolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, B.; Zhao, X.; Wu, D.; Zhao, W.; Wei, H.

    2015-12-01

    Abstract: The wind turbine industry in china has experienced a dramatic increase in recent years and wind farms (WFs) have an impact on the underlying surface conditions of climate system. This paper assesses the impacts of wind farms by analyzing the variations of the land surface temperature (LST) data for the period of 2003-2014 over a region consisted of 1097 turbines in the Huitengxile Wind Farm, the largest wind farm in Asia. We first compare the spatial coupling between the geographic layouts of the WFs and the spatial patterns of LST changes of two periods (post- versus pre- wind turbines construction) and then employ the difference of LST between WF pixels and surrounding non-WF pixels to quantify the effects of WFs. The results reveal that the LST at daytime increases by 0.52-0.86°C in winter, spring and autumn and decreases by about 0.56°C in summer over the WFs on average, with the spatial pattern of this warming or cooling generally coupled with the geographic distribution of the wind turbines, while the changes in LST at nighttime are much noisier. The daytime LST warming or cooling effects vary with seasons, and the strongest warming and tightest spatial coupling are in autumn months of September-November. The seasonal variations in albedo due to the construction of wind turbines are primarily responsible for the daytime LST changes. Areal mean decreases in winter, spring and autumn and increase in summer in albedo are observed over the WFs and the spatial pattern and magnitude of the changes in albedo couple very well with the layouts of the wind turbines. The increase (decrease) in albedo over the WFs indicates that WFs across the Huitengxile grassland absorb less (more) incoming radiation, thus resulting in a decrease (increase) in LST at daytime. The inter-annual variations in areal mean LST differences at daytime are highly correlated with those in areal mean albedo differences for all four seasons (R2=0.48~0.67). Our findings are in contrast

  9. Economic consequences of land surface subsidence

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, L.C.

    1981-06-01

    Overdraft in the Santa Clara Valley, Calif., groundwater basin caused land surface subsidence over an area of 63,000 ha with a maximum depression of 3.6 m from 1912-67. Since cessation of overdraft and replenishment of groundwater levels in 1969, there has been no significant land surface subsidence. During the period of active subsidence, water well casings buckled, sewers lost capacity as a result of changes in slope, and roads and railroads had to be raised. These damages are estimated at over $130 million. (1 graph, 1 map, 6 photos, 2 references, 1 table)

  10. Remote sensing of land surface phenology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meier, G.A.; Brown, J.F.

    2014-01-01

    Remote sensing of land-surface phenology is an important method for studying the patterns of plant and animal growth cycles. Phenological events are sensitive to climate variation; therefore phenology data provide important baseline information documenting trends in ecology and detecting the impacts of climate change on multiple scales. The USGS Remote sensing of land surface phenology program produces annually, nine phenology indicator variables at 250 m and 1,000 m resolution for the contiguous U.S. The 12 year archive is available at http://phenology.cr.usgs.gov/index.php.

  11. Afforestation in China cools local land surface temperature.

    PubMed

    Peng, Shu-Shi; Piao, Shilong; Zeng, Zhenzhong; Ciais, Philippe; Zhou, Liming; Li, Laurent Z X; Myneni, Ranga B; Yin, Yi; Zeng, Hui

    2014-02-25

    China has the largest afforested area in the world (∼62 million hectares in 2008), and these forests are carbon sinks. The climatic effect of these new forests depends on how radiant and turbulent energy fluxes over these plantations modify surface temperature. For instance, a lower albedo may cause warming, which negates the climatic benefits of carbon sequestration. Here, we used satellite measurements of land surface temperature (LST) from planted forests and adjacent grasslands or croplands in China to understand how afforestation affects LST. Afforestation is found to decrease daytime LST by about 1.1 ± 0.5 °C (mean ± 1 SD) and to increase nighttime LST by about 0.2 ± 0.5 °C, on average. The observed daytime cooling is a result of increased evapotranspiration. The nighttime warming is found to increase with latitude and decrease with average rainfall. Afforestation in dry regions therefore leads to net warming, as daytime cooling is offset by nighttime warming. Thus, it is necessary to carefully consider where to plant trees to realize potential climatic benefits in future afforestation projects. PMID:24516135

  12. Afforestation in China cools local land surface temperature

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Shu-Shi; Piao, Shilong; Zeng, Zhenzhong; Ciais, Philippe; Zhou, Liming; Li, Laurent Z. X.; Myneni, Ranga B.; Yin, Yi; Zeng, Hui

    2014-01-01

    China has the largest afforested area in the world (∼62 million hectares in 2008), and these forests are carbon sinks. The climatic effect of these new forests depends on how radiant and turbulent energy fluxes over these plantations modify surface temperature. For instance, a lower albedo may cause warming, which negates the climatic benefits of carbon sequestration. Here, we used satellite measurements of land surface temperature (LST) from planted forests and adjacent grasslands or croplands in China to understand how afforestation affects LST. Afforestation is found to decrease daytime LST by about 1.1 ± 0.5 °C (mean ± 1 SD) and to increase nighttime LST by about 0.2 ± 0.5 °C, on average. The observed daytime cooling is a result of increased evapotranspiration. The nighttime warming is found to increase with latitude and decrease with average rainfall. Afforestation in dry regions therefore leads to net warming, as daytime cooling is offset by nighttime warming. Thus, it is necessary to carefully consider where to plant trees to realize potential climatic benefits in future afforestation projects. PMID:24516135

  13. Evaluation of the SMAP model calculated snow albedo at the SIGMA-A site, northwest Greenland, during the 2012 record surface melt event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niwano, M.; Aoki, T.; Matoba, S.; Yamaguchi, S.; Tanikawa, T.; Kuchiki, K.; Motoyama, H.

    2015-12-01

    The snow and ice on the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) experienced the extreme surface melt around 12 July, 2012. In order to understand the snow-atmosphere interaction during the period, we applied a physical snowpack model SMAP to the GrIS snowpack. In the SMAP model, the snow albedo is calculated by the PBSAM component explicitly considering effects of snow grain size and light-absorbing snow impurities such as black carbon and dust. Temporal evolution of snow grain size is calculated internally in the SMAP model, whereas mass concentrations of snow impurities are externally given from observations. In the PBSAM, the (shortwave) snow albedo is calculated from a weighted summation of visible albedo (primarily affected by snow impurities) and near-infrared albedo (mainly controlled by snow grain size). The weights for these albedos are the visible and near-infrared fractions of the downward shortwave radiant flux. The SMAP model forced by meteorological data obtained from an automated weather station at SIGMA-A site, northwest GrIS during 30 June to 14 July, 2012 (IOP) was evaluated in terms of surface (optically equivalent) snow grain size and snow albedo. Snow grain size simulated by the model was compared against that retrieved from in-situ spectral albedo measurements. Although the RMSE and ME were reasonable (0.21 mm and 0.17 mm, respectively), the small snow grain size associated with the surface hoar could not be simulated by the SMAP model. As for snow albedo, simulation results agreed well with observations throughout the IOP (RMSE was 0.022 and ME was 0.008). Under cloudy-sky conditions, the SMAP model reproduced observed rapid increase in the snow albedo. When cloud cover is present the near-infrared fraction of the downward shortwave radiant flux is decreased, while it is increased under clear-sky conditions. Therefore, the above mentioned performance of the SMAP model can be attributed to the PBSAM component driven by the observed near-infrared and

  14. Climate Responses to Changes in Land-surface Properties due to Wildfires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Hao, X.; Qu, J. J.

    2015-12-01

    Wildfires can feedback the atmosphere by impacting atmospheric radiation transfer and cloud microphysics through emitting smoke particles and the land-air heat and water fluxes through modifying land-surface properties. While the impacts through smoke particles have been extensively investigated recently, very few studies have been conducted to examine the impacts through land-surface property change. This study is to fill this gap by examining the climate responses to the changes in land-surface properties induced by several large wildfires in the United States. Satellite remote sensing tools including MODIS and Landsat are used to quantitatively evaluate the land-surface changes characterized by reduced vegetation coverage and increased albedo over long post-fire periods. Variations in air and soil temperature and moisture of the burned areas are also monitored. Climate modeling is conducted to simulate climate responses and understand the related physical processes and interactions. The preliminary results indicate noticeable changes in water and heat transfers from the ground to the atmosphere through several mechanisms. Larger albedo reduces solar radiation absorbed on the ground, leading to less energy for latent and sensible heat fluxes. With smaller vegetation coverage, water transfer from the soil to the atmosphere through transpiration is reduced. Meanwhile, the Bowen ratio becomes larger after burning and therefore more solar energy absorbed on the ground is converted into sensible heat instead of being used as latent energy for water phase change. In addition, reduced vegetation coverage reduces roughness and increases wind speed, which modify dynamic resistances to water and heat movements. As a result of the changes in the land-air heat and water fluxes, clouds and precipitation as well as other atmospheric processes are affected by wildfires.

  15. Bacteria increase arid-land soil surface temperature through the production of sunscreens

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Couradeau, Estelle; Karaoz, Ulas; Lim, Hsiao Chien; Nunes da Rocha, Ulisses; Northen, Trent; Brodie, Eoin; Garcia-Pichel, Ferran

    2016-01-20

    Soil surface temperature, an important driver of terrestrial biogeochemical processes, depends strongly on soil albedo, which can be significantly modified by factors such as plant cover. In sparsely vegetated lands, the soil surface can be colonized by photosynthetic microbes that build biocrust communities. Here we use concurrent physical, biochemical and microbiological analyses to show that mature biocrusts can increase surface soil temperature by as much as 10 °C through the accumulation of large quantities of a secondary metabolite, the microbial sunscreen scytonemin, produced by a group of late-successional cyanobacteria. Scytonemin accumulation decreases soil albedo significantly. Such localized warming has apparentmore » and immediate consequences for the soil microbiome, inducing the replacement of thermosensitive bacterial species with more thermotolerant forms. In conclusion, these results reveal that not only vegetation but also microorganisms are a factor in modifying terrestrial albedo, potentially impacting biosphere feedbacks on past and future climate, and call for a direct assessment of such effects at larger scales.« less

  16. Soft Landing of Complex Molecules on Surfaces *

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Grant E.; Hu, Qichi; Laskin, Julia

    2011-07-01

    Soft and reactive landing of mass-selected ions onto surfaces has become a topic of substantial interest due to its promising potential for the highly controlled preparation of materials. For example, there are possible applications in the production of peptide and protein microarrays for use in high-throughput screening, protein separation and conformational enrichment of peptides, redox protein characterization, thin-film production, and the preparation of catalysts through deposition of clusters and organometallic complexes. Soft landing overcomes many of the limitations associated with conventional thin-film production techniques and offers unprecedented selectivity and specificity of preparation of deposited species. This review discusses the fundamental aspects of soft and reactive landing of mass-selected ions on surfaces that pertain to applications of these techniques in biomaterials, molecular electronics, catalysis, and interfacial chemistry.

  17. Remote sensing of surface hemispherical reflectance (albedo) using pointable multispectral imaging spectroradiometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimes, D. S.; Deering, D. W.

    1992-01-01

    Remote techniques for determining albedo are examined in terms of the range of view angles required in the use of string techniques with the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the High Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (HIRIS). Ground data are used to compute full and half strings out to 15, 30, 45, and 60 degrees for various sun angles and ground cover types. A knowledge-based system is employed to evaluate both the visible and near-IR bands, and the results indicate errors of up to 7 percent for the MODIS data, HIRIS data, and the full-string +/- 60 degrees. In the cases of large extrapolations greater ranges of error are noted indicating that 60-deg systems are most effective. The error is increased in the case of sensor systems that only view in the fore or aft direction, and the MODIS full string for +/- 45 deg is also considered a good system.

  18. Retrieval error estimation of surface albedo derived from geostationary large band satellite observations: Application to Meteosat-2 and Meteosat-7 data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govaerts, Y. M.; Lattanzio, A.

    2007-03-01

    The extraction of critical geophysical variables from multidecade archived satellite observations, such as those acquired by the European Meteosat First Generation satellite series, for the generation of climate data records is recognized as a pressing challenge by international environmental organizations. This paper presents a statistical method for the estimation of the surface albedo retrieval error that explicitly accounts for the measurement uncertainties and differences in the Meteosat radiometer characteristics. The benefit of this approach is illustrated with a simple case study consisting of a meaningful comparison of surface albedo derived from observations acquired at a 20 year interval by sensors with different radiometric performances. In particular, it is shown how it is possible to assess the magnitude of minimum detectable significant surface albedo change.

  19. Mapping land surface energy budget from the AVIRIS and MASTER data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, S.; Wang, D.

    2015-12-01

    Mapping land surface energy budget from the AVIRIS and MASTER dataDongdong Wang, Shunlin Liang, Tao He, Qinqing ShiDepartment of Geographical SciencesUniversity of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742The synergy of the AVIRIS and MASTER data with high spatial and spectral resolutions provides us an unprecedented data resource to study the spatial variability of the land-atmosphere exchange of water, carbon and energy at the ecosystem scale. Supported by the NASA HyspIRI program, we have worked on developing algorithms to estimate quantities of surface energy and radiation budget from AVIRIS and MASTER data collected by the HyspIRI preparatory airborne campaign. We will here present results of algorithm development and data analysis, including 1) retrieving broadband surface albedo from AVIRIS, 2) estimating surface shortwave net radiation from hyperspectral data, 3) combing VSWIR and TIR data to estimate all-wave net radiation, and 4) mapping evapotranspiration from MASTER and ancillary data. Validation against field measurements and other satellite data suggests that surface albedo, shortwave net radiation, all-wave net radiation and ET can be estimated with improved resolution and accuracy from the AVIRIS and MASTER data.

  20. LAnd surface remote sensing Products VAlidation System (LAPVAS) and its preliminary application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Xingwen; Wen, Jianguang; Tang, Yong; Ma, Mingguo; Dou, Baocheng; Wu, Xiaodan; Meng, Lumin

    2014-11-01

    The long term record of remote sensing product shows the land surface parameters with spatial and temporal change to support regional and global scientific research widely. Remote sensing product with different sensors and different algorithms is necessary to be validated to ensure the high quality remote sensing product. Investigation about the remote sensing product validation shows that it is a complex processing both the quality of in-situ data requirement and method of precision assessment. A comprehensive validation should be needed with long time series and multiple land surface types. So a system named as land surface remote sensing product is designed in this paper to assess the uncertainty information of the remote sensing products based on a amount of in situ data and the validation techniques. The designed validation system platform consists of three parts: Validation databases Precision analysis subsystem, Inter-external interface of system. These three parts are built by some essential service modules, such as Data-Read service modules, Data-Insert service modules, Data-Associated service modules, Precision-Analysis service modules, Scale-Change service modules and so on. To run the validation system platform, users could order these service modules and choreograph them by the user interactive and then compete the validation tasks of remote sensing products (such as LAI ,ALBEDO ,VI etc.) . Taking SOA-based architecture as the framework of this system. The benefit of this architecture is the good service modules which could be independent of any development environment by standards such as the Web-Service Description Language(WSDL). The standard language: C++ and java will used as the primary programming language to create service modules. One of the key land surface parameter, albedo, is selected as an example of the system application. It is illustrated that the LAPVAS has a good performance to implement the land surface remote sensing product

  1. Characterizing Mediterranean Land Surfaces as Component of the Regional Climate System by Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolle, H.-J.; Koslowsky, D.; Menenti, M.; Nerry, F.; Otterman, Joseph; Starr, D.

    1998-01-01

    Extensive areas in the Mediterranean region are subject to land degradation and desertification. The high variability of the coupling between the surface and the atmosphere affects the regional climate. Relevant surface characteristics, such as spectral reflectance, surface emissivity in the thermal-infrared region, and vegetation indices, serve as "primary" level indicators for the state of the surface. Their spatial, seasonal and interannual variability can be monitored from satellites. Using relationships between these primary data and combining them with prior information about the land surfaces (such as topography, dominant soil type, land use, collateral ground measurements and models), a second layer of information is built up which specifies the land surfaces as a component of the regional climate system. To this category of parameters which are directly involved in the exchange of energy, momentum and mass between the surface and the atmosphere, belong broadband albedo, thermodynamic surface temperature, vegetation types, vegetation cover density, soil top moisture, and soil heat flux. Information about these parameters finally leads to the computation of sensible and latent heat fluxes. The methodology was tested with pilot data sets. Full resolution, properly calibrated and normalized NOAA-AVHRR multi-annual primary data sets are presently compiled for the whole Mediterranean area, to study interannual variability and longer term trends.

  2. 25 CFR 214.14 - Use of surface lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... land to any point of prospecting or mining operations, but such use of the surface shall be permissible... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Use of surface lands. 214.14 Section 214.14 Indians... LANDS, OKLAHOMA, FOR MINING, EXCEPT OIL AND GAS § 214.14 Use of surface lands. (a) Lessees may use...

  3. The temporal scale research of MODIS albedo product authenticity verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yongxing; Xue, Zhihang; Cheng, Hui; Xiong, Yajv; Chen, Yunping; Tong, Ling

    2016-06-01

    This study introduces a method that normalizes the inversed ETM+ albedo to the local solar noon albedo for the temporal scale of the MODIS albedo validation. Firstly, the statistical relation model between the surface albedo and the solar elevation angle was set up, and then deducing relationship between ETM+ albedo and the solar elevation angle, so the ETM+ albedo at local solar noon could be got. Secondly, the ground measurement albedo at the local solar noon was used to assess the inversed ETM+ albedo and the normalized albedo. The experiment results show that the method can effectively improve the accuracy of product certification.

  4. Global Albedo

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    ... to one in the visible region of the solar spectrum whereas deep clean ocean water has an albedo that is close to zero. Five years of ... Atmospheric Science Data Center's  MISR Level 3 Imagery  web site. The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer observes the daylit ...

  5. Landsat Estimate of Albedo Change from Fire in the Alaskan Boreal Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, N. H.

    2001-05-01

    The impact of fire on boreal land cover is substantial with dramatic implications for the exchange of carbon and energy between the land and atmosphere. One of the primary mechanisms through which ecosystem characteristics are able to influence surface-atmosphere energy exchange is by influencing the radiation balance. Land surface albedo defines how much shortwave energy is "captured" by the system and is key in determining surface net radiation. The purpose of this study is to quantify and map the change in summertime land surface albedo from fire disturbance in a black spruce dominated landscape in Alaska. The study was conducted at a set of three fire-disturbed sites located near the town of Delta Junction. Five Landsat TM and ETM images from late August/early September for 1986 to 1999 were the primary data used. Albedo change was derived using the six reflective bands of Landsat (bands 1-5 and 7). The images were used to map albedo change at each of the three burn sites from the fire disturbance itself and from vegetation regrowth at the two older burn scars. Field measurements of albedo were also collected and are used to complement the remote sensing-based results. The results show that albedo change is spatially and temporally variable based on pre-burn vegetation, canopy density, burn severity, and site age. In moderately burned, medium density black spruce, the most typical burn conditions in Alaska, no significant change in albedo was found within the first year after the burn (+/-1%). At sites with some deciduous vegetation in the pre-burn canopy, albedo decreased (4%). In areas of severe burn, albedo increased (2-3%). Most notably, at all sites albedo increased after several years of vegetation growth (7 to 10%) due to the transition to herbaceous and deciduous vegetation. Similar results were found with the tower-based measurements at these sites. The albedo changes measured in this study have important implications for net radiation and surface

  6. Upscaling and Downscaling of Land Surface Fluxes with Surface Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kustas, W. P.; Anderson, M. C.; Hain, C.; Albertson, J. D.; Gao, F.; Yang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Land surface temperature (LST) is a key surface boundary condition that is significantly correlated to surface flux partitioning between latent and sensible heat. The spatial and temporal variation in LST is driven by radiation, wind, vegetation cover and roughness as well as soil moisture status in the surface and root zone. Data from airborne and satellite-based platforms provide LST from ~10 km to sub meter resolutions. A land surface scheme called the Two-Source Energy Balance (TSEB) model has been incorporated into a multi-scale regional modeling system ALEXI (Atmosphere Land Exchange Inverse) and a disaggregation scheme (DisALEXI) using higher resolution LST. Results with this modeling system indicates that it can be applied over heterogeneous land surfaces and estimate reliable surface fluxes with minimal in situ information. Consequently, this modeling system allows for scaling energy fluxes from subfield to regional scales in regions with little ground data. In addition, the TSEB scheme has been incorporated into a large Eddy Simulation (LES) model for investigating dynamic interactions between variations in the land surface state reflected in the spatial pattern in LST and the lower atmospheric air properties affecting energy exchange. An overview of research results on scaling of fluxes and interactions with the lower atmosphere from the subfield level to regional scales using the TSEB, ALEX/DisALEX and the LES-TSEB approaches will be presented. Some unresolved issues in the use of LST at different spatial resolutions for estimating surface energy balance and upscaling fluxes, particularly evapotranspiration, will be discussed.

  7. Assimilation of land surface temperature into the land surface model JULES with an ensemble Kalman filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghent, D.; Kaduk, J.; Remedios, J.; Ardö, J.; Balzter, H.

    2010-10-01

    Land surface models have uncertainties due to their approximation of physical processes and the heterogeneity of the land surface. These can be compounded when key variables are inadequately represented. Land surface temperature (LST) is critical as it forms an integral component in the surface energy budget, water stress evaluation, fuel moisture derivation, and soil moisture-climate feedbacks. A reduction in the uncertainty of surface energy fluxes, and moisture quantification, is assumed to be achievable by constraining simulations of LST with observation data. This technique is known as data assimilation and involves the adjustment of the model state at observation times with measurements of a predictable uncertainty. In this paper, the validity of LST simulations in a regionalized parameterization of the land surface model Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES) for Africa is assessed by way of a multitemporal intercomparison study with the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), the Advanced Along Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR), and the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) thermal products, with a two-thirds reduction in model bias found when soil properties are reparameterized. A data assimilation experiment of SEVIRI LST into the JULES model via an ensemble Kalman filter shows an improvement in the modeled LST, soil moisture, and latent and sensible heat fluxes. This paper presents the first investigation into reducing the uncertainty in modeling energy and water fluxes with the United Kingdom's most important land surface model, JULES, by means of data assimilation of LST.

  8. Surface temperature cooling trends and negative radiative forcing due to land use change toward greenhouse farming in southeastern Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campra, Pablo; Garcia, Monica; Canton, Yolanda; Palacios-Orueta, Alicia

    2008-09-01

    Greenhouse horticulture has experienced in recent decades a dramatic spatial expansion in the semiarid province of Almeria, in southeastern (SE) Spain, reaching a continuous area of 26,000 ha in 2007, the widest greenhouse area in the world. A significant surface air temperature trend of -0.3°C decade-1 in this area during the period 1983-2006 is first time reported here. This local cooling trend shows no correlation with Spanish regional and global warming trends. Radiative forcing (RF) is widely used to assess and compare the climate change mechanisms. Surface shortwave RF (SWRF) caused through clearing of pasture land for greenhouse farming development in this area is estimated here. We present the first empirical evidences to support the working hypothesis of the development of a localized forcing created by surface albedo change to explain the differences in temperature trends among stations either inside or far from this agricultural land. SWRF was estimated from satellite-retrieved surface albedo data and calculated shortwave outgoing fluxes associated with either uses of land under typical incoming solar radiation. Outgoing fluxes were calculated from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) surface reflectance data. A difference in mean annual surface albedo of +0.09 was measured comparing greenhouses surface to a typical pasture land. Strong negative forcing associated with land use change was estimated all year round, ranging from -5.0 W m-2 to -34.8 W m-2, with a mean annual value of -19.8 W m-2. According to our data of SWRF and local temperatures trends, recent development of greenhouse horticulture in this area may have masked local warming signals associated to greenhouse gases increase.

  9. Evaluation and Validation of Global Land Surface Products Derived from Landsat, MODIS, and VIIRS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roman, Miguel O.

    2012-01-01

    Data at medium and coarse resolution from the Landsat, MODIS, and VIIRS instruments provide crucial and indispensable time-series for the land component of the study of global change. This talk will be divided into two main sections. In the first part, a summary of the status of the processing, archiving, and early (Launch +6 months) on-orbit evaluation of the VIIRS Land Environmental Data Records (EDRs), will be presented. In the second part, results from an uncertainty analysis of MODIS- and Landsat-based albedo retrievals, based on collocated comparisons with tower and airborne multiangular measurements collected at the Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site during the 2007 Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC'07), will be discussed.

  10. Albedo and its relationship with seasonal surface roughness using repeat UAV survey across the Kangerlussuaq sector of the Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, A., II; Ryan, J.; Box, J. E.; Snooke, N.

    2015-12-01

    Surface albedo is a primary control on absorbed radiation and hence ice surface darkening is a powerful amplifier of melt across the margin of the Greenland ice sheet. To investigate the relationship between ice surface roughness and variations in albedo in space and time at ~dm resolution, a suite of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) were deployed from the margin of Russell Glacier between June and August, 2014. The UAVs were equipped with digital and multispectral cameras, GoPros, fast response broadband pyranometers and temperature and humidity sensors. The primary mission was regular repeat longitudinal transects attaining data from the margin to the equilibrium line 80 km into the ice sheet interior and which were complimented by selected watershed and catchment surveys. The pyranometers reliably measure bare ice surface albedo between 0.34 and 0.58 that correlate well against concurrent MODIS data (where available). Repeat digital photogrammetric analysis enables investigation of relationship between changing meso- and micro-scale albedo and melt processes modulated by ice surface roughness that, in turn, are related to the seasonally evolving surface energy balance recorded at three AWS on the flight path.

  11. Erosion thresholds and land surface morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, William E.; Wilson, Cathy J.; Montgomery, David R.; McKean, James; Bauer, Romy

    1992-08-01

    We propose a graphical technique to analyze the entirety of landforms in a catchment to define quantitatively the spatial variation in the dominance of different erosion processes. High-resolution digital elevation data of a 1.2 km2 hilly area where the channel network had been mapped in the field were used in the digital terrain model, TOPOG, to test threshold theories for erosion. The land surface was divided into ˜20 m2 elements whose shapes were then classified as convergent, planar, or divergent. The entire landscape plotted on a graph of area per unit contour length against surface gradient shows each planform plotting as a separate field. A simple steady-state hydrologic model was used to predict zones of saturation and areas of high pore pressure to mimic the extreme hydrologic events responsible for erosive instability of the land surface. The field observation that saturation overland flow is rare outside convergent zones provided a significant constraint on the hydrologic parameter in the model. This model was used in threshold theories to predict areas of slope instability and areas subject to erosion by saturation overland flow, both of which can contribute to channel initiation. The proportion of convergent elements predicted to exceed the threshold varies greatly with relatively small changes in surface resistance, demonstrating a high sensitivity to land use such as cattle grazing. Overall, the landscape can be divided, using erosion threshold lines, into areas prone to channel instability due to runoff and stable areas where diffusive transport predominates.

  12. Estimates of land surface heat fluxes of the Mt. Everest region over the Tibetan Plateau utilizing ASTER data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Cunbo; Ma, Yaoming; Chen, Xuelong; Su, Zhongbo

    2016-02-01

    Regional land surface albedo, land surface temperature, net radiation flux, ground heat flux, sensible heat flux, and latent heat flux were derived in the Mt. Everest area utilizing topographical enhanced surface energy balance system (TESEBS) model and nine scenes of ASTER (Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer) data under clear-sky and in-situ measurements at the QOMS station (the Qomolangma Station for Atmospheric Environmental Observation and Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences). The parameterization schemes for diffused and reflected downward shortwave radiation flux of the TESEBS model were improved by introducing the parameters sky-view factor (SVF) and terrain configuration factor (Ct). Then, a so-called C-correction method for land surface albedo was coupled into the TESEBS model to reduce the influences of topography. After topographical correction, the albedo of the dark tilted surface facing away from the Sun was compensated and albedo of the brightness surface facing the Sun was restrained. The downward shortwave radiation flux was broken down into three components including solar direct radiation flux, solar diffused radiation flux, and reflected solar radiation flux by surrounding terrain. The solar diffused radiation flux ranges from about 30 to 60 W/m2 at the satellite passing time on 6 January 2008. The reflected solar radiation flux changes from 0 to more than 100 W/m2 in the area covered by glaciers and snows. Thus, it is important to take the topographical effects into account in estimation of surface radiation balance in the mountainous area, especially in the glacier area. The retrieved land surface parameters, land surface radiation balance components, and the land surface energy balance components were evaluated by the field measurements in the QOMS station. The estimated results were very close to the in-situ observations with low mean bias errors, low root mean square errors and high correlation coefficients

  13. Distributions of surface-layer buoyance versus lifting condensation level over a heterogeneous land surface

    SciTech Connect

    Schrieber, K.; Zhang, Qing; Stull, R.

    1996-04-15

    Onset and coverage of small cumulus clouds depend on the relative abundance of surface-layer air parcels possessing favorable buoyancy and moisture - two variables that are coupled through the surface energy budget. This abundance is described using a joint frequency distribution (JFD) as a function of virtual potential temperature {theta}{sub v} and height of the lifting condensation level z{sub LCL}. It is shown analytically that the shape and spread of this JFD depends on the ranges of Bowen ratios and solar forcings (albedoes, cloud shading, etc.) that exist within a domain of heterogeneous land use. To sample the character of such JFDs in the real atmosphere, a case study is presented using turbulence data gathered by aircraft flying in the surface layer of southwest France. This case study includes 4 days of clear skies during the Hydrologic Atmospheric Pilot Experiment (HAPEX) of 1986. The full flight track during HAPEX overflew a wide range of land use including evergreen forest, corn, vineyards, pastures, and irrigated fields over varied topography. The JFDs from these full tracks are found to be quite complex, being frequently multimodal with a convoluted perimeter. However, when a full track is broken into segments, each over a subdomain of quasi-homogeneous land use, the resulting segment JFDs are mono-modal with simpler topology. Such a characterization of JFDs provides guidance toward eventual subgrid cumulus parameterization in large-scale forecast models, with associated impacts in aviation forecasting, pollutant venting and chemical reactions, verticle dispersion and turbulence modulation, and radiation balance in climate-change models. 48 refs., 17 figs., 7 tabs.

  14. Enhancement of surface-atmosphere fluxes by desert-fringe vegetation through reduction of surface albedo and of soil heat flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otterman, J.

    1987-01-01

    Under the arid conditions prevailing at the end of the dry season in the western Negev/northern Sinai region, vegetation causes a sharp increase relative to bare soil in the daytime sensible heat flux from the surface to the atmosphere. Two mechanisms are involved: the increase in the surface absorptivity and a decrease in the surface heat flux. By increasing the sensible heat flux to the atmosphere through the albedo and the soil heat flux reductions, the desert-fringe vegetation increases the daytime convection and the growth of the planetary boundary layer. Removal of vegetation by overgrazing, by reducing the sensible heat flux, tends to reduce daytime convective precipitation, producing higher probabilities of drought conditions. This assessment of overgrazing is based on observations in the Sinai/Negev, where the soil albedo is high and where overgrazing produces an essential bare soil. Even if the assessment for the Sinai/Negev does not quantitatively apply throughout Africa, the current practice in many African countries of maintaining a large population of grazing animals, can contribute through the mesoscale mechanisms described to reduce daytime convective precipitation, perpetuating higher probabilities of drought. Time-of-day analysis of precipitation in Africa appears worthwhile, to better assess the role of the surface conditions in contributing to drought.

  15. Oscillations in land surface hydrological cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labat, D.

    2006-02-01

    Hydrological cycle is the perpetual movement of water throughout the various component of the global Earth's system. Focusing on the land surface component of this cycle, the determination of the succession of dry and humid periods is of high importance with respect to water resources management but also with respect to global geochemical cycles. This knowledge requires a specified estimation of recent fluctuations of the land surface cycle at continental and global scales. Our approach leans towards a new estimation of freshwater discharge to oceans from 1875 to 1994 as recently proposed by Labat et al. [Labat, D., Goddéris, Y., Probst, JL, Guyot, JL, 2004. Evidence for global runoff increase related to climate warming. Advances in Water Resources, 631-642]. Wavelet analyses of the annual freshwater discharge time series reveal an intermittent multiannual variability (4- to 8-y, 14- to 16-y and 20- to 25-y fluctuations) and a persistent multidecadal 30- to 40-y variability. Continent by continent, reasonable relationships between land-water cycle oscillations and climate forcing (such as ENSO, NAO or sea surface temperature) are proposed even though if such relationships or correlations remain very complex. The high intermittency of interannual oscillations and the existence of persistent multidecadal fluctuations make prediction difficult for medium-term variability of droughts and high-flows, but lead to a more optimistic diagnostic for long-term fluctuations prediction.

  16. Evaluation of MODIS Albedo Product (MCD43A) over Grassland, Agriculture and Forest Surface Types During Dormant and Snow-Covered Periods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Zhousen; Schaaf, Crystal B.; Strahler, Alan H.; Chopping, Mark J.; Roman, Miguel O.; Shuai, Yanmin; Woodcock, Curtis E.; Hollinger, David Y.; Fitzjarrald, David R.

    2013-01-01

    This study assesses the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) BRDF/albedo 8 day standard product and products from the daily Direct Broadcast BRDF/albedo algorithm, and shows that these products agree well with ground-based albedo measurements during the more difficult periods of vegetation dormancy and snow cover. Cropland, grassland, deciduous and coniferous forests are considered. Using an integrated validation strategy, analyses of the representativeness of the surface heterogeneity under both dormant and snow-covered situations are performed to decide whether direct comparisons between ground measurements and 500-m satellite observations can be made or whether finer spatial resolution airborne or spaceborne data are required to scale the results at each location. Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM +) data are used to generate finer scale representations of albedo at each location to fully link ground data with satellite data. In general, results indicate the root mean square errors (RMSEs) are less than 0.030 over spatially representative sites of agriculture/grassland during the dormant periods and less than 0.050 during the snow-covered periods for MCD43A albedo products. For forest, the RMSEs are less than 0.020 during the dormant period and 0.025 during the snow-covered periods. However, a daily retrieval strategy is necessary to capture ephemeral snow events or rapidly changing situations such as the spring snow melt.

  17. The Effect of Aerosol Deposition on Snow Albedo Reduction in the Sierra Nevada Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, W.; Liou, K.

    2008-12-01

    We investigate snow cover and albedo changes in the Sierra Nevada regions due to deposition of black carbon and dust particles from East Asia. We note that coal combustion reaches maximum in the winter, while dust storms originate in the Gobi Desert occur most frequently in April. We selected snow and albedo data from MODIS/Terra to examine albedo reduction in March and April from 2000 to 2008. To eliminate the contamination of albedo by bare land, only the pixels with 100% snow cover in the entire period were used. Analysis using the 8-day average snow cover and 16-day average surface albedo reveals that there is a small increasing trend of albedo reduction. We also show that a large snow albedo reduction in 2001 is possibly due to the strong dust storm event that occurred in April, 2001. Finally, composite time series have been made using daily data to demonstrate decrease in snow albedo after each snowfall event. We illustrate that the rate of albedo reduction increases by 0.01/day per year from 2000 to 2008.

  18. Changes on albedo after a large forest fire in Mediterranean ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintano, Carmen; Fernández-Manso, Alfonso; Fernández-García, Victor; Marcos, Elena; Calvo, Leonor

    2015-09-01

    Fires are one of the main causes of environmental alteration in Mediterranean forest ecosystems. Albedo varies and evolves seasonally based on solar illumination. It is greatly influenced by changes on vegetation: vegetation growth, cutting/planting forests or forest fires. This work analyzes albedo variations due to a large forest fire that occurred on 19- 21 September 2012 in northwestern Spain. From this area, albedo post-fire images (immediately and 1-year after fire) were generated from Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper (ETM+) data. Specifically we considered total shortwave albedo, total-, direct-, and diffuse-visible, and near-infrared albedo. Nine to twelve weeks after fire, 111 field plots were measured (27 unburned plots, 84 burned plots). The relationship between albedo values and thematic class (burned/unburned) was evaluated by one-way analysis of variance. Our results demonstrate that albedo changes were related to burned/unburned variable with statistical significance, indicating the importance of forestry areas as regulators of land surface energy fluxes and revealing the potential of post-fire albedo for assessing burned areas. Future research, however, is needed to evaluate the persistence of albedo changes.

  19. Estimating land surface energy fluxes over Mt.Everest area of the Tibetan Plateau by using the ASTER and in situ data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Cunbo; Ma, Yaoming; Liu, Xin; Chen, Xuelong; Ma, Weiqiang

    2013-04-01

    Determination of land surface energy fluxes is a difficult and crucial work over heterogeneous landscape especially over mountainous regions. In this study, based on 9 scenes of ASTER (Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer) images from 2006 to 2011 and in situ data around Mt.Everest area of the Tibetan Plateau, land surface characteristic variables (albedo, land surface temperature, NDVI and vegetation fraction) and energy fluxes (net radiation flux, soil heat flux, sensible heat flux and latent heat flux) was estimated by using SEBS (Surface Energy Balance System) model. During calculating net radiation, the effect of topography was taken into account by DEM data. The total incoming solar radiation at the ground surface was separated into three parts, the solar direct radiation, the diffuse sky radiation and the adjacent terrain reflected radiation. The results of estimation were validated by land surface observations in the Qomolangma (Mt. Everest) Station for Atmospheric and Environmental Observation and Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences (QOMS/CAS). It is shown that the derived land surface characteristic variables and energy fluxes are in good accordance with the land surface and their thermodynamic status. The mean absolute percentage difference of albedo, land surface temperature and net radiation flux is less than 10%.

  20. Retrieving surface parameters for climate models from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)-Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) albedo products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinty, B.; Lavergne, T.; VoßBeck, M.; Kaminski, T.; Aussedat, O.; Giering, R.; Gobron, N.; Taberner, M.; Verstraete, M. M.; Widlowski, J.-L.

    2007-05-01

    We present a computer-efficient software package enabling us to assimilate operational remote-sensing flux products into a state-of-the-art two-stream radiation transfer scheme suitable for climate models. This package implements the adjoint and Hessian codes, generated using automatic differentiation techniques, of a cost function balancing (1) the deviation from the a priori knowledge on the model parameter values and (2) the misfit between the observed remote-sensing fluxes and the two-stream model simulations. The individual weights of these contributions are specified notably via covariance matrices of the uncertainties in the a priori knowledge on the model parameters and the measurements. The proposed procedure delivers a Gaussian approximation of the PDFs of the retrieved model parameter values. The a posteriori covariance matrix is further exploited to evaluate, in turn, the posterior probability density functions of the radiant fluxes simulated by the two-stream model, including those that are not measured, for example, the fraction of radiation absorbed in the ground. Applications are conducted using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) broadband surface albedo products. It turns out that the differences between these two albedo sets may translate into discernible signatures on some retrieved model parameters. Meanwhile, adding the Joint Research Centre (JRC)-Fraction of Absorbed Photosynthetically Active Radiation (FAPAR) Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) products into the measurements yields a significant reduction of uncertainties. Results from these applications indicate that the products retrieved from the two-stream inversion procedure (1) exhibit much less variability than those generated by the operational algorithms for the LAI and FAPAR, and (2) are in good agreement with the available ground-based estimates.

  1. Preferential cooling of hot extremes from cropland albedo management

    PubMed Central

    Davin, Edouard L.; Seneviratne, Sonia I.; Ciais, Philippe; Olioso, Albert; Wang, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Changes in agricultural practices are considered a possible option to mitigate climate change. In particular, reducing or suppressing tillage (no-till) may have the potential to sequester carbon in soils, which could help slow global warming. On the other hand, such practices also have a direct effect on regional climate by altering the physical properties of the land surface. These biogeophysical effects, however, are still poorly known. Here we show that no-till management increases the surface albedo of croplands in summer and that the resulting cooling effect is amplified during hot extremes, thus attenuating peak temperatures reached during heat waves. Using a regional climate model accounting for the observed effects of no-till farming on surface albedo, as well as possible reductions in soil evaporation, we investigate the potential consequences of a full conversion to no-till agriculture in Europe. We find that the summer cooling from cropland albedo increase is strongly amplified during hot summer days, when surface albedo has more impact on the Earth’s radiative balance due to clear-sky conditions. The reduced evaporation associated with the crop residue cover tends to counteract the albedo-induced cooling, but during hot days the albedo effect is the dominating factor. For heatwave summer days the local cooling effect gained from no-till practice is of the order of 2 °C. The identified asymmetric impact of surface albedo change on summer temperature opens new avenues for climate-engineering measures targeting high-impact events rather than mean climate properties. PMID:24958872

  2. Preferential cooling of hot extremes from cropland albedo management.

    PubMed

    Davin, Edouard L; Seneviratne, Sonia I; Ciais, Philippe; Olioso, Albert; Wang, Tao

    2014-07-01

    Changes in agricultural practices are considered a possible option to mitigate climate change. In particular, reducing or suppressing tillage (no-till) may have the potential to sequester carbon in soils, which could help slow global warming. On the other hand, such practices also have a direct effect on regional climate by altering the physical properties of the land surface. These biogeophysical effects, however, are still poorly known. Here we show that no-till management increases the surface albedo of croplands in summer and that the resulting cooling effect is amplified during hot extremes, thus attenuating peak temperatures reached during heat waves. Using a regional climate model accounting for the observed effects of no-till farming on surface albedo, as well as possible reductions in soil evaporation, we investigate the potential consequences of a full conversion to no-till agriculture in Europe. We find that the summer cooling from cropland albedo increase is strongly amplified during hot summer days, when surface albedo has more impact on the Earth's radiative balance due to clear-sky conditions. The reduced evaporation associated with the crop residue cover tends to counteract the albedo-induced cooling, but during hot days the albedo effect is the dominating factor. For heatwave summer days the local cooling effect gained from no-till practice is of the order of 2 °C. The identified asymmetric impact of surface albedo change on summer temperature opens new avenues for climate-engineering measures targeting high-impact events rather than mean climate properties. PMID:24958872

  3. DISAGGREGATION OF GOES LAND SURFACE TEMPERATURES USING SURFACE EMISSIVITY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accurate temporal and spatial estimation of land surface temperatures (LST) is important for modeling the hydrological cycle at field to global scales because LSTs can improve estimates of soil moisture and evapotranspiration. Using remote sensing satellites, accurate LSTs could be routine, but unfo...

  4. Coupled land surface/hydrologic/atmospheric models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pielke, Roger; Steyaert, Lou; Arritt, Ray; Lahtakia, Mercedes; Smith, Chris; Ziegler, Conrad; Soong, Su Tzai; Avissar, Roni; Wetzel, Peter; Sellers, Piers

    1993-01-01

    The topics covered include the following: prototype land cover characteristics data base for the conterminous United States; surface evapotranspiration effects on cumulus convection and implications for mesoscale models; the use of complex treatment of surface hydrology and thermodynamics within a mesoscale model and some related issues; initialization of soil-water content for regional-scale atmospheric prediction models; impact of surface properties on dryline and MCS evolution; a numerical simulation of heavy precipitation over the complex topography of California; representing mesoscale fluxes induced by landscape discontinuities in global climate models; emphasizing the role of subgrid-scale heterogeneity in surface-air interaction; and problems with modeling and measuring biosphere-atmosphere exchanges of energy, water, and carbon on large scales.

  5. Use of in situ and airborne multiangle data to assess MODIS-and landsat-based estimates of directional reflectance and albedo

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The quantification of uncertainty in satellite-derived global surface albedo products is a critical aspect in producing complete, physically consistent, and decadal land property data records for studying ecosystem change. A challenge in validating albedo measurements acquired from space is the abil...

  6. Albedo Pattern Recognition and Time-Series Analyses in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salleh, S. A.; Abd Latif, Z.; Mohd, W. M. N. Wan; Chan, A.

    2012-07-01

    Pattern recognition and time-series analyses will enable one to evaluate and generate predictions of specific phenomena. The albedo pattern and time-series analyses are very much useful especially in relation to climate condition monitoring. This study is conducted to seek for Malaysia albedo pattern changes. The pattern recognition and changes will be useful for variety of environmental and climate monitoring researches such as carbon budgeting and aerosol mapping. The 10 years (2000-2009) MODIS satellite images were used for the analyses and interpretation. These images were being processed using ERDAS Imagine remote sensing software, ArcGIS 9.3, the 6S code for atmospherical calibration and several MODIS tools (MRT, HDF2GIS, Albedo tools). There are several methods for time-series analyses were explored, this paper demonstrates trends and seasonal time-series analyses using converted HDF format MODIS MCD43A3 albedo land product. The results revealed significance changes of albedo percentages over the past 10 years and the pattern with regards to Malaysia's nebulosity index (NI) and aerosol optical depth (AOD). There is noticeable trend can be identified with regards to its maximum and minimum value of the albedo. The rise and fall of the line graph show a similar trend with regards to its daily observation. The different can be identified in term of the value or percentage of rises and falls of albedo. Thus, it can be concludes that the temporal behavior of land surface albedo in Malaysia have a uniform behaviours and effects with regards to the local monsoons. However, although the average albedo shows linear trend with nebulosity index, the pattern changes of albedo with respects to the nebulosity index indicates that there are external factors that implicates the albedo values, as the sky conditions and its diffusion plotted does not have uniform trend over the years, especially when the trend of 5 years interval is examined, 2000 shows high negative linear

  7. Land Surface Verification Toolkit (LVT) - A Generalized Framework for Land Surface Model Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Sujay V.; Peters-Lidard, Christa D.; Santanello, Joseph; Harrison, Ken; Liu, Yuqiong; Shaw, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Model evaluation and verification are key in improving the usage and applicability of simulation models for real-world applications. In this article, the development and capabilities of a formal system for land surface model evaluation called the Land surface Verification Toolkit (LVT) is described. LVT is designed to provide an integrated environment for systematic land model evaluation and facilitates a range of verification approaches and analysis capabilities. LVT operates across multiple temporal and spatial scales and employs a large suite of in-situ, remotely sensed and other model and reanalysis datasets in their native formats. In addition to the traditional accuracy-based measures, LVT also includes uncertainty and ensemble diagnostics, information theory measures, spatial similarity metrics and scale decomposition techniques that provide novel ways for performing diagnostic model evaluations. Though LVT was originally designed to support the land surface modeling and data assimilation framework known as the Land Information System (LIS), it also supports hydrological data products from other, non-LIS environments. In addition, the analysis of diagnostics from various computational subsystems of LIS including data assimilation, optimization and uncertainty estimation are supported within LVT. Together, LIS and LVT provide a robust end-to-end environment for enabling the concepts of model data fusion for hydrological applications. The evolving capabilities of LVT framework are expected to facilitate rapid model evaluation efforts and aid the definition and refinement of formal evaluation procedures for the land surface modeling community.

  8. The global land surface energy balance and its representation in CMIP5 models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wild, Martin; Folini, Doris; Hakuba, Maria; Schär, Christoph; Seneviratne, Sonia; Kato, Seiji; Rutan, David; Ammann, Christof; Wood, Eric; König-Langlo, Gert

    2015-04-01

    (ERA-Interim) and satellite-derived products (surface CERES EBAF). This remarkable consistency enhances confidence in the determined flux magnitudes, which so far caused large uncertainties in the energy budgets and often hampered an accurate simulation of surface climates in models. Using in addition a land mean surface albedo estimate of 0.26, we determine an average absorbed solar radiation at land surfaces of 136 Wm-2. Our best estimate for the upward thermal radiation at land surfaces (essentially based on the Stefan Boltzmann law) is 372 Wm-2, and combined with the above best estimate of 306 Wm-2 for the downward thermal radiation, this results in a net thermal radiation of -66 Wm-2 averaged over global land surfaces. Adding the absorbed solar and net thermal radiation, our best estimate of the land mean surface net radiation amounts to 70 Wm-2, which is the energy available for the sensible and latent heat fluxes. Latest estimates of terrestrial latent heat fluxes indicate a land mean value slightly below 40 Wm-2. In our best estimate of the global land mean energy balance we thus adopt a land mean latent heat flux of 38 Wm-2, leaving a land mean sensible heat flux of 32 Wm-2 as residual to close the energy balance over terrestrial surfaces. A diagram of the global land mean energy balance including these new estimates and the related discussion has recently been published in Climate Dynamics (Wild et al. 2015). Related reference: Wild, M., Folini, D., Hakuba, M., Schär, C., Seneviratne, S.I., Kato, S., Rutan, D., Ammann, C., Wood E.F. ·and König-Langlo, G., 2015: The energy balance over land and oceans: An assessment based on direct observations and CMIP5 climate models, Climate Dynamics, DOI 10.1007/s00382-014-2430-z

  9. Determining Land Surface Temperature Relations with Land Use-Land Cover and Air Pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahya, Ceyhan; Bektas Balcik, Filiz; Burak Oztaner, Yasar; Guney, Burcu

    2016-04-01

    Rapid population growth in conjunction with unplanned urbanization, expansion, and encroachment into the limited agricultural fields and green areas have negative impacts on vegetated areas. Land Surface Temperature (LST), Urban Heat Islands (UHI) and air pollution are the most important environmental problems that the extensive part of the world suffers from. The main objective of this research is to investigate the relationship between LST, air pollution and Land Use-Land Cover (LULC) in Istanbul, using Landsat 8 OLI satellite image. Mono-window algorithm is used to compute LST from Landsat 8 TIR data. In order to determine the air pollution, in-situ measurements of particulate matter (PM10) of the same day as the Landsat 8 OLI satellite image are obtained. The results of this data are interpolated using the Inverse Distance Weighted (IDW) method and LULC categories of Istanbul were determined by using remote sensing indices. Error matrix was created for accuracy assessment. The relationship between LST, air pollution and LULC categories are determined by using regression analysis method. Keywords: Land Surface Temperature (LST), air pollution, Land Use-Land Cover (LULC), Istanbul

  10. Timescales of Land Surface Evapotranspiration Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Russell; Entekhabi, Dara; Koster, Randal; Suarez, Max

    1997-01-01

    Soil and vegetation exert strong control over the evapotranspiration rate, which couples the land surface water and energy balances. A method is presented to quantify the timescale of this surface control using daily general circulation model (GCM) simulation values of evapotranspiration and precipitation. By equating the time history of evaporation efficiency (ratio of actual to potential evapotranspiration) to the convolution of precipitation and a unit kernel (temporal weighting function), response functions are generated that can be used to characterize the timescales of evapotranspiration response for the land surface model (LSM) component of GCMS. The technique is applied to the output of two multiyear simulations of a GCM, one using a Surface-Vegetation-Atmosphere-Transfer (SVAT) scheme and the other a Bucket LSM. The derived response functions show that the Bucket LSM's response is significantly slower than that of the SVAT across the globe. The analysis also shows how the timescales of interception reservoir evaporation, bare soil evaporation, and vegetation transpiration differ within the SVAT LSM.

  11. Evaluating the effects of historical land cover change on summertime weather and climate in New Jersey: Land cover and surface energy budget changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wichansky, Paul S.; Steyaert, Louis T.; Walko, Robert L.; Weaver, Christopher P.

    2008-05-01

    The 19th-century agrarian landscape of New Jersey (NJ) and the surrounding region has been extensively transformed to the present-day land cover by urbanization, reforestation, and localized areas of deforestation. This study used a mesoscale atmospheric numerical model to investigate the sensitivity of the warm season climate of NJ to these land cover changes. Reconstructed 1880s-era and present-day land cover data sets were used as surface boundary conditions for a set of simulations performed with the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS). Three-member ensembles with historical and present-day land cover were compared to examine the sensitivity of surface air and dew point temperatures, rainfall, and the individual components of the surface energy budget to these land cover changes. Mean temperatures for the present-day landscape were 0.3-0.6°C warmer than for the historical landscape over a considerable portion of NJ and the surrounding region, with daily maximum temperatures at least 1.0°C warmer over some of the highly urbanized locations. Reforested regions, however, were slightly cooler. Dew point temperatures decreased by 0.3-0.6°C, suggesting drier, less humid near-surface air for the present-day landscape. Surface warming was generally associated with repartitioning of net radiation from latent to sensible heat flux, and conversely for cooling. While urbanization was accompanied by strong surface albedo decreases and increases in net shortwave radiation, reforestation and potential changes in forest composition have generally increased albedos and also enhanced landscape heterogeneity. The increased deciduousness of forests may have further reduced net downward longwave radiation.

  12. Evaluating the effects of historical land cover change on summertime weather and climate in New Jersey: Land cover and surface energy budget changes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wichansky, P.S.; Steyaert, L.T.; Walko, R.L.; Waever, C.P.

    2008-01-01

    The 19th-century agrarian landscape of New Jersey (NJ) and the surrounding region has been extensively transformed to the present-day land cover by urbanization, reforestation, and localized areas of deforestation. This study used a mesoscale atmospheric numerical model to investigate the sensitivity of the warm season climate of NJ to these land cover changes. Reconstructed 1880s-era and present-day land cover data sets were used as surface boundary conditions for a set of simulations performed with the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS). Three-member ensembles with historical and present-day land cover were compared to examine the sensitivity of surface air and dew point temperatures, rainfall, and the individual components of the surface energy budget to these land cover changes. Mean temperatures for the present-day landscape were 0.3-0.6??C warmer than for the historical landscape over a considerable portion of NJ and the surrounding region, with daily maximum temperatures at least 1.0??C warmer over some of the highly urbanized locations. Reforested regions, however, were slightly cooler. Dew point temperatures decreased by 0.3-0.6??C, suggesting drier, less humid near-surface air for the present-day landscape. Surface warming was generally associated with repartitioning of net radiation from latent to sensible heat flux, and conversely for cooling. While urbanization was accompanied by strong surface albedo decreases and increases in net shortwave radiation, reforestation and potential changes in forest composition have generally increased albedos and also enhanced landscape heterogeneity. The increased deciduousness of forests may have further reduced net downward longwave radiation. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  13. Multispectral satellite data in the context of land surface heat balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhury, Bhaskar J.

    1991-01-01

    Multispectral satellite data are demonstrated to be an important potential contributor to the understanding and completeness of heat balance analysis. Satellite observations are presented, including visible, near-IR, IR, and microwave bands, which estimate surface characteristics and surface fluctuations. The relationship of the interannual variations of the satellite data and the land surface changes is discussed. It is shown that spatially representative values of global fluxes and parameters from multispectral data can consistently enhance the results of heat balance analysis. Daily net radiation can be estimated with a 10 percent error, while the error for albedo would be higher. Computations for all heat fluxes except the latent heat flux are shown. Soil moisture and surface temperature estimates can be derived from microwave and IR observations, respectively. Spectral reflectances in the visible and near-IR bands are suggested as important heat-balance indices for future consideration.

  14. Effect of Spectrally Varying Albedo of Vegetation Surfaces on Shortwave Radiation Fluxes and Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, L.; Martins, J. V.; Yu, H.

    2012-01-01

    This study develops an algorithm for representing detailed spectral features of vegetation albedo based on Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) observations at 7 discrete channels, referred to as the MODIS Enhanced Vegetation Albedo (MEVA) algorithm. The MEVA algorithm empirically fills spectral gaps around the vegetation red edge near 0.7 micrometers and vegetation water absorption features at 1.48 and 1.92 micrometers which cannot be adequately captured by the MODIS 7 channels. We then assess the effects of applying MEVA in comparison to four other traditional approaches to calculate solar fluxes and aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF) at the top of atmosphere (TOA) based on the MODIS discrete reflectance bands. By comparing the DRF results obtained through the MEVA method with the results obtained through the other four traditional approaches, we show that filling the spectral gap of the MODIS measurements around 0.7 micrometers based on the general spectral behavior of healthy green vegetation leads to significant improvement in the instantaneous aerosol DRF at TOA (up to 3.02Wm(exp -2) difference or 48% fraction of the aerosol DRF, .6.28Wm(exp -2), calculated for high spectral resolution surface reflectance from 0.3 to 2.5 micrometers for deciduous vegetation surface). The corrections of the spectral gaps in the vegetation spectrum in the near infrared, again missed by the MODIS reflectances, also contributes to improving TOA DRF calculations but to a much lower extent (less than 0.27Wm(exp -2), or about 4% of the instantaneous DRF). Compared to traditional approaches, MEVA also improves the accuracy of the outgoing solar flux between 0.3 to 2.5 micrometers at TOA by over 60Wm(exp -2) (for aspen 3 surface) and aerosol DRF by over 10Wm(exp -2) (for dry grass). Specifically, for Amazon vegetation types, MEVA can improve the accuracy of daily averaged aerosol radiative forcing in the spectral range of 0.3 to 2.5 micrometers at equator at the

  15. Offline land surface temperature assimilation in mumerical weather prediction output

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Land surface temperature plays an important role in land surface processes, and it is a key input to physically-based retrieval algorithms of important hydrological states and fluxes, such as soil moisture and evaporation. For this reason there are many independent estimates of land surface temperat...

  16. Complex land surface phenologies of moisture status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henebry, G. M.; Doubkova, M.

    2006-12-01

    Making cross-scale linkages from experimental plots or flux tower footprints to regional and continental extents is made difficult by disparate spatial and temporal scales between process and observation. While exchanges between the vegetated land surface and the atmospheric boundary layer are continual, sampling and observations are typically intermittent in time and limited across space. Remote sensing of reflected sunlight has proven useful to track ecological dynamics. These observations are, however, restricted to daytime and often obscured by cloud cover, necessitating production of multi-date composites. The current generation of passive microwave radiometers can observe the land surface both day and night regardless of cloudiness, albeit at a spatial resolution coarser than typically used in ecological remote sensing. Datastreams from the AMSR-E (Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-EOS) onboard NASA's Aqua platform are processed daily at the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) into various products, including global retrievals of surficial soil moisture and vegetation water content based on microwave brightness temperatures observed at multiple frequencies. Due to sensor orbit and swath width, gaps occur at the lower latitudes in daily products. We have further processed the product-streams from the descending (01:30) and ascending (13:30) orbits into separate smoothed daily composites using an 8-day retrospective moving average. Of particular interest for synoptic ecology is the diel difference in vegetation water content. When the difference between the pre-dawn and the early afternoon values is positive, it suggests that the supply of moisture from the root zone is not able to keep pace with evapotranspiration during the day, but the soil and canopy moisture equalize overnight. Time series of the diel difference show rapid changes in moisture status in response to precipitation events and dry spells. What constitutes the appropriate baseline

  17. A review of our understanding of the role played in the climate system by land surface processes (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, S. E.

    2013-12-01

    The paper provides an historical review of research on the impact of the land surface on climate. It commences will the seminal work of Jule Charney on albedo as a potential cause of drought and follows the trail of follow-up studies on the question of desertification and its role in climate. With the exception of a very early paper by Namias, early work was limited mainly to modeling efforts. At the same time, several observational studies provided evidence that land surface feedbacks could enhance and prolong drought, especially in the African Sahel. Later work emphasized the role of soil moisture rather than albedo. Several important field studies also examined the role of the land surface. Examples include FIFE, HAPEX-Sahel and BOREAS. In recent years some major changes in the concept have occurred. There is now substantial observational evidence of an impact at the mesoscale. The role of land surface feedback on climate has become mainstream. Finally, a new subdiscipline has emerged that emphasizes feedbacks between the water cycle, vegetation and climate, namely ecohydrology.

  18. 25 CFR 226.19 - Use of surface of land.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Use of surface of land. 226.19 Section 226.19 Indians... LANDS FOR OIL AND GAS MINING Operations § 226.19 Use of surface of land. (a) Lessee or his/her authorized representative shall have the right to use so much of the surface of the land within the...

  19. 25 CFR 226.19 - Use of surface of land.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Use of surface of land. 226.19 Section 226.19 Indians... LANDS FOR OIL AND GAS MINING Operations § 226.19 Use of surface of land. (a) Lessee or his/her authorized representative shall have the right to use so much of the surface of the land within the...

  20. 25 CFR 226.19 - Use of surface of land.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Use of surface of land. 226.19 Section 226.19 Indians... LANDS FOR OIL AND GAS MINING Operations § 226.19 Use of surface of land. (a) Lessee or his/her authorized representative shall have the right to use so much of the surface of the land within the...

  1. 25 CFR 226.19 - Use of surface of land.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Use of surface of land. 226.19 Section 226.19 Indians... LANDS FOR OIL AND GAS MINING Operations § 226.19 Use of surface of land. (a) Lessee or his/her authorized representative shall have the right to use so much of the surface of the land within the...

  2. High Resolution Surface Geometry and Albedo by Combining Laser Altimetry and Visible Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Robin D.; vonToussaint, Udo; Cheeseman, Peter C.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The need for accurate geometric and radiometric information over large areas has become increasingly important. Laser altimetry is one of the key technologies for obtaining this geometric information. However, there are important application areas where the observing platform has its orbit constrained by the other instruments it is carrying, and so the spatial resolution that can be recorded by the laser altimeter is limited. In this paper we show how information recorded by one of the other instruments commonly carried, a high-resolution imaging camera, can be combined with the laser altimeter measurements to give a high resolution estimate both of the surface geometry and its reflectance properties. This estimate has an accuracy unavailable from other interpolation methods. We present the results from combining synthetic laser altimeter measurements on a coarse grid with images generated from a surface model to re-create the surface model.

  3. Toward Transfer Functions for Land Surface Phenologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henebry, G. M.

    2010-12-01

    A key problem in projecting future landscapes is simulating the associated land surface phenologies (or LSPs). A recent study of land surface models concluded that the representations of crop phenologies among the models diverged sufficiently to impede a useful intercomparison of simulation results from their associated climate models. Grassland phenologies are far more complicated than cropland phenologies due to multiple forcing factors, photosynthetic pathways (C3 vs C4), and spatial heterogeneities in both resource availabilities and land management practices. Furthermore, many tallgrass species (such as switchgrass) are widely distributed across temperature, but not moisture, gradients, resulting in significant ecotypic variation across the species' geographic range. Thus, how feasible is "transplanting" tallgrass LSPs across isotherms—but along isohyets—to simulate a shift in cultivation from maize-soy to switchgrass? Prior work has shown a quadratic model can provide a parsimonious link between a Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (or NDVI) time series and thermal time, measured in terms of accumulated growing degree-days (or AGDD). Moreover, the thermal time to peak NDVI (or TTP) is a simple function of the parameter coefficients of fitted model. I fitted quadratic models to MODIS NDVI and weather station data at multiple sites across the Northern Great Plains over ten growing seasons, 2000-2009. There is a strong latitudinal gradient in TTP that results in part from a quasi-linear gradient in accumulated daylight hours (or ADH) between 30 and 50 degrees north. However, AGDD improves upon ADH by providing sensitivity to the variability of growing season weather. In the quadratic parameter coefficients there is a geographic pattern apparent as a function of TTP, although it is more variable at shorter TTPs. Using these patterns, an LSP transfer function was implemented along a latitudinal transect to simulate switchgrass cultivation in areas now

  4. A semiempirical model for interpreting microwave emission from semiarid land surfaces as seen from space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerr, Yann H.; Njoku, Eni G.

    1990-01-01

    A radiative-transfer model for simulating microwave brightness temperatures over land surfaces is described. The model takes into account sensor viewing conditions (spacecraft altitude, viewing angle, frequency, and polarization) and atmospheric parameters over a soil surface characterized by its moisture, roughness, and temperature and covered with a layer of vegetation characterized by its temperature, water content, single scattering albedo, structure, and percent coverage. In order to reduce the influence of atmospheric and surface temperature effects, the brightness temperatures are expressed as polarization ratios that depend primarily on the soil moisture and roughness, canopy water content, and percentage of cover. The sensitivity of the polarization ratio to these parameters is investigated. Simulation of the temporal evolution of the microwave signal over semiarid areas in the African Sahel is presented and compared to actual satellite data from the SMMR instrument on Nimbus-7.

  5. Towards Monitoring Satellite Land Surface Temperature Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, P.; Yu, Y.; Liu, Y.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, X.

    2014-12-01

    Land surface temperature (LST) is of fundamental importance to the net radiation budget at the Earth surface and to monitoring the state of crops and vegetation, as well as an important indicator of both the greenhouse effect and the energy flux between the atmosphere and the land. Since its launch on October 28, 2011, the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) satellite has been continuously providing data for LST production; intensive validation and calibration of the LST data have been conducted since then. To better monitor the performance of the S-NPP LST product and evaluate different retrieval algorithms for potential improvement, a near-real-time monitoring system has been developed and implemented. The system serves as a tool for both the routine monitoring and the deep-dive researches. It currently consists of two major components: the global cross-satellite LST comparisons between S-NPP/VIIRS and MODIS/AQUA, and the LST validation with respect to in-situ observations from SURFRAD network. Results about cross-satellite comparisons, satellite-in situ LST validation, and evaluation of different retrieval algorithms are routinely generated and published through an FTP server of the system ftp. The results indicate that LST from the S-NPP is comparable to that from MODIS. A few case studies using this tool will be analyzed and presented.

  6. Global albedo change and radiative cooling from anthropogenic land-cover change, 1700 to 2005 based on MODIS, land-use harmonization and radiative kernels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Widespread anthropogenic land-cover change over the last five centuries has influenced the global climate system through both biogeochemical and biophysical processes. Models indicate that warming from carbon emissions associated with land cover conversion have been partially offset if not outweigh...

  7. Incorporation of surface albedo-temperature feedback in a one-dimensional radiative-connective climate model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, W. C.; Stone, P. H.

    1979-01-01

    The feedback between ice snow albedo and temperature is included in a one dimensional radiative convective climate model. The effect of this feedback on sensitivity to changes in solar constant is studied for the current values of the solar constant and cloud characteristics. The ice snow albedo feedback amplifies global climate sensitivity by 33% and 50%, respectively, for assumptions of constant cloud altitude and constant cloud temperature.

  8. Estimating the broadband longwave emissivity of global bare soil from the MODIS shortwave albedo product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jie; Liang, Shunlin

    2014-01-01

    A constant land surface longwave emissivity value, or very simple parameterization, has been adopted by current land surface models because of a current lack of reliable observations. Of all the various Earth surface types, bare soil has the highest variations in broadband emissivity (BBE). We propose here a new algorithm to estimate BBE in the 8-13.5 µm spectral range based on the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) albedo product for bare soil. This algorithm takes advantage of both Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) longwave emissivity and MODIS shortwave albedo products, as well as the established linear relationship between ASTER BBE and seven MODIS spectral albedos for bare soil. In order to mitigate step discontinuities in the global land surface BBE product, a transition zone was established and the BBE estimation method was also provided. Three linear formulae were derived for bare soil and transition zones, respectively. Given the accuracy of 0.01 for MODIS spectral albedo, the absolute accuracy of BBE retrieval is better than 0.017. The validation results obtained from the three field trials conducted in China and one field trial in western/southwestern U.S. indicated that the average difference between the estimated BBE and the measured BBE was 0.016. We have introduced a new strategy to generate global land surface BBE using MODIS data. This strategy was used to generate global 8 day 1 km land surface BBE products from 2000 through 2010.

  9. Low Albedo Surfaces and Eolian Sediment: Mars Orbiter Camera Views of Western Arabia Terra Craters and Wind Streaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edgett, Kenneth S.

    2001-01-01

    High spatial resolution (1.5 to 12 m/pixel) Mars Global Surveyor Mars Orbiter Camera images obtained September 1997 through June 2001 indicate that the large, dark wind streaks of western Arabia Terra each originate at a barchan dune field on a crater floor. The streaks consist of a relatively thin coating of sediment deflated from the dune fields and their vicinity. This sediment drapes a previous mantle that more thickly covers nearly all of western Arabia Terra. No dunes or eolian bedforms are found within the dark wind streaks, nor do any of the intracrater dunes climb up crater walls to provide sand to the wind streaks. The relations between dunes, wind streak, and subjacent terrain imply that dark-toned grains finer than those which comprise the dunes are lifted into suspension and carried out of the craters to be deposited on the adjacent terrain. Such grains are most likely in the silt size range (3.9-62.5 micrometers). The streaks change in terms of extent, relative albedo, and surface pattern over periods measured in years, but very little evidence for recent eolian activity (dust plumes, storms, dune movement) has been observed.

  10. 25 CFR 214.14 - Use of surface lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Use of surface lands. 214.14 Section 214.14 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF OSAGE RESERVATION LANDS, OKLAHOMA, FOR MINING, EXCEPT OIL AND GAS § 214.14 Use of surface lands. (a) Lessees may use...

  11. 25 CFR 214.14 - Use of surface lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Use of surface lands. 214.14 Section 214.14 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF OSAGE RESERVATION LANDS, OKLAHOMA, FOR MINING, EXCEPT OIL AND GAS § 214.14 Use of surface lands. (a) Lessees may use...

  12. 25 CFR 214.14 - Use of surface lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Use of surface lands. 214.14 Section 214.14 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF OSAGE RESERVATION LANDS, OKLAHOMA, FOR MINING, EXCEPT OIL AND GAS § 214.14 Use of surface lands. (a) Lessees may use...

  13. 25 CFR 214.14 - Use of surface lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Use of surface lands. 214.14 Section 214.14 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF OSAGE RESERVATION LANDS, OKLAHOMA, FOR MINING, EXCEPT OIL AND GAS § 214.14 Use of surface lands. (a) Lessees may use so much of...

  14. Application and Evaluation of MODIS LAI, fPAR, and Albedo Products in the WRFCMAQ System

    EPA Science Inventory

    Leaf area index (LAI), vegetation fraction (VF), and surface albedo are important parameters in the land surface model (LSM) for meteorology and air quality modeling systems such as WRF/CMAQ. LAI and VF control not only leaf to canopy level evapotranspiration flux scaling but al...

  15. Remote sensing of solar radiation absorbed and reflected by vegetated land surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Tanre, D.; Myneni, R.B.; Choudhury, B.J. ); Asrar, G. )

    1992-03-01

    This paper discusses the problem of remotely sensing the amount of solar radiation absorbed and reflected by vegetated land surfaces which was investigated with the aid of one- and three-dimensional radiative transfer models. Desert-like vegetation was modeled as clumps of leaves randomly distributed on a bright dry soil with a ground cover of generally less than 100%. Surface albedo (ALB), fraction of photosynthetically active radiation absorbed by the canopy (FAPAR), fractions of solar radiation absorbed by the canopy (FASOLAR) and soil (FASOIL), and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) were calculated for various illumination conditions. A base case was defined with problem parameters considered typical for desert vegetation in order to understand the dynamics of NDVI and ALB with respect to ground cover, leaf area index, soil brightness, and illumination conditions. The magnitude of errors involved in the estimation of surface albedo from broad-band monodirectional measurements was assessed through model simulations of SPOT, AVHRR, and GOES sensors. The nature of the relationships between NDVI vs. FASOLAR, FAPAR, FASOIL, and ALB, and their sensitivity to all problem parameter was investigated in order to develop simple predictive models.

  16. Landsat Estimate of Albedo Change from Fire in the Alaskan Boreal Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, N. H.; French, N. H.

    2001-12-01

    The impact of fire on boreal land cover is substantial with dramatic implications for the exchange of carbon and energy between the land and atmosphere. One of the primary mechanisms through which ecosystems can influence surface-atmosphere energy exchange is by affecting radiation balance. Land surface albedo defines how much shortwave energy is "captured" by the system and is key in determining surface net radiation. The radiation balance and net energy exchange, in turn is an important factor in regulating carbon balance by influencing site temperature, moisture, and , therefore, the biotic exchange of carbon. The purpose of this study was to quantify and map the change in summertime land surface albedo from fire disturbance in a black spruce dominated landscape in Alaska. The study was conducted at a set of three fire-disturbed sites located near Delta Junction. Five Landsat TM and ETM images from late August/early September for 1986 to 1999 were the primary data used. Albedo change was derived using the six reflective bands of Landsat (bands 1-5 and 7). The images were used to map albedo change at each of the three burn sites from the fire disturbance itself and from vegetation regrowth at the two older burn scars. Field measurements of albedo were also collected and were used to complement the remote sensing-based results. The results show that fire disturbance can cause an increase, decrease or no significant change in summertime land surface albedo. Albedo change is spatially and temporally variable based on pre-burn vegetation, canopy density, burn severity, and site age. Moderately burned, medium density black spruce, the most typical burn conditions in Alaska, experienced a very small decrease and often insignificant change in albedo. Dense and medium density spruce sites nearly always showed no change in albedo from the fire disturbance. Sparse density spruce and the vegetation types with large amounts of deciduous or herbaceous cover generally

  17. 25 CFR 226.19 - Use of surface of land.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... LANDS FOR OIL AND GAS MINING Operations § 226.19 Use of surface of land. (a) Lessee or his/her... originally drilled under the currently lease. A drilling site shall be held to the minimum area essential...

  18. Land Surface Emission Modeling to Support Physical Precipitation Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters-Lidard, Christina D.; Harrison, Kenneth; Kumar, Sujay; Ferraro, Ralph; Skofronick-Jackson, Gail

    2010-01-01

    Land surface modeling and data assimilation can provide dynamic land surface state variables necessary to support physical precipitation retrieval algorithms over land. It is well-known that surface emission, particularly over the range of frequencies to be included in the Global Precipitation Measurement Mission (GPM), is sensitive to land surface states, including soil properties, vegetation type and greenness, soil moisture, surface temperature, and snow cover, density, and grain size. In order to investigate the robustness of both the land surface model states and the microwave emissivity and forward radiative transfer models, we have undertaken a multi-site investigation as part of the NASA Precipitation Measurement Missions (PMM) Land Surface Characterization. Working Group.

  19. An Iterative, Geometric, Tilt Correction Method for Radiation and Albedo Observed by Automatic Weather Stations on Snow-Covered Surfaces: Application to Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W.; Zender, C. S.; van As, D.; Smeets, P.; van den Broeke, M.

    2015-12-01

    Surface melt and mass loss of Greenland Ice Sheet may play crucial roles in global climate change due to their positive feedbacks and large fresh water storage. With few other regular meteorological observations available in this extreme environment, measurements from Automatic Weather Stations (AWS) are the primary data source for the surface energy budget studies, and for validating satellite observations and model simulations. However, station tilt, due to surface melt and compaction, results in considerable biases in the radiation and thus albedo measurements by AWS. In this study, we identify the tilt-induced biases in the climatology of surface radiative flux and albedo, and then correct them based on geometrical principles. Over all the AWS from the Greenland Climate Network (GC-Net), the Kangerlussuaq transect (K-transect) and the Programme for Monitoring of the Greenland Ice Sheet (PROMICE), only ~15% of clear days have the correct solar noon time, with the largest bias to be 3 hours. Absolute hourly biases in the magnitude of surface insolation can reach up to 200 W/m2, with daily average exceeding 100 W/m2. The biases are larger in the accumulation zone due to the systematic tilt at each station, although variabilities of tilt angles are larger in the ablation zone. Averaged over the whole Greenland Ice Sheet in the melting season, the absolute bias in insolation is ~23 W/m2, enough to melt 0.51 m snow water equivalent. We estimate the tilt angles and their directions by comparing the simulated insolation at a horizontal surface with the observed insolation by these tilted AWS under clear-sky conditions. Our correction reduces the RMSE against satellite measurements and reanalysis by ~30 W/m2 relative to the uncorrected data, with correlation coefficients over 0.95 for both references. The corrected diurnal changes of albedo are more smooth, with consistent semi-smiling patterns (see Fig. 1). The seasonal cycles and annual variabilities of albedo are in

  20. Passive microwave retrieval of land surface properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owe, Manfred; de Jeu, Richard A. M.; Holmes, Thomas R. H.

    2006-05-01

    A methodology for retrieving land surface properties from passive microwave observations is presented. Dual polarization microwave brightness temperature data, together with a simple radiative transfer model are used to derive surface soil moisture and vegetation optical depth simultaneously, in a non linear optimization procedure using a forward modeling approach. Soil temperature is derived off-line with a common heat flow model, driven by high frequency vertical polarization microwave data and remotely sensed observations of net radiation. The methodology does not require any field observations of soil moisture or canopy biophysical properties for calibration purposes and is independent of wavelength. Remote sensing provides an excellent opportunity to monitor and gather environmental data in regions that have little or no instrumentation. Moreover, microwave technology provides a more all-weather capability than is typically afforded with visible and near infrared wavelengths. The model was developed for regional- to global-scale monitoring and related environmental applications such as surface energy balance modelling, numerical weather prediction, flood and drought forecasting, and climate change studies. However, at higher spatial resolutions, which would be possible with aircraft, especially unmanned vehicles, tactical applications may be realized as well. Retrieval results compare well with field observations of soil moisture and satellite-derived vegetation index data from optical sensors.

  1. Assimilation of Surface Temperature in Land Surface Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakshmi, Venkataraman

    1998-01-01

    Hydrological models have been calibrated and validated using catchment streamflows. However, using a point measurement does not guarantee correct spatial distribution of model computed heat fluxes, soil moisture and surface temperatures. With the advent of satellites in the late 70s, surface temperature is being measured two to four times a day from various satellite sensors and different platforms. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate use of satellite surface temperature in (a) validation of model computed surface temperatures and (b) assimilation of satellite surface temperatures into a hydrological model in order to improve the prediction accuracy of soil moistures and heat fluxes. The assimilation is carried out by comparing the satellite and the model produced surface temperatures and setting the "true"temperature midway between the two values. Based on this "true" surface temperature, the physical relationships of water and energy balance are used to reset the other variables. This is a case of nudging the water and energy balance variables so that they are consistent with each other and the true" surface temperature. The potential of this assimilation scheme is demonstrated in the form of various experiments that highlight the various aspects. This study is carried over the Red-Arkansas basin in the southern United States (a 5 deg X 10 deg area) over a time period of a year (August 1987 - July 1988). The land surface hydrological model is run on an hourly time step. The results show that satellite surface temperature assimilation improves the accuracy of the computed surface soil moisture remarkably.

  2. Standards for the validation of remotely sensed albedo products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Jennifer

    2015-04-01

    Land surface albedo is important component of the Earth's energy balance, defined as the fraction of shortwave radiation absorbed by a surface, and is one many Essential Climate Variables (ECVS) that can be retrieved from space through remote sensing. To quantify the accuracy of these products, they must be validated with respect to in-situ measurements of albedo using an albedometer. Whilst accepted standards exist for the calibration of albedometers, standards for the use of in-situ measurement schemes, and their use in validation procedures have yet to be developed. It is essential that we can assess the quality of remotely sensed albedo data, and to identify traceable sources of uncertainty during process of providing these data. As a result of the current lack of accepted standards for in-situ albedo retrieval and validation procedures, we are not yet able to identify and quantify traceable sources of uncertainty. Establishing standard protocols for in-situ retrievals for the validation of global albedo products would allow inter-product use and comparison, in addition to product standardization. Accordingly, this study aims to assess the quality of in-situ albedo retrieval schemes and identify sources of uncertainty, specifically in vegetation environments. A 3D Monte Carlo Ray Tracing Model will be used to simulate albedometer instruments in complex 3D vegetation canopies. To determine sources of uncertainty, factors that influence albedo measurement uncertainty were identified and will subsequently be examined: 1. Time of day (Solar Zenith Angle) 2. Ecosytem type 3. Placement of albedometer within the ecosystem 4. Height of albedometer above the canopy 5. Clustering within the ecosystem A variety of 3D vegetation canopies have been generated to cover the main ecosystems found globally, different seasons, and different plant distributions. Canopies generated include birchstand and pinestand forests for summer and winter, savanna, shrubland, cropland and

  3. The long-term Global LAnd Surface Satellite (GLASS) product suite and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, S.

    2015-12-01

    Our Earth's environment is experiencing rapid changes due to natural variability and human activities. To monitor, understand and predict environment changes to meet the economic, social and environmental needs, use of long-term high-quality satellite data products is critical. The Global LAnd Surface Satellite (GLASS) product suite, generated at Beijing Normal University, currently includes 12 products, including leaf area index (LAI), broadband shortwave albedo, broadband longwave emissivity, downwelling shortwave radiation and photosynthetically active radiation, land surface skin temperature, longwave net radiation, daytime all-wave net radiation, fraction of absorbed photosynetically active radiation absorbed by green vegetation (FAPAR), fraction of green vegetation coverage, gross primary productivity (GPP), and evapotranspiration (ET). Most products span from 1981-2014. The algorithms for producing these products have been published in the top remote sensing related journals and books. More and more applications have being reported in the scientific literature. The GLASS products are freely available at the Center for Global Change Data Processing and Analysis of Beijing Normal University (http://www.bnu-datacenter.com/), and the University of Maryland Global Land Cover Facility (http://glcf.umd.edu). After briefly introducing the basic characteristics of GLASS products, we will present some applications on the long-term environmental changes detected from GLASS products at both global and local scales. Detailed analysis of regional hotspots, such as Greenland, Tibetan plateau, and northern China, will be emphasized, where environmental changes have been mainly associated with climate warming, drought, land-atmosphere interactions, and human activities.

  4. The Effect of Land Use Change on Land Surface Temperature in the Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youneszadeh, S.; Amiri, N.; Pilesjo, P.

    2015-12-01

    The Netherlands is a small country with a relatively large population which experienced a rapid rate of land use changes from 2000 to 2008 years due to the industrialization and population increase. Land use change is especially related to the urban expansion and open agriculture reduction due to the enhanced economic growth. This research reports an investigation into the application of remote sensing and geographical information system (GIS) in combination with statistical methods to provide a quantitative information on the effect of land use change on the land surface temperature. In this study, remote sensing techniques were used to retrieve the land surface temperature (LST) by using the MODIS Terra (MOD11A2) Satellite imagery product. As land use change alters the thermal environment, the land surface temperature (LST) could be a proper change indicator to show the thermal changes in relation with land use changes. The Geographical information system was further applied to extract the mean yearly land surface temperature (LST) for each land use type and each province in the 2003, 2006 and 2008 years, by using the zonal statistic techniques. The results show that, the inland water and offshore area has the highest night land surface temperature (LST). Furthermore, the Zued (South)-Holland province has the highest night LST value in the 2003, 2006 and 2008 years. The result of this research will be helpful tool for urban planners and environmental scientists by providing the critical information about the land surface temperature.

  5. Cross comparisons of land surface process descriptions in land surface models using multiple sources of data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Gi Hyeon

    2006-12-01

    Land surface-atmospheric interactions influence climate and weather varying spatial scales from local to mesoscale, and even to global. This dissertation deals with several topics: (1) evaluation of various sources of incoming solar radiations, (2) evaluation of land surface process descriptions in the land surface models in both basin-scale and point scale offline model simulations, and (3) inverse estimation of radiation components using net radiation and other meteorological variables. Incoming solar radiations from various sources were evaluated. This study identified the two sources of errors in the North American Data Assimilation system (NLDAS) solar radiation: One is related to bias inherited from the ETA Data Assimilation System (EDAS) during 2001 and 2003, and the other is software error at NESDIS operational system during 2002. Land surface processes are treated quite differently in the land surface models used in this study. Over the state of Oklahoma, Common Land Model 2.1 (CLM2.1) estimates more evaporation but less transpiration than the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC3L) model. This is due to the difference in the runoff algorithm, which results in more infiltration down to the soil layer and then providing more available water to plant roots in VIC3L. CLM2.1 overestimates ground heat flux in Point scale simulation. CoLM, which employs two stream radiative transfer scheme, shows better agreements to adjusted ground observations (using Bowen-ration closure method) in offline simulations than CLM2.1. CoLM, in addition, shows various model behaviors depending on vegetation cover types. Inverse radiation estimation methods were developed and evaluated at four AmeriFlux sites. Analysis of observed radiations showed a triangle shape relationship among net radiation, net solar radiation and cloud factor (defined in this study). Clear-sky downward longwave radiation is needed to be calibrated for each site. SCE-UA method was used to calibrate an

  6. Enhancing the Representation of Subgrid Land Surface Characteristics in Land Surface Models

    SciTech Connect

    Ke, Yinghai; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Huang, Maoyi; Li, Hongyi

    2013-09-27

    Land surface heterogeneity has long been recognized and increasingly incorporated in the land surface modelling. In most existing land surface models, the spatial variability of surface cover is represented as subgrid composition of multiple surface cover types. In this study, we developed a new subgrid classification method (SGC) that accounts for the topographic variability of the vegetation cover. Each model grid cell was represented with a number of elevation classes and each elevation class was further described by a number of vegetation types. The numbers of elevation classes and vegetation types were variable and optimized for each model grid so that the spatial variability of both elevation and vegetation can be reasonably explained given a pre-determined total number of classes. The subgrid structure of the Community Land Model (CLM) was used as an example to illustrate the newly developed method in this study. With similar computational burden as the current subgrid vegetation representation in CLM, the new method is able to explain at least 80% of the total subgrid PFTs and greatly reduced the variations of elevation within each subgrid class compared to the baseline method where a single elevation class is assigned to each subgrid PFT. The new method was also evaluated against two other subgrid methods (SGC1 and SGC2) that assigned fixed numbers of elevation and vegetation classes for each model grid with different perspectives of surface cover classification. Implemented at five model resolutions (0.1°, 0.25°, 0.5°, 1.0° and 2.0°) with three maximum-allowed total number of classes N_class of 24, 18 and 12 representing different computational burdens over the North America (NA) continent, the new method showed variable performances compared to the SGC1 and SGC2 methods. However, the advantage of the SGC method over the other two methods clearly emerged at coarser model resolutions and with moderate computational intensity (N_class = 18) as it

  7. Intercomparison of MODIS Albedo Retrievals and In Situ Measurements Across the Global FLUXNET Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cescatti, Alessandro; Marcolla, Barbara; Vannan, Suresh K. Santhana; Pan, Jerry Yun; Roman, Miguel O.; Yang, Xiaoyuan; Ciais, Philippe; Cook, Robert B.; Law, Beverly E.; Matteucci, Girogio; Migliavacca, Mirco; Moors, Eddy; Richardson, Andrew D.; Seufert, Guenther; Schaaf, Crystal B.

    2012-01-01

    Surface albedo is a key parameter in the Earth's energy balance since it affects the amount of solar radiation directly absorbed at the planet surface. Its variability in time and space can be globally retrieved through the use of remote sensing products. To evaluate and improve the quality of satellite retrievals, careful intercomparisons with in situ measurements of surface albedo are crucial. For this purpose we compared MODIS albedo retrievals with surface measurements taken at 53 FLUXNET sites that met strict conditions of land cover homogeneity. A good agreement between mean yearly values of satellite retrievals and in situ measurements was found (R(exp 2)= 0.82). The mismatch is correlated to the spatial heterogeneity of surface albedo, stressing the relevance of land cover homogeneity when comparing point to pixel data. When the seasonal patterns of MODIS albedo is considered for different plant functional types, the match with surface observation is extremely good at all forest sites. On the contrary, in non-forest sites satellite retrievals underestimate in situ measurements across the seasonal cycle. The mismatch observed at grasslands and croplands sites is likely due to the extreme fragmentation of these landscapes, as confirmed by geostatistical attributes derived from high resolution scenes.

  8. Mycorrhizal fungi and global land surface models?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzostek, E. R.; Fisher, J. B.; Shi, M.; Phillips, R.

    2013-12-01

    In the current generation of Land Surface Models (LSMs), the representation of coupled carbon (C) and nutrient cycles does not account for allocation of C by plants to mycorrhizal fungi in exchange for limiting nutrients. Given that the amount of C transferred to mycorrhizae can exceed 20% of net primary production (NPP), mycorrhizae can supply over half of the nitrogen (N) needed to support NPP, and that large majority of plants form associations with mycorrhizae; integrating these mechanisms into LSMs may significantly alter our understanding of the role of the terrestrial biosphere in mitigating climate change. Here, we present results from the integration of a mycorrhizal framework into a cutting-edge global plant nitrogen model -- Fixation & Uptake of Nitrogen (FUN; Fisher et al., 2010) -- that can be coupled into existing LSMs. In this mycorrhizal framework, the C cost of N acquisition varies as a function of mycorrhizal type with: (1) plants that support arbuscular mycorrhizae (AM) benefiting when N is plentiful and (2) plants that support ectomycorrhizae (ECM) benefiting when N is limiting. At the plot scale (15 x 15m), the My-FUN model improved predictions of retranslocation, N uptake, and the amount of C transferred into the soil relative to the base model across 45 plots that vary in mycorrhizal type in Indiana, USA. At the ecosystem scale, when we coupled this new framework into the Community Land Model (CLM-CN), the model estimated lower C uptake than the base model and more accurately predicted C uptake at the Morgan Monroe State Forest AmeriFlux site. These results suggest that the inclusion of a mycorrhizal framework into LSMs will enhance our ability to predict feedbacks between global change and the terrestrial biosphere.

  9. Radiative forcing impacts of boreal forest biofuels: a scenario study for Norway in light of albedo.

    PubMed

    Bright, Ryan M; Strømman, Anders Hammer; Peters, Glen P

    2011-09-01

    Radiative forcing impacts due to increased harvesting of boreal forests for use as transportation biofuel in Norway are quantified using simple climate models together with life cycle emission data, MODIS surface albedo data, and a dynamic land use model tracking carbon flux and clear-cut area changes within productive forests over a 100-year management period. We approximate the magnitude of radiative forcing due to albedo changes and compare it to the forcing due to changes in the carbon cycle for purposes of attributing the net result, along with changes in fossil fuel emissions, to the combined anthropogenic land use plus transport fuel system. Depending on albedo uncertainty and uncertainty about the geographic distribution of future logging activity, we report a range of results, thus only general conclusions about the magnitude of the carbon offset potential due to changes in surface albedo can be drawn. Nevertheless, our results have important implications for how forests might be managed for mitigating climate change in light of this additional biophysical criterion, and in particular, on future biofuel policies throughout the region. Future research efforts should be directed at understanding the relationships between the physical properties of managed forests and albedo, and how albedo changes in time as a result of specific management interventions. PMID:21797227

  10. Estimation of Land Surface Energy Balance Using Satellite Data of Spatial Reduced Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vintila, Ruxandra; Radnea, Cristina; Savin, Elena; Poenaru, Violeta

    2010-12-01

    The paper presents preliminary results concerning the monitoring at national level of several geo-biophysical variables retrieved by remote sensing, in particular those related to drought or aridisation. The study, which is in progress, represents also an exercise for to the implementation of a Land Monitoring Core Service for Romania, according to the Kopernikus Program and in compliance with the INSPIRE Directive. The SEBS model has been used to retrieve land surface energy balance variables, such as turbulent heat fluxes, evaporative fraction and daily evaporation, based on three information types: (1) surface albedo, emissivity, temperature, fraction of vegetation cover (fCover), leaf area index (LAI) and vegetation height; (2) air pressure, temperature, humidity and wind speed at the planetary boundary layer (PBL) height; (3) downward solar radiation and downward longwave radiation. AATSR and MERIS archived reprocessed images have provided several types of information. Thus, surface albedo, emissivity, and land surface temperature have been retrieved from AATSR, while LAI and fCover have been estimated from MERIS. The vegetation height has been derived from CORINE Land Cover and PELCOM Land Use databases, while the meteorological information at the height of PBL have been estimated from the measurements provided by the national weather station network. Other sources of data used during this study have been the GETASSE30 digital elevation model with 30" spatial resolution, used for satellite image orthorectification, and the SIGSTAR-200 geographical information system of soil resources of Romania, used for water deficit characterisation. The study will continue by processing other AATSR and MERIS archived images, complemented by the validation of SEBS results with ground data collected on the most important biomes for Romania at various phenological stages, and the transformation of evaporation / evapotranspiration into a drought index using the soil texture

  11. Sensitivity of global tropical climate to land surface processes: Mean state and interannual variability

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Hsi-Yen; Xiao, Heng; Mechoso, C. R.; Xue, Yongkang

    2013-03-01

    This study examines the sensitivity of global tropical climate to land surface processes (LSP) using an atmospheric general circulation model both uncoupled (with prescribed SSTs) and coupled to an oceanic general circulation model. The emphasis is on the interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical processes, which have first order influence on the surface energy and water budgets. The sensitivity to those processes is represented by the differences between model simulations, in which two land surface schemes are considered: 1) a simple land scheme that specifies surface albedo and soil moisture availability, and 2) the Simplified Simple Biosphere Model (SSiB), which allows for consideration of interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical process. Observational datasets are also employed to assess the reality of model-revealed sensitivity. The mean state sensitivity to different LSP is stronger in the coupled mode, especially in the tropical Pacific. Furthermore, seasonal cycle of SSTs in the equatorial Pacific, as well as ENSO frequency, amplitude, and locking to the seasonal cycle of SSTs are significantly modified and more realistic with SSiB. This outstanding sensitivity of the atmosphere-ocean system develops through changes in the intensity of equatorial Pacific trades modified by convection over land. Our results further demonstrate that the direct impact of land-atmosphere interactions on the tropical climate is modified by feedbacks associated with perturbed oceanic conditions ("indirect effect" of LSP). The magnitude of such indirect effect is strong enough to suggest that comprehensive studies on the importance of LSP on the global climate have to be made in a system that allows for atmosphere-ocean interactions.

  12. Spatial distribution of Sahelian land surface properties from airborne POLDER multiangular observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacaze, Roselyne; Roujean, Jean-Louis; Goutorbe, Jean-Paul

    1999-05-01

    This paper presents the spatial distribution of land surface parameters in southwestern Niger, a region composed mainly of shrub and grassland fallows, millet crop, and tiger bush. The regional patterns of the surface albedo, the leaf area index, the fractional vegetation cover, and the fraction of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation are estimated through the growing season from airborne POLDER (Polarization and Directionality of Earth Reflectances) data acquired during the Hydrologic Atmospheric Pilot Experiment in Sahel (HAPEX-Sahel). The retrieval of these parameters is via a bidirectional reflectance model, appropriate vegetation indices, and Sun-view geometries. Comparison of the POLDER-derived surface parameters with airborne and ground measurements shows that the procedure generally performs well, enhancing the ability to constrain soil-vegetation-atmosphere transfer (SVAT) models in the Sahel area by providing spatially averaged and updated information. This will enable a more valid assessment of the role of the land surface in determining the Sahelian climate, with a better determination of the scaling effect of surface processes. Although the algorithms described in this work rely primarily on multiangular observations, such as those provided by spaceborne POLDER data sets, they should be useful in a number of remote sensing applications.

  13. CARBON SEQUESTRATION ON SURFACE MINE LANDS

    SciTech Connect

    Donald H. Graves; Christopher Barton; Richard Sweigard; Richard Warner

    2003-10-30

    The 2002-2003 Department of Energy plantings amounted to 164 acres containing 111,520 tree seedlings in eastern and western Kentucky. Data gathered on these trees included an inventory to determine survival of all planted species. A sub-sample of seedlings was selected to assess the height and diameter of individual species of seedlings established. Additional efforts involved collection of soil sample and litter samples, analysis of herbaceous ground cover from vegetation clip plots and leaf area on each tree species, and development of tissue collections. All areas were sampled for penetration resistance, penetration depth (or depth to refusal), and bulk density at various depths. Rain fall events and flow rates were recorded. The water quality of runoff samples involved the determination of total and settleable solids and particle size distribution. A study was initiated that will focus on the colonization of small mammals from forest edges to various areas located on reclaimed surface mines. This effort will provide a better understanding of the role small mammals and birds have in the establishment of plant communities on mine lands that will be useful in developing and improving reclamation techniques.

  14. Characterization of land surface energy fluxes at the Salar de Atacama, Northern Chile using ASTER image classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampf, S. K.; Tyler, S. W.

    2003-12-01

    Models of land surface energy fluxes often use remotely sensed data to derive surface temperature, albedo, and emissivity, important parameters in energy budget calculations. The ability to determine the spatial distribution of these parameters can lead to improved estimations of the spatial variability of land surface energy fluxes. However, other parameters used in energy flux calculations such as aerodynamic resistance are not directly linked to quantities commonly derived from remotely sensed data. If images can be accurately classified into separate land cover types, empirically determined values of unknown parameters can then be assigned separately to each land cover classification. This study examines several techniques of determining the spatial distribution of land surface energy fluxes at the Salar de Atacama, a large playa in northern Chile. Fluxes are calculated using Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection radiometer (ASTER) Level 2 surface kinetic temperature, surface emissivity, and surface reflectance data in conjunction with ground-based meteorological measurements. Energy fluxes are calculated initially by applying a single value of aerodynamic resistance to the entire image area. Subsequently, the ASTER scene is classified into distinct land cover types, and land surface roughness is characterized using the ratio of ASTER band 3N (nadir-viewing) to band 3B (back-viewing). Separate values of aerodynamic resistance are then assigned to each land cover type, and energy fluxes over the entire Salar de Atacama are calculated using these spatially distributed aerodynamic resistance values. Results of both energy flux calculation techniques are evaluated at several sites on the playa using ground-based energy flux measurements.

  15. Ground surface temperature simulation for different land covers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herb, William R.; Janke, Ben; Mohseni, Omid; Stefan, Heinz G.

    2008-07-01

    SummaryA model for predicting temperature time series for dry and wet land surfaces is described, as part of a larger project to assess the impact of urban development on the temperature of surface runoff and coldwater streams. Surface heat transfer processes on impervious and pervious land surfaces were investigated for both dry and wet weather periods. The surface heat transfer equations were combined with a numerical approximation of the 1-D unsteady heat diffusion equation to calculate pavement and soil temperature profiles to a depth of 10 m. Equations to predict the magnitude of the radiative, convective, conductive and evaporative heat fluxes at a dry or wet surface, using standard climate data as input, were developed. A model for the effect of plant canopies on surface heat transfer was included for vegetated land surfaces. Given suitable climate data, the model can simulate the land surface and sub-surface temperatures continuously throughout a six month time period or for a single rainfall event. Land surface temperatures have been successfully simulated for pavements, bare soil, short and tall grass, a forest, and two agricultural crops (corn and soybeans). The simulations were run for three different locations in US, and different years as imposed by the availability of measured soil temperature and climate data. To clarify the effect of land use on surface temperatures, the calibrated coefficients for each land use and the same soil coefficients were used to simulate surface temperatures for a six year climate data set from Albertville, MN. Asphalt and concrete give the highest surface temperatures, as expected, while vegetated surfaces gave the lowest. Bare soil gives surface temperatures that lie between those for pavements and plant-covered surfaces. The soil temperature model predicts hourly surface temperatures of bare soil and pavement with root-mean-square errors (RMSEs) of 1-2 °C, and hourly surface temperatures of vegetation-covered surfaces

  16. Climate and the equilibrium state of land surface hydrology parameterizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Entekhabi, Dara; Eagleson, Peter S.

    1991-01-01

    For given climatic rates of precipitation and potential evaporation, the land surface hydrology parameterizations of atmospheric general circulation models will maintain soil-water storage conditions that balance the moisture input and output. The surface relative soil saturation for such climatic conditions serves as a measure of the land surface parameterization state under a given forcing. The equilibrium value of this variable for alternate parameterizations of land surface hydrology are determined as a function of climate and the sensitivity of the surface to shifts and changes in climatic forcing are estimated.

  17. Determining Robust Impacts of Land-Use-Induced Land Cover Changes on Surface Temperature over China and surrounding regions: Results from the First Set of LUCID Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Zheng; Guo, Weidong

    2016-04-01

    The project Land-Use and Climate, Identification of Robust Impacts (LUCID) was designed to address the robustness of biogeophysical impacts of historical land use-land cover change (LULCC). LUCID used seven atmosphere-land models with a common experimental design to explore those impacts of LULCC that are robust and consistent across the climate models. The biogeophysical impacts of LULCC were also compared to the impact of elevated greenhouse gases and resulting changes in sea surface temperatures and sea ice extent (hereafter SST/CO2). Focusing the analysis on China and surrounding regions, the climate models involved in LUCID show, however, significant differences in the magnitude and the seasonal partitioning of the temperature change. The LULCC-induced cooling is directed by decreases in absorbed solar radiation, but its amplitude is 30 to 50% smaller than the one that would be expected from the sole radiative changes. This results from direct impacts on the total turbulent energy flux (related to changes in land-cover properties other than albedo, such as evapotranspiration efficiency or surface roughness) that decreases at all seasons, and thereby induces a relative warming in all models. The magnitude of those processes varies significantly from model to model, resulting on different climate responses to LULCC.

  18. Impacts of snow and organic soils parameterization on northern Eurasian soil temperature profiles simulated by the ISBA land surface model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decharme, Bertrand; Brun, Eric; Boone, Aaron; Delire, Christine; Le Moigne, Patrick; Morin, Samuel

    2016-04-01

    In this study we analyzed how an improved representation of snowpack processes and soil properties in the multilayer snow and soil schemes of the Interaction Soil-Biosphere-Atmosphere (ISBA) land surface model impacts the simulation of soil temperature profiles over northern Eurasian regions. For this purpose, we refine ISBA's snow layering algorithm and propose a parameterization of snow albedo and snow compaction/densification adapted from the detailed Crocus snowpack model. We also include a dependency on soil organic carbon content for ISBA's hydraulic and thermal soil properties. First, changes in the snowpack parameterization are evaluated against snow depth, snow water equivalent, surface albedo, and soil temperature at a 10 cm depth observed at the Col de Porte field site in the French Alps. Next, the new model version including all of the changes is used over northern Eurasia to evaluate the model's ability to simulate the snow depth, the soil temperature profile, and the permafrost characteristics. The results confirm that an adequate simulation of snow layering and snow compaction/densification significantly impacts the snowpack characteristics and the soil temperature profile during winter, while the impact of the more accurate snow albedo computation is dominant during the spring. In summer, the accounting for the effect of soil organic carbon on hydraulic and thermal soil properties improves the simulation of the soil temperature profile. Finally, the results confirm that this last process strongly influences the simulation of the permafrost active layer thickness and its spatial distribution.

  19. Surface Characterization for Land-Atmosphere Studies of CLASIC

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign will focus on interactions between the land surface, convective boundary layer, and cumulus clouds. It will take place in the Southern Great Plains (SGP) area of the U.S, specifically within the US DOE ARM Climate Research Facility. The intensive obser...

  20. A NEW LAND-SURFACE MODEL IN MM5

    EPA Science Inventory

    There has recently been a general realization that more sophisticated modeling of land-surface processes can be important for mesoscale meteorology models. Land-surface models (LSMs) have long been important components in global-scale climate models because of their more compl...

  1. Land Surface Microwave Emissivity Dynamics: Observations, Analysis and Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tian, Yudong; Peters-Lidard, Christa D.; Harrison, Kenneth W.; Kumar, Sujay; Ringerud, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Land surface microwave emissivity affects remote sensing of both the atmosphere and the land surface. The dynamical behavior of microwave emissivity over a very diverse sample of land surface types is studied. With seven years of satellite measurements from AMSR-E, we identified various dynamical regimes of the land surface emission. In addition, we used two radiative transfer models (RTMs), the Community Radiative Transfer Model (CRTM) and the Community Microwave Emission Modeling Platform (CMEM), to simulate land surface emissivity dynamics. With both CRTM and CMEM coupled to NASA's Land Information System, global-scale land surface microwave emissivities were simulated for five years, and evaluated against AMSR-E observations. It is found that both models have successes and failures over various types of land surfaces. Among them, the desert shows the most consistent underestimates (by approx. 70-80%), due to limitations of the physical models used, and requires a revision in both systems. Other snow-free surface types exhibit various degrees of success and it is expected that parameter tuning can improve their performances.

  2. Carbon Sequestration on Surface Mine Lands

    SciTech Connect

    Donald Graves; Christopher Barton; Richard Sweigard; Richard Warner; Carmen Agouridis

    2006-03-31

    Since the implementation of the federal Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA) in May of 1978, many opportunities have been lost for the reforestation of surface mines in the eastern United States. Research has shown that excessive compaction of spoil material in the backfilling and grading process is the biggest impediment to the establishment of productive forests as a post-mining land use (Ashby, 1998, Burger et al., 1994, Graves et al., 2000). Stability of mine sites was a prominent concern among regulators and mine operators in the years immediately following the implementation of SMCRA. These concerns resulted in the highly compacted, flatly graded, and consequently unproductive spoils of the early post-SMCRA era. However, there is nothing in the regulations that requires mine sites to be overly compacted as long as stability is achieved. It has been cultural barriers and not regulatory barriers that have contributed to the failure of reforestation efforts under the federal law over the past 27 years. Efforts to change the perception that the federal law and regulations impede effective reforestation techniques and interfere with bond release must be implemented. Demonstration of techniques that lead to the successful reforestation of surface mines is one such method that can be used to change perceptions and protect the forest ecosystems that were indigenous to these areas prior to mining. The University of Kentucky initiated a large-scale reforestation effort to address regulatory and cultural impediments to forest reclamation in 2003. During the three years of this project 383,000 trees were planted on over 556 acres in different physiographic areas of Kentucky (Table 1, Figure 1). Species used for the project were similar to those that existed on the sites before mining was initiated (Table 2). A monitoring program was undertaken to evaluate growth and survival of the planted species as a function of spoil characteristics and

  3. Numerical Experiments on Land Surface Alterations with a Zonal Model Allowing for Interaction between the Geobotanic State and Climate.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutman, George

    1984-09-01

    A zonally-averaged steady-state hemispheric mean-annual climate model is used for conducting a series of experiments on land surface alterations: desertification, deforestation and irrigation. In each experiment a fixed perturbation of surface albedo and water availability is imposed in a single latitude belt (but a different perturbation is specified in each experiment). The desertification and deforestation experiments simulate modifications to the geobotanic state due to destruction of vegetation by overgrazing and excessive cultivation of the land in the semiarid and tropical zones, respectively. The irrigation experiment simulates the climatic impact of massive irrigation of the desert belt.Results indicate that the effect of changes in evapotranspiration rather than in surface albedo is predominant in regulating the surface temperature. It is shown that the impact of biofeedback is strongest in the area adjacent to the perturbation zone. It is also concluded that the prescribed perturbations of the geobotanic state are not sufficient to modify climate to an extent that these perturbations would persist.

  4. Validation of satellite-derived land surface variables - international coordination and status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaepman-Strub, Gabriela

    2015-04-01

    Validation and quality assessment are important components in the processing chain of satellite-derived land surface products. While most products nowadays are being validated by the responsible space agency, common validation data sets and methods across products from different agencies are still under development. The aim of the Land Product Validation Sub-group (Committee on Earth Observation Satellites) is to internationally coordinate intercomparison and validation efforts of satellite-derived land surface variables. Main components of the proposed validation concept are a peer-reviewed protocol describing standard methods and the identification of fiducial reference data and reference sites where new validation methods and algorithms can be tested. The identified methods, fiducial reference data, and satellite product subsets are then integrated in an online platform to generate standardized validation reports. This presentation summarizes the state of validation of satellite-derived products as assessed by LPV. LPV currently covers albedo, FAPAR, LAI, land cover, snow cover, land surface temperature, soil moisture, phenology, and fire/burnt area. For a selected set of above variables, a summary of validation methods, available in situ data, challenges, and validation stage are provided. We conclude with the identification of methodological gaps and data needs for a sustainable validation of satellite-based terrestrial Essential Climate and Biodiversity Variables in support of the climate observing system and biodiversity and ecosystem services assessments. The presentation is thought to highlight achievements by LPV, as well as to reach out to the satellite product user community and to measurement networks interested in supporting validation efforts with reference data.

  5. Monsoon dependent ecosystems: Implications of the vertical distribution of soil moisture on land surface-atmosphere interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Mejia, Zulia M.

    Uncertainty of predicted change in precipitation frequency and intensity motivates the scientific community to better understand, quantify, and model the possible outcome of dryland ecosystems. In pulse dependent ecosystems (i.e. monsoon driven) soil moisture is tightly linked to atmospheric processes. Here, I analyze three overarching questions; Q1) How does soil moisture presence or absence in a shallow or deep layer influence the surface energy budget and planetary boundary layer characteristics?, Q2) What is the role of vegetation on ecosystem albedo in the presence or absence of deep soil moisture?, Q3) Can we develop empirical relationships between soil moisture and the planetary boundary layer height to help evaluate the role of future precipitation changes in land surface atmosphere interactions? . To address these questions I use a conceptual framework based on the presence or absence of soil moisture in a shallow or deep layer. I define these layers by using root profiles and establish soil moisture thresholds for each layer using four years of observations from the Santa Rita Creosote Ameriflux site. Soil moisture drydown curves were used to establish the shallow layer threshold in the shallow layer, while NEE (Net Ecosystem Exchange of carbon dioxide) was used to define the deep soil moisture threshold. Four cases were generated using these thresholds: Case 1, dry shallow layer and dry deep layer; Case 2, wet shallow layer and dry deep layer; Case 3, wet shallow layer and wet deep layer, and Case 4 dry shallow and wet deep layer. Using this framework, I related data from the Ameriflux site SRC (Santa Rita Creosote) from 2008 to 2012 and from atmospheric soundings from the nearby Tucson Airport; conducted field campaigns during 2011 and 2012 to measure albedo from individual bare and canopy patches that were then evaluated in a grid to estimate the influence of deep moisture on albedo via vegetation cover change; and evaluated the potential of using a

  6. Development of high resolution land surface parameters for the Community Land Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Y.; Leung, L. R.; Huang, M.; Coleman, A. M.; Li, H.; Wigmosta, M. S.

    2012-06-01

    There is a growing need for high-resolution land surface parameters as land surface models are being applied at increasingly higher spatial resolution offline as well as in regional and global models. The default land surface parameters for the most recent version of the Community Land Model (i.e. CLM 4.0) are at 0.5° or coarser resolutions, released with the model from the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). Plant Functional Types (PFTs), vegetation properties such as Leaf Area Index (LAI), Stem Area Index (SAI), and non-vegetated land covers were developed using remotely-sensed datasets retrieved in late 1990's and the beginning of this century. In this study, we developed new land surface parameters for CLM 4.0, specifically PFTs, LAI, SAI and non-vegetated land cover composition, at 0.05° resolution globally based on the most recent MODIS land cover and improved MODIS LAI products. Compared to the current CLM 4.0 parameters, the new parameters produced a decreased coverage by bare soil and trees, but an increased coverage by shrub, grass, and cropland. The new parameters result in a decrease in global seasonal LAI, with the biggest decrease in boreal forests; however, the new parameters also show a large increase in LAI in tropical forest. Differences between the new and the current parameters are mainly caused by changes in the sources of remotely sensed data and the representation of land cover in the source data. The new high-resolution land surface parameters have been used in a coupled land-atmosphere model (WRF-CLM) applied to the western US to demonstrate their use in high-resolution modeling. Future work will include global offline CLMsimulations to examine the impacts of source data resolution and subsequent land parameter changes on simulated land surface processes.

  7. The land surface scheme ISBA within the Meteo-France climate model arpege. Part I: Implementation and preliminary results

    SciTech Connect

    Mahfouf, J.F.; Noilhan, J.; Manzi, A.O.

    1995-08-01

    This paper describes recent developments in climate modeling at Meteo-France related to land surface processes. The implementation of a simple land surface parameterization, Interactions between Soil Biosphere Atmosphere (ISBA), has gained from previous validations and calibrations at local scale against field datasets and from aggregation procedures devised to define effective land surface properties. Specific improvements from climate purposes are introduced; spatial variability of convective rainfall in canopy drainage estimation and subsurface gravitational percolation. The methodology used to derive climatological maps of land surface parameters at the grid-scale resolution of the model from existing databases for soil and vegetation types at global scale is described. A 3-yr integration for the present day climate with a T42L30 version of the climate model has been performed. Results obtained compare favorably with available observed climatologies related to the various components of the continental surface energy and water budgets. Differences are due mostly to a poor simulation of the precipitation field. However, some difference suggest specific improvements in the surface scheme concerning representation of the bare soil albedo, the surface runoff, and the soil moisture initialization. As a first step prior to tropical deforestation experiments presented to Part II, regional analyses over the Amazon forest indicate that the modeled evaporation and net radiation are in good agreement with data collected during the Amazon Region Micrometeorological Experiment campaign. 77 refs., 11 figs., 8 tabs.

  8. The Costs of Climate Change: Impact of Future Snow Cover Projections on Valuation of Albedo in Forest Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burakowski, E. A.; Lutz, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    Surface albedo provides an important climate regulating ecosystem service, particularly in the mid-latitudes where seasonal snow cover influences surface radiation budgets. In the case of substantial seasonal snow cover, the influence of albedo can equal or surpass the climatic benefits of carbon sequestration from forest growth. Climate mitigation platforms should therefore consider albedo in their framework in order to integrate these two climatic services in an economic context for the effective design and implementation of forest management projects. Over the next century, the influence of surface albedo is projected to diminish under higher emissions scenarios due to an overall decrease in snow depth and duration of snow cover in the mid-latitudes. In this study, we focus on the change in economic value of winter albedo in the northeastern United States projected through 2100 using the Special Report on Emissions Scenarios (SRES) a1 and b1 scenarios. Statistically downscaled temperature and precipitation are used as input to the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model to provide future daily snow depth fields through 2100. Using VIC projections of future snow depth, projected winter albedo fields over deforested lands were generated using an empirical logarithmic relationship between snow depth and albedo derived from a volunteer network of snow observers in New Hampshire over the period Nov 2011 through 2014. Our results show that greater reductions in snow depth and the number of winter days with snow cover in the a1 compared to the b1 scenario reduce wintertime albedo when forested lands are harvested. This result has implications on future trade-offs among albedo, carbon storage, and timber value that should be investigated in greater detail. The impacts of forest harvest on radiative forcing associated with energy redistribution (e.g., latent heat and surface roughness length) should also be considered in future work.

  9. Surface Albedo Assessment in Clear Sky and Dense Smoke Atmospheres Using a Shortwave Radiation Stochastic Model and MODIS 1B Image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Souza, Juarez D.; Ceballos, Juan C.; da Silva, Bernardo B.

    2009-03-01

    The surface albedo, which is a fundamental parameter in the estimation of the radiation balance, corresponds to the reflectance integrated in the solar spectrum. It can be obtained through satellite images that have great spatial coverage. A stochastic model of two-flux, presented by Ceballos [1] and developed by Souza and Ceballos [2], is used to establish a direct relationship between the reflectance of the surface and the radiance measured by MODIS-Terra/Aqua sensor. The propagation of radiation, in the solar spectrum from 0.3 to 3.0 μm, is described by an scheme of 16 layers. In such scheme, it is obtained the necessary parameters to establish the radiation balance in the top of the atmosphere. The optical properties of the atmospheric layers are defined by aerosol, ozone and water vapor. In this way, to determine the surface albedo, it is considered that the radiance originated from the system earth-atmosphere, measured by the satellite, is isotropic. A simple adjustment factor is introduced to compensate anisotropic and multiple reflections effects between the surface and the atmosphere. An application for Amazonian region in conditions of low and high aerosol load due to smoke caused by forest burning, is presented. The results show similarity in the assessed surface reflectance, with and without burning in the region.

  10. Progress in Understanding Land-Surface-Atmosphere Coupling from LBA Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betts, Alan K.; Silva Dias, Maria AssunçÃ.£O. F.

    2010-02-01

    LBA research has deepened our understanding of the role of soil water storage, clouds and aerosols in land-atmosphere coupling. We show how the reformulation of cloud forcing in terms of an effective cloud albedo per unit area of surface gives a useful measure of the role of clouds in the surface energy budget over the Amazon. We show that the diurnal temperature range has a quasi-linear relation to the daily mean longwave cooling; and to effective cloud albedo because of the tight coupling between the near-surface climate, the boundary layer and the cloud field. The coupling of surface and atmospheric processes is critical to the seasonal cycle: deep forest rooting systems make water available throughout the year, whereas in the dry season the shortwave cloud forcing is reduced by regional scale subsidence, so that more light is available for photosynthesis. At sites with an annual precipitation above 1900 mm and a dry season length less than 4 months, evaporation rates increased in the dry season, coincident with increased radiation. In contrast, ecosystems with precipitation less than 1700 mm and a longer dry season showed clear evidence of reduced evaporation in the dry season coming from water stress. In all these sites, the seasonal variation of the effective cloud albedo is a major factor in determining the surface available energy. Dry season fires add substantial aerosol to the atmosphere. Aerosol scattering and absorption both reduce the total downward surface radiative flux, but increase the diffuse/direct flux ratio, which increases photosynthetic efficiency. Convective plumes produced by fires enhance the vertical transport of aerosols over the Amazon, and effectively inject smoke aerosol and gases directly into the middle troposphere with substantial impacts on mid-tropospheric dispersion. In the rainy season in Rondônia, convection in low-level westerly flows with low aerosol content resembles oceanic convection with precipitation from warm rain

  11. Investigations on the effect of high surface albedo on erythemally effective UV irradiance: results of a campaign at the Salar de Uyuni, Bolivia.

    PubMed

    Reuder, Joachim; Ghezzi, Flavio; Palenque, Eduardo; Torrez, Rene; Andrade, Marco; Zaratti, Francesco

    2007-04-01

    Measurements and model calculations have been performed to study the effect of high surface albedo on erythemally effective UV irradiance. A central part of the investigation has been a one week measurement campaign at Salar de Uyuni in the Southern part of the Bolivian Altiplano. The Salar de Uyuni, the largest salt lake of the world, is characterized by largely homogeneous surface conditions during most of the year. Albedo measurements performed by an UV radiometer result in a reflectivity for erythemally effective radiation of 0.69+/-0.02. The measurements show hardly any dependency on solar elevation, indicating the homogeneity of the surface and nearly isotropic reflection properties of the Salar. The effects of the high albedo surface on the erythemally effective irradiance, i.e. the UV index (UVI), has been experimentally determined by simultaneous measurements of several UV radiometers located at different sites around and on the Salar. In this context a method for the minimization of systematic deviations between the individual detectors used for the investigation is presented. It ensures the intercomparability of the performed UV measurements within +/-2% which is a distinct improvement compared to the typical absolute accuracy of UV irradiance measurements in the order of +/-5%. For solar elevations around 50 degrees the UVI measured close to the center of the Salar is typically enhanced by 20% compared to the values determined outside. Towards lower solar elevations this increase becomes slightly weaker. The measurements agree well with both, own corresponding 1D and previously published 3D radiative transfer calculations from literature. PMID:17227712

  12. Observations of atmosphere and ocean/land surfaces using UAVs in Ny-Alesund

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, J.; Storvold, R.

    2008-12-01

    Using a Norwegian small robotic aircraft called the Cryowing, atmospheric and ocean/land surface observations were made over Ny-Alesund, Svalbard, Norway from 31 July to 17 August 2008. The aircraft has meteorological sensors to observe dynamic and static air pressures, air temperature, and relative humidity, infrared thermometer to observe surface temperature, and digital camera to record the surface characteristics. From the results of surface mapping, the atmosphere responded differently with different types of surface (i.e., grass, crust, glacier, and ocean). The continuous observation at the same region showed that the time change in incoming solar radiation affects the variation of surface temperature due to difference in surface albedo, resulting in spacial distribution of air temperature in the boundary layer. While in the long ocean flight, the strong SST gradient was observed between the warm Atlantic water and melted water of sea ice near the Fram Strait. The air temperature above 150-m level observed by the UAV was clearly high over the warm current. These results demonstrate the utility of recent advances in UAV technology for monitoring and interpreting the spatial variations in cryosphere.

  13. Observational study of land-surface-cloud-atmosphere coupling on daily timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betts, Alan; Desjardins, Raymond; Beljaars, Anton; Tawfik, Ahmed

    2015-04-01

    Our aim is to provide an observational reference for the evaluation of the surface and boundary layer parameterizations used in large-scale models using the remarkable long-term Canadian Prairie hourly dataset. First we use shortwave and longwave data from the Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN) station at Bratt’s Lake, Saskatchewan, and clear sky radiative fluxes from ERA-Interim, to show the coupling between the diurnal cycle of temperature and relative humidity and effective cloud albedo and net longwave flux. Then we calibrate the nearby opaque cloud observations at Regina, Saskatchewan in terms of the BSRN radiation fluxes. We find that in the warm season, we can determine effective cloud albedo to ±0.08 from daytime opaque cloud, and net long-wave radiation to ±8 W/m2 from daily mean opaque cloud and relative humidity. This enables us to extend our analysis to the 55 years of hourly observations of opaque cloud cover, temperature, relative humidity, and daily precipitation from 11 climate stations across the Canadian Prairies. We show the land-surface-atmosphere coupling on daily timescales in summer by stratifying the Prairie data by opaque cloud, relative humidity, surface wind, day-night cloud asymmetry and monthly weighted precipitation anomalies. The multiple linear regression fits relating key diurnal climate variables, the diurnal temperature range, afternoon relative humidity and lifting condensation level, to daily mean net longwave flux, wind-speed and precipitation anomalies have R2 values between 0.61 and 0.69. These fits will be a useful guide for evaluating the fully coupled system in models.

  14. Mimicking biochar-albedo feedback in complex Mediterranean agricultural landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozzi, E.; Genesio, L.; Toscano, P.; Pieri, M.; Miglietta, F.

    2015-08-01

    Incorporation of charcoal produced by biomass pyrolysis (biochar) in agricultural soils is a potentially sustainable strategy for climate change mitigation. However, some side effects of large-scale biochar application need to be investigated. In particular a massive use of a low-reflecting material on large cropland areas may impact the climate via changes in surface albedo. Twelve years of MODIS-derived albedo data were analysed for three pairs of selected agricultural sites in central Italy. In each pair bright and dark coloured soil were identified, mimicking the effect of biochar application on the land surface albedo of complex agricultural landscapes. Over this period vegetation canopies never completely masked differences in background soil colour. This soil signal, expressed as an albedo difference, induced a local instantaneous radiative forcing of up to 4.7 W m-2 during periods of high solar irradiance. Biochar mitigation potential might therefore be reduced up to ˜30%. This study proves the importance of accounting for crop phenology and crop management when assessing biochar mitigation potential and provides more insights into the analysis of its environmental feedback.

  15. Daily albedo estimation and comparison to MCD43 product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franch, B.; Vermote, E.; Sobrino, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    Land surface broadband albedo is among the main radiative uncertainties in current climate modelling. An accuracy requirement of 5% and a daily temporal resolution is suggested by the Global Climate Observing System for albedo characterization at spatial and temporal scales compatible with climate studies. Satellite remote sensing provides the only practical way of producing high-quality global albedo data sets with high spatial and temporal resolutions. For view-ilumination geometries such as Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), in order to retrieve the Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) parameters and, consequently, the albedo, a period of sequential measurement is needed to accumulate sufficient observations. This is used to derive the MODIS BRDF/Albedo product (MCD43), which consider a composite period of 16 days with a resulting temporal resolution of 8 days. Looking for an improvement in the albedo temporal resolution that mitigated the assumption of a stable target, Vermote et al. (2009) presented the VJB method that assumes that the BRDF shape variations throughout a year are limited and linked to the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI). This method retains the highest temporal resolution (daily, cloud cover permitting). The purpose of this work is to compare the MCD43 product with the VJB method through the albedo. Additionally, we present and study a method based on the VJB assumption, the 5param Rsqr. In this study we focus our analysis on daily MODIS CMG Collection 6 data from both Aqua and Terra satellites over Europe from 2002 until 2011. Figure 1 shows the percentage of the total RMSE of the VJB and the 5param Rsqr method against the MCD43 product. They display that southern latitudes present lower errors while they increase for northern latitudes and mountainous areas. Comparing the methods, the VJB presents errors higher than 15% in 8.2% of total land pixels while they suppose 6.9% of pixels when

  16. The interplay between transpiration and Runoff formulations in land surface schemes used with atmospheric models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koster, R.D.; Milly, P.C.D.

    1997-01-01

    The Project for Intercomparison of Land-surface Parameterization Schemes (PILPS) has shown that different land surface models (LSMs) driven by the same meteorological forcing can produce markedly different surface energy and water budgets, even when certain critical aspects of the LSMs (vegetation cover, albedo, turbulent drag coefficient, and snowcover) are carefully controlled. To help explain these differences, the authors devised a monthly water balance model that successfully reproduces the annual and seasonal water balances of the different PILPS schemes. Analysis of this model leads to the identification of two quantities that characterize an LSM's formulation of soil water balance dynamics: 1) the efficiency of the soil's evaporation sink integrated over the active soil moisture range, and 2) the fraction of this range over which runoff is generated. Regardless of the LSM's complexity, the combination of these two derived parameters with rates of interception loss, potential evaporation, and precipitation provides a reasonable estimate for the LSM's simulated annual water balance. The two derived parameters shed light on how evaporation and runoff formulations interact in an LSM, and the analysis as a whole underscores the need for compatibility in these formulations.

  17. The Interplay Between Transpiration and Runoff Formulations in Land Surface Schemes Used with Atmospheric Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koster, Rindal D.; Milly, P. C. D.

    1997-01-01

    The Project for Intercomparison of Land-surface Parameterization Schemes (PILPS) has shown that different land surface models (LSMS) driven by the same meteorological forcing can produce markedly different surface energy and water budgets, even when certain critical aspects of the LSMs (vegetation cover, albedo, turbulent drag coefficient, and snow cover) are carefully controlled. To help explain these differences, the authors devised a monthly water balance model that successfully reproduces the annual and seasonal water balances of the different PILPS schemes. Analysis of this model leads to the identification of two quantities that characterize an LSM's formulation of soil water balance dynamics: (1) the efficiency of the soil's evaporation sink integrated over the active soil moisture range, and (2) the fraction of this range over which runoff is generated. Regardless of the LSM's complexity, the combination of these two derived parameters with rates of interception loss, potential evaporation, and precipitation provides a reasonable estimate for the LSM's simulated annual water balance. The two derived parameters shed light on how evaporation and runoff formulations interact in an LSM, and the analysis as a whole underscores the need for compatibility in these formulations.

  18. High-resolution climate and land surface interactions modeling over Belgium: current state and decennial scale projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquemin, Ingrid; Henrot, Alexandra-Jane; Beckers, Veronique; Berckmans, Julie; Debusscher, Bos; Dury, Marie; Minet, Julien; Hamdi, Rafiq; Dendoncker, Nicolas; Tychon, Bernard; Hambuckers, Alain; François, Louis

    2016-04-01

    The interactions between land surface and climate are complex. Climate changes can affect ecosystem structure and functions, by altering photosynthesis and productivity or inducing thermal and hydric stresses on plant species. These changes then impact socio-economic systems, through e.g., lower farming or forestry incomes. Ultimately, it can lead to permanent changes in land use structure, especially when associated with other non-climatic factors, such as urbanization pressure. These interactions and changes have feedbacks on the climate systems, in terms of changing: (1) surface properties (albedo, roughness, evapotranspiration, etc.) and (2) greenhouse gas emissions (mainly CO2, CH4, N2O). In the framework of the MASC project (« Modelling and Assessing Surface Change impacts on Belgian and Western European climate »), we aim at improving regional climate model projections at the decennial scale over Belgium and Western Europe by combining high-resolution models of climate, land surface dynamics and socio-economic processes. The land surface dynamics (LSD) module is composed of a dynamic vegetation model (CARAIB) calculating the productivity and growth of natural and managed vegetation, and an agent-based model (CRAFTY), determining the shifts in land use and land cover. This up-scaled LSD module is made consistent with the surface scheme of the regional climate model (RCM: ALARO) to allow simulations of the RCM with a fully dynamic land surface for the recent past and the period 2000-2030. In this contribution, we analyze the results of the first simulations performed with the CARAIB dynamic vegetation model over Belgium at a resolution of 1km. This analysis is performed at the species level, using a set of 17 species for natural vegetation (trees and grasses) and 10 crops, especially designed to represent the Belgian vegetation. The CARAIB model is forced with surface atmospheric variables derived from the monthly global CRU climatology or ALARO outputs

  19. Radiative Forcing and Temperature Response to Changes in Urban Albedos and Associated CO2 Offsets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, Surabi; Akbari, Hashem; Mahanama, Sarith; Sednev, Igor; Levinson, Ronnen

    2009-01-01

    The two main forcings that can counteract to some extent the positive forcings from greenhouse gases from pre-industrial times to present-day are the aerosol and related aerosol-cloud forcings, and the radiative response to changes in surface albedo. Here, we quantify the change in radiative forcing and surface temperature that may be obtained by increasing the albedos of roofs and pavements in urban areas in temperate and tropical regions of the globe. Using the catchment land surface model (the land model coupled to the GEOS-5 Atmospheric General Circulation Model), we quantify the response of the total outgoing (outgoing shortwave+longwave) radiation to urban albedo changes. Globally, the total outgoing radiation increased by 0.5 W/square m and temperature decreased by -0.008 K for an average 0.003 increase in albedo. For the U.S. the total outgoing total radiation increased by 2.3 W/square meter, and temperature decreased by approximately 0.03 K for an average 0.01 increase in albedo. These values are for the boreal summer (Tune-July-August). Based on these forcings, the expected emitted CO2 offset for a plausible 0.25 and 0.15 increase in albedos of roofs and pavements, respectively, for all global urban areas, was found to be approximately 57 Gt CO2 . A more meaningful evaluation of the impacts of urban albedo increases on climate and the expected CO2 offsets would require simulations which better characterizes urban surfaces and represents the full annual cycle.

  20. Precipitation and global land surface hydrology in the MERRA-Land and MERRA-2 reanalysis datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichle, Rolf; Liu, Qing

    2015-04-01

    Multi-decadal reanalysis datasets have been widely used to study the global terrestrial water cycle. Examples include atmospheric reanalysis datasets (e.g., MERRA and ERA-Interim), coupled atmosphere-ocean reanalysis datasets (e.g., CFSR), and land-surface only reanalysis datasets (e.g., MERRA-Land and ERA-Interim/Land). The driving component of the land surface water budget is the incoming precipitation forcing. Traditionally, e.g. in ERA-Interim and MERRA, the reanalysis precipitation over land is generated by the atmospheric general circulation model component of the reanalysis system. By contrast, MERRA-Land, ERA-Interim/Land, CSFR, and the forthcoming MERRA-2 atmospheric reanalysis essentially use precipitation observations from satellites and/or gauges to force the land surface, which typically results in improved estimates of large-scale hydrological conditions. This presentation first reviews the approach by which the precipitation observations are introduced in MERRA-Land and MERRA-2. Precipitation in MERRA-Land relies on a global, daily, 0.5 degree gauge product from the NOAA Climate Prediction Center (CPC). But this product is based on a very limited number of measurements at high latitudes and over Africa. Therefore, MERRA-2 relies on a mix of (i) model-generated precipitation at high-latitudes, (ii) a pentad, 2.5 degree satellite product from CPC over Africa, and (iii) the daily, 0.5 degree gauge-based precipitation product elsewhere. Next, the precipitation climatologies and the resulting land surface hydrological conditions are compared regionally and for the reanalysis time period (1980-present). The more sophisticated approach of MERRA-2 precipitation results in generally improved land surface conditions. But MERRA-2 also suffers from adverse spin-up effects in soil moisture conditions at high latitudes.

  1. GLDAS Land Surface Models based Aridity Indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pande, S.; Ghazanfari, S.

    2011-12-01

    Identification of dryland areas is crucial to guide policy aimed at intervening in water stressed areas and addressing its perennial livelihood or food insecurity. Aridity indices based on spatially relative soil moisture conditions such as NCEP aridity index allow cross comparison of dry conditions between sites. NCEP aridity index is based on the ratio of annual precipitation (supply) to annual potential evaporation (demand). Such an index ignores subannual scale competition between evaporation and drainage functions well as rainfall and temperature regimes. This determines partitioning of annual supply of precipitation into two competing (but met) evaporation and runoff demands. We here introduce aridity indices based on these additional considerations by using soil moisture time series for the past 3 decades from three Land Surface Models (LSM) models and compare it with NCEP index. We analyze global monthly soil moisture time series (385 months) at 1 x 1 degree spatial resolution as modeled by three GLDAS LSMs - VIC, MOSAIC and NOAH. The first eigen vector from Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF) analysis, as it is the most dominant spatial template of global soil moisture conditions, is extracted. Frequency of nonexceedences of this dominant soil moisture mode for a location by other locations is calculated and is used as our proposed aridity index. An area is indexed drier (relative to other areas in the world) if its frequency of nonexceedence is lower. The EOF analysis reveals that their first eigen vector explains approximately 32%, 43% and 47% of variance explained by first 385 eigen vectors for VIC, MOSAIC and NOAH respectively. The temporal coefficients associated with it for all three LSMS show seasonality with a jump in trend around the year 1999 for NOAH and MOSAIC. The VIC aridity index displays a pattern most closely resembling that of NCEP though all LSM based indices isolate dominant dryland areas. However, all three LSMs identify some parts of

  2. Sensitivity of the Weather Research and Forecast/Community Multiscale Air Quality modeling system to MODIS LAI, FPAR, and albedo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ran, Limei; Gilliam, Robert; Binkowski, Francis S.; Xiu, Aijun; Pleim, Jonathan; Band, Larry

    2015-08-01

    This study aims to improve land surface processes in a retrospective meteorology and air quality modeling system through the use of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) vegetation and albedo products for more realistic vegetation and surface representation. MODIS leaf area index (LAI), fraction of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (FPAR), and albedo are incorporated into the Pleim-Xiu land surface model (PX LSM) used in a combined meteorology and air quality modeling system. The current PX LSM intentionally exaggerates vegetation coverage and LAI in western dry lands so that its soil moisture nudging scheme is more effective in simulating surface temperature and mixing ratio. Reduced vegetation coverage from the PX LSM with MODIS input results in hotter and dryer daytime conditions with reduced ozone dry deposition velocities in much of western North America. Evaluations of the new system indicate greater error and bias in temperature, but reduced error and bias in moisture with the MODIS vegetation input. Hotter daytime temperatures and reduced dry deposition result in greater ozone concentrations in the western arid regions even with deeper boundary layer depths. MODIS albedo has much less impact on the meteorology simulations than MODIS LAI and FPAR. The MODIS vegetation and albedo input does not have much influence in the east where differences in vegetation and albedo parameters are less extreme. Evaluation results showing increased temperature errors with more accurate representation of vegetation suggests that improvements are needed in the model surface physics, particularly the soil processes in the PX LSM.

  3. Improving arable land heterogeneity information in available land cover products for land surface modelling using MERIS NDVI data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabel, F.; Hank, T. B.; Mauser, W.

    2010-07-01

    Regionalization of physical land surface models requires the supply of detailed land cover information. Numerous global and regional land cover maps already exist, but generally they do not resolve arable land into different crop types. However, the characteristic phenological behaviour of different crops affects the mass and energy fluxes on the land surface and thus its hydrology. The objective of this study is the generation of a land cover map for Central Europe based on CORINE Land Cover 2000, merged with CORINE Switzerland, but distinguishing different crop types. Accordingly, an approach was developed, subdividing the land cover class arable land into the regionally most relevant subclasses for Central Europe using statistical data from EUROSTAT. This database was analysed concerning the acreage of different crop types, taking a multiseasonal series of MERIS Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) into account. The satellite data were used for the separation of spring and summer crops. The hydrological impact of the improved land cover map was modelled exemplarily for the Upper Danube catchment.

  4. Translation of Land Surface Model Accuracy and Uncertainty into Coupled Land-Atmosphere Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santanello, Joseph A.; Kumar, Sujay; Peters-Lidard, Christa D.; Harrison, Kenneth W.; Zhou, Shuija

    2012-01-01

    Land-atmosphere (L-A) Interactions playa critical role in determining the diurnal evolution of both planetary boundary layer (PBL) and land surface heat and moisture budgets, as well as controlling feedbacks with clouds and precipitation that lead to the persistence of dry and wet regimes. Recent efforts to quantify the strength of L-A coupling in prediction models have produced diagnostics that integrate across both the land and PBL components of the system. In this study, we examine the impact of improved specification of land surface states, anomalies, and fluxes on coupled WRF forecasts during the summers of extreme dry (2006) and wet (2007) land surface conditions in the U.S. Southern Great Plains. The improved land initialization and surface flux parameterizations are obtained through the use of a new optimization and uncertainty estimation module in NASA's Land Information System (US-OPT/UE), whereby parameter sets are calibrated in the Noah land surface model and classified according to a land cover and soil type mapping of the observation sites to the full model domain. The impact of calibrated parameters on the a) spinup of the land surface used as initial conditions, and b) heat and moisture states and fluxes of the coupled WRF Simulations are then assessed in terms of ambient weather and land-atmosphere coupling along with measures of uncertainty propagation into the forecasts. In addition, the sensitivity of this approach to the period of calibration (dry, wet, average) is investigated. Finally, tradeoffs of computational tractability and scientific validity, and the potential for combining this approach with satellite remote sensing data are also discussed.

  5. Calculation of albedos for neutrons and photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brockhoff, Ronald Carl

    2003-07-01

    The albedo concept is used to describe radiation that appears to be reflected from a surface, although in reality this reflected radiation is comprised of radiation that has entered the medium, and is subsequently scattered back through the surface. The albedo often offers a computationally simple alternative to estimate doses from radiation reflected from surfaces surrounding a streaming region. However, albedo data available prior to this study, are limited to relatively few source energies and reflecting media, and are based on obsolete and incomplete cross sections and response functions. The Monte Carlo code MCNP is applied in this study to calculate the differential photon and neutron dose albedos, along with the differential secondary-photon dose albedo, based on modern response functions and cross section data. Differential photon dose albedo data were calculated for source energies ranging from 0.1 to 10 MeV incident on slabs of concrete, iron, lead, and water. Differential neutron dose albedo data, and the associated differential secondary-photon dose albedo data, were calculated for source energy bands ranging from 0.1 to 10 MeV, and for thermal, Californium, and 14 MeV source spectra, incident on the same four reflecting media. The results indicate that (1) the approximation of the differential photon dose albedo proposed by Chilton and Huddleston usually deviates from the raw albedo data by less than 10% for source energies between 0.1 and 10.0 MeV, (2) the new 24-parameter approximation of the differential neutron dose albedo deviates from the raw albedo data by less than 10% for source energy bands between 0.1 and 10 MeV, and (3) the five-parameter approximation of the secondary-photon dose albedo deviates from the raw albedo data by less than 25% for source energies between 0.1 and 10 MeV. The differential dose albedo approximations obtained in this study are used to solve several example radiation transport problems, where the dose from reflected

  6. Understanding land surface evapotranspiration with satellite multispectral measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menenti, M.

    1993-01-01

    Quantitative use of remote multispectral measurements to study and map land surface evapotranspiration has been a challenging issue for the past 20 years. Past work is reviewed against process physics. A simple two-layer combination-type model is used which is applicable to both vegetation and bare soil. The theoretic analysis is done to show which land surface properties are implicitly defined by such evaporation models and to assess whether they are measurable as a matter of principle. Conceptual implications of the spatial correlation of land surface properties, as observed by means of remote multispectral measurements, are illustrated with results of work done in arid zones. A normalization of spatial variability of land surface evaporation is proposed by defining a location-dependent potential evaporation and surface temperature range. Examples of the application of remote based estimates of evaporation to hydrological modeling studies in Egypt and Argentina are presented.

  7. Global Albedo

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    ... by surfaces because this energy drives processes such as plant photosynthesis, snow melt, and longwave reradiation. These images from ... from MISR are now available at the NASA Langley Atmospheric Science Data Center's  MISR Level 3 Imagery web site . The Multi-angle ...

  8. Classes of land-surface form in the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hammond, Edwin

    1964-01-01

    This digital dataset describes classes of land-surface form in the conterminous United States. The source of the data is the map of land-surface form in the 1970 National Atlas of the United States, pages 62-63, which was adapted from Edwin H. Hammond, "Classes of land surface form in the forty-eight states, U.S.A," Annals of the Assoc. of Am. Geographers, v.54, no. 1, 1964, map supp. no. 1, 1:5,000,000.

  9. Comparison of Satellite-Derived TOA Shortwave Clear-Sky Fluxes to Estimates from GCM Simulations Constrained by Satellite Observations of Land Surface Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anantharaj, Valentine G.; Nair, Udaysankar S.; Lawrence, Peter; Chase, Thomas N.; Christopher, Sundar; Jones, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Clear-sky, upwelling shortwave flux at the top of the atmosphere (S(sub TOA raised arrow)), simulated using the atmospheric and land model components of the Community Climate System Model 3 (CCSM3), is compared to corresponding observational estimates from the Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) sensor. Improvements resulting from the use of land surface albedo derived from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) to constrain the simulations are also examined. Compared to CERES observations, CCSM3 overestimates global, annual averaged S(sub TOA raised arrow) over both land and oceans. However, regionally, CCSM3 overestimates S(sub TOA raised arrow) over some land and ocean areas while underestimating it over other sites. CCSM3 underestimates S(sub TOA raised arrow) over the Saharan and Arabian Deserts and substantial differences exist between CERES observations and CCSM3 over agricultural areas. Over selected sites, after using groundbased observations to remove systematic biases that exist in CCSM computation of S(sub TOA raised arrow), it is found that use of MODIS albedo improves the simulation of S(sub TOA raised arrow). Inability of coarse resolution CCSM3 simulation to resolve spatial heterogeneity of snowfall over high altitude sites such as the Tibetan Plateau causes overestimation of S(sub TOA raised arrow) in these areas. Discrepancies also exist in the simulation of S(sub TOA raised arrow) over ocean areas as CCSM3 does not account for the effect of wind speed on ocean surface albedo. This study shows that the radiative energy budget at the TOA is improved through the use of MODIS albedo in Global Climate Models.

  10. Snow specific surface area simulation using the one-layer snow model in the Canadian LAnd Surface Scheme (CLASS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, A.; Royer, A.; Montpetit, B.; Bartlett, P. A.; Langlois, A.

    2012-12-01

    Snow grain size is a key parameter for modeling microwave snow emission properties and the surface energy balance because of its influence on the snow albedo, thermal conductivity and diffusivity. A model of the specific surface area (SSA) of snow was implemented in the one-layer snow model in the Canadian LAnd Surface Scheme (CLASS) version 3.4. This offline multilayer model (CLASS-SSA) simulates the decrease of SSA based on snow age, snow temperature and the temperature gradient under dry snow conditions, whereas it considers the liquid water content for wet snow metamorphism. We compare the model with ground-based measurements from several sites (alpine, Arctic and sub-Arctic) with different types of snow. The model provides simulated SSA in good agreement with measurements with an overall point-to-point comparison RMSE of 8.1 m2 kg-1, and a RMSE of 4.9 m2 kg-1 for the snowpack average SSA. The model, however, is limited under wet conditions due to the single-layer nature of the CLASS model, leading to a single liquid water content value for the whole snowpack. The SSA simulations are of great interest for satellite passive microwave brightness temperature assimilations, snow mass balance retrievals and surface energy balance calculations with associated climate feedbacks.

  11. Improving arable land heterogeneity information in available land cover products for land surface modelling using MERIS NDVI data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabel, F.; Hank, T. B.; Mauser, W.

    2010-10-01

    Regionalization of physical land surface models requires the supply of detailed land cover information. Numerous global and regional land cover maps already exist but generally, they do not resolve arable land into different crop types. However, arable land comprises a huge variety of different crops with characteristic phenological behaviour, demonstrated in this paper with Leaf Area Index (LAI) measurements exemplarily for maize and winter wheat. This affects the mass and energy fluxes on the land surface and thus its hydrology. The objective of this study is the generation of a land cover map for central Europe based on CORINE Land Cover (CLC) 2000, merged with CORINE Switzerland, but distinguishing different crop types. Accordingly, an approach was developed, subdividing the land cover class arable land into the regionally most relevant subclasses for central Europe using multiseasonal MERIS Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) data. The satellite data were used for the separation of spring and summer crops due to their different phenological behaviour. Subsequently, the generated phenological classes were subdivided following statistical data from EUROSTAT. This database was analysed concerning the acreage of different crop types. The impact of the improved land use/cover map on evapotranspiration was modelled exemplarily for the Upper Danube catchment with the hydrological model PROMET. Simulations based on the newly developed land cover approach showed a more detailed evapotranspiration pattern compared to model results using the traditional CLC map, which is ignorant of most arable subdivisions. Due to the improved temporal behaviour and spatial allocation of evapotranspiration processes in the new land cover approach, the simulated water balance more closely matches the measured gauge.

  12. Sensitivity of June Near-Surface Temperatures and Precipitation in the Eastern United States to Historical Land Cover Changes Since European Settlement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strack, John E.; Pielke, Roger A.; Steyaert, Louis T.; Knox, Robert G.

    2008-01-01

    Land cover changes alter the near surface weather and climate. Changes in land surface properties such as albedo, roughness length, stomatal resistance, and leaf area index alter the surface energy balance, leading to differences in near surface temperatures. This study utilized a newly developed land cover data set for the eastern United States to examine the influence of historical land cover change on June temperatures and precipitation. The new data set contains representations of the land cover and associated biophysical parameters for 1650, 1850, 1920, and 1992, capturing the clearing of the forest and the expansion of agriculture over the eastern United States from 1650 to the early twentieth century and the subsequent forest regrowth. The data set also includes the inferred distribution of potentially water-saturated soils at each time slice for use in the sensitivity tests. The Regional Atmospheric Modeling System, equipped with the Land Ecosystem-Atmosphere Feedback (LEAF-2) land surface parameterization, was used to simulate the weather of June 1996 using the 1992, 1920, 1850, and 1650 land cover representations. The results suggest that changes in surface roughness and stomatal resistance have caused present-day maximum and minimum temperatures in the eastern United States to warm by about 0.3 C and 0.4 C, respectively, when compared to values in 1650. In contrast, the maximum temperatures have remained about the same, while the minimums have cooled by about 0.1 C when compared to 1920. Little change in precipitation was found.

  13. On the Non-Monotonic Variation of the Opposition Surge Morphology with Albedo Exhibited by Satellites' Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deau, E. A.; Spilker, L. J.; Flandes, A.

    2011-01-01

    We used well know phase functions of satellites and rings around the giant planets of our Solar System to study the morphology of the opposition effect (at phase angles alpha < 20 degrees. To avoid the effect of the variable finite size of the Sun, we use a deconvolution morphological model to retrieve the morphological parameters of the surge (A and HWHM). These parameters are found to have a non-monotonic variation with the single scattering albedo, similar to that observed in asteroids, which is unexplained so far. The non-monotonic variation is discussed in the framework of the coherent backscattering and shadow hiding mechanisms.

  14. Assimilation of Satellite Remote Sensing Retrievals into Land Surface Models

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For at least two decades, remote sensing observations have been used to define static model parameters and/or forcing inputs for a range of land surface models. However, recent advances in remote sensing theory have also enabled the satellite-based retrieval of dynamic land model states (e.g. leaf ...

  15. Global analysis of radiative forcing from fire-induced shortwave albedo change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Saldaña, G.; Bistinas, I.; Pereira, J. M. C.

    2015-01-01

    Land surface albedo, a key parameter to derive Earth's surface energy balance, is used in the parameterization of numerical weather prediction, climate monitoring and climate change impact assessments. Changes in albedo due to fire have not been fully investigated on a continental and global scale. The main goal of this study, therefore, is to quantify the changes in instantaneous shortwave albedo produced by biomass burning activities and their associated radiative forcing. The study relies on the MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) MCD64A1 burned-area product to create an annual composite of areas affected by fire and the MCD43C2 bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) albedo snow-free product to compute a bihemispherical reflectance time series. The approximate day of burning is used to calculate the instantaneous change in shortwave albedo. Using the corresponding National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) monthly mean downward solar radiation flux at the surface, the global radiative forcing associated with fire was computed. The analysis reveals a mean decrease in shortwave albedo of -0.014 (1σ = 0.017), causing a mean positive radiative forcing of 3.99 Wm-2 (1σ = 4.89) over the 2002-20012 time period in areas affected by fire. The greatest drop in mean shortwave albedo change occurs in 2002, which corresponds to the highest total area burned (378 Mha) observed in the same year and produces the highest mean radiative forcing (4.5 Wm-2). Africa is the main contributor in terms of burned area, but forests globally give the highest radiative forcing per unit area and thus give detectable changes in shortwave albedo. The global mean radiative forcing for the whole period studied (~0.0275 Wm-2) shows that the contribution of fires to the Earth system is not insignificant.

  16. A Land Surface Data Assimilation Framework Using the Land Information System: Description and Application

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Land Information System (LIS) is a hydrologic modeling framework that integrates various community land surface models, ground and satellite-based observations, and high performance computing and data management tools to enable assessment and prediction of hydrologic conditions at various spatia...

  17. Transitioning MODIS to VIIRS observations for Land: Surface Reflectance results, Status and Long-term Prospective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermote, E.

    2015-12-01

    Surface reflectance is one of the key products from VIIRS and as with MODIS, is used in developing several higher-order land products. The VIIRS Surface Reflectance (SR) IP is based on the heritage MODIS Collection 5 product (Vermote et al. 2002). The quality and character of surface reflectance depends on the accuracy of the VIIRS Cloud Mask (VCM) and aerosol algorithms and of course on the adequate calibration of the sensor. Early evaluation of the VIIRS SR product in the context of the maturity of the operational processing system known as the Interface Data Processing System (IDPS), has been a major focus of work to-date, but is now evolving into the development of a VIIRS suite of Climate Data Records produced by the NASA Land Science Investigator Processing System (SIPS). We will present the calibration performance and the role of the surface reflectance in calibration monitoring, the performance of the cloud mask with a focus on vegetation monitoring (no snow conditions), the performance of the aerosol input used in the atmospheric correction with quantitative results of the performance of the SR product over AERONET sites. Based on those elements and further assessment, we will address the readiness of the SR product for the production of higher-order land products such as Vegetation Indices, Albedo and LAI/FPAR, the its application to agricultural monitoring and in particular the integration of VIIRS data into the global agricultural monitoring (GLAM) system developed at UMd. Finally from the lessons learned, we will articulate a set of critical recommendations to ensure consistency and continuity of the JPSS mission with the MODIS data record.

  18. Estimation of Surface Air Temperature from MODIS 1km Resolution Land Surface Temperature Over Northern China

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Suhung; Leptoukh, Gregory G.; Gerasimov, Irina

    2010-01-01

    Surface air temperature is a critical variable to describe the energy and water cycle of the Earth-atmosphere system and is a key input element for hydrology and land surface models. It is a very important variable in agricultural applications and climate change studies. This is a preliminary study to examine statistical relationships between ground meteorological station measured surface daily maximum/minimum air temperature and satellite remotely sensed land surface temperature from MODIS over the dry and semiarid regions of northern China. Studies were conducted for both MODIS-Terra and MODIS-Aqua by using year 2009 data. Results indicate that the relationships between surface air temperature and remotely sensed land surface temperature are statistically significant. The relationships between the maximum air temperature and daytime land surface temperature depends significantly on land surface types and vegetation index, but the minimum air temperature and nighttime land surface temperature has little dependence on the surface conditions. Based on linear regression relationship between surface air temperature and MODIS land surface temperature, surface maximum and minimum air temperatures are estimated from 1km MODIS land surface temperature under clear sky conditions. The statistical errors (sigma) of the estimated daily maximum (minimum) air temperature is about 3.8 C(3.7 C).

  19. Increased Surface Albedo in the Northern Hemisphere: Did satellites warn of the weather troubles of 1972 and 1973?

    PubMed

    Kukla, G J; Kukla, H J

    1974-02-22

    Routine mapping of snow and ice fields in the northern hemisphere was started by NOAA in 1967. Large year-to-year variations of the snow and pack-ice covers were observed. The annual mean coverage increased by 12 percent during 1971 and has remained high. The index R, which shows the approximate amount of energy reflected from the surface by snow and ice under the mean cloudiness, increased correspondingly. Thus, if the cloud cover over the snow fields did not increase substantially, the anomalous weather patterns of 1972 and 1973 could have been connected with the deficit in surface heat exchange which originated in the northern hemisphere the year before. During the past 7 years the largest changes occurred in the fall and in the continental interiors of Asia and America (8). Two synoptic parameters which could readily provide information on the development of snow and ice cover in the northern hemisphere are (i) the total area momentarily covered and (ii) the running annual mean of snow and ice coverage for the preceding 1-year period. By 20 September 1973 the annual mean coverage was 37.3 x 10(6) km(2), 11 to 12 percent higher than at the same time during 1968 through 1970. Snow cover-fall, the season when 15 x 10(6) to 55 x 10(6) km(2) of the northern hemisphere is covered with snow and ice, started on 20 September 1973, compared to 17 September 1972 and 5 or 10 October during 1967 through 1970. The links between the atmosphere, the oceans, and the land surfaces must be better understood before the role of snow and ice can be thoroughly explained and exploited for long-range weather forecasting. But it is clear that snow, hitherto almost overlooked in synoptic meteorological reports, must be important in the mechanism of weather changes. PMID:17790616

  20. The role of land cover in high latitude land surface temperature heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, D.; Nagol, J. R.; Morton, D. C.; Masek, J. G.

    2011-12-01

    Near-surface air temperature governs a range of land surface processes, such as photosynthesis, respiration, and evapotranspiration. However, the spatiotemporal patterns of near-surface air temperature are complex. Meteorological stations provide a detailed account of temporal variations in air temperature, but fail to capture spatial heterogeneity in surface temperature, especially over remote regions with sparse station networks. Gridded climate datasets (0.5° - 2.0° spatial resolution) produced from the meteorological station observations therefore inherit these same shortcomings, since current algorithms use only latitude, longitude, and elevation to interpolate between station locations. Here, we explored the use of MODIS-based estimates of land surface temperature (LST) and land cover to estimate fine-scale heterogeneity in land surface temperature during summer months over boreal North America. We combined nighttime MODIS LST with meteorological station and gridded climate data records. Our analysis quantified the contribution from station distance (latitude and longitude) and land cover type for differences between MODIS and station-based estimates of nighttime temperatures. Finally, we estimated the impact of sub-grid cell heterogeneity in LST for ecosystem processes by comparing seasonal respiration fluxes from an ecosystem model driven by gridded climate data and MODIS LST. Our study suggests that downscaling coarse resolution temperature data using MODIS LST and land cover information can improve estimates of spatial variability in surface temperature data and related ecosystem processes.

  1. [New index for soil moisture monitoring based on deltaT(s)-albedo spectral information].

    PubMed

    Yao, Yun-Jun; Qin, Qi-Ming; Zhao, Shao-Hua; Shen, Xin-Yi; Sui, Xin-Xin

    2011-06-01

    Monitoring soil moisture by remote sensing has been an important problem for both agricultural drought monitoring and water resources management. In the present paper, we acquire the land surface temperature difference (deltaT(s)) and broadband albedo using MODIS Terra reflectance and land surface temperature products to construct the deltaT(s)-albedo spectral feature space. According to the soil moisture variation in spectral feature space, we put forward a simple and practical temperature difference albedo drought index (TDADI) and validate it using ground-measured 0-10 cm averaged soil moisture of Ningxia plain The results show that the coefficient of determination (R2) of both them varies from 0.36 to 0.52, and TDADI has higher accuracy than temperature albedo drought index (TADI) for soil moisture retrieval. The good agreement of TDADI, Albedo/LST, LST/ NDVI and TVDI for analyzing the trends of soil moisture change supports the reliability of TDADI. However, TDADI has been designed only at Ningxia plain and still needs further validation in other regions. PMID:21847933

  2. Using water isotopes in the evaluation of land surface models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guglielmo, Francesca; Risi, Camille; Ottlé, Catherine; Bastrikov, Vladislav; Valdayskikh, Victor; Cattani, Olivier; Jouzel, Jean; Gribanov, Konstantin; Nekrasova, Olga; Zacharov, Vyacheslav; Ogée, Jérôme; Wingate, Lisa; Raz-Yaseef, Naama

    2013-04-01

    Several studies show that uncertainties in the representation of land surface processes contribute significantly to the spread in projections for the hydrological cycle. Improvements in the evaluation of land surface models would therefore translate into more reliable predictions of future changes. The isotopic composition of water is affected by phase transitions and, for this reason, is a good tracer for the hydrological cycle. Particularly relevant for the assessment of land surface processes is the fact that bare soil evaporation and transpiration bear different isotopic signatures. Water isotopic measurement could thus be employed in the evaluation of the land surface hydrological budget. With this objective, isotopes have been implemented in the most recent version of the land surface model ORCHIDEE. This model has undergone considerable development in the past few years. In particular, a newly discretised (11 layers) hydrology aims at a more realistic representation of the soil water budget. In addition, biogeophysical processes, as, for instance, the dynamics of permafrost and of its interaction with snow and vegetation, have been included. This model version will allow us to better resolve vertical profiles of soil water isotopic composition and to more realistically simulate the land surface hydrological and isotopic budget in a broader range of climate zones. Model results have been evaluated against temperature profiles and isotopes measurements in soil and stem water at sites located in semi-arid (Yatir), temperate (Le Bray) and boreal (Labytnangi) regions. Seasonal cycles are reasonably well reproduced. Furthermore, a sensitivity analysis investigates to what extent water isotopic measurements in soil water can help constrain the representation of land surface processes, with a focus on the partitioning between evaporation and transpiration. In turn, improvements in the description of this partitioning may help reduce the uncertainties in the land

  3. Impact of land use changes on surface warming in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingyong; Dong, Wenjie; Wu, Lingyun; Wei, Jiangfeng; Chen, Peiyan; Lee, Dong-Kyou

    2005-06-01

    Land use changes such as urbanization, agriculture, pasturing, deforestation, desertification and irrigation can change the land surface heat flux directly, and also change the atmospheric circulation indirectly, and therefore affect the local temperature. But it is difficult to separate their effects from climate trends such as greenhouse-gas effects. Comparing the decadal trends of the observation station data with those of the NCEP/NCAR Reanalysis (NNR) data provides a good method to separate the effects because the NNR is insensitive to land surface changes. The effects of urbanization and other land use changes over China are estimated by using the difference between the station and the NNR surface temperature trends. Our results show that urbanization and other land use changes may contribute to the observed 0.12°C (10yr)-1 increase for daily mean surface temperature, and the 0.20°C (10yr)-1 and 0.03°C (10 yr)-1 increases for the daily minimum and maximum surface temperatures, respectively. The urban heat island effect and the effects of other land-use changes may also play an important role in the diurnal temperature range change. The spatial pattern of the differences in trends shows a marked heterogeneity. The land surface degradation such as deforestation and desertification due to human activities over northern China, and rapidly-developed urbanization over southern China, may have mostly contributed to the increases at stations north of about 38°N and in Southeast China, respectively. Furthermore, the vegetation cover increase due to irrigation and fertilization may have contributed to the decreasing trend of surface temperature over the lower Yellow River Basin. The study illustrates the possible impacts of land use changes on surface temperature over China.

  4. Turbulent flow over an interactive alternating land-water surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Heerwaarden, C.; Mellado, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    The alternating land-water surface is a challenging surface to represent accurately in weather and climate models, but it is of great importance for the surface energy balance in polar regions. The complexity of this surface lies in the fact that secondary circulations, which form at the boundary of water and land, interact strongly with the surface energy balance. Due to its large heat capacity, the water temperature adapts slowly to the flow, thus the properties of the atmosphere determine the uptake of energy from the water. In order to study this complex system in a simpler way, retaining only the most essential physics, we have simplified the full surface energy balance including radiation. We have derived a boundary condition that mimics the full balance and can be formulated as a so-called Robin boundary condition: a linear combination of Dirichlet (fixed temperature) and Neumann (fixed temperature gradient) ones. By spatially varying the coefficients, we are able to express land and water using this boundary condition. We have done a series of direct numerical simulations in which we generate artificial land-water patterns from noise created from a Gaussian spectrum centered around a dominant wave number. This method creates realistic random patterns, but we are still in control of the length scales. We show that the system can manifest itself in three regimes: micro-, meso- and macro-scale. In the micro-scale, we find perfect mixing of the near-surface atmosphere that results in identical air properties over water and land. In the meso-scale, secondary circulations alter the heat exchange considerably by advecting air between land and water. In addition, they bring the surface temperature of the land closer to that of the air, thereby modulating the energy loss due to outgoing longwave radiation. In the macro-scale regime, the flow over land and water become independent of each other and only the large scale forcings determine the energy balance.

  5. Real Time Land-Surface Hydrologic Modeling Over Continental US

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houser, Paul R.

    1998-01-01

    The land surface component of the hydrological cycle is fundamental to the overall functioning of the atmospheric and climate processes. Spatially and temporally variable rainfall and available energy, combined with land surface heterogeneity cause complex variations in all processes related to surface hydrology. The characterization of the spatial and temporal variability of water and energy cycles are critical to improve our understanding of land surface-atmosphere interaction and the impact of land surface processes on climate extremes. Because the accurate knowledge of these processes and their variability is important for climate predictions, most Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) centers have incorporated land surface schemes in their models. However, errors in the NWP forcing accumulate in the surface and energy stores, leading to incorrect surface water and energy partitioning and related processes. This has motivated the NWP to impose ad hoc corrections to the land surface states to prevent this drift. A proposed methodology is to develop Land Data Assimilation schemes (LDAS), which are uncoupled models forced with observations, and not affected by NWP forcing biases. The proposed research is being implemented as a real time operation using an existing Surface Vegetation Atmosphere Transfer Scheme (SVATS) model at a 40 km degree resolution across the United States to evaluate these critical science questions. The model will be forced with real time output from numerical prediction models, satellite data, and radar precipitation measurements. Model parameters will be derived from the existing GIS vegetation and soil coverages. The model results will be aggregated to various scales to assess water and energy balances and these will be validated with various in-situ observations.

  6. Land surface temperature shaped by urban fractions in megacity region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoxuan; Hu, Yonghong; Jia, Gensuo; Hou, Meiting; Fan, Yanguo; Sun, Zhongchang; Zhu, Yuxiang

    2015-11-01

    Large areas of cropland and natural vegetation have been replaced by impervious surfaces during the recent rapid urbanization in China, which has resulted in intensified urban heat island effects and modified local or regional warming trends. However, it is unclear how urban expansion contributes to local temperature change. In this study, we investigated the relationship between land surface temperature (LST) change and the increase of urban land signals. The megacity of Tianjin was chosen for the case study because it is representative of the urbanization process in northern China. A combined analysis of LST and urban land information was conducted based on an urban-rural transect derived from Landsat 8 Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS), Terra Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS), and QuickBird images. The results indicated that the density of urban land signals has intensified within a 1-km2 grid in the urban center with an impervious land fraction >60 %. However, the construction on urban land is quite different with low-/mid-rise buildings outnumbering high-rise buildings in the urban-rural transect. Based on a statistical moving window analysis, positive correlation (R 2 > 0.9) is found between LST and urban land signals. Surface temperature change (ΔLST) increases by 0.062 °C, which was probably caused by the 1 % increase of urbanized land (ΔIF) in this case region.

  7. The ``coming of age'' of land surface climatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson-Sellers, A.

    1990-08-01

    Land surface climates have never been more crucial that at the present. Scenarios of climatic change, say due to greenhouse warming, require successful prediction of the land surface characteristics since this is the locus of mankind's activities. Evaluation of the state-of-the-art land surface parameterization schemes has only just begun. Here we consider the performance of the Biosphere Atmosphere Transfer Scheme (BATS) when coupled to the National Center for Atmospheric Research's Community Climate Model (CCM). The land surface climatology generated by averaging the results of a three year model integration on a monthly basis is evaluated for the continent of Australia by comparison with published descriptions of a wide range of parameters. Proposals are outlined for improved methods of validation and testing the predictions of such complex biospheric submodels at least at continental scale. Future requirements for an interactive vegetation submodel are examined by assessing the generalized life zones predicted by the CCM as compared with the life zone types currently specified in the model and those predicted by the same GCM but using a simpler land-surface scheme. It is concluded that the climate community is now poised for the next crucial step towards a fully interactive land-surface climatic model.

  8. Vegetation, land surface brightness, and temperature dynamics after aspen forest die-off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Cho-ying; Anderegg, William R. L.

    2014-07-01

    Forest dynamics following drought-induced tree mortality can affect regional climate through biophysical surface properties. These dynamics have not been well quantified, particularly at the regional scale, and are a large uncertainty in ecosystem-climate feedback. We investigated regional biophysical characteristics through time (1995-2011) in drought-impacted (2001-2003), trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) forests by utilizing Landsat time series green and brown vegetation cover, surface brightness (total shortwave albedo), and daytime land surface temperature. We quantified the temporal dynamics and postdrought recovery of these characteristics for aspen forests experiencing severe drought-induced mortality in the San Juan National Forest in southwestern Colorado, USA. We partitioned forests into three categories from healthy to severe mortality (Healthy, Intermediate, and Die-off) by referring to field observations of aspen canopy mortality and live aboveground biomass losses. The vegetation cover of die-off areas in 2011 (26.9% of the aspen forest) was significantly different compared to predrought conditions (decrease of 7.4% of the green vegetation cover and increase of 12.1% of the brown vegetation cover compared to 1999). The surface brightness of the study region 9 years after drought however was comparable to predrought estimates (12.7-13.7%). Postdrought brightness was potentially influenced by understory shrubs, since they became the top layer green canopies in disturbed sites from a satellite's point of view. Satellite evidence also showed that the differences of land surface temperature among the three groups increased substantially (≥45%) after drought, possibly due to the reduction of plant evapotranspiration in the Intermediate and Die-off sites. Our results suggest that the mortality-affected systems have not recovered in terms of the surface biophysical properties. We also find that the temporal dynamics of vegetation cover holds

  9. Near-surface temperatures at proposed Mars Exploration Rover land sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, T. Z.; Bridges, N. T.; Murphy, J. R.

    2003-01-01

    Minimum nighttime temperature at the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) landing sites may limit power available for science activities and thus mission lifetime. Here, 1 m air temperature at the end of the nominal 90 sol primary mission are derived for the four primary and three previously considered MER landing sites based on Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emmision Spectrometer thermal inertia and albedo, estimated opacity, and predictions of air temperature from a one-dimensional atmospheric model.

  10. The MODIS (Collection V005) BRDF/albedo product: Assessment of spatial representativeness over forested landscapes

    SciTech Connect

    Roman, Miguel O.; Schaaf, Crystal; Woodcock, Curtis E.; Strahler, Alan; Yang, Xiaoyuan; Braswell, Rob H.; Curtis, Peter; Davis, Kenneth J.; Dragoni, Danilo; Goulden, Michael L.; Gu, Lianhong; Hollinger, David Y; Meyers, Tilden P.; Wilson, Tim B.; Munger, J. William; Wofsy, Steve; Privette, Jeffrey L.; Richardson, Andrew D.

    2009-11-01

    A new methodology for establishing the spatial representativeness of tower albedo measurements that are routinely used in validation of satellite retrievals from global land surface albedo and reflectance anisotropy products is presented. This method brings together knowledge of the intrinsic biophysical properties of a measurement site, and the surrounding landscape to produce a number of geostatistical attributes that describe the overall variability, spatial extent, strength of the spatial correlation, and spatial structure of surface albedo patterns at separate seasonal periods throughout the year. Variogram functions extracted from Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) retrievals of surface albedo using multiple spatial and temporal thresholds were used to assess the degree to which a given point (tower) measurement is able to capture the intrinsic variability of the immediate landscape extending to a satellite pixel. A validation scheme was implemented over a wide range of forested landscapes, looking at both deciduous and coniferous sites, from tropical to boreal ecosystems. The experiment focused on comparisons between tower measurements of surface albedo acquired at local solar noon and matching retrievals from the MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) (Collection V005) Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF)/albedo algorithm. Assessments over a select group of field stations with comparable landscape features and daily retrieval scenarios further demonstrate the ability of this technique to identify measurement sites that contain the intrinsic spatial and seasonal features of surface albedo over sufficiently large enough footprints for use in modeling and remote sensing studies. This approach, therefore, improves our understanding of product uncertainty both in terms of the representativeness of the field data and its relationship to the larger satellite pixel.

  11. COMETARY SCIENCE. The landing(s) of Philae and inferences about comet surface mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Biele, Jens; Ulamec, Stephan; Maibaum, Michael; Roll, Reinhard; Witte, Lars; Jurado, Eric; Muñoz, Pablo; Arnold, Walter; Auster, Hans-Ulrich; Casas, Carlos; Faber, Claudia; Fantinati, Cinzia; Finke, Felix; Fischer, Hans-Herbert; Geurts, Koen; Güttler, Carsten; Heinisch, Philip; Herique, Alain; Hviid, Stubbe; Kargl, Günter; Knapmeyer, Martin; Knollenberg, Jörg; Kofman, Wlodek; Kömle, Norbert; Kührt, Ekkehard; Lommatsch, Valentina; Mottola, Stefano; Pardo de Santayana, Ramon; Remetean, Emile; Scholten, Frank; Seidensticker, Klaus J; Sierks, Holger; Spohn, Tilman

    2015-07-31

    The Philae lander, part of the Rosetta mission to investigate comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, was delivered to the cometary surface in November 2014. Here we report the precise circumstances of the multiple landings of Philae, including the bouncing trajectory and rebound parameters, based on engineering data in conjunction with operational instrument data. These data also provide information on the mechanical properties (strength and layering) of the comet surface. The first touchdown site, Agilkia, appears to have a granular soft surface (with a compressive strength of 1 kilopascal) at least ~20 cm thick, possibly on top of a more rigid layer. The final landing site, Abydos, has a hard surface. PMID:26228158

  12. Development of High Resolution Land Surface Parameters for the Community Land Model

    SciTech Connect

    Ke, Yinghai; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Huang, Maoyi; Coleman, Andre M.; Li, Hongyi; Wigmosta, Mark S.

    2012-11-06

    There is a growing need for high-resolution land surface parameters as land surface models are being applied at increasingly higher spatial resolution offline as well as in regional and global models. The default land surface parameters for the most recent version of the Community Land Model (i.e. CLM 4.0) are at 0.5° or coarser resolutions, released with the Community Earth System Model (CESM). Plant Functional Types (PFTs), vegetation properties such as Leaf Area Index (LAI), Stem Area Index (SAI), and non-vegetated land covers were developed using remotely sensed datasets retrieved in late 1990’s and the beginning of this century. In this study, we developed new land surface parameters for CLM 4.0, specifically PFTs, LAI, SAI and non-vegetated land cover composition, at 0.05° resolution globally based on the most recent MODIS land cover and improved MODIS LAI products. Compared to the current CLM 4.0 parameters, the new parameters produced a decreased coverage by bare soil and trees, but an increased coverage by shrub, grass, and cropland. The new parameters result in a decrease in global seasonal LAI, with the biggest decrease in boreal forests; however, the new parameters also show a large increase in LAI in tropical forest. Differences between the new and the current parameters are mainly caused by changes in the sources of remotely sensed data and the representation of land cover in the source data. Advantages and disadvantages of each dataset were discussed in order to provide guidance on the use of the data. The new high-resolution land surface parameters have been used in a coupled land-atmosphere model (WRF-CLM) applied to the western U.S. to demonstrate their use in high-resolution modeling. A remapping method from the latitude/longitude grid of the CLM data to the WRF grids with map projection was also demonstrated. Future work will include global offline CLM simulations to examine the impacts of source data resolution and subsequent land parameter

  13. Development of high resolution land surface parameters for the Community Land Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Y.; Leung, L. R.; Huang, M.; Coleman, A. M.; Li, H.; Wigmosta, M. S.

    2012-11-01

    There is a growing need for high-resolution land surface parameters as land surface models are being applied at increasingly higher spatial resolution offline as well as in regional and global models. The default land surface parameters for the most recent version of the Community Land Model (i.e. CLM 4.0) are at 0.5° or coarser resolutions, released with the Community Earth System Model (CESM). Plant Functional Types (PFTs), vegetation properties such as Leaf Area Index (LAI), Stem Area Index (SAI), and non-vegetated land covers were developed using remotely sensed datasets retrieved in late 1990's and the beginning of this century. In this study, we developed new land surface parameters for CLM 4.0, specifically PFTs, LAI, SAI and non-vegetated land cover composition, at 0.05° resolution globally based on the most recent MODIS land cover and improved MODIS LAI products. Compared to the current CLM 4.0 parameters, the new parameters produced a decreased coverage by bare soil and trees, but an increased coverage by shrub, grass, and cropland. The new parameters result in a decrease in global seasonal LAI, with the biggest decrease in boreal forests; however, the new parameters also show a large increase in LAI in tropical forest. Differences between the new and the current parameters are mainly caused by changes in the sources of remotely sensed data and the representation of land cover in the source data. Advantages and disadvantages of each dataset were discussed in order to provide guidance on the use of the data. The new high-resolution land surface parameters have been used in a coupled land-atmosphere model (WRF-CLM) applied to the western US to demonstrate their use in high-resolution modeling. A remapping method from the latitude/longitude grid of the CLM data to the WRF grids with map projection was also demonstrated. Future work will include global offline CLM simulations to examine the impacts of source data resolution and subsequent land parameter

  14. CARBON SEQUESTRATION ON SURFACE MINE LANDS

    SciTech Connect

    Donald H. Graves; Christopher Barton; Richard Sweigard; Richard Warner

    2005-06-22

    An area planted in 2004 on Bent Mountain in Pike County was shifted to the Department of Energy project to centralize an area to become a demonstration site. An additional 98.3 acres were planted on Peabody lands in western Kentucky and Bent Mountain to bring the total area under study by this project to 556.5 acres as indicated in Table 2. Major efforts this quarter include the implementation of new plots that will examine the influence of differing geologic material on tree growth and survival, water quality and quantity and carbon sequestration. Normal monitoring and maintenance was conducted and additional instrumentation was installed to monitor the new areas planted.

  15. On The Reproducibility of Seasonal Land-surface Climate

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, T J

    2004-10-22

    The sensitivity of the continental seasonal climate to initial conditions is estimated from an ensemble of decadal simulations of an atmospheric general circulation model with the same specifications of radiative forcings and monthly ocean boundary conditions, but with different initial states of atmosphere and land. As measures of the ''reproducibility'' of continental climate for different initial conditions, spatio-temporal correlations are computed across paired realizations of eleven model land-surface variables in which the seasonal cycle is either included or excluded--the former case being pertinent to climate simulation, and the latter to seasonal anomaly prediction. It is found that the land-surface variables which include the seasonal cycle are impacted only marginally by changes in initial conditions; moreover, their seasonal climatologies exhibit high spatial reproducibility. In contrast, the reproducibility of a seasonal land-surface anomaly is generally low, although it is substantially higher in the Tropics; its spatial reproducibility also markedly fluctuates in tandem with warm and cold phases of the El Nino/Southern Oscillation. However, the overall degree of reproducibility depends strongly on the particular land-surface anomaly considered. It is also shown that the predictability of a land-surface anomaly implied by its reproducibility statistics is consistent with what is inferred from more conventional predictability metrics. Implications of these results for climate model intercomparison projects and for operational forecasts of seasonal continental climate also are elaborated.

  16. Evapotranspiration and runoff from large land areas: Land surface hydrology for atmospheric general circulation models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Famiglietti, J. S.; Wood, Eric F.

    1993-01-01

    A land surface hydrology parameterization for use in atmospheric GCM's is presented. The parameterization incorporates subgrid scale variability in topography, soils, soil moisture and precipitation. The framework of the model is the statistical distribution of a topography-soils index, which controls the local water balance fluxes, and is therefore taken to represent the large land area. Spatially variable water balance fluxes are integrated with respect to the topography-soils index to yield our large topography-soils distribution, and interval responses are weighted by the probability of occurrence of the interval. Grid square averaged land surface fluxes result. The model functions independently as a macroscale water balance model. Runoff ratio and evapotranspiration efficiency parameterizations are derived and are shown to depend on the spatial variability of the above mentioned properties and processes, as well as the dynamics of land surface-atmosphere interactions.

  17. Water equivalent hydrogen estimates from the first 200 sols of Curiosity's traverse (Bradbury Landing to Yellowknife Bay): Results from the Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons (DAN) passive mode experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tate, C. G.; Moersch, J.; Jun, I.; Ming, D. W.; Mitrofanov, I.; Litvak, M.; Behar, A.; Boynton, W. V.; Deflores, L.; Drake, D.; Ehresmann, B.; Fedosov, F.; Golovin, D.; Hardgrove, C.; Harshman, K.; Hassler, D. M.; Kozyrev, A. S.; Kuzmin, R.; Lisov, D.; Malakhov, A.; Milliken, R.; Mischna, M.; Mokrousov, M.; Nikiforov, S.; Sanin, A. B.; Starr, R.; Varenikov, A.; Vostrukhin, A.; Zeitlin, C.

    2015-12-01

    The Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons (DAN) experiment on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover Curiosity is designed to detect neutrons to determine hydrogen abundance within the subsurface of Mars (Mitrofanov, I.G. et al. [2012]. Space Sci. Rev. 170, 559-582. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11214-012-9924-y; Litvak, M.L. et al. [2008]. Astrobiology 8, 605-613. http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/ast.2007.0157). While DAN has a pulsed neutron generator for active measurements, in passive mode it only measures the leakage spectrum of neutrons produced by the Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG) and Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR). DAN passive measurements provide better spatial coverage than the active measurements because they can be acquired while the rover is moving. Here we compare DAN passive-mode data to models of the instrument's response to compositional differences in a homogeneous regolith in order to estimate the water equivalent hydrogen (WEH) content along the first 200 sols of Curiosity's traverse in Gale Crater, Mars. WEH content is shown to vary greatly along the traverse. These estimates range from 0.5 ± 0.1 wt.% to 3.9 ± 0.2 wt.% for fixed locations (usually overnight stops) investigated by the rover and 0.6 ± 0.2 wt.% to 7.6 ± 1.3 wt.% for areas that the rover has traversed while continuously acquiring DAN passive data between fixed locations. Estimates of WEH abundances at fixed locations based on passive mode data are in broad agreement with those estimated at the same locations using active mode data. Localized (meter-scale) anomalies in estimated WEH values from traverse measurements have no particular surface expression observable in co-located images. However at a much larger scale, the hummocky plains and bedded fractured units are shown to be distinct compositional units based on the hydrogen content derived from DAN passive measurements. DAN passive WEH estimates are also shown to be consistent with geologic models inferred from other

  18. Determination of surface reflectance and estimates of atmospheric optical depth and single scattering albedo from Landsat Thematic Mapper data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conel, James E.

    1990-01-01

    Groound-reflectance data on selected targets for calbiration of a Landsat TM image of Wind River Basin, Wyoming, acquired November 21, 1982 were examined. Field-derived calibration relationships together with Landsat radiometric calibration data are used to convert scanner DN values to spectral radiance for the TM bands and (together with a simplified homogeneous atmospheric model) to obtain estimates of single-scattering albedo and optical depth consistent with the derived path radiance and transmission properties of the atmosphere. These estimates are used to study the problems of evaluation of the magnitude of adjacency effects for reference targets, the assumption of isotropic properties, and the aggregate magnitude of multiple reflections between sky and ground. The radiance calibration equations are also used together with preflight measured signal/noise properties of the TM-4 system to estimate the noise-equivalent reflectance recoverable in practice from the system.

  19. On the connection between continental-scale land surface processes and the tropical climate in a coupled ocean-atmosphere-land system

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Hsi-Yen; Mechoso, C. R.; Xue, Yongkang; Xiao, Heng; Neelin, David; Ji, Xuan

    2013-11-15

    The impact of global tropical climate to perturbations in land surface processes (LSP) are evaluated using perturbations given by different LSP representations of continental-scale in a global climate model that includes atmosphere-ocean interactions. One representation is a simple land scheme, which specifies climatological albedos and soil moisture availability. The other representation is the more comprehensive Simplified Simple Biosphere Model, which allows for interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical processes. The results demonstrate that LSP processes such as interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical processes have strong impacts on the seasonal mean states and seasonal cycles of global precipitation, clouds, and surface air temperature. The impact is especially significant over the tropical Pacific. To explore the mechanisms for such impact, different LSP representations are confined to selected continental-scale regions where strong interactions of climate-vegetation biophysical processes are present. We find that the largest impact is mainly from LSP perturbations over the tropical African continent. The impact is through anomalous convective heating in tropical Africa due to changes in the surface heat fluxes, which in turn affect basinwide teleconnections in the Pacific through equatorial wave dynamics. The modifications in the equatorial Pacific climate are further enhanced by strong air-sea coupling between surface wind stress and upwelling, as well as effect of ocean memory. Our results further suggest that correct representations of land surface processes, land use change and the associated changes in the deep convection over tropical Africa are crucial to reducing the uncertainty when performing future climate projections under different climate change scenarios.

  20. Advanced microwave forward model for the land surface data assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Chang-Hwan; Pause, Marion; Gayler, Sebastian; Wollschlaeger, Ute; Jackson, Thomas J.; LeDrew, Ellsworth; Behrendt, Andreas; Wulfmeyer, Volker

    2015-04-01

    From local to global scales, microwave remote-sensing techniques can provide temporally and spatially highly resolved observations of land surface properties including soil moisture and temperature as well as the state of vegetation. These variables are critical for agricultural productivity and water resource management. Furthermore, having accurate information of these variables allows us to improve the performances of numerical weather forecasts and climate prediction models. However, it is challenging to translate a measured brightness temperature into the multiple land surface properties because of the inherent inversion problem. In this study, we introduce a novel forward model for microwave remote sensing to resolve this inversion problem and to close the gap between land surface modeling and observations. It is composed of the Noah-MP land surface model as well as new models for the dielectric mixing and the radiative transfer. For developing a realistic forward operator, the land surface model must simulate soil and vegetation processes properly. The Noah-MP land surface model provides an excellent starting point because it contains already a sophisticated soil texture and land cover data set. Soil moisture transport is derived using the Richards equation in combination with a set of soil hydraulic parameters. Vegetation properties are considered using several photosynthesis models with different complexity. The energy balance is closed for the top soil and the vegetation layers. The energy flux becomes more realistic due to including not only the volumetric ratio of land surface properties but also their surface fraction as sub-grid scale information (semitile approach). Dielectric constant is the fundamental link to quantify the land surface properties. Our physical based new dielectric-mixing model is superior to previous calibration and semi-empirical approaches. Furthermore, owing to the consideration of the oversaturated surface dielectric behaviour

  1. Using a coupled atmospheric-biospheric modeling system (GEMRAMS) to model the effects of land-use/land-cover changes on the near-surface atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltran, Adriana Beatriz

    A coupled atmospheric-biospheric model is a particularly valuable tool to study the potential effects of land-use/land-cover changes on near-surface atmosphere since the atmosphere and biosphere are allowed to dynamically interact through the surface and canopy energy balance. GEMRAMS is an ecophysiological process-based model, comprised of the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) and the General Energy and Mass Transport Model (GEMTM), and was used in this study. At a regional and seasonal scale, several spring-early summer simulations were conducted on a southern South America domain. GEMRAMS were able to simulate the observed monthly temperature and precipitation. Sensitivity to lateral boundary conditions was explored for RAMS using NCEP and ECMWF reanalysis as atmospheric forcing. Land-cover scenarios representing current, natural, and afforestation conditions were implemented for this region and used to simulate the impacts of land-cover changes on near-surface atmosphere. Changes in near-surface fluxes and temperature depended on the type of vegetation conversion and the season. Warmer temperatures were found in the conversion from wooded grasslands or forest to agriculture. Afforestation and conversion from grass to agriculture led to a cooler and wetter near-surface atmosphere. Additional simulations with a double CO2 concentration were also performed to assess the relative contributions of the land-cover and doubled CO2 forcing to meteorological and biological variables. At a local and diurnal scale, GEMRAMS was used to evaluate the effects of observed vegetation changes that occurred in the northern Chihuahuan Desert, from grasslands in the mid-1800s to shrublands in the late 1900s. Simulations were performed using detailed vegetation maps for 1858 and 1998. Surface flux changes and the associated effects on near-surface temperature were spatially heterogeneous: different vegetation changes led to different effects, but albedo was the dominant

  2. CARBON SEQUESTRATION OF SURFACE MINE LANDS

    SciTech Connect

    Donald H. Graves; Christopher Barton; Richard Sweigard; Richard Warner

    2004-05-19

    The January-March 2004 Quarter was dedicated to tree planting activities in two locations in Kentucky. During year one of this project there was no available mine land to plant in the Hazard area so 107 acres were planted in the Martin county mine location. This year 120 acres was planted in the Hazard area to compensate for the prior year and an additional 57 acres was planted on Peabody properties in western Kentucky. An additional set of special plots were established on each of these areas that contained 4800 seedlings each for special carbon sequestration determinations. Plantings were also conducted to continue compaction and water quality studies on two newly established areas as well as confirmed measurements on the first years plantings. Total plantings on this project now amount to 357 acres containing 245,960 tree seedlings.

  3. Surface Characterization for Land-Atmosphere Studies of CLASIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, T. J.; Kustas, W.; Torn, M. S.; Meyers, T.; Prueger, J.; Fischer, M. L.; Avissar, R.; Yueh, S.; Anderson, M.; Miller, M.

    2006-12-01

    The Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign will focus on interactions between the land surface, convective boundary layer, and cumulus clouds. It will take place in the Southern Great Plains (SGP) area of the U.S, specifically within the US DOE ARM Climate Research Facility. The intensive observing period will be June of 2007, which typically covers the winter wheat harvest in the region. This region has been the focus of several related experiments that include SGP97, SGP99, and SMEX03. For the land surface, some of the specific science questions include 1) how do spatial variations in land cover along this trajectory modulate the cloud structure and the low-level water vapor budget, 2) what are the relationships between land surface characteristics (i.e., soil texture, vegetation type and fractional cover) and states (particularly soil moisture and surface temperature) and the resulting impact of the surface energy balance on boundary layer and cloud structure and dynamics and aerosol loading; and 3) what is the interplay between cumulus cloud development and surface energy balance partitioning between latent and sensible heat, and implications for the carbon flux? Most of these objectives will require flux and state measurements throughout the dominant land covers and distributed over the geographic domain. These observations would allow determining the level of up- scaling/aggregation required in order to understand the impact of landscape changes affecting energy balance/flux partitioning and impact on cloud/atmospheric dynamics. Specific contributions that are planned to be added to CLASIC include continuous tower-based monitoring of surface fluxes for key land cover types prior to, during, and post-IOP, replicate towers to quantify flux variance within each land cover, boundary layer properties and fluxes from a helicopter-based system, airplane- and satellite-based flux products throughout the region, aircraft- and tower-based concentration data for

  4. Microwave Brightness Of Land Surfaces From Outer Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerr, Yann H.; Njoku, Eni G.

    1991-01-01

    Mathematical model approximates microwave radiation emitted by land surfaces traveling to microwave radiometer in outer space. Applied to measurements made by Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR). Developed for interpretation of microwave imagery of Earth to obtain distributions of various chemical, physical, and biological characteristics across its surface. Intended primarily for use in mapping moisture content of soil and fraction of Earth covered by vegetation. Advanced Very-High-Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR), provides additional information on vegetative cover, thereby making possible retrieval of soil-moisture values from SMMR measurements. Possible to monitor changes of land surface during intervals of 5 to 10 years, providing significant data for mathematical models of evolution of climate.

  5. Results From Global Land-surface Data Assimilation Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radakovich, J. D.; Houser, P. R.; da Silva, A.; Bosilovich, M. G.

    2001-05-01

    Realistic representation of the land surface is crucial in global climate modeling (GCM). Recently, the Mosaic land-surface Model (LSM) has been driven off-line using GEOS DAS (Goddard Earth Observing System Data Assimilation System) atmospheric forcing, forming the Off-line Land-surface Global Assimilation (OLGA) system. This system provides a computationally efficient test bed for land surface data assimilation. Here, we validate the OLGA simulation of surface processes and the assimilation of ISCCP surface temperatures. Another component of this study was the incorporation of the Physical-space Statistical Analysis System (PSAS) into OLGA, in order to assimilate surface temperature observations from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP). To counteract the subsequent forcing of the analyzed skin temperature back to the initial state following the analysis, incremental bias correction (IBC) was included in the assimilation. The IBC scheme effectively removed the time mean bias, but did not remove bias in the mean diurnal cycle. Therefore, a diurnal bias correction (DBC) scheme was developed, where the time-dependent bias was modeled with a sine wave parameterization. In addition, quality control of the ISCCP data and anisotropic temperature correction were implemented in PSAS. Preliminary results showed a substantial impact from the inclusion of PSAS and DBC that was visible in the surface meteorology fields and energy budget. Also, the monthly mean diurnal cycle from the experiment closely matched the diurnal cycle from the observations.

  6. Results from Global Land-Surface Data Assimilation Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radakovich, Jon D.; Houser, Paul R.; daSilva, Arlindo; Bosilovich, Michael G.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Realistic representation of the land surface is crucial in global climate modeling (GCM). Recently, the Mosaic land-surface Model (LSM) has been driven off-line using GEOS DAS (Goddard Earth Observing System Data Assimilation System) atmospheric forcing, forming the Off-line Land-surface Global Assimilation (OLGA) system. This system provides a computationally efficient test bed for land surface data assimilation. Here, we validate the OLGA simulation of surface processes and the assimilation of ISCCP surface temperatures. Another component of this study as the incorporation of the Physical-space Statistical Analysis System (PSAS) into OLGA, in order to assimilate surface temperature observations from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP). To counteract the subsequent forcing of the analyzed skin temperature back to the initial state following the analysis. incremental bias correction (IBC) was included in the assimilation. The IBC scheme effectively removed the time mean bias, but did not remove him in the mean diurnal cycle. Therefore, a diurnal him correction (DBC) scheme was developed, where the time-dependent bias was modeled with a sine wave parameterization. In addition, quality control of the ISCCP data and anisotropic temperature correction were implemented in PSAS. Preliminary results showed a substantial impact from the inclusion of PSAS and DBC that was visible in the surface meteorology fields and energy budget. Also, the monthly mean diurnal cycle from the experiment closely matched the diurnal cycle from the observations.

  7. Daily Operational MODIS BRDF, Albedo and Nadir Reflectance Products (V006)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaaf, C.; Wang, Z.; Shuai, Y.; Strahler, A. H.

    2012-12-01

    The operational surface Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) and Albedo product (MCD43) has been produced for more than a decade from the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensors aboard NASA's Terra and Aqua satellites. The Collection V005 operational product, reprocessed for the entire record, provides BRDF models, surface albedo quantities, and Nadir BRDF-Adjusted Reflectances (NBAR) globally on a 500m grid in a sinusoidal projection every 8 days (based on a 16 day window). As surface albedo is an essential climate variable (ECV), the accurate global estimations of terrestrial albedo provided by this product are used by numerous climate and biogeochemical modeling efforts. Of equal utility, the NBAR values are used as the primary inputs to the MODIS Land Cover product and (in the form of NBAR vegetation indices) are used for a variety of vegetation monitoring and phenological studies. Furthermore, the retrieved BRDF model parameters are increasingly being used to provide estimates of vegetation canopy variability and clumping. In the Collection V006 reprocessing effort, the standard global MODIS BRDF/Albedo product will finally be produced as a daily product (based on a 16 day moving window). The daily algorithm will rely on rolling multi-date directional surface reflectances to establish a general surface reflectance anisotropy model of the surface, while emphasizing the daily observation in an attempt to capture rapidly changing surface conditions. In order to improve retrievals over high latitudes and better capture snow covered and dormant vegetation conditions, more surface reflectances per day will be used in V006. Furthermore, the backup database (used to produce poorer quality magnitude inversions when high quality full retrievals are not possible) will now be continuously updated from the latest high quality full inversion for improved accuracy. The availability of daily V006 BRDF/albedo products will allow more

  8. Global Land Cover Classification Using Modis Surface Reflectance Prosucts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukue, Kiyonari; Shimoda, Haruhisa

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study is to develop high accuracy land cover classification algorithm for Global scale by using multi-temporal MODIS land reflectance products. In this study, time-domain co-occurrence matrix was introduced as a classification feature which provides time-series signature of land covers. Further, the non-parametric minimum distance classifier was introduced for timedomain co-occurrence matrix, which performs multi-dimensional pattern matching for time-domain co-occurrence matrices of a classification target pixel and each classification classes. The global land cover classification experiments have been conducted by applying the proposed classification method using 46 multi-temporal(in one year) SR(Surface Reflectance) and NBAR(Nadir BRDF-Adjusted Reflectance) products, respectively. IGBP 17 land cover categories were used in our classification experiments. As the results, SR and NBAR products showed similar classification accuracy of 99%.

  9. Post-fire influences of snag attrition on albedo and radiative forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Halloran, T. L.; Acker, S. A.; Joerger, V.; Kertis, J.; Law, B. E.

    2014-12-01

    We examine albedo perturbation and associated radiative forcing after a high-severity fire in a mature forest in the Oregon Cascade Range. Correlations between post-fire albedo and seedling, sapling, and standing dead tree (snag) density were investigated across fire severity classes and seasons for years 4-15 after fire. Albedo perturbation was 14 times larger in winter compared to summer and increased with fire severity class for the first several years after fire. Summer and winter albedo perturbation increased approximately linearly over the study period. Albedo correlations were strongest with snags, and significant in all fire classes in both summer and winter. The resulting annual radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere decreased (became more negative) linearly for the first 15 years after fire. These results suggest that snags, more than recovering vegetation, can control the shortwave energy balance of the burned land surface. As such, the dynamics of snag attrition may need to be included in coupled land-atmosphere models to properly represent the climate impacts of wildfire.

  10. Quantifying the climate impacts of albedo changes due to biofuel production: a comparison with biogeochemical effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caiazzo, Fabio; Malina, Robert; Staples, Mark D.; Wolfe, Philip J.; Yim, Steve H. L.; Barrett, Steven R. H.

    2014-01-01

    Lifecycle analysis is a tool widely used to evaluate the climate impact of greenhouse gas emissions attributable to the production and use of biofuels. In this paper we employ an augmented lifecycle framework that includes climate impacts from changes in surface albedo due to land use change. We consider eleven land-use change scenarios for the cultivation of biomass for middle distillate fuel production, and compare our results to previous estimates of lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions for the same set of land-use change scenarios in terms of CO2e per unit of fuel energy. We find that two of the land-use change scenarios considered demonstrate a warming effect due to changes in surface albedo, compared to conventional fuel, the largest of which is for replacement of desert land with salicornia cultivation. This corresponds to 222 gCO2e/MJ, equivalent to 3890% and 247% of the lifecycle GHG emissions of fuels derived from salicornia and crude oil, respectively. Nine of the land-use change scenarios considered demonstrate a cooling effect, the largest of which is for the replacement of tropical rainforests with soybean cultivation. This corresponds to - 161 gCO2e/MJ, or - 28% and - 178% of the lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions of fuels derived from soybean and crude oil, respectively. These results indicate that changes in surface albedo have the potential to dominate the climate impact of biofuels, and we conclude that accounting for changes in surface albedo is necessary for a complete assessment of the aggregate climate impacts of biofuel production and use.

  11. Carbon Sequestration on Surface Mine Lands

    SciTech Connect

    Donald H. Graves; Christopher Barton; Bon Jun Koo; Richard Sweigard; Richard Warner

    2004-11-30

    The first quarter of 2004 was dedicated to tree planting activities in two locations in Kentucky. During the first year of this project there was not available mine land to plant in the Hazard area, so 107 acres were planted in the Martin County mine location. This year 120 acres were planted in the Hazard area to compensate for the prior year and an additional 57 acres were planted on Peabody properties in western Kentucky. Additional sets of special plots were established on each of these areas that contained 4800 seedlings each for carbon sequestration demonstrations. Plantings were also conducted to continue compaction and water quality studies on the newly established areas as well as continual measurements of the first year's plantings. Total plantings on this project now amount to 357 acres containing 245,960 seedlings. During the second quarter of this year monitoring systems were established for all the new research areas. Weather data pertinent to the research as well as hydrology and water quality monitoring continues to be conducted on all areas. Studies established to assess specific questions pertaining to carbon flux and the invasion of the vegetation by small mammals are being quantified. Experimental practices initiated with this research project will eventually allow for the planting on long steep slopes with loose grading systems and allow mountain top removal areas to be constructed with loose spoil with no grading of the final layers of rooting material when establishing trees for the final land use designation. Monitoring systems have been installed to measure treatment effects on both above and below ground carbon and nitrogen pools in the planting areas. Soil and tissue samples were collected from both years planting and analyses were conducted in the laboratory. Examination of decomposition and heterotropic respiration on carbon cycling in the reforestation plots continued during the reporting period. Entire planted trees were extracted

  12. CARBON SEQUESTRATION ON SURFACE MINE LANDS

    SciTech Connect

    Donald H. Graves; Christopher Barton; Richard Sweigard; Richard Warner

    2001-01-30

    The October-December 2003 Quarter was dedicated to analyzing the first years tree planting activities and evaluation of the results. This included the analyses of the species success at each of the sites and quantifying the baseline data for future year determination of research levels of mixes. The small mammal colonization study of revegetated surface mines was also initiated and sampling systems initiated.

  13. Improving land surface emissivty parameter for land surface models using portable FTIR and remote sensing observation in Taklimakan Desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yongqiang; Mamtimin, Ali; He, Qing

    2014-05-01

    Because land surface emissivity (ɛ) has not been reliably measured, global climate model (GCM) land surface schemes conventionally set this parameter as simply assumption, for example, 1 as in the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) model, 0.96 for soil and wetland in the Global and Regional Assimilation and Prediction System (GRAPES) Common Land Model (CoLM). This is the so-called emissivity assumption. Accurate broadband emissivity data are needed as model inputs to better simulate the land surface climate. It is demonstrated in this paper that the assumption of the emissivity induces errors in modeling the surface energy budget over Taklimakan Desert where ɛ is far smaller than original value. One feasible solution to this problem is to apply the accurate broadband emissivity into land surface models. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument has routinely measured spectral emissivities in six thermal infrared bands. The empirical regression equations have been developed in this study to convert these spectral emissivities to broadband emissivity required by land surface models. In order to calibrate the regression equations, using a portable Fourier Transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer instrument, crossing Taklimakan Desert along with highway from north to south, to measure the accurate broadband emissivity. The observed emissivity data show broadband ɛ around 0.89-0.92. To examine the impact of improved ɛ to radiative energy redistribution, simulation studies were conducted using offline CoLM. The results illustrate that large impacts of surface ɛ occur over desert, with changes up in surface skin temperature, as well as evident changes in sensible heat fluxes. Keywords: Taklimakan Desert, surface broadband emissivity, Fourier Transform infrared spectrometer, MODIS, CoLM

  14. Influence of atmospheric forcing parameters on land surface simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, H. P.; Mandal, M.; Bhattacharya, A.

    2015-12-01

    The quality of atmospheric forcing plays important role on land surface simulation using decoupled land surface modeling system. In the present study, the influence of the various atmospheric forcing parameters on land surface simulation is assessed through sensitivity experiments. Numerical experiments are conducted towards preparation of land surface analysis for the period Jan-2011 - Dec-2013 using offline 2D-Noah land surface model (LSM) based land data assimilation system (LDAS) over Indian region (5 - 39N, 60 - 100E) hereafter referred as LDASI. The surface temperature, specific humidity, horizontal winds and pressure as atmospheric forcing parameters are derived from Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA). The downward (solar and thermal) radiation and precipitation is obtained from European Centre for Medium Range Forecast (ECMWF) and Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) respectively. The sensitivity experiments are conducted by introducing perturbation in one atmospheric forcing parameter at a time keeping the other parameters unchanged. Influence of temperature, specific humidity, downward (shortwave and long wave) radiation, rain-rate and wind speed is investigated by conducted 13 numerical experiments. It is observed that the land surface analysis from LDASI is most sensitive to the downward longwave radiation and least sensitive to wind speed. The analysis is also substantially influenced by the surface air temperature. The annual mean soil moisture at 5 cm is decreased by 12-15% if the downward long-wave radiation is increased by 20% and it is increased by 15% if the downward long-wave radiation is decreased by 20%. The influence is even more in the Himalayan region but the increase in long-wave radiation leads to increase in soil moisture and similar influence on decrease because downward long-wave radiation leads glacier melting. The annual mean soil temperature in the analysis is increased by 2.2 K if surface

  15. Aerosol Direct, Indirect, Semidirect, and Surface Albedo Effects from Sector Contributions Based on the IPCC AR5 Emissions for Preindustrial and Present-day Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Susanne E.; Menon, Surabi

    2012-01-01

    The anthropogenic increase in aerosol concentrations since preindustrial times and its net cooling effect on the atmosphere is thought to mask some of the greenhouse gas-induced warming. Although the overall effect of aerosols on solar radiation and clouds is most certainly negative, some individual forcing agents and feedbacks have positive forcing effects. Recent studies have tried to identify some of those positive forcing agents and their individual emission sectors, with the hope that mitigation policies could be developed to target those emitters. Understanding the net effect of multisource emitting sectors and the involved cloud feedbacks is very challenging, and this paper will clarify forcing and feedback effects by separating direct, indirect, semidirect and surface albedo effects due to aerosols. To this end, we apply the Goddard Institute for Space Studies climate model including detailed aerosol microphysics to examine aerosol impacts on climate by isolating single emission sector contributions as given by the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) emission data sets developed for Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) AR5. For the modeled past 150 years, using the climate model and emissions from preindustrial times to present-day, the total global annual mean aerosol radiative forcing is -0.6 W/m(exp 2), with the largest contribution from the direct effect (-0.5 W/m(exp 2)). Aerosol-induced changes on cloud cover often depends on cloud type and geographical region. The indirect (includes only the cloud albedo effect with -0.17 W/m(exp 2)) and semidirect effects (-0.10 W/m(exp 2)) can be isolated on a regional scale, and they often have opposing forcing effects, leading to overall small forcing effects on a global scale. Although the surface albedo effects from aerosols are small (0.016 W/m(exp 2)), triggered feedbacks on top of the atmosphere (TOA) radiative forcing can be 10 times larger. Our results point out that each

  16. Aerosol direct, indirect, semidirect, and surface albedo effects from sector contributions based on the IPCC AR5 emissions for preindustrial and present-day conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Susanne E.; Menon, Surabi

    2012-01-01

    The anthropogenic increase in aerosol concentrations since preindustrial times and its net cooling effect on the atmosphere is thought to mask some of the greenhouse gas-induced warming. Although the overall effect of aerosols on solar radiation and clouds is most certainly negative, some individual forcing agents and feedbacks have positive forcing effects. Recent studies have tried to identify some of those positive forcing agents and their individual emission sectors, with the hope that mitigation policies could be developed to target those emitters. Understanding the net effect of multisource emitting sectors and the involved cloud feedbacks is very challenging, and this paper will clarify forcing and feedback effects by separating direct, indirect, semidirect and surface albedo effects due to aerosols. To this end, we apply the Goddard Institute for Space Studies climate model including detailed aerosol microphysics to examine aerosol impacts on climate by isolating single emission sector contributions as given by the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) emission data sets developed for Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) AR5. For the modeled past 150 years, using the climate model and emissions from preindustrial times to present-day, the total global annual mean aerosol radiative forcing is -0.6 W/m2, with the largest contribution from the direct effect (-0.5 W/m2). Aerosol-induced changes on cloud cover often depends on cloud type and geographical region. The indirect (includes only the cloud albedo effect with -0.17 W/m2) and semidirect effects (-0.10 W/m2) can be isolated on a regional scale, and they often have opposing forcing effects, leading to overall small forcing effects on a global scale. Although the surface albedo effects from aerosols are small (0.016 W/m2), triggered feedbacks on top of the atmosphere (TOA) radiative forcing can be 10 times larger. Our results point out that each emission sector has varying

  17. Spatio-Temporal Sensitivity of MODIS Land Surface Temperature Anomalies Indicates High Potential for Large-Scale Land Cover Change Detection in Permafrost Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muster, S.; Langer, M.; Abnizova, A.; Young, K. L.; Boike, J.

    2014-12-01

    The accelerated warming Arctic climate may alter the surface energy balance locally and regionally of which a changing land surface temperature (LST) is a key indicator. Modelling current and anticipated changes of the surface energy balance requires an understanding of the spatio-temporal interactions between LST and land cover. This paper investigated the accuracy of MODIS LST V5 1 km level 3 product and its spatio-temporal sensitivity to land cover properties in a Canadian High Arctic permafrost landscape. Land cover ranged from fully vegetated moss/segde grass tundra to sparsely vegetated bare soil and barren areas. Daily mean MODIS LST were compared to in-situ radiometer measurements over wet tundra for three summers and two winters in 2008, 2009, and 2010. MODIS LST showed an accuracy of 1.8°C and a RMSE of 3.8°C in the total observation period including both summer and winter. Agreement was lowest during summer 2009 and freeze-back periods which were associated with prevailing overcast conditions. A multi-year anomaly analysis revealed robust spatio-temporal patterns taking into account the found uncertainty and different atmospheric conditions. Summer periods with regional mean LST larger than 5°C showed highest spatial diversity with four distinct anomaly classes. Dry ridge areas heated up most whereas wetland areas and dry barren surfaces with high albedo were coolest. Mean inter-annual differences of LST anomalies for different land cover classes were less than 1°C. However, spatial pattern showed fewer positive anomalies in 2010 suggesting differences in surface moisture due to inter­annual differences in the amount of end-of-winter snow. Presented summer LST anomalies might serve as a baseline against which to evaluate past and future changes in land surface properties with regard to the surface energy balance. Sub-temporal heterogeneity due to snow or ice on/off as well as the effect of subpixel water bodies has to be taken into account. A multi

  18. Relationship between high daily erythemal UV doses, total ozone, surface albedo and cloudiness: An analysis of 30 years of data from Switzerland and Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieder, H. E.; Staehelin, J.; Weihs, P.; Vuilleumier, L.; Maeder, J. A.; Holawe, F.; Blumthaler, M.; Lindfors, A.; Peter, T.; Simic, S.; Spichtinger, P.; Wagner, J. E.; Walker, D.; Ribatet, M.

    2010-10-01

    This work investigates the occurrence frequency of days with high erythemal UV doses at three stations in Switzerland and Austria (Davos, Hoher Sonnblick and Vienna) for the time period 1974-2003. While several earlier studies have reported on increases in erythemal UV dose up to 10% during the last decades, this study focuses on days with high erythemal UV dose, which is defined as a daily dose at least 15% higher than for 1950s clear-sky conditions (which represent preindustrial conditions with respect to anthropogenic chlorine). Furthermore, the influence of low column ozone, clear-sky/partly cloudy conditions and surface albedo on UV irradiance has been analyzed on annual and seasonal basis. The results of this study show that in the Central Alpine Region the number of days with high UV dose increased strongly in the early 1990s. A large fraction of all days with high UV dose occurring in the period 1974-2003 was found especially during the years 1994-2003, namely 40% at Davos, 54% at Hoher Sonnblick and 65% at Vienna. The importance of total ozone, clear-sky/partly cloudy conditions and surface albedo (e.g. in dependence of snow cover) varies strongly among the seasons. However, overall the interplay of low total ozone and clear-sky/partly cloudy conditions led to the largest fraction of days showing high erythemal UV dose. Furthermore, an analysis of the synoptic weather situation showed that days with high erythemal UV dose, low total ozone and high relative sunshine duration occur at all three stations more frequently during situations with low pressure gradients or southerly advection.

  19. Radiative Properties of Smoke and Aerosol Over Land Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Michael D.

    2000-01-01

    This talk discusses smoke and aerosol's radiative properties with particular attention to distinguishing the measurement over clear sky from clouds over land, sea, snow, etc. surfaces, using MODIS Airborne Simulator data from (Brazil, arctic sea ice and tundra and southern Africa, west Africa, and other ecosystems. This talk also discusses the surface bidirectional reflectance using Cloud Absorption Radiometer, BRDF measurements of Saudi Arabian desert, Persian Gulf, cerrado and rain forests in Brazil, sea ice, tundra, Atlantic Ocean, Great Dismal Swamp, Kuwait oil fire smoke. Recent upgrades to instrument (new TOMS UVA channels at 340 and 380 planned use in Africa (SAFARI 2000) and possibly for MEIDEX will also be discussed. This talk also plans to discuss the spectral variation of surface reflectance over land and the sensitivity of off-nadir view angles to correlation between visible near-infrared reflectance for use in remote sensing of aerosol over land.

  20. Comparison of land-atmosphere interaction at different surface types in the mid- to lower Yangzi River Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Weidong; Wang, Xueqian; Sun, Jianning; Ding, Aijun; Zou, Jun

    2016-04-01

    The mid- to lower Yangzi River Valley is located within the typical monsoon zone. Rapid urbanization, industrialization, and development of agriculture have led to fast and complicated land use and land cover changes in this region. To investigate land-atmosphere interaction in this region where human activities and monsoon climate are highly interactive with each other, micro-meteorological elements over four different surface types, i.e. urban surface represented by the observational site at Communist Party School in Nanjing (hereafter DX), suburban surface represented by the ground site at Xianling (XL), and grassland and farmland represented by field sites at Lishui County (LS-grass and LS-crop), are analyzed and their differences are revealed. Impacts of different surface parameters applied for different surface types on the radiation budget and surface-atmosphere heat, water, and mass exchanges are investigated. Results indicate that (1) the largest differences in daily average surface air temperature (Ta), surface skin temperature (Ts), and relative humidity (RH) , which are found during the dry periods between DX and LS-crop, can be up to 3.21°C, 7.26°C, and 22.79% respectively. During the growing season, the diurnal ranges of the above three elements are the smallest at DX and the largest at LS-grass, XL and LS-crop; (2) differences in radiative fluxes are mainly reflected in upward shortwave radiation (USR) that is related to surface albedo and upward longwave radiation (ULR) that is related to Ts. USR is the smallest and ULR is the largest at DX. During the growing season, the average difference in ULR between the DX site and other sites with vegetation cover can be up to 20Wm-2. The USR variability is the largest at LS-crop, while the diurnal variation of ULR is the same as that of Ts at all the four sites; (3) the differences in daily average sensible heat (H) and latent heat (LE) between DX and LS-crop are larger than 45 and 95Wm-2, respectively

  1. SGP Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC): Measurement Platforms

    SciTech Connect

    MA Miller; R Avissar; LK Berg; SA Edgerton; ML Fischer; TJ Jackson; B. Kustas; PJ Lamb; G McFarquhar; Q Min; B Schmid; MS Torn; DD Tuner

    2007-06-01

    The Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC) will be conducted from June 8 to June 30, 2007, at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. Data will be collected using eight aircraft equipped with a variety of specialized sensors, four specially instrumented surface sites, and two prototype surface radar systems. The architecture of CLASIC includes a high-altitude surveillance aircraft and enhanced vertical thermodynamic and wind profile measurements that will characterize the synoptic scale structure of the clouds and the land surface within the ACRF SGP site. Mesoscale and microscale structures will be sampled with a variety of aircraft, surface, and radar observations. An overview of the measurement platforms that will be used during the CLASIC are described in this report. The coordination of measurements, especially as it relates to aircraft flight plans, will be discussed in the CLASIC Implementation Plan.

  2. Validation of GEOLAND-2 Spot/vgt Albedo Products by Using Ceos Olive Methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camacho de Coca, F.; Sanchez, J.; Schaaf, C.; Baret, F.; Weiss, M.; Cescatti, A.; Lacaze, R. N.

    2012-12-01

    This study evaluates the scientific merit of the global surface albedo products developed in the framework of the Geoland-2 project based on SPOT/VEGETATION observations. The methodology follows the OLIVE (On-Line Validation Exercise) approach supported by the CEOS Land Product Validation subgroup (calvalportal.ceos.org/cvp/web/olive). First, the spatial and temporal consistency of SPOT/VGT albedo products was assessed by intercomparison with reference global products (MODIS/Terra+Aqua and POLDER-3/PARASOL) for the period 2006-2007. A bulk statistical analysis over a global network of 420 homogeneous sites (BELMANIP-2) was performed and analyzed per biome types. Additional sites were included to study albedo under snow conditions. Second, the accuracy and realism of temporal variations were evaluated using a number of ground measurements from FLUXNET sites suitable for use in direct comparison to the co-located satellite data. Our results show that SPOT/VGT albedo products present reliable spatial and temporal distribution of retrievals. The SPOT/VGT albedo performs admirably with MODIS, with a mean bias and RMSE for the shortwave black-sky albedo over BELMANIP-2 sites lower than 0.006 and 0.03 (13% in relative terms) respectively, and even better for snow free pixels. Similar results were found for the white-sky albedo quantities. Discrepancies are larger when comparing with POLDER-3 products: for the shortwave black-sky albedo a mean bias of -0.014 and RMSE of 0.04 (20%) was found. This overall performance figures are however land-cover dependent and larger uncertainties were found over some biomes (or regions) or specific periods (e.g. winter in the north hemisphere). The comparison of SPOT/VGT blue-sky albedo estimates with ground measurements (mainly over Needle-leaf forest sites) show a RMSE of 0.04 and a bias of 0.003 when only snow-free pixels are considered. Moreover, this work shows that the OLIVE tool is also suitable for validation of global albedo

  3. CARBON SEQUESTRATION ON SURFACE MINE LANDS

    SciTech Connect

    Donald H. Graves; Christopher Barton; Richard Sweigard; Richard Warner

    2004-08-02

    The April-June 2004 quarter was dedicated to the establishment of monitoring systems for all the new research areas. Hydrology and water quality monitoring continues to be conducted on all areas as does weather data pertinent to the research. Studies assessing specific questions pertaining to carbon flux has been established and the invasion of the vegetation by small mammals is being quantified. The approval of two experimental practices associated with this research by the United States Office of Surface Mining was a major accomplishment during this period of time. These experimental practices will eventually allow for tree planting on long steep slopes with loose grading systems and for the use of loose dumped spoil on mountain top removal areas with no grading in the final layer of rooting material for tree establishment.

  4. Arctic sea ice albedo from AVHRR

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsay, R.W.; Rothrock, D.A.

    1994-11-01

    The seasonal cycle of surface albedo of sea ice in the Arctic is estimated from measurements made with the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) on the polar-orbiting satellites NOAA-10 and NOAA-11. The albedos of 145 200-km-square cells are analyzed. The cells are from March through September 1989 and include only those for which the sun is more than 10 deg above the horizon. Cloud masking is performed manually. Corrections are applied for instrument calibration, nonisotropic reflection, atmospheric interference, narrowband to broadband conversion, and normalization to a common solar zenith angle. The estimated albedos are relative, with the instrument gain set to give an albedo of 0.80 for ice floes in March and April. The mean values for the cloud-free portions of individual cells range from 0.18 to 0.91. Monthly averages of cells in the central Arctic range from 0.76 in April to 0.47 in August. The monthly averages of the within-cell standard deviations in the central Arctic are 0.04 in April and 0.06 in September. The surface albedo and surface temperature are correlated most strongly in March (R = -0.77) with little correlation in the summer. The monthly average lead fraction is determined from the mean potential open water, a scaled representation of the temperature or albedo between 0.0 (for ice) and 1.0 (for water); in the central Arctic it rises from an average 0.025 in the spring to 0.06 in September. Sparse data on aerosols, ozone, and water vapor in the atmospheric column contribute uncertainties to instantaneous, area-average albedos of 0.13, 0.04, and 0.08. Uncertainties in monthly average albedos are not this large. Contemporaneous estimation of these variables could reduce the uncertainty in the estimated albedo considerably.

  5. A Study on the Influence of the Land Surface Processes on the Southwest Monsoon Simulations using a Regional Climate Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivas, C. V.; Bhaskar Rao, D. V.; Hari Prasad, D.; Hari Prasad, K. B. R. R.; Baskaran, R.; Venkatraman, B.

    2015-10-01

    Influence of the land surface processes as an important mechanism in the development of the Indian Summer Monsoon is studied by performing simulations with a regional atmospheric model. Seasonal scale simulations are conducted for two contrasting summer monsoons (MJJAS months) in 2008 & 2009 with the Weather Research and Forecasting-Advanced Research regional model at a high resolution of 15 km using the boundary conditions derived from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) reanalysis data and using the NOAH land surface parameterization scheme. Simulations are evaluated by comparison of precipitation with 0.5° India Meteorological Department gridded rainfall data over land, atmospheric circulation fields with 1° resolution NCEP global final analysis, and surface fluxes with 0.75° resolution Era-Interim reanalysis. Results indicated significant variation in the evolution of the surface fluxes, air temperatures and flux convergence in the 2 contrasting years. A lower albedo, higher heating (sensible, latent heat fluxes), higher air temperatures, stronger flow and higher moisture flux convergence are noted over the subcontinent during the monsoon 2008 relative to the monsoon 2009. The simulated surface fluxes are in good comparison with observations. The stronger flow in 2008 is found to be associated with stronger heat flux gradients as well as stronger north-south geopotential/pressure gradients. The simulations revealed notable differences in many features such as zonal and meridional surface sensible heat gradients which, in turn, influenced the low-level pressure gradients, wind flow, and moisture transport. The present study reveals that, even at a regional scale, the physical processes of land-surface energy partitioning do influence the regional behavior of the monsoon system to a certain extent.

  6. Tangent linear analysis of the Mosaic land surface model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Runhua; Cohn, Stephen E.; da Silva, Arlindo; Joiner, Joanna; Houser, Paul R.

    2003-01-01

    In this study, a tangent linear eigenanalysis is applied to the Mosaic land surface model (LSM) [, 1992] to examine the impacts of the model internal dynamics and physics on the land surface state variability. The tangent linear model (TLM) of the Mosaic LSM is derived numerically for two sets of basic states and two tile types of land condition, grass and bare soil. An additional TLM, for the soil moisture subsystem of this LSM, is derived analytically for the same cases to obtain explicit expressions for the eigenvalues. An eigenvalue of the TLM determines a characteristic timescale, and the corresponding eigenvector, or mode, describes a particular coupling among the perturbed states. The results show that (1) errors in initial conditions tend to decay with e-folding times given by the characteristic timescales; (2) the LSM exhibits a wide range of internal variability, modes mainly representing surface temperature and surface moisture perturbations exhibit short timescales, whereas modes mainly representing deep soil temperature perturbations and moisture transfer throughout the entire soil column exhibit much longer timescales; (3) the modes of soil moisture tend to be weakly coupled with other perturbed variables, and the mode representing the deep soil temperature perturbation has a consistent e-folding time across the experiments; (4) the key parameters include soil moisture, soil layer depth, and soil hydraulic parameters. The results agree qualitatively with previous findings. However, tangent linear eigenanalysis provides a new approach to the quantitative substantiation of those findings. Also, it reveals the evolution and the coupling of the perturbed land states that are useful for the development of land surface data assimilation schemes. One must be careful when generalizing the quantitative results since they are obtained with respect to two specific basic states and two simple land conditions. Also, the methodology employed here does not apply

  7. Queen Maud Land Traverses: Surface Glaciology (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, R. L.

    2009-12-01

    One of the main tasks of a glaciologist is to determine the mass budget of a glacier; and snow accumulation is the first part of the equation. To do this, a great number of snow pits must be dug to analyze the stratigraphy. A. P. Crary once said “to be a glaciologist one should first of all love to dig snow pits.” Seventy-five snow pits were dug on the SPQMLT traverses. Several experienced glaciologists had difficulty in interpreting the stratigraphic sequences in these pits. Irregular layering, caused by uneven deposition and subsequent erosion, suggested that some of the layers could be missing. However, the fallout of artificial radioactive nuclides released by the first large thermonuclear bomb test, on March 1, 1954, at Castle Bravo on Bikini Atoll, Marshall Islands, produced a datum horizon over the Antarctic ice sheet. This horizon is the summer of 1954-55 and provides the basis for measuring the average accumulation since 1955. Accumulation varied from 6.7 ± 0.2 g cm-2 yr-1 at South Pole Station to a low of 0.6 ± 0.2 g cm-2 yr-1 in a pit on the second leg of SPQMLT 2. The average accumulation along the entire traverse route was 3.7 g cm-2 yr-1. Temperatures at ten meters (considered an approximate mean annual air temperature) varied from -58.4 degrees Centigrade at Plateau Station (elevation 3620 meters) to -38 degrees Centigrade at the terminus of SPQMLT 3 (elevation 2310 meters). The condition of the ice sheet surface varied considerably. Some surface was quite hard and easy to traverse; while other areas that were smooth and soft were troublesome enough to bog down vehicles and sleds. Sastrugi were sporadic with some as high as a meter. A large crevasse field forced a slight change in course toward the end of the first leg of SPQMLT 2. There the ice thickness changed dramatically from 3060 meters to 1852 meters. At the time the geophysicist said, “The ‘bottom’ came up so fast I thought we would hit a nunatak.”

  8. Albedo maps of Pluto and Charon - Initial mutual event results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buie, Marc W.; Tholen, David J.; Horne, Keith

    1992-01-01

    By applying the technique of maximum entropy image reconstruction to invert observed lightcurves, surface maps of single-scattering albedo are obtained for the surfaces of Pluto and Charon from 1954 to 1986. The albedo features of the surface of Pluto are similar to those of the Buie and Tholen (1989) spot model maps; a south polar cap is evident. The map of Charon is somewhat darker, with single-scattering albedos as low as 0.03.

  9. Atmosphere-land cover feedbacks alter the response of surface temperature to CO2 forcing in the western United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diffenbaugh, Noah S.

    2005-02-01

    In order to test the sensitivity of regional climate to regional-scale atmosphere-land cover feedbacks, we have employed a regional climate model asynchronously coupled to an equilibrium vegetation model, focusing on the western United States as a case study. CO2-induced atmosphere-land cover feedbacks resulted in statistically significant seasonal temperature changes of up to 3.5°C, with land cover change accounting for up to 60% of the total seasonal response to elevated atmospheric CO2 levels. In many areas, such as the Great Basin, albedo acted as the primary control on changes in surface temperature. Along the central coast of California, soil moisture effects magnified the temperature response in JJA and SON, with negative surface soil moisture anomalies accompanied by negative evaporation anomalies, decreasing latent heat flux and further increasing surface temperature. Additionally, negative temperature anomalies were calculated at high elevation in California and Oregon in DJF, MAM and SON, indicating that future warming of these sensitive areas could be mitigated by changes in vegetation distribution and an associated muting of winter snow-temperature feedbacks. Precipitation anomalies were almost universally not statistically significant, and very little change in mean seasonal atmospheric circulation occurred in response to atmosphere-land cover feedbacks. Further, the mean regional temperature sensitivity to regional-scale land cover feedbacks did not exceed the large-scale sensitivity calculated elsewhere, indicating that spatial heterogeneity does not introduce non-linearities in the response of regional climate to CO2-induced atmosphere-land cover feedbacks.

  10. Implications of albedo changes following afforestation on the benefits of forests as carbon sinks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirschbaum, M. U. F.; Whitehead, D.; Dean, S. M.; Beets, P. N.; Shepherd, J. D.; Ausseil, A.-G. E.

    2011-08-01

    Increased carbon storage with afforestation leads to a decrease in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration and thus decreases radiative forcing and cools the Earth. However, land-use change also changes the reflective properties of the surface vegetation from more reflective pasture to relatively less reflective forest cover. This increase in radiation absorption by the forest constitutes an increase in radiative forcing, with a warming effect. The net effect of decreased albedo and carbon storage on radiative forcing depends on the relative magnitude of these two opposing processes. We used data from an intensively studied site in New Zealand's Central North Island that has long-term, ground-based measurements of albedo over the full short-wave spectrum from a developing Pinus radiata forest. Data from this site were supplemented with satellite-derived albedo estimates from New Zealand pastures. The albedo of a well-established forest was measured as 13 % and pasture albedo as 20 %. We used these data to calculate the direct radiative forcing effect of changing albedo as the forest grew. We calculated the radiative forcing resulting from the removal of carbon from the atmosphere as a decrease in radiative forcing of -104 GJ tC-1 yr-1. We also showed that the observed change in albedo constituted a direct radiative forcing of 2759 GJ ha-1 yr-1. Thus, following afforestation, 26.5 tC ha-1 needs to be stored in a growing forest to balance the increase in radiative forcing resulting from the observed albedo change. Measurements of tree biomass and albedo were used to estimate the net change in radiative forcing as the newly planted forest grew. Albedo and carbon-storage effects were of similar magnitude for the first four to five years after tree planting, but as the stand grew older, the carbon storage effect increasingly dominated. Averaged over the whole length of the rotation, the changes in albedo negated the benefits from increased carbon storage by 17-24 %.

  11. Carbon Sequestration on Surface Mine Lands

    SciTech Connect

    Donald H. Graves; Christopher Barton; Richard Sweigard; Richard Warner

    2005-10-02

    During this quarter a general forest monitoring program was conducted to measure treatment effects on above ground and below ground carbon C and Nitrogen (N) pools for the tree planting areas. Detailed studies to address specific questions pertaining to Carbon cycling was initiated with the development of plots to examine the influence of mycorrhizae, spoil chemical and mineralogical properties, and use of amendment on forest establishment and carbon sequestration. Efforts continued during this period to examine decomposition and heterotrophic respiration on C cycling in the reforestation plots. Projected climate change resulting from elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide has given rise to various strategies to sequester carbon in various terrestrial ecosystems. Reclaimed surface mine soils present one such potential carbon sink where traditional reclamation objectives can complement carbon sequestration. New plantings required the modification and design and installation on monitoring equipment. Maintenance and data monitoring on past and present installations are a continuing operation. The Department of Mining Engineering continued the collection of penetration resistance, penetration depth, and bulk density on both old and new treatment areas. Data processing and analysis is in process for these variables. Project scientists and graduate students continue to present results at scientific meetings, tours and field days presentations of the research areas are being conducted on a request basis.

  12. Radiation Dose from Lunar Neutron Albedo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, J. H., Jr.; Bhattacharya, M.; Lin, Zi-Wei; Pendleton, G.

    2006-01-01

    The lunar neutron albedo from thermal energies to 8 MeV was measured on the Lunar Prospector Mission in 1998-1999. Using GEANT4 we have calculated the neutron albedo due to cosmic ray bombardment of the moon and found a good-agreement with the measured fast neutron spectra. We then calculated the total effective dose from neutron albedo of all energies, and made comparisons with the effective dose contributions from both galactic cosmic rays and solar particle events to be expected on the lunar surface.

  13. Recent increase in snow-melt area in the Greenland Ice sheet as an indicator of the effect of reduced surface albedo by snow impurities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rikiishi, K.

    2008-12-01

    Recent rapid decline of cryosphere including mountain glaciers, sea ice, and seasonal snow cover tends to be associated with global warming. However, positive feedback is likely to operate between the cryosphere and air temperature, and then it may not be so simple to decide the cause-and-effect relation between them. The theory of heat budget for snow surface tells us that sensible heat transfer from the air to the snow by atmospheric warming by 1°C is about 10 W/m2, which is comparable with heat supply introduced by reduction of the snow surface albedo by only 0.02. Since snow impurities such as black carbon and soil- origin dusts have been accumulated every year on the snow surface in snow-melting season, it is very important to examine whether the snow-melting on the ice sheets, mountain glaciers, and sea ice is caused by global warming or by accumulated snow impurities originated from atmospheric pollutants. In this paper we analyze the dataset of snow-melt area in the Greenland ice sheet for the years 1979 - 2007 (available from the National Snow and Ice Data Center), which is reduced empirically from the satellite micro-wave observations by SMMR and SMM/I. It has been found that, seasonally, the snow-melt area extends most significantly from the second half of June to the first half of July when the sun is highest and sunshine duration is longest, while it doesn't extend any more from the second half of July to the first half of August when the air temperature is highest. This fact may imply that sensible heat required for snow-melting comes from the solar radiation rather than from the atmosphere. As for the interannual variation of snow-melt area, on the other hand, we have found that the growth rate of snow-melt area gradually increases from July, to August, and to the first half of September as the impurities come out to and accumulated at the snow surface. However, the growth rate is almost zero in June and the second half of September when fresh snow

  14. On the connection between continental-scale land surface processes and the tropical climate in a coupled ocean-atmosphere-land system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, H.; Mechoso, C. R.; Xue, Y.; Xiao, H.; Neelin, J.; Ji, X.

    2013-12-01

    An evaluation is presented of the impact on tropical climate of continental-scale perturbations given by different representations of land surface processes (LSP) in a general circulation model that includes atmosphere-ocean interactions. One representation is a simple land scheme, which specifies climatological albedos and soil moisture availability. The other representation is the more comprehensive Simplified Simple Biosphere Model, which allows for interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical processes. The results demonstrate that such perturbations have strong impacts on the seasonal mean states and seasonal cycles of global precipitation, clouds, and surface air temperature. The impact is especially significant over the tropical Pacific Ocean. To explore the mechanisms for such impact, model experiments are performed with different LSP representations confined to selected continental-scale regions where strong interactions of climate-vegetation biophysical processes are present. The largest impact found over the tropical Pacific is mainly from perturbations in the tropical African continent where convective heating anomalies associated with perturbed surface heat fluxes trigger global teleconnections through equatorial wave dynamics. In the equatorial Pacific, the remote impacts of the convection anomalies are further enhanced by strong air-sea coupling between surface wind stress and upwelling, as well as by the effects of ocean memory. LSP perturbations over South America and Asia-Australia have much weaker global impacts. The results further suggest that correct representations of LSP, land use change, and associated changes in the deep convection over tropical Africa are crucial to reducing the uncertainty of future climate projections with global climate models under various climate change scenarios. This work is performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA

  15. Influence of land-surface evapotranspiration on the earth's climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shukla, J.; Mintz, Y.

    1982-01-01

    Land-surface evapotranspiration is shown to strongly influence global fields of rainfall, temperature and motion by calculations using a numerical model of the atmosphere, confirming the general belief in the importance of evapotranspiration-producing surface vegetation for the earth's climate. The current version of the Goddard Laboratory atmospheric general circulation model is used in the present experiment, in which conservation equations for mass, momentum, moisture and energy are expressed in finite-difference form for a spherical grid to calculate (1) surface pressure field evolution, and (2) the wind, temperature, and water vapor fields at nine levels between the surface and a 20 km height.

  16. Modeling the relationship between land use and surface water quality.

    PubMed

    Tong, Susanna T Y; Chen, Wenli

    2002-12-01

    It is widely known that watershed hydrology is dependent on many factors, including land use, climate, and soil conditions. But the relative impacts of different types of land use on the surface water are yet to be ascertained and quantified. This research attempted to use a comprehensive approach to examine the hydrologic effects of land use at both a regional and a local scale. Statistical and spatial analyses were employed to examine the statistical and spatial relationships of land use and the flow and water quality in receiving waters on a regional scale in the State of Ohio. Besides, a widely accepted watershed-based water quality assessment tool, the Better Assessment Science Integrating Point and Nonpoint Sources (BASINS), was adopted to model the plausible effects of land use on water quality in a local watershed in the East Fork Little Miami River Basin. The results from the statistical analyses revealed that there was a significant relationship between land use and in-stream water quality, especially for nitrogen, phosphorus and Fecal coliform. The geographic information systems (GIS) spatial analyses identified the watersheds that have high levels of contaminants and percentages of agricultural and urban lands. Furthermore, the hydrologic and water quality modeling showed that agricultural and impervious urban lands produced a much higher level of nitrogen and phosphorus than other land surfaces. From this research, it seems that the approach adopted in this study is comprehensive, covering both the regional and local scales. It also reveals that BASINS is a very useful and reliable tool, capable of characterizing the flow and water quality conditions for the study area under different watershed scales. With little modification, these models should be able to adapt to other watersheds or to simulate other contaminants. They also can be used to study the plausible impacts of global environmental change. In addition, the information on the hydrologic

  17. RESUSPENSION OF PLUTONIUM FROM CONTAMINATED LAND SURFACES: METEOROLOGICAL FACTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A literature review is presented in a discussion of the relevance of meteorological factors on the resuspension of plutonium from contaminated land surfaces. The physical processes of resuspension based on soil erosion work are described. Some of the models developed to simulate ...

  18. Advances in Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing for Land Surface Modeling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Over 10 years ago, John Norman and co-authors proposed a thermal-based land surface modeling strategy that treated the energy exchange and kinetic temperatures of the soil and vegetated components in a unique “Two-Source Model” (TSM) approach. The TSM formulation addresses key factors affecting the...

  19. Applications of Land Surface Temperature from Microwave Observations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Land surface temperature (LST) is a key input for physically-based retrieval algorithms of hydrological states and fluxes. Yet, it remains a poorly constrained parameter for global scale studies. The main two observational methods to remotely measure T are based on thermal infrared (TIR) observation...

  20. Land-surface influences on weather and climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baer, F.; Mintz, Y.

    1984-01-01

    Land-surface influences on weather and climate are reviewed. The interrelationship of vegetation, evapotranspiration, atmospheric circulation, and climate is discussed. Global precipitation, soil moisture, the seasonal water cycle, heat transfer, and atmospheric temperature are among the parameters considered in the context of a general biosphere model.