Science.gov

Sample records for albedo neutron decay

  1. Calibration of neutron albedo dosemeters.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, R B; Eisenhauer, C M

    2002-01-01

    It is shown that by calibrating neutron albedo dosemeters under the proper conditions, two complicating effects will essentially cancel out, allowing accurate calibrations with no need for explicit corrections. The 'proper conditions' are: a large room (> or = 8 m on a side). use of a D2O moderated 252Cf source, and a source-to-phantom calibration distance of approximately 70 cm. PMID:12212898

  2. Nuclear cascades in Saturn's rings - Cosmic ray albedo neutron decay and origins of trapped protons in the inner magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, J. F.

    1983-01-01

    The nearly equatorial trajectory of the Pioneer 11 spacecraft through Saturn's high energy proton radiation belts and under the main A-B-C rings provided a unique opportunity to study the radial dependence of the greater than 30 MeV proton intensities in the belts in terms of models for secondary nucleon production by cosmic ray interactions in the rings, in situ proton injection in the radiation belts by neutron beta decay, magnetospheric diffusion, and absorption by planetary rings and satellites. Maximum trapped proton intensities measured by Pioneer 11 in the radiation belts are compared with calculated intensities and found consistent with trapping times of roughly 40 years and a radial diffusion coefficient of about 10 to the -15th L to the 9th R sub s squared/s. Differential energy spectra proportional to E to the -2 estimated from integral measurements of trapped photons with E greater than 100 MeV are consistent with the beta decay model, but an inferred turndown of the spectra toward lower energies and reported integral proton anisotropies of a specified form both indicate the need for more realistic calculations of the neutron source from the rings and the radiation belt loss processes.

  3. Radiation Dose from Lunar Neutron Albedo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, J. H., Jr.; Bhattacharya, M.; Lin, Zi-Wei; Pendleton, G.

    2006-01-01

    The lunar neutron albedo from thermal energies to 8 MeV was measured on the Lunar Prospector Mission in 1998-1999. Using GEANT4 we have calculated the neutron albedo due to cosmic ray bombardment of the moon and found a good-agreement with the measured fast neutron spectra. We then calculated the total effective dose from neutron albedo of all energies, and made comparisons with the effective dose contributions from both galactic cosmic rays and solar particle events to be expected on the lunar surface.

  4. Variable control of neutron albedo in toroidal fusion devices

    DOEpatents

    Jassby, Daniel L.; Micklich, Bradley J.

    1986-01-01

    An arrangement is provided for controlling neutron albedo in toroidal fusion devices having inboard and outboard vacuum vessel walls for containment of the neutrons of a fusion plasma. Neutron albedo material is disposed immediately adjacent the inboard wall, and is movable, preferably in vertical directions, so as to be brought into and out of neutron modifying communication with the fusion neutrons. Neutron albedo material preferably comprises a liquid form, but may also take pebble, stringer and curtain-like forms. A neutron flux valve, rotatable about a vertical axis is also disclosed.

  5. The albedo effect on neutron transmission probability.

    PubMed

    Khanouchi, A; Sabir, A; Boulkheir, M; Ichaoui, R; Ghassoun, J; Jehouani, A

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the albedo effect on the neutron transmission probability through slab shields. For this reason we have considered an infinite homogeneous slab having a fixed thickness equal to 20 lambda (lambda is the mean free path of the neutron in the slab). This slab is characterized by the factor Ps (scattering probability) and contains a vacuum channel which is formed by two horizontal parts and an inclined one (David, M. C. (1962) Duc and Voids in shields. In Reactor Handbook, Vol. III, Part B, p. 166). The thickness of the vacuum channel is taken equal to 2 lambda. An infinite plane source of neutrons is placed on the first of the slab (left face) and detectors, having windows equal to 2 lambda, are placed on the second face of the slab (right face). Neutron histories are sampled by the Monte Carlo method (Booth, T. E. and Hendricks, J. S. (1994) Nuclear Technology 5) using exponential biasing in order to increase the Monte Carlo calculation efficiency (Levitt, L. B. (1968) Nuclear Science and Engineering 31, 500-504; Jehouani, A., Ghassoun, J. and Abouker, A. (1994) In Proceedings of the 6th International Symposium on Radiation Physics, Rabat, Morocco) and we have applied the statistical weight method which supposes that the neutron is born at the source with a unit statistical weight and after each collision this weight is corrected. For different values of the scattering probability and for different slopes of the inclined part of the channel we have calculated the neutron transmission probability for different positions of the detectors versus the albedo at the vacuum channel-medium interface. Some analytical representations are also presented for these transmission probabilities. PMID:9463883

  6. Earth albedo neutrons from 10 to 100 MeV.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preszler, A. M.; Simnett, G. M.; White, R. S.

    1972-01-01

    We report the measurement of the energy and angular distributions of earth albedo neutrons from 10 to 100 MeV at 40 deg N geomagnetic latitude from a balloon at 120,000 ft, below 4.65 g/sq cm. The albedo-neutron omnidirectional energy distribution is flat to 50 MeV, then decreases with energy. The absolute neutron energy distribution is of the correct strength and shape for the albedo neutrons to be the source of the protons trapped in earth's inner radiation belt.

  7. Neutron dosimetry with TL albedo dosemeters at high energy accelerators.

    PubMed

    Haninger, T; Fehrenbacher, G

    2007-01-01

    The GSF-Personal Monitoring Service uses the TLD albedo dosemeter as standard neutron personal dosemeter. Due to its low sensitivity for fast neutrons however, it is generally not recommended for workplaces at high-energy accelerators. Test measurements with the albedo dosemeter were performed at the accelerator laboratories of GSI in Darmstadt and DESY in Hamburg to reconsider this hypothesis. It revealed that the albedo dosemeter can also be used as personal dosemeter at these workplaces, because at all measurement locations a significant part of neutrons with lower energies could be found, which were produced by scattering at walls or the ground. PMID:17766258

  8. Albedo neutron dosimetry in Germany: regulations and performance.

    PubMed

    Luszik-Bhadra, M; Zimbal, A; Busch, F; Eichelberger, A; Engelhardt, J; Figel, M; Frasch, G; Günther, K; Jordan, M; Martini, E; Haninger, T; Rimpler, A; Seifert, R

    2014-12-01

    Personal neutron dosimetry has been performed in Germany using albedo dosemeters for >20 y. This paper describes the main principles, the national standards, regulations and recommendations, the quality management and the overall performance, giving some examples. PMID:24639589

  9. Charred Forests Increase Snow Albedo Decay: Watershed-Scale Implications of the Postfire Snow Albedo Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleason, K. E.; Nolin, A. W.

    2014-12-01

    Recent work shows that after a high severity forest fire, approximately 60% more solar radiation reaches the snow surface due to the reduction in canopy density. Also, significant amounts of black carbon (BC) particles and larger burned woody debris (BWD) are shed from standing charred trees, which concentrate on the snowpack, darken its surface, and reduce snow albedo by 50% during ablation. The postfire forest environment drives a substantial increase in net shortwave radiation at the snowpack surface, driving earlier and more rapid melt, however hydrologic models do not explicitly incorporate forest fire disturbance effects to snowpack dynamics. In this study we characterized, parameterized, and validated the postfire snow albedo effect: how the deposition and concentration of charred forest debris decreases snow albedo, increases snow albedo decay rates, and drives an earlier date of snow disappearance. For three study sites in the Oregon High Cascade Mountains, a 2-yr old burned forest, a 10-yr burned forest, and a nearby unburned forest, we used a suite of empirical data to characterize the magnitude and duration of the postfire effect to snow albedo decay. For WY 2012, WY2013, and WY2014 we conducted spectral albedo measurements, snow surface sampling, in-situ snow and meteorological monitoring, and snow energy balance modeling. From these data we developed a new parameterization which represents the postfire effect to snow albedo decay as a function of days-since-snowfall. We validated our parameterization using a physically-based, spatially-distributed snow accumulation and melt model, in-situ snow monitoring, net snowpack radiation, and remote sensing data. We modeled snow dynamics across the extent of all burned area in the headwaters of the McKenzie River Basin and validated the watershed-scale implications of the postfire snow albedo effect using in-situ micrometeorological and remote sensing data. This research quantified the watershed scale postfire

  10. Variable control of neutron albedo in toroidal fusion devices

    DOEpatents

    Jassby, D.L.; Micklich, B.J.

    1983-06-01

    This invention pertains to methods of controlling in the steady state, neutron albedo in toroidal fusion devices, and in particular, to methods of controlling the flux and energy distribution of collided neutrons which are incident on an outboard wall of a toroidal fusion device.

  11. Analytical modeling of thermoluminescent albedo detectors for neutron dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Glickstein, S S

    1983-02-01

    In order to gain an in-depth understanding of the neutron physics of a 6LiF TLD when used as an albedo neutron dosimeter, an analytical model was developed to simulate the response of a 6LiF chip. The analytical model was used to examine the sensitivity of the albedo TLD response to incident monoenergetic neutrons and to evaluate a multiple chip TLD neutron dosimeter. Contrary to initial experimental studies, which were hampered by statistical uncertainties, the analytical evaluation revealed that a three-energy-group detector could not reliably measure the dose equivalent to personnel exposed to multiple neutron spectra. The analysis clearly illustrates that there may be order of magnitude errors in the measured neutron dose if the dosimeter has not been calibrated for the same flux spectrum to which it is exposed. As a result of this analysis, it was concluded that, for personnel neutron monitoring, a present TLD badge must be calibrated for the neutron spectrum into which the badge is to be introduced. The analytical model used in this study can readily be adopted for evaluating other possible detectors and shield material that might be proposed in the future as suitable for use in neutron dosimetry applications. PMID:6826377

  12. Beta decay of polarized neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Bopp, P.; Dubbers, D.; Hornig, L.; Klemt, E.; Last, J.; Schuetze, H.; Freedman, S.J.; Schaerpf, O.

    1985-01-15

    Beta decay of polarized neutrons has been studied with the superconductive spectrometer PERKEO at the Institut Laue-Langevin. The energy spectrum of the ..beta..-decay asymmetry has been measured for the first time; from the absolute value of the asymmetry we obtain a new value for the ratio of weak coupling constants g/sub A//g/sub V/, which is compared to similar data from hyperon decays. The measurement of further weak interaction parameters from neutron decay is in progress.

  13. Use of a spherical albedo system for correcting the readings of albedo dosimeters in JINR phasotron neutron radiation fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokrov, Yu. V.; Morozova, S. V.

    2014-03-01

    Results of calibrating a spherical albedo system in the radiation fields of a Pu-Be radionuclide neutron source are presented. It is shown that it can be used for correcting the readings of the DVGN-01 albedo dosimeter. The results of measurements with the system in JINR phasotron neutron fields for the purpose of correcting the DVGN-01 readings in these fields are given. The values of the correction factors for DVGN-01 albedo dosimeters when used in personnel neutron dosimetry (PD) on the JINR phasotron are determined.

  14. DOSIMETRIC PROPERTIES OF THE NEW TLD ALBEDO NEUTRON DOSEMETER AWST-TL-GD 04.

    PubMed

    Haninger, T; Henniger, J

    2016-09-01

    A new official albedo dosemeter based on thermoluminescent detectors has been introduced in 2015 by the individual monitoring service of the Helmholtz Zentrum München for monitoring persons who are exposed occupationally against photon and neutron radiation. To enhance the sensitivity for fast neutrons, a new badge with an enlarged albedo window has been developed at TU Dresden. The properties of the new albedo dosemeter are discussed, and the results of official intercomparisons and field calibrations are shown.

  15. DOSIMETRIC PROPERTIES OF THE NEW TLD ALBEDO NEUTRON DOSEMETER AWST-TL-GD 04.

    PubMed

    Haninger, T; Henniger, J

    2016-09-01

    A new official albedo dosemeter based on thermoluminescent detectors has been introduced in 2015 by the individual monitoring service of the Helmholtz Zentrum München for monitoring persons who are exposed occupationally against photon and neutron radiation. To enhance the sensitivity for fast neutrons, a new badge with an enlarged albedo window has been developed at TU Dresden. The properties of the new albedo dosemeter are discussed, and the results of official intercomparisons and field calibrations are shown. PMID:26405220

  16. The Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons (DAN) experiment for NASA's 2009 Mars Science Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Litvak, M L; Mitrofanov, I G; Barmakov, Yu N; Behar, A; Bitulev, A; Bobrovnitsky, Yu; Bogolubov, E P; Boynton, W V; Bragin, S I; Churin, S; Grebennikov, A S; Konovalov, A; Kozyrev, A S; Kurdumov, I G; Krylov, A; Kuznetsov, Yu P; Malakhov, A V; Mokrousov, M I; Ryzhkov, V I; Sanin, A B; Shvetsov, V N; Smirnov, G A; Sholeninov, S; Timoshenko, G N; Tomilina, T M; Tuvakin, D V; Tretyakov, V I; Troshin, V S; Uvarov, V N; Varenikov, A; Vostrukhin, A

    2008-06-01

    We present a summary of the physical principles and design of the Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons (DAN) instrument onboard NASA's 2009 Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission. The DAN instrument will use the method of neutron-neutron activation analysis in a space application to study the abundance and depth distribution of water in the martian subsurface along the path of the MSL rover.

  17. Radiative decay of the free neutron

    SciTech Connect

    Gentile, T. R.; Dewey, M. S.; Fisher, B. M.; Mumm, H. P.; Nico, J. S.; Thompson, A. K.; Chupp, T. E.; Cooper, R. L.; Kremsky, I.; Wietfeldt, F. E.; Beise, E. J.; Breuer, H.; Hood, J.; Kiriluk, K. G.; McGonagle, M.; Byrne, J.; Coakley, K. J.

    2007-10-26

    The theory of quantum electrodynamics predicts that beta decay of the neutron into a proton, electron, and antineutrino should be accompanied by a continuous spectrum of soft photons. We recently reported the first observation of this radiative decay mode of the neutron, measured by recording photons in coincidence with both the electron and proton emitted in neutron decay. The experiment was performed on the NG-6 Fundamental Physics Beam Line at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Center for Neutron Research (NCNR). A new experiment is under development to measure both the branching ratio and energy spectrum for radiative decay with a relative standard uncertainty of a few percent. We briefly review the fundamental neutron physics program at the NCNR and describe the new radiative decay experiment.

  18. Neutron Decay with PERC: a Progress Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konrad, G.; Abele, H.; Beck, M.; Drescher, C.; Dubbers, D.; Erhart, J.; Fillunger, H.; Gösselsberger, C.; Heil, W.; Horvath, M.; Jericha, E.; Klauser, C.; Klenke, J.; Märkisch, B.; Maix, R. K.; Mest, H.; Nowak, S.; Rebrova, N.; Roick, C.; Sauerzopf, C.; Schmidt, U.; Soldner, T.; Wang, X.; Zimmer, O.; Perc Collaboration

    2012-02-01

    The PERC collaboration will perform high-precision measurements of angular correlations in neutron beta decay at the beam facility MEPHISTO of the Forschungs-Neutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz in Munich, Germany. The new beam station PERC, a clean, bright, and versatile source of neutron decay products, is designed to improve the sensitivity of neutron decay studies by one order of magnitude. The charged decay products are collected by a strong longitudinal magnetic field directly from inside a neutron guide. This combination provides the highest phase space density of decay products. A magnetic mirror serves to perform precise cuts in phase space, reducing related systematic errors. The new instrument PERC is under development by an international collaboration. The physics motivation, sensitivity, and applications of PERC as well as the status of the design and preliminary results on uncertainties in proton spectroscopy are presented in this paper.

  19. Cosmic-ray neutron albedo dose in low-earth orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Townsend, L. W.; Farhat, H.

    1989-01-01

    An earth albedo neutron environmental model is proposed which provides a way to estimate neutron exposure in low-earth orbit. It is shown that, in the predominantly low inclination orbits (i=28.5 deg) used in the U.S. space program, the neutron exposures are relatively low (0.7 cSv/y). The neutron exposures are more significant for polar orbital missions and even high inclination missions, such as Skylab (i=57 deg).

  20. Measuring planetary neutron albedo fluxes by remote gamma-ray sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, E. L.; Metzger, A. E.

    1984-01-01

    In order to measure the planetary neutron albedo fluxes, a neutron-absorbing shield which emits gamma rays of characteristic energy and serves as a neutron detector, is added to a gamma-ray spectrometer (GRS). The gamma rays representing the neutron flux are observed against interference consisting of cosmic gamma rays, planetary continuum and line emission, and gamma rays arising from the interaction of cosmic rays with the GRS and the spacecraft. The uncertainty and minimum detection limits in neutron albedo fluxes are calculated for two missions, a lunar orbiter and a comet nucleus rendezvous. A GRS on a lunar orbiter at 100 km altitude detects a thermal neutron albedo flux as low as 0.002/sq cm/s and an expected flux of about 0.6/sq cm/s is measured with an uncertainty of 0.001/sq cm/s, for a 100 h observation period. For the comet nucleus, again in a 100 h observing period, a thermal neutron albedo flux is detected at a level of 0.006/sq cm/s and an expected flux of about 0.4/sq cm/s is measured with an uncertainty of 0.004/sq cm/s. The expanded geological capabilities made possible by this technique include improvements in H sensitivity, spatial resolution, and measurement depth; and an improved model of induced gamma-ray emission.

  1. beta. -decay asymmetry of the free neutron

    SciTech Connect

    Bopp, P.; Dubbers, D.; Klemt, E.; Last, J.; Schuetze, H.; Weibler, W.; Freedman, S.J.; Schaerpf, O.

    1983-01-01

    The ..beta..-decay of polarized neutrons has been studied with the new superconducting spectrometer PERKEO at the ILL. The energy dependence of the ..beta..-decay asymmetry has been measured for the first time. From the measured ..beta..-asymmetry parameter we obtain a new value for the ratio of weak coupling constants g/sub A//g/sub V/. 11 references.

  2. The Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons (DAN) experiment for NASA's 2009 Mars Science Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Litvak, M L; Mitrofanov, I G; Barmakov, Yu N; Behar, A; Bitulev, A; Bobrovnitsky, Yu; Bogolubov, E P; Boynton, W V; Bragin, S I; Churin, S; Grebennikov, A S; Konovalov, A; Kozyrev, A S; Kurdumov, I G; Krylov, A; Kuznetsov, Yu P; Malakhov, A V; Mokrousov, M I; Ryzhkov, V I; Sanin, A B; Shvetsov, V N; Smirnov, G A; Sholeninov, S; Timoshenko, G N; Tomilina, T M; Tuvakin, D V; Tretyakov, V I; Troshin, V S; Uvarov, V N; Varenikov, A; Vostrukhin, A

    2008-06-01

    We present a summary of the physical principles and design of the Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons (DAN) instrument onboard NASA's 2009 Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission. The DAN instrument will use the method of neutron-neutron activation analysis in a space application to study the abundance and depth distribution of water in the martian subsurface along the path of the MSL rover. PMID:18598140

  3. Time reversal invariance in polarized neutron decay

    SciTech Connect

    Wasserman, E.G.

    1994-03-01

    An experiment to measure the time reversal invariance violating (T-violating) triple correlation (D) in the decay of free polarized neutrons has been developed. The detector design incorporates a detector geometry that provides a significant improvement in the sensitivity over that used in the most sensitive of previous experiments. A prototype detector was tested in measurements with a cold neutron beam. Data resulting from the tests are presented. A detailed calculation of systematic effects has been performed and new diagnostic techniques that allow these effects to be measured have been developed. As the result of this work, a new experiment is under way that will improve the sensitivity to D to 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} or better. With higher neutron flux a statistical sensitivity of the order 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} is ultimately expected. The decay of free polarized neutrons (n {yields} p + e + {bar v}{sub e}) is used to search for T-violation by measuring the triple correlation of the neutron spin polarization, and the electron and proton momenta ({sigma}{sub n} {center_dot} p{sub p} {times} p{sub e}). This correlation changes sign under reversal of the motion. Since final state effects in neutron decay are small, a nonzero coefficient, D, of this correlation indicates the violation of time reversal invariance. D is measured by comparing the numbers of coincidences in electron and proton detectors arranged symmetrically about a longitudinally polarized neutron beam. Particular care must be taken to eliminate residual asymmetries in the detectors or beam as these can lead to significant false effects. The Standard Model predicts negligible T-violating effects in neutron decay. Extensions to the Standard Model include new interactions some of which include CP-violating components. Some of these make first order contributions to D.

  4. - and -delayed neutron- decay of neutron-rich copper isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Korgul, A.; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr; Winger, J. A.; Ilyushkin, S.; Gross, Carl J; Batchelder, J. C.; Bingham, C. R.; Borzov, Ivan N; Goodin, C.; Grzywacz, Robert Kazimierz; Hamilton, Joseph H; Krolas, W.; Liddick, S. N.; Mazzocchi, C.; Nelson, C.; Nowacki, F.; Padgett, Stephen; Piechaczek, A.; Rajabali, M. M.; Shapira, Dan; Sieja, K.; Zganjar, E. F.

    2012-01-01

    The {beta}-decay properties of neutron-rich Cu isotopes produced in proton-induced fission of {sup 238}U were studied at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The data were collected using high-resolution online mass separation, reacceleration, and digital {beta}-{gamma} spectroscopy methods. An improved decay scheme of N = 49 {sup 78}Cu and the first observation of N = 50 {sup 79}Cu {beta}-delayed neutron decay followed by a gamma transition are reported. Spin and parity (5{sup -}) are deduced for {sup 78gs}Cu. The {beta}-delayed neutron branching ratios (P{sub {beta}n}) for the {sup 77}Cu and {sup 79}Cu precursors are analyzed with the help of nuclear structure models.

  5. A neutron Albedo system with time rejection for landmine and IED detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovaltchouk, V. D.; Andrews, H. R.; Clifford, E. T. H.; Faust, A. A.; Ing, H.; McFee, J. E.

    2011-10-01

    A neutron Albedo system has been developed for imaging of buried landmines and improvised explosive devices (IEDs). It involves irradiating the ground with fast neutrons and subsequently detecting the thermalized neutrons that return. A scintillating 6Li loaded ZnS(Ag) screen with a sensitive area of 40 cm×40 cm is used as a thermal neutron detector. Scintillation light is captured by orthogonal arrays of wavelength-shifting fibers placed on either side of the scintillator surface and then transferred to X and Y multi-pixel PMTs. A timing circuit, used with pulsed neutron sources, records the time when a neutron detection takes place relative to an external synchronization pulse from the pulsed source. Experimental tests of the Albedo system performance have been done in a sand box with a 252Cf neutron source (no time gating) and with pulsed D-D (2.6 MeV) neutrons from the Defense R&D Ottawa Van de Graaff accelerator (with time gating). Information contained in the time evolution of the thermal neutron field provided improved detection capability and image reconstruction. The detector design is described and experimental results are discussed.

  6. Radiation damage in silicon due to albedo neutrons emitted from hadronic beam dumps (Fe and U)

    SciTech Connect

    Gabriel, T.A.; Bishop, B.L.

    1987-01-01

    Calculations have been carried out to determine the level of radiation damage that can be expected from albedo neutrons when 1- and 5-GeV negative pions are incident on iron and uranium beam dumps. The calculated damage data are presented in several ways including neutron fluence above 0.111 MeV, 1 MeV equivalent neutron fluence, damage energy deposition, and DPA or displacements per atom. Details are presented as to the method of calculation. 14 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  7. Observation of lunar neutron albedo along the 24th Solar cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanin, Anton; Mitrofanov, Igor; Litvak, Maxim; Bodnarik, Julia; Boynton, William; Chin, Gordon; Evans, Larry; Golovin, Dmitry; Harshman, Karl; Livengood, Timothy; Malakhov, Alexey; Mokrousov, Maxim; McClanahan, Timothy; Sagdeev, Roald; Starr, Richard; Vostrukhin, Andrey

    2015-04-01

    It is well known that the Sun is not a steady source of radiation and demonstrates quasi-periodic variations of its activity with an average period of 11 years. The variation in solar activity yields a number of important physical effects that impact the entire heliosphere. Some of these effects are important for human life, since variations of the solar wind and the interplanetary magnetic field in the Solar System may produce variations of geomagnetic field and Van Allen radiation belts. Moreover, after strong Solar Coronal Mass Ejection events global geomagnetic storms are possible. Solar variability generates a strong modulation of the Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) flux inside the heliosphere and results in a modulation of the neutron albedo of the Moon and other celestial bodies that lack a strong global magnetic field. Observations of the lunar neutron albedo and its variability are quite important for future human missions on the Moon since they provide an understanding of that radiation environment on the surface and in the subsurface. We have used the data of collimated and omnidirectional epithermal neutron detectors of the Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector (LEND) gathered from September 2009 up to present. This period covers the first half of the 24th Solar cycle from period of minimum solar activity with maximum lunar neutron albedo up to high solar activity and less neutron albedo. It was found that for the observed time period, the amplitude of neutron flux drops down by a factor of ~1.7 after a maximal values observed at December 2009. We have compared LEND measurements with ongoing observations of GCR variability by neutron detectors on-board other spacecraft orbiting around Earth (BTN/ISS) and Mars (HEND/Odyssey). All neutron instruments show similar global trends and local variations. It was found that HEND on Martian orbit has detected highest amplitude of neutron flux variations (~1.8 times) and the peak of neutron flux occurred by a couple of

  8. Fast Neutron Albedo Calculations for a Concrete Shield with Different Curvatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayed Ahmed, F. M.; Salama, M.

    The O5R Monte Carlo neutron transport Code had been used to calculate the neutron albedo for neutrons reflected from plane and curved concrete shields. The present calculations were performed to investigate the fast-neutron albedo in case of ordinary concrete shield, in order to perform comparative studies with the case of neutron reflection against a flat wall. The calculations were performed for three different neutron source energies of 1 MeV, 5 MeV and 15 MeV and at neutron incident angles of 5°, 30°, 45°, 60° and 90° and for surfaces with different curvatures (flat, 100, 50, 20 and 5 cm).The results obtained reveal that there will be an appreciable error on using the flat wall albedo value in the case of duct penetration calculations. The error was assumed to be due to the neglection of the curvature effect as well as to the improper choice of the neutron incident angle.Translated AbstractAlbedoberechnungen für schnelle Neutronen an einem Betonschild unterschiedlicher KrümmungDas O5R Monte Carlo Neutronentransport-Programm wurde benutzt, um die Albedo für Neutronen, reflektiert von ebenen oder gekrümmten Betonschilden, zu berechnen. Diese Berechnungen für die Albedo schneller Neutronen an gewöhnlichen Betonschilden wurden zum Vergleich mit ähnlichen Untersuchungen der Neutronenreflektion an flachen Wänden angestellt. Es wird bei drei verschiedenen Neutronenquellenenergien, 1 MeV, 5 MeV, und 15 MeV, Einfallswinkeln von 5°, 30°, 45°, 60° und 90° sowie für verschieden gekrümmte Oberflächen (flach, 100, 50, 20 und 5 cm) gerechnet.Diese Ergebnisse zeigen, daß die Verwendung von Albedowerten an flachen Wänden für den Fall von Durchlaßkanälen zu beträchtlichen Fehlern führt. Sie können sowohl der Vernachlässigung der Krümmung als auch der Wahl falscher Einfallswinkel zugeschrieben werden.

  9. Observation of Ground-state Two-neutron Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoennessen, M.; Kohley, Z.; Spyrou, A.; Lunderberg, E.; DeYoung, P. A.; Attanayake, H.; Baumann, T.; Bazin, D.; Brown, B. A.; Christian, G.; Divaratne, D.; Grimes, S. M.; Haagsma, A.; Finck, J. E.; Frank, N.; Luther, B.; Mosby, S.; Nagi, T.; Peaslee, G. F.; Peters, W. A.; Schiller, A.; Smith, J. K.; Snyder, J.; Strongman, M.; Volya, A.

    Neutron decay spectroscopy has become a successful tool to explore nuclear properties of nuclei with the largest neutron-to-proton ratios. Resonances in nuclei located beyond the neutron dripline are accessible by kinematic reconstruction of the decay products. The development of two-neutron detection capabilities of the Modular Neutron Array (MoNA) at NSCL has opened up the possibility to search for unbound nuclei which decay by the emission of two neutrons. Specifically this exotic decay mode was observed in 16Be and 26O.

  10. Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons (DAN) Experiment Onboard NASA's Mars Science Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitrofanov, I. G.; Litvak, M. L.; Varenikov, A. B.; Barmakov, Y. N.; Behar, A.; Bobrovnitsky, Y. I.; Bogolubov, E. P.; Boynton, W. V.; Harshman, K.; Kan, E.; Kozyrev, A. S.; Kuzmin, R. O.; Malakhov, A. V.; Mokrousov, M. I.; Ponomareva, S. N.; Ryzhkov, V. I.; Sanin, A. B.; Smirnov, G. A.; Shvetsov, V. N.; Timoshenko, G. N.; Tomilina, T. M.; Tret'yakov, V. I.; Vostrukhin, A. A.

    2012-09-01

    The description of Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons (DAN) experiment is presented, as a part of the NASA's Mars Science Laboratory mission onboard the mars rover Curiosity. The instrument DAN includes Pulsing Neutron Generator (PNG) producing pulses of 14.1 MeV neutrons for irradiation of subsurface material below the rover, and Detectors and Electronics (DE) unit, which operates the instrument itself and measures the die-away time profiles of epithermal and thermal neutrons following each neutron pulse. It is shown that the DAN investigation will measure a content of hydrogen along the path of the MSL rover, and it will also provide information about a depth distribution of hydrogen at 10-20 regions selected for the detailed studies and sampling analysis.

  11. Verification analysis of thermoluminescent albedo neutron dosimetry at MOX fuel facilities.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Takahiro; Takada, Chie; Tsujimura, Norio

    2011-07-01

    Radiation workers engaging in the fabrication of MOX fuels at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency-Nuclear Fuel Cycle Engineering Laboratories are exposed to neutrons. Accordingly, thermoluminescent albedo dosemeters (TLADs) are used for individual neutron dosimetry. Because dose estimation using TLADs is susceptible to variation of the neutron energy spectrum, the authors have provided TLADs incorporating solid-state nuclear tracks detectors (SSNTDs) to selected workers who are routinely exposed to neutrons and have continued analysis of the relationship between the SSNTD and the TLAD (T/R(f)) over the past 6 y from 2004 to 2009. Consequently, the T/R(f) value in each year was less than the data during 1991-1993, although the neutron spectra had not changed since then. This decrease of the T/R(f) implies that the ratio of operation time nearby gloveboxes and the total work time has decreased. PMID:21493603

  12. Analyzing of the Die Away Curve of the Msl Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons (dan) Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varenikov, A.; Jun, I.; Litvak, M. L.

    2012-12-01

    The Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons (DAN) is flown on board Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) to provide measurements of the dynamic albedo of thermal and epithermal neutrons induced by a pulse 14 MeV neutron generator. The DAN instrument consists of pulse neutron generator (DAN/PNG) electrically and logically combined with neutron detection system (DAN/DE). The major science objective of DAN instrument is to detect and provide quantitative estimates of the hydrogen content in the sub-surface layer of Mars. The amplitude and shape of the die-away time profile strongly depends on the content, depth and geometry distribution of water ice/bound layer. Die-away curves of thermal neutrons are simulated using a Monte Carlo transport code (MCNPX) for a homogeneous model of regolith with different contents of water. Tw different cases were considered in the initial simulations: single layered model and double layered model. In the first case, the sub-surface is modelled as a homogeneous single layer with different water contents. The preliminary results show that DAN could measure the water content as low as 0.1-0.2 weight %. The second case includes the sub-surface described by two layers. It is used to evaluate the DAN sensitivity to detect water depth (where the bottom layer is richer in water content than the upper layer).

  13. Neutron-Gamma-ray-coupled albedo Monte Carlo method streaming analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Yamauchi, M.; Kawai, M.; Seki, Y.

    1986-11-01

    The neutron-gamma-ray-coupled albedo Monte Carlo (AMC) method has been developed and implemented in MORSE-I. The energy- and angle-dependent differential albedo data, which include secondary gamma rays, are calculated for a slab layer with one dimensional transport theory. Fundamental formulas for this method are described. The applicability to shielding design of fusion reactors is confirmed by analyzing the radiation streaming experiment conducted at the Fusion Neutronics Source facility, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. The AMC method has reproduced well the experimental data of radiation dose rates and spectra with an accuracy of approximately 10%. It is shown that the AMC method is several times more efficient than the ordinary Monte Carlo calculation in obtaining data necessary for the design with expected accuracy.

  14. N-SAP and G-SAP neutron and gamma ray albedo model scatter shield analysis program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sapovchak, B. J.; Stephenson, L. D.

    1967-01-01

    Computer program calculates neutron or gamma ray first order scattering from a plane or cylindrical surface to a detector point. The SAP Codes, G-SAP and N-SAP, constitute a multiple scatter albedo model shield analysis.

  15. Neutron decay spectroscopy of neutron-rich oxygen isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, N.; Baumann, T.; Bazin, D.; Brown, B. A.; Brown, J.; DeYoung, P. A.; Finck, J. E.; Gade, A.; Hinnefeld, J.; Howes, R.; Lecouey, J.-L.; Luther, B.; Peters, W. A.; Scheit, H.; Schiller, A.; Thoennessen, M.; Tostevin, J.

    2008-12-01

    Neutron decay spectroscopy of neutron-rich oxygen isotopes has been performed using the two-proton knock-out reaction 9Be( 26Ne, X) 24,23,22O. A combination of the knock-out of valence and core protons can explain the three observed spectra. These knock-out processes are selective and preferentially populate hole states. The observed narrow resonance state in 23O at an excitation energy of 2.8(1) MeV was assigned to the 5/2 state.

  16. Neutron Bound β-Decay-BOB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schott, W.; Paul, S.; Berger, M.; Emmerich, R.; Engels, R.; Faestermann, T.; Fierlinger, P.; Gabriel, M.; Gutsmiedl, E.; Hartmann, F. J.; Hertenberger, R.; R̈ohrmoser, A.; Ruschel, S.; Scḧon, J.; Schubert, U.; Trautner, A.; Udem, T.; Ulrich, A.

    The bound neutron β-decay(BOB) into a hydrogen atom and an electron antineutrino is investigated. The hyperfinestate population of the monoenergetic hydrogen atoms yields the neutrino left-handedness or a possible right-handed admixture and possible small scalar and tensor contributions to the weak force. The BOB H(2 s) hyperfine states are separated with a Lamb shift spin filter. The H(2 s) atoms are detected either by quenching yielding Lyman-α photons, or ionizing or charge exchanging into protons and H-, respectively. A first experiment is planned at the FRM2 high thermal neutron flux beam reactor SR6 through-going beam pipe. The neutron and ray background suppression with absorbing traps between SR6 and the experiment has been simulated using MCNP4 and GEANT4. The Lyman-α photon background produced by protons hitting the vacuum chamber wall was measured in a mockup setup.

  17. Neutron bound beta-decay: BOB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAndrew, Josephine; Paul, Stephan; Emmerich, Ralf; Engels, Ralf; Fierlinger, Peter; Gabriel, Mirko; Gutsmiedl, Erwin; Mellenthin, Johannes; Schön, Johannes; Schott, Wolfgang; Ulrich, Andreas; Grüenauer, Florian; Röhrmoser, Anton

    2012-05-01

    An experiment to observe the bound beta-decay (BOB) of the free neutron into a hydrogen atom and an electron anti-neutrino is described. The hyperfine spin state population of the monoenergetic hydrogen atom yields the neutrino left-handedness or possible right-handed admixture as well as possible small scalar and tensor contributions to the weak force. The BOB H(2s) hyperfine states can be separated with a Lamb-Shift Spin Filter. These monoenergetic H(2s) atoms are ionised into H- by charge exchanging within an argon cell. These ions are then separated using an adaptation of a MAC-E Filter. A first experiment is proposed at the FRMII high thermal-neutron flux beam reactor SR6 through-going beam tube, where we will seek to observe this rare neutron decay-mode for the first time and determine the branching ratio. After successful completion, the hyperfine spin state population will be determined, possibly at the ILL high-flux beam reactor through-going beam tube H6-H7, where the thermal neutron flux is a factor of four larger.

  18. Neutron bound beta-decay: BOB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAndrew, Josephine; Paul, Stephan; Emmerich, Ralf; Engels, Ralf; Fierlinger, Peter; Gabriel, Mirko; Gutsmiedl, Erwin; Mellenthin, Johannes; Schön, Johannes; Schott, Wolfgang; Ulrich, Andreas; Grüenauer, Florian; Röhrmoser, Anton

    An experiment to observe the bound beta-decay (BOB) of the free neutron into a hydrogen atom and an electron anti-neutrino is described. The hyperfine spin state population of the monoenergetic hydrogen atom yields the neutrino left-handedness or possible right-handed admixture as well as possible small scalar and tensor contributions to the weak force. The BOB H(2s) hyperfine states can be separated with a Lamb-Shift Spin Filter. These monoenergetic H(2s) atoms are ionised into H- by charge exchanging within an argon cell. These ions are then separated using an adaptation of a MAC-E Filter. A first experiment is proposed at the FRMII high thermal-neutron flux beam reactor SR6 through-going beam tube, where we will seek to observe this rare neutron decay-mode for the first time and determine the branching ratio. After successful completion, the hyperfine spin state population will be determined, possibly at the ILL high-flux beam reactor through-going beam tube H6-H7, where the thermal neutron flux is a factor of four larger.

  19. Constraining decaying dark matter with neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-García, M. Ángeles; Silk, Joseph

    2015-05-01

    The amount of decaying dark matter, accumulated in the central regions in neutron stars together with the energy deposition rate from decays, may set a limit on the neutron star survival rate against transitions to more compact objects provided nuclear matter is not the ultimate stable state of matter and that dark matter indeed is unstable. More generally, this limit sets constraints on the dark matter particle decay time, τχ. We find that in the range of uncertainties intrinsic to such a scenario, masses (mχ /TeV) ≳ 9 ×10-4 or (mχ /TeV) ≳ 5 ×10-2 and lifetimes τχ ≲1055 s and τχ ≲1053 s can be excluded in the bosonic or fermionic decay cases, respectively, in an optimistic estimate, while more conservatively, it decreases τχ by a factor ≳1020. We discuss the validity under which these results may improve with other current constraints.

  20. Use of computer memory chips as the basis for a digital albedo neutron dosimeter.

    PubMed

    Davis, J L

    1985-08-01

    We have measured the sensitivity of commercially available dynamic random access memories (D-RAMs) to alpha particles. Using a beam of 14-meV neutrons and a 6LiF crystal as a converter we have measured sensitivities to neutron radiation as high as 9.25 memory errors per millirem. We estimate that an optimized converter would produce even higher sensitivities as an albedo dosimeter in realistic radiation fields. Such a device would have a number of operational advantages. PMID:4019197

  1. Radiative Corrections for Neutron Decay and Search for New Physics

    PubMed Central

    Gudkov, V.; Kubodera, K.; Myhrer, F.

    2005-01-01

    The expected increased accuracy of neutron β-decay experiments at the new Spallation Neutron Source could result in more stringent tests of the Standard Model. For an unambiguous search for new physics in neutron decay experiments and for a precise determination of fundamental constants, it is necessarily to understand and evaluate all corrections for neutron decay with higher accuracy than the expected experimental precision. We discuss the possibility to estimate the accuracy of radiative corrections. New results based on the applications of effective field theory for neutron decay is presented. PMID:27308143

  2. New precision measurements of free neutron beta decay with cold neutrons

    DOE PAGES

    Baeßler, Stefan; Bowman, James David; Penttilä, Seppo I.; Počanić, Dinko

    2014-10-14

    Precision measurements in free neutron beta decay serve to determine the coupling constants of beta decay, and offer several stringent tests of the standard model. This study describes the free neutron beta decay program planned for the Fundamental Physics Beamline at the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and finally puts it into the context of other recent and planned measurements of neutron beta decay observables.

  3. Neutron β Decay: Status and Future of the Asymmetry Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, Takeyasu M.

    2007-04-04

    With more intense sources of cold and ultracold neutrons becoming available and with improved experimental techniques being developed, determination of ΙVud l from neutron β decay with a similar precision to that from from superallowed β decays is within reach. Determination of IVud l from neutron β decay, free from nuclear corrections, holds the most promise for a further improvement of the determination of IVud l· The current and future neutron β decay correlation experiments including the UCNA experiment at Los Alamos National Laboratory are reviewed.

  4. Solar neutron decay proton observations in cycle 21

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evenson, Paul; Kroeger, Richard; Meyer, Peter; Reames, Donald

    1990-01-01

    Measurement of the flux and energy spectrum of the protons resulting from the decay of solar flare neutrons gives unique information on the spectrum of neutrons from 5 to 200 MeV. Neutrons from three flares have been observed in this manner during solar cycle 21. The use of the decay protons to determine neutron energy spectra is reviewed, and new and definitive energy spectra are presented for the two large flares on June 3, 1982 and April 25, 1984.

  5. Neutron background environment measured by the Mars Science Laboratory's Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons instrument during the first 100 sols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, I.; Mitrofanov, I.; Litvak, M. L.; Sanin, A. B.; Kim, W.; Behar, A.; Boynton, W. V.; DeFlores, L.; Fedosov, F.; Golovin, D.; Hardgrove, C.; Harshman, K.; Kozyrev, A. S.; Kuzmin, R. O.; Malakhov, A.; Mischna, M.; Moersch, J.; Mokrousov, M.; Nikiforov, S.; Shvetsov, V. N.; Tate, C.; Tret'yakov, V. I.; Vostrukhin, A.

    2013-11-01

    Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons (DAN) instrument on board Mars Science Laboratory has been operating successfully since the landing and has been making measurements regularly along Curiosity's traverse at the surface. DAN measures thermal (E < 0.4 eV) and epithermal neutrons (0.4 eV < E < ~1 keV) while operating in two different modes: active and passive. The active mode uses a pulsed neutron generator (PNG) to study the geological characteristics of the subsurface. In the passive mode, DAN measures the background neutron environment. This paper presents results of measurements in the passive mode from landing through to sol 100 and provides an interpretation of the data based on extensive Monte Carlo simulations. The main observations are summarized as follows: (1) the thermal neutron counts vary strongly along the rover traverse while the epithermal counts do not show much variation; (2) the neutrons from the Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG) are a larger contributor to the DAN passive data than the Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR)-induced neutrons; (3) for the MMRTG neutrons, both the thermal and the epithermal counts increase as a function of the subsurface water content; (4) on the other hand, for the GCR-induced neutrons, the thermal counts increase but the epithermal counts decrease as a function of the subsurface water content; and (5) relative contributions by the MMRTG and GCR to the DAN thermal neutron counts at the Rocknest site, where the rover was stationed from sol 59 to sol 100, are estimated to be ~60% and ~40%, respectively.

  6. Personal neutron dosimetry in nuclear power plants using etched track and albedo thermoluminescence dosemeters.

    PubMed

    Fernández, F; Bakali, M; Amgarou, K; Nourreddine, A; Mouhssine, D

    2004-01-01

    Measurement of the personal dose equivalent rates for neutrons is a difficult task because available dosemeters do not provide the required energy response and sensitivity. Furthermore, the available wide calibration spectra recommended by the International Standard Organisation does not reproduce adequately the spectra encountered in practical situations of the nuclear industry. There is a real necessity to characterise the radiation field, in which workers can be exposed, and to calibrate personal dosemeters in order to determine the dose equivalent in these installations. For this reason, we measure the neutron spectrum with our Bonner sphere system and we fold this spectrum with energy-dependent fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients to obtain the reference dose equivalent rate. This reference value is then compared with the personal dosemeter reading to determine a field-specific correction factor. In this paper, we present the values of this field-specific correction factor for etched track and albedo thermoluminescence dosemeters at three measurement locations inside the containment building of the Vandellòs II nuclear power plant. We have found that assigning to each personal dosemeter the mean value of the field-specific correction factors of the three measurement locations, allows the evaluation of neutron personal dose equivalent rate with a relative uncertainty of approximately 25 and 15% for the PADC and albedo dosemeters, respectively. PMID:15353734

  7. Modes of decay in neutron-rich nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, B.; Biswal, S. K.; Singh, S. K.; Lahiri, C.; Patra, S. K.

    2016-03-01

    We calculate the ground, first intrinsic excited states and density distribution for neutron-rich thorium and uranium isotopes, within the framework of relativistic mean field (RMF) approach using axially deformed basis. The total nucleon densities are calculated, from which the cluster-structures inside the parent nuclei are determined. The possible modes of decay, like α-decay and β-decay are analyzed. We find the neutron-rich isotopes are stable against α-decay, however they are very much unstable against β-decay. The life time of these nuclei predicted to be tens of second against β-decay.

  8. Solar cosmic ray, solar wind, solar flare, and neutron albedo measurements, part C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnett, D.; Hohenberg, C.; Maurette, M.; Monnin, M.; Walker, R.; Wollum, D.

    1972-01-01

    All mineral detectors exposed on Apollo 16 had high surface track densities probably produced by a solar flare that occurred during the mission. The heavy ions followed a power law spectrum with exponent approximately 3 down to approximately 200 KeV/nucleon. The abundance of low-energy particle tracks observed in this flare may explain the high track densities observed in lunar dust grains. Pristine heavy-particle tracks in feldspar give long tracks. Shallow pits similar to those expected from extremely heavy solar wind ions were observed in about the expected number. Initial results give a low apparent value of neutron albedo relative to theory.

  9. Effects of geochemical composition on neutron die-away measurements: Implications for Mars Science Laboratory's Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardgrove, C.; Moersch, J.; Drake, D.

    2011-12-01

    The Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons (DAN) experiment, part of the scientific payload of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover mission, will have the ability to assess both the abundance and the burial depth of subsurface hydrogen as the rover traverses the Martian surface. DAN will employ a method of measuring neutron fluxes called “neutron die-away” that has not been used in previous planetary exploration missions. This method requires the use of a pulsed neutron generator that supplements neutrons produced via spallation in the subsurface by the cosmic ray background. It is well established in neutron remote sensing that low-energy (thermal) neutrons are sensitive not only to hydrogen content, but also to the macroscopic absorption cross-section of near-surface materials. To better understand the results that will be forthcoming from DAN, we model the effects of varying abundances of high absorption cross-section elements that are likely to be found on the Martian surface (Cl, Fe) on neutron die-away measurements made from a rover platform. Previously, the Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) Spirit and Opportunity found that elevated abundances of these two elements are commonly associated with locales that have experienced some form of aqueous activity in the past, even though hydrogen-rich materials are not necessarily still present. By modeling a suite of H and Cl compositions, we demonstrate that (for abundance ranges reasonable for Mars) both the elements will significantly affect DAN thermal neutron count rates. Additionally, we show that the timing of thermal neutron arrivals at the detector can be used together with the thermal neutron count rates to independently determine the abundances of hydrogen and high neutron absorption cross-section elements (the most important being Cl). Epithermal neutron die-away curves may also be used to separate these two components. We model neutron scattering in actual Martian compositions that were determined by the MER Alpha

  10. Does mass accretion lead to field decay in neutron stars?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shibazaki, N.; Murakami, T.; Shaham, J.; Nomoto, K.

    1989-01-01

    Adopting the hypothesis of accretion-induced magnetic field decay in neutron stars, the consequent evolution of a neutron star's spin and magnetic field are calculated. The results are consistent with observations of binary and millisecond radio pulsars. Thermomagnetic effects could provide a possible physical mechanism for such accretion-induced field decay.

  11. A clean, bright, and versatile source of neutron decay products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubbers, D.; Abele, H.; Baeßler, S.; Märkisch, B.; Schumann, M.; Soldner, T.; Zimmer, O.

    2008-11-01

    We present a case study on a new type of beam station for the measurement of angular correlations in the β-decay of free neutrons. This beam station, called proton and electron radiation channel (PERC), is a cold-neutron guide that delivers at its open end, instead of neutrons, a beam of electrons and protons from neutron decays that take place far inside the guide. These charged neutron-decay products are magnetically guided to the end of the neutron guide, where they are separated from the cold-neutron beam. In this way, a general-purpose source of neutron decay products is obtained which can be operated as a user facility for a variety of different experiments in neutron decay correlation spectroscopy that may be installed at this beam station. The angular distribution of the emitted charged particles depends on the magnetic field configuration and can be chosen freely, according to the need of the experiment being carried out. A gain in phase space density of several orders of magnitude can be achieved with PERC, as compared to existing neutron decay spectrometers. Detailed calculations show that the spectra and angular distributions of the emerging electrons and protons will be distortion- and background-free on the level of 10 -4, more than 10 times better than that achieved today.

  12. Contribution of Neutron Beta Decay to Radiation Belt Pumping from High Altitude Nuclear Explosion

    SciTech Connect

    Marrs, R

    2002-11-13

    fission products to belt pumping (e.g., the SNRTACS code system [2]). It is a daunting task because multiple, difficult-to-model plasma processes must be included, and existing belt pumping models cannot reproduce the trapped electron numbers, spectra, and spatial distributions observed following the 1962 tests. Neutrons are not affected by the earth's magnetic field or by plasma electric and magnetic fields, so their contribution to belt pumping can in principle be calculated more accurately than that of fission products. Those neutrons emitted in an upward direction from a high altitude nuclear explosion travel in straight lines. They beta decay and contribute a trapped energetic electron to the earth's radiation belts at a rate determined by the 900-second neutron lifetime (which is much longer than the {approx}2-second flight time of a fast neutron through the radiation belts). Neutrons emitted in a downward direction will scatter in the atmosphere. Most of them will diffuse out of the atmosphere and travel up through the earth's radiation belts, where their probability of injecting a trapped electron is now greater because of their lower velocity. This albedo effect increases the amount of belt pumping from neutron beta decay by several fold. In the present work, we use Monte Carlo neutron transport techniques to account for the albedo effect of the earth's atmosphere and obtain accurate values for the magnitude and distribution of trapped electrons from neutron beta decay.

  13. Does mass accretion lead to field decay in neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shibazaki, N.; Murakami, T.; Shaham, Jacob; Nomoto, K.

    1989-01-01

    The recent discovery of cyclotron lines from gamma-ray bursts indicates that the strong magnetic fields of isolated neutron stars might not decay. The possible inverse correlation between the strength of the magnetic field and the mass accreted by the neutron star suggests that mass accretion itself may lead to the decay of the magnetic field. The spin and magnetic field evolution of the neutron star was calculated under the hypothesis of the accretion-induced field decay. It is shown that the calculated results are consistent with the observations of binary and millisecond radio pulsars.

  14. Ground Albedo Neutron Sensing (GANS) method for measurements of soil moisture in cropped fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andres Rivera Villarreyes, Carlos; Baroni, Gabriele; Oswald, Sascha E.

    2013-04-01

    Measurement of soil moisture at the plot or hill-slope scale is an important link between local vadose zone hydrology and catchment hydrology. However, so far only few methods are on the way to close this gap between point measurements and remote sensing. This study evaluates the applicability of the Ground Albedo Neutron Sensing (GANS) for integral quantification of seasonal soil moisture in the root zone at the scale of a field or small watershed, making use of the crucial role of hydrogen as neutron moderator relative to other landscape materials. GANS measurements were performed at two locations in Germany under different vegetative situations and seasonal conditions. Ground albedo neutrons were measured at (i) a lowland Bornim farmland (Brandenburg) cropped with sunflower in 2011 and winter rye in 2012, and (ii) a mountainous farmland catchment (Schaefertal, Harz Mountains) since middle 2011. At both sites depth profiles of soil moisture were measured at several locations in parallel by frequency domain reflectometry (FDR) for comparison and calibration. Initially, calibration parameters derived from a previous study with corn cover were tested under sunflower and winter rye periods at the same farmland. GANS soil moisture based on these parameters showed a large discrepancy compared to classical soil moisture measurements. Therefore, two new calibration approaches and four different ways of integration the soil moisture profile to an integral value for GANS were evaluated in this study. This included different sets of calibration parameters based on different growing periods of sunflower. New calibration parameters showed a good agreement with FDR network during sunflower period (RMSE = 0.023 m3 m-3), but they underestimated soil moisture in the winter rye period. The GANS approach resulted to be highly affected by temporal changes of biomass and crop types which suggest the need of neutron corrections for long-term observations with crop rotation. Finally

  15. The bound β-decay of the free neutron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schön, J.; Paul, S.; Emmerich, R.; Engels, R.; Faestermann, T.; Fierlinger, P.; Gabriel, M.; Gutsmied, E.; Hartmann, F. J.; Hertenberger, R.; McAndrew, J.; Röhrmoser, A.; Ruschel, S.; Schott, W.; Schubert, U.; Trautner, A.; Udem, T.; Ulrich, A.

    2012-09-01

    An experiment to measure the bound β-decay of the neutron into a hydrogen atom and an electron anti-neutrino is described. Observation of such a decay would open an alternative pathway to physics beyond the Standard Model, in particular right-handed current admixtures in the weak interaction as well as the handedness of the neutrino. The experiment is planned at the through-going beam tube SR6 at the FRM2 high-flux reactor in Garching. Although the branching ratio of this decay is expected to be only 4 . 10-6 of the normal neutron β-decay [1], a sufficient decay rate due to the high flux of neutrons available for the experiment is expected. Simulations have shown that the measurement is feasible, with proper shielding being the critical factor. The experimental setup is currently being studied, testing different detection techniques for H(2s) at the TUM.

  16. Measurement of the Neutron's Beta Decay Asymmetry using Polarized Ultra-cold Neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogelaar, R. B.; Makela, M.; Pitt, M.; Carr, R.; Filippone, B.; Ito, T. M.; Martin, J. W.; McKeown, R.; Tipton, B.; Yuan, J.; Geltenbort, P.; Soyama, K.; Bowles, T.; Fowler, M.; Hill, R.; Hime, A.; Hogan, G.; Kirch, K.; Lamoreaux, S.; Morris, C.; Pichlmaeir, A.; Saunders, A.; Seestrom, S.; Walstrom, P.; Wilhelmy, J.; Alduschenkov, A.; Kharitonov, A.; Lassakov, M.; Rudnev, Yu.; Serebrov, A.; Vasilev, A.; Hoedel, S.; Liu, C.-Y.; Smith, D.; Young, A. R.; Kitagaki, T.; Asahi, K.; Hino, M.; Kawai, T.; Utsuro, M.; Garcia, A.; Miyachi, T.

    2001-04-01

    A measurement of the beta decay asymmetry in polarized neutron decay, when combined with the neutron lifetime, provides a determination of the fundamental vector and axial vector weak coupling constants, GV and G_A. The value of GV can be compared to that obtained from other observables to check the consistency of the electroweak Standard Model and to search for physics beyond it. We describe a new neutron beta decay asymmetry experiment being prepared at LANSCE. The experiment will use ultra-cold neutrons (UCN) from a recently developed spallation driven solid deuterium UCN source. UCNs can be produced with 100polarization, and they can be efficiently transported over long distances, thus insuring a low background environment. These properties provide some important advantages over previous neutron beta decay asymmetry experiments performed using cold neutron beams from reactors. We will report on the details of the experimental setup and the expected precision.

  17. New limit on T violation in neutron decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldner, T.; Beck, L.; Plonka, C.; Schreckenbach, K.; Zimmer, O.

    2004-02-01

    We have measured the triple correlation D of the neutron polarisation and the momenta of electron and antineutrino, dW∝1+DP(pe×pν¯), in neutron beta decay. Our result is D=[-2.8±6.4(stat)±3.0(syst)]×10-4. The corresponding phase between gA and gV in V-A-theory follows as φAV=180.04°±0.09°. This result improves the limit on a possible T violation in neutron beta decay.

  18. Decay-Assisted Laser Spectroscopy of Neutron-Deficient Francium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, K. M.; Billowes, J.; Bissell, M. L.; Budinčević, I.; Cocolios, T. E.; De Groote, R. P.; De Schepper, S.; Fedosseev, V. N.; Flanagan, K. T.; Franchoo, S.; Garcia Ruiz, R. F.; Heylen, H.; Marsh, B. A.; Neyens, G.; Procter, T. J.; Rossel, R. E.; Rothe, S.; Strashnov, I.; Stroke, H. H.; Wendt, K. D. A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on the hyperfine-structure and radioactive-decay studies of the neutron-deficient francium isotopes Fr202-206 performed with the Collinear Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (CRIS) experiment at the ISOLDE facility, CERN. The high resolution innate to collinear laser spectroscopy is combined with the high efficiency of ion detection to provide a highly sensitive technique to probe the hyperfine structure of exotic isotopes. The technique of decay-assisted laser spectroscopy is presented, whereby the isomeric ion beam is deflected to a decay-spectroscopy station for alpha-decay tagging of the hyperfine components. Here, we present the first hyperfine-structure measurements of the neutron-deficient francium isotopes Fr202-206, in addition to the identification of the low-lying states of Fr202,204 performed at the CRIS experiment.

  19. Integral Quantification of Soil Water Content at the Intermediate Catchment Scale by Ground Albedo Neutron Sensing (GANS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera Villarreyes, C. A.; Baroni, G.; Oswald, S. E.

    2012-04-01

    Soil water content at the plot or hill-slope scale is an important link between local vadose zone hydrology and catchment hydrology. However, so far only few methods are on the way to close this gap between point measurements and remote sensing. One new measurement methodology for integral quantifications of mean areal soil water content at the intermediate catchment scale is the aboveground sensing of cosmic-ray neutrons, more precisely ground albedo neutron sensing (GANS). Ground albedo natural neutrons, are generated by collisions of secondary cosmic rays with land surface materials (soil, water, biomass, snow, etc). Neutrons measured at the air/ground interface correlate with soil moisture contained in a footprint of ca. 600 m diameter and a depth ranging down to a few decimeters. This correlation is based on the crucial role of hydrogen as neutron moderator compared to others landscape materials. The present study performed ground albedo neutron sensing in different locations in Germany under different vegetative situations (cropped and bare field) and different seasonal conditions (summer, autumn and winter). Ground albedo neutrons were measured at (i) a farmland close to Potsdam (Brandenburg, Germany) cropped with corn in 2010 and sunflowers in 2011, and (ii) a mountainous farmland catchment (Schaefertal, Harz Mountains, Germany) in 2011. In order to test this method, classical soil moisture devices and meteorological data were used for comparison. Moreover, calibration approach, and transferability of calibration parameters to different times and locations are also evaluated. Our observations suggest that GANS can overcome the lack of data for hydrological processes at the intermediate scale. Soil water content from GANS compared quantitatively with mean water content values derived from a network of classical devices (RMSE = 0.02 m3/m3 and r2 = 0.98) in three calibration periods with cropped-field conditions. Then, same calibration parameters corresponded

  20. Protons from the decay of solar flare neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evenson, P.; Meyer, P.; Pyle, K. R.

    1983-01-01

    Fluxes of energetic protons in interplanetary space are observed which are interpreted as the decay products of neutrons generated in a solar flare on 1982 June 3 at 11:42 UT. Because of the particular geometry of this event the spectrum of neutrons escaping from the sun can be constructed with great accuracy in the kinetic energy range 10-100 MeV. The resulting spectrum places stringent constraints on the free parameters used in previously published calculations of neutron production in solar flares. An estimate is made of the diffusion mean free path of charged particles in the interplanetary medium in a new way.

  1. Calculation of neutron-decay-proton trapping in the Jovian magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, J. R.; Doherty, W. R.

    1972-01-01

    Investigations on the possible proton fluxes resulting from cosmic ray albedo neutron decay (CRAND) are summarized. It is recalled that experimental data on the earth's belts are reasonably consistent with a CRAND source for most of the protons with energies 50 MeV in the heart of the inner belt. It is assumed that the CRAND and cosmic ray flux and spectrum for Jupiter are the same as for the Earth, with the significant difference that considerably higher energy particles are needed to reach the Jupiter atmosphere at the same magnetic latitude. The ratio of the CRAND source averaged over an L shell on Jupiter to that on Earth at L = 1.3 is derived from a geometrical calculation. The ratio of average loss rate on Jupiter to that for the Earth is also discussed. The flux around Jupiter is obtained by scaling according to the ratio of source to loss from the flux observed in the Earth's inner belt.

  2. Comparison of two experiments on radiative neutron decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khafizov, R. U.; Tolokonnikov, S. V.; Solovei, V. A.; Kolhidashvili, M. R.

    2009-12-01

    Over 10 years ago we proposed an experiment on measuring the characteristics of radiative neutron decay in papers [1, 2]. At the same time we had published the theoretical spectrum of radiative gamma quanta, calculated within the framework of the electroweak interactions, on the basis of which we proposed the methodology for the future experiment [3, 4]. However, because we were denied beam time on the intensive cold neutron beam at ILL (Grenoble, France) for a number of years, we could only conduct the experiment in 2005 on the newly opened FRMII reactor of Technical University of Muenchen. The main result of this experiment was the discovery of radiative neutron decay and the measurement of its relative intensity B.R. = (3.2 ± 1.6) × 10-3 with C.L. = 99.7% for radiative gamma quanta with energy over 35 kev [5, 6]. Over a year after our first announcement about the results of the conducted experiment, “Nature” [7] published a letter asserting that its authors have also measured the branching ratio of radiative neutron decay B.R. = (3.13 ± 0.34) × 10-3 with c.l. = 68% and gamma quanta energy from 15 to 340 kev. This article aims to compare these two experiments. It is shown that the use of strong magnetic fields in the NIST (Washington, USA) experiment methodology not only prevents any exact measurement of the branching ratio and identification of radiative neutron decay events, but also makes registration of ordinary neutron decay events impossible.

  3. Nab: precise experimental study of unpolarized neutron beta decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pocanic, Dinko; Nab Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    Nab, a program of experimental study of unpolarized neutron decays at the Spallation Neutron Source, Oak Ridge, TN, aims to determine a, the electron-neutrino correlation with precision of δa / a =10-3 , and b, the Fierz interference term, with uncertainty δb ~= 3 ×10-3 . Neutron beta decay's simple theoretical description in the Standard Model (SM) is overconstrained by the set of available observables, providing opportunities to search for evidence of SM extensions. Planned Nab results will lead to a new precise determination of the ratio λ =GA /GV , and to significant reductions in the allowed limits for both right- and left-handed scalar and tensor currents. Alternatively, the experiment may detect a discrepancy from SM predictions consistent with certain realizations of supersymmetry. An optimized, asymmetric spectrometer has been designed to achieve the narrow proton momentum response function required to meet the physics goals of the experiment. The apparatus is to be used in a follow-up measurement (ABba) of asymmetry observables A and B in polarized neutron decay. Nab is funded, now in the construction stage, with planned beam readiness in 2016. We discuss the experiment's motivation, expected reach, design and method. Nab, a program of experimental study of unpolarized neutron decays at the Spallation Neutron Source, Oak Ridge, TN, aims to determine a, the electron-neutrino correlation with precision of δa / a =10-3 , and b, the Fierz interference term, with uncertainty δb ~= 3 ×10-3 . Neutron beta decay's simple theoretical description in the Standard Model (SM) is overconstrained by the set of available observables, providing opportunities to search for evidence of SM extensions. Planned Nab results will lead to a new precise determination of the ratio λ =GA /GV , and to significant reductions in the allowed limits for both right- and left-handed scalar and tensor currents. Alternatively, the experiment may detect a discrepancy from SM

  4. Two-neutron sequential decay of 24O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, M. D.; Frank, N.; Baumann, T.; Brett, J.; Bullaro, J.; DeYoung, P. A.; Finck, J. E.; Hammerton, K.; Hinnefeld, J.; Kohley, Z.; Kuchera, A. N.; Pereira, J.; Rabeh, A.; Rogers, W. F.; Smith, J. K.; Spyrou, A.; Stephenson, S. L.; Stiefel, K.; Tuttle-Timm, M.; Zegers, R. G. T.; Thoennessen, M.

    2015-11-01

    A two-neutron unbound excited state of 24O was populated through a (d ,d' ) reaction at 83.4 MeV/nucleon. A state at E =715 ±110 (stat)±45 (sys)keV with a width of Γ <2 MeV was observed above the two-neutron separation energy placing it at 7.65 ±0.2 MeV with respect to the ground state. Three-body correlations for the decay of 24O→22O+2 n show clear evidence of a sequential decay through an intermediate state in 23O. Neither a di-neutron nor phase-space model for the three-body breakup were able to describe these correlations.

  5. Observational Evidence of a Hemispheric-wide Ice-ocean Albedo Feedback Effect on Antarctic Sea-ice Decay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nihashi, Sohey; Cavalieri, Donald J.

    2007-01-01

    The effect of ice-ocean albedo feedback (a kind of ice-albedo feedback) on sea-ice decay is demonstrated over the Antarctic sea-ice zone from an analysis of satellite-derived hemispheric sea ice concentration and European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ERA-40) atmospheric data for the period 1979-2001. Sea ice concentration in December (time of most active melt) correlates better with the meridional component of the wind-forced ice drift (MID) in November (beginning of the melt season) than the MID in December. This 1 month lagged correlation is observed in most of the Antarctic sea-ice covered ocean. Daily time series of ice , concentration show that the ice concentration anomaly increases toward the time of maximum sea-ice melt. These findings can be explained by the following positive feedback effect: once ice concentration decreases (increases) at the beginning of the melt season, solar heating of the upper ocean through the increased (decreased) open water fraction is enhanced (reduced), leading to (suppressing) a further decrease in ice concentration by the oceanic heat. Results obtained fi-om a simple ice-ocean coupled model also support our interpretation of the observational results. This positive feedback mechanism explains in part the large interannual variability of the sea-ice cover in summer.

  6. Nab: a precise study of unpolarized neutron beta decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pocanic, Dinko; Nab Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Nab is a program of measurements of unpolarized neutron decays at the Spallation Neutron Source, Oak Ridge, TN. Nab aims to determine a, the e- ν correlation with precision of δa / a =10-3 , and b, the Fierz interference term, with uncertainty δb ~= 3 ×10-3 . The set of available observables overconstrains neutron beta decay in the Standard Model (SM), opening the door to searches for evidence of possible SM extensions. Projected Nab results will lead to a new precise determination of the ratio λ =GA /GV , and to significant reductions in the allowed limits for both right- and left-handed scalar and tensor currents. Alternatively, Nab may detect a discrepancy from SM predictions consistent with certain realizations of supersymmetry. A long asymmetric spectrometer, optimized to achieve the required narrow proton momentum response function, is currently under construction. The apparatus is to be used in follow-up measurements (ABba experiment) of asymmetry observables A and B in polarized neutron decay. Nab is planned for beam readiness in 2016. We discuss the experiment's motivation, expected reach, design and method, and update its status. Work supported by NSF Grants PHY-1126683, 1205833, 1307328, 1506320, and others.

  7. Precision Neutron Decay Studies with the Nab and UCNB Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprow, Aaron; Nab Collaboration; UCNB Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    Precision neutron decay correlation experiments are a sensitive means to study the standard model and probe for beyond the standard model physics. Nab and UCNB are two such experiments that will measure the neutrino-electron correlation term, a, and the neutrino asymmetry, B, respectively. Thick, highly-segmented silicon detectors will be used to directly measure the proton and electron from each decay event in coincidence, leading to the extraction of these angular correlations. Preliminary work to understand the systematic uncertainties associated with these experiments, as well as the early analysis of data taken from the 2015-2016 beam time at Los Alamos National Laboratory will be presented.

  8. Beta-Decay and Delayed Neutron Emission of Very Neutron-Rich Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borzov, I. N.

    2014-09-01

    Extended self-consistent beta-decay model has been applied for beta-decay rates and delayed multi-neutron emission probabilities of quasi-spherical neutron-rich isotopes. The Gamow-Teller and first-forbidden decays are treated within the coordinate-space formalism of the continuum QRPA based on the density functional theory description of the ground state. A new set of the Fayans density functional parameters (DF3a) have been employed giving a better spin-orbit splitting due to a stronger tensor term. A provision has been included to fix the odd particle in the proper orbit (before variation). This accounts for ground-state spin inversion effect which has been shown to exist in the region of the most neutron-rich doubly-magic nucleus 78Ni.

  9. Measurement of the neutrino-spin correlation parameter B neutron decay using ultracold neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Wilburn, Wesley S

    2009-01-01

    We present a new approach to measuring the neutrino-spin correlation parameter B in neutron decay. The approach combines the technology of large-area ion-implanted silicon detectors being developed for the abBA experiment, with an ultracold neutron source to provide more precise neutron polarimetry. The technique detects both proton and electron from the neutron decay in coincidence. B is determined from an electron-energy-dependent measurement of the proton spin asymmetry. This approach will provide a statistical precision of 1 x 10-4 . The systematic precision is still being evaluated, but is expected to be below 1 x 10-3 , and could approach 1 x 10-4 . A measurement of B with this precision would place constraints on supersymmetric extensions to the Standard Model.

  10. Two-neutron Sequential Decay of 24O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Michael; Deyoung, Paul; Baumann, Thomas; Finck, Joe; Kohley, Zach; Kuchera, Anthony; Smith, Jenna; Spyrou, Artemis; Stiefel, Krystin; Frank, Nathan; Thoennessen, Michael; MoNA Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    A recent experiment performed at the NSCL populated a two-neutron unbound excited state in 24O through a (d,d') reaction at 82 MeV/nucleon. Using invariant mass spectroscopy, a three-body state was observed in the 22O + 2 n system at E = 750-100 + 100 keV and Γ =100-100 + 300 keV, placing it at ~7.68 MeV with respect to the ground state of 24O. Three-body correlations for the decay of 24O --> 22O + 2 n were examined and found to show strong evidence for a sequential decay through an intermediate state in 23O. A di-neutron or phase-space model for the three-body breakup is unable to describe these correlations.

  11. Ground Albedo Neutron Sensing (GANS) for Measurement of Integral Soil Water Content at the Small Catchment Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera Villarreyes, C.; Baroni, G.; Oswald, S. E.

    2012-12-01

    Soil water content at the plot or hill-slope scale is an important link between local vadose zone hydrology and catchment hydrology. One largest initiative to cover the measuring gap of soil moisture between point scale and remote sensing observations is the COSMOS network (Zreda et al., 2012). Here, cosmic-ray neutron sensing, which may be more precisely named ground albedo neutron sensing (GANS), is applied. The measuring principle is based on the crucial role of hydrogen as neutron moderator compared to others landscape materials. Soil water content contained in a footprint of ca. 600 m diameter and a depth ranging down to a few decimeters is inversely correlated to the neutron flux at the air-ground interface. This approach is now implemented, e.g. in USA (Zreda et al., 2012) and Germany (Rivera Villarreyes et al., 2011), based on its simple installation and integral measurement of soil moisture at the small catchment scale. The present study performed Ground Albedo Neutron Sensing on farmland at two locations in Germany under different vegetative situations (cropped and bare field) and different seasonal conditions (summer, autumn and winter). Ground albedo neutrons were measured at (i) a farmland close to Potsdam and Berlin cropped with corn in 2010, sunflower in 2011 and winter rye in 2012, and (ii) a mountainous farmland catchment (Schaefertal, Harz Mountains) since middle 2011. In order to test this methodology, classical soil moisture devices and meteorological data were used for comparison. Moreover, several calibration approaches, role of vegetation cover and transferability of calibration parameters to different times and locations were also evaluated. Observations suggest that GANS can overcome the lack of data for hydrological processes at the intermediate scale. Soil moisture from GANS compared quantitatively with mean values derived from a network of classical devices under vegetated and non- vegetated conditions. The GANS approach responded well

  12. Measuring Underground Neutron Fluxes for Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colletti, Katrina; Tayloe, Rex; Cooper, Robert; Garrison, Lance; Thornton, Tyler; Steele, Ethan

    2013-10-01

    The goal of this project was to measure the muon-induced neutron flux in lead at sea level using the SciBath neutral particle detector. The muon-induced neutron rate is not well known, is challenging to measure and simulate, and potentially an important background for underground experiments such as the EXO neutrinoless double beta-decay experiment. A mass of 45 kg of lead was placed on top of the detector, and muon/neutron-capture correlated events were measured. Events with accidental neutron-capture signals were subtracted as were muon/neutron-capture correlated events from spallation in the detector liquid scintillator. This procedure resulted in a neutron yield from lead at sea level of 1 . 4 (+/- 1 . 1) ×10-5n/μ (gcm-2)-1 with the typical muon energy at sea level Eμ ~ 4 GeV. We compare this to parameterizations created for underground experimental sites extrapolated up to sea level. NSF funded.

  13. Time reversal invariance - a test in free neutron decay

    SciTech Connect

    Lising, Laura J.

    1999-05-18

    Time reversal invariance violation plays only a small role in the Standard Model, and the existence of a T-violating effect above the predicted level would be an indication of new physics. A sensitive probe of this symmetry in the weak interaction is the measurement of the T-violating ''D''-correlation in the decay of free neutrons. The triple-correlation D{sigma}{sub n}{center_dot}p{sub e} x p{sub v} involves three kinematic variables, the neutron spin, electron momentu, and neutrino (or proton) momentum, and changes sign under time reversal. This experiment detects the decay products of a polarized cold neutron beam with an octagonal array of scintillation and solid-state detectors. Data from first run at NIST's Cold Neutron Research Facility give a D-coefficient of -0.1 {+-} 1.3(stat.) {+-} 0.7(syst) x 10{sup -3}. This measurement has the greatest bearing on extensions to the Standard model that incorporate leptoquarks, although exotic fermion and lift-right symmetric models also allow a D as large as the present limit.

  14. Neutron decay widths of excited states of Be11

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haigh, P. J.; Freer, M.; Ashwood, N. I.; Bloxham, T.; Curtis, N.; McEwan, P.; Bohlen, H. G.; Dorsch, T.; Kokalova, Tz.; Schulz, Ch.; Wheldon, C.

    2009-01-01

    The two-neutron transfer reaction Be9(O16, O14)Be11[Be10 +n] has been used to measure the branching ratios for the neutron decay of excited states of Be11. The O14 ejectile was detected by a Q3D spectrometer at forward angles. The energies and angles of the Be10 fragments of the decaying Be11* recoil were measured in coincidence with the O14 ejectile using a double-sided silicon strip detector array at backward angles. This enabled a kinematic reconstruction of the reaction to be performed. Theoretical decay branch ratios were calculated using barrier penetrability factors and were compared to the measured ratios to provide information on the relative reduced widths of the states. The decay widths have been used to link states in Be11 with a common structure and structurally to states in the daughter nucleus Be10. The 3/2-8.82-MeV state was identified as a candidate for a molecular band head.

  15. Ten years of personal neutron dosimetry with albedo dosemeters in The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Draaisma, F S; Verhagen, H W

    2002-01-01

    Since 1987, the dosimetry service of the Netherlands Energy Research Foundation (ECN) has been certified by the Dutch government to perform personal dosimetry, using thermoluminescence dosemeters (TLDs). Performing neutron personal dosimetry requires a rather large investment in readers, TLDs and personnel to operate the service. About 800 persons are subjected to routine neutron monitoring in The Netherlands and their annual neutron doses are a relatively small fraction (less than 10%) of the annual Hp(10). In general, the measured neutron dose values are low (on average 93% of the users receive an annual neutron dose <0.2 mSv). The collective annual (neutron) dose has tended to decrease since 1992, but incidentally high doses have been observed. Leaving these incidents out, the average collective annual neutron doses for the different users of neutron sources are about the same. PMID:12382755

  16. Strong Neutron-γ Competition above the Neutron Threshold in the Decay of 70Co

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spyrou, A.; Liddick, S. N.; Naqvi, F.; Crider, B. P.; Dombos, A. C.; Bleuel, D. L.; Brown, B. A.; Couture, A.; Crespo Campo, L.; Guttormsen, M.; Larsen, A. C.; Lewis, R.; Möller, P.; Mosby, S.; Mumpower, M. R.; Perdikakis, G.; Prokop, C. J.; Renstrøm, T.; Siem, S.; Quinn, S. J.; Valenta, S.

    2016-09-01

    The β -decay intensity of 70Co was measured for the first time using the technique of total absorption spectroscopy. The large β -decay Q value [12.3(3) MeV] offers a rare opportunity to study β -decay properties in a broad energy range. Two surprising features were observed in the experimental results, namely, the large fragmentation of the β intensity at high energies, as well as the strong competition between γ rays and neutrons, up to more than 2 MeV above the neutron-separation energy. The data are compared to two theoretical calculations: the shell model and the quasiparticle random phase approximation (QRPA). Both models seem to be missing a significant strength at high excitation energies. Possible interpretations of this discrepancy are discussed. The shell model is used for a detailed nuclear structure interpretation and helps to explain the observed γ -neutron competition. The comparison to the QRPA calculations is done as a means to test a model that provides global β -decay properties for astrophysical calculations. Our work demonstrates the importance of performing detailed comparisons to experimental results, beyond the simple half-life comparisons. A realistic and robust description of the β -decay intensity is crucial for our understanding of nuclear structure as well as of r -process nucleosynthesis.

  17. Beta-decay measurements of neutron-deficient cesium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Parry, R.F.

    1983-03-01

    Beta decay endpoint energy measurements of the neutron deficient cesium isotopes were done using an energy spectrum shape fitting technique. This was a departure from the typical method of endpoint energy analysis, the Fermi-Kurie plot. A discussion of the shape fitting procedure and its improved features are discussed. These beta endpoint measurements have led to total decay energies (Q/sub EC/) of the neutron deficient /sup 119/ /sup 123/Cs isotopes. The total decay energies of /sup 122m/Cs (Q/sub EC/ = 6.95 +- 0.25 MeV) and /sup 119/Cs (Q/sub EC/ = 6.26 +- 0.29 MeV) were new measurements. The total decay energies of /sup 123/Cs (Q/sub EC/ = 4.05 +- 0.18 MeV), /sup 122g/Cs (Q/sub EC/ = 7.05 +- 0.18 MeV), /sup 121/Cs (Q/sub EC/ = 5.21 +- 0.22 MeV), and /sup 120/Cs (Q/sub EC/ = 7.38 +- 0.23 MeV) were measurements with significantly improved uncertainties as compared to the literature. Further, a combination of the energy levels derived from previous literature gamma-gamma coincident measurements and the experimental beta-coincident gamma decay energies has supported an improved level scheme for /sup 121/Xe and the proposal of three new energy levels in /sup 119/Xe. Comparison of the experimental cesium mass excesses (determined with our Q/sub EC/ values and known xenon mass excesses) with both the literature and theoretical predicted values showed general agreement except for /sup 120/Cs. Possible explanations for this deviation are discussed.

  18. Predicting fissile content of spent nuclear fuel assemblies with the passive neutron Albedo reactivity technique and Monte Carlo code emulation

    SciTech Connect

    Conlin, Jeremy Lloyd; Tobin, Stephen J

    2010-10-13

    There is a great need in the safeguards community to be able to nondestructively quantify the mass of plutonium of a spent nuclear fuel assembly. As part of the Next Generation of Safeguards Initiative, we are investigating several techniques, or detector systems, which, when integrated, will be capable of quantifying the plutonium mass of a spent fuel assembly without dismantling the assembly. This paper reports on the simulation of one of these techniques, the Passive Neutron Albedo Reactivity with Fission Chambers (PNAR-FC) system. The response of this system over a wide range of spent fuel assemblies with different burnup, initial enrichment, and cooling time characteristics is shown. A Monte Carlo method of using these modeled results to estimate the fissile content of a spent fuel assembly has been developed. A few numerical simulations of using this method are shown. Finally, additional developments still needed and being worked on are discussed.

  19. First measurements with the neutron decay spectrometer a SPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baeßler, S.; Ayala Guardia, F.; Borg, M.; Glück, F.; Heil, W.; Konrad, G.; Konorov, I.; Muñoz Horta, R.; Petzoldt, G.; Rich, D.; Simson, M.; Sobolev, Yu.; Wirth, H.-F.; Zimmer, O.

    2008-10-01

    The neutron decay spectrometer a SPECT has been built to perform a precise measurement of the proton spectrum shape in the decay of free neutrons. Such a measurement allows a determination of the neutrino electron angular-correlation coefficient a . The present best experiments have an uncertainty of Δ a/ a = 5% and since the seventies there is no substantial improvement. With a SPECT, we aim for an uncertainty which is lower by more than an order of magnitude, thus enabling us to perform several precise tests of the Standard Model. In our first beam time at the particle physics beam MEPHISTO at the Forschungsneutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz, we studied the properties of the spectrometer. The most serious problem turned out to be the situation- and time-dependent behavior of the background. From the data sets from this beam time in which a background problem was not obvious, we could extract a value of a = - 0.1151±0.0040stat , but we could not quantify the background uncertainty. We show ways to deal with the background and other problems for future beam times.

  20. Decay studies of the highly neutron-deficient indium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Wouters, J.M.

    1982-02-01

    An extension of the experimentally known nuclidic mass surface to nuclei far from the region of beta-stability is of fundamental interest in providing a better determination of the input parameters for the various nuclear mass formulae, allowing a more accurate prediction of the ultimate limits of nuclear stability. In addition, a study of the shape of the mass surface in the vicinity of the doubly-closed nuclide /sup 100/Sn provides initial information on the behavior of the shell closure to be expected when Z = N = 50. Experiments measuring the decay energies of /sup 103/ /sup 105/In by ..beta..-endpoint measurements are described with special attention focused on the development of a plastic scintillator ..beta..-telescope coupled to the on-line mass separator RAMA (Recoil Atom Mass Analyzer). An attempt to measure the ..beta..-endpoint energy of /sup 102/In is also briefly described. The experimentally determined decay energies and derived masses for /sup 103/ /sup 105/In are compared with the predictions of different mass models to identify which models are more successful in this region. Furthermore, the inclusion in these comparisons of the available data on the neutron-rich indium nuclei permits a systematic study of their ground state mass behavior as a function of the neutron number between the shell closures at N = 50 and N = 82. These analyses indicate that the binding energy of /sup 103/In is 1 MeV larger than predicted by the majority of the mass models. An examination of the Q/sub EC/ surface and the single- and two-neutron separation energies in the vicinity of /sup 103/ /sup 105/In is also performed to investigate further the deviation and other possible systematic variations in the mass surface in a model-independent way.

  1. Beta Decay Study of Neutron-rich Magnesium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ash, John; Rajabali, Mustafa; Griffin Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Within the ``island of inversion'' around the N = 20 shell gap, isotopes of magnesium, and aluminum deviate from the expected closed-shell structure. Particles promoted across the N = 20 shell gap result in a lower energy deformed ground state configuration rather than the expected spherical configuration. An experiment was conducted at TRIUMF laboratory in the summer of 2015 to study the decay of ``island of inversion'' isotopes 33 , 34 , 35Mg and the structure of the respective daughter nuclei. The isotopes of interest were produced by a proton beam from TRIUMF's 500 MeV cyclotron impacting on a UCx target. The magnesium decays populated states along the decay chain in Al, Si, P, and S isotopes. The new GRIFFIN spectrometer in the ISAC-I facility was used to detect the gamma rays. Two sets of scintillators, one for detecting the beta particles (SCEPTAR) and the other for detecting beta-delayed neutrons (DESCANT), were also used in conjunction with GRIFFIN. The GRIFFIN data were energy calibrated and partially analyzed for this project. New algorithms were developed for the analysis. Preliminary results for new transitions detected in 34Mg as well as the half lives obtained will be presented in their current form. This research was supported by the Tennessee Tech research office.

  2. Toward precision D coefficient measurement in polarized neutron decay and the development of A helium-3 neutron polarizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Shenq-Rong

    1998-12-01

    I describe the search for possible time reversal symmetry violation by measurement of the coefficient D in polarized neutron decay. This relates to the triple product among the neutron polarization vector, electron momentum, and proton momentum in the neutron decay rate (w~[-]/σnċ(/vec pe×/vec pp)). With the improvements in neutron polarization (97%), an optimal octagonal detector geometry, and neutron spin transport system, about 15×106 decay events were selected from data acquired at the Cold Neutron Research Facility at NIST, Gaithersburg. I have developed techniques for extracting D from the positive and negative triple product decay rates. My preliminary result is D=(12.1/pm13.4)×10-4 where the uncertainty is statistical only. The false D resulting from the instrumental factor (σκ) and neutron polarization uncertainty (σP) are negligible. I also estimate the false D of the asymmetric transverse polarization (ATP) effect with an upper limit 5×10-4 for the preliminary analysis of the initial data. I also describe development of an optical pumping/spin exchange neutron spin filter and obtained 40% neutron polarization for 2 A neutrons with a 10 amagat-cm 35 cm3 polarized 3He cell.

  3. Numerical Simulation of the MSL Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons (DAN) Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, I.; Mitrofanov, I.; Litvak, M.; Varenikov, A.

    2012-12-01

    The DAN instrument on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) has been tasked with detecting enhanced level of hydrogen content in the Martian subsurface. DAN accomplishes this goal by irradiating pulses of 14 MeV neutrons to the subsurface below the rover and by measuring the die-away time profiles of epi-thermal and thermal neutrons from the subsurface. Increased levels of thermal neutron are highly indicative of the presence of hydrogen (and thus water) in the soil. However, there are many factors that influence the thermalization process as well. To better understand the significance of these factors, we used the Monte Carlo N-Particle Extended (MCNPX) code to investigate numerous difference cases simulating conditions on the Martian surface that may affect the characteristics of die away curves. The results provide an insight into the varying impacts of factors such as water content in the soil, soil depth, soil density, temperature, soil elemental composition, and rover internal structure on the level of thermal neutrons, and ultimately better equip us to interpret real data from MSL. We will present some of the numerical simulation results performed on these factors, especially the effect of the mass distribution within the rover on the time profiles of thermal and epi-thermal neutron die-away curves. We also plan to show initial DAN measurement data obtained from a few months' of operation on the mars surface at the time of the conference.

  4. Results of the first beam time with the neutron decay spectrometer aSPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baeßler, Stefan; Ayala Guardia, Fidel; Borg, Michael; Eberhardt, Klaus; Heil, Werner; Konrad, Gertrud; Muñoz Horta, Raquel; Sobolev, Yuri; Konorov, Igor; Petzoldt, Gerd; Simson, Martin; Zimmer, Oliver; Glück, Ferenc; Rich, Dennis

    2007-10-01

    With the neutron decay spectrometer aSPECT we aim to measure the proton spectrum in free neutron beta decay precisely. This allows us to determine the neutrino electron correlation coefficient a. We had our first test beam time in 2005/06 at the new neutron source FRM-II in Garching. In my talk I want to talk about the results, the systematic effects we found and the ways how to deal with them in later beam times.

  5. Beta decay rates of neutron-rich nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marketin, Tomislav; Huther, Lutz; Petković, Jelena; Paar, Nils; Martínez-Pinedo, Gabriel

    2016-06-01

    Heavy element nucleosynthesis models involve various properties of thousands of nuclei in order to simulate the intricate details of the process. By necessity, as most of these nuclei cannot be studied in a controlled environment, these models must rely on the nuclear structure models for input. Of all the properties, the beta-decay half-lives are one of the most important ones due to their direct impact on the resulting abundance distributions. In this study we present the results of a large-scale calculation based on the relativistic nuclear energy density functional, where both the allowed and the first-forbidden transitions are studied in more than 5000 neutron-rich nuclei. Aside from the astrophysical applications, the results of this calculation can also be employed in the modeling of the electron and antineutrino spectra from nuclear reactors.

  6. Beta decay rates of neutron-rich nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Marketin, Tomislav; Huther, Lutz; Martínez-Pinedo, Gabriel

    2015-10-15

    Heavy element nucleosynthesis models involve various properties of thousands of nuclei in order to simulate the intricate details of the process. By necessity, as most of these nuclei cannot be studied in a controlled environment, these models must rely on the nuclear structure models for input. Of all the properties, the beta-decay half-lives are one of the most important ones due to their direct impact on the resulting abundance distributions. Currently, a single large-scale calculation is available based on a QRPA calculation with a schematic interaction on top of the Finite Range Droplet Model. In this study we present the results of a large-scale calculation based on the relativistic nuclear energy density functional, where both the allowed and the first-forbidden transitions are studied in more than 5000 neutron-rich nuclei.

  7. Neutron Interactions in the CUORE Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Dolinski, Michelle Jean

    2008-10-01

    Neutrinoless double beta decay (0vDBD) is a lepton-number violating process that can occur only for a massive Majorana neutrino. The search for 0vDBD is currently the only practical experimental way to determine whether neutrinos are identical to their own antiparticles (Majorana neutrinos) or have distinct particle and anti-particle states (Dirac neutrinos). In addition, the observation of 0vDBD can provide information about the absolute mass scale of the neutrino. The Cuoricino experiment was a sensitive search for 0vDBD, as well as a proof of principle for the next generation experiment, CUORE. CUORE will search for 0vDBD of 130Te with a ton-scale array of unenriched TeO2 bolometers. By increasing mass and decreasing the background for 0vDBD, the half-life sensitivity of CUORE will be a factor of twenty better than that of Cuoricino. The site for both of these experiments is the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, an underground laboratory with 3300 meters water equivalent rock overburden and a cosmic ray muon attenuation factor of 10-6. Because of the extreme low background requirements for CUORE, it is important that all potential sources of background in the 0vDBD peak region at 2530 keV are well understood. One potential source of background for CUORE comes from neutrons, which can be produced underground both by (α,n) reactions and by fast cosmic ray muon interactions. Preliminary simulations by the CUORE collaboration indicate that these backgrounds will be negligible for CUORE. However, in order to accurately simulate the expected neutron background, it is important to understand the cross sections for neutron interactions with detector materials. In order to help refine these simulations, I have measured the gamma-ray production cross sections for interactions of neutrons on the abundant stable isotopes of Te using the GEANIE detector array at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. In addition, I have used the GEANIE

  8. Simulated Performance of the Integrated Passive Neutron Albedo Reactivity and Self-Interrogation Neutron Resonance Densitometry Detector Designed for Spent Fuel Measurement at the Fugen Reactor in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrich, Timothy J. II; Lafleur, Adrienne M.; Menlove, Howard O.; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Tobin, Stephen J.; Seya, Michio; Bolind, Alan M.

    2012-07-16

    An integrated nondestructive assay instrument, which combined the Passive Neutron Albedo Reactivity (PNAR) and the Self-Interrogation Neutron Resonance Densitometry (SINRD) techniques, is the research focus for a collaborative effort between Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and the Japanese Atomic Energy Agency as part of the Next Generation Safeguard Initiative. We will quantify the anticipated performance of this experimental system in two physical environments: (1) At LANL we will measure fresh Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) assemblies for which the average enrichment can be varied from 0.2% to 3.2% and for which Gd laced rods will be included. (2) At Fugen we will measure spent Mixed Oxide (MOX-B) and LEU spent fuel assemblies from the heavy water moderated Fugen reactor. The MOX-B assemblies will vary in burnup from {approx}3 GWd/tHM to {approx}20 GWd/tHM while the LEU assemblies ({approx}1.9% initial enrichment) will vary from {approx}2 GWd/tHM to {approx}7 GWd/tHM. The estimated count rates will be calculated using MCNPX. These preliminary results will help the finalization of the hardware design and also serve a guide for the experiment. The hardware of the detector is expected to be fabricated in 2012 with measurements expected to take place in 2012 and 2013. This work is supported by the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative, Office of Nuclear Safeguards and Security, National Nuclear Security Administration.

  9. Cadmium Subtraction Method for the Active Albedo Neutron Interrogation of Uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Worrall, Louise G.; Croft, Stephen

    2015-02-01

    This report describes work performed under the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) Cadmium Subtraction Project. The project objective was to explore the difference between the traditional cadmium (Cd) ratio signature and a proposed alternative Cd subtraction (or Cd difference) approach. The thinking behind the project was that a Cd subtraction method would provide a more direct measure of multiplication than the existing Cd ratio method. At the same time, it would be relatively insensitive to changes in neutron detection efficiency when properly calibrated. This is the first published experimental comparison and evaluation of the Cd ratio and Cd subtraction methods.

  10. Radiative decay of neutron-unbound intruder states in 19O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dungan, R.; Tabor, S. L.; Tripathi, Vandana; Volya, A.; Kravvaris, K.; Abromeit, B.; Caussyn, D. D.; Morrow, S.; Parker, J. J.; Tai, P.-L.; VonMoss, J. M.

    2016-02-01

    The 9Be(14C, α γ ) reaction at EL a b=30 and 35 MeV was used to study excited states of 19O. The Florida State University (FSU) γ detector array was used to detect γ radiation in coincidence with charged particles detected and identified with a silicon Δ E -E particle telescope. γ decays have been observed for the first time from six states ranging from 368 to 2147 keV above the neutron separation energy (Sn=3962 keV) in 19O. The γ -decaying states are interspersed among states previously observed to decay by neutron emission. The ability of electromagnetic decay to compete successfully with neutron decay is explained in terms of neutron angular momentum barriers and small spectroscopic factors implying higher spin and complex structure for these intruder states. These results illustrate the need for complementary experimental approaches to best illuminate the complete nuclear structure.

  11. Testing JEFF-3.1.1 and ENDF/B-VII.1 Decay and Fission Yield Nuclear Data Libraries with Fission Pulse Neutron Emission and Decay Heat Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabellos, O.; de Fusco, V.; Diez de la Obra, C. J.; Martinez, J. S.; Gonzalez, E.; Cano-Ott, D.; Alvarez-Velarde, F.

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this work is to test the present status of Evaluated Nuclear Decay and Fission Yield Data Libraries to predict decay heat and delayed neutron emission rate, average neutron energy and neutron delayed spectra after a neutron fission pulse. Calculations are performed with JEFF-3.1.1 and ENDF/B-VII.1, and these are compared with experimental values. An uncertainty propagation assessment of the current nuclear data uncertainties is performed.

  12. Impact of Neutron Decay Experiments on Non-Standard Model Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konrad, G.; Heil, W.; Baeßler, S.; Počanić, D.; Glück, F.

    2011-03-01

    This paper gives a brief overview of the present and expected future limits on physics beyond the Standard Model (SM) from neutron beta decay, which is described by two parameters only within the SM. Since more than two observables are accessible, the problem is over-determined. Thus, precise measurements of correlations in neutron decay can be used to study the SM as well to search for evidence of possible extensions to it. Of particular interest in this context are the search for right-handed currents or for scalar and tensor interactions. Precision measurements of neutron decay observables address important open questions of particle physics and cosmology, and are generally complementary to direct searches for new physics beyond the SM in high-energy physics. Free neutron decay is therefore a very active field, with a number of new measurements underway worldwide. We present the impact of recent developments.

  13. MCNP SIMULATION OF THE HP(10) ENERGY RESPONSE OF A BRAZILIAN TLD ALBEDO NEUTRON INDIVIDUAL DOSEMETER, FROM THERMAL TO 20 MeV.

    PubMed

    Freitas, B M; Martins, M M; Pereira, W W; da Silva, A X; Mauricio, C L P

    2016-09-01

    The Brazilian Instituto de Radioproteção e Dosimetria (IRD) runs a neutron individual monitoring system with a home-made TLD albedo dosemeter. It has already been characterised and calibrated in some reference fields. However, the complete energy response of this dosemeter is not known, and the calibration factors for all monitored workplace neutron fields are difficult to be obtained experimentally. Therefore, to overcome such difficulties, Monte Carlo simulations have been used. This paper describes the simulation of the HP(10) neutron response of the IRD TLD albedo dosemeter using the MCNPX transport code, for energies from thermal to 20 MeV. The validation of the MCNPX modelling is done comparing the simulated results with the experimental measurements for ISO standard neutron fields of (241)Am-Be, (252)Cf, (241)Am-B and (252)Cf(D2O) and also for (241)Am-Be source moderated with paraffin and silicone. Bare (252)Cf are used for normalisation. PMID:26276807

  14. Determining fissile content in PWR spent fuel assemblies using a passive neutron Albedo reactivity with fission chambers technique

    SciTech Connect

    Conlin, Jeremy Lloyd; Tobin, Stephen J

    2010-01-01

    State regulatory bodies and organizations such as the IAEA that are concerned with preventing the proliferation of nuclear weapons are interested in a means of quantifying the amount of plutonium in a given spent fuel assembly. The complexity of spent nuclear fuel makes the measurement of plutonium content challenging. There are a variety of techniques that can measure various properties of spent nuclear fuel including burnup, and mass of fissile content. No single technique can provide all desired information, necessitating an approach using multiple detector systems and types. This paper presents our analysis of the Passive Neutron Albedo Reactivity Fission Chamber (PNAR-FC) detector system. PNAR-FC is a simplified version of the PNAR technique originally developed in 1997. This earlier research was performed with a high efficiency, {sup 3}He-based system (PNAR-3He) with which multiplicty analysis was performed. With the PNAR technique a portion of the spent fuel assembly is wrapped in a 1 mm thick cadmium liner. Neutron count rates are measured both with and without the cadmium liner present. The ratio of the count rate with the cadmium liner to the count rate without the cadmium liner is calculated and called the cadmium ratio. In the PNAR-3He technique, multiplicity measurements were made and the cadmium ratio was shown to scale with the fissile content of the material being measured. PNAR-FC simplifies the PNAR technique by using only a few fission chambers instead of many {sup 3}He tubes. Using a simplified PNAR-FC technique provides for a cheaper, lighter, and thus more portable detector system than was possible with the PNAR-3He system. The challenge with the PNAR-FC system are two-fold: (1) the change in the cadmium ratio is weaker as a afunction of the changing fissile content relative to multiplicity count rates, and (2) the efficiency for the fission chamber based system are poorer than for the {sup 3}He based detectors. In this paper, we present our

  15. Study of {beta}-Decay in the Proton-Neutron Interacting Boson-Fermion Model

    SciTech Connect

    Zuffi, L.; Brant, S.; Yoshida, N.

    2006-04-26

    We study {beta}-decay in odd-A nuclei together with the energy levels and other properties in the proton-neutron interacting-boson-fermion model. We also report on the preliminary results in the odd-odd nuclei in the proton-neutron interacting boson-fermion-fermion model.

  16. Decay properties of neutron-deficient isotopes of elements from Z = 101 to Z = 108

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heßberger, F. P.; Hofmann, S.; Streicher, B.; Sulignano, B.; Antalic, S.; Ackermann, D.; Heinz, S.; Kindler, B.; Kojouharov, I.; Kuusiniemi, P.; Leino, M.; Lommel, B.; Mann, R.; Popeko, A. G.; Šáro, Š.; Uusitalo, J.; Yeremin, A. V.

    2009-08-01

    In a series of experiments performed at the velocity filter SHIP, new or improved decay data of neutron-deficient isotopes of elements from mendelevium ( Z = 101) to hassium ( Z = 108) were obtained. In particular, evidence for α -decay or electron capture from isomeric states in 265Hs and 258Db was found.

  17. Further observations of protons resulting from the decay of neutrons ejected by solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evenson, P. A.; Kroeger, R.; Meyer, P.

    1985-01-01

    The solar flare of 1984 April 24 produced a large gamma ray fluence with energy 2MeV. The time profile of the interplanetary flux from this flare indicates the presence of decaying solar neutrons. This makes a total of three neutron flares so far observed by this method. The three flares are used to place constraints on the fluence and spectra of neutrons emitted by the Sun.

  18. Structure and decay correlations of two-neutron systems beyond the dripline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohley, Z.; Baumann, T.; Bazin, D.; Christian, G.; De Young, P. A.; Finck, J. E.; Haring-Kaye, R. A.; Hinnefeld, J.; Frank, N.; Lunderberg, E.; Luther, B.; Mosby, S.; Peters, W. A.; Smith, J. K.; Snyder, J.; Stephenson, S. L.; Strongman, M. J.; Spyrou, A.; Thoennessen, M.; Volya, A.

    2014-12-01

    The two-neutron unbound systems of 16Be, 13Li, 10He, and 26O have been measured using the Modular Neutron Array (MoNA) and 4 Tm Sweeper magnet setup. The correlations of the 3-body decay for the 6Be and 3Li were extracted and demonstrated a strong correlated enhancement between the two neutrons. The measurement of the 10He ground state resonance from a 14Be(-2p2n) reaction provided insight into previous predictions that wavefunction of the entrance channel, projectile, can influence the observed decay energy spectrum for the unbound system. Lastly, the decay-in-target (DiT) technique was utilized to extract the lifetime of the 26O ground state. The measured lifetime of 4.5+1.1-1.5(stat.)±3(sys.) ps provides the first indication of two-neutron radioactivity.

  19. Beta-decay properties of neutron-rich medium-mass nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarriguren, Pedro

    2016-06-01

    β-decay properties of even-even and odd-A neutron-rich Ge, Se, Kr, Sr, Zr, Mo, Ru, and Pd isotopes involved in the astrophysical rapid neutron capture process are studied within a microscopic proton-neutron quasiparticle random-phase approximation. The underlying mean field is based on a self-consistent Skyrme Hartree-Fock + BCS calculation that includes deformation as a key ingredient. The isotopic evolution of the various nuclear equilibrium shapes and the corresponding charge radii are investigated in all the isotopic chains. The energy distributions of the Gamow-Teller strength, as well as the β-decay half-lives are discussed and compared with the available experimental information. It is shown that nuclear deformation plays a significant role in the description of the decay properties in this mass region. Reliable predictions of the strength distributions are essential to evaluate decay rates in astrophysical scenarios.

  20. Proposed experiment to measure the neutron spin-electron angular correlation in polarized neutron beta decay with ultra-cold neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Seestrom, S.J.; UCN A Collaboration

    1998-12-01

    One area in which the Standard Model can be probed is neutron beta decay. In particular, measurements of angular correlations in neutron beta decay can place constraints on the existence of right-handed currents, the presence of scalar and tensor terms in the weak interaction, and for evidence of Time Reversal Violation, which is expected from the observed violation of CP invariance in kaon decay. A measurement of A, the correlation between the neutron spin and the direction of emission of the electron in neutron decay, can be combined with the neutron lifetime to determine the fundamental vector and axial vector weak coupling constants G{sub A} and G{sub V}. The authors have presented the essential elements of their plans to carry out an A correlation measurement using the UCN source they have constructed at the Manuel Lujan Neutron Scattering Center (MLNSC). Their goal is an initial measurement with an accuracy of about 0.2% of A (which has a value of about {minus}0.114). The count rate expected in the experiment will allow a determination at this statistical accuracy level in a running time of about four months.

  1. Neutron correlations in the decay of the first excited state of 11Li

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J. K.; Baumann, T.; Bazin, D.; Brown, J.; DeYoung, P. A.; Frank, N.; Jones, M. D.; Kohley, Z.; Luther, B.; Marks, B.; Spyrou, A.; Stephenson, S. L.; Thoennessen, M.; Volya, A.

    2016-11-01

    The decay of unbound excited 11Li was measured after being populated by a two-proton removal from a 13B beam at 71 MeV/nucleon. Decay energy spectra and Jacobi plots were obtained from measurements of the momentum vectors of the 9Li fragment and neutrons. A resonance at an excitation energy of ∼1.2 MeV was observed. The kinematics of the decay are equally well fit by a simple dineutron-like model or a phase-space model that includes final state interactions. A sequential decay model can be excluded.

  2. Large β-delayed one and two neutron emission rates in the decay of 86Ga.

    PubMed

    Miernik, K; Rykaczewski, K P; Gross, C J; Grzywacz, R; Madurga, M; Miller, D; Batchelder, J C; Borzov, I N; Brewer, N T; Jost, C; Korgul, A; Mazzocchi, C; Mendez, A J; Liu, Y; Paulauskas, S V; Stracener, D W; Winger, J A; Wolińska-Cichocka, M; Zganjar, E F

    2013-09-27

    Beta decay of 86Ga was studied by means of β-neutron-γ spectroscopy. An isotopically pure ^{86}Ga beam was produced at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility using a resonance ionization laser ion source and high-resolution electromagnetic separation. The decay of 86Ga revealed a half-life of 43(-15)(+21) ms and large β-delayed one-neutron and two-neutron branching ratios of P1n=60(10)% and P2n=20(10)%. The βγ decay of 86Ga populated a 527 keV transition that is interpreted as the deexcitation of the first 2+ state in the N=54 isotone 86Ge and suggests a quick onset of deformation in Ge isotopes beyond N=50. PMID:24116772

  3. Lifetime and fragment correlations for the two-neutron decay of 26O ground state.

    PubMed

    Grigorenko, L V; Mukha, I G; Zhukov, M V

    2013-07-26

    The structure and decay of 26O are investigated in a three-body 24O+n+n model suitable for studies of the long-lived (including radioactivity time scale) states. We have found extremely strong effects of the subbarrier configuration mixing on the decay width of true 2n emitters due to core recoil and neutron-neutron final state interaction. This effect far exceeds the analogous effect in the true 2p emitters. Our calculations provide reasonably narrow boundaries for the lifetime vs decay energy dependence for the true 2n emission. An upper limit of ∼1  keV for the decay energy of the unbound 26O is inferred based on the recent experimental lifetime value.

  4. Beta-decay asymmetry of the neutron and g/sub A//g/sub V/

    SciTech Connect

    Bopp, P.; Dubbers, D.; Hornig, L.; Klemt, E.; Last, J.; Schuetze, H.; Freedman, S.J.; Scharpf, O.

    1986-03-03

    The ..beta..-decay asymmetry of the free neutron is measured by use of a beam of polarized neutrons and a long solenoidal ..beta.. spectrometer with 4..pi.. solid angle for electron detection. The asymmetry parameter corrected for recoil and weak magnetism is A/sub 0/ = -0.1146 +- 0.0019, implying g/sub A//g/sub V/ = -1.262 +- 0.005 for the ratio of the axial-vector to the vector weak-coupling constants.

  5. Analysis of neutron and photon response of a TLD-ALBEDO personal dosemeter on an ISO slab phantom using TRIPOLI-4.3 Monte Carlo code.

    PubMed

    Lee, Y K

    2005-01-01

    TRIPOLI-4.3 Monte Carlo transport code has been used to evaluate the QUADOS (Quality Assurance of Computational Tools for Dosimetry) problem P4, neutron and photon response of an albedo-type thermoluminescence personal dosemeter (TLD) located on an ISO slab phantom. Two enriched 6LiF and two 7LiF TLD chips were used and they were protected, in front or behind, with a boron-loaded dosemeter-holder. Neutron response of the four chips was determined by counting 6Li(n,t)4He events using ENDF/B-VI.4 library and photon response by estimating absorbed dose (MeV g(-1)). Ten neutron energies from thermal to 20 MeV and six photon energies from 33 keV to 1.25 MeV were used to study the energy dependence. The fraction of the neutron and photon response owing to phantom backscatter has also been investigated. Detailed TRIPOLI-4.3 solutions are presented and compared with MCNP-4C calculations. PMID:16381740

  6. Fission Product Decay Heat Calculations for Neutron Fission of 232Th

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, P. N.; Hai, N. X.

    2016-06-01

    Precise information on the decay heat from fission products following times after a fission reaction is necessary for safety designs and operations of nuclear-power reactors, fuel storage, transport flasks, and for spent fuel management and processing. In this study, the timing distributions of fission products' concentrations and their integrated decay heat as function of time following a fast neutron fission reaction of 232Th were exactly calculated by the numerical method with using the DHP code.

  7. Study of two-neutron radioactivity in the decay of 26O.

    PubMed

    Kohley, Z; Baumann, T; Bazin, D; Christian, G; DeYoung, P A; Finck, J E; Frank, N; Jones, M; Lunderberg, E; Luther, B; Mosby, S; Nagi, T; Smith, J K; Snyder, J; Spyrou, A; Thoennessen, M

    2013-04-12

    A new technique was developed to measure the lifetimes of neutron unbound nuclei in the picosecond range. The decay of 26O→24O+n+n was examined as it had been predicted to have an appreciable lifetime due to the unique structure of the neutron-rich oxygen isotopes. The half-life of 26O was extracted as 4.5(-1.5)(+1.1)(stat)±3(syst)  ps. This corresponds to 26O having a finite lifetime at an 82% confidence level and, thus, suggests the possibility of two-neutron radioactivity.

  8. Study of Two-Neutron Radioactivity in the Decay of O26

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohley, Z.; Baumann, T.; Bazin, D.; Christian, G.; DeYoung, P. A.; Finck, J. E.; Frank, N.; Jones, M.; Lunderberg, E.; Luther, B.; Mosby, S.; Nagi, T.; Smith, J. K.; Snyder, J.; Spyrou, A.; Thoennessen, M.

    2013-04-01

    A new technique was developed to measure the lifetimes of neutron unbound nuclei in the picosecond range. The decay of O26→O24+n+n was examined as it had been predicted to have an appreciable lifetime due to the unique structure of the neutron-rich oxygen isotopes. The half-life of O26 was extracted as 4.5-1.5+1.1(stat)±3(syst)ps. This corresponds to O26 having a finite lifetime at an 82% confidence level and, thus, suggests the possibility of two-neutron radioactivity.

  9. Enhanced γ -Ray Emission from Neutron Unbound States Populated in β Decay

    DOE PAGES

    Tain, J. L.; Valencia, E.; Algora, A.; Agramunt, J.; Rubio, B.; Rice, S.; Gelletly, W.; Regan, P.; Zakari-Issoufou, A. -A.; Fallot, M.; et al

    2015-08-01

    Total absorption spectroscopy was used to investigate the β -decay intensity to states above the neutron separation energy followed by γ -ray emission in 87,88Br and 94Rb. Accurate results were obtained thanks to the careful control of systematic errors. An unexpectedly large γ intensity was observed in all three cases extending well beyond the excitation energy region where neutron penetration is hindered by low neutron energy. The γ branching as a function of excitation energy was compared to Hauser-Feshbach model calculations. For 87Br and 88Br the branching reaches 57% and 20% respectively, and could be explained as a nuclear structuremore » effect. Some of the states populated in the daughter can only decay through the emission of a large orbital angular momentum neutron with a strongly reduced barrier penetrability. In the case of neutron-rich 94Rb the observed 4.5% branching is much larger than the calculations performed with standard nuclear statistical model parameters, even after proper correction for fluctuation effects on individual transition widths. The difference can be reconciled introducing an enhancement of one order-of-magnitude in the photon strength to neutron strength ratio. An increase in the photon strength function of such magnitude for very neutron-rich nuclei, if it proved to be correct, leads to a similar increase in the (n, γ) cross section that would have an impact on r process abundance calculations.« less

  10. Enhanced γ -Ray Emission from Neutron Unbound States Populated in β Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tain, J. L.; Valencia, E.; Algora, A.; Agramunt, J.; Rubio, B.; Rice, S.; Gelletly, W.; Regan, P.; Zakari-Issoufou, A.-A.; Fallot, M.; Porta, A.; Rissanen, J.; Eronen, T.; ńystö, J.; Batist, L.; Bowry, M.; Bui, V. M.; Caballero-Folch, R.; Cano-Ott, D.; Elomaa, V.-V.; Estevez, E.; Farrelly, G. F.; Garcia, A. R.; Gomez-Hornillos, B.; Gorlychev, V.; Hakala, J.; Jordan, M. D.; Jokinen, A.; Kolhinen, V. S.; Kondev, F. G.; Martínez, T.; Mendoza, E.; Moore, I.; Penttilä, H.; Podolyák, Zs.; Reponen, M.; Sonnenschein, V.; Sonzogni, A. A.

    2015-08-01

    Total absorption spectroscopy is used to investigate the β -decay intensity to states above the neutron separation energy followed by γ -ray emission in Br,8887 and 94Rb. Accurate results are obtained thanks to a careful control of systematic errors. An unexpectedly large γ intensity is observed in all three cases extending well beyond the excitation energy region where neutron penetration is hindered by low neutron energy. The γ branching as a function of excitation energy is compared to Hauser-Feshbach model calculations. For 87Br and 88Br the γ branching reaches 57% and 20%, respectively, and could be explained as a nuclear structure effect. Some of the states populated in the daughter can only decay through the emission of a large orbital angular momentum neutron with a strongly reduced barrier penetrability. In the case of neutron-rich 94Rb the observed 4.5% branching is much larger than the calculations performed with standard nuclear statistical model parameters, even after proper correction for fluctuation effects on individual transition widths. The difference can be reconciled by introducing an enhancement of 1 order of magnitude in the photon strength to neutron strength ratio. An increase in the photon strength function of such magnitude for very neutron-rich nuclei, if it proves to be correct, leads to a similar increase in the (n ,γ ) cross section that would have an impact on r process abundance calculations.

  11. Comparative sensitivity study and reading correction of various albedo dosimeters in neutron fields on the U-400M accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokrov, Yu. V.; Morozov, S. V.; Shchegolev, V. Yu.

    2013-03-01

    The sensitivities of three types of albedo dosimeters are experimentally studied in U-400M accelerator radiation fields in the experimental hall (one point) and behind its shielding (three points). It is shown that the ratios of the sensitivity of the albedo dosimeter (AD) and the combined personal dosimeter (CPD) used earlier at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) to the sensitivity of the DVGN-01 dosimeter are constant within 25%. This allows the AD and CPD sensitivities obtained earlier at the JINR facilities to be used for correcting readings of the DVGN-01 now used at JINR for personal radiation monitoring. Correction coefficients are found for DVGN-01 readings behind the U-400M shielding. This has allowed a more reliable correction coefficient to be established for the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions (FLNR).

  12. α decay of the very neutron-deficient isotopes 197-199Fr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalaninová, Z.; Andreyev, A. N.; Antalic, S.; Heßberger, F. P.; Ackermann, D.; Andel, B.; Drummond, M. C.; Hofmann, S.; Huyse, M.; Kindler, B.; Lane, J. F. W.; Liberati, V.; Lommel, B.; Page, R. D.; Rapisarda, E.; Sandhu, K.; Šáro, Š.; Thornthwaite, A.; Van Duppen, P.

    2013-04-01

    Decay properties of the very neutron-deficient isotopes 197-199Fr were studied at the velocity filter Separator for Heavy Ion reaction Products (SHIP) at GSI in Darmstadt. The isotopes were produced in the 2n-4n evaporation channels of the fusion-evaporation reaction 60Ni+141Pr → 201Fr*. Improved α-decay properties of 199Fr were determined and the possible existence of two α-decaying states in this nucleus is discussed. For the isotope 198Fr a broad α-decay energy distribution was detected in the range of (7470-7930) keV and two α-decaying states were observed with half-lives of 1.1(7) and 15(3) ms. The new isotope 197Fr was identified based on the observation of one α-decay chain yielding Eα=7728(15) keV and T1/2=0.6-0.3+3.0 ms. The systematics of reduced α-decay widths are presented for neutron-deficient francium, radon, and astatine isotopes.

  13. The Proton Spectrum in Neutron Beta Decay: Latest Results with the aSPECT Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konrad, G.; Ayala Guardia, F.; Baeßler, S.; Borg, M.; Glück, F.; Heil, W.; Konorov, I.; Leung, K. K. H.; Muñoz Horta, R.; Simson, M.; Sobolev, Y.; Soldner, T.; Wirth, H.-F.; Zimmer, O.

    2009-08-01

    The purpose of the neutron decay spectrometer aSPECT is to determine the antineutrino electron angular correlation coefficient a with high precision. Latest measurements with aSPECT were performed during April/May 2008 at the Institut Laue-Langevin in Grenoble, France. In this paper we give a report on the experiment and the status of the ongoing data analysis.

  14. Decay Studies of Very Neutron Rich Nuclei near 78Ni

    SciTech Connect

    Winger, J. A.; Ilyushkin, S.; Korgul, A.; Gross, Carl J; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr; Batchelder, J. C.; Goodin, C.; Grzywacz, R.; Hamilton, J. H.; Krolas, W.; Liddick, Sean; Mazzocchi, C.; Nelson, C.; Padgett, Stephen; Piechaczek, A.; Rajabali, M. M.; Shapira, Dan; Zganjar, E. F.

    2008-01-01

    The properties of beta-gamma and beta-delayed neutron emission from 76-79Cu and 83-85Ga were measured at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Selected results on the decay properties of copper isotopes are briefly presented and discussed.

  15. The Physics of Ultracold Neutrons and Fierz Interference in Beta Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickerson, Kevin Peter

    In the first component of this thesis, we investigate the physics of ultacold neutrons (UCN). UCN are neutrons so cold they can be stored inside of material, magnetic and gravitational bottles. Using this property we use UCN nonimaging optics to design a type of reflector that directs UCN upward in to vertical paths. Next we examine UCN passing through thin, multilayered foils. In the remaining sections we investigate the so-called Fierz interference term of free neutron beta decay, denoted bn. It is theorized that contributions to scalar and tensor interactions from physics beyond the Standard Model could be detectable in the spectrum of neutron beta decay, manifest as a nonzero value for bn. We investigate three techniques for measuring bn. The first is to use the primordial helium abundance fraction and compare that to predictive Big Bang nucleosynthesis calculations. Second we extract bn from the spectral shape generated by the 2010 data set of the UCNA experiment. Third, we discuss progress toward constructing the UCNb experimental prototype. We present the design of this new experiment that uses the UCN source at LANSCE for measuring bn, in which UCN are guided into a shielded 4π calorimeter where they are stored and decay. From Big Bang nucleosynthesis we can place the limit 0.021 < bn < 0.277 (90% C.L.) on the neutron Fierz term and from the UCNA 2010 data we set -0.044 < bn < 0.218 (90% C.L.).

  16. Experiment to find the neutron clusters in the decay of 238U nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bystritsky, V. M.; Dudkin, G. N.; Kuznetsov, S. I.; Varlachev, V. A.; Padalko, V. N.

    2016-10-01

    The first experiment was carried out, the task of which is the direct detection of neutron nuclei (number of bound neutrons ≥6) with a multineutron detector. The experimental results indicate that in the cluster decay of 238U there is a hexaneutrons and (or) octaneutrons. Multineutron detector made of 20 3He counters located in the moderator of polyethylene. The samples (emitters) from uranium trioxide (UO3) were the sources of neutron nuclei. The duration of the experiment was 112.66 days. For the probability of hexaneutrons and (or) octaneutrons emission of nuclei 238U with respect to the probability of α-decay mode are determined. The upper limits on the 90% confidence level are the following: λ(6n)/λα≤9.3×10-9and (or) λ(8n)/λα≤3.6×10-10.

  17. A Novel Approach to β-delayed Neutron Spectroscopy Using the Beta-decay Paul Trap

    SciTech Connect

    Scielzo, N.D.; Yee, R.M.; Bertone, P.F.; Buchinger, F.; Caldwell, S.A.; Clark, J.A.; Czeszumska, A.; Deibel, C.M.; Greene, J.P.; Gulick, S.; Lascar, D.; Levand, A.F.; and others

    2014-06-15

    A new approach to β-delayed neutron spectroscopy has been demonstrated that circumvents the many limitations associated with neutron detection by instead inferring the decay branching ratios and energy spectra of the emitted neutrons by studying the nuclear recoil. Using the Beta-decay Paul Trap, fission-product ions were trapped and confined to within a 1-mm{sup 3} volume under vacuum using only electric fields. Results from recent measurements of {sup 137}I{sup +} and plans for development of a dedicated ion trap for future experiments using the intense fission fragment beams from the Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) facility at Argonne National Laboratory are summarized. The improved nuclear data that can be collected is needed in many fields of basic and applied science such as nuclear energy, nuclear astrophysics, and stockpile stewardship.

  18. A Novel Approach to β-delayed Neutron Spectroscopy Using the Beta-decay Paul Trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scielzo, N. D.; Yee, R. M.; Bertone, P. F.; Buchinger, F.; Caldwell, S. A.; Clark, J. A.; Czeszumska, A.; Deibel, C. M.; Greene, J. P.; Gulick, S.; Lascar, D.; Levand, A. F.; Li, G.; Norman, E. B.; Padgett, S.; Pedretti, M.; Perez Galvan, A.; Savard, G.; Segel, R. E.; Sharma, K. S.; Sternberg, M. G.; Van Schelt, J.; Zabransky, B. J.

    2014-06-01

    A new approach to β-delayed neutron spectroscopy has been demonstrated that circumvents the many limitations associated with neutron detection by instead inferring the decay branching ratios and energy spectra of the emitted neutrons by studying the nuclear recoil. Using the Beta-decay Paul Trap, fission-product ions were trapped and confined to within a 1-mm3 volume under vacuum using only electric fields. Results from recent measurements of 137I+ and plans for development of a dedicated ion trap for future experiments using the intense fission fragment beams from the Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) facility at Argonne National Laboratory are summarized. The improved nuclear data that can be collected is needed in many fields of basic and applied science such as nuclear energy, nuclear astrophysics, and stockpile stewardship.

  19. β-decay properties of neutron-deficient Pt, Hg, and Pb isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Sarriguren, P.; Boillos, J. M.; Moreno, O.; Moya de Guerra, E.

    2015-10-15

    Neutron-deficient isotopes in the lead region are well established examples of the shape coexistence phenomenon in nuclei. In this work, bulk and decay properties, including deformation energy curves, charge mean square radii, Gamow-Teller (GT) strength distributions, and β-decay half-lives, are studied in neutron-deficient Pt, Hg, and Pb isotopes. The nuclear structure involved is described microscopically from deformed quasiparticle random-phase approximation calculations with residual interactions in both particle-hole and particle-particle channels, performed on top of a self-consistent deformed quasiparticle Skyrme Hartree-Fock basis. The sensitivity to deformation of the GT strength distributions in those isotopes is proposed as an additional complementary signature of the nuclear shape. The β-decay half-lives resulting from the GT strength distributions are compared to experiment to demonstrate the ability of the method.

  20. Decay studies of neutron deficient rare earth isotopes with OASIS

    SciTech Connect

    Gilat, J.; Nitschke, J.M.; Wilmarth, P.A.; Vierinen, K.; Firestone, R.B.

    1987-09-01

    We report results on the decay of /sup 124/Pr, /sup 124,125/Ce, /sup 124,125/La, /sup 134-136/Eu, /sup 134-136/Sm, /sup 134-136/Pm, /sup 144/Ho, /sup 141,142,144/Dy, /sup 140,141,142,144/Tb, /sup 140-142/Gd, and /sup 140-142/Eu, produced by /sup 92/Mo(H.I.,xpyn) reactions at the Berkeley SuperHILAC, and studied with the OASIS on-line mass separator facility. Half-lives, delayed proton branching ratios, ..gamma..-ray energies and intensities, partial decay schemes and several J/sup ..pi../ assignments are presented. Level systematics of the even mass Nd and Sm isotopes and of the nu h/sub 11/2/ - nu s/sub 1/2/ isomers for N = 77 are discussed.

  1. Beta Decay Spectroscopy of Neutron-Rich Nuclei at RIBF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorusso, G.; Nishimura, S.; Baba, H.; Doornenbal, P.; Isobe, T.; Söderström, P.-A.; Browne, F.; Daido, R.; Yifan, F.; Nishibata, H.; Yagi, A.; Gey, G.; Li, Z.; Wu, J.; Lubos, D.; Moschner, K.; Patel, Z.; Rice, S.; Sinclair, L.; Sumikama, T.; Taprogge, J.; Vajta, Zs.; Watanabe, H.; Xu, Z. Y.; Yoshinaga, K.

    2015-11-01

    The development of a high intensity 238U beam at the Radioactive Isotope Beam Factory (RIBF) has opened a new opportunity to explore exotic regions of the nuclear chart that were not accessible before. Along with beam development, the installation of the high efficiency γ-detector EURICA has made β-decay spectroscopy measurements of these regions possible, and a large international effort named the EURICA project has been launched to take advantage of this new opportunity.

  2. Failure of the gross theory of beta decay in neutron deficient nuclei

    DOE PAGES

    Firestone, R. B.; Schwengner, R.; Zuber, K.

    2015-05-28

    The neutron deficient isotopes 117-121Xe, 117-124Cs, and 122-124Ba were produced by a beam of 28Si from the LBNL SuperHILAC on a target of natMo. The isotopes were mass separated and their beta decay schemes were measured with a Total Absorption Spectrometer (TAS). The beta strengths derived from these data decreased dramatically to levels above ≈1 MeV for the even-even decays; 3–4 MeV for even-Z, odd-N decays; 4–5 MeV for the odd-Z, even-N decays; and 7–8 MeV for the odd-Z, odd-N decays. The decreasing strength to higher excitation energies in the daughters contradicts the predictions of the Gross Theory of Betamore » Decay. The integrated beta strengths are instead found to be consistent with shell model predictions where the single-particle beta strengths are divided amoung many low-lying levels. The experimental beta strengths determined here have been used calculate the half-lives of 143 neutron deficient nuclei with Z=51–64 to a precision of 20% with respect to the measured values.« less

  3. Failure of the gross theory of beta decay in neutron deficient nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Firestone, R. B.; Schwengner, R.; Zuber, K.

    2015-05-28

    The neutron deficient isotopes 117-121Xe, 117-124Cs, and 122-124Ba were produced by a beam of 28Si from the LBNL SuperHILAC on a target of natMo. The isotopes were mass separated and their beta decay schemes were measured with a Total Absorption Spectrometer (TAS). The beta strengths derived from these data decreased dramatically to levels above ≈1 MeV for the even-even decays; 3–4 MeV for even-Z, odd-N decays; 4–5 MeV for the odd-Z, even-N decays; and 7–8 MeV for the odd-Z, odd-N decays. The decreasing strength to higher excitation energies in the daughters contradicts the predictions of the Gross Theory of Beta Decay. The integrated beta strengths are instead found to be consistent with shell model predictions where the single-particle beta strengths are divided amoung many low-lying levels. The experimental beta strengths determined here have been used calculate the half-lives of 143 neutron deficient nuclei with Z=51–64 to a precision of 20% with respect to the measured values.

  4. Two-neutron decay from the 21+ state of 6He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Yuma; Matsumoto, Takuma; Minomo, Kosho; Ogata, Kazuyuki

    2014-09-01

    Two-neutron correlations in neutron-rich nuclei have attracted much attention. In paricular, in two-neutron halo nuclei, such two-neutron correlations are characterized as a sptially-correlated n- n pair, the so-called dineutron, and have extensively studied from both theoretical and experimental sides. In this contribution, we investigate the dineutron correlation in the excited resonant state of 6He. To do it, we calculate the breakup cross section of 6He + 12C reaction at 240 MeV/nucleon, in which the 21+ resonant state is populated. From the results, we pin down the decay mode of the 21+ state, and discuss the exsistence of a dineutron in the excited state of 6He.

  5. Evidence for Gamow-Teller Decay of ^{78}Ni Core from Beta-Delayed Neutron Emission Studies.

    PubMed

    Madurga, M; Paulauskas, S V; Grzywacz, R; Miller, D; Bardayan, D W; Batchelder, J C; Brewer, N T; Cizewski, J A; Fijałkowska, A; Gross, C J; Howard, M E; Ilyushkin, S V; Manning, B; Matoš, M; Mendez, A J; Miernik, K; Padgett, S W; Peters, W A; Rasco, B C; Ratkiewicz, A; Rykaczewski, K P; Stracener, D W; Wang, E H; Wolińska-Cichocka, M; Zganjar, E F

    2016-08-26

    The β-delayed neutron emission of ^{83,84}Ga isotopes was studied using the neutron time-of-flight technique. The measured neutron energy spectra showed emission from states at excitation energies high above the neutron separation energy and previously not observed in the β decay of midmass nuclei. The large decay strength deduced from the observed intense neutron emission is a signature of Gamow-Teller transformation. This observation was interpreted as evidence for allowed β decay to ^{78}Ni core-excited states in ^{83,84}Ge favored by shell effects. We developed shell model calculations in the proton fpg_{9/2} and neutron extended fpg_{9/2}+d_{5/2} valence space using realistic interactions that were used to understand measured β-decay lifetimes. We conclude that enhanced, concentrated β-decay strength for neutron-unbound states may be common for very neutron-rich nuclei. This leads to intense β-delayed high-energy neutron and strong multineutron emission probabilities that in turn affect astrophysical nucleosynthesis models. PMID:27610848

  6. Evidence for Gamow-Teller Decay of 78Ni Core from Beta-Delayed Neutron Emission Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madurga, M.; Paulauskas, S. V.; Grzywacz, R.; Miller, D.; Bardayan, D. W.; Batchelder, J. C.; Brewer, N. T.; Cizewski, J. A.; Fijałkowska, A.; Gross, C. J.; Howard, M. E.; Ilyushkin, S. V.; Manning, B.; Matoš, M.; Mendez, A. J.; Miernik, K.; Padgett, S. W.; Peters, W. A.; Rasco, B. C.; Ratkiewicz, A.; Rykaczewski, K. P.; Stracener, D. W.; Wang, E. H.; Wolińska-Cichocka, M.; Zganjar, E. F.

    2016-08-01

    The β -delayed neutron emission of Ga,8483 isotopes was studied using the neutron time-of-flight technique. The measured neutron energy spectra showed emission from states at excitation energies high above the neutron separation energy and previously not observed in the β decay of midmass nuclei. The large decay strength deduced from the observed intense neutron emission is a signature of Gamow-Teller transformation. This observation was interpreted as evidence for allowed β decay to 78Ni core-excited states in Ge,8483 favored by shell effects. We developed shell model calculations in the proton f p g9 /2 and neutron extended f p g9 /2+d5 /2 valence space using realistic interactions that were used to understand measured β -decay lifetimes. We conclude that enhanced, concentrated β -decay strength for neutron-unbound states may be common for very neutron-rich nuclei. This leads to intense β -delayed high-energy neutron and strong multineutron emission probabilities that in turn affect astrophysical nucleosynthesis models.

  7. Calculation of the lunar photon albedo from galactic and solar proton bombardment.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, T. W.

    1972-01-01

    The lunar photon albedo due to cosmogenic and primordial photon sources has been calculated. The individual photon leakage spectra from prompt photons produced by galactic cosmic ray (GCR) and solar cosmic ray (SCR) induced nuclear interactions, from the decay of GCR- and SCR-induced radionuclides, and from the decay of naturally occurring radionuclides are given. An approximate estimate of the leakage from the photon-electron cascade initiated by the decay of neutral pions is also given. Monte Carlo methods have been used to determine the nucleon-meson cascade, and discrete-ordinates methods were used for the photon and low-energy neutron transport.

  8. {alpha} decay studies of very neutron-deficient francium and radium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Uusitalo, J.; Leino, M.; Enqvist, T.; Grahn, T.; Greenlees, P.T.; Jones, P.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Keenan, A.; Kettunen, H.; Koivisto, H.; Kuusiniemi, P.; Leppaenen, A.-P.; Nieminen, P.; Pakarinen, J.; Rahkila, P.; Scholey, C.; Eskola, K.

    2005-02-01

    Very neutron-deficient francium and radium isotopes have been produced in fusion evaporation reactions using {sup 63}Cu and {sup 65}Cu ions on {sup 141}Pr targets and {sup 36}Ar ions on {sup 170}Yb targets. The gas-filled recoil separator RITU was employed to collect the fusion products and to separate them from the scattered beam. The activities were implanted into a position-sensitive silicon detector after passing through a gas-counter system. The isotopes were identified using spatial and time correlations between the implants and decays. Two new {alpha} decaying radium isotopes, {sup 201}Ra and {sup 202}Ra, were identified. The {alpha} decay energy and half-life of {sup 203}Ra were measured with improved precision. The {alpha} decay properties measured for the francium isotopes {sup 201}Fr,{sup 202}Fr,{sup 203}Fr, and {sup 204}Fr were confirmed, in many cases with improved precision. For the first time, a ({pi}s{sub 1/2}{sup -1})1/2{sup +} proton intruder state was identified in francium isotopes, namely in {sup 201}Fr and tentatively in {sup 203}Fr. The measured decay properties for the neutron-deficient odd-mass Fr isotopes suggest an onset of substantial deformation at N=112.

  9. Decay spectroscopy of neutron-rich rare-earth isotopes and collectivity around double midshell

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Hiroshi

    2015-10-15

    Neutron-rich rare-earth isotopes with A ≈ 170, which locate near the middle of the major shells for both proton and neutron between the doubly magic nuclei {sup 132}Sn and {sup 208}Pb, have been investigated by means of decay spectroscopy techniques at the RIBF facility at RIKEN. The nuclei of interest were produced by in-flight fission of a high-intensity {sup 238}U beam at 345 MeV/u. In this contribution, scientific motivations, the details of experimental procedures, and some prospects of the data analysis are reported.

  10. Multiple β- decaying states in 194Re: Shape evolution in neutron-rich osmium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Dahan, N.; Regan, P. H.; Podolyák, Zs.; Walker, P. M.; Alkhomashi, N.; Dracoulis, G. D.; Farrelly, G.; Benlliure, J.; Pietri, S. B.; Casten, R. F.; Stevenson, P. D.; Gelletly, W.; Steer, S. J.; Garnsworthy, A. B.; Casarejos, E.; Gerl, J.; Wollersheim, H. J.; Grebosz, J.; Górska, M.; Kojouharov, I.; Schaffner, H.; Algora, A.; Benzoni, G.; Blazhev, A.; Boutachkov, P.; Bruce, A. M.; Cullen, I. J.; Denis Bacelar, A. M.; Deo, A. Y.; Estevez, M. E.; Fujita, Y.; Hoischen, R.; Kumar, R.; Lalkovski, S.; Liu, Z.; Mason, P. J.; Mihai, C.; Molina, F.; Mücher, D.; Rubio, B.; Tamii, A.; Tashenov, S.; Valiente-Dobón, J. J.; Woods, P. J.

    2012-03-01

    β decays from heavy, neutron-rich nuclei with A˜190 have been investigated following their production via the relativistic projectile fragmentation of an E/A=1 GeV 208Pb primary beam on a ˜2.5 g/cm2 9Be target. The reaction products were separated and identified using the GSI FRagment Separator (FRS) and stopped in the RISING active stopper. γ decays were observed and correlated with these secondary ions on an event-by-event basis such that γ-ray transitions following from both internal (isomeric) and β decays were recorded. A number of discrete, β-delayed γ-ray transitions associated with β decays from 194Re to excited states in 194Os have been observed, including previously reported decays from the yrast Iπ=(6+) state. Three previously unreported γ-ray transitions with energies 194, 349, and 554 keV are also identified; these transitions are associated with decays from higher spin states in 194Os. The results of these investigations are compared with theoretical predictions from Nilsson multi-quasiparticle (MQP) calculations. Based on lifetime measurements and the observed feeding pattern to states in 194Os, it is concluded that there are three β--decaying states in 194Re.

  11. Decay heat measurement of fusion related materials in an ITER-like neutron field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimoto, Y.; Ochiai, K.; Maekawa, F.; Wada, M.; Nishitani, T.; Takeuchi, H.

    2002-12-01

    Decay heat is one of the most important factors for the safety aspect of ITER. Especially, the prediction of decay heat with an uncertainty less than 15% for the three most important materials, i.e., copper, type-316 stainless steel (SS316) and tungsten, is strongly requested by designers of ITER. To provide experimental decay heat data needed for validation of decay heat calculations for SS316 and copper, an experiment was conducted as the ITER/EDA task T-426. An ITER-like neutron field was constructed, and decay heat source distributions in thick copper and SS316 plates were measured with the whole energy absorption spectrometer. The measured decay heat distributions in the thick sample plates were compared with the predicted values by MCNP calculations. It was found that the use of an effective activation cross-section calculated by MCNP was needed to consider the self-shielding effects and, for both cases, MCNP calculations could predict the decay heat adequately.

  12. β Decay in the Region of Neutron-deficient {sup 69,70,71}Kr

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, A.M.; Giovinazzo, J.; Blank, B.; Canchel, G.; France, G. de; Grévy, S.; Oliveira Santos, F. de; Stefan, I.; Thomas, J.-C.

    2014-06-15

    Decay spectroscopy was performed for neutron-deficient nuclei ranging from zinc to krypton with isospin −3/2 ≤T{sub z}≤0. Measurements of correlated β-delayed protons allowed us to determine the isobaric analog states fed from the decay of {sup 65}Se and {sup 69}Kr, constraining the spin of the {sup 69}Kr ground state. Preliminary results regarding the half lives for the T{sub z}=−1 systems, relevant to the rapid proton capture (rp) process, are discussed.

  13. β-decay studies of neutron-rich Tl, Pb, and Bi isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, A. I.; Benzoni, G.; Gottardo, A.; Valiente-Dobón, J. J.; Blasi, N.; Bracco, A.; Camera, F.; Crespi, F. C. L.; Corsi, A.; Leoni, S.; Million, B.; Nicolini, R.; Wieland, O.; Gadea, A.; Lunardi, S.; Górska, M.; Regan, P. H.; Podolyák, Zs.; Pfützner, M.; Pietri, S.; Boutachkov, P.; Weick, H.; Grebosz, J.; Bruce, A. M.; Núñez, J. Alcántara; Algora, A.; Al-Dahan, N.; Ayyad, Y.; Alkhomashi, N.; Allegro, P. R. P.; Bazzacco, D.; Benlliure, J.; Bowry, M.; Bunce, M.; Casarejos, E.; Cortes, M. L.; Bacelar, A. M. Denis; Deo, A. Y.; de Angelis, G.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Doncel, M.; Dombradi, Zs.; Engert, T.; Eppinger, K.; Farrelly, G. F.; Farinon, F.; Farnea, E.; Geissel, H.; Gerl, J.; Goel, N.; Gregor, E.; Habermann, T.; Hoischen, R.; Janik, R.; Klupp, S.; Kojouharov, I.; Kurz, N.; Mandal, S.; Menegazzo, R.; Mengoni, D.; Napoli, D. R.; Naqvi, F.; Nociforo, C.; Prochazka, A.; Prokopowicz, W.; Recchia, F.; Ribas, R. V.; Reed, M. W.; Rudolph, D.; Sahin, E.; Schaffner, H.; Sharma, A.; Sitar, B.; Siwal, D.; Steiger, K.; Strmen, P.; Swan, T. P. D.; Szarka, I.; Ur, C. A.; Walker, P. M.; Wollersheim, H.-J.

    2014-01-01

    The fragmentation of relativistic uranium projectiles has been exploited at the Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung laboratory to investigate the β decay of neutron-rich nuclei just beyond 208Pb. This paper reports on β-delayed γ decays of 211-213Tl, 215Pb, and 215-219Bi de-exciting states in the daughters 211-213Pb, 215Bi, and 215-219Po. The resulting partial level schemes, proposed with the help of systematics and shell-model calculations, are presented. The role of allowed Gamow-Teller and first-forbidden β transitions in this mass region is discussed.

  14. Beta-decay rate and beta-delayed neutron emission probability of improved gross theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koura, Hiroyuki

    2014-09-01

    A theoretical study has been carried out on beta-decay rate and beta-delayed neutron emission probability. The gross theory of the beta decay is based on an idea of the sum rule of the beta-decay strength function, and has succeeded in describing beta-decay half-lives of nuclei overall nuclear mass region. The gross theory includes not only the allowed transition as the Fermi and the Gamow-Teller, but also the first-forbidden transition. In this work, some improvements are introduced as the nuclear shell correction on nuclear level densities and the nuclear deformation for nuclear strength functions, those effects were not included in the original gross theory. The shell energy and the nuclear deformation for unmeasured nuclei are adopted from the KTUY nuclear mass formula, which is based on the spherical-basis method. Considering the properties of the integrated Fermi function, we can roughly categorized energy region of excited-state of a daughter nucleus into three regions: a highly-excited energy region, which fully affect a delayed neutron probability, a middle energy region, which is estimated to contribute the decay heat, and a region neighboring the ground-state, which determines the beta-decay rate. Some results will be given in the presentation. A theoretical study has been carried out on beta-decay rate and beta-delayed neutron emission probability. The gross theory of the beta decay is based on an idea of the sum rule of the beta-decay strength function, and has succeeded in describing beta-decay half-lives of nuclei overall nuclear mass region. The gross theory includes not only the allowed transition as the Fermi and the Gamow-Teller, but also the first-forbidden transition. In this work, some improvements are introduced as the nuclear shell correction on nuclear level densities and the nuclear deformation for nuclear strength functions, those effects were not included in the original gross theory. The shell energy and the nuclear deformation for

  15. {beta}-decay in neutron-deficient Hg, Pb, and Po isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, O.; Sarriguren, P.; Alvarez-Rodriguez, R.; Guerra, E. Moya de

    2006-05-15

    The effect of nuclear deformation on the energy distributions of the Gamow-Teller strength is studied in neutron-deficient Hg, Pb, and Po even isotopes. The theoretical framework is based on a self-consistent deformed Skyrme Hartree-Fock mean field with pairing correlations between like nucleons in BCS approximation and residual spin-isospin interactions treated in the proton-neutron quasiparticle random-phase approximation. After a systematic study of the Gamow-Teller strength distributions in the low-excitation-energy region, relevant for {beta}{sup +} decay, we have identified the best candidates to look for deformation signatures in their {beta}{sup +}-decay patterns. {beta}{sup +} half-lives and total Gamow-Teller strengths B(GT{sup {+-}}) are analyzed as well.

  16. Beta-decay study of neutron rich isotopes of Bromine and Krypton

    SciTech Connect

    Miernik, Krzysztof A; Gross, Carl J; Grzywacz, Robert Kazimierz; Madurga, M; Mendez, II, Anthony J; Miller, D.; Padgett, S; Paulauskas, Stanley V; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr; Stracener, Daniel W; Wolinska-Cichocka, Marzena; Zganjar, E. F.; Batchelder, J. C.; Brewer, N.T.; Cartegni, L.; Fijalkowska, Aleksandra G; Hamilton, J. H.; Hwang, J. K.; Ilyushkin, S.; Jost, Carola U; Karny, M.; Korgul, A.; Krolas, W.; Liu, S.H.; Ramayya, A. V.; Surman, Rebecca; Winger, J. A.; Wolinska-Cichocka, M

    2013-01-01

    Short lived neutron rich nuclei including 93 Br, 93 Kr and 94 Kr were produced in proton induced fission of 238 U at the HRIBF in Oak Ridge. Their beta decay was studied by means of a high resolution on line mass separator and beta gamma spectroscopy methods. The half life of 93Br T1/2 = 152(8) ms and delayed branching ratio of Pn = 53-8+11 may be compared to the previously reported values of T1/2 = 102(10) ms and Pn = 68(7)%. At the same time the half life of 94Kr T1/2 = 227(14) ms and B delayed branching ratio of Pn = 1.9+0.6 0.2 % of 93Kr are in very good agreement with literature values. The decay properties of 93Br include four new gamma transitions following beta delayed neutron emission.

  17. β and β -n decay of the neutron-rich

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korgul, A.; Rykaczewski, K. P.; Grzywacz, R. K.; Bingham, C. R.; Brewer, N. T.; Gross, C. J.; Ciemny, A. A.; Jost, C.; Karny, M.; Madurga, M.; Mazzocchi, C.; Mendez, A. J.; Miernik, K.; Miller, D.; Padgett, S.; Paulauskas, S. V.; Piersa, M.; Stracener, D. W.; Stryjczyk, M.; Wolińska-Cichocka, M.; Zganjar, E. F.

    2016-06-01

    The β -decay properties of the very neutron-rich decay scheme and the order of the two lowest-lying levels in the daughter neutron emission was observed. The shell-model calculations and apparent β transition intensities were used to guide the spin assignment to the

  18. Realistic fission models, new beta-decay half-lives and the r-process in neutron star mergers

    SciTech Connect

    Shibagaki, S.; Kajino, T.; Chiba, S.; Lorusso, G.; Nishimura, S.; Mathews, G. J.

    2014-05-02

    Almost half of heavy nuclei beyond iron are considered to be produced by rapid neutron capture process (r-process). This process occurs in the neutron-rich environment such as core-collapse supernovae or neutron star mergers, but the main production site is still unknown. In the r-process of neutron star mergers, nuclear fission reactions play an important role. Also beta-decay half-lives of magic nuclei are crucial for the r-process. We have carried out r-process nucleosynthesis calculations based upon new theoretical estimates of fission fragment distributions and new beta-decay half-lives for N=82 nuclei measured at RIBF-RIKEN. We investigate the effect of nuclear fission on abundance patterns in the matter ejected from neutron star mergers with two different fission fragment mass distributions. We also discuss how the new experimental beta-decay half-lives affect the r-process.

  19. Search for the invisible decay of neutrons with KamLAND.

    PubMed

    Araki, T; Enomoto, S; Furuno, K; Gando, Y; Ichimura, K; Ikeda, H; Inoue, K; Kishimoto, Y; Koga, M; Koseki, Y; Maeda, T; Mitsui, T; Motoki, M; Nakajima, K; Nakamura, K; Ogawa, H; Ogawa, M; Owada, K; Ricol, J-S; Shimizu, I; Shirai, J; Suekane, F; Suzuki, A; Tada, K; Takeuchi, S; Tamae, K; Tsuda, Y; Watanabe, H; Busenitz, J; Classen, T; Djurcic, Z; Keefer, G; Leonard, D S; Piepke, A; Yakushev, E; Berger, B E; Chan, Y D; Decowski, M P; Dwyer, D A; Freedman, S J; Fujikawa, B K; Goldman, J; Gray, F; Heeger, K M; Hsu, L; Lesko, K T; Luk, K-B; Murayama, H; O'Donnell, T; Poon, A W P; Steiner, H M; Winslow, L A; Jillings, C; Mauger, C; McKeown, R D; Vogel, P; Zhang, C; Lane, C E; Miletic, T; Guillian, G; Learned, J G; Maricic, J; Matsuno, S; Pakvasa, S; Horton-Smith, G A; Dazeley, S; Hatakeyama, S; Rojas, A; Svoboda, R; Dieterle, B D; Detwiler, J; Gratta, G; Ishii, K; Tolich, N; Uchida, Y; Batygov, M; Bugg, W; Efremenko, Y; Kamyshkov, Y; Kozlov, A; Nakamura, Y; Karwowski, H J; Markoff, D M; Rohm, R M; Tornow, W; Wendell, R; Chen, M-J; Wang, Y-F; Piquemal, F

    2006-03-17

    The Kamioka Liquid scintillator Anti-Neutrino Detector is used in a search for single neutron or two-neutron intranuclear disappearance that would produce holes in the -shell energy level of (12)C nuclei. Such holes could be created as a result of nucleon decay into invisible modes (inv), e.g., n--> 3v or nn--> 2v. The deexcitation of the corresponding daughter nucleus results in a sequence of space and time-correlated events observable in the liquid scintillator detector. We report on new limits for one- and two-neutron disappearance: tau(n--> inv) > 5.8 x 10(29) years and tau (nn--> inv) > 1.4 x 10(30) years at 90% C.L. These results represent an improvement of factors of approximately 3 and >10(4) and over previous experiments. PMID:16605724

  20. First-forbidden β-decay rates, energy rates of β-delayed neutrons and probability of β-delayed neutron emissions for neutron-rich nickel isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabi, Jameel-Un; Çakmak, Necla; Iftikhar, Zafar

    2016-01-01

    First-forbidden (FF) transitions can play an important role in decreasing the calculated half-lives specially in environments where allowed Gamow-Teller (GT) transitions are unfavored. Of special mention is the case of neutron-rich nuclei where, due to phase-space amplification, FF transitions are much favored. We calculate the allowed GT transitions in various pn-QRPA models for even-even neutron-rich isotopes of nickel. Here we also study the effect of deformation on the calculated GT strengths. The FF transitions for even-even neutron-rich isotopes of nickel are calculated assuming the nuclei to be spherical. Later we take into account deformation of nuclei and calculate GT + unique FF transitions, stellar β-decay rates, energy rate of β-delayed neutrons and probability of β-delayed neutron emissions. The calculated half-lives are in excellent agreement with measured ones and might contribute in speeding-up of the r-matter flow.

  1. Water equivalent hydrogen estimates from the first 200 sols of Curiosity's traverse (Bradbury Landing to Yellowknife Bay): Results from the Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons (DAN) passive mode experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tate, C. G.; Moersch, J.; Jun, I.; Ming, D. W.; Mitrofanov, I.; Litvak, M.; Behar, A.; Boynton, W. V.; Deflores, L.; Drake, D.; Ehresmann, B.; Fedosov, F.; Golovin, D.; Hardgrove, C.; Harshman, K.; Hassler, D. M.; Kozyrev, A. S.; Kuzmin, R.; Lisov, D.; Malakhov, A.; Milliken, R.; Mischna, M.; Mokrousov, M.; Nikiforov, S.; Sanin, A. B.; Starr, R.; Varenikov, A.; Vostrukhin, A.; Zeitlin, C.

    2015-12-01

    The Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons (DAN) experiment on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover Curiosity is designed to detect neutrons to determine hydrogen abundance within the subsurface of Mars (Mitrofanov, I.G. et al. [2012]. Space Sci. Rev. 170, 559-582. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11214-012-9924-y; Litvak, M.L. et al. [2008]. Astrobiology 8, 605-613. http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/ast.2007.0157). While DAN has a pulsed neutron generator for active measurements, in passive mode it only measures the leakage spectrum of neutrons produced by the Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG) and Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR). DAN passive measurements provide better spatial coverage than the active measurements because they can be acquired while the rover is moving. Here we compare DAN passive-mode data to models of the instrument's response to compositional differences in a homogeneous regolith in order to estimate the water equivalent hydrogen (WEH) content along the first 200 sols of Curiosity's traverse in Gale Crater, Mars. WEH content is shown to vary greatly along the traverse. These estimates range from 0.5 ± 0.1 wt.% to 3.9 ± 0.2 wt.% for fixed locations (usually overnight stops) investigated by the rover and 0.6 ± 0.2 wt.% to 7.6 ± 1.3 wt.% for areas that the rover has traversed while continuously acquiring DAN passive data between fixed locations. Estimates of WEH abundances at fixed locations based on passive mode data are in broad agreement with those estimated at the same locations using active mode data. Localized (meter-scale) anomalies in estimated WEH values from traverse measurements have no particular surface expression observable in co-located images. However at a much larger scale, the hummocky plains and bedded fractured units are shown to be distinct compositional units based on the hydrogen content derived from DAN passive measurements. DAN passive WEH estimates are also shown to be consistent with geologic models inferred from other

  2. Strong neutrino cooling by cycles of electron capture and β- decay in neutron star crusts.

    PubMed

    Schatz, H; Gupta, S; Möller, P; Beard, M; Brown, E F; Deibel, A T; Gasques, L R; Hix, W R; Keek, L; Lau, R; Steiner, A W; Wiescher, M

    2014-01-01

    The temperature in the crust of an accreting neutron star, which comprises its outermost kilometre, is set by heating from nuclear reactions at large densities, neutrino cooling and heat transport from the interior. The heated crust has been thought to affect observable phenomena at shallower depths, such as thermonuclear bursts in the accreted envelope. Here we report that cycles of electron capture and its inverse, β(-) decay, involving neutron-rich nuclei at a typical depth of about 150 metres, cool the outer neutron star crust by emitting neutrinos while also thermally decoupling the surface layers from the deeper crust. This 'Urca' mechanism has been studied in the context of white dwarfs and type Ia supernovae, but hitherto was not considered in neutron stars, because previous models computed the crust reactions using a zero-temperature approximation and assumed that only a single nuclear species was present at any given depth. The thermal decoupling means that X-ray bursts and other surface phenomena are largely independent of the strength of deep crustal heating. The unexpectedly short recurrence times, of the order of years, observed for very energetic thermonuclear superbursts are therefore not an indicator of a hot crust, but may point instead to an unknown local heating mechanism near the neutron star surface. PMID:24291788

  3. Strong neutrino cooling by cycles of electron capture and decay in neutron star crusts

    SciTech Connect

    Schatz, Hendrik; Gupta, Sanjib; Moeller, Peter; Beard, Mary; Brown, Edward; Deibel, A. T.; Gasques, Leandro; Hix, William Raphael; Keek, Laurens; Lau, Rita; Steiner, Andrew M; Wiescher, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The temperature in the crust of an accreting neutron star, which comprises its outermost kilometre, is set by heating from nuclear reactions at large densities, neutrino cooling and heat transport from the interior. The heated crust has been thought to affect observable phenomena at shallower depths, such as thermonuclear bursts in the accreted envelope. Here we report that cycles of electron capture and its inverse, decay, involving neutron-rich nuclei at a typical depth of about 150 metres, cool the outer neutron star crust by emitting neutrinos while also thermally decoupling the surface layers from the deeper crust. This Urca mechanism has been studied in the context of white dwarfs13 and type Ia supernovae, but hitherto was not considered in neutron stars, because previous models1, 2 computed the crust reactions using a zero-temperature approximation and assumed that only a single nuclear species was present at any given depth. The thermal decoupling means that X-ray bursts and other surface phenomena are largely independent of the strength of deep crustal heating. The unexpectedly short recurrence times, of the order of years, observed for very energetic thermonuclear superbursts are therefore not an indicator of a hot crust, but may point instead to an unknown local heating mechanism near the neutron star surface.

  4. Calculated angular distributions of energetic atmospheric neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merker, M.

    1975-01-01

    Calculated angular distributions of atmospheric leakage neutron fluxes from 19 MeV to 1 GeV are presented. Comparisons with the balloon measurements of Preszler et al. and Kanbach et al. are made and show substantial agreement, strengthening the belief in the importance of the CRAND (cosmic-ray albedo-neutron decay) contribution to the high-energy protons in the earth's inner radiation belt. The calculation is presented as a means for investigating features of atmospheric flux distributions.

  5. Status of Neutron Beta Decay Asymmetry Studies from the UCNA Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, David, II

    2013-04-01

    The UCNA experiment measures the neutron β decay asymmetry parameter A(E) using bottled polarized ultracold neutrons (UCN). UCN are produced from a pulsed spallation solid deuterium source coupled to the 800 MeV proton beam at LANSCE. The UCN spin states are selected via a 7 T polarizing field and an adiabatic fast passage spin flipper. The polarized UCN are then transported to a 1 T 2x2π spectrometer where the emitted electrons are measured. In the Standard Model, the leading order value of A(E), A0, is a function of the axial-vector to vector coupling ratio λ≡gA/gV, providing complementary data to the physics probed by measurements of the neutron lifetime τn. When taken together with τn, measurements of the beta decay asymmetry permit a nuclear structure independent determination of the CKM matrix element Vud. This talk presents an overview of the UCNA experiment, the status of the analysis of our 2011 dataset, the work performed in 2012 and the path forward.

  6. β-decay study of neutron-rich ^102Rb at TRIUMF-ISAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhimin

    2012-10-01

    Experimental investigations of the β-decay properties of nuclei which lie along the astrophysical r-process are becoming possible with modern facilities and detection systems. In this experiment, a ^102Rb beam was produced by 500 MeV, 10 μA protons impinging on a multilayer UCx target at TRIUMF-ISAC Facility. The beam of ^102Rb ions was implanted on a movable tape at the center of the 8π spectrometer. The 20 HPGe 8π γ-ray detectors were coupled with SCEPTAR, an hemispherical array of scintillators for β-tagging and DANTE, an array of five LaBr3 detectors for fast γ-ray timing. A preliminary analysis has allowed the first identification of the 4^+ to 2^+ transition in the daughter nucleus, ^102Sr. A near identical low-lying band structure of ^102Sr with ^98, 100Sr nuclei has been observed, indicating the rigidly deformed rotational nature continues towards to the N=66 midshell. The current experimental measurements of ^102Rb β-decay half life as well as the β-delayed neutron emission branching ratio compared with reported values, the shorter β-decay half life and the larger β-delayed neutron emission branching ratio will locally reshape astrophysical r-process predictions.

  7. beta decay and isomeric properties of neutron-rich Ca and Sc isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, H. L.; Mantica, P. F.; Berryman, J. S.; Stoker, J. B.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Carpenter, M. P.; Kay, B. P.; Lauritsen, T.; Zhu, S.; Broda, R.; Cieplicka, N.; Fornal, B.; Grinyer, G. F.; Minamisono, K.; Hoteling, N.; Stefanescu, I.; Walters, W. B.

    2010-07-15

    The isomeric and beta-decay properties of neutron-rich {sup 53-57}Sc and {sup 53,54}Ca nuclei near neutron number N=32 are reported, and the low-energy level schemes of {sup 53,54,56}Sc and {sup 53-57}Ti are presented. The low-energy level structures of the {sub 21}Sc isotopes are discussed in terms of the coupling of the valence 1f{sub 7/2} proton to states in the corresponding {sub 20}Ca cores. Implications with respect to the robustness of the N=32 subshell closure are discussed, as well as the repercussions for a possible N=34 subshell closure.

  8. Laser-intensity effect on beta decay of the free neutron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashid, Shahid

    2012-06-01

    Using the exact solution of the minimally coupled Dirac equation as the state for the lepton, the cross section for the weak interaction is calculated in the presence of an intense laser field. A completely new term is discovered due to the interaction of the spin of the electron with the intense laser field present. Moreover, the presence of the dressed lepton only in the initial or final state gives rise to new arguments for the Bessel functions which is different from those calculated by previous authors. We have computed the decay rate of a free neutron in the presence of an intense laser field. It is shown that with the increasing intensity, the lifetime of the free neutron increases nonlinearly.

  9. Disordered nuclear pasta, magnetic field decay, and crust cooling in neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horowitz, C. J.; Berry, D. K.; Briggs, C. M.; Caplan, M. E.; Cumming, A.; Schneider, A. S.

    2015-04-01

    Nuclear pasta, with non-spherical shapes, is expected near the base of the crust in neutron stars. Large scale molecular dynamics simulations of pasta show long lived topological defects that could increase electron scattering and reduce both the thermal and electrical conductivities. We model a possible low conductivity pasta layer by increasing an impurity parameter Qimp. Predictions of light curves for the low mass X-ray binary MXB 1659-29, assuming a large Qimp, find continued late time cooling that is consistent with Chandra observations. The electrical and thermal conductivities are likely related. Therefore observations of late time crust cooling can provide insight on the electrical conductivity and the possible decay of neutron star magnetic fields (assuming these are supported by currents in the crust). This research was supported in part by DOE Grants DE-FG02-87ER40365 (Indiana University) and DE-SC0008808 (NUCLEI SciDAC Collaboration).

  10. Disordered Nuclear Pasta, Magnetic Field Decay, and Crust Cooling in Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horowitz, C. J.; Berry, D. K.; Briggs, C. M.; Caplan, M. E.; Cumming, A.; Schneider, A. S.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear pasta, with nonspherical shapes, is expected near the base of the crust in neutron stars. Large-scale molecular dynamics simulations of pasta show long lived topological defects that could increase electron scattering and reduce both the thermal and electrical conductivities. We model a possible low-conductivity pasta layer by increasing an impurity parameter Qimp . Predictions of light curves for the low-mass x-ray binary MXB 1659-29, assuming a large Qimp, find continued late time cooling that is consistent with Chandra observations. The electrical and thermal conductivities are likely related. Therefore, observations of late time crust cooling can provide insight on the electrical conductivity and the possible decay of neutron star magnetic fields (assuming these are supported by currents in the crust).

  11. Disordered nuclear pasta, magnetic field decay, and crust cooling in neutron stars.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, C J; Berry, D K; Briggs, C M; Caplan, M E; Cumming, A; Schneider, A S

    2015-01-23

    Nuclear pasta, with nonspherical shapes, is expected near the base of the crust in neutron stars. Large-scale molecular dynamics simulations of pasta show long lived topological defects that could increase electron scattering and reduce both the thermal and electrical conductivities. We model a possible low-conductivity pasta layer by increasing an impurity parameter Q_{imp}. Predictions of light curves for the low-mass x-ray binary MXB 1659-29, assuming a large Q_{imp}, find continued late time cooling that is consistent with Chandra observations. The electrical and thermal conductivities are likely related. Therefore, observations of late time crust cooling can provide insight on the electrical conductivity and the possible decay of neutron star magnetic fields (assuming these are supported by currents in the crust).

  12. Neutron Background Measurements by the the MSL Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons (DAN) Instrument during the First 360 sols of the Surface Operation at Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, I.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; litvak, M. L.; Sanin, A.; Behar, A.; Boynton, W. V.; DeFlores, L.; Golovin, D.; Hardgrove, C. J.; Harshman, K.; Kozyrev, A.; Kuzmin, R.; Malakhov, A.; Mischna, M. A.; Moersch, J.; Mokrousov, M.; Nikiforov, S.; Shvetsov, V.; Tate, C.; Vostrukhin, A.; Team, M.

    2013-12-01

    Since first commissioned on sol 3 after landing in August 2012, DAN has been operating successfully and provided a wealth of surface measurement data both in Active mode and in Passive mode operations. Active mode measurements provide a means to determine the characteristics of subsurface in terms of layering structure, content of water equivalent hydrogen (WEH), and/or content of chlorine. Passive mode measurements provide a general background level of low energy (< ~1 keV) neutrons induced by Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) interactions with the Martian atmosphere and the surface material and from Multi Mission Radioisotope Thermonuclear Generator (MMRTG). Passive mode measurements have been done on almost every sols with durations ranging from 1 hour to ~9 hour, covering different times of a day. Extensive numerical simulations have been carried out to aid in interpreting the DAN passive data. Both surface operation and numerical simulations show that the passive data correlate very well with the active data. It was also found that the passive data alone could provide a general trend of WEH content variation along the rover traverse. A methodology to estimate the respective contribution from each source (i.e., MMRTG neutrons and GCR-induced neutrons) for the passive data has been developed and was used to understand the neutron background environment at the Rocknest site, where the rover stayed over an extended period of time (from sol 59 to sol 100). The result shows that the MMRTG contribution to the DAN passive counts was about 60% of the total, and the GCR-induced counts were estimated to be about 40%. Details of all these observations, modeling effort, and analysis and interpretation processes will be presented in the final paper by using the passive data collected through sol 360.

  13. Neutrino mass, proton decay, and neutron oscillations as crucial tests of unification models (A Review)

    PubMed Central

    Marshak, R. E.

    1982-01-01

    Several crucial tests of three popular unification models (of strong, electromagnetic, and weak interactions) are described. The models are SU(5) and SO(10) at the grand unification theory (GUT) level and SU(4)C × SU(2)L × SU(2)R at the partial unification theory (PUT) level. The tests selected for discussion are the finiteness of the neutrino mass in the electron volt region, the decay of protons into antileptons in the range of 1031± yr, and the detectability of neutron oscillations at all. The PUT group can also be tested by establishing the existence of four generations of quarks and leptons.

  14. Precision Measurement of the Radiative β Decay of the Free Neutron.

    PubMed

    Bales, M J; Alarcon, R; Bass, C D; Beise, E J; Breuer, H; Byrne, J; Chupp, T E; Coakley, K J; Cooper, R L; Dewey, M S; Gardner, S; Gentile, T R; He, D; Mumm, H P; Nico, J S; O'Neill, B; Thompson, A K; Wietfeldt, F E

    2016-06-17

    The standard model predicts that, in addition to a proton, an electron, and an antineutrino, a continuous spectrum of photons is emitted in the β decay of the free neutron. We report on the RDK II experiment which measured the photon spectrum using two different detector arrays. An annular array of bismuth germanium oxide scintillators detected photons from 14 to 782 keV. The spectral shape was consistent with theory, and we determined a branching ratio of 0.00335±0.00005[stat]±0.00015[syst]. A second detector array of large area avalanche photodiodes directly detected photons from 0.4 to 14 keV. For this array, the spectral shape was consistent with theory, and the branching ratio was determined to be 0.00582±0.00023[stat]±0.00062[syst]. We report the first precision test of the shape of the photon energy spectrum from neutron radiative decay and a substantially improved determination of the branching ratio over a broad range of photon energies. PMID:27367385

  15. Precision Measurement of the Radiative β Decay of the Free Neutron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bales, M. J.; Alarcon, R.; Bass, C. D.; Beise, E. J.; Breuer, H.; Byrne, J.; Chupp, T. E.; Coakley, K. J.; Cooper, R. L.; Dewey, M. S.; Gardner, S.; Gentile, T. R.; He, D.; Mumm, H. P.; Nico, J. S.; O'Neill, B.; Thompson, A. K.; Wietfeldt, F. E.; RDK Collaboration, II

    2016-06-01

    The standard model predicts that, in addition to a proton, an electron, and an antineutrino, a continuous spectrum of photons is emitted in the β decay of the free neutron. We report on the RDK II experiment which measured the photon spectrum using two different detector arrays. An annular array of bismuth germanium oxide scintillators detected photons from 14 to 782 keV. The spectral shape was consistent with theory, and we determined a branching ratio of 0.00335 ±0.00005 [stat ]±0.00015 [syst ] . A second detector array of large area avalanche photodiodes directly detected photons from 0.4 to 14 keV. For this array, the spectral shape was consistent with theory, and the branching ratio was determined to be 0.00582 ±0.00023 [stat ]±0.00062 [syst ] . We report the first precision test of the shape of the photon energy spectrum from neutron radiative decay and a substantially improved determination of the branching ratio over a broad range of photon energies.

  16. Nuclear-decay studies of neutron-rich rare-earth nuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Chasteler, R.M. . Dept. of Chemistry Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA )

    1990-04-26

    Neutron-rich rare-earth nuclei were produced in multinucleon transfer reactions of {sup 170}Er and {sup 176}Yb projectiles on {sup nat}W targets at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory SuperHILAC and their radioactive decays properties studied at the on-line mass separation facility OASIS. Two unknown isotopes, {sup 169}Dy (t {sub 1/2} {equals} 39 {plus minus} 8 s) and {sup 174}Er(t{sub 1/2} {equals} 3.3 {plus minus} 0.2 m) were discovered and their decay characteristics determined. The decay schemes for two previously identified isotopes, {sup 168}Dy (t{sub 1/2} {equals} 8.8 {plus minus} 0.3 m) and {sup 171}Ho (t{sub 1/2} {equals} 55 {plus minus} 3 s), were characterized. Evidence for a new isomer of 3.0 m {sup 168}Ho{sup g}, {sup 168}Ho{sup m} (t{sub 1/2} {equals} 132 {plus minus} 4 s) which decays by isomeric transition (IT) is presented. Beta particle endpoint energies were determined for the decay of {sup 168}Ho{sup g}, {sup 169}Dy, {sup 171}Ho, and {sup 174}Er, the resulting Q{beta}-values are: 2.93 {plus minus} 0.03, 3.2 {plus minus} 0.3, 3.2 {plus minus} 0.6, and 1.8 {plus minus} 0.2 MeV, respectively. These values were compared with values calculated using recent atomic mass formulae. Comparisons of various target/ion source geometries used in the OASIS mass separator facility for these multinucleon transfer reactions were performed. 73 refs., 40 figs., 11 tabs.

  17. Valence neutron properties relevant to the neutrinoless double-β decay of 130Te

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, B. P.; Bloxham, T.; McAllister, S. A.; Clark, J. A.; Deibel, C. M.; Freedman, S. J.; Freeman, S. J.; Han, K.; Howard, A. M.; Mitchell, A. J.; Parker, P. D.; Schiffer, J. P.; Sharp, D. K.; Thomas, J. S.

    2013-01-01

    The valence neutron composition of the 130Te and 130Xe ground states has been studied with a view to constraining calculations of the nuclear matrix element for the neutrinoless double-β decay of 130Te. Single-neutron adding and removing reactions on 128,130Te and 130,132Xe have been used to probe the vacancy of the 0g7/2, 1d5/2, 1d3/2, 2s1/2, and 0h11/2 orbitals. The change in the vacancy of these orbitals, obtained through a self-consistent determination of spectroscopic factors utilizing the Macfarlane-French sum rules, for 130Te→130Xe is shared only between the d, s1/2, and h11/2 orbitals, with the g7/2 playing no significant role. This is in disagreement with recent calculations within both the quasiparticle random-phase approximation and shell-model frameworks, which show a role for the g7/2 orbital that should have been observable. The neutron pairing properties of 130Xe have also been explored through the 132Xe(p,t) reaction showing no evidence for pairing vibrations.

  18. Naked-eye optical flash from gamma-ray burst 080319B: Tracing the decaying neutrons in the outflow

    SciTech Connect

    Fan Yizhong; Zhang Bing; Wei Daming

    2009-01-15

    For an unsteady baryonic gamma-ray burst (GRB) outflow, the fast and slow proton shells collide with each other and produce energetic soft gamma-ray emission. If the outflow has a significant neutron component, the ultrarelativistic neutrons initially expand freely until decaying at a larger radius. The late-time proton shells ejected from the GRB central engine, after powering the regular internal shocks, will sweep these {beta}-decay products and give rise to very bright UV/optical emission. The naked-eye optical flash from GRB 080319B, an energetic explosion in the distant Universe, can be well explained in this way.

  19. β-decay spectroscopy of neutron-rich 160,161,162Sm isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Z.; Podolyák, Zs.; Walker, P. M.; Regan, P. H.; Söderström, P.-A.; Watanabe, H.; Ideguchi, E.; Simpson, G. S.; Nishimura, S.; Browne, F.; Doornenbal, P.; Lorusso, G.; Rice, S.; Sinclair, L.; Sumikama, T.; Wu, J.; Xu, Z. Y.; Aoi, N.; Baba, H.; Bello Garrote, F. L.; Benzoni, G.; Daido, R.; Dombrádi, Zs.; Fang, Y.; Fukuda, N.; Gey, G.; Go, S.; Gottardo, A.; Inabe, N.; Isobe, T.; Kameda, D.; Kobayashi, K.; Kobayashi, M.; Komatsubara, T.; Kojouharov, I.; Kubo, T.; Kurz, N.; Kuti, I.; Li, Z.; Liu, H. L.; Matsushita, M.; Michimasa, S.; Moon, C.-B.; Nishizuka, H.; Nishizuka, I.; Odahara, A.; Şahin, E.; Sakurai, H.; Schaffner, H.; Suzuki, H.; Takeda, H.; Tanaka, M.; Taprogge, J.; Vajta, Zs.; Xu, F. R.; Yagi, A.; Yokoyama, R.

    2016-09-01

    Neutron-rich 160,161,162Sm isotopes have been populated at the RIBF, RIKEN via β first time. β-coincident γ rays were observed in all three isotopes including γ rays from the isomeric decay of 160Sm and 162Sm. The isomers in 160Sm and 162Sm have previously been observed but have been populated via β decay for the first time. The isomeric state in 162Sm is assigned a {4^ - }v{{7 over 2}^ + }≤ft[ {633} right] otimes v{{1 over 2}^ - }≤ft[ {521} right] configuration based on the decay pattern. The level schemes of 160Sm and 162Sm are presented. The ground states in the parent nuclei 160Pm and 162Pm are both assigned a {6^ - }v{{7 over 2}^ + }≤ft[ {633} right] otimes π {{5 over 2}^ - }≤ft[ {532} right] configuration based on the population of states in the daughter nuclei. Blocked BCS calculations were performed to further investigate the spin-parities of the ground states in 160Pm, 161Pm, and 162Pm, and the isomeric state in 162Sm

  20. Possible ground-level measurements of solar neutron decay protons during the 19 October 1989 solar cosmic ray event

    SciTech Connect

    Flueckiger, E.O. ); Shea, M.A.; Smart, D.F.; Wilson, M.D.

    1991-05-01

    The high energy solar proton event of 19 October 1989 had an atypical particle anisotropy during the initial phase with the Deep River, Ottawa and Goose Bay neutron monitors in the Eastern Canadian region recording the intensity increase about 25 minutes before comparable detectors in Europe and Western Canada. Using the asymptotic cones of acceptance for these neutron monitors, the authors show that this early onset in the particle intensity increase may be the detection of relativistic protons that are the decay product of solar flare generated relativistic neutrons.

  1. Recent activities for β-decay half-lives and β-delayed neutron emission of very neutron-rich isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Dillmann, Iris; Abriola, Daniel; Singh, Balraj

    2014-05-02

    Beta-delayed neutron (βn) emitters play an important, two-fold role in the stellar nucleosynthesis of heavy elements in the 'rapid neutron-capture process' (r process). On one hand they lead to a detour of the material β-decaying back to stability. On the other hand, the released neutrons increase the neutron-to-seed ratio, and are re-captured during the freeze-out phase and thus influence the final solar r-abundance curve. A large fraction of the isotopes inside the r-process reaction path are not yet experimentally accessible and are located in the (experimental) 'Terra Incognita'. With the next generation of fragmentation and ISOL facilities presently being built or already in operation, one of the main motivation of all projects is the investigation of these very neutron-rich isotopes. A short overview of one of the planned programs to measure βn-emitters at the limits of the presently know isotopes, the BRIKEN campaign (Beta delayed neutron emission measurements at RIKEN) will be given. Presently, about 600 β-delayed one-neutron emitters are accessible, but only for a third of them experimental data are available. Reaching more neutron-rich isotopes means also that multiple neutron-emission becomes the dominant decay mechanism. About 460 β-delayed two-, three-or four-neutron emitters are identified up to now but for only 30 of them experimental data about the neutron branching ratios are available, most of them in the light mass region below A=30. The International Atomic and Energy Agency (IAEA) has identified the urgency and picked up this topic recently in a 'Coordinated Research Project' on a 'Reference Database for Beta-Delayed Neutron Emission Data'. This project will review, compile, and evaluate the existing data for neutron-branching ratios and half-lives of β-delayed neutron emitters and help to ensure a reliable database for the future discoveries of new isotopes and help to constrain astrophysical and theoretical models.

  2. Time-Projection with Optical Readout for Dark Matter, Double Beta Decay, and Neutron Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahlen, S. P.

    In recent years, there have been impressive advances in the technology of cameras using charged coupled devices (CCD's) and electron multiplying charged coupled devices (EMCCD's) that make possible a number of applications for the detection of ionizing radiation. The new cameras have quantum efficiencies exceeding 90%, effective noise levels less than one electron per pixel, and can be made to detect light ranging from the ultraviolet to the infrared. When combined with photomultiplier tubes (PMT's), and when used with Time-Projection-Chambers (TPC's) that contain narrow gap mesh charge amplification stages and scintillating gas compositions, these cameras can be used to provide three-dimensional images of particle tracks. There are many applications for such devices, including direction sensitive searches for dark matter, measurements of thermal and fast neutrons, and searches for double-beta-decay. I will describe the operation of optical TPC's and their various applications in this review article.

  3. Beta decay of neutron-rich Co: Probing single-particle states at and above the N=40 subshell closure

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, W. F.; Bruyneel, B.; Franchoo, S.; Huyse, M.; Kruglov, K.; Kudryavtsev, Y.; Raabe, R.; Reusen, I.; Duppen, P. van; Roosbroeck, J. van; Vermeeren, L.; Weissman, L.; Woehr, A.; Koester, U.; Kratz, K.-L.; Pfeiffer, B.; Thirolf, P.; Walters, W. B.

    1999-09-02

    Neutron-rich Co nuclei with A=66-70 were produced by the laser-ionization isotope-separation on-line method. The {beta} decay from these nuclei has been studied. A case example is given by reporting on the observed decay scheme of {sup 68}Co. The half life of the ground-state decay of this nucleus was measured to be 0.21(3) seconds. In addition, a new {beta} decaying isomer half life of 1.16(25) seconds was discovered. The level scheme of {sup 68}Ni has been significantly extended, and an interpretation of the observed levels is made by assuming that the N=40 gap has the characteristics of a shell closure.

  4. Calculation of Beta Decay Half-Lives and Delayed Neutron Branching Ratio of Fission Fragments with Skyrme-QRPA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minato, Futoshi

    2016-06-01

    Nuclear β-decay and delayed neutron (DN) emission is important for the r-process nucleosynthesis after the freeze-out, and stable and safe operation of nuclear reactors. Even though radioactive beam facilities have enabled us to measure β-decay and branching ratio of neutron-rich nuclei apart from the stability line in the nuclear chart, there are still a lot of nuclei which one cannot investigate experimentally. In particular, information on DN is rather scarce than that of T1/2. To predict T1/2 and the branching ratios of DN for next JENDL decay data, we have developed a method which comprises the quasiparticle-random-phase-approximation (QRPA) and the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model (HFSM). In this work, we calculate fission fragments with T1/2 ≤ 50 sec. We obtain the rms deviation from experimental half-life of 3:71. Although the result is still worse than GT2 which has been adopted in JENDL decay data, DN spectra are newly calculated. We also discuss further subjects to be done in future for improving the present approach and making next generation of JENDL decay data.

  5. β-Decay of Neutron-Rich Nuclei around 158Nd and the Origin of Rare-Earth Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, J.; Nishimura, S.; Lorusso, G.; Xu, Z. Y.; Ideguchi, E.; Simpson, G. S.; Baba, H.; Browne, F.; Daido, R.; Doornenbal, P.; Fang, Y. F.; Isobe, T.; Li, Z.; Patel, Z.; Rice, S.; Sinclair, L.; Söderström, P.-A.; Sumikama, T.; Watanabe, H.; Yagi, A.; Yokoyama, R.; Aoi, N.; Bello Garrote, F. L.; Benzoni, G.; Gey, G.; Gottardo, A.; Nishibata, H.; Odahara, A.; Sakurai, H.; Tanaka, M.; Taprogge, J.; Yamamoto, T.

    A large fraction of the rare-earth elements around mass number A = 160 observed in the solar system are produced in the astrophysical rapid (r-) neutron capture process. However, current stellar models cannot completely explain the relative abundance of these elements partially because of nuclear physics uncertainties. To address this problem, a β-decay spectroscopy experiment was performed at the RI Beam Factory (RIBF), aimed at studying a wide region of very neutron-rich nuclei around 158Nd. The data from this experiment provides a test of nuclear models as well as experimental inputs for r-process calculations.

  6. Experimental study of β and β -n decay of the neutron-rich N =54 isotone 87As

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korgul, A.; Rykaczewski, K. P.; Grzywacz, R.; Bingham, C. R.; Brewer, N. T.; Ciemny, A. A.; Gross, C. J.; Jost, C.; Karny, M.; Madurga, M.; Mazzocchi, C.; Mendez, A. J.; Miernik, K.; Miller, D.; Padgett, S.; Paulauskas, S. V.; Stracener, D. W.; Wolińska-Cichocka, M.

    2015-11-01

    The β -decay properties of neutron-rich 87As produced in the proton-induced fission of 238U were studied at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The low-energy excited states in N =53 87Se and N =52 86Se were identified through β -γ and β -delayed neutrondecay of 87As, respectively. The experimental systematics of low-energy levels of N =53 isotones, Z =34 Se87, and Z =32 85Ge, and along with an analysis of shell-model calculations, allow us to discuss the main features of excited states expected for the next N =53 isotone, 83Zn.

  7. Quality assurance of temporal variability of natural decay chain and neutron induced background for low-level NORM analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Yoho, Michael; Porterfield, Donivan R.; Landsberger, Sheldon

    2015-09-22

    In this study, twenty-one high purity germanium (HPGe) background spectra were collected over 2 years at Los Alamos National Laboratory. A quality assurance methodology was developed to monitor spectral background levels from thermal and fast neutron flux levels and naturally occurring radioactive material decay series radionuclides. 238U decay products above 222Rn demonstrated minimal temporal variability beyond that expected from counting statistics. 238U and 232Th progeny below Rn gas displayed at most twice the expected variability. Further, an analysis of the 139 keV 74Ge(n, γ) and 691 keV 72Ge(n, n') spectral features demonstrated temporal stability for both thermal and fast neutron fluxes.

  8. The magnetic shielding for the neutron decay spectrometer aSPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konrad, Gertrud; Ayala Guardia, Fidel; Baeßler, Stefan; Borg, Michael; Glück, Ferenc; Heil, Werner; Hiebel, Stefan; Muñoz Horta, Raquel; Sobolev, Yury

    2014-12-01

    Many experiments in nuclear and neutron physics are confronted with the problem that they use a superconducting magnetic spectrometer which potentially affects other experiments by their stray magnetic field. The retardation spectrometer aSPECT consists, inter alia, of a superconducting magnet system that produces a strong longitudinal magnetic field of up to 6.2 T. In order not to disturb other experiments in the vicinity of aSPECT, we had to develop a magnetic field return yoke for the magnet system. While the return yoke must reduce the stray magnetic field, the internal magnetic field and its homogeneity should not be affected. As in many cases, the magnetic shielding for aSPECT must manage with limited space. In addition, we must ensure that the additional magnetic forces on the magnet coils are not destructive. In order to determine the most suitable geometry for the magnetic shielding for aSPECT, we simulated a variety of possible geometries and combinations of shielding materials of non-linear permeability. The results of our simulations were checked through magnetic field measurements both with Hall and nuclear magnetic resonance probes. The experimental data are in good agreement with the simulated values: the mean deviation from the simulated exterior magnetic field is (-1.7±4.8)%. However, in the two critical regions, the internal magnetic field deviates by 0.2% (decay volume) and < 1 ×10-4 (analyzing plane) from the simulated values.

  9. E2 transition probabilities for decays of isomers observed in neutron-rich odd Sn isotopes

    DOE PAGES

    Iskra, Ł. W.; Broda, R.; Janssens, R. V.F.; Wrzesiński, J.; Chiara, C. J.; Carpenter, M. P.; Fornal, B.; Hoteling, N.; Kondev, F. G.; Królas, W.; et al

    2015-01-01

    High-spin states were investigated with gamma coincidence techniques in neutron-rich Sn isotopes produced in fission processes following ⁴⁸Ca + ²⁰⁸Pb, ⁴⁸Ca + ²³⁸U, and ⁶⁴Ni + ²³⁸U reactions. By exploiting delayed and cross-coincidence techniques, level schemes have been delineated in odd ¹¹⁹⁻¹²⁵Sn isotopes. Particular attention was paid to the occurrence of 19/2⁺ and 23/2⁺ isomeric states for which the available information has now been significantly extended. Reduced transition probabilities, B(E2), extracted from the measured half-lives and the established details of the isomeric decays exhibit a striking regularity. This behavior was compared with the previously observed regularity of the B(E2) amplitudesmore » for the seniority ν = 2 and 3, 10⁺ and 27/2⁻ isomers in even- and odd-Sn isotopes, respectively.« less

  10. E2 transition probabilities for decays of isomers observed in neutron-rich odd Sn isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Iskra, Ł. W.; Broda, R.; Janssens, R. V.F.; Wrzesiński, J.; Chiara, C. J.; Carpenter, M. P.; Fornal, B.; Hoteling, N.; Kondev, F. G.; Królas, W.; Lauritsen, T.; Pawłat, T.; Seweryniak, D.; Stefanescu, I.; Walters, W. B.; Zhu, S.

    2015-01-01

    High-spin states were investigated with gamma coincidence techniques in neutron-rich Sn isotopes produced in fission processes following ⁴⁸Ca + ²⁰⁸Pb, ⁴⁸Ca + ²³⁸U, and ⁶⁴Ni + ²³⁸U reactions. By exploiting delayed and cross-coincidence techniques, level schemes have been delineated in odd ¹¹⁹⁻¹²⁵Sn isotopes. Particular attention was paid to the occurrence of 19/2⁺ and 23/2⁺ isomeric states for which the available information has now been significantly extended. Reduced transition probabilities, B(E2), extracted from the measured half-lives and the established details of the isomeric decays exhibit a striking regularity. This behavior was compared with the previously observed regularity of the B(E2) amplitudes for the seniority ν = 2 and 3, 10⁺ and 27/2⁻ isomers in even- and odd-Sn isotopes, respectively.

  11. The neutron decay retardation spectrometer aSPECT: Electromagnetic design and systematic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glück, F.; Baeßler, S.; Byrne, J.; van der Grinten, M. G. D.; Hartmann, F. J.; Heil, W.; Konorov, I.; Petzoldt, G.; Sobolev, Yu.; Zimmer, O.

    2005-01-01

    The apparatus described here, aSPECT, will be used for a measurement of the neutrino-electron angular correlation coefficient a in the decay of free neutrons. The idea of the aSPECT spectrometer is to measure the integrated proton energy spectrum very accurately using an energy filter by electrostatic retardation and magnetic adiabatic collimation. The main ideas of the spectrometer are presented, followed by an explanation of the adiabatic transmission function. Details of the superconducting coil and of the electrode system are given, as well as a discussion of the most important systematic effects: magnetic field and electrostatic potential inhomogeneities, deviation from adiabatic motion, scattering in the residual gas, background, Doppler effect, edge effect, and detector efficiency. Using this spectrometer, the parameter a is planned to be measured with an absolute experimental uncertainty of δ a ≈ 3 . 10-4, from which the axial vector to vector coupling constant ratio λ can be determined with an accuracy of δλ ≈ 0.001.

  12. Albedo in the ATIC Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokolskaya, N. V.; Adams, J. H., Jr.; Ahn, H. S.; Bashindzhagyan, G. L.; Batkov, K. E.; Case, G.; Christl, M.; Chang, J.; Fazely, A. R.; Ganel, O.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    ATIC(Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter) is a balloon borne experiment designed to measure the cosmic ray composition for elements from hydrogen to iron and their energy spectra from approx.50 GeV to near 100 TeV. It consists of a Si-matrix detector to determine the charge of a CR particle, a scintillator hodoscope for tracking, carbon interaction targets and a fully active BGO calorimeter. ATIC had its first 16-day flight from McMurdo, Antarctica from 28/12/2000 to 13/01/2000. The ATIC flight collected approximately 25 million events. To measure charge of primary particle in presence of radiation scattered back from the interaction and subsequent shower development in the calorimeter a charge detector must be a mosaic of small detector pads so that the pad containing the signal from the incident particle has no additional signal from albedo particles. Therefore the silicon matrix was built of 4480 individual silicon pads each 2 cm x 1.5 cm. The matrix consists of four planes of detectors and the active detector area, in these planes are partially overlapped to completely cover the aperture. The lateral and amplitude distributions of albedo signals in Si-matrix are analyzed for different primary nuclei and different energy deposits in BGO calorimeter. The greater part of albedo signals has Q near 1, where Q = square root of Amplitude(MIP). The albedo distribution exponentially decreases up to Q near 8. These high values are produced by slow protons and plans. There are also a small number of signals of Q > 8, mainly for heavy nucleus primaries. These signals are apparently generated by neutrons. The comparison of the experimental data and simulations with GEANT 3-21 code using QGSM generator for nucleus-nucleus interactions is presented.

  13. β -decay properties of neutron-rich Ge, Se, Kr, Sr, Ru, and Pd isotopes from deformed quasiparticle random-phase approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarriguren, P.

    2015-04-01

    β -decay properties of even- and odd-A neutron-rich Ge, Se, Kr, Sr, Ru, and Pd isotopes involved in the astrophysical rapid neutron capture process are studied within a deformed proton-neutron quasiparticle random-phase approximation. The underlying mean field is described self-consistently from deformed Skyrme-Hartree-Fock calculations with pairing correlations. Residual interactions in the particle-hole and particle-particle channels are also included in the formalism. The isotopic evolution of the various nuclear equilibrium shapes and the corresponding charge radii are investigated in all the isotopic chains. The energy distributions of the Gamow-Teller strength as well as the β -decay half-lives are discussed and compared with the available experimental information. It is shown that nuclear deformation plays a significant role in the description of the decay properties in this mass region. Reliable predictions of the strength distributions are essential to evaluate decay rates in astrophysical scenarios.

  14. Decays of New Nuclides and Isomers Beyond the Proton Drip Line--The Influence of Neutron Configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Page, R. D.; Bianco, L.; Darby, I. G.; Joss, D. T.; Cooper, R. J.; Grahn, T.; Judson, D. S.; Sapple, P. J.; Thomson, J.; Simpson, J.; Labiche, M.; O'Donnell, D.; Al-Khalili, J. S.; Cannon, A. J.; Stevenson, P. D.; Suckling, E. B.; Eeckhaudt, S.; Greenlees, P. T.; Jones, P. M.; Julin, R.

    2008-11-11

    The energy of the vh{sub 9/2} orbital in nuclei above N = 82 drops rapidly in energy relative to the vf{sub 7/2} orbital as the occupancy of the {pi}h{sub 11/2} orbital increases. These two neutron orbitals become nearly degenerate as the proton drip line is approached. In this work, we have discovered the new nuclides {sup 161}Os and {sup 157}W, and studied the decays of the proton emitter {sup 160}Re in detail. The {sup 161}Os and {sup 160}Re nuclei were produced in reactions of 290, 300 and 310 MeV {sup 58}Ni ions with an isotopically enriched {sup 106}Cd target, separated in-flight using the RITU separator and implanted into the GREAT spectrometer. The {sup 161}Os{alpha} a decays populated the new nuclide {sup 157}W, which decayed by {beta}-particle emission. The {beta} decay fed the known {alpha}-decaying 1/2{sup +} and 11/2{sup -} states in {sup 157}Ta, which is consistent with a vf{sub 7/2} ground state in {sup 157}W. The measured {alpha}-decay energy and half-life for {sup 161}Os correspond to a reduced {alpha}-decay width that is compatible with s-wave {alpha}-particle emission, implying that its ground state is also a vf{sub 7/2} state. Over 7000 {sup 160}Re nuclei were produced and the {gamma} decays of a new isomeric state feeding the {pi}d{sub 3/2} level in {sup 160}Re were discovered, but no evidence for the proton or a decay of the expected {pi}h{sub 11/2} state could be found. The isomer decays offer a natural explanation for this non-observation and provides a striking example of the influence of the near degeneracy of the vh{sub 9/2} and vf{sub 7/2} orbitals on the properties of nuclei in this region.

  15. Calculations of neutron flux spectra induced in the earth's atmosphere by galactic cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, T. W.; Chandler, K. C.; Barish, J.

    1972-01-01

    Calculations have been carried out to determine the neutron flux induced in the earth's atmosphere by galactic protons and alpha particles at solar minimum for a geomagnetic latitude of 42 N. Neutron flux spectra were calculated using Monte Carlo and discrete ordinates methods, and various comparisons with experimental data are presented. The magnitude and shape of the calculated neutron-leakage spectrum at the particular latitude considered support the theory that the cosmic-ray-albedo-neutron-decay mechanism is the source of the protons and electrons trapped in the Van Allen belts.

  16. Earth's Reflection: Albedo

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillette, Brandon; Hamilton, Cheri

    2011-01-01

    When viewing objects of different colors, you might notice that some appear brighter than others. This is because light is reflected differently from various surfaces, depending on their physical properties. The word "albedo" is used to describe how reflective a surface is. The Earth-atmosphere has a combined albedo of about 30%, a number that is…

  17. Albedos. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, F.V.

    1993-07-01

    The albedo of the earth's surface varies dramatically from values of about 3 to 4 percent for calm bodies of water up to about 55 percent for gypsum sands. This rather broad range of reflected incoming solar radiation presents difficulties when attempting to define an average albedo for terrain over a large region from locally determined values. The patchwork, or checkerboard, appearance of the earth's surface as viewed from above is the result of various human activities, such as agriculture, the proliferation of urban sprawl, and road building. Each of these variable appearing surfaces will have individual albedos, rendering any attempt to determine an a real albedo almost an impossibility on the mesoscale. However, a vast data base exists for microscale applications for individual acreages, for example. A compilation of these data is presented.... Albedo, Solar radiation, Crops, Urban areas, Land uses.

  18. β-decay of neutron-rich Zâ¼60 nuclei and the origin of rare earth elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, J.; Nishimura, S.; Lorusso, G.; Xu, Z. Y.; Baba, H.; Browne, F.; Daido, R.; Doornenbal, P.; Fang, Y. F.; Ideguchi, E.; Isobe, T.; Li, Z.; Patel, Z.; Rice, S.; Simpson, G.; Sinclair, L.; Söderström, P. A.; Sumikama, T.; Watanabe, H.; Yagi, A.; Yokoyama, R.; Aoi, N.; Garrote, F. L. Bello; Benzoni, G.; Gey, G.; Gottardo, A.; Nishibata, H.; Odahara, A.; Sakurai, H.; Tanaka, M.; Taprogge, J.; Yamamoto, T.; Eurica Collaboration

    2014-05-01

    A large fraction of the rare-earth elements observed in the solar system is produced in the astrophysical rapid neutron capture process (r-process). However, current stellar models cannot completely explain the relative abundance of these elements partially because of nuclear physics uncertainties. To address this problem, a β-decay spectroscopy experiment was performed at RI Beam Factory (RIBF) at RIKEN, aimed at studying a wide range of very neutron-rich nuclei with Z˜60 that are progenitors of the rare-earth elements with mass number A˜460. The experiment provides a test of nuclear models as well as experimental inputs for r-process calculations. This contribution presents the experimental setup and some preliminary results of the experiment.

  19. β-decay of neutron-rich Z∼60 nuclei and the origin of rare earth elements

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.; Nishimura, S.; Lorusso, G.; Baba, H.; Doornenbal, P.; Isobe, T.; Söderström, P. A.; Sakurai, H.; Xu, Z. Y.; Browne, F.; Daido, R.; Fang, Y. F.; Yagi, A.; Nishibata, H.; Odahara, A.; Yamamoto, T.; Ideguchi, E.; Aoi, N.; Tanaka, M.; Collaboration: EURICA Collaboration; and others

    2014-05-02

    A large fraction of the rare-earth elements observed in the solar system is produced in the astrophysical rapid neutron capture process (r-process). However, current stellar models cannot completely explain the relative abundance of these elements partially because of nuclear physics uncertainties. To address this problem, a β-decay spectroscopy experiment was performed at RI Beam Factory (RIBF) at RIKEN, aimed at studying a wide range of very neutron-rich nuclei with Z∼60 that are progenitors of the rare-earth elements with mass number A∼460. The experiment provides a test of nuclear models as well as experimental inputs for r-process calculations. This contribution presents the experimental setup and some preliminary results of the experiment.

  20. Inelastic neutron scattering studies of Ge-76 and Se-76: relevance to neutrinoless double-beta decay

    SciTech Connect

    Crider, Ben; Peters, Erin; Ross, T.J.; McEllistrem, M; Prados-Estevez, F.; Allmond, James M; Vanhoy, J.R.; Yates, S.W.

    2015-01-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering measurements were performed at the University of Kentucky Accelerator Laboratory on enriched Ge-76 and Se-76 scattering samples. From measurements at incident neutron energies from 2.0 to 4.0 MeV, many new levels were identified and characterized in each nucleus; level lifetimes, transition probabilities, multipole mixing ratios, and other properties were determined. In addition, gamma-ray cross sections for the Ge-76(n,n'gamma) reaction were measured at neutron energies up to 5.0 MeV, with the goal of determining the cross sections of gamma rays in 2040-keV region, which corresponds to the region of interest in the neutrinoless double beta decay of Ge-76. Gamma rays from the three strongest branches from the 3952-keV level were observed, but the previously reported 2041-keV gamma ray was not. Population cross sections across the range of incident neutron energies were determined for the 3952-keV level, resulting in a cross section of similar to 0.1 mb for the 2041-keV branch using the previously determined branching ratios. Beyond this, the data from these experiments indicate that previously unreported gamma rays from levels in Ge-76 can be found in the 2039-keV region.

  1. Quality assurance of temporal variability of natural decay chain and neutron induced background for low-level NORM analysis

    DOE PAGES

    Yoho, Michael; Porterfield, Donivan R.; Landsberger, Sheldon

    2015-09-22

    In this study, twenty-one high purity germanium (HPGe) background spectra were collected over 2 years at Los Alamos National Laboratory. A quality assurance methodology was developed to monitor spectral background levels from thermal and fast neutron flux levels and naturally occurring radioactive material decay series radionuclides. 238U decay products above 222Rn demonstrated minimal temporal variability beyond that expected from counting statistics. 238U and 232Th progeny below Rn gas displayed at most twice the expected variability. Further, an analysis of the 139 keV 74Ge(n, γ) and 691 keV 72Ge(n, n') spectral features demonstrated temporal stability for both thermal and fast neutronmore » fluxes.« less

  2. Theory and use of GIRAFFE for analysis of decay characteristics of delayed-neutron precursors in an LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, K. C.

    1980-07-01

    The application of the computer code GIRAFFE (General Isotope Release Analysis For Failed Elements) written in FORTRAN IV is described. GIRAFFE was designed to provide parameter estimates of the nonlinear discrete-measurement models that govern the transport and decay of delayed-neutron precursors in a liquid-metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR). The code has been organized into a set of small, relatively independent and well-defined modules to facilitate modification and maintenance. The program logic, the numerical techniques, and the methods of solution used by the code are presented, and the functions of the MAIN program and of each subroutine are discussed.

  3. Deformation in the neutron-deficient rare earth isotopes: Radioactive decay scheme studies in the neodymium, promethium, and samarium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Breitenbach, J.B.

    1993-12-31

    Several experiments were performed at the UNISOR isotope separator facility at HHIRF at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory on the {beta}{sup +}/EC decay of neutron-deficient rare earth isotopes. Data for the decay chain {sup 133}Sm {yields} {sup 133}Pm {yields} {sup 133}Nd was obtained, consisting of multiscaled spectra of {gamma} rays, X rays, and conversion electrons, as well as {gamma}{gamma}t, X{gamma}t, e{gamma}t and eXt coincidences. Gamma rays associated with the decay of {sup 133}Sm and {sup 133}Pm were observed for the first time. The decay of a new low-spin (1/2) isomeric state, with a half life of about 70 sec was established for {sup 133}Nd. The level schemes for {sup 133}Nd and {sup 133}Pr were constructed. An M3 and two E1 isomers are established in {sup 133}Nd and an E3 isomer is confirmed in {sup 133}Pr. The energy level systematics for the nuclear region bounded by Z {ge} 58 and N {le} 78 is discussed. Theoretical interpretations are based on the particle-plus-triaxial rotor model calculations. In the framework of these calculations, the {beta}{sub 2} deformation is moderate for these nuclei ({beta}{sub 2} {approx} 0.20-0.25). A sudden onset of strong deformation is not observed, in contrast with the theoretical predictions by Leander and Moeller [Lea82].

  4. Detecting Low-Contrast Features in the Cosmic Ray Albedo Proton Map of the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. K.; Schwadron, N.; Spence, H. E.; Golightly, M. J.; Case, A. W.; Smith, S.; Blake, J. B.; Kasper, J.; Looper, M. D.; Mazur, J. E.; Townsend, L. W.; Zeitlin, C.; Stubbs, T. J.

    2014-01-01

    High energy cosmic rays constantly bombard the lunar regolith, producing (via nuclear evaporation) secondary 'albedo' or 'splash' particles like protons and neutrons, some of which escape back to space. Lunar Prospector and the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), have shown that the energy distribution of albedo neutrons is modulated by the elemental composition of the lunar regolith, and by ice deposits in permanently shadowed polar craters. Here we investigate an analogous phenomenon with high energy ((is) approximately 100 MeV) lunar albedo protons.

  5. Nuclear structure from radioactive decay

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, J.L.

    1990-09-30

    This report discusses the nuclear structure of the following isotopes as a result of radioactive decays: neutron-deficient iridium isotopes; neutron-deficient platinum isotopes; neutron-deficient gold isotopes; neutron-deficient mercury isotopes; neutron-deficient thallium isotopes; neutron-deficient lead isotopes; neutron-deficient promethium isotopes; and neutron-deficient samarium isotopes.

  6. Observations of Surfzone Albedo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinnett, G.; Feddersen, F.

    2014-12-01

    The surfzone environment (where waves break) contains several unique and previously unconsidered processes that affect the heat budget. Entering short-wave radiation is a dominant term in both shelf and surfzone heat budgets. In contrast to the shelf, however, depth limited wave breaking in the surfzone generates spray, whitewater and suspended sediments, elevating the surface albedo (ratio of reflected to incident short-wave radiation). Elevated albedo reduces the level of solar short-wave radiation entering the water, potentially resulting in less heating. Additionally, surfzone water quality is often impacted by fecal bacteria contamination. As bacteria mortality is related to short-wave solar radiation, elevated surfzone albedo could reduce pathogen mortality, impacting human health. Albedo in the open ocean has been frequently studied and parameterizations often consider solar zenith angle, wind speed and ocean chlorophyll concentration, producing albedo values typically near 0.06. However, surfzone albedo observations have been extremely sparse, yet show depth limited wave breaking may increase the albedo by nearly a factor of 10 up to 0.5. Here, we present findings from a field study at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography pier to observe the affect of waves on surfzone albedo. Concurrent measurements were taken with a four-way radiometer (to measure both downwelling and upwelling short-wave and long wave radiation) mounted above the surfzone. A co-located GoPro camera was used to relate visual aspects of the surfzone to measured reflectance, and wave height and period were observed with a bottom mounted pressure sensor in 5 m water depth just outside the surfzone. Wind speed and direction were observed on the pier 10 m above the water surface. Here, we will examine the surfzone albedo dependence on surfzone parameters, such as wave height.

  7. Inelastic neutron scattering cross sections for Ge76 relevant to background in neutrinoless double- β decay experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Crider, B. P.; Peters, E. E.; Allmond, J. M.; McEllistrem, M. T.; Prados-Estévez, F. M.; Ross, T. J.; Vanhoy, J. R.; Yates, S. W.

    2015-09-11

    The experimental signature in searches for the neutrinoless double- decay of 76Ge is a peak near 2039 keV in the spectrum. Given the low probability of the process, it is important that the background in this region be well understood. Moreover, inelastic scattering reactions with neutrons from muon-induced interactions and ( ,n) reactions in the surrounding materials or in the detector can provide contributions to the background. We also measured the production cross sections for rays from the 76Ge(n,n ) reaction in the 2039-keV region at incident neutron energies up to 4.9 MeV. In addition to determining that the crossmore » sections of a previously known 2040.7-keV ray from the 3952-keV level in 76 Ge are rather small, we find that a larger contribution arises from a 2037.5-keV ray which is attributed to a newly identified level at 3147 keV in 76Ge. Finally, a third contribution is also possible from another new level at 3577 keV. These results indicate that the 2039-keV region in 76Ge neutrinoless double- decay searches is more complex than was previously thought.« less

  8. Greenland Glacier Albedo Variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The program for Arctic Regional Climate Assessment (PARCA) is a NASA-funded project with the prime goal of addressing the mass balance of the Greenland ice sheet. Since the formal initiation of the program in 1995, there has been a significant improvement in the estimates of the mass balance of the ice sheet. Results from this program reveal that the high-elevation regions of the ice sheet are approximately in balance, but the margins are thinning. Laser surveys reveal significant thinning along 70 percent of the ice sheet periphery below 2000 m elevations, and in at least one outlet glacier, Kangerdlugssuaq in southeast Greenland, thinning has been as much as 10 m/yr. This study examines the albedo variability in four outlet glaciers to help separate out the relative contributions of surface melting versus ice dynamics to the recent mass balance changes. Analysis of AVHRR Polar Pathfinder albedo shows that at the Petermann and Jakobshavn glaciers, there has been a negative trend in albedo at the glacier terminus from 1981 to 2000, whereas the Stor+strommen and Kangerdlugssuaq glaciers show slightly positive trends in albedo. These findings are consistent with recent observations of melt extent from passive microwave data which show more melt on the western side of Greenland and slightly less on the eastern side. Significance of albedo trends will depend on where and when the albedo changes occur. Since the majority of surface melt occurs in the shallow sloping western margin of the ice sheet where the shortwave radiation dominates the energy balance in summer (e.g. Jakobshavn region) this region will be more sensitive to changes in albedo than in regions where this is not the case. Near the Jakobshavn glacier, even larger changes in albedo have been observed, with decreases as much as 20 percent per decade.

  9. Neutron capture by Ru: Neutron cross sections of {sup 96,102,104}Ru and gamma-ray spectroscopy in the decays of {sup 97,103,105}Ru

    SciTech Connect

    Krane, K. S.

    2010-04-15

    Cross sections for radiative capture of neutrons have been measured for stable isotopes of Ru with mass numbers 96,102, and 104. From separate irradiations using thermal and epithermal neutrons, independent values for the thermal cross section and effective resonance integral have been determined. Spectroscopic studies of the gamma rays emitted in the decays of {sup 97,103,105}Ru have enabled improvements in the precision of the energies and intensities of the radiations along with corresponding improvements in the beta-decay feeding intensities and the energies of the levels in the respective daughter nuclei. Similar spectroscopic measurements of the decays of {sup 105}Rh (daughter of {sup 105}Ru) and {sup 96}Tc (produced from n,p reactions on {sup 96}Ru) have resulted in improved gamma-ray energies and intensities in those decays.

  10. Measurement result of the neutron monitor onboard the Space Environment Data Acquisition Equipment - Attached Payload (SEDA-AP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koga, K.; Muraki, Y.; Shibata, S.; Yamamoto, T.; Matsumoto, H.; Okudaira, O.; Kawano, H.; Yumoto, K.

    2013-12-01

    decays are thought to originate from the radiation belt. This theory is called CRAND (Cosmic Ray Albedo Neutron Decay). Our observation result is consistent with the CRAND theory prediction in the case of low-energy parts. Moreover, the flux and angular distribution of local neutrons were estimated using the nuclear simulation code 'PHITS' to evaluate the influence of local neutrons on the structure of SEDA-AP and 'Kibo'. The results of our analyses on solar and albedo neutrons are reported in this paper.

  11. Enhanced γ -Ray Emission from Neutron Unbound States Populated in β Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Tain, J. L.; Valencia, E.; Algora, A.; Agramunt, J.; Rubio, B.; Rice, S.; Gelletly, W.; Regan, P.; Zakari-Issoufou, A. -A.; Fallot, M.; Porta, A.; Rissanen, J.; Eronen, T.; Äystö, J.; Batist, L.; Bowry, M.; Bui, V. M.; Caballero-Folch, R.; Cano-Ott, D.; Elomaa, V. -V.; Estevez, E.; Farrelly, G. F.; Garcia, A. R.; Gomez-Hornillos, B.; Gorlychev, V.; Hakala, J.; Jordan, M. D.; Jokinen, A.; Kolhinen, V. S.; Kondev, F. G.; Martínez, T.; Mendoza, E.; Moore, I.; Penttilä, H.; Podolyák, Zs.; Reponen, M.; Sonnenschein, V.; Sonzogni, A. A.

    2015-08-01

    Total absorption spectroscopy was used to investigate the β -decay intensity to states above the neutron separation energy followed by γ -ray emission in 87,88Br and 94Rb. Accurate results were obtained thanks to the careful control of systematic errors. An unexpectedly large γ intensity was observed in all three cases extending well beyond the excitation energy region where neutron penetration is hindered by low neutron energy. The γ branching as a function of excitation energy was compared to Hauser-Feshbach model calculations. For 87Br and 88Br the branching reaches 57% and 20% respectively, and could be explained as a nuclear structure effect. Some of the states populated in the daughter can only decay through the emission of a large orbital angular momentum neutron with a strongly reduced barrier penetrability. In the case of neutron-rich 94Rb the observed 4.5% branching is much larger than the calculations performed with standard nuclear statistical model parameters, even after proper correction for fluctuation effects on individual transition widths. The difference can be reconciled introducing an enhancement of one order-of-magnitude in the photon strength to neutron strength ratio. An increase in the photon strength function of such magnitude for very neutron-rich nuclei, if it proved to be correct, leads to a similar increase in the (n, γ) cross section that would have an impact on r process abundance calculations.

  12. Nuclear Structure Relevant to Double-beta Decay: Studies of 76Ge and 76Se using Inelastic Neutron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crider, Benjamin P.

    While neutrino oscillations indicate that neutrino flavors mix and that neutrinos have mass, they do not supply information on the absolute mass scale of the three flavors of neutrinos. Currently, the only viable way to determine this mass scale is through the observation of the theoretically predicted process of neutrinoless double-beta decay (0nubetabeta). This yet-to-be-observed decay process is speculated to occur in a handful of nuclei and has predicted half-lives greater than 1025 years. Observation of 0nubetabeta is the goal of several large-scale, multinational efforts and consists of detecting a sharp peak in the summed energies at the Q-value of the reaction. An exceptional candidate for the observation of 0nubetabeta is 76Ge, which offers an excellent combination of capabilities and sensitivities, and two such collaborations, MAJORANA and GERDA, propose tonne-scale experiments that have already begun initial phases using a fraction of the material. The absolute scale of the neutrino masses hinges on a matrix element, which depends on the ground-state wave functions for both the parent (76Ge) and daughter (76Se) nuclei in the 0nubetabeta decay and can only be calculated from nuclear structure models. Efforts to provide information on the applicability of these models have been undertaken at the University of Kentucky Accelerator Laboratory using gamma-ray spectroscopy following inelastic scattering reactions with monoenergetic, accelerator-produced fast neutrons. Information on new energy levels and transitions, spin and parity assignments, lifetimes, multipole mixing ratios, and transition probabilities have been determined for 76Se, the daughter of 76Ge 0nubetabeta, up to 3.0 MeV. Additionally, inaccuracies in the accepted level schemes have been addressed. Observation of 0nubetabeta requires precise knowledge of potential contributors to background within the region of interest, i.e., approximately 2039 keV for 76Ge. In addition to backgrounds

  13. The Proton Spectrum in Neutron Beta Decay: First Results with the aSPECT spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baeßler, S.; Angerer, H.; Ayala Guardia, F.; Borg, M.; Eberhardt, K.; Glück, F.; Heil, W.; Konorov, I.; Konrad, G.; Luquero Llopis, N.; Muñoz Horta, R.; Orlowski, M.; Petzoldt, G.; Rich, D.; Simson, M.; Sobolev, Y.; Wirth, H. F.; Zimmer, O.

    2006-11-01

    First measurements with the aSPECT spectrometer have been performed in a beam time at the beam line MEPHISTO of the neutron research reactor FRM-II. In this paper we give a short description of the spectrometer. The data analysis is still underway.

  14. Nuclear structure from radioactive decay

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, J.L.

    1991-09-30

    This report discusses nuclear structure from radioactive decay of the following: Neutron-Deficient Iridium Isotopes; Neutron-Deficient Platinum Isotopes; Neutron-Deficient Gold Isotopes; Neutron-Deficient Mercury Isotopes; Neutron-Deficient Thallium Isotopes; Neutron-Deficient Lead Isotopes; Neutron-Deficient Samarium Isotopes; Neutron-Deficient Promethium Isotopes; Neutron-Deficient Neodymium Isotopes; and Neutron-Deficient Praseodymium Isotopes. Also discussed are Nuclear Systematics and Models.

  15. {alpha}-decay of the new isotope {sup 187}Po: Probing prolate structures beyond the neutron mid-shell at N = 104

    SciTech Connect

    Andreyev, A.N.; Antalic, S.

    2006-04-15

    The new neutron-deficient isotope {sup 187}Po has been identified in the complete fusion reaction {sup 46}Ti+{sup 144}Sm{yields}{sup 187}Po+3n at the velocity filter SHIP. Striking features of the {sup 187}Po {alpha} decay are the strongly-hindered decay to the spherical ground state and unhindered decay to a surprisingly low-lying deformed excited state at 286 keV in the daughter nucleus {sup 183}Pb. Based on the potential energy surface calculations, the {sup 187}Po ground state and the 286 keV excited state in {sup 183}Pb were interpreted as being of prolate origin. The systematic deviation of the {alpha}-decay properties in the lightest odd-A Po isotopes relative to the smooth behavior in the even-A neighbors is discussed. Improved data for the decay of {sup 187}Bi{sup m,g} were also obtained.

  16. ANITA-2000 activation code package - updating of the decay data libraries and validation on the experimental data of the 14 MeV Frascati Neutron Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisoni, Manuela

    2016-03-01

    ANITA-2000 is a code package for the activation characterization of materials exposed to neutron irradiation released by ENEA to OECD-NEADB and ORNL-RSICC. The main component of the package is the activation code ANITA-4M that computes the radioactive inventory of a material exposed to neutron irradiation. The code requires the decay data library (file fl1) containing the quantities describing the decay properties of the unstable nuclides and the library (file fl2) containing the gamma ray spectra emitted by the radioactive nuclei. The fl1 and fl2 files of the ANITA-2000 code package, originally based on the evaluated nuclear data library FENDL/D-2.0, were recently updated on the basis of the JEFF-3.1.1 Radioactive Decay Data Library. This paper presents the results of the validation of the new fl1 decay data library through the comparison of the ANITA-4M calculated values with the measured electron and photon decay heats and activities of fusion material samples irradiated at the 14 MeV Frascati Neutron Generator (FNG) of the NEA-Frascati Research Centre. Twelve material samples were considered, namely: Mo, Cu, Hf, Mg, Ni, Cd, Sn, Re, Ti, W, Ag and Al. The ratios between calculated and experimental values (C/E) are shown and discussed in this paper.

  17. Project of Neutron Beta-Decay A-Asymmetry Measurement With Relative Accuracy of (1-2)×10(-3).

    PubMed

    Serebrov, A; Rudnev, Yu; Murashkin, A; Zherebtsov, O; Kharitonov, A; Korolev, V; Morozov, T; Fomin, A; Pusenkov, V; Schebetov, A; Varlamov, V

    2005-01-01

    We are going to use a polarized cold neutron beam and an axial magnetic field in the shape of a bottle formed by a superconducting magnetic system. Such a configuration of magnetic fields allows us to extract the decay electrons inside a well-defined solid angle with high accuracy. An electrostatic cylinder with a potential of 25 kV defines the detected region of neutron decays. The protons, which come from this region will be accelerated and registered by a proton detector. The use of coincidences between electron and proton signals will allow us to considerably suppress the background. The final accuracy of the A-asymmetry will be determined by the uncertainty of the neutron beam polarization measurement which is at the level of (1-2) × 10(-3), as shown in previous studies. PMID:27308154

  18. β -decay half-lives of neutron-rich nuclei at A ~ 110 on r-process path

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishizuka, Ippei; Sumikama, Toshiyuki; Browne, Frank; Bruce, Alison; Nishimura, Shunji; Doornenbal, Pieter; Lorusso, Giuseppe; Patel, Zena; Rice, Simon; Sinclair, Laura; Soderstom, Par-Ander; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Wu, Jin; Xu, Zhengyu; Yagi, Ayumi; Eurica Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    About half of the elements heavier than iron are thought to be produced by rapid-neutron capture process (r-process). The observed natural abundance in solar system was underestimated by a theoretical model at A ~ 110 , which uses β-decay half-lives. In the present study, we measured new β half-lives of neutron-rich nuclei on r-process path at RIBF in RIKEN. The nuclei of interest were produced by in-flight fission of uranium beam in beryllium target. The WAS3ABi detector which was 5 stacked double-sided silicon strip detectors (60 × 40 × 1 mm3), was used for the implantation of ions and the detection of both the implanted ions and the subsequently-emitted β rays. It is essential to make a position correlation between the mother nucleus and the β rays. In this talk, the analysis of the position correlation will be presented in detail. Preliminary results will be also shown.

  19. Kilonovae: Electromagnetic Counterparts of Neutron Star Mergers Powered by the Radioactive Decay of R-Process Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, Brian

    2014-03-01

    The coalescence of binary neutron stars (NSs) are the most promising sources for the direct detection of gravitational waves by Advanced LIGO and Virgo. However, maximizing the scientific opportunities from such a discovery will require the detection of a coincident electromagnetic counterpart. One possible counterpart is a short gamma-ray burst (GRB), powered by the accretion of NS debris left over from the merger onto the newly-formed black hole. However, GRBs are thought to be relativistically beamed and hence to accompany only a small fraction of mergers. NS mergers also produce isotropic supernova-like emission, powered by the radioactive decay of heavy (r-process) elements which are synthesized in the neutron-rich ejecta from the merger. I will describe the first calculations of such ``kilonovae'' which include realistic nuclear physics and radiative transport. In addition to providing a smoking gun for detecting binary NS mergers, kilonovae inform the unknown origin of the heaviest elements in the Universe. The first kilonova may have been discovered by the Hubble Space Telescope last year.

  20. Energetic neutrons leaking from the top of the atmosphere.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merker, M.

    1972-01-01

    The energy, angular, and latitude distributions of energetic neutrons (up to 2 GeV) leaking from the top of the atmosphere have been calculated. The results agree with the recent measurement of Preszler, Simnett, and White, whose leakage rates were well above the calculation of Lingenfelter. Since the spectrum of Lingenfelter has served for evaluating the cosmic-ray albedo-neutron decay (CRAND) source of energetic protons in Earth's inner radiation belt, it is suggested that the results reported here be used to reevaluate the CRAND contribution.

  1. Particle decay of very neutron deficient nuclei near {sup 100}Sn

    SciTech Connect

    Tighe, R.J.; Moltz, D.M.; Batchelder, J.C.; Ognibene, T.J.; Rowe, M.W.; Cerny, J.

    1993-10-01

    Proton emission from the nuclear ground state (gs) not only determines the limit of nuclear stability, but yields information on nuclear masses and structure very far from stability. There has been much recent experimental work in the region of the expected doubly-magic nucleus {sup 100}Sn (N=Z=50). This includes the discovery of the lightest known gs proton emitters, {sup 109}I and {sup 113}CS. We have used the compound nuclear reaction {sup 58}Ni + {sup 50}Cr to search for the gs particle decay of {sup 104}Sb and {sup 105}Sb. The evaporation residues were transported via our He-jet system and collected on a thin tape at the center of our new detector ball. This detector ball consists of six gas-{Delta}E gas-{Delta}E Si-E triple telescopes each capable of detecting protons with energies down to {approx}200 keV. Previous attempts to identify the gs proton decay of {sup 105}Sb had a lower energy threshold of {approx}500 keV. We have observed several low-energy ({approx}350-800 keV) proton groups at {sup 58}Ni bombarding energies of 223 MeV, 244 MeV, and 259 MeV.

  2. Earth Albedo and the orbit of LAGEOS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubincam, D. P.; Weiss, N. R.

    1985-01-01

    The long-period perturbations in the orbit of the Lageos satellite due to the Earth's albedo have been found using a new analytical formalism. The Earth is assumed to be a sphere whose surface diffusely reflects sunlight according to Lambert's law. Specular reflection is not considered. The formalism is based on spherical harmonics; it produces equations which hold regardless of whether the terminator is seen by the satellite or not. Specializing to the case of a realistic zonal albedo shows that Lageos' orbital semimajor axis changes periodically by only the a few millimeters and the eccentricity by one part in 100,000. The longitude of the node increases secularly. The effect considered here can explain neither the secular decay of 1.1 mm/day in the semimajor axis nor the observed along-track variations in acceleration of order 2 x 10 to the minus 12 power/sq ms.

  3. β - γ and β-neutron- γ emission in mass A=137 Decay Chain Studied with the Modular Total Absorption Spectrometer (MTAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasco, Charles; Fijałkowska, Aleksandra; Karny, Marek; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof; Wolińska-Cichocka, Marzena; Grzywacz, Robert

    2013-10-01

    The Modular Total Absorption Spectrometer (MTAS) is a detector made up of 19 separate hexagon modules of NaI which results in over a ton of NaI in the MTAS detector. MTAS was designed to capture as much of the electromagnetic energy release in β-decays as possible. MTAS was constructed at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility and measured over 20 decay products of 238U fission products in its inaugural measurement campaign in January 2012. The measurements were focused on nuclei identified as important for decay heat analysis of the nuclear fuel cycle. Silicon detectors placed at the center of MTAS to provide β triggers, make for extremely clean signals in MTAS. Preliminary results on the average electromagnetic energy release in the β decay of 137Xe and 137I isotopes will be presented. These isotopes are among the priority 1 cases listed by the NEA. The 137I also has a beta -neutron decay branch that is detected in MTAS. Neutron detection in a large NaI detector will also be discussed. This work was supported by the US DOE by award no. DE-FG02-96ER40978 and by US DOE, Office of Nuclear Physics.

  4. Observation of a large β -delayed neutron emission component in 102Rb decay and identification of excited states in 102Sr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z. M.; Garnsworthy, A. B.; Andreoiu, C.; Ball, G. C.; Bender, P. C.; Bildstein, V.; Cross, D. S.; Demand, G.; Dunlop, R.; Evitts, L. J.; Garrett, P. E.; Hackman, G.; Hadinia, B.; Ketelhut, S.; Krücken, R.; Leach, K. G.; Laffoley, A. T.; Miller, D.; Moukaddam, M.; Pore, J.; Radich, A. J.; Rajabali, M. M.; Svensson, C. E.; Tan, A.; Tardiff, E.; Unsworth, C.; Voss, A.; Voss, P.

    2016-05-01

    The β decay and β -delayed neutron emission of 102Rb have been studied using the 8 π spectrometer at TRIUMF-ISAC. The level scheme of 102Sr has been expanded from results of a γ -γ coincidence analysis, including the identification of the (4+ ) member of the ground-state band. The β -delayed neutron branching ratio of 102Rb was found to be significantly larger than previously reported. This larger value has the potential to modify the results of r -process calculations and motivates further measurements as well as refinements of theoretical models.

  5. The Gamma-ray Albedo of the Moon

    SciTech Connect

    Moskalenko, Igor V.; Porter, Troy A.; /UC, Santa Cruz

    2007-09-28

    We use the GEANT4 Monte Carlo framework to calculate the {gamma}-ray albedo of the Moon due to interactions of cosmic ray (CR) nuclei with moon rock. Our calculation of the albedo spectrum agrees with the EGRET data. We show that the spectrum of {gamma}-rays from the Moon is very steep with an effective cutoff around 3-4 GeV (600 MeV for the inner part of the Moon disk) and exhibits a narrow pion-decay line at 67.5 MeV, perhaps unique in astrophysics. Apart from other astrophysical sources, the albedo spectrum of the Moon is well understood, including its absolute normalization; this makes it a useful 'standard candle' for {gamma}-ray telescopes. The steep albedo spectrum also provides a unique opportunity for energy calibration of {gamma}-ray telescopes, such as the forthcoming Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST). Since the albedo flux depends on the incident CR spectrum which changes over the solar cycle, it is possible to monitor the CR spectrum using the albedo {gamma}-ray flux. Simultaneous measurements of CR proton and helium spectra by the Payload for Antimatter-Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics (PAMELA), and observations of the albedo {gamma}-rays by the GLAST Large Area Telescope (LAT), can be used to test the model predictions and will enable the LAT to monitor the CR spectrum near the Earth beyond the lifetime of the PAMELA.

  6. The Gamma-Ray Albedo of the Moon

    SciTech Connect

    Moskalenko, I.V.; Porter, T.A.; /UC, Santa Cruz

    2008-03-25

    We use the GEANT4 Monte Carlo framework to calculate the {gamma}-ray albedo of the Moon due to interactions of cosmic ray (CR) nuclei with moon rock. Our calculation of the albedo spectrum agrees with the EGRET data. We show that the spectrum of {gamma}-rays from the Moon is very steep with an effective cutoff around 3-4 GeV (600 MeV for the inner part of the Moon disk) and exhibits a narrow pion-decay line at 67.5 MeV, perhaps unique in astrophysics. Apart from other astrophysical sources, the albedo spectrum of the Moon is well understood, including its absolute normalization; this makes it a useful 'standard candle' for {gamma}-ray telescopes. The steep albedo spectrum also provides a unique opportunity for energy calibration of {gamma}-ray telescopes, such as the forthcoming Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST). Since the albedo flux depends on the incident CR spectrum which changes over the solar cycle, it is possible to monitor the CR spectrum using the albedo {gamma}-ray flux. Simultaneous measurements of CR proton and helium spectra by the Payload for Antimatter-Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics (PAMELA), and observations of the albedo {gamma}-rays by the GLAST Large Area Telescope (LAT), can be used to test the model predictions and will enable the LAT to monitor the CR spectrum near the Earth beyond the lifetime of the PAMELA.

  7. Radioactive decay products in neutron star merger ejecta: heating efficiency and γ-ray emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotokezaka, K.; Wanajo, S.; Tanaka, M.; Bamba, A.; Terada, Y.; Piran, T.

    2016-06-01

    The radioactive decay of the freshly synthesized r-process nuclei ejected in compact binary mergers powers optical/infrared macronovae (kilonovae) that follow these events. The light curves depend critically on the energy partition among the different decay products and it plays an important role in estimates of the amount of ejected r-process elements from a given observed signal. We show that 20-50 per cent of the total radioactive energy is released in γ-rays on time-scales from hours to a month. The number of emitted γ-rays per unit energy interval has roughly a flat spectrum between a few dozen keV and 1 MeV so that most of the energy is carried by ˜1 MeV γ-rays. However, at the peak of macronova emission the optical depth of the γ-rays is ˜0.02 and most of the γ-rays escape. The loss of these γ-rays reduces the heat deposition into the ejecta and hence reduces the expected macronova signals if those are lanthanides dominated. This implies that the ejected mass is larger by a factor of 2-3 than what was previously estimated. Spontaneous fission heats up the ejecta and the heating rate can increase if a sufficient amount of transuranic nuclei are synthesized. Direct measurements of these escaping γ-rays may provide the ultimate proof for the macronova mechanisms and an identification of the r-process nucleosynthesis sites. However, the chances to detect these signals are slim with current X-ray and γ-ray missions. New detectors, more sensitive by at least a factor of 10, are needed for a realistic detection rate.

  8. {beta}-decay half-lives and {beta}-delayed neutron emission probabilities of nuclei in the region A < or approx. 110, relevant for the r process

    SciTech Connect

    Pereira, J.; Galaviz, D.; Matos, M.; Montes, F.; Hennrich, S.; Kessler, R.; Schertz, F.; Aprahamian, A.; Quinn, M.; Woehr, A.; Arndt, O.; Pfeiffer, B.; Becerril, A.; Elliot, T.; Estrade, A.; Lorusso, G.; Schatz, H.; Kratz, K.-L.; Mantica, P. F.; Moeller, P.

    2009-03-15

    Measurements of {beta}-decay properties of A < or approx. 110 r-process nuclei have been completed at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University. {beta}-decay half-lives for {sup 105}Y, {sup 106,107}Zr, and {sup 111}Mo, along with {beta}-delayed neutron emission probabilities of {sup 104}Y, {sup 109,110}Mo and upper limits for {sup 105}Y, {sup 103-107}Zr, and {sup 108,111}Mo have been measured for the first time. Studies on the basis of the quasi-random-phase approximation are used to analyze the ground-state deformation of these nuclei.

  9. Beta-decay half-lives and beta-delayed neutron emisison probabilities of nuclei in the region A. 110, relevant for the r-process

    SciTech Connect

    Moller, Peter; Pereira, J; Hennrich, S; Aprahamian, A; Arndt, O; Becerril, A; Elliot, T; Estrade, A; Galaviz, D; Kessler, R; Kratz, K - L; Lorusso, G; Mantica, P F; Matos, M; Montes, F; Pfeiffer, B; Schatz, F; Schnorrenberger, L; Smith, E; Stolz, A; Quinn, M; Walters, W B; Wohr, A

    2009-01-01

    Measurements of the {beta}-decay properties of A {approx}< 110 r-process nuclei have been completed at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, at Michigan State University. {beta}-decay half-lives for {sup 105}Y, {sup 106,107}Zr and {sup 108,111}Mo, along with ,B-delayed neutron emission probabilities of 104Y, 109,11OMo and upper limits for 105Y, 103-107Zr and 108,111 Mo have been measured for the first time. Studies on the basis of the quasi-random phase approximation are used to analyze the ground-state deformation of these nuclei.

  10. Half-life systematics across the N=126 shell closure: role of first-forbidden transitions in the β decay of heavy neutron-rich nuclei.

    PubMed

    Morales, A I; Benlliure, J; Kurtukián-Nieto, T; Schmidt, K-H; Verma, S; Regan, P H; Podolyák, Z; Górska, M; Pietri, S; Kumar, R; Casarejos, E; Al-Dahan, N; Algora, A; Alkhomashi, N; Álvarez-Pol, H; Benzoni, G; Blazhev, A; Boutachkov, P; Bruce, A M; Cáceres, L S; Cullen, I J; Denis Bacelar, A M; Doornenbal, P; Estévez-Aguado, M E; Farrelly, G; Fujita, Y; Garnsworthy, A B; Gelletly, W; Gerl, J; Grebosz, J; Hoischen, R; Kojouharov, I; Kurz, N; Lalkovski, S; Liu, Z; Mihai, C; Molina, F; Mücher, D; Rubio, B; Shaffner, H; Steer, S J; Tamii, A; Tashenov, S; Valiente-Dobón, J J; Walker, P M; Wollersheim, H J; Woods, P J

    2014-07-11

    This Letter reports on a systematic study of β-decay half-lives of neutron-rich nuclei around doubly magic (208)Pb. The lifetimes of the 126-neutron shell isotone (204)Pt and the neighboring (200-202)Ir, (203)Pt, (204)Au are presented together with other 19 half-lives measured during the "stopped beam" campaign of the rare isotope investigations at GSI collaboration. The results constrain the main nuclear theories used in calculations of r-process nucleosynthesis. Predictions based on a statistical macroscopic description of the first-forbidden β strength reveal significant deviations for most of the nuclei with N<126. In contrast, theories including a fully microscopic treatment of allowed and first-forbidden transitions reproduce more satisfactorily the trend in the measured half-lives for the nuclei in this region, where the r-process pathway passes through during β decay back to stability. PMID:25062171

  11. Description of the 2ννββ decay within a fully renormalized proton-neutron quasiparticle random-phase approximation approach with a restored gauge symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raduta, C. M.; Raduta, A. A.

    2010-12-01

    A many-body Hamiltonian involving the mean field for a projected spherical single-particle basis, the pairing interactions for alike nucleons, and the dipole-dipole proton-neutron interactions in the particle-hole (ph) channel and the ph dipole pairing potential is treated by the projected gauge fully renormalized proton-neutron quasiparticle random phase approximation approach. The resulting wave functions and energies for the mother and daughter nuclei are used to calculate the 2νββ decay rate and the process half-life. For illustration, the formalism is applied for the decay 100Mo→100Ru. The calculated half-life is in agreement with the corresponding experimental data. The Ikeda sum rule is obeyed.

  12. Neutron dosimetry with the {sup 58}Ni(n,p){sup 58}Co reaction at short-decay times

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, P.J.; Holm, C.V.; Vehar, D.W.; Kelly, J.G.

    1992-12-31

    The {sup 58}Ni(n,p){sup 58}Co reaction is a very attractive choice for use as shown a neutron fluence monitor foil in reactor irradiations. The most important drawback to this reaction is the interference from the 9.15-h half-life {sup 58m}Co metastable state. A methodology is presented in this paper to allow the {sup 58g}Co ground-state activity to be read at short decay times and to be converted into the total {sup 58t}Co activity with no significant increase in the measurement uncertainty. This methodology involves modeling the {sup 58m}Co/{sup 58t}Co population ratio. Both theoretical and experimental estimates of the energy dependence of this ratio are presented. A method is presented to accurately measure this ratio. An empirical model of the energy dependence of this ratio is presented to allow simple estimates of the ratio to be made prior to a measurement.

  13. Variation in lunar neutron dose estimates.

    PubMed

    Slaba, Tony C; Blattnig, Steve R; Clowdsley, Martha S

    2011-12-01

    The radiation environment on the Moon includes albedo neutrons produced by primary particles interacting with the lunar surface. In this work, HZETRN2010 is used to calculate the albedo neutron contribution to effective dose as a function of shielding thickness for four different space radiation environments and to determine to what extent various factors affect such estimates. First, albedo neutron spectra computed with HZETRN2010 are compared to Monte Carlo results in various radiation environments. Next, the impact of lunar regolith composition on the albedo neutron spectrum is examined, and the variation on effective dose caused by neutron fluence-to-effective dose conversion coefficients is studied. A methodology for computing effective dose in detailed human phantoms using HZETRN2010 is also discussed and compared. Finally, the combined variation caused by environmental models, shielding materials, shielding thickness, regolith composition and conversion coefficients on the albedo neutron contribution to effective dose is determined. It is shown that a single percentage number for characterizing the albedo neutron contribution to effective dose can be misleading. In general, the albedo neutron contribution to effective dose is found to vary between 1-32%, with the environmental model, shielding material and shielding thickness being the driving factors that determine the exact contribution. It is also shown that polyethylene or other hydrogen-rich materials may be used to mitigate the albedo neutron exposure. PMID:21859325

  14. MISR Level 3 Albedo and Cloud Versioning

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-09-07

    ... MIL3YALN MISR_AM1_CGAL Stage 2:  CLOUD - Wind Vectors, Height Histogram Stage 1:  ALBEDO - Expansive, ... Stage 2 CLOUD - Height Histogram Stage 1 CLOUD - Wind Vectors Stage 1 ALBEDO - Expansive and Restrictive Albedos ...

  15. Decays of {sup 131}In, {sup 131}Sn, and the position of the h{sub 11/2} neutron hole state

    SciTech Connect

    Fogelberg, B.; Mach, H.; Sanchez-Vega, M.; Lindroth, A.; Ramstroem, E.; Gausemel, H.; Hoff, P.; Mezilev, K.A.; Genevey, J.; Pinston, J.A.

    2004-09-01

    The decays of the three isomers of {sup 131}In and the total decay energies of the two isomers of {sup 131}Sn have been studied in high sensitivity experiments at the OSIRIS mass separator. The main purpose of the investigation was to determine the position of the neutron hole h{sub 11/2} state, since a previous determination appeared to be in error. The present results support a small separation of the d{sub 3/2} and h{sub 11/2} neutron hole states. The new value obtained from measurements of decay energies is 69{+-}14 keV. A more precise value of 65.1 keV may be deduced from the level scheme of {sup 131}Sn obtained currently, however without firm support from coincidence data. This relatively low excitation energy of the h{sub 11/2} state is in agreement with systematics and in disagreement with the previous determination. A re-evaluation of the Q{sub {beta}} values and isomer spacings of {sup 131}In has been made.

  16. Cosmic Ray Albedo Proton Yield Correlated with Lunar Elemental Abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, J. K.; Spence, H. E.; Case, A. W.; Blake, J. B.; Golightly, M. J.; Kasper, J. C.; Looper, M. D.; Mazur, J. E.; Schwadron, N. A.; Townsend, L. W.; Zeitlin, C. J.

    2012-12-01

    High energy cosmic rays constantly bombard the lunar regolith, producing secondary "albedo" or "splash" particles like protons and neutrons, some of which escape back to space. Two lunar missions, Lunar Prospector and the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), have shown that the energy distribution of albedo neutrons is modulated by the elemental composition of the lunar regolith[1-4], with reduced neutron fluxes near the lunar poles being the result of collisions with hydrogen nuclei in ice deposits[5] in permanently shadowed craters. Here we investigate an analogous phenomenon with high energy (~100 MeV) lunar albedo protons. LRO has been observing the surface and environment of the Moon since June of 2009. The CRaTER instrument (Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation) on LRO is designed to characterize the lunar radiation environment and its effects on simulated human tissue. CRaTER's multiple solid-state detectors can discriminate the different elements in the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) population above ~10 MeV/nucleon, and can also distinguish between primary GCR protons arriving from deep space and albedo particles propagating up from the lunar surface. We use albedo protons with energies greater than 60 MeV to construct a cosmic ray albedo proton map of the Moon. The yield of albedo protons is proportional to the rate of lunar proton detections divided by the rate of incoming GCR detections. The map accounts for time variation in the albedo particles driven by time variations in the primary GCR population, thus revealing any true spatial variation of the albedo proton yield. Our current map is a significant improvement over the proof-of-concept map of Wilson et al.[6]. In addition to including twelve more months of CRaTER data here, we use more numerous minimum ionizing GCR protons for normalization, and we make use of all six of CRaTER's detectors to reduce contamination from spurious non-proton events in the data stream. We find find that the flux

  17. γ -ray decay from neutron-bound and unbound states in 95Mo and a novel technique for spin determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedeking, M.; Krtička, M.; Bernstein, L. A.; Allmond, J. M.; Basunia, M. S.; Bleuel, D. L.; Burke, J. T.; Daub, B. H.; Fallon, P.; Firestone, R. B.; Goldblum, B. L.; Hatarik, R.; Lake, P. T.; Larsen, A. C.; Lee, I.-Y.; Lesher, S. R.; Paschalis, S.; Petri, M.; Phair, L.; Scielzo, N. D.; Volya, A.

    2016-02-01

    The emission of γ rays from neutron-bound and neutron-unbound states in 95Mo, populated in the 94Mo(d ,p ) reaction, has been investigated. Charged particles and γ radiation were detected with arrays of annular silicon and Clover-type high-purity Germanium detectors, respectively. Utilizing p -γ and p -γ -γ coincidences, the 95Mo level scheme was greatly enhanced with 102 new transitions and 43 new states. It agrees well with shell model calculations for excitation energies below ≈2 MeV. From p -γ coincidence data, a new method for the determination of spins of discrete levels is proposed. The method exploits the suppression of high-angular momentum neutron emission from levels with high spins populated in the (d ,p ) reaction above the neutron separation energy. Spins for almost all 95Mo levels below 2 MeV (and for a few levels above) have been determined with this method.

  18. Calculations of neutron flux spectra induced in the earth's atmosphere by galactic cosmic rays.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, T. W.; Chandler, K. C.; Barish, J.

    1973-01-01

    Calculations have been carried out to determine the neutron flux induced in the earth's atmosphere by galactic protons and alpha particles at solar minimum for a geomagnetic latitude of 42 N. Neutron flux spectra in the energy range from about 10 to the minus 8th to about 100,000 MeV at various depths in the atmosphere were calculated by using Monte Carlo and discrete ordinates methods, and various comparisons with experimental data are presented. The magnitude and shape of the calculated neutron leakage spectrum at the particular latitude considered support the theory that the cosmic ray albedo neutron decay (Crand) mechanism is the source of the protons trapped in the inner radiation belt.

  19. Signatures of volatiles in the lunar proton albedo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwadron, N. A.; Wilson, J. K.; Looper, M. D.; Jordan, A. P.; Spence, H. E.; Blake, J. B.; Case, A. W.; Iwata, Y.; Kasper, J. C.; Farrell, W. M.; Lawrence, D. J.; Livadiotis, G.; Mazur, J.; Petro, N.; Pieters, C.; Robinson, M. S.; Smith, S.; Townsend, L. W.; Zeitlin, C.

    2016-07-01

    We find evidence for hydrated material in the lunar regolith using "albedo protons" measured with the Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation (CRaTER) on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO). Fluxes of these albedo protons, which are emitted from the regolith due to steady bombardment by high energy radiation (Galactic Cosmic Rays), are observed to peak near the poles, and are inconsistent with the latitude trends of heavy element enrichment (e.g., enhanced Fe abundance). The latitudinal distribution of albedo protons anti-correlates with that of epithermal or high energy neutrons. The high latitude enhancement may be due to the conversion of upward directed secondary neutrons from the lunar regolith into tertiary protons due to neutron-proton collisions in hydrated regolith that is more prevalent near the poles. The CRaTER instrument may thus provide important measurements of volatile distributions within regolith at the Moon and potentially, with similar sensors and observations, at other bodies within the Solar System.

  20. Possible Albedo Proton Signature of Hydrated Lunar Surface Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwadron, N.; Wilson, J. K.; Looper, M. D.; Jordan, A.; Spence, H. E.; Blake, J. B.; Case, A. W.; Iwata, Y.; Kasper, J. C.; Farrell, W. M.; Lawrence, D. J.; Livadiotis, G.; Mazur, J. E.; Petro, N. E.; Pieters, C. M.; Robinson, M. S.; Smith, S. S.; Townsend, L. W.; Zeitlin, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    We find evidence for a surface layer of hydrated material in the lunar regolith using "albedo protons" measured by the Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation (CRaTER) on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO). Fluxes of these albedo protons, which are emitted from the regolith due to steady bombardment by high-energy radiation (Galactic Cosmic Rays), are observed to peak near the poles, and cannot be accounted for by either heavy element enrichment (e.g., enhanced Fe abundance), or by deeply buried (> 50 cm) hydrogenous material. The latitudinal distribution of albedo protons does not correlate with that of epithermal or high-energy neutrons. The high latitude enhancement may be due to the conversion of upward directed secondary neutrons from the lunar regolith into tertiary protons due to neutron-proton collisions in a thin (~ 1-10 cm) layer of hydrated regolith near the surface that is more prevalent near the poles. The CRaTER instrument thus provides critical measurements of volatile distributions within lunar regolith and potentially, with similar sensors and observations, at other bodies within the Solar System.

  1. Spectral albedos of midlatitude snowpacks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhury, B.

    1981-01-01

    Spectral albedos of impure-nonhomogeneous snowpacks, typical of midlatitudes, from 400 to 2200 nm were modeled through a numerical solution of the radiative transfer equation in the two-stream approximation. Discrete depth-dependent values of density, grain size and impurity concentration were used to characterize the snowpacks. The model is for diffuse incident radiation, and the numerical method is based on doubling and invariant imbedding. The effect of soot impurities on snowpack albedos is illustrated when a snowpack is several centimeters deep and soot reduces the albedos at visible wavelengths, however, when a snowpack is only a few centimeters deep, soot may increase the albedos at visible wavelengths. By adjusting soot content and snow grain size, good quantitative agreement with some observations at the Cascade Mountains (Washington) and at Point Barrow (Alaska) are obtained; however, the model grain sizes are found to be fifty to four hundred percent larger than the measured values. For satellite snowcover observations, a model for effective albedo of partially snow-covered areas was developed and compared with some NOAA-2 observations of the southeastern United States.

  2. Accuracy of neutron self-activation method with iodine-containing scintillators for quantifying 128I generation using decay-fitting technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nohtomi, Akihiro; Wakabayashi, Genichiro

    2015-11-01

    We evaluated the accuracy of a self-activation method with iodine-containing scintillators in quantifying 128I generation in an activation detector; the self-activation method was recently proposed for photo-neutron on-line measurements around X-ray radiotherapy machines. Here, we consider the accuracy of determining the initial count rate R0, observed just after termination of neutron irradiation of the activation detector. The value R0 is directly related to the amount of activity generated by incident neutrons; the detection efficiency of radiation emitted from the activity should be taken into account for such an evaluation. Decay curves of 128I activity were numerically simulated by a computer program for various conditions including different initial count rates (R0) and background rates (RB), as well as counting statistical fluctuations. The data points sampled at minute intervals and integrated over the same period were fit by a non-linear least-squares fitting routine to obtain the value R0 as a fitting parameter with an associated uncertainty. The corresponding background rate RB was simultaneously calculated in the same fitting routine. Identical data sets were also evaluated by a well-known integration algorithm used for conventional activation methods and the results were compared with those of the proposed fitting method. When we fixed RB = 500 cpm, the relative uncertainty σR0 /R0 ≤ 0.02 was achieved for R0/RB ≥ 20 with 20 data points from 1 min to 20 min following the termination of neutron irradiation used in the fitting; σR0 /R0 ≤ 0.01 was achieved for R0/RB ≥ 50 with the same data points. Reasonable relative uncertainties to evaluate initial count rates were reached by the decay-fitting method using practically realistic sampling numbers. These results clarified the theoretical limits of the fitting method. The integration method was found to be potentially vulnerable to short-term variations in background levels, especially

  3. Correction of the readings of albedo dosimeters at the MC400 LNR cyclotron with the use of the spherical albedo system and comparison with other correction methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokrov, Yu. V.; Morozova, S. V.; Timoshenko, G. N.; Krylov, V. A.

    2014-11-01

    The results of correcting the readings of DVGN-01 albedo dosimeters behind the shielding of the MC400 cyclotron at the Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions (LNR) with the use of the spherical albedo system are presented. The formulas approximating the dependences of correction coefficients used to correct the readings on the hardness parameters of low-energy neutron spectra were obtained based on these results and the results of earlier studies. Neutron spectra were measured at three points behind the MC400 shielding, and the correction coefficients for DVGN-01 were calculated based on these spectra. It was demonstrated that these coefficients agree well with the coefficients obtained with the use of the spherical albedo system. This suggests that the obtained correction coefficient values are accurate. The recommended correction coefficient values to be used in the individual dosimetric control at LNR were specified based on the results of the present study and the data given in other papers.

  4. Characterization of neutron field in a NPP workplace.

    PubMed

    Breznik, B; Pochat, J L; Muller, H; Asselineau, B; Pavlin, M

    2007-01-01

    At the Krsko Nuclear Power Plant (NPP), albedo dosimeters are used for personal neutron dosimetry. Spectrometric measurements allow determination of reference dosimetric values of realistic neutron fields to be used for calibration of albedo dosimeters. The Laboratory for Neutron Metrology and Dosimetry from the Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) was in charge of characterising neutron fields in the plant at two representative points with high neutron and gamma dose rate. Calibration of the dosimeters in the workplace used to be performed only by a spherical survey meter. Based on the reference dosimetric values, the Plant Dosimetry Laboratory has verified the response of albedo dosimeters.

  5. Characterization of neutron field in a NPP workplace.

    PubMed

    Breznik, B; Pochat, J L; Muller, H; Asselineau, B; Pavlin, M

    2007-01-01

    At the Krsko Nuclear Power Plant (NPP), albedo dosimeters are used for personal neutron dosimetry. Spectrometric measurements allow determination of reference dosimetric values of realistic neutron fields to be used for calibration of albedo dosimeters. The Laboratory for Neutron Metrology and Dosimetry from the Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) was in charge of characterising neutron fields in the plant at two representative points with high neutron and gamma dose rate. Calibration of the dosimeters in the workplace used to be performed only by a spherical survey meter. Based on the reference dosimetric values, the Plant Dosimetry Laboratory has verified the response of albedo dosimeters. PMID:17416593

  6. β-decay half-lives of new neutron-rich rare-earth isotopes 159Pm,162Sm, and 166Gd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichikawa, S.; Asai, M.; Tsukada, K.; Haba, H.; Nagame, Y.; Shibata, M.; Sakama, M.; Kojima, Y.

    2005-06-01

    The new neutron-rich rare-earth isotopes 159Pm, 162Sm, and 166Gd produced in the proton-induced fission of 238U were identified using the JAERI on-line isotope separator (JAERI-ISOL) coupled to a gas-jet transport system. The half-lives of 159Pm, 162Sm, and 166Gd were determined to be 1.5 ± 0.2, 2.4 ± 0.5, and 4.8 ± 1.0 s respectively. The partial decay scheme of 166Gd was constructed from γγ-coincidence data. A more accurate half-life value of 25.6 ± 2.2 s was obtained for the previously identified isotope 166Tb. The half-lives measured in the present study are in good agreement with the theoretical predictions calculated by the second generation of the gross theory with the atomic masses evaluated by Audi and Wapstra.

  7. Effect of the electron decay of metallic fission products on the chemical and phase compositions of an uranium-plutonium fuel irradiated by fast neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondarenko, G. G.; Bulatov, G. S.; Gedgovd, K. N.; Lyubimov, D. Yu.; Yakushkin, M. M.

    2011-11-01

    After fast-neutron irradiation, uranium-plutonium nitride U0.8Pu0.2N is shown to acquire a complex structure consisting of a solid solution that is based on the nitrides of uranium, plutonium, americium, neptunium, zirconium, yttrium, and lanthanides and contains condensed phases U2N3, CeRu2, BaTe, Ba3N2, CsI, Sr3N2, LaSe, metallic molybdenum, technetium, and U(Ru, Rh, Pd)3 intermetallics. The contents and compositions of these phases are calculated at a temperature of 900 K and a burn-up fraction up to 14% (U + Pu). The change in the composition of the irradiated uranium-plutonium nitride is studied during the electron decay of metallic radionuclides. The kinetics of transformation of U103Ru3, 137CsI, 140Ba3N2, and 241PuN is calculated.

  8. Neutron-Induced Partial Cross-Section Measurements on ^76Ge Motivated by The Majorana Project 0νββ Decay Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilderbrand, S.; Kwan, E.; Angell, C.; Fallin, B.; Howell, C. R.; Hutcheson, A.; Karwowski, H. J.; Kelley, J. H.; Tonchev, A. P.; Tornow, W.; Masters, D. B.; Pedroni, R. S.; Weisel, G. J.

    2007-10-01

    The goal of the Majorana Collaboration is to study 0νββ in order to verify that the neutrino is its own anti-particle; and if so, what is the mass ofthe electron neutrino. Observation of a sharp peak at the ββ endpoint energy will confirm 0νββ as a decay mode, and determination of the partial width will determine the matrix element which depends directly on the electron neutrino mass. In order to observe and verify the existence of 0νββ, it is important to reduce intrinsic, extrinsic,& cosmogenic backgrounds. The Majorana Project will operate with HPGe detectors deep underground to achieve a low-background environment. Recent advances in signal processing and detector design have also enabled scientists to further understand background sources. γ-ray spectra from the interaction of pulsed mono-energetic neutrons with ^76Ge were measured at TUNL using segmented HPGe clover detectors. The neutron-induced partial cross-sections for γ transitions in ^76Ge were measured at En = 8 and 12MeV.

  9. Neutron one-quasiparticle states in {sup 251}Fm{sub 151} populated via the {alpha} decay of {sup 255}No

    SciTech Connect

    Asai, M.; Tsukada, K.; Ishii, Y.; Toyoshima, A.; Ishii, T.; Nagame, Y.; Nishinaka, I.; Haba, H.; Ichikawa, T.; Kojima, Y.; Sueki, K.

    2011-01-15

    Excited states in {sup 251}Fm populated via the {alpha} decay of {sup 255}No are studied in detail through {alpha}-{gamma} coincidence and {alpha} fine-structure measurements. Five excited states reported previously in {sup 251}Fm are firmly established through the {alpha}-{gamma} coincidence measurement, and rotational bands built on one-quasiparticle states are newly established through the {alpha} fine-structure measurement. Spin-parities and neutron configurations of the excited states in {sup 251}Fm as well as the ground state of {sup 255}No are definitely identified on the basis of deduced internal conversion coefficients, lifetimes of {gamma} transitions, rotational-band energies built on one-quasiparticle states, and hindrance factors of {alpha} transitions. It is found that the excitation energy of the 1/2{sup +}[620] state in N=151 isotones increases with the atomic number, especially at Z{>=}100, while that of the 1/2{sup +}[631] state decreases at Z=100. Ground-state deformations and energies of neutron one-quasiparticle states in the N=151 isotones are calculated using a macroscopic-microscopic model, and the energy systematics of the one-quasiparticle states in the isotones are discussed in terms of the evolution of nuclear deformation involving the hexadecapole ({beta}{sub 4}) and hexacontatetrapole ({beta}{sub 6}) deformations.

  10. New model of the cascade gamma decay of neutron resonances for practitioners: Basic concepts and attainable precision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhovoj, A. M.

    2015-03-01

    A model-free extraction of level densities and radiative strength functions for cascade dipole gamma transitions that has been performed to date revealed the need for developing a new model of the deexcitation of compound states of nuclei having arbitrary masses and belonging to any type over a broad range of their excitations. Such a model should provide a practical means for determining thresholds for the breaking of nucleon Cooper pairs below the neutron binding energy, the relationship between the level densities for excitations of the quasiparticle and phonon types, and the emission widths for nuclear-reaction products in excited nuclei. From an analysis of data on the intensities of two-step cascades initiated by radiative thermal-neutron capture, it can be seen that the highest precision in describing available experimental spectra is reached upon taking into account the breaking of three to four Cooper pairs of nucleons.

  11. New model of the cascade gamma decay of neutron resonances for practitioners: Basic concepts and attainable precision

    SciTech Connect

    Sukhovoj, A. M.

    2015-03-15

    A model-free extraction of level densities and radiative strength functions for cascade dipole gamma transitions that has been performed to date revealed the need for developing a new model of the deexcitation of compound states of nuclei having arbitrary masses and belonging to any type over a broad range of their excitations. Such a model should provide a practical means for determining thresholds for the breaking of nucleon Cooper pairs below the neutron binding energy, the relationship between the level densities for excitations of the quasiparticle and phonon types, and the emission widths for nuclear-reaction products in excited nuclei. From an analysis of data on the intensities of two-step cascades initiated by radiative thermal-neutron capture, it can be seen that the highest precision in describing available experimental spectra is reached upon taking into account the breaking of three to four Cooper pairs of nucleons.

  12. Nuclear structure from radioactive decay. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, J.L.

    1991-09-30

    This report discusses nuclear structure from radioactive decay of the following: Neutron-Deficient Iridium Isotopes; Neutron-Deficient Platinum Isotopes; Neutron-Deficient Gold Isotopes; Neutron-Deficient Mercury Isotopes; Neutron-Deficient Thallium Isotopes; Neutron-Deficient Lead Isotopes; Neutron-Deficient Samarium Isotopes; Neutron-Deficient Promethium Isotopes; Neutron-Deficient Neodymium Isotopes; and Neutron-Deficient Praseodymium Isotopes. Also discussed are Nuclear Systematics and Models.

  13. Operational comparison of TLD albedo dosemeters and solid state nuclear tracks detectors in fuel fabrication facilities.

    PubMed

    Tsujimura, N; Takada, C; Yoshida, T; Momose, T

    2007-01-01

    The authors carried out an operational study that compared the use of TLD albedo dosemeters and solid state nuclear tracks detector in plutonium environments of Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute, Tokai Works. A selected group of workers engaged in the fabrication process of MOX (Plutonium-Uranium mixed oxide) fuel wore both TLD albedo dosemeters and solid state nuclear tracks detectors. The TL readings were generally proportional to the counted etch-pits, and thus the dose equivalent results obtained from TLD albedo dosemeter agreed with those from solid state nuclear tracks detector within a factor of 1.5. This result indicates that, in the workplaces of the MOX fuel plants, the neutron spectrum remained almost constant in terms of time and space, and the appropriate range of field-specific correction with spectrum variations was small in albedo dosimetry. PMID:17337735

  14. Long-term Passive Mode Data Measured by the Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons (DAN) Instrument onboard Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) and Comparison to REMS Surface Pressure and Temperature Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, I.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Litvak, M. L.; Sanin, A. B.; Martín-Torres, J.; Zorzano, M. P.; Boynton, W. V.; Fedosov, F.; Golovin, D.; Hardgrove, C. J.; Harshman, K.; Kozyrev, A.; Kuzmin, R.; Malakhov, A. V.; Mischna, M. A.; Moersch, J.; Mokrousov, M.; Nikiforov, S.; Tate, C. G.

    2014-12-01

    Since the landing in August 2012, DAN has provided a wealth of scientific data from the successful surface operation in both Active mode and Passive mode. While the main DAN science investigation so far has focused in estimating the contents of water-equivalent-hydrogen (WEH) and chlorine-equivalent-neutron-absorption in the surface, here we will provide/discuss low energy (less than about 1 keV) background neutron environment at the Martian surface as measured by DAN Passive mode operation. Passive mode measurements have been done on almost every sols with durations ranging from 1 hour to ~9 hour, covering different times of a day. Neutrons from the onboard power source Multi Mission Radioisotope Thermonuclear Generator (MMRTG) and induced by Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR)/Solar Energetic Particles (SEP) interactions with the Martian atmosphere and the surface material contribute to the DAN passive data. An approach to separate out the respective contributions from the DAN total count rates was developed previously (Jun et al., 2013) using the data collected at Rocknest (where the rover stayed from sol 60 to sol 100). The main goal of this paper is to extend the same analysis to other locations encountered during the rover traverse especially to understand the long-term (through Sol 800, covering more than 1 Martian year) behavior of the neutron environment at the Martian surface as measured by DAN in response to variation of the free space GCR/SEP environment. Extensive Monte Carlo transport simulations using Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) have been performed to support the analysis and to aid interpretation of the DAN passive data. In addition, the DAN passive data are compared to the long-term surface temperature and pressure data (both measured and modeled) from Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS) to investigate possible correlation of the DAN data with ambient environmental conditions.

  15. Weak decay of hypernuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Grace, R.

    1983-01-01

    The Moby Dick spectrometer (at BNL) in coincidence with a range spectrometer and a TOF neutron detector will be used to study the weak decay modes of /sup 12/C. The Moby Dick spectrometer will be used to reconstruct and tag events in which specific hypernuclear states are formed in the reaction K/sup -/ + /sup 12/C ..-->.. ..pi../sup -/ + /sup 12/C. Subsequent emission of decay products (pions, protons and neutrons) in coincidence with the fast forward pion will be detected in a time and range spectrometer, and a neutron detector.

  16. {beta}-decay half-lives of new neutron-rich isotopes of elements from Pm to Tb

    SciTech Connect

    Ichikawa, S.; Asai, M.; Tsukada, K.; Nishinaka, I.; Nagame, Y.; Osa, A.; Sakama, M.; Oura, Y.; Kojima, Y.; Shibata, M.; Kawade, K.

    1999-11-16

    Eight new neutron-rich lanthanide isotopes produced in the proton-induced fission of {sup 238}U have been identified using the JAERI on-line isotope separator (JAERI-ISOL) coupled to a gas-jet transport system. For six of these, each half-life was determined: {sup 159}Pm (2{+-}1 s), {sup 161}Sm (4.8{+-}0.8 s), {sup 165}Gd (10.3{+-}1.6 s), {sup 166}Tb (21{+-}6 s), {sup 167}Tb (19.4{+-}2.7 s) and {sup 168}Tb (8.2{+-}1.3 s). The observed half-lives were compared with theoretical calculations. The recent calculation by the gross theory with the new one-particle strength function shows quite good agreement with the experimental half-lives.

  17. {beta}-Decay Half-Lives of New Neutron-Rich Isotopes of Elements from Pm to Tb

    SciTech Connect

    S. Ichikawa; M. Asai; K. Tsukada; A. Osa; M. Sakama; Y. Kojima; M. Shibata; I. Nishinaka; Y. Nagame; Y. Oura; K. Kawade

    1999-12-31

    Eight new neutron-rich lanthanide isotopes produced in the proton-induced fission of {sup 238}U have been identified using the JAERI on-line isotope separator (JAERI-ISOL) coupled to a gas-jet transport system. For six of these, each half-life was determined: {sup 159}Pm (2 {+-} 1 s), {sup 161}Sm (4.8 {+-} 0.8 s), {sup 165}Gd (10.3 {+-} 1.6 s), {sup 166}Tb (21 {+-} 6 s), {sup 167}Tb (19.4 {+-} 2.7 s) and {sup 168}Tb (8.2 {+-} 1.3 s). The observed half-lives were compared with theoretical calculations. The recent calculation by the gross theory with the new one-particle strength function shows quite good agreement with the experimental half-lives.

  18. {beta}-decay half-lives of new neutron-rich rare-earth isotopes {sup 159}Pm,{sup 162}Sm, and {sup 166}Gd

    SciTech Connect

    Ichikawa, S.; Asai, M.; Tsukada, K.; Nagame, Y.; Haba, H.; Shibata, M.; Sakama, M.; Kojima, Y.

    2005-06-01

    The new neutron-rich rare-earth isotopes {sup 159}Pm, {sup 162}Sm, and {sup 166}Gd produced in the proton-induced fission of {sup 238}U were identified using the JAERI on-line isotope separator (JAERI-ISOL) coupled to a gas-jet transport system. The half-lives of {sup 159}Pm, {sup 162}Sm, and {sup 166}Gd were determined to be 1.5 {+-} 0.2, 2.4 {+-} 0.5, and 4.8 {+-} 1.0 s respectively. The partial decay scheme of {sup 166}Gd was constructed from {gamma}{gamma}-coincidence data. A more accurate half-life value of 25.6 {+-} 2.2 s was obtained for the previously identified isotope {sup 166}Tb. The half-lives measured in the present study are in good agreement with the theoretical predictions calculated by the second generation of the gross theory with the atomic masses evaluated by Audi and Wapstra.

  19. β -Decay Half-Lives of 110 Neutron-Rich Nuclei across the N =82 Shell Gap: Implications for the Mechanism and Universality of the Astrophysical r Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorusso, G.; Nishimura, S.; Xu, Z. Y.; Jungclaus, A.; Shimizu, Y.; Simpson, G. S.; Söderström, P.-A.; Watanabe, H.; Browne, F.; Doornenbal, P.; Gey, G.; Jung, H. S.; Meyer, B.; Sumikama, T.; Taprogge, J.; Vajta, Zs.; Wu, J.; Baba, H.; Benzoni, G.; Chae, K. Y.; Crespi, F. C. L.; Fukuda, N.; Gernhäuser, R.; Inabe, N.; Isobe, T.; Kajino, T.; Kameda, D.; Kim, G. D.; Kim, Y.-K.; Kojouharov, I.; Kondev, F. G.; Kubo, T.; Kurz, N.; Kwon, Y. K.; Lane, G. J.; Li, Z.; Montaner-Pizá, A.; Moschner, K.; Naqvi, F.; Niikura, M.; Nishibata, H.; Odahara, A.; Orlandi, R.; Patel, Z.; Podolyák, Zs.; Sakurai, H.; Schaffner, H.; Schury, P.; Shibagaki, S.; Steiger, K.; Suzuki, H.; Takeda, H.; Wendt, A.; Yagi, A.; Yoshinaga, K.

    2015-05-01

    The β -decay half-lives of 110 neutron-rich isotopes of the elements from Rb 37 to Sn 50 were measured at the Radioactive Isotope Beam Factory. The 40 new half-lives follow robust systematics and highlight the persistence of shell effects. The new data have direct implications for r -process calculations and reinforce the notion that the second (A ≈130 ) and the rare-earth-element (A ≈160 ) abundance peaks may result from the freeze-out of an (n ,γ )⇄(γ ,n ) equilibrium. In such an equilibrium, the new half-lives are important factors determining the abundance of rare-earth elements, and allow for a more reliable discussion of the r process universality. It is anticipated that universality may not extend to the elements Sn, Sb, I, and Cs, making the detection of these elements in metal-poor stars of the utmost importance to determine the exact conditions of individual r -process events.

  20. The Ultraviolet Albedo of Ganymede

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrath, Melissa; Hendrix, A.

    2013-10-01

    A large set of ultraviolet images of Ganymede have been acquired with the Hubble Space Telescope over the last 15 years. These images have been used almost exclusively to study Ganymede’s stunning auroral emissions (Feldman et al. 2000; Eviatar et al. 2001; McGrath et al. 2004; Saur et al. 2011; McGrath et al. 2013), and even the most basic information about Ganymede’s UV albedo has yet to be gleaned from these data. We will present a first-cut analysis of both disk-averaged and spatially-resolved UV albedos of Ganymede, with focus on the spatially-resolved Lyman-alpha albedo, which has never been considered previously for this satellite. Ganymede's visibly bright regions are known to be rich in water ice, while the visibly dark regions seem to be more carbonaceous (Carlson et al., 1996). At Lyman-alpha, these two species should also have very different albedo values. References Carlson, R. and 39 co-authors, Near-infrared spectroscopy and spectral mapping of Jupiter and the Galilean satellites: Results from Galileo’s initial orbit, Science, 274, 385-388, 1996. Eviatar, A., D. F. Strobel, B. C. Wolven, P. D. Feldman, M. A. McGrath, and D. J. Williams, Excitation of the Ganymede ultraviolet aurora, Astrophys. J, 555, 1013-1019, 2001. Feldman, P. D., M. A. McGrath, D. F. Strobel, H. W. Moos, K. D. Retherford, and B. C. Wolven, HST/STIS imaging of ultraviolet aurora on Ganymede, Astrophys. J, 535, 1085-1090, 2000. McGrath M. A., Lellouch E., Strobel D. F., Feldman P. D., Johnson R. E., Satellite Atmospheres, Chapter 19 in Jupiter: The Planet, Satellites and Magnetosphere, ed. F. Bagenal, T. Dowling, W. McKinnon, Cambridge University Press, 2004. McGrath M. A., Jia, Xianzhe; Retherford, Kurt; Feldman, Paul D.; Strobel, Darrell F.; Saur, Joachim, Aurora on Ganymede, J. Geophys. Res., doi: 10.1002/jgra.50122, 2013. Saur, J., S. Duling, S., L. Roth, P. D. Feldman, D. F. Strobel, K. D. Retherford, M. A. McGrath, A. Wennmacher, American Geophysical Union, Fall Meeting

  1. The temporal scale research of MODIS albedo product authenticity verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yongxing; Xue, Zhihang; Cheng, Hui; Xiong, Yajv; Chen, Yunping; Tong, Ling

    2016-06-01

    This study introduces a method that normalizes the inversed ETM+ albedo to the local solar noon albedo for the temporal scale of the MODIS albedo validation. Firstly, the statistical relation model between the surface albedo and the solar elevation angle was set up, and then deducing relationship between ETM+ albedo and the solar elevation angle, so the ETM+ albedo at local solar noon could be got. Secondly, the ground measurement albedo at the local solar noon was used to assess the inversed ETM+ albedo and the normalized albedo. The experiment results show that the method can effectively improve the accuracy of product certification.

  2. A more accurate and penetrating method to measure the enrichment and mass of UF6 storage containers using passive neutron self-interrogation

    SciTech Connect

    Menlove, Howard O; Swinhoe, Martyn T; Miller, Karen A

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes an unattended mode neutron measurement that can provide the enrichment of the uranium in UF{sub 6} cylinders. The new passive neutron measurement provides better penetration into the uranium mass than prior gamma-ray enrichment measurement methods. The Passive Neutron Enrichment Monitor (PNEM) provides a new measurement technique that uses passive neutron totals and coincidence counting together with neutron self-interrogation to measure the enrichment in the cylinders. The measurement uses the neutron rates from two detector pods. One of the pods has a bare polyethylene surface next to the cylinder and the other polyethylene surface is covered with Cd to prevent thermal neutrons from returning to the cylinder. The primary neutron source from the enriched UF{sub 6} is the alpha-particle decay from the {sub 234}U that interacts with the fluorine to produce random neutrons. The singles neutron counting rate is dominated by the {sub 234}U neutrons with a minor contribution from the induced fissions in the {sub 235}U. However, the doubles counting rate comes primarily from the induced fissions (i.e., multiplication) in the {sub 235}U in enriched uranium. The PNEM concept makes use of the passive neutrons that are initially produced from the {sub 234}U reactions that track the {sub 235}U enrichment during the enrichment process. The induced fission reactions from the thermal-neutron albedo are all from the {sub 235}U and provide a measurement of the {sub 235}U. The Cd ratio has the desirable feature that all of the thermal-neutron-induced fissions in {sub 235}U are independent of the original neutron source. Thus, the ratio is independent of the uranium age, purity, and prior reactor history.

  3. Lunar Proton Albedo Anomalies: Soil, Surveyors, and Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, J. K.; Schwadron, N.; Spence, H. E.; Case, A. W.; Golightly, M. J.; Jordan, A.; Looper, M. D.; Petro, N. E.; Robinson, M. S.; Stubbs, T. J.; Zeitlin, C. J.; Blake, J. B.; Kasper, J. C.; Mazur, J. E.; Smith, S. S.; Townsend, L. W.

    2014-12-01

    Since the launch of LRO in 2009, the CRaTER instrument has been mapping albedo protons (~100 MeV) from the Moon. These protons are produced by nuclear spallation, a consequence of galactic cosmic ray (GCR) bombardment of the lunar regolith. Just as spalled neutrons and gamma rays reveal elemental abundances in the lunar regolith, albedo protons may be a complimentary method for mapping compositional variations. We presently find that the lunar maria have an average proton yield 0.9% ±0.3% higher than the average yield in the highlands; this is consistent with neutron data that is sensitive to the regolith's average atomic weight. We also see cases where two or more adjacent pixels (15° × 15°) have significantly anomalous yields above or below the mean. These include two high-yielding regions in the maria, and three low-yielding regions in the far-side highlands. Some of the regions could be artifacts of Poisson noise, but for completeness we consider possible effects from compositional anomalies in the lunar regolith, including pyroclastic flows, antipodes of fresh craters, and so-called "red spots". We also consider man-made landers and crash sites that may have brought elements not normally found in the lunar regolith.

  4. The Search for Proton Decay.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshak, Marvin L.

    1984-01-01

    Provides the rationale for and examples of experiments designed to test the stability of protons and bound neutrons. Also considers the unification question, cosmological implications, current and future detectors, and current status of knowledge on proton decay. (JN)

  5. Winter Albedo Characteristics at St. Paul, Minnesota.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Donald G.; Ruschy, David L.

    1989-03-01

    Mean and median daily albedos of the November-April period are presented for a nonforested station in the North Central region of the United States where frozen soil and persistent snow cover are common winter features. Three distinct albedo periods were found, the occurrence of which can be explained by comparison with associated daily records of air temperature and snow depth. These periods are: I) Introduction to Winter, 9-22 November, a transitional period in which snowfalls begin to occur but with insufficient frequency or duration to greatly alter the mean albedo from growing season values; II) the High Albedo Season, 23 November-17 March, that is characterized by mean and median albedos of 50% or higher and by a negatively skewed distribution of albedo values in contrast to periods I and III; and III) the transition period, Introduction to Spring, 18 March-12 April, where late season snowfalls of brief duration occur, but the mean albedo is lower than in period I because of the more common occurrence of moist surfaces due to snowmelt and rains.

  6. Response of TLD-albedo and nuclear track dosimeters exposed to plutonium sources

    SciTech Connect

    Brackenbush, L.W.; Baumgartner, W.V.; Fix, J.J.

    1991-12-01

    Neutron dosimetry has been extensively studied at Hanford since the mid-1940s. At the present time, Hanford contractors use thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD)-albedo dosimeters to record the neutron dose equivalent received by workers. The energy dependence of the TLD-albedo dosimeter has been recognized and documented since introduced at Hanford in 1964 and numerous studies have helped assure the accuracy of dosimeters. With the recent change in Hanford's mission, there has been a significant decrease in the handling of plutonium tetrafluoride, and an increase in the handling of plutonium metal and plutonium oxide sources. This study was initiated to document the performance of the current Hanford TLD-albedo dosimeter under the low scatter conditions of the calibration laboratory and under the high scatter conditions in the work place under carefully controlled conditions at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). The neutron fields at the PFP facility were measured using a variety of instruments, including a multisphere spectrometer, tissue equivalent proportional counters, and specially calibrated rem meters. Various algorithms were used to evaluate the TLD-albedo dosimeters, and the results are given in this report. Using current algorithms, the dose equivalents evaluated for bare sources and sources with less than 2.5 cm (1 in.) of acrylic plastic shielding in high scatter conditions typical of glove box operations are reasonably accurate. Recently developed CR-39 track etch dosimeters (TEDs) were also exposed in the calibration laboratory and at the PFP. The results indicate that the TED dosimeters are quite accurate for both bare and moderated neutron sources. Until personnel dosimeter is available that incorporates a direct measure of the neutron dose to a person, technical uncertainties in the accuracy of the recorded data will continue.

  7. Response of TLD-albedo and nuclear track dosimeters exposed to plutonium sources

    SciTech Connect

    Brackenbush, L.W.; Baumgartner, W.V.; Fix, J.J.

    1991-12-01

    Neutron dosimetry has been extensively studied at Hanford since the mid-1940s. At the present time, Hanford contractors use thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD)-albedo dosimeters to record the neutron dose equivalent received by workers. The energy dependence of the TLD-albedo dosimeter has been recognized and documented since introduced at Hanford in 1964 and numerous studies have helped assure the accuracy of dosimeters. With the recent change in Hanford`s mission, there has been a significant decrease in the handling of plutonium tetrafluoride, and an increase in the handling of plutonium metal and plutonium oxide sources. This study was initiated to document the performance of the current Hanford TLD-albedo dosimeter under the low scatter conditions of the calibration laboratory and under the high scatter conditions in the work place under carefully controlled conditions at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). The neutron fields at the PFP facility were measured using a variety of instruments, including a multisphere spectrometer, tissue equivalent proportional counters, and specially calibrated rem meters. Various algorithms were used to evaluate the TLD-albedo dosimeters, and the results are given in this report. Using current algorithms, the dose equivalents evaluated for bare sources and sources with less than 2.5 cm (1 in.) of acrylic plastic shielding in high scatter conditions typical of glove box operations are reasonably accurate. Recently developed CR-39 track etch dosimeters (TEDs) were also exposed in the calibration laboratory and at the PFP. The results indicate that the TED dosimeters are quite accurate for both bare and moderated neutron sources. Until personnel dosimeter is available that incorporates a direct measure of the neutron dose to a person, technical uncertainties in the accuracy of the recorded data will continue.

  8. Variability of albedo and utility of the MODIS albedo product in forested wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sumner, David M.; Wu, Qinglong; Pathak, Chandra S.

    2011-01-01

    Albedo was monitored over a two-year period (beginning April 2008) at three forested wetland sites in Florida, USA using up- and down-ward facing pyranometers. Water level, above and below land surface, is the primary control on the temporal variability of daily albedo. Relatively low reflectivity of water accounts for the observed reductions in albedo with increased inundation of the forest floor. Enhanced canopy shading of the forest floor was responsible for lower sensitivity of albedo to water level at the most dense forest site. At one site, the most dramatic reduction in daily albedo was observed during the inundation of a highly-reflective, calcareous periphyton-covered land surface. Satellite-based Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) estimates of albedo compare favorably with measured albedo. Use of MODIS albedo values in net radiation computations introduced a root mean squared error of less than 4.7 W/m2 and a mean, annual bias of less than 2.3 W/m2 (1.7%). These results suggest that MODIS-estimated albedo values can reliably be used to capture areal and temporal variations in albedo that are important to the surface energy balance.

  9. Detecting Low-Contrast Features in the Cosmic Ray Albedo Proton Yield Map of the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, J. K.; Schwadron, N.; Spence, H.; Smith, S. S.; Golightly, M. J.; Case, A. W.; Stubbs, T. J.; Blake, J. B.; Kasper, J. C.; Looper, M. D.; Mazur, J. E.; Townsend, L. W.; Zeitlin, C. J.

    2013-12-01

    High energy cosmic rays constantly bombard the lunar regolith, producing (via nuclear evaporation[1]) secondary 'albedo' or 'splash' particles like protons and neutrons, some of which escape back to space. Lunar Prospector and the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), have shown that the energy distribution of albedo neutrons is modulated by the elemental composition of the lunar regolith[2-5], and by ice deposits[6] in permanently shadowed polar craters. Here we investigate an analogous phenomenon with high energy lunar albedo protons. Using the CRaTER instrument (Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation) on LRO, we measure albedo protons (60 to 150 MeV) to construct a cosmic ray albedo proton map of the Moon. Our current map is a significant improvement over the proof-of-concept map of Wilson et al.[7]. In addition to using more numerous minimum ionizing GCR protons for normalization, we filter out all solar particle enhancement periods and make use of all six of CRaTER's detectors to reduce contamination from spurious non-proton events in the data stream. The average yield of albedo protons from the maria is 0.8% × 0.4% higher than the yield from the highlands. In addition there appear to be localized peaks in the albedo proton yield that are co-located with peaks in trace elemental abundances as measured by the Lunar Prospector Gamma Ray Spectrometer. More data may reveal subtler proton yield variations correlated with latitude, time of day, or the locations of permanently shadowed craters, due to the presence of water frost. Given that the most obvious features in the map have a proton yield only 2σ above average, the search for more subtle regions of enhancement or reduction in proton yield will require precise corrections for small but systematic effects of time and spacecraft altitude on the apparent proton yield. We will show the effects of these trends as well as the latest version of the albedo proton map. References: [1] Bethe (1937) Rev. Mod

  10. Arctic sea ice albedo from AVHRR

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsay, R.W.; Rothrock, D.A.

    1994-11-01

    The seasonal cycle of surface albedo of sea ice in the Arctic is estimated from measurements made with the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) on the polar-orbiting satellites NOAA-10 and NOAA-11. The albedos of 145 200-km-square cells are analyzed. The cells are from March through September 1989 and include only those for which the sun is more than 10 deg above the horizon. Cloud masking is performed manually. Corrections are applied for instrument calibration, nonisotropic reflection, atmospheric interference, narrowband to broadband conversion, and normalization to a common solar zenith angle. The estimated albedos are relative, with the instrument gain set to give an albedo of 0.80 for ice floes in March and April. The mean values for the cloud-free portions of individual cells range from 0.18 to 0.91. Monthly averages of cells in the central Arctic range from 0.76 in April to 0.47 in August. The monthly averages of the within-cell standard deviations in the central Arctic are 0.04 in April and 0.06 in September. The surface albedo and surface temperature are correlated most strongly in March (R = -0.77) with little correlation in the summer. The monthly average lead fraction is determined from the mean potential open water, a scaled representation of the temperature or albedo between 0.0 (for ice) and 1.0 (for water); in the central Arctic it rises from an average 0.025 in the spring to 0.06 in September. Sparse data on aerosols, ozone, and water vapor in the atmospheric column contribute uncertainties to instantaneous, area-average albedos of 0.13, 0.04, and 0.08. Uncertainties in monthly average albedos are not this large. Contemporaneous estimation of these variables could reduce the uncertainty in the estimated albedo considerably.

  11. Beta-decay rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borzov, I. N.

    2006-10-01

    Major astrophysical applications involve a huge number of exotic nuclei. Their beta-decay properties play a crucial role in stellar explosive events. An important effort has been developed in last decades to measure the masses and β-decay properties of very neutron-rich nuclei at radioactive nuclear beam facilities. However, most of them cannot be synthesized in terrestrial laboratories and only theoretical predictions can fill the gap. We will concentrate mainly on the β-decay rates needed for stellar r-process modeling and for performing the RNB experiments. An overview of the microscopic approaches to the β-decay strength function is given. The continuum QRPA approach based on the self-consistent ground state description in the framework of the density functional theory is outlined. For the first time, a systematic study of the total β-decay half-lives and delayed neutron emission probabilities takes into account the Gamow Teller and first-forbidden transitions. Due to the shell configuration effects, the first-forbidden decays have a strong impact on the β-decay characteristics of the r-process relevant nuclei at Z≈28, N>50; Z⩾50, N>82 and Z=60 70, N≈126. Suppression of the delayed neutron emission probability is found in nuclei with the neutron excess bigger than one major shell. The effect originates from the high-energy first-forbidden transitions to the states outside the (Q-B)-window in the daughter nuclei. The performance of existing global models for the nuclides near the r-process paths is critically analyzed and confronted with the recent RIB experiments in the regions of 78Ni, 132Sn and “east” of 208Pb.

  12. Arctic sea ice albedo from AVHRR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindsay, R. W.; Rothrock, D. A.

    1994-01-01

    The seasonal cycle of surface albedo of sea ice in the Arctic is estimated from measurements made with the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) on the polar-orbiting satellites NOAA-10 and NOAA-11. The albedos of 145 200-km-square cells are analyzed. The cells are from March through September 1989 and include only those for which the sun is more than 10 deg above the horizon. Cloud masking is performed manually. Corrections are applied for instrument calibration, nonisotropic reflection, atmospheric interference, narrowband to broadband conversion, and normalization to a common solar zenith angle. The estimated albedos are relative, with the instrument gain set to give an albedo of 0.80 for ice floes in March and April. The mean values for the cloud-free portions of individual cells range from 0.18 to 0.91. Monthly averages of cells in the central Arctic range from 0.76 in April to 0.47 in August. The monthly averages of the within-cell standard deviations in the central Arctic are 0.04 in April and 0.06 in September. The surface albedo and surface temperature are correlated most strongly in March (R = -0.77) with little correlation in the summer. The monthly average lead fraction is determined from the mean potential open water, a scaled representation of the temperature or albedo between 0.0 (for ice) and 1.0 (for water); in the central Arctic it rises from an average 0.025 in the spring to 0.06 in September. Sparse data on aerosols, ozone, and water vapor in the atmospheric column contribute uncertainties to instantaneous, area-average albedos of 0.13, 0.04, and 0.08. Uncertainties in monthly average albedos are not this large. Contemporaneous estimation of these variables could reduce the uncertainty in the estimated albedo considerably. The poor calibration of AVHRR channels 1 and 2 is another large impediment to making accurate albedo estimates.

  13. Optimizing VANDLE for Decay Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewer, N. T.; Taylor, S. Z.; Grzywacz, R.; Madurga, M.; Paulauskas, S. V.; Cizewski, J. A.; Peters, W. A.; Vandle Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    Understanding the decay properties of neutron rich isotopes has well established importance to the path of the r-process and to the total decay heat for reactor physics. Specifically, the half-life, branching ratio and spectra for β-n decay is of particular interest. With that in mind, we have continued attempts to improve upon the Versatile Array of Neutron Detectors at Low Energy (VANDLE) in terms of efficiency and TOF resolution through the use of new and larger scintillators. Details of the new implementation, design and characterization of the array will be shown and compared to previous results.

  14. A new parameterization of the post-fire snow albedo effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleason, K. E.; Nolin, A. W.

    2013-12-01

    Mountain snowpack serves as an important natural reservoir of water: recharging aquifers, sustaining streams, and providing important ecosystem services. Reduced snowpacks and earlier snowmelt have been shown to affect fire size, frequency, and severity in the western United States. In turn, wildfire disturbance affects patterns of snow accumulation and ablation by reducing canopy interception, increasing turbulent fluxes, and modifying the surface radiation balance. Recent work shows that after a high severity forest fire, approximately 60% more solar radiation reaches the snow surface due to the reduction in canopy density. Also, significant amounts of pyrogenic carbon particles and larger burned woody debris (BWD) are shed from standing charred trees, which concentrate on the snowpack, darken its surface, and reduce snow albedo by 50% during ablation. Although the post-fire forest environment drives a substantial increase in net shortwave radiation at the snowpack surface, driving earlier and more rapid melt, hydrologic models do not explicitly incorporate forest fire disturbance effects to snowpack dynamics. The objective of this study was to parameterize the post-fire snow albedo effect due to BWD deposition on snow to better represent forest fire disturbance in modeling of snow-dominated hydrologic regimes. Based on empirical results from winter experiments, in-situ snow monitoring, and remote sensing data from a recent forest fire in the Oregon High Cascades, we characterized the post-fire snow albedo effect, and developed a simple parameterization of snowpack albedo decay in the post-fire forest environment. We modified the recession coefficient in the algorithm: α = α0 + K exp (-nr) where α = snowpack albedo, α0 = minimum snowpack albedo (≈0.4), K = constant (≈ 0.44), -n = number of days since last major snowfall, r = recession coefficient [Rohrer and Braun, 1994]. Our parameterization quantified BWD deposition and snow albedo decay rates and

  15. The LLNL CR-39 personnel neutron dosimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Hankins, D.E.; Homann, S.; Westermark, J.

    1987-09-29

    We developed a personnel neutron dosimetry system based on the electrochemical etching of CR-39 plastic at elevated temperatures. The doses obtained using this dosimeter system are more accurate than those obtained using other dosimetry systems, especially when varied neutron spectra are encountered. This CR-39 dosimetry system does not have the severe energy dependence that exists with albedo neutron dosimeters or the fading and reading problems encountered with NTA film. 3 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Sea ice-albedo climate feedback mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Schramm, J.L.; Curry, J.A.; Ebert, E.E.

    1995-02-01

    The sea ice-albedo feedback mechanism over the Arctic Ocean multiyear sea ice is investigated by conducting a series of experiments using several one-dimensional models of the coupled sea ice-atmosphere system. In its simplest form, ice-albedo feedback is thought to be associated with a decrease in the areal cover of snow and ice and a corresponding increase in the surface temperature, further decreasing the area cover of snow and ice. It is shown that the sea ice-albedo feedback can operate even in multiyear pack ice, without the disappearance of this ice, associated with internal processes occurring within the multiyear ice pack (e.g., duration of the snow cover, ice thickness, ice distribution, lead fraction, and melt pond characteristics). The strength of the ice-albedo feedback mechanism is compared for several different thermodynamic sea ice models: a new model that includes ice thickness distribution., the Ebert and Curry model, the Mayjut and Untersteiner model, and the Semtner level-3 and level-0 models. The climate forcing is chosen to be a perturbation of the surface heat flux, and cloud and water vapor feedbacks are inoperative so that the effects of the sea ice-albedo feedback mechanism can be isolated. The inclusion of melt ponds significantly strengthens the ice-albedo feedback, while the ice thickness distribution decreases the strength of the modeled sea ice-albedo feedback. It is emphasized that accurately modeling present-day sea ice thickness is not adequate for a sea ice parameterization; the correct physical processes must be included so that the sea ice parameterization yields correct sensitivities to external forcing. 22 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Surface Albedo and Spectral Variability of Ceres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian-Yang; Reddy, Vishnu; Nathues, Andreas; Le Corre, Lucille; Izawa, Matthew R. M.; Cloutis, Edward A.; Sykes, Mark V.; Carsenty, Uri; Castillo-Rogez, Julie C.; Hoffmann, Martin; Jaumann, Ralf; Krohn, Katrin; Mottola, Stefano; Prettyman, Thomas H.; Schaefer, Michael; Schenk, Paul; Schröder, Stefan E.; Williams, David A.; Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.; Konopliv, Alexander S.; Park, Ryan S.; Raymond, Carol A.; Russell, Christopher T.

    2016-02-01

    Previous observations suggested that Ceres has active, but possibly sporadic, water outgassing as well as possibly varying spectral characteristics over a timescale of months. We used all available data of Ceres collected in the past three decades from the ground and the Hubble Space Telescope, as well as the newly acquired images by the Dawn  Framing Camera, to search for spectral and albedo variability on Ceres, on both a global scale and in local regions, particularly the bright spots inside the Occator crater, over timescales of a few months to decades. Our analysis has placed an upper limit on the possible temporal albedo variation on Ceres. Sporadic water vapor venting, or any possibly ongoing activity on Ceres, is not significant enough to change the albedo or the area of the bright features in the Occator crater by >15%, or the global albedo by >3% over the various timescales that we searched. Recently reported spectral slope variations can be explained by changing Sun–Ceres–Earth geometry. The active area on Ceres is less than 1 km2, too small to cause global albedo and spectral variations detectable in our data. Impact ejecta due to impacting projectiles of tens of meters in size like those known to cause observable changes to the surface albedo on Asteroid Scheila cannot cause detectable albedo change on Ceres due to its relatively large size and strong gravity. The water vapor activity on Ceres is independent of Ceres’ heliocentric distance, ruling out the possibility of the comet-like sublimation process as a possible mechanism driving the activity.

  18. Surface Albedo and Spectral Variability of Ceres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian-Yang; Reddy, Vishnu; Nathues, Andreas; Le Corre, Lucille; Izawa, Matthew R. M.; Cloutis, Edward A.; Sykes, Mark V.; Carsenty, Uri; Castillo-Rogez, Julie C.; Hoffmann, Martin; Jaumann, Ralf; Krohn, Katrin; Mottola, Stefano; Prettyman, Thomas H.; Schaefer, Michael; Schenk, Paul; Schröder, Stefan E.; Williams, David A.; Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.; Konopliv, Alexander S.; Park, Ryan S.; Raymond, Carol A.; Russell, Christopher T.

    2016-02-01

    Previous observations suggested that Ceres has active, but possibly sporadic, water outgassing as well as possibly varying spectral characteristics over a timescale of months. We used all available data of Ceres collected in the past three decades from the ground and the Hubble Space Telescope, as well as the newly acquired images by the Dawn  Framing Camera, to search for spectral and albedo variability on Ceres, on both a global scale and in local regions, particularly the bright spots inside the Occator crater, over timescales of a few months to decades. Our analysis has placed an upper limit on the possible temporal albedo variation on Ceres. Sporadic water vapor venting, or any possibly ongoing activity on Ceres, is not significant enough to change the albedo or the area of the bright features in the Occator crater by >15%, or the global albedo by >3% over the various timescales that we searched. Recently reported spectral slope variations can be explained by changing Sun-Ceres-Earth geometry. The active area on Ceres is less than 1 km2, too small to cause global albedo and spectral variations detectable in our data. Impact ejecta due to impacting projectiles of tens of meters in size like those known to cause observable changes to the surface albedo on Asteroid Scheila cannot cause detectable albedo change on Ceres due to its relatively large size and strong gravity. The water vapor activity on Ceres is independent of Ceres’ heliocentric distance, ruling out the possibility of the comet-like sublimation process as a possible mechanism driving the activity.

  19. Inelastic neutron scattering cross sections for Ge76 relevant to background in neutrinoless double- β decay experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Crider, B. P.; Peters, E. E.; Allmond, J. M.; McEllistrem, M. T.; Prados-Estévez, F. M.; Ross, T. J.; Vanhoy, J. R.; Yates, S. W.

    2015-09-11

    The experimental signature in searches for the neutrinoless double- decay of 76Ge is a peak near 2039 keV in the spectrum. Given the low probability of the process, it is important that the background in this region be well understood. Moreover, inelastic scattering reactions with neutrons from muon-induced interactions and ( ,n) reactions in the surrounding materials or in the detector can provide contributions to the background. We also measured the production cross sections for rays from the 76Ge(n,n ) reaction in the 2039-keV region at incident neutron energies up to 4.9 MeV. In addition to determining that the cross sections of a previously known 2040.7-keV ray from the 3952-keV level in 76 Ge are rather small, we find that a larger contribution arises from a 2037.5-keV ray which is attributed to a newly identified level at 3147 keV in 76Ge. Finally, a third contribution is also possible from another new level at 3577 keV. These results indicate that the 2039-keV region in 76Ge neutrinoless double- decay searches is more complex than was previously thought.

  20. Saturn Neutron Exosphere as Source for Inner and Innermost Radiation Belts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, John; Lipatov, Alexander; Sittler, Edward; Sturner, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Energetic proton and electron measurements by the ongoing Cassini orbiter mission are expanding our knowledge of the highest energy components of the Saturn magnetosphere in the inner radiation belt region after the initial discoveries of these belts by the Pioneer 11 and Voyager 2 missions. Saturn has a neutron exosphere that extends throughout the magnetosphere from the cosmic ray albedo neutron source at the planetary main rings and atmosphere. The neutrons emitted from these sources at energies respectively above 4 and 8 eV escape the Saturn system, while those at lower energies are gravitationally bound. The neutrons undergo beta decay in average times of about 1000 seconds to provide distributed sources of protons and electrons throughout Saturn's magnetosphere with highest injection rates close to the Saturn and ring sources. The competing radiation belt source for energetic electrons is rapid inward diffusion and acceleration of electrons from the middle magnetosphere and beyond. Minimal losses during diffusive transport across the moon orbits, e.g. of Mimas and Enceladus, and local time asymmetries in electron intensity, suggest that drift resonance effects preferentially boost the diffusion rates of electrons from both sources. Energy dependences of longitudinal gradient-curvature drift speeds relative to the icy moons are likely responsible for hemispheric differences (e.g., Mimas, Tethys) in composition and thermal properties as at least partly produced by radiolytic processes. A continuing mystery is the similar radial profiles of lower energy (<10 MeV) protons in the inner belt region. Either the source of these lower energy protons is also neutron decay, but perhaps alternatively from atmospheric albedo, or else all protons from diverse distributed sources are similarly affected by losses at the moon' orbits, e.g. because the proton diffusion rates are extremely low. Enceladus cryovolcanism, and radiolytic processing elsewhere on the icy moon and

  1. β-decay and β-delayed Neutron Emission Measurements at GSI-FRS Beyond N=126, for r-process Nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Caballero-Folch, R.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Cortès, G.; Taín, J.L.; Agramunt, J.; Algora, A.; Ameil, F.; Ayyad, Y.; Benlliure, J.; Bowry, M.; Calviño, F.; Cano-Ott, D.; Davinson, T.; and others

    2014-06-15

    New measurements of very exotic nuclei in the neutron-rich region beyond N=126 have been performed at the GSI facility with the fragment separator (FRS). The aim of the experiment is to determine half-lives and β-delayed neutron emission branching ratios of isotopes of Hg, Tl and Pb in this region. This contribution summarizes final counting statistics for identification and for implantation, as well as the present status of the data analysis of the half-lives. In summary, isotopes of Pt, Au, Hg, Tl, Pb, Bi, Po, At, Rn and Fr were clearly identified and several of them ({sup 208-211}Hg, {sup 211-215}Tl, {sup 214-218}Pb) were implanted with enough statistics to determine their half-lives. About half of them are expected to be neutron emitters, in such cases it will become possible to obtain the neutron emission probabilities, Pn.

  2. Gamma-ray Albedo of the Moon

    SciTech Connect

    Moskalenko, Igor V.; Porter, Troy A.

    2007-06-14

    We use the GEANT4 Monte Carlo framework to calculate the gamma-ray albedo of the Moon due to interactions of cosmic ray (CR) nuclei with moon rock. Our calculation of the albedo spectrum agrees with the EGRET data. We show that the spectrum of gamma-rays from the Moon is very steep with an effective cutoff around 3 GeV (600 MeV for the inner part of the Moon disc). Since it is the only (almost) black spot in the gamma-ray sky, it provides a unique opportunity for calibration of gamma-ray telescopes, such as the forthcoming Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST). The albedo flux depends on the incident CR spectrum which changes over the solar cycle. Therefore, it is possible to monitor the CR spectrum using the albedo gamma-ray flux. Simultaneous measurements of CR proton and helium spectra by the Payload for Antimatter Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics (PAMELA), and observations of the albedo -rays by the GLAST Large Area Telescope (LAT), can be used to test the model predictions and will enable the GLAST LAT to monitor the CR spectrum near the Earth beyond the lifetime of PAMELA.

  3. System albedo as sensed by satellites - Its definition and variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, N. A.; Henderson-Sellers, A.

    1982-01-01

    System albedo, an important climatological and environmental parameter, is considered. Some of the problems and assumptions involved in evaluating albedo from satellite data are discussed. Clear-sky and cloud albedos over the United Kingdom and parts of northwest Europe are treated. Consideration is given to the spectral, temporal, and spatial variations and the effect of averaging. The implications of these results for those using and archiving albedo values and for future monitoring of system albedo are discussed. Normalization is of especial importance since this correction alters many albedo values. The pronounced difference in spectral albedo of the two visible channels reemphasizes the problem of attempting to calculate integrated albedo values from meteorological satellite data. The assumption of isotropic reflection is seen to be invalid, hindering the computation of accurate albedo values.

  4. Improvement and calibration of a SSNT personal dosemeter and study of importance of albedo factor for dose calculation.

    PubMed

    Torkzadeh, F; Taheri, M

    2007-01-01

    The Neutriran albedo neutron dosemeter has been improved and calibrated for neutron personal dosimetry. The Monte Carlo code MCNP4b was used to calculate the thermal neutrons backscattered from the body (albedo factor). Backscattering from the wall, ceiling and floor in calibration room was considered also via simulation by MCNP4C. A semi automated counting system applying a high-resolution scanner was used for counting of tracks. An 241Am source was used to produce similar alpha particles from 10B (n,alpha)7Li reaction for the optimisation of scanner parameters to distinguish and separate the tracks in SSNTD, which lead to a better distinction between etched alpha tracks and, consequently, a higher linear region of dose characteristic. PMID:16980708

  5. The determination of surface albedo from meteorological satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. T.

    1977-01-01

    A surface albedo was determined from visible data collected by the NOAA-4 polar orbiting meteorological satellite. To filter out the major cause of atmospheric reflectivity, namely clouds, techniques were developed and applied to the data resulting in a map of global surface albedo. Neglecting spurious surface albedos for regions with persistent cloud cover, sun glint effects, insufficient reflected light and, at this time, some unresolved influences, the surface albedos retrieved from satellite data closely matched those of a global surface albedo map produced from surface and aircraft measurements and from characteristic albedos for land type and land use.

  6. Multiscale climatological albedo look-up maps derived from moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer BRDF/albedo products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Feng; He, Tao; Wang, Zhuosen; Ghimire, Bardan; Shuai, Yanmin; Masek, Jeffrey; Schaaf, Crystal; Williams, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Surface albedo determines radiative forcing and is a key parameter for driving Earth's climate. Better characterization of surface albedo for individual land cover types can reduce the uncertainty in estimating changes to Earth's radiation balance due to land cover change. This paper presents albedo look-up maps (LUMs) using a multiscale hierarchical approach based on moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF)/albedo products and Landsat imagery. Ten years (2001 to 2011) of MODIS BRDF/albedo products were used to generate global albedo climatology. Albedo LUMs of land cover classes defined by the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme (IGBP) at multiple spatial resolutions were generated. The albedo LUMs included monthly statistics of white-sky (diffuse) and black-sky (direct) albedo for each IGBP class for visible, near-infrared, and shortwave broadband under both snow-free and snow-covered conditions. The albedo LUMs were assessed by using the annual MODIS IGBP land cover map and the projected land use scenarios from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change land-use harmonization project. The comparisons between the reconstructed albedo and the MODIS albedo data product show good agreement. The LUMs provide high temporal and spatial resolution global albedo statistics without gaps for investigating albedo variations under different land cover scenarios and could be used for land surface modeling.

  7. Monitoring surface albedo change with Landsat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otterman, J.

    1977-01-01

    A pronounced decrease of the surface albedo (reflectivity) has been observed in an area in the Northern Sinai, fenced-in in the summer of 1974. Analysis of the Landsat Multispectral Scanner System digital data from an April 1977 pass indicates a reduction in the albedo in the exclosure by 13%, as compared to the outside, which continues to be subjected to overgrazing and anthropogenic pressures. The reduction of reflectivity is approximately the same in all the spectral bands, and is therefore attributable to accumulation of dead plants and plant debris, and not directly to live vegetation.

  8. The ultraviolet continuum albedo of Uranus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochran, W. D.; Wagener, R.; Caldwell, J.; Fricke, K. H.

    1990-01-01

    A radiative transfer code explicitly treating the Raman scattering of solar protons by H2 is presently used to analyze the Uranus geometric albedo in the 2000-5000 A range. The Baines and Bergstralh (1986) baseline model used reproduces the geometric albedo peak produced by Raman scattering filling of solar absorption line cores, but is found to be excessively bright for wavelengths below 2400 A. This discrepancy is resolvable through inclusion of an absorbing stratospheric haze layer, and results are thereby obtained which are consistent with the Pollack et al. (1987) model, in which aerosols are generated stratospherically through photochemical effects on hydrocarbons.

  9. The ultraviolet continuum albedo of Uranus

    SciTech Connect

    Cochran, W.D.; Wagener, R.; Caldwell, J.; Fricke, K.H. New York State Univ., Stony Brook York Univ., Toronto Bonn Universitaet )

    1990-01-01

    A radiative transfer code explicitly treating the Raman scattering of solar protons by H{sub 2} is presently used to analyze the Uranus geometric albedo in the 2000-5000 A range. The Baines and Bergstralh (1986) baseline model used reproduces the geometric albedo peak produced by Raman scattering filling of solar absorption line cores, but is found to be excessively bright for wavelengths below 2400 A. This discrepancy is resolvable through inclusion of an absorbing stratospheric haze layer, and results are thereby obtained which are consistent with the Pollack et al. (1987) model, in which aerosols are generated stratospherically through photochemical effects on hydrocarbons. 20 refs.

  10. The albedo of fractal stratocumulus clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahalan, Robert F.; Ridgway, William; Wiscombe, Warren J.; Bell, Thomas L.; Snider, Jack B.

    1994-01-01

    An increase in the planetary albedo of the earth-atmosphere system by only 10% can decrease the equilibrium surface temperature to that of the last ice age. Nevertheless, albedo biases of 10% or greater would be introduced into large regions of current climate models if clouds were given their observed liquid water amounts, because of the treatment of clouds as plane parallel. The focus on marine stratocumulus clouds is due to their important role in cloud radiative forcing and also that, of the wide variety of earth's cloud types, they are most nearly plane parallel, so that they have the least albedo bias. The fractal model employed here reproduces both the probability distribution and the wavenumber spectrum of the stratocumulus liquid water path, as observed during the First ISCCP Regional Experiment (FIRE). A single new fractal parameter 0 less than or equal to f less than or equal to 1, is introduced and determined empirically by the variance of the logarithm of the vertically integrated liquid water. The reduced reflectivity of fractal stratocumulus clouds is approximately given by the plane-parallel reflectivity evaluated at a reduced 'effective optical thickness,' which when f = 0.5 is tau(sub eff) approximately equal to 10. Study of the diurnal cycle of stratocumulus liquid water during FIRE leads to a key unexpected result: the plane-parallel albedo bias is largest when the cloud fraction reaches 100%, that is, when any bias associated with the cloud fraction vanishes. This is primarily due to the variability increase with cloud fraction. Thus, the within-cloud fractal structure of stratocumulus has a more significant impact on estimates of its mesoscale-average albedo than does the cloud fraction.

  11. γ-ray decay from neutron-bound and unbound states in 95Mo and a novel technique for spin determination

    DOE PAGES

    Wiedeking, M.; Krticka, M.; Bernstein, L. A.; Allmond, James M.; Basunia, M. S.; Bleuel, D. L.; Burke, J. T.; Daub, B. H.; Fallon, P.; Firestone, R. B.; et al

    2016-02-01

    The emission of γ rays from neutron-bound and neutron-unbound states in 95Mo, populated in the 94Mo(d,p) reaction, has been investigated. Charged particles and γ radiation were detected with arrays of annular silicon and Clover-type high-purity Germanium detectors, respectively. Utilizing p-γ and p-γ-γ coincidences, the 95Mo level scheme was greatly enhanced with 102 new transitions and 43 new states. It agrees well with shell model calculations for excitation energies below ≈2 MeV. From p-γ coincidence data, a new method for the determination of spins of discrete levels is proposed. The method exploits the suppression of high-angular momentum neutron emission from levelsmore » with high spins populated in the (d,p) reaction above the neutron separation energy. As a result, spins for almost all 95Mo levels below 2 MeV (and for a few levels above) have been determined with this method.« less

  12. Albedo boundaries on Mars in 1972: Results from Mariner 9

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Batson, R.M.; Inge, J.L.

    1976-01-01

    A map of "albedo" boundaries (light and dark markings) on Mars was prepared from Mariner 9 images. After special digital processing, these pictures provide detailed locations of albedo boundaries, which is significant in interpreting recent eolian activity. Derivation of absolute albedo values from the spacecraft data was not attempted. The map correlates well with telescopic observations of Mars after the 1971 dust storm. ?? 1976.

  13. γ-decay of {}_{8}^{16}{{\\rm{O}}}_{8}\\,{and}\\,{}_{7}^{16}{{\\rm{N}}}_{9} in proton-neutron Tamm-Dancoff and random phase approximations with optimized surface δ interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahlavani, M. R.; Firoozi, B.

    2016-09-01

    γ-ray transitions from excited states of {}16{{N}} and {}16{{O}} isomers that appear in the γ spectrum of the {}616{{{C}}}10\\to {}716{{{N}}}9\\to {}816{{{O}}}8 beta decay chain are investigated. The theoretical approach used in this research starts with a mean-field potential consisting of a phenomenological Woods-Saxon potential including spin-orbit and Coulomb terms (for protons) in order to obtain single-particle energies and wave functions for nucleons in a nucleus. A schematic residual surface delta interaction is then employed on the top of the mean field and is treated within the proton-neutron Tamm-Dancoff approximation (pnTDA) and the proton-neutron random phase approximation. The goal is to use an optimized surface delta interaction interaction, as a residual interaction, to improve the results. We have used artificial intelligence algorithms to establish a good agreement between theoretical and experimental energy spectra. The final results of the ‘optimized’ calculations are reasonable via this approach.

  14. γ-decay of {}_{8}^{16}{{\\rm{O}}}_{8}\\,{and}\\,{}_{7}^{16}{{\\rm{N}}}_{9} in proton–neutron Tamm–Dancoff and random phase approximations with optimized surface δ interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahlavani, M. R.; Firoozi, B.

    2016-09-01

    γ-ray transitions from excited states of {}16{{N}} and {}16{{O}} isomers that appear in the γ spectrum of the {}616{{{C}}}10\\to {}716{{{N}}}9\\to {}816{{{O}}}8 beta decay chain are investigated. The theoretical approach used in this research starts with a mean-field potential consisting of a phenomenological Woods–Saxon potential including spin-orbit and Coulomb terms (for protons) in order to obtain single-particle energies and wave functions for nucleons in a nucleus. A schematic residual surface delta interaction is then employed on the top of the mean field and is treated within the proton–neutron Tamm–Dancoff approximation (pnTDA) and the proton–neutron random phase approximation. The goal is to use an optimized surface delta interaction interaction, as a residual interaction, to improve the results. We have used artificial intelligence algorithms to establish a good agreement between theoretical and experimental energy spectra. The final results of the ‘optimized’ calculations are reasonable via this approach.

  15. Operational comparison of bubble (super heated drop) dosimetry with routine albedo TLD for a selected group of Pu-238 workers at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Romero, L.L.; Hoffman, J.M.; Foltyn, E.M.; Buhl, T.E.

    1998-09-01

    Personnel neutron dosimetry continues to be a difficult science due to the lack of availability of robust passive dosimeters that exhibit tissue- or near-tissue- equivalent response. This paper is an operational study that compares the use of albedo thermoluminescent dosimeters with bubble dosimeters to determine whether bubble dosimeters do provide a useful daily ALARA tool that can yield measurements close to the dose-of-record. A group of workers at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) working on the Radioisotopic Thermoelectric Generators (RTG) for the NASA Cassini space mission wore both bubble dosimeters and albedo dosimeters over a period from 1993 through 1996. The personal albedo dosimeter was processed on a monthly basis and used as the dose-of-record. The results of this study indicated that cumulative daily bubble dosimetry results agreed with whole-body albedo dosimetry results within about 37% on average.

  16. Lorentz violation and {alpha} decay

    SciTech Connect

    Altschul, Brett

    2009-01-01

    Relating the effective Lorentz violation coefficients for composite particles to the coefficients for their constituent fields is a challenging problem. We calculate the Lorentz violation coefficients relevant to the dynamics of an {alpha} particle in terms of proton and neutron coefficients. The {alpha}-particle coefficients would lead to anisotropies in the {alpha} decays of nuclei, and because the decay process involves quantum tunneling, the effects of any Lorentz violations could be exponentially enhanced.

  17. Review of Non-Neutron and Neutron Nuclear Data, 2004

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, Norman E.

    2005-05-24

    Review articles are in preparation for the 2004 edition of the CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics dealing with the evaluation of both non-neutron and neutron nuclear data. Data on the discovery of element 110, Darmstadtium, and element 111 have been officially accepted, while data on element 118 have been withdrawn. Data to be presented include revised values for very short-lived nuclides, long-lived nuclides, and beta-beta decay measurements. There has been a reassessment of the spontaneous fission (sf) half-lives, which distinguishes between sf decay half-lives and cluster decay half-lives, and with cluster-fission decay. New measurements of isotopic abundance values for many elements will be discussed with an emphasis on the minor isotopes of interest for use in neutron activation analysis measurements. Neutron resonance integrals will be discussed emphasizing the differences between the calculated values obtained from the analytical integration over neutron resonances and the measured values in a neutron reactor-spectrum, which does not quite conform to the assumed 1/E neutron energy spectrum. The method used to determine the neutron resonance integral from measurement, using neutron activation analysis, will be discussed.

  18. REVIEW OF NON-NEUTRON AND NEUTRON NUCLEAR DATA, 2004.

    SciTech Connect

    HOLDEN, N.E.

    2004-09-26

    Review articles are in preparation for the 2004 edition of the CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics dealing with the evaluation of both non-neutron and neutron nuclear data. Data on the discovery of element 110, Darmstadtium, and element 111 have been officially accepted, while data on element 11 8 have been withdrawn. Data to be presented include revised values for very short-lived nuclides, long-lived nuclides and beta-beta decay measurements. There has been a reassessment of the spontaneous fission (sf) half-lives, which distinguishes between sf decay half-lives and cluster decay half-lives and with cluster-fission decay. New measurements of isotopic abundance values for many elements will be discussed with an emphasis on the minor isotopes of interest for use in neutron activation analysis measurements. Neutron resonance integrals will be discussed emphasizing the differences between the calculated values obtained from the analytical integration over neutron resonances and the measured values in a neutron reactor-spectrum, which does not quite conform to the assumed 1/E neutron energy spectrum. The method used to determine the neutron resonance integral from measurement, using neutron activation analysis, will be discussed.

  19. Spectroscopic studies beyond N = 152 neutron gap : decay of {sup 255 ovr sub 101}Md and {sup 256 ovr sub 101}Md.

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, I.; Chasman, R. R.; Fields, P. R.

    2000-01-01

    The isotopes {sup 255}Md and {sup 256}Md were produced by the irradiation of {sup 253}Es with 35-45 MeV {alpha} particles by ({alpha},n) and ({alpha},2n) reactions and were removed from the target by a helium jet system. {alpha}, {gamma}, and {alpha}-{gamma} coincidence spectra were measured with Si and Ge(Li) detectors. From the EC decays of {sup 255}Md and {sup 256}Md, levels in {sup 255}Fm and {sup 256}Fm were deduced. Favored {alpha} decay of {sup 255}Md was found to populate the 7/2{sup -}[514] single-particle state in {sup 251}Es, thus establishing the 7/2{sup -}[514] as the {sup 255}Md ground state. Several {gamma} rays were observed in the {sub 256}Md {alpha}-{gamma} coincidence spectrum. {sup 256}Fm is the heaviest nucleus in which excited intrinsic states have been identified.

  20. Spectroscopic studies beyond the N=152 neutron gap: Decay of {sub 101}{sup 255}Md and {sub 101}{sup 256}Md

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, I.; Chasman, R. R.; Fields, P. R.

    2000-04-01

    The isotopes {sup 255}Md and {sup 256}Md were produced by the irradiation of {sup 253}Es with 35-45 MeV {alpha} particles by ({alpha},n) and ({alpha},2n) reactions and were removed from the target by a helium jet system. {alpha}, {gamma}, and {alpha}-{gamma} coincidence spectra were measured with Si and Ge(Li) detectors. From the EC decays of {sup 255}Md and {sup 256}Md, levels in {sup 255}Fm and {sup 256}Fm were deduced. Favored {alpha} decay of {sup 255}Md was found to populate the 7/2{sup -}[514] single-particle state in {sup 251}Es, thus establishing the 7/2{sup -}[514] as the {sup 255}Md ground state. Several {gamma} rays were observed in the {sup 256}Md {alpha}-{gamma} coincidence spectrum. {sup 256}Fm is the heaviest nucleus in which excited intrinsic states have been identified. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  1. β-decay half-lives of neutron-rich nuclei around 158Nd, relevant to the formation of the A≈165 rare-earth element peak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, J.; Nishimura, S.; Lorusso, G.; Xu, Z. Y.; Ideguchi, E.; Simpson, G. S.; Baba, H.; Browne, F.; Daido, R.; Doornebal, P.; Fang, Y. F.; Isobe, T.; Li, Z.; Patel, Z.; Rice, S.; Sinclair, L.; Söderström, P.-A.; Sumikama, T.; Watanabe, H.; Yagi, A.; Yokoyama, R.; Aoi, N.; Bello Garrote, F. L.; Benzoni, G.; Gey, G.; Gottardo, A.; Nishibata, H.; Odahara, A.; Sakurai, H.; Tanaka, M.; Taprogge, J.; Yamamoto, T.

    2016-02-01

    A β-decay spectroscopy experiment around 158Nd was performed at RI Beam Factory (RIBF), RIKEN Nishina Center, in order to understand the production mechanism of the A≈165 rare-earth element (REE) peak in the r-process mass abundance pattern. In this experiment, 53 half-lives are measured including 34 new results, which could be employed in a fully dynamic r-process network calculation.

  2. Estimating big bluestem albedo from directional reflectance measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irons, J. R.; Ranson, K. J.; Daughtry, C. S. T.

    1988-01-01

    Multidirectional reflectance factor measurements acquired in the summer of 1986 are used to make estimates of big bluestem grass albedo, evaluating the variation of albedo with changes in solar zenith angle and phenology. On any given day, the albedo was observed to increase by at least 19 percent as solar zenith angle increased. Changes in albedo were found to correspond to changes in the green leaf area index of the grass canopy. Estimates of albedo made using reflectance data acquired within only one or two azimuthal planes and at a restricted range of view zenith angle were evaluated and compared to 'true' albedos derived from all available reflectance factor data. It was found that even a limited amount of multiple direction reflectance data was preferable to a single nadir reflectance factor for the estimation of prarie grass albedo.

  3. The albedo of particles in reflection nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rush, W. F.

    1974-01-01

    The relation between the apparent angular extent of a reflection nebula and the apparent magnitude of its illuminating star was reconsidered under a less restrictive set of assumptions. A computational technique was developed which permits the use of fits to the observed m-log a values to determine the albedo of particles composing reflection nebulae, providing only that a phase function and average optical thickness are assumed. Multiple scattering, anisotropic phase functions, and illumination by the general star field are considered, and the albedo of reflection nebular particles appears to be the same as that for interstellar particles in general. The possibility of continuous fluorescence contributions to the surface brightness is also considered.

  4. Tooth Decay

    MedlinePlus

    ... in your mouth made up mostly of germs. Tooth decay starts in the outer layer, called the enamel. Without a filling, the decay can get deep into the tooth and its nerves and cause a toothache or ...

  5. Correlation of Neutron Data Taken at Commercial Nuclear Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Rathbun, L. A.; Endres, G. W.R.

    1983-10-01

    In this report, data from neutron measurement and dosimetry studies performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory, the Environmental Measurements Laboratory, and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute are examined and compared. The purpose of this data correlation effort is to determine whether useful relationships exist between the actual neutron dose equivalent in a typical commercial nuclear power reactor and various measurement parameters, such as ratios of the response of 9-in. to 3-in. spheres, neutron/gamma ratios, albedo dosimeter response and neutron spectrometer readings. In most neutron radiation fields found in the reactors visited, the response of albedo dosimeters can be brought into reasonable agreement with dose equivalents measured with multispheres, tissue equivalent proportional counters (TEPCs) or remmeters. Because the responses of the remmeters, like the responses of albedo dosimeters, are energy dependent, it is preferable to correct the responses of the albedo dosimeters to agree with dose equivalents measured with either TEPCs or multispheres. If one of these laboratory systems has been used to measure neutron dose equivalents at a specific pressurized water reactor, a calculated average albedo dosimeter correction factor can be used for most locations at that reactor. However, if the measured 9-in. to 3-in. remmeter ratio is greater than 0.20, it is advisable to use a plot of 9-in. to 3-in. remmeter ratios versus albedo dosimeter correction factors to obtain an albedo dosimeter correction factor. Because 9-in. to 3-in. remmeter ratios at boiling water reactors are typically greater than 0.20, the latter approach applies to this type of reactor.

  6. Prediction analysis of dose equivalent responses of neutron dosemeters used at a MOX fuel facility.

    PubMed

    Tsujimura, N; Yoshida, T; Takada, C

    2011-07-01

    To predict how accurately neutron dosemeters can measure the neutron dose equivalent (rate) in MOX fuel fabrication facility work environments, the dose equivalent responses of neutron dosemeters were calculated by the spectral folding method. The dosemeters selected included two types of personal dosemeter, namely a thermoluminescent albedo neutron dosemeter and an electronic neutron dosemeter, three moderator-based neutron survey meters, and one special instrument called an H(p)(10) monitor. The calculations revealed the energy dependences of the responses expected within the entire range of neutron spectral variations observed in neutron fields at workplaces. PMID:21498409

  7. Half space albedo problem for the nonconservative vector equation of transfer with a combination of Rayleigh and isotropic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şenyiğit, M.

    2016-09-01

    The half-space albedo problem has been solved for a combination of Rayleigh and isotropic scattering using HN method which is developed for the neutron transport studies. The numerical results are compared with exact values obtained using variational method and Chandrasekhar's equation for the {H}-matrix. The analytical solutions of HN method are easy to handle in comparison with the other methods. The numerical results are in good agreement with previous works in literature.

  8. Calibrated Color and Albedo Maps of Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, M. S.; Lucey, P. G.

    1996-03-01

    In order to determine the albedo and color of the mercurian surface, we are completing calibrated mosaics of Mariner 10 image data. A set of clear filter mosaics is being compiled in such a way as to maximize the signal-to-noise-ratio of the data and to allow for a quantitative measure of the precision of the data on a pixel-by-pixel basis. Three major imaging sequences of Mercury were acquired by Mariner 10: incoming first encounter (centered at 20S, 2E), outgoing first encounter (centered at 20N, 175E), and southern hemisphere second encounter (centered at 40S, 100E). For each sequence we are making separate mosaics for each camera (A and B) in order to have independent measurements. For each mosaic, regions of overlap from frame-to-frame are being averaged and the attendant standard deviations are being calculated. Due to the highly redundant nature of the data, each pixel in each mosaic will be an average calculated from 1-10 images. Each mosaic will have a corresponding standard deviation and n (number of measurements) map. A final mosaic will be created by averaging the six independent mosaics. This procedure lessens the effects of random noise and calibration residuals. From these data an albedo map will be produced using an improved photometric function for the Moon. A similar procedure is being followed for the lower resolution color sequences (ultraviolet, blue, orange, ultraviolet polarized). These data will be calibrated to absolute units through comparison of Mariner 10 images acquired of the Moon and Jupiter. Spectral interpretation of these new color and albedo maps will be presented with an emphasis on comparison with the Moon.

  9. Yrast structure of the two-proton - and three-neutron-hole nucleus {sup 203}Hg from the decay of a 53/2+ isomer.

    SciTech Connect

    Szpak, B.; Maier, K. H.; Smolkowska, A. S.; Fornal, B.; Broda, R.; Carpenter, M. P.; Cieplicka, N.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Krolas, W.; Pawlat, T.; Wrzesinski, J.; Zhu, S.

    2011-06-15

    The decay of a new, 53/2{sup +}, isomer at 8281 keV in {sup 203}Hg has been studied by {gamma} coincidence spectroscopy. A half-life of 146(30) ns was measured. In addition, another isomeric, 39/2{sup +}, level with a half-life of 7.8(1.5) ns was observed. Some elements of the Rydstroem shell-model interaction have been adjusted to reproduce level energies in nuclei with two to four holes in the {sup 208}Pb core. With this interaction, the new states in the five-hole nucleus {sup 203}Hg are reproduced with an rms error of 105 keV.

  10. Yrast structure of the two-proton- and three-neutron-hole nucleus {sup 203}Hg from the decay of a 53/2{sup +} isomer

    SciTech Connect

    Szpak, B.; Maier, K. H.; Fornal, B.; Broda, R.; Cieplicka, N.; Krolas, W.; Pawlat, T.; Wrzesinski, J.; Smolkowska, A. S.; Carpenter, M. P.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Zhu, S.

    2011-06-15

    The decay of a new, 53/2{sup +}, isomer at 8281 keV in {sup 203}Hg has been studied by {gamma} coincidence spectroscopy. A half-life of 146(30) ns was measured. In addition, another isomeric, 39/2{sup +}, level with a half-life of 7.8(1.5) ns was observed. Some elements of the Rydstroem shell-model interaction have been adjusted to reproduce level energies in nuclei with two to four holes in the {sup 208}Pb core. With this interaction, the new states in the five-hole nucleus {sup 203}Hg are reproduced with an rms error of 105 keV.

  11. Albedo and transmittance of inhomogeneous stratus clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Zuev, V.E.; Kasyanov, E.I.; Titov, G.A.

    1996-04-01

    A highly important topic is the study of the relationship between the statistical parameters of optical and radiative charactertistics of inhomogeneous stratus clouds. This is important because the radiation codes of general circulation models need improvement, and it is important for geophysical information. A cascade model has been developed at the Goddard Space Flight Center to treat stratocumulus clouds with the simplest geometry and horizontal fluctuations of the liquid water path (optical thickness). The model evaluates the strength with which the stochastic geometry of clouds influences the statistical characteristics of albedo and the trnasmittance of solar radiation.

  12. Global color and albedo variations on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcewen, Alfred S.

    1988-01-01

    The present Voyager imaging data multispectral mosaics of Io include global mosaics from each of the Voyager 1 and 2 data sets and a high-resolution mosaic of the region centered on the Ra Patera volcano. The constancy of the disk-integrated color and albedo of Io over recent decades despite volcanic activity may be due to the regular occurrence of large Pele-type plumes with relatively dark, red deposits. Io's intrinsic spectral variability involves continuous variation among three major spectral end members. Attention is given to the mapping of the data into five spectral units for the purposes of comparison with laboratory measurements of Io surface material candidates.

  13. Albedo maps of Pluto and Charon - Initial mutual event results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buie, Marc W.; Tholen, David J.; Horne, Keith

    1992-01-01

    By applying the technique of maximum entropy image reconstruction to invert observed lightcurves, surface maps of single-scattering albedo are obtained for the surfaces of Pluto and Charon from 1954 to 1986. The albedo features of the surface of Pluto are similar to those of the Buie and Tholen (1989) spot model maps; a south polar cap is evident. The map of Charon is somewhat darker, with single-scattering albedos as low as 0.03.

  14. Radioactive decay.

    PubMed

    Groch, M W

    1998-01-01

    When a parent radionuclide decays to its daughter radionuclide by means of alpha, beta, or isomeric transition, the decay follows an exponential form, which is characterized by the decay constant lambda. The decay constant represents the probability per unit time that a single radioatom will decay. The decay equation can be used to provide a useful expression for radionuclide decay, the half-life, the time when 50% of the radioatoms present will have decayed. Radiotracer half-life has direct implications in nuclear imaging, radiation therapy, and radiation safety because radionuclide half-life affects the ability to evaluate tracer kinetics and create appropriate nuclear images and also affects organ, tumor, and whole-body radiation dose. The number of radioatoms present in a sample is equal to the activity, defined as the number of transitions per unit time, divided by the decay constant; the mass of radioatoms present in a sample can be calculated to determine the specific activity (activity per unit mass). The dynamic relationship between the number of parent and daughter atoms present over time may lead to radioactive equilibrium, which takes two forms--secular and transient--and has direct relevance to generator-produced radionuclides.

  15. THE ALBEDO-COLOR DIVERSITY OF TRANSNEPTUNIAN OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Lacerda, Pedro; Rengel, Miriam; Fornasier, Sonia; Lellouch, Emmanuel; Delsanti, Audrey; Kiss, Csaba; Vilenius, Esa; Müller, Thomas; Santos-Sanz, Pablo; Duffard, René; Guilbert-Lepoutre, Aurélie

    2014-09-20

    We analyze albedo data obtained using the Herschel Space Observatory that reveal the existence of two distinct types of surface among midsized trans-Neptunian objects. A color-albedo diagram shows two large clusters of objects, one redder and higher albedo and another darker and more neutrally colored. Crucially, all objects in our sample located in dynamically stable orbits within the classical Kuiper Belt region and beyond are confined to the bright red group, implying a compositional link. Those objects are believed to have formed further from the Sun than the dark neutral bodies. This color-albedo separation is evidence for a compositional discontinuity in the young solar system.

  16. Enhancement of the MODIS Daily Snow Albedo Product

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Dorothy K.; Schaaf, Crystal B.; Wang, Zhuosen; Riggs, George A.

    2009-01-01

    The MODIS daily snow albedo product is a data layer in the MOD10A1 snow-cover product that includes snow-covered area and fractional snow cover as well as quality information and other metadata. It was developed to augment the MODIS BRDF/Albedo algorithm (MCD43) that provides 16-day maps of albedo globally at 500-m resolution. But many modelers require daily snow albedo, especially during the snowmelt season when the snow albedo is changing rapidly. Many models have an unrealistic snow albedo feedback in both estimated albedo and change in albedo over the seasonal cycle context, Rapid changes in snow cover extent or brightness challenge the MCD43 algorithm; over a 16-day period, MCD43 determines whether the majority of clear observations was snow-covered or snow-free then only calculates albedo for the majority condition. Thus changes in snow albedo and snow cover are not portrayed accurately during times of rapid change, therefore the current MCD43 product is not ideal for snow work. The MODIS daily snow albedo from the MOD10 product provides more frequent, though less robust maps for pixels defined as "snow" by the MODIS snow-cover algorithm. Though useful, the daily snow albedo product can be improved using a daily version of the MCD43 product as described in this paper. There are important limitations to the MOD10A1 daily snow albedo product, some of which can be mitigated. Utilizing the appropriate per-pixel Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Functions (BRDFs) can be problematic, and correction for anisotropic scattering must be included. The BRDF describes how the reflectance varies with view and illumination geometry. Also, narrow-to-broadband conversion specific for snow on different surfaces must be calculated and this can be difficult. In consideration of these limitations of MOD10A1, we are planning to improve the daily snow albedo algorithm by coupling the periodic per-pixel snow albedo from MCD43, with daily surface ref|outanoom, In this paper, we

  17. Pulsed neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Robertson, deceased, J. Craig; Rowland, Mark S.

    1989-03-21

    A pulsed neutron detector and system for detecting low intensity fast neutron pulses has a body of beryllium adjacent a body of hydrogenous material the latter of which acts as a beta particle detector, scintillator, and moderator. The fast neutrons (defined as having En>1.5 MeV) react in the beryllium and the hydrogenous material to produce larger numbers of slow neutrons than would be generated in the beryllium itself and which in the beryllium generate hellium-6 which decays and yields beta particles. The beta particles reach the hydrogenous material which scintillates to yield light of intensity related to the number of fast neutrons. A photomultiplier adjacent the hydrogenous material (scintillator) senses the light emission from the scintillator. Utilization means, such as a summing device, sums the pulses from the photo-multiplier for monitoring or other purposes.

  18. β -decay study of 94Kr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miernik, K.; Rykaczewski, K. P.; Grzywacz, R.; Gross, C. J.; Madurga, M.; Miller, D.; Stracener, D. W.; Batchelder, J. C.; Brewer, N. T.; Cartegni, L.; Fijałkowska, A.; Karny, M.; Korgul, A.; Królas, W.; Mazzocchi, C.; Mendez, A. J., II; Padgett, S. W.; Paulauskas, S. V.; Winger, J. A.; Wolińska-Cichocka, M.; Zganjar, E. F.

    2016-08-01

    β decay of neutron-rich nuclide 94Kr was reinvestigated by means of a high resolution on-line mass separator and β -γ spectroscopy. In total 22 γ -ray transitions were assigned to the decay of 94Kr, and a new isomeric state was identified. The new information allows us to build detailed levels systematics in a chain of odd-odd rubidium isotopes and draw conclusions on nuclear structure for some of the observed states. The discussed level structure affects the evolution of β -decay half-lives for neutron-rich selenium, krypton, and strontium isotopes.

  19. FIELD CORRECTION FACTORS FOR PERSONAL NEUTRON DOSEMETERS.

    PubMed

    Luszik-Bhadra, M

    2016-09-01

    A field-dependent correction factor can be obtained by comparing the readings of two albedo neutron dosemeters fixed in opposite directions on a polyethylene sphere to the H*(10) reading as determined with a thermal neutron detector in the centre of the same sphere. The work shows that the field calibration technique as used for albedo neutron dosemeters can be generalised for all kind of dosemeters, since H*(10) is a conservative estimate of the sum of the personal dose equivalents Hp(10) in two opposite directions. This result is drawn from reference values as determined by spectrometers within the EVIDOS project at workplace of nuclear installations in Europe. More accurate field-dependent correction factors can be achieved by the analysis of several personal dosimeters on a phantom, but reliable angular responses of these dosemeters need to be taken into account. PMID:26493946

  20. β-Decay Half-Lives of 110 Neutron-Rich Nuclei across the N=82 Shell Gap: Implications for the Mechanism and Universality of the Astrophysical r Process.

    PubMed

    Lorusso, G; Nishimura, S; Xu, Z Y; Jungclaus, A; Shimizu, Y; Simpson, G S; Söderström, P-A; Watanabe, H; Browne, F; Doornenbal, P; Gey, G; Jung, H S; Meyer, B; Sumikama, T; Taprogge, J; Vajta, Zs; Wu, J; Baba, H; Benzoni, G; Chae, K Y; Crespi, F C L; Fukuda, N; Gernhäuser, R; Inabe, N; Isobe, T; Kajino, T; Kameda, D; Kim, G D; Kim, Y-K; Kojouharov, I; Kondev, F G; Kubo, T; Kurz, N; Kwon, Y K; Lane, G J; Li, Z; Montaner-Pizá, A; Moschner, K; Naqvi, F; Niikura, M; Nishibata, H; Odahara, A; Orlandi, R; Patel, Z; Podolyák, Zs; Sakurai, H; Schaffner, H; Schury, P; Shibagaki, S; Steiger, K; Suzuki, H; Takeda, H; Wendt, A; Yagi, A; Yoshinaga, K

    2015-05-15

    The β-decay half-lives of 110 neutron-rich isotopes of the elements from _{37}Rb to _{50}Sn were measured at the Radioactive Isotope Beam Factory. The 40 new half-lives follow robust systematics and highlight the persistence of shell effects. The new data have direct implications for r-process calculations and reinforce the notion that the second (A≈130) and the rare-earth-element (A≈160) abundance peaks may result from the freeze-out of an (n,γ)⇄(γ,n) equilibrium. In such an equilibrium, the new half-lives are important factors determining the abundance of rare-earth elements, and allow for a more reliable discussion of the r process universality. It is anticipated that universality may not extend to the elements Sn, Sb, I, and Cs, making the detection of these elements in metal-poor stars of the utmost importance to determine the exact conditions of individual r-process events.

  1. β-Decay Half-Lives of 110 Neutron-Rich Nuclei across the N=82 Shell Gap: Implications for the Mechanism and Universality of the Astrophysical r Process.

    PubMed

    Lorusso, G; Nishimura, S; Xu, Z Y; Jungclaus, A; Shimizu, Y; Simpson, G S; Söderström, P-A; Watanabe, H; Browne, F; Doornenbal, P; Gey, G; Jung, H S; Meyer, B; Sumikama, T; Taprogge, J; Vajta, Zs; Wu, J; Baba, H; Benzoni, G; Chae, K Y; Crespi, F C L; Fukuda, N; Gernhäuser, R; Inabe, N; Isobe, T; Kajino, T; Kameda, D; Kim, G D; Kim, Y-K; Kojouharov, I; Kondev, F G; Kubo, T; Kurz, N; Kwon, Y K; Lane, G J; Li, Z; Montaner-Pizá, A; Moschner, K; Naqvi, F; Niikura, M; Nishibata, H; Odahara, A; Orlandi, R; Patel, Z; Podolyák, Zs; Sakurai, H; Schaffner, H; Schury, P; Shibagaki, S; Steiger, K; Suzuki, H; Takeda, H; Wendt, A; Yagi, A; Yoshinaga, K

    2015-05-15

    The β-decay half-lives of 110 neutron-rich isotopes of the elements from _{37}Rb to _{50}Sn were measured at the Radioactive Isotope Beam Factory. The 40 new half-lives follow robust systematics and highlight the persistence of shell effects. The new data have direct implications for r-process calculations and reinforce the notion that the second (A≈130) and the rare-earth-element (A≈160) abundance peaks may result from the freeze-out of an (n,γ)⇄(γ,n) equilibrium. In such an equilibrium, the new half-lives are important factors determining the abundance of rare-earth elements, and allow for a more reliable discussion of the r process universality. It is anticipated that universality may not extend to the elements Sn, Sb, I, and Cs, making the detection of these elements in metal-poor stars of the utmost importance to determine the exact conditions of individual r-process events. PMID:26024165

  2. Surface Albedo Variations Across Opportunity's Traverse in Meridiani Planum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Studer-Ellis, G. L.; Rice, M. S.; Johnson, J. R.; Bell, J. F., III

    2015-12-01

    Surface albedo measurements from the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) Opportunity mission can be used to help understand surface-atmosphere interactions at Meridiani Planum. Opportunity has acquired 117 albedo panoramas with the Pancam instrument as of sol 3870, across the first 40 km of its traverse. To date, only the first 32 panoramas have been reported upon in previous studies [1]. Here we present an analysis of the full set of PDS-released albedo observations from Opportunity and correlate our measurements with terrain type and known atmospheric events. To acquire a 360-degree albedo observation, Pancam's L1 ("clear") filter is used to take 27 broad-spectrum images, which are stitched into a mosaic. Pancam images are calibrated to reflectance factor (R*), which is taken as an approximation of the Lambertian albedo. Areas of interest are selected and average albedo calculations are applied to all of the selections. Results include the average albedo of each scene, as well as equal-area corrections where applicable, in addition to measurements of specific classes of surface features (e.g., outcrops, dusty terrain, and rover tracks). Average scene albedo measurements range from 0.11 ± 0.04 to 0.30 ± 0.04, with the highest value observed on sol 1290 (immediately after the planet-encircling dust storm of 2007). We compare these results to distance traveled, surface morphologies, local wind driven events, and dust opacity measurements. Future work will focus on correlating Pancam albedo values with orbital data from cameras such as HiRISE, CTX, MOC, THEMIS-VIS, and MARCI, and completion of the same analysis for the full Pancam albedo dataset from Spirit. References: [1] Bell, J. F., III, M. S. Rice, J. R. Johnson, and T. M. Hare (2008), Surface albedo observations at Gusev Crater and Meridiani Planum, Mars, J. Geophys. Res., 113, E06S18, doi:10.1029/2007JE002976.

  3. From Regional Cloud-Albedo to a Global Albedo Footprint - Studying Aerosol Effects on the Radiation Budget Using the Relation Between Albedo and Cloud Fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, F.; Engström, A.; Karlsson, J.; Wood, R.; Charlson, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    Earth's albedo is the primary determinant of the amount of energy absorbed by the Earth-atmosphere system. The main factor controlling albedo is the amount of clouds present, but aerosols can affect and alter both clear-sky and cloudy-sky reflectance. How albedo depends on cloud fraction and how albedo varies at a given cloud fraction and a given cloud water content, reveals information about these aerosol effects on the radiation budget. Hence, the relation between total albedo and cloud fraction can be used for illustration and quantification of aerosol effects, and as a diagnostic tool, to test model performance. Here, we show examples of the utilisation of this relation focusing on satellite observations from CERES and MODIS on Aqua, as well as from Calipso and CloudSat, and performing comparisons with climate models on the way: In low-cloud regions in the subtropics, we find that climate models well represent a near-constant regional cloud albedo, and this representation has improved from CMIP3 to CMIP5. CMIP5 models indicate more reflective clouds in present-day climate than pre-industrial, as a result of increased aerosol burdens. On monthly mean time scale, models are found to over-estimate the regional cloud-brightening due to aerosols. On the global scale we find an increasing cloud albedo with increasing cloud fraction - a relation that is very well defined in observations, and less so in CMIP5 models. Cloud brightening from pre-industrial to present day is also seen on global scale. Further, controlling for both cloud fraction and cloud water content we can trace small variations in albedo, or perturbations of solar reflectivity, that create a near-global coherent geographical pattern that is consistent with aerosol impacts on climate, with albedo enhancement in regions dominant of known aerosol sources and suppression of albedo in regions associated with high rates of aerosol removal (deduced using CloudSat precipitation estimates). This mapping can be

  4. Anthropogenic desertification by high-albedo pollution Observations and modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otterman, J.; Rosenberg, N. W.; Rosenberg, E.

    1974-01-01

    ERTS-1 MSS albedo data of Western Negev, Sinai and the Gaza strip are presented. A sharp contrast in albedo exists across the Negev-Sinai and Negev-Gaza strip borders. Anthropogenic desertification has occurred on the Arab side due to overgrazing and Bedouin agriculture, whereas natural vegetation grows much more abundantly on the Israeli side.

  5. The albedo of snow for partially cloudy skies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhury, B. J.; Chang, A. T. C.

    1980-01-01

    The input parameters of the model are atmospheric precipitable water, ozone content, turbidity, cloud optical thickness, size and shape of ice crystal of snow and surface pressure. The model outputs spectral and integrated solar flux snow reflectance as a function of solar elevation and fractional cloudcover. The model is illustrated using representative parameters for the Antarctic coastal regions. The albedo for a clear sky depends inversely on the solar elevation. At high elevation the albedo depends primarily upon the grain size; at low elevation this dependence is on grain size and shape. The gradient of the albedo-elevation curve increases as the grains get larger and faceted. The albedo for a dense overcast is a few percent higher than the clear sky albedo at high elevations. A simple relation between the grain size and the overcast albedo is obtained. For a set of grain size and shape, the albedo matrices (the albedo as a function of solar elevation and fractional cloudcover) are tabulated.

  6. Greenland surface albedo changes 1981-2012 from satellite observations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Significant melt over Greenland has been observed during the last several decades associated with extreme warming events over the northern Atlantic Ocean. An analysis of surface albedo change over Greenland is presented, using a 32-year consistent satellite albedo product from the Global Land Surfac...

  7. Seasonal evolution of the albedo of multiyear Arctic sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perovich, D. K.; Grenfell, T. C.; Light, B.; Hobbs, P. V.

    2002-10-01

    As part of ice albedo feedback studies during the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) field experiment, we measured spectral and wavelength-integrated albedo on multiyear sea ice. Measurements were made every 2.5 m along a 200-m survey line from April through October. Initially, this line was completely snow covered, but as the melt season progressed, it became a mixture of bare ice and melt ponds. Observed changes in albedo were a combination of a gradual evolution due to seasonal transitions and abrupt shifts resulting from synoptic weather events. There were five distinct phases in the evolution of albedo: dry snow, melting snow, pond formation, pond evolution, and fall freeze-up. In April the surface albedo was high (0.8-0.9) and spatially uniform. By the end of July the average albedo along the line was 0.4, and there was significant spatial variability, with values ranging from 0.1 for deep, dark ponds to 0.65 for bare, white ice. There was good agreement between surface-based albedos and measurements made from the University of Washington's Convair-580 research aircraft. A comparison between net solar irradiance computed using observed albedos and a simplified model of seasonal evolution shows good agreement as long as the timing of the transitions is accurately determined.

  8. Neutron measurements in near-Earth orbit with COMPTEL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, D. J.; Aarts, H.; Bennett, K.; Lockwood, J. A.; Mcconnell, M. L.; Ryan, J. M.; Schoenfelder, V.; Steinle, H.; Peng, X.

    1995-01-01

    The fast neutron flux in near-Earth orbit has been measured with the COMPTEL instrument on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO). For this measurement one of COMPTEL's seven liquid scintillator modules was used as an uncollimated neutron detector with threshold of 12.8 MeV. The measurements cover a range of 4.8 to 15.5 GV in vertical cutoff rigidity and 3 deg to 177 deg in spacecraft geocenter zenith angle. One of the measurements occurred near the minimum of the deepest Forbush decrease ever observed by ground-level neutron monitors. After correction for solar modulation, the total flux is well fitted by separable functions in rigidity and zenith angle. With the spacecraft pointed near the nadir the flux is consistent with balloon measurements of the atmospheric neutron albedo. The flux varies by about a factor of 4 between the extremes of rigidity and a factor of 2 between the extremes of zenith angle. The effect of the spacecraft mass in shielding the detector from the atmospheric neutron albedo is much more important than its role as a source of additional secondary neutrons. The neutron spectral hardness varies little with rigidity or zenith angle and lies in the range spanned by earlier atmospheric neutron albedo measurements.

  9. NEOWISE Reactivation Mission Year Two: Asteroid Diameters and Albedos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nugent, C. R.; Mainzer, A.; Bauer, J.; Cutri, R. M.; Kramer, E. A.; Grav, T.; Masiero, J.; Sonnett, S.; Wright, E. L.

    2016-09-01

    The Near-Earth Object Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (NEOWISE) mission continues to detect, track, and characterize minor planets. We present diameters and albedos calculated from observations taken during the second year since the spacecraft was reactivated in late 2013. These include 207 near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) and 8885 other asteroids. Of the NEAs, 84% NEAs did not have previously measured diameters and albedos by the NEOWISE mission. Comparison of sizes and albedos calculated from NEOWISE measurements with those measured by occultations, spacecraft, and radar-derived shapes shows accuracy consistent with previous NEOWISE publications. Diameters and albedos fall within ±˜20% and ±˜40%, 1-sigma, respectively, of those measured by these alternate techniques. NEOWISE continues to preferentially discover near-Earth objects which are large (>100 m), and have low albedos.

  10. Global color and albedo variations on Io

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McEwen, A.S.

    1988-01-01

    Three multispectral mosaics of Io have been produced from Voyager imaging data: a global mosaic from each of the Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 data sets and a high-resolution mosaic of the region surrounding the volcano Ra Patera. The mosaics are maps of normal albedo and color in accurate geometric map formats. Io's photometric behavior, mapped with a two-image technique, is spatially variable, especially in the bright white areas. The disk-integrated color and albedo of the satellite have been remarkably constant over recent decades, despite the volcanic activity and the many differences between Voyager 1 and 2 images (acquired just 4 months apart). This constancy is most likely due to the consistent occurrence of large Pele-type plumes with relatively dark, red deposits in the region from long 240 to 360??. A transient brightening southeast of Pele during the Voyager 1 encounter was probably due to real changes in surface and/or atmospheric materials, rather than to photometric behavior. The intrinsic spectral variability of Io, as seen in a series of two-dimensional histograms of the multispectral mosaics, consists of continuous variation among three major spectral end members. The data were mapped into five spectral units to compare them with laboratory measurements of candidate surface materials and to show the planimetric distributions. Unit 1 is best fit by the spectral reflectance of ordinary elemental sulfur, and it is closely associated with the Peletype plume deposits. Unit 2 is strongly confined to the polar caps above about latitude ??50??, but its composition is unknown. Unit 5 is probably SO2 with relatively minor contamination; it is concentrated in the equatorial region and near the long-lived Prometheus-type plumes. Units 3 and 4 are gradational between units 1 and 5. In addition to SO2 and elemental sulfur, other plausible components of the surface are polysulfur oxides, FeCl2, Na2S, and NaHS. ?? 1988.

  11. Neutron Absorption Measurements Constrain Eucrite-Diogenite Mixing in Vesta's Regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prettyman, T. H.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Feldman, W. C.; Hendricks, J. S.; Lawrence, D. J.; Peplowski, P. N.; Toplis, M. J.; Yamashita, N.; Beck, A.; LeCorre, L.; McCoy, T. J.; McSween, H. Y.; Reedy, R. C.; Titus, T. N.; Mizzon, H.; Reddy, V.; Joy, S. P.; Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.

    2013-01-01

    The NASA Dawn Mission s Gamma Ray and Neutron Detector (GRaND) [1] acquired mapping data during 5 months in a polar, low altitude mapping orbit (LAMO) with approx.460-km mean radius around main-belt asteroid Vesta (264-km mean radius) [2]. Neutrons and gamma rays are produced by galactic cosmic ray interactions and by the decay of natural radioelements (K, Th, U), providing information about the elemental composition of Vesta s regolith to depths of a few decimeters beneath the surface. From the data acquired in LAMO, maps of vestan neutron and gamma ray signatures were determined with a spatial resolution of approx.300 km full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM), comparable in scale to the Rheasilvia impact basin (approx.500 km diameter). The data from Vesta encounter are available from the NASA Planetary Data System. Based on an analysis of gamma-ray spectra, Vesta s global-average regolith composition was found to be consistent with the Howardite, Eucrite, and Diogenite (HED) meteorites, reinforcing the HED-Vesta connection [2-7]. Further, an analysis of epithermal neutrons revealed variations in the abundance of hydrogen on Vesta s surface, reaching values up to 400 micro-g/g [2]. The association of high concentrations of hydrogen with equatorial, low-albedo surface regions indicated exogenic delivery of hydrogen by the infall of carbonaceous chondrite (CC) materials. This finding was buttressed by the presence of minimally-altered CC clasts in howardites, with inferred bulk hydrogen abundances similar to that found by GRaND, and by studies using data from Dawn s Framing Camera (FC) and VIR instruments [8-10]. In addition, from an analysis of neutron absorption, spatial-variations in the abundance of elements other than hydrogen were detected [2].

  12. Fire disturbance effects on land surface albedo in Alaskan tundra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, Nancy H. F.; Whitley, Matthew A.; Jenkins, Liza K.

    2016-03-01

    The study uses satellite Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer albedo products (MCD43A3) to assess changes in albedo at two sites in the treeless tundra region of Alaska, both within the foothills region of the Brooks Range, the 2007 Anaktuvuk River Fire (ARF) and 2012 Kucher Creek Fire (KCF). Results are compared to each other and other studies to assess the magnitude of albedo change and the longevity of impact of fire on land surface albedo. In both sites there was a marked decrease of albedo in the year following the fire. In the ARF, albedo slowly increased until 4 years after the fire, when it returned to albedo values prior to the fire. For the year immediately after the fire, a threefold difference in the shortwave albedo decrease was found between the two sites. ARF showed a 45.3% decrease, while the KCF showed a 14.1% decrease in shortwave albedo, and albedo is more variable in the KCF site than ARF site 1 year after the fire. These differences are possibly the result of differences in burn severity of the two fires, wherein the ARF burned more completely with more contiguous patches of complete burn than KCF. The impact of fire on average growing season (April-September) surface shortwave forcing in the year following fire is estimated to be 13.24 ± 6.52 W m-2 at the ARF site, a forcing comparable to studies in other treeless ecosystems. Comparison to boreal studies and the implications to energy flux are discussed in the context of future increases in fire occurrence and severity in a warming climate.

  13. Snow-albedo feedback in future climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Xin

    We quantify the two factors controlling Northern Hemisphere springtime snow-albedo feedback in transient climate change based on scenario runs of 18 climate models used in the Intergovernmental Panel of Climate Change 4th Assessment. The first factor is the dependence of planetary albedo on surface albedo. We find in all simulations surface albedo anomalies are attenuated by approximately half in Northern Hemisphere land areas as they are transformed into planetary albedo anomalies. The intermodel standard deviation in this factor is surprisingly small. Moreover, when we calculate an observational estimate of this factor using the satellite-based International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project data, we find most simulations agree with ISCCP values to within about 10%. The second factor, related exclusively to surface processes, is the change in surface albedo associated with an anthropogenically-induced temperature change in Northern Hemisphere land areas. It exhibits much more intermodel variability. This large intermodel spread is attributable mostly to a correspondingly large spread in mean effective snow albedo. Models without explicit treatment of the vegetation canopy in their surface albedo calculations typically have high effective snow albedos and strong SAF, often stronger than observed. In models with explicit canopy treatment, completely snow-covered surfaces typically have lower albedos and the simulations have weaker SAF, generally weaker than observed. These large intermodel variations in feedback strength in climate change are nearly perfectly correlated with comparably large intermodel variations in feedback strength in the context of the seasonal cycle. Moreover, the feedback strength in the real seasonal cycle can be measured and compared to simulated values. These mostly fall outside the range of the observed estimate. Because of the tight correlation between simulated feedback strength in the seasonal cycle and climate change, eliminating the

  14. Relationship between cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction and cloud albedo, and new surface-based approach for determining cloud albedo

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.; Wu, W.; Jensen, M. P.; Toto, T.

    2011-07-21

    This paper focuses on three interconnected topics: (1) quantitative relationship between surface shortwave cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo; (2) surface-based approach for measuring cloud albedo; (3) multiscale (diurnal, annual and inter-annual) variations and covariations of surface shortwave cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo. An analytical expression is first derived to quantify the relationship between cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo. The analytical expression is then used to deduce a new approach for inferring cloud albedo from concurrent surface-based measurements of downwelling surface shortwave radiation and cloud fraction. High-resolution decade-long data on cloud albedos are obtained by use of this surface-based approach over the US Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiaton Measurement (ARM) Program at the Great Southern Plains (SGP) site. The surface-based cloud albedos are further compared against those derived from the coincident GOES satellite measurements. The three long-term (1997-2009) sets of hourly data on shortwave cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction and cloud albedo collected over the SGP site are analyzed to explore the multiscale (diurnal, annual and inter-annual) variations and covariations. The analytical formulation is useful for diagnosing deficiencies of cloud-radiation parameterizations in climate models.

  15. Generating multi-scale albedo look-up maps using MODIS BRDF/Albedo products and landsat imagery

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surface albedo determines radiative forcing and is a key parameter for driving Earth’s climate. Better characterization of surface albedo for individual land cover types can reduce the uncertainty in estimating changes to Earth’s radiation balance due to land cover change. This paper presents a mult...

  16. Differential neutron energy spectra measured on spacecraft low Earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. V.; Frank, A. L.; Dudkin, E. V.; Potapov, Yu. V.; Akopova, A. B.; Melkumyan, L. V.

    1995-01-01

    Two methods for measuring neutrons in the range from thermal energies to dozens of MeV were used. In the first method, alpha-particles emitted from the (sup 6) Li(n.x)T reaction are detected with the help of plastic nuclear track detectors, yielding results on thermal and resonance neutrons. Also, fission foils are used to detect fast neutrons. In the second method, fast neutrons are recorded by nuclear photographic emulsions (NPE). The results of measurements on board various satellites are presented. The neutron flux density does not appear to correlate clearly with orbital parameters. Up to 50% of neutrons are due to albedo neutrons from the atmosphere while the fluxes inside the satellites are 15-20% higher than those on the outside. Estimates show that the neutron contribution to the total equivalent radiation dose reaches 20-30%.

  17. ALBEDOS OF SMALL HILDA GROUP ASTEROIDS AS REVEALED BY SPITZER

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, Erin Lee; Woodward, Charles E. E-mail: chelsea@astro.umn.edu

    2011-06-15

    We present thermal 24 {mu}m observations from the Spitzer Space Telescope of 62 Hilda asteroid group members with diameters ranging from 3 to 12 km. Measurements of the thermal emission, when combined with reported absolute magnitudes, allow us to constrain the albedo and diameter of each object. From our Spitzer sample, we find the mean geometric albedo, p{sub V} = 0.07 {+-} 0.05, for small (D < 10 km) Hilda group asteroids. This Spitzer-derived value of p{sub V} is greater than and spans a larger range in albedo space than the mean albedo of large (D {approx}> 10 km) Hilda group asteroids which is p{sub V} = 0.04 {+-} 0.01. Though this difference may be attributed to space weathering, the small Hilda group population reportedly displays greater taxonomic range from C-, D-, and X-type whose albedo distributions are commensurate with the range of determined albedos. We discuss the derived Hilda size-frequency distribution, color-color space, and geometric albedo for our survey sample in the context of the expected migration induced 'seeding' of the Hilda asteroid group with outer solar system proto-planetesimals as outlined in the 'Nice' formalism.

  18. Arid land monitoring using Landsat albedo difference images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinove, Charles J.; Chavez, Pat S.; Gehring, Dale G.; Holmgren, Ralph

    1981-01-01

    The Landsat albedo, or percentage of incoming radiation reflected from the ground in the wavelength range of 0.5 [mu]m to 1.1 [mu]m, is calculated from an equation using the Landsat digital brightness values and solar irradiance values, and correcting for atmospheric scattering, multispectral scanner calibration, and sun angle. The albedo calculated for each pixel is used to create an albedo image, whose grey scale is proportional to the albedo. Differencing sequential registered images and mapping selected values of the difference is used to create quantitative maps of increased or decreased albedo values of the terrain. All maps and other output products are in black and white rather than color, thus making the method quite economical. Decreases of albedo in arid regions may indicate improvement of land quality; increases may indicate degradation. Tests of the albedo difference mapping method in the Desert Experimental Range in southwestern Utah (a cold desert with little long-term terrain change) for a four-year period show that mapped changes can be correlated with erosion from flash floods, increased or decreased soil moisture, and increases or decreases in the density of desert vegetation, both perennial shrubs and annual plants. All terrain changes identified in this test were related to variations in precipitation. Although further tests of this method in hot deserts showing severe "desertification" are needed, the method is nevertheless recommended for experimental use in monitoring terrain change in other arid and semiarid regions of the world.

  19. Aerial albedos of natural vegetation in South-eastern Australia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    Black-and-white low-level 70mm photography was used to record the track of the aircraft, which was then plotted on conventional 1:80,000 23 cm photogrammetric photographs and referenced against simultaneous measurements of the beam albedos of vegetation. Using stereoscopic pairs of the 70mm photographs, the vegetation was classified into sub-formations. Marked differences in the 'sub-formation' albedos were observed. A two-way table using stand height and crown cover of the sub-formations clearly showed a very distinctive trend of albedos. This finding may be important in other vegetal studies.

  20. Deriving surface albedo measurements from narrow band satellite data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brest, Christopher L.; Goward, Samuel N.

    1987-01-01

    A target calibration procedure for obtaining surface albedo from satellite data is presented. The methodology addresses two key issues, the calibration of remotely-sensed, discrete wavelength, digital data and the derivation of an albedo measurement (defined over the solar short wave spectrum) from spectrally limited observations. Twenty-seven Landsat observations, calibrated with urban targets (building roof-tops and parking lots), are used to derive spatial and seasonal patterns of surface reflectance and albedo for four land cover types: city, suburb, farm and forest.

  1. Lunar Terrain and Albedo Reconstruction from Apollo Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nefian, Ara V.; Kim, Taemin; Broxton, Michael; Moratto, Zach

    2010-01-01

    Generating accurate three dimensional planetary models and albedo maps is becoming increasingly more important as NASA plans more robotics missions to the Moon in the coming years. This paper describes a novel approach for separation of topography and albedo maps from orbital Lunar images. Our method uses an optimal Bayesian correlator to refine the stereo disparity map and generate a set of accurate digital elevation models (DEM). The albedo maps are obtained using a multi-image formation model that relies on the derived DEMs and the Lunar- Lambert reflectance model. The method is demonstrated on a set of high resolution scanned images from the Apollo era missions.

  2. First Observation of Ground State Dineutron Decay: Be16

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spyrou, A.; Kohley, Z.; Baumann, T.; Bazin, D.; Brown, B. A.; Christian, G.; Deyoung, P. A.; Finck, J. E.; Frank, N.; Lunderberg, E.; Mosby, S.; Peters, W. A.; Schiller, A.; Smith, J. K.; Snyder, J.; Strongman, M. J.; Thoennessen, M.; Volya, A.

    2012-03-01

    We report on the first observation of dineutron emission in the decay of Be16. A single-proton knockout reaction from a 53MeV/u B17 beam was used to populate the ground state of Be16. Be16 is bound with respect to the emission of one neutron and unbound to two-neutron emission. The dineutron character of the decay is evidenced by a small emission angle between the two neutrons. The two-neutron separation energy of Be16 was measured to be 1.35(10) MeV, in good agreement with shell model calculations, using standard interactions for this mass region.

  3. The Albedo Distribution of Near Earth Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Edward L.

    2016-01-01

    The cryogenic WISE mission in 2010 was extremely sensitive to asteroids and not biased against detecting dark objects. Mainzer et al (2011, ApJ, 743, 156) fit the distribution of albedos of the 428 NEAs observed by WISE with a double Gaussian function with 5 parameters.This note describes a 3 parameter function that fits as well as the double Gaussian: a sum of two Rayleigh distributions. The Rayleigh distribution is zero for negative values, and follows f(x) = x exp[-x2/(2σ2)]/σ2 for positive x. The peak value is at x=σ, so the position and width are tied together. The three parameters are the fraction of the objects in the dark population, the position of the dark peak, and the position of the normal peak. 25.1% of the NEAs observed by WISE are in a very dark population peaking at pV = 0.03, while the other 74.9% of the NEAs seen by WISE are in a moderately dark population peaking at pV = 0.167.A consequence of this bimodal distribution is that the Congressional mandate to find 90% of all NEOs larger than 140 m diameter cannot be satisfied by surveying to H=22 mag, since a 140 m diameter asteroid at the very dark peak has H=23.7 mag, and more than 10% of NEAs are darker than pV = 0.03.

  4. The Albedo Distribution of Near Earth Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Edward L.; Mainzer, Amy; Masiero, Joseph; Grav, Tommy; Bauer, James

    2016-10-01

    The cryogenic Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) mission in 2010 was extremely sensitive to asteroids and not biased against detecting dark objects. The albedos of 428 near Earth asteroids (NEAs) observed by WISE during its fully cryogenic mission can be fit quite well by a three parameter function that is the sum of two Rayleigh distributions. The Rayleigh distribution is zero for negative values, and follows f(x) =x\\exp [-{x}2/(2{σ }2)]/{σ }2 for positive x. The peak value is at x = σ, so the position and width are tied together. The three parameters are the fraction of the objects in the dark population, the position of the dark peak, and the position of the brighter peak. We find that 25.3% of the NEAs observed by WISE are in a very dark population peaking at p V = 0.030, while the other 74.7% of the NEAs seen by WISE are in a moderately dark population peaking at p V = 0.168. A consequence of this bimodal distribution is that the congressional mandate to find 90% of all NEAs larger than 140 m diameter cannot be satisfied by surveying to H = 22 mag, since a 140 m diameter asteroid at the very dark peak has H = 23.7 mag, and more than 10% of NEAs are darker than p V = 0.03.

  5. Global color and albedo variations on Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcewen, Alfred S.

    1990-01-01

    Global multispectral mosaics of Triton have been produced from Voyager approach images; six spectral units are defined and mapped. The margin of the south polar cap (SPC) is scalloped and ranges in latitude from + 10 deg to -30 deg. A bright fringe is closely associated with the cap's margin; form it, diffuse bright rays extend north-northeast for hundreds of kilometers. Thus, the rays may consist of fringe materials that were redistributed by northward-going Coriolis-deflected winds. From 1977 to 1989, Triton's full-disk spectrum changed from markedly red and UV-dark to nearly neutral white and UV-bright. This spectral change can be explained by new deposition of nitrogen frost over both the northern hemisphere and parts of a formerly redder SPC. Frost deposition in the southern hemisphere during southern summer is possible over relatively high albedo areas of the cap (Stansberry et al., 1990), which helps to explain the apparent stability of the unexpectedly large SPC and the presence of the bright fringe.

  6. A preliminary global oceanic cloud climatology from satellite albedo observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, N. A.; Henderson-Sellers, A.

    1983-01-01

    A predictive relationship is developed between over-ocean cloud system albedo and the cloud amount present, using as a data base ERB satellite microwave readings at 0.5-0.7 micron and the USAF three-dimensional nephanalysis archive. The ERB data provided global coverage at a resolution of 2.5 x 2.5 deg during the 1974-78 period. Regression analyses were performed on the amounts and albedos for several years of data for one month in order to detect seasonal variations. A logarithmic relationship was found between the cloud system albedo and cloud amount over the oceans, with negligible seasonal variance. The analysis is noted to apply only where low surface albedos are encountered, and further work to extend the study to continental vegetated areas is indicated.

  7. The Changing Albedo of the Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Human, J. M.; Box, J. E.

    2009-12-01

    The study evaluates Greenland ice sheet surface albedo sensitivity to surface melt intensity, air pollution, and precipitation using data from the MODIS and MOPITT sensors operating on the NASA Terra satellite 2000-2009. Precipitation rates are simulated by the Polar WRF climate model running in data assimilation mode. Statistical regression facilitates ranking the relative importance of each of the albedo forcings in space and time. Further, quantitative estimates of the albedo sensitivity to its forcing factors are made, for the first time and over the observed inter-annual range. The work investigates regional patterns in detail to quantify melt water production associated with absorbed solar radiation variability. In-situ records are used to evaluate the cloud radiative effect as another important factor of absorbed solar radiation and ice melt. Insight into Greenland ice sheet melt-precipitation-pollution-albedo feedback is gained, key in better understanding the mass balance response of the ice sheet to future climate change.

  8. Cloud condensation nucleus-sulfate mass relationship and cloud albedo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hegg, Dean A.

    1994-01-01

    Analysis of previously published, simultaneous measurements of cloud condensation nucleus number concentration and sulfate mass concentration suggest a nonlinear relationship between the two variables. This nonlinearity reduces the sensitivity of cloud albedo to changes in the sulfur cycle.

  9. Albedo Pattern Recognition and Time-Series Analyses in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salleh, S. A.; Abd Latif, Z.; Mohd, W. M. N. Wan; Chan, A.

    2012-07-01

    Pattern recognition and time-series analyses will enable one to evaluate and generate predictions of specific phenomena. The albedo pattern and time-series analyses are very much useful especially in relation to climate condition monitoring. This study is conducted to seek for Malaysia albedo pattern changes. The pattern recognition and changes will be useful for variety of environmental and climate monitoring researches such as carbon budgeting and aerosol mapping. The 10 years (2000-2009) MODIS satellite images were used for the analyses and interpretation. These images were being processed using ERDAS Imagine remote sensing software, ArcGIS 9.3, the 6S code for atmospherical calibration and several MODIS tools (MRT, HDF2GIS, Albedo tools). There are several methods for time-series analyses were explored, this paper demonstrates trends and seasonal time-series analyses using converted HDF format MODIS MCD43A3 albedo land product. The results revealed significance changes of albedo percentages over the past 10 years and the pattern with regards to Malaysia's nebulosity index (NI) and aerosol optical depth (AOD). There is noticeable trend can be identified with regards to its maximum and minimum value of the albedo. The rise and fall of the line graph show a similar trend with regards to its daily observation. The different can be identified in term of the value or percentage of rises and falls of albedo. Thus, it can be concludes that the temporal behavior of land surface albedo in Malaysia have a uniform behaviours and effects with regards to the local monsoons. However, although the average albedo shows linear trend with nebulosity index, the pattern changes of albedo with respects to the nebulosity index indicates that there are external factors that implicates the albedo values, as the sky conditions and its diffusion plotted does not have uniform trend over the years, especially when the trend of 5 years interval is examined, 2000 shows high negative linear

  10. On the definition of albedo and application to irregular particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanner, M. S.; Giese, R. H.; Weiss, K.; Zerull, R.

    1981-01-01

    The various definitions of albedo used in planetary astronomy are reviewed. In particular, the Bond albedo, which refers only to the reflected and refracted components, is not applicable to small particles or highly irregular particles, where diffraction is not restricted to a well-defined lobe at small scattering angles. Measured scattering functions for irregular particles are presented in a normalized form and are applied to the case of zodiacal light.

  11. NEOWISE Diameters and Albedos V1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mainzer, A. K.; Bauer, J. M.; Cutri, R. M.; Grav, T.; Kramer, E. A.; Masiero, J. R.; Nugent, C. R.; Sonnett, S. M.; Stevenson, R. A.; Wright, E. L.

    2016-06-01

    This PDS data set represents a compilation of published diameters, optical albedos, near-infrared albedos, and beaming parameters for minor planets detected by NEOWISE during the fully cryogenic, 3-band cryo, post-cryo and NEOWISE-Reactivation Year 1 operations. It contains data covering near-Earth asteroids, Main Belt asteroids, active Main Belt objects, Hildas, Jupiter Trojans, Centaurs, and Jovian and Saturnian irregular satellites. Methodology for physical property determination is described in the referenced articles.

  12. Measurements of Black Carbon Induced Snow-Albedo Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadley, O. L.; Kirchstetter, T. W.

    2011-12-01

    Several modeling studies have indicated that black carbon (BC) reduces the albedo of snow and ice and appreciably contributes to Northern Hemisphere warming and glacier retreat. Observations of the BC impact on snow albedo are needed to verify model predictions. Whereas field studies dating back to the early 1980s measured BC concentrations in snow and ice in the arctic, the BC effect on snow albedo and melting has been difficult to observe directly because the albedo reduction is small and often masked by other natural variables. This study evaluates both the initial impact of BC on snow albedo, as well as associated feedbacks due to snow age and BC scavenging during snow melting. The first feedback is related to the increasing grain size of snow as it ages. Larger snow grains allow sunlight to penetrate farther, where it is exposed to and may be increasingly absorbed by BC. This enhances the albedo reduction attributable to the mass of BC present in the snow and deposits energy at greater depths in the snowpack, potentially increasing the melt rate and therefore the growth rate of the snow grains. The second potential feedback, associated with BC transport through a melting snowpack, occurs if BC is scavenged from the melt water by the ice grains thus increasing the BC concentration in the remaining snow. Measurement of pristine and sooty snow made in the laboratory verifies that BC reduces snow albedo to a greater extent for larger-grained snow. Experimental observations yield an empirical model of the BC snow albedo reduction. Measurements of BC transport in both laboratory and natural snow were used to develop a model of the evolution of the vertical distribution of BC in melting snow. These measurements provide the first quantification of a BC concentration enhancement in melting snow.

  13. Surface albedo observations at Gusev Crater and Meridiani Planum, Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bell, J.F.; Rice, M.S.; Johnson, J. R.; Hare, T.M.

    2008-01-01

    During the Mars Exploration Rover mission, the Pancam instrument has periodically acquired large-scale panoramic images with its broadband (739??338 nm) filter in order to estimate the Lambert bolometric albedo of the surface along each rover's traverse. In this work we present the full suite of such estimated albedo values measured to date by the Spirit and Opportunity rovers along their traverses in Gusev Crater and Meridiani Planum, respectively. We include estimated bolometric albedo values of individual surface features (e.g., outcrops, dusty plains, aeolian bed forms, wheel tracks, light-toned soils, and crater walls) as well as overall surface averages of the 43 total panoramic albedo data sets acquired to date. We also present comparisons to estimated Lambert albedo values taken from the Mars Global Surveyor Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) along the rovers' traverses, and to the large-scale bolometric albedos of the sites from the Viking Orbiter Infrared Thermal Mapper (IRTM) and Mars Global Surveyor/Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES). The ranges of Pancam-derived albedos at Gusev Crater (0.14 to 0.25) and in Meridiani Planum. (0.10 to 0.18) are in good agreement with IRTM, TES, and MOC orbital measurements. These data sets will be a useful tool and benchmark for future investigations of albodo variations with time, including measurements from orbital instruments like the Context Camera and High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment on Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Long-term, accurate albedo measurements could also be important for future efforts in climate modeling as well as for studies of active surface processes. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  14. IAU nomenclature for albedo features on the planet Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dollfus, A.; Chapman, C. R.; Davies, M. E.; Gingerich, O.; Goldstein, R.; Guest, J.; Morrison, D.; Smith, B. A.

    1978-01-01

    The International Astronomical Union has endorsed a nomenclature for the albedo features on Mercury. Designations are based upon the mythological names related to the god Hermes; they are expressed in Latin form. The dark-hued albedo features are associated with the generic term Solitudo. The light-hued areas are designated by a single name without generic term. The 32 names adopted are allocated on the Mercury map.

  15. Albedo as a modulator of climate response to tropical deforestation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dirmeyer, Paul A.; Shukla, J.

    1994-01-01

    An atmospheric general circulation model with land surface properties represented by the simplified Simple Biosphere model is used to investigate the effects on local climate due to tropical deforestation for the Amazon basin. One control and three anomaly integrations of 4 years' duration are performed. In the anomaly integrations, rain forest in South America is replaced by degraded grassland. The anomaly integrations differ only in the optical properties of the grassland vegetation, with net surface albedos ranging from the same as to 0.09 lighter than that of rain forest. It is found that the change in climate, particularly rainfall, is strongly dependent on the change in surface albedo that accompanies deforestation. Replacement of forest by grass causes a reduction in transpiration and reduces frictional convergence by decreasing surface roughness. However, precipitation averaged over the deforested area is not necessarily reduced. Average precipitation decreases when the increase in albedo is greater than 0.03. If surface albedo is not increased appreciably as a result of deforestation, moisture flux convergence driven by the increase in surface temperature can offset the other effects, and average precipitation increases. As albedo is increased, surface temperature does not change, but surface latent and sensible heat flux decreases due to reduced radiational energy absorbed at the surface, resulting in a reduction in convection and precipitation. A change in the distribution of precipitation due to deforestation that appears to be independent of the albedo is observed.

  16. Albedo as a modulator of climate response to tropical deforestation

    SciTech Connect

    Dirmeyer, P.A.; Shukla, J.

    1994-10-01

    An atmospheric general circulation model with land surface properties represented by the simplified Simple Biosphere model is used to investigate the effects on local climate due to tropical deforestation for the Amazon basin. One control and three anomaly integrations of 4 years` duration are performed. In the anomaly integrations, rain forest in South America is replaced by degraded grassland. The anomaly integrations differ only in the optical properties of the grassland vegetation, with net surface albedos ranging from the same as to 0.09 lighter than that of rain forest. It is found that the change in climate, particularly rainfall, is strongly dependent on the change in surface albedo that accompanies deforestation. Replacement of forest by grass causes a reduction in transpiration and reduces frictional convergence by decreasing surface roughness. However, precipitation averaged over the deforested area is not necessarily reduced. Average precipitation decreases when the increase in albedo is greater than 0.03. If surface albedo is not increased appreciably as a result of deforestation, moisture flux convergence driven by the increase in surface temperature can offset the other effects, and average precipitation increases. As albedo is increased, surface temperature does not change, but surface latent and sensible heat flux decreases due to reduced radiational energy absorbed at the surface, resulting in a reduction in convection and precipitation. A change in the distribution of precipitation due to deforestation that appears to be independent of the albedo is observed.

  17. Postfire influences of snag attrition on albedo and radiative forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Halloran, Thomas L.; Acker, Steven A.; Joerger, Verena M.; Kertis, Jane; Law, Beverly E.

    2014-12-01

    This paper examines albedo perturbation and radiative forcing after a high-severity fire in a mature forest in the Oregon Cascade Range. Correlations between postfire albedo and seedling, sapling, and snag (standing dead tree) density were investigated across fire severity classes and seasons for years 4-15 after fire. Albedo perturbation was 14 times larger in winter compared to summer and increased with fire severity class for the first several years. Albedo perturbation increased linearly with time over the study period. Correlations between albedo perturbations and the vegetation densities were strongest with snags, and significant in all fire classes in both summer and winter (R < -0.92, p < 0.01). The resulting annual radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere became more negative linearly at a rate of -0.86 W m-2 yr-1, reaching -15 W m-2 in year 15 after fire. This suggests that snags can be the dominant controller of postfire albedo on decadal time scales.

  18. Precise calculations in simulations of the interaction of low energy neutrons with nano-dispersed media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artem'ev, V. A.; Nezvanov, A. Yu.; Nesvizhevsky, V. V.

    2016-01-01

    We discuss properties of the interaction of slow neutrons with nano-dispersed media and their application for neutron reflectors. In order to increase the accuracy of model simulation of the interaction of neutrons with nanopowders, we perform precise quantum mechanical calculation of potential scattering of neutrons on single nanoparticles using the method of phase functions. We compare results of precise calculations with those performed within first Born approximation for nanodiamonds with the radius of 2-5 nm and for neutron energies 3 × 10-7-10-3 eV. Born approximation overestimates the probability of scattering to large angles, while the accuracy of evaluation of integral characteristics (cross sections, albedo) is acceptable. Using Monte-Carlo method, we calculate albedo of neutrons from different layers of piled up diamond nanopowder.

  19. On the nature of the sea ice albedo feedback in simple models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, W.; Wettlaufer, J. S.

    2014-08-01

    We examine the nature of the ice-albedo feedback in a long-standing approach used in the dynamic-thermodynamic modeling of sea ice. The central issue examined is how the evolution of the ice area is treated when modeling a partial ice cover using a two-category-thickness scheme; thin sea ice and open water in one category and "thick" sea ice in the second. The problem with the scheme is that the area evolution is handled in a manner that violates the basic rules of calculus, which leads to a neglected area evolution term that is equivalent to neglecting a leading-order latent heat flux. We demonstrate the consequences by constructing energy balance models with a fractional ice cover and studying them under the influence of increased radiative forcing. It is shown that the neglected flux is particularly important in a decaying ice cover approaching the transitions to seasonal or ice-free conditions. Clearly, a mishandling of the evolution of the ice area has leading-order effects on the ice-albedo feedback. Accordingly, it may be of considerable importance to reexamine the relevant climate model schemes and to begin the process of converting them to fully resolve the sea ice thickness distribution in a manner such as remapping, which does not in principle suffer from the pathology we describe.

  20. High-albedo materials for reducing building cooling energy use

    SciTech Connect

    Taha, H.; Sailor, D.; Akbari, H.

    1992-01-01

    One simple and effective way to mitigate urban heat islands, i.e., the higher temperatures in cities compared to those of the surrounds, and their negative impacts on cooling energy consumption is to use high-albedo materials on major urban surfaces such as rooftops, streets, sidewalks, school yards, and the exposed surfaces of parking lots. High-albedo materials can save cooling energy use by directly reducing the heat gain through a building`s envelope (direct effect) and also by lowering the urban air temperature in the neighborhood of the building (indirect effect). This project is an attempt to address high-albedo materials for buildings and to perform measurements of roof coatings. We search for existing methods and materials to implement fighter colors on major building and urban surfaces. Their cost effectiveness are examined and the possible related technical, maintenance, and environmental problems are identified. We develop a method for measuring albedo in the field by studying the instrumentation aspects of such measurements. The surface temperature impacts of various albedo/materials in the actual outdoor environment are studied by measuring the surface temperatures of a variety of materials tested on an actual roof. We also generate an albedo database for several urban surfaces to serve as a reference for future use. The results indicate that high-albedo materials can have a large impact on the surface temperature regime. On clear sunny days, when the solar noon surface temperatures of conventional roofing materials were about 40{degrees}C (72{degrees}F) warmer than air, the surface temperature of high-albedo coatings were only about 5{degrees}C warmer than air. In the morning and in the late afternoon, the high-albedo materials were as cool as the air itself. While conventional roofing materials warm up by an average 0.055{degrees}C/(W m{sup {minus}2}), the high-albedo surfaces warm up by an average 0.015{degrees}C/(W m{sup {minus}2}).

  1. High-albedo materials for reducing building cooling energy use

    SciTech Connect

    Taha, H.; Sailor, D.; Akbari, H.

    1992-01-01

    One simple and effective way to mitigate urban heat islands, i.e., the higher temperatures in cities compared to those of the surrounds, and their negative impacts on cooling energy consumption is to use high-albedo materials on major urban surfaces such as rooftops, streets, sidewalks, school yards, and the exposed surfaces of parking lots. High-albedo materials can save cooling energy use by directly reducing the heat gain through a building's envelope (direct effect) and also by lowering the urban air temperature in the neighborhood of the building (indirect effect). This project is an attempt to address high-albedo materials for buildings and to perform measurements of roof coatings. We search for existing methods and materials to implement fighter colors on major building and urban surfaces. Their cost effectiveness are examined and the possible related technical, maintenance, and environmental problems are identified. We develop a method for measuring albedo in the field by studying the instrumentation aspects of such measurements. The surface temperature impacts of various albedo/materials in the actual outdoor environment are studied by measuring the surface temperatures of a variety of materials tested on an actual roof. We also generate an albedo database for several urban surfaces to serve as a reference for future use. The results indicate that high-albedo materials can have a large impact on the surface temperature regime. On clear sunny days, when the solar noon surface temperatures of conventional roofing materials were about 40{degrees}C (72{degrees}F) warmer than air, the surface temperature of high-albedo coatings were only about 5{degrees}C warmer than air. In the morning and in the late afternoon, the high-albedo materials were as cool as the air itself. While conventional roofing materials warm up by an average 0.055{degrees}C/(W m{sup {minus}2}), the high-albedo surfaces warm up by an average 0.015{degrees}C/(W m{sup {minus}2}).

  2. Standards for the validation of remotely sensed albedo products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Jennifer

    2015-04-01

    Land surface albedo is important component of the Earth's energy balance, defined as the fraction of shortwave radiation absorbed by a surface, and is one many Essential Climate Variables (ECVS) that can be retrieved from space through remote sensing. To quantify the accuracy of these products, they must be validated with respect to in-situ measurements of albedo using an albedometer. Whilst accepted standards exist for the calibration of albedometers, standards for the use of in-situ measurement schemes, and their use in validation procedures have yet to be developed. It is essential that we can assess the quality of remotely sensed albedo data, and to identify traceable sources of uncertainty during process of providing these data. As a result of the current lack of accepted standards for in-situ albedo retrieval and validation procedures, we are not yet able to identify and quantify traceable sources of uncertainty. Establishing standard protocols for in-situ retrievals for the validation of global albedo products would allow inter-product use and comparison, in addition to product standardization. Accordingly, this study aims to assess the quality of in-situ albedo retrieval schemes and identify sources of uncertainty, specifically in vegetation environments. A 3D Monte Carlo Ray Tracing Model will be used to simulate albedometer instruments in complex 3D vegetation canopies. To determine sources of uncertainty, factors that influence albedo measurement uncertainty were identified and will subsequently be examined: 1. Time of day (Solar Zenith Angle) 2. Ecosytem type 3. Placement of albedometer within the ecosystem 4. Height of albedometer above the canopy 5. Clustering within the ecosystem A variety of 3D vegetation canopies have been generated to cover the main ecosystems found globally, different seasons, and different plant distributions. Canopies generated include birchstand and pinestand forests for summer and winter, savanna, shrubland, cropland and

  3. Neutron background in underground particle astrophysics experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kudryavtsev, V. A.

    2007-03-28

    Neutron background for the high-sensitivity underground particle astrophysics experiments, such as dark matter searches, double-beta decay detectors, low-energy neutrino physics and astrophysics, is discussed. Neutron production via spontaneous fission and ({alpha},n) reactions from U and Th, and by cosmic-ray muons is considered. We describe the method of calculating neutron spectra from radioactivity and effects produced in the detectors. The requirements for passive neutron shielding are given and the efficiency of an active veto system is discussed. It is shown that muon-induced neutrons require complex and accurate simulations where any simplification may lead to a significant error in the result.

  4. Preferential cooling of hot extremes from cropland albedo management

    PubMed Central

    Davin, Edouard L.; Seneviratne, Sonia I.; Ciais, Philippe; Olioso, Albert; Wang, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Changes in agricultural practices are considered a possible option to mitigate climate change. In particular, reducing or suppressing tillage (no-till) may have the potential to sequester carbon in soils, which could help slow global warming. On the other hand, such practices also have a direct effect on regional climate by altering the physical properties of the land surface. These biogeophysical effects, however, are still poorly known. Here we show that no-till management increases the surface albedo of croplands in summer and that the resulting cooling effect is amplified during hot extremes, thus attenuating peak temperatures reached during heat waves. Using a regional climate model accounting for the observed effects of no-till farming on surface albedo, as well as possible reductions in soil evaporation, we investigate the potential consequences of a full conversion to no-till agriculture in Europe. We find that the summer cooling from cropland albedo increase is strongly amplified during hot summer days, when surface albedo has more impact on the Earth’s radiative balance due to clear-sky conditions. The reduced evaporation associated with the crop residue cover tends to counteract the albedo-induced cooling, but during hot days the albedo effect is the dominating factor. For heatwave summer days the local cooling effect gained from no-till practice is of the order of 2 °C. The identified asymmetric impact of surface albedo change on summer temperature opens new avenues for climate-engineering measures targeting high-impact events rather than mean climate properties. PMID:24958872

  5. Preferential cooling of hot extremes from cropland albedo management.

    PubMed

    Davin, Edouard L; Seneviratne, Sonia I; Ciais, Philippe; Olioso, Albert; Wang, Tao

    2014-07-01

    Changes in agricultural practices are considered a possible option to mitigate climate change. In particular, reducing or suppressing tillage (no-till) may have the potential to sequester carbon in soils, which could help slow global warming. On the other hand, such practices also have a direct effect on regional climate by altering the physical properties of the land surface. These biogeophysical effects, however, are still poorly known. Here we show that no-till management increases the surface albedo of croplands in summer and that the resulting cooling effect is amplified during hot extremes, thus attenuating peak temperatures reached during heat waves. Using a regional climate model accounting for the observed effects of no-till farming on surface albedo, as well as possible reductions in soil evaporation, we investigate the potential consequences of a full conversion to no-till agriculture in Europe. We find that the summer cooling from cropland albedo increase is strongly amplified during hot summer days, when surface albedo has more impact on the Earth's radiative balance due to clear-sky conditions. The reduced evaporation associated with the crop residue cover tends to counteract the albedo-induced cooling, but during hot days the albedo effect is the dominating factor. For heatwave summer days the local cooling effect gained from no-till practice is of the order of 2 °C. The identified asymmetric impact of surface albedo change on summer temperature opens new avenues for climate-engineering measures targeting high-impact events rather than mean climate properties. PMID:24958872

  6. Global Cooling: Effect of Urban Albedo on Global Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Akbari, Hashem; Menon, Surabi; Rosenfeld, Arthur

    2007-05-22

    In many urban areas, pavements and roofs constitute over 60% of urban surfaces (roof 20-25%, pavements about 40%). The roof and the pavement albedo can be increased by about 0.25 and 0.10, respectively, resulting in a net albedo increase for urban areas of about 0.1. Many studies have demonstrated building cooling-energy savings in excess of 20% upon raising roof reflectivity from an existing 10-20% to about 60%. We estimate U.S. potential savings in excess of $1 billion (B) per year in net annual energy bills. Increasing albedo of urban surfaces can reduce the summertime urban temperature and improve the urban air quality. Increasing the urban albedo has the added benefit of reflecting more of the incoming global solar radiation and countering the effect of global warming. We estimate that increasing albedo of urban areas by 0.1 results in an increase of 3 x 10{sup -4} in Earth albedo. Using a simple global model, the change in air temperature in lowest 1.8 km of the atmosphere is estimated at 0.01K. Modelers predict a warming of about 3K in the next 60 years (0.05K/year). Change of 0.1 in urban albedo will result in 0.01K global cooling, a delay of {approx}0.2 years in global warming. This 0.2 years delay in global warming is equivalent to 10 Gt reduction in CO2 emissions.

  7. A Continental United States High Resolution NLCD Land Cover – MODIS Albedo Database to Examine Albedo and Land Cover Change Relationships

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surface albedo influences climate by affecting the amount of solar radiation that is reflected at the Earth’s surface, and surface albedo is, in turn, affected by land cover. General Circulation Models typically use modeled or prescribed albedo to assess the influence of land co...

  8. The nature of albedo features on Mercury, with maps for the telescopic observer. Part II: The nature of the albedo markings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, D. L.

    1995-04-01

    Part One of this paper (J. Brit. Astron. Assoc., 105(1), 1995) reviewed the classical telescopic observations of albedo markings on Mercury and reproduced the definitive albedo map to assist visual observers of the planet. In Part Two, an investigation into the relationship between albedo and physiography is conducted, and the significance of the historical observations is discussed.

  9. Seal Out Tooth Decay

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topics > Tooth Decay (Caries) > Seal Out Tooth Decay Seal Out Tooth Decay Main Content What are dental ... back teeth decay so easily? Who should get seal​ants? Should sealants be put on baby teeth? ...

  10. Decay studies of neutron deficient nuclei near the Z=64 subshell: 142Dy, 140,142Tb, 140,142Gd, 140,142Eu, 142Sm, and 142Pm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firestone, R. B.; Gilat, J.; Nitschke, J. M.; Wilmarth, P. A.; Vierinen, K. S.

    1991-03-01

    The electron-capture and β+-decay branchings (EC/β+) and delayed proton decays of A=142 isotopes with 61<=Z<=66 and A=140 isotopes with 63<=Z<=65 were investigated with the OASIS facility on-line at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory SuperHILAC. Electron capture and positron-decay emission probabilities have been determined for 142Pm and 142Sm decays, and extensive decay schemes have been constructed for 142Eug(2.34+/-0.12 s), 142Gd(70.2+/-0.6 s), 140Eu(1.51+/-0.02 s), and 140Gd(15.8+/-0.4 s). Decay schemes for the new isotopes 142Tbg(597+/-17 ms), 142Tbm(303+/-17 ms), 142Dy(2.3+/-0.3 s), 140Eum(125+/-2 ms), and 140Tb(2.4+/-0.2 s) are also presented. We have assigned γ rays to these isotopes on the basis of γγ and xγ coincidences, and from half-life determinations. Electron-capture and β+-decay branchings were measured for each decay, and β-delayed proton branchings were determined for 142Dy, 142Tb, and 140Tb decays. QEC values, derived from the measured EC/β+ branchings and the level schemes are compared with those from the Wapstra and Audi mass evaluation and the Liran and Zeldes mass calculation. The systematics of the N=77 isomer decays are discussed, and the intense 0+-->1+ and 1+-->0+ ground-state beta decays are compared with shell-model predictions for simple spin-flip transitions.

  11. Measurement of the Neutron Lifetime by Counting Trapped Protons

    PubMed Central

    Wietfeldt, F. E.; Dewey, M. S.; Gilliam, D. M.; Nico, J. S.; Fei, X.; Snow, W. M.; Greene, G. L.; Pauwels, J.; Eykens, R.; Lamberty, A.; Van Gestel, J.

    2005-01-01

    We measured the neutron decay lifetime by counting in-beam neutron decay recoil protons trapped in a quasi-Penning trap. The absolute neutron beam fluence was measured by capture in a thin 6LiF foil detector with known efficiency. The combination of these measurements gives the neutron lifetime: τn = (886.8 ± 1.2 ± 3.2) s, where the first (second) uncertainty is statistical (systematic) in nature. This is the most precise neutron lifetime determination to date using an in-beam method. PMID:27308145

  12. Understanding the Factors That Control Snow Albedo Over Central Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, P.; Bergin, M. H.; Dibb, J. E.; Domine, F.; Carmagnola, C.; Courville, Z.; Sokolik, I. N.; Lefer, B. L.

    2011-12-01

    Snow albedo plays a critical role in the energy balance of the Greenland Ice Sheet. In particular, the snow albedo influences the extent to which absorbing aerosols over Greenland (i.e. dust and black carbon) force climate. With this in mind the spectral snow albedo, physical snow properties, and snow chemistry were measured during May, June, and July 2011 at Summit, Greenland to investigate the variability in snow spectral albedo and its impact on aerosol direct radiative forcing. Optical and chemical properties of aerosol and aerosol optical depth were also measured as part of this study. Strellis et. al. will present a preliminary assessment of aerosol radiative forcing at Summit in summer 2011, in a separate presentation at this meeting. Spectral albedo was measured from 350-2500 nm with an ASD FieldSpec Pro spectroradiometer daily at four permanent sites and a moving fifth site where snow was sampled for characterization, as well as in more intensive diurnal and spatial surveys. Snow specific surface area (SSA), the ratio of snow crystal surface area to mass, was measured with a Dual Frequency Integrating Sphere (DUFISSS) at 1310 nm and 1550 nm, as well as with dyed and cast samples collected for stereology analysis. Snow stratigraphy, crystal size, and density were also measured on a daily basis, and snow samples will be analyzed for microstructural parameters determined from micro-CT imaging. Snow chemistry measurements include specific elements, major ions, and elemental and organic carbon. The time series of daily albedo measurements ranged from 0.88 to nearly 1.0 in visible wavelengths and from 0.42 to 0.65 in the near infrared. Changes as large as 0.1 were observed between consecutive daily measurements across the spectrum. Preliminary results show a strong correlation between variation in albedo and co-located measurements of snow specific surface area, specifically in the near infrared. By conducting our measurements near solar noon every day, and

  13. Potential effects of forest management on surface albedo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, J.; Bréon, F.-M.; Schelhaas, M.-J.; Pinty, B.; Luyssaert, S.

    2012-04-01

    Currently 70% of the world's forests are managed and this figure is likely to rise due to population growth and increasing demand for wood based products. Forest management has been put forward by the Kyoto-Protocol as one of the key instruments in mitigating climate change. For temperate and boreal forests, the effects of forest management on the stand-level carbon balance are reasonably well understood, but the biophysical effects, for example through changes in the albedo, remain elusive. Following a modeling approach, we aim to quantify the variability in albedo that can be attributed to forest management through changes in canopy structure and density. The modelling approach chains three separate models: (1) a forest gap model to describe stand dynamics, (2) a Monte-Carlo model to estimate the probability density function of the optical path length of photons through the canopy and (3) a physically-based canopy transfer model to estimate the interaction between photons and leaves. The forest gap model provides, on a monthly time step the position, height, diameter, crown size and leaf area index of individual trees. The Monte-Carlo model computes from this the probability density function of the distance a photon travels through crown volumes to determine the direct light reaching the forest floor. This information is needed by the canopy transfer model to calculate the effective leaf area index - a quantity that allows it to correctly represent a 3D process with a 1D model. Outgoing radiation is calculated as the result of multiple processes involving the scattering due to the canopy layer and the forest floor. Finally, surface albedo is computed as the ratio between incident solar radiation and calculated outgoing radiation. The study used two time series representing thinning from below of a beech and a Scots pine forest. The results show a strong temporal evolution in albedo during stand establishment followed by a relatively stable albedo once the canopy

  14. Occurrence of lower cloud albedo in ship tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.-C.; Christensen, M. W.; Xue, L.; Sorooshian, A.; Stephens, G. L.; Rasmussen, R. M.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2012-05-01

    The concept of geoengineering by marine cloud brightening is based on seeding marine stratocumulus clouds with sub-micrometer sea-salt particles to enhance the cloud droplet number concentration and cloud albedo, thereby producing a climate cooling effect. The efficacy of this as a strategy for global cooling rests on the extent to which aerosol-perturbed marine clouds will respond with increased albedo. Ship tracks, cloud regions impacted by ship exhaust, are a well-known manifestation of the effect of aerosol injection on marine clouds. We present here an analysis of the albedo responses in ship tracks, based on in situ aircraft measurements and three years of satellite observations of 589 individual ship tracks. It is found that the sign (increase or decrease) and magnitude of the albedo response in ship tracks depends on the mesoscale cloud structure, the free tropospheric humidity, and cloud top height. In a closed cell structure (cloud cells ringed by a perimeter of clear air), nearly 30% of ship tracks exhibited a decreased albedo. Detailed cloud responses must be accounted for in global studies of the potential efficacy of sea-spray geoengineering as a means to counteract global warming.

  15. Occurrence of lower cloud albedo in ship tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.-C.; Christensen, M. W.; Xue, L.; Sorooshian, A.; Stephens, G. L.; Rasmussen, R. M.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2012-09-01

    The concept of geoengineering by marine cloud brightening is based on seeding marine stratocumulus clouds with sub-micrometer sea-salt particles to enhance the cloud droplet number concentration and cloud albedo, thereby producing a climate cooling effect. The efficacy of this as a strategy for global cooling rests on the extent to which aerosol-perturbed marine clouds will respond with increased albedo. Ship tracks, quasi-linear cloud features prevalent in oceanic regions impacted by ship exhaust, are a well-known manifestation of the effect of aerosol injection on marine clouds. We present here an analysis of the albedo responses in ship tracks, based on in situ aircraft measurements and three years of satellite observations of 589 individual ship tracks. It is found that the sign (increase or decrease) and magnitude of the albedo response in ship tracks depends on the mesoscale cloud structure, the free tropospheric humidity, and cloud top height. In a closed cell structure (cloud cells ringed by a perimeter of clear air), nearly 30% of ship tracks exhibited a decreased albedo. Detailed cloud responses must be accounted for in global studies of the potential efficacy of sea-spray geoengineering as a means to counteract global warming.

  16. Spectral surface albedo derived from GOME-2/Metop measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pflug, Bringfried; Loyola, Diego

    2009-09-01

    Spectral surface albedo is an important input for GOME-2 trace gas retrievals. An algorithm was developed for estimation of spectral surface albedo from top-of-atmosphere (TOA)-radiances measured by the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment GOME-2 flying on-board MetOp-A. The climatologically version of this algorithm estimates Minimum Lambert-Equivalent Reflectivity (MLER) for a fixed time window and can use data of many years in contrast to the Near-real time version. Accuracy of surface albedo estimated by MLER-computation increases with the amount of available data. Unfortunately, most of the large GOME pixels are partly covered by clouds, which enhance the LER-data. A plot of LER-values over cloud fraction is used within this presentation to account for this influence of clouds. This "cloud fraction plot" can be applied over all surface types. Surface albedo obtained using the "cloud fraction plot" is compared with reference surface albedo spectra and with the FRESCO climatology. There is a general good agreement; however there are also large differences for some pixels.

  17. THE ALBEDOS OF KEPLER'S CLOSE-IN SUPER-EARTHS

    SciTech Connect

    Demory, Brice-Olivier

    2014-07-01

    Exoplanet research focusing on the characterization of super-Earths is currently limited to the handful of targets orbiting bright stars that are amenable to detailed study. This Letter proposes to look at alternative avenues to probe the surface and atmospheric properties of this category of planets, known to be ubiquitous in our galaxy. I conduct Markov Chain Monte Carlo light-curves analyses for 97 Kepler close-in R{sub P} ≲ 2.0 R {sub ⊕} super-Earth candidates with the aim of detecting their occultations at visible wavelengths. Brightness temperatures and geometric albedos in the Kepler bandpass are constrained for 27 super-Earth candidates. A hierarchical Bayesian modeling approach is then employed to characterize the population-level reflective properties of these close-in super-Earths. I find median geometric albedos A{sub g} in the Kepler bandpass ranging between 0.16 and 0.30, once decontaminated from thermal emission. These super-Earth geometric albedos are statistically larger than for hot Jupiters, which have medians A{sub g} ranging between 0.06 and 0.11. A subset of objects, including Kepler-10b, exhibit significantly larger albedos (A{sub g} ≳ 0.4). I argue that a better understanding of the incidence of stellar irradation on planetary surface and atmospheric processes is key to explain the diversity in albedos observed for close-in super-Earths.

  18. Spitzer Space Telescope Albedo Survey of Small Jovian Trojans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, Yanga R.; Jewitt, D. C.; Grisetti, R.; Igyarto, C.

    2006-09-01

    We will present preliminary results from our Spitzer Space Telescope (SST) survey of small Jovian Trojan asteroids. For the first time, we have been able to make thermophysical measurements of objects at the faint end of the known Trojan magnitude distribution. Our scientific goal is to determine the mean albedo of these small Trojans. Our sample contains 35 objects with approximate absolute magnitudes (H) between 13 and 14 (diameter 10 to 15 km for 0.05 albedo). For this survey we obtained 24-micron (mid-IR) photometry with the MIPS instrument aboard SST, and visible-wavelength CCD photometry using the University of Hawaii 88-inch Telescope. This lets us constrain each Trojan's effective radius and geometric albedo. While the two datasets were not simultaneous, this is not detrimental to the achievement of our goal since we only need for the effect of the rotational context to average out. In an earlier survey, we found that the mean V-band geometric albedo for large Trojans (sample median diameter of 110 km) is 0.041±0.002 (Fernandez et al. 2003, AJ 126, 1563). If the small Trojans' mean albedo is significantly higher, this would be evidence for a significant volatile component in the Trojan population having survived since formation, and would have implications for the contribution of Trojan asteroids to the Jupiter-family comet population. This research was made possible through a SIRTF Fellowship to YRF and through a GO data analysis grant from SSC to YRF and DCJ.

  19. NEANDC specialists meeting on yields and decay data of fission product nuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Chrien, R.E.; Burrows, T.W.

    1983-01-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 29 papers presented. Workshop reports on decay heat, fission yields, beta- and gamma-ray spectroscopy, and delayed neutrons are included. An appendix contains a survey of the most recent compilations and evaluations containing fission product yield, fission product decay data, and delayed neutron yield information. (WHK)

  20. Gamma/neutron competition above the neutron separation energy in delayed neutron emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valencia, E.; Algora, A.; Tain, J. L.; Rice, S.; Agramunt, J.; Zakari-Issoufou, A.-A.; Äystö, J.; Bowry, M.; Bui, V. M.; Caballero-Folch, R.; Cano-Ott, D.; Eloma, V.; Eronen, T.; Estevez, E.; Farrelly, G. F.; Fallot, M.; Garcia, A.; Gelletly, W.; Gomez-Hornillos, M. B.; Gorlychev, V.; Hakala, J.; Jokinen, A.; Jordan, M. D.; Kankainen, A.; Kondev, F. G.; Martinez, T.; Mendoza, E.; Molina, F.; Moore, I.; Perez, A.; Podolyak, Zs.; Penttilä, H.; Porta, A.; Regan, P. H.; Rissanen, J.; Rubio, B.; Weber, C.

    2014-03-01

    To study the β-decay properties of some well known delayed neutron emitters an experiment was performed in 2009 at the IGISOL facility (University of Jyväskylä in Finland) using Total Absorption γ-ray Spectroscopy (TAGS) technique. The aim of these measurements is to obtain the full β-strength distribution below the neutron separation energy (Sn) and the γ/neutron competition above. This information is a key parameter in nuclear technology applications as well as in nuclear astrophysics and nuclear structure. Preliminary results of the analysis show a significant γ-branching ratio above Sn.

  1. MORSE/STORM: A generalized albedo option for Monte Carlo calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Gomes, I.C.; Stevens, P.N. )

    1991-09-01

    The advisability of using the albedo procedure for the Monte Carlo solution of deep penetration shielding problems that have ducts and other penetrations has been investigated. The use of albedo data can dramatically improve the computational efficiency of certain Monte Carlo calculations. However, the accuracy of these results may be unacceptable because of lost information during the albedo event and serious errors in the available differential albedo data. This study was done to evaluate and appropriately modify the MORSE/BREESE package, to develop new methods for generating the required albedo data, and to extend the adjoint capability to the albedo-modified calculations. Major modifications to MORSE/BREESE include an option to save for further use information that would be lost at the albedo event, an option to displace the point of emergence during an albedo event, and an option to use spatially dependent albedo data for both forward and adjoint calculations, which includes the point of emergence as a new random variable to be selected during an albedo event. The theoretical basis for using TORT-generated forward albedo information to produce adjuncton albedos was derived. The MORSE/STORM package was developed to perform both forward and adjoint modes of analysis using spatially dependent albedo data. Results obtained with MORSE/STORM for both forward and adjoint modes were compared with benchmark solutions. Excellent agreement and improved computational efficiency were achieved, demonstrating the full utilization of the albedo option in the MORSE code. 7 refs., 17 figs., 15 tabs.

  2. 2002 REVIEW OF NEUTRON AND NON NEUTRON NUCLEAR DATA.

    SciTech Connect

    HOLDEN,N.E.

    2002-08-18

    Review articles are in preparation for the 2003 edition of the CRC's Handbook of Chemistry and Physics dealing with both non-neutron and neutron nuclear data. Highlights include: withdrawal of the claim for discovery of element 118; new measurements of isotopic abundances have led to changes for many elements; a new set of recommended standards for calibration of {gamma}-ray energies have been published for many nuclides; new half-life measurements reported for very short lived isotopes, many long-lived nuclides and {beta}{beta} decay measurements for quasi-stable nuclides; a new reassessment of spontaneous fission (sf) half-lives for ground state nuclides, distinguishing half-lives from sf decay and cluster decay half-lives and the new cluster-fission decay; charged particle cross sections, (n,p) and (n,{alpha}) measurements for thermal neutrons incident on light nuclides; new thermal (n,{gamma}) cross sections and neutron resonance integrals measured. Details are presented.

  3. Nucleon-decay-like signatures of hylogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demidov, S. V.; Gorbunov, D. S.

    2016-02-01

    We consider nucleon-decay-like signatures of hylogenesis, a variant of the antibaryonic dark matter model. For the interaction between visible and dark matter sectors through the neutron portal, we calculate the rates of dark matter scatterings off a neutron which mimic neutron-decay processes n →ν γ and n →ν e+e- with richer kinematics. We obtain bounds on the model parameters from nonobservation of the neutron decays by applying the kinematical cuts adopted in the experimental analyses. The bounds are generally (much) weaker than those coming from the recently performed study of events with a single jet of high transverse momentum and missing energy observed at the LHC. Then we suggest several new nucleon-decay-like processes with two mesons in the final state and estimate (accounting for the LHC constraints) the lower limits on the nucleon lifetime with respect to these channels. The obtained values appear to be promising for probing the antibaryonic dark matter at future underground experiments like HyperK and DUNE.

  4. A new parameterization of spectral and broadband ocean surface albedo.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhonghai; Qiao, Yanli; Wang, Yingjian; Fang, Yonghua; Yi, Weining

    2011-12-19

    A simple yet accurate parameterization of spectral and broadband ocean surface albedo has been developed. To facilitate the parameterization and its applications, the albedo is parameterized for the direct and diffuse incident radiation separately, and then each of them is further divided into two components: the contributions from surface and water, respectively. The four albedo components are independent of each other, hence, altering one will not affect the others. Such a designed parameterization scheme is flexible for any future update. Users can simply replace any of the adopted empirical formulations (e.g., the relationship between foam reflectance and wind speed) as desired without a need to change the parameterization scheme. The parameterization is validated by in situ measurements and can be easily implemented into a climate or radiative transfer model. PMID:22274228

  5. Moon: lunar albedo for soft x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibadov, Subhon

    2016-07-01

    Albedo of the Moon for soft X-rays (0.1-2 keV photons) is determined on the basis of the X-ray luminosity of the Moon detected and measured for the first time by orbital space telescope ROSAT in 1990. It is found that the lunar albedo for the solar soft X-rays is less than the lunar visual region albedo almost thousand times. The data allow to estimate more correctly X-ray luminosity of dusty comets like Hyakutake C/1996 B2 and Hale-Bopp C/1995 O1 due to scattering of solar soft X-rays and to reveal thus the dominant mechanism for production of X-rays in dusty comets.

  6. Direct determination of surface albedos from satellite imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mekler, Y.; Joseph, J. H.

    1983-01-01

    An empirical method to measure the spectral surface albedo of surfaces from Landsat imagery is presented and analyzed. The empiricism in the method is due only to the fact that three parameters of the solution must be determined for each spectral photograph of an image on the basis of independently known albedos at three points. The approach is otherwise based on exact solutions of the radiative transfer equation for upwelling intensity. Application of the method allows the routine construction of spectral albedo maps from satelite imagery, without requiring detailed knowledge of the atmospheric aerosol content, as long as the optical depth is less than 0.75, and of the calibration of the satellite sensor.

  7. The weak decay of helium hypernuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Athanas, M.J.

    1992-08-01

    A {Lambda} hyperon replaces a neutron in a nucleus to form a hypernucleus via the {sup A}X(K{sup {minus}}, {pi}{sup {minus}}) {sub {Lambda}}{sup A}X reaction at 750 MeV/c (Brookhaven Experiment 788). The free {Lambda} decay rates {Gamma}({Lambda} {yields} p{pi}{sup {minus}}) and {Gamma}({Lambda} {yields} n{pi}{sup 0}) are diminished due to Pauli blocking; but a non-mesonic decay mode, nucleon stimulated decay N{Lambda} {yields} Nn, is present and is detected via the energetic decay nucleon(s) ({approx} 400MeV/c). Measurements of the various hypernuclear decay rates {Gamma}({Lambda} {yields} p{pi}{sup {minus}}), {Gamma}({Lambda} {yields} n{pi}{sup 0}) and {Gamma}({Lambda}n {yields} nn) provides insight into the strong modification of the weak interaction such as the baryon-baryon {Delta}I ={1/2} rule. The hypernuclear state is isolated by momentum analysis of (K{sup {minus}}, {pi}{sup {minus}}) target reaction. Out-of-beam large volume scintillation detectors and tracking chambers axe used to make particle identification of the hypernuclear decay products by time-of-flight, dE/dx, and range. The kinetic energy of the decay neutrons are measured by time of flight using the large volume 100 element neutron detector system. The hypernuclear lifetime is directly measured using precision scintillator counters and tracking chambers. Measurements of the various decay rates as well as the total lifetime are discussed for {sub {Lambda}}{sup 4}He.

  8. Albedo control of seasonal South Polar cap recession on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Frédéric; Douté, Sylvain; Schmitt, Bernard; Vincendon, Mathieu; Bibring, Jean-Pierre; Langevin, Yves; Omega Team

    2009-04-01

    Over the last few decades, General Circulation Models (GCM) have been used to simulate the current martian climate. The calibration of these GCMs with the current seasonal cycle is a crucial step in understanding the climate history of Mars. One of the main climatic signals currently used to validate GCMs is the annual atmospheric pressure cycle. It is difficult to use changes in seasonal deposits on the surface of Mars to calibrate the GCMs given the spectral ambiguities between CO 2 and H 2O ice in the visible range. With the OMEGA imaging spectrometer covering the near infra-red range, it is now possible to monitor both types of ice at a spatial resolution of about 1 km. At global scale, we determine the change with time of the Seasonal South Polar Cap (SSPC) crocus line, defining the edge of CO 2 deposits. This crocus line is not symmetric around the geographic South Pole. At local scale, we introduce the snowdrop distance, describing the local structure of the SSPC edge. Crocus line and snowdrop distance changes can now be used to calibrate GCMs. The albedo of the seasonal deposits is usually assumed to be a uniform and constant parameter of the GCMs. In this study, albedo is found to be the main parameter controlling the SSPC recession at both global and local scale. Using a defrost mass balance model (referred to as D-frost) that incorporates the effect of shadowing induced by topography, we show that the global SSPC asymmetry in the crocus line is controlled by albedo variations. At local scale, we show that the snowdrop distance is correlated with the albedo variability. Further GCM improvements should take into account these two results. We propose several possibilities for the origin of the asymmetric albedo control. The next step will be to identify and model the physical processes that create the albedo differences.

  9. Detailed spatiotemporal albedo observations at Greenland's Mittivakkat Gletscher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mernild, Sebastian H.; Knudsen, Niels T.; Yde, Jacob C.; Malmros, Jeppe K.

    2015-04-01

    Surface albedo is defined as the reflected fraction of incoming solar shortwave radiation at the surface. On Greenland's Mittivakkat Gletscher the mean glacier-wide MODIS-estimated albedo dropped by 0.10 (2000-2013) from 0.43 to 0.33 by the end of the mass balance year (EBY). Hand-held albedo measurements as low as 0.10 were observed over debris-covered ice at the glacier margin at the EBY: these values were slightly below observed values for proglacial bedrock (~0.2). The albedo is highly variable in space - a significant variability occurred within few meters at the glacier margin area ranging from 0.10 to 0.39 due to variability in debris-cover thickness and composition, microbial activity (including algae and cyanobacteria), snow grain crystal metamorphism, bare ice exposure, and meltwater ponding. Huge dark-red-brown-colored ice algae colonies were observed. Albedo measurements on snow patches and bare glacier ice changed significant with increasing elevations (180-600 m a.s.l.) by lapse rates of 0.04 and 0.03 per 100 m, respectively, indicating values as high as 0.82 and 0.40 on the upper part of the glacier. Over a period of two weeks from early August to late August 2014 the hand-held observed mean glacier-wide albedo changed from 0.40 to 0.30 indicating that on average 10% more incoming solar shortwave radiation became available for surface ablation at the end of the melt season.

  10. Mapping global land surface albedo from NOAA AVHRR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csiszar, I.; Gutman, G.

    1999-03-01

    A set of algorithms is combined for a simple derivation of land surface albedo from measurements of reflected visible and near-infrared radiation made by the advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) onboard the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) polar orbiting satellites. The system consists of a narrowband-to-broadband conversion and bidirectional correction at the top of the atmosphere and an atmospheric correction. We demonstrate the results with 1 month worth of data from the NOAA National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (NESDIS) global vegetation index (GVI) weekly data set and the NOAA/NASA Pathfinder Atmosphere (PATMOS) project daily data. Error analysis of the methodology indicates that the surface albedo can be retrieved with 10-15% relative accuracy. Monthly albedo maps derived from September 1989 GVI and PATMOS data agree well except for small discrepancies attributed mainly to different preprocessing and residual atmospheric effects. A 5-year mean September map derived from the GVI multiannual time series is consistent with that derived from low-resolution Earth Radiation Budget Experiment data as well as with a September map compiled from ground observations and used in many numerical weather and climate models. Instantaneous GVI-derived albedos were found to be consistent with surface albedo measurements over various surface types. The discrepancies found can be attributed to differences in areal coverage and representativeness of the satellite and ground data. The present pilot study is a prototype for a routine real-time production of high-resolution global surface albedo maps from NOAA AVHRR Global Area Coverage (GAC) data.

  11. Bolometric albedos and diurnal temperatures of the brightest regions on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonelli, Damon P.; Veverka, Joseph

    1988-01-01

    Cylindrical maps of the locations and estimated Bond albedos of the brightest regions on the Io surface have been constructed on the basis of Voyager data; the albedos are then rescaled to correct for radiometric calibration uncertainties. The highest surface albedos are found to be only moderately higher than the Bond albedo of Io as a whole. The brightest regions include two bright patches southeast of the Maui and Amirani active vents, as well as a large equatorial field of high-albedo material and a lone bright patch at high northern latitudes. These maps indicate that Io's albedos are strongly latitude-dependent.

  12. Transformation of surface albedo to surface: Atmosphere surface and irradiance, and their spectral and temporal averages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nack, M. L.; Curran, R. J.

    1978-01-01

    The dependence of the albedo at the top of a realistic atmosphere upon the surface albedo, solar zenith angle, and cloud optical thickness is examined for the cases of clear sky, total cloud cover, and fractional cloud cover. The radiative transfer calculations of Dave and Braslau (1975) for particular values of surface albedo and solar zenith angle, and a single value of cloud optical thickness are used as the basis of a parametric albedo model. The question of spectral and temporal averages of albedos and reflected irradiances is addressed, and unique weighting functions for the spectral and temporal albedo averages are developed.

  13. 2013 Review of Neutron and Non-Neutron Nuclear Data

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, N. E.

    2014-05-23

    The results of a review and evaluation of neutron and non-neutron nuclear data published in the scientific literature over the past three years since the ISRD-14 Symposium has been performed and the highlights are presented. Included in the data review are the status of new chemical elements, new measurements of the isotopic composition for many chemical elements and the resulting change in the atomic weight values. New half-life measurements for both short-lived and longlived nuclides, some alpha decay and double beta decay measurements for quasistable nuclides are discussed. The latest evaluation of atomic masses has been published. Data from new measurements on the very heavy (trans-meitnerium) elements are discussed and tabulated. Data on various recent neutron cross section and resonance integral measurements are discussed and tabulated.

  14. 2013 Review of Neutron and Non-Neutron Nuclear Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holden, N. E.

    2016-02-01

    The results of a review and evaluation of neutron and non-neutron nuclear data published in the scientific literature over the past three years since the ISRD-14 Symposium has been performed and the highlights are presented. Included in the data review are the status of new chemical elements, new measurements of the isotopic composition for many chemical elements and the resulting change in the atomic weight values. New half-life measurements for both short-lived and long-lived nuclides, some alpha decay and double beta decay measurements for quasi-stable nuclides are discussed. The latest evaluation of atomic masses has been published. Data from new measurements on the very heavy (trans-meitnerium) elements are discussed and tabulated. Data on various recent neutron cross section and resonance integral measurements are discussed and tabulated.

  15. NEOWISE REACTIVATION MISSION YEAR ONE: PRELIMINARY ASTEROID DIAMETERS AND ALBEDOS

    SciTech Connect

    Nugent, C. R.; Cutri, R. M.; Mainzer, A.; Masiero, J.; Bauer, J.; Kramer, E.; Sonnett, S.; Stevenson, R.; Grav, T.; Wright, E. L.

    2015-12-01

    We present preliminary diameters and albedos for 7956 asteroids detected in the first year of the NEOWISE Reactivation mission. Of those, 201 are near-Earth asteroids and 7755 are Main Belt or Mars-crossing asteroids. 17% of these objects have not been previously characterized using the Near-Earth Object Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, or “NEOWISE” thermal measurements. Diameters are determined to an accuracy of ∼20% or better. If good-quality H magnitudes are available, albedos can be determined to within ∼40% or better.

  16. Mariner 9 high-resolution albedo mapping of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devaucouleurs, G.

    1974-01-01

    Large and small scale albedo markings obtained from Mariner 9 photographs and ground based telescope observations are shown on quadrangle charts with a scale of 1:5,000,000. Mercator and stereographic projections at the same scale are presented of the various regions of Mars along with explanatory information about their preparation. Changes in the albedo for the Solis Lacus area were observed and are compared with previous data for the same region. Large scale relief maps covering up to 1.7 million sq miles of the Martian surface are included.

  17. {beta}-decay study of {sup 77}Cu

    SciTech Connect

    Patronis, N.; De Witte, H.; Gorska, M.; Huyse, M.; Kruglov, K.; Pauwels, D.; Van de Vel, K.; Van Duppen, P.; Van Roosbroeck, J.; Thomas, J.-C.; Materna, T.; Mathieu, L.; Serot, O.

    2009-09-15

    A {beta}-decay study of {sup 77}Cu has been performed at the ISOLDE mass separator with the aim to deduce its {beta}-decay properties and to obtain spectroscopic information on {sup 77}Zn. Neutron-rich copper isotopes were produced by means of proton- or neutron-induced fission reactions on {sup 238}U. After the production, {sup 77}Cu was selectively laser ionized, mass separated, and sent to different detection systems where {beta}-{gamma} and {beta}-n coincidence data were collected. We report on the deduced half-live, decay scheme, and possible spin assignment of {sup 77}Cu.

  18. Greenland ice sheet albedo feedback: mass balance implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Box, J. E.; Tedesco, M.; Fettweis, X.; Hall, D. K.; Steffen, K.; Stroeve, J. C.

    2012-12-01

    Greenland ice sheet mass loss has accelerated responding to combined glacier discharge and surface melt water runoff increases. During summer, absorbed solar energy, modulated at the surface primarily by albedo, is the dominant factor governing surface melt variability in the ablation area. NASA MODIS data spanning 13 summers (2000 - 2012), indicate that mid-summer (July) ice sheet albedo declined by 0.064 from a value of 0.752 in the early 2000s. The ice sheet accordingly absorbed 100 EJ more solar energy for the month of July in 2012 than in the early 2000s. This additional energy flux during summer doubled melt rates in the ice sheet ablation area during the observation period. Abnormally strong anticyclonic circulation, associated with a persistent summer North Atlantic Oscillation extreme 2007-2012, enabled 3 amplifying mechanisms to maximize the albedo feedback: 1) increased warm (south) air advection along the western ice sheet increased surface sensible heating that in turn enhanced snow grain metamorphic rates, further reducing albedo; 2) increased surface downward shortwave flux, leading to more surface heating and further albedo reduction; and 3) reduced snowfall rates sustained low albedo, maximizing surface solar heating, progressively lowering albedo over multiple years. The summer net infrared and solar radiation for the high elevation accumulation area reached positive values during this period, contributing to an abrupt melt area increase in 2012. A number of factors make it reasonable to expect more melt episodes covering 100% of the ice sheet area in coming years: 1) the past 13 y of increasing surface air temperatures have eroded snowpack 'cold content', preconditioning the ice sheet for earlier melt onset. Less heat is required to bring the surface to melting; 2) Greenland temperatures, have lagged the N Hemisphere average in the 2000s, need to increase further for Greenland to be in phase with the N Hemisphere average. 3) Arctic amplification

  19. Martian Neutron Energy Spectrometer (MANES)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maurer, R. H.; Roth, D. R.; Kinnison, J. D.; Goldsten, J. O.; Fainchtein, R.; Badhwar, G.

    2000-01-01

    High energy charged particles of extragalactic, galactic, and solar origin collide with spacecraft structures and planetary atmospheres. These primaries create a number of secondary particles inside the structures or on the surfaces of planets to produce a significant radiation environment. This radiation is a threat to long term inhabitants and travelers for interplanetary missions and produces an increased risk of carcinogenesis, central nervous system (CNS) and DNA damage. Charged particles are readily detected; but, neutrons, being electrically neutral, are much more difficult to monitor. These secondary neutrons are reported to contribute 30-60% of the dose equivalent in the Shuttle and MIR station. The Martian atmosphere has an areal density of 37 g/sq cm primarily of carbon dioxide molecules. This shallow atmosphere presents fewer mean free paths to the bombarding cosmic rays and solar particles. The secondary neutrons present at the surface of Mars will have undergone fewer generations of collisions and have higher energies than at sea level on Earth. Albedo neutrons produced by collisions with the Martian surface material will also contribute to the radiation environment. The increased threat of radiation damage to humans on Mars occurs when neutrons of higher mean energy traverse the thin, dry Martian atmosphere and encounter water in the astronaut's body. Water, being hydrogeneous, efficiently moderates the high energy neutrons thereby slowing them as they penetrate deeply into the body. Consequently, greater radiation doses can be deposited in or near critical organs such as the liver or spleen than is the case on Earth. A second significant threat is the possibility of a high energy heavy ion or neutron causing a DNA double strand break in a single strike.

  20. The Reiner Gamma Albedo Marking on Earth's Moon: Old or Young?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholas, J. B.; Purucker, M. E.; Sabaka, T. J.

    2007-03-01

    A minimum magnetization necessary to explain the Reiner Gamma albedo feature was determined, and estimates made of spatial distribution of magnetization, depth of source and magnetization direction. The evidence suggests that the albedo feature arises fro

  1. Albedo Study of the Depositional Fans Associated with Martian Gullies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, J.; Sears, D. W. G.

    2005-03-01

    This work is a two-part investigation of the albedo of the depositional aprons or fans associated with Martian gully features. Using Adobe Systems Photoshop 5.0 software we analyzed numerous Mars Global Surveyor MOC and Mars Odyssey THEMIS images.

  2. Albedo and color maps of the Saturnian satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buratti, Bonnie J.; Mosher, Joel A.; Johnson, Torrence V.

    1990-01-01

    The paper discusses the production of maps of the albedos and colors of Mimas, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione, and Rhea over the full range of their imaged surfaces. Voyager images were used to prepare maps of the normal reflectances and color ratios (0.58/0.41 micron) of these satelites.

  3. Detection of light transformations and concomitant changes in surface albedo

    PubMed Central

    Gerhard, Holly E.; Maloney, Laurence T.

    2010-01-01

    We report two experiments demonstrating that (1) observers are sensitive to information about changes in the light field not captured by local scene statistics and that (2) they can use this information to enhance detection of changes in surface albedo. Observers viewed scenes consisting of matte surfaces at many orientations illuminated by a collimated light source. All surfaces were achromatic, all lights neutral. In the first experiment, observers attempted to discriminate small changes in direction of the collimated light source (light transformations) from matched changes in the albedos of all surfaces (non-light transformations). Light changes and non-light changes shared the same local scene statistics and edge ratios, but the latter were not consistent with any change in direction to the collimated source. We found that observers could discriminate light changes as small as 5 degrees with sensitivity d′ > 1 and accurately judge the direction of change. In a second experiment, we measured observers' ability to detect a change in the surface albedo of an isolated surface patch during either a light change or a surface change. Observers were more accurate in detecting isolated albedo changes during light changes. Measures of sensitivity d′ were more than twice as great. PMID:20884599

  4. Asteroid magnitudes, UBV colors, and IRAS albedos and diameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tedesco, Edward F.

    1989-01-01

    This paper lists absolute magnitudes and slope parameters for known asteroids numbered through 3318. The values presented are those used in reducing asteroid IR flux data obtained with the IRAS. U-B colors are given for 938 asteroids, and B-V colors are given for 945 asteroids. The IRAS albedos and diameters are tabulated for 1790 asteroids.

  5. Neutron Trapping using a Magneto-Gravitational Trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chen-Yu

    2014-03-01

    Eighty years after Chadwick discovered the neutron, physicists today still cannot agree on how long the neutron lives. Measurements of the neutron lifetime have achieved the 0.1% level of precision (~ 1 s). However, results from several recent experiments are up to 7 s lower than the (pre-2010) particle data group (PDG) value. Experiments using the trap technique yield lifetime results lower than those using the beam technique. The PDG urges the community to resolve this discrepancy, now 6.5 sigma. Measuring the absolute neutron lifetime is difficult because of several limitations: the low energy of the neutron decay products, the inability to track slow neutrons, and the fact that the neutron lifetime is long (880.1 +/- 1.1 s). Slow neutrons are susceptible to many loss mechanisms other than beta-decay, such as upscattering and absorption on material surfaces. Often, these interactions act on time scales comparable to the neutron beta-decay, making the extraction of the beta-decay lifetime particularly challenging. We will revisit this measurement by trapping ultracold neutrons (UCN) in a hybrid magnetic-gravitational trap. The trap consists of a Halbach array of permanent magnets, which can levitate UCN up to 50 neV. These neutrons are also confined vertically up to 0.5 m by gravity. Such a trap minimizes the chance of neutron interactions with material walls. In addition, the open-top geometry allows room to implement novel schemes to detect neutrons and decay particles in-situ. The UCN τ experiment aims to reduce the uncertainty of the neutron lifetime measurement to below 1 second. In this talk, I will report results of our first attempt to trap UCN in 2013 and discuss plans to quantify systematic effects. The work is supported by NSF grant PHY-1306942.

  6. Atmospheric neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korff, S. A.; Mendell, R. B.; Merker, M.; Light, E. S.; Verschell, H. J.; Sandie, W. S.

    1979-01-01

    Contributions to fast neutron measurements in the atmosphere are outlined. The results of a calculation to determine the production, distribution and final disappearance of atmospheric neutrons over the entire spectrum are presented. An attempt is made to answer questions that relate to processes such as neutron escape from the atmosphere and C-14 production. In addition, since variations of secondary neutrons can be related to variations in the primary radiation, comment on the modulation of both radiation components is made.

  7. Albedo of Permanently Shadowed Regions of the Lunar Poles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riner, M. A.; Lucey, P. G.; Bussey, B.; Cahill, J. T.; McGovern, A.

    2012-12-01

    Due to the slight tilt in the Moon's spin axis, some topographic depressions near the lunar poles experience permanent shadow and may serve as cold traps, harboring water ice and/or other volatile compounds [1]. Permanently shadowed regions (PSRs) provide an opportunity toward understanding the amount, nature and transport of volatiles on the Moon and may also be a potential resource for human exploration. While many different data sets have suggested the presence of water ice in PSRs near the lunar poles many questions remain. For example, ice does not appear to be uniformly distributed across identified PSRs. More work is needed to understand the distribution of ice in PSRs and how delivery and retention mechanisms influence the distribution. The active illumination of the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) provides a unique contribution toward exploration PSR exploration. While LOLA is principally a laser altimeter used for quantitative topography and related cartographic and geodetic applications [2], LOLA also measures the intensity and width of the return laser pulse (1064 nm) from the surface. Here we use a global mosaic (4 pixels per degree) of LOLA albedo data corrected for instrumental drift, irregular variations, and calibrated to normal albedo using local equatorial measurements of normal albedo obtained by the Kaguya Multiband Imager [3]. Recent work using LOLA albedo shows the floor of Shackleton crater, near the lunar south pole, is brighter than the surrounding terrain (and the interior of nearby craters) at 1064 nm [4]. This albedo difference may be due to decreased space weathering due to shadowing from the Sun or to a 1 μm thick layer with 20% water ice a the surface of the crater floor [4]. Here we use LOLA dayside reflectance measurements to examine the albedo of PSRs catalogued by [5] derived from illumination modeling of a hybrid 100 m/pixel LOLA-LROC digital terrain model (DTM) up to 83° north and south latitudes. The upper latitude

  8. Effective Albedo of Vegetated Terrain at L-Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurum, Mehmet; O'Neill, Peggy E.; Lang, Roger H.

    2011-01-01

    This paper derives an explicit expression for an effective albedo of vegetated terrain from the zero- and multiple- order radiative transfer (RT) model comparison. The formulation establishes a direct physical link between the effective vegetation parameterization and the theoretical description of absorption and scattering within the canopy. The paper will present an evaluation of the derived albedo for corn canopies with data taken during an experiment at Alabama A&M Winfield A. Thomas Agricultural Research Station near Huntsville, Alabama in June, 1998. The test site consisted of two 50-m x 60-m plots - one with a bare surface and the other with grass cover - and four 30-m x 50-m plots of corn at different planting densities. One corn field was planted at a full density of 9.5 plants/sq m while the others were planted at 1/3, 1/2 and 2/3 of the full density. The fields were observed with a truck-mounted L-band radiometer at incident angle of 15 degree for the period of two weeks. Soil moisture (SM) changed daily due to irrigation and natural rainfall. Variations in gravimetric SM from 18 % to 34 % were seen during this period. Ground truth data, including careful characterization of the corn size and orientation statistics, and its dielectric, was also collected and used to simulate the effective albedo for the vegetation. The single-scattering albedo is defined as the fractional power scattered from individual vegetation constituents with respect to canopy extinction. It represents single-scattering properties of vegetation elements only, and is independent of ground properties. The values of the albedo get higher when there is dense vegetation (i.e. forest, mature corn, etc.) with scatterers, such as branches and trunks (or stalks in the case of corn), which are large with respect to the wavelength. This large albedo leads to a reduction in brightness temperature in the zero-order RT solution (known as tau-omega model). Higher-order multiple-scattering RT

  9. A quantification of errors in surface albedo due to common assumptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arduini, Robert F.; Suttles, J. T.

    1990-01-01

    A study comparing the performance of three approaches to estimating the spectral albedo of a typical land surface is presented. The most accurate albedo estimates under all atmospheric situations are those for which the scattering properties of the atmosphere can be used. Simply utilizing the direct-to-total ratio as a weight between direct and Lambertian albedos reduced the errors in broadband albedo to less than one percent for almost all simulated atmospheric conditions.

  10. Neutron guide

    DOEpatents

    Greene, Geoffrey L.

    1999-01-01

    A neutron guide in which lengths of cylindrical glass tubing have rectangular glass plates properly dimensioned to allow insertion into the cylindrical glass tubing so that a sealed geometrically precise polygonal cross-section is formed in the cylindrical glass tubing. The neutron guide provides easier alignment between adjacent sections than do the neutron guides of the prior art.

  11. Neutron dosimetry

    DOEpatents

    Quinby, Thomas C.

    1976-07-27

    A method of measuring neutron radiation within a nuclear reactor is provided. A sintered oxide wire is disposed within the reactor and exposed to neutron radiation. The induced radioactivity is measured to provide an indication of the neutron energy and flux within the reactor.

  12. Physical basis for prompt-neutron activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chrien, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    The technique called prompt ..gamma..-ray neutron activation analysis has been applied to rapid materials analysis. The radiation following the neutron radiation capture is prompt in the sense that the nuclear decay time is on the order of 10/sup -15/ second, and thus the technique is not strictly activation, but should be called radiation neutron capture spectroscopy or neutron capture ..gamma..-ray spectroscopy. This paper reviews the following: sources and detectors, theory of radiative capture, nonstatistical capture, giant dipole resonance, fast neutron capture, and thermal neutron capture ..gamma..-ray spectra. 14 figures.

  13. Albedo Response of Native and Artificial Soils to a Wetting Event: Implications for Critical Zone Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovell, L.; Sanchez-Mejia, Z. M.; Papuga, S. A.

    2012-12-01

    The Landscape Evolution Observatory (LEO) at Biosphere 2 is composed of three experimental hill slopes filled to one meter depth of a ground basaltic tephra soil, set up to investigate critical zone processes. Our goal is to understand the energy aspects of this artificial LEO soil; surfaces with a high surface reflectance (albedo) may limit energy available for critical zone processes. The albedo of a surface can change, e.g. by vegetation growth or soil wetting, which can further influence available energy. Here, we examine the soil moisture and albedo response of LEO soil to a 10 mm rainfall event, and compare the results to those found using traditional potting and native desert soils that differ in color and texture. We hypothesized that: 1) increased soil moisture would decrease albedo for all soil types; 2) a smaller wetting front would maximize any decrease in albedo, and 3) albedo will reach a minimum within hours of a rainstorm, returning to a maximum albedo value within the day. We found that albedo was lowest under wet conditions for all soils, regardless of initial color and texture. Additionally, the LEO soil experienced the shallowest wetting front and also showed the most significant decrease in albedo following rainfall. After the rainfall event, all soils showed an initial decrease in albedo, followed by an increase in albedo as the soil dried. While the albedo and soil moisture of each soil reacted similarly, the very dark and fine LEO soil showed the strongest response to wetting.

  14. Differential neutron energy spectra measured on spacecraft in low Earth orbit.

    PubMed

    Dudkin, V E; Potapov YuV; Akopova, A B; Melkumyan, L V; Benton, E V; Frank, A L

    1990-01-01

    Two methods for measuring neutrons in the range from thermal energies to dozens of MeV were used. In the first method, alpha-particles emitted from the 6Li(n,alpha)T reaction are detected with the help of plastic nuclear track detectors, yielding results on thermal and resonance neutrons. Also, fission foils are used to detect fast neutrons. In the second method, fast neutrons are recorded by nuclear photographic emulsions (NPE). The results of measurements on board various satellites are presented. The neutron flux density does not appear to correlate clearly with orbital parameters. Up to 50% of neutrons are due to albedo neutrons from the atmosphere while the fluxes inside the satellites are 15-20% higher than those on the outside. Estimates show that the neutron contribution to the total equivalent radiation dose reaches 20-30%. PMID:11537519

  15. Differential neutron energy spectra measured on spacecraft in low Earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dudkin, V. E.; Akopova, A. B.; Melkumyan, L. V.; Benton, E. V.; Frank, A. L.

    1990-01-01

    Two methods for measuring neutrons in the range from thermal energies to dozens of MeV were used. In the first method, alpha-particles emitted from the 6Li(n,alpha)T reaction are detected with the help of plastic nuclear track detectors, yielding results on thermal and resonance neutrons. Also, fission foils are used to detect fast neutrons. In the second method, fast neutrons are recorded by nuclear photographic emulsions (NPE). The results of measurements on board various satellites are presented. The neutron flux density does not appear to correlate clearly with orbital parameters. Up to 50% of neutrons are due to albedo neutrons from the atmosphere while the fluxes inside the satellites are 15-20% higher than those on the outside. Estimates show that the neutron contribution to the total equivalent radiation dose reaches 20-30%.

  16. Long term surface albedo datasets generated with Meteosat images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lattanzio, A.; Govaerts, Y. M.; Theodore, B.

    2009-04-01

    The Global Climate Observing System (GCOS) has recognized the importance and the key-role of the surface albedo in the study of the climate change. This and the other climate variables, called Essential Climate Variables (ECVs), must satisfy the following requirements: (i) a global coverage over long-term periods with adequate spatial and temporal resolution, (ii) reliability and accuracy as well as a (iii) quality control. The Coordination Group for Meteorological Satellites (CGMS) assigned to EUMETSAT an action (T18 (TF7)) in order to prototype and test a new algorithm able to retrieve surface albedo using geostationary satellites as described in the "Implementation plan for the global observing system for climate in support of the UNFCCC" document (WMO/TD No. 1219). In this frame EUMETSAT decided to develop a new specific algorithm, named Meteosat Surface Albedo (MSA), based on a method proposed by Pinty et al. The MSA algorithm is currently running in the operational reprocessing facility of EUMETSAT in order to generate reliable albedo data set starting from 1982. These data have been acquired by six different radiometers. As Meteosat first generation satellites have not been designed for climate monitoring, before proceeding with the interpretation of the complete archive (~ 25 years of data), a detailed temporal consistency analysis of the albedo data set generated with the MSA algorithm has been performed in order to check the compliance with points (ii) and (iii). Specific efforts have been put on the estimation of the measurement error accounting for the observation uncertainties and retrieval method assumptions. Currently 100% of the archive for the prime mission at 0 degree has been processed and the albedo data set can be requested from the EUMETSAT archive facility. This paper will present the method elaborated for the evaluation of the temporal consistency of the MSA data set and illustrate typical problems raising from the processing of old data and

  17. Radiative transfer in dusty nebulae. III - The effects of dust albedo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrosian, V.; Dana, R. A.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of an albedo of internal dust, such as ionization structure and temperature of dust grain, were studied by the quasi-diffusion method with an iterative technique for solving the radiative heat transfer equations. It was found that the generalized on-the-spot approximation solution is adequate for most astrophysical applications for a zero albedo; for a nonzero albedo, the Eddington approximation is more accurate. The albedo increases the average energy of the diffuse photons, increasing the ionization level of hydrogen and heavy elements if the Eddington approximation is applied; the dust thermal gradient is reduced so that the infrared spectrum approaches blackbody spectrum with an increasing albedo.

  18. β -Decay Half-Lives of 110 Neutron-Rich Nuclei across the N=82 Shell Gap: Implications for the Mechanism and Universality of the Astrophysical r Process

    SciTech Connect

    Lorusso, G.; Nishimura, S.; Xu, Z. Y.; Jungclaus, A.; Shimizu, Y.; Simpson, G. S.; Söderström, P. -A.; Watanabe, H.; Browne, F.; Doornenbal, P.; Gey, G.; Jung, H. S.; Meyer, B.; Sumikama, T.; Taprogge, J.; Vajta, Zs.; Wu, J.; Baba, H.; Benzoni, G.; Chae, K. Y.; Crespi, F. C. L.; Fukuda, N.; Gernhäuser, R.; Inabe, N.; Isobe, T.; Kajino, T.; Kameda, D.; Kim, G. D.; Kim, Y. -K.; Kojouharov, I.; Kondev, F. G.; Kubo, T.; Kurz, N.; Kwon, Y. K.; Lane, G. J.; Li, Z.; Montaner-Pizá, A.; Moschner, K.; Naqvi, F.; Niikura, M.; Nishibata, H.; Odahara, A.; Orlandi, R.; Patel, Z.; Podolyák, Zs.; Sakurai, H.; Schaffner, H.; Schury, P.; Shibagaki, S.; Steiger, K.; Suzuki, H.; Takeda, H.; Wendt, A.; Yagi, A.; Yoshinaga, K.

    2015-05-01

    The β -decay half-lives of 110 neutron-rich isotopes of the elements from Rb 37 to Sn 50 were measured at the Radioactive Isotope Beam Factory. The 40 new half-lives follow robust systematics and highlight the persistence of shell effects. The new data have direct implications for r -process calculations and reinforce the notion that the second (A≈130 ) and the rare-earth-element (A≈160 ) abundance peaks may result from the freeze-out of an (n,γ)⇌(γ,n) equilibrium. In such an equilibrium, the new half-lives are important factors determining the abundance of rare-earth elements, and allow for a more reliable discussion of the r process universality. It is anticipated that universality may not extend to the elements Sn, Sb, I, and Cs, making the detection of these elements in metal-poor stars of the utmost importance to determine the exact conditions of individual r -process events.

  19. Effect of land cover change on snow free surface albedo across the continental United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickham, J.; Nash, M. S.; Barnes, C. A.

    2016-11-01

    Land cover changes (e.g., forest to grassland) affect albedo, and changes in albedo can influence radiative forcing (warming, cooling). We empirically tested albedo response to land cover change for 130 locations across the continental United States using high resolution (30 m-×-30 m) land cover change data and moderate resolution (~ 500 m-×-500 m) albedo data. The land cover change data spanned 10 years (2001 - 2011) and the albedo data included observations every eight days for 13 years (2001 - 2013). Empirical testing was based on autoregressive time series analysis of snow free albedo for verified locations of land cover change. Approximately one-third of the autoregressive analyses for woody to herbaceous or forest to shrub change classes were not significant, indicating that albedo did not change significantly as a result of land cover change at these locations. In addition, ~ 80% of mean differences in albedo arising from land cover change were less than ± 0.02, a nominal benchmark for precision of albedo measurements that is related to significant changes in radiative forcing. Under snow free conditions, we found that land cover change does not guarantee a significant albedo response, and that the differences in mean albedo response for the majority of land cover change locations were small.

  20. Durability of high-albedo roof coatings and implications for cooling energy savings. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bretz, S.E.; Akbari, H.

    1994-06-01

    Twenty-six spot albedo measurements of roofs were made using a calibrated pyranometer. The roofs were surfaced with either an acrylic elastomeric coating, a polymer coating with an acrylic base, or a cementitious coating. Some of the roofs` albedos were measured before and after washing to determine whether the albedo decrease was permanent. Data indicated that most of the albedo degradation occurred within the first year, and even within the first two months. On one roof, 70% of one year`s albedo degradation occurred in the first two months. After the first year, the degradation slowed, with data indicating small losses in albedo after the second year. Measurements of seasonal cooling energy savings by Akbari et al. (1993) included the effects of over two months of albedo degradation. We estimated {approximately}20% loss in cooling-energy savings after the first year because of dirt accumulation. For most of the roofs we cleaned, the albedo was restored to within 90% of its initial value. Although washing is effective at restoring albedo, the increase in energy savings is temporary and labor costs are significant in comparison to savings. By our calculations, it is not cost-effective to hire someone to clean a high-albedo roof only to achieve energy savings. Thus, it would be useful to develop and identify dirt-resistant high-albedo coatings.

  1. Effect of canopy structure and the presence of snow on the albedo of boreal conifer forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Wenge; Woodcock, Curtis E.

    2000-05-01

    A Geometric-Optical and Radiative Transfer (GORT) approach for modeling the radiation regime within plant canopies is capable of predicting temporal variation in the albedo of boreal conifer forests. Model predictions of daily surface albedo patterns and reflected solar radiation during the winter and summer seasons were validated using field measurements from two forest stands in the northern study area of BOReal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) in 1995. The model is able to predict the "W" shape for the daily albedo over the sparse old jack pine forest stand during the snow season and the "bowl" shape of daily albedo during clear days in the summer. Results immediately following new snow and at the end of the snowmelt season indicate the sensitivity of overall forest albedos to the albedo of snow. Incorporation of time-varying values for snow albedo may improve future efforts to estimate forest albedos in the winter. Forest albedos are a complicated function of the canopy structure, the presence or absence of snow on the ground and the angular distribution of irradiance. These effects differ for the visible, near-infrared and midinfrared portions of the solar spectrum. Forest albedos vary dramatically as a function of canopy cover when snow covers the ground, but very little when snow is not present. It is found that for tree cover over about 70%, the presence of snow has little effect on albedo.

  2. Albedo of coastal landfast sea ice in Prydz Bay, Antarctica: Observations and parameterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qinghua; Liu, Jiping; Leppäranta, Matti; Sun, Qizhen; Li, Rongbin; Zhang, Lin; Jung, Thomas; Lei, Ruibo; Zhang, Zhanhai; Li, Ming; Zhao, Jiechen; Cheng, Jingjing

    2016-05-01

    The snow/sea-ice albedo was measured over coastal landfast sea ice in Prydz Bay, East Antarctica (off Zhongshan Station) during the austral spring and summer of 2010 and 2011. The variation of the observed albedo was a combination of a gradual seasonal transition from spring to summer and abrupt changes resulting from synoptic events, including snowfall, blowing snow, and overcast skies. The measured albedo ranged from 0.94 over thick fresh snow to 0.36 over melting sea ice. It was found that snow thickness was the most important factor influencing the albedo variation, while synoptic events and overcast skies could increase the albedo by about 0.18 and 0.06, respectively. The in-situ measured albedo and related physical parameters (e.g., snow thickness, ice thickness, surface temperature, and air temperature) were then used to evaluate four different snow/ice albedo parameterizations used in a variety of climate models. The parameterized albedos showed substantial discrepancies compared to the observed albedo, particularly during the summer melt period, even though more complex parameterizations yielded more realistic variations than simple ones. A modified parameterization was developed, which further considered synoptic events, cloud cover, and the local landfast sea-ice surface characteristics. The resulting parameterized albedo showed very good agreement with the observed albedo.

  3. Albedo maps of Comets P/Giacobini-Zinner and P/Halley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammel, H. B.; Storrs, A. D.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Telesco, C. M.; Decher, R. M.; Campins, H.

    1986-01-01

    Near-simultaneous infrared and visual maps of P/Giacobini-Zinner (P/G-Z) and P/Halley are combined to create maps of the spatial variation of geometric albedo. Giacobini-Zinner shows a minimum in albedo near 0.07 with an increase of a factor of 2 over 30 arcsec. The lowest albedos are offset from the nucleus in the antisunward direction, coincident with a dust tail observed in the IR. The P/Halley albedos are higher than those for P/G-Z and range from 0.2 to 0.4, but the trend of darker albedo in the antisunward direction (along the tail) is the same. The albedo distribution is attributed to large, dark, fluffy grains confined to the orbital plane close to the nucleus. The high albedo values in P/Halley may be due to enhanced flux in the visual image because of the comet's very small phase angle.

  4. Reentrant albedo proton fluxes measured by the PAMELA experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adriani, O.; Barbarino, G. C.; Bazilevskaya, G. A.; Bellotti, R.; Boezio, M.; Bogomolov, E. A.; Bongi, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Bottai, S.; Bruno, A.; Cafagna, F.; Campana, D.; Carlson, P.; Casolino, M.; Castellini, G.; Donato, C. De; De Santis, C.; De Simone, N.; Di Felice, V.; Formato, V.; Galper, A. M.; Karelin, A. V.; Koldashov, S. V.; Koldobskiy, S.; Krutkov, S. Y.; Kvashnin, A. N.; Leonov, A.; Malakhov, V.; Marcelli, L.; Martucci, M.; Mayorov, A. G.; Menn, W.; Mergé, M.; Mikhailov, V. V.; Mocchiutti, E.; Monaco, A.; Mori, N.; Munini, R.; Osteria, G.; Palma, F.; Panico, B.; Papini, P.; Pearce, M.; Picozza, P.; Ricci, M.; Ricciarini, S. B.; Sarkar, R.; Scotti, V.; Simon, M.; Sparvoli, R.; Spillantini, P.; Stozhkov, Y. I.; Vacchi, A.; Vannuccini, E.; Vasilyev, G. I.; Voronov, S. A.; Yurkin, Y. T.; Zampa, G.; Zampa, N.

    2015-05-01

    We present a precise measurement of downward going albedo proton fluxes for kinetic energy above ˜70 MeV performed by the Payload for Antimatter Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics (PAMELA) experiment at an altitude between 350 and 610 km. On the basis of a trajectory tracing simulation, the analyzed protons were classified into quasi-trapped, concentrating in the magnetic equatorial region, and untrapped spreading over all latitudes, including both short-lived (precipitating) and long-lived (pseudotrapped) components. In addition, features of the penumbra region around the geomagnetic cutoff were investigated in detail. PAMELA results significantly improve the characterization of the high-energy albedo proton populations at low-Earth orbits.

  5. NEOWISE diameters and albedos: now available on PDS!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masiero, Joseph R.; Mainzer, Amy K.; Bauer, James M.; Cutri, Roc M.; Grav, Tommy; Kramer, Emily A.; Nugent, Carolyn; Sonnett, Sarah M.; Stevenson, Rachel; Wright, Edward L.

    2016-10-01

    We present the recent PDS release of minor planet physical property data from the WISE/NEOWISE fully cryogenic, 3-band cryo, and post-cryo surveys as well as the first year of the NEOWISE-Reactivation survey. This release includes 165,865 diameters, visible albedos, near-infrared albedos, and/or beaming parameters for 140,493 unique minor planets. The published data include near-Earth asteroids, Main Belt asteroids, Hildas, Jupiter Trojans, Centaurs, active Main Belt objects and irregular satellites of Jupiter and Saturn. We provide an overview of the available data and discuss the key features of the PDS data set. The data are available online at: http://sbn.psi.edu/pds/resource/neowisediam.html.

  6. Exogenic and endogenic albedo and color patterns on Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcewen, A. S.

    1986-01-01

    New global and high-resolution multispectral mosaics of Europa have been produced from the Voyager imaging data. Photometric normalizations are based on multiple-image techniques that explicitly account for intrinsic albedo variations through pixel-by-pixel solutions. The exogenic color and albedo pattern on Europa is described by a second-order function of the cosine of the angular distance from the apex of orbital motion. On the basis of this second-order function and of color trends that are different on the leading and trailing hemispheres, the exogenic pattern is interpreted as being due to equilibrium between two dominant processes: (1) impact gardening and (2) magnetospheric interactions, including sulfur-ion implantation and sputtering redistribution. Removal of the model exogenic pattern in the mosaics reveals the endogenic variations, consisting of only two major units: darker (redder) and bright materials. Therefore Europa's visual spectral reflectivity is simple, having one continuous exogenic pattern and two discrete endogenic units.

  7. Land Surface Albedo from MERIS Reflectances Using MODIS Directional Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaaf, Crystal L. B.; Gao, Feng; Strahler, Alan H.

    2004-01-01

    MERIS Level 2 surface reflectance products are now available to the scientific community. This paper demonstrates the production of MERIS-derived surface albedo and Nadir Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) adjusted reflectances by coupling the MERIS data with MODIS BRDF products. Initial efforts rely on the specification of surface anisotropy as provided by the global MODIS BRDF product for a first guess of the shape of the BRDF and then make use all of the coincidently available, partially atmospherically corrected, cloud cleared, MERIS observations to generate MERIS-derived BRDF and surface albedo quantities for each location. Comparisons between MODIS (aerosol-corrected) and MERIS (not-yet aerosol-corrected) surface values from April and May 2003 are also presented for case studies in Spain and California as well as preliminary comparisons with field data from the Devil's Rock Surfrad/BSRN site.

  8. Deriving Albedo from Coupled MERIS and MODIS Surface Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Feng; Schaaf, Crystal; Jin, Yu-Fang; Lucht, Wolfgang; Strahler, Alan

    2004-01-01

    MERIS Level 2 surface reflectance products are now available to the scientific community. This paper demonstrates the production of MERIS-derived surface albedo and Nadir Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) adjusted reflectances by coupling the MERIS data with MODIS BRDF products. Initial efforts rely on the specification of surface anisotropy as provided by the global MODIS BRDF product for a first guess of the shape of the BRDF and then make use all of the coincidently available, partially atmospherically corrected, cloud cleared, MERIS observations to generate MERIS-derived BRDF and surface albedo quantities for each location. Comparisons between MODIS (aerosol-corrected) and MERIS (not-yet aerosol-corrected) surface values from April and May 2003 are also presented for case studies in Spain and California as well as preliminary comparisons with field data from the Devil's Rock Surfrad/BSRN site.

  9. Studies of seasonal variations on Mars based on orbital and surface observations of neutron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvak, Maxim; Mitrofanov, Igor; Sanin, Anton; Golovin, Dmitry; Nikiforov, Sergey; Lisov, Denis

    2014-05-01

    Starting from February 2002 High Energy Neutron Detector (HEND) onboard Mars Odyssey is performing continuous monitoring of regional and seasonal variations of martian neutron albedo to deconvolve and to map subsurface water distribution at different latitudes and to observe Mars climate cycle processes over a long baseline. In our investigation we have used HEND/Odyssey observations accumulated for seven successive martian years to search for the seasonal and inter annual variations of orbital neutron flux at equatorial latitudes due to seasonal variations of atmospheric thickness and seasonal cycle of subsurface water distribution. The obtained results have been compared with a ground truth measurements of local environment obtained by Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons instrument onboard MSL Curiosity rover during first year of surface operations in vicinity of Gale crater.

  10. Neutron Sources for Standard-Based Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Radev, Radoslav; McLean, Thomas

    2014-11-10

    The DHS TC Standards and the consensus ANSI Standards use 252Cf as the neutron source for performance testing because its energy spectrum is similar to the 235U and 239Pu fission sources used in nuclear weapons. An emission rate of 20,000 ± 20% neutrons per second is used for testing of the radiological requirements both in the ANSI standards and the TCS. Determination of the accurate neutron emission rate of the test source is important for maintaining consistency and agreement between testing results obtained at different testing facilities. Several characteristics in the manufacture and the decay of the source need to be understood and accounted for in order to make an accurate measurement of the performance of the neutron detection instrument. Additionally, neutron response characteristics of the particular instrument need to be known and taken into account as well as neutron scattering in the testing environment.

  11. From the similarities between neutrons and radon to advanced radon-detection and improved cold fusion neutron-measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tommasino, L.; Espinosa, G.

    2014-07-01

    Neutrons and radon are both ubiquitous in the earth's crust. The neutrons of terrestrial origin are strongly related to radon since they originate mainly from the interactions between the alpha particles from the decays of radioactive-gas (namely Radon and Thoron) and the light nuclei. Since the early studies in the field of neutrons, the radon gas was used to produce neutrons by (α, n) reactions in beryllium. Another important similarity between radon and neutrons is that they can be detected only through the radiations produced respectively by decays or by nuclear reactions. These charged particles from the two distinct nuclear processes are often the same (namely alpha-particles). A typical neutron detector is based on a radiator facing a alpha-particle detector, such as in the case of a neutron film badge. Based on the similarity between neutrons and radon, a film badge for radon has been recently proposed. The radon film badge, in addition to be similar, may be even identical to the neutron film badge. For these reasons, neutron measurements can be easily affected by the presence of unpredictable large radon concentration. In several cold fusion experiments, the CR-39 plastic films (typically used in radon and neutron film-badges), have been the detectors of choice for measuring neutrons. In this paper, attempts will be made to prove that most of these neutron-measurements might have been affected by the presence of large radon concentrations.

  12. Detection of special nuclear material by observation of delayed neutrons with a novel fast neutron composite detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Michael; Nattress, Jason; Barhoumi Meddeb, Amira; Foster, Albert; Trivelpiece, Cory; Rose, Paul; Erickson, Anna; Ounaies, Zoubeida; Jovanovic, Igor

    2015-10-01

    Detection of shielded special nuclear material is crucial to countering nuclear terrorism and proliferation, but its detection is challenging. By observing the emission of delayed neutrons, which is a unique signature of nuclear fission, the presence of nuclear material can be inferred. We report on the observation of delayed neutrons from natural uranium by using monoenergetic photons and neutrons to induce fission. An interrogating beam of 4.4 MeV and 15.1 MeV gamma-rays and neutrons was produced using the 11B(d,n-γ)12C reaction and used to probe different targets. Neutron detectors with complementary Cherenkov detectors then discriminate material undergoing fission. A Li-doped glass-polymer composite neutron detector was used, which displays excellent n/ γ discrimination even at low energies, to observe delayed neutrons from uranium fission. Delayed neutrons have relatively low energies (~0.5 MeV) compared to prompt neutrons, which makes them difficult to detect using recoil-based detectors. Neutrons were counted and timed after the beam was turned off to observe the characteristic decaying time profile of delayed neutrons. The expected decay of neutron emission rate is in agreement with the common parametrization into six delayed neutron groups.

  13. a Generalized Albedo Option for Forward and Adjoint Monte Carlo Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, Itacil Chiari

    1991-02-01

    The advisability of using the albedo procedure for the Monte Carlo solution of deep penetration shielding problems which have ducts and other penetrations is investigated. It is generally accepted that the use of albedo data can dramatically improve the computational efficiency of certain Monte Carlo calculations--however the accuracy of these results may be unacceptable because of lost information during the albedo event and serious errors in the available differential albedo data. This study has been done to evaluate and appropriately modify the MORSE/BREESE package, to develop new methods for generating the required albedo data, and to extend the adjoint capability to the albedo-modified calculations. The major modifications include an option to save for further use information that would be lost at the albedo event, an option to displace the emergent point during an albedo event, and an option to read spatially -dependent albedo data for both forward and adjoint calculations --which includes the emergent point as a new random variable to be selected during an albedo reflection event. The theoretical basis for using TORT-generated forward albedo information to produce adjuncton-albedos is derived. The MORSE/STORM code was developed to perform both forward and adjoint modes of analysis using spatially-dependent albedo data. The results obtained using the MORSE/STORM code package for both forward and adjoint modes were compared with benchmark solutions--excellent agreements along with improved computational efficiencies were achieved demonstrating the full utilization of the albedo option in the MORSE code.

  14. Technique for the identification of dominant delayed neutron precursors.

    SciTech Connect

    Loaiza, D. J.; Haskin, E.

    2001-01-01

    A technique for the identification of delayed neutron precursors has been developed based on the product of cumulative yield and probability of neutron emission. The motivation behind this work is to fix the decay constants of delayed neutrons to those of the dominant delayed neutron precursors. The desirability of identifying a single set of decay constants that would apply to all fissionable isotopes and be independent of the neutron energy spectrum has been addressed by several authors. The main advantages of a fixed-decay constant representation are simplifying the analysis of epithemal and fast reactors with multiple fissioning isotopes, and improving the fit to experimental data while preserving the inferred positive reactivity scale associated with the original six-group representation. It is well known that 27 1 delayed neutron precursors exist, but only a select number of those precursors contribute significantly to the decay of delayed neutron. Using data compiled by England and Rider, which lists fission yield and probability of neutron emission values for the 27 1 known delayed neutron precursors in 32 fissioning systems, thirteen precursors were identified that are consistently dominant for alI fissioning systems.

  15. Neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Stephan, Andrew C.; Jardret; Vincent D.

    2011-04-05

    A neutron detector has a volume of neutron moderating material and a plurality of individual neutron sensing elements dispersed at selected locations throughout the moderator, and particularly arranged so that some of the detecting elements are closer to the surface of the moderator assembly and others are more deeply embedded. The arrangement captures some thermalized neutrons that might otherwise be scattered away from a single, centrally located detector element. Different geometrical arrangements may be used while preserving its fundamental characteristics. Different types of neutron sensing elements may be used, which may operate on any of a number of physical principles to perform the function of sensing a neutron, either by a capture or a scattering reaction, and converting that reaction to a detectable signal. High detection efficiency, an ability to acquire spectral information, and directional sensitivity may be obtained.

  16. Neutron detector

    SciTech Connect

    Stephan, Andrew C; Jardret, Vincent D

    2009-04-07

    A neutron detector has a volume of neutron moderating material and a plurality of individual neutron sensing elements dispersed at selected locations throughout the moderator, and particularly arranged so that some of the detecting elements are closer to the surface of the moderator assembly and others are more deeply embedded. The arrangement captures some thermalized neutrons that might otherwise be scattered away from a single, centrally located detector element. Different geometrical arrangements may be used while preserving its fundamental characteristics. Different types of neutron sensing elements may be used, which may operate on any of a number of physical principles to perform the function of sensing a neutron, either by a capture or a scattering reaction, and converting that reaction to a detectable signal. High detection efficiency, an ability to acquire spectral information, and directional sensitivity may be obtained.

  17. Gamma-ray Albedo of Small Solar System Bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Moskalenko, I.V.

    2008-03-25

    We calculate the {gamma}-ray albedo flux from cosmic-ray (CR) interactions with the solid rock and ice in Main Belt asteroids and Kuiper Belt objects (KBOs) using the Moon as a template. We show that the {gamma}-ray albedo for the Main Belt and KBOs strongly depends on the small-body mass spectrum of each system and may be detectable by the forthcoming Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST). If detected, it can be used to derive the mass spectrum of small bodies in the Main Belt and Kuiper Belt and to probe the spectrum of CR nuclei at close-to-interstellar conditions. The orbits of the Main Belt asteroids and KBOs are distributed near the ecliptic, which passes through the Galactic center and high Galactic latitudes. Therefore, the {gamma}-ray emission by the Main Belt and Kuiper Belt has to be taken into account when analyzing weak {gamma}-ray sources close to the ecliptic. The asteroid albedo spectrum also exhibits a 511 keV line due to secondary positrons annihilating in the rock. This may be an important and previously unrecognized celestial foreground for the INTErnational Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) observations of the Galactic 511 keV line emission including the direction of the Galactic center. For details of our calculations and references see [1].

  18. Albedo polarimétrico de asteroides del grupo Hungaria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil-Hutton, R.; Benavidez, P.

    La región del cinturón de asteroides en donde se encuentra el grupo de los Hungarias (a= 1.79 a 1.98 UA, i=15 a 40 grados) es la única zona donde es común encontrar objetos de tipo taxonómico E, caracterizados por altos albedos, colores relativamente neutros y espectros sin detalles. Este tipo de asteroides está relacionado espectralmente con ciertos meteoritos (aubritas) que indican la existencia de episodios de gran calentamiento que ocurrieron durante la formación del Sistema Solar. Como el espectro de los asteroides de tipo E es idéntico a los de tipo M y P, la única forma de clasificar un asteroide en alguno de estos tres tipos taxonómicos es mediante el albedo. En este trabajo se presentan resultados preliminares sobre la determinación polarimétrica de albedos para objetos de este grupo utilizando el polarímetro CASPROF de CASLEO.

  19. Supercritical Salt Spray for the Implementation of Cloud Albedo Modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neukermans, A. P.; Cooper, G.; Foster, J. D.; Galbraith, L.; Ormond, B.; Wang, Q.; Johnston, D.; Cloud Brightening Research

    2011-12-01

    Of all the geo-engineering schemes proposed so far, the Latham-Salter cloud albedo modification scheme is perhaps the most benign and "natural" method. In its full deployment, it proposes to densify and thereby modify the albedo of low-hanging marine boundary clouds by a few percent such that the overall earth albedo might be changed by 1%. The scheme would require the production of vast numbers of salt cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), in one implementation on the order of 10^17 per second from each of some 1500 autonomous sailing vessels. We have investigated a number of possible techniques to create these nuclei. We reported previously the laboratory production of suitable nuclei from saltwater using Taylor cones. This method would require about 10^8 Taylor cones per vessel to get to the required CCN production rate, and hence needs a very extensive scale-up effort. We report here on the use of saltwater sprayed at or near its critical temperature and pressure through small nozzles. Although a number of technical problems remain, results to date suggest that this method might be suitable, at least for research purposes. The mean particle size distributions of nuclei generated (40-100 nm) are acceptable, and the scale-up effort to the estimated number of nozzles required (1000-2000) seems reasonable.

  20. Constraints on nucleon decay via invisible modes from the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, S N; Anthony, A E; Beier, E W; Bellerive, A; Biller, S D; Boger, J; Boulay, M G; Bowler, M G; Bowles, T J; Brice, S J; Bullard, T V; Chan, Y D; Chen, M; Chen, X; Cleveland, B T; Cox, G A; Dai, X; Dalnoki-Veress, F; Doe, P J; Dosanjh, R S; Doucas, G; Dragowsky, M R; Duba, C A; Duncan, F A; Dunford, M; Dunmore, J A; Earle, E D; Elliott, S R; Evans, H C; Ewan, G T; Farine, J; Fergani, H; Fleurot, F; Formaggio, J A; Fowler, M M; Frame, K; Frati, W; Fulsom, B G; Gagnon, N; Graham, K; Grant, D R; Hahn, R L; Hall, J C; Hallin, A L; Hallman, E D; Hamer, A S; Handler, W B; Hargrove, C K; Harvey, P J; Hazama, R; Heeger, K M; Heintzelman, W J; Heise, J; Helmer, R L; Hemingway, R J; Hime, A; Howe, M A; Jagam, P; Jelley, N A; Klein, J R; Kos, M S; Krumins, A V; Kutter, T; Kyba, C C M; Labranche, H; Lange, R; Law, J; Lawson, I T; Lesko, K T; Leslie, J R; Levine, I; Luoma, S; MacLellan, R; Majerus, S; Mak, H B; Maneira, J; Marino, A D; McCauley, N; McDonald, A B; McGee, S; McGregor, G; Mifflin, C; Miknaitis, K K S; Miller, G G; Moffat, B A; Nally, C W; Neubauer, M S; Nickel, B G; Noble, A J; Norman, E B; Oblath, N S; Okada, C E; Ollerhead, R W; Orrell, J L; Oser, S M; Ouellet, C; Peeters, S J M; Poon, A W P; Robertson, B C; Robertson, R G H; Rollin, E; Rosendahl, S S E; Rusu, V L; Schwendener, M H; Simard, O; Simpson, J J; Sims, C J; Sinclair, D; Skensved, P; Smith, M W E; Starinsky, N; Stokstad, R G; Stonehill, L C; Tafirout, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tesić, G; Thomson, M; Thorman, M; Van Berg, R; Van de Water, R G; Virtue, C J; Wall, B L; Waller, D; Waltham, C E; Tseung, H Wan Chan; Wark, D L; West, N; Wilhelmy, J B; Wilkerson, J F; Wilson, J R; Wittich, P; Wouters, J M; Yeh, M; Zuber, K

    2004-03-12

    Data from the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory have been used to constrain the lifetime for nucleon decay to "invisible" modes, such as n-->3nu. The analysis was based on a search for gamma rays from the deexcitation of the residual nucleus that would result from the disappearance of either a proton or neutron from 16O. A limit of tau(inv)>2 x 10(29) yr is obtained at 90% confidence for either neutron- or proton-decay modes. This is about an order of magnitude more stringent than previous constraints on invisible proton-decay modes and 400 times more stringent than similar neutron modes.

  1. A magneto-gravitational neutron trap for the measurement of the neutron lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvat, Daniel J.

    Neutron decay is the simplest example of nuclear beta-decay. The mean decay lifetime is a key input for predicting the abundance of light elements in the early universe. A precise measurement of the neutron lifetime, when combined with other neutron decay observables, can test for physics beyond the standard model in a way that is complimentary to, and potentially competitive with, results from high energy collider experiments. Many previous measurements of the neutron lifetime used ultracold neutrons (UCN) confined in material bottles. In a material bottle experiment, UCN are loaded into the apparatus, stored for varying times, and the surviving UCN are emptied and counted. These measurements are in poor agreement with experiments that use neutron beams, and new experiments are needed to resolve the discrepancy and precisely determine the lifetime. Here we present an experiment that uses a bowl-shaped array of NdFeB magnets to confine neutrons without material wall interactions. The trap shape is designed to rapidly remove higher energy UCN that might slowly leak from the top of the trap, and can facilitate new techniques to count surviving UCN within the trap. We review the scientific motivation for a precise measurement of the neutron lifetime, and present the commissioning of the trap. Data are presented using a vanadium activation technique to count UCN within the trap, providing an alternative method to emptying neutrons from the trap and into a counter. Potential systematic effects in the experiment are then discussed and estimated using analytical and numerical techniques. We also investigate solid nitrogen-15 as a source of UCN using neutron time-of-flight spectroscopy. We conclude with a discussion of forthcoming research and development for UCN detection and UCN sources.

  2. Neutron measurements onboard the space shuttle.

    PubMed

    Badhwar, G D; Keith, J E; Cleghorn, T F

    2001-06-01

    The radiation environment inside a shielded volume is highly complex, consisting of both charged and neutral particles. Since the inception of human space flights, the charged particle component has received virtually all of the attention. There is however, a significant production of secondary neutrons, particularly from the aluminum structure in low earth orbiting spacecrafts. The interactions of galactic cosmic rays (GCR), and solar energetic particles with the earth's atmosphere produce a non-isotropic distribution of albedo neutrons. Inside any reasonable habitable module, the average radiation quality factor of neutrons is about 4-5 times larger than the corresponding average quality factor of charged particles. The measurement of neutrons and their energy spectra is a difficult problem due the intense sources of charged particles. This paper reviews the results of Shuttle flight experiments (made during both solar maximum and solar minimum) to measure the contribution of neutrons to the dose equivalent, as well as theoretical calculations to estimate the appropriate range of neutron energies that contribute most to the dose equivalent.

  3. Neutron measurements onboard the space shuttle.

    PubMed

    Badhwar, G D; Keith, J E; Cleghorn, T F

    2001-06-01

    The radiation environment inside a shielded volume is highly complex, consisting of both charged and neutral particles. Since the inception of human space flights, the charged particle component has received virtually all of the attention. There is however, a significant production of secondary neutrons, particularly from the aluminum structure in low earth orbiting spacecrafts. The interactions of galactic cosmic rays (GCR), and solar energetic particles with the earth's atmosphere produce a non-isotropic distribution of albedo neutrons. Inside any reasonable habitable module, the average radiation quality factor of neutrons is about 4-5 times larger than the corresponding average quality factor of charged particles. The measurement of neutrons and their energy spectra is a difficult problem due the intense sources of charged particles. This paper reviews the results of Shuttle flight experiments (made during both solar maximum and solar minimum) to measure the contribution of neutrons to the dose equivalent, as well as theoretical calculations to estimate the appropriate range of neutron energies that contribute most to the dose equivalent. PMID:11852943

  4. Neutron measurements onboard the space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, G. D.; Keith, J. E.; Cleghorn, T. F.

    2001-01-01

    The radiation environment inside a shielded volume is highly complex, consisting of both charged and neutral particles. Since the inception of human space flights, the charged particle component has received virtually all of the attention. There is however, a significant production of secondary neutrons, particularly from the aluminum structure in low earth orbiting spacecrafts. The interactions of galactic cosmic rays (GCR), and solar energetic particles with the earth's atmosphere produce a non-isotropic distribution of albedo neutrons. Inside any reasonable habitable module, the average radiation quality factor of neutrons is about 4-5 times larger than the corresponding average quality factor of charged particles. The measurement of neutrons and their energy spectra is a difficult problem due the intense sources of charged particles. This paper reviews the results of Shuttle flight experiments (made during both solar maximum and solar minimum) to measure the contribution of neutrons to the dose equivalent, as well as theoretical calculations to estimate the appropriate range of neutron energies that contribute most to the dose equivalent. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd.

  5. Atmospheric neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preszler, A. M.; Moon, S.; White, R. S.

    1976-01-01

    Additional calibrations of the University of California double-scatter neutron detector and additional analysis corrections lead to slightly changed neutron fluxes. The theoretical angular distributions of Merker (1975) are in general agreement with the reported experimental fluxes but do not give the peaks for vertical upward and downward moving neutrons. The theoretical neutron escape current is in agreement with the experimental values from 10 to 100 MeV. The experimental fluxes obtained agree with those of Kanbach et al. (1974) in the overlap region from 70 to 100 MeV.

  6. Neutron-driven gamma-ray laser

    DOEpatents

    Bowman, Charles D.

    1990-01-01

    A lasing cylinder emits laser radiation at a gamma-ray wavelength of 0.87 .ANG. when subjected to an intense neutron flux of about 400 eV neutrons. A 250 .ANG. thick layer of Be is provided between two layers of 100 .ANG. thick layer of .sup.57 Co and these layers are supported on a foil substrate. The coated foil is coiled to form the lasing cylinder. Under the neutron flux .sup.57 Co becomes .sup.58 Co by neutron absorption. The .sup.58 Co then decays to .sup.57 Fe by 1.6 MeV proton emission. .sup.57 Fe then transitions by mesne decay to a population inversion for lasing action at 14.4 keV. Recoil from the proton emission separates the .sup.57 Fe from the .sup.57 Co and into the Be, where Mossbauer emission occurs at a gamma-ray wavelength.

  7. Spectroscopy of neutron-unbound ^15Be

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Jesse; Thoennessen, Michael; Baumann, Thomas; Spyrou, Artemis; Strongman, Michael; Christian, Greg; Mosby, Shea; Mosby, Michelle; Smith, Jenna; Simon, Anna; Luther, Bryan; Stephenson, Sharon; Peters, Alex; Deyoung, Paul; Lunderberg, Eric; Finck, Joseph

    2012-10-01

    A (d,p) reaction was used to populate neutron unbound states in ^15Be from a secondary beam of ^14Be at 55 MeV/u impinging upon a deuterated polyethylene target. The unbound states in ^15Be decayed though the emission of a neutron. The neutron was detected using MoNA, an array of 144 plastic scintillator bars. The charged ^14Be fragments were deflected by the Sweeper dipole magnet into a system of charged particle detectors which allow the reconstruction of their kinematic properties. The decay energy was calculated through invariant mass analysis, using the energy and momentum information of the neutron and fragment at the target. Results will be presented.

  8. Spectroscopy of neutron-unbound 15Be

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Jesse; Thoennessen, Michael; Baumann, Thomas; Spryou, Artemis; Strongman, Michael; Christian, Greg; Mosby, Shea; Mosby, Michelle; Smith, Jenna; Simon, Anna; Luther, Bryan; Stephenson, Sharon; Peters, Alex; Deyoung, Paul; Lunderberg, Eric; Finck, Joseph

    2011-10-01

    A (d,p) reaction was used to populate neutron unbound states in 15Be from a secondary beam of 14Be at 55MeV/u. These unbound states in 15Be decayed though the emission of a neutron and a 14Be fragment. The neutron was detected using MoNA, an array of 144 plastic scintillator bars. The charged 14Be fragments were deflected by the Sweeper dipole magnet into a system of charged particle detectors which allow the reconstruction of their kinematic properties. The decay energy was calculated through invariant mass analysis, using the energy and momentum information of the neutron and fragment at the target. Preliminary results will be presented.

  9. Multidecadal analysis of forest growth and albedo in boreal Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukeš, Petr; Stenberg, Pauline; Mõttus, Matti; Manninen, Terhikki; Rautiainen, Miina

    2016-10-01

    It is well known that forests serve as carbon sinks. However, the balancing effect of afforestation and increased forest density on global warming due to carbon storage may be lost by low albedo (thus high absorption) of the forests. In the last 30 years, there has been a steady increase in the growing stock of Finnish forests by nearly a quarter while the area of the forests has remained virtually unchanged. Such increase in forest density together with the availability of detailed forest inventories provided by the Multi-Source National Forest Inventory (MS-NFI) in high spatial resolution makes Finland an ideal candidate for exploring the effects of increased forest density on satellite derived estimates of bio-geochemical products e.g. albedo (directional-hemispherical reflectance, DHR), fraction of photosynthetically active radiation absorbed by canopies (fAPAR), leaf area index (LAI) and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) in both current and long-term perspective. In this study, we first used MODIS-based vegetation satellite products for Finnish forests to study their seasonal patterns and interrelations. Next, the peak growing season observations are linked to the MS-NFI database to yield the generic relationships between forest density and the satellite-derived vegetation indicators. Finally, long-term GIMMS3g datasets between 1982 and 2011 (2008 for DHR) are analyzed and interpreted using forest inventory data. The vegetation peak growing season NIR DHR and VIS DHR showed weak to moderate negative correlation with fAPAR, whereas there was no correlation between NIR DHR and fAPAR. Next, we show that the spectral albedos in the near-infrared region (NIR DHR) showed weak negative correlation with forest biomass, basal area or canopy cover whereas, as expected, the spectral albedo in the visible region (VIS DHR) correlated negatively with these measures of forest density. Interestingly, the increase in forest density (biomass per ha) of Finnish

  10. Measurement of neutron capture on 136Xe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, J. B.; Daugherty, S. J.; Johnson, T. N.; O'Conner, T.; Kaufman, L. J.; Couture, A.; Ullmann, J. L.; Krtička, M.

    2016-09-01

    136Xe is a 0 ν β β decay candidate isotope, and is used in multiple experiments searching for this hypothetical decay mode. These experiments require precise information about neutron capture for their background characterization and minimization. Thermal and resonant neutron capture on 136Xe have been measured at the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. A neutron beam ranging from thermal energy to greater than 100 keV was incident on a gas cell filled with isotopically pure 136Xe. The relative neutron capture cross sections for neutrons at thermal energies and the first resonance at 2.154 keV have been measured, yielding a new absolute measurement of 0.238 ±0.019 b for the thermal neutron capture cross section. Additionally, the γ cascades for captures at both energies have been measured, and cascade models have been developed which may be used by 0 ν β β experiments using 136Xe.

  11. Personnel neutron dose assessment upgrade: Volume 1, Personnel neutron dosimetry assessment: (Final report)

    SciTech Connect

    Hadlock, D.E.; Brackenbush, L.W.; Griffith, R.V.; Hankins, D.E.; Parkhurst, M.A.; Stroud, C.M.; Faust, L.G.; Vallario, E.J.

    1988-07-01

    This report provides guidance on the characteristics, use, and calibration criteria for personnel neutron dosimeters. The report is applicable for neutrons with energies ranging from thermal to less than 20 MeV. Background for general neutron dosimetry requirements is provided, as is relevant federal regulations and other standards. The characteristics of personnel neutron dosimeters are discussed, with particular attention paid to passive neutron dosimetry systems. Two of the systems discussed are used at DOE and DOE-contractor facilities (nuclear track emulsion and thermoluminescent-albedo) and another (the combination TLD/TED) was recently developed. Topics discussed in the field applications of these dosimeters include their theory of operation, their processing, readout, and interpretation, and their advantages and disadvantages for field use. The procedures required for occupational neutron dosimetry are discussed, including radiation monitoring and the wearing of dosimeters, their exchange periods, dose equivalent evaluations, and the documenting of neutron exposures. The coverage of dosimeter testing, maintenance, and calibration includes guidance on the selection of calibration sources, the effects of irradiation geometries, lower limits of detectability, fading, frequency of calibration, spectrometry, and quality control. 49 refs., 6 figs., 8 tabs.

  12. Effect of oxide films and structural inhomogeneities on transmission of ultracold neutrons through foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokotilovski, Yuri N.

    2016-02-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are performed of the ultracold neutron (UCN) transmission through metal foils relevant to experiments with UCN, and the UCN albedo from an inhomogeneous 6LiF layer. The computations are based on the measured energy dependent cross sections of real materials.

  13. Studying the neutron-unbound ^18B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spyrou, A.; Baumann, T.; Bazin, D.; Christian, G.; Mosby, S.; Strogman, M.; Thoennessen, M.; Brown, J.; Deyoung, P. A.; Deline, A.; Finck, J. E.; Russel, A.; Frank, N.; Breitbach, E.; Howes, R.; Peters, W. A.; Schiller, A.

    2009-10-01

    The decay of the neutron-unbound ground state of ^18B was studied for the first time through a single-proton knockout reaction from a 62 MeV/u ^19C beam. The decay energy spectrum was reconstructed from coincidence measurements between the emitted neutron and ^17B fragment using the MoNA/Sweeper setup. An s-wave line shape was used to describe the experimental spectrum resulting in an upper limit for the scattering length of -50 fm which corresponds to a decay energy < 10 keV. Observing an s-wave decay of ^18B provides an experimental verification that the ground state of ^19C includes a large s component. In addition, our results show that the s-d mixing proposed for ^19C is also present in ^18B, therefore no clear signs of an inversion between the s1/2 and d5/2 orbitals can be suggested.

  14. Assessment of VIIRS daily BRDF/Albedo product using in situ measurement of SURFRAD sites and MODIS V006 daily BRDF/Albedo product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Wang, Z.; Sun, Q.; Schaaf, C.; Roman, M. O.

    2014-12-01

    Surface albedo is defined as the ratio of upwelling to downwelling radiative flux. It's important for understanding the global energy budget. Remote sensing albedo products provide global time continuous coverage to help capture global energy variability and change. The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) on the Suomi-NPP satellite, launched on October 28, 2011, is aiming to provide continues data record with the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), which has been providing Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF)/Albedo product since 2000. By utilizing the same approach that was used for the most recently V006 daily MODIS BRDF/Albedo product, VIIRS has the ability to keep providing products for research and operational users. Validating albedo product of VIIRS using in situmeasured albedo can assure the quality for land surface climate and biosphere models, and comparing with MODIS product can assure time continues of BRDF/albedo product. The daily BRDF/Albedo product still uses 16-day period multispectral, cloud-cleared, atmospherically-corrected surface reflectances to fit the Ross-Thick/Li-Sparse-Reciprocal semi-empirical BRDF model. But the multiday observations are also weighted based on proximity to the production date in order to emphasis on that individual day. Surface Radiation Budget Network (SURFRAD) was established in 1993 through the support of NOAA's Office of Global Programs. In situ albedo was driven from downwelling and upwelling radiative flux measured from the towers. Fraction of diffuse sky light was calculated using the direct and diffuse solar recorded in the data. It was further used to translate VIIRS, MODIS black sky and white sky albedos into actual albedo at local solar noon. Results show that VIIRS, MODIS and in situ albedo agree well at SURFARD spatially representative sites. While the VIIRS surface reflectance, snow, and cloud algorithms are still undergoing revision, the result shows that

  15. Decay spectroscopy of exotic nuclei at RIBF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, H.

    2016-09-01

    Neutron-rich nuclei around the doubly magic nucleus 132Sn and the double midshell nucleus 170Dy have been investigated by means of decay spectroscopy techniques with the EURICA setup at the RIBF facility at RIKEN. The nuclei of interest were produced by in-flight fission of a high-intensity 238U beam at 345 MeV/u. In this contribution, some selected topics are reported.

  16. Quantifying the Impacts of Surface Albedo on Climate Using the WRF Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlosser, C. A.; Xu, L.; Xu, X.; Gregory, J.; Kirchain, R.

    2015-12-01

    Surface albedo is an important part of the energy budget in shaping local and regional climate. It could also be a potential tool to mitigate the anthropogenic effect on climate change. However, the current level of scientific understanding of surface albedo on global warming potential is medium to low. In order to investigate the anthropogenic impact of surface albedo on climate, different scenarios of urban surface albedo over continental US using the WRF model are simulated. In this study, the change in surface albedo applies to rooftops, pavements, and walls of urban land cover grid cells. The two groups of simulations (low and high albedo) were compared to determine the impacts of elevating urban surface albedo and to account for the uncertainty in the errors or noise introduced by the slightly different initial conditions. The results are represented as the differences in surface temperature and the top of the atmosphere radiation between the two scenarios when urban surface albedos are elevated from 0.15 to 0.40. The ensemble mean of all potential outcomes as a whole, instead of individual initial conditions, shows that the impact of elevating surface albedo has a cooling effect that is robust at both local and regional scales during the summer season. More refined analyses of urban areas will provide insights on surface albedo impacts in specific regions. Future analyses may address changes in CO2 equivalence.

  17. Robust estimation of albedo for illumination-invariant matching and shape recovery.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Soma; Aggarwal, Gaurav; Chellappa, Rama

    2009-05-01

    We present a nonstationary stochastic filtering framework for the task of albedo estimation from a single image. There are several approaches in the literature for albedo estimation, but few include the errors in estimates of surface normals and light source direction to improve the albedo estimate. The proposed approach effectively utilizes the error statistics of surface normals and illumination direction for robust estimation of albedo, for images illuminated by single and multiple light sources. The albedo estimate obtained is subsequently used to generate albedo-free normalized images for recovering the shape of an object. Traditional Shape-from-Shading (SFS) approaches often assume constant/piecewise constant albedo and known light source direction to recover the underlying shape. Using the estimated albedo, the general problem of estimating the shape of an object with varying albedo map and unknown illumination source is reduced to one that can be handled by traditional SFS approaches. Experimental results are provided to show the effectiveness of the approach and its application to illumination-invariant matching and shape recovery. The estimated albedo maps are compared with the ground truth. The maps are used as illumination-invariant signatures for the task of face recognition across illumination variations. The recognition results obtained compare well with the current state-of-the-art approaches. Impressive shape recovery results are obtained using images downloaded from the Web with little control over imaging conditions. The recovered shapes are also used to synthesize novel views under novel illumination conditions. PMID:19299862

  18. [Temporal and Spatial Characteristics of Lake Taihu Surface Albedo and Its Impact Factors].

    PubMed

    Cao, Chang; Li, Xu-hui; Zhang, Mi; Liu, Shou-dong; Xiao, Wei; Xiao, Qi-tao; Xu, Jia-ping

    2015-10-01

    Lake surface albedo determines energy balance of water-atmospheric interface and water physical environment. Solar elevation angle, cloudiness, wind speed, water quality and other factors can affect lake surface albedo. Using solar radiation, wind speed, and water quality data (turbidity and chlorophyll-a concentration) which were observed in four eddy covariance sites (Meiliangwan, Dapukou, Bifenggang and Xiaoleishan i. e. MLW, DPK, BFG and XLS) in Lake Taihu and clearness index (k(t)), the influence of these factors on Lake Taihu surface albedo and the reasons that led to its spatial difference were investigated. The results showed that solar elevation angle played a leading role in the diurnal and seasonal change of lake surface albedo; lake surface albedo reached two peaks in 0 < k(t) < 0.1 and 0.4 < k(t) < 0.6 respectively, when solar elevation angle was below 35 degrees. The surface albedo increased with the increasing wind speed, turbidity and chlorophyll-a concentration. However, wind could indirectly affect surface albedo through leading to the changes in sediment resuspension and chlorophyll-a distribution. The sequence of albedo in the four sites was XLS > BFG > DPK > MLW. XLS and BFG belonged to the higher albedo group, while DPK and MLW belonged to the lower albedo group. The different biological environments caused by aquatic macrophytes and algae resulting in the spatial variation of Lake Taihu surface albedo. The relationship between albedo and chlorophyll-a concentration was not a very sensitive factor for indicating the outbreak of algae. This study can provide theoretical reference for lake albedo parameterization. PMID:26841592

  19. [Temporal and Spatial Characteristics of Lake Taihu Surface Albedo and Its Impact Factors].

    PubMed

    Cao, Chang; Li, Xu-hui; Zhang, Mi; Liu, Shou-dong; Xiao, Wei; Xiao, Qi-tao; Xu, Jia-ping

    2015-10-01

    Lake surface albedo determines energy balance of water-atmospheric interface and water physical environment. Solar elevation angle, cloudiness, wind speed, water quality and other factors can affect lake surface albedo. Using solar radiation, wind speed, and water quality data (turbidity and chlorophyll-a concentration) which were observed in four eddy covariance sites (Meiliangwan, Dapukou, Bifenggang and Xiaoleishan i. e. MLW, DPK, BFG and XLS) in Lake Taihu and clearness index (k(t)), the influence of these factors on Lake Taihu surface albedo and the reasons that led to its spatial difference were investigated. The results showed that solar elevation angle played a leading role in the diurnal and seasonal change of lake surface albedo; lake surface albedo reached two peaks in 0 < k(t) < 0.1 and 0.4 < k(t) < 0.6 respectively, when solar elevation angle was below 35 degrees. The surface albedo increased with the increasing wind speed, turbidity and chlorophyll-a concentration. However, wind could indirectly affect surface albedo through leading to the changes in sediment resuspension and chlorophyll-a distribution. The sequence of albedo in the four sites was XLS > BFG > DPK > MLW. XLS and BFG belonged to the higher albedo group, while DPK and MLW belonged to the lower albedo group. The different biological environments caused by aquatic macrophytes and algae resulting in the spatial variation of Lake Taihu surface albedo. The relationship between albedo and chlorophyll-a concentration was not a very sensitive factor for indicating the outbreak of algae. This study can provide theoretical reference for lake albedo parameterization.

  20. Neutronic reactor

    DOEpatents

    Wende, Charles W. J.

    1976-08-17

    A safety rod for a nuclear reactor has an inner end portion having a gamma absorption coefficient and neutron capture cross section approximately equal to those of the adjacent shield, a central portion containing materials of high neutron capture cross section and an outer end portion having a gamma absorption coefficient at least equal to that of the adjacent shield.

  1. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Fermi, E.; Zinn, W.H.; Anderson, H.L.

    1958-09-16

    Means are presenied for increasing the reproduction ratio of a gaphite- moderated neutronic reactor by diminishing the neutron loss due to absorption or capture by gaseous impurities within the reactor. This means comprised of a fluid-tight casing or envelope completely enclosing the reactor and provided with a valve through which the casing, and thereby the reactor, may be evacuated of atmospheric air.

  2. 2010 Review of neutron and non-neutron nuclear data

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, N.E.

    2011-07-01

    The results of a review and evaluation of neutron and non-neutron nuclear data published in the scientific literature over the past three years are presented. The status of new chemical elements is examined. Ten elements have had their atomic weight and uncertainty replaced by interval values of upper and lower bounds. Data on revised values for the isotopic composition of the elements are reviewed and new recommended values are presented for germanium. Radioactive half-lives are reviewed and latest values presented which include measurements on nuclides of interest and very long-lived nuclides such as double beta decay, double electron capture, long-lived alpha decay, and long-lived beta decay. The latest information and the status on the evaluation of atomic masses are discussed. Data from new measurements on the very heavy elements (trans-meitnerium elements) are discussed and tabulated. Data on various recent neutron cross-section and resonance integral measurements are also discussed and the latest measurements are tabulated in both cases. The JENDL-4.0 and ENDF/B-VII.1 nuclear data libraries are discussed. A new initiative on the existence and importance of isotopes is presented. (authors)

  3. Neutron tubes

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Lou, Tak Pui; Reijonen, Jani

    2008-03-11

    A neutron tube or generator is based on a RF driven plasma ion source having a quartz or other chamber surrounded by an external RF antenna. A deuterium or mixed deuterium/tritium (or even just a tritium) plasma is generated in the chamber and D or D/T (or T) ions are extracted from the plasma. A neutron generating target is positioned so that the ion beam is incident thereon and loads the target. Incident ions cause D-D or D-T (or T-T) reactions which generate neutrons. Various embodiments differ primarily in size of the chamber and position and shape of the neutron generating target. Some neutron generators are small enough for implantation in the body. The target may be at the end of a catheter-like drift tube. The target may have a tapered or conical surface to increase target surface area.

  4. Neutron source

    DOEpatents

    Cason, J.L. Jr.; Shaw, C.B.

    1975-10-21

    A neutron source which is particularly useful for neutron radiography consists of a vessel containing a moderating media of relatively low moderating ratio, a flux trap including a moderating media of relatively high moderating ratio at the center of the vessel, a shell of depleted uranium dioxide surrounding the moderating media of relatively high moderating ratio, a plurality of guide tubes each containing a movable source of neutrons surrounding the flux trap, a neutron shield surrounding one part of each guide tube, and at least one collimator extending from the flux trap to the exterior of the neutron source. The shell of depleted uranium dioxide has a window provided with depleted uranium dioxide shutters for each collimator. Reflectors are provided above and below the flux trap and on the guide tubes away from the flux trap.

  5. β-decay spectroscopy for the r-process nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, Shunji; Collaboration: RIBF Decay Collaborations

    2014-05-09

    Series of decay spectroscopy experiments, utilizing of high-purity Ge detectors and double-sided silicon-strip detectors, have been conducted to harvest the decay properties of very exotic nuclei relevant to the r-process nucleosynthesis at the RIBF. The decay properties such as β-decay half-lives, low-lying states, β-delayed neutron emissions, isomeric states, and possibly Q{sub β} of the very neutron-rich nuclei are to be measured to give significant constraints in the uncertainties of nuclear properties for the r-process nucleosynthesis. Recent results of βγ spectroscopy study using in-flight fission of {sup 238}U-beam will be presented together with our future perspectives.

  6. Climatic Benefit of Swiss Forest Cover Change: Including Albedo Change into Net Carbon Balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwaab, J.; Lehning, M.; Bebi, P.

    2012-12-01

    Forests influence climate through physical, chemical and biological processes. It has been shown that warming caused by the comparatively low albedo of forests (albedo-effect), can reduce or even exceed cooling caused by carbon storage in forests (CO2-effect). Although warming caused by albedo and the amount of carbon storage depend on local characteristics, studies are lacking that investigate the combined local patterns of albedo and CO2-effect. Our study area, Switzerland, provides a variety of geographical features and thus the possibility to show how different geographical variables influence the two effects. We used the concept of radiative forcing to compare the effect of a changing albedo and a change in atmospheric CO2 concentration due to land cover change in the past. The change of forest cover was analysed over a period of 12 years based on aerial photographs. We estimate the albedo-effect by combining albedo data derived from the satellite sensor MODIS and data on snow cover derived from the satellite sensor AVHRR. Changes in carbon storage were calculated as differences in biomass and soil stocks of specific land cover classes. We found carbon storage induced cooling to be higher than albedo induced warming everywhere in Switzerland. However, especially in altitudes over 1200 m the albedo-effect reduced the benefits of carbon storage by more than 50%. In lower altitudes the albedo change was less important. The albedo-effect in altitudes above 1200 m was more relevant because of a more persistent snow-cover, a slightly higher global radiation and less additional carbon storage. The relevance of warming caused by an albedo change did not only depend on altitude, but also on the characteristics of forest cover change. While transitions from open land to open forest were accompanied by high albedo changes, the albedo change was only marginal if open forest turned into closed forest. Since snow cover has a large influence on the albedo effect, we included

  7. The fission track detector revisited: application to individual neutron dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Prêtre, S; Aroua, A; Boschung, M; Grecescu, M; Valley, J F; Wernli, C

    1996-08-01

    A system based on fission fragment tracks had previously been developed for individual neutron dosimetry. The dosimeter detects both fast neutrons by means of the 232Th(n,f) reaction, and thermal and albedo neutrons by means of the 235U(n,f) reaction. The fission tracks produced in a plastic foil are chemically etched and counted by spark discharges. The response of the dosimeter has recently been re-investigated in 36 different neutron fields: monoenergetic beams, reference fields near isotopic sources, and radiation fields encountered in a variety of situations inside nuclear power plants. The results obtained have been compared to those computed by convolution of the neutron spectra with the energy response functions of the dosimeters. In practical situations, it is essential to know the shape of the neutron spectrum, approximately at least, in order to perform an acceptably accurate dose evaluation. For that purpose, the neutron fields encountered inside nuclear power plants have been grouped into four categories, for which algorithms for dose evaluation have been developed. Concerning the neutron equivalent dose, the error associated with this approach does not exceed a factor of 2, a performance which is comparable to other detection systems used in the field of individual neutron dosimetry. PMID:8690594

  8. UV signatures of carbonaceous species on low-albedo asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrix, A.; Vilas, F.

    2014-07-01

    Asteroids in the low-albedo classes (C, B, G, F) are known to have spectra that are relatively feature-free in the visible/near-infrared (VNIR) spectral region, making them classically difficult to study in terms of surface mineralogy. Many of these bodies exhibit a 3-micron absorption band (e.g., [1]), which can be used to study hydration and organics. The primary other spectrally active region --- less well studied so far --- is the ultraviolet (UV). In this study, we utilize UV spectra of low-albedo asteroids (C, B, G, and F class) to study surface composition. In particular, we investigate implications for the presence of carbonaceous compounds, including tholins and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs), which have unique spectral features in the UV. Low-albedo asteroids are typically rather bland spectrally at VNIR wavelengths. Many of these objects exhibit an absorption band near 3 microns, indicative of some type of hydration (OH and-or H_2O). A subset of the asteroids with the 3-micron features also exhibit absorption near 0.7 microns, due to a ferrous-ferric charge-transfer transition likely resulting from aqueous alteration (the interaction of material with liquid water formed by melting of water upon a heating event). Some asteroids likely do not exhibit these features due to a history of heating experienced at some point in the asteroid's evolution. Despite having little spectral activity in the VNIR, all low-albedo asteroids absorb at wavelengths shorter than ˜500 nm. This has been generally attributed to a ferric-iron intervalence charge-transfer transition absorption. Carbon-bearing phases have long been assumed to be important on low-albedo asteroids (e.g., [2]) due to the dark, mostly-featureless VNIR spectra of these bodies. However, there are many forms of carbonaceous species and the species are expected to undergo phase modifications (e.g., due to thermal, aqueous, and radiation processes) that affect the spectra [3,7]. Tholins are residues

  9. Mars Polar Thermal Inertia and Albedo Properties Using TES Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherbenski, J. M.; Paige, D. A.

    2002-12-01

    We present north and south polar thermal inertia and albedo maps derived from MGS TES observations. The maps were derived using the same robust approach developed to make polar thermal and inertia and albedo maps using IRTM observationsby Paige, Bachman, and Keegan (1994) and Paige and Keegan (1994). The data processing approach involved reading TES reduced data records in PDS format using the Vanilla software tool, and sending the data down a processing pipeline that constrains and bins the data, and compares it to the results of a diurnal and seasonal thermal model to obtain the best fit thermal inertia and apparent albedo. To facilitate comparison, the TES maps were created at the same Ls ranges as the published IRTM maps using TES spectral surface temperature results. The north polar maps used TES nadir observations obtained during a 50-day period from Ls 98.39 to Ls 121.25. The south polar maps used TES nadir observations obtained during a 30-day period from Ls 321.58 to 338.07. The creation of these maps employ a basic thermal model that does not include the effects of the atmosphere, as well as a one-dimensional radiative-convective model that does include the effects of the atmosphere. The spatial resolution of the north polar maps is 0.1 degrees of latitude and 1.0 degrees of longitude. The spatial resolution of the south polar maps is 2 degrees of latitude and 2 degrees of longitude. The TES north polar maps show the residual cap area in significantly greater detail than has been available previously. The IRTM maps showed that the north polar sand sea that surrounds the cap has unusually low thermal inertia. The TES maps confirm this conclusion, but also show that the dark renetrant features in chama boreal and elsewhere on the cap also have low thermal inertias. This strongly supports the proposal that these dark rentrants are the sources of the dune material. The TES maps also show that the darker layered deposits which are found at the periphery of the

  10. Splash and Re-entrant Albedo Fluxes Measured in the PAMELA Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayorov, A. G.; Moiseeva, A. I.; Adriani, O.; Barbarino, G. C.; Bazilevskaya, G. A.; Bellotti, R.; Boezio, M.; Bogomolov, E. A.; Bongi, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Bottai, S.; Bruno, A.; Cafagna, F.; Campana, D.; Carbone, R.; Carlson, P.; Casolino, M.; Castellini, G.; DeDonato, C.; DeSantis, C.; DeSimone, N.; DiFelice, V.; Formato, V.; Galper, A. M.; Karelin, A. V.; Koldashov, S. V.; Koldobskiy, S.; Kvashnin, A. A.; Kvashnin, A. N.; Leonov, A.; Malakhov, V.; Marcelli, L.; Martucci, M.; Mayorova, M. A.; Menn, W.; Merge', M.; Mikhailov, V. V.; Mocchiutti, E.; Monaco, A.; Mori, N.; Munini, R.; Osteria, G.; Palma, F.; Panico, B.; Papini, P.; Pearce, M.; Picozza, P.; Pizzolotto, C.; Ricci, M.; Ricciarini, S. B.; Sarkar, R.; Scotti, V.; Simon, M.; Sparvoli, R.; Spillantini, P.; Stozhkov, Y. I.; Vacchi, A.; Vannuccini, E.; Voronov, S. A.; Yurkin, Y. T.; Zampa, G.; Zampa, N.; Zverev, V. G.

    This work devoted to the description of the method for splash albedo protons identification in the satellite-born experiment PAMELA. In contrast to the reentrant albedo particles, which enter into the main aperture of the instrument, the direct albedo particles enter from the opposite direction, so they pass a few detectors, including calorimeter, before being register by the magnetic spectrometer. The developed method take into account the influence of these detectors on the selection of events and measurements of their characteristics. To test this method the energy spectrum of reentrant albedo protons in various regions of the near-Earth space reconstructed; it is in a good agreement with the classical measurements in the main aperture. Therefore, this method can be useful to obtain a new physical data about fluxes of splash albedo protons in the PAMELA experiment, which, unlike the reentrant albedo, can be study even at high geomagnetic latitudes.

  11. Earth's albedo variations 1998-2014 as measured from ground-based earthshine observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palle, E.; Goode, P. R.; Montañés-Rodríguez, P.; Shumko, A.; Gonzalez-Merino, B.; Lombilla, C. Martinez; Jimenez-Ibarra, F.; Shumko, S.; Sanroma, E.; Hulist, A.; Miles-Paez, P.; Murgas, F.; Nowak, G.; Koonin, S. E.

    2016-05-01

    The Earth's albedo is a fundamental climate parameter for understanding the radiation budget of the atmosphere. It has been traditionally measured not only from space platforms but also from the ground for 16 years from Big Bear Solar Observatory by observing the Moon. The photometric ratio of the dark (earthshine) to the bright (moonshine) sides of the Moon is used to determine nightly anomalies in the terrestrial albedo, with the aim of quantifying sustained monthly, annual, and/or decadal changes. We find two modest decadal scale cycles in the albedo, but with no significant net change over the 16 years of accumulated data. Within the evolution of the two cycles, we find periods of sustained annual increases, followed by comparable sustained decreases in albedo. The evolution of the earthshine albedo is in remarkable agreement with that from the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System instruments, although each method measures different slices of the Earth's Bond albedo.

  12. A REVISED ASTEROID POLARIZATION-ALBEDO RELATIONSHIP USING WISE/NEOWISE DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Masiero, Joseph R.; Mainzer, A. K.; Bauer, J. M.; Wright, E. L.; McMillan, R. S.; Tholen, D. J.; Blain, A. W.

    2012-04-20

    We present a reanalysis of the relationship between asteroid albedo and polarization properties using the albedos derived from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer. We find that the function that best describes this relation is a three-dimensional linear fit in the space of log (albedo)-log (polarization slope)-log (minimum polarization). When projected to two dimensions, the parameters of the fit are consistent with those found in previous work. We also define p* as the quantity of maximal polarization variation when compared with the albedo and present the best-fitting albedo-p* relation. Some asteroid taxonomic types stand out in this three-dimensional space, notably the E, B, and M Tholen types, while others cluster in clumps coincident with the S- and C-complex bodies. We note that both low albedo and small (D < 30 km) asteroids are underrepresented in the polarimetric sample, and we encourage future polarimetric surveys to focus on these bodies.

  13. Albedo Drop on the Greenland Ice Sheet: Relative Impacts of Wet and Dry Snow Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Polashenski, C.

    2014-12-01

    The energy balance of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GIS) is strongly impacted by changes in snow albedo. MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) observations indicate that the GIS albedo has dropped since the early part of this century. We analyze data from the MODIS products MOD10A1 for broadband snow albedo and MOD09A1 for surface spectral reflectance since 2001 to better explain the physical mechanisms driving these changes. The MODIS products are filtered, and the data is masked using microwave-derived surface melt maps to isolate albedo changes due to dry snow processes from those driven by melt impacts. Results show that the majority of recent changes in the GIS albedo - even at high elevations - are driven by snow wetting rather than dry snow processes such as grain metamorphosis and aerosol impurity deposition. The spectral signature of the smaller changes occurring within dry snow areas suggests that grain metamorphosis dominates the albedo decline in these regions.

  14. Effect of reflectance model choice on earthshine-based terrestrial albedo determinations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thejll, Peter; Gleisner, Hans; Flynn, Chris

    2016-04-01

    Earthshine observations can be used to determine near-hemispheric average terrestrial albedos by careful observation of the relative strength of the earthshine-lit half of the Moon coupled with correct modelling of the reflectances of Earth and Moon, as well as lunar single-scattering albedo maps. Using our own observations of the earthshine, from Mauna Loa Observatory in 2011-12, we investigate the influence of the choice of bidirectional reflectance models for the Moon on derived terrestrial albedos. We find a considerable dependence on albedo results in this choice, and discuss ways to determine what the origin of the dependence is - e.g is it in the joint choices of lunar and terrestrial BRDFs, or is the choice of terrestrial BRDF less important than the lunar one? We report on the results of modelling lunar reflectance and albedo in 6 ways and terrestrial reflectance in two ways, assuming a uniform single-scattering albedo on Earth.

  15. Can increasing albedo of existing ship wakes reduce climate change?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crook, Julia A.; Jackson, Lawrence S.; Forster, Piers M.

    2016-02-01

    Solar radiation management schemes could potentially alleviate the impacts of global warming. One such scheme could be to brighten the surface of the ocean by increasing the albedo and areal extent of bubbles in the wakes of existing shipping. Here we show that ship wake bubble lifetimes would need to be extended from minutes to days, requiring the addition of surfactant, for ship wake area to be increased enough to have a significant forcing. We use a global climate model to simulate brightening the wakes of existing shipping by increasing wake albedo by 0.2 and increasing wake lifetime by ×1440. This yields a global mean radiative forcing of -0.9 ± 0.6 Wm-2 (-1.8 ± 0.9 Wm-2 in the Northern Hemisphere) and a 0.5°C reduction of global mean surface temperature with greater cooling over land and in the Northern Hemisphere, partially offsetting greenhouse gas warming. Tropical precipitation shifts southward but remains within current variability. The hemispheric forcing asymmetry of this scheme is due to the asymmetry in the distribution of existing shipping. If wake lifetime could reach ~3 months, the global mean radiative forcing could potentially reach -3 Wm-2. Increasing wake area through increasing bubble lifetime could result in a greater temperature reduction, but regional precipitation would likely deviate further from current climatology as suggested by results from our uniform ocean albedo simulation. Alternatively, additional ships specifically for the purpose of geoengineering could be used to produce a larger and more hemispherically symmetrical forcing.

  16. Surface Albedo/BRDF Parameters (Terra/Aqua MODIS)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Trishchenko, Alexander

    2008-01-15

    Spatially and temporally complete surface spectral albedo/BRDF products over the ARM SGP area were generated using data from two Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensors on Terra and Aqua satellites. A landcover-based fitting (LBF) algorithm is developed to derive the BRDF model parameters and albedo product (Luo et al., 2004a). The approach employs a landcover map and multi-day clearsky composites of directional surface reflectance. The landcover map is derived from the Landsat TM 30-meter data set (Trishchenko et al., 2004a), and the surface reflectances are from MODIS 500m-resolution 8-day composite products (MOD09/MYD09). The MOD09/MYD09 data are re-arranged into 10-day intervals for compatibility with other satellite products, such as those from the NOVA/AVHRR and SPOT/VGT sensors. The LBF method increases the success rate of the BRDF fitting process and enables more accurate monitoring of surface temporal changes during periods of rapid spring vegetation green-up and autumn leaf-fall, as well as changes due to agricultural practices and snowcover variations (Luo et al., 2004b, Trishchenko et al., 2004b). Albedo/BRDF products for MODIS on Terra and MODIS on Aqua, as well as for Terra/Aqua combined dataset, are generated at 500m spatial resolution and every 10-day since March 2000 (Terra) and July 2002 (Aqua and combined), respectively. The purpose for the latter product is to obtain a more comprehensive dataset that takes advantages of multi-sensor observations (Trishchenko et al., 2002). To fill data gaps due to cloud presence, various interpolation procedures are applied based on a multi-year observation database and referring to results from other locations with similar landcover property. Special seasonal smoothing procedure is also applied to further remove outliers and artifacts in data series.

  17. Dual neutron flux/temperature measurement sensor

    DOEpatents

    Mihalczo, John T.; Simpson, Marc L.; McElhaney, Stephanie A.

    1994-01-01

    Simultaneous measurement of neutron flux and temperature is provided by a single sensor which includes a phosphor mixture having two principal constituents. The first constituent is a neutron sensitive 6LiF and the second is a rare-earth activated Y203 thermophosphor. The mixture is coated on the end of a fiber optic, while the opposite end of the fiber optic is coupled to a light detector. The detected light scintillations are quantified for neutron flux determination, and the decay is measured for temperature determination.

  18. Independent pixel and Monte Carlo estimates of stratocumulus albedo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahalan, Robert F.; Ridgway, William; Wiscombe, Warren J.; Gollmer, Steven; HARSHVARDHAN

    1994-01-01

    Monte Carlo radiative transfer methods are employed here to estimate the plane-parallel albedo bias for marine stratocumulus clouds. This is the bias in estimates of the mesoscale-average albedo, which arises from the assumption that cloud liquid water is uniformly distributed. The authors compare such estimates with those based on a more realistic distribution generated from a fractal model of marine stratocumulus clouds belonging to the class of 'bounded cascade' models. In this model the cloud top and base are fixed, so that all variations in cloud shape are ignored. The model generates random variations in liquid water along a single horizontal direction, forming fractal cloud streets while conserving the total liquid water in the cloud field. The model reproduces the mean, variance, and skewness of the vertically integrated cloud liquid water, as well as its observed wavenumber spectrum, which is approximately a power law. The Monte Carlo method keeps track of the three-dimensional paths solar photons take through the cloud field, using a vectorized implementation of a direct technique. The simplifications in the cloud field studied here allow the computations to be accelerated. The Monte Carlo results are compared to those of the independent pixel approximation, which neglects net horizontal photon transport. Differences between the Monte Carlo and independent pixel estimates of the mesoscale-average albedo are on the order of 1% for conservative scattering, while the plane-parallel bias itself is an order of magnitude larger. As cloud absorption increases, the independent pixel approximation agrees even more closely with the Monte Carlo estimates. This result holds for a wide range of sun angles and aspect ratios. Thus, horizontal photon transport can be safely neglected in estimates of the area-average flux for such cloud models. This result relies on the rapid falloff of the wavenumber spectrum of stratocumulus, which ensures that the smaller

  19. Albedos and densities of the inner satellites of Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, D.

    1974-01-01

    Broad-band radiometry at 20 microns is presented for Rhea and Dione; the measured flux densities, together with visual photometry, indicate that both satellites have geometric albedos near 0.6 and that their radii are, respectively, 800 plus or minus 125 and 575 plus or minus 100 km. The density of Dione is 1.4 plus or minus 0.6 g per cu cm; for Tethys, Enceladus, and Mimas, whose densities have not been measured, a 'photometric density' is defined from the available data, and it is shown that their densities are probably near unity. These satellites must therefore all be composed primarily of ices.

  20. The Opposition Phase Curve in Low Albedo Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, R. M.; Hapke, B. W.; Smythe, W. D.; Hale, A. S.; Piatek, J. L.

    2003-04-01

    Introduction: We report the results of an investigation into the opposition surge of low albedo particulate materials of varying particle size and packing density. These very low albedo materials exhibit nearly constant circular polarization ratio with decreasing phase angle consistent with the elimination of shadows being the overwhelming contributitor to the phase curve. The Experiment: The measurements were made on the long arm goniometer at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory The samples of were presented with linearly and circularly polarized light from a laser of wavelength 0.633 mm. The samples (SiC, B_4C, Fe_3O_4 and Co_2O_3) differed in reflectance from 13% to 1.6%. The reflectance of each sample measured at 5^o phase angle relative to Spectralonä was, 13%, 5%, 2.3% and 1.7% for the SiC and B_4C, Fe_3O_4 and Co_2O_3 respectively. They were presented with light that was polarized in and perpendicular to the scattering plane. A quarter wave plate was inserted into the optical train at appropriate places to permit the samples to be presented with both senses of circular polarization. The scattered beam was analyzed in both senses of linear and circular polarization. We combined the data from all of the polarization configurations and these are shown as integrated phase curves. The Results: The phase curves all exhibit an increase in reflectance as phase angle decreases. From 5 to 0^o.05 SiC exhibits a non-linear increase in circular polarization ratio (CPR) compared to the more absorbing media. The increase in CPR with decreasing phase angle can only be caused by significant multiple scattering in the medium. This is consistent with coherent backscattering. Discussion: We have previously shown that significant multiple scattering is observed in materials of high reflectance (70--90%) We found the result for SiC to be unusual given that is it so much more absorbing. However, if the reflectance of a material decreases still further (below (10%) the contribution

  1. Albedo, thermal inertia and rotation of ring particles (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morishima, R.; Spilker, L. J.; Ohtsuki, K.; Cassini Cirs Ring Team

    2010-12-01

    Since the Saturn orbit insertion of the Cassini spacecraft in mid-2004 up to now, the Cassini composite infrared spectrometer (CIRS) has measured temperatures of Saturn's main rings at various observational geometries. We present results of parameter fits using our new thermal model (Morishima et al. 2009). Our model is based on classical radiative transfer and takes into account the heat transport due to particle motion in the azimuthal and vertical directions. The model assumes a bimodal size distribution consisting of small fast rotators and large slow rotators. Important parameters are the Bolometric bond albedo, A_V, the fraction of fast rotators in cross section, f_fast, and the thermal inertia, Γ. Two different data sets are used to estimate these parameters. The first set, which consists of four radial scans obtained at low and high solar phases both on the lit and unlit faces of rings (Spilker et al. 2006), is suitable for accurate estimations of A_V and f_fast with high radial resolution. Another one, which consists of azimuthal scans that include data in Saturn shadow (Leyrat et al. 2008), is suitable for estimations of Γ. The estimated parameters are shown in Fig.1. The albedo is 0.1-0.4, 0.5-0.7, 0.4, 0.5 for the C ring, the B ring, the Cassini division, and the A ring, respectively. The fraction of fast rotators is roughly half for all the rings. The thermal inertia is 7-21 in MKS units. For the mid B ring, values of parameters obtained from two data sets are consistent with each other if ring particles are assumed to bounce at the midplane due to mutual collisions. We also find that fits to azimuthal scans are improved if Γ for fast rotators is larger than that for slow rotators. Albedo, fraction of fast rotators in cross section, and thermal inertia estimated from parameter fits. Two different thermal data sets are used: radial scans at four different geometries (solid curves) and azimuthal scans including data in Saturn shadow (diamonds). Dashed

  2. The asteroid albedo scale. II - Laboratory polarimetry of dark carbon-bearing silicates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zellner, B.; Lebertre, T.; Day, K.

    1977-01-01

    Laboratory reflection polarimetry is presented for eight samples of artificial, poorly crystalline magnesian silicates with varying admixtures of carbon black. The polarimetric slope-albedo law saturates for geometric albedos lower than about 0.05, and good agreement with the telescopic polarization-phase curves of C-type asteroids is found for albedos as low as 0.02. Thus the conclusion from thermal radiometry is confirmed that the C objects are very dark, darker than any known carbonaceous chondrite.

  3. Isolated neutron stars in the galaxy: from magnetars to antimagnetars

    SciTech Connect

    Boldin, P. A.; Popov, S. B.

    2012-07-15

    Using the model with decaying magnetic fields it is possible to describe with one smooth (log-Gaussian) initial magnetic field distribution three types of isolated neutron stars: radiopulsar, magnetars, and cooling close-by compact objects. The same model is used here to make predictions for old accreting isolated neutron stars. It is shown that using the updated field distribution we predict a significant fraction of isolated neutron stars at the stage of accretion despite long subsonic propeller stage.

  4. Use of Gd-loaded scintillation-detector systems for inverse beta-decay reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Gabriel, T.A.; Lillie, R.A.; Childs, R.L.

    1983-05-01

    The results of calculations carried out to determine the time frame and spatial separation of neutron captures in Gd resulting from inverse beta decay reactions are presented for a modular neutrino detector system.

  5. Study of the β-decay of ^11Li at ISAC/TRIUMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattoon, Caleb; Sarazin, F.; Andreoiu, C.; Andreyev, A.; Austin, R. A. E.; Ball, G. C.; Chakrawarthy, R. S.; Cross, D.; Cunningham, E. S.; Daoud, J.; Garrett, P. E.; Grinyer, G. F.; Hackman, G.; Melconian, D.; Morton, C.; Pearson, C.; Ressler, J.; Schwartzenberg, J.; Smith, M. B.; Svensson, C. E.

    2007-10-01

    The β-decay of ^11Li was investigated using the 8π β-decay spectrometer, an array of 20 Compton-suppressed HPGe detectors and 20 plastic scintillators for β-particle detection. Doppler-broadened line shapes appear in the experimental spectrum, resulting from the decay of excited states of ^10Be populated by β-delayed neutron emission. Using a Monte Carlo simulation, we have simulated the β-delayed neutron decay and subsequent γ-ray emission, in order to explore the excited states in ^10Be and the neutron-emitting states in ^11Be. Overall agreement is observed with the two most recent studies [F. Sarazin et al, PRC70 (2004) and Y.Hirayama et al, PLB611 (2005)]. Analysis however also suggests the existence of small contributions from previously unobserved neutron branches.

  6. Improving neutron dosimetry using bubble detector technology

    SciTech Connect

    Buckner, M.A.

    1993-02-01

    Providing accurate neutron dosimetry for a variety of neutron energy spectra is a formidable task for any dosimetry system. Unless something is known about the neutron spectrum prior to processing the dosimeter, the calculated dose may vary greatly from that actually encountered; that is until now. The entrance of bubble detector technology into the field of neutron dosimetry has eliminated the necessity of having an a priori knowledge of the neutron energy spectra. Recently, a new approach in measuring personnel neutron dose equivalent was developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. By using bubble detectors in combination with current thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) as a Combination Personnel Neutron Dosimeter (CPND), not only is it possible to provide accurate dose equivalent results, but a simple four-interval neutron energy spectrum is obtained as well. The components of the CPND are a Harshaw albedo TLD and two bubble detectors with theoretical energy thresholds of 100 key and 1500 keV. Presented are (1) a synoptic history surrounding emergence of bubble detector technology, (2) a brief overview of the current theory on mechanisms of interaction, (3) the data and analysis process involved in refining the response functions, (4) performance evaluation of the original CPND and a reevaluation of the same data under the modified method, (5) the procedure used to determine the reference values of component fluence and dose equivalent for field assessment, (6) analysis of the after-modification results, (7) a critique of some currently held assumptions, offering some alternative explanations, and (8) thoughts concerning potential applications and directions for future research.

  7. NEUTRON SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Bernander, N.K. et al.

    1960-10-18

    An apparatus is described for producing neutrons through target bombardment with deuterons. Deuterium gas is ionized by electron bombardment and the deuteron ions are accelerated through a magnetic field to collimate them into a continuous high intensity beam. The ion beam is directed against a deuteron pervious metal target of substantially the same nnaterial throughout to embed the deuterous therein and react them to produce neutrons. A large quantity of neutrons is produced in this manner due to the increased energy and quantity of ions bombarding the target.

  8. Evidence for the decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Cartelle, P. Alvarez; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Gutierrez, O. Aquines; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Balagura, V.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Bauer, Th.; Bay, A.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjørnstad, P. M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; van den Brand, J.; Bressieux, J.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brook, N. H.; Brown, H.; Bursche, A.; Busetto, G.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Callot, O.; Calvi, M.; Gomez, M. Calvo; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Perez, D. Campora; Caponio, F.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carranza-Mejia, H.; Carson, L.; Akiba, K. Carvalho; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Garcia, L. Castillo; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Ciba, K.; Vidal, X. Cid; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coca, C.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Counts, I.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Torres, M. Cruz; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Suárez, A. Dosil; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Esen, S.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Ferguson, D.; Albor, V. Fernandez; Rodrigues, F. Ferreira; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Torreira, A. Gallas; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garofoli, J.; Tico, J. Garra; Garrido, L.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Giani', S.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gordon, H.; Gotti, C.; Gándara, M. Grabalosa; Diaz, R. Graciani; Cardoso, L. A. Granado; Graugés, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Hafkenscheid, T. W.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; Hartmann, T.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Morata, J. A. Hernando; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jans, E.; Jaton, P.; Jawahery, A.; Jezabek, M.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kaballo, M.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanciotti, E.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leo, S.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Liu, G.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez-March, N.; Lowdon, P.; Lu, H.; Lucchesi, D.; Luo, H.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Malde, S.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manzali, M.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Benito, C. Marin; Marino, P.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martens, A.; Sánchez, A. Martín; Martinelli, M.; Santos, D. Martinez; Vidal, F. Martinez; Tostes, D. Martins; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; McSkelly, B.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Rodriguez, J. Molina; Monteil, S.; Moran, D.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, K.; Muresan, R.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nicol, M.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Oggero, S.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, G.; Orlandea, M.; Goicochea, J. M. Otalora; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pal, B. K.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L.; Parkes, C.; Parkinson, C. J.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Alvarez, A. Pazos; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Altarelli, M. Pepe; Perazzini, S.; Trigo, E. Perez; Perret, P.; Perrin-Terrin, M.; Pescatore, L.; Pesen, E.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Olloqui, E. Picatoste; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Playfer, S.; Casasus, M. Plo; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Powell, A.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Navarro, A. Puig; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, A.; Rinnert, K.; Molina, V. Rives; Romero, D. A. Roa; Robbe, P.; Roberts, D. A.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Perez, P. Rodriguez; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Vidal, A. Romero; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, H.; Valls, P. Ruiz; Sabatino, G.; Silva, J. J. Saborido; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Guimaraes, V. Salustino; Sedes, B. Sanmartin; Santacesaria, R.; Rios, C. Santamarina; Santovetti, E.; Sapunov, M.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Savrie, M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Seco, M.; Semennikov, A.; Senderowska, K.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, O.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Sidorov, F.; Coutinho, R. Silva; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, N. A.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; De Paula, B. Souza; Spaan, B.; Sparkes, A.; Spinella, F.; Spradlin, P.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Stroili, R.; Subbiah, V. K.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szilard, D.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Garcia, M. Ubeda; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Gomez, R. Vazquez; Regueiro, P. Vazquez; Sierra, C. Vázquez; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; Voss, H.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wiedner, D.; Wilkinson, G.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wu, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W. C.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zvyagin, A.

    2014-05-01

    Evidence is presented for the decay using proton-proton collision data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3 fb-1, collected with the LHCb detector. A signal yield of 32 ± 8 decays is found with a significance of 4.5 standard deviations. The ratio of the branching fraction of the decay to that of the decay is measured to be where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  9. Investigating the spread in surface albedo for snow-covered forests in CMIP5 models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Libo; Cole, Jason N. S.; Bartlett, Paul; Verseghy, Diana; Derksen, Chris; Brown, Ross; Salzen, Knut

    2016-02-01

    This study investigates the role of leaf/plant area index (LAI/PAI) specification on the large spread of winter albedo simulated by climate models. To examine the sensitivity of winter albedo to LAI, we perform a sensitivity analysis using two methods commonly used to compute albedo in snow-covered forests as well as diagnostic calculations within version 4.2 of the Canadian Atmospheric Model for which PAI is systematically varied. The results show that the simulated albedo is very sensitive to negative PAI biases, especially for smaller PAI values. The LAI and surface albedo of boreal forests in the presence of snow simulated by the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) models are evaluated using satellite observations. The evaluation of CMIP5 models suggest that inaccurate tree cover fraction due to improper plant functional type specification or erroneous LAI parameterization in some models explains, in part, an observed positive bias in winter albedo over boreal forest regions of the Northern Hemisphere. This contributes to a large intermodel spread in simulated surface albedo in the presence of snow over these regions and is largely responsible for uncertainties in simulated snow-albedo feedback strength. Errors are largest (+20-40%) in models with large underestimation of LAI but are typically within ±15% when simulated LAI is within the observed range. This study underscores the importance of accurate representation of vegetation distribution and parameters in realistic simulation of surface albedo.

  10. Investigating the spread of surface albedo in snow covered forests in CMIP5 models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Libo; Cole, Jason; Bartlett, Paul; Verseghy, Diana; Derksen, Chris; Brown, Ross; von Salzen, Knut

    2016-04-01

    This study investigates the role of leaf/plant area index (LAI/PAI) specification on the large spread of winter albedo simulated by climate models. To examine the sensitivity of winter albedo to LAI, we perform a sensitivity analysis using two methods commonly used to compute albedo in snow-covered forests as well as diagnostic calculations within version 4.2 of the Canadian Atmospheric Model for which PAI is systematically varied. The results show that the simulated albedo is very sensitive to negative PAI biases, especially for smaller PAI values. The LAI and surface albedo of boreal forests in the presence of snow simulated by the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) models are evaluated using satellite observations. The evaluation of CMIP5 models suggest that inaccurate tree cover fraction due to improper plant functional type specification or erroneous LAI parameterization in some models explains, in part, an observed positive bias in winter albedo over boreal forest regions of the Northern Hemisphere. This contributes to a large intermodel spread in simulated surface albedo in the presence of snow over these regions and is largely responsible for uncertainties in simulated snow-albedo feedback strength. Errors are largest (+20-40 %) in models with large underestimation of LAI but are typically within ±15% when simulated LAI is within the observed range. This study underscores the importance of accurate representation of vegetation distribution and parameters in realistic simulation of surface albedo.

  11. Influence of surface-albedo in subtropical regions on July circulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sud, Y.; Fennessy, M.

    1981-01-01

    A simulation study to examine the influence of surface-albedo on July circulation in subtropical regions is presented. The results are based on two 47-day integrations. In the first integration, called the control run, surface albedos were normally prescribed, whereas in the second integration, called the anomaly run, the surface albedo was modified in four regions: the Sahel in Africa, the Great Plains in the United States, the Thar Desert border in the Indian subcontinent, and Brazil in South America. Each run was started from observed initial conditions for June 15, 1979 based on NMC analysis. The surface albedo in each of the regions was arbitrarily made 30%.

  12. Surface features on Mars: Ground-based albedo and radar compared with Mariner 9 topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, H.

    1973-01-01

    Earth-based albedo maps of Mars were compared with Mariner 9 television data and ground-based radar profiles to investigate the nature of the bright and dark albedo features. Little correlation was found except at the boundaries of classical albedo features, where some topographic control is indicated. Wind-blown dust models for seasonal and secular albedo variations are supported, but it is not clear whether the fines are derived from bright or dark parent rock. Mars, like the Earth and Moon, has probably generated two distinct types of crustal material.

  13. Natural versus anthropogenic factors affecting low-level cloud albedo over the North Atlantic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falkowski, Paul G.; Kim, Yongseung; Kolber, Zbigniew; Wilson, Cara; Wirick, Creighton; Cess, Robert

    1992-01-01

    Cloud albedo plays a key role in regulating earth's climate. Cloud albedo depends on column-integrated liquid water content and the density of cloud condensation nuclei, which consists primarily of submicrometer-sized aerosol sulfate particles. A comparison of two independent satellite data sets suggests that, although anthropogenic sulfate emissions may enhance cloud albedo immediately adjacent to the east coast of the United States, over the central North Atlantic Ocean the variability in albedo can be largely accounted for by natural marine and atmospheric processes that probably have remained relatively constant since the beginning of the industrial revolution.

  14. Vegetation controls on northern high latitude snow-albedo feedback: observations and CMIP5 model simulations.

    PubMed

    Loranty, Michael M; Berner, Logan T; Goetz, Scott J; Jin, Yufang; Randerson, James T

    2014-02-01

    The snow-masking effect of vegetation exerts strong control on albedo in northern high latitude ecosystems. Large-scale changes in the distribution and stature of vegetation in this region will thus have important feedbacks to climate. The snow-albedo feedback is controlled largely by the contrast between snow-covered and snow-free albedo (Δα), which influences predictions of future warming in coupled climate models, despite being poorly constrained at seasonal and century time scales. Here, we compare satellite observations and coupled climate model representations of albedo and tree cover for the boreal and Arctic region. Our analyses reveal consistent declines in albedo with increasing tree cover, occurring south of latitudinal tree line, that are poorly represented in coupled climate models. Observed relationships between albedo and tree cover differ substantially between snow-covered and snow-free periods, and among plant functional type. Tree cover in models varies widely but surprisingly does not correlate well with model albedo. Furthermore, our results demonstrate a relationship between tree cover and snow-albedo feedback that may be used to accurately constrain high latitude albedo feedbacks in coupled climate models under current and future vegetation distributions.

  15. Changes on albedo after a large forest fire in Mediterranean ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintano, Carmen; Fernández-Manso, Alfonso; Fernández-García, Victor; Marcos, Elena; Calvo, Leonor

    2015-09-01

    Fires are one of the main causes of environmental alteration in Mediterranean forest ecosystems. Albedo varies and evolves seasonally based on solar illumination. It is greatly influenced by changes on vegetation: vegetation growth, cutting/planting forests or forest fires. This work analyzes albedo variations due to a large forest fire that occurred on 19- 21 September 2012 in northwestern Spain. From this area, albedo post-fire images (immediately and 1-year after fire) were generated from Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper (ETM+) data. Specifically we considered total shortwave albedo, total-, direct-, and diffuse-visible, and near-infrared albedo. Nine to twelve weeks after fire, 111 field plots were measured (27 unburned plots, 84 burned plots). The relationship between albedo values and thematic class (burned/unburned) was evaluated by one-way analysis of variance. Our results demonstrate that albedo changes were related to burned/unburned variable with statistical significance, indicating the importance of forestry areas as regulators of land surface energy fluxes and revealing the potential of post-fire albedo for assessing burned areas. Future research, however, is needed to evaluate the persistence of albedo changes.

  16. Thermal neutron detection system

    DOEpatents

    Peurrung, Anthony J.; Stromswold, David C.

    2000-01-01

    According to the present invention, a system for measuring a thermal neutron emission from a neutron source, has a reflector/moderator proximate the neutron source that reflects and moderates neutrons from the neutron source. The reflector/moderator further directs thermal neutrons toward an unmoderated thermal neutron detector.

  17. Results from the LISA Commissioning Experiment on the decay of 24O* --> 22O + n

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Warren F.; MoNA Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    The Large multi-Institutional Scintillator Array (LISA) at NSCL, Michigan State University was constructed and tested by undergraduate students from several institutions in the MoNA (Modular Neutron Array) collaboration. LISA is used in conjunction with MoNA for detection of neutrons at large angles to the beam axis, corresponding to high energy decays from exotic nuclei at or beyond the neutron dripline. The LISA commissioning experiment was designed to measure and resolve neutron decays from the first two excited states (2+ and 1+) of 24O to the 23O ground state, using proton-knockout of 26F on a thin Be target. The trajectories of charged fragments at the site of the decay were identified using the Sweeper Magnet chamber detectors and inverse-tracking through the magnet. The two scintillator arrays measured the time of flight path of neutrons. Decay energies were determined using these decay kinematics and invariant mass spectroscopy. The two 24O states were previously observed, but with insufficient resolution to separate the two cleanly. This experiment provided sufficiently resolution to separate the two states cleanly. Results for the decay energies and comparison with Monte Carlo simulations will be presented. The Large multi-Institutional Scintillator Array (LISA) at NSCL, Michigan State University was constructed and tested by undergraduate students from several institutions in the MoNA (Modular Neutron Array) collaboration. LISA is used in conjunction with MoNA for detection of neutrons at large angles to the beam axis, corresponding to high energy decays from exotic nuclei at or beyond the neutron dripline. The LISA commissioning experiment was designed to measure and resolve neutron decays from the first two excited states (2+ and 1+) of 24O to the 23O ground state, using proton-knockout of 26F on a thin Be target. The trajectories of charged fragments at the site of the decay were identified using the Sweeper Magnet chamber detectors and inverse

  18. Neutron fluctuations: The importance of being delayed.

    PubMed

    Houchmandzadeh, B; Dumonteil, E; Mazzolo, A; Zoia, A

    2015-11-01

    The neutron population in a nuclear reactor is subject to fluctuations in time and in space due to the competition of diffusion by scattering, births by fission events, and deaths by absorptions. As such, fission chains provide a prototype model for the study of spatial clustering phenomena. In order for the reactor to be operated in stationary conditions at the critical point, the population of prompt neutrons instantaneously emitted at fission must be in equilibrium with the much smaller population of delayed neutrons, emitted after a Poissonian time by nuclear decay of the fissioned nuclei. In this work, we will show that the delayed neutrons, although representing a tiny fraction of the total number of neutrons in the reactor, actually have a key impact on the fluctuations, and their contribution is very effective in quenching the spatial clustering. PMID:26651654

  19. Neutron fluctuations: The importance of being delayed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houchmandzadeh, B.; Dumonteil, E.; Mazzolo, A.; Zoia, A.

    2015-11-01

    The neutron population in a nuclear reactor is subject to fluctuations in time and in space due to the competition of diffusion by scattering, births by fission events, and deaths by absorptions. As such, fission chains provide a prototype model for the study of spatial clustering phenomena. In order for the reactor to be operated in stationary conditions at the critical point, the population of prompt neutrons instantaneously emitted at fission must be in equilibrium with the much smaller population of delayed neutrons, emitted after a Poissonian time by nuclear decay of the fissioned nuclei. In this work, we will show that the delayed neutrons, although representing a tiny fraction of the total number of neutrons in the reactor, actually have a key impact on the fluctuations, and their contribution is very effective in quenching the spatial clustering.

  20. Inferring Nuclear Structure Trends of r-PROCESS Nuclei from β-DECAY Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, J.

    2013-03-01

    The present paper reports on several r-process motivated β-decay experiments undertaken at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory. β-decay half-lives and β-delayed neutron-emission probabilities were measured for neutron-rich nuclei in the region A=80-110. The data are discussed on the basis of quasi-random phase approximation calculations. The emphasis is made on the impact of these data upon calculations of r-process abundances.

  1. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Wade, E.J.

    1958-09-16

    This patent relates to a reflector means for a neutronic reactor. A reflector comprised of a plurality of vertically movable beryllium control members is provided surrounding the sides of the reactor core. An absorber of fast neutrons comprised of natural uramum surrounds the reflector. An absorber of slow neutrons surrounds the absorber of fast neutrons and is formed of a plurality of beryllium blocks having natural uranium members distributcd therethrough. in addition, a movable body is positioned directly below the core and is comprised of a beryllium reflector and an absorbing member attached to the botiom thereof, the absorbing member containing a substance selected from the goup consisting of natural urantum and Th/sup 232/.

  2. Tackling regional climate change by leaf albedo bio-geoengineering.

    PubMed

    Ridgwell, Andy; Singarayer, Joy S; Hetherington, Alistair M; Valdes, Paul J

    2009-01-27

    The likelihood that continuing greenhouse-gas emissions will lead to an unmanageable degree of climate change has stimulated the search for planetary-scale technological solutions for reducing global warming ("geoengineering"), typically characterized by the necessity for costly new infrastructures and industries. We suggest that the existing global infrastructure associated with arable agriculture can help, given that crop plants exert an important influence over the climatic energy budget because of differences in their albedo (solar reflectivity) compared to soils and to natural vegetation. Specifically, we propose a "bio-geoengineering" approach to mitigate surface warming, in which crop varieties having specific leaf glossiness and/or canopy morphological traits are specifically chosen to maximize solar reflectivity. We quantify this by modifying the canopy albedo of vegetation in prescribed cropland areas in a global-climate model, and thereby estimate the near-term potential for bio-geoengineering to be a summertime cooling of more than 1 degrees C throughout much of central North America and midlatitude Eurasia, equivalent to seasonally offsetting approximately one-fifth of regional warming due to doubling of atmospheric CO(2). Ultimately, genetic modification of plant leaf waxes or canopy structure could achieve greater temperature reductions, although better characterization of existing intraspecies variability is needed first.

  3. Mars - Experimental study of albedo changes caused by dust fallout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, E. N.; Veverka, J.; Thomas, P.

    1984-01-01

    A laboratory apparatus was used to simulate the uniform fallout and deposition of particles 1 to 5 microns in diameter in an experimental study on how the spectral and photometric properties of representative Martian areas are affected by fallout of atmospheric dust (smaller than or equalling 60 microns) suspended during dust storms. In this study, measurements are made in the changes in reflectance at optical and near-infrared wavelengths (0.4 to 1.2 micron) caused by deposition of varying amounts of a Mars-analog dust on bright and dark substrates before and after deposition of 6 x 10 to the -5th to 1.5 x 10 to the -3rd g/sq cm of simulated fallout. It is believed that only small amounts of dust particles (approximately 3 x 10 to the -4th g/sq cm) are needed to make significant albedo changes in dark areas of Mars, and that this would rule out uniform dust deposition on the surface of the planet. Data also indicate that other high albedo features like bright crater-related wind streaks may not be areas of significant sediment deposits. Laboratory simulations have permitted estimates of how much the reflectance of an area on Mars would change given a certain amount of dust fallout (g/sq cm) or reflectance data. These simulations may also be useful in tracking the transport and deposition of the dust.

  4. Soot climate forcing via snow and ice albedos.

    PubMed

    Hansen, James; Nazarenko, Larissa

    2004-01-13

    Plausible estimates for the effect of soot on snow and ice albedos (1.5% in the Arctic and 3% in Northern Hemisphere land areas) yield a climate forcing of +0.3 W/m(2) in the Northern Hemisphere. The "efficacy" of this forcing is approximately 2, i.e., for a given forcing it is twice as effective as CO(2) in altering global surface air temperature. This indirect soot forcing may have contributed to global warming of the past century, including the trend toward early springs in the Northern Hemisphere, thinning Arctic sea ice, and melting land ice and permafrost. If, as we suggest, melting ice and sea level rise define the level of dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system, then reducing soot emissions, thus restoring snow albedos to pristine high values, would have the double benefit of reducing global warming and raising the global temperature level at which dangerous anthropogenic interference occurs. However, soot contributions to climate change do not alter the conclusion that anthropogenic greenhouse gases have been the main cause of recent global warming and will be the predominant climate forcing in the future.

  5. Soot climate forcing via snow and ice albedos

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, James; Nazarenko, Larissa

    2004-01-01

    Plausible estimates for the effect of soot on snow and ice albedos (1.5% in the Arctic and 3% in Northern Hemisphere land areas) yield a climate forcing of +0.3 W/m2 in the Northern Hemisphere. The “efficacy” of this forcing is ∼2, i.e., for a given forcing it is twice as effective as CO2 in altering global surface air temperature. This indirect soot forcing may have contributed to global warming of the past century, including the trend toward early springs in the Northern Hemisphere, thinning Arctic sea ice, and melting land ice and permafrost. If, as we suggest, melting ice and sea level rise define the level of dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system, then reducing soot emissions, thus restoring snow albedos to pristine high values, would have the double benefit of reducing global warming and raising the global temperature level at which dangerous anthropogenic interference occurs. However, soot contributions to climate change do not alter the conclusion that anthropogenic greenhouse gases have been the main cause of recent global warming and will be the predominant climate forcing in the future. PMID:14699053

  6. Soot climate forcing via snow and ice albedos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, James; Nazarenko, Larissa

    2004-01-01

    Plausible estimates for the effect of soot on snow and ice albedos (1.5% in the Arctic and 3% in Northern Hemisphere land areas) yield a climate forcing of +0.3 W/m2 in the Northern Hemisphere. The "efficacy" of this forcing is 2, i.e., for a given forcing it is twice as effective as CO2 in altering global surface air temperature. This indirect soot forcing may have contributed to global warming of the past century, including the trend toward early springs in the Northern Hemisphere, thinning Arctic sea ice, and melting land ice and permafrost. If, as we suggest, melting ice and sea level rise define the level of dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system, then reducing soot emissions, thus restoring snow albedos to pristine high values, would have the double benefit of reducing global warming and raising the global temperature level at which dangerous anthropogenic interference occurs. However, soot contributions to climate change do not alter the conclusion that anthropogenic greenhouse gases have been the main cause of recent global warming and will be the predominant climate forcing in the future. aerosols | air pollution | climate change | sea level

  7. A cavity radiometer for Earth albedo measurement, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Radiometric measurements of the directional albedo of the Earth requires a detector with a flat response from 0.2 to 50 microns, a response time of about 2 seconds, a sensitivity of the order of 0.02 mw/sq cm, and a measurement uncertainty of less than 5 percent. Absolute cavity radiometers easily meet the spectral response and accuracy requirements for Earth albedo measurements, but the radiometers available today lack the necessary sensitivity and response time. The specific innovations addressed were the development of a very low thermal mass cavity and printed/deposited thermocouple sensing elements which were incorporated into the radiometer design to produce a sensitive, fast response, absolute radiometer. The cavity is applicable to the measurement of the reflected and radiated fluxes from the Earth surface and lower atmosphere from low Earth orbit satellites. The effort consisted of requirements and thermal analysis; design, construction, and test of prototype elements of the black cavity and sensor elements to show proof-of-concept. The results obtained indicate that a black body cavity sensor that has inherently a flat response from 0.2 to 50 microns can be produced which has a sensitivity of at least 0.02 mw/sq cm per micro volt ouput and with a time constant of less than two seconds. Additional work is required to develop the required thermopile.

  8. Low energy neutron measurements aboard encounter missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilmer, N.; Maksimovic, M.; Trottet, G.

    Neutrons in the MeV to GeV range are produced by interaction of flare accelerated ions with the solar atmosphere. Because of their lifetime, only high energy neutrons (> 100 MeV) have a high probability to be detected at earth's orbit. So far, around fifteen solar neutron events have been observed either by high energy detectors aboard spacecrafts at 1 AU or by ground based neutron monitors. Neutrons between 10 and 100 MeV have also been detected for a few events through their proton decay. Measurements of solar neutrons closer to the Sun aboard encounter missions will allow to probe for the first time the MeV neutrons which are produced by the nuclear reactions of energetic ions with thresholds around 1 MeV/nuc and will provide information on the accelerated ion spectrum in the energy range between ˜ 1 MeV and 100 MeV/nuc in complementarity with what can be deduced from γ -ray line emission. The close proximity of the Sun would allow to measure neutron events for many more flares opening a new field of solar physics. Combined with near in-situ ion measurements and γ -ray observations, neutrons will bring information on the link between interacting and escaping ions while getting rid of most of the transport effects.

  9. Updates for Gadolinium neutron capture measurements at DANCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dashdorj, Dugersuren; Mitchell, G. E.; Baramsai, B.; Chankova, R.; Chyzh, A.; Walker, C.; Agvaanluvsan, U.; Becker, J. A.; Parker, W.; Wu, C. Y.; Bredeweg, T.; Couture, A.; Haight, R.; Jandel, M.; O'Donnell, J.; Rundberg, R.; Wouters, J.; Ullmann, J.; Vieira, D.; Becvar, F.; Krticka, M.

    2007-10-01

    Neutron capture reactions for several isotopes of Gadolinium have been measured at DANCE array in Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. Progress on the analysis is discussed. The detector response function of DANCE array is presented in connection with the statistical gamma-ray decay cascade simulation. In the region of separated neutron resonances, the statistical gamma-ray decay cascade is simulated using the DICEBOX code. Various models for the photon strength function and level density are used as input. The output of simulations is compared with DANCE data.

  10. Delayed neutron emission near the shell-closures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borzov, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    The self-consistent Density Functional + Continuum QRPA approach (DF+CQRPA) provides a good description of the recent experimental beta-decay half-lives and delayed neutron emission branchings for the nuclei approaching to (and beyond) the neutron closed shells N = 28; 50; 82. Predictions of beta-decay properties are more reliable than the ones of standard global approaches traditionally used for the r-process modelling. An impact of the quasi-particle phonon coupling on the delayed multi-neutron emission rates P2n, P3n,… near the closed shells is also discussed.

  11. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Fraas, A.P.; Mills, C.B.

    1961-11-21

    A neutronic reactor in which neutron moderation is achieved primarily in its reflector is described. The reactor structure consists of a cylindrical central "island" of moderator and a spherical moderating reflector spaced therefrom, thereby providing an annular space. An essentially unmoderated liquid fuel is continuously passed through the annular space and undergoes fission while contained therein. The reactor, because of its small size, is particularly adapted for propulsion uses, including the propulsion of aircraft. (AEC)

  12. NEUTRON SOURCES

    DOEpatents

    Richmond, J.L.; Wells, C.E.

    1963-01-15

    A neutron source is obtained without employing any separate beryllia receptacle, as was formerly required. The new method is safer and faster, and affords a source with both improved yield and symmetry of neutron emission. A Be container is used to hold and react with Pu. This container has a thin isolating layer that does not obstruct the desired Pu--Be reaction and obviates procedures previously employed to disassemble and remove a beryllia receptacle. (AEC)

  13. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.

    1958-04-22

    A nuclear reactor for isotope production is described. This reactor is designed to provide a maximum thermal neutron flux in a region adjacent to the periphery of the reactor rather than in the center of the reactor. The core of the reactor is generally centrally located with respect tn a surrounding first reflector, constructed of beryllium. The beryllium reflector is surrounded by a second reflector, constructed of graphite, which, in tune, is surrounded by a conventional thermal shield. Water is circulated through the core and the reflector and functions both as a moderator and a coolant. In order to produce a greatsr maximum thermal neutron flux adjacent to the periphery of the reactor rather than in the core, the reactor is designed so tbat the ratio of neutron scattering cross section to neutron absorption cross section averaged over all of the materials in the reflector is approximately twice the ratio of neutron scattering cross section to neutron absorption cross section averaged over all of the material of the core of the reactor.

  14. FOREWORD: Neutron metrology Neutron metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, David J.; Nolte, Ralf; Gressier, Vincent

    2011-12-01

    The International Committee for Weights and Measures (CIPM) has consultative committees covering various areas of metrology. The Consultative Committee for Ionizing Radiation (CCRI) differs from the others in having three sections: Section (I) deals with radiation dosimetry, Section (II) with radionuclide metrology and Section (III) with neutron metrology. In 2003 a proposal was made to publish special issues of Metrologia covering the work of the three Sections. Section (II) was the first to complete their task, and their special issue was published in 2007, volume 44(4). This was followed in 2009 by the special issue on radiation dosimetry, volume 46(2). The present issue, volume 48(6), completes the trilogy and attempts to explain neutron metrology, the youngest of the three disciplines, the neutron only having been discovered in 1932, to a wider audience and to highlight the relevance and importance of this field. When originally approached with the idea of this special issue, Section (III) immediately saw the value of a publication specifically on neutron metrology. It is a topic area where papers tend to be scattered throughout the literature in journals covering, for example, nuclear instrumentation, radiation protection or radiation measurements in general. Review articles tend to be few. People new to the field often ask for an introduction to the various topics. There are some excellent older textbooks, but these are now becoming obsolete. More experienced workers in specific areas of neutron metrology can find it difficult to know the latest position in related areas. The papers in this issue attempt, without presenting a purely historical outline, to describe the field in a sufficiently logical way to provide the novice with a clear introduction, while being sufficiently up-to-date to provide the more experienced reader with the latest scientific developments in the different topic areas. Neutron radiation fields obviously occur throughout the nuclear

  15. Neutron knockout of Be12 populating neutron-unbound states in Be11

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, W. A.; Baumann, T.; Brown, B. A.; Brown, J.; Deyoung, P. A.; Finck, J. E.; Frank, N.; Jones, K. L.; Lecouey, J.-L.; Luther, B.; Peaslee, G. F.; Rogers, W. F.; Schiller, A.; Thoennessen, M.; Tostevin, J. A.; Yoneda, K.

    2011-05-01

    Neutron-unbound resonant states of Be11 were populated in neutron knockout reactions from Be12 and identified by Be10-n coincidence measurements. A resonance in the decay-energy spectrum at 80(2) keV was attributed to a highly excited unbound state in Be11 at 3.949(2) MeV decaying to the 2+ excited state in Be10. A knockout cross section of 15(3) mb was inferred for this 3.949(2) MeV state, suggesting a spectroscopic factor near unity for this 0p3/2- level, consistent with the detailed shell model calculations.

  16. Delayed neutrons in fission of polonium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Ramazanov, R.; Urikbaev, Z.S.; Maksyutenko, B.P.; Ignat'ev, S.V.

    1988-06-01

    A strong difference is found in the relative yields of delayed neutrons in the production of compound nuclei of polonium isotopes in reactions in which bismuth and lead are bombarded by various charged particles. The effect can be partially explained by the different lengths of the ..beta..-decay chains of the light and heavy fission products.

  17. Impacts of Satellite-Based Snow Albedo Assimilation on Offline and Coupled Land Surface Model Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Peng, Shushi; Krinner, Gerhard; Ryder, James; Li, Yue; Dantec-Nédélec, Sarah; Ottlé, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Seasonal snow cover in the Northern Hemisphere is the largest component of the terrestrial cryosphere and plays a major role in the climate system through strong positive feedbacks related to albedo. The snow-albedo feedback is invoked as an important cause for the polar amplification of ongoing and projected climate change, and its parameterization across models is an important source of uncertainty in climate simulations. Here, instead of developing a physical snow albedo scheme, we use a direct insertion approach to assimilate satellite-based surface albedo during the snow season (hereafter as snow albedo assimilation) into the land surface model ORCHIDEE (ORganizing Carbon and Hydrology In Dynamic EcosystEms) and assess the influences of such assimilation on offline and coupled simulations. Our results have shown that snow albedo assimilation in both ORCHIDEE and ORCHIDEE-LMDZ (a general circulation model of Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique) improve the simulation accuracy of mean seasonal (October throughout May) snow water equivalent over the region north of 40 degrees. The sensitivity of snow water equivalent to snow albedo assimilation is more pronounced in the coupled simulation than the offline simulation since the feedback of albedo on air temperature is allowed in ORCHIDEE-LMDZ. We have also shown that simulations of air temperature at 2 meters in ORCHIDEE-LMDZ due to snow albedo assimilation are significantly improved during the spring in particular over the eastern Siberia region. This is a result of the fact that high amounts of shortwave radiation during the spring can maximize its snow albedo feedback, which is also supported by the finding that the spatial sensitivity of temperature change to albedo change is much larger during the spring than during the autumn and winter. In addition, the radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere induced by snow albedo assimilation during the spring is estimated to be -2.50 W m-2, the magnitude of

  18. Spring-summer albedo variations of Antarctic sea ice from 1982 to 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Zhu-De; Ke, Chang-Qing

    2015-06-01

    This study examined the spring-summer (November, December, January and February) albedo averages and trends using a dataset consisting of 28 years of homogenized satellite data for the entire Antarctic sea ice region and for five longitudinal sectors around Antarctica: the Weddell Sea (WS), the Indian Ocean sector (IO), the Pacific Ocean sector (PO), the Ross Sea (RS) and the Bellingshausen-Amundsen Sea (BS). Time series data of the sea ice concentrations and sea surface temperatures were used to analyse their relations to the albedo. The results indicated that the sea ice albedo increased slightly during the study period, at a rate of 0.314% per decade, over the Antarctic sea ice region. The sea ice albedos in the PO, the IO and the WS increased at rates of 2.599% per decade (confidence level 99.86%), 0.824% per decade and 0.413% per decade, respectively, and the steepest increase occurred in the PO. However, the sea ice albedo in the BS decreased at a rate of -1.617% per decade (confidence level 95.05%) and was near zero in the RS. The spring-summer average albedo over the Antarctic sea ice region was 50.24%. The highest albedo values were mainly found on the continental coast and in the WS; in contrast, the lowest albedo values were found on the outer edge of the sea ice, the RS and the Amery Ice Shelf. The average albedo in the western Antarctic sea ice region was distinctly higher than that in the east. The albedo was significantly positively correlated with sea ice concentration (SIC) and was significantly negatively correlated with sea surface temperature (SST); these scenarios held true for all five longitudinal sectors. Spatially, the higher surface albedos follow the higher SICs and lower SST patterns. The increasing albedo means that Antarctic sea ice region reflects more solar radiation and absorbs less, leading to a decrease in temperature and much snowfall on sea ice, and further resulted in an increase in albedo. Conversely, the decreasing albedo

  19. Impacts of Satellite-Based Snow Albedo Assimilation on Offline and Coupled Land Surface Model Simulations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Peng, Shushi; Krinner, Gerhard; Ryder, James; Li, Yue; Dantec-Nédélec, Sarah; Ottlé, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Seasonal snow cover in the Northern Hemisphere is the largest component of the terrestrial cryosphere and plays a major role in the climate system through strong positive feedbacks related to albedo. The snow-albedo feedback is invoked as an important cause for the polar amplification of ongoing and projected climate change, and its parameterization across models is an important source of uncertainty in climate simulations. Here, instead of developing a physical snow albedo scheme, we use a direct insertion approach to assimilate satellite-based surface albedo during the snow season (hereafter as snow albedo assimilation) into the land surface model ORCHIDEE (ORganizing Carbon and Hydrology In Dynamic EcosystEms) and assess the influences of such assimilation on offline and coupled simulations. Our results have shown that snow albedo assimilation in both ORCHIDEE and ORCHIDEE-LMDZ (a general circulation model of Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique) improve the simulation accuracy of mean seasonal (October throughout May) snow water equivalent over the region north of 40 degrees. The sensitivity of snow water equivalent to snow albedo assimilation is more pronounced in the coupled simulation than the offline simulation since the feedback of albedo on air temperature is allowed in ORCHIDEE-LMDZ. We have also shown that simulations of air temperature at 2 meters in ORCHIDEE-LMDZ due to snow albedo assimilation are significantly improved during the spring in particular over the eastern Siberia region. This is a result of the fact that high amounts of shortwave radiation during the spring can maximize its snow albedo feedback, which is also supported by the finding that the spatial sensitivity of temperature change to albedo change is much larger during the spring than during the autumn and winter. In addition, the radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere induced by snow albedo assimilation during the spring is estimated to be -2.50 W m-2, the magnitude of

  20. Bimodal albedo distributions in the ablation zone of the southwestern Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moustafa, S. E.; Rennermalm, A. K.; Smith, L. C.; Miller, M. A.; Mioduszewski, J. R.

    2014-09-01

    Surface albedo is a key variable controlling solar radiation absorbed at the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) surface, and thus, meltwater production. Recent decline in surface albedo over the GrIS has been linked to enhanced snow grain metamorphic rates and amplified ice-albedo feedback from atmospheric warming. However, the importance of distinct surface types on ablation zone albedo and meltwater production is still relatively unknown, and excluded in surface mass balance models. In this study, we analyze albedo and ablation rates using in situ and remotely-sensed data. Observations include: (1) a new high-quality in situ spectral albedo dataset collected with an Analytical Spectral Devices (ASD) spectroradiometer measuring at 325-1075 nm, along a 1.25 km transect during three days in June 2013; (2) broadband albedo at two automatic weather stations; and (3) daily MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) albedo (MOD10A1) between 31 May and 30 August. We find that seasonal ablation zone albedos have a bimodal distribution, with two alternate states. This suggests that an abrupt switch from high to low albedo can be triggered by a modest melt event, resulting in amplified surface ablation rates. Our results show that such a shift corresponds to an observed melt rate percent difference increase of 51.6% during peak melt season (between 10-14 and 20-24 July 2013). Furthermore, our findings demonstrate that seasonal changes in GrIS ablation zone albedo are not exclusively a function of a darkening surface from ice crystal growth, but rather are controlled by changes in the fractional coverage of snow, bare ice, and impurity-rich surface types. As the climate continues to warm, regional climate models should consider the seasonal evolution of ice surface types in Greenland's ablation zone to improve projections of mass loss contributions to sea level rise.