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Sample records for albedo roughness length

  1. Testing the hypothesis on the relationship between aerodynamic roughness length and albedo using vegetation structure parameters.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jaeil; Miyazaki, Shin; Yeh, Pat J-F; Kim, Wonsik; Kanae, Shinjiro; Oki, Taikan

    2012-03-01

    Surface albedo (α) and aerodynamic roughness length (z(0)), which partition surface net radiation into energy fluxes, are critical land surface properties for biosphere-atmosphere interactions and climate variability. Previous studies suggested that canopy structure parameters influence both α and z(0); however, no field data have been reported to quantify their relationships. Here, we hypothesize that a functional relationship between α and z(0) exists for a vegetated surface, since both land surface parameters can be conceptually related to the characteristics of canopy structure. We test this hypothesis by using the observed data collected from 50 site-years of field measurements from sites worldwide covering various vegetated surfaces. On the basis of these data, a negative linear relationship between α and log(z(0)) was found, which is related to the canopy structural parameter. We believe that our finding is a big step toward the estimation of z(0) with high accuracy. This can be used, for example, in the parameterization of land properties and the observation of z(0) using satellite remote sensing. PMID:21562788

  2. A global climatology of albedo, roughness length and stomatal resistance for atmospheric general circulation models as represented by the Simple Biosphere Model (SiB)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorman, J. L.; Sellers, P. J.

    1989-01-01

    Components of the Simple Biosphere Model (SiB) of Sellers et al. (1986) were used to generate global monthly fields of surface albedo (0.4-4.0 microns), roughness length and minimum surface (stomatal) resistance. SiB consists of three submodels which describe the roles of radiative transfer, turbulent transfer and surface resistance in determining the energy balance of the vegetated land surface. These three submodels were detached from SiB and used on the SiB parameter set (total and green leaf area index, leaf angle orientation, canopy dimensions, etc.) to calculate global monthly fields of albedo, roughness length and minimum stomatal resistance at 1 x 1 deg resolution. Time series of various parameters are also displayed for each vegetation type for specified grid points. The SiB results compare reasonably well with appropriate measurements obtained from the literature and have the additional merit of being mutually consistent; the three submodels use many common parameters, which ensures that, for each grid area, the calculated surface properties are closely interrelated as is the case in nature. The derived fields provide a check on the operation of the submodels and the correctness of the parameter set. They can also be used as prescribed fields for GCMs that do not have biophysically based land surface parameterizations.

  3. Mimas - Photometric roughness and albedo map

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verbiscer, Anne J.; Veverka, Joseph

    1992-01-01

    The backscattering phase function asssociated with bright icy satellites may render Hapke's (1986) isotropic approximation to multiple scattering inadequate. A reanalysis is accordingly conducted here of the Voyager observations of Mimas, using a modification to Hapke's equation that accommodates anisotropic multiple scattering, in order to characterize the physical and photometric properties of the heavily cratered icy surface. The roughness parameter of Mimas is in this way redefined, and an accurate albedo map is obtained which deminstrates small latitudinal and longitudinal albedo variations.

  4. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE AERODYNAMIC ROUGHNESS LENGTH AND THE ROUGHNESS DENSITY IN CASES OF LOW ROUGHNESS DENSITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents measurements of roughness length performed in a wind tunnel for low roughness density. The experiments were performed with both compact and porous obstacles (clusters), in order to simulate the behavior of sparsely vegetated surfaces.

  5. ROUGHNESS LENGTHS FOR THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, C.

    2012-03-28

    Surface roughness values for the areas surrounding the H, D and N-Area meteorological towers were computed from archived 2010 meteorological data. These 15-minute-averaged data were measured with cup anemometers and bidirectional wind vanes (bivanes) 61 m above the surface. The results of the roughness calculation using the standard deviation of elevation angle {sigma}{sub E}, and applying the simple formula based on tree canopy height, gave consistent estimates for roughness around the H-Area tower in the range of 1.76 to 1.86 m (95% confidence interval) with a mean value of 1.81 m. Application of the {sigma}{sub E} method for the 61-m level at D and N-Areas gave mean values of 1.71 and 1.81 with confidence ranges of 1.62-1.81 and 1.73-1.88 meters, respectively. Roughness results are azimuth dependent, and thus are presented as averages over compass sectors spanning 22.5 degrees. Calculated values were compared to other methods of determining roughness, including the standard deviation of the azimuth direction, {sigma}{sub A}, and standard deviation of the wind speed, {sigma}{sub U}. Additional data was obtained from a sonic anemometer at 61-m on the H-Area tower during a period of a few weeks in 2010. Results from the sonic anemometer support our use of {sigma}{sub E} to calculate roughness. Based on the H-Area tower results, a surface roughness of 1.8 m using is recommended for use in dispersion modeling applications that consider the impacts of a contaminant release to individuals along the Site boundary. The canopy surrounding the H-Area tower is relatively uniform (i.e., little variance in roughness by upwind direction), and data supplied by the U.S. Forest Service at Savannah River show that the canopy height and composition surrounding the H-Area tower is reasonably representative of forested areas throughout the SRS reservation. For dispersion modeling analyses requiring assessments of a co-located worker within the respective operations area, recommended

  6. LENGTH SCALE OF TURBULENCE ABOVE ROUGH SURFACES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Results of analyses of data for two urban sites and a rural site suggest that the mixing length can be represented by the integral length scale of the turbulence derived from vertical velocity spectra. The result is apparently universal and permits the shear production of turbule...

  7. Measurement of surface roughness and correlation length using dichromatic speckle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deka, M.

    1980-03-01

    A computer simulation study of the dichromatic speckle was conducted and the surface roughness and correlation length of sample surfaces were measured using a stylus instrument and similar measurements with dichromatic speckle. The rms difference of the two speckle intensities was analyzed for spot sizes smaller than, comparable and larger than the correlation length of the surface. The rms roughness of the sample ground glasses was calculated from the data obtained from the stylus instrument. The correlation length was obtained from an online multichannel FFT processor connected to the stylus instrument. The correlation length was estimated from the correlation function. The rms difference between the speckle intensities of two different wavelengths were measured for various spot sizes. For each intensity 64 K data samples was collected and processed in a PDP 11/40 computer. These data were used to calculate the second moment of the monochromatic speckle, the cross correlation of these and the rms difference. The roughness and the correlation length of the surface were estimated from these results. The results obtained from the dichromatic speckle are in good agreement with the values obtained from the stylus instrument.

  8. Relating Vegetation Aerodynamic Roughness Length to Interferometric SAR Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saatchi, Sassan; Rodriquez, Ernesto

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the feasibility of estimating aerodynamic roughness parameter from interferometric SAR (INSAR) measurements. The relation between the interferometric correlation and the rms height of the surface is presented analytically. Model simulations performed over realistic canopy parameters obtained from field measurements in boreal forest environment demonstrate the capability of the INSAR measurements for estimating and mapping surface roughness lengths over forests and/or other vegetation types. The procedure for estimating this parameter over boreal forests using the INSAR data is discussed and the possibility of extending the methodology over tropical forests is examined.

  9. Mask roughness induced LER: geometric model at long correlation lengths

    SciTech Connect

    McClinton, Brittany M.; Naulleau, Patrick P.

    2011-02-11

    Collective understanding of how both the resist and line-edge roughness (LER) on the mask affect the final printed LER has made significant advances. What is poorly understood, however, is the extent to which mask surface roughness couples to image plane LER as a function of illumination conditions, NA, and defocus. Recently, progress has been made in formulating a simplified solution for mask roughness induced LER. Here, we investigate the LER behavior at long correlation lengths of surface roughness on the mask. We find that for correlation lengths greater than 3/NA in wafer dimensions and CDs greater than approximately 0.75/NA, the previously described simplified model, which remains based on physical optics, converges to a 'geometric regime' which is based on ray optics and is independent of partial coherence. In this 'geometric regime', the LER is proportional to the mask slope error as it propagates through focus, and provides a faster alternative to calculating LER in contrast to either full 2D aerial image simulation modeling or the newly proposed physical optics model. Data is presented for both an NA = 0.32 and an NA = 0.5 imaging system for CDs of 22-nm and 50-nm horizontal-line-dense structures.

  10. Parameterization of albedo, thermal inertia, and surface roughness of desert scrub/sandy soil surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otterman, J.; Mccumber, M.

    1986-01-01

    Spectral albedo, A sub n, for the direct solar beam is defined as A sub n (r sub i,s, theta sub 0) = r sub i exp(-s tan theta sub 0)1-I(s) where I(s) is the integral over all reflection angles describing the interception by the absorbing plants of the flux reflected from the soil, r sub i soil reflectance, assumed Lambertian, S the projection on a vertical plane of plants per unit surface area, and theta sub 0 is the solar zenith angle. Hemispheric reflectance for the direct solar beam equals 1-I(s) times the reflectance to the zenith. The values of s of 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3 respectively quantify sparse, moderately dense, and very dense desert scrub. Thin plants are assumed to be of negligible thermal inertia, and thus directly yield the absorbed insolation to the atmosphere. Surface thermal inertia is therefore effectively reduced. The ratio of surface roughness height to plant height is parameterized for sparse, moderately dense, and very dense desert-scrub as a function of s based on data expressing the dependence of this ratio on plant silhouette.

  11. Estimating Shear Velocity and Roughness Length From Velocity Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, Normand E.; Abrahams, Athol D.

    1992-08-01

    In turbulent boundary layer flows, shear velocity u*, and roughness length z0 are commonly derived from semilogarithmic flow velocity profiles by fitting a straight line by ordinary least squares regression to the profile and calculating estimates of u*, and z0 from the slope and intercept of the computed regression equation. However, it is not clear from the literature whether the appropriate regression is of flow velocity u on the logarithm of height above the bed In z or of ln z on u. In order to calculate estimates of u* and z0, the true or structural relation between u and In z must be established. Because u is generally observed with much greater error than is In z, the structural relation may be estimated by regressing u on ln z; regressing ln z on u is incorrect. An analysis of 24 stream channel flow velocity profiles indicates that even in situations where the correlation between u and ln z exceeds 0.9, performing the incorrect regression can result in the considerable overestimation of u* and z0.

  12. Global Retrieval of Roughness Length from EOS-Terra Satellite Products and Limited Field Study Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaudt, K. J.; Dickinson, R. E.

    2003-12-01

    Global and regional retrievals, which illustrate the seasonality, of roughness length will be presented. Roughness length is a key factor in estimating the sensible and latent heat fluxes in climate models. In the past the lack of observations made it necessary for most climate models to use relatively crude estimates for roughness length. Typically the roughness length was assigned a constant value for each of the land cover classifications. In reality roughness length depends upon the average height, shape, density and Leaf Area Index (LAI) of the vegetation present. The retrievals presented here depend on these four variables, and they represent a significant improvement over past approaches. The parameterization of roughness length in terms of the four variables (average height, shape, density and LAI) is based on the work of Raupach and Lindroth. The roughness length is formulated in such a way that roughness length can be found either by remote sensing or by variables used in climate models with interactive canopies. The EOS-Terra satellite products used are the overstory plant density and LAI for the seven treed IGBP land cover classes (evergreen and deciduous needle-leaf, evergreen and deciduous broad-leaf and mixed forests, savannah and woody savannah). The tree crown shape (the canopy height-to-width ratio) is based on field studies; it depends on the tree's basic shape (conical or elliptical) and on latitude. At present, the height is of all the vegetation is the average height for the various land cover classifications found in numerous field studies. Limitations of the current retrieval and future improvements will be discussed.

  13. Simultaneous measurement of the root-mean-square roughness and autocorrelation length by optical method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dalwoo; Oh, Ki-Jang; Lim, Choong-Soo

    1998-12-01

    We developed an on-line measurement system for the simultaneous measurement of the root-mean-square roughness and autocorrelation length which are the parameters of surface roughness. The measurement is based on the scattering theory of light on the rough surface. Computer simulation shows that the measurement range depends on the wavelength of the light source, and this is verified with the experiment. We installed the measurement system at the finishing line of a cold-rolling steel work, and measured the two parameters in situ. The rms roughness and autocorrelation length are measured and transformed in the average surface roughness and then umber of peaks per inch, respectively. The measured data for both of the parameters are compared with those of stylus method, an the optical method is well coincided with the conventional stylus method.

  14. Albedo and its relationship with seasonal surface roughness using repeat UAV survey across the Kangerlussuaq sector of the Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, A., II; Ryan, J.; Box, J. E.; Snooke, N.

    2015-12-01

    Surface albedo is a primary control on absorbed radiation and hence ice surface darkening is a powerful amplifier of melt across the margin of the Greenland ice sheet. To investigate the relationship between ice surface roughness and variations in albedo in space and time at ~dm resolution, a suite of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) were deployed from the margin of Russell Glacier between June and August, 2014. The UAVs were equipped with digital and multispectral cameras, GoPros, fast response broadband pyranometers and temperature and humidity sensors. The primary mission was regular repeat longitudinal transects attaining data from the margin to the equilibrium line 80 km into the ice sheet interior and which were complimented by selected watershed and catchment surveys. The pyranometers reliably measure bare ice surface albedo between 0.34 and 0.58 that correlate well against concurrent MODIS data (where available). Repeat digital photogrammetric analysis enables investigation of relationship between changing meso- and micro-scale albedo and melt processes modulated by ice surface roughness that, in turn, are related to the seasonally evolving surface energy balance recorded at three AWS on the flight path.

  15. Turbulent transfer coefficient and roughness length in a high-altitude lake, Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhaoguo; Lyu, Shihua; Zhao, Lin; Wen, Lijuan; Ao, Yinhuan; Wang, Shaoying

    2016-05-01

    A persistent unstable atmospheric boundary layer was observed over Lake Ngoring, caused by higher temperature on the water surface compared with the overlying air. Against this background, the eddy covariance flux data collected from Lake Ngoring were used to analyse the variation of transfer coefficients and roughness lengths for momentum, heat and moisture. Results are discussed and compared with parameterization schemes in a lake model. The drag coefficient and momentum roughness length rapidly decreased with increasing wind velocity, reached a minimum value in the moderate wind velocity and then increased slowly as wind velocity increased further. Under weak wind conditions, the surface tension or small scale capillary wave becomes more important and increases the surface roughness. The scalar roughness length ratio was much larger than unity under weak wind conditions, and it decreased to values near unity as wind velocity exceeded 4.0 m s-1. The lake model could not reproduce well the variation of drag coefficient, or momentum roughness length, versus wind velocity in Lake Ngoring, but it did simulate well the sensible heat and latent heat fluxes, as a result of complementary opposite errors.

  16. Topographic Roughness of Hawaiian Volcanic Terrains: Analysis of Multiple Datasets Indicates Length Scales are Critical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, A. R.; Anderson, F. S.; Mouginis-Mark, P.; Haldemann, A.; Brooks, B.; Foster, J.

    2007-12-01

    The roughness of a natural surface is often defined by the topography of the surface at scales of a few tens of meters or less. To ensure the safety of rovers and scientific instruments on Mars, these scales are of critical importance during landing site selection and rover traverse operations. Published work on terrestrial and Martian topography datasets has demonstrated that statistical values such as the Hurst exponent can be used in conjunction with related statistical measures such as RMS slope or deviation to quantify the relationship between scale-dependent roughness values and the morphology of a surface. In our detailed studies of the statistical behavior of meter-scale surface roughness on Earth, we determine that the length scales used to calculate the surface roughness affect the resulting roughness statistics and must be taken into account when analyzing planetary surface roughness. Extensive airborne Light Detection and Ranging (a-LiDAR) coverage of the summit of Kilauea volcano on the Big Island of Hawaii (1 m DEM) provides an opportunity for simulating higher resolution Martian topography data such as will be obtained from photoclinometry and stereo imaging using the HiRISE camera on MRO. In addition to the a-LiDAR data, we use high-resolution topography (2 cm DEM) generated from a tripod-mounted scanning LiDAR system (t-LiDAR). Previous authors have described techniques for calculating roughness statistics in one dimension using topographic profiles. We adapt the 1D method for use with 2D topographic datasets to generate maps of the Hurst exponent of Martian analog flows in Hawaii. Results from the surface roughness analysis suggest that the calculated RMS deviation or slope and Hurst exponent exhibit systematic variations as the length of a profile segment (in 1D studies) or size of the cell (in 2D studies) changes. These new results, combined with previously described data, indicate that the length scales used to calculate roughness statistics

  17. Atmospheric sensitivity to roughness length in a regional atmospheric model over the Ohio-Tennessee River Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintanar, Arturo I.; Mahmood, Rezaul; Suarez, Astrid; Leeper, Ronnie

    2016-06-01

    The response of a regional atmospheric model to small changes in roughness length of two vegetation categories (crops and deciduous broadleaf forest) was analyzed for three synoptic events in June 2006. These were characterized by two convective events (June 11 and 22) and one prefrontal event (June 17). The responses of the model, for precipitation, equivalent potential temperature and wind field were notable in general. However, the response became muted as roughness lengths were increased or decreased. Atmospheric response to these changes varied for different convective events. A small dependence on roughness length was found for the sensible and latent heat fluxes and planetary boundary layer heights during the convective event of June 11. For the June 22 event, the model response was weaker for the crop-only and forest-only roughness length experiments compared to the response when both the crop and forest-only roughness length were changed in combination.

  18. Atmospheric sensitivity to roughness length in a regional atmospheric model over the Ohio-Tennessee River Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintanar, Arturo I.; Mahmood, Rezaul; Suarez, Astrid; Leeper, Ronnie

    2015-11-01

    The response of a regional atmospheric model to small changes in roughness length of two vegetation categories (crops and deciduous broadleaf forest) was analyzed for three synoptic events in June 2006. These were characterized by two convective events (June 11 and 22) and one prefrontal event (June 17). The responses of the model, for precipitation, equivalent potential temperature and wind field were notable in general. However, the response became muted as roughness lengths were increased or decreased. Atmospheric response to these changes varied for different convective events. A small dependence on roughness length was found for the sensible and latent heat fluxes and planetary boundary layer heights during the convective event of June 11. For the June 22 event, the model response was weaker for the crop-only and forest-only roughness length experiments compared to the response when both the crop and forest-only roughness length were changed in combination.

  19. Predicting the roughness length of turbulent flows over landscapes with multi-scale microtopography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelletier, Jon D.; Field, Jason P.

    2016-05-01

    The fully rough form of the law of the wall is commonly used to quantify velocity profiles and associated bed shear stresses in fluvial, aeolian, and coastal environments. A key parameter in this law is the roughness length, z0. Here we propose a predictive formula for z0 that uses the amplitude and slope of each wavelength of microtopography within a discrete-Fourier-transform-based approach. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling is used to quantify the effective z0 value of sinusoidal microtopography as a function of the amplitude and slope. The effective z0 value of landscapes with multi-scale roughness is then given by the sum of contributions from each Fourier mode of the microtopography. Predictions of the equation are tested against z0 values measured in ˜ 105 wind-velocity profiles from southwestern US playa surfaces. Our equation is capable of predicting z0 values to 50 % accuracy, on average, across a 4 order of magnitude range. We also use our results to provide an alternative formula that, while somewhat less accurate than the one obtained from a full multi-scale analysis, has an advantage of being simpler and easier to apply.

  20. Displacement Height and Roughness Length of Forests - Are They Really Dependent on Stability?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mölder, M.; Lindroth, A.

    2015-12-01

    Displacement height d and roughness length zo are two important parameters in a commonly used Obukhov-Monin similarity-theory wind-profile formulation. These parameters have historically been considered to be properties of the underlying surface. A few studies have pointed out that d and zo for tall vegetation, like forest, are also dependent on stability. Since d and zo are defined by the semi-logarithmic law, the most strict determination of them would be based on the upper part of the surface layer, which is free of roughness sublayer effects. Often the displacement height is determined from the wind profile inside the stand. The present study makes use of measurements with 14 3D sonic anemometers (Metek) in the Norunda forest in Sweden. This site is dominated by pine with trees up to 26 m tall. The sonics were mounted at 1.8, 4.4, 9.5, 14.8, 20.8, 26.6, 29.6, 32.7, 37.9, 44.7, 59.5, 74, 88.5 and 101.8 m heights. Data from two summer seasons, 2014 and 2015, were used in the current analysis. A serious complication was that the momentum and sensible heat fluxes were rarely constant with height. Also, during nighttime profiles appeared with nearly constant wind speed in the upper part of the profile. In our analysis, the Obukhov length was calculated from friction velocity and sensible heat flux averaged for 26.6, 29.6 and 32.7 m. The mean friction velocity and Obukhov length were then used in the profile formulation. Displacement height giving the best match to the measured data at 44.7, 59.5, 74, 88.5 and 101.8 m was searched for. This method gave extremely erratic results. Alternatively, d was estimated using the exponential law with measurement heights 9.5, 14.8, 20.8 and 26.6 m giving d close to 22 m with a tendency of slightly increasing d towards more stable situations, but with large uncertainty. We then used a constant d of 22 m in the upper part of the profile and this resulted in zo of about 2.5 m. A small tendency of lower zo could be observed for very

  1. Influence of aerodynamic roughness length on aeolian processes: Earth, Mars, Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blumberg, Dan G.; Greeley, Ronald

    1992-01-01

    The aerodynamic roughness length (z sub 0) is the height at which a wind profile assumes a zero velocity. The lower part of the atmospheric boundary layer will be impeded by friction with the surface. An increase in surface roughness will also increase the shear stress required to initiate particle entrainment by the wind. Bagnold (1941) estimated z sub 0 as being 1/30 of the mean particle size. In Nature, surface roughness is composed of nonerodible elements as well as sand-size erodible particles. To assess z sub 0 values as a function of terrain, field experiments were conducted to obtain wind profiles monitored over natural surfaces at 15 sites in the Mojave Desert, Death Valley, and Nye County, Nevada. These sites span a variety of arid-land terrains, including smooth playas, alluvial fans, and lava flows; z sub 0 values ranged from 0.0001 cm to 1 cm. These values were incorporated in a threshold model and a flux model to assess transport efficiency over such terrains in three planetary environments (Venus, Earth, and Mars), and for particle sizes ranging from 60-500 micron. Threshold and flux are a function of planetary environment, particle density and size (Dp), and z sub 0, and the shear velocity of 1.2 x U sub *t (for Dp = 250 micron and z sub 0 = 0.84). Results show that flux on Mars is approximately 14 g/(cm x s), on Earth it is approximately 3 g/(cm x s), and on Venus 0.5 g/(cm x s). Under all planetary environments, the results also show a dramatic decrease in the flux for particles greater than 200 microns when z sub 0 increases above 0.0085 cm (corresponding to sites consisting of alluvium). When z sub 0 approaches 0.03 cm (corresponding to a mantled pahoehoe lava), the flux diminishes.

  2. Comparison of aerodynamically and model-derived roughness lengths (zo) over diverse surfaces, central Mojave Desert, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    MacKinnon, D.J.; Clow, G.D.; Tigges, R.K.; Reynolds, R.L.; Chavez, P.S., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    The vulnerability of dryland surfaces to wind erosion depends importantly on the absence or the presence and character of surface roughness elements, such as plants, clasts, and topographic irregularities that diminish wind speed near the surface. A model for the friction velocity ratio has been developed to account for wind sheltering by many different types of co-existing roughness elements. Such conditions typify a monitored area in the central Mojave Desert, California, that experiences frequent sand movement and dust emission. Two additional models are used to convert the friction velocity ratio to the surface roughness length (zo) for momentum. To calculate roughness lengths from these models, measurements were made at 11 sites within the monitored area to characterize the surface roughness element. Measurements included (1) the number of roughness species (e.g., plants, small-scale topography, clasts), and their associated heights and widths, (2) spacing among species, and (3) vegetation porosity (a measurement of the spatial distribution of woody elements of a plant). Documented or estimated values of drag coefficients for different species were included in the modeling. At these sites, wind-speed profiles were measured during periods of neutral atmospheric stability using three 9-m towers with three or four calibrated anemometers on each. Modeled roughness lengths show a close correspondence (correlation coefficient, 0.84-0.86) to the aerodynamically determined values at the field sites. The geometric properties of the roughness elements in the model are amenable to measurement at much higher temporal and spatial resolutions using remote-sensing techniques than can be accomplished through laborious ground-based methods. A remote-sensing approach to acquire values of the modeled roughness length is particularly important for the development of linked surface/atmosphere wind-erosion models sensitive to climate variability and land-use changes in areas such

  3. Roughness length estimation over a complex topography under different wind conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falocchi, Marco; Barontini, Stefano; Ranzi, Roberto

    2013-04-01

    The choice of a representative value of the roughness length (z0) is a key aspect to estimate the momentum flux in the lowest atmosphere layer by means of traditional micrometeorological methods. In complex terrains however the orography and the non-uniform land use around the measurement point affect both the winds regime, their turbulent characteristics and therefore the estimate of the representative roughness length as well. Aiming at better characterising this parameter in view of hydrological water-balance applications in complex mountain environments, a micrometeorological station equipped with eddy covariance devices was installed during summer 2012 at Cividate Camuno (Oglio river basin, Central Italian Alps, 274ma.s.l.). The soil of the experimental site was a lawn covered with 0.6m-grass for most of the field campaign duration, and with about 0.1m during the last days. The wind analyses detected an alternation between two main wind regimes: an Eastern katabatic wind blowing daily since 8 pm until 5 am and a local South-Western wind, called Óra, rising the valley from Lake Iseo in the afternoon. Secondary and less frequent drainage conditions were also detected. The aerodynamic drag coefficients (CD) were calculated from the 30 minutes-averaged turbulent momentum flux and for eight different equally spaced wind direction classes. According to the von Kàrmàn logaritmic law for the vertical wind speed profile and to the universal stability functions of the Monin-Obukhov similarity theory, the z0 was then estimated. The obtained values show a sensitivity to the wind directions, but they seems not to be strongly influenced by the landcover variations.

  4. Application of a roughness-length representation to parameterize energy loss in 3-D numerical simulations of large rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandbach, S. D.; Lane, S. N.; Hardy, R. J.; Amsler, M. L.; Ashworth, P. J.; Best, J. L.; Nicholas, A. P.; Orfeo, O.; Parsons, D. R.; Reesink, A. J. H.; Szupiany, R. N.

    2012-12-01

    Recent technological advances in remote sensing have enabled investigation of the morphodynamics and hydrodynamics of large rivers. However, measuring topography and flow in these very large rivers is time consuming and thus often constrains the spatial resolution and reach-length scales that can be monitored. Similar constraints exist for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) studies of large rivers, requiring maximization of mesh- or grid-cell dimensions and implying a reduction in the representation of bedform-roughness elements that are of the order of a model grid cell or less, even if they are represented in available topographic data. These "subgrid" elements must be parameterized, and this paper applies and considers the impact of roughness-length treatments that include the effect of bed roughness due to "unmeasured" topography. CFD predictions were found to be sensitive to the roughness-length specification. Model optimization was based on acoustic Doppler current profiler measurements and estimates of the water surface slope for a variety of roughness lengths. This proved difficult as the metrics used to assess optimal model performance diverged due to the effects of large bedforms that are not well parameterized in roughness-length treatments. However, the general spatial flow patterns are effectively predicted by the model. Changes in roughness length were shown to have a major impact upon flow routing at the channel scale. The results also indicate an absence of secondary flow circulation cells in the reached studied, and suggest simpler two-dimensional models may have great utility in the investigation of flow within large rivers.

  5. Roughness Lengths at Four Stations Within the Micrometeorological Network over the Indian Monsoon Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, N. Narendra; Rao, Kusuma G.

    2016-01-01

    The aerodynamic roughness length (z0) is estimated here for four locations, Bangalore, Ranchi, Hyderabad and Tirunelveli of the Indian region, using micrometeorological measurements from the instrumentation network established during the programme, " Prediction of Regional Weather using Observational meso- Network and Atmospheric Modelling (PRWONAM)". The average z0 values estimated are 0.04 ± 0.02 and 0.06 ± 0.03 m for Bangalore for the summer and the winter seasons respectively; and 0.009 ± 0.007 and 0.04 ± 0.02 m for Ranchi. For Hyderabad and Tirunelveli locations, average z0 values for the summer season are 0.8 ± 0.1 and 0.02 ± 0.02 m respectively. This value of z0 for Hyderabad is consistent with the range 0.2-2.1 m quoted for fetches mainly covered with trees. The z0 values for Bangalore, Ranchi and Tirunelveli are consistent with similar terrain pattern in the prevailing wind sectors at the experiment locations and are also in the range 0.006-0.08 m quoted in the literature for homogeneous land surfaces.

  6. An estimate of the roughness length and displacement height of Sonoran Desert vegetation, south-central Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Claassen, H.C.; Riggs, A.C.

    1993-12-01

    A somewhat unconventional technique using a tethered balloon was used to estimate the roughness length for momentum (z{sub m}) and displacement height (d) for typical Sonoran Desert vegetation. It has been suggested that measurements of the meteorological fluxes of momentum, sensible heat, and latent heat are best done at heights above ground level determined by either the roughness length (z{sub m}) or the size and shape of vegetation. Therefore, estimates of z{sub m} and vegetation characteristics are a desirable prerequisite to developing a flux-measurement protocol. Because the literature contains little information on z{sub m} for Sonoran Desert vegetation, it is desirable to measure z{sub m} and the displacement height (d) associated with Sonoran Desert vegetation.

  7. The impacts of thermal roughness length on land surface climate in IPSL-CM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wand, Fuxing; Cheruy, Frédérique; Vuichard, Nicolas; Sima, Adriana; Hourdin, Frederic

    2016-04-01

    The aerodynamic and thermal roughness lengths (z0m and z0h) are the two crucial parameters for bulk transfer equations to calculate turbulent flux. The exchange of momentum is usually different with scalars as heat (or water vapor, carbon dioxide, traces gas). In general, the transport of scalars (by molecular diffusion) is considered less efficient than momentum (by pressure fluctuations), owing to the absence of bluff-body forces for scalar exchange. However, the z0h and z0m are equal in the current IPSL-CM model. The objective of the study is to investigate the impacts of z0h parameterizations on the land surface climate. Several sensitivity experiments that accounting for different z0h and z0m are carried out with IPSL-CM: (1) z0h = z0m/10; (2) z0h = z0m/100; (3) a more physically based z0h parameterizations. A nudging approach is used in order to avoid the time-consuming long-term simulations required to account for the natural variability of the climate. The results show that the seasonal mean surface temperature (Ts) increases 0.5-1 K (for z0h = z0m/10) and 1-2 K (for z0h = z0m/100) over JJA due to the decrease of z0h. The most significant variation is over the Sahara. During the daytime, the increase of Ts (around 1-2 K) is higher than the air temperature (Tair, ~0.2 K) for z0h = z0m/10. During the night time, the increase of Ts and Tair are very close (around 0.3-0.6 K) for z0h = z0m/10. The asymmetric variation of Tair during night and day causes a decrease (~0.3 K for z0h = z0m/10; ~0.6 K for z0h = z0m/100) of diurnal temperature range (DTR). The seasonal mean sensible heat flux decreases by ~4-6 W/m2 (for z0h = z0m/10) with the decrease of z0h as well. The change of latent heat flux is the most significant over the tropics with the seasonal mean decrease of 4-8 W/m2 for z0h = z0m/10 over both JJA and DJF. Besides the change of mean climate, the human thermal comfort is also affected by z0h. A smaller z0h corresponds to a higher wet-bulb temperature

  8. A study of the atmospheric surface layer and roughness lengths on the high-altitude tropical Zongo glacier, Bolivia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sicart, Jean Emmanuel; Litt, Maxime; Helgason, Warren; Tahar, Vanessa Ben; Chaperon, Thomas

    2014-04-01

    The atmospheric surface layer of high-altitude tropical glaciers is inadequately understood, particularly concerning turbulent fluxes. Measurements have shown that sublimation reduces melt energy in the dry season, but the errors are large when a katabatic wind maximum occurs at a low height. This study analyzed wind and temperature vertical profiles measured by a 6 m mast in the ablation area of the tropical Zongo glacier (16°S, 5060 m above sea level) in the dry seasons of 2005 and 2007. Surface roughness lengths for momentum and temperature were derived from least squares fits of hourly wind and temperature profile data. Measurement errors were explored, focusing on the poorly defined reference level for sensor heights. A katabatic wind maximum at heights between 2 and 3 m was regularly observed during low wind speed and strong inversion conditions, or about ~50%of the time, greatly reducing the surface layer depth. The glacier surface, experiencing melting conditions in the early afternoon and strong cooling at night, remained relatively smooth with z0 ~ 1 mm and zT ~ 0.1 mm. Sensible heat flux measured at ~1 m was not very sensitive to the zero reference level due to two opposite effects: when measurement heights increase, profile-derived roughness lengths increase but temperature and wind gradients decrease. The relation between zT/z0 and the roughness Reynolds number Re* roughly agrees with the surface renewal model. However, this is mostly due to self-correlation because of the shared variable z0 in zT/z0 and Re*, which prevents a sound experimental validation of the model.

  9. Is a change in roughness length the cause of the recent decrease in Sahelian dust emission?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowie, S.; Knippertz, P.; Marsham, J.

    2012-04-01

    conditions in the Sahel through the following mechanisms: (A) Changes in Bowen ratio due to higher soil moisture levels reduce atmospheric turbulence, which has a larger negative impact on local wind-speed measurements than on grid box vector winds. (B) Increases in vegetation lead to increased surface roughness, which is not accounted for by ECMWF. This effect might have been enhanced by population increase around the measurement sites.

  10. A two-concentric-loop iterative method in estimation of displacement height and roughness length for momentum and sensible heat.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wenguang; Qualls, Russell J; Berliner, Pedro R

    2008-11-01

    A two-concentric-loop iterative (TCLI) method is proposed to estimate the displacement height and roughness length for momentum and sensible heat by using the measurements of wind speed and air temperature at two heights, sensible heat flux above the crop canopy, and the surface temperature of the canopy. This method is deduced theoretically from existing formulae and equations. The main advantage of this method is that data measured not only under near neutral conditions, but also under unstable and slightly stable conditions can be used to calculate the scaling parameters. Based on the data measured above an Acacia Saligna agroforestry system, the displacement height (d0) calculated by the TCLI method and by a conventional method are compared. Under strict neutral conditions, the two methods give almost the same results. Under unstable conditions, d0 values calculated by the conventional method are systematically lower than those calculated by the TCLI method, with the latter exhibiting only slightly lower values than those seen under strictly neutral conditions. Computation of the average values of the scaling parameters for the agroforestry system showed that the displacement height and roughness length for momentum are 68% and 9.4% of the average height of the tree canopy, respectively, which are similar to percentages found in the literature. The calculated roughness length for sensible heat is 6.4% of the average height of the tree canopy, a little higher than the percentages documented in the literature. When wind direction was aligned within 5 degrees of the row direction of the trees, the average displacement height calculated was about 0.6 m lower than when the wind blew across the row direction. This difference was statistically significant at the 0.0005 probability level. This implies that when the wind blows parallel to the row direction, the logarithmic profile of wind speed is shifted lower to the ground, so that, at a given height, the wind speeds

  11. Albedo Boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-510, 11 October 2003

    The sharp, nearly straight line that runs diagonally across the center of this April 2003 Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image is an albedo boundary. Albedois a term that refers to reflectance of sunlight. A surface with a low albedo is one that appears dark because it reflects less light than a high albedo (bright) surface. On Mars, albedo boundaries occur between two materials of differing texture, particle size, or composition, or some combination of these three factors. The boundary shown here is remarkable because it is so sharp and straight. This is caused by wind. Most likely, the entire surface was once covered with the lower-albedo (darker) material that is now seen in the upper half of the image. At some later time, wind stripped away this darker material from the surfaces in the lower half of the image. The difference in albedo here might be related to composition, and possibly particle size. This picture is located near the southwest rim of Schiaparelli Basin at 5.5oS, 345.9oW. The picture covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and is illuminated by sunlight from the left.

  12. Effects of Nanowire Length and Surface Roughness on the Electrochemical Sensor Properties of Nafion-Free, Vertically Aligned Pt Nanowire Array Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhiyang; Leung, Calvin; Gao, Fan; Gu, Zhiyong

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, vertically aligned Pt nanowire arrays (PtNWA) with different lengths and surface roughnesses were fabricated and their electrochemical performance toward hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) detection was studied. The nanowire arrays were synthesized by electroplating Pt in nanopores of anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) template. Different parameters, such as current density and deposition time, were precisely controlled to synthesize nanowires with different surface roughnesses and various lengths from 3 μm to 12 μm. The PtNWA electrodes showed better performance than the conventional electrodes modified by Pt nanowires randomly dispersed on the electrode surface. The results indicate that both the length and surface roughness can affect the sensing performance of vertically aligned Pt nanowire array electrodes. Generally, longer nanowires with rougher surfaces showed better electrochemical sensing performance. The 12 μm rough surface PtNWA presented the largest sensitivity (654 μA·mM⁻¹·cm⁻²) among all the nanowires studied, and showed a limit of detection of 2.4 μM. The 12 μm rough surface PtNWA electrode also showed good anti-interference property from chemicals that are typically present in the biological samples such as ascorbic, uric acid, citric acid, and glucose. The sensing performance in real samples (river water) was tested and good recovery was observed. These Nafion-free, vertically aligned Pt nanowires with surface roughness control show great promise as versatile electrochemical sensors and biosensors. PMID:26404303

  13. Effects of Nanowire Length and Surface Roughness on the Electrochemical Sensor Properties of Nafion-Free, Vertically Aligned Pt Nanowire Array Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhiyang; Leung, Calvin; Gao, Fan; Gu, Zhiyong

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, vertically aligned Pt nanowire arrays (PtNWA) with different lengths and surface roughnesses were fabricated and their electrochemical performance toward hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) detection was studied. The nanowire arrays were synthesized by electroplating Pt in nanopores of anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) template. Different parameters, such as current density and deposition time, were precisely controlled to synthesize nanowires with different surface roughnesses and various lengths from 3 μm to 12 μm. The PtNWA electrodes showed better performance than the conventional electrodes modified by Pt nanowires randomly dispersed on the electrode surface. The results indicate that both the length and surface roughness can affect the sensing performance of vertically aligned Pt nanowire array electrodes. Generally, longer nanowires with rougher surfaces showed better electrochemical sensing performance. The 12 μm rough surface PtNWA presented the largest sensitivity (654 μA·mM−1·cm−2) among all the nanowires studied, and showed a limit of detection of 2.4 μM. The 12 μm rough surface PtNWA electrode also showed good anti-interference property from chemicals that are typically present in the biological samples such as ascorbic, uric acid, citric acid, and glucose. The sensing performance in real samples (river water) was tested and good recovery was observed. These Nafion-free, vertically aligned Pt nanowires with surface roughness control show great promise as versatile electrochemical sensors and biosensors. PMID:26404303

  14. Global Albedo

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    ... to one in the visible region of the solar spectrum whereas deep clean ocean water has an albedo that is close to zero. Five years of ... Atmospheric Science Data Center's  MISR Level 3 Imagery  web site. The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer observes the daylit ...

  15. Global Albedo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A new sensor aboard NASA?s Terra satellite is now collecting the most detailed and accurate measurements ever made of how much sunlight the Earth?s surface reflects back up into the atmosphere. By quantifying precisely our planet?s reflectivity, or albedo, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) is helping scientists better understand and predict how various surface features influence both short-term weather patterns as well as longer-term climate trends. (Click to read the press release.) The colors in this image emphasize the albedo over the Earth?s land surfaces, ranging from 0.0 to 0.4. Areas colored red show the brightest, most reflective regions; yellows and greens are intermediate values; and blues and violets show relatively dark surfaces. White indicates where no data were available, and no albedo data are provided over the oceans. This image was produced using data composited over a 16-day period, from April 7-22, 2002. Image courtesy Crystal Schaaf, Boston University, based upon data processed by the MODIS Land Science Team

  16. Simulation of the mineral dust emission over Northern Africa and Middle East using an aerodynamic roughness length map derived from the ASCAT/PARASOL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basart, Sara; Jorba, Oriol; Pérez García-Pando, Carlos; Prigent, Catherine; Baldasano, Jose M.

    2014-05-01

    Aeolian aerodynamic roughness length in arid regions is a key parameter to predict the vulnerability of the surface to wind erosion, and, as a consequence, the related production of mineral aerosol (e.g. Laurent et al., 2008). Recently, satellite-derived roughness length at the global scale have emerged and provide the opportunity to use them in advanced emission schemes in global and regional models (i.e. Menut et al., 2013). A global map of the aeolian aerodynamic roughness length at high resolution (6 km) is derived, for arid and semi-arid regions merging PARASOL and ASCAT data to estimate aeolian roughness length. It shows very good consistency with the existing information on the properties of these surfaces. The dataset is available to the community, for use in atmospheric dust transport models. The present contribution analyses the behaviour of the NMMB/BSC-Dust model (Pérez et al., 2011) when the ASCAT/PARASOL satellite-derived global roughness length (Prigent et al, 2012) and the State Soil Geographic database Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (STATSGO-FAO) soil texture data set (based on wet techniques) is used. We explore the sensitivity of the drag partition scheme (a critical component of the dust emission scheme) and the dust vertical fluxes (intensity and spatial patterns) to the roughness length. An annual evaluation of NMMB/BSC-Dust (for the year 2011) over Northern Africa and the Middle East using observed aerosol optical depths (AODs) from Aerosol Robotic Network sites and aerosol satellite products (MODIS and MISR) will be discussed. Laurent, B., Marticorena, B., Bergametti, G., Leon, J. F., and Mahowald, N. M.: Modeling mineral dust emissions from the Sahara desert using new surface properties and soil database, J. Geophys. Res., 113, D14218, doi:10.1029/2007JD009484, 2008. Menut, L., C. Pérez, K. Haustein, B. Bessagnet, C. Prigent, and S. Alfaro, Impact of surface roughness and soil texture on mineral dust emission

  17. Mars Albedo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    These two views of Mars are derived from the MGS Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) measurements of global broadband (0.3 - 3.0 microns) visible and near-infrared reflectance, also known as albedo. The range of colors are in dimensionless units. The values are the ratio of the amount of electromagnetic energy reflected by the surface to the amount of energy incident upon it from the sun (larger values are brighter surfaces).

    The TES instrument was built by Santa Barbara Remote Sensing and is operated by Philip R. Christensen, of Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ.

  18. Investigation of surface roughness and tool wear length with varying combination of depth of cut and feed rate of Aluminium alloy and P20 steel machining.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varmma a/l Suparmaniam, Madan; Razlan Yusoff, Ahmad

    2016-02-01

    High-speed milling technique is often used in many industries to boost productivity of the manufacturing of high-technology components. The occurrence of wear highly limits the efficiency and accuracy of high- speed milling operations. In this paper, analysis of high-speed milling process parameters such as material removal rate, cutting speed, feed rate and depth of cut carried out by implemented to conventional milling. This experiment investigate the effects of varying combination of depth of cut and feed rate to tool wear rate length using metallurgical microscope and surface roughness using portable surface roughness tester after end milling of Aluminium and P20 steel. Results showed that feed rate significantly influences the surface roughness value while depth of cut does not as the surface roughness value keep increasing with the increase of feed rate and decreasing depth of cut. Whereas, tool wear rate almost remain unchanged indicates that material removal rate strongly contribute the wear rate. It believe that with no significant tool wear rate the results of this experiment are useful by showing that HSM technique is possible to be applied in conventional machine with extra benefits of high productivity, eliminating semi-finishing operation and reducing tool load for finishing.

  19. The Costs of Climate Change: Impact of Future Snow Cover Projections on Valuation of Albedo in Forest Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burakowski, E. A.; Lutz, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    Surface albedo provides an important climate regulating ecosystem service, particularly in the mid-latitudes where seasonal snow cover influences surface radiation budgets. In the case of substantial seasonal snow cover, the influence of albedo can equal or surpass the climatic benefits of carbon sequestration from forest growth. Climate mitigation platforms should therefore consider albedo in their framework in order to integrate these two climatic services in an economic context for the effective design and implementation of forest management projects. Over the next century, the influence of surface albedo is projected to diminish under higher emissions scenarios due to an overall decrease in snow depth and duration of snow cover in the mid-latitudes. In this study, we focus on the change in economic value of winter albedo in the northeastern United States projected through 2100 using the Special Report on Emissions Scenarios (SRES) a1 and b1 scenarios. Statistically downscaled temperature and precipitation are used as input to the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model to provide future daily snow depth fields through 2100. Using VIC projections of future snow depth, projected winter albedo fields over deforested lands were generated using an empirical logarithmic relationship between snow depth and albedo derived from a volunteer network of snow observers in New Hampshire over the period Nov 2011 through 2014. Our results show that greater reductions in snow depth and the number of winter days with snow cover in the a1 compared to the b1 scenario reduce wintertime albedo when forested lands are harvested. This result has implications on future trade-offs among albedo, carbon storage, and timber value that should be investigated in greater detail. The impacts of forest harvest on radiative forcing associated with energy redistribution (e.g., latent heat and surface roughness length) should also be considered in future work.

  20. Intercomparison of Methods for the Simultaneous Estimation of Zero-Plane Displacement and Aerodynamic Roughness Length from Single-Level Eddy-Covariance Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, Alexander; van de Boer, Anneke; Moene, Arnold; Vereecken, Harry

    2014-05-01

    We applied three approaches to estimate the zero-plane displacement through the aerodynamic measurement height (with and being the measurement height above the surface), and the aerodynamic roughness length , from single-level eddy covariance data. Two approaches (one iterative and one regression-based) were based on the universal function in the logarithmic wind profile and yielded an inherently simultaneous estimation of both and . The third approach was based on flux-variance similarity, where estimation of and consecutive estimation of are independent steps. Each approach was further divided into two methods differing either with respect to the solution technique (profile approaches) or with respect to the variable (variance of vertical wind and temperature, respectively). All methods were applied to measurements above a large, growing wheat field where a uniform canopy height and its frequent monitoring provided plausibility limits for the resulting estimates of time-variant and . After applying, for each approach, a specific data filtering that accounted for the range of conditions (e.g. stability) for which it is valid, five of the six methods were able to describe the temporal changes of roughness parameters associated with crop growth and harvest, and four of them agreed on to within 0.3 m most of the time. Application of the same methods to measurements with a more heterogeneous footprint consisting of fully-grown sugarbeet and a varying contribution of adjacent harvested fields exhibited a plausible dependence of the roughness parameters on the sugarbeet fraction. It also revealed that the methods producing the largest outliers can differ between site conditions and stability. We therefore conclude that when determining for canopies with unknown properties from single-level measurements, as is increasingly done, it is important to compare the results of a number of methods rather than rely on a single one. An ensemble average or median of the results

  1. Improvements in Sensible Heat-Flux Parametrization in the High-Resolution Regional Model (HRM) Through the Modified Treatment of the Roughness Length for Heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anurose, T. J.; Subrahamanyam, D. Bala

    2013-06-01

    We discuss the impact of the differential treatment of the roughness lengths for momentum and heat (z_{0m} and z_{0h}) in the flux parametrization scheme of the high-resolution regional model (HRM) for a heterogeneous terrain centred around Thiruvananthapuram, India (8.5°N, 76.9°E). The magnitudes of sensible heat flux ( H) obtained from HRM simulations using the original parametrization scheme differed drastically from the concurrent in situ observations. With a view to improving the performance of this parametrization scheme, two distinct modifications are incorporated: (1) In the first method, a constant value of 100 is assigned to the z_{0m}/z_{0h} ratio; (2) and in the second approach, this ratio is treated as a function of time. Both these modifications in the HRM model showed significant improvements in the H simulations for Thiruvananthapuram and its adjoining regions. Results obtained from the present study provide a first-ever comparison of H simulations using the modified parametrization scheme in the HRM model with in situ observations for the Indian coastal region, and suggest a differential treatment of z_{0m} and z_{0h} in the flux parametrization scheme.

  2. Upscaling analysis of aerodynamic roughness length based on in situ data at different spatial scales and remote sensing in north Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Genhou; Hu, Zeyong; Wang, Jiemin; Xie, Zhipeng; Lin, Yun; Huang, Fangfang

    2016-07-01

    The aerodynamic roughness length (z0m) is a crucial parameter in quantifying momentum, sensible and latent heat fluxes between land surface and atmosphere, and it depends greatly on spatial scales. This paper presents a tentative study on the upscaling analysis of z0m in the north Tibetan Plateau based on in situ data from eddy covariance (EC) and large aperture scintillometer (LAS) and leaf area index (LAI) of MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) with 250 m and 2 km spatial resolutions. The comparison of z0m calculated from EC (z0m_EC) and LAS (z0m _LAS) data indicates that z0m at both scales has apparent seasonal variations and is in good agreement with the LAI result. However, z0m_LAS is higher than z0m_EC, which is attributed to the differences in roughness elements in their footprints. An upscaling relationship for z0m is developed with z0m_EC, z0m _LAS and LAI with 250 m spatial resolution of MODIS. In addition, an altitude correction factor is introduced into the vegetation height estimation equation because the cold environment in the north Tibetan Plateau, which is due to its high altitude, has a strong influence on vegetation height. The z0m retrieval with 250 m spatial resolution in the rain season is validated with z0m_EC at sites Nagqu/Amdo, Nagqu/MS3478 and Nagqu/NewD66, and the agreement is acceptable. The spatial distribution of z0m retrievals at small spatial scale in the north Tibetan Plateau from June to September 2012 shows that the z0m values are less than 0.015 m in most areas, with the exception of the area in the southeast part, where z0m reaches 0.025 m owing to low altitudes. The z0m retrievals at large spatial scale in the north Tibetan Plateau from June to September 2012 range from 0.015 to 0.065 m, and high values appear in the area with low altitudes. The spatial distribution and frequency statistics of z0m retrievals at both spatial scales reveal the influence of altitude and LAI on the z0m in the north Tibetan

  3. Characterizing aerodynamic roughness length (z0) for a debris-covered glacier: aerodynamic inversion and SfM-derived microtopographic approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, Evan; Steiner, Jakob; Brun, Fanny; Detert, Martin; Buri, Pascal; Pellicciotti, Francesca

    2016-04-01

    ) regression-fits based on topographic metrics produced intermediate values. A tower of wind and temperature sensors was installed in the depression in October 2014. Using an iterative method to derive friction velocity and temperature scale, we derive the Monin-Obukov length and subsequently surface roughness values for each data pair (Garratt 1992, Hogstrom 1988, Brock 2006). Values range from 0.01 to 0.2 m over the observation period for this single location. Clearly, the surface of debris-covered glaciers is extremely variable spatially and temporally, so what should be used in models? Our results suggest z0 varies between 0.004 m (smooth cobbles) to 0.5m (large boulders), and that 0.015m is a reasonable central value for Lirung Glacier. As the grain-size distributions closely reproduce the distribution of obstacle sizes determined by the zero-up-crossing method, and d80 preserves the plot ranking of z0 magnitudes, it may be possible to develop a representative z0 lookup table based on grain sizes, which would provide a straightforward method to roughly vary z0 across the debris surface for energy-balance modelling applications.

  4. Earth's Reflection: Albedo

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillette, Brandon; Hamilton, Cheri

    2011-01-01

    When viewing objects of different colors, you might notice that some appear brighter than others. This is because light is reflected differently from various surfaces, depending on their physical properties. The word "albedo" is used to describe how reflective a surface is. The Earth-atmosphere has a combined albedo of about 30%, a number that is…

  5. Investigating the influence of roughness length for heat transport (zoh) on the performance of SEBAL in semi-arid irrigated and dryland agricultural systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, George; Gowda, Prasanna H.; Vara Prasad, P. V.; Howell, Terry A.; Aiken, Robert M.; Neale, Christopher M. U.

    2014-02-01

    Satellite-based thermal infrared remote sensing has greatly contributed to the development and improvement of remote sensing-based evapotranspiration (RS-ET) mapping algorithms. Radiometric temperature (Ts) derived from thermal sensors is inherently different from the aerodynamic temperature (To) required for solving the bulk formulation of sensible heat (H). The scalar roughness length (zoh) representing heat transport mechanism and described by the dimensionless parameter kB-1 was used to account for the discrepancy between Ts and To. Surface Energy Balance Algorithm for Land (SEBAL), with its indigenous approach of linearly relating dT (near-surface temperature gradient) with Ts across the imagery, maintained that this approach would absorb the impacts of differences between Ts and To. Therefore, it utilized a constant kB-1 value of 2.3 in its initial version, and later switched to a constant zoh (z1) value of 0.1. In this study, we investigated the influence of these changes in SEBAL by testing four different approaches: (i) zoh derived from a constant kB-1 of 2.3, (ii) constant zoh (z1) = 0.1 m, (iii) constant zoh (z1) = 0.01 m, and (iv) spatially variable zoh from kB-1 parameterization. SEBAL was applied on 10 high-resolution airborne images acquired during BEAREX07-08 (Bushland Evapotranspiration and Agricultural Remote Sensing Experiment) and validated against measurements from four large weighing lysimeters installed on two irrigated and two dryland fields. The spatially variable kB-1 produced statistically different and improved ET estimates compared to that with constant kB-1 and constant z1 (zoh) approaches. SEBAL performance for irrigated fields representing high ET and complete ground cover surfaces was markedly different from that for dryland fields representing greater soil water deficits with sparser vegetation cover. A variable kB-1 value derived from a physical model generated good overall estimates while delivering improved performance for

  6. Albedos. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, F.V.

    1993-07-01

    The albedo of the earth's surface varies dramatically from values of about 3 to 4 percent for calm bodies of water up to about 55 percent for gypsum sands. This rather broad range of reflected incoming solar radiation presents difficulties when attempting to define an average albedo for terrain over a large region from locally determined values. The patchwork, or checkerboard, appearance of the earth's surface as viewed from above is the result of various human activities, such as agriculture, the proliferation of urban sprawl, and road building. Each of these variable appearing surfaces will have individual albedos, rendering any attempt to determine an a real albedo almost an impossibility on the mesoscale. However, a vast data base exists for microscale applications for individual acreages, for example. A compilation of these data is presented.... Albedo, Solar radiation, Crops, Urban areas, Land uses.

  7. Observations of Surfzone Albedo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinnett, G.; Feddersen, F.

    2014-12-01

    The surfzone environment (where waves break) contains several unique and previously unconsidered processes that affect the heat budget. Entering short-wave radiation is a dominant term in both shelf and surfzone heat budgets. In contrast to the shelf, however, depth limited wave breaking in the surfzone generates spray, whitewater and suspended sediments, elevating the surface albedo (ratio of reflected to incident short-wave radiation). Elevated albedo reduces the level of solar short-wave radiation entering the water, potentially resulting in less heating. Additionally, surfzone water quality is often impacted by fecal bacteria contamination. As bacteria mortality is related to short-wave solar radiation, elevated surfzone albedo could reduce pathogen mortality, impacting human health. Albedo in the open ocean has been frequently studied and parameterizations often consider solar zenith angle, wind speed and ocean chlorophyll concentration, producing albedo values typically near 0.06. However, surfzone albedo observations have been extremely sparse, yet show depth limited wave breaking may increase the albedo by nearly a factor of 10 up to 0.5. Here, we present findings from a field study at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography pier to observe the affect of waves on surfzone albedo. Concurrent measurements were taken with a four-way radiometer (to measure both downwelling and upwelling short-wave and long wave radiation) mounted above the surfzone. A co-located GoPro camera was used to relate visual aspects of the surfzone to measured reflectance, and wave height and period were observed with a bottom mounted pressure sensor in 5 m water depth just outside the surfzone. Wind speed and direction were observed on the pier 10 m above the water surface. Here, we will examine the surfzone albedo dependence on surfzone parameters, such as wave height.

  8. Greenland Glacier Albedo Variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The program for Arctic Regional Climate Assessment (PARCA) is a NASA-funded project with the prime goal of addressing the mass balance of the Greenland ice sheet. Since the formal initiation of the program in 1995, there has been a significant improvement in the estimates of the mass balance of the ice sheet. Results from this program reveal that the high-elevation regions of the ice sheet are approximately in balance, but the margins are thinning. Laser surveys reveal significant thinning along 70 percent of the ice sheet periphery below 2000 m elevations, and in at least one outlet glacier, Kangerdlugssuaq in southeast Greenland, thinning has been as much as 10 m/yr. This study examines the albedo variability in four outlet glaciers to help separate out the relative contributions of surface melting versus ice dynamics to the recent mass balance changes. Analysis of AVHRR Polar Pathfinder albedo shows that at the Petermann and Jakobshavn glaciers, there has been a negative trend in albedo at the glacier terminus from 1981 to 2000, whereas the Stor+strommen and Kangerdlugssuaq glaciers show slightly positive trends in albedo. These findings are consistent with recent observations of melt extent from passive microwave data which show more melt on the western side of Greenland and slightly less on the eastern side. Significance of albedo trends will depend on where and when the albedo changes occur. Since the majority of surface melt occurs in the shallow sloping western margin of the ice sheet where the shortwave radiation dominates the energy balance in summer (e.g. Jakobshavn region) this region will be more sensitive to changes in albedo than in regions where this is not the case. Near the Jakobshavn glacier, even larger changes in albedo have been observed, with decreases as much as 20 percent per decade.

  9. Program for Computing Albedo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justus, Carl G.

    2003-01-01

    Simple Thermal Environment Model (STEM) is a FORTRAN-based computer program that provides engineering estimates of top-of-atmosphere albedo and outgoing long-wave radiation (OLR) for use in analyzing thermal loads on spacecraft near Earth. The thermal environment of a spacecraft is represented in STEM as consisting of direct solar radiation; short-wave radiation reflected by the atmosphere of the Earth, as characterized in terms of the albedo of the Earth; and OLR emitted by the atmosphere of the Earth. STEM can also address effects of heat loads internal to a spacecraft. Novel features of STEM include (1) the use of Earth albedo and OLR information based on time series of measurements by Earth Radiation Budget Experiment satellites in orbit; (2) the ability to address thermal time constants of spacecraft systems by use of albedo and OLR values representing averages over a range of averaging times; and (3) the ability to address effects, on albedo and OLR values, of satellite orbital inclination, the angle between the plane of a spacecraft orbit and the line between the centers of the Earth and Sun, the solar zenith angle, and latitude.

  10. Greenland ice sheet albedo variability and feedback: 2000-2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Box, J. E.; van As, D.; Fausto, R. S.; Mottram, R.; Langen, P. P.; Steffen, K.

    2015-12-01

    Absorbed solar irradiance represents the dominant source of surface melt energy for Greenland ice. Surface melting has increased as part of a positive feedback amplifier due to surface darkening. The 16 most recent summers of observations from the NASA MODIS sensor indicate a darkening exceeding 6% in July when most melting occurs. Without the darkening, the increase in surface melting would be roughly half as large. A minority of the albedo decline signal may be from sensor degradation. So, in this study, MOD10A1 and MCD43 albedo products from MODIS are evaluated for sensor degradation and anisotropic reflectance errors. Errors are minimized through calibration to GC-Net and PROMICE Greenland snow and ice ground control data. The seasonal and spatial variability in Greenland snow and ice albedo over a 16 year period is presented, including quantifying changing absorbed solar irradiance and melt enhancement due to albedo feedback using the DMI HIRHAM5 5 km model.

  11. Albedo as a modulator of climate response to tropical deforestation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dirmeyer, Paul A.; Shukla, J.

    1994-01-01

    An atmospheric general circulation model with land surface properties represented by the simplified Simple Biosphere model is used to investigate the effects on local climate due to tropical deforestation for the Amazon basin. One control and three anomaly integrations of 4 years' duration are performed. In the anomaly integrations, rain forest in South America is replaced by degraded grassland. The anomaly integrations differ only in the optical properties of the grassland vegetation, with net surface albedos ranging from the same as to 0.09 lighter than that of rain forest. It is found that the change in climate, particularly rainfall, is strongly dependent on the change in surface albedo that accompanies deforestation. Replacement of forest by grass causes a reduction in transpiration and reduces frictional convergence by decreasing surface roughness. However, precipitation averaged over the deforested area is not necessarily reduced. Average precipitation decreases when the increase in albedo is greater than 0.03. If surface albedo is not increased appreciably as a result of deforestation, moisture flux convergence driven by the increase in surface temperature can offset the other effects, and average precipitation increases. As albedo is increased, surface temperature does not change, but surface latent and sensible heat flux decreases due to reduced radiational energy absorbed at the surface, resulting in a reduction in convection and precipitation. A change in the distribution of precipitation due to deforestation that appears to be independent of the albedo is observed.

  12. Albedo as a modulator of climate response to tropical deforestation

    SciTech Connect

    Dirmeyer, P.A.; Shukla, J.

    1994-10-01

    An atmospheric general circulation model with land surface properties represented by the simplified Simple Biosphere model is used to investigate the effects on local climate due to tropical deforestation for the Amazon basin. One control and three anomaly integrations of 4 years` duration are performed. In the anomaly integrations, rain forest in South America is replaced by degraded grassland. The anomaly integrations differ only in the optical properties of the grassland vegetation, with net surface albedos ranging from the same as to 0.09 lighter than that of rain forest. It is found that the change in climate, particularly rainfall, is strongly dependent on the change in surface albedo that accompanies deforestation. Replacement of forest by grass causes a reduction in transpiration and reduces frictional convergence by decreasing surface roughness. However, precipitation averaged over the deforested area is not necessarily reduced. Average precipitation decreases when the increase in albedo is greater than 0.03. If surface albedo is not increased appreciably as a result of deforestation, moisture flux convergence driven by the increase in surface temperature can offset the other effects, and average precipitation increases. As albedo is increased, surface temperature does not change, but surface latent and sensible heat flux decreases due to reduced radiational energy absorbed at the surface, resulting in a reduction in convection and precipitation. A change in the distribution of precipitation due to deforestation that appears to be independent of the albedo is observed.

  13. Mesoscale roughness of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garvin, J. B.; Frawley, James J.

    1994-01-01

    The global distribution of multi-kilometer (approx. 9 km) length scale 'roughness' (hereafter mesoscale roughness or MR) on Venus can be estimated from the Magellan global altimetry dataset (GxDR) and then compared with MR data derived for Earth from 5' ETOP5 data and for Mars (from USGS Mars DTM dataset). The mesoscale roughness parameter (MR) represents the RMS variance in meters of the actual planetary surface topography relative to the best fitting tangent plane defined on the basis of a 3x3 pixel sliding window. The best-fit plane was computed using a least-squares solution which minimizes delta H, the sum of the squares of the differences between the 9 local elevation values (H(sub i)), and the elevation of best-fit plane at the same grid location. Using the best-fit plane and delta H, we have computed the RMS 'roughness' var(delta R), where this parameter is always minimized on the basis of its calculation using least squares. We have called this 'ruggedness' parameter the Mesoscale Roughness (MR) because it is directly related to the high-frequency variance of topography after mesoscale slopes and tilts (i.e., for Venus, the baseline over which MR is computed (dx) is approx. 8.8 km and dx for Earth is approx. 9.3 km) are removed. As such, MR represents the degree to which a planetary surface is more rugged than approximately 10 km scale facets or tilts. It should not be confused with the radar 'RMS Roughness' parameter computed at 0.1 to 10 m length scales on the basis of the Magellan radar altimeter echo. We will use our MR parameter to investigate the global ruggedness properties of Venus as they relate to geological provinces and in comparison with the spatial pattern of MR for Earth and Mars.

  14. MISR Level 3 Albedo and Cloud Versioning

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-09-07

    ... 2:  CLOUD - Wind Vectors, Height Histogram Stage 1:  ALBEDO - Expansive, Restrictive and Local Albedo (except over snow and ... Stage 2 CLOUD - Height Histogram Stage 1 CLOUD - Wind Vectors Stage 1 ALBEDO - Expansive and Restrictive ...

  15. Albedo feedback enhanced by smoother Arctic sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landy, Jack C.; Ehn, Jens K.; Barber, David G.

    2015-12-01

    The ICESat operational period 2003-2008 coincided with a dramatic decline in Arctic sea ice—linked to prolonged melt season duration and enhanced melt pond coverage. Although melt ponds evolve in stages, sea ice with smoother surface topography typically allows the pond water to spread over a wider area, reducing the ice-albedo and accelerating further melt. Here we develop this theory into a quantitative relationship between premelt sea ice surface roughness and summer melt pond coverage. Our method, applied to ICESat observations of the end-of-winter sea ice roughness, can account for 85% of the variance in advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) observations of the summer ice-albedo. An Arctic-wide reduction in sea ice roughness from 2003 to 2008 explains a drop in ice-albedo that resulted in a 16% increase in solar heat input to the sea ice cover, which represents ten times the heat input contributed by earlier melt onset timing over the same period.

  16. The Ultraviolet Albedo of Ganymede

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGrath, Melissa; Hendrix, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    A large set of ultraviolet images of Ganymede have been acquired with the Hubble Space Telescope over the last 15 years. These images have been used almost exclusively to study Ganymede's stunning auroral emissions (Feldman et al. 2000; Eviatar et al. 2001; McGrath et al. 2004; Saur et al. 2011; McGrath et al. 2013), and even the most basic information about Ganymede's UV albedo has yet to be gleaned from these data. We will present a first-cut analysis of both disk-averaged and spatially-resolved UV albedos of Ganymede, with focus on the spatially-resolved Lyman-alpha albedo, which has never been considered previously for this satellite. Ganymede's visibly bright regions are known to be rich in water ice, while the visibly dark regions seem to be more carbonaceous (Carlson et al., 1996). At Lyman-alpha, these two species should also have very different albedo values.

  17. Spectral albedos of midlatitude snowpacks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhury, B.

    1981-01-01

    Spectral albedos of impure-nonhomogeneous snowpacks, typical of midlatitudes, from 400 to 2200 nm were modeled through a numerical solution of the radiative transfer equation in the two-stream approximation. Discrete depth-dependent values of density, grain size and impurity concentration were used to characterize the snowpacks. The model is for diffuse incident radiation, and the numerical method is based on doubling and invariant imbedding. The effect of soot impurities on snowpack albedos is illustrated when a snowpack is several centimeters deep and soot reduces the albedos at visible wavelengths, however, when a snowpack is only a few centimeters deep, soot may increase the albedos at visible wavelengths. By adjusting soot content and snow grain size, good quantitative agreement with some observations at the Cascade Mountains (Washington) and at Point Barrow (Alaska) are obtained; however, the model grain sizes are found to be fifty to four hundred percent larger than the measured values. For satellite snowcover observations, a model for effective albedo of partially snow-covered areas was developed and compared with some NOAA-2 observations of the southeastern United States.

  18. Electrokinetic transport in microchannels with random roughness

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Moran; Kang, Qinjun

    2008-01-01

    We present a numerical framework to model the electrokinetic transport in microchannels with random roughness. The three-dimensional microstructure of the rough channel is generated by a random generation-growth method with three statistical parameters to control the number density, the total volume fraction, and the anisotropy characteristics of roughness elements. The governing equations for the electrokinetic transport are solved by a high-efficiency lattice Poisson?Boltzmann method in complex geometries. The effects from the geometric characteristics of roughness on the electrokinetic transport in microchannels are therefore modeled and analyzed. For a given total roughness volume fraction, a higher number density leads to a lower fluctuation because of the random factors. The electroosmotic flow rate increases with the roughness number density nearly logarithmically for a given volume fraction of roughness but decreases with the volume fraction for a given roughness number density. When both the volume fraction and the number density of roughness are given, the electroosmotic flow rate is enhanced by the increase of the characteristic length along the external electric field direction but is reduced by that in the direction across the channel. For a given microstructure of the rough microchannel, the electroosmotic flow rate decreases with the Debye length. It is found that the shape resistance of roughness is responsible for the flow rate reduction in the rough channel compared to the smooth channel even for very thin double layers, and hence plays an important role in microchannel electroosmotic flows.

  19. Does surface roughness amplify wetting?

    SciTech Connect

    Malijevský, Alexandr

    2014-11-14

    Any solid surface is intrinsically rough on the microscopic scale. In this paper, we study the effect of this roughness on the wetting properties of hydrophilic substrates. Macroscopic arguments, such as those leading to the well-known Wenzel's law, predict that surface roughness should amplify the wetting properties of such adsorbents. We use a fundamental measure density functional theory to demonstrate the opposite effect from roughness for microscopically corrugated surfaces, i.e., wetting is hindered. Based on three independent analyses we show that microscopic surface corrugation increases the wetting temperature or even makes the surface hydrophobic. Since for macroscopically corrugated surfaces the solid texture does indeed amplify wetting there must exist a crossover between two length-scale regimes that are distinguished by opposite response on surface roughening. This demonstrates how deceptive can be efforts to extend the thermodynamical laws beyond their macroscopic territory.

  20. Potential effects of forest management on surface albedo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, J.; Bréon, F.-M.; Schelhaas, M.-J.; Pinty, B.; Luyssaert, S.

    2012-04-01

    Currently 70% of the world's forests are managed and this figure is likely to rise due to population growth and increasing demand for wood based products. Forest management has been put forward by the Kyoto-Protocol as one of the key instruments in mitigating climate change. For temperate and boreal forests, the effects of forest management on the stand-level carbon balance are reasonably well understood, but the biophysical effects, for example through changes in the albedo, remain elusive. Following a modeling approach, we aim to quantify the variability in albedo that can be attributed to forest management through changes in canopy structure and density. The modelling approach chains three separate models: (1) a forest gap model to describe stand dynamics, (2) a Monte-Carlo model to estimate the probability density function of the optical path length of photons through the canopy and (3) a physically-based canopy transfer model to estimate the interaction between photons and leaves. The forest gap model provides, on a monthly time step the position, height, diameter, crown size and leaf area index of individual trees. The Monte-Carlo model computes from this the probability density function of the distance a photon travels through crown volumes to determine the direct light reaching the forest floor. This information is needed by the canopy transfer model to calculate the effective leaf area index - a quantity that allows it to correctly represent a 3D process with a 1D model. Outgoing radiation is calculated as the result of multiple processes involving the scattering due to the canopy layer and the forest floor. Finally, surface albedo is computed as the ratio between incident solar radiation and calculated outgoing radiation. The study used two time series representing thinning from below of a beech and a Scots pine forest. The results show a strong temporal evolution in albedo during stand establishment followed by a relatively stable albedo once the canopy

  1. The Effect of Black Carbon and Snow Grain Size on Snow Surface Albedo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadley, O. L.; Kirchstetter, T.; Flanner, M.

    2009-12-01

    Black carbon (BC) has been measured in snow and ice cores at levels that climate models predict are high enough to be the second leading cause in arctic ice melt and glacial retreat after greenhouse gas warming. BC deposited on snow reduces the snow surface albedo; however, in addition to BC content, snow albedo also depends on sky cover, solar angle, snow grain size and shape, surface roughness, and depth. Quantifying the albedo reduction due to BC separately from these other variables is difficult to achieve in field measurements. We are conducting laboratory experiments that isolate the effect of BC and snow grain size on snow albedo. Snow is made by spraying and freezing drops of water; BC contaminated snow is made from BC hydrosol. Snow albedo is measured with a spectrometer equipped with an integrating sphere over the entire visible spectrum (400-1000 nm). Snow grain size distribution and shape are characterized using a digital microscope to calculate the effective radius of the snow. Measured snow albedo is compared to that predicted using the Snow, Ice, and Aerosol Radiative Model. Preliminary results indicate good agreement between measured and modeled albedo for pure and BC contaminated snow.

  2. Analysis of earth albedo effect on sun sensor measurements based on theoretical model and mission experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brasoveanu, Dan; Sedlak, Joseph

    1998-01-01

    Analysis of flight data from previous missions indicates that anomalous Sun sensor readings could be caused by Earth albedo interference. A previous Sun sensor study presented a detailed mathematical model of this effect. The model can be used to study the effect of both diffusive and specular reflections and to improve Sun angle determination based on perturbed Sun sensor measurements, satellite position, and an approximate knowledge of attitude. The model predicts that diffuse reflected light can cause errors of up to 10 degrees in Coarse Sun Sensor (CSS) measurements and 5 to 10 arc sec in Fine Sun Sensor (FSS) measurements, depending on spacecraft orbit and attitude. The accuracy of these sensors is affected as long as part of the illuminated Earth surface is present in the sensor field of view. Digital Sun Sensors (DSS) respond in a different manner to the Earth albedo interference. Most of the time DSS measurements are not affected, but for brief periods of time the Earth albedo can cause errors which are a multiple of the sensor least significant bit and may exceed one degree. This paper compares model predictions with Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) CSS measurements in order to validate and refine the model. Methods of reducing and mitigating the impact of Earth albedo are discussed. ne CSS sensor errors are roughly proportional to the Earth albedo coefficient. Photocells that are sensitive only to ultraviolet emissions would reduce the effective Earth albedo by up to a thousand times, virtually eliminating all errors caused by Earth albedo interference.

  3. Implications of albedo changes following afforestation on the benefits of forests as carbon sinks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirschbaum, M. U. F.; Whitehead, D.; Dean, S. M.; Beets, P. N.; Shepherd, J. D.; Ausseil, A.-G. E.

    2011-12-01

    Increased carbon storage with afforestation leads to a decrease in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration and thus decreases radiative forcing and cools the Earth. However, afforestation also changes the reflective properties of the surface vegetation from more reflective pasture to relatively less reflective forest cover. This increase in radiation absorption by the forest constitutes an increase in radiative forcing, with a warming effect. The net effect of decreased albedo and carbon storage on radiative forcing depends on the relative magnitude of these two opposing processes. We used data from an intensively studied site in New Zealand's Central North Island that has long-term, ground-based measurements of albedo over the full short-wave spectrum from a developing Pinus radiata forest. Data from this site were supplemented with satellite-derived albedo estimates from New Zealand pastures. The albedo of a well-established forest was measured as 13 % and pasture albedo as 20 %. We used these data to calculate the direct radiative forcing effect of changing albedo as the forest grew. We calculated the radiative forcing resulting from the removal of carbon from the atmosphere as a decrease in radiative forcing of -104 GJ tC-1 yr-1. We also showed that the observed change in albedo constituted a direct radiative forcing of 2759 GJ ha-1 yr-1. Thus, following afforestation, 26.5 tC ha-1 needs to be stored in a growing forest to balance the increase in radiative forcing resulting from the observed albedo change. Measurements of tree biomass and albedo were used to estimate the net change in radiative forcing as the newly planted forest grew. Albedo and carbon-storage effects were of similar magnitude for the first four to five years after tree planting, but as the stand grew older, the carbon storage effect increasingly dominated. Averaged over the whole length of the rotation, the changes in albedo negated the benefits from increased carbon storage by 17-24 %.

  4. Optical methods for cylindrical rough surface testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez Quintian, F.; Rebollo, Maria A.; Gaggioli, Nestor G.; Raffo, C. A.

    1999-07-01

    This work studies theoretically the scattering of light from cylindrical rough surfaces. It is shown, for the conical diffraction configuration, that the mean intensity on an observation plane perpendicular to the cylinder longitudinal axis, is related to the statistical parameters that characterize the surface: the roughness (sigma) and the correlation length T.

  5. The albedo field and cloud radiative forcing produced by a general circulation model with internally generated cloud optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charlock, T. P.; Ramanathan, V.

    1985-01-01

    A general circulation model (GCM) study is presented in which cloud radiative properties are computed from cloud liquid water content inferred from the GCM hydrological cycle. Model-generated and satellite albedos are in rough agreement. Analysis of the cloud radiative forcing indicates that cloud albedo effects overcome cloud infrared opacity effects in most regions. Both computed and observed albedo of clouds decrease from low to high altitudes. The model with variable cloud optics produces significantly different regional albedos from the same one with fixed cloud optics, especially over the tropics. The cloud droplet size distribution also has a significant impact on the model albedos. The temperature of the tropical upper troposphere is somewhat sensitive to the microphysical characteristics of the model cirrus clouds.

  6. Albedo in the ATIC Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokolskaya, N. V.; Adams, J. H., Jr.; Ahn, H. S.; Bashindzhagyan, G. L.; Batkov, K. E.; Case, G.; Christl, M.; Chang, J.; Fazely, A. R.; Ganel, O.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    ATIC(Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter) is a balloon borne experiment designed to measure the cosmic ray composition for elements from hydrogen to iron and their energy spectra from approx.50 GeV to near 100 TeV. It consists of a Si-matrix detector to determine the charge of a CR particle, a scintillator hodoscope for tracking, carbon interaction targets and a fully active BGO calorimeter. ATIC had its first 16-day flight from McMurdo, Antarctica from 28/12/2000 to 13/01/2000. The ATIC flight collected approximately 25 million events. To measure charge of primary particle in presence of radiation scattered back from the interaction and subsequent shower development in the calorimeter a charge detector must be a mosaic of small detector pads so that the pad containing the signal from the incident particle has no additional signal from albedo particles. Therefore the silicon matrix was built of 4480 individual silicon pads each 2 cm x 1.5 cm. The matrix consists of four planes of detectors and the active detector area, in these planes are partially overlapped to completely cover the aperture. The lateral and amplitude distributions of albedo signals in Si-matrix are analyzed for different primary nuclei and different energy deposits in BGO calorimeter. The greater part of albedo signals has Q near 1, where Q = square root of Amplitude(MIP). The albedo distribution exponentially decreases up to Q near 8. These high values are produced by slow protons and plans. There are also a small number of signals of Q > 8, mainly for heavy nucleus primaries. These signals are apparently generated by neutrons. The comparison of the experimental data and simulations with GEANT 3-21 code using QGSM generator for nucleus-nucleus interactions is presented.

  7. Casimir effect with rough metallic mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Neto, Paulo A. Maia; Lambrecht, Astrid; Reynaud, Serge

    2005-07-15

    We calculate the second-order roughness correction to the Casimir energy for two parallel metallic mirrors. Our results may also be applied to the plane-sphere geometry used in most experiments. The metallic mirrors are described by the plasma model, with arbitrary values for the plasma wavelength, the mirror separation, and the roughness correlation length, with the roughness amplitude remaining the smallest length scale for perturbation theory to hold. From the analysis of the intracavity field fluctuations, we obtain the Casimir energy correction in terms of generalized reflection operators, which account for diffraction and polarization coupling in the scattering by the rough surfaces. We present simple analytical expressions for several limiting cases, as well as numerical results that allow for a reliable calculation of the roughness correction in real experiments. The correction is larger than the result of the proximity force approximation, which is obtained from our theory as a limiting case (very smooth surfaces)

  8. The Ultraviolet Albedo of Ganymede

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrath, Melissa; Hendrix, A.

    2013-10-01

    A large set of ultraviolet images of Ganymede have been acquired with the Hubble Space Telescope over the last 15 years. These images have been used almost exclusively to study Ganymede’s stunning auroral emissions (Feldman et al. 2000; Eviatar et al. 2001; McGrath et al. 2004; Saur et al. 2011; McGrath et al. 2013), and even the most basic information about Ganymede’s UV albedo has yet to be gleaned from these data. We will present a first-cut analysis of both disk-averaged and spatially-resolved UV albedos of Ganymede, with focus on the spatially-resolved Lyman-alpha albedo, which has never been considered previously for this satellite. Ganymede's visibly bright regions are known to be rich in water ice, while the visibly dark regions seem to be more carbonaceous (Carlson et al., 1996). At Lyman-alpha, these two species should also have very different albedo values. References Carlson, R. and 39 co-authors, Near-infrared spectroscopy and spectral mapping of Jupiter and the Galilean satellites: Results from Galileo’s initial orbit, Science, 274, 385-388, 1996. Eviatar, A., D. F. Strobel, B. C. Wolven, P. D. Feldman, M. A. McGrath, and D. J. Williams, Excitation of the Ganymede ultraviolet aurora, Astrophys. J, 555, 1013-1019, 2001. Feldman, P. D., M. A. McGrath, D. F. Strobel, H. W. Moos, K. D. Retherford, and B. C. Wolven, HST/STIS imaging of ultraviolet aurora on Ganymede, Astrophys. J, 535, 1085-1090, 2000. McGrath M. A., Lellouch E., Strobel D. F., Feldman P. D., Johnson R. E., Satellite Atmospheres, Chapter 19 in Jupiter: The Planet, Satellites and Magnetosphere, ed. F. Bagenal, T. Dowling, W. McKinnon, Cambridge University Press, 2004. McGrath M. A., Jia, Xianzhe; Retherford, Kurt; Feldman, Paul D.; Strobel, Darrell F.; Saur, Joachim, Aurora on Ganymede, J. Geophys. Res., doi: 10.1002/jgra.50122, 2013. Saur, J., S. Duling, S., L. Roth, P. D. Feldman, D. F. Strobel, K. D. Retherford, M. A. McGrath, A. Wennmacher, American Geophysical Union, Fall Meeting

  9. Calculation of albedos for neutrons and photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brockhoff, Ronald Carl

    2003-07-01

    The albedo concept is used to describe radiation that appears to be reflected from a surface, although in reality this reflected radiation is comprised of radiation that has entered the medium, and is subsequently scattered back through the surface. The albedo often offers a computationally simple alternative to estimate doses from radiation reflected from surfaces surrounding a streaming region. However, albedo data available prior to this study, are limited to relatively few source energies and reflecting media, and are based on obsolete and incomplete cross sections and response functions. The Monte Carlo code MCNP is applied in this study to calculate the differential photon and neutron dose albedos, along with the differential secondary-photon dose albedo, based on modern response functions and cross section data. Differential photon dose albedo data were calculated for source energies ranging from 0.1 to 10 MeV incident on slabs of concrete, iron, lead, and water. Differential neutron dose albedo data, and the associated differential secondary-photon dose albedo data, were calculated for source energy bands ranging from 0.1 to 10 MeV, and for thermal, Californium, and 14 MeV source spectra, incident on the same four reflecting media. The results indicate that (1) the approximation of the differential photon dose albedo proposed by Chilton and Huddleston usually deviates from the raw albedo data by less than 10% for source energies between 0.1 and 10.0 MeV, (2) the new 24-parameter approximation of the differential neutron dose albedo deviates from the raw albedo data by less than 10% for source energy bands between 0.1 and 10 MeV, and (3) the five-parameter approximation of the secondary-photon dose albedo deviates from the raw albedo data by less than 25% for source energies between 0.1 and 10 MeV. The differential dose albedo approximations obtained in this study are used to solve several example radiation transport problems, where the dose from reflected

  10. The temporal scale research of MODIS albedo product authenticity verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yongxing; Xue, Zhihang; Cheng, Hui; Xiong, Yajv; Chen, Yunping; Tong, Ling

    2016-06-01

    This study introduces a method that normalizes the inversed ETM+ albedo to the local solar noon albedo for the temporal scale of the MODIS albedo validation. Firstly, the statistical relation model between the surface albedo and the solar elevation angle was set up, and then deducing relationship between ETM+ albedo and the solar elevation angle, so the ETM+ albedo at local solar noon could be got. Secondly, the ground measurement albedo at the local solar noon was used to assess the inversed ETM+ albedo and the normalized albedo. The experiment results show that the method can effectively improve the accuracy of product certification.

  11. Laws of Flow in Rough Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikuradse, J

    1950-01-01

    An experimental investigation is made of the turbulent flow of water in pipes with various degrees of relative roughness. The pipes range in size from 25 to 100 millimeters in diameter and from 1800 to 7050 millimeters in length. Flow velocities permitted Reynolds numbers from about 10 (sup. 4) to 10 (sup. 6). The laws of resistance and velocity distributions were obtained as a function of relative roughness and Reynolds number. Mixing length, as described by Prandtl's mixing-length formula, is discussed in relation to the experimental results.

  12. Computation of averaged monthly zonal albedo utilizing the solar zenith angle, properties of clear and cloudy atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhuria, H.

    1981-01-01

    The zonal temporal averages of albedos at the top of the atmosphere were considered as a function of the length of the day. The length of the day were used to determine the average daily values of mu sub 0(=Cos of the solar zenith angle, theta sub 0). Polynominal fits of the slope and intercept functions of A sub s (cloud-free albedo) and A sub c(cloud albedo) as function of Cos theta sub 0 were obtained by using the sample values of albedo corresponding to solar zenith angles from 0 to 90 deg with interval of 5 deg. The daily zonal values of mu sub 0 and the surface albedos were used to compute the daily zonal values of albedos at the top of the clear and cloudy atmosphere. The monthly zonal cloud fractions were used to compute planetary albedo A at the top of the atmosphere. The global values of monthly albedos A sub s, A sub c and A were computed by using the weighting function defined as the difference of the sins of zonal values of latitudes. The computer program implementation is also described.

  13. Effective field model of roughness in magnetic nano-structures

    SciTech Connect

    Lepadatu, Serban

    2015-12-28

    An effective field model is introduced here within the micromagnetics formulation, to study roughness in magnetic structures, by considering sub-exchange length roughness levels as a perturbation on a smooth structure. This allows the roughness contribution to be separated, which is found to give rise to an effective configurational anisotropy for both edge and surface roughness, and accurately model its effects with fine control over the roughness depth without the explicit need to refine the computational cell size to accommodate the roughness profile. The model is validated by comparisons with directly roughened structures for a series of magnetization switching and domain wall velocity simulations and found to be in excellent agreement for roughness levels up to the exchange length. The model is further applied to vortex domain wall velocity simulations with surface roughness, which is shown to significantly modify domain wall movement and result in dynamic pinning and stochastic creep effects.

  14. Using Remote Sensing to Quantify Roof Albedo in Seven California Cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ban-Weiss, G. A.; Woods, J.; Millstein, D.; Levinson, R.

    2013-12-01

    Building Energy Efficiency Standard (Title-24, Part 6) includes the use of high-albedo surfaces on low-sloped roofs on non-residential buildings. Analyzing a subset of large presumably commercial buildings, we find high albedo roofs represent 0.5% and 10% of total roofs and roof surface area, respectively. The potential for high albedo roofs to reduce urban temperatures was investigated for a California city (Bakersfield) with warm summers using a state-of-the-art meteorological model (Weather Research and Forecasting, WRF). Base case and cool roof scenarios were simulated with the only difference being that the surface albedo was increased under the cool roof scenario. Roof albedos derived from the aerial imagery were used as an input to the climate model in the base case scenario. Simulation results indicate that seasonal average afternoon (1500 h) temperatures could be reduced by up to 0.2 °C across Bakersfield during both the summer and winter. While temperature changes are similar during winter and summer, only summer shows statistically significant temperature changes downwind (southeast) from Bakersfield. This indicates that reduced summertime temperatures may be felt over a distance that is 2 or 3 times the length scale of the region with high albedo roofs.

  15. Variability of albedo and utility of the MODIS albedo product in forested wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sumner, David M.; Wu, Qinglong; Pathak, Chandra S.

    2011-01-01

    Albedo was monitored over a two-year period (beginning April 2008) at three forested wetland sites in Florida, USA using up- and down-ward facing pyranometers. Water level, above and below land surface, is the primary control on the temporal variability of daily albedo. Relatively low reflectivity of water accounts for the observed reductions in albedo with increased inundation of the forest floor. Enhanced canopy shading of the forest floor was responsible for lower sensitivity of albedo to water level at the most dense forest site. At one site, the most dramatic reduction in daily albedo was observed during the inundation of a highly-reflective, calcareous periphyton-covered land surface. Satellite-based Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) estimates of albedo compare favorably with measured albedo. Use of MODIS albedo values in net radiation computations introduced a root mean squared error of less than 4.7 W/m2 and a mean, annual bias of less than 2.3 W/m2 (1.7%). These results suggest that MODIS-estimated albedo values can reliably be used to capture areal and temporal variations in albedo that are important to the surface energy balance.

  16. Arctic sea ice albedo from AVHRR

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsay, R.W.; Rothrock, D.A.

    1994-11-01

    The seasonal cycle of surface albedo of sea ice in the Arctic is estimated from measurements made with the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) on the polar-orbiting satellites NOAA-10 and NOAA-11. The albedos of 145 200-km-square cells are analyzed. The cells are from March through September 1989 and include only those for which the sun is more than 10 deg above the horizon. Cloud masking is performed manually. Corrections are applied for instrument calibration, nonisotropic reflection, atmospheric interference, narrowband to broadband conversion, and normalization to a common solar zenith angle. The estimated albedos are relative, with the instrument gain set to give an albedo of 0.80 for ice floes in March and April. The mean values for the cloud-free portions of individual cells range from 0.18 to 0.91. Monthly averages of cells in the central Arctic range from 0.76 in April to 0.47 in August. The monthly averages of the within-cell standard deviations in the central Arctic are 0.04 in April and 0.06 in September. The surface albedo and surface temperature are correlated most strongly in March (R = -0.77) with little correlation in the summer. The monthly average lead fraction is determined from the mean potential open water, a scaled representation of the temperature or albedo between 0.0 (for ice) and 1.0 (for water); in the central Arctic it rises from an average 0.025 in the spring to 0.06 in September. Sparse data on aerosols, ozone, and water vapor in the atmospheric column contribute uncertainties to instantaneous, area-average albedos of 0.13, 0.04, and 0.08. Uncertainties in monthly average albedos are not this large. Contemporaneous estimation of these variables could reduce the uncertainty in the estimated albedo considerably.

  17. Radiation Dose from Lunar Neutron Albedo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, J. H., Jr.; Bhattacharya, M.; Lin, Zi-Wei; Pendleton, G.

    2006-01-01

    The lunar neutron albedo from thermal energies to 8 MeV was measured on the Lunar Prospector Mission in 1998-1999. Using GEANT4 we have calculated the neutron albedo due to cosmic ray bombardment of the moon and found a good-agreement with the measured fast neutron spectra. We then calculated the total effective dose from neutron albedo of all energies, and made comparisons with the effective dose contributions from both galactic cosmic rays and solar particle events to be expected on the lunar surface.

  18. Implications of albedo changes following afforestation on the benefits of forests as carbon sinks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirschbaum, M. U. F.; Whitehead, D.; Dean, S. M.; Beets, P. N.; Shepherd, J. D.; Ausseil, A.-G. E.

    2011-08-01

    Increased carbon storage with afforestation leads to a decrease in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration and thus decreases radiative forcing and cools the Earth. However, land-use change also changes the reflective properties of the surface vegetation from more reflective pasture to relatively less reflective forest cover. This increase in radiation absorption by the forest constitutes an increase in radiative forcing, with a warming effect. The net effect of decreased albedo and carbon storage on radiative forcing depends on the relative magnitude of these two opposing processes. We used data from an intensively studied site in New Zealand's Central North Island that has long-term, ground-based measurements of albedo over the full short-wave spectrum from a developing Pinus radiata forest. Data from this site were supplemented with satellite-derived albedo estimates from New Zealand pastures. The albedo of a well-established forest was measured as 13 % and pasture albedo as 20 %. We used these data to calculate the direct radiative forcing effect of changing albedo as the forest grew. We calculated the radiative forcing resulting from the removal of carbon from the atmosphere as a decrease in radiative forcing of -104 GJ tC-1 yr-1. We also showed that the observed change in albedo constituted a direct radiative forcing of 2759 GJ ha-1 yr-1. Thus, following afforestation, 26.5 tC ha-1 needs to be stored in a growing forest to balance the increase in radiative forcing resulting from the observed albedo change. Measurements of tree biomass and albedo were used to estimate the net change in radiative forcing as the newly planted forest grew. Albedo and carbon-storage effects were of similar magnitude for the first four to five years after tree planting, but as the stand grew older, the carbon storage effect increasingly dominated. Averaged over the whole length of the rotation, the changes in albedo negated the benefits from increased carbon storage by 17-24 %.

  19. The Albedo 'system' in the Cryosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkhart, J. F.; Storvold, R.; Solbo, S.; Pedersen, C. A.; Bogren, W.; Gerland, S.; Kylling, A.

    2012-12-01

    An Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) equipped with spectrometers making upward and downward measurements between 320-950nm was flown in Ny-Ålesund and Summit providing measurements of sea ice, ice sheet, and snow-covered tundra conditions. Concurrent with the flights, ground based stations with identical instrumentation were established. Micro snow pits and snow samples for black carbon analysis were collected at each measurement location. Preliminary analysis of the data show reflectance variability larger than albedo variability and more sensitive at longer wavelengths. This variability is driven by both the light absorbing aerosol component of the black carbon as well as physical aspects of the snow pack properties. At the each location, grain size variability, stratigraphy, and other physical snow pack properties are recorded. Analysis of black carbon content of the snow and inter-comparison with satellite retrieved measurements of albedo is ongoing. In this presentation the multiple measurements of albedo show that traditional measurements and estimates of albedo lack adequate characterization of the system within which the measurements are being made. Albedo is not a property of the surface being measured, but rather a property of a system and dependent on multiple parameters within the system that change seasonally, daily, and even hourly. We examine this system, and identify areas for improvement in current albedo parameterizations in the cryosphere.

  20. Albedo, thermal inertia and rotation of ring particles (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morishima, R.; Spilker, L. J.; Ohtsuki, K.; Cassini Cirs Ring Team

    2010-12-01

    Since the Saturn orbit insertion of the Cassini spacecraft in mid-2004 up to now, the Cassini composite infrared spectrometer (CIRS) has measured temperatures of Saturn's main rings at various observational geometries. We present results of parameter fits using our new thermal model (Morishima et al. 2009). Our model is based on classical radiative transfer and takes into account the heat transport due to particle motion in the azimuthal and vertical directions. The model assumes a bimodal size distribution consisting of small fast rotators and large slow rotators. Important parameters are the Bolometric bond albedo, A_V, the fraction of fast rotators in cross section, f_fast, and the thermal inertia, Γ. Two different data sets are used to estimate these parameters. The first set, which consists of four radial scans obtained at low and high solar phases both on the lit and unlit faces of rings (Spilker et al. 2006), is suitable for accurate estimations of A_V and f_fast with high radial resolution. Another one, which consists of azimuthal scans that include data in Saturn shadow (Leyrat et al. 2008), is suitable for estimations of Γ. The estimated parameters are shown in Fig.1. The albedo is 0.1-0.4, 0.5-0.7, 0.4, 0.5 for the C ring, the B ring, the Cassini division, and the A ring, respectively. The fraction of fast rotators is roughly half for all the rings. The thermal inertia is 7-21 in MKS units. For the mid B ring, values of parameters obtained from two data sets are consistent with each other if ring particles are assumed to bounce at the midplane due to mutual collisions. We also find that fits to azimuthal scans are improved if Γ for fast rotators is larger than that for slow rotators. Albedo, fraction of fast rotators in cross section, and thermal inertia estimated from parameter fits. Two different thermal data sets are used: radial scans at four different geometries (solid curves) and azimuthal scans including data in Saturn shadow (diamonds). Dashed

  1. Roughness and function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, T. R.

    2014-01-01

    A function map is used to locate applications of roughness in separation-velocity space. The importance of roughness in contact mechanics is demonstrated and versions of the plasticity index are introduced and compared. Case studies of roughness and function are presented from tribology and the life sciences. Tribological examples are taken from the automotive industry and include the manufacture of vehicle bodies, and drive train tribology, particularly cylinder liner, cam and gearbox friction and wear. From the life sciences, problems of prosthetic fixation and tribology are shown to depend on roughness. The interaction of haptics and surface finish is described and illustrated. A number of other areas of application are listed. Finally the likely future importance of structured surfaces is discussed.

  2. Wetting on rough self-affine surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palasantzas, George

    1995-05-01

    In this paper, we present a general investigation of the effective potential for complete wetting on self-affine rough surfaces. The roughness effect is investigated by means of the height-height correlation model in Fourier space ~(1+aξ2q2)-1-H. The parameters H and ξ are, respectively, the roughness exponent and the substrate in-plane correlation length. It is observed that the effect of H on the free interface profile is significant for ξlength), and becomes negligible for wetting-layer thickness larger than a characteristic thickness τ~ξu for long-range substrate forces. Finally, the large Y (Y>>ξ) regime is characterized by a power-law scaling ~Y-2.

  3. Sea ice-albedo climate feedback mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Schramm, J.L.; Curry, J.A.; Ebert, E.E.

    1995-02-01

    The sea ice-albedo feedback mechanism over the Arctic Ocean multiyear sea ice is investigated by conducting a series of experiments using several one-dimensional models of the coupled sea ice-atmosphere system. In its simplest form, ice-albedo feedback is thought to be associated with a decrease in the areal cover of snow and ice and a corresponding increase in the surface temperature, further decreasing the area cover of snow and ice. It is shown that the sea ice-albedo feedback can operate even in multiyear pack ice, without the disappearance of this ice, associated with internal processes occurring within the multiyear ice pack (e.g., duration of the snow cover, ice thickness, ice distribution, lead fraction, and melt pond characteristics). The strength of the ice-albedo feedback mechanism is compared for several different thermodynamic sea ice models: a new model that includes ice thickness distribution., the Ebert and Curry model, the Mayjut and Untersteiner model, and the Semtner level-3 and level-0 models. The climate forcing is chosen to be a perturbation of the surface heat flux, and cloud and water vapor feedbacks are inoperative so that the effects of the sea ice-albedo feedback mechanism can be isolated. The inclusion of melt ponds significantly strengthens the ice-albedo feedback, while the ice thickness distribution decreases the strength of the modeled sea ice-albedo feedback. It is emphasized that accurately modeling present-day sea ice thickness is not adequate for a sea ice parameterization; the correct physical processes must be included so that the sea ice parameterization yields correct sensitivities to external forcing. 22 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Surface Albedo and Spectral Variability of Ceres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian-Yang; Reddy, Vishnu; Nathues, Andreas; Le Corre, Lucille; Izawa, Matthew R. M.; Cloutis, Edward A.; Sykes, Mark V.; Carsenty, Uri; Castillo-Rogez, Julie C.; Hoffmann, Martin; Jaumann, Ralf; Krohn, Katrin; Mottola, Stefano; Prettyman, Thomas H.; Schaefer, Michael; Schenk, Paul; Schröder, Stefan E.; Williams, David A.; Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.; Konopliv, Alexander S.; Park, Ryan S.; Raymond, Carol A.; Russell, Christopher T.

    2016-02-01

    Previous observations suggested that Ceres has active, but possibly sporadic, water outgassing as well as possibly varying spectral characteristics over a timescale of months. We used all available data of Ceres collected in the past three decades from the ground and the Hubble Space Telescope, as well as the newly acquired images by the Dawn  Framing Camera, to search for spectral and albedo variability on Ceres, on both a global scale and in local regions, particularly the bright spots inside the Occator crater, over timescales of a few months to decades. Our analysis has placed an upper limit on the possible temporal albedo variation on Ceres. Sporadic water vapor venting, or any possibly ongoing activity on Ceres, is not significant enough to change the albedo or the area of the bright features in the Occator crater by >15%, or the global albedo by >3% over the various timescales that we searched. Recently reported spectral slope variations can be explained by changing Sun-Ceres-Earth geometry. The active area on Ceres is less than 1 km2, too small to cause global albedo and spectral variations detectable in our data. Impact ejecta due to impacting projectiles of tens of meters in size like those known to cause observable changes to the surface albedo on Asteroid Scheila cannot cause detectable albedo change on Ceres due to its relatively large size and strong gravity. The water vapor activity on Ceres is independent of Ceres’ heliocentric distance, ruling out the possibility of the comet-like sublimation process as a possible mechanism driving the activity.

  5. Surface Albedo and Spectral Variability of Ceres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian-Yang; Reddy, Vishnu; Nathues, Andreas; Le Corre, Lucille; Izawa, Matthew R. M.; Cloutis, Edward A.; Sykes, Mark V.; Carsenty, Uri; Castillo-Rogez, Julie C.; Hoffmann, Martin; Jaumann, Ralf; Krohn, Katrin; Mottola, Stefano; Prettyman, Thomas H.; Schaefer, Michael; Schenk, Paul; Schröder, Stefan E.; Williams, David A.; Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.; Konopliv, Alexander S.; Park, Ryan S.; Raymond, Carol A.; Russell, Christopher T.

    2016-02-01

    Previous observations suggested that Ceres has active, but possibly sporadic, water outgassing as well as possibly varying spectral characteristics over a timescale of months. We used all available data of Ceres collected in the past three decades from the ground and the Hubble Space Telescope, as well as the newly acquired images by the Dawn  Framing Camera, to search for spectral and albedo variability on Ceres, on both a global scale and in local regions, particularly the bright spots inside the Occator crater, over timescales of a few months to decades. Our analysis has placed an upper limit on the possible temporal albedo variation on Ceres. Sporadic water vapor venting, or any possibly ongoing activity on Ceres, is not significant enough to change the albedo or the area of the bright features in the Occator crater by >15%, or the global albedo by >3% over the various timescales that we searched. Recently reported spectral slope variations can be explained by changing Sun–Ceres–Earth geometry. The active area on Ceres is less than 1 km2, too small to cause global albedo and spectral variations detectable in our data. Impact ejecta due to impacting projectiles of tens of meters in size like those known to cause observable changes to the surface albedo on Asteroid Scheila cannot cause detectable albedo change on Ceres due to its relatively large size and strong gravity. The water vapor activity on Ceres is independent of Ceres’ heliocentric distance, ruling out the possibility of the comet-like sublimation process as a possible mechanism driving the activity.

  6. Spatially Complete Global Surface Albedos Derived from Terra/MODIS Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Michael D.; Moody, Eric G.; Schaaf, Crystal B.; Platnick, Steven

    2006-01-01

    Spectral land surface albedo is an important parameter for describing the radiative properties of the Earth. Accordingly it reflects the consequences of natural and human interactions, such as anthropogenic, meteorological, and phenological effects, on global and local climatological trends. Consequently, albedos are integral parts in a variety of research areas, such as general circulation models (GCMs), energy balance studies, modeling of land use and land use change, and biophysical, oceanographic, and meteorological studies. , Over five years of land surface anisotropy, diffuse bihemispherical (white-sky) albedo and direct beam directional hemispherical (black-sky) albedo from observations acquired by the MODIS instruments aboard NASA s Terra and Aqua satellite platforms have provided researchers with unprecedented spatial, spectral, and temporal information on the land surface s radiative characteristics. However, roughly 30% of the global land surface, on an annual equal-angle basis, is obscured due to persistent and transient cloud cover, while another 207% is obscured due to ephemeral and seasonal snow effects. This precludes the MOD43B3 albedo products from being directly used in some remote sensing and ground-based applications, climate models, and global change research projects. To provide researchers with the requisite spatially complete global snow-free land surface albedo dataset, an ecosystem-dependent temporal interpolation technique was developed to fill missing or lower quality data and snow covered values from the official MOD43B3 dataset with geophysically realistic values. The method imposes pixel-level and local regional ecosystem-dependent phenological behavior onto retrieved pixel temporal data in such a way as to maintain pixel-level spatial and spectral detail and integrity. The phenological curves are derived from statistics based on the MODIS MOD12Q1 IGBP land cover classification product geolocated with the MOD43B3 data.

  7. The Relationship Between Arctic Sea Ice Albedo and the Geophysical Parameters of the Ice Cover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riihelä, A.

    2015-12-01

    ice in the central parts of the Arctic Ocean is resistant to the decreasing overall trend.A similar analysis is also extended to ice concentration, melt season length and other appropriate parameters describing the surface conditions. The results of the analyses are summed up to provide an assessment of the relative impact strengths of the ice field parameters on the albedo.

  8. Gamma-ray Albedo of the Moon

    SciTech Connect

    Moskalenko, Igor V.; Porter, Troy A.

    2007-06-14

    We use the GEANT4 Monte Carlo framework to calculate the gamma-ray albedo of the Moon due to interactions of cosmic ray (CR) nuclei with moon rock. Our calculation of the albedo spectrum agrees with the EGRET data. We show that the spectrum of gamma-rays from the Moon is very steep with an effective cutoff around 3 GeV (600 MeV for the inner part of the Moon disc). Since it is the only (almost) black spot in the gamma-ray sky, it provides a unique opportunity for calibration of gamma-ray telescopes, such as the forthcoming Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST). The albedo flux depends on the incident CR spectrum which changes over the solar cycle. Therefore, it is possible to monitor the CR spectrum using the albedo gamma-ray flux. Simultaneous measurements of CR proton and helium spectra by the Payload for Antimatter Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics (PAMELA), and observations of the albedo -rays by the GLAST Large Area Telescope (LAT), can be used to test the model predictions and will enable the GLAST LAT to monitor the CR spectrum near the Earth beyond the lifetime of PAMELA.

  9. A rough-surface thermophysical model for airless planets

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, J.R. )

    1990-01-01

    A model for determining diurnal temperatures in spherical-section depressions and which encompasses both subsurface heat-flow and direct and scattered sunlight effects is presently applied to the disk-integrated thermal emission of a rough planetary surface with nonzero thermal inertia. Attention is given to the variation with roughness and thermal inertia of the beaming parameter eta, which characterizes zero-phase thermal emission by comparison with a smooth, nonrotating body and is almost independent of albedo for a given surface roughness. The thermal phase curve of Ceres is noted to be well matched by the model features of (1) prograde rotation, (2) 44-deg rms surface slope, and (3) a thermal inertia that is 30 percent of the lunar value. 23 refs.

  10. A rough-surface thermophysical model for airless planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, John R.

    1990-01-01

    A model for determining diurnal temperatures in spherical-section depressions and which encompasses both subsurface heat-flow and direct and scattered sunlight effects is presently applied to the disk-integrated thermal emission of a rough planetary surface with nonzero thermal inertia. Attention is given to the variation with roughness and thermal inertia of the beaming parameter eta, which characterizes zero-phase thermal emission by comparison with a smooth, nonrotating body and is almost independent of albedo for a given surface roughness. The thermal phase curve of Ceres is noted to be well matched by the model features of (1) prograde rotation, (2) 44-deg rms surface slope, and (3) a thermal inertia that is 30 percent of the lunar value.

  11. Fault Roughness Records Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodsky, E. E.; Candela, T.; Kirkpatrick, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    Fault roughness is commonly ~0.1-1% at the outcrop exposure scale. More mature faults are smoother than less mature ones, but the overall range of roughness is surprisingly limited which suggests dynamic control. In addition, the power spectra of many exposed fault surfaces follow a single power law over scales from millimeters to 10's of meters. This is another surprising observation as distinct structures such as slickenlines and mullions are clearly visible on the same surfaces at well-defined scales. We can reconcile both observations by suggesting that the roughness of fault surfaces is controlled by the maximum strain that can be supported elastically in the wallrock. If the fault surface topography requires more than 0.1-1% strain, it fails. Invoking wallrock strength explains two additional observations on the Corona Heights fault for which we have extensive roughness data. Firstly, the surface is isotropic below a scale of 30 microns and has grooves at larger scales. Samples from at least three other faults (Dixie Valley, Mount St. Helens and San Andreas) also are isotropic at scales below 10's of microns. If grooves can only persist when the walls of the grooves have a sufficiently low slope to maintain the shape, this scale of isotropy can be predicted based on the measured slip perpendicular roughness data. The observed 30 micron scale at Corona Heights is consistent with an elastic strain of 0.01 estimated from the observed slip perpendicular roughness with a Hurst exponent of 0.8. The second observation at Corona Heights is that slickenlines are not deflected around meter-scale mullions. Yielding of these mullions at centimeter to meter scale is predicted from the slip parallel roughness as measured here. The success of the strain criterion for Corona Heights supports it as the appropriate control on fault roughness. Micromechanically, the criterion implies that failure of the fault surface is a continual process during slip. Macroscopically, the

  12. Soil surface roughness characterization for microwave remote sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzahn, P.; Rieke-Zapp, D.; Ludwig, R.

    2012-04-01

    With this poster we present a simple and efficient method to measure soil surface roughness in an agricultural environment. Micro scale soil surface roughness is a crucial parameter in many environmental applications. In recent studies it is strongly recognized that soil surface roughness significantly influences the backscatter of agricultural surface, especially on bare fields. Indeed, while different roughness indices depend on their measurement length, no satisfying roughness parametrization and measurement technique has been found yet, introducing large uncertainty in the interpretation of the radar backscattering. In this study, we introduce a photogrammetric system which consists of a customized consumer grade Canon EOS 5d camera and a reference frame providing ground control points. With the system one can generate digital surface models (DSM) with a minimum size of 1 x 2.5 m2, extendable to any desired size, with a ground x,y- resolution of 2 mm. Using this approach, we generated a set of DSM with sizes ranging from 2.5 m2 to 22 m2, acquired over different roughness conditions representing ploughed, harrowed as well as crusted fields on different test sites. For roughness characterization we calculated in microwave remote sensing common roughness indices such as the RMS- height s and the autocorrelation length l. In an extensive statistical investigation we show the behavior of the roughness indices for different acquisition sizes of the proposed method. Results indicate, compared to results from profiles generated out of the dataset, that using a three dimensional measuring device, the calculated roughness indices are more robust in their estimation. In addition, a strong directional dependency of the proposed roughness indices was observed which could be related to the orientation of the seedbed rows to the acqusition direction. In a geostatistical analysis, we decomposed the acquired roughness indices into different scales, yielding a roughness quantity

  13. Albedo and color contrasts on asteroid surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degewij, J.; Tedesco, E. F.; Zellner, B.

    1979-01-01

    Asteroids in general display only small or negligible variations in spectrum or albedo during a rotational cycle. Color variations with rotation are described in the literature but are usually comparable to the noise in the measurements. Twenty-four asteroids have been systematically monitored for such color changes. Only 3 Juno, 4 Vesta, 6 Hebe, 71 Niobe, 349 Dembowska, and 944 Hidalgo display color variations larger than 0.03 mag. In each of these cases the asteroid appears redder near maximum brightness. Of seven asteroids monitored polarimetrically, only 4 Vesta shows a convincing variation, attributed to an albedo change with rotation. The lightcurve can be explained by albedo differences alone; Vesta apparently has a nearly spheroidal shape. Nothwithstanding the above results, the degree of uniformity of most asteroid surfaces is remarkable. If asteroids exist with large discrete domains of ferrosilicate, metallic, and/or carbonaceous material together on their surfaces, they have not yet been identified.

  14. Albedo and atmospheric constraints of dwarf planet Makemake from a stellar occultation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, J. L.; Sicardy, B.; Braga-Ribas, F.; Alvarez-Candal, A.; Lellouch, E.; Duffard, R.; Pinilla-Alonso, N.; Ivanov, V. D.; Littlefair, S. P.; Camargo, J. I. B.; Assafin, M.; Unda-Sanzana, E.; Jehin, E.; Morales, N.; Tancredi, G.; Gil-Hutton, R.; de La Cueva, I.; Colque, J. P.; da Silva Neto, D. N.; Manfroid, J.; Thirouin, A.; Gutiérrez, P. J.; Lecacheux, J.; Gillon, M.; Maury, A.; Colas, F.; Licandro, J.; Mueller, T.; Jacques, C.; Weaver, D.; Milone, A.; Salvo, R.; Bruzzone, S.; Organero, F.; Behrend, R.; Roland, S.; Vieira-Martins, R.; Widemann, T.; Roques, F.; Santos-Sanz, P.; Hestroffer, D.; Dhillon, V. S.; Marsh, T. R.; Harlingten, C.; Campo Bagatin, A.; Alonso, M. L.; Ortiz, M.; Colazo, C.; Lima, H. J. F.; Oliveira, A. S.; Kerber, L. O.; Smiljanic, R.; Pimentel, E.; Giacchini, B.; Cacella, P.; Emilio, M.

    2012-11-01

    Pluto and Eris are icy dwarf planets with nearly identical sizes, comparable densities and similar surface compositions as revealed by spectroscopic studies. Pluto possesses an atmosphere whereas Eris does not; the difference probably arises from their differing distances from the Sun, and explains their different albedos. Makemake is another icy dwarf planet with a spectrum similar to Eris and Pluto, and is currently at a distance to the Sun intermediate between the two. Although Makemake's size (1,420 +/- 60 km) and albedo are roughly known, there has been no constraint on its density and there were expectations that it could have a Pluto-like atmosphere. Here we report the results from a stellar occultation by Makemake on 2011 April 23. Our preferred solution that fits the occultation chords corresponds to a body with projected axes of 1,430 +/- 9 km (1σ) and 1,502 +/- 45 km, implying a V-band geometric albedo pV = 0.77 +/- 0.03. This albedo is larger than that of Pluto, but smaller than that of Eris. The disappearances and reappearances of the star were abrupt, showing that Makemake has no global Pluto-like atmosphere at an upper limit of 4-12 nanobar (1σ) for the surface pressure, although a localized atmosphere is possible. A density of 1.7 +/- 0.3 g cm-3 is inferred from the data.

  15. Albedo and atmospheric constraints of dwarf planet Makemake from a stellar occultation.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, J L; Sicardy, B; Braga-Ribas, F; Alvarez-Candal, A; Lellouch, E; Duffard, R; Pinilla-Alonso, N; Ivanov, V D; Littlefair, S P; Camargo, J I B; Assafin, M; Unda-Sanzana, E; Jehin, E; Morales, N; Tancredi, G; Gil-Hutton, R; de la Cueva, I; Colque, J P; Da Silva Neto, D N; Manfroid, J; Thirouin, A; Gutiérrez, P J; Lecacheux, J; Gillon, M; Maury, A; Colas, F; Licandro, J; Mueller, T; Jacques, C; Weaver, D; Milone, A; Salvo, R; Bruzzone, S; Organero, F; Behrend, R; Roland, S; Vieira-Martins, R; Widemann, T; Roques, F; Santos-Sanz, P; Hestroffer, D; Dhillon, V S; Marsh, T R; Harlingten, C; Bagatin, A Campo; Alonso, M L; Ortiz, M; Colazo, C; Lima, H J F; Oliveira, A S; Kerber, L O; Smiljanic, R; Pimentel, E; Giacchini, B; Cacella, P; Emilio, M

    2012-11-22

    Pluto and Eris are icy dwarf planets with nearly identical sizes, comparable densities and similar surface compositions as revealed by spectroscopic studies. Pluto possesses an atmosphere whereas Eris does not; the difference probably arises from their differing distances from the Sun, and explains their different albedos. Makemake is another icy dwarf planet with a spectrum similar to Eris and Pluto, and is currently at a distance to the Sun intermediate between the two. Although Makemake's size (1,420 ± 60 km) and albedo are roughly known, there has been no constraint on its density and there were expectations that it could have a Pluto-like atmosphere. Here we report the results from a stellar occultation by Makemake on 2011 April 23. Our preferred solution that fits the occultation chords corresponds to a body with projected axes of 1,430 ± 9 km (1σ) and 1,502 ± 45 km, implying a V-band geometric albedo p(V) = 0.77 ± 0.03. This albedo is larger than that of Pluto, but smaller than that of Eris. The disappearances and reappearances of the star were abrupt, showing that Makemake has no global Pluto-like atmosphere at an upper limit of 4-12 nanobar (1σ) for the surface pressure, although a localized atmosphere is possible. A density of 1.7 ± 0.3 g cm(-3) is inferred from the data. PMID:23172214

  16. The determination of surface albedo from meteorological satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. T.

    1977-01-01

    A surface albedo was determined from visible data collected by the NOAA-4 polar orbiting meteorological satellite. To filter out the major cause of atmospheric reflectivity, namely clouds, techniques were developed and applied to the data resulting in a map of global surface albedo. Neglecting spurious surface albedos for regions with persistent cloud cover, sun glint effects, insufficient reflected light and, at this time, some unresolved influences, the surface albedos retrieved from satellite data closely matched those of a global surface albedo map produced from surface and aircraft measurements and from characteristic albedos for land type and land use.

  17. Multiscale climatological albedo look-up maps derived from moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer BRDF/albedo products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Feng; He, Tao; Wang, Zhuosen; Ghimire, Bardan; Shuai, Yanmin; Masek, Jeffrey; Schaaf, Crystal; Williams, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Surface albedo determines radiative forcing and is a key parameter for driving Earth's climate. Better characterization of surface albedo for individual land cover types can reduce the uncertainty in estimating changes to Earth's radiation balance due to land cover change. This paper presents albedo look-up maps (LUMs) using a multiscale hierarchical approach based on moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF)/albedo products and Landsat imagery. Ten years (2001 to 2011) of MODIS BRDF/albedo products were used to generate global albedo climatology. Albedo LUMs of land cover classes defined by the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme (IGBP) at multiple spatial resolutions were generated. The albedo LUMs included monthly statistics of white-sky (diffuse) and black-sky (direct) albedo for each IGBP class for visible, near-infrared, and shortwave broadband under both snow-free and snow-covered conditions. The albedo LUMs were assessed by using the annual MODIS IGBP land cover map and the projected land use scenarios from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change land-use harmonization project. The comparisons between the reconstructed albedo and the MODIS albedo data product show good agreement. The LUMs provide high temporal and spatial resolution global albedo statistics without gaps for investigating albedo variations under different land cover scenarios and could be used for land surface modeling.

  18. Monitoring surface albedo change with Landsat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otterman, J.

    1977-01-01

    A pronounced decrease of the surface albedo (reflectivity) has been observed in an area in the Northern Sinai, fenced-in in the summer of 1974. Analysis of the Landsat Multispectral Scanner System digital data from an April 1977 pass indicates a reduction in the albedo in the exclosure by 13%, as compared to the outside, which continues to be subjected to overgrazing and anthropogenic pressures. The reduction of reflectivity is approximately the same in all the spectral bands, and is therefore attributable to accumulation of dead plants and plant debris, and not directly to live vegetation.

  19. The diameter and albedo of 1943 Anteros

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veeder, G. J.; Tedesco, E. F.; Tholen, D. J.; Tokunaga, A.; Matthews, K.; Neugebauer, G.; Soifer, B. T.; Kowal, C.

    1981-01-01

    The results of broadband visual and infrared photometry of the Apollo-Amor asteroid 1943 Anteros during its 1980 apparition are reported. By means of a radiometric model, a diameter of 2.3 + or - 0.2 km and a visual geometric albedo of 0.13 + or - 0.03 is calculated. The albedo and reflectance spectrum of Anteros imply that it is a type S asteroid. Thus, Anteros may have a silicate surface similar to other Apollo-Amor asteroids as well as some stony-iron meteorites.

  20. The ultraviolet continuum albedo of Uranus

    SciTech Connect

    Cochran, W.D.; Wagener, R.; Caldwell, J.; Fricke, K.H. New York State Univ., Stony Brook York Univ., Toronto Bonn Universitaet )

    1990-01-01

    A radiative transfer code explicitly treating the Raman scattering of solar protons by H{sub 2} is presently used to analyze the Uranus geometric albedo in the 2000-5000 A range. The Baines and Bergstralh (1986) baseline model used reproduces the geometric albedo peak produced by Raman scattering filling of solar absorption line cores, but is found to be excessively bright for wavelengths below 2400 A. This discrepancy is resolvable through inclusion of an absorbing stratospheric haze layer, and results are thereby obtained which are consistent with the Pollack et al. (1987) model, in which aerosols are generated stratospherically through photochemical effects on hydrocarbons. 20 refs.

  1. Contribution of surface roughness to simulations of historical deforestation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ye; Wang, Zhaomin

    Surface roughness which partitions surface net radiation into energy fluxes is a key parameter for estimation of biosphere-atmosphere interactions and climate variability. An earth system model of intermediate complexity (EMIC), MPM-2, is used to derive the impact of surface roughness on climate from simulations of historical land cover change effects. The direct change in surface roughness leads to a global surface warming of 0.08 °C through altering the turbulence in the boundary layer. The regional temperature response to surface roughness associated deforestation is very strong at northern mid-latitudes with a most prominent warming of 0.72 °C around 50°N in the Eurasia continent during summer. They can be explained mainly as direct and indirect consequences of decreases in surface albedo and increases in precipitation in response to deforestation, although there are a few significant changes in precipitation. There is also a prominent warming of 0.25 °C around 40°N in the North American continent. This study indicates that land surface roughness plays a significant role which is comparable with the whole land conversion effect in climate change. Therefore, further investigation of roughness-climate relationship is needed to incorporate these aspects.

  2. Reflectance for an approximately one-dimensional rough surface that has rms roughness greater than a wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendeleev, Vladimir Y.; Skovorod'ko, Sergey N.

    2004-02-01

    A relation between the intensity reflectances of approximately one-dimensional and one-dimensional rough surfaces within the diffraction solid angle in the specular direction for normal incidence is derived for an rms roughness greater than a wavelength. The relation shows that the reflectance of an approximately one-dimensional rough surface is proportional to the reflectance of a one-dimension rough surface. The validity of the derived relation is studied for an approximately one-dimensional rough steel surface with an rms roughness of 1.3 μm and a correlation length of 15.2 μm. The wavelength was 0.6328 μm and the angle of incidence was 4°. The reflectance of the rough steel surface was measured and estimated from the derived relation. Satisfactory agreement was found between the estimated and measured reflectance values.

  3. Disappearance of the Propontis Regional Dark Albedo Feature on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Steven W.; Thomas, P. C.; Cantor, B. A.

    2013-10-01

    The appearance of Propontis, one of many distinct classical dark albedo features on Mars, has been documented by ground-based observers for well over a century; Propontis was once thought to be the location of a “typical Martian canal”. The roughly circular feature (centered at 38°N, 179°W) covers about 500km in north-south extent. Modern spacecraft observations have shown the northern plains in which Propontis is located to include many subdued craters, knobs, and troughs. Observations by the Mars Color Imager (MARCI) onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) have documented dramatic changes in the Propontis feature during August 2009. Daily MARCI mosaics (spatial resolution of 1 km/pixel) revealed extensive dust storm activity in this region over a ten day period (August 16-25, Ls ~ 322°-327°). At this time, the north polar seasonal ice cap was at maximum extent (reaching southward to about 55°N), and dust storm activity was frequently observed southward of the seasonal cap. These storms apparently led to sufficient deposition of bright dust to effectively “erase” the dark Propontis feature - yielding one of the most significant changes in regional albedo since Mars Global Surveyor began routine global mapping in 1997. Only minor changes have been detected over the course of repeated MARCI observations of this region since late-2009 - Propontis has not yet “recovered” to its previous extent and appearance. MRO is expected to provide ongoing MARCI mapping, enhanced with regular Context Imager (CTX, spatial resolution of 6 m/pixel) monitoring. An overview of the accumulated observations to date will be presented, along with interpretation of the magnitude of sediment transport required to account for the observed changes in Propontis.

  4. Survey of TES high albedo events in Mars' northern polar craters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Armstrong, J.C.; Nielson, S.K.; Titus, T.N.

    2007-01-01

    Following the work exploring Korolev Crater (Armstrong et al., 2005) for evidence of crater interior ice deposits, we have conducted a survey of Thermal Emission Spectroscopy (TES) temperature and albedo measurements for Mars' northern polar craters larger than 10 km. Specifically, we identify a class of craters that exhibits brightening in their interiors during a solar longitude, Ls, of 60 to 120 degrees, roughly depending on latitude. These craters vary in size, latitude, and morphology, but appear to have a specific regional association on the surface that correlates with the distribution of subsurface hydrogen (interpreted as water ice) previously observed on Mars. We suggest that these craters, like Korolev, exhibit seasonal high albedo frost events that indicate subsurface water ice within the craters. A detailed study of these craters may provide insight in the geographical distribution of the ice and context for future polar missions. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  5. The ultraviolet spectral albedo of planet earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederick, John E.; Serafino, George N.

    1987-01-01

    The solar backscattered ultraviolet spectral radiometer on the Nimbus 7 satellite provides a unique set of radiation measurements which allows an evaluation of the spectral albedo of the earth and its atmosphere in the wavelength range 300 to 340 nm. Near 340 nm, the derived spectral albedo expressed as a function of latitude and month exceeds that in the visible part of the spectrum, with values near 45 percent existing equatorward of 30 deg and an increase to 60-80 percent toward the poles. At middle to high latitudes, the monthly mean spectral albedo exceeds the contribution from Rayleigh scattering alone by factors of 1.4 to 2.2. At wavelengths from 300 to 310 nm, where absorption by stratospheric ozone is significant, the daylight averaged spectral albedos receive negligible contribution from scattering by tropospheric clouds, yet the derived values exceed those predicted for Rayleigh scattering from a clean stratosphere. These observations are consistent with the presence of an atmospheric scattering layer, distinct from cloudiness, located at an altitude above the tropopause.

  6. The low energy atmospheric antiproton albedo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, J. B.; Ormes, J. F.

    1989-01-01

    The flux of albedo antiprotons in the 100-1000 MeV kinetic energy range produced by the cosmic ray primaries in the atmosphere is calculated. It is shown that this is not a significant background to measurements of the low energy anti-proton cosmic ray flux.

  7. Trade-offs between three forest ecosystem services across the state of New Hampshire, USA: timber, carbon, and albedo.

    PubMed

    Lutz, David A; Burakowski, Elizabeth A; Murphy, Mackenzie B; Borsuk, Mark E; Niemiec, Rebecca M; Howarth, Richard B

    2016-01-01

    Forests are more frequently being managed to store and sequester carbon for the purposes of climate change mitigation. Generally, this practice involves long-term conservation of intact mature forests and/or reductions in the frequency and intensity of timber harvests. However, incorporating the influence of forest surface albedo often suggests that long rotation lengths may not always be optimal in mitigating climate change in forests characterized by frequent snowfall. To address this, we investigated trade-offs between three ecosystem services: carbon storage, albedo-related radiative forcing, and timber provisioning. We calculated optimal rotation length at 498 diverse Forest Inventory and Analysis forest sites in the state of New Hampshire, USA. We found that the mean optimal rotation lengths across all sites was 94 yr (standard deviation of sample means = 44 yr), with a large cluster of short optimal rotation lengths that were calculated at high elevations in the White Mountain National Forest. Using a regression tree approach, we found that timber growth, annual storage of carbon, and the difference between annual albedo in mature forest vs. a post-harvest landscape were the most important variables that influenced optimal rotation. Additionally, we found that the choice of a baseline albedo value for each site significantly altered the optimal rotation lengths across all sites, lowering the mean rotation to 59 yr with a high albedo baseline, and increasing the mean rotation to 112 yr given a low albedo baseline. Given these results, we suggest that utilizing temperate forests in New Hampshire for climate mitigation purposes through carbon storage and the cessation of harvest is appropriate at a site-dependent level that varies significantly across the state. PMID:27039516

  8. The albedo of fractal stratocumulus clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahalan, Robert F.; Ridgway, William; Wiscombe, Warren J.; Bell, Thomas L.; Snider, Jack B.

    1994-01-01

    An increase in the planetary albedo of the earth-atmosphere system by only 10% can decrease the equilibrium surface temperature to that of the last ice age. Nevertheless, albedo biases of 10% or greater would be introduced into large regions of current climate models if clouds were given their observed liquid water amounts, because of the treatment of clouds as plane parallel. The focus on marine stratocumulus clouds is due to their important role in cloud radiative forcing and also that, of the wide variety of earth's cloud types, they are most nearly plane parallel, so that they have the least albedo bias. The fractal model employed here reproduces both the probability distribution and the wavenumber spectrum of the stratocumulus liquid water path, as observed during the First ISCCP Regional Experiment (FIRE). A single new fractal parameter 0 less than or equal to f less than or equal to 1, is introduced and determined empirically by the variance of the logarithm of the vertically integrated liquid water. The reduced reflectivity of fractal stratocumulus clouds is approximately given by the plane-parallel reflectivity evaluated at a reduced 'effective optical thickness,' which when f = 0.5 is tau(sub eff) approximately equal to 10. Study of the diurnal cycle of stratocumulus liquid water during FIRE leads to a key unexpected result: the plane-parallel albedo bias is largest when the cloud fraction reaches 100%, that is, when any bias associated with the cloud fraction vanishes. This is primarily due to the variability increase with cloud fraction. Thus, the within-cloud fractal structure of stratocumulus has a more significant impact on estimates of its mesoscale-average albedo than does the cloud fraction.

  9. Measurements and modelling of snow particle size and shortwave infrared albedo over a melting Antarctic ice sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirazzini, R.; Räisänen, P.; Vihma, T.; Johansson, M.; Tastula, E.-M.

    2015-06-01

    The albedo of a snowpack depends on the single-scattering properties of individual snow crystals, which have a variety of shapes and sizes, and are often bounded in clusters. From the point of view of optical modelling, it is essential to identify the geometric dimensions of the population of snow particles that synthetize the scattering properties of the snowpack surface. This involves challenges related to the complexity of modelling the radiative transfer in such an irregular medium, and to the difficulty of measuring microphysical snow properties. In this paper, we illustrate a method to measure the size distribution of a snow particle parameter, which roughly corresponds to the smallest snow particle dimension, from two-dimensional macro-photos of snow particles taken in Antarctica at the surface layer of a melting ice sheet. We demonstrate that this snow particle metric corresponds well to the optically equivalent effective radius utilized in radiative transfer modelling, in particular when snow particles are modelled with the droxtal shape. The surface albedo modelled on the basis of the measured snow particle metric showed an excellent match with the observed albedo when there was fresh or drifted snow at the surface. In the other cases, a good match was present only for wavelengths longer than 1.4 μm. For shorter wavelengths, our modelled albedo generally overestimated the observations, in particular when surface hoar and faceted polycrystals were present at the surface and surface roughness was increased by millimetre-scale cavities generated during melting. Our results indicate that more than just one particle metric distribution is needed to characterize the snow scattering properties at all optical wavelengths, and suggest an impact of millimetre-scale surface roughness on the shortwave infrared albedo.

  10. Measurements and modelling of snow particle size and shortwave infrared albedo over a melting Antarctic ice sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirazzini, R.; Räisänen, P.; Vihma, T.; Johansson, M.; Tastula, E.-M.

    2015-12-01

    The albedo of a snowpack depends on the single-scattering properties of individual snow crystals, which have a variety of shapes and sizes, and are often bounded in clusters. From the point of view of optical modelling, it is essential to identify the geometric dimensions of the population of snow particles that synthesize the scattering properties of the snowpack surface. This involves challenges related to the complexity of modelling the radiative transfer in such an irregular medium, and to the difficulty of measuring microphysical snow properties. In this paper, we illustrate a method to measure the size distribution of a snow particle parameter, which roughly corresponds to the smallest snow particle dimension, from two-dimensional macro photos of snow particles taken in Antarctica at the surface layer of a melting ice sheet. We demonstrate that this snow particle metric corresponds well to the optically equivalent effective radius utilized in radiative transfer modelling, in particular when snow particles are modelled with the droxtal shape. The surface albedo modelled on the basis of the measured snow particle metric showed an excellent match with the observed albedo when there was fresh or drifted snow at the surface. In the other cases, a good match was present only for wavelengths longer than 1.4 μm. For shorter wavelengths, our modelled albedo generally overestimated the observations, in particular when surface hoar and faceted polycrystals were present at the surface and surface roughness was increased by millimetre-scale cavities generated during melting. Our results indicate that more than just one particle metric distribution is needed to characterize the snow scattering properties at all optical wavelengths, and suggest an impact of millimetre-scale surface roughness on the shortwave infrared albedo.

  11. Thermal Inertia, Albedo, and MOLA-derived Roughness for Terrains in the Terra Meridiani Area, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arvidson, R. E.; Deal, K.; Hynek, B. M.; Seelos, F. P., IV; Snider, N. O.; Mellon, M. T.; Garvin, J. B.

    2002-01-01

    Surface properties of layered deposits draped on dissected, cratered terrain in the Terra Meridiani area are analyzed using remote sensing data. The etched plains are cemented and differentially eroded, and the hematite plains are loose and drifting. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  12. Albedo boundaries on Mars in 1972: Results from Mariner 9

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Batson, R.M.; Inge, J.L.

    1976-01-01

    A map of "albedo" boundaries (light and dark markings) on Mars was prepared from Mariner 9 images. After special digital processing, these pictures provide detailed locations of albedo boundaries, which is significant in interpreting recent eolian activity. Derivation of absolute albedo values from the spacecraft data was not attempted. The map correlates well with telescopic observations of Mars after the 1971 dust storm. ?? 1976.

  13. Surface photometric properties and albedo changes in the central equatorial region of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strickland, Edwin L., III

    1992-01-01

    Comparison of the Viking Orbiter 2 Approach mosaic taken 11 Mars months later provides qualitative information on the photometric properties of the martian albedo features, and the distribution of dust and sand deposits responsible for the atmosphere near the northern summer solstice. The approach mosaic was taken at L (sub s) 106 degrees (early N. summer), phase angle 106 degrees; and airmasses varying from 4.6 at 30 degrees N to 3.3 near 10 degrees S. The apoapsis mosaic was taken in four sequences between L (sub s) 72 degrees and 76 degrees (late N. spring), near phase angles of 47 degrees, and at airmasses near 2.5. Systematic differences in the photometric decalibrations used to generate these mosaics may induce multiplicative errors of 5-10 percent of the observed albedos in comparisons of the mosaics, but they are probably nearer 3 percent of the albedos. In the study area (30 degrees N to 20 degrees S, 57 degrees E to 75 degrees W), scene-average approach Minnaert albedos were about 10 percent greater than apoapsis albedos and slightly less 'red'. The preferred explanation for the observed approach-apoapsis albedo difference is that both Arabia and Meridiani materials are smoother on millimeter and larger scales than other units in the study area. This is in good agreement with preliminary conclusions of Thorpe and (for dark intracrater Meridiani splotches) Regner et al. This is also consistent with reasonable models of these surfaces. 'Dark Blue' Meridiani surfaces are interpreted as consisting of sand dunes and sand sheets, which would be expected to have macroscopically smooth, nonshadowing surfaces. Viking Lander images of the surfaces at both landing sites show that smooth drift area's brightnesses are close to those of adjacent rough soil areas at low phase angles, but drifts become much brighter than rough soils when looking up-sun at high phase angles. Smooth patches of duricrust at both landing sites, interpreted by Strickland as eolian deposits

  14. The price of snow: albedo valuation and a case study for forest management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, David A.; Howarth, Richard B.

    2015-06-01

    Several climate frameworks have included the role of carbon storage in natural landscapes as a potential mechanism for climate change mitigation. This has resulted in an incentive to grow and maintain intact long-lived forest ecosystems. However, recent research has suggested that the influence of albedo-related radiative forcing can impart equal and in some cases greater magnitudes of climate mitigation compared to carbon storage in forests where snowfall is common and biomass is slow-growing. While several methodologies exist for relating albedo-associated radiative forcing to carbon storage for the analysis of the tradeoffs of these ecosystem services, they are varied, and they have yet to be contrasted in a case study with implications for future forest management. Here we utilize four methodologies for calculating a shadow price for albedo radiative forcing and apply the resulting eight prices to an ecological and economic forest model to examine the effects on optimal rotation periods on two different forest stands in the White Mountain National Forest in New Hampshire, USA. These pricing methodologies produce distinctly different shadow prices of albedo, varying from a high of 9.36 × 10-4 and a low of 1.75 × 10-5 w-1yr-1 in the initial year, to a high of 0.019 and a low of 3.55 × 10-4 w-1yr-1 in year 200 of the simulation. When implemented in the forest model, optimal rotation periods also varied considerably, from a low of 2 to a high of 107 years for a spruce-fir stand and from 35 to 80 years for a maple-beech-birch stand. Our results suggest that the choice of climate metrics and pricing methodologies for use with forest albedo alter albedo prices considerably, may substantially adjust optimal rotation period length, and therefore may have consequences with respect to forest land cover change.

  15. Random rough surface photofabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brissonneau, Vincent; Escoubas, Ludovic; Flory, François; Berginc, Gérard

    2011-10-01

    Random rough surfaces are of primary interest for their optical properties: reducing reflection at the interface or obtaining specific scattering diagram for example. Thus controlling surface statistics during the fabrication process paves the way to original and specific behaviors of reflected optical waves. We detail an experimental method allowing the fabrication of random rough surfaces showing tuned statistical properties. A two-step photoresist exposure process was developed. In order to initiate photoresist polymerization, an energy threshold needs to be reached by light exposure. This energy is brought by a uniform exposure equipment comprising UV-LEDs. This pre-exposure is studied by varying parameters such as optical power and exposure time. The second step consists in an exposure based on the Gray method.1 The speckle pattern of an enlarged scattered laser beam is used to insolate the photoresist. A specific photofabrication bench using an argon ion laser was implemented. Parameters such as exposure time and distances between optical components are discussed. Then, we describe how we modify the speckle-based exposure bench to include a spatial light modulator (SLM). The SLM used is a micromirror matrix known as Digital Micromirror Device (DMD) which allows spatial modulation by displaying binary images. Thus, the spatial beam shape can be tuned and so the speckle pattern on the photoresist is modified. As the photoresist photofabricated surface is correlated to the speckle pattern used to insolate, the roughness parameters can be adjusted.

  16. Mask roughness induced LER: a rule of thumb -- paper

    SciTech Connect

    McClinton, Brittany; Naulleau, Patrick

    2010-03-12

    Much work has already been done on how both the resist and line-edge roughness (LER) on the mask affect the final printed LER. What is poorly understood, however, is the extent to which system-level effects such as mask surface roughness, illumination conditions, and defocus couple to speckle at the image plane, and currently factor into LER limits. Here, we propose a 'rule-of-thumb' simplified solution that provides a fast and powerful method to obtain mask roughness induced LER. We present modeling data on an older generation mask with a roughness of 230 pm as well as the ultimate target roughness of 50 pm. Moreover, we consider feature sizes of 50 nm and 22 nm, and show that as a function of correlation length, the LER peaks at the condition that the correlation length is approximately equal to the resolution of the imaging optic.

  17. Prediction of Frictional Drag over Rough Walls using Surface Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flack, Karen; Schultz, Michael

    2014-11-01

    Although the frictional drag of rough-wall-bounded flows has been studied extensively, several practical questions remain largely unresolved. First, the relationship between the shape of the roughness function in transitionally-rough regime and the surface topography which gives rise to it are not well understood. Second, it is not completely clear which textural parameters best describe a rough surface in a hydraulic sense. Furthermore, the range of roughness wavelengths that influence the skin-friction is not well established. The focus of the present work is to attempt to address these questions with a systematic study of the skin-friction of fifteen rough surfaces that were generated by grit blasting. The hydrodynamic tests were carried out over a large Reynolds number range. Five surfaces were prepared by grit blasting with a single scale blast media. These underwent hydrodynamic testing and were subsequently blasted with secondary and tertiary scale media in order to investigate the role that the incorporation of additional roughness length scales plays in determining the shape of the roughness function and the resulting hydraulic length scale. The presentation will focus on the appropriate statistical scales for prediction of the roughness function. Spatial filtering prior to the calculation of surface statistics will also be discussed. Work supported by the Office of Naval Research.

  18. Theory of adhesion: Role of surface roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persson, B. N. J.; Scaraggi, M.

    2014-09-01

    We discuss how surface roughness influences the adhesion between elastic solids. We introduce a Tabor number which depends on the length scale or magnification, and which gives information about the nature of the adhesion at different length scales. We consider two limiting cases relevant for (a) elastically hard solids with weak (or long ranged) adhesive interaction (DMT-limit) and (b) elastically soft solids with strong (or short ranged) adhesive interaction (JKR-limit). For the former cases we study the nature of the adhesion using different adhesive force laws (F ˜ u-n, n = 1.5-4, where u is the wall-wall separation). In general, adhesion may switch from DMT-like at short length scales to JKR-like at large (macroscopic) length scale. We compare the theory predictions to results of exact numerical simulations and find good agreement between theory and simulation results.

  19. Estimating big bluestem albedo from directional reflectance measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irons, J. R.; Ranson, K. J.; Daughtry, C. S. T.

    1988-01-01

    Multidirectional reflectance factor measurements acquired in the summer of 1986 are used to make estimates of big bluestem grass albedo, evaluating the variation of albedo with changes in solar zenith angle and phenology. On any given day, the albedo was observed to increase by at least 19 percent as solar zenith angle increased. Changes in albedo were found to correspond to changes in the green leaf area index of the grass canopy. Estimates of albedo made using reflectance data acquired within only one or two azimuthal planes and at a restricted range of view zenith angle were evaluated and compared to 'true' albedos derived from all available reflectance factor data. It was found that even a limited amount of multiple direction reflectance data was preferable to a single nadir reflectance factor for the estimation of prarie grass albedo.

  20. Calibration system for albedo neutron dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Rothermich, N.E.

    1981-01-01

    Albedo neutron dosimeters have proven to be effective as a method of measuring the dose from neutron exposures that other types of neutron detectors cannot measure. Results of research conducted to calibrate an albedo neutron dosemeter are presented. The calibration procedure consisted of exposing the TLD chips to a 46 curie /sup 238/PuBe source at known distances, dose rates and exposure periods. The response of the TLD's is related to the dose rate measured with a dose rate meter to obtain the calibration factor. This calibration factor is then related to the ratio of the counting rates determined by 9-inch and 3-inch Bonner spheres (also called remmeters) and a calibration curve was determined. 17 references, 10 figures, 3 tables.

  1. The albedo of particles in reflection nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rush, W. F.

    1974-01-01

    The relation between the apparent angular extent of a reflection nebula and the apparent magnitude of its illuminating star was reconsidered under a less restrictive set of assumptions. A computational technique was developed which permits the use of fits to the observed m-log a values to determine the albedo of particles composing reflection nebulae, providing only that a phase function and average optical thickness are assumed. Multiple scattering, anisotropic phase functions, and illumination by the general star field are considered, and the albedo of reflection nebular particles appears to be the same as that for interstellar particles in general. The possibility of continuous fluorescence contributions to the surface brightness is also considered.

  2. Earth Albedo and the orbit of LAGEOS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubincam, D. P.; Weiss, N. R.

    1985-01-01

    The long-period perturbations in the orbit of the Lageos satellite due to the Earth's albedo have been found using a new analytical formalism. The Earth is assumed to be a sphere whose surface diffusely reflects sunlight according to Lambert's law. Specular reflection is not considered. The formalism is based on spherical harmonics; it produces equations which hold regardless of whether the terminator is seen by the satellite or not. Specializing to the case of a realistic zonal albedo shows that Lageos' orbital semimajor axis changes periodically by only the a few millimeters and the eccentricity by one part in 100,000. The longitude of the node increases secularly. The effect considered here can explain neither the secular decay of 1.1 mm/day in the semimajor axis nor the observed along-track variations in acceleration of order 2 x 10 to the minus 12 power/sq ms.

  3. Geomorphological related albedo features on Ceres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krohn, K.; Matz, K.-D.; Jaumann, R.; Otto, K.; Li, J.-Y.; Buczkowski, D.; Mest, S.; Scully, J. E. C.; Williams, D. A.; Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.

    2015-10-01

    NASA's Dawn spacecraft entered orbit of Ceres on March 6, 2015, to spend one year characterizing the geology, elemental and mineralogical composition, topography, shape, and internal structure of the Ceres [1]. Ceres is supposed to be differentiated into a silicate core, a liquid water mantle and a solid ice crust with a surface temperature from 130K to 235K [2,3]. At the time of writing, the acquired image data from Ceres provide a spatial resolution of up to 2.1 km/pixel. The surface of Ceres reveals some albedo features that seem to be related to geomorphology. Those features show either a high or a low albedo compared to the surrounding.

  4. Climatic effects of surface albedo geoengineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irvine, Peter J.; Ridgwell, Andy; Lunt, Daniel J.

    2011-12-01

    Various surface albedo modification geoengineering schemes such as those involving desert, urban, or agricultural areas have been proposed as potential strategies for helping counteract the warming caused by greenhouse gas emissions. However, such schemes tend to be inherently limited in their potential and would create a much more heterogeneous radiative forcing than propositions for space-based "reflectors" and enhanced stratospheric aerosol concentrations. Here we present results of a series of atmosphere-ocean general circulation model (GCM) simulations to compare three surface albedo geoengineering proposals: urban, cropland, and desert albedo enhancement. We find that the cooling effect of surface albedo modification is strongly seasonal and mostly confined to the areas of application. For urban and cropland geoengineering, the global effects are minor but, because of being colocated with areas of human activity, they may provide some regional benefits. Global desert geoengineering, which is associated with significant global-scale changes in circulation and the hydrological cycle, causes a smaller reduction in global precipitation per degree of cooling than sunshade geoengineering, 1.1% K-1 and 2.0% K-1 respectively, but a far greater reduction in the precipitation over land, 3.9% K-1 compared with 1.0% K-1. Desert geoengineering also causes large regional-scale changes in precipitation with a large reduction in the intensity of the Indian and African monsoons in particular. None of the schemes studied reverse the climate changes associated with a doubling of CO2, with desert geoengineering profoundly altering the climate and with urban and cropland geoengineering providing only some regional amelioration at most.

  5. Charred Forests Increase Snow Albedo Decay: Watershed-Scale Implications of the Postfire Snow Albedo Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleason, K. E.; Nolin, A. W.

    2014-12-01

    Recent work shows that after a high severity forest fire, approximately 60% more solar radiation reaches the snow surface due to the reduction in canopy density. Also, significant amounts of black carbon (BC) particles and larger burned woody debris (BWD) are shed from standing charred trees, which concentrate on the snowpack, darken its surface, and reduce snow albedo by 50% during ablation. The postfire forest environment drives a substantial increase in net shortwave radiation at the snowpack surface, driving earlier and more rapid melt, however hydrologic models do not explicitly incorporate forest fire disturbance effects to snowpack dynamics. In this study we characterized, parameterized, and validated the postfire snow albedo effect: how the deposition and concentration of charred forest debris decreases snow albedo, increases snow albedo decay rates, and drives an earlier date of snow disappearance. For three study sites in the Oregon High Cascade Mountains, a 2-yr old burned forest, a 10-yr burned forest, and a nearby unburned forest, we used a suite of empirical data to characterize the magnitude and duration of the postfire effect to snow albedo decay. For WY 2012, WY2013, and WY2014 we conducted spectral albedo measurements, snow surface sampling, in-situ snow and meteorological monitoring, and snow energy balance modeling. From these data we developed a new parameterization which represents the postfire effect to snow albedo decay as a function of days-since-snowfall. We validated our parameterization using a physically-based, spatially-distributed snow accumulation and melt model, in-situ snow monitoring, net snowpack radiation, and remote sensing data. We modeled snow dynamics across the extent of all burned area in the headwaters of the McKenzie River Basin and validated the watershed-scale implications of the postfire snow albedo effect using in-situ micrometeorological and remote sensing data. This research quantified the watershed scale postfire

  6. Determination of Joint Roughness Coefficients Using Roughness Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Hyun-Sic; Kang, Seong-Seung; Jang, Bo-An

    2014-11-01

    This study used precisely digitized standard roughness profiles to determine roughness parameters such as statistical and 2D discontinuity roughness, and fractal dimensions. Our methods were based on the relationship between the joint roughness coefficient (JRC) values and roughness parameters calculated using power law equations. Statistical and 2D roughness parameters, and fractal dimensions correlated well with JRC values, and had correlation coefficients of over 0.96. However, all of these relationships have a 4th profile (JRC 6-8) that deviates by more than ±5 % from the JRC values given in the standard roughness profiles. This indicates that this profile is statistically different than the others. We suggest that fractal dimensions should be measured within the entire range of the divider, instead of merely measuring values within a suitable range. Normalized intercept values also correlated with the JRC values, similarly to the fractal dimension values discussed above. The root mean square first derivative values, roughness profile indexes, 2D roughness parameter, and fractal dimension values decreased as the sampling interval increased. However, the structure function values increased very rapidly with increasing sampling intervals. This indicates that the roughness parameters are not independent of the sampling interval, and that the different relationships between the JRC values and these roughness parameters are dependent on the sampling interval.

  7. Albedo Observation by Hayabusa2 LIDAR: Instrument Performance and Error Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Ryuhei; Senshu, Hiroki; Namiki, Noriyuki; Mizuno, Takahide; Abe, Shinsuke; Yoshida, Fumi; Noda, Hirotomo; Hirata, Naru; Oshigami, Shoko; Araki, Hiroshi; Ishihara, Yoshiaki; Matsumoto, Koji

    2016-03-01

    The Japanese asteroid explorer Hayabusa2 was launched at the end of 2014. Hayabusa2 is supposed to observe the near-Earth C-type asteroid 162173 Ryugu (1999 JU3) and bring surface material samples back to Earth in 2020. It is equipped with Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) instrument for laser ranging which can be used to measure the intensities of transmitted and received pulses. The intensity data can be used to estimate the normal albedo of Ryugu at a laser wavelength of 1.064 μm. To perform this estimation, we determined the transfer functions of the laser module and receiver to convert the intensity data into pulse energies, along with the utilization ratio of the returned pulse energy, through verification tests of the LIDAR flight model. Then, we evaluated the error of the normal albedo. This error is affected not only by the performance of the LIDAR but also by the slope and roughness of the asteroid's surface. In this paper, we focus on the error in the normal albedo due only to the instrument error, which will be 18.0 % in an observation at a nominal altitude of 20 km.

  8. HIGH-RESOLUTION IMAGING OF THE GEGENSCHEIN AND THE GEOMETRIC ALBEDO OF INTERPLANETARY DUST

    SciTech Connect

    Ishiguro, Masateru; Yang, Hongu; Usui, Fumihiko; Pyo, Jeonghyun; Ueno, Munetaka; Ootsubo, Takafumi; Kwon, Suk Minn; Mukai, Tadashi

    2013-04-10

    We performed optical observations of the Gegenschein using a liquid-nitrogen-cooled wide-field camera, the Wide-field Imager of Zodiacal light with ARray Detector (WIZARD), between 2003 March and 2006 November. We found a narrow brightness enhancement superimposed on the smooth gradient of the Gegenschein at the exact position of the antisolar point. Whereas the Gegenschein morphology changed according to the orbital motion of the Earth, the maximum brightness coincided with the antisolar direction throughout the year. We compared the observed morphology of the Gegenschein with those of models in which the spatial density of the interplanetary dust cloud was considered and found that the volume scattering phase function had a narrow backscattering enhancement. The morphology was reproducible with a spatial distribution model for infrared zodiacal emission. It is likely that the zero-phase peak (the so-called opposition effect) was caused by coherent backscattering and/or shadow-hiding effects on the rough surfaces of individual dust particles. These results suggest that big particles are responsible for both zodiacal light and zodiacal emission. Finally, we derived the geometric albedo of the smooth component of interplanetary dust, assuming big particles, and obtained a geometric albedo of 0.06 {+-} 0.01. The derived albedo is in accordance with collected dark micrometeorites and observed cometary dust particles. We concluded that chondritic particles are dominant near Earth space, supporting the recent theoretical study by dynamical simulation.

  9. Turbulent boundary layer flow over broad-banded roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlak, Geno; Aghsaee, Payam; Mazrouei, Saeed; Leonardi, Stefano; Rajagopalan, Krishnakumar; Kobayashi, Marcelo

    2014-11-01

    The response of the boundary layer to a regular roughness is often parameterized in terms of the length scales defining the roughness. Difficulty arises in the case of broad-banded and highly irregular roughness distributions such as over coral reefs or urban canopies where the length scale that determines the response of the boundary layer is not clear. Here we use a spectral description for roughness to create idealized two-dimensional irregular roughness profiles, using square waves as a basis function. Laboratory experiments along with Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) are used to examine the hydrodynamic response to the broad-banded roughness and flow characteristics are related to geometric characteristics of the boundary. The simulations and experiments show that the nature of the flow over two-dimensional irregular walls can be determined as a function of the hydrodynamic origin, which, in turn, can be determined as a function of a mean cavity shape. Results are interpreted in terms of the spectral characteristics of the roughness. The contribution of the various spectral components to the total drag is analyzed for each case. The roughness spectrum influences the flow through the shape of the cavities on the wall and can provide some guidance in predicting the nature of the flow.

  10. Surface roughness scattering in multisubband accumulation layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Han; Reich, K. V.; Shklovskii, B. I.

    2016-06-01

    Accumulation layers with very large concentrations of electrons where many subbands are filled became recently available due to ionic liquid and other new methods of gating. The low-temperature mobility in such layers is limited by the surface roughness scattering. However, theories of roughness scattering so far dealt only with the small-density single subband two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG). Here we develop a theory of roughness-scattering limited mobility for the multisubband large concentration case. We show that with growing 2D electron concentration n the surface dimensionless conductivity σ /(2 e2/h ) first decreases as ∝n-6 /5 and then saturates as ˜(d aB/Δ2)≫1 , where d and Δ are the characteristic length and height of the surface roughness and aB is the effective Bohr radius. This means that in spite of the shrinkage of the 2DEG thickness and the related increase of the scattering rate the 2DEG remains a good metal.

  11. Optical roughness measurements on specially designed roughness standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danzl, R.; Helmli, F.; Rubert, P.; Prantl, M.

    2008-09-01

    The measurement of surface texture is one of the most common and important ways to judge the quality of a technical surface. In order to verify whether a metrology device is able to measure certain types of roughness accurately, various roughness standards with calibrated roughness values are available. While almost all roughness standards produced so far have been designed for tactile systems we demonstrate how the optical metrology device InfiniteFocus can be applied to special roughness standards that have been artificially roughened. Experiments are performed on standards with periodic structure and the results of the optical system are compared to the calibrated values obtained by tactile systems with different tip radius. Additionally the profile-based measurements are compared to area-based measurements conform to a recently developed ISO standard draft. Finally roughness measurements on real surfaces are presented.

  12. Global color and albedo variations on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcewen, Alfred S.

    1988-01-01

    The present Voyager imaging data multispectral mosaics of Io include global mosaics from each of the Voyager 1 and 2 data sets and a high-resolution mosaic of the region centered on the Ra Patera volcano. The constancy of the disk-integrated color and albedo of Io over recent decades despite volcanic activity may be due to the regular occurrence of large Pele-type plumes with relatively dark, red deposits. Io's intrinsic spectral variability involves continuous variation among three major spectral end members. Attention is given to the mapping of the data into five spectral units for the purposes of comparison with laboratory measurements of Io surface material candidates.

  13. Albedo and transmittance of inhomogeneous stratus clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Zuev, V.E.; Kasyanov, E.I.; Titov, G.A.

    1996-04-01

    A highly important topic is the study of the relationship between the statistical parameters of optical and radiative charactertistics of inhomogeneous stratus clouds. This is important because the radiation codes of general circulation models need improvement, and it is important for geophysical information. A cascade model has been developed at the Goddard Space Flight Center to treat stratocumulus clouds with the simplest geometry and horizontal fluctuations of the liquid water path (optical thickness). The model evaluates the strength with which the stochastic geometry of clouds influences the statistical characteristics of albedo and the trnasmittance of solar radiation.

  14. Impact of Atmospheric Albedo on Amazon Evapotranspiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, A. V.; Thompson, S. E.; Dracup, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    The vulnerability of the Amazon region to climate and anthropogenic driven disturbances has been the subject of extensive research efforts, given its importance in the global and regional climate and ecologic systems. The evaluation of such vulnerabilities requires the proper understanding of physical mechanisms controlling water and energy balances and how the disturbances change them. Among those mechanisms, the effects of atmospheric albedo on evapotranspiration have not been fully explored yet and are explored in this study. Evapotranspiration in the Amazon is sustained at high levels across all seasons and represents a large fraction of water and energy surface budgets. In this study, statistical analysis of data from four flux towers installed at Amazon primary forest sites was employed to quantify the impact of atmospheric albedo, mostly resulted from cloudiness, on evapotranspiration and to compare it to the effect of water limitation. Firstly, the difference in eddy-flux derived evapotranspiration at the flux towers under rainy and non-rainy antecedent conditions was tested for significance. Secondly, the same statistical comparison was performed under cloudy and clear sky conditions at hourly and daily time scales, using the reduction in incoming solar radiation as an indicator of cloudiness. Finally, the sensitivity of seasonal evapotranspiration totals to atmospheric albedo resulted from rainfall patterns is evaluated. That was done by sampling daily evapotranspiration estimates from empirical probability distribution functions conditioned to rainfall occurrence and then varying the number of dry days in each season. It was found that light limitation is much more important than water limitation in the Amazon, resulting in up to 43% reduction in daily evapotranspiration. Also, this effect varies by location and by season, the largest impact being in wet season, from December do January. Moreover, seasonal evapotranspiration totals were found to be

  15. Albedo maps of Pluto and Charon - Initial mutual event results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buie, Marc W.; Tholen, David J.; Horne, Keith

    1992-01-01

    By applying the technique of maximum entropy image reconstruction to invert observed lightcurves, surface maps of single-scattering albedo are obtained for the surfaces of Pluto and Charon from 1954 to 1986. The albedo features of the surface of Pluto are similar to those of the Buie and Tholen (1989) spot model maps; a south polar cap is evident. The map of Charon is somewhat darker, with single-scattering albedos as low as 0.03.

  16. Correlation of Far Ultraviolet Lunar Albedo with Solar Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddox, Will; Spann, James F.; Germany, Glynn

    2004-01-01

    We present a correlative analysis between the variability of the lunar albedo in the far ultraviolet wavelength range (130- 190 nm) and various solar activity indices for a two-week period. We also report lunar albedo measurements in four separate wavelength ranges, corresponding to four filters on the Polar Ultraviolet Imager. To our knowledge this is the first reported long term measurements of the lunar albedo in this wavelength range.

  17. Impact of weather events on Arctic sea ice albedo evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arntsen, A. E.; Perovich, D. K.; Polashenski, C.; Stwertka, C.

    2015-12-01

    Arctic sea ice undergoes a seasonal evolution from cold snow-covered ice to melting snow to bare ice with melt ponds. Associated with this physical evolution is a decrease in the albedo of the ice cover. While the change in albedo is often considered as a steady seasonal decrease, weather events during melt, such as rain or snow, can impact the albedo evolution. Measurements on first year ice in the Chukchi Sea showed a decrease in visible albedo to 0.77 during the onset of melt. New snow from 4 - 6 June halted melting and increased the visible albedo to 0.87. It took 12 days for the albedo to decrease to levels prior to the snowfall. Incident solar radiation is large in June and thus a change in albedo has a large impact on the surface heat budget. The snowfall increased the albedo by 0.1 and reduced the absorbed sunlight from 5 June to 17 June by approximately 32 MJ m-2. The total impact of the snowfall will be even greater, since the delay in albedo reduction will be propagated throughout the entire summer. A rain event would have the opposite impact, increasing solar heat input and accelerating melting. Snow or rain in May or June can impact the summer melt cycle of Arctic sea ice.

  18. THE ALBEDO-COLOR DIVERSITY OF TRANSNEPTUNIAN OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Lacerda, Pedro; Rengel, Miriam; Fornasier, Sonia; Lellouch, Emmanuel; Delsanti, Audrey; Kiss, Csaba; Vilenius, Esa; Müller, Thomas; Santos-Sanz, Pablo; Duffard, René; Guilbert-Lepoutre, Aurélie

    2014-09-20

    We analyze albedo data obtained using the Herschel Space Observatory that reveal the existence of two distinct types of surface among midsized trans-Neptunian objects. A color-albedo diagram shows two large clusters of objects, one redder and higher albedo and another darker and more neutrally colored. Crucially, all objects in our sample located in dynamically stable orbits within the classical Kuiper Belt region and beyond are confined to the bright red group, implying a compositional link. Those objects are believed to have formed further from the Sun than the dark neutral bodies. This color-albedo separation is evidence for a compositional discontinuity in the young solar system.

  19. The first cosmic ray albedo proton map of the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Jody K.; Spence, Harlan E.; Kasper, Justin; Golightly, Michael; Bern Blake, J.; Mazur, Joe E.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Case, Anthony W.; Dixon Looper, Mark; Zeitlin, Cary; Schwadron, Nathan A.

    2012-06-01

    Neutrons emitted from the Moon are produced by the impact of galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) within the regolith. GCRs are high-energy particles capable of smashing atomic nuclei in the lunar regolith and producing a shower of energetic protons, neutrons and other subatomic particles. Secondary particles that are ejected out of the regolith become “albedo” particles. The neutron albedo has been used to study the hydrogen content of the lunar regolith, which motivates our study of albedo protons. In principle, the albedo protons should vary as a function of the input GCR source and possibly as a result of surface composition and properties. During the LRO mission, the total detection rate of albedo protons between 60 MeV and 150 MeV has been declining since 2009 in parallel with the decline in the galactic cosmic ray flux, which validates the concept of an albedo proton source. On the other hand, the average yield of albedo protons has been increasing as the galactic cosmic ray spectrum has been hardening, consistent with a disproportionately stronger modulation of lower energy GCRs as solar activity increases. We construct the first map of the normalized albedo proton emission rate from the lunar surface to look for any albedo variation that correlates with surface features. The map is consistent with a spatially uniform albedo proton yield to within statistical uncertainties.

  20. Enhancement of the MODIS Daily Snow Albedo Product

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Dorothy K.; Schaaf, Crystal B.; Wang, Zhuosen; Riggs, George A.

    2009-01-01

    The MODIS daily snow albedo product is a data layer in the MOD10A1 snow-cover product that includes snow-covered area and fractional snow cover as well as quality information and other metadata. It was developed to augment the MODIS BRDF/Albedo algorithm (MCD43) that provides 16-day maps of albedo globally at 500-m resolution. But many modelers require daily snow albedo, especially during the snowmelt season when the snow albedo is changing rapidly. Many models have an unrealistic snow albedo feedback in both estimated albedo and change in albedo over the seasonal cycle context, Rapid changes in snow cover extent or brightness challenge the MCD43 algorithm; over a 16-day period, MCD43 determines whether the majority of clear observations was snow-covered or snow-free then only calculates albedo for the majority condition. Thus changes in snow albedo and snow cover are not portrayed accurately during times of rapid change, therefore the current MCD43 product is not ideal for snow work. The MODIS daily snow albedo from the MOD10 product provides more frequent, though less robust maps for pixels defined as "snow" by the MODIS snow-cover algorithm. Though useful, the daily snow albedo product can be improved using a daily version of the MCD43 product as described in this paper. There are important limitations to the MOD10A1 daily snow albedo product, some of which can be mitigated. Utilizing the appropriate per-pixel Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Functions (BRDFs) can be problematic, and correction for anisotropic scattering must be included. The BRDF describes how the reflectance varies with view and illumination geometry. Also, narrow-to-broadband conversion specific for snow on different surfaces must be calculated and this can be difficult. In consideration of these limitations of MOD10A1, we are planning to improve the daily snow albedo algorithm by coupling the periodic per-pixel snow albedo from MCD43, with daily surface ref|outanoom, In this paper, we

  1. Very Large-Scale Motions in Smooth and Rough Wall Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKeon, Beverley J.; Guala, Michele; LeHew, Jeff; Jacobi, Ian

    2010-01-01

    Structural skeleton of high Reynolds number flow gives insight into smooth and rough walls. (modeling implications not yet clear) Dynamic roughness as a model of "designer" roughness: a) Impose length scale(s) and dominant frequency. b) Irregular roughness well-represented by first "few" POD modes (Christensen, 2009). Experiments and simple model demonstrate: a) Harmonics associated with forcing (and w) important. b) Change to the mean profile (skin friction).

  2. On universality of scaling law describing roughness of triple line.

    PubMed

    Bormashenko, Edward; Musin, Albina; Whyman, Gene; Barkay, Zahava; Zinigrad, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The fine structure of the three-phase (triple) line was studied for different liquids, various topographies of micro-rough substrates and various wetting regimes. Wetting of porous and pillar-based micro-scaled polymer surfaces was investigated. The triple line was visualized with the environmental scanning electron microscope and scanning electron microscope for the "frozen" triple lines. The value of the roughness exponent ζ for water (ice)/rough polymer systems was located within 0.55-0.63. For epoxy glue/rough polymer systems somewhat lower values of the exponent, 0.42 < ζ < 0.54, were established. The obtained values of ζ were close for the Cassie and Wenzel wetting regimes, different liquids, and different substrates' topographies. Thus, the above values of the exponent are to a great extent universal. The switch of the exponent, when the roughness size approaches to the correlation length of the defects, is also universal. PMID:25618613

  3. Roughness characteristics of natural channels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnes, Harry Hawthorne

    1967-01-01

    Color photographs and descriptive data are presented for 50 stream channels for which roughness coefficients have been determined. All hydraulic computations involving flow in open channels require an evaluation of the roughness characteristics of the channel. In the absence of a satisfactory quantitative procedure this evaluation remains chiefly an art. The ability to evaluate roughness coefficients must be developed through experience. One means of gaining this experience is by examining and becoming acquainted with the appearance of some typical channels whose roughness coefficients are known. The photographs and data contained in this report represent a wide range of channel conditions. Familiarity with the appearance, geometry, and roughness characteristics of these channels will improve the engineer's ability to select roughness coefficients for other channels .

  4. Entrainment, Drizzle, and Stratocumulus Cloud Albedo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackerman, A. S.; Kirkpatrick, M. P.; Stevens, D. E.; Toon, O. B.

    2004-01-01

    Globally averaged cloud changes from GCMs on average show a doubling of the Twomey effect, which is the change in cloud albedo with respect to changes in droplet concentrations for fixed cloud water and droplet dispersion. In contrast, ship-track measurements show a much more modest amplification of the Twomey effect, suggesting that the GCMs are exaggerating the indirect aerosol effect. We have run large-eddy simulations with bin microphysics of marine stratocumulus from multiple field campaigns, and find that the large-eddy simulations are in much better agreement with the ship-track measurements. The inversion strength over N. Pacific stratocumulus (as measured during DYCOMS-II) is generally much stronger than over N. Atlantic stratocumulus (as measured during ASTEX), and we have found that the response of cloud water to increasing droplet concentration changes sign as the inversion strengthens. For the different environmental conditions, we will show the overall response of cloud albedo to droplet concentrations, and decompose the response into its contributing factors of changes in cloud water, droplet dispersion, and horizontal inhomogeneity.

  5. Solvation forces between rough surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Frink, L.J.; van Swol, F.

    1998-04-01

    We investigate the role of surface roughness on solvation forces and solvation free energies. Roughness is introduced by dividing a surface into an array of square tiles that are then randomly displaced in the direction perpendicular to the wall. The integrated wall strength of these tiled surfaces is independent of the surface roughness and hence this class of rough walls is ideally suited for isolating roughness effects. We use grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations of a Lennard-Jones fluid confined in a slit pore with rough walls to generate the solvation interactions as a function of roughness, tile size, and surface area. The simulation data are compared to a simple superposition approximation of smooth wall solvation interactions (obtained from simulation or density functional theory), based on a distribution of wall separations. We find that this approximation provides a surprisingly accurate route to the solvation interaction of rough surfaces. In general, increased roughness leads to a reduction of oscillations in the solvation forces and surface free energies. However, nonmonotonic behavior of the oscillation amplitude with roughness can be observed for finite surfaces. The washing out of the oscillations found for large surface roughness produces a solvation force that exhibits a broad repulsive peak with separation. The broad repulsion is a consequence of the resistance to squeezing out fluid from the smallest gaps between two opposing rough surfaces. It is as much a reflection of packing effects as are the solvation oscillations for perfectly smooth pores. In addition, we present results for patterned and undulating surfaces produced by an analogous modification of the one-body external field for smooth walls. Finally, we discuss the implications of our results for a number of experimental systems including self-assembled monolayers, microporous materials, protein solutions, and DNA crystals. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Lateral Casimir force between self-affine rough surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajik, Fatemeh; Masoudi, Amir Ali; Khorrami, Mohammad

    2016-03-01

    The effect of self-affine roughness on the lateral Casimir force between two plates is studied using a perturbative expansion method. The PWS (pairwise summation) method is applicable only at lateral correlation lengths much larger than the separation between two plates. The effect of the roughness parameters on the lateral Casimir force is investigated, and it is seen that this effect is significant, enabling one to tailor roughness parameters so that to obtain the desirable Casimir force and increase the yield of micro- or nano-electromechanical devices based on the vacuum fluctuations.

  7. A rough earth scattering model for multipath prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Page, L. J.; Chestnut, P. C.

    1970-01-01

    The most important phenomena to be considered in a model of radio wave communication between earth satellites are scattering from the surface of the earth. A model is derived and implemented on a computer to predict the field received after reflection from a rough, spherical earth. The scattering integrals are computed numerically; the domain of integration is the appropriate region on the surface of the earth. Calculations have been performed at VHF frequencies and for terrain which could be described as marshy land. Rough surface scattering calculations must be performed over a spherical earth when satellites are involved. There is a definite dependence on the values of the roughness, and the correlation length.

  8. Droplet morphologies on particles with macroscopic surface roughness.

    PubMed

    Stepánek, Frantisek; Rajniak, Pavol

    2006-01-31

    The equilibrium configuration of liquid droplets on the surface of macroscopically rough solid particles was determined by numerical simulations using the volume-of-fluid (VOF) method. The fractional surface coverage of the particle as a function of the droplet size, equilibrium contact angle, and the particle surface roughness amplitude and correlation length has been systematically investigated. Droplet size and contact angle were found to generally have a stronger effect on surface coverage than particle surface roughness. Because of droplet coalescence, a relatively large variation in surface coverage was observed for any given total liquid volume, particularly for larger values of the equilibrium contact angle. PMID:16430249

  9. Roughness Measurement of Dental Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shulev, Assen; Roussev, Ilia; Karpuzov, Simeon; Stoilov, Georgi; Ignatova, Detelina; See, Constantin von; Mitov, Gergo

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a roughness measurement of zirconia ceramics, widely used for dental applications. Surface roughness variations caused by the most commonly used dental instruments for intraoral grinding and polishing are estimated. The applied technique is simple and utilizes the speckle properties of the scattered laser light. It could be easily implemented even in dental clinic environment. The main criteria for roughness estimation is the average speckle size, which varies with the roughness of zirconia. The algorithm used for the speckle size estimation is based on the normalized autocorrelation approach.

  10. Surface Albedo Variations Across Opportunity's Traverse in Meridiani Planum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Studer-Ellis, G. L.; Rice, M. S.; Johnson, J. R.; Bell, J. F., III

    2015-12-01

    Surface albedo measurements from the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) Opportunity mission can be used to help understand surface-atmosphere interactions at Meridiani Planum. Opportunity has acquired 117 albedo panoramas with the Pancam instrument as of sol 3870, across the first 40 km of its traverse. To date, only the first 32 panoramas have been reported upon in previous studies [1]. Here we present an analysis of the full set of PDS-released albedo observations from Opportunity and correlate our measurements with terrain type and known atmospheric events. To acquire a 360-degree albedo observation, Pancam's L1 ("clear") filter is used to take 27 broad-spectrum images, which are stitched into a mosaic. Pancam images are calibrated to reflectance factor (R*), which is taken as an approximation of the Lambertian albedo. Areas of interest are selected and average albedo calculations are applied to all of the selections. Results include the average albedo of each scene, as well as equal-area corrections where applicable, in addition to measurements of specific classes of surface features (e.g., outcrops, dusty terrain, and rover tracks). Average scene albedo measurements range from 0.11 ± 0.04 to 0.30 ± 0.04, with the highest value observed on sol 1290 (immediately after the planet-encircling dust storm of 2007). We compare these results to distance traveled, surface morphologies, local wind driven events, and dust opacity measurements. Future work will focus on correlating Pancam albedo values with orbital data from cameras such as HiRISE, CTX, MOC, THEMIS-VIS, and MARCI, and completion of the same analysis for the full Pancam albedo dataset from Spirit. References: [1] Bell, J. F., III, M. S. Rice, J. R. Johnson, and T. M. Hare (2008), Surface albedo observations at Gusev Crater and Meridiani Planum, Mars, J. Geophys. Res., 113, E06S18, doi:10.1029/2007JE002976.

  11. From Regional Cloud-Albedo to a Global Albedo Footprint - Studying Aerosol Effects on the Radiation Budget Using the Relation Between Albedo and Cloud Fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, F.; Engström, A.; Karlsson, J.; Wood, R.; Charlson, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    Earth's albedo is the primary determinant of the amount of energy absorbed by the Earth-atmosphere system. The main factor controlling albedo is the amount of clouds present, but aerosols can affect and alter both clear-sky and cloudy-sky reflectance. How albedo depends on cloud fraction and how albedo varies at a given cloud fraction and a given cloud water content, reveals information about these aerosol effects on the radiation budget. Hence, the relation between total albedo and cloud fraction can be used for illustration and quantification of aerosol effects, and as a diagnostic tool, to test model performance. Here, we show examples of the utilisation of this relation focusing on satellite observations from CERES and MODIS on Aqua, as well as from Calipso and CloudSat, and performing comparisons with climate models on the way: In low-cloud regions in the subtropics, we find that climate models well represent a near-constant regional cloud albedo, and this representation has improved from CMIP3 to CMIP5. CMIP5 models indicate more reflective clouds in present-day climate than pre-industrial, as a result of increased aerosol burdens. On monthly mean time scale, models are found to over-estimate the regional cloud-brightening due to aerosols. On the global scale we find an increasing cloud albedo with increasing cloud fraction - a relation that is very well defined in observations, and less so in CMIP5 models. Cloud brightening from pre-industrial to present day is also seen on global scale. Further, controlling for both cloud fraction and cloud water content we can trace small variations in albedo, or perturbations of solar reflectivity, that create a near-global coherent geographical pattern that is consistent with aerosol impacts on climate, with albedo enhancement in regions dominant of known aerosol sources and suppression of albedo in regions associated with high rates of aerosol removal (deduced using CloudSat precipitation estimates). This mapping can be

  12. Thermal-Infrared Surveys of Near-Earth Object Diameters and Albedos with Spitzer and IRTF/MIRSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mommert, Michael; Trilling, David; Hora, Joseph L.; Chesley, Steven; Emery, Josh; Fazio, Giovanni; Harris, Alan W.; Moskovitz, Nick; Mueller, Michael; Smith, Howard

    2015-08-01

    More than 12000 Near-Earth Objects (NEOs) have been discovered over the past few decades and current discovery surveys find on average 4 new NEOs every night. In comparison to asteroid discovery, the physical characterization of NEOs lags far behind: measured diameters and albedos exist only for roughly 10% of all known NEOs. We describe a current and a future observing program that provide diameter and albedo measurements of a large number of NEOs.In our Spitzer Space Telescope Exploration Science program 'NEOSurvey', we are performing a fast and efficient flux-limited survey in which we measure the diameters and albedos of ~600 NEOs in a total of 710 hrs of observing time. We measure the thermal emission of our targets at 4.5 micron and combine these measurements with optical data in a thermal model. Our diameters and albedos come with highly realistic uncertainties that account for a wide range of potential asteroid properties. Our primary goal is to create a large and uniform catalog of NEO properties, including diameters, albedos, and flux density data. This catalog is publicly accessible and provides the latest results usually within 2 weeks after the observation.Starting in 2016, we will also make use of the refurbished and recommissioned MIRSI mid-infrared imaging camera on NASA's InfraRed Telescope Facility (IRTF) to derive the diameters and albedos of up to 750 NEOs over a period of 3 yrs. MIRSI will be equipped with an optical camera that will allow for simultaneous optical imaging, which will improve our thermal modeling results. With MIRSI, we will focus on newly discovered NEOs that are close to Earth and hence relatively bright.The results from both programs, together with already exisiting diameter and albedo results from the literature, will form the largest database of NEO physical properties available to date. With this data set, we will be able to refine the size distribution of small NEOs and the corresponding impact frequency, and compare the

  13. Mold Cavity Roughness vs. Flow of Polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanek, Michal; Manas, Miroslav; Manas, David

    2009-07-01

    Injection molding represents such a way of polymer processing that requires injection of polymer melt into the mold cavity with very high injection rate. The fluidity of polymers is affected by many parameters (mold design, melt temperature, injection rate and pressure). The main objective of this paper is the study of influence of surface roughness of mold cavity of the polymer melts flow. Evaluation of set of data obtained by experiments where the testing conditions were widely changed shows that quality of cavity surface affects on the length of flow.

  14. The albedo of snow for partially cloudy skies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhury, B. J.; Chang, A. T. C.

    1980-01-01

    The input parameters of the model are atmospheric precipitable water, ozone content, turbidity, cloud optical thickness, size and shape of ice crystal of snow and surface pressure. The model outputs spectral and integrated solar flux snow reflectance as a function of solar elevation and fractional cloudcover. The model is illustrated using representative parameters for the Antarctic coastal regions. The albedo for a clear sky depends inversely on the solar elevation. At high elevation the albedo depends primarily upon the grain size; at low elevation this dependence is on grain size and shape. The gradient of the albedo-elevation curve increases as the grains get larger and faceted. The albedo for a dense overcast is a few percent higher than the clear sky albedo at high elevations. A simple relation between the grain size and the overcast albedo is obtained. For a set of grain size and shape, the albedo matrices (the albedo as a function of solar elevation and fractional cloudcover) are tabulated.

  15. Shallow Lunar Hydrogen and Forward-Scattered Albedo Protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, J. K.; Schwadron, N.; Jordan, A. P.; Spence, H. E.; Looper, M. D.; Townsend, L. W.

    2015-11-01

    The CRaTER instrument sees a ~40% higher flux of lunar albedo protons (>65 MeV) at grazing angles compared to the nadir direction. A shallow layer (<10 cm) of hydrated lunar regolith may enhance the yield of forward-scattered albedo protons.

  16. Effect of shaddock albedo addition on the properties of frankfurters.

    PubMed

    Shan, Bing; Li, Xingmin; Pan, Teng; Zheng, Limin; Zhang, Hao; Guo, Huiyuan; Jiang, Lu; Zhen, Shaobo; Ren, Fazheng

    2015-07-01

    To explore the potential as a natural auxiliary emulsifier, shaddock albedo was added into frankfurters at six different levels: 0.0, 2.5, 5.0, 7.5, 10 and 12.5 %. The emulsion capacity (EC) of meat batters and cooking properties of frankfurters were evaluated. EC of meat batters was improved with the addition of shaddock albedo and the maximum value was reached at the 5 % albedo concentration. The addition of shaddock albedo resulted in lower cooking losses of frankfurters, with the lowest value obtained at the 7.5 % level. The presence of shaddock albedo decreased the total expressible fluid (TEF) and the proportion of fat in total expressible fluid (PF) which indicated the emulsion stability of frankfurters and the lowest values both occurred at the concentration of 7.5 %. Shaddock albedo inclusion increased the lightness and yellowness of frankfurters and decreased redness. Texture profile analysis showed increased hardness and decreased chewiness of frankfurters with the addition of shaddock albedo. Consequently, shaddock albedo could be a potential source of auxiliary emulsifier filler for emulsion-type meat products. PMID:26139927

  17. Anthropogenic desertification by high-albedo pollution Observations and modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otterman, J.; Rosenberg, N. W.; Rosenberg, E.

    1974-01-01

    ERTS-1 MSS albedo data of Western Negev, Sinai and the Gaza strip are presented. A sharp contrast in albedo exists across the Negev-Sinai and Negev-Gaza strip borders. Anthropogenic desertification has occurred on the Arab side due to overgrazing and Bedouin agriculture, whereas natural vegetation grows much more abundantly on the Israeli side.

  18. Greenland surface albedo changes 1981-2012 from satellite observations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Significant melt over Greenland has been observed during the last several decades associated with extreme warming events over the northern Atlantic Ocean. An analysis of surface albedo change over Greenland is presented, using a 32-year consistent satellite albedo product from the Global Land Surfac...

  19. Asymmetry in the Diurnal Variation of Surface Albedo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayor, S.; Smith, W. L., Jr.; Nguyen, L.; Alberta, T. A.; Minnis, P.; Whitlock, C. H.; Schuster, G. L.

    1996-01-01

    Remote sensing of surface properties and estimation of clear-sky and surface albedo generally assumes that the albedo depends only on the solar zenith angle. The effects of dew, frost, and precipitation as well as evaporation and wind can lead to some systematic diurnal variability resulting in an asymmetric diurnal cycle of albedo. This paper examines the symmetry of both surface-observed albedos and top-of-the-atmosphere (TOA) albedos derived from satellite data. Broadband and visible surface albedos were measured at the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Southern Great Plains Central Facility, at some fields near the ARM site, and over a coniferous forest in eastern Virginia. Surface and wind conditions are available for most cases. GOES-8 satellite radiance data are converted to broadband albedo using bidirectional reflectance functions and an empirical narrowband-to-broadband relationship. The initial results indicate that surface moisture has a significant effect and can change the albedo in the afternoon by 20% relative to its morning counterpart. Such effects may need to be incorporated in mesoscale and even large-scale models of atmospheric processes.

  20. NEOWISE Reactivation Mission Year Two: Asteroid Diameters and Albedos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nugent, C. R.; Mainzer, A.; Bauer, J.; Cutri, R. M.; Kramer, E. A.; Grav, T.; Masiero, J.; Sonnett, S.; Wright, E. L.

    2016-09-01

    The Near-Earth Object Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (NEOWISE) mission continues to detect, track, and characterize minor planets. We present diameters and albedos calculated from observations taken during the second year since the spacecraft was reactivated in late 2013. These include 207 near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) and 8885 other asteroids. Of the NEAs, 84% NEAs did not have previously measured diameters and albedos by the NEOWISE mission. Comparison of sizes and albedos calculated from NEOWISE measurements with those measured by occultations, spacecraft, and radar-derived shapes shows accuracy consistent with previous NEOWISE publications. Diameters and albedos fall within ±∼20% and ±∼40%, 1-sigma, respectively, of those measured by these alternate techniques. NEOWISE continues to preferentially discover near-Earth objects which are large (>100 m), and have low albedos.

  1. NEOWISE Reactivation Mission Year Two: Asteroid Diameters and Albedos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nugent, C. R.; Mainzer, A.; Bauer, J.; Cutri, R. M.; Kramer, E. A.; Grav, T.; Masiero, J.; Sonnett, S.; Wright, E. L.

    2016-09-01

    The Near-Earth Object Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (NEOWISE) mission continues to detect, track, and characterize minor planets. We present diameters and albedos calculated from observations taken during the second year since the spacecraft was reactivated in late 2013. These include 207 near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) and 8885 other asteroids. Of the NEAs, 84% NEAs did not have previously measured diameters and albedos by the NEOWISE mission. Comparison of sizes and albedos calculated from NEOWISE measurements with those measured by occultations, spacecraft, and radar-derived shapes shows accuracy consistent with previous NEOWISE publications. Diameters and albedos fall within ±˜20% and ±˜40%, 1-sigma, respectively, of those measured by these alternate techniques. NEOWISE continues to preferentially discover near-Earth objects which are large (>100 m), and have low albedos.

  2. Shear Stress Partitioning in Airflow over Rough Surfaces: Roughness Form Effects and Influence on the Distribution of Shear Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillies, J. A.; Nickling, W. G.; King, J.

    2004-12-01

    Roughness elements distributed across a surface can significantly decrease the entrainment and transport of underlying fine-grained sediments by wind. The parameterization of roughness effects on wind erosion thresholds and sediment transport is critical to the development of models that can provide realistic predictions of sediment thresholds and fluxes due to wind erosion. Raupach et al. (1993) present a model for predicting the protective role of roughness elements in terms of a threshold friction velocity ratio as a function of the roughness geometry and the aerodynamic properties of the surface and roughness elements. The predictive capacity of this model remains uncertain and the work presented here represents part of an on-going effort of our group to improve the parameterization of the Raupach et al. (1993) model. To gain additional understanding of how roughness elements influence the magnitude and nature of the shear stress acting on the surface among the elements and evaluate strength and weaknesses of the roughness density parameter to characterize these effects, a wind tunnel study using model roughness arrays of similar roughness density composed of cube-shaped elements of different length dimensions was undertaken. Roughness density is defined as the total frontal area of all the elements to the total surface area that they occupy. Shear stress in the above element air flow was determined from vertical wind speed profile measurements. Point measurements of near surface shear stresses within the roughness array were made with simple omni-directional skin friction meters in order to investigate the partitioning of shear stress to the intervening surface. The results suggest that the roughness density parameter has severe limitations in describing the shear stress partitioning for these regularly arrayed rough surfaces. For surfaces with identical roughness densities, the surface composed of more and smaller elements was observed to have average and

  3. Use of wrist albedo neutron dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Hankins, D.E.

    1983-01-01

    We are developing a wrist dosimeter that can be used to measure the exposure at the wrist to x-rays, gamma rays, beta-particles, thermal neutrons and fast neutrons. It consists of a modified Hankins Type albedo neutron dosimeter and also contains three pieces of CR-39 plastic. ABS plastic in the form of an elongated hemisphere provides the beta and low energy x-ray shielding necessary to meet the requirement of depth dose measurements at 1 cm. The dosimeter has a beta window located in the side of the hemisphere oriented towards an object being held in the hands. A TLD 600 is positioned under the 1 cm thick ABS plastic and is used to measure the thermal neutron dose. At present we are using Velcro straps to hold the dosimeter on the inside of the wrist. 9 figures.

  4. The albedo effect on neutron transmission probability.

    PubMed

    Khanouchi, A; Sabir, A; Boulkheir, M; Ichaoui, R; Ghassoun, J; Jehouani, A

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the albedo effect on the neutron transmission probability through slab shields. For this reason we have considered an infinite homogeneous slab having a fixed thickness equal to 20 lambda (lambda is the mean free path of the neutron in the slab). This slab is characterized by the factor Ps (scattering probability) and contains a vacuum channel which is formed by two horizontal parts and an inclined one (David, M. C. (1962) Duc and Voids in shields. In Reactor Handbook, Vol. III, Part B, p. 166). The thickness of the vacuum channel is taken equal to 2 lambda. An infinite plane source of neutrons is placed on the first of the slab (left face) and detectors, having windows equal to 2 lambda, are placed on the second face of the slab (right face). Neutron histories are sampled by the Monte Carlo method (Booth, T. E. and Hendricks, J. S. (1994) Nuclear Technology 5) using exponential biasing in order to increase the Monte Carlo calculation efficiency (Levitt, L. B. (1968) Nuclear Science and Engineering 31, 500-504; Jehouani, A., Ghassoun, J. and Abouker, A. (1994) In Proceedings of the 6th International Symposium on Radiation Physics, Rabat, Morocco) and we have applied the statistical weight method which supposes that the neutron is born at the source with a unit statistical weight and after each collision this weight is corrected. For different values of the scattering probability and for different slopes of the inclined part of the channel we have calculated the neutron transmission probability for different positions of the detectors versus the albedo at the vacuum channel-medium interface. Some analytical representations are also presented for these transmission probabilities. PMID:9463883

  5. Global color and albedo variations on Io

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McEwen, A.S.

    1988-01-01

    Three multispectral mosaics of Io have been produced from Voyager imaging data: a global mosaic from each of the Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 data sets and a high-resolution mosaic of the region surrounding the volcano Ra Patera. The mosaics are maps of normal albedo and color in accurate geometric map formats. Io's photometric behavior, mapped with a two-image technique, is spatially variable, especially in the bright white areas. The disk-integrated color and albedo of the satellite have been remarkably constant over recent decades, despite the volcanic activity and the many differences between Voyager 1 and 2 images (acquired just 4 months apart). This constancy is most likely due to the consistent occurrence of large Pele-type plumes with relatively dark, red deposits in the region from long 240 to 360??. A transient brightening southeast of Pele during the Voyager 1 encounter was probably due to real changes in surface and/or atmospheric materials, rather than to photometric behavior. The intrinsic spectral variability of Io, as seen in a series of two-dimensional histograms of the multispectral mosaics, consists of continuous variation among three major spectral end members. The data were mapped into five spectral units to compare them with laboratory measurements of candidate surface materials and to show the planimetric distributions. Unit 1 is best fit by the spectral reflectance of ordinary elemental sulfur, and it is closely associated with the Peletype plume deposits. Unit 2 is strongly confined to the polar caps above about latitude ??50??, but its composition is unknown. Unit 5 is probably SO2 with relatively minor contamination; it is concentrated in the equatorial region and near the long-lived Prometheus-type plumes. Units 3 and 4 are gradational between units 1 and 5. In addition to SO2 and elemental sulfur, other plausible components of the surface are polysulfur oxides, FeCl2, Na2S, and NaHS. ?? 1988.

  6. Generalizing roughness: experiments with flow-oriented roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trevisani, Sebastiano

    2015-04-01

    Surface texture analysis applied to High Resolution Digital Terrain Models (HRDTMs) improves the capability to characterize fine-scale morphology and permits the derivation of useful morphometric indexes. An important indicator to be taken into account in surface texture analysis is surface roughness, which can have a discriminant role in the detection of different geomorphic processes and factors. The evaluation of surface roughness is generally performed considering it as an isotropic surface parameter (e.g., Cavalli, 2008; Grohmann, 2011). However, surface texture has often an anisotropic character, which means that surface roughness could change according to the considered direction. In some applications, for example involving surface flow processes, the anisotropy of roughness should be taken into account (e.g., Trevisani, 2012; Smith, 2014). Accordingly, we test the application of a flow-oriented directional measure of roughness, computed considering surface gravity-driven flow. For the calculation of flow-oriented roughness we use both classical variogram-based roughness (e.g., Herzfeld,1996; Atkinson, 2000) as well as an ad-hoc developed robust modification of variogram (i.e. MAD, Trevisani, 2014). The presented approach, based on a D8 algorithm, shows the potential impact of considering directionality in the calculation of roughness indexes. The use of flow-oriented roughness could improve the definition of effective proxies of impedance to flow. Preliminary results on the integration of directional roughness operators with morphometric-based models, are promising and can be extended to more complex approaches. Atkinson, P.M., Lewis, P., 2000. Geostatistical classification for remote sensing: an introduction. Computers & Geosciences 26, 361-371. Cavalli, M. & Marchi, L. 2008, "Characterization of the surface morphology of an alpine alluvial fan using airborne LiDAR", Natural Hazards and Earth System Science, vol. 8, no. 2, pp. 323-333. Grohmann, C

  7. Fire disturbance effects on land surface albedo in Alaskan tundra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, Nancy H. F.; Whitley, Matthew A.; Jenkins, Liza K.

    2016-03-01

    The study uses satellite Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer albedo products (MCD43A3) to assess changes in albedo at two sites in the treeless tundra region of Alaska, both within the foothills region of the Brooks Range, the 2007 Anaktuvuk River Fire (ARF) and 2012 Kucher Creek Fire (KCF). Results are compared to each other and other studies to assess the magnitude of albedo change and the longevity of impact of fire on land surface albedo. In both sites there was a marked decrease of albedo in the year following the fire. In the ARF, albedo slowly increased until 4 years after the fire, when it returned to albedo values prior to the fire. For the year immediately after the fire, a threefold difference in the shortwave albedo decrease was found between the two sites. ARF showed a 45.3% decrease, while the KCF showed a 14.1% decrease in shortwave albedo, and albedo is more variable in the KCF site than ARF site 1 year after the fire. These differences are possibly the result of differences in burn severity of the two fires, wherein the ARF burned more completely with more contiguous patches of complete burn than KCF. The impact of fire on average growing season (April-September) surface shortwave forcing in the year following fire is estimated to be 13.24 ± 6.52 W m-2 at the ARF site, a forcing comparable to studies in other treeless ecosystems. Comparison to boreal studies and the implications to energy flux are discussed in the context of future increases in fire occurrence and severity in a warming climate.

  8. Generating multi-scale albedo look-up maps using MODIS BRDF/Albedo products and landsat imagery

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surface albedo determines radiative forcing and is a key parameter for driving Earth’s climate. Better characterization of surface albedo for individual land cover types can reduce the uncertainty in estimating changes to Earth’s radiation balance due to land cover change. This paper presents a mult...

  9. Relationship between cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction and cloud albedo, and new surface-based approach for determining cloud albedo

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.; Wu, W.; Jensen, M. P.; Toto, T.

    2011-07-21

    This paper focuses on three interconnected topics: (1) quantitative relationship between surface shortwave cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo; (2) surface-based approach for measuring cloud albedo; (3) multiscale (diurnal, annual and inter-annual) variations and covariations of surface shortwave cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo. An analytical expression is first derived to quantify the relationship between cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo. The analytical expression is then used to deduce a new approach for inferring cloud albedo from concurrent surface-based measurements of downwelling surface shortwave radiation and cloud fraction. High-resolution decade-long data on cloud albedos are obtained by use of this surface-based approach over the US Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiaton Measurement (ARM) Program at the Great Southern Plains (SGP) site. The surface-based cloud albedos are further compared against those derived from the coincident GOES satellite measurements. The three long-term (1997-2009) sets of hourly data on shortwave cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction and cloud albedo collected over the SGP site are analyzed to explore the multiscale (diurnal, annual and inter-annual) variations and covariations. The analytical formulation is useful for diagnosing deficiencies of cloud-radiation parameterizations in climate models.

  10. Long distance roughness of fracture surfaces in heterogeneous materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hinojosa, M.; Bouchaud, E.; Nghiem, B.

    1999-08-01

    The long distance roughness of fatigue fracture surfaces of a nickel-based superalloy is reported for two samples of different grain size. Statistical analysis over a wide range of length scales, from a few nanometers to a few millimeters, using scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy allows to obtain accurately the self-affine correlation length. Long distance fracture profiles of 14,000 points were obtained and digitized from overlapping electron micrographs at a resolution of 0.22 micrometers/point. The authors have also analyzed the long distance roughness of the mirror zone on a soda-lime glass using atomic force microscopy. In the case of the nickel superalloy, correlation lengths are found to correspond well to the grain size. This result gives information about the mechanism of crack propagation in heterogeneous materials and shows that the correlation length of fracture surfaces is of the order of the largest microstructural heterogeneity.

  11. Adjustment of roughness sublayer in turbulent flows over two-dimensional idealised roughness elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    HO, Yat-Kiu; LIU, Chun-Ho

    2015-04-01

    The atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) immediately above the urban canopy is the roughness sublayer (RSL). In this layer, flows and turbulence are strongly affected by the roughness elements beneath, e.g. building obstacles. The wind flows over urban areas could be represented by conventional logarithmic law of the wall (log-law) in the neutrally stratified ABL. However, in the RSL region, the vertical wind profile deviates from that predicted from log-law and the effect could be extended from ground level up to several canopy heights. As a result, the Monin-Obukhov similarity theory (MOST) fails and an additional length scale is required to describe the flows. The key aim of this study is to introduce a simple wind profile model which accounts for the effect of the RSL in neutral stratification using wind tunnel experiments. Profile measurements of wind speeds and turbulence quantities over various two-dimensional (2D) idealised roughness elements are carried out in an open-circuit wind tunnel with test section of size 560 mm (width) × 560 mm (height) × 6 m (length). The separation between the roughness elements is varied systematically so that ten different types of surface forms are adopted. The velocity measurements are obtained by hot-wire anemometry using X-probe design (for UW- measurements) with a constant temperature anemometer. For each configuration, eight vertical profiles are collected over the canopy, including solid boundaries and cavities of the roughness elements. Firstly, we compute the measurement results using conventional MOST to determine different roughness parameters. Afterwards, we derive the RSL height from the Reynolds stress profiles. Since the profiles taken from different locations of the canopy are eventually converged with increasing height, we use this 'congregated height' to define the RSL height. Next, we introduce an alternative function, i.e. power-law function, instead of MOST, to describe the velocity profile in attempt to

  12. Clouds Versus Carbon: Predicting Vegetation Roughness by Maximizing Productivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, Lola M.

    2004-01-01

    Surface roughness is one of the dominant vegetation properties that affects land surface exchange of energy, water, carbon, and momentum with the overlying atmosphere. We hypothesize that the canopy structure of terrestrial vegetation adapts optimally to climate by maximizing productivity, leading to an optimum surface roughness. An optimum should exist because increasing values of surface roughness cause increased surface exchange, leading to increased supply of carbon dioxide for photosynthesis. At the same time, increased roughness enhances evapotranspiration and cloud cover, thereby reducing the supply of photosynthetically active radiation. We demonstrate the optimum through sensitivity simulations using a coupled dynamic vegetation-climate model for present day conditions, in which we vary the value of surface roughness for vegetated surfaces. We find that the maximum in productivity occurs at a roughness length of 2 meters, a value commonly used to describe the roughness of today's forested surfaces. The sensitivity simulations also illustrate the strong climatic impacts of vegetation roughness on the energy and water balances over land: with increasing vegetation roughness, solar radiation is reduced by up to 20 W/sq m in the global land mean, causing shifts in the energy partitioning and leading to general cooling of the surface by 1.5 K. We conclude that the roughness of vegetated surfaces can be understood as a reflection of optimum adaptation, and it is associated with substantial changes in the surface energy and water balances over land. The role of the cloud feedback in shaping the optimum underlines the importance of an integrated perspective that views vegetation and its adaptive nature as an integrated component of the Earth system.

  13. Arid land monitoring using Landsat albedo difference images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinove, Charles J.; Chavez, Pat S., Jr.; Gehring, Dale G.; Holmgren, Ralph

    1981-01-01

    The Landsat albedo, or percentage of incoming radiation reflected from the ground in the wavelength range of 0.5 [mu]m to 1.1 [mu]m, is calculated from an equation using the Landsat digital brightness values and solar irradiance values, and correcting for atmospheric scattering, multispectral scanner calibration, and sun angle. The albedo calculated for each pixel is used to create an albedo image, whose grey scale is proportional to the albedo. Differencing sequential registered images and mapping selected values of the difference is used to create quantitative maps of increased or decreased albedo values of the terrain. All maps and other output products are in black and white rather than color, thus making the method quite economical. Decreases of albedo in arid regions may indicate improvement of land quality; increases may indicate degradation. Tests of the albedo difference mapping method in the Desert Experimental Range in southwestern Utah (a cold desert with little long-term terrain change) for a four-year period show that mapped changes can be correlated with erosion from flash floods, increased or decreased soil moisture, and increases or decreases in the density of desert vegetation, both perennial shrubs and annual plants. All terrain changes identified in this test were related to variations in precipitation. Although further tests of this method in hot deserts showing severe "desertification" are needed, the method is nevertheless recommended for experimental use in monitoring terrain change in other arid and semiarid regions of the world.

  14. The Temporal Evolution of the Albedo of Seasonal Sea Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perovich, D. K.; Polashenski, C.; Eicken, H.; Grenfell, T. C.

    2009-12-01

    The ice-albedo feedback mechanism plays a key role in the heat budget of the Arctic sea ice cover and has climate implications. Seasonal ice is now the dominant Arctic ice type and has a significant impact on the large-scale albedo. The albedo of shorefast, seasonal ice was measured from April through late June for five field seasons. There was considerable interannual variability in the seasonal evolution of albedo, and consequently the solar heat input to the ice and upper ocean. In one year there was a monotonic decrease in areally averaged albedo after the onset of melt, while in others there were significant fluctuations of up to 0.4 over periods of only a few days. For all of the different evolutionary pathways there were two key drivers of albedo; the timing of the onset of melt and the areal coverage of melt ponds. Melt ponds on undeformed seasonal ice have been observed to reach coverages as large as 80% in only a few days. Just as rapidly coverages have been observed to drop to 7% as the ponds drained. The evolution of melt ponds is the key to understanding the evolution of seasonal ice albedo during the early stages of melt.

  15. ALBEDOS OF SMALL HILDA GROUP ASTEROIDS AS REVEALED BY SPITZER

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, Erin Lee; Woodward, Charles E. E-mail: chelsea@astro.umn.edu

    2011-06-15

    We present thermal 24 {mu}m observations from the Spitzer Space Telescope of 62 Hilda asteroid group members with diameters ranging from 3 to 12 km. Measurements of the thermal emission, when combined with reported absolute magnitudes, allow us to constrain the albedo and diameter of each object. From our Spitzer sample, we find the mean geometric albedo, p{sub V} = 0.07 {+-} 0.05, for small (D < 10 km) Hilda group asteroids. This Spitzer-derived value of p{sub V} is greater than and spans a larger range in albedo space than the mean albedo of large (D {approx}> 10 km) Hilda group asteroids which is p{sub V} = 0.04 {+-} 0.01. Though this difference may be attributed to space weathering, the small Hilda group population reportedly displays greater taxonomic range from C-, D-, and X-type whose albedo distributions are commensurate with the range of determined albedos. We discuss the derived Hilda size-frequency distribution, color-color space, and geometric albedo for our survey sample in the context of the expected migration induced 'seeding' of the Hilda asteroid group with outer solar system proto-planetesimals as outlined in the 'Nice' formalism.

  16. Albedo reduction by dirty snow: measurements and implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zender, C. S.; Gallet, J.; Domine, F.; Picard, G.

    2008-12-01

    Industrial and biomass burning emissions of black carbon (BC) from low- and mid-latitudes dominate the radiative forcing by absorbing impurities trapped in snow and ice at mid- and high- northern latitudes. Correct model representation of albedo reduction by BC-contaminated snow is crucial because our GCM simulations show that dirty snow can explain about 30% of the observed 20th century Arctic warming. Until now, measurements of actual snow darkening by BC have been attempted only in the field, under non- reproducible conditions, and limited to the environmental BC concentration. We have conducted the first measurements of the direct effect of BC-contamination on snow albedo by in a controlled environment. We doped natural snow with a commercially available BC-analogue and measured the resulting albedo change at visible and near-infrared wavelengths. Snow albedo was measured in a (portable) integrating sphere system. Snow grain size is estimated from the near-infrared albedo. Snow density, temperature, and BC properties were known a priori. The albedo measurement reproducibility is about 1% for natural snow. Our measurements agree with model predictions that BC concentrations from 250 ppbm to 200 ppmm darken snow albedo by 1--70%. Our results lend confidence to the current model representations of surface darkening in the cryosphere. Applying these methods to impurity records in polar ice cores yields surface radiative forcing estimates that can be extrapolated to regional scales.

  17. The Gamma-ray Albedo of the Moon

    SciTech Connect

    Moskalenko, Igor V.; Porter, Troy A.; /UC, Santa Cruz

    2007-09-28

    We use the GEANT4 Monte Carlo framework to calculate the {gamma}-ray albedo of the Moon due to interactions of cosmic ray (CR) nuclei with moon rock. Our calculation of the albedo spectrum agrees with the EGRET data. We show that the spectrum of {gamma}-rays from the Moon is very steep with an effective cutoff around 3-4 GeV (600 MeV for the inner part of the Moon disk) and exhibits a narrow pion-decay line at 67.5 MeV, perhaps unique in astrophysics. Apart from other astrophysical sources, the albedo spectrum of the Moon is well understood, including its absolute normalization; this makes it a useful 'standard candle' for {gamma}-ray telescopes. The steep albedo spectrum also provides a unique opportunity for energy calibration of {gamma}-ray telescopes, such as the forthcoming Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST). Since the albedo flux depends on the incident CR spectrum which changes over the solar cycle, it is possible to monitor the CR spectrum using the albedo {gamma}-ray flux. Simultaneous measurements of CR proton and helium spectra by the Payload for Antimatter-Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics (PAMELA), and observations of the albedo {gamma}-rays by the GLAST Large Area Telescope (LAT), can be used to test the model predictions and will enable the LAT to monitor the CR spectrum near the Earth beyond the lifetime of the PAMELA.

  18. The Gamma-Ray Albedo of the Moon

    SciTech Connect

    Moskalenko, I.V.; Porter, T.A.; /UC, Santa Cruz

    2008-03-25

    We use the GEANT4 Monte Carlo framework to calculate the {gamma}-ray albedo of the Moon due to interactions of cosmic ray (CR) nuclei with moon rock. Our calculation of the albedo spectrum agrees with the EGRET data. We show that the spectrum of {gamma}-rays from the Moon is very steep with an effective cutoff around 3-4 GeV (600 MeV for the inner part of the Moon disk) and exhibits a narrow pion-decay line at 67.5 MeV, perhaps unique in astrophysics. Apart from other astrophysical sources, the albedo spectrum of the Moon is well understood, including its absolute normalization; this makes it a useful 'standard candle' for {gamma}-ray telescopes. The steep albedo spectrum also provides a unique opportunity for energy calibration of {gamma}-ray telescopes, such as the forthcoming Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST). Since the albedo flux depends on the incident CR spectrum which changes over the solar cycle, it is possible to monitor the CR spectrum using the albedo {gamma}-ray flux. Simultaneous measurements of CR proton and helium spectra by the Payload for Antimatter-Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics (PAMELA), and observations of the albedo {gamma}-rays by the GLAST Large Area Telescope (LAT), can be used to test the model predictions and will enable the LAT to monitor the CR spectrum near the Earth beyond the lifetime of the PAMELA.

  19. Bidirectional reflectance spectroscopy. III - Correction for macroscopic roughness. [of planetary surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hapke, B.

    1984-01-01

    A mathematically rigorous formalism is derived by which an arbitrary photometric function for the bidirectional reflectance of a smooth surface may be corrected to include effects of general macroscopic roughness. The correction involves only one arbitrary parameter, the mean slope angle, and is applicable to surfaces of any albedo. Using physically reasonable assumptions and mathematical approximations, the correction expressions are evaluated analytically to second order in the mean slope angle. The correction is applied to the bidirectional-reflectance function of Hapke (1981). Expressions for both the differential and integral brightnesses are obtained. Photometric profiles on hypothetical smooth and rough planets of low and high albedo are shown to illustrate the effects of macroscopic roughness. The theory is applied to observations of Mercury and predicts the integral phase function, the apparent polar darkening, and the lack of limb brightness surge on the planet. The roughness-corrected bidirectional-reflectance function is sufficiently simple that it can be conveniently evaluated on a programmable hand-held calculator.

  20. Measuring Roughnesses Of Optical Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coulter, Daniel R.; Al-Jumaily, Gahnim A.; Raouf, Nasrat A.; Anderson, Mark S.

    1994-01-01

    Report discusses use of scanning tunneling microscopy and atomic force microscopy to measure roughnesses of optical surfaces. These techniques offer greater spatial resolution than other techniques. Report notes scanning tunneling microscopes and atomic force microscopes resolve down to 1 nm.

  1. Thermal slip for liquids at rough solid surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chengbin; Chen, Yongping; Peterson, G. P.

    2014-06-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation is used to examine the thermal slip of liquids at rough solid surfaces as characterized by fractal Cantor structures. The temperature profiles, potential energy distributions, thermal slip, and interfacial thermal resistance are investigated and evaluated for a variety of surface topographies. In addition, the effects of liquid-solid interaction, surface stiffness, and boundary condition on thermal slip length are presented. Our results indicate that the presence of roughness expands the low potential energy regions in adjacent liquids, enhances the energy transfer at liquid-solid interface, and decreases the thermal slip. Interestingly, the thermal slip length and thermal resistance for liquids in contact with solid surfaces depends not only on the statistical roughness height, but also on the fractal dimension (i.e., topographical spectrum).

  2. Radar-aeolian roughness project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, Ronald; Dobrovolskis, A.; Gaddis, L.; Iversen, J. D.; Lancaster, N.; Leach, Rodman N.; Rasnussen, K.; Saunders, S.; Vanzyl, J.; Wall, S.

    1991-01-01

    The objective is to establish an empirical relationship between measurements of radar, aeolian, and surface roughness on a variety of natural surfaces and to understand the underlying physical causes. This relationship will form the basis for developing a predictive equation to derive aeolian roughness from radar backscatter. Results are given from investigations carried out in 1989 on the principal elements of the project, with separate sections on field studies, radar data analysis, laboratory simulations, and development of theory for planetary applications.

  3. Surface roughness scattering of electrons in bulk mosfets

    SciTech Connect

    Zuverink, Amanda Renee

    2015-11-01

    Surface-roughness scattering of electrons at the Si-SiO2 interface is a very important consideration when analyzing Si metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs). Scattering reduces the mobility of the electrons and degrades the device performance. 250-nm and 50-nm bulk MOSFETs were simulated with varying device parameters and mesh sizes in order to compare the effects of surface-roughness scattering in multiple devices. The simulation framework includes the ensemble Monte Carlo method used to solve the Boltzmann transport equation coupled with a successive over-relaxation method used to solve the two-dimensional Poisson's equation. Four methods for simulating the surface-roughness scattering of electrons were implemented on both devices and compared: the constant specularity parameter, the momentum-dependent specularity parameter, and the real-space-roughness method with both uniform and varying electric fields. The specularity parameter is the probability of an electron scattering speculariy from a rough surface. It can be chosen as a constant, characterizing partially diffuse scattering of all electrons from the surface the same way, or it can be momentum dependent, where the size of rms roughness and the normal component of the electron wave number determine the probability of electron-momentum randomization. The real-space rough surface method uses the rms roughness height and correlation length of an actual MOSFET to simulate a rough interface. Due to their charge, electrons scatter from the electric field and not directly from the surface. If the electric field is kept uniform, the electrons do not perceive the roughness and scatter as if from a at surface. However, if the field is allowed to vary, the electrons scatter from the varying electric field as they would in a MOSFET. These methods were implemented for both the 50-nm and 250-nm MOSFETs, and using the rms roughness heights and correlation lengths for real devices. The

  4. Earth albedo neutrons from 10 to 100 MeV.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preszler, A. M.; Simnett, G. M.; White, R. S.

    1972-01-01

    We report the measurement of the energy and angular distributions of earth albedo neutrons from 10 to 100 MeV at 40 deg N geomagnetic latitude from a balloon at 120,000 ft, below 4.65 g/sq cm. The albedo-neutron omnidirectional energy distribution is flat to 50 MeV, then decreases with energy. The absolute neutron energy distribution is of the correct strength and shape for the albedo neutrons to be the source of the protons trapped in earth's inner radiation belt.

  5. Variable control of neutron albedo in toroidal fusion devices

    DOEpatents

    Jassby, Daniel L.; Micklich, Bradley J.

    1986-01-01

    An arrangement is provided for controlling neutron albedo in toroidal fusion devices having inboard and outboard vacuum vessel walls for containment of the neutrons of a fusion plasma. Neutron albedo material is disposed immediately adjacent the inboard wall, and is movable, preferably in vertical directions, so as to be brought into and out of neutron modifying communication with the fusion neutrons. Neutron albedo material preferably comprises a liquid form, but may also take pebble, stringer and curtain-like forms. A neutron flux valve, rotatable about a vertical axis is also disclosed.

  6. Lunar Terrain and Albedo Reconstruction from Apollo Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nefian, Ara V.; Kim, Taemin; Broxton, Michael; Moratto, Zach

    2010-01-01

    Generating accurate three dimensional planetary models and albedo maps is becoming increasingly more important as NASA plans more robotics missions to the Moon in the coming years. This paper describes a novel approach for separation of topography and albedo maps from orbital Lunar images. Our method uses an optimal Bayesian correlator to refine the stereo disparity map and generate a set of accurate digital elevation models (DEM). The albedo maps are obtained using a multi-image formation model that relies on the derived DEMs and the Lunar- Lambert reflectance model. The method is demonstrated on a set of high resolution scanned images from the Apollo era missions.

  7. Assessing modeled Greenland surface mass balance in the GISS Model E2 and its sensitivity to surface albedo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Patrick; LeGrande, Allegra N.; Koenig, Lora S.; Tedesco, Marco; Moustafa, Samiah E.; Ivanoff, Alvaro; Fischer, Robert P.; Fettweis, Xavier

    2016-04-01

    The surface mass balance (SMB) of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) plays an important role in global sea level change. Regional Climate Models (RCMs) such as the Modèle Atmosphérique Régionale (MAR) have been employed at high spatial resolution with relatively complex physics to simulate ice sheet SMB. Global climate models (GCMs) incorporate less sophisticated physical schemes and provide outputs at a lower spatial resolution, but have the advantage of modeling the interaction between different components of the earth's oceans, climate, and land surface at a global scale. Improving the ability of GCMs to represent ice sheet SMB is important for making predictions of future changes in global sea level. With the ultimate goal of improving SMB simulated by the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) Model E2 GCM, we compare simulated GrIS SMB against the outputs of the MAR model and radar-derived estimates of snow accumulation. In order to reproduce present-day climate variability in the Model E2 simulation, winds are constrained to match the reanalysis datasets used to force MAR at the lateral boundaries. We conduct a preliminary assessment of the sensitivity of the simulated Model E2 SMB to surface albedo, a parameter that is known to strongly influence SMB. Model E2 albedo is set to a fixed value of 0.8 over the entire ice sheet in the initial configuration of the model (control case). We adjust this fixed value in an ensemble of simulations over a range of 0.4 to 0.8 (roughly the range of observed summer GrIS albedo values) to examine the sensitivity of ice-sheet-wide SMB to albedo. We prescribe albedo from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) MCD43A3 v6 to examine the impact of a more realistic spatial and temporal variations in albedo. An age-dependent snow albedo parameterization is applied, and its impact on SMB relative to observations and the RCM is assessed.

  8. Audiotactile interactions in roughness perception.

    PubMed

    Guest, Steve; Catmur, Caroline; Lloyd, Donna; Spence, Charles

    2002-09-01

    The sounds produced when we touch textured surfaces frequently provide information regarding the structure of those surfaces. It has recently been demonstrated that the perception of the texture of the hands can be modified simply by manipulating the frequency content of such touch-related sounds. We investigated whether similar auditory manipulations change people's perception of the roughness of abrasive surfaces (experiment 1). Participants were required to make speeded, forced-choice discrimination responses regarding the roughness of a series of abrasive samples which they touched briefly. Analysis of discrimination errors verified that tactile roughness perception was modulated by the frequency content of the auditory feedback. Specifically, attenuating high frequencies led to a bias towards an increased perception of tactile smoothness. In experiment 2, we replicated the rubbing-hands manipulation of previous experimenters while participants rated either the perceived roughness or wetness of their hands. The wetness scale data replicated the results in the literature, while the roughness scale data replicated the result from experiment 1. A final experiment showed that delaying the auditory feedback from the hand-rubbing reduced the magnitude of this parchment-skin illusion. These experiments demonstrate the dramatic effect that auditory frequency manipulations can have on the perceived tactile roughness and moistness of surfaces, and are consistent with the proposal that different auditory perceptual dimensions may have varying salience for different surfaces. PMID:12195518

  9. Roughness reduction on aspheric surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiontke, S.; Kokot, Sebastian

    2015-02-01

    For a lot of applications like spectrometer and high power laser roughness as an important parameter has been discussed over and over again. Especially for high power systems the surface quality is crucial for determining the damage threshold and therefore the field of application. Above that, it has often been difficult to compare roughness measurements because of different measurement methods and the usage of filters and surface fits. Measurement results differ significantly depending on filters and especially on the measured surface size. Insights will be given how values behave depending on the quality of surface and the size of measured area. Many applications require a high quality of roughness in order to reduce scattering. Some of them in order to prevent from damage like high power laser applications. Others like spectrometers seek to increase the signal-to-noise ratio. Most of them have already been built with spherical surfaces. With higher demands on efficiency and more sophisticated versions aspherical surfaces need to be employed. Therefore, the high requirement in roughness known from spherical surfaces is also needed on aspherical surfaces. For one thing, the constant change of curvature of an aspherical surface accounts for the superior performance, for another thing, it prevents from using classical polishing technics, which guarantied this low roughness. New methods need to be qualified. In addition, also results of a new manufacturing process will be shown allowing low roughness on aspheric even with remarkable departure from the best fit sphere.

  10. The effect of sidewall roughness on line edge roughness in top-down scanning electron microscopy images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verduin, T.; Lokhorst, S. R.; Kruit, P.; Hagen, C. W.

    2015-03-01

    We have investigated in a numerical study the determination of sidewall roughness (SWR) from top down scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images. In a typical metrology application, top-down SEM images are acquired in a (critical-dimension) SEM and the roughness is analyzed. However, the true size, shape and roughness characteristics of resist features are not fully investigated in the analysis of top-down SEM images. In reality, rough resist features are complex three-dimensional structures and the characterization naturally extends to the analysis of SWR. In this study we randomly generate images of rough lines and spaces, where the lines are made of PMMA on a silicon substrate. The lines that we study have a length of 2 µm, a width of 32nm and a height of 32 nm. The SWR is modeled by using the power spectral density (PSD) function of Palasantzas, which characterizes roughness by the standard deviation σ, correlation length ξ and roughness exponent α . The actual roughness is generated by application of the method of Thorsos in two dimensions. The images are constructed by using a home-built program for simulating electron-specimen interactions. The program that we have developed is optimized for complex arbitrary geometries and large number of incident low energy primary electrons by using multi-core CPUs and GPUs. The program uses the dielectric function model for inelastic scattering events and has an implementation specifically for low energy electrons. A satisfactory comparison is made between the secondary electron yields from the home-built program and another program found in literature. In order to reduce the risk of shrinkage, we use a beam energy of 300 eV and a spot size of 3 nm. Each pixel is exposed with 20 electrons on average (≍ 276 µC/cm2), following the Poisson distribution to account for illumination shot noise. We have assumed that the detection of electrons is perfect and does not introduce additional noise. We measure line edge

  11. Effects of surface roughness and film thickness on the adhesion of a bioinspired nanofilm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Z. L.; Chen, S. H.

    2011-05-01

    Inspired by the gecko's climbing ability, adhesion between an elastic nanofilm with finite length and a rough substrate with sinusoidal roughness is studied in the present paper, considering the effects of substrate roughness and film thickness. It demonstrates that the normal adhesion force of the nanofilm on a rough substrate depends significantly on the geometrical parameters of the substrate. When the film length is larger than the wavelength of the sinusoidal roughness of the substrate, the normal adhesion force decreases with increasing surface roughness, while the normal adhesion force initially decreases then increases if the wavelength of roughness is larger than the film length. This finding is qualitatively consistent with a previously interesting experimental observation in which the adhesion force of the gecko spatula is found to reduce significantly at an intermediate roughness. Furthermore, it is inferred that the gecko may achieve an optimal spatula thickness not only to follow rough surfaces, but also to saturate the adhesion force. The results in this paper may be helpful for understanding how geckos overcome the influence of natural surface roughness and possess such adhesion to support their weights.

  12. Global color and albedo variations on Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcewen, Alfred S.

    1990-01-01

    Global multispectral mosaics of Triton have been produced from Voyager approach images; six spectral units are defined and mapped. The margin of the south polar cap (SPC) is scalloped and ranges in latitude from + 10 deg to -30 deg. A bright fringe is closely associated with the cap's margin; form it, diffuse bright rays extend north-northeast for hundreds of kilometers. Thus, the rays may consist of fringe materials that were redistributed by northward-going Coriolis-deflected winds. From 1977 to 1989, Triton's full-disk spectrum changed from markedly red and UV-dark to nearly neutral white and UV-bright. This spectral change can be explained by new deposition of nitrogen frost over both the northern hemisphere and parts of a formerly redder SPC. Frost deposition in the southern hemisphere during southern summer is possible over relatively high albedo areas of the cap (Stansberry et al., 1990), which helps to explain the apparent stability of the unexpectedly large SPC and the presence of the bright fringe.

  13. SCAP. Point Kernel Single or Albedo Scatter

    SciTech Connect

    Disney, R.K.; Bevan, S.E.

    1982-08-05

    SCAP solves for radiation transport in complex geometries using the single or albedo-scatter point kernel method. The program is designed to calculate the neutron or gamma-ray radiation level at detector points located within or outside a complex radiation scatter source geometry or a user-specified discrete scattering volume. The geometry is described by zones bounded by intersecting quadratic surfaces with an arbitrary maximum number of boundary surfaces per zone. The anisotropic point sources are described as point-wise energy dependent distributions of polar angles on a meridian; isotropic point sources may be specified also. The attenuation function for gamma rays is an exponential function on the primary source leg and the scatter leg with a buildup factor approximation to account for multiple scatter on the scatter leg. The neutron attenuation function is an exponential function using neutron removal cross sections on the primary source leg and scatter leg. Line or volumetric sources can be represented as distributions of isotropic point sources, with uncollided line-of-sight attenuation and buildup calculated between each source point and the detector point.

  14. 9969 Braille: Deep Space 1 infrared spectroscopy, geometric albedo, and classification

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buratti, B.J.; Britt, D.T.; Soderblom, L.A.; Hicks, M.D.; Boice, D.C.; Brown, R.H.; Meier, R.; Nelson, R.M.; Oberst, J.; Owen, T.C.; Rivkin, A.S.; Sandel, B.R.; Stern, S.A.; Thomas, N.; Yelle, R.V.

    2004-01-01

    Spectra of Asteroid 9969 Braille in the 1.25-2.6 ??m region returned by the Deep Space 1 (DS1) Mission show a ???10% absorption band centered at 2 ??m, and a reflectance peak at 1.6 ??m. Analysis of these features suggest that the composition of Braille is roughly equal parts pyroxene and olivine. Its spectrum between 0.4 and 2.5 ??m suggests that it is most closely related to the Q taxonomic type of asteroid. The spectrum also closely matches that of the ordinary chondrites, the most common type of terrestrial meteorite. The geometric albedo of Braille is unusually high (pv = 0.34), which is also consistent with its placement within the rarer classes of stony asteroids, and which suggests it has a relatively fresh, unweathered surface, perhaps due to a recent collision. ?? 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Cloud condensation nucleus-sulfate mass relationship and cloud albedo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hegg, Dean A.

    1994-01-01

    Analysis of previously published, simultaneous measurements of cloud condensation nucleus number concentration and sulfate mass concentration suggest a nonlinear relationship between the two variables. This nonlinearity reduces the sensitivity of cloud albedo to changes in the sulfur cycle.

  16. Disappearance of the Propontis Regional Dark Albedo Feature on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S. W.; Thomas, P. C.; Cantor, B. A.

    2014-07-01

    In Aug. 2009, repeated local dust storms deposited sufficient bright dust to reduce the contrast of the Propontis dark albedo feature dramatically — effectively “erasing” this distinct and long-observed feature. Propontis has yet to "recover".

  17. Interpretation of surface and planetary directional albedos for vegetated regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cess, Robert D.; Vulis, Inna L.

    1989-01-01

    An atmospheric solar radiation model has been coupled with surface reflectance measurements for two vegetation types, pasture land and savannah, in order to address several issues associated with understanding the directional planetary albedo; i.e., the dependence of planetary albedo upon solar zenith angle. These include an elucidation of processes that influence the variation of planetary albedo with solar zenith angle, as well as emphasizing potential problems associated with converting narrowband planetary albedo measurements to broadband quantities. It is suggested that, for vegetated surfaces, this latter task could be somewhat formidable, since the model simulations indicate that narrowband to broadband conversions strongly depend upon vegetation type. A further aspect of this paper is to illustrate a procedure by which reciprocity inconsistencies within a bidirectional reflectance dataset, if they are not too severe, can be circumvented.

  18. A preliminary global oceanic cloud climatology from satellite albedo observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, N. A.; Henderson-Sellers, A.

    1983-01-01

    A predictive relationship is developed between over-ocean cloud system albedo and the cloud amount present, using as a data base ERB satellite microwave readings at 0.5-0.7 micron and the USAF three-dimensional nephanalysis archive. The ERB data provided global coverage at a resolution of 2.5 x 2.5 deg during the 1974-78 period. Regression analyses were performed on the amounts and albedos for several years of data for one month in order to detect seasonal variations. A logarithmic relationship was found between the cloud system albedo and cloud amount over the oceans, with negligible seasonal variance. The analysis is noted to apply only where low surface albedos are encountered, and further work to extend the study to continental vegetated areas is indicated.

  19. Albedo Pattern Recognition and Time-Series Analyses in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salleh, S. A.; Abd Latif, Z.; Mohd, W. M. N. Wan; Chan, A.

    2012-07-01

    Pattern recognition and time-series analyses will enable one to evaluate and generate predictions of specific phenomena. The albedo pattern and time-series analyses are very much useful especially in relation to climate condition monitoring. This study is conducted to seek for Malaysia albedo pattern changes. The pattern recognition and changes will be useful for variety of environmental and climate monitoring researches such as carbon budgeting and aerosol mapping. The 10 years (2000-2009) MODIS satellite images were used for the analyses and interpretation. These images were being processed using ERDAS Imagine remote sensing software, ArcGIS 9.3, the 6S code for atmospherical calibration and several MODIS tools (MRT, HDF2GIS, Albedo tools). There are several methods for time-series analyses were explored, this paper demonstrates trends and seasonal time-series analyses using converted HDF format MODIS MCD43A3 albedo land product. The results revealed significance changes of albedo percentages over the past 10 years and the pattern with regards to Malaysia's nebulosity index (NI) and aerosol optical depth (AOD). There is noticeable trend can be identified with regards to its maximum and minimum value of the albedo. The rise and fall of the line graph show a similar trend with regards to its daily observation. The different can be identified in term of the value or percentage of rises and falls of albedo. Thus, it can be concludes that the temporal behavior of land surface albedo in Malaysia have a uniform behaviours and effects with regards to the local monsoons. However, although the average albedo shows linear trend with nebulosity index, the pattern changes of albedo with respects to the nebulosity index indicates that there are external factors that implicates the albedo values, as the sky conditions and its diffusion plotted does not have uniform trend over the years, especially when the trend of 5 years interval is examined, 2000 shows high negative linear

  20. Earth albedo effects in the motion of artificial earth satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lala, P.

    Different models of the earth albedo values and geographical distribution are compared. Effects of the local cloud cover on the satellite perturbing acceleration are investigated. Resulting changes of the satellite orbit obtained by the method of numerical integration in the spherical coordinate system are given. It is shown that a sufficiently sensitive microaccelerometer on board a special satellite could significantly improve existing models of the earth albedo.

  1. NEOWISE Diameters and Albedos V1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mainzer, A. K.; Bauer, J. M.; Cutri, R. M.; Grav, T.; Kramer, E. A.; Masiero, J. R.; Nugent, C. R.; Sonnett, S. M.; Stevenson, R. A.; Wright, E. L.

    2016-06-01

    This PDS data set represents a compilation of published diameters, optical albedos, near-infrared albedos, and beaming parameters for minor planets detected by NEOWISE during the fully cryogenic, 3-band cryo, post-cryo and NEOWISE-Reactivation Year 1 operations. It contains data covering near-Earth asteroids, Main Belt asteroids, active Main Belt objects, Hildas, Jupiter Trojans, Centaurs, and Jovian and Saturnian irregular satellites. Methodology for physical property determination is described in the referenced articles.

  2. Surface albedo observations at Gusev Crater and Meridiani Planum, Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bell, J.F., III; Rice, M.S.; Johnson, J. R.; Hare, T.M.

    2008-01-01

    During the Mars Exploration Rover mission, the Pancam instrument has periodically acquired large-scale panoramic images with its broadband (739??338 nm) filter in order to estimate the Lambert bolometric albedo of the surface along each rover's traverse. In this work we present the full suite of such estimated albedo values measured to date by the Spirit and Opportunity rovers along their traverses in Gusev Crater and Meridiani Planum, respectively. We include estimated bolometric albedo values of individual surface features (e.g., outcrops, dusty plains, aeolian bed forms, wheel tracks, light-toned soils, and crater walls) as well as overall surface averages of the 43 total panoramic albedo data sets acquired to date. We also present comparisons to estimated Lambert albedo values taken from the Mars Global Surveyor Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) along the rovers' traverses, and to the large-scale bolometric albedos of the sites from the Viking Orbiter Infrared Thermal Mapper (IRTM) and Mars Global Surveyor/Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES). The ranges of Pancam-derived albedos at Gusev Crater (0.14 to 0.25) and in Meridiani Planum. (0.10 to 0.18) are in good agreement with IRTM, TES, and MOC orbital measurements. These data sets will be a useful tool and benchmark for future investigations of albodo variations with time, including measurements from orbital instruments like the Context Camera and High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment on Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Long-term, accurate albedo measurements could also be important for future efforts in climate modeling as well as for studies of active surface processes. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  3. IAU nomenclature for albedo features on the planet Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dollfus, A.; Chapman, C. R.; Davies, M. E.; Gingerich, O.; Goldstein, R.; Guest, J.; Morrison, D.; Smith, B. A.

    1978-01-01

    The International Astronomical Union has endorsed a nomenclature for the albedo features on Mercury. Designations are based upon the mythological names related to the god Hermes; they are expressed in Latin form. The dark-hued albedo features are associated with the generic term Solitudo. The light-hued areas are designated by a single name without generic term. The 32 names adopted are allocated on the Mercury map.

  4. Improving modeled snow albedo estimates during the spring melt season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, M. Jahanzeb; Velde, Rogier; Vekerdy, Zoltan; Su, Zhongbo

    2014-06-01

    Snow albedo influences snow-covered land energy and water budgets and is thus an important variable for energy and water fluxes calculations. Here, we quantify the performance of the three existing snow albedo parameterizations under alpine, tundra, and prairie snow conditions when implemented in the Noah land surface model (LSM)—Noah's default and ones from the Biosphere-Atmosphere Transfer Scheme (BATS) and the Canadian Land Surface Scheme (CLASS) LSMs. The Noah LSM is forced with and its output is evaluated using in situ measurements from seven sites in U.S. and France. Comparison of the snow albedo simulations with the in situ measurements reveals that the three parameterizations overestimate snow albedo during springtime. An alternative snow albedo parameterization is introduced that adopts the shape of the variogram for the optically thick snowpacks and decreases the albedo further for optically thin conditions by mixing the snow with the land surface (background) albedo as a function of snow depth. In comparison with the in situ measurements, the new parameterization improves albedo simulation of the alpine and tundra snowpacks and positively impacts the simulation of snow depth, snowmelt rate, and upward shortwave radiation. An improved model performance with the variogram-shaped parameterization can, however, not be unambiguously detected for prairie snowpacks, which may be attributed to uncertainties associated with the simulation of snow density. An assessment of the model performance for the Upper Colorado River Basin highlights that with the variogram-shaped parameterization Noah simulates more evapotranspiration and larger runoff peaks in Spring, whereas the Summer runoff is lower.

  5. Simultaneous Spectral Albedo Measurements Near the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Southern Great Plains (ARM SGP) Central Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Michalsky, Joseph J.; Min, Qilong; Barnard, James C.; Marchand, Roger T.; Pilewskie, Peter

    2003-04-30

    In this study, a data analysis is performed to determine the area-averaged, spectral albedo at ARM's SGP central facility site. The spectral albedo is then fed into radiation transfer models to show that the diffuse discrepancy is diminished when the spectral albedo is used (as opposed to using the broadband albedo).

  6. Roughness effects in uncompensated antiferromagnets

    SciTech Connect

    Charilaou, M.; Hellman, F.

    2015-02-28

    Monte Carlo simulations show that roughness in uncompensated antiferromagnets decreases not just the surface magnetization but also the net magnetization and particularly strongly affects the temperature dependence. In films with step-type roughness, each step creates a new compensation front that decreases the global net magnetization. The saturation magnetization decreases non-monotonically with increasing roughness and does not scale with the surface area. Roughness in the form of surface vacancies changes the temperature-dependence of the magnetization; when only one surface has vacancies, the saturation magnetization will decrease linearly with surface occupancy, whereas when both surfaces have vacancies, the magnetization is negative and exhibits a compensation point at finite temperature, which can be tuned by controlling the occupancy. Roughness also affects the spin-texture of the surfaces due to long-range dipolar interactions and generates non-collinear spin configurations that could be used in devices to produce locally modified exchange bias. These results explain the strongly reduced magnetization found in magnetometry experiments and furthers our understanding of the temperature-dependence of exchange bias.

  7. Two-dimensional Navier-Stokes heat transfer analysis for rough turbine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, R. J.; Civinskas, K. C.

    1991-01-01

    A quasi-three-dimensional thin-layer Navier-Stokes analysis was used to predict heat transfer to rough surfaces. Comparisons are made between predicted and experimental heat transfer for turbine blades and flat plates of known roughness. The effect of surface roughness on heat transfer was modeled using a mixing length approach. The effect of near-wall grid spacing and convergence criteria on the accuracy of the heat transfer predictions are examined. An eddy viscosity mixing length model having an inner and outer layer was used. A discussion of the appropriate model for the crossover between the inner and outer layers is included. The analytic results are compared with experimental data for both flat plates and turbine blade geometries. Comparisons between predicted and experimental heat transfer showed that a modeling roughness effects using a modified mixing length approach results in good predictions of the trends in heat transfer due to roughness.

  8. Spectral albedo and transmittance of thin young Arctic sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taskjelle, Torbjørn; Hudson, Stephen R.; Granskog, Mats A.; Nicolaus, Marcel; Lei, Ruibo; Gerland, Sebastian; Stamnes, Jakob J.; Hamre, Børge

    2016-01-01

    Spectral albedo and transmittance in the range were measured on three separate dates on less than thick new Arctic sea ice growing on Kongsfjorden, Svalbard at , . Inherent optical properties, including absorption coefficients of particulate and dissolved material, were obtained from ice samples and fed into a radiative transfer model, which was used to analyze spectral albedo and transmittance and to study the influence of clouds and snow on these. Integrated albedo and transmittance for photosynthetically active radiation () were in the range 0.17-0.21 and 0.77-0.86, respectively. The average albedo and transmittance of the total solar radiation energy were 0.16 and 0.51, respectively. Values inferred from the model indicate that the ice contained possibly up to 40% brine and only 0.6% bubbles. Angular redistribution of solar radiation by clouds and snow was found to influence both the wavelength-integrated value and the spectral shape of albedo and transmittance. In particular, local peaks and depressions in the spectral albedo and spectral transmittance were found for wavelengths within atmospheric absorption bands. Simulated and measured transmittance spectra were within 5% for most of the wavelength range, but deviated up to 25% in the vicinity of , indicating the need for more optical laboratory measurements of pure ice, or improved modeling of brine optical properties in this near-infrared wavelength region.

  9. Postfire influences of snag attrition on albedo and radiative forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Halloran, Thomas L.; Acker, Steven A.; Joerger, Verena M.; Kertis, Jane; Law, Beverly E.

    2014-12-01

    This paper examines albedo perturbation and radiative forcing after a high-severity fire in a mature forest in the Oregon Cascade Range. Correlations between postfire albedo and seedling, sapling, and snag (standing dead tree) density were investigated across fire severity classes and seasons for years 4-15 after fire. Albedo perturbation was 14 times larger in winter compared to summer and increased with fire severity class for the first several years. Albedo perturbation increased linearly with time over the study period. Correlations between albedo perturbations and the vegetation densities were strongest with snags, and significant in all fire classes in both summer and winter (R < -0.92, p < 0.01). The resulting annual radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere became more negative linearly at a rate of -0.86 W m-2 yr-1, reaching -15 W m-2 in year 15 after fire. This suggests that snags can be the dominant controller of postfire albedo on decadal time scales.

  10. Characterization of the High-Albedo NEA 3691 Bede

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wooden, Diane H.; Lederer, Susan M.; Jehin, Emmanuel; Rozitis, Benjamin; Jefferson, Jeffrey D.; Nelson, Tyler W.; Dotson, Jessie L.; Ryan, Erin L.; Howell, Ellen S.; Fernandez, Yanga R.; Lovell, Amy J.; Woodward, Charles E.; Harker, David E.

    2016-01-01

    Characterization of NEAs provides important inputs to models for atmospheric entry, risk assessment and mitigation. Diameter is a key parameter because diameter translates to kinetic energy in atmospheric entry. Diameters can be derived from the absolute magnitude, H(PA=0deg), and from thermal modeling of observed IR fluxes. For both methods, the albedo (pv) is important - high pv surfaces have cooler temperatures, larger diameters for a given Hmag, and shallower phase curves (larger slope parameter G). Thermal model parameters are coupled, however, so that a higher thermal inertia also results in a cooler surface temperature. Multiple parameters contribute to constraining the diameter. Observations made at multiple observing geometries can contribute to understanding the relationships between and potentially breaking some of the degeneracies between parameters. We present data and analyses on NEA 3691 Bede with the aim of best constraining the diameter and pv from a combination of thermal modeling and light curve analyses. We employ our UKIRT+Michelle mid-IR photometric observations of 3691 Bede's thermal emission at 2 phase angles (27&43 deg 2015-03-19 & 04-13), in addition to WISE data (33deg 2010-05-27, Mainzer+2011). Observing geometries differ by solar phase angles and by moderate changes in heliocentric distance (e.g., further distances produce somewhat cooler surface temperatures). With the NEATM model and for a constant IR beaming parameter (eta=constant), there is a family of solutions for (diameter, pv, G, eta) where G is the slope parameter from the H-G Relation. NEATM models employing Pravec+2012's choice of G=0.43, produce D=1.8 km and pv˜0.4, given that G=0.43 is assumed from studies of main belt asteroids (Warner+2009). We present an analysis of the light curve of 3691 Bede to constrain G from observations. We also investigate fitting thermophysical models (TPM, Rozitis+11) to constrain the coupled parameters of thermal inertia (Gamma) and surface

  11. Interface roughness limited electron mobility in HgTe-CdTe superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, J. R.; Arnold, D. J.; Hoffman, C. A.; Bartoli, F. J.

    1991-06-01

    It is demonstrated that interface roughness is the dominant low-temperature scattering mechanism for electrons in HgTe-CdTe superlattices with thin wells. Not only do the experimental mobilities follow the expected d6(W) dependence, but the observed temperature dependence is accurately reproduced by theory when the treatment of interface roughness scattering is generalized for narrow-gap superlattices. The fits to data yield roughness correlation lengths in the range 60-200 A.

  12. Recent Studies of Runway Roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Garland; Hall, Albert W.

    1965-01-01

    Recent studies of NASA research related to aircraft operating problems on rough runways are presented. Some of these investigations were conducted cooperatively with the airport operators, with the Federal Aviation Agency, and with the U.S. Air Force. The studies show that criteria based on power spectral levels of runway-profile data are not sufficient to define acceptable levels of runway roughness from the piloting viewpoint. Because of the large variation in response characteristics between various types of aircraft, a runway may be acceptable for some aircraft and unacceptable for others. A criterion for roughness, therefore, should be expressed in terms of aircraft response - preferably, cockpit acceleration. A criterion suggested is that the maximum vertical acceleration in the cockpit should not exceed +/- 0.4 g for sections of the runway where precise aircraft control is required.

  13. Wetting phenomena on rough substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hao; Kardar, Mehran

    1990-10-01

    We consider wetting phenomena in the vicinity of rough substrates. The quenched random geometry of the substrate is assumed to be a self-affine fractal with a roughness exponent of ζS. Asymptotic critical properties on approaching complete and critical wetting transitions are studied by combining the replica method with scaling and renormalization-group arguments. We find new critical behavior, controlled by a zero-temperature fixed point, when ζS exceeds the thermal roughness exponent of the emerging wetting layer. The possibility of an effective dimensional reduction due to randomness is considered. In two dimensions a number of exact results are obtained by using a many-body transfer-matrix technique.

  14. Single Scattering Albedo Monitor for Airborne Particulates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onasch, Timothy; Massoli, Paola; Kebabian, Paul; Hills, Frank; Bacon, Fred; Freedman, Andrew

    2015-04-01

    We describe a robust, compact, field deployable instrument (the CAPS PMssa) that simultaneously measures airborne particle light extinction and scattering coefficients and thus the single scattering albedo (SSA) on the same sample volume. With an appropriate change in mirrors and light source, measurements have been made at wavelengths ranging from 450 to 780 nm. The extinction measurement is based on cavity attenuated phase shift (CAPS) techniques as employed in the CAPS PMex particle extinction monitor; scattering is measured using a integrating nephelometry by incorporating a Lambertian integrating sphere within the sample cell. The scattering measurement is calibrated using the extinction measurement. Measurements using ammonium sulfate particles of various sizes indicate that the response of the scattering channel with respect to measured extinction is linear to within 1% up to 1000 Mm-1 and can be extended further (4000 Mm-1) with additional corrections. The precision in both measurement channels is less than 1 Mm-1 (1s, 1σ). The truncation effect in the scattering channel, caused by light lost at extreme forward/backward scattering angles, was measured as a function of particle size using monodisperse polystyrene latex particles (n=1.59). The results were successfully fit using a simple geometric model allowing for reasonable extrapolation to a given wavelength, particle index of refraction and particle size distribution, assuming spherical particles. For sub-micron sized particles, the truncation corrections are comparable to those reported for commercial nephelometers. Measurements of the optical properties of ambient aerosol indicate that the values of the SSA of these particles measured with this instrument (0.91±0.03) using scattering and extinction agreed within experimental uncertainty with those determined using extinction measured by this instrument and absorption measured using a Multi-Angle Absorption Spectrometer (0.89±0.03) where the

  15. Parameterized Spectral Bathymetric Roughness Using the Nonequispaced Fast Fourier Transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabre, David Hanks

    The ocean and acoustic modeling community has specifically asked for roughness from bathymetry. An effort has been undertaken to provide what can be thought of as the high frequency content of bathymetry. By contrast, the low frequency content of bathymetry is the set of contours. The two-dimensional amplitude spectrum calculated with the nonequispaced fast Fourier transform (Kunis, 2006) is exploited as the statistic to provide several parameters of roughness following the method of Fox (1996). When an area is uniformly rough, it is termed isotropically rough. When an area exhibits lineation effects (like in a trough or a ridge line in the bathymetry), the term anisotropically rough is used. A predominant spatial azimuth of lineation summarizes anisotropic roughness. The power law model fit produces a roll-off parameter that also provides insight into the roughness of the area. These four parameters give rise to several derived parameters. Algorithmic accomplishments include reviving Fox's method (1985, 1996) and improving the method with the possibly geophysically more appropriate nonequispaced fast Fourier transform. A new composite parameter, simply the overall integral length of the nonlinear parameterizing function, is used to make within-dataset comparisons. A synthetic dataset and six multibeam datasets covering practically all depth regimes have been analyzed with the tools that have been developed. Data specific contributions include possibly discovering an aspect ratio isotropic cutoff level (less than 1.2), showing a range of spectral fall-off values between about -0.5 for a sandybottomed Gulf of Mexico area, to about -1.8 for a coral reef area just outside of the Saipan harbor. We also rank the targeted type of dataset, the best resolution gridded datasets, from smoothest to roughest using a factor based on the kernel dimensions, a percentage from the windowing operation, all multiplied by the overall integration length.

  16. Quantifying surface roughness over debris covered ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quincey, Duncan; Rounce, David; Ross, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    Aerodynamic roughness length (z0) remains a major uncertainty when determining turbulent heat fluxes over glacier surfaces, and can vary by an order of magnitude even within a small area and through the melt season. Defining z0 over debris-covered ice is particularly complex, because the surface may comprise clasts of greatly varying size, and the broader-scale surface relief can be similarly heterogeneous. Several recent studies have used Structure from Motion to data model debris-covered surfaces at the centimetric scale and calculate z0 based on measurements of surface microtopography. However, few have validated these measurements with independent vertical wind profile measurements, or considered how the measurements vary over a range of different surface types or scales of analysis. Here, we present the results of a field investigation conducted on the debris covered Khumbu Glacier during the post-monsoon season of 2015. We focus on two sites. The first is characterised by gravels and cobbles supported by a fine sandy matrix. The second comprises cobbles and boulders separated by voids. Vertical profiles of wind speed measured over both sites enable us to derive measurements of aerodynamic roughness that are similar in magnitude, with z0 at the second site exceeding that at the first by < 1 cm. During our observation period, snow covered the second site for three days, but the impact on z0 is small, implying that roughness is predominantly determined by major rock size obstacles rather than the general form of the surface. To complement these aerodynamic measurements we also conducted a Structure from Motion survey across each patch and calculated z0 using microtopographic methods published in a range of recent studies. We compare the outputs of each of these algorithms with each other and with the aerodynamic measurements, assess how they perform over a range of scales, and evaluate the validity of using microtopographic methods where aerodynamic measurements

  17. High-albedo materials for reducing building cooling energy use

    SciTech Connect

    Taha, H.; Sailor, D.; Akbari, H.

    1992-01-01

    One simple and effective way to mitigate urban heat islands, i.e., the higher temperatures in cities compared to those of the surrounds, and their negative impacts on cooling energy consumption is to use high-albedo materials on major urban surfaces such as rooftops, streets, sidewalks, school yards, and the exposed surfaces of parking lots. High-albedo materials can save cooling energy use by directly reducing the heat gain through a building`s envelope (direct effect) and also by lowering the urban air temperature in the neighborhood of the building (indirect effect). This project is an attempt to address high-albedo materials for buildings and to perform measurements of roof coatings. We search for existing methods and materials to implement fighter colors on major building and urban surfaces. Their cost effectiveness are examined and the possible related technical, maintenance, and environmental problems are identified. We develop a method for measuring albedo in the field by studying the instrumentation aspects of such measurements. The surface temperature impacts of various albedo/materials in the actual outdoor environment are studied by measuring the surface temperatures of a variety of materials tested on an actual roof. We also generate an albedo database for several urban surfaces to serve as a reference for future use. The results indicate that high-albedo materials can have a large impact on the surface temperature regime. On clear sunny days, when the solar noon surface temperatures of conventional roofing materials were about 40{degrees}C (72{degrees}F) warmer than air, the surface temperature of high-albedo coatings were only about 5{degrees}C warmer than air. In the morning and in the late afternoon, the high-albedo materials were as cool as the air itself. While conventional roofing materials warm up by an average 0.055{degrees}C/(W m{sup {minus}2}), the high-albedo surfaces warm up by an average 0.015{degrees}C/(W m{sup {minus}2}).

  18. High-albedo materials for reducing building cooling energy use

    SciTech Connect

    Taha, H.; Sailor, D.; Akbari, H.

    1992-01-01

    One simple and effective way to mitigate urban heat islands, i.e., the higher temperatures in cities compared to those of the surrounds, and their negative impacts on cooling energy consumption is to use high-albedo materials on major urban surfaces such as rooftops, streets, sidewalks, school yards, and the exposed surfaces of parking lots. High-albedo materials can save cooling energy use by directly reducing the heat gain through a building's envelope (direct effect) and also by lowering the urban air temperature in the neighborhood of the building (indirect effect). This project is an attempt to address high-albedo materials for buildings and to perform measurements of roof coatings. We search for existing methods and materials to implement fighter colors on major building and urban surfaces. Their cost effectiveness are examined and the possible related technical, maintenance, and environmental problems are identified. We develop a method for measuring albedo in the field by studying the instrumentation aspects of such measurements. The surface temperature impacts of various albedo/materials in the actual outdoor environment are studied by measuring the surface temperatures of a variety of materials tested on an actual roof. We also generate an albedo database for several urban surfaces to serve as a reference for future use. The results indicate that high-albedo materials can have a large impact on the surface temperature regime. On clear sunny days, when the solar noon surface temperatures of conventional roofing materials were about 40{degrees}C (72{degrees}F) warmer than air, the surface temperature of high-albedo coatings were only about 5{degrees}C warmer than air. In the morning and in the late afternoon, the high-albedo materials were as cool as the air itself. While conventional roofing materials warm up by an average 0.055{degrees}C/(W m{sup {minus}2}), the high-albedo surfaces warm up by an average 0.015{degrees}C/(W m{sup {minus}2}).

  19. Standards for the validation of remotely sensed albedo products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Jennifer

    2015-04-01

    Land surface albedo is important component of the Earth's energy balance, defined as the fraction of shortwave radiation absorbed by a surface, and is one many Essential Climate Variables (ECVS) that can be retrieved from space through remote sensing. To quantify the accuracy of these products, they must be validated with respect to in-situ measurements of albedo using an albedometer. Whilst accepted standards exist for the calibration of albedometers, standards for the use of in-situ measurement schemes, and their use in validation procedures have yet to be developed. It is essential that we can assess the quality of remotely sensed albedo data, and to identify traceable sources of uncertainty during process of providing these data. As a result of the current lack of accepted standards for in-situ albedo retrieval and validation procedures, we are not yet able to identify and quantify traceable sources of uncertainty. Establishing standard protocols for in-situ retrievals for the validation of global albedo products would allow inter-product use and comparison, in addition to product standardization. Accordingly, this study aims to assess the quality of in-situ albedo retrieval schemes and identify sources of uncertainty, specifically in vegetation environments. A 3D Monte Carlo Ray Tracing Model will be used to simulate albedometer instruments in complex 3D vegetation canopies. To determine sources of uncertainty, factors that influence albedo measurement uncertainty were identified and will subsequently be examined: 1. Time of day (Solar Zenith Angle) 2. Ecosytem type 3. Placement of albedometer within the ecosystem 4. Height of albedometer above the canopy 5. Clustering within the ecosystem A variety of 3D vegetation canopies have been generated to cover the main ecosystems found globally, different seasons, and different plant distributions. Canopies generated include birchstand and pinestand forests for summer and winter, savanna, shrubland, cropland and

  20. Gliding swifts attain laminar flow over rough wings.

    PubMed

    Lentink, David; de Kat, Roeland

    2014-01-01

    Swifts are among the most aerodynamically refined gliding birds. However, the overlapping vanes and protruding shafts of their primary feathers make swift wings remarkably rough for their size. Wing roughness height is 1-2% of chord length on the upper surface--10,000 times rougher than sailplane wings. Sailplanes depend on extreme wing smoothness to increase the area of laminar flow on the wing surface and minimize drag for extended glides. To understand why the swift does not rely on smooth wings, we used a stethoscope to map laminar flow over preserved wings in a low-turbulence wind tunnel. By combining laminar area, lift, and drag measurements, we show that average area of laminar flow on swift wings is 69% (n = 3; std 13%) of their total area during glides that maximize flight distance and duration--similar to high-performance sailplanes. Our aerodynamic analysis indicates that swifts attain laminar flow over their rough wings because their wing size is comparable to the distance the air travels (after a roughness-induced perturbation) before it transitions from laminar to turbulent. To interpret the function of swift wing roughness, we simulated its effect on smooth model wings using physical models. This manipulation shows that laminar flow is reduced and drag increased at high speeds. At the speeds at which swifts cruise, however, swift-like roughness prolongs laminar flow and reduces drag. This feature gives small birds with rudimentary wings an edge during the evolution of glide performance. PMID:24964089

  1. Surface roughness effect on finite oil journal bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, B. C.; Hamrock, B. J.

    1981-01-01

    A theoretical study of the performance of finite oil journal bearings is made, considering the surface roughness effect. The total load supporting ability under such a condition derives from the hydrodynamic as well as asperity contact pressure. These two components of load are calculated separately. The average Reynolds equation for partially lubricated surfaces is used to evaluate hydrodynamic pressure. An analytical expression for average film thickness is obtained and introduced to modify the average Reynolds equation. The resulting differential equation is then solved numerically by finite difference methods for mean hydrodynamic pressure, which in turn gives the hydrodynamic load. Assuming the surface height distribution as Gaussian, the asperity contact pressure is found. The effect of surface roughness parameter, surface pattern, eccentricity ratio, and length to diameter ratio on hydrodynamic load and on side leakage is investigated. It is shown that hydrodynamic load increases with increasing surface roughness when both journal and bearing surfaces have identical roughness structures or when the journal only has a rough surface. The trend of hydrodynamic load is reversed if the journal surface is smooth and the bearing surface is rough.

  2. Gliding Swifts Attain Laminar Flow over Rough Wings

    PubMed Central

    Lentink, David; de Kat, Roeland

    2014-01-01

    Swifts are among the most aerodynamically refined gliding birds. However, the overlapping vanes and protruding shafts of their primary feathers make swift wings remarkably rough for their size. Wing roughness height is 1–2% of chord length on the upper surface—10,000 times rougher than sailplane wings. Sailplanes depend on extreme wing smoothness to increase the area of laminar flow on the wing surface and minimize drag for extended glides. To understand why the swift does not rely on smooth wings, we used a stethoscope to map laminar flow over preserved wings in a low-turbulence wind tunnel. By combining laminar area, lift, and drag measurements, we show that average area of laminar flow on swift wings is 69% (n = 3; std 13%) of their total area during glides that maximize flight distance and duration—similar to high-performance sailplanes. Our aerodynamic analysis indicates that swifts attain laminar flow over their rough wings because their wing size is comparable to the distance the air travels (after a roughness-induced perturbation) before it transitions from laminar to turbulent. To interpret the function of swift wing roughness, we simulated its effect on smooth model wings using physical models. This manipulation shows that laminar flow is reduced and drag increased at high speeds. At the speeds at which swifts cruise, however, swift-like roughness prolongs laminar flow and reduces drag. This feature gives small birds with rudimentary wings an edge during the evolution of glide performance. PMID:24964089

  3. Experimental study of noise emitted by circular cylinders with large roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alomar, Antoni; Angland, David; Zhang, Xin; Molin, Nicolas

    2014-12-01

    The aerodynamic noise generated by high Reynolds number flow around a bluff body with large surface roughness was investigated. This is a relevant problem in many applications, in particular aircraft landing gear noise. A circular cylinder in cross-flow and a zero-pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layer with various types of roughness was tested in a series of wind tunnel experiments. It has been shown that distributed roughness covering a circular cylinder affects the spectra over the entire frequency range. Roughness noise is dominant at high frequencies, and the peak frequency is well described by Howe's roughness noise model when scaled with the maximum outer velocity. There are differences between hemispherical and cylindrical roughness elements for both the circular cylinder and the zero-pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layer cases, indicating a dependence on roughness shape, not described by the considered roughness noise models. Cylindrical roughness generates higher noise levels at the highest frequencies, especially for the zero-pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layer case. Cable-type roughness aligned with the mean flow does not generate roughness noise, and its spectrum has been found to collapse with the smooth cylinder at medium and high frequencies. At low and medium frequencies the noise spectra have the same features as the smooth cylinder, but with higher shedding peak levels and fall-off levels, despite the decrease in spanwise correlation length. Roughness induces early separation, and thus a shift of the spectra to lower frequencies.

  4. Dissipative transport in rough edge graphene nanoribbon tunnel transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Youngki; Salahuddin, Sayeef

    2012-12-01

    We have studied quantum transport in graphene nanoribbon tunnel field-effect transistors. Unlike other studies on similar structures, we have included dissipative processes induced by inelastic electron-phonon scattering and edge roughness in the nanoribbon self-consistently within a non-equilibrium transport simulation. Our results show that the dissipative scattering imposes a limit to the minimum OFF current and a minimum subthreshold swing that can be obtained even for long channel lengths where direct source-drain tunneling is inhibited. The edge roughness, in the presence of dissipative scattering, somewhat surprisingly, shows a classical behavior where it mostly reduces the maximum ON current achievable in this structure.

  5. Ice911: Developing an Effective Response to Climate Change in Earth's Cryosphere using High Albedo Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, L. A.; Wadhams, P.; Root, T.; Chetty, S.; Kammen, D. M.; Venkatesh, S.; van der Heide, D.; Baum, E.

    2012-12-01

    We are developing a localized surface albedo modification technique which shows promise for preserving ice and snow using inexpensive and environmentally benign floating materials. The approach has been developed with aims including preservation of polar and glacial ice, snow, permafrost and polar habitat,and keeping water cooler, using a localized and ecologically respectful "planetary band-aid" that can be deployed quickly and can be removed once it is no longer needed. The method has been tested at small scale using various material sets over several years, including four Winter/Spring seasons at sites including California's San Francisco Bay Area and Sierra Nevada Mountains, and a Canadian lake. The materials can passively float and in granular form can be easily deployed as a "monolayer" and/or corralled in the desired locations. They have been shown to reduce solar heat absorption in the underlying water in small test pools by nearly 200 Watts/m2 in California summer daytime conditions, and 2 to 11 degree-C reductions in water temperatures have been logged over the course of a day. The materials have a cost of roughly of $11.15/kW-hour (of reflected solar energy that would otherwise have heated the underlying water) for one day. Over a two-month summer period, the materials cost would be roughly eighteen cents/kW-hour of reflected solar energy, and work is ongoing to reduce costs further. Material deployments in a sheet form were used on a California mountain lake in Winter/Spring 2010-2011 to successfully demonstrate over a larger scale that properly engineered materials are effective in aiding snow and ice retention. Over the course of several days during the melting season, we typically observed differences of 70 cm greater snow retention under a Teslin sheet compared to the uncovered control areas. However, sheets tend to act as sails, requiring special measures to remain stable. The most recent season's experimentation saw further evolution in the

  6. Effects of surface roughness on the VIRTIS/Rosetta thermal measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leyrat, C.; Erard, S.; Capria, M.; Capaccioni, F.

    2014-07-01

    Thermal emission from planetary surfaces depends on many physical processes/parameters such as the Bond albedo, the heat capacity, the thermal inertia, the sublimation of ices at the surfaces, but also on the small-scale surface roughness. Distinguishing the effect of both thermal inertia and surface roughness on the infrared measurements is not trivial. In particular, surface roughness, that cannot be resolved within the pixels of instruments frame, can produce both shadows at small scales and mutual heating, which affect the thermal flux and the temperature estimations. The effect of roughness also varies with local incidence and emission angles, and local time, being significantly stronger closed to terminator when the local hills cast their shadows at far distances. In this poster, we present a thermo-physical model based on thermal conduction of heat over several diurnal and seasonal skin depths and show how surface roughness affects the retrieved temperature, especially, in the near-infrared domain [1--5 microns], where the VIRTIS/Rosetta instrument will observe comet CG 67/P starting in July 2014. We first compute the surface temperature of CG 67P using a simple thermo-physical model that takes into account the global shape of the nucleus. Then, we investigate (1) how the surface roughness can modify the apparent surface temperature and the thermal inertia, and (2) what are the best geometries of observation to distinguish between topographic effects and physical thermal processes.

  7. THE HIGH ALBEDO OF THE HOT JUPITER KEPLER-7 b

    SciTech Connect

    Demory, Brice-Olivier; Seager, Sara; Madhusudhan, Nikku; Kjeldsen, Hans; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Joergen; Gillon, Michael; Rowe, Jason F.; Borucki, William J.; Koch, David G.; Welsh, William F.; Adams, Elisabeth R.; Dupree, Andrea; McCarthy, Don; Kulesa, Craig

    2011-07-01

    Hot Jupiters are expected to be dark from both observations (albedo upper limits) and theory (alkali metals and/or TiO and VO absorption). However, only a handful of hot Jupiters have been observed with high enough photometric precision at visible wavelengths to investigate these expectations. The NASA Kepler mission provides a means to widen the sample and to assess the extent to which hot Jupiter albedos are low. We present a global analysis of Kepler-7 b based on Q0-Q4 data, published radial velocities, and asteroseismology constraints. We measure an occultation depth in the Kepler bandpass of 44 {+-} 5 ppm. If directly related to the albedo, this translates to a Kepler geometric albedo of 0.32 {+-} 0.03, the most precise value measured so far for an exoplanet. We also characterize the planetary orbital phase light curve with an amplitude of 42 {+-} 4 ppm. Using atmospheric models, we find it unlikely that the high albedo is due to a dominant thermal component and propose two solutions to explain the observed planetary flux. First, we interpret the Kepler-7 b albedo as resulting from an excess reflection over what can be explained solely by Rayleigh scattering, along with a nominal thermal component. This excess reflection might indicate the presence of a cloud or haze layer in the atmosphere, motivating new modeling and observational efforts. Alternatively, the albedo can be explained by Rayleigh scattering alone if Na and K are depleted in the atmosphere by a factor of 10-100 below solar abundances.

  8. Preferential cooling of hot extremes from cropland albedo management

    PubMed Central

    Davin, Edouard L.; Seneviratne, Sonia I.; Ciais, Philippe; Olioso, Albert; Wang, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Changes in agricultural practices are considered a possible option to mitigate climate change. In particular, reducing or suppressing tillage (no-till) may have the potential to sequester carbon in soils, which could help slow global warming. On the other hand, such practices also have a direct effect on regional climate by altering the physical properties of the land surface. These biogeophysical effects, however, are still poorly known. Here we show that no-till management increases the surface albedo of croplands in summer and that the resulting cooling effect is amplified during hot extremes, thus attenuating peak temperatures reached during heat waves. Using a regional climate model accounting for the observed effects of no-till farming on surface albedo, as well as possible reductions in soil evaporation, we investigate the potential consequences of a full conversion to no-till agriculture in Europe. We find that the summer cooling from cropland albedo increase is strongly amplified during hot summer days, when surface albedo has more impact on the Earth’s radiative balance due to clear-sky conditions. The reduced evaporation associated with the crop residue cover tends to counteract the albedo-induced cooling, but during hot days the albedo effect is the dominating factor. For heatwave summer days the local cooling effect gained from no-till practice is of the order of 2 °C. The identified asymmetric impact of surface albedo change on summer temperature opens new avenues for climate-engineering measures targeting high-impact events rather than mean climate properties. PMID:24958872

  9. Preferential cooling of hot extremes from cropland albedo management.

    PubMed

    Davin, Edouard L; Seneviratne, Sonia I; Ciais, Philippe; Olioso, Albert; Wang, Tao

    2014-07-01

    Changes in agricultural practices are considered a possible option to mitigate climate change. In particular, reducing or suppressing tillage (no-till) may have the potential to sequester carbon in soils, which could help slow global warming. On the other hand, such practices also have a direct effect on regional climate by altering the physical properties of the land surface. These biogeophysical effects, however, are still poorly known. Here we show that no-till management increases the surface albedo of croplands in summer and that the resulting cooling effect is amplified during hot extremes, thus attenuating peak temperatures reached during heat waves. Using a regional climate model accounting for the observed effects of no-till farming on surface albedo, as well as possible reductions in soil evaporation, we investigate the potential consequences of a full conversion to no-till agriculture in Europe. We find that the summer cooling from cropland albedo increase is strongly amplified during hot summer days, when surface albedo has more impact on the Earth's radiative balance due to clear-sky conditions. The reduced evaporation associated with the crop residue cover tends to counteract the albedo-induced cooling, but during hot days the albedo effect is the dominating factor. For heatwave summer days the local cooling effect gained from no-till practice is of the order of 2 °C. The identified asymmetric impact of surface albedo change on summer temperature opens new avenues for climate-engineering measures targeting high-impact events rather than mean climate properties. PMID:24958872

  10. Global Cooling: Effect of Urban Albedo on Global Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Akbari, Hashem; Menon, Surabi; Rosenfeld, Arthur

    2007-05-22

    In many urban areas, pavements and roofs constitute over 60% of urban surfaces (roof 20-25%, pavements about 40%). The roof and the pavement albedo can be increased by about 0.25 and 0.10, respectively, resulting in a net albedo increase for urban areas of about 0.1. Many studies have demonstrated building cooling-energy savings in excess of 20% upon raising roof reflectivity from an existing 10-20% to about 60%. We estimate U.S. potential savings in excess of $1 billion (B) per year in net annual energy bills. Increasing albedo of urban surfaces can reduce the summertime urban temperature and improve the urban air quality. Increasing the urban albedo has the added benefit of reflecting more of the incoming global solar radiation and countering the effect of global warming. We estimate that increasing albedo of urban areas by 0.1 results in an increase of 3 x 10{sup -4} in Earth albedo. Using a simple global model, the change in air temperature in lowest 1.8 km of the atmosphere is estimated at 0.01K. Modelers predict a warming of about 3K in the next 60 years (0.05K/year). Change of 0.1 in urban albedo will result in 0.01K global cooling, a delay of {approx}0.2 years in global warming. This 0.2 years delay in global warming is equivalent to 10 Gt reduction in CO2 emissions.

  11. Nanowetting of rough superhydrophobic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Lamb, R. N.; Cookson, D. J.

    2007-12-01

    Small angle x-ray scattering has been used to investigate the in situ immersive wetting of ultrarough surfaces which exhibit superhydrophobicity with extreme water contact angle (θA=169°). Reduced scattering contrast observed from rough surfaces when partially or totally wetted reveals significant physical differences between superhydrophobic surfaces not otherwise apparent from conventional contact angle measurements.

  12. Plant Communities of Rough Rock.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Linda

    A unit of study on plants grown in the Navajo community of Rough Rock, Arizona, is presented in sketches providing the common Navajo name for the plant, a literal English translation, the English name of the plant, and the Latin name. A brief description of each plant includes where the plant grows, how the Navajos use the plant, and the color and…

  13. A Continental United States High Resolution NLCD Land Cover – MODIS Albedo Database to Examine Albedo and Land Cover Change Relationships

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surface albedo influences climate by affecting the amount of solar radiation that is reflected at the Earth’s surface, and surface albedo is, in turn, affected by land cover. General Circulation Models typically use modeled or prescribed albedo to assess the influence of land co...

  14. Estimating surface roughness using stereophotogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, V.; Krasa, J.

    2009-04-01

    At the Department of Drainage, Irrigation and Landscape Engineering (CTU Prague) we use several mathematical models for soil erosion, sediment transport and surface runoff assessment. Here we continuously struggle for successful models parameterizations. One of the typical coefficients usually taken from literature instead of measurements is surface roughness, eg. Manning roughness (Maidment, 1993). Roughness is a key to surface runoff velocity and surface runoff depth estimation but often it is very roughly estimated. Within the COST 22 Action research we focused on estimating actual surface roughness using stereophotogrammetry. Our aim was to set up a simple low cost system useful for roughness measurements in nature conditions - mainly on agricultural fields. Our system consists of Canon EOS 400 digital camera with angle viewfinder, two robust tripods and a horizontal bar with sliding 3D tripod head. We tested different camera heights and focal distances as well as various parallaxes to obtain reasonable results. Finally we shot the surfaces from 1600 millimeters with 24 and 35 mm lens and parallaxes close to 100 mm. For 3D scene development we use Geomatica 10 GIS and its OrthoEngine module. Testing the proper system and many variables of the 3D scene modelling was an important part of the first year of the project. For these purposes we first prepared a calibrated and known 3D surface consisting of 70 by 70 cm grid and several geometrical objects of different sizes and shapes. Preparing the correct lighting conditions, finding the resolving power of the system and solving the problems with low contrast areas of measured surfaces was a time consuming but interesting task. After the system calibration we started with the actual terrain measurements. Our setup, system testing and preliminary results of the roughness computations are presented on the poster. Acknowledgement This research was acomplished within national COST project OC189 „Flood risk and its

  15. Surface Roughness Characterization of Niobium Subjected to Incremental BCP and EP Processing Steps

    SciTech Connect

    Hui Tian; Guihem Ribeill; Charles Reece; Michael Kelley

    2008-02-12

    The surface of niobium samples polished under incremental Buffered Chemical Polish (BCP) and Electro-Polishing (EP) have been characterized through Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and stylus profilometry across a range of length of scales. The results were analyzed using Power Density Spectral (PSD) technique to determine roughness and characteristic dimensions. This study has shown that the PSD method is a valuable tool that provides quantitative information about surface roughness at different length scales.

  16. 31 CFR 592.310 - Rough diamond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Rough diamond. 592.310 Section 592.310... ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ROUGH DIAMONDS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 592.310 Rough diamond. The term rough diamond means any diamond that is unworked or simply sawn,...

  17. 31 CFR 592.310 - Rough diamond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Rough diamond. 592.310 Section 592.310... ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ROUGH DIAMONDS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 592.310 Rough diamond. The term rough diamond means any diamond that is unworked or simply sawn,...

  18. 31 CFR 592.310 - Rough diamond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Rough diamond. 592.310 Section 592.310... ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ROUGH DIAMONDS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 592.310 Rough diamond. The term rough diamond means any diamond that is unworked or simply sawn,...

  19. 31 CFR 592.310 - Rough diamond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Rough diamond. 592.310 Section 592.310... ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ROUGH DIAMONDS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 592.310 Rough diamond. The term rough diamond means any diamond that is unworked or simply sawn,...

  20. 31 CFR 592.310 - Rough diamond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rough diamond. 592.310 Section 592... FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ROUGH DIAMONDS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 592.310 Rough diamond. The term rough diamond means any diamond that is unworked or simply...

  1. Roughness of stable, armored gravel beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Basil

    1993-11-01

    The grain roughness of stable armored beds that formed in a laboratory flume under a range of steady flow conditions on rounded, flat and angular gravel is analyzed. Gravel roughness geometry is determined from bed surface profiles and vertical photographs. These techniques have been employed in field situations. Thus the methodology is potentially applicable to the analysis of grain roughness in natural gravel bed channels. The description of representative roughness geometry is also analogous to that used to characterize artificial roughness arrays. Armor roughness increases with increasing flow. Armored surfaces composed of angular gravel are roughest, and surfaces formed of flat gravel offer least resistance to the flow. Stable armored beds may exhibit a tendency to maximize the ratio of the shear due to drag on representative roughness elements to total shear. Roughness concentration is strongly correlated with the energy slope, and there is a linear increase in equivalent roughness height with increasing roughness concentration. The friction factor for an armored surface varies in a linear manner with representative roughness geometry. The equation defining this relation is probably similar to that used to characterize variations in the friction factor with artificial roughness geometry at low roughness concentrations. However, to reconcile the relations for artificial and natural roughness completely, it may be necessary to explicitly consider the contribution to flow resistance made by roughness shape, background roughness, and blocking in shallow flows.

  2. Phase-Angle Dependence of Determinations of Diameter, Albedo, and Taxonomy: A case study of NEO 3691 Bede

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooden, D. H.; Lederer, S. M.; Jehin, E.; Howell, E. S.; Fernandez, Y. R.; Harker, D. E.; Ryan, E. L.; Lovell, A. J.; Woodward, C. E.; Benner, L.

    2015-12-01

    Parameters important for NEO risk assessment and mitigation include Near-Earth Object diameter and taxonomic classification, which translates to surface composition. Diameters of NEOs are derived from the thermal fluxes measured by WISE, NEOWISE, Spitzer Warm Mission and ground-based telescopes including the IRTF and UKIRT. Diameter and its coupled parameters Albedo and IR beaming parameter (a proxy for thermal inertia and/or surface roughness) are dependent upon the phase angle, which is the Sun-target-observer angle. Orbit geometries of NEOs, however, typically provide for observations at phase angles > 20 degrees. At higher phase angles, the observed thermal emission is sampling both the day and night sides of the NEO. We compare thermal models for NEOs that exclude (NEATM) and include (NESTM) night-side emission. We present a case study of NEO 3691 Bede, which is a higher albedo object, X (Ec) or Cgh taxonomy, to highlight the range of H magnitudes for this object (depending on the albedo and phase function slope parameter G), and to examine at different phase angles the taxonomy and thermal model fits for this NEO. Observations of 3691 Bede include our observations with IRTF+SpeX and with the 10μm UKIRT+Michelle instrument, as well as WISE and Spitzer Warm mission data. By examining 3691 Bede as a case study, we highlight the interplay between the derivation of basic physical parameters and observing geometry, and we discuss the uncertainties in H magnitude, taxonomy assignment amongst the X-class (P, M, E), and diameter determinations. Systematic dependencies in the derivation of basic characterization parameters of H-magnitude, diameter, albedo and taxonomy with observing geometry are important to understand. These basic characterization parameters affect the statistical assessments of the NEO population, which in turn, affects the assignment of statistically-assessed basic parameters to discovered but yet-to-be-fully-characterized NEOs.

  3. Investigations of Titan's topography and surface roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Priyanka

    Saturn's moon, Titan is a geomorphologically active planetary object, and its surface is influenced by multiple processes like impact cratering, fluvial and aeolian erosion, lacustrine processes, tectonics, cryovolcanism and mantling. Disentangling the processes that compete to shape Titan's landscape is difficult in the absence of global topography data. In this thesis, I utilize techniques in topographic statistics, fractal theory, study of terrestrial analogs and landscape evolution modeling to characterize Titan's topography and surface roughness and investigate the relative roles of surface processes in sculpting its landscape. I mapped the shorelines of 290 North Polar Titanian lakes using the Cassini Synthetic Aperture Radar dataset. The fractal dimensions of the shorelines were calculated via the divider/ruler method and box-counting method, at length scales of (1--10) km and found to average 1.27 and 1.32, respectively. The inferred power-spectral exponent of Titan's topography was found to be ≤ 2, which is lower than the values obtained from the global topography of the Earth or Venus. In order to interpret fractal dimensions of Titan's shorelines in terms of the surficial processes at work, I repeated a similar statistical analysis with 114 terrestrial analogous lakes formed by different processes, using C-band radar backscatter data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). I found different lake generation mechanisms on Earth produce 'statistically different' shorelines; however, no specific set of processes could be identified for forming Titanian lake basins. Using the Cassini RADAR altimetry data, I investigated Titan's global surface roughness and calculated median absolute slopes, average relief and Hurst exponent (H) for the surface of Titan. I detected a clear trend with latitude in these roughness parameters. Equatorial regions had the smallest slopes, lowest values of H and smallest intra-footprint relief, compared to the mid

  4. Relating black carbon content to reduction of snow albedo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, R. E.; Warren, S. G.; Clarke, A. D.

    2011-12-01

    In remote snow of the Northern Hemisphere, the levels of soot pollution are in the parts-per-billion (ppb) range, where the effect on albedo is at the level of a few percent. A reduction of albedo by 1-2% is significant for climate but is difficult to detect experimentally, because snow albedo depends on several other variables. In our work to quantify the climatic effect of black carbon (BC) in snow, we therefore do not directly measure the albedo reduction. Instead, we use a two-step procedure: (1) We collect snow samples, melt and filter them, and analyze the filters spectrophotometrically for BC concentration. (2) We use the BC amount from the filter measurement, together with snow grain size, in a radiative transfer model to compute the albedo reduction. Our radiative transfer model uses the discrete ordinates algorithm DISORT 2.0. We have chosen a representative BC size distribution and optical constants, and have incorporated those of mineral dust as well. While a given mass of BC causes over an order of magnitude more snow albedo reduction compared to dust, a snowpack containing dust mutes the albedo-reducing effect of BC. Because the computed reduction of snow albedo is model-based, it requires experimental verification. We doubt that direct measurement of albedo-reduction will be feasible in nature, because of the vertical variation of both snow grain size and soot content, and because the natural soot content is small. We conclude that what is needed is an artificial snowpack, with uniform grain size and large uniform soot content (ppm not ppb), to produce a large signal on albedo. We have chosen to pursue this experiment outdoors rather than in the laboratory, for the following reasons: (1) The snowpack in the field of view is uniformly illuminated if the source of radiation is the Sun. (2) Visible radiation penetrates into the snow, so photons emerge horizontally distant from where they entered. In the limited width of a laboratory snowpack, radiation

  5. Understanding the Factors That Control Snow Albedo Over Central Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, P.; Bergin, M. H.; Dibb, J. E.; Domine, F.; Carmagnola, C.; Courville, Z.; Sokolik, I. N.; Lefer, B. L.

    2011-12-01

    Snow albedo plays a critical role in the energy balance of the Greenland Ice Sheet. In particular, the snow albedo influences the extent to which absorbing aerosols over Greenland (i.e. dust and black carbon) force climate. With this in mind the spectral snow albedo, physical snow properties, and snow chemistry were measured during May, June, and July 2011 at Summit, Greenland to investigate the variability in snow spectral albedo and its impact on aerosol direct radiative forcing. Optical and chemical properties of aerosol and aerosol optical depth were also measured as part of this study. Strellis et. al. will present a preliminary assessment of aerosol radiative forcing at Summit in summer 2011, in a separate presentation at this meeting. Spectral albedo was measured from 350-2500 nm with an ASD FieldSpec Pro spectroradiometer daily at four permanent sites and a moving fifth site where snow was sampled for characterization, as well as in more intensive diurnal and spatial surveys. Snow specific surface area (SSA), the ratio of snow crystal surface area to mass, was measured with a Dual Frequency Integrating Sphere (DUFISSS) at 1310 nm and 1550 nm, as well as with dyed and cast samples collected for stereology analysis. Snow stratigraphy, crystal size, and density were also measured on a daily basis, and snow samples will be analyzed for microstructural parameters determined from micro-CT imaging. Snow chemistry measurements include specific elements, major ions, and elemental and organic carbon. The time series of daily albedo measurements ranged from 0.88 to nearly 1.0 in visible wavelengths and from 0.42 to 0.65 in the near infrared. Changes as large as 0.1 were observed between consecutive daily measurements across the spectrum. Preliminary results show a strong correlation between variation in albedo and co-located measurements of snow specific surface area, specifically in the near infrared. By conducting our measurements near solar noon every day, and

  6. Occurrence of lower cloud albedo in ship tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.-C.; Christensen, M. W.; Xue, L.; Sorooshian, A.; Stephens, G. L.; Rasmussen, R. M.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2012-05-01

    The concept of geoengineering by marine cloud brightening is based on seeding marine stratocumulus clouds with sub-micrometer sea-salt particles to enhance the cloud droplet number concentration and cloud albedo, thereby producing a climate cooling effect. The efficacy of this as a strategy for global cooling rests on the extent to which aerosol-perturbed marine clouds will respond with increased albedo. Ship tracks, cloud regions impacted by ship exhaust, are a well-known manifestation of the effect of aerosol injection on marine clouds. We present here an analysis of the albedo responses in ship tracks, based on in situ aircraft measurements and three years of satellite observations of 589 individual ship tracks. It is found that the sign (increase or decrease) and magnitude of the albedo response in ship tracks depends on the mesoscale cloud structure, the free tropospheric humidity, and cloud top height. In a closed cell structure (cloud cells ringed by a perimeter of clear air), nearly 30% of ship tracks exhibited a decreased albedo. Detailed cloud responses must be accounted for in global studies of the potential efficacy of sea-spray geoengineering as a means to counteract global warming.

  7. Occurrence of lower cloud albedo in ship tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.-C.; Christensen, M. W.; Xue, L.; Sorooshian, A.; Stephens, G. L.; Rasmussen, R. M.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2012-09-01

    The concept of geoengineering by marine cloud brightening is based on seeding marine stratocumulus clouds with sub-micrometer sea-salt particles to enhance the cloud droplet number concentration and cloud albedo, thereby producing a climate cooling effect. The efficacy of this as a strategy for global cooling rests on the extent to which aerosol-perturbed marine clouds will respond with increased albedo. Ship tracks, quasi-linear cloud features prevalent in oceanic regions impacted by ship exhaust, are a well-known manifestation of the effect of aerosol injection on marine clouds. We present here an analysis of the albedo responses in ship tracks, based on in situ aircraft measurements and three years of satellite observations of 589 individual ship tracks. It is found that the sign (increase or decrease) and magnitude of the albedo response in ship tracks depends on the mesoscale cloud structure, the free tropospheric humidity, and cloud top height. In a closed cell structure (cloud cells ringed by a perimeter of clear air), nearly 30% of ship tracks exhibited a decreased albedo. Detailed cloud responses must be accounted for in global studies of the potential efficacy of sea-spray geoengineering as a means to counteract global warming.

  8. Climate change due to anthropogenic surface albedo modification

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, G.L.; Ellsaesser, H.W.; MacCracken, M.C.; Ellis, J.S.; Luther, F.M.

    1980-02-01

    Using a statistical dynamic climate model with more realistic surface albedo changes than used in previous experiments, we have conducted a numerical experiment combining desertification of the Sahara and deforestation of the tropical rain forest. Over an area of 9 x 10/sup 6/ km/sup 2/ at 20/sup 0/N the desert albedo was increased from 0.16 to 0.35 and over 7 x 10/sup 6/ km/sup 2/ at the equator and 10/sup 0/S the rain forest albedo was increased from 0.07 to 0.16. While the most significant direct climatic responses were observed in the modified zones, high northern latitudes exhibited the greatest cooling through activation of the ice-albedo feedback process. In contrast to Sagan et al., this experiment suggests that anthropogenic modification of surface albedo over the past few thousand years has had an impact on global climate which is likely quite small and probably undetectable.

  9. THE ALBEDOS OF KEPLER'S CLOSE-IN SUPER-EARTHS

    SciTech Connect

    Demory, Brice-Olivier

    2014-07-01

    Exoplanet research focusing on the characterization of super-Earths is currently limited to the handful of targets orbiting bright stars that are amenable to detailed study. This Letter proposes to look at alternative avenues to probe the surface and atmospheric properties of this category of planets, known to be ubiquitous in our galaxy. I conduct Markov Chain Monte Carlo light-curves analyses for 97 Kepler close-in R{sub P} ≲ 2.0 R {sub ⊕} super-Earth candidates with the aim of detecting their occultations at visible wavelengths. Brightness temperatures and geometric albedos in the Kepler bandpass are constrained for 27 super-Earth candidates. A hierarchical Bayesian modeling approach is then employed to characterize the population-level reflective properties of these close-in super-Earths. I find median geometric albedos A{sub g} in the Kepler bandpass ranging between 0.16 and 0.30, once decontaminated from thermal emission. These super-Earth geometric albedos are statistically larger than for hot Jupiters, which have medians A{sub g} ranging between 0.06 and 0.11. A subset of objects, including Kepler-10b, exhibit significantly larger albedos (A{sub g} ≳ 0.4). I argue that a better understanding of the incidence of stellar irradation on planetary surface and atmospheric processes is key to explain the diversity in albedos observed for close-in super-Earths.

  10. Spectral surface albedo derived from GOME-2/Metop measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pflug, Bringfried; Loyola, Diego

    2009-09-01

    Spectral surface albedo is an important input for GOME-2 trace gas retrievals. An algorithm was developed for estimation of spectral surface albedo from top-of-atmosphere (TOA)-radiances measured by the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment GOME-2 flying on-board MetOp-A. The climatologically version of this algorithm estimates Minimum Lambert-Equivalent Reflectivity (MLER) for a fixed time window and can use data of many years in contrast to the Near-real time version. Accuracy of surface albedo estimated by MLER-computation increases with the amount of available data. Unfortunately, most of the large GOME pixels are partly covered by clouds, which enhance the LER-data. A plot of LER-values over cloud fraction is used within this presentation to account for this influence of clouds. This "cloud fraction plot" can be applied over all surface types. Surface albedo obtained using the "cloud fraction plot" is compared with reference surface albedo spectra and with the FRESCO climatology. There is a general good agreement; however there are also large differences for some pixels.

  11. Ghost imaging for a reflected object with a rough surface

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Chunfang; Zhang Dawei; Chen Bin; Bai Yanfeng

    2010-12-15

    Ghost imaging for the reflected object with rough surface is investigated. The surface height variance {sigma}{sub h}{sup 2} and the correlation length l{sub c} have been introduced to characterize the rough surface. Based on a simple scattering model, we derive the analytical expressions which are used to describe the effects of {sigma}{sub h}{sup 2} and l{sub c} on ghost imaging. The results show that both {sigma}{sub h}{sup 2} and l{sub c} have no influence on the image resolution, while the convergence of the correlation decreases as {sigma}{sub h}{sup 2} increases. Additionally, the bucket detector used in the test arm can dramatically improve the visibility of ghost images. The results are backed up by numerical simulations, in which a Monte Carlo approach to generate a rough surface has been used.

  12. The Impedance Due to the Roughness of Metallic Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Bane, Karl L.F.; Chao, Alex W.; Ng, Cho-K.; /SLAC

    2011-08-26

    In some future accelerator designs, such as that of the Linear Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the bunch is very short, with an rms length on the order of 10's of microns, and the effective skin depth of the vacuum chamber walls can be very small compared to 1 micron. If the skin depth is small compared to the scale of the surface roughness then the wakefield due to the walls will be dominated by the roughness, and not by the wall resistance. To estimate the wakefields of a rough, metallic surface we begin with a simple, analytical model. Then we apply the MAFIA 3-dimensional, time-domain computer module, T3 to check and find the correct coefficient for the model.

  13. MORSE/STORM: A generalized albedo option for Monte Carlo calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Gomes, I.C.; Stevens, P.N. )

    1991-09-01

    The advisability of using the albedo procedure for the Monte Carlo solution of deep penetration shielding problems that have ducts and other penetrations has been investigated. The use of albedo data can dramatically improve the computational efficiency of certain Monte Carlo calculations. However, the accuracy of these results may be unacceptable because of lost information during the albedo event and serious errors in the available differential albedo data. This study was done to evaluate and appropriately modify the MORSE/BREESE package, to develop new methods for generating the required albedo data, and to extend the adjoint capability to the albedo-modified calculations. Major modifications to MORSE/BREESE include an option to save for further use information that would be lost at the albedo event, an option to displace the point of emergence during an albedo event, and an option to use spatially dependent albedo data for both forward and adjoint calculations, which includes the point of emergence as a new random variable to be selected during an albedo event. The theoretical basis for using TORT-generated forward albedo information to produce adjuncton albedos was derived. The MORSE/STORM package was developed to perform both forward and adjoint modes of analysis using spatially dependent albedo data. Results obtained with MORSE/STORM for both forward and adjoint modes were compared with benchmark solutions. Excellent agreement and improved computational efficiency were achieved, demonstrating the full utilization of the albedo option in the MORSE code. 7 refs., 17 figs., 15 tabs.

  14. The effect of surface roughness on the adhesion of elastic plates with application to biological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persson, B. N. J.; Gorb, S.

    2003-12-01

    We study the influence of surface roughness on the adhesion of elastic plates. Most real surfaces have roughness on many different length scales, and this fact is taken into account in our analysis. We consider in detail the case when the surface roughness can be described as a self-affine fractal, and study the plate-substrate pull-off force as a function of the surface roughness. Based on the theoretical results we discuss adhesion in biological systems, focusing on the adhesive pads of lizards.

  15. Interfacial thermodynamics of confined water near molecularly rough surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Jeetain; Hummer, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    We study the effects of nanoscopic roughness on the interfacial free energy of water confined between solid surfaces. SPC/E water is simulated in confinement between two infinite planar surfaces that differ in their physical topology: one is smooth and the other one is physically rough on a nanometer length scale. The two thermodynamic ensembles considered, with constant pressure either normal or parallel to the walls, correspond to different experimental conditions. We find that molecular-scale surface roughness significantly increases the solid-liquid interfacial free energy compared to the smooth surface. For our surfaces with a water-wall interaction energy minimum of −1.2 kcal/mol, we observe a transition from a hydrophilic surface to a hydrophobic surface at a roughness amplitude of about 3 Å and a wave length of 11.6 Å, with the interfacial free energy changing sign from negative to positive. In agreement with previous studies of water near hydrophobic surfaces, we find an increase in the isothermal compressibility of water with increasing surface roughness. Interestingly, average measures of the water density and hydrogen-bond number do not contain distinct signatures of increased hydrophobicity. In contrast, a local analysis indicates transient dewetting of water in the valleys of the rough surface, together with a significant loss of hydrogen bonds, and a change in the dipole orientation toward the surface. These microscopic changes in the density, hydrogen bonding, and water orientation contribute to the large increase in the interfacial free energy, and the change from a hydrophilic to a hydrophobic character of the surface. PMID:21043431

  16. X-Ray Diffraction Studies of Interfacial Roughness in Multilayer Thin Films.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phang, Yew Hoong

    1995-01-01

    Multilayer thin films have many interesting and potentially useful properties. Defects can affect the performance of multilayers. Interfacial roughness is an imperfection that is always present in multilayers. The work investigates multilayer interfacial roughness quantitatively using x-ray diffraction (XRD). Specifically, it focuses on (1) developing new ways of using diffuse-intensity XRD to measure quantitatively interfacial roughness in multilayers and (2) correlating roughness information obtained from XRD with the possible origins of roughness. Interfacial roughness in amorphous W/C multilayers and crystalline Si_{1-x}Ge_{x }/Si multilayers on vicinal Si(001) substrates grown by sputter deposition and molecular beam epitaxy respectively is explored using x-ray scattering. By performing appropriate measurements of scattered x-ray intensity, it is possible to measure, in addition to values of magnitudes of interfacial roughness, magnitude of correlated roughness and its lateral correlation length, the degree of correlation between roughness in different interfaces, and the symmetry of correlated roughness with respect to substrate orientation and substrate miscut. In the W/C multilayers prepared under standard conditions, the correlation of roughness in different interfaces is isotropic but incomplete, and can be described by a simple phenomenological model. Using a cumulative roughness function, we identify the wavelength range in which the roughness predominates in these layers and we show that the long-wavelength roughness replicates better than the short-wavelength roughness. In the Si _{1-x}Ge_{x }/Si multilayers, correlated interfacial roughness is highly anisotropic and is aligned with respect to the substrate miscut direction. The lateral length scale of the anisotropic correlated roughness is many times greater than the average separation of the substrate steps. The existence of the anisotropic correlated roughness depends on the Ge concentration in

  17. Addressing scale dependence in roughness and morphometric statistics derived from point cloud data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buscombe, D.; Wheaton, J. M.; Hensleigh, J.; Grams, P. E.; Welcker, C. W.; Anderson, K.; Kaplinski, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    The heights of natural surfaces can be measured with such spatial density that almost the entire spectrum of physical roughness scales can be characterized, down to the morphological form and grain scales. With an ability to measure 'microtopography' comes a demand for analytical/computational tools for spatially explicit statistical characterization of surface roughness. Detrended standard deviation of surface heights is a popular means to create continuous maps of roughness from point cloud data, using moving windows and reporting window-centered statistics of variations from a trend surface. If 'roughness' is the statistical variation in the distribution of relief of a surface, then 'texture' is the frequency of change and spatial arrangement of roughness. The variance in surface height as a function of frequency obeys a power law. In consequence, roughness is dependent on the window size through which it is examined, which has a number of potential disadvantages: 1) the choice of window size becomes crucial, and obstructs comparisons between data; 2) if windows are large relative to multiple roughness scales, it is harder to discriminate between those scales; 3) if roughness is not scaled by the texture length scale, information on the spacing and clustering of roughness `elements' can be lost; and 4) such practice is not amenable to models describing the scattering of light and sound from rough natural surfaces. We discuss the relationship between roughness and texture. Some useful parameters which scale vertical roughness to characteristic horizontal length scales are suggested, with examples of bathymetric point clouds obtained using multibeam from two contrasting riverbeds, namely those of the Colorado River in Grand Canyon, and the Snake River in Hells Canyon. Such work, aside from automated texture characterization and texture segmentation, roughness and grain size calculation, might also be useful for feature detection and classification from point

  18. Polymer Transport Near Rough Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloom, Moses; Whitmer, Jonathan; Luijten, Erik

    2011-03-01

    The rheology of dilute polymer solutions under confinement is important in biology, medicine, microfluidic device design, synthetic polymer processing, and even geologic porous media. However, the solution's specific interactions with the confining surface are poorly understood. This situation is exacerbated for composite nanoparticles, such as polymer/metallic hybrids. Using multi-particle collision dynamics, we find a rich array of transport regimes depending on small-scale surface roughness and the specific surface/solute interactions. These factors couple to hydrodynamic conditions, including flow strength and confinement geometry in unexpected ways. Our findings may be relevant to transport phenomena in certain rough-walled capillaries, such as the distribution of various nanoconjugates in vivo.

  19. Cosmic Ray Albedo Proton Yield Correlated with Lunar Elemental Abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, J. K.; Spence, H. E.; Case, A. W.; Blake, J. B.; Golightly, M. J.; Kasper, J. C.; Looper, M. D.; Mazur, J. E.; Schwadron, N. A.; Townsend, L. W.; Zeitlin, C. J.

    2012-12-01

    High energy cosmic rays constantly bombard the lunar regolith, producing secondary "albedo" or "splash" particles like protons and neutrons, some of which escape back to space. Two lunar missions, Lunar Prospector and the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), have shown that the energy distribution of albedo neutrons is modulated by the elemental composition of the lunar regolith[1-4], with reduced neutron fluxes near the lunar poles being the result of collisions with hydrogen nuclei in ice deposits[5] in permanently shadowed craters. Here we investigate an analogous phenomenon with high energy (~100 MeV) lunar albedo protons. LRO has been observing the surface and environment of the Moon since June of 2009. The CRaTER instrument (Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation) on LRO is designed to characterize the lunar radiation environment and its effects on simulated human tissue. CRaTER's multiple solid-state detectors can discriminate the different elements in the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) population above ~10 MeV/nucleon, and can also distinguish between primary GCR protons arriving from deep space and albedo particles propagating up from the lunar surface. We use albedo protons with energies greater than 60 MeV to construct a cosmic ray albedo proton map of the Moon. The yield of albedo protons is proportional to the rate of lunar proton detections divided by the rate of incoming GCR detections. The map accounts for time variation in the albedo particles driven by time variations in the primary GCR population, thus revealing any true spatial variation of the albedo proton yield. Our current map is a significant improvement over the proof-of-concept map of Wilson et al.[6]. In addition to including twelve more months of CRaTER data here, we use more numerous minimum ionizing GCR protons for normalization, and we make use of all six of CRaTER's detectors to reduce contamination from spurious non-proton events in the data stream. We find find that the flux

  20. Direct determination of surface albedos from satellite imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mekler, Y.; Joseph, J. H.

    1983-01-01

    An empirical method to measure the spectral surface albedo of surfaces from Landsat imagery is presented and analyzed. The empiricism in the method is due only to the fact that three parameters of the solution must be determined for each spectral photograph of an image on the basis of independently known albedos at three points. The approach is otherwise based on exact solutions of the radiative transfer equation for upwelling intensity. Application of the method allows the routine construction of spectral albedo maps from satelite imagery, without requiring detailed knowledge of the atmospheric aerosol content, as long as the optical depth is less than 0.75, and of the calibration of the satellite sensor.

  1. A new parameterization of spectral and broadband ocean surface albedo.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhonghai; Qiao, Yanli; Wang, Yingjian; Fang, Yonghua; Yi, Weining

    2011-12-19

    A simple yet accurate parameterization of spectral and broadband ocean surface albedo has been developed. To facilitate the parameterization and its applications, the albedo is parameterized for the direct and diffuse incident radiation separately, and then each of them is further divided into two components: the contributions from surface and water, respectively. The four albedo components are independent of each other, hence, altering one will not affect the others. Such a designed parameterization scheme is flexible for any future update. Users can simply replace any of the adopted empirical formulations (e.g., the relationship between foam reflectance and wind speed) as desired without a need to change the parameterization scheme. The parameterization is validated by in situ measurements and can be easily implemented into a climate or radiative transfer model. PMID:22274228

  2. The two faces of Iapetus. [photometric and radiometric albedo observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, D.; Jones, T. J.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Murphy, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    Radiometric and photometric observations of Iapetus are described, and a model is developed for the albedo distribution consistent with the visual light curves, color variations, and radiometric flux curve. The 20-micron infrared observations show that the radiometric variation differs by about 180 deg in phase from the visual light curve and has a peak-to-peak amplitude of about a factor of two, while the linear phase coefficient of the light curve varies, as the satellite rotates, from 0.028 to 0.068 mag/deg. Determination of the albedo distribution is described, and it is found to be characterized by a dark area covering most of the leading hemisphere, a bright trailing hemisphere, and a bright south polar cap. The radius is approximated as 800 to 850 km, and the mean geometric albedos for the light and dark faces are estimated as 0.35 and 0.07, respectively.

  3. Sample size and scene identification (cloud) - Effect on albedo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vemury, S. K.; Stowe, L.; Jacobowitz, H.

    1984-01-01

    Scan channels on the Nimbus 7 Earth Radiation Budget instrument sample radiances from underlying earth scenes at a number of incident and scattering angles. A sampling excess toward measurements at large satellite zenith angles is noted. Also, at large satellite zenith angles, the present scheme for scene selection causes many observations to be classified as cloud, resulting in higher flux averages. Thus the combined effect of sampling bias and scene identification errors is to overestimate the computed albedo. It is shown, using a process of successive thresholding, that observations with satellite zenith angles greater than 50-60 deg lead to incorrect cloud identification. Elimination of these observations has reduced the albedo from 32.2 to 28.8 percent. This reduction is very nearly the same and in the right direction as the discrepancy between the albedoes derived from the scanner and the wide-field-of-view channels.

  4. Moon: lunar albedo for soft x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibadov, Subhon

    2016-07-01

    Albedo of the Moon for soft X-rays (0.1-2 keV photons) is determined on the basis of the X-ray luminosity of the Moon detected and measured for the first time by orbital space telescope ROSAT in 1990. It is found that the lunar albedo for the solar soft X-rays is less than the lunar visual region albedo almost thousand times. The data allow to estimate more correctly X-ray luminosity of dusty comets like Hyakutake C/1996 B2 and Hale-Bopp C/1995 O1 due to scattering of solar soft X-rays and to reveal thus the dominant mechanism for production of X-rays in dusty comets.

  5. Cloud albedo control by cloud-top entrainment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, Howard P.

    1991-01-01

    Marine stratus and stratocumulus clouds exert a considerable influence on the earth's heat budget, mainly due to their high albedos relative to the ocean surface. It is therefore important to understand the processes that control the radiative properties of these extensive cloud systems, particularly during daylight hours. Aircraft measurements of a stratocumulus cloud deck taken around local noon during the 1987 field phase of the First International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project Regional Experiment are the topic of this paper. A mixing line analysis of data from a series of flight tracks across a strong gradient in cloud albedo provides evidence that variations in the water vapor content of the air above the marine inversion can be responsible for the albedo change. The implications of this unexpected result for climate modeling are discussed.

  6. Rough-to-smooth transition of an equilibrium neutral constant stress layer. [atmospheric flow over rough terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logan, E., Jr.; Fichtl, G. H.

    1975-01-01

    A model is proposed for low-level atmospheric flows over terrains of changing roughness length, such as those found at the windward end of landing strips adjoining rough terrain. The proposed model is used to develop a prediction technique for calculating transition wind and shear-stress profiles in the region following surface roughness discontinuity. The model for the transition region comprises two layers: a logarithmic layer and a buffer layer. The flow is assumed to be steady, two-dimensional, and incompressible, with neutral hydrostatic stability. A diagram is presented for a typical wind profile in the transition region, obtained from the logarithmic and velocity defect profiles using shear stress calculated by relevant equations.

  7. Sensing roughness and polish direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakobsen, M. L.; Olesen, A. S.; Larsen, H. E.; Stubager, J.; Hanson, S. G.; Pedersen, T. F.; Pedersen, H. C.

    2016-04-01

    As a part of the work carried out on a project supported by the Danish council for technology and innovation, we have investigated the option of smoothing standard CNC machined surfaces. In the process of constructing optical prototypes, involving custom-designed optics, the development cost and time consumption can become relatively large numbers in a research budget. Machining the optical surfaces directly is expensive and time consuming. Alternatively, a more standardized and cheaper machining method can be used, but then the object needs to be manually polished. During the polishing process the operator needs information about the RMS-value of the surface roughness and the current direction of the scratches introduces by the polishing process. The RMS-value indicates to the operator how far he is from the final finish, and the scratch orientation is often specified by the customer in order to avoid complications during the casting process. In this work we present a method for measuring the RMS-values of the surface roughness while simultaneously determining the polishing direction. We are mainly interested in the RMS-values in the range from 0 - 100 nm, which corresponds to the finish categories of A1, A2 and A3. Based on simple intensity measurements we estimates the RMS-value of the surface roughness, and by using a sectioned annual photo-detector to collect the scattered light we can determine the direction of polishing and distinguish light scattered from random structures and light scattered from scratches.

  8. Detailed spatiotemporal albedo observations at Greenland's Mittivakkat Gletscher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mernild, Sebastian H.; Knudsen, Niels T.; Yde, Jacob C.; Malmros, Jeppe K.

    2015-04-01

    Surface albedo is defined as the reflected fraction of incoming solar shortwave radiation at the surface. On Greenland's Mittivakkat Gletscher the mean glacier-wide MODIS-estimated albedo dropped by 0.10 (2000-2013) from 0.43 to 0.33 by the end of the mass balance year (EBY). Hand-held albedo measurements as low as 0.10 were observed over debris-covered ice at the glacier margin at the EBY: these values were slightly below observed values for proglacial bedrock (~0.2). The albedo is highly variable in space - a significant variability occurred within few meters at the glacier margin area ranging from 0.10 to 0.39 due to variability in debris-cover thickness and composition, microbial activity (including algae and cyanobacteria), snow grain crystal metamorphism, bare ice exposure, and meltwater ponding. Huge dark-red-brown-colored ice algae colonies were observed. Albedo measurements on snow patches and bare glacier ice changed significant with increasing elevations (180-600 m a.s.l.) by lapse rates of 0.04 and 0.03 per 100 m, respectively, indicating values as high as 0.82 and 0.40 on the upper part of the glacier. Over a period of two weeks from early August to late August 2014 the hand-held observed mean glacier-wide albedo changed from 0.40 to 0.30 indicating that on average 10% more incoming solar shortwave radiation became available for surface ablation at the end of the melt season.

  9. Transformation of surface albedo to surface: Atmosphere surface and irradiance, and their spectral and temporal averages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nack, M. L.; Curran, R. J.

    1978-01-01

    The dependence of the albedo at the top of a realistic atmosphere upon the surface albedo, solar zenith angle, and cloud optical thickness is examined for the cases of clear sky, total cloud cover, and fractional cloud cover. The radiative transfer calculations of Dave and Braslau (1975) for particular values of surface albedo and solar zenith angle, and a single value of cloud optical thickness are used as the basis of a parametric albedo model. The question of spectral and temporal averages of albedos and reflected irradiances is addressed, and unique weighting functions for the spectral and temporal albedo averages are developed.

  10. Spin relaxation in graphene nanoribbons in the presence of substrate surface roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaghazardi, Zahra; Touski, Shoeib Babaee; Pourfath, Mahdi; Faez, Rahim

    2016-08-01

    In this work, spin transport in corrugated armchair graphene nanoribbons (AGNRs) is studied. We survey combined effects of spin-orbit interaction and surface roughness, employing the non-equilibrium Green's function formalism and multi-orbitals tight-binding model. Rough substrate surfaces have been statistically generated and the hopping parameters are modulated based on the bending and distance of corrugated carbon atoms. The effects of surface roughness parameters, such as roughness amplitude and correlation length, on spin transport in AGNRs are studied. The increase of surface roughness amplitude results in the coupling of σ and π bands in neighboring atoms, leading to larger spin flipping rate and therefore reduction of the spin-polarization, whereas a longer correlation length makes AGNR surface smoother and increases spin-polarization. Moreover, spin diffusion length of carriers is extracted and its dependency on the roughness parameters is investigated. In agreement with experimental data, the spin diffusion length for various substrate ranges between 2 and 340 μm. Our results indicate the importance of surface roughness on spin-transport in graphene.

  11. Speckle size of light scattered from slightly rough cylindrical surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berlasso, Ricardo G.; Quintian, Fernando Perez; Rebollo, Maria A.; Gaggioli, Nestor G.; Brea, Luis Miguel Sanchez; Martinez, Eusebio Bernabeu

    2002-04-01

    This research is an extension of the optical method of quality control presented in a previous paper [Appl. Opt. 39, 5811 (2000)] to the case of slightly rough cylindrical surfaces. Applying the Kirchhoff scalar diffraction theory yields an analytical expression of the autocorrelation function of the intensity scattered from slightly rough cylindrical surfaces. This function, which is related to speckle size and shape, is shown to depend on the surface correlation length, unlike for plane surfaces for which the speckle depends on the illuminated area only. The theoretical expression is compared with that for the speckle produced by the light scattered from a cylindrical bearing and from various high-quality wires, showing that the method allows the correlation lengths of high-quality cylindrical surfaces to be determined.

  12. Comparative global albedo and color maps of the Uranian satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buratti, Bonnie J.; Mosher, Joel A.

    1991-01-01

    The surfaces of the Uranian satellites Ariel, Miranda, Oberon, Titania, and Umbriel are characterized on the basis of Voyager observations. Tables of spectrophotometric data and maps of normal reflectances, green/violet ratios, and possible geological formations are presented and discussed in detail. Variations in albedo are found to be associated with impact features, and it is inferred from color differences that the upper surface of Ariel contains a higher proportion of redder material (tentatively identified as accreted low-albedo meteoritic dust) than those of the other moons.

  13. Albedo, clouds and climate sensitivity in the CMIP3 models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, F.; Rodhe, H.; Ekman, A. M.; Charlson, R.

    2010-12-01

    The albedo is a key parameter in the radiative budget of the Earth and a primary determinant of the planetary temperature and is therefore also central to questions regarding climate stability, climate change and climate sensitivity. Global climate models are essential for studying the albedo, and the parameters determining it (specifically clouds), on large spatial and temporal scales. Although models (here represented by the CMIP3 models) are able to capture the large-scale characteristics of the albedo, a bias is found between modelled and observed global albedo estimates, and on a regional scale particularly problematic regions can be identified. Many cloud parameters are poorly constrained by observations, and vary widely among models. This freedom of variability can be used in tuning models to the better constrained radiative budget, which may influence the model climate sensitivity. The effect can be kept small, compared to the range of climate sensitivities estimated by different models. Despite their different parameterizations of clouds, aerosols etc., models do have fundamental features in common, which can further the understanding of the real climate system. For instance, sensitivity to volcanic forcing is related to climate sensitivity in an ensemble of CMIP3 models. If this relation is valid for the real climate as well, observations of the volcanic sensitivity can help restrict estimates of climate sensitivity. The range of climate sensitivity estimates in models can largely be attributed to variations in cloud response to external forcing. In models with high (low) climate sensitivity, changes in cloud cover and cloud reflectivity generally enhance (counteract) a positive radiative forcing due to increased CO2 concentrations, feeding back on (damping) the warming, with a more (less) negative albedo response to the forcing. Cloud albedo is important in this regard, yet not well known. Regional cloud albedo, particularly for low-level marine

  14. Daily albedo estimation and comparison to MCD43 product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franch, B.; Vermote, E.; Sobrino, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    Land surface broadband albedo is among the main radiative uncertainties in current climate modelling. An accuracy requirement of 5% and a daily temporal resolution is suggested by the Global Climate Observing System for albedo characterization at spatial and temporal scales compatible with climate studies. Satellite remote sensing provides the only practical way of producing high-quality global albedo data sets with high spatial and temporal resolutions. For view-ilumination geometries such as Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), in order to retrieve the Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) parameters and, consequently, the albedo, a period of sequential measurement is needed to accumulate sufficient observations. This is used to derive the MODIS BRDF/Albedo product (MCD43), which consider a composite period of 16 days with a resulting temporal resolution of 8 days. Looking for an improvement in the albedo temporal resolution that mitigated the assumption of a stable target, Vermote et al. (2009) presented the VJB method that assumes that the BRDF shape variations throughout a year are limited and linked to the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI). This method retains the highest temporal resolution (daily, cloud cover permitting). The purpose of this work is to compare the MCD43 product with the VJB method through the albedo. Additionally, we present and study a method based on the VJB assumption, the 5param Rsqr. In this study we focus our analysis on daily MODIS CMG Collection 6 data from both Aqua and Terra satellites over Europe from 2002 until 2011. Figure 1 shows the percentage of the total RMSE of the VJB and the 5param Rsqr method against the MCD43 product. They display that southern latitudes present lower errors while they increase for northern latitudes and mountainous areas. Comparing the methods, the VJB presents errors higher than 15% in 8.2% of total land pixels while they suppose 6.9% of pixels when

  15. Interaction of fast charges with a rough metal surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyon, Keenan; Zhang, Ying-Ying; Mišković, Z. L.; Song, Yuan-Hong; Wang, You-Nian

    2015-09-01

    We use the Green function formulation of a dielectric response formalism to study the dynamic polarization of a rough metal surface by a single charged particle and by a pair of charged particles that move parallel to the surface. While the surface roughness is treated nonperturbatively, the plasmon excitation of the metal electron gas is described locally. We find that the magnitudes of both the image potential and the stopping power of a single particle are increased by the increasing roughness and decreasing correlation length of the surface. On the other hand, both the long-range wake potential of a single charged particle and the interaction potential between two particles are weakly affected by the surface roughness. However, the strongest effects of the surface roughness are seen in the correlated stopping power of two charged particles, giving rise to oscillations in the dependence of the stopping ratio on their distance, both when the interparticle axis is perpendicular to their direction of motion and when the wake-related oscillations are damped by adiabatic suppression of plasmon excitations at low particle speeds.

  16. Time Series Vegetation Aerodynamic Roughness Fields Estimated from MODIS Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borak, Jordan S.; Jasinski, Michael F.; Crago, Richard D.

    2005-01-01

    Most land surface models used today require estimates of aerodynamic roughness length in order to characterize momentum transfer between the surface and atmosphere. The most common method of prescribing roughness is through the use of empirical look-up tables based solely on land cover class. Theoretical approaches that employ satellite-based estimates of canopy density present an attractive alternative to current look-up table approaches based on vegetation cover type that do not account for within-class variability and are oftentimes simplistic with respect to temporal variability. The current research applies Raupach s formulation of momentum aerodynamic roughness to MODIS data on a regional scale in order to estimate seasonally variable roughness and zero-plane displacement height fields using bulk land cover parameters estimated by [Jasinski, M.F., Borak, J., Crago, R., 2005. Bulk surface momentum parameters for satellite-derived vegetation fields. Agric. For. Meteorol. 133, 55-68]. Results indicate promising advances over look-up approaches with respect to characterization of vegetation roughness variability in land surface and atmospheric circulation models.

  17. Modelling surface roughness and rocks in LRO Diviner observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, J.-P.; Hayne, P. O.; Paige, D. A.

    2012-09-01

    The Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment on NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) observes radiance in 7 infrared spectral channels from which brightness temperatures of the lunar surface are derived. In general, Diviner's surface footprint contains small scale variations in temperature. This anisothermality results in different observed brightness temperatures in Diviner's individual channels. A three-dimensional heat diffusion model is used to explore anisothermality in Diviner observations resulting from surface roughness and rocks at multiple length-scales and illumination conditions.

  18. Relevance of roughness parameters of surface finish in precision hard turning.

    PubMed

    Jouini, Nabil; Revel, Philippe; Bigerelle, Maxence

    2014-01-01

    Precision hard turning is a process to improve the surface integrity of functional surfaces. Machining experiments are carried out on hardened AISI 52100 bearing steel under dry condition using c-BN cutting tools. A full factorial experimental design is used to characterize the effect of cutting parameters. As surface topography is characterized by numerous roughness parameters, their relative relevance is investigated by statistical indices of performance computed by combining the analysis of variance, discriminant analysis and the bootstrap method. The analysis shows that the profile Length ratio (Lr) and the Roughness average (Ra) are the relevant pair of roughness parameters which best discriminates the effect of cutting parameters and enable the classification of surfaces which cannot be distinguished by one parameter: low profile length ratio Lr (Lr = 100.23%) is clearly distinguished from an irregular surface corresponding to a profile length ratio Lr (Lr = 100.42%), whereas the roughness average Ra values are nearly identical. PMID:23868394

  19. An Analytical Solution of Radiative Transfer in the Coupled Atmosphere-Ocean System with Rough Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, Zhonghai; Charlock, Thomas P.; Rutledge, Ken; Knut Stamnes; Wang, Yingjian

    2006-01-01

    Using the efficient discrete-ordinate method, we present an analytical solution for radiative transfer in the coupled atmosphere-ocean system with rough air-water interface. The theoretical formulations of the radiative transfer equation and solution are described. The effects of surface roughness on radiation field in the atmosphere and ocean are studied and compared with measurements. The results show that ocean surface roughness has significant effects on the upwelling radiation in the atmosphere and the downwelling radiation in the ocean. As wind speed increases, the angular domain of sunglint broadens, the surface albedo decreases, and the transmission to ocean increases. The downward radiance field in the upper ocean is highly anisotropic, but this anisotropy decreases rapidly as surface wind increases and as depth in ocean increases. The effects of surface roughness on radiation also depend greatly on both wavelength and angle of incidence (i.e., solar elevation); these effects are significantly smaller throughout the spectrum at high sun. The model-observation discrepancies may indicate that the Cox-Munk surface roughness model is not sufficient for high wind conditions.

  20. Optical receivers using rough reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilnrotter, V. A.

    1985-01-01

    This report examines the possible use of rough, or nondiffraction-limited, reflectors for collecting optical signals. It is shown that in the absence of background radiation, the reflector's surface quality has little effect on the performance of a properly designed receiver, but that the presence of even small amounts of background radiation can lead to severe performance degradation. Techniques are suggested for improving receiver performance in high-background environments, and bounds and approximations to the exact error-probability expressions are derived.

  1. Intercomparison and interpretation of satellite-derived directional albedos over deserts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cess, Robert D.; Vulis, Inna L.

    1989-01-01

    Issues related to the dependence of planetary albedo upon solar zenith angle are studied using Nimbus-7, GOES, and Meteosat data over deserts. Geographical variations of the planetary albedo are isolated from the albedo's solar zenith angle dependence. An atmospheric solar radiation model is coupled with desert surface bidirectional reflectance measurements to test the consistency of satellite-derived directional planetary albedos. Consideration is given to the use of narrowband versus broadband instruments, the impact of desert aerosols on the directional planetary albedo, and potential differences in the directional planetary albedo associated with different types of deserts. The results show that the directional planetary albedo is dominated by the directional surface albedo, although surface brightness influences the atmospheric limb brightening and limb darkening processes.

  2. Albedo and color maps of the Saturnian satellites

    SciTech Connect

    Buratti, B.J.; Mosher, J.A.; Johnson, T.V. )

    1990-10-01

    The paper discusses the production of maps of the albedos and colors of Mimas, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione, and Rhea over the full range of their imaged surfaces. Voyager images were used to prepare maps of the normal reflectances and color ratios (0.58/0.41 micron) of these satelites. 67 refs.

  3. The albedo of snow for partially cloudy skies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhury, B. J.; Chang, A. T. C.

    1981-01-01

    The albedo of snow is defined as the ratio of reflected to incident solar energy, and it is an important parameter in the earth's radiation budget analysis and in the study of snowpack's thermal conditions. An approximate model for calculating the incident spectral flux for partially cloudy skies is presented. The input parameters for the calculation are atmospheric precipitable water, turbidity, ozone content, surface pressure, the optical thickness of clouds, and the grain size of snow crystals. The spectral snow reflectance model considers both specular surface reflection and volumetric multiple scattering. The surface reflection is calculated by using a crystal-shape-dependent bidirectional reflectance distribution function; the volumetric multiple scattering is calculated by using a crystal-size-dependent approximate solution in the radiative transfer equation. The model yields spectral and integrated solar flux and snow reflectance as a function of solar elevation and fractional cloud-cover. The illustrative insolation and albedo values were obtained from spectral reflectance and incident flux for representative parameters of Antarctic coastal regions. A simple relationship between grain size and the overcast albedo was obtained. For a set of grain size and shape, the albedo as a function of solar elevation and fractional cloud cover was tabulated.

  4. Asteroid magnitudes, UBV colors, and IRAS albedos and diameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tedesco, Edward F.

    1989-01-01

    This paper lists absolute magnitudes and slope parameters for known asteroids numbered through 3318. The values presented are those used in reducing asteroid IR flux data obtained with the IRAS. U-B colors are given for 938 asteroids, and B-V colors are given for 945 asteroids. The IRAS albedos and diameters are tabulated for 1790 asteroids.

  5. Detection limits of albedo changes induced by climate engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, Dian J.; Feingold, Graham; Jacobson, Andrew R.; Loeb, Norman

    2014-02-01

    A key question surrounding proposals for climate engineering by increasing Earth's reflection of sunlight is the feasibility of detecting engineered albedo increases from short-duration experiments or prolonged implementation of solar-radiation management. We show that satellite observations permit detection of large increases, but interannual variability overwhelms the maximum conceivable albedo increases for some schemes. Detection of an abrupt global average albedo increase <0.002 (comparable to a ~0.7 W m-2 reduction in radiative forcing) would be unlikely within a year, given a five-year prior record. A three-month experiment in the equatorial zone (5° N-5° S), a potential target for stratospheric aerosol injection, would need to cause an ~0.03 albedo increase, three times larger than that due to the Mount Pinatubo eruption, to be detected. Detection limits for three-month experiments in 1° (latitude and longitude) regions of the subtropical Pacific, possible targets for cloud brightening, are ~0.2 larger than might be expected from some model simulations.

  6. Variable control of neutron albedo in toroidal fusion devices

    DOEpatents

    Jassby, D.L.; Micklich, B.J.

    1983-06-01

    This invention pertains to methods of controlling in the steady state, neutron albedo in toroidal fusion devices, and in particular, to methods of controlling the flux and energy distribution of collided neutrons which are incident on an outboard wall of a toroidal fusion device.

  7. Albedo in the ATIC Experiment: Results of Measurements and Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokolskaya, N. V.; Adams, J. H., Jr.; Ahn, H. S.; Bashindzhagyan, G. L.; Batkov, K. E.; Chang, J.; Christl, M.; Fazely, A. R.; Ganel, O.; Gunasingha, R. M.

    2004-01-01

    Characteristics of albedo, or backscatter current, providing a 'background' for calorimeter experiments in high energy cosmic rays are analyzed. The comparison of experimental data obtained in the flights of the ATIC spectrometer is made with simulations performed using the GEANT 3.21 code. The influence of the backscatter on charge resolution in the ATIC experiment is discussed.

  8. Mimicking biochar-albedo feedback in complex Mediterranean agricultural landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozzi, E.; Genesio, L.; Toscano, P.; Pieri, M.; Miglietta, F.

    2015-08-01

    Incorporation of charcoal produced by biomass pyrolysis (biochar) in agricultural soils is a potentially sustainable strategy for climate change mitigation. However, some side effects of large-scale biochar application need to be investigated. In particular a massive use of a low-reflecting material on large cropland areas may impact the climate via changes in surface albedo. Twelve years of MODIS-derived albedo data were analysed for three pairs of selected agricultural sites in central Italy. In each pair bright and dark coloured soil were identified, mimicking the effect of biochar application on the land surface albedo of complex agricultural landscapes. Over this period vegetation canopies never completely masked differences in background soil colour. This soil signal, expressed as an albedo difference, induced a local instantaneous radiative forcing of up to 4.7 W m-2 during periods of high solar irradiance. Biochar mitigation potential might therefore be reduced up to ˜30%. This study proves the importance of accounting for crop phenology and crop management when assessing biochar mitigation potential and provides more insights into the analysis of its environmental feedback.

  9. FLASH EXTRACTION OF PECTIN FROM ORANGE ALBEDO BY STEAM INJECTION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pectin was acid extracted from orange albedo by steam injection heating under pressure. Extraction times ranged from 2 to 6 minutes at a pressure of about 15 psi. Solubilized pectin was characterized by HPSEC with online light scattering and viscosity detection. Molar mass (M), radius of gyration...

  10. Detection of light transformations and concomitant changes in surface albedo

    PubMed Central

    Gerhard, Holly E.; Maloney, Laurence T.

    2010-01-01

    We report two experiments demonstrating that (1) observers are sensitive to information about changes in the light field not captured by local scene statistics and that (2) they can use this information to enhance detection of changes in surface albedo. Observers viewed scenes consisting of matte surfaces at many orientations illuminated by a collimated light source. All surfaces were achromatic, all lights neutral. In the first experiment, observers attempted to discriminate small changes in direction of the collimated light source (light transformations) from matched changes in the albedos of all surfaces (non-light transformations). Light changes and non-light changes shared the same local scene statistics and edge ratios, but the latter were not consistent with any change in direction to the collimated source. We found that observers could discriminate light changes as small as 5 degrees with sensitivity d′ > 1 and accurately judge the direction of change. In a second experiment, we measured observers' ability to detect a change in the surface albedo of an isolated surface patch during either a light change or a surface change. Observers were more accurate in detecting isolated albedo changes during light changes. Measures of sensitivity d′ were more than twice as great. PMID:20884599

  11. Using BRDFs for accurate albedo calculations and adjacency effect corrections

    SciTech Connect

    Borel, C.C.; Gerstl, S.A.W.

    1996-09-01

    In this paper the authors discuss two uses of BRDFs in remote sensing: (1) in determining the clear sky top of the atmosphere (TOA) albedo, (2) in quantifying the effect of the BRDF on the adjacency point-spread function and on atmospheric corrections. The TOA spectral albedo is an important parameter retrieved by the Multi-angle Imaging Spectro-Radiometer (MISR). Its accuracy depends mainly on how well one can model the surface BRDF for many different situations. The authors present results from an algorithm which matches several semi-empirical functions to the nine MISR measured BRFs that are then numerically integrated to yield the clear sky TOA spectral albedo in four spectral channels. They show that absolute accuracies in the albedo of better than 1% are possible for the visible and better than 2% in the near infrared channels. Using a simplified extensive radiosity model, the authors show that the shape of the adjacency point-spread function (PSF) depends on the underlying surface BRDFs. The adjacency point-spread function at a given offset (x,y) from the center pixel is given by the integral of transmission-weighted products of BRDF and scattering phase function along the line of sight.

  12. Albedo and color maps of the Saturnian satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buratti, Bonnie J.; Mosher, Joel A.; Johnson, Torrence V.

    1990-01-01

    The paper discusses the production of maps of the albedos and colors of Mimas, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione, and Rhea over the full range of their imaged surfaces. Voyager images were used to prepare maps of the normal reflectances and color ratios (0.58/0.41 micron) of these satelites.

  13. Albedo of Permanently Shadowed Regions of the Lunar Poles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riner, M. A.; Lucey, P. G.; Bussey, B.; Cahill, J. T.; McGovern, A.

    2012-12-01

    Due to the slight tilt in the Moon's spin axis, some topographic depressions near the lunar poles experience permanent shadow and may serve as cold traps, harboring water ice and/or other volatile compounds [1]. Permanently shadowed regions (PSRs) provide an opportunity toward understanding the amount, nature and transport of volatiles on the Moon and may also be a potential resource for human exploration. While many different data sets have suggested the presence of water ice in PSRs near the lunar poles many questions remain. For example, ice does not appear to be uniformly distributed across identified PSRs. More work is needed to understand the distribution of ice in PSRs and how delivery and retention mechanisms influence the distribution. The active illumination of the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) provides a unique contribution toward exploration PSR exploration. While LOLA is principally a laser altimeter used for quantitative topography and related cartographic and geodetic applications [2], LOLA also measures the intensity and width of the return laser pulse (1064 nm) from the surface. Here we use a global mosaic (4 pixels per degree) of LOLA albedo data corrected for instrumental drift, irregular variations, and calibrated to normal albedo using local equatorial measurements of normal albedo obtained by the Kaguya Multiband Imager [3]. Recent work using LOLA albedo shows the floor of Shackleton crater, near the lunar south pole, is brighter than the surrounding terrain (and the interior of nearby craters) at 1064 nm [4]. This albedo difference may be due to decreased space weathering due to shadowing from the Sun or to a 1 μm thick layer with 20% water ice a the surface of the crater floor [4]. Here we use LOLA dayside reflectance measurements to examine the albedo of PSRs catalogued by [5] derived from illumination modeling of a hybrid 100 m/pixel LOLA-LROC digital terrain model (DTM) up to 83° north and south latitudes. The upper latitude

  14. Effective Albedo of Vegetated Terrain at L-Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurum, Mehmet; O'Neill, Peggy E.; Lang, Roger H.

    2011-01-01

    This paper derives an explicit expression for an effective albedo of vegetated terrain from the zero- and multiple- order radiative transfer (RT) model comparison. The formulation establishes a direct physical link between the effective vegetation parameterization and the theoretical description of absorption and scattering within the canopy. The paper will present an evaluation of the derived albedo for corn canopies with data taken during an experiment at Alabama A&M Winfield A. Thomas Agricultural Research Station near Huntsville, Alabama in June, 1998. The test site consisted of two 50-m x 60-m plots - one with a bare surface and the other with grass cover - and four 30-m x 50-m plots of corn at different planting densities. One corn field was planted at a full density of 9.5 plants/sq m while the others were planted at 1/3, 1/2 and 2/3 of the full density. The fields were observed with a truck-mounted L-band radiometer at incident angle of 15 degree for the period of two weeks. Soil moisture (SM) changed daily due to irrigation and natural rainfall. Variations in gravimetric SM from 18 % to 34 % were seen during this period. Ground truth data, including careful characterization of the corn size and orientation statistics, and its dielectric, was also collected and used to simulate the effective albedo for the vegetation. The single-scattering albedo is defined as the fractional power scattered from individual vegetation constituents with respect to canopy extinction. It represents single-scattering properties of vegetation elements only, and is independent of ground properties. The values of the albedo get higher when there is dense vegetation (i.e. forest, mature corn, etc.) with scatterers, such as branches and trunks (or stalks in the case of corn), which are large with respect to the wavelength. This large albedo leads to a reduction in brightness temperature in the zero-order RT solution (known as tau-omega model). Higher-order multiple-scattering RT

  15. Influence of polar-cap albedo on past and current Martian climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kieffer, Hugh H.; Paige, David A.

    1987-01-01

    The finding that the observed albedo of the Martian polar caps increase with increasing isolation is reviewed. Models of the Martian climate system are greatly stabilized when an insolation-dependent frost albedo instead of a constant albedo is used in the energy budget. The authors views on microphysics of the process is then presented. Long term climate models must account for the variability of CO2 frost albedo.

  16. Diffusion-induced line-edge roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Michael D.; Schmid, Gerard M.; Goldfarb, Dario L.; Angelopoulos, Marie; Willson, C. Grant

    2003-06-01

    As feature dimensions shrink, line edge roughness has become an increasing concern in semiconductor fabrication. There are numerous potential contributors to line edge roughness throughout the lithographic process and any measured roughness value on a printed device feature is, like the feature itself, a convolved function of every processing step. When the full lithographic process is used to study line edge roughness, it can be difficult to isolate the contribution to final roughness from any individual processing step or factor. To gain a more fundamental understanding of roughness generation that is specifically related to photoresist chemistry and formulation it is necessary to design experiments that separate out exposure related issues like mask dimension variation or local dose variation ("shot noise"). This can be accomplished using previously reported experimental protocols for bilayer film stack creation. The bilayer experimental approach has been used to study the effect of variations in such factors as post exposure bake time, photoacid generator loading, and developer concentration on roughness generation. Surface roughness of the developed film stacks is measured via atomic force microscopy. Surface roughness of developed bilayer film stacks may be considered analogous to sidewall roughness of printed features. An acrylate-based 193nm photoresist resin and an APEX-type resin are used in these experiments. In addition to experimental results, results from mesoscale lithographic simulations are used to gain further insight into diffusion induced roughness and how roughness in the latent image is modified during the development step.

  17. Intelligent Information Retrieval Using Rough Set Approximations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Srinivasan, Padmini

    1989-01-01

    Describes rough sets theory and discusses the advantages it offers for information retrieval, including the implicit inclusion of Boolean logic, term weighting, ranked retrieval output, and relevance feedback. Rough set formalism is compared to Boolean, vector, and fuzzy models of information retrieval and a small scale evaluation of rough sets is…

  18. Calibration of surface roughness standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thalmann, R.; Nicolet, A.; Meli, F.; Picotto, G. B.; Matus, M.; Carcedo, L.; Hemming, B.; Ganioglu, O.; De Chiffre, L.; Saraiva, F.; Bergstrand, S.; Zelenika, S.; Tonmueanwai, A.; Tsai, C.-L.; Shihua, W.; Kruger, O.; de Souza, M. M.; Salgado, J. A.; Ramotowski, Z.

    2016-01-01

    The key comparison EURAMET.L-K8.2013 on roughness was carried out in the framework of a EURAMET project starting in 2013 and ending in 2015. It involved the participation of 17 National Metrology Institutes from Europe, Asia, South America and Africa representing four regional metrology organisations. Five surface texture standards of different type were circulated and on each of the standards several roughness parameters according to the standard ISO 4287 had to be determined. 32 out of 395 individual results were not consistent with the reference value. After some corrective actions the number of inconsistent results could be reduced to 20, which correspond to about 5% of the total and can statistically be expected. In addition to the material standards, two softgauges were circulated, which allow to test the software of the instruments used in the comparison. The comparison results help to support the calibraton and measurement capabilities (CMCs) of the laboratories involved in the CIPM MRA. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCL, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  19. Extensive wetting due to roughness

    SciTech Connect

    Yost, F.G.; Michael, J.R.; Eisenmann, E.T. . Center for Solder Science and Technology)

    1995-01-01

    Typically, a small mass of eutectic Sn-Pb solder wets a copper surface and flows radially outward to form a hemispherical shape with a contact angle of approx. 15--20 deg. When a similar mass of solder wets and thick electroless copper coated substrate, rapid radial flow commences and surprising new effects occur. Thick coats of electroless copper have a nodular surface structure and spreading on it does not subside until all solder is consumed. When the nodular structure is wetted by solder a coastline'' with many nearby islands'' are defined. Photos of regions at the wetting front were taken in the backscatter imaging mode of an SEM. These images show that solder wets the valleys between the surface nodules forming a delicate, lacy arrangement. The geometry of this coastal'' solder structure is described as fractal-like having a dimension D = 1.38 making it similar to drying fronts and cloud configurations. The importance of surface roughness in wetting phenomena is discussed in the light of an extensive history on the subject. It is shown that for spontaneous flow, assisted by roughness, the surface geometry must consist of local angles that are larger than the equilibrium contact angle. Kinetics of the wetting process are demonstrated by image analysis of wetted area taken from videotaped experiments. These experimental kinetics are shown to be similar in form to flow in open channel capillaries.

  20. Report on the ALPO LTP observing program. [for establishing albedo scale for lunar features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, W. S.

    1974-01-01

    Observations of lunar transient phenomena for the Association of Lunar and Planetary Observers (ALPO) are reported. The procedures for making visual observations for estimating albedo are described, and the reported albedo analyzed for lunar topographic features. It is shown that a catalog or scale of albedos can be established for each feature.

  1. The electromagnetic component of albedo from superhigh energy cascades in dense media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golynskaya, R. M.; Hein, L. A.; Plyasheshnikov, A. V.; Vorobyev, K. V.

    1985-01-01

    Albedo from cascades induced in iron by high energy gamma quanta were Monte Carlo simulated. Thereafter the albedo electromagnetic component from proton induced cascades were calculated analytically. The calculations showed that the albedo electromagnetic component increases more rapidly than the nuclear active component and will dominate at sufficiently high energies.

  2. Albedo Response of Native and Artificial Soils to a Wetting Event: Implications for Critical Zone Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovell, L.; Sanchez-Mejia, Z. M.; Papuga, S. A.

    2012-12-01

    The Landscape Evolution Observatory (LEO) at Biosphere 2 is composed of three experimental hill slopes filled to one meter depth of a ground basaltic tephra soil, set up to investigate critical zone processes. Our goal is to understand the energy aspects of this artificial LEO soil; surfaces with a high surface reflectance (albedo) may limit energy available for critical zone processes. The albedo of a surface can change, e.g. by vegetation growth or soil wetting, which can further influence available energy. Here, we examine the soil moisture and albedo response of LEO soil to a 10 mm rainfall event, and compare the results to those found using traditional potting and native desert soils that differ in color and texture. We hypothesized that: 1) increased soil moisture would decrease albedo for all soil types; 2) a smaller wetting front would maximize any decrease in albedo, and 3) albedo will reach a minimum within hours of a rainstorm, returning to a maximum albedo value within the day. We found that albedo was lowest under wet conditions for all soils, regardless of initial color and texture. Additionally, the LEO soil experienced the shallowest wetting front and also showed the most significant decrease in albedo following rainfall. After the rainfall event, all soils showed an initial decrease in albedo, followed by an increase in albedo as the soil dried. While the albedo and soil moisture of each soil reacted similarly, the very dark and fine LEO soil showed the strongest response to wetting.

  3. Long term surface albedo datasets generated with Meteosat images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lattanzio, A.; Govaerts, Y. M.; Theodore, B.

    2009-04-01

    The Global Climate Observing System (GCOS) has recognized the importance and the key-role of the surface albedo in the study of the climate change. This and the other climate variables, called Essential Climate Variables (ECVs), must satisfy the following requirements: (i) a global coverage over long-term periods with adequate spatial and temporal resolution, (ii) reliability and accuracy as well as a (iii) quality control. The Coordination Group for Meteorological Satellites (CGMS) assigned to EUMETSAT an action (T18 (TF7)) in order to prototype and test a new algorithm able to retrieve surface albedo using geostationary satellites as described in the "Implementation plan for the global observing system for climate in support of the UNFCCC" document (WMO/TD No. 1219). In this frame EUMETSAT decided to develop a new specific algorithm, named Meteosat Surface Albedo (MSA), based on a method proposed by Pinty et al. The MSA algorithm is currently running in the operational reprocessing facility of EUMETSAT in order to generate reliable albedo data set starting from 1982. These data have been acquired by six different radiometers. As Meteosat first generation satellites have not been designed for climate monitoring, before proceeding with the interpretation of the complete archive (~ 25 years of data), a detailed temporal consistency analysis of the albedo data set generated with the MSA algorithm has been performed in order to check the compliance with points (ii) and (iii). Specific efforts have been put on the estimation of the measurement error accounting for the observation uncertainties and retrieval method assumptions. Currently 100% of the archive for the prime mission at 0 degree has been processed and the albedo data set can be requested from the EUMETSAT archive facility. This paper will present the method elaborated for the evaluation of the temporal consistency of the MSA data set and illustrate typical problems raising from the processing of old data and

  4. Radiative transfer in dusty nebulae. III - The effects of dust albedo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrosian, V.; Dana, R. A.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of an albedo of internal dust, such as ionization structure and temperature of dust grain, were studied by the quasi-diffusion method with an iterative technique for solving the radiative heat transfer equations. It was found that the generalized on-the-spot approximation solution is adequate for most astrophysical applications for a zero albedo; for a nonzero albedo, the Eddington approximation is more accurate. The albedo increases the average energy of the diffuse photons, increasing the ionization level of hydrogen and heavy elements if the Eddington approximation is applied; the dust thermal gradient is reduced so that the infrared spectrum approaches blackbody spectrum with an increasing albedo.

  5. Turbulence Structure in Rough and Smooth Wall Boundary Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volino, Ralph; Schultz, Michael; Flack, Karen

    2006-11-01

    The outer region structure of turbulent boundary layers on smooth and rough walls was studied experimentally. Turbulence spectra were computed from LDV data. Velocity fields were computed from PIV data. Instantaneous swirl strength fields were computed from the velocity fields. The heads of hairpin vortices grouped as packets were visible in the streamwise wall normal plane, and the legs of these vortices were visible along the length of low speed streaks in streamwise spanwise planes at y/δ=0.1 and 0.4. These structures, observed previously in smooth wall boundary layers, were qualitatively similar in the rough and smooth wall cases. Two point correlations of the velocity and swirl strength were quantitatively similar for the smooth and rough walls. The turbulence spectra and probability density functions of the turbulence and swirl strength also showed quantitative similarity between the rough and smooth wall cases when the results were normalized using the friction velocity and the boundary layer thickness. This similarity in turbulence structure is in agreement with the similarity in turbulence statistics reported previously.

  6. Parameterization of Vegetation Aerodynamic Roughness of Natural Regions Satellite Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jasinski, Michael F.; Crago, Richard; Stewart, Pamela

    1998-01-01

    Parameterizations of the frontal area index and canopy area index of natural or randomly distributed plants are developed, and applied to the estimation of local aerodynamic roughness using satellite imagery. The formulas are expressed in terms of the subpixel fractional vegetation cover and one non-dimensional geometric parameter that characterizes the plant's shape. Geometrically similar plants and Poisson distributed plant centers are assumed. An appropriate averaging technique to extend satellite pixel-scale estimates to larger scales is provided. The parameterization is applied to the estimation of aerodynamic roughness using satellite imagery for a 2.3 sq km coniferous portion of the Landes Forest near Lubbon, France, during the 1986 HAPEX-Mobilhy Experiment. The canopy area index is estimated first for each pixel in the scene based on previous estimates of fractional cover obtained using Landsat Thematic Mapper imagery. Next, the results are incorporated into Raupach's (1992, 1994) analytical formulas for momentum roughness and zero-plane displacement height. The estimates compare reasonably well to reference values determined from measurements taken during the experiment and to published literature values. The approach offers the potential for estimating regionally variable, vegetation aerodynamic roughness lengths over natural regions using satellite imagery when there exists only limited knowledge of the vegetated surface.

  7. Amplitude modulation of streamwise velocity fluctuations in the roughness sublayer: evidence from large-eddy simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awasthi, Ankit; Anderson, William

    2015-11-01

    Large-scale motions in the logarithmic region of turbulent boundary layers amplitude modulate the viscous sublayer (Marusic et al., 2010: Science; Mathis et al., 2009: J. Fluid Mech.). This finding has promising implications for large-eddy simulation of wall-bounded turbulence at high Reynolds number (wherein the turbulence integral length exhibits linear proportionality with wall-normal elevation). Existing amplitude modulation studies have addressed smooth wall flows, though high Reynolds number rough wall flows are ubiquitous. Under such conditions, roughness-scale vortices ablate the viscous sublayer and result in the roughness sublayer. The roughness sublayer depth scales with aggregate element height, k, and is typically 2k ~ 3k. Above this, Townsend's Hypothesis dictates that the logarithmic layer is unaffected by the roughness sublayer. Here, we present large-eddy simulation results of turbulent channel flow over rough walls. We follow the decoupling procedure of Mathis et al., 2009: J. Fluid Mech., and present evidence that outer-layer dynamics amplitude modulate the roughness sublayer. Below the roughness element height, we report enormous sensitivity to element proximity. Above the elements, but within the roughness sublayer, topography dependence rapidly declines. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Turbulence and Transition Program (PM: Dr. R. Ponnoppan) under Grant # FA9550-14-1-0101. Computational resources were provided by the Texas Adv. Comp. Center at the Univ. of Texas.

  8. A parameterization of the effect of surface roughness on microwave emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mo, Tsan; Schmugge, Thomas J.

    1987-01-01

    A simple model is developed to represent the net effect of surface roughness on the microwave emission from soils. The reflectivity of a rough soil surface is defined in a theoretical model that includes both coherent and incoherent reflectivities in terms of the statistical properties of the rough surface, i.e., the surface height standard deviation and its horizontal correlation length. It is shown that the rough surface reflectivity obtained from this theoretical model can be presented in a form that is simply the reflectivity of a smooth surface attenuated by a 'rough thickness'. It is found that the rough thickness can be parameterized as a function of the statistical slope ratio of a rough surface by a simple power-law relationship. Since the slope of a rough surface can be determined experimentally, the rough thickness can be quantitatively estimated from the parametric representation. Model calculations show that this simple model can provide reasonably accurate results of predicted brightness temperatures that agree well with field measurements within experimental uncertainty.

  9. Albedo of coastal landfast sea ice in Prydz Bay, Antarctica: Observations and parameterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qinghua; Liu, Jiping; Leppäranta, Matti; Sun, Qizhen; Li, Rongbin; Zhang, Lin; Jung, Thomas; Lei, Ruibo; Zhang, Zhanhai; Li, Ming; Zhao, Jiechen; Cheng, Jingjing

    2016-05-01

    The snow/sea-ice albedo was measured over coastal landfast sea ice in Prydz Bay, East Antarctica (off Zhongshan Station) during the austral spring and summer of 2010 and 2011. The variation of the observed albedo was a combination of a gradual seasonal transition from spring to summer and abrupt changes resulting from synoptic events, including snowfall, blowing snow, and overcast skies. The measured albedo ranged from 0.94 over thick fresh snow to 0.36 over melting sea ice. It was found that snow thickness was the most important factor influencing the albedo variation, while synoptic events and overcast skies could increase the albedo by about 0.18 and 0.06, respectively. The in-situ measured albedo and related physical parameters (e.g., snow thickness, ice thickness, surface temperature, and air temperature) were then used to evaluate four different snow/ice albedo parameterizations used in a variety of climate models. The parameterized albedos showed substantial discrepancies compared to the observed albedo, particularly during the summer melt period, even though more complex parameterizations yielded more realistic variations than simple ones. A modified parameterization was developed, which further considered synoptic events, cloud cover, and the local landfast sea-ice surface characteristics. The resulting parameterized albedo showed very good agreement with the observed albedo.

  10. Comparison of spectral surface albedos and their impact on the general circulation model simulated surface climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roesch, A.; Wild, M.; Pinker, R.; Ohmura, A.

    2002-07-01

    This study investigates the impact of spectrally resolved surface albedo on the total surface albedo. The neglect of albedo variation within the shortwave spectrum may lead to substantial errors as the atmospheric water greatly influences the spectral distribution of the incoming radiation. It is shown that ignoring the spectral dependence of the surface albedo will affect the predicted climate. The study reveals substantial changes in the climate over northern Africa when modifying the surface albedo of the Sahara deserts. Detailed information is given how the European Center/Hamburg General Circulation Model (ECHAM4) can be extended to include surface boundary conditions for both the visible and near-infrared incoming radiation. This comprises global climatologies for both the visible and near-infrared albedo for snow-free conditions, as well as the corresponding albedo values over snow, land-/sea ice and over snow covered forests. Comparisons between several available surface albedo climatologies and a newly compiled albedo data set show substantial scatter in estimated albedos. The largest albedo differences are found in snow covered forest regions as well as in arid and semi-arid terrains.

  11. Evaluating biases in simulated land surface albedo from CMIP5 global climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yue; Wang, Tao; Zeng, Zhenzhong; Peng, Shushi; Lian, Xu; Piao, Shilong

    2016-06-01

    Land surface albedo is a key parameter affecting energy balance and near-surface climate. In this study, we used satellite data to evaluate simulated surface albedo in 37 models participating in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5). There was a systematic overestimation in the simulated seasonal cycle of albedo with the highest bias occurring during the Northern Hemisphere's winter months. The bias in surface albedo during the snow-covered season was classified into that in snow cover fraction (SCF) and albedo contrast (β1). There was a general overestimation of β1 due to the simulated snow-covered albedo being brighter than the observed value; negative biases in SCF were not always related to negative albedo biases, highlighting the need for realistic representation of snow-covered albedo in models. In addition, models with a lower leaf area index (LAI) tend to produce a higher surface albedo over the boreal forests during the winter, which emphasizes the necessity of improving LAI simulations in CMIP5 models. Insolation weighting showed that spring albedo biases were of greater importance for climate. The removal of albedo biases is expected to improve temperature simulations particularly over high-elevation regions.

  12. MISR Level 2 TOA/Cloud Albedo parameters (MIL2TCAL_V2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diner, David J. (Principal Investigator)

    The TOA/Cloud Albedo data contain albedo values, including finely-sampled or local (2.2 km) TOA albedos registered to the RLRA, and two coarsely-sampled (35.2 km resolution) TOA albedos projected to 30-km altitude. The local (2.2 km) albedos do not take the obscuration of cloud features into account, so they should only be treated as traditional albedos when the number of obscured pixels is low. The restrictive and expansive albedos are both available at 35.2 km resolution: the restrictive albedos are only calculated using the radiation upwelling from the pixel under consideration, whereas the expansive albedos use all the radiation emanating from the surrounding area. Therefore, the expansive albedo is closer to the traditional definition of top-of-atmosphere albedos. [Temporal_Coverage: Start_Date=2000-02-24; Stop_Date=] [Spatial_Coverage: Southernmost_Latitude=-90; Northernmost_Latitude=90; Westernmost_Longitude=-180; Easternmost_Longitude=180] [Data_Resolution: Latitude_Resolution=1.1 km; Longitude_Resolution=1.1 km; Temporal_Resolution=about 15 orbits/day].

  13. Durability of high-albedo roof coatings and implications for cooling energy savings. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bretz, S.E.; Akbari, H.

    1994-06-01

    Twenty-six spot albedo measurements of roofs were made using a calibrated pyranometer. The roofs were surfaced with either an acrylic elastomeric coating, a polymer coating with an acrylic base, or a cementitious coating. Some of the roofs` albedos were measured before and after washing to determine whether the albedo decrease was permanent. Data indicated that most of the albedo degradation occurred within the first year, and even within the first two months. On one roof, 70% of one year`s albedo degradation occurred in the first two months. After the first year, the degradation slowed, with data indicating small losses in albedo after the second year. Measurements of seasonal cooling energy savings by Akbari et al. (1993) included the effects of over two months of albedo degradation. We estimated {approximately}20% loss in cooling-energy savings after the first year because of dirt accumulation. For most of the roofs we cleaned, the albedo was restored to within 90% of its initial value. Although washing is effective at restoring albedo, the increase in energy savings is temporary and labor costs are significant in comparison to savings. By our calculations, it is not cost-effective to hire someone to clean a high-albedo roof only to achieve energy savings. Thus, it would be useful to develop and identify dirt-resistant high-albedo coatings.

  14. Roughness of undoped graphene and its short-range induced gauge field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abedpour, N.; Neek-Amal, M.; Asgari, Reza; Shahbazi, F.; Nafari, N.; Tabar, M. Reza Rahimi

    2007-11-01

    We present both numerical and analytical studies of graphene roughness with a crystal structure including 500×500 atoms. The roughness can effectively result in a random gauge field and has important consequences for its electronic structure. Our results show that its height fluctuations in small scales have a scaling behavior with a temperature dependent roughness exponent in the interval of 0.6<χ<0.7 . The correlation function of height fluctuations depends on temperature with a characteristic length scale of ≈90Å (at room temperature). We show that the correlation function of the induced gauge field has a short-range nature with a correlation length of about ≃2-3Å . We also treat the problem analytically by using the Martin-Siggia-Rose method. The renormalization group flows did not yield any delocalized-localized transition arising from the graphene roughness. Our results are in good agreement with recent experimental observations.

  15. Arc Length Gone Global

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boudreaux, Gregory M.; Wells, M. Scott

    2007-01-01

    Everyone with a thorough knowledge of single variable calculus knows that integration can be used to find the length of a curve on a given interval, called its arc length. Fortunately, if one endeavors to pose and solve more interesting problems than simply computing lengths of various curves, there are techniques available that do not require an…

  16. Linking sediment transport and channel roughness in bedrock rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodge, R. A.; Hoey, T.; Maniatis, G.

    2012-12-01

    Improved understanding of sediment transport processes in bedrock rivers is needed for both upland management and for prediction of landscape evolution. Recent advances have focussed on the sediment processes in bedrock rivers that have implications for both sediment transfer and bedrock incision. A significant component of grain-scale transport dynamics is the difference in roughness between bedrock and alluvial surfaces. Although bedrock surfaces typically exhibit roughness at a range of scales, they are often locally smooth at the scale of individual grains; significant roughness can however also exist at this length scale. Grains on smooth bedrock surfaces are more easily entrained than grains on alluvial patches because of the higher grain exposure and lower pivoting angles. Recent laboratory and modelling work has demonstrated the effect of these differing entrainment thresholds on the development of sediment cover in a smooth channel. Here we model the effect of the spatial distribution of roughness in a bedrock river on the total sediment transport capacity of the channel. The model represents the channel as two parallel strips; an alluvial strip and a bedrock strip with sparse sediment cover. We evaluate the effect of sediment cover on the sediment flux conveyed by the entire channel, including the total sediment flux integrated over multiple flow events. A range of conditions between two end members are explored; sediment cover is increased either by widening the alluvial strip, and/or by increasing the density of sediment cover on the bedrock strip (subject to the condition that there is not significant interaction between grains). Depending on the exact conditions applied, increasing sediment cover can actually decrease the total sediment flux in the channel as a result of the decreased mobility of the alluvial sediment. However, laboratory experiments show that sediment accumulation alters the spatial pattern of roughness in bedrock channels, affecting

  17. Preliminary albedo map of the south polar region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devaucouleurs, G.; Roth, J.; Mulholand, C.

    1973-01-01

    A preliminary albedo map of the Martian south polar region in stereographic projection was prepared mainly from mission test video system (MTVS) prints before rectified and gridded prints were received, but some adjustments were made to conform with a semi-controlled photomosaic. Wherever possible, use also was made of crater coordinates. Two versions of the map are presented: one with a coordinate grid overlay and one without it. The precision of the coordinates is generally within 1 deg in latitude and the corresponding are in longitude. The maps show both the albedo markings and, with subdued contrast, the craters and topographic features that are necessary to locate the former. The map covers the range of latitudes from - 65 deg to the south pole.

  18. Comparison of MISR and MODIS land surface albedos: Methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taberner, M.; Pinty, B.; Govaerts, Y.; Liang, S.; Verstraete, M. M.; Gobron, N.; Widlowski, J.-L.

    2010-03-01

    The broadband white sky surface albedo (bihemispherical reflectance) products available from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) are compared at regional and continental scales with similar products generated from the Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) land surface bidirectional reflectance factor (BRF) parameters. This paper describes the methodology applied to derive MISR white sky albedos over four spectral broadbands of interest, namely, 0.3-0.7 μm, 0.4-1.1 μm, 0.7-3.0 μm, and 0.3-3.0 μm, as well as an evaluation of the strategy adopted to compare the MODIS and MISR products. The results are very encouraging since the two data sets show very good statistical agreement over large areas and over a full year of measurements, despite the many differences that exist in the suite of algorithms applied to retrieve these surface quantities from each of these instruments separately.

  19. Exogenic and endogenic albedo and color patterns on Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcewen, A. S.

    1986-01-01

    New global and high-resolution multispectral mosaics of Europa have been produced from the Voyager imaging data. Photometric normalizations are based on multiple-image techniques that explicitly account for intrinsic albedo variations through pixel-by-pixel solutions. The exogenic color and albedo pattern on Europa is described by a second-order function of the cosine of the angular distance from the apex of orbital motion. On the basis of this second-order function and of color trends that are different on the leading and trailing hemispheres, the exogenic pattern is interpreted as being due to equilibrium between two dominant processes: (1) impact gardening and (2) magnetospheric interactions, including sulfur-ion implantation and sputtering redistribution. Removal of the model exogenic pattern in the mosaics reveals the endogenic variations, consisting of only two major units: darker (redder) and bright materials. Therefore Europa's visual spectral reflectivity is simple, having one continuous exogenic pattern and two discrete endogenic units.

  20. Deriving Albedo from Coupled MERIS and MODIS Surface Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Feng; Schaaf, Crystal; Jin, Yu-Fang; Lucht, Wolfgang; Strahler, Alan

    2004-01-01

    MERIS Level 2 surface reflectance products are now available to the scientific community. This paper demonstrates the production of MERIS-derived surface albedo and Nadir Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) adjusted reflectances by coupling the MERIS data with MODIS BRDF products. Initial efforts rely on the specification of surface anisotropy as provided by the global MODIS BRDF product for a first guess of the shape of the BRDF and then make use all of the coincidently available, partially atmospherically corrected, cloud cleared, MERIS observations to generate MERIS-derived BRDF and surface albedo quantities for each location. Comparisons between MODIS (aerosol-corrected) and MERIS (not-yet aerosol-corrected) surface values from April and May 2003 are also presented for case studies in Spain and California as well as preliminary comparisons with field data from the Devil's Rock Surfrad/BSRN site.

  1. Land Surface Albedo from MERIS Reflectances Using MODIS Directional Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaaf, Crystal L. B.; Gao, Feng; Strahler, Alan H.

    2004-01-01

    MERIS Level 2 surface reflectance products are now available to the scientific community. This paper demonstrates the production of MERIS-derived surface albedo and Nadir Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) adjusted reflectances by coupling the MERIS data with MODIS BRDF products. Initial efforts rely on the specification of surface anisotropy as provided by the global MODIS BRDF product for a first guess of the shape of the BRDF and then make use all of the coincidently available, partially atmospherically corrected, cloud cleared, MERIS observations to generate MERIS-derived BRDF and surface albedo quantities for each location. Comparisons between MODIS (aerosol-corrected) and MERIS (not-yet aerosol-corrected) surface values from April and May 2003 are also presented for case studies in Spain and California as well as preliminary comparisons with field data from the Devil's Rock Surfrad/BSRN site.

  2. Temporal Variations in the Uranian Near-IR Geometric Albedo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, C. M.; Marley, M. S.; Baines, K. H.

    1996-09-01

    Over the period August 1995 -- August 1996 the near-infrared geometric albedo of Uranus showed distinct variation. We obtained images of the planet in 10 broad and narrowband filters using the ARC 3.5 meter telescope at Apache Point Observatory. Along with the albedo variations we saw significant changes in the contrast of the planet. Data acquired in August 1995 (Walter & Marley 1995) show the same high altitude hazes encircling the south polar region as seen by Baines et al. (1995) from the IRTF two days prior to our observations and by HST in August 1994. Followup images from June 1996 no longer contain this asymmetry, instead showing a homogeneous disk with corresponding lower albedos at matching wavelengths. Observations will also be made in late August 1996. We modeled this data by computing theoretical monochromatic albedos which were then integrated over the filter bandpasses. These filters were chosen to best probe a variety of atmospheric levels, with continuum filters probing down to the CH_4 tropospheric cloud and beyond. Filters selected in the deep H_2 and CH_4 absorption bands allow us to examine the structure of hazes in the upper stratosphere, whose small reflection contributions dominate in these dark filters. Preliminary analysis of information from two very different states of Uranian weather shows evidence for temporal variability in the vertical location and thickness of the CH_4 cloud as well as the incompatibility of extrapolating optical stratospheric haze characteristics in the near-infrared. This work was supported by NASA grant NGT-51383. Baines, K. H., Yanamandra-Fisher, P., Lebofsky, L. A., Momary, T. W., & Golisch, W. 1995, BAAS, 27, 1088. Walter, C & Marley, M. S. 1995, BAAS, 27, 1089.

  3. A wide angle earth albedo sensor for spacecraft attitude determinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruise, A. M.; Barnsdale, K.; Bowles, J. A.; Coker, A. J.; Sheather, P. H.

    1991-03-01

    A design is proposed for an earth albedo sensor which meets the conflicting parameters of a wide field of view and high sensitivity by using large area photodiodes and a very low noise dc amplifier. Two units have been launched on the United Kingdom Satellite of the Active Magnetospheric Particle tracer Experiment mission and operated successfully, measuring spacecraft attitude to an accuracy of one degree.

  4. Extended HXR Sources - Albedo Patches or Coronal Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Brian R.

    2011-01-01

    Extended HXR sources in the presence of compact footpoints have been reported based on visibility amplitudes from different detectors. Attempts have been made to determine the location and extent of these sources through direct imaging. Results of this work will be described for simulated sources and for specific flares at different solar longitudes, with a discussion of the possible nature of the extended sources as either albedo patches or coronal sources or a combination of the two.

  5. An Improved Degree-day Melt Model Considering Albedo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellicciotti, F.; Strasser, U.; Burlando, P.; Funk, M.; Brock, B.; Corripio, J.

    Albedo is a major controlling factor for the melting of snow and ice. Here, an en- hanced degree-day melt model for the point scale is presented, in which the classical dependency on temperature is extended by considering albedo and global radiation. Temperature based index melt methods have been widely used due to their good per- formances, the availability of temperature data and the ease of its spatial interpolation. Other authors have recently improved the standard approach by addition of a radiation term. Here, the latter is modified with albedo, which represents a physical property of the material, and accounts for the way the surface reacts to the energy input of global radiation. The formulation adopted is additive, being melt expressed as the sum of two components, one controlled by temperature and the second by short-wave incoming radiation. Such a representation allows to separate in a clear way the two important contributions to melt of long wave and global radiation The model was run at different sites where the necessary meteorological data are measured and melt values are avail- able. In the pre-alpine site of Col de Porte (French Alps, 1340m), melt was computed by use of a highly sophisticated, physically based energy balance model. An ultrasonic device was used at a glacier location on Haut Glacier d'Arolla (Swiss Alps, 2920 m). Both measured short-wave radiation and computed potential direct short-wave radia- tion were used, and different temporal resolutions were tested. Results are discussed with the purpose of evaluating the increased efficiency of the improved degree-day scheme, and in the light of extending it to a distributed model, which accounts for space-time albedo variability.

  6. Surface-roughness contributions to the electrical resistivity of polycrystalline metal films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, U.; Vancea, J.; Hoffmann, H.

    1990-06-01

    The influence of surface roughness on the electrical conductivity of polycrystalline metal films has to be considered at two different length scales. The large-scale surface roughness due to the granular arrangement of these films gives rise to a fluctuating film cross section. One-dimensional models of these fluctuations lead to roughness values consistent with scanning-tunneling-microscopy images of film surfaces. The microscopic surface roughness, mainly given by atomic steps on the crystallite surfaces, represents centers for surface scattering of conduction electrons. With this concept we were able to describe not only the thickness-dependent conductivity of films with natural (as-deposited) surface roughness, but also the increase in the resistance during subsequent coating with adatoms at 80 K owing to an artificial microscopic roughening of their surfaces.

  7. The Long Range Persistence of Wakes Behind a Row of Roughness Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. E.; Sescu, Adrian; Duck, Peter W.; Choudhari, Meelan

    2010-01-01

    We consider a periodic array of relatively small roughness elements whose spanwise separation is of the order of the local boundary-layer thickness and construct a local asymptotic high-Reynolds-number solution that is valid in the vicinity of the roughness. The resulting flow decays on the very short streamwise length scale of the roughness, but the solution eventually becomes invalid at large downstream distances and a new solution has to be constructed in the downstream region. This latter result shows that the roughness-generated wakes can persist over very long streamwise distances, which are much longer than the distance between the roughness elements and the leading edge. Detailed numerical results are given for the far wake structure.

  8. Martian surface roughness and stratigraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyer, Ross Alan

    2004-12-01

    Orbital datasets can be combined and manipulated to learn about the three- dimensional structure of planetary surfaces, and the processes that have acted on them. The Mars Orbital Camera (MOC) is providing high-resolution images. These images allow qualitative inspection of features, and contain quantitative information about the shape of the surface. Using a photoclinometry technique derived from a lunar-Lambert photometric function, I am able to obtain estimates of the down-sun slope of each pixel in an image. This technique was calibrated against synthetic topography, compared to an area photoclinometry technique, and applied to the Viking and Pathfinder landing sites. It is a robust technique for obtaining the roughness and slope characteristics of large areas. It was applied to the potential landing sites for the Mars Exploration Rovers to evaluate site safety. The slopes from this point photoclinometry technique can be used to obtain a rough estimate of topography, which I used in a number of studies where topographic information was crucial. MOC images have shown that layering is pervasive on the martian surface. Mars Orbital Laser Altimeter (MOLA) data can be registered to MOC images to provide elevation constraints on layer outcrops. Such layers are observed in eastern Coprates Chasma both in the chasma rim and in a flat-topped massif. Observations indicate that the chasma stratigraphy consists of thin sequences of resistant layers and intervening thicker sequences of relatively less resistant layers. More resistant units cap the massif against erosion and result in steeper slopes than the weaker units would otherwise allow. These resistant layers can be used as stratigraphic markers which have allowed me to measure the subsidence and tilting of the massif relative to the chasma walls, providing evidence for tectonic motion in this portion of the Valles Marineris. These outcrops indicate that some of these layers may be analogus to terristrial flood

  9. Signatures of volatiles in the lunar proton albedo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwadron, N. A.; Wilson, J. K.; Looper, M. D.; Jordan, A. P.; Spence, H. E.; Blake, J. B.; Case, A. W.; Iwata, Y.; Kasper, J. C.; Farrell, W. M.; Lawrence, D. J.; Livadiotis, G.; Mazur, J.; Petro, N.; Pieters, C.; Robinson, M. S.; Smith, S.; Townsend, L. W.; Zeitlin, C.

    2016-07-01

    We find evidence for hydrated material in the lunar regolith using "albedo protons" measured with the Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation (CRaTER) on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO). Fluxes of these albedo protons, which are emitted from the regolith due to steady bombardment by high energy radiation (Galactic Cosmic Rays), are observed to peak near the poles, and are inconsistent with the latitude trends of heavy element enrichment (e.g., enhanced Fe abundance). The latitudinal distribution of albedo protons anti-correlates with that of epithermal or high energy neutrons. The high latitude enhancement may be due to the conversion of upward directed secondary neutrons from the lunar regolith into tertiary protons due to neutron-proton collisions in hydrated regolith that is more prevalent near the poles. The CRaTER instrument may thus provide important measurements of volatile distributions within regolith at the Moon and potentially, with similar sensors and observations, at other bodies within the Solar System.

  10. Gamma-ray Albedo of Small Solar System Bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Moskalenko, I.V.

    2008-03-25

    We calculate the {gamma}-ray albedo flux from cosmic-ray (CR) interactions with the solid rock and ice in Main Belt asteroids and Kuiper Belt objects (KBOs) using the Moon as a template. We show that the {gamma}-ray albedo for the Main Belt and KBOs strongly depends on the small-body mass spectrum of each system and may be detectable by the forthcoming Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST). If detected, it can be used to derive the mass spectrum of small bodies in the Main Belt and Kuiper Belt and to probe the spectrum of CR nuclei at close-to-interstellar conditions. The orbits of the Main Belt asteroids and KBOs are distributed near the ecliptic, which passes through the Galactic center and high Galactic latitudes. Therefore, the {gamma}-ray emission by the Main Belt and Kuiper Belt has to be taken into account when analyzing weak {gamma}-ray sources close to the ecliptic. The asteroid albedo spectrum also exhibits a 511 keV line due to secondary positrons annihilating in the rock. This may be an important and previously unrecognized celestial foreground for the INTErnational Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) observations of the Galactic 511 keV line emission including the direction of the Galactic center. For details of our calculations and references see [1].

  11. Leading/Trailing Albedo Asymmetries of Thebe, Amalthea, and Metis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonelli, Damon P.; Rossier, Laura; Thomas, Peter C.; Veverka, Joseph; Burns, Joseph A.; Belton, Michael J. S.

    2000-10-01

    Using Galileo clear-filter images (effective wavelength ≈0.64 μm), we have created the first albedo maps of the small inner jovian satellites Thebe, Amalthea, and Metis. These maps clearly show that the leading sides of all three satellites are significantly brighter than their corresponding trailing sides, confirming and extending a result first reported by P. C. Thomas et al. (1998, Icarus135, 360-371). In particular, on all three moons the leading side is brighter than the trailing side by 25 to 30%. The fact that the direction and size of this albedo asymmetry is identical from satellite to satellite suggests that one common physical mechanism is governing the global albedo patterns of all three moons. The most plausible such mechanism is the impact of macroscopic meteoroids that originated outside the jovian system. These impacts, which eject the dust that forms Jupiter's ring system (M. E. Ockert-Bell et al., 1999, Icarus138, 188-213; J. A. Burns et al., 1999, Science284, 1146-1150), are probably also responsible for brightening the leading sides of these small satellites.

  12. Supercritical Salt Spray for the Implementation of Cloud Albedo Modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neukermans, A. P.; Cooper, G.; Foster, J. D.; Galbraith, L.; Ormond, B.; Wang, Q.; Johnston, D.; Cloud Brightening Research

    2011-12-01

    Of all the geo-engineering schemes proposed so far, the Latham-Salter cloud albedo modification scheme is perhaps the most benign and "natural" method. In its full deployment, it proposes to densify and thereby modify the albedo of low-hanging marine boundary clouds by a few percent such that the overall earth albedo might be changed by 1%. The scheme would require the production of vast numbers of salt cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), in one implementation on the order of 10^17 per second from each of some 1500 autonomous sailing vessels. We have investigated a number of possible techniques to create these nuclei. We reported previously the laboratory production of suitable nuclei from saltwater using Taylor cones. This method would require about 10^8 Taylor cones per vessel to get to the required CCN production rate, and hence needs a very extensive scale-up effort. We report here on the use of saltwater sprayed at or near its critical temperature and pressure through small nozzles. Although a number of technical problems remain, results to date suggest that this method might be suitable, at least for research purposes. The mean particle size distributions of nuclei generated (40-100 nm) are acceptable, and the scale-up effort to the estimated number of nozzles required (1000-2000) seems reasonable.

  13. Measuring Thermodynamic Length

    SciTech Connect

    Crooks, Gavin E

    2007-09-07

    Thermodynamic length is a metric distance between equilibrium thermodynamic states. Among other interesting properties, this metric asymptotically bounds the dissipation induced by a finite time transformation of a thermodynamic system. It is also connected to the Jensen-Shannon divergence, Fisher information, and Rao's entropy differential metric. Therefore, thermodynamic length is of central interestin understanding matter out of equilibrium. In this Letter, we will consider how to denethermodynamic length for a small system described by equilibrium statistical mechanics and how to measure thermodynamic length within a computer simulation. Surprisingly, Bennett's classic acceptance ratio method for measuring free energy differences also measures thermodynamic length.

  14. Effects of surface roughness on ultrasonic flaw signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, Peter B.; Adler, Laszlo; Rose, James H.

    In order to demonstrate the effect of random phase modulation on a well-collimated coherent ultrasonic beam, a simple computer simulation is run using the so-called angular-spectrum representation method. The experiments verify the conclusion derived from theoretical results that the ratio of the surface roughness induced transmission loss to the reflection loss at normal incidence is basically a simple constant determined by the sound velocities in the fluid and the solid. The normalized transmission loss is independent of both frequency and rms roughness. It is also almost entirely independent of the densities of the fluid and the solid and, at least in the two angular ranges of high practical importance in ultrasonic NDE, it is marginally sensitive to the autocorrelation length of the surface topography and to the angle of incidence.

  15. Large eddy simulation of smooth-wall, transitional and fully rough-wall channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Namiko; Pullin, Dale I.; Inoue, Michio

    2012-07-01

    Large eddy simulation (LES) is reported for both smooth and rough-wall channel flows at resolutions for which the roughness is subgrid. The stretched vortex, subgrid-scale model is combined with an existing wall-model that calculates the local friction velocity dynamically while providing a Dirichlet-like slip velocity at a slightly raised wall. This wall model is presently extended to include the effects of subgrid wall roughness by the incorporation of the Hama's roughness function Δ U^+(k_{sinfty }^+) that depends on some geometric roughness height ks∞ scaled in inner variables. Presently Colebrook's empirical roughness function is used but the model can utilize any given function of an arbitrary number of inner-scaled, roughness length parameters. This approach requires no change to the interior LES and can handle both smooth and rough walls. The LES is applied to fully turbulent, smooth, and rough-wall channel flow in both the transitional and fully rough regimes. Both roughness and Reynolds number effects are captured for Reynolds numbers Reb based on the bulk flow speed in the range 104-1010 with the equivalent Reτ, based on the wall-drag velocity uτ varying from 650 to 108. Results include a Moody-like diagram for the friction factor f = f(Reb, ɛ), ɛ = ks∞/δ, mean velocity profiles, and turbulence statistics. In the fully rough regime, at sufficiently large Reb, the mean velocity profiles show collapse in outer variables onto a roughness modified, universal, velocity-deficit profile. Outer-flow stream-wise turbulence intensities scale well with uτ for both smooth and rough-wall flow, showing a log-like profile. The infinite Reynolds number limits of both smooth and rough-wall flows are explored. An assumption that, for smooth-wall flow, the turbulence intensities scaled on uτ are bounded above by the sum of a logarithmic profile plus a finite function across the whole channel suggests that the infinite Reb limit is inviscid slip flow without

  16. The relationship between radar scattering and surface roughness of lunar volcanic features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jawin, Erica R.; Kiefer, Walter S.; Fassett, Caleb I.; Bussey, D. Benjamin J.; Cahill, Joshua T. S.; Dyar, M. Darby; Lawrence, Samuel J.; Spudis, Paul D.

    2014-11-01

    Lunar roughness measurements derived from the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter are compared to 12.6 cm wavelength radar data collected by the Miniature Radio Frequency instrument and 70 cm wavelength radar data collected by the Arecibo Observatory. These data are compared to assess how surface and subsurface roughness are correlated and affected by parameters including age and composition at length scales between 0.1 and 100 m. A range of features are analyzed including volcanic domes (Marius Hills, Rümker Hills, Gruithuisen, and Mairan Domes); mare (Imbrium, Serenitatis, and Oceanus Procellarum); pyroclastic dark mantle deposits (Sinus Aestuum, Sulpicius Gallus, and Mare Vaporum); and two young craters (Copernicus and Tycho). Statistically significant positive correlations exist between topographic roughness and both P- and S-band circular polarization ratios. The strongest correlation is observed at the longest length scales. Correlations weaken as length scales become less similar, potentially due to distinct processes controlling surface modification. Roughness is not significantly correlated with local slope. Although the Marius Hills are compositionally distinct from the Gruithuisen and Mairan domes, they are indistinguishable in roughness characteristics. Conversely, the Rümker Hills, mare, and dark mantle deposits are smoother at the length scales examined, possibly due to fine-grained mantling of regolith or pyroclastic deposits. The floor and ejecta of Tycho are the roughest surfaces measured in this study, while the floor and ejecta of Copernicus overlap the roughness distribution of the volcanic features. This study shows that many factors control the evolution of roughness over time on various length scales.

  17. Equivalent impedance of a rough interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuk, N. P.; Tret'iakov, O. A.

    1987-10-01

    An equivalent-impedance (EI) dyad is constructed for a rough and plane (on the average) interface dividing two plane-stratified magnetodielectric media. Its characteristics are related to those of a smooth surface and to the scattering properties of the roughnesses. It is shown that the Hermitian part of an EI dyad is formed through field scattering by roughnesses into the propagating natural modes of the regular medium.

  18. Minor planets and related objects. XX - Polarimetric evidence for the albedos and compositions of 94 asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zellner, B.; Gradie, J.

    1976-01-01

    Polarimetric observations are presented and analyzed for a total of 94 asteroids. The data include numerical parameters describing the polarization-plane curve, the maximum depth of the negative branch, geometric albedo, and diameter. With few exceptions, the polarizations are found to be repeatable from hour to hour, night to night, and apparition to apparition at the same solar phase angle within an observational accuracy of plus or minus 0.05%. It is shown that over a range of more than a factor of 50 in diameter or a factor of 100,000 in mass, all the asteroids seem to have microscopically very rough or particulate surface textures. In terms of their polarimetric properties, the asteroids are classified as follows: 48 in the broad S class, with compositions corresponding to stony-iron meteorites or ordinary chondrites; 34 in the C class, probably corresponding to carbonaceous chondrites; three to five M asteroids with surfaces rich in free metal; two with low-opacity surfaces (class E) attributable to pure enstatite; and five of other types.

  19. Influence of compound bedforms on hydraulic roughness in a tidal environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefebvre, Alice; Ernstsen, Verner B.; Winter, Christian

    2011-12-01

    The effect exerted by the seabed morphology on the flow is commonly expressed by the hydraulic roughness, a fundamental parameter in the understanding and simulation of hydro- and sediment dynamics in coastal areas. This study quantifies the hydraulic roughness of large compound bedforms throughout a tidal cycle and investigates its relationship to averaged bedform dimensions. Consecutive measurements with an acoustic Doppler current profiler and a multibeam echosounder were carried out in the Jade tidal channel (North Sea, Germany) along large compound bedforms comprising ebb-oriented primary bedforms with superimposed smaller secondary bedforms. Spatially averaged velocity profiles produced log-linear relationships which were used to calculate roughness lengths. During the flood phase, the velocity profiles were best described by a single log-linear fit related to the roughness created by the secondary bedforms. During the ebb phase, the velocity profiles were segmented, showing the existence of at least two boundary layers: a lower one scaling with the superimposed secondary bedforms and an upper one scaling with the ebb-oriented primary bedforms. The drag induced by the primary bedform during the ebb phase is suggested to be related to flow expansion, separation, and recirculation on the downstream side of the bedform. Three existing formulas were tested to predict roughness lengths from the local bedform dimensions. All three predicted the right order of magnitude for the average roughness length but failed to predict its variation over the tidal cycle.

  20. Comparative study of line roughness metrics of chemically amplified and inorganic resists for EUV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallica, Roberto; Buitrago, Elizabeth; Ekinci, Yasin

    2016-03-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the roughness metrics of different resists. Dense line/space (L/S) images of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), hydrogen silsesquioxane (HSQ), different chemically amplified resists (CARs), and metal oxide based resists have been patterned by extreme ultraviolet interference lithography (EUV-IL). The three line width roughness metrics: r.m.s. value σLWR, correlation length ξ and roughness exponent α, were measured by metrological analysis of top down SEM images and compared for the different resists imaged here. It was found, that all metrics are required to fully describe the roughness of each resist. Our measurements indicate that few of the state-of-the- art resists tested here can meet the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS) requirements for σLWR. The correlation length ξ has been found to be considerably higher in polymer-based materials in comparison to non-polymers. The roughness exponent α, interpreted using the concept of fractal geometry, is mainly affected by acid diffusion in CARs where it produces line edges with a higher complexity than in non-CAR resists. These results indicate that different resists platforms show very different LWR resist metrics and roughness is not only manifested in the σLWR but in all parameters. Therefore, all roughness metrics should be taken into account in the performance comparison of the resist, since they can have a substantial impact on the device performance.

  1. Investigation of the influence of a step change in surface roughness on turbulent heat transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Robert P.; Coleman, Hugh W.; Taylor, J. Keith; Hosni, M. H.

    1991-01-01

    The use is studied of smooth heat flux gages on the otherwise very rough SSME fuel pump turbine blades. To gain insights into behavior of such installations, fluid mechanics and heat transfer data were collected and are reported for a turbulent boundary layer over a surface with a step change from a rough surface to a smooth surface. The first 0.9 m length of the flat plate test surface was roughened with 1.27 mm hemispheres in a staggered, uniform array spaced 2 base diameters apart. The remaining 1.5 m length was smooth. The effect of the alignment of the smooth surface with respect to the rough surface was also studied by conducting experiments with the smooth surface aligned with the bases or alternatively with the crests of the roughness elements. Stanton number distributions, skin friction distributions, and boundary layer profiles of temperature and velocity are reported and are compared to previous data for both all rough and all smooth wall cases. The experiments show that the step change from rough to smooth has a dramatic effect on the convective heat transfer. It is concluded that use of smooth heat flux gages on otherwise rough surfaces could cause large errors.

  2. Simplified Approach to Predicting Rough Surface Transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, R. J.; Stripf, M.

    2009-01-01

    Turbine vane heat transfer predictions are given for smooth and rough vanes where the experimental data show transition moving forward on the vane as the surface roughness physical height increases. Consistent with smooth vane heat transfer, the transition moves forward for a fixed roughness height as the Reynolds number increases. Comparisons are presented with published experimental data. Some of the data are for a regular roughness geometry with a range of roughness heights, Reynolds numbers, and inlet turbulence intensities. The approach taken in this analysis is to treat the roughness in a statistical sense, consistent with what would be obtained from blades measured after exposure to actual engine environments. An approach is given to determine the equivalent sand grain roughness from the statistics of the regular geometry. This approach is guided by the experimental data. A roughness transition criterion is developed, and comparisons are made with experimental data over the entire range of experimental test conditions. Additional comparisons are made with experimental heat transfer data, where the roughness geometries are both regular and statistical. Using the developed analysis, heat transfer calculations are presented for the second stage vane of a high pressure turbine at hypothetical engine conditions.

  3. Simplified Approach to Predicting Rough Surface Transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, Robert J.; Stripf, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    Turbine vane heat transfer predictions are given for smooth and rough vanes where the experimental data show transition moving forward on the vane as the surface roughness physical height increases. Consiste nt with smooth vane heat transfer, the transition moves forward for a fixed roughness height as the Reynolds number increases. Comparison s are presented with published experimental data. Some of the data ar e for a regular roughness geometry with a range of roughness heights, Reynolds numbers, and inlet turbulence intensities. The approach ta ken in this analysis is to treat the roughness in a statistical sense , consistent with what would be obtained from blades measured after e xposure to actual engine environments. An approach is given to determ ine the equivalent sand grain roughness from the statistics of the re gular geometry. This approach is guided by the experimental data. A roughness transition criterion is developed, and comparisons are made with experimental data over the entire range of experimental test co nditions. Additional comparisons are made with experimental heat tran sfer data, where the roughness geometries are both regular as well a s statistical. Using the developed analysis, heat transfer calculatio ns are presented for the second stage vane of a high pressure turbine at hypothetical engine conditions.

  4. Rough set models of Physarum machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pancerz, Krzysztof; Schumann, Andrew

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, we consider transition system models of behaviour of Physarum machines in terms of rough set theory. A Physarum machine, a biological computing device implemented in the plasmodium of Physarum polycephalum (true slime mould), is a natural transition system. In the behaviour of Physarum machines, one can notice some ambiguity in Physarum motions that influences exact anticipation of states of machines in time. To model this ambiguity, we propose to use rough set models created over transition systems. Rough sets are an appropriate tool to deal with rough (ambiguous, imprecise) concepts in the universe of discourse.

  5. Quantifying the Impacts of Surface Albedo on Climate Using the WRF Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlosser, C. A.; Xu, L.; Xu, X.; Gregory, J.; Kirchain, R.

    2015-12-01

    Surface albedo is an important part of the energy budget in shaping local and regional climate. It could also be a potential tool to mitigate the anthropogenic effect on climate change. However, the current level of scientific understanding of surface albedo on global warming potential is medium to low. In order to investigate the anthropogenic impact of surface albedo on climate, different scenarios of urban surface albedo over continental US using the WRF model are simulated. In this study, the change in surface albedo applies to rooftops, pavements, and walls of urban land cover grid cells. The two groups of simulations (low and high albedo) were compared to determine the impacts of elevating urban surface albedo and to account for the uncertainty in the errors or noise introduced by the slightly different initial conditions. The results are represented as the differences in surface temperature and the top of the atmosphere radiation between the two scenarios when urban surface albedos are elevated from 0.15 to 0.40. The ensemble mean of all potential outcomes as a whole, instead of individual initial conditions, shows that the impact of elevating surface albedo has a cooling effect that is robust at both local and regional scales during the summer season. More refined analyses of urban areas will provide insights on surface albedo impacts in specific regions. Future analyses may address changes in CO2 equivalence.

  6. Robust estimation of albedo for illumination-invariant matching and shape recovery.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Soma; Aggarwal, Gaurav; Chellappa, Rama

    2009-05-01

    We present a nonstationary stochastic filtering framework for the task of albedo estimation from a single image. There are several approaches in the literature for albedo estimation, but few include the errors in estimates of surface normals and light source direction to improve the albedo estimate. The proposed approach effectively utilizes the error statistics of surface normals and illumination direction for robust estimation of albedo, for images illuminated by single and multiple light sources. The albedo estimate obtained is subsequently used to generate albedo-free normalized images for recovering the shape of an object. Traditional Shape-from-Shading (SFS) approaches often assume constant/piecewise constant albedo and known light source direction to recover the underlying shape. Using the estimated albedo, the general problem of estimating the shape of an object with varying albedo map and unknown illumination source is reduced to one that can be handled by traditional SFS approaches. Experimental results are provided to show the effectiveness of the approach and its application to illumination-invariant matching and shape recovery. The estimated albedo maps are compared with the ground truth. The maps are used as illumination-invariant signatures for the task of face recognition across illumination variations. The recognition results obtained compare well with the current state-of-the-art approaches. Impressive shape recovery results are obtained using images downloaded from the Web with little control over imaging conditions. The recovered shapes are also used to synthesize novel views under novel illumination conditions. PMID:19299862

  7. Thermal Stability of Ice on Ceres with Rough Topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayne, Paul O.; Aharonson, Oded

    2015-11-01

    The dwarf planet Ceres may have an ice-rich crust, and subsurface ice exposed by impacts or endogenic activity would be subject to sublimation. The “bright spots” recently discovered by the Dawn mission on the illuminated surface of Ceres have prompted speculation regarding their possible icy composition and the youthful age this might imply. Furthermore, sublimation of ice at the surface or in the interior of Ceres could explain water vapor observed on more than one occasion in the exosphere. We investigated the possible distribution and lifetimes of water ice and other volatiles on Ceres using detailed thermal models, including realistic thermophysical properties and surface roughness.Topographic shadowing creates polar cold traps where a small, but non-negligible fraction (~0.4%) of Ceres' surface is perennially below the ~110 K criterion for 1 Gyr of H2O ice stability. These areas are found above 60° latitude. Other molecules (CH3OH, NH3, SO2, CO2) may be cold-trapped in smaller abundances. A model for the transport, gravitational escape and photoionization of H2O molecules suggests net accumulation in the cold traps. At latitudes 0° - 30°, ice is stable under solar illumination only briefly (~10-100 yr), unless it has high albedo and thermal inertia, in which case lifetimes of > 104 yr are possible.Buried ice is stable within a meter for > 1 Gyr at latitudes higher than ~50°. An illuminated polar cap of water ice would be stable within a few degrees of the poles only if it maintained a high albedo (> 0.5) at present obliquity. If the obliquity exceeded 5° in the geologically recent past, then a putative polar cap would have been erased. Finally, a small hemispheric asymmetry exists due to the timing of Ceres' perihelion passage, which would lead to a detectable enhancement of ice in the northern hemisphere if the orbital elements vary slowly relative to the ice accumulation rate. Our model results are potentially testable during the Dawn science

  8. "Albedo dome": a method for measuring spectral flux-reflectance in a laboratory for media with long optical paths.

    PubMed

    Light, Bonnie; Carns, Regina C; Warren, Stephen G

    2015-06-10

    A method is presented for accurate measurement of spectral flux-reflectance (albedo) in a laboratory, for media with long optical path lengths, such as snow and ice. The approach uses an acrylic hemispheric dome, which, when placed over the surface being studied, serves two functions: (i) it creates an overcast "sky" to illuminate the target surface from all directions within a hemisphere, and (ii) serves as a platform for measuring incident and backscattered spectral radiances, which can be integrated to obtain fluxes. The fluxes are relative measurements and because their ratio is used to determine flux-reflectance, no absolute radiometric calibrations are required. The dome and surface must meet minimum size requirements based on the scattering properties of the surface. This technique is suited for media with long photon path lengths since the backscattered illumination is collected over a large enough area to include photons that reemerge from the domain far from their point of entry because of multiple scattering and small absorption. Comparison between field and laboratory albedo of a portable test surface demonstrates the viability of this method. PMID:26192823

  9. [Temporal and Spatial Characteristics of Lake Taihu Surface Albedo and Its Impact Factors].

    PubMed

    Cao, Chang; Li, Xu-hui; Zhang, Mi; Liu, Shou-dong; Xiao, Wei; Xiao, Qi-tao; Xu, Jia-ping

    2015-10-01

    Lake surface albedo determines energy balance of water-atmospheric interface and water physical environment. Solar elevation angle, cloudiness, wind speed, water quality and other factors can affect lake surface albedo. Using solar radiation, wind speed, and water quality data (turbidity and chlorophyll-a concentration) which were observed in four eddy covariance sites (Meiliangwan, Dapukou, Bifenggang and Xiaoleishan i. e. MLW, DPK, BFG and XLS) in Lake Taihu and clearness index (k(t)), the influence of these factors on Lake Taihu surface albedo and the reasons that led to its spatial difference were investigated. The results showed that solar elevation angle played a leading role in the diurnal and seasonal change of lake surface albedo; lake surface albedo reached two peaks in 0 < k(t) < 0.1 and 0.4 < k(t) < 0.6 respectively, when solar elevation angle was below 35 degrees. The surface albedo increased with the increasing wind speed, turbidity and chlorophyll-a concentration. However, wind could indirectly affect surface albedo through leading to the changes in sediment resuspension and chlorophyll-a distribution. The sequence of albedo in the four sites was XLS > BFG > DPK > MLW. XLS and BFG belonged to the higher albedo group, while DPK and MLW belonged to the lower albedo group. The different biological environments caused by aquatic macrophytes and algae resulting in the spatial variation of Lake Taihu surface albedo. The relationship between albedo and chlorophyll-a concentration was not a very sensitive factor for indicating the outbreak of algae. This study can provide theoretical reference for lake albedo parameterization. PMID:26841592

  10. Numerical simulation of adverse-pressure-gradient boundary layer with or without roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mottaghian, Pouya; Yuan, Junlin; Piomelli, Ugo

    2014-11-01

    Large-eddy and direct numerical simulations are carried out on flat-plate boundary layer over smooth and rough surfaces, with adverse pressure gradient.The deceleration is achieved by imposing a wall-normal freestream velocity profile, and is strong enough to cause separation at the wall. The Reynolds number based on momentum thickness and freestream velocity at inlet is 600. Numerical sandgrain roughness is applied based on an immersed boundary method, yielding a flow that is transitionally rough. The turbulence intensity increases before separation, and reaches a higher value for the rough case, indicating stronger mixing. Roughness also causes higher momentum deficit near the wall, leading to earlier separation. This is consistent with previous observation made on rough-wall flow separation over a ramp. In both cases, the turbulent kinetic energy peaks inside the shear layer above the detachment region, with higher values in the rough case; it then decreases approaching the reattachment region. Near the wall inside the separation bubble, the near-zero turbulent intensity indicates that the turbulent structures are lifted up in the separation region. Compared with the smooth case, the shear layer is farther from the wall and the reattachment length is longer on the rough wall.

  11. Diffuse scattered field of elastic waves from randomly rough surfaces using an analytical Kirchhoff theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, F.; Lowe, M. J. S.; Xi, X.; Craster, R. V.

    2016-07-01

    We develop an elastodynamic theory to predict the diffuse scattered field of elastic waves by randomly rough surfaces, for the first time, with the aid of the Kirchhoff approximation (KA). Analytical expressions are derived incorporating surface statistics, to represent the expectation of the angular distribution of the diffuse intensity for different modes. The analytical solutions are successfully verified with numerical Monte Carlo simulations, and also validated by comparison with experiments. We then apply the theory to quantitatively investigate the effects of the roughness and the shear-to-compressional wave speed ratio on the mode conversion and the scattering intensity, from low to high roughness within the valid region of KA. Both the direct and the mode converted intensities are significantly affected by the roughness, which leads to distinct scattering patterns for different wave modes. The mode conversion effect is very strong around the specular angle and it is found to increase as the surface appears to be more rough. In addition, the 3D roughness induced coupling between the out-of-plane shear horizontal (SH) mode and the in-plane modes is studied. The intensity of the SH mode is shown to be very sensitive to the out-of-plane correlation length, being influenced more by this than by the RMS value of the roughness. However, it is found that the depolarization pattern for the diffuse field is independent of the actual value of the roughness.

  12. Wetting properties of molecularly rough surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Svoboda, Martin; Lísal, Martin; Malijevský, Alexandr

    2015-09-14

    We employ molecular dynamics simulations to study the wettability of nanoscale rough surfaces in systems governed by Lennard-Jones (LJ) interactions. We consider both smooth and molecularly rough planar surfaces. Solid substrates are modeled as a static collection of LJ particles arranged in a face-centered cubic lattice with the (100) surface exposed to the LJ fluid. Molecularly rough solid surfaces are prepared by removing several strips of LJ atoms from the external layers of the substrate, i.e., forming parallel nanogrooves on the surface. We vary the solid-fluid interactions to investigate strongly and weakly wettable surfaces. We determine the wetting properties by measuring the equilibrium droplet profiles that are in turn used to evaluate the contact angles. Macroscopic arguments, such as those leading to Wenzel’s law, suggest that surface roughness always amplifies the wetting properties of a lyophilic surface. However, our results indicate the opposite effect from roughness for microscopically corrugated surfaces, i.e., surface roughness deteriorates the substrate wettability. Adding the roughness to a strongly wettable surface shrinks the surface area wet with the liquid, and it either increases or only marginally affects the contact angle, depending on the degree of liquid adsorption into the nanogrooves. For a weakly wettable surface, the roughness changes the surface character from lyophilic to lyophobic due to a weakening of the solid-fluid interactions by the presence of the nanogrooves and the weaker adsorption of the liquid into the nanogrooves.

  13. Roughness configuration matters for aeolian sediment flux

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The parameterisation of surface roughness effects on aeolian sediment transport is a key source of uncertainty in wind erosion models. Roughness effects are typically represented by bulk drag-partitioning schemes that scale the threshold friction velocity (u*t) for soil entrainment by the ratio of s...

  14. Wetting properties of molecularly rough surfaces.

    PubMed

    Svoboda, Martin; Malijevský, Alexandr; Lísal, Martin

    2015-09-14

    We employ molecular dynamics simulations to study the wettability of nanoscale rough surfaces in systems governed by Lennard-Jones (LJ) interactions. We consider both smooth and molecularly rough planar surfaces. Solid substrates are modeled as a static collection of LJ particles arranged in a face-centered cubic lattice with the (100) surface exposed to the LJ fluid. Molecularly rough solid surfaces are prepared by removing several strips of LJ atoms from the external layers of the substrate, i.e., forming parallel nanogrooves on the surface. We vary the solid-fluid interactions to investigate strongly and weakly wettable surfaces. We determine the wetting properties by measuring the equilibrium droplet profiles that are in turn used to evaluate the contact angles. Macroscopic arguments, such as those leading to Wenzel's law, suggest that surface roughness always amplifies the wetting properties of a lyophilic surface. However, our results indicate the opposite effect from roughness for microscopically corrugated surfaces, i.e., surface roughness deteriorates the substrate wettability. Adding the roughness to a strongly wettable surface shrinks the surface area wet with the liquid, and it either increases or only marginally affects the contact angle, depending on the degree of liquid adsorption into the nanogrooves. For a weakly wettable surface, the roughness changes the surface character from lyophilic to lyophobic due to a weakening of the solid-fluid interactions by the presence of the nanogrooves and the weaker adsorption of the liquid into the nanogrooves. PMID:26374050

  15. Computational Methods for Rough Classification and Discovery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, D. A.; Guan, J. W.

    1998-01-01

    Rough set theory is a new mathematical tool to deal with vagueness and uncertainty. Computational methods are presented for using rough sets to identify classes in datasets, finding dependencies in relations, and discovering rules which are hidden in databases. The methods are illustrated with a running example from a database of car test results.…

  16. Climatic Benefit of Swiss Forest Cover Change: Including Albedo Change into Net Carbon Balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwaab, J.; Lehning, M.; Bebi, P.

    2012-12-01

    Forests influence climate through physical, chemical and biological processes. It has been shown that warming caused by the comparatively low albedo of forests (albedo-effect), can reduce or even exceed cooling caused by carbon storage in forests (CO2-effect). Although warming caused by albedo and the amount of carbon storage depend on local characteristics, studies are lacking that investigate the combined local patterns of albedo and CO2-effect. Our study area, Switzerland, provides a variety of geographical features and thus the possibility to show how different geographical variables influence the two effects. We used the concept of radiative forcing to compare the effect of a changing albedo and a change in atmospheric CO2 concentration due to land cover change in the past. The change of forest cover was analysed over a period of 12 years based on aerial photographs. We estimate the albedo-effect by combining albedo data derived from the satellite sensor MODIS and data on snow cover derived from the satellite sensor AVHRR. Changes in carbon storage were calculated as differences in biomass and soil stocks of specific land cover classes. We found carbon storage induced cooling to be higher than albedo induced warming everywhere in Switzerland. However, especially in altitudes over 1200 m the albedo-effect reduced the benefits of carbon storage by more than 50%. In lower altitudes the albedo change was less important. The albedo-effect in altitudes above 1200 m was more relevant because of a more persistent snow-cover, a slightly higher global radiation and less additional carbon storage. The relevance of warming caused by an albedo change did not only depend on altitude, but also on the characteristics of forest cover change. While transitions from open land to open forest were accompanied by high albedo changes, the albedo change was only marginal if open forest turned into closed forest. Since snow cover has a large influence on the albedo effect, we included

  17. Slip due to surface roughness for a Newtonian liquid in a viscous microscale disk pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ligrani, Phil; Blanchard, Danny; Gale, Bruce

    2010-05-01

    In the present study, hydrophobic roughness is used to induce near-wall slip in a single rotating-disk micropump operating with Newtonian water. The amount of induced slip is altered by employing different sizes of surface roughness on the rotating disk. The magnitudes of slip length and slip velocities increase as the average size of the surface roughness becomes larger. In the present study, increased slip magnitudes from roughness are then associated with reduced pressure rise through the pump and lower radial-line-averaged shear stress magnitudes (determined within slip planes). Such shear stress and pressure rise variations are similar to those which would be present if the slip is induced by the intermolecular interactions which are associated with near-wall microscale effects. The present slip-roughness effects are quantified experimentally over rotational speeds from 50 to 1200 rpm, pressure increases from 0 to 312 kPa, net flow rates of 0-100 μl/min, and fluid chamber heights from 6.85 to 29.2 μm. Verification is provided by comparisons with analytic results determined from the rotating Couette flow forms of the Navier-Stokes equations, with different disk rotational speeds, disk roughness levels, and fluid chamber heights. These data show that slip length magnitudes show significant dependence on radial-line-averaged shear stress for average disk roughness heights of 404 and 770 nm. These slip length data additionally show a high degree of organization when normalized using by either the average roughness height or the fluid chamber height. For the latter case, such behavior provides evidence that the flow over a significant portion of the passage height is affected by the roughness, and near-wall slip velocities, especially when the average roughness height amounts to 11% of the h =6.86 μm passage height of the channel. Such scaling of the disk slip length bdisk with fluid chamber height h is consistent with d-type roughness scaling in macroscale

  18. Modeling surface roughness scattering in metallic nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Moors, Kristof; Sorée, Bart; Magnus, Wim

    2015-09-28

    Ando's model provides a rigorous quantum-mechanical framework for electron-surface roughness scattering, based on the detailed roughness structure. We apply this method to metallic nanowires and improve the model introducing surface roughness distribution functions on a finite domain with analytical expressions for the average surface roughness matrix elements. This approach is valid for any roughness size and extends beyond the commonly used Prange-Nee approximation. The resistivity scaling is obtained from the self-consistent relaxation time solution of the Boltzmann transport equation and is compared to Prange-Nee's approach and other known methods. The results show that a substantial drop in resistivity can be obtained for certain diameters by achieving a large momentum gap between Fermi level states with positive and negative momentum in the transport direction.

  19. UV signatures of carbonaceous species on low-albedo asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrix, A.; Vilas, F.

    2014-07-01

    Asteroids in the low-albedo classes (C, B, G, F) are known to have spectra that are relatively feature-free in the visible/near-infrared (VNIR) spectral region, making them classically difficult to study in terms of surface mineralogy. Many of these bodies exhibit a 3-micron absorption band (e.g., [1]), which can be used to study hydration and organics. The primary other spectrally active region --- less well studied so far --- is the ultraviolet (UV). In this study, we utilize UV spectra of low-albedo asteroids (C, B, G, and F class) to study surface composition. In particular, we investigate implications for the presence of carbonaceous compounds, including tholins and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs), which have unique spectral features in the UV. Low-albedo asteroids are typically rather bland spectrally at VNIR wavelengths. Many of these objects exhibit an absorption band near 3 microns, indicative of some type of hydration (OH and-or H_2O). A subset of the asteroids with the 3-micron features also exhibit absorption near 0.7 microns, due to a ferrous-ferric charge-transfer transition likely resulting from aqueous alteration (the interaction of material with liquid water formed by melting of water upon a heating event). Some asteroids likely do not exhibit these features due to a history of heating experienced at some point in the asteroid's evolution. Despite having little spectral activity in the VNIR, all low-albedo asteroids absorb at wavelengths shorter than ˜500 nm. This has been generally attributed to a ferric-iron intervalence charge-transfer transition absorption. Carbon-bearing phases have long been assumed to be important on low-albedo asteroids (e.g., [2]) due to the dark, mostly-featureless VNIR spectra of these bodies. However, there are many forms of carbonaceous species and the species are expected to undergo phase modifications (e.g., due to thermal, aqueous, and radiation processes) that affect the spectra [3,7]. Tholins are residues

  20. Effect of reflectance model choice on earthshine-based terrestrial albedo determinations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thejll, Peter; Gleisner, Hans; Flynn, Chris

    2016-04-01

    Earthshine observations can be used to determine near-hemispheric average terrestrial albedos by careful observation of the relative strength of the earthshine-lit half of the Moon coupled with correct modelling of the reflectances of Earth and Moon, as well as lunar single-scattering albedo maps. Using our own observations of the earthshine, from Mauna Loa Observatory in 2011-12, we investigate the influence of the choice of bidirectional reflectance models for the Moon on derived terrestrial albedos. We find a considerable dependence on albedo results in this choice, and discuss ways to determine what the origin of the dependence is - e.g is it in the joint choices of lunar and terrestrial BRDFs, or is the choice of terrestrial BRDF less important than the lunar one? We report on the results of modelling lunar reflectance and albedo in 6 ways and terrestrial reflectance in two ways, assuming a uniform single-scattering albedo on Earth.

  1. A REVISED ASTEROID POLARIZATION-ALBEDO RELATIONSHIP USING WISE/NEOWISE DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Masiero, Joseph R.; Mainzer, A. K.; Bauer, J. M.; Wright, E. L.; McMillan, R. S.; Tholen, D. J.; Blain, A. W.

    2012-04-20

    We present a reanalysis of the relationship between asteroid albedo and polarization properties using the albedos derived from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer. We find that the function that best describes this relation is a three-dimensional linear fit in the space of log (albedo)-log (polarization slope)-log (minimum polarization). When projected to two dimensions, the parameters of the fit are consistent with those found in previous work. We also define p* as the quantity of maximal polarization variation when compared with the albedo and present the best-fitting albedo-p* relation. Some asteroid taxonomic types stand out in this three-dimensional space, notably the E, B, and M Tholen types, while others cluster in clumps coincident with the S- and C-complex bodies. We note that both low albedo and small (D < 30 km) asteroids are underrepresented in the polarimetric sample, and we encourage future polarimetric surveys to focus on these bodies.

  2. Earth's albedo variations 1998-2014 as measured from ground-based earthshine observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palle, E.; Goode, P. R.; Montañés-Rodríguez, P.; Shumko, A.; Gonzalez-Merino, B.; Lombilla, C. Martinez; Jimenez-Ibarra, F.; Shumko, S.; Sanroma, E.; Hulist, A.; Miles-Paez, P.; Murgas, F.; Nowak, G.; Koonin, S. E.

    2016-05-01

    The Earth's albedo is a fundamental climate parameter for understanding the radiation budget of the atmosphere. It has been traditionally measured not only from space platforms but also from the ground for 16 years from Big Bear Solar Observatory by observing the Moon. The photometric ratio of the dark (earthshine) to the bright (moonshine) sides of the Moon is used to determine nightly anomalies in the terrestrial albedo, with the aim of quantifying sustained monthly, annual, and/or decadal changes. We find two modest decadal scale cycles in the albedo, but with no significant net change over the 16 years of accumulated data. Within the evolution of the two cycles, we find periods of sustained annual increases, followed by comparable sustained decreases in albedo. The evolution of the earthshine albedo is in remarkable agreement with that from the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System instruments, although each method measures different slices of the Earth's Bond albedo.

  3. Splash and Re-entrant Albedo Fluxes Measured in the PAMELA Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayorov, A. G.; Moiseeva, A. I.; Adriani, O.; Barbarino, G. C.; Bazilevskaya, G. A.; Bellotti, R.; Boezio, M.; Bogomolov, E. A.; Bongi, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Bottai, S.; Bruno, A.; Cafagna, F.; Campana, D.; Carbone, R.; Carlson, P.; Casolino, M.; Castellini, G.; DeDonato, C.; DeSantis, C.; DeSimone, N.; DiFelice, V.; Formato, V.; Galper, A. M.; Karelin, A. V.; Koldashov, S. V.; Koldobskiy, S.; Kvashnin, A. A.; Kvashnin, A. N.; Leonov, A.; Malakhov, V.; Marcelli, L.; Martucci, M.; Mayorova, M. A.; Menn, W.; Merge', M.; Mikhailov, V. V.; Mocchiutti, E.; Monaco, A.; Mori, N.; Munini, R.; Osteria, G.; Palma, F.; Panico, B.; Papini, P.; Pearce, M.; Picozza, P.; Pizzolotto, C.; Ricci, M.; Ricciarini, S. B.; Sarkar, R.; Scotti, V.; Simon, M.; Sparvoli, R.; Spillantini, P.; Stozhkov, Y. I.; Vacchi, A.; Vannuccini, E.; Voronov, S. A.; Yurkin, Y. T.; Zampa, G.; Zampa, N.; Zverev, V. G.

    This work devoted to the description of the method for splash albedo protons identification in the satellite-born experiment PAMELA. In contrast to the reentrant albedo particles, which enter into the main aperture of the instrument, the direct albedo particles enter from the opposite direction, so they pass a few detectors, including calorimeter, before being register by the magnetic spectrometer. The developed method take into account the influence of these detectors on the selection of events and measurements of their characteristics. To test this method the energy spectrum of reentrant albedo protons in various regions of the near-Earth space reconstructed; it is in a good agreement with the classical measurements in the main aperture. Therefore, this method can be useful to obtain a new physical data about fluxes of splash albedo protons in the PAMELA experiment, which, unlike the reentrant albedo, can be study even at high geomagnetic latitudes.

  4. Neandertal clavicle length

    PubMed Central

    Trinkaus, Erik; Holliday, Trenton W.; Auerbach, Benjamin M.

    2014-01-01

    The Late Pleistocene archaic humans from western Eurasia (the Neandertals) have been described for a century as exhibiting absolutely and relatively long clavicles. This aspect of their body proportions has been used to distinguish them from modern humans, invoked to account for other aspects of their anatomy and genetics, used in assessments of their phylogenetic polarities, and used as evidence for Late Pleistocene population relationships. However, it has been unclear whether the usual scaling of Neandertal clavicular lengths to their associated humeral lengths reflects long clavicles, short humeri, or both. Neandertal clavicle lengths, along with those of early modern humans and latitudinally diverse recent humans, were compared with both humeral lengths and estimated body masses (based on femoral head diameters). The Neandertal do have long clavicles relative their humeri, even though they fall within the ranges of variation of early and recent humans. However, when scaled to body masses, their humeral lengths are relatively short, and their clavicular lengths are indistinguishable from those of Late Pleistocene and recent modern humans. The few sufficiently complete Early Pleistocene Homo clavicles seem to have relative lengths also well within recent human variation. Therefore, appropriately scaled clavicular length seems to have varied little through the genus Homo, and it should not be used to account for other aspects of Neandertal biology or their phylogenetic status. PMID:24616525

  5. Surface Albedo/BRDF Parameters (Terra/Aqua MODIS)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Trishchenko, Alexander

    2008-01-15

    Spatially and temporally complete surface spectral albedo/BRDF products over the ARM SGP area were generated using data from two Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensors on Terra and Aqua satellites. A landcover-based fitting (LBF) algorithm is developed to derive the BRDF model parameters and albedo product (Luo et al., 2004a). The approach employs a landcover map and multi-day clearsky composites of directional surface reflectance. The landcover map is derived from the Landsat TM 30-meter data set (Trishchenko et al., 2004a), and the surface reflectances are from MODIS 500m-resolution 8-day composite products (MOD09/MYD09). The MOD09/MYD09 data are re-arranged into 10-day intervals for compatibility with other satellite products, such as those from the NOVA/AVHRR and SPOT/VGT sensors. The LBF method increases the success rate of the BRDF fitting process and enables more accurate monitoring of surface temporal changes during periods of rapid spring vegetation green-up and autumn leaf-fall, as well as changes due to agricultural practices and snowcover variations (Luo et al., 2004b, Trishchenko et al., 2004b). Albedo/BRDF products for MODIS on Terra and MODIS on Aqua, as well as for Terra/Aqua combined dataset, are generated at 500m spatial resolution and every 10-day since March 2000 (Terra) and July 2002 (Aqua and combined), respectively. The purpose for the latter product is to obtain a more comprehensive dataset that takes advantages of multi-sensor observations (Trishchenko et al., 2002). To fill data gaps due to cloud presence, various interpolation procedures are applied based on a multi-year observation database and referring to results from other locations with similar landcover property. Special seasonal smoothing procedure is also applied to further remove outliers and artifacts in data series.

  6. Can increasing albedo of existing ship wakes reduce climate change?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crook, Julia A.; Jackson, Lawrence S.; Forster, Piers M.

    2016-02-01

    Solar radiation management schemes could potentially alleviate the impacts of global warming. One such scheme could be to brighten the surface of the ocean by increasing the albedo and areal extent of bubbles in the wakes of existing shipping. Here we show that ship wake bubble lifetimes would need to be extended from minutes to days, requiring the addition of surfactant, for ship wake area to be increased enough to have a significant forcing. We use a global climate model to simulate brightening the wakes of existing shipping by increasing wake albedo by 0.2 and increasing wake lifetime by ×1440. This yields a global mean radiative forcing of -0.9 ± 0.6 Wm-2 (-1.8 ± 0.9 Wm-2 in the Northern Hemisphere) and a 0.5°C reduction of global mean surface temperature with greater cooling over land and in the Northern Hemisphere, partially offsetting greenhouse gas warming. Tropical precipitation shifts southward but remains within current variability. The hemispheric forcing asymmetry of this scheme is due to the asymmetry in the distribution of existing shipping. If wake lifetime could reach ~3 months, the global mean radiative forcing could potentially reach -3 Wm-2. Increasing wake area through increasing bubble lifetime could result in a greater temperature reduction, but regional precipitation would likely deviate further from current climatology as suggested by results from our uniform ocean albedo simulation. Alternatively, additional ships specifically for the purpose of geoengineering could be used to produce a larger and more hemispherically symmetrical forcing.

  7. Independent pixel and Monte Carlo estimates of stratocumulus albedo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahalan, Robert F.; Ridgway, William; Wiscombe, Warren J.; Gollmer, Steven; HARSHVARDHAN

    1994-01-01

    Monte Carlo radiative transfer methods are employed here to estimate the plane-parallel albedo bias for marine stratocumulus clouds. This is the bias in estimates of the mesoscale-average albedo, which arises from the assumption that cloud liquid water is uniformly distributed. The authors compare such estimates with those based on a more realistic distribution generated from a fractal model of marine stratocumulus clouds belonging to the class of 'bounded cascade' models. In this model the cloud top and base are fixed, so that all variations in cloud shape are ignored. The model generates random variations in liquid water along a single horizontal direction, forming fractal cloud streets while conserving the total liquid water in the cloud field. The model reproduces the mean, variance, and skewness of the vertically integrated cloud liquid water, as well as its observed wavenumber spectrum, which is approximately a power law. The Monte Carlo method keeps track of the three-dimensional paths solar photons take through the cloud field, using a vectorized implementation of a direct technique. The simplifications in the cloud field studied here allow the computations to be accelerated. The Monte Carlo results are compared to those of the independent pixel approximation, which neglects net horizontal photon transport. Differences between the Monte Carlo and independent pixel estimates of the mesoscale-average albedo are on the order of 1% for conservative scattering, while the plane-parallel bias itself is an order of magnitude larger. As cloud absorption increases, the independent pixel approximation agrees even more closely with the Monte Carlo estimates. This result holds for a wide range of sun angles and aspect ratios. Thus, horizontal photon transport can be safely neglected in estimates of the area-average flux for such cloud models. This result relies on the rapid falloff of the wavenumber spectrum of stratocumulus, which ensures that the smaller

  8. Sizes and Albedos of Young C-type Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamblyn, Peter; Chapman, Clark; Durda, Dan; Merline, William; Nesvorny, David

    2005-06-01

    We propose to measure the sizes and albedos of 8 very young C-type asteroids with IRAC 8um and near-simultaneous ground-based visible photometry. Asteroid families are created from major collisions between asteroids and are identified from clustering of orbital elements. Co-I Nesvorny has recently identified an exceptionally-young family (Veritas) and precisely-dated it at only 8.3+/-0.5 Myr (just 0.2% of the age of the solar system). We will compare our results for this family with those obtained by our similar Spitzer GO-1 program where we study an even younger S-type family, Karin. C-type asteroids are composed of primitive material (as opposed to the more processed silicate-rich S-types) and comprise the majority of asteorids in the Main Belt, yet their compositions and properties remain elusive. These recent breakup events provide unparalleled opportunities to study compositions, dynamics, and collisions of asteroids. They allow tests of the rates of physical processes that happen on time scales comparable with the family age. Space weathering, for example, appears to affect C- and S-type asteroids very differently. We will test directly whether the Veritas fragments have similar albedos; we will also test if their albedos differ from those of similar asteroids with much older surfaces by study of a second C-type family, Themis. We will compare our observations with those made of larger asteroids of both families, from a companion ground-based program. We will quantify any correlation of size with albedo, a dominant uncertainty in standard size estimates. The size distribution will be used to calibrate hydrocode models of asteroid collisions. To do this will require observations at the smallest practical sizes. In addition, the measured sizes will be immediately applicable to a novel measurement of the Yarkovsky Effect. We have already demonstrated in our GO-1 program that we can make similar Spitzer observations and provide the ground-based visible support.

  9. Detecting Low-Contrast Features in the Cosmic Ray Albedo Proton Map of the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. K.; Schwadron, N.; Spence, H. E.; Golightly, M. J.; Case, A. W.; Smith, S.; Blake, J. B.; Kasper, J.; Looper, M. D.; Mazur, J. E.; Townsend, L. W.; Zeitlin, C.; Stubbs, T. J.

    2014-01-01

    High energy cosmic rays constantly bombard the lunar regolith, producing (via nuclear evaporation) secondary 'albedo' or 'splash' particles like protons and neutrons, some of which escape back to space. Lunar Prospector and the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), have shown that the energy distribution of albedo neutrons is modulated by the elemental composition of the lunar regolith, and by ice deposits in permanently shadowed polar craters. Here we investigate an analogous phenomenon with high energy ((is) approximately 100 MeV) lunar albedo protons.

  10. The asteroid albedo scale. II - Laboratory polarimetry of dark carbon-bearing silicates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zellner, B.; Lebertre, T.; Day, K.

    1977-01-01

    Laboratory reflection polarimetry is presented for eight samples of artificial, poorly crystalline magnesian silicates with varying admixtures of carbon black. The polarimetric slope-albedo law saturates for geometric albedos lower than about 0.05, and good agreement with the telescopic polarization-phase curves of C-type asteroids is found for albedos as low as 0.02. Thus the conclusion from thermal radiometry is confirmed that the C objects are very dark, darker than any known carbonaceous chondrite.

  11. Predicting bed form roughness: the influence of lee side angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefebvre, Alice; Winter, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Flow transverse bedforms (ripples and dunes) are ubiquitous in rivers and coastal seas. Local hydrodynamics and transport conditions depend on the size and geometry of these bedforms, as they constitute roughness elements at the bed. Bedform influence on flow energy must be considered for the understanding of flow dynamics, and in the development and application of numerical models. Common estimations or predictors of form roughness (friction factors) are based mostly on data of steep bedforms (with angle-of-repose lee slopes), and described by highly simplified bedform dimensions (heights and lengths). However, natural bedforms often are not steep, and differ in form and hydraulic effect relative to idealised bedforms. Based on systematic numerical model experiments, this study shows how the hydraulic effect of bedforms depends on the flow structure behind bedforms, which is determined by the bedform lee side angle, aspect ratio and relative height. Simulations reveal that flow separation behind bedform crests and, thus, a hydraulic effect is induced at lee side angles steeper than 11 to 18° depending on relative height, and that a fully developed flow separation zone exists only over bedforms with a lee side angle steeper than 24°. Furthermore, the hydraulic effect of bedforms with varying lee side angle is evaluated and a reduction function to common friction factors is proposed. A function is also developed for the Nikuradse roughness (k s), and a new equation is proposed which directly relates k s to bedform relative height, aspect ratio and lee side angle.

  12. Data fusion for accurate microscopic rough surface metrology.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuhang

    2016-06-01

    Data fusion for rough surface measurement and evaluation was analyzed on simulated datasets, one with higher density (HD) but lower accuracy and the other with lower density (LD) but higher accuracy. Experimental verifications were then performed on laser scanning microscopy (LSM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) characterizations of surface areal roughness artifacts. The results demonstrated that the fusion based on Gaussian process models is effective and robust under different measurement biases and noise strengths. All the amplitude, height distribution, and spatial characteristics of the original sample structure can be precisely recovered, with better metrological performance than any individual measurements. As for the influencing factors, the HD noise has a relatively weaker effect as compared with the LD noise. Furthermore, to enable an accurate fusion, the ratio of LD sampling interval to surface autocorrelation length should be smaller than a critical threshold. In general, data fusion is capable of enhancing the nanometrology of rough surfaces by combining efficient LSM measurement and down-sampled fast AFM scan. The accuracy, resolution, spatial coverage and efficiency can all be significantly improved. It is thus expected to have potential applications in development of hybrid microscopy and in surface metrology. PMID:27058888

  13. New technique to improve the accuracy of albedo neutron dosimeter evaluations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hankins, D. E.

    The calibration factor for albedo neutron dosimeters varies greatly depending upon the energy of the neutrons in the exposure. Calibration results obtained over an eight-year period at each Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory facility where neutron exposure may occur were reviewed. A stronger relationship than expected was found between the ratio of the readings of the 9-in. to 3-in. spheres and the percent thermal. Readings from personnel and albedo badges were reviewed. The readings were consistent with the use of a calibration factor for the albedo dosimeter which varies with changes in the ratio of the personnel and albedo dosimeter TLD readings.

  14. Radii and albedos of asteroids 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 15, 51, 433, and 511

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruikshank, D. P.; Morrison, D.

    1973-01-01

    The following radii (in kilometers) and visual geometric albedos are derived for nine asteroids from 10- and 20-micron radiometry: 1 Ceres (540, .06); 2 Pallas (275, .08); 3 Juno (125, .14); 4 Vesta (270, .21); 6 Hebe (110, .16); 15 Eunomia (135, .15); 51 Nemausa (80, .05); 433 Eros (12, .07); and 511 Davida (180, .04). Vesta has the highest albedo measured for an asteroid, while Davida, the lowest-albedo object in the sample, is one of the darkest known objects in the solar system. The median of all asteroid albedos measured to date is 0.1.-

  15. Surface features on Mars: Ground-based albedo and radar compared with Mariner 9 topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, H.

    1973-01-01

    Earth-based albedo maps of Mars were compared with Mariner 9 television data and ground-based radar profiles to investigate the nature of the bright and dark albedo features. Little correlation was found except at the boundaries of classical albedo features, where some topographic control is indicated. Wind-blown dust models for seasonal and secular albedo variations are supported, but it is not clear whether the fines are derived from bright or dark parent rock. Mars, like the Earth and Moon, has probably generated two distinct types of crustal material.

  16. Investigating the spread in surface albedo for snow-covered forests in CMIP5 models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Libo; Cole, Jason N. S.; Bartlett, Paul; Verseghy, Diana; Derksen, Chris; Brown, Ross; Salzen, Knut

    2016-02-01

    This study investigates the role of leaf/plant area index (LAI/PAI) specification on the large spread of winter albedo simulated by climate models. To examine the sensitivity of winter albedo to LAI, we perform a sensitivity analysis using two methods commonly used to compute albedo in snow-covered forests as well as diagnostic calculations within version 4.2 of the Canadian Atmospheric Model for which PAI is systematically varied. The results show that the simulated albedo is very sensitive to negative PAI biases, especially for smaller PAI values. The LAI and surface albedo of boreal forests in the presence of snow simulated by the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) models are evaluated using satellite observations. The evaluation of CMIP5 models suggest that inaccurate tree cover fraction due to improper plant functional type specification or erroneous LAI parameterization in some models explains, in part, an observed positive bias in winter albedo over boreal forest regions of the Northern Hemisphere. This contributes to a large intermodel spread in simulated surface albedo in the presence of snow over these regions and is largely responsible for uncertainties in simulated snow-albedo feedback strength. Errors are largest (+20-40%) in models with large underestimation of LAI but are typically within ±15% when simulated LAI is within the observed range. This study underscores the importance of accurate representation of vegetation distribution and parameters in realistic simulation of surface albedo.

  17. Investigating the spread of surface albedo in snow covered forests in CMIP5 models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Libo; Cole, Jason; Bartlett, Paul; Verseghy, Diana; Derksen, Chris; Brown, Ross; von Salzen, Knut

    2016-04-01

    This study investigates the role of leaf/plant area index (LAI/PAI) specification on the large spread of winter albedo simulated by climate models. To examine the sensitivity of winter albedo to LAI, we perform a sensitivity analysis using two methods commonly used to compute albedo in snow-covered forests as well as diagnostic calculations within version 4.2 of the Canadian Atmospheric Model for which PAI is systematically varied. The results show that the simulated albedo is very sensitive to negative PAI biases, especially for smaller PAI values. The LAI and surface albedo of boreal forests in the presence of snow simulated by the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) models are evaluated using satellite observations. The evaluation of CMIP5 models suggest that inaccurate tree cover fraction due to improper plant functional type specification or erroneous LAI parameterization in some models explains, in part, an observed positive bias in winter albedo over boreal forest regions of the Northern Hemisphere. This contributes to a large intermodel spread in simulated surface albedo in the presence of snow over these regions and is largely responsible for uncertainties in simulated snow-albedo feedback strength. Errors are largest (+20-40 %) in models with large underestimation of LAI but are typically within ±15% when simulated LAI is within the observed range. This study underscores the importance of accurate representation of vegetation distribution and parameters in realistic simulation of surface albedo.

  18. Vegetation controls on northern high latitude snow-albedo feedback: observations and CMIP5 model simulations.

    PubMed

    Loranty, Michael M; Berner, Logan T; Goetz, Scott J; Jin, Yufang; Randerson, James T

    2014-02-01

    The snow-masking effect of vegetation exerts strong control on albedo in northern high latitude ecosystems. Large-scale changes in the distribution and stature of vegetation in this region will thus have important feedbacks to climate. The snow-albedo feedback is controlled largely by the contrast between snow-covered and snow-free albedo (Δα), which influences predictions of future warming in coupled climate models, despite being poorly constrained at seasonal and century time scales. Here, we compare satellite observations and coupled climate model representations of albedo and tree cover for the boreal and Arctic region. Our analyses reveal consistent declines in albedo with increasing tree cover, occurring south of latitudinal tree line, that are poorly represented in coupled climate models. Observed relationships between albedo and tree cover differ substantially between snow-covered and snow-free periods, and among plant functional type. Tree cover in models varies widely but surprisingly does not correlate well with model albedo. Furthermore, our results demonstrate a relationship between tree cover and snow-albedo feedback that may be used to accurately constrain high latitude albedo feedbacks in coupled climate models under current and future vegetation distributions. PMID:24039000

  19. A comparative study of the effects of albedo change on drought in semi-arid regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charney, J.; Quirk, W. J.; Chow, S.-H.; Kornfield, J.

    1977-01-01

    Numerical simulation studies of the effects of changes in albedo on rainfall involve comparisons of semiarid areas, lying at the boundary between a major desert and an adjacent monsoonal region, with areas of the same size located within the monsoonal region itself. The sensitivity of the rainfall to the ground hydrology was determined by performing the albedo simulations with two different evapotranspiration parameterizations, one giving too high evaporation over land and the other giving negligible evaporation over land. The evaporation rate is, in general, found to have as important an effect as changes in albedo. The mechanism by which an increase of albedo reduces the rainfall during conditions of high evaporation is considered.

  20. Estimation of shortwave hemispherical reflectance (albedo) from bidirectionally reflected radiance data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starks, Patrick J.; Norman, John M.; Blad, Blaine L.; Walter-Shea, Elizabeth A.; Walthall, Charles L.

    1991-01-01

    An equation for estimating albedo from bidirectional reflectance data is proposed. The estimates of albedo are found to be greater than values obtained with simultaneous pyranometer measurements. Particular attention is given to potential sources of systematic errors including extrapolation of bidirectional reflectance data out to a view zenith angle of 90 deg, the use of inappropriate weighting coefficients in the numerator of the albedo equation, surface shadowing caused by the A-frame instrumentation used to measure the incoming and outgoing radiation fluxes, errors in estimates of the denominator of the proposed albedo equation, and a 'hot spot' contribution in bidirectional data measured by a modular multiband radiometer.

  1. Natural versus anthropogenic factors affecting low-level cloud albedo over the North Atlantic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falkowski, Paul G.; Kim, Yongseung; Kolber, Zbigniew; Wilson, Cara; Wirick, Creighton; Cess, Robert

    1992-01-01

    Cloud albedo plays a key role in regulating earth's climate. Cloud albedo depends on column-integrated liquid water content and the density of cloud condensation nuclei, which consists primarily of submicrometer-sized aerosol sulfate particles. A comparison of two independent satellite data sets suggests that, although anthropogenic sulfate emissions may enhance cloud albedo immediately adjacent to the east coast of the United States, over the central North Atlantic Ocean the variability in albedo can be largely accounted for by natural marine and atmospheric processes that probably have remained relatively constant since the beginning of the industrial revolution.

  2. The Effect of Aerosol Deposition on Snow Albedo Reduction in the Sierra Nevada Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, W.; Liou, K.

    2008-12-01

    We investigate snow cover and albedo changes in the Sierra Nevada regions due to deposition of black carbon and dust particles from East Asia. We note that coal combustion reaches maximum in the winter, while dust storms originate in the Gobi Desert occur most frequently in April. We selected snow and albedo data from MODIS/Terra to examine albedo reduction in March and April from 2000 to 2008. To eliminate the contamination of albedo by bare land, only the pixels with 100% snow cover in the entire period were used. Analysis using the 8-day average snow cover and 16-day average surface albedo reveals that there is a small increasing trend of albedo reduction. We also show that a large snow albedo reduction in 2001 is possibly due to the strong dust storm event that occurred in April, 2001. Finally, composite time series have been made using daily data to demonstrate decrease in snow albedo after each snowfall event. We illustrate that the rate of albedo reduction increases by 0.01/day per year from 2000 to 2008.

  3. New technique to improve the accuracy of albedo neutron dosimeter evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Hankins, D.E.

    1984-01-01

    The calibration factor for albedo neutron dosimeters varies greatly depending upon the energy of the neutrons in the exposure. Calibration results obtained over an eight-year period at each Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory facility where neutron exposure may occur were reviewed. A stronger relationship than expected was found between the ratio of the readings of the 9-in. to 3-in. spheres and the percent thermal. Readings from personnel and albedo badges were reviewed. The readings were consistent with the use of a calibration factor for the albedo dosimeter which varies with changes in the ratio of the personnel and albedo dosimeter TLD readings. 2 references, 6 figures. (ACR)

  4. Changes on albedo after a large forest fire in Mediterranean ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintano, Carmen; Fernández-Manso, Alfonso; Fernández-García, Victor; Marcos, Elena; Calvo, Leonor

    2015-09-01

    Fires are one of the main causes of environmental alteration in Mediterranean forest ecosystems. Albedo varies and evolves seasonally based on solar illumination. It is greatly influenced by changes on vegetation: vegetation growth, cutting/planting forests or forest fires. This work analyzes albedo variations due to a large forest fire that occurred on 19- 21 September 2012 in northwestern Spain. From this area, albedo post-fire images (immediately and 1-year after fire) were generated from Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper (ETM+) data. Specifically we considered total shortwave albedo, total-, direct-, and diffuse-visible, and near-infrared albedo. Nine to twelve weeks after fire, 111 field plots were measured (27 unburned plots, 84 burned plots). The relationship between albedo values and thematic class (burned/unburned) was evaluated by one-way analysis of variance. Our results demonstrate that albedo changes were related to burned/unburned variable with statistical significance, indicating the importance of forestry areas as regulators of land surface energy fluxes and revealing the potential of post-fire albedo for assessing burned areas. Future research, however, is needed to evaluate the persistence of albedo changes.

  5. Natural Versus Anthropogenic Factors Affecting Low-Level Cloud Albedo over the North Atlantic.

    PubMed

    Falkowski, P G; Kim, Y; Kolber, Z; Wilson, C; Wirick, C; Cess, R

    1992-05-29

    Cloud albedo plays a key role in regulating Earth's climate. Cloud albedo depends on column-integrated liquid water content and the density of cloud condensation nuclei, which consists primarily of submicrometer-sized aerosol sulfate particles. A comparison of two independent satellite data sets suggests that, although anthropogenic sulfate emissions may enhance cloud albedo immediately adjacent to the east coast of the United States, over the central North Atlantic Ocean the variability in albedo can be largely accounted for by natural marine and atmospheric processes that probably have remained relatively constant since the beginning of the industrial revolution. PMID:17736762

  6. On the importance of interpolation schemes for albedo data from local to global grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preuschmann, Swantje; Jacob, Daniela; Löw, Alexander

    2013-04-01

    Surface albedo has a key role in Earth's radiation balance. As vegetation cover is influencing the albedo of solid surfaces, it is clear that land cover changes are leading to changes in the radiation balance and further are influencing the whole Earth's energy budget. It is obvious, that a forested area reflects sunlight differently compared to a sparsely vegetated area of shrubs. Different studies have shown, that certain land cover types (even compounds) have a characteristic annual cycle of the albedo (Moody et al. 2005 and Preuschmann, 2012). An annual cycle for one land cover type might vary in a year about 2%. The difference of the surface albedo of a forested area in summer to an agricultural area at the same time is only about 0.5%. A major question in climate modelling under future conditions is to analyse the impact of land cover changes onto climate. Nevertheless for different reasons it is not easy to describe surface albedo changes due to land cover changes within a climate model. One reason is that differences in the albedo of different surfaces are comparatively small. Another reason is based in the spatial resolution of a climate model. Climate models are operating on grids with horizontal resolutions of 10x10 km² for regional models up to about 200x200 km² for global models with a spectral resolution of T63. This means, that spatial (and also temporal) mean values of surface albedo are taken into account. Therefore one grid box of a climate model is representing a composition of different surface albedos. For model validation, it is of interest to compare the modelled albedo data with observed albedo data, but a comparison is not as trivial as it looks in the first sight. One problematic is the necessity of comparing different data types in the same horizontal and temporal resolution. Commonly used satellite based albedo data are available in 0.05° horizontal resolution, which is about 5 km at the equator, for several-day means and monthly

  7. On the roughness measurement on knee prostheses.

    PubMed

    Jaber, Sami Abdel; Ruggiero, Alessandro; Battaglia, Santina; Affatato, Saverio

    2015-01-01

    The majority of total knee replacements currently implanted present an articulation composed of two metal parts, femoral and tibial components, between which there is a polyethylene insert serving as a bearing surface. The finishing surface of the metal components is a very important factor in minimizing the polyethylene wear rate and, later, the gradual production of metal and plastic debris. Considering the role of surface roughness on volumetric wear rates, the purpose of this study is to develop a protocol for the roughness characterization of total knee prosthesis (TKP) metal components, taking into consideration a limited number of points on each surface. Six mobile TKP of different sizes (three size 2 and three size 6) were tested on a knee joint simulator to compare the wear behavior of each group. After 2 million cycles the weight loss by the polyethylene inserts was measured with gravimetric method and the surface roughness of the metallic components was assessed in terms of average surface roughness, Ra, skewness, Rsk, and total roughness, Rt. Roughness measurement involved 29 points on each femoral condyle and 26 points on each metal tibial plate. The data collected has shown an increased roughness upon wear testing for both the investigated TKP sizes. No statistical differences were observed between the two groups for both the parameters Ra, Rsk, and Rt. The surface of all metallic components became more negatively skewed, indicating diminishing peaks. The various parameters were correlated to the volumetric loss using a linear regression analysis. PMID:25588764

  8. Thermal contact conductance of spherical, rough metals

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, M.A.; Fletcher, L.S.

    1996-12-31

    Junction thermal conductance is an important consideration in such applications as thermally induced stresses in supersonic and hypersonic flight vehicles, nuclear reactor cooling, electronics packaging, spacecraft thermal control, gas turbine and internal combustion engine cooling, and cryogenic liquid storage. A fundamental problem in analyzing and predicting junction thermal conductance is thermal contact conductance of non-flat, rough metals. Workable models have been previously derived for the limiting idealized cases of flat, rough and spherical, smooth surfaces. However, until now, no tractable models have been advanced for non-flat, rough surfaces (so called engineering surfaces) which are much more commonly dealt with in practice. The present investigation details the synthesis of previously derived models for macroscopically non-uniform thermal contact conductance and contact of non-flat, rough spheres, into a thermo-mechanical model, its refinement, and its presentation in an easily applied format. The present model is compared to representative experimental conductance results form the literature for stainless steel 304 with widely varying flatness deviation and roughness. Also included in the comparisons is a previous, often cited model for flat, rough metals to which the present model reduces in the limit of flat surfaces. The present model agrees well with the experimental results over the wide ranges of flatness deviation and roughness for which data was available. Conversely, the previous, well known model becomes increasingly overpredictive with increasing flatness deviation.

  9. Turbulent flow in smooth and rough pipes.

    PubMed

    Allen, J J; Shockling, M A; Kunkel, G J; Smits, A J

    2007-03-15

    Recent experiments at Princeton University have revealed aspects of smooth pipe flow behaviour that suggest a more complex scaling than previously noted. In particular, the pressure gradient results yield a new friction factor relationship for smooth pipes, and the velocity profiles indicate the presence of a power-law region near the wall and, for Reynolds numbers greater than about 400x103 (R+>9x103), a logarithmic region further out. New experiments on a rough pipe with a honed surface finish with krms/D=19.4x10-6, over a Reynolds number range of 57x103-21x106, show that in the transitionally rough regime this surface follows an inflectional friction factor relationship rather than the monotonic relationship given in the Moody diagram. Outer-layer scaling of the mean velocity data and streamwise turbulence intensities for the rough pipe show excellent collapse and provide strong support for Townsend's outer-layer similarity hypothesis for rough-walled flows. The streamwise rough-wall spectra also agree well with the corresponding smooth-wall data. The pipe exhibited smooth behaviour for ks+ < or =3.5, which supports the suggestion that the original smooth pipe was indeed hydraulically smooth for ReD< or =24x106. The relationship between the velocity shift, DeltaU/utau, and the roughness Reynolds number, ks+, has been used to generalize the form of the transition from smooth to fully rough flow for an arbitrary relative roughness krms/D. These predictions apply for honed pipes when the separation of pipe diameter to roughness height is large, and they differ significantly from the traditional Moody curves. PMID:17244585

  10. Layering of ionic liquids on rough surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheehan, Alexis; Jurado, L. Andres; Ramakrishna, Shivaprakash N.; Arcifa, Andrea; Rossi, Antonella; Spencer, Nicholas D.; Espinosa-Marzal, Rosa M.

    2016-02-01

    Understanding the behavior of ionic liquids (ILs) either confined between rough surfaces or in rough nanoscale pores is of great relevance to extend studies performed on ideally flat surfaces to real applications. In this work we have performed an extensive investigation of the structural forces between two surfaces with well-defined roughness (<9 nm RMS) in 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide by atomic force microscopy. Statistical studies of the measured layer thicknesses, layering force, and layering frequency reveal the ordered structure of the rough IL-solid interface. Our work shows that the equilibrium structure of the interfacial IL strongly depends on the topography of the contact.Understanding the behavior of ionic liquids (ILs) either confined between rough surfaces or in rough nanoscale pores is of great relevance to extend studies performed on ideally flat surfaces to real applications. In this work we have performed an extensive investigation of the structural forces between two surfaces with well-defined roughness (<9 nm RMS) in 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide by atomic force microscopy. Statistical studies of the measured layer thicknesses, layering force, and layering frequency reveal the ordered structure of the rough IL-solid interface. Our work shows that the equilibrium structure of the interfacial IL strongly depends on the topography of the contact. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Optimized geometries and sizes for [HMIM] Ntf2, SEM images of the smooth and rough colloids, frequency of occurrence of layering in the resolved force-distance curves for all investigated systems with [HMIM] Ntf2, layer size and layering force measured with a sharp tip on mica for the same IL, and results of the kinetics experiments. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr07805a

  11. Understanding EUV mask blank surface roughness induced LWR and associated roughness requirement

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Pei-Yang; Zhang, Guojing; Gullickson, Eric M.; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Benk, Markus P.

    2015-03-01

    Extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) mask multi-layer (ML) blank surface roughness specification historically comes from blank defect inspection tool requirement. Later, new concerns on ML surface roughness induced wafer pattern line width roughness (LWR) arise. In this paper, we have studied wafer level pattern LWR as a function of EUVL mask surface roughness via High-NA Actinic Reticle Review Tool. We found that the blank surface roughness induced LWR at current blank roughness level is in the order of 0.5nm 3σ for NA=0.42 at the best focus. At defocus of ±40nm, the corresponding LWR will be 0.2nm higher. Further reducing EUVL mask blank surface roughness will increase the blank cost with limited benefit in improving the pattern LWR, provided that the intrinsic resist LWR is in the order of 1nm and above.

  12. Solution deposition planarization of long-length flexible substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheehan, Chris; Jung, Yehyun; Holesinger, Terry; Feldmann, D. Matthew; Edney, Cynthia; Ihlefeld, Jon F.; Clem, Paul G.; Matias, Vladimir

    2011-02-01

    Solution deposition planarization (SDP) is studied for preparing smooth flexible substrates in multimeter lengths. We demonstrate 0.5 nm rms surface roughness starting from unpolished metal tapes and a correlation of substrate roughness with the texture of subsequent ion-beam aligned films. Surface roughness reduction in SDP is modeled via film shrinkage during solution deposition and a residual roughness based on film thickness. Use of solution deposited a-Y2O3 to planarize substrates prior to ion-beam textured MgO growth shows an in-plane texture of MgO down to 4°. Utilizing these templates, we demonstrated superconducting YBa2Cu3Oy coated conductors with critical current densities of 2.8-4.0 MA/cm2 at 75 K.

  13. Numerical Schemes for Rough Parabolic Equations

    SciTech Connect

    Deya, Aurelien

    2012-04-15

    This paper is devoted to the study of numerical approximation schemes for a class of parabolic equations on (0,1) perturbed by a non-linear rough signal. It is the continuation of Deya (Electron. J. Probab. 16:1489-1518, 2011) and Deya et al. (Probab. Theory Relat. Fields, to appear), where the existence and uniqueness of a solution has been established. The approach combines rough paths methods with standard considerations on discretizing stochastic PDEs. The results apply to a geometric 2-rough path, which covers the case of the multidimensional fractional Brownian motion with Hurst index H>1/3.

  14. Giant persistent photoconductivity in rough silicon nanomembranes.

    PubMed

    Feng, Ping; Mönch, Ingolf; Harazim, Stefan; Huang, Gaoshan; Mei, Yongfeng; Schmidt, Oliver G

    2009-10-01

    This paper reports the observation of giant persistent photoconductivity from rough Si nanomembranes. When exposed to light, the current in p-type Si nanomembranes is enhanced by roughly 3 orders of magnitude in comparison with that in the dark and can persist for days at a high conductive state after the light is switched off. An applied gate voltage can tune the persistent photocurrent and accelerate the response to light. By analyzing the band structure of the devices and the surfaces through various coatings, we attribute the observed effect to hole-localized regions in Si nanomembranes due to the rough surfaces, where light can activate the confined holes. PMID:19637888

  15. Nanoscale roughness micromilled silica evanescent refractometer.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Lewis G; Cooper, Peter A; Holmes, Christopher; Gawith, Corin B E; Gates, James C; Smith, Peter G R

    2015-01-26

    We demonstrate machining of precision slots in silica with nanoscale roughness for applications in photonics. Using our in-house developed milling system we have achieved machined slots with surface roughness of 3.0 nm (Sa) and 17 µm depth of cut. This result represents eight times improvement in surface roughness and forty times increase in depth of cut than previously reported. We also demonstrate integration of these milled slots with UV-written waveguides and Bragg gratings to create optical refractometers, based on monitoring Fabry-Pérot spectral fringe changes. PMID:25835860

  16. Rough-Wall Channel Analysis Using Suboptimal Control Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flores, O.; Jimenez, J.; Tenpleton, J.

    2003-01-01

    The original aim of this work was to shed some light on the physics of turbulence over rough walls using large-eddy simulations and the suboptimal-control wall boundary conditions introduced by Nicoud et al. It was hoped that, if that algorithm was used to fit the mean velocity profile of the simulations to that of a rough-walled channel, instead of to a smooth one, the wall stresses introduced by the control algorithm would give some indication of what aspects of rough walls are most responsible for the modification of the flow in real turbulence. It was similarly expected that the structure of the resulting velocity fluctuations would share some of the characteristics of rough-walled flows, thus again suggesting what is intrinsic and what is accidental in the effect of geometric wall roughness. A secondary goal was to study the effect of 'unphysical' boundary conditions on the outside flow by observing how a relatively major change of the target velocity profile, and therefore presumably of the applied wall stresses, modifies properties such as the dominant length scales of the velocity fluctuations away from the wall. As will be seen below, this secondary goal grew more important during the course of the study, which was carried out during a short summer visit of the first two authors to the CTR. It became clear that there are open questions about the way in which the control algorithm models the boundary conditions, even for smooth walls, and that these questions make the physical interpretation of the results difficult. Considerable more work in that area seems to be needed before even relatively advanced large-eddy simulations, such as these, can be used to draw conclusions about the physics of wall-bounded turbulent flows. The numerical method is the same as in Nicoud et al. The modifications introduced in the original code are briefly described in section 2, but the original paper should be consulted for a full description of the algorithm. The results are

  17. Analytical modeling of thermoluminescent albedo detectors for neutron dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Glickstein, S S

    1983-02-01

    In order to gain an in-depth understanding of the neutron physics of a 6LiF TLD when used as an albedo neutron dosimeter, an analytical model was developed to simulate the response of a 6LiF chip. The analytical model was used to examine the sensitivity of the albedo TLD response to incident monoenergetic neutrons and to evaluate a multiple chip TLD neutron dosimeter. Contrary to initial experimental studies, which were hampered by statistical uncertainties, the analytical evaluation revealed that a three-energy-group detector could not reliably measure the dose equivalent to personnel exposed to multiple neutron spectra. The analysis clearly illustrates that there may be order of magnitude errors in the measured neutron dose if the dosimeter has not been calibrated for the same flux spectrum to which it is exposed. As a result of this analysis, it was concluded that, for personnel neutron monitoring, a present TLD badge must be calibrated for the neutron spectrum into which the badge is to be introduced. The analytical model used in this study can readily be adopted for evaluating other possible detectors and shield material that might be proposed in the future as suitable for use in neutron dosimetry applications. PMID:6826377

  18. Instrument Development for Single-Particle Albedo Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanford, T. J.; Murphy, D. M.; Fox, R. W.

    2008-12-01

    The ASTER (Aerosol Scattering To Extinction Ratio) instrument simultaneously measures scattering and extinction by single aerosol particles from which the albedo for each particle can be determined. ASTER employs a high-Q laser cavity to amplify loses in the cavity caused by individual particles to produce measurable extinction signals. The instrument collects light in three separate channels representing backward, forward, and wide-angle scattering. The ratio of forward to total scattering provides a proxy measurement for particle size that Mie scattering calculations show to be largely independent of particle refractive index for diameters below about 2 micrometers. Laboratory measurements on particles of known sizes and scattering properties have been used to assess the performance of the instrument and as a guide for ongoing modifications for eventual field deployment. Results from the current version of the instrument will be presented and compared to previous ASTER data to demonstrate improved performance. Data taken from ambient air have shown modes of highly absorbing particles that would not have been evident from bulk measurements. The single-particle nature of the measurements will provide additional information to complement existing methods for measuring aerosol albedos in the atmosphere.

  19. A cavity radiometer for Earth albedo measurement, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Radiometric measurements of the directional albedo of the Earth requires a detector with a flat response from 0.2 to 50 microns, a response time of about 2 seconds, a sensitivity of the order of 0.02 mw/sq cm, and a measurement uncertainty of less than 5 percent. Absolute cavity radiometers easily meet the spectral response and accuracy requirements for Earth albedo measurements, but the radiometers available today lack the necessary sensitivity and response time. The specific innovations addressed were the development of a very low thermal mass cavity and printed/deposited thermocouple sensing elements which were incorporated into the radiometer design to produce a sensitive, fast response, absolute radiometer. The cavity is applicable to the measurement of the reflected and radiated fluxes from the Earth surface and lower atmosphere from low Earth orbit satellites. The effort consisted of requirements and thermal analysis; design, construction, and test of prototype elements of the black cavity and sensor elements to show proof-of-concept. The results obtained indicate that a black body cavity sensor that has inherently a flat response from 0.2 to 50 microns can be produced which has a sensitivity of at least 0.02 mw/sq cm per micro volt ouput and with a time constant of less than two seconds. Additional work is required to develop the required thermopile.

  20. Tackling regional climate change by leaf albedo bio-geoengineering.

    PubMed

    Ridgwell, Andy; Singarayer, Joy S; Hetherington, Alistair M; Valdes, Paul J

    2009-01-27

    The likelihood that continuing greenhouse-gas emissions will lead to an unmanageable degree of climate change has stimulated the search for planetary-scale technological solutions for reducing global warming ("geoengineering"), typically characterized by the necessity for costly new infrastructures and industries. We suggest that the existing global infrastructure associated with arable agriculture can help, given that crop plants exert an important influence over the climatic energy budget because of differences in their albedo (solar reflectivity) compared to soils and to natural vegetation. Specifically, we propose a "bio-geoengineering" approach to mitigate surface warming, in which crop varieties having specific leaf glossiness and/or canopy morphological traits are specifically chosen to maximize solar reflectivity. We quantify this by modifying the canopy albedo of vegetation in prescribed cropland areas in a global-climate model, and thereby estimate the near-term potential for bio-geoengineering to be a summertime cooling of more than 1 degrees C throughout much of central North America and midlatitude Eurasia, equivalent to seasonally offsetting approximately one-fifth of regional warming due to doubling of atmospheric CO(2). Ultimately, genetic modification of plant leaf waxes or canopy structure could achieve greater temperature reductions, although better characterization of existing intraspecies variability is needed first. PMID:19147356

  1. Lunar Proton Albedo Anomalies: Soil, Surveyors, and Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, J. K.; Schwadron, N.; Spence, H. E.; Case, A. W.; Golightly, M. J.; Jordan, A.; Looper, M. D.; Petro, N. E.; Robinson, M. S.; Stubbs, T. J.; Zeitlin, C. J.; Blake, J. B.; Kasper, J. C.; Mazur, J. E.; Smith, S. S.; Townsend, L. W.

    2014-12-01

    Since the launch of LRO in 2009, the CRaTER instrument has been mapping albedo protons (~100 MeV) from the Moon. These protons are produced by nuclear spallation, a consequence of galactic cosmic ray (GCR) bombardment of the lunar regolith. Just as spalled neutrons and gamma rays reveal elemental abundances in the lunar regolith, albedo protons may be a complimentary method for mapping compositional variations. We presently find that the lunar maria have an average proton yield 0.9% ±0.3% higher than the average yield in the highlands; this is consistent with neutron data that is sensitive to the regolith's average atomic weight. We also see cases where two or more adjacent pixels (15° × 15°) have significantly anomalous yields above or below the mean. These include two high-yielding regions in the maria, and three low-yielding regions in the far-side highlands. Some of the regions could be artifacts of Poisson noise, but for completeness we consider possible effects from compositional anomalies in the lunar regolith, including pyroclastic flows, antipodes of fresh craters, and so-called "red spots". We also consider man-made landers and crash sites that may have brought elements not normally found in the lunar regolith.

  2. Soot climate forcing via snow and ice albedos

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, James; Nazarenko, Larissa

    2004-01-01

    Plausible estimates for the effect of soot on snow and ice albedos (1.5% in the Arctic and 3% in Northern Hemisphere land areas) yield a climate forcing of +0.3 W/m2 in the Northern Hemisphere. The “efficacy” of this forcing is ∼2, i.e., for a given forcing it is twice as effective as CO2 in altering global surface air temperature. This indirect soot forcing may have contributed to global warming of the past century, including the trend toward early springs in the Northern Hemisphere, thinning Arctic sea ice, and melting land ice and permafrost. If, as we suggest, melting ice and sea level rise define the level of dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system, then reducing soot emissions, thus restoring snow albedos to pristine high values, would have the double benefit of reducing global warming and raising the global temperature level at which dangerous anthropogenic interference occurs. However, soot contributions to climate change do not alter the conclusion that anthropogenic greenhouse gases have been the main cause of recent global warming and will be the predominant climate forcing in the future. PMID:14699053

  3. Coefficients of Effective Length.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Roger H.

    1981-01-01

    Under certain conditions, a validity Coefficient of Effective Length (CEL) can produce highly misleading results. A modified coefficent is suggested for use when empirical studies indicate that underlying assumptions have been violated. (Author/BW)

  4. Length Paradox in Relativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martins, Roberto de A.

    1978-01-01

    Describes a thought experiment using a general analysis approach with Lorentz transformations to show that the apparent self-contradictions of special relativity concerning the length-paradox are really non-existant. (GA)

  5. Evaluation of the EUMETSAT Meteosat Surface Albedo Climate Data Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lattanzio, Alessio; Schulz, Joerg; Roebeling, Rob; Fell, Frank; Bennartz, Ralf; Cahill, Brownwyn; Muller, Jan-Peter; Shane, Neville; Trigo, Isabel; Watson, Gill

    2013-04-01

    Understanding the climate system, with its variability and changes, requires a joint long-term international commitment from research and governmental institutions. The Global Climate Observing System (GCOS) formulated scientific requirements for the needed global observations and products including a list of relevant parameters, the so called Essential Climate Variables (ECVs). The Sustained and Coordinated Processing of Environmental Satellite Data for Climate Monitoring (SCOPE-CM) activity, is answering to these requirements by establishing an international network of facilities to ensure a continuous and sustained generation of high-quality Climate Data Records (CDR) from satellite data in compliance with the GCOS principles and guidelines. Currently, SCOPE-CM represents a partnership between operational space agencies to coordinate the generation of CDRs. Within the SCOPE-CM framework the European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT) has generated the Meteosat Surface Albedo (MSA) Climate Data Record that comprises up to 25 years (1982-2010) of continuous surface albedo coverage for large areas of the Earth. As part of the SCOPE-CM activity on land surface albedo, involving the operational meteorological satellite agencies in Europe (EUMETSAT), in Japan (JMA: Japanese Meteorological Agency) and in the USA (NOAA: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration), the MSA CDR contributes to the creation of a global harmonised surface albedo record derived from all satellites in geostationary orbit. This presentation discusses the results of an evaluation study for the MSA CDR that has been performed by independent researchers in Europe and the US. The MSA CDR has been evaluated in terms of its internal consistency, its compatibility to other satellite-derived surface albedo products, its validity against in-situ observations of superior quality, and its temporal homogeneity. The evaluation of the MSA data record has revealed a

  6. [Sonographic leg length measurement].

    PubMed

    Holst, A; Thomas, W

    1989-03-01

    After brief presentation of the clinical and radiological methods to measure the leg length and the leg length difference the authors outline the new diagnostic method for measuring the leg length and the leg length difference by means of real time sonography. Postmortem tests and clinical examples show that ultrasound is ideal to determine exactly the length of femur and tibia. The joint gaps on the hip, knee and upper ankle joint can be demonstrated by means of a 5 MHz linear scanner. A 1 mm strong metal bar on the skin and under the scanner is placed at right angles to the longitudinal axis of the body so that the bar can be seen in the centre. A measuring device gives the distances of the joint gaps in cm so that the difference correspond to the real length of femur and tibia. This standardised measuring is done by a particularly developed bearing and measuring device. The results of the sonographical measurements on 20 corpses and checking after consecutive dissections showed in 75% of cases a 100% sonographic measuring accuracy of the total leg length. The separately considered results for femur (85%) and tibia (90) were even better. The maximum sonographic measuring fault was 1.0 cm for the femur (in one case) and 0.5 cm for the tibia, respectively. All sonographic measurements were performed with the Sonoline SL-1 of the Siemens Company (Erlangen, W-Germany). Thus, sonographical measuring of the leg length offers a reliable, non-invasive method that can be repeated as often as necessary and is simply executed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2652268

  7. Editorial: Redefining Length

    SciTech Connect

    Sprouse, Gene D.

    2011-07-15

    Technological changes have moved publishing to electronic-first publication where the print version has been relegated to simply another display mode. Distribution in HTML and EPUB formats, for example, changes the reading environment and reduces the need for strict pagination. Therefore, in an effort to streamline the calculation of length, the APS journals will no longer use the printed page as the determining factor for length. Instead the journals will now use word counts (or word equivalents for tables, figures, and equations) to establish length; for details please see http://publish.aps.org/authors/length-guide. The title, byline, abstract, acknowledgment, and references will not be included in these counts allowing authors the freedom to appropriately credit coworkers, funding sources, and the previous literature, bringing all relevant references to the attention of readers. This new method for determining length will be easier for authors to calculate in advance, and lead to fewer length-associated revisions in proof, yet still retain the quality of concise communication that is a virtue of short papers.

  8. A DNA-based algorithm for minimizing decision rules: a rough sets approach.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ikno; Chu, Yu-Yi; Watada, Junzo; Wu, Jui-Yu; Pedrycz, Witold

    2011-09-01

    Rough sets are often exploited for data reduction and classification. While they are conceptually appealing, the techniques used with rough sets can be computationally demanding. To address this obstacle, the objective of this study is to investigate the use of DNA molecules and associated techniques as an optimization vehicle to support algorithms of rough sets. In particular, we develop a DNA-based algorithm to derive decision rules of minimal length. This new approach can be of value when dealing with a large number of objects and their attributes, in which case the complexity of rough-sets-based methods is NP-hard. The proposed algorithm shows how the essential components involved in the minimization of decision rules in data processing can be realized. PMID:22020105

  9. Massively Parallel Computation of Soil Surface Roughness Parameters on A Fermi GPU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaojie; Song, Changhe

    2016-06-01

    Surface roughness is description of the surface micro topography of randomness or irregular. The standard deviation of surface height and the surface correlation length describe the statistical variation for the random component of a surface height relative to a reference surface. When the number of data points is large, calculation of surface roughness parameters is time-consuming. With the advent of Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) architectures, inherently parallel problem can be effectively solved using GPUs. In this paper we propose a GPU-based massively parallel computing method for 2D bare soil surface roughness estimation. This method was applied to the data collected by the surface roughness tester based on the laser triangulation principle during the field experiment in April 2012. The total number of data points was 52,040. It took 47 seconds on a Fermi GTX 590 GPU whereas its serial CPU version took 5422 seconds, leading to a significant 115x speedup.

  10. Studies of the Combined Effects of Roughness and Reynolds Number in Turbulent Boundary Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehdi, Faraz; Klewicki, Joseph

    2010-11-01

    Mehdi, Klewicki & White [Physica D 239(2010)] provide evidence from existing studies that the prevalent scheme for classifying roughness regimes is likely to be incomplete. To further pursue these findings, more data are required, and for this purpose, additional rough-wall experiments are being performed. We report on our studies of the combined roughness-Reynolds number problem conducted in a 8m long wind-tunnel. The roughness considered is the randomly distributed type and introduced in the form of 24-grit sandpaper and pea gravel. The primary measurement tool is two-component LDV. The basis of the analysis is the mean equation of dynamics. In this regard, the length scale defining where the mean dynamics become dominated by inertia is of central importance.

  11. Spring-summer albedo variations of Antarctic sea ice from 1982 to 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Zhu-De; Ke, Chang-Qing

    2015-06-01

    This study examined the spring-summer (November, December, January and February) albedo averages and trends using a dataset consisting of 28 years of homogenized satellite data for the entire Antarctic sea ice region and for five longitudinal sectors around Antarctica: the Weddell Sea (WS), the Indian Ocean sector (IO), the Pacific Ocean sector (PO), the Ross Sea (RS) and the Bellingshausen-Amundsen Sea (BS). Time series data of the sea ice concentrations and sea surface temperatures were used to analyse their relations to the albedo. The results indicated that the sea ice albedo increased slightly during the study period, at a rate of 0.314% per decade, over the Antarctic sea ice region. The sea ice albedos in the PO, the IO and the WS increased at rates of 2.599% per decade (confidence level 99.86%), 0.824% per decade and 0.413% per decade, respectively, and the steepest increase occurred in the PO. However, the sea ice albedo in the BS decreased at a rate of -1.617% per decade (confidence level 95.05%) and was near zero in the RS. The spring-summer average albedo over the Antarctic sea ice region was 50.24%. The highest albedo values were mainly found on the continental coast and in the WS; in contrast, the lowest albedo values were found on the outer edge of the sea ice, the RS and the Amery Ice Shelf. The average albedo in the western Antarctic sea ice region was distinctly higher than that in the east. The albedo was significantly positively correlated with sea ice concentration (SIC) and was significantly negatively correlated with sea surface temperature (SST); these scenarios held true for all five longitudinal sectors. Spatially, the higher surface albedos follow the higher SICs and lower SST patterns. The increasing albedo means that Antarctic sea ice region reflects more solar radiation and absorbs less, leading to a decrease in temperature and much snowfall on sea ice, and further resulted in an increase in albedo. Conversely, the decreasing albedo

  12. Impacts of Satellite-Based Snow Albedo Assimilation on Offline and Coupled Land Surface Model Simulations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Peng, Shushi; Krinner, Gerhard; Ryder, James; Li, Yue; Dantec-Nédélec, Sarah; Ottlé, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Seasonal snow cover in the Northern Hemisphere is the largest component of the terrestrial cryosphere and plays a major role in the climate system through strong positive feedbacks related to albedo. The snow-albedo feedback is invoked as an important cause for the polar amplification of ongoing and projected climate change, and its parameterization across models is an important source of uncertainty in climate simulations. Here, instead of developing a physical snow albedo scheme, we use a direct insertion approach to assimilate satellite-based surface albedo during the snow season (hereafter as snow albedo assimilation) into the land surface model ORCHIDEE (ORganizing Carbon and Hydrology In Dynamic EcosystEms) and assess the influences of such assimilation on offline and coupled simulations. Our results have shown that snow albedo assimilation in both ORCHIDEE and ORCHIDEE-LMDZ (a general circulation model of Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique) improve the simulation accuracy of mean seasonal (October throughout May) snow water equivalent over the region north of 40 degrees. The sensitivity of snow water equivalent to snow albedo assimilation is more pronounced in the coupled simulation than the offline simulation since the feedback of albedo on air temperature is allowed in ORCHIDEE-LMDZ. We have also shown that simulations of air temperature at 2 meters in ORCHIDEE-LMDZ due to snow albedo assimilation are significantly improved during the spring in particular over the eastern Siberia region. This is a result of the fact that high amounts of shortwave radiation during the spring can maximize its snow albedo feedback, which is also supported by the finding that the spatial sensitivity of temperature change to albedo change is much larger during the spring than during the autumn and winter. In addition, the radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere induced by snow albedo assimilation during the spring is estimated to be -2.50 W m-2, the magnitude of

  13. Impacts of Satellite-Based Snow Albedo Assimilation on Offline and Coupled Land Surface Model Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Peng, Shushi; Krinner, Gerhard; Ryder, James; Li, Yue; Dantec-Nédélec, Sarah; Ottlé, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Seasonal snow cover in the Northern Hemisphere is the largest component of the terrestrial cryosphere and plays a major role in the climate system through strong positive feedbacks related to albedo. The snow-albedo feedback is invoked as an important cause for the polar amplification of ongoing and projected climate change, and its parameterization across models is an important source of uncertainty in climate simulations. Here, instead of developing a physical snow albedo scheme, we use a direct insertion approach to assimilate satellite-based surface albedo during the snow season (hereafter as snow albedo assimilation) into the land surface model ORCHIDEE (ORganizing Carbon and Hydrology In Dynamic EcosystEms) and assess the influences of such assimilation on offline and coupled simulations. Our results have shown that snow albedo assimilation in both ORCHIDEE and ORCHIDEE-LMDZ (a general circulation model of Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique) improve the simulation accuracy of mean seasonal (October throughout May) snow water equivalent over the region north of 40 degrees. The sensitivity of snow water equivalent to snow albedo assimilation is more pronounced in the coupled simulation than the offline simulation since the feedback of albedo on air temperature is allowed in ORCHIDEE-LMDZ. We have also shown that simulations of air temperature at 2 meters in ORCHIDEE-LMDZ due to snow albedo assimilation are significantly improved during the spring in particular over the eastern Siberia region. This is a result of the fact that high amounts of shortwave radiation during the spring can maximize its snow albedo feedback, which is also supported by the finding that the spatial sensitivity of temperature change to albedo change is much larger during the spring than during the autumn and winter. In addition, the radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere induced by snow albedo assimilation during the spring is estimated to be -2.50 W m-2, the magnitude of

  14. Effect of Surface Roughness on Hydrodynamic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, B. C.; Hamrock, B. J.

    1981-01-01

    A theoretical analysis on the performance of hydrodynamic oil bearings is made considering surface roughness effect. The hydrodynamic as well as asperity contact load is found. The contact pressure was calculated with the assumption that the surface height distribution was Gaussian. The average Reynolds equation of partially lubricated surface was used to calculate hydrodynamic load. An analytical expression for average gap was found and was introduced to modify the average Reynolds equation. The resulting boundary value problem was then solved numerically by finite difference methods using the method of successive over relaxation. The pressure distribution and hydrodynamic load capacity of plane slider and journal bearings were calculated for various design data. The effects of attitude and roughness of surface on the bearing performance were shown. The results are compared with similar available solution of rough surface bearings. It is shown that: (1) the contribution of contact load is not significant; and (2) the hydrodynamic and contact load increase with surface roughness.

  15. Simplified models for mask roughness induced LER

    SciTech Connect

    McClinton, Brittany; Naulleau, Patrick

    2011-02-21

    The ITRS requires < 1.2nm line-edge roughness (LER) for the 22nm half-pitch node. Currently, we can consistently achieve only about 3nm LER. Further progress requires understanding the principle causes of LER. Much work has already been done on how both the resist and LER on the mask effect the final printed LER. What is poorly understood, however, is the extent to which system-level effects such as mask surface roughness, illumination conditions, and defocus couple to speckle at the image plane, and factor into LER limits. Presently, mask-roughness induced LER is studied via full 2D aerial image modeling and subsequent analysis of the resulting image. This method is time consuming and cumbersome. It is, therefore, the goal of this research to develop a useful 'rule-of-thumb' analytic model for mask roughness induced LER to expedite learning and understanding.

  16. Surface roughness effects on bidirectional reflectance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, T. F.; Hering, R. G.

    1972-01-01

    An experimental study of surface roughness effects on bidirectional reflectance of metallic surfaces is presented. A facility capable of irradiating a sample from normal to grazing incidence and recording plane of incidence bidirectional reflectance measurements was developed. Samples consisting of glass, aluminum alloy, and stainless steel materials were selected for examination. Samples were roughened using standard grinding techniques and coated with a radiatively opaque layer of pure aluminum. Mechanical surface roughness parameters, rms heights and rms slopes, evaluated from digitized surface profile measurements are less than 1.0 micrometers and 0.28, respectively. Rough surface specular, bidirectional, and directional reflectance measurements for selected values of polar angle of incidence and wavelength of incident energy within the spectral range of 1 to 14 micrometers are reported. The Beckmann bidirectional reflectance model is compared with reflectance measurements to establish its usefulness in describing the magnitude and spatial distribution of energy reflected from rough surfaces.

  17. Mineralogical Variations Among High Albedo E-Type Asteroids: Implications for Asteroid Igneous Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaffey, Michael J.; Kelley, Michael S.

    2004-01-01

    The link between the E-type asteroids and the enstatite achondrites (aubrites) was first proposed for the original E-asteroid, 44 Nysa. The association was based on the high albedos and the featureless spectra shared by the E-asteroids and the aubrites. Among the plausible geologic and meteoritic materials, only enstatite (the magnesium end-member of the pyroxene solid solution series) is sufficiently abundant to comprise asteroid-sized bodies. However, the presence of a weak 0.89 m absorption feature in the spectrum of 44 Nysa indicates that its pyroxene contains a small amount of Fe(2+) but still substantially more than any aubrite present in the meteorite collection. The original E-class was defined based on its high albedo and flat to slightly reddish spectrum. In the absence of albedo data, the E-type was degenerate with the M- and P-types, and together these were designated as X-types. Recently, a taxonomy has been proposed to identify E-types in the absence of albedo data. In this newer classification system three subdivisions of the X-type have been proposed, including Xc, Xe and Xk. Of nine albedo-defined E-types [d], this newer non-albedo based taxonomy produced the following classifications: X-1 asteroid; Xc-2 asteroids; Xe-5 asteroids; and Xk-1 asteroid. Although the Xe subtype includes the largest number of albedo-defined E-types, most of the remaining 24 Xe-types can be excluded based on their low measured IRAS albedos, ranging from 0.116 to 0.329, which are below the lower albedo limit of the E-class (0.34) and substantially below that of the lowest albedo an actual E-type asteroid (0.41). The present discussion will be limited to unambiguous E-type asteroids determined on albedo criteria.

  18. Bimodal albedo distributions in the ablation zone of the southwestern Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moustafa, S. E.; Rennermalm, A. K.; Smith, L. C.; Miller, M. A.; Mioduszewski, J. R.

    2014-09-01

    Surface albedo is a key variable controlling solar radiation absorbed at the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) surface, and thus, meltwater production. Recent decline in surface albedo over the GrIS has been linked to enhanced snow grain metamorphic rates and amplified ice-albedo feedback from atmospheric warming. However, the importance of distinct surface types on ablation zone albedo and meltwater production is still relatively unknown, and excluded in surface mass balance models. In this study, we analyze albedo and ablation rates using in situ and remotely-sensed data. Observations include: (1) a new high-quality in situ spectral albedo dataset collected with an Analytical Spectral Devices (ASD) spectroradiometer measuring at 325-1075 nm, along a 1.25 km transect during three days in June 2013; (2) broadband albedo at two automatic weather stations; and (3) daily MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) albedo (MOD10A1) between 31 May and 30 August. We find that seasonal ablation zone albedos have a bimodal distribution, with two alternate states. This suggests that an abrupt switch from high to low albedo can be triggered by a modest melt event, resulting in amplified surface ablation rates. Our results show that such a shift corresponds to an observed melt rate percent difference increase of 51.6% during peak melt season (between 10-14 and 20-24 July 2013). Furthermore, our findings demonstrate that seasonal changes in GrIS ablation zone albedo are not exclusively a function of a darkening surface from ice crystal growth, but rather are controlled by changes in the fractional coverage of snow, bare ice, and impurity-rich surface types. As the climate continues to warm, regional climate models should consider the seasonal evolution of ice surface types in Greenland's ablation zone to improve projections of mass loss contributions to sea level rise.

  19. Bimodal Albedo Distributions in the Ablation Zone of the Southwestern Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moustafa, S.; Rennermalm, A. K.; Smith, L. C.; Miller, M. A.; Mioduszewski, J.; Koenig, L.

    2014-12-01

    Surface albedo is a key variable controlling solar radiation absorbed at the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) surface, and thus meltwater production. Recent decline in surface albedo over the GrIS has been linked to enhanced snow grain metamorphic rates and amplified ice-albedo feedback from atmospheric warming. However, the importance of distinct surface types on ablation zone albedo and meltwater production is still relatively unknown, and excluded in surface mass balance models. In this study, we analyze albedo and ablation rates (m d-1) using in situ and remotely-sensed data. Observations include: 1) a new high-quality in situ spectral albedo dataset collected with an Analytical Spectral Devices (ASD) spectroradiometer measuring at 325-1075 nm, along a 1.25 km transect during three days in June 2013; 2) broadband albedo at two automatic weather stations; and 3) daily MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) albedo (MOD10A1) between 31 May and 30 August. We find that seasonal ablation zone albedos have a bimodal distribution, with two alternate states. This suggests that an abrupt switch from high to low albedo can be triggered by a modest melt event, resulting in amplified ablation rates. Our results show that such a shift corresponds to an observed melt rate percent difference increase of 51.6% during peak melt season (between 10-14 July and 20-24 July, 2013). Furthermore, our findings demonstrate that seasonal changes in GrIS ablation zone albedo are not exclusively a function of a darkening surface from ice crystal growth, but rather are controlled by changes in the fractional coverage of snow, bare ice, and impurity-rich surface types. As the climate continues to warm, regional climate models should consider the seasonal evolution of ice surface types in Greenland's ablation zone to improve projections of mass loss contributions to sea level rise.

  20. Effects of aerosol and horizontal inhomogeneity on the broadband albedo of marine stratus: Numerical simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Duda, D.P.; Stephens, G.L.; Stevens, B.; Cotton, W.R.

    1996-12-15

    Recent estimates of the effect of increasing of anthropogenic sulfate aerosol on the radiative forcing of the atmosphere have indicated that its impact may be comparable in magnitude to the effect from increases in CO{sub 2}. Much of this impact is expected from the effects of the aerosol on cloud microphysics and the subsequent impact on cloud albedo. A solar broadband version of a 2D radiative transfer model was used to quantify the impact of enhanced aerosol concentrations and horizontal inhomogeneity on the solar broadband albedo of marine stratus. The results of the radiative transfer calculations indicated that in unbroken marine stratus clouds the net horizontal transport of photons over a domain of a few kilometers was nearly zero, and the domain-average broadband albedo computed in a 2D cross section was nearly identical to the domain average calculated from a series of independent pixel approximation (IPA) calculations of the same cross section. However, the horizontal inhomogeneity does affect the cloud albedo compared to plane-parallel approximation (PPA) computations due to the nonlinear relationship between albedo and optical depth. The reduction in cloud albedo could be related to the variability of the distribution of log (cloud optical depth). These results extend the finding of Cahalan et al. to broadband solar albedos in a more realistic cloud model and suggest that accurate computation of domain-averaged broadband albedos in unbroken (or nearly unbroken) marine stratus can be made using IPA calculations with 1D radiative transfer models. Computations of the mean albedo over portions of the 3D RAMS domain show the relative increase in cloud albedo due to a 67% increase in the boundary-layer average CCN concentration was between 6% and 9%. The effects of cloud inhomogeneity on the broadband albedo as measured from the PPA bias ranged from 3% to 5%. 25 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Heat transfer in the turbulent boundary layer with a step change in surface roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Robert P.; Taylor, J. K.; Coleman, Hugh W.; Hosni, M. H.

    1991-01-01

    Measurements of Stanton numbers, velocity profiles, temperature profiles, and turbulence intensity profiles are reported for turbulent flat plate boundary layer flows with a step change in surface roughness. The first 0.9 m length of the test surface is roughened with 1.27 mm diameter hemispheres spaced 2 base diameters apart in a staggered array. The remaining 1.5 m length is smooth. The experiments show that the step change from a rough to a smooth surface has a dramatic effect on the convective heat transfer. In many cases, the Stanton number drops below the smooth-wall correlation immediately downstream of the change in roughness. The Stanton number measurements are compared with predictions using the discrete element method with excellent results.

  2. The boundary layer over turbine blade models with realistic rough surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIlroy, Hugh M., Jr.

    The impact of turbine blade surface roughness on aerodynamic performance and heat loads is well known. Over time, as the turbine blades are exposed to heat loads, the external surfaces of the blades become rough. Also, for film-cooled blades, surface degradation can have a significant impact on film-cooling effectiveness. Many studies have been conducted on the effects of surface degradation/roughness on engine performance but most investigations have modeled the rough surfaces with uniform or two-dimensional roughness patterns. The objective of the present investigation is to conduct measurements that will reveal the influence of realistic surface roughness on the near-wall behavior of the boundary layer. Measurements have been conducted at the Matched-Index-of-Refraction (MIR) Facility at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory with a laser Doppler velocimeter. A flat plate model of a turbine blade has been developed that produces a transitional boundary layer, elevated freestream turbulence and an accelerating freestream in order to simulate conditions on the suction side of a high-pressure turbine blade. Boundary layer measurements have been completed over a smooth plate model and over a model with a strip of realistic rough surface. The realistic rough surface was developed by scaling actual turbine blade surface data that was provided by U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory. The results indicate that bypass transition occurred very early in the flow over the model and that the boundary layer remained unstable throughout the entire length of the test plate; the boundary layer thickness and momentum thickness Reynolds numbers increased over the rough patch; and the shape factor increased over the rough patch but then decreased downstream of the patch relative to the smooth plate case; in the rough patch case the flow experienced two transition reversals with laminar-like behavior achieved by the end of the test plate; streamwise turbulence

  3. Influence of a Two-scale Surface Roughness on a Neutral Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salizzoni, Pietro; Soulhac, Lionel; Mejean, Patrick; Perkins, Richard J.

    2008-04-01

    Flow in the urban boundary layer is strongly influenced by the surface roughness, which is composed principally of isolated buildings or groups of buildings. Previous research has shown that the flow regime depends on the characteristic height of these obstacles ( H), and the spacing between them ( W). In reality, the urban boundary layer contains roughness elements with a wide range of length scales; in many practical situations these can be classified into large-scale roughness—buildings, or groups of buildings—and small-scale roughness, such as street furniture and elements on the façades and roofs. It is important to understand how the small-scale roughness might modify mass and momentum transfer in the urban boundary layer, but relatively little information is available concerning the potential interaction between large- and small-scale roughness elements in the different flow regimes. This problem has been studied using wind-tunnel experiments, by measuring vertical velocity profiles over a two-dimensional obstacle array, adding small-scale roughness elements to the top of larger parallel square bars. The experiments were performed for different cavity aspect ratios: the results show that the small-scale roughness increases the turbulence intensities and the momentum transfer when the large-scale obstacles are closely packed ( H/ W > 1) but it has very little effect for more widely-spaced obstacles ( H/ W < 1).

  4. Comparison of selected approaches for urban roughness determination based on voronoi cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketterer, Christine; Gangwisch, Marcel; Fröhlich, Dominik; Matzarakis, Andreas

    2016-07-01

    Wind speed is reduced above urban areas due to their high aerodynamic roughness. This not only holds for above the urban canopy. The local vertical wind profile is modified. Aerodynamic roughness (both roughness length and displacement height) therefore is relevant for many fields within human biometeorology, e.g. for the identification of ventilation paths, the concentration and dispersion of air pollutants at street level or to simulate wind speed and direction in urban environments and everything depending on them. Roughness, thus, also shows strong influence on human thermal comfort. Currently, roughness parameters are mostly estimated using classifications. However, such classifications only provide limited assessment of roughness in urban areas. In order to calculate spatially resolved roughness on the micro-scale, three different approaches were implemented in the SkyHelios model. For all of them, the urban area is divided into reference areas for each of the obstacles using a voronoi diagram. The three approaches are based on building and [+one of them also on] vegetation (trees and forests) data. They were compared for the city of Stuttgart, Germany. Results show that the approach after Bottema and Mestayer (J Wind Eng Ind Aerodyn 74-76:163-173 1998) on the spatial basis of a voronoi diagram provides the most plausible results.

  5. Roughness effects on fine-scale anisotropy and anomalous scaling in atmospheric flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katul, G. G.; Porporato, A.; Poggi, D.

    2009-03-01

    The effects of surface roughness on various measures of fine-scale intermittency within the inertial subrange were analyzed using two data sets that span the roughness "extremes" encountered in atmospheric flows, an ice sheet and a tall rough forest, and supplemented by a large number of existing literature data. Three inter-related problems pertaining to surface roughness effects on (i) anomalous scaling in higher-order structure functions, (ii) generalized dimensions and singularity spectra of the componentwise turbulent kinetic energy, and (iii) scalewise measures such local flatness factors and stretching exponents were addressed. It was demonstrated that surface roughness effects do not impact the fine-scale intermittency in u (the longitudinal velocity component), consistent with previous laboratory experiments. However, fine-scale intermittency in w (the vertical velocity component) increased with decreasing roughness. The consequence of this external intermittency (i.e., surface roughness induced) is that the singularity spectra of the scaling exponents are much broader for w when compared u in the context of the multifractal formalism for the local kinetic energy (instead of the usual conservative cascade studied for the dissipation rate). The scalewise evolution of the flatness factors and stretching exponents collapse when normalized using a global Reynolds number Rt=σLI/ν, where σ is the velocity standard deviation, LI is the integral length scale, and ν is the fluid viscosity.

  6. How supercontinents and superoceans affect seafloor roughness.

    PubMed

    Whittaker, Joanne M; Müller, R Dietmar; Roest, Walter R; Wessel, Paul; Smith, Walter H F

    2008-12-18

    Seafloor roughness varies considerably across the world's ocean basins and is fundamental to controlling the circulation and mixing of heat in the ocean and dissipating eddy kinetic energy. Models derived from analyses of active mid-ocean ridges suggest that ocean floor roughness depends on seafloor spreading rates, with rougher basement forming below a half-spreading rate threshold of 30-35 mm yr(-1) (refs 4, 5), as well as on the local interaction of mid-ocean ridges with mantle plumes or cold-spots. Here we present a global analysis of marine gravity-derived roughness, sediment thickness, seafloor isochrons and palaeo-spreading rates of Cretaceous to Cenozoic ridge flanks. Our analysis reveals that, after eliminating effects related to spreading rate and sediment thickness, residual roughness anomalies of 5-20 mGal remain over large swaths of ocean floor. We found that the roughness as a function of palaeo-spreading directions and isochron orientations indicates that most of the observed excess roughness is not related to spreading obliquity, as this effect is restricted to relatively rare occurrences of very high obliquity angles (>45 degrees ). Cretaceous Atlantic ocean floor, formed over mantle previously overlain by the Pangaea supercontinent, displays anomalously low roughness away from mantle plumes and is independent of spreading rates. We attribute this observation to a sub-Pangaean supercontinental mantle temperature anomaly leading to slightly thicker than normal Late Jurassic and Cretaceous Atlantic crust, reduced brittle fracturing and smoother basement relief. In contrast, ocean crust formed above Pacific superswells, probably reflecting metasomatized lithosphere underlain by mantle at only slightly elevated temperatures, is not associated with basement roughness anomalies. These results highlight a fundamental difference in the nature of large-scale mantle upwellings below supercontinents and superoceans, and their impact on oceanic crustal

  7. Initiative learning algorithm based on rough set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guoyin; He, Xiao

    2003-03-01

    Rough set theory is emerging as a new tool for dealing with fuzzy and uncertain data. In this paper, a theory is developed to express, measure and process uncertain information and uncertain knowledge based on our result about the uncertainty measure of decision tables and decision rule systems. Based on Skowron"s propositional default rule generation algorithm, we develop an initiative learning model with rough set based initiative rule generation algorithm. Simulation results illustrate its efficiency.

  8. Structural and Critical Behaviors of Ag Rough Films Deposited on Liquid Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Gao-xiang; Feng, Chun-mu; Zhang, Qi-rui; Ge, Hong-liang; Zhang, Xuan-jia

    1996-10-01

    A new Ag rough film system, deposited on silicone oil surfaces by rf-magnetron sputtering method, has been fabricated. The chrysanthemum-like surface morphology at micron length scale is observed. It is proposed that the anomalous critical behavior mainly results from the relative shift between the Ag atom clusters and the substrate. The discussion of the deposition mechanism is also presented.

  9. Rough surface reconstruction for ultrasonic NDE simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Wonjae; Shi, Fan; Lowe, Michael J. S.; Skelton, Elizabeth A.; Craster, Richard V.

    2014-02-18

    The reflection of ultrasound from rough surfaces is an important topic for the NDE of safety-critical components, such as pressure-containing components in power stations. The specular reflection from a rough surface of a defect is normally lower than it would be from a flat surface, so it is typical to apply a safety factor in order that justification cases for inspection planning are conservative. The study of the statistics of the rough surfaces that might be expected in candidate defects according to materials and loading, and the reflections from them, can be useful to develop arguments for realistic safety factors. This paper presents a study of real rough crack surfaces that are representative of the potential defects in pressure-containing power plant. Two-dimensional (area) values of the height of the roughness have been measured and their statistics analysed. Then a means to reconstruct model cases with similar statistics, so as to enable the creation of multiple realistic realizations of the surfaces, has been investigated, using random field theory. Rough surfaces are reconstructed, based on a real surface, and results for these two-dimensional descriptions of the original surface have been compared with those from the conventional model based on a one-dimensional correlation coefficient function. In addition, ultrasonic reflections from them are simulated using a finite element method.

  10. Quantifying trends in surface roughness and the effect on surface wind speed observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wever, N.

    2012-06-01

    Many studies analyzing surface wind speed observations find a decrease in wind speed over the last 30 to 50 years. A cause sometimes proposed is increasing surface roughness, although to date the evidence that this is the primary factor is still inconclusive. In this study, changes in surface roughness are investigated for 20 stations in the Netherlands and 137 stations in 7 other European countries. From the Dutch data set, local aerodynamic roughness lengths were calculated from hourly gust factors. Trends in wind speed for individual stations and wind direction sectors correlate negatively with trends in surface roughness. For 1962-2009, typically a doubling of the local roughness length was found, with the strongest increase after 1981. An accompanying average decrease in wind speed by 3.1% (0.13 m/s) per decade was found for 1981-2009. A conceptual boundary layer model was used to show that 70% of the wind speed trend can be attributed to surface roughness changes; the remaining 30% of the trend remains unresolved. Changes in land use, including urbanization, forestation, and a decrease in pasture land area, are probable causes for the increasing surface roughness. For the European station data from the European Climate Assessment and Dataset (ECA&D) and the Swiss Federal Office of Meteorology and Climatology (MeteoSwiss), the analysis was restricted to daily gust factors. Observed trends in wind speed at stations correlate negatively with trends in gust factors. Averaged over all stations, the wind speed decreased 1.2% (0.05 m/s) per decade over 1982-2009, consistent with increasing surface roughness.

  11. Barrow Ak: A Focal Point for Ice-Albedo-Transmission Feedback Processes in Arctic Sea Ice.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grenfell, T. C.; Perovich, D. K.; Eicken, H.

    2003-12-01

    The Arctic sea ice cover has measurably decreased in thickness, extent, and seasonal duration over the last two decades culminating in record or near-record fluctuations in 1998 and again in 2002 followed by a further strong melt season in 2003. Seasonal changes and short-term variability in the state of the ice cover and their effect on the interaction of solar radiation with the ice cover and underlying ocean are of particular importance in this context. Positive feedback processes associated with decreases in albedo and increasing transmissivity act to accelerate these changes. The rates of spring warming and summer melt as well as the length of the melt season are strongly influenced by the albedo, which in turn decreases as the melt season progresses. At the same time, increased transmission provides more energy to the upper oceanic mixed layer further increasing the potential for melting at the bottom of the ice. This ice-albedo-transmission (IAT) feedback plays a central role in modulating the heat and mass balance of the Arctic sea ice cover. Along the coastal contact zone, the feedback processes are even more complex due to interactions with the adjacent land surfaces. Indeed, this zone appears to be a focal point where the feedbacks are amplified. To understand and model the processes involved, it is necessary to determine how shortwave radiation is distributed within the ice-ocean system and how this distribution affects heat and mass balance. Analysis of this system is complicated by spatial and temporal inhomogeneity of the spring/summer ice cover, with surface conditions varying from deep snow to bare ice to melt ponds to open leads, and with ice thickness ranging from zero (open water) to ridges tens of meters thick, all within an area that is often less than one square km. Each of these categories has a different set of physical and optical properties. Treatment of the surface as a locally homogeneous medium with effective bulk optical properties

  12. Surface roughness estimation by inversion of the Hapke photometric model on optical data simulated using a ray tracing code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champion, J.; Ristorcelli, T.; Ferrari, C. C.; Briottet, X.; Jacquemoud, S.

    2013-12-01

    Surface roughness is a key physical parameter that governs various processes (incident radiation distribution, temperature, erosion,...) on Earth and other Solar System objects. Its impact on the scattering function of incident electromagnetic waves is difficult to model. In the 80's, Hapke provided an approximate analytic solution for the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) of a particulate medium and, later on, included the effect of surface roughness as a correction factor for the BRDF of a smooth surface. This analytical radiative transfer model is widely used in solar system science whereas its ability to remotely determine surface roughness is still a question at issue. The validation of the Hapke model has been only occasionally undertaken due to the lack of radiometric data associated with field measurement of surface roughness. We propose to validate it on Earth, on several volcanic terrains for which very high resolution digital elevation models are available at small scale. We simulate the BRDF of these DEMs thanks to a ray-tracing code and fit them with the Hapke model to retrieve surface roughness. The mean slope angle of the facets, which quantifies surface roughness, can be fairly well retrieved when most conditions are met, i.e. a random-like surface and little multiple scattering between the facets. A directional sensitivity analysis of the Hapke model confirms that both surface intrinsic optical properties (facet's reflectance or single scattering albedo) and roughness are the most influential variables on ground BRDFs. Their interactions in some directions explain why their separation may be difficult, unless some constraints are introduced in the inversion process. Simulation of soil surface BRDF at different illumination and viewing angles

  13. Impurities in Snow: Effects on Spectral Albedo of Prairie Snowpacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, J. N.; Klein, A. G.

    2007-12-01

    While extensive research on soot in snow has been done in the Polar Regions, there remains a lack of observations addressing the effect of soot on snow albedo in North American prairie snowpacks which causes uncertainty to the overall global effect that soot in snow has on climate. Measurements of snow impurities in freshly fallen prairie snowpacks in northwestern Iowa and central Texas collected from February 28 - March 5, 2007 and April 6, 2007, respectively. Two significant snowfall events occurred in northwestern Iowa during the study; the second snowfall event produced the most severe blizzard conditions in northwestern Iowa in the last thirty years. An unusual snowfall event in central Texas offered a unique sampling opportunity Several types of sites were sampled during the field campaign; this includes: frozen lakes with minimal human impact, agricultural fields impacted by agricultural dust, and human impacted sample sites. At twelve sites in northwestern Iowa samples were collected on multiple days and for both snow events to examine changes in snow impurities over time. At all site locations snow samples, temperature, density, and grain size were recorded. Snow reflectance and snow radiance was collected at a subset of the sites with an ASD VNIR Spectroradiometer (350 - 1500 nm). Snow impurities of light-absorbing particulate matter were measured by filtering the meltwater through a nuclepore 0.4 micrometer filter. Impurity concentration was determined by comparing the filters against a set of standards. A photometer will provide a more exact determination of snow impurities in the near future. Preliminary soot observations indicate prairie snow pack concentrations ranging from 1 ngC/g to 236 ngC/g with an average of 61.4 ngC/g. These measurements are within range of previously published values in the Arctic and can lower snow albedo. Differences in soot concentrations were observed between the two Iowa snowfall events. Impurity concentrations measured

  14. Connection between the spherical albedo and the observable characteristics of a planetary atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Fomin, N.N.; Yanovitskii, E.G.

    1986-07-01

    Semiempirical dependences of the geometrical albedo and the reflection coefficient at the center of a planetary disk on the spherical albedo are found. The nonsteady analogs of these quantities are studied on the basis of the approximate equations obtained. These analogs can be used in the analysis of radiation transfer in forbidden molecular absorption bands.

  15. Main-belt asteroids with WISE/NEOWISE: Near-infrared albedos

    SciTech Connect

    Masiero, Joseph R.; Mainzer, A. K.; Nugent, C. R.; Bauer, J. M.; Stevenson, R.; Sonnett, S.

    2014-08-20

    We present revised near-infrared albedo fits of 2835 main-belt asteroids observed by WISE/NEOWISE over the course of its fully cryogenic survey in 2010. These fits are derived from reflected-light near-infrared images taken simultaneously with thermal emission measurements, allowing for more accurate measurements of the near-infrared albedos than is possible for visible albedo measurements. Because our sample requires reflected light measurements, it undersamples small, low-albedo asteroids, as well as those with blue spectral slopes across the wavelengths investigated. We find that the main belt separates into three distinct groups of 6%, 16%, and 40% reflectance at 3.4 μm. Conversely, the 4.6 μm albedo distribution spans the full range of possible values with no clear grouping. Asteroid families show a narrow distribution of 3.4 μm albedos within each family that map to one of the three observed groupings, with the (221) Eos family being the sole family associated with the 16% reflectance 3.4 μm albedo group. We show that near-infrared albedos derived from simultaneous thermal emission and reflected light measurements are important indicators of asteroid taxonomy and can identify interesting targets for spectroscopic follow-up.

  16. ANALYTIC MODELS FOR ALBEDOS, PHASE CURVES, AND POLARIZATION OF REFLECTED LIGHT FROM EXOPLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Madhusudhan, Nikku; Burrows, Adam E-mail: burrows@astro.princeton.edu

    2012-03-01

    New observational facilities are becoming increasingly capable of observing reflected light from transiting and directly imaged extrasolar planets. In this study, we provide an analytic framework to interpret observed phase curves, geometric albedos, and polarization of giant planet atmospheres. We compute the observables for non-conservative Rayleigh scattering in homogeneous semi-infinite atmospheres using both scalar and vector formalisms. In addition, we compute phase curves and albedos for Lambertian, isotropic, and anisotropic scattering phase functions. We provide analytic expressions for geometric albedos and spherical albedos as a function of the scattering albedo for Rayleigh scattering in semi-infinite atmospheres. Given an observed geometric albedo our prescriptions can be used to estimate the underlying scattering albedo of the atmosphere, which in turn is indicative of the scattering and absorptive properties of the atmosphere. We also study the dependence of polarization in Rayleigh scattering atmospheres on the orbital parameters of the planet-star system, particularly on the orbital inclination. We show how the orbital inclination of non-transiting exoplanets can be constrained from their observed polarization parameters. We consolidate the formalism, solution techniques, and results from analytic models available in the literature, often scattered in various sources, and present a systematic procedure to compute albedos, phase curves, and polarization of reflected light.

  17. MAIN BELT ASTEROIDS WITH WISE/NEOWISE. I. PRELIMINARY ALBEDOS AND DIAMETERS

    SciTech Connect

    Masiero, Joseph R.; Mainzer, A. K.; Bauer, J. M.; Eisenhardt, P. R. M.; DeBaun, E.; Elsbury, D.; Gautier, T. IV; Gomillion, S.; Wilkins, A.; Cutri, R. M.; Dailey, J.; McMillan, R. S.; Spahr, T. B.; Skrutskie, M. F.; Tholen, D.; Walker, R. G.; Wright, E. L.

    2011-11-10

    We present initial results from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), a four-band all-sky thermal infrared survey that produces data well suited for measuring the physical properties of asteroids, and the NEOWISE enhancement to the WISE mission allowing for detailed study of solar system objects. Using a NEATM thermal model fitting routine, we compute diameters for over 100,000 Main Belt asteroids from their IR thermal flux, with errors better than 10%. We then incorporate literature values of visible measurements (in the form of the H absolute magnitude) to determine albedos. Using these data we investigate the albedo and diameter distributions of the Main Belt. As observed previously, we find a change in the average albedo when comparing the inner, middle, and outer portions of the Main Belt. We also confirm that the albedo distribution of each region is strongly bimodal. We observe groupings of objects with similar albedos in regions of the Main Belt associated with dynamical breakup families. Asteroid families typically show a characteristic albedo for all members, but there are notable exceptions to this. This paper is the first look at the Main Belt asteroids in the WISE data, and only represents the preliminary, observed raw size, and albedo distributions for the populations considered. These distributions are subject to survey biases inherent to the NEOWISE data set and cannot yet be interpreted as describing the true populations; the debiased size and albedo distributions will be the subject of the next paper in this series.

  18. Intercomparison Between in situ and AVHRR Polar Pathfinder-Derived Surface Albedo over Greenland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroeve, Julienne C.; Box, Jason E.; Fowler, Charles; Haran, Terence; Key, Jeffery

    2001-01-01

    The Advanced Very High Resolution (AVHRR) Polar Pathfinder Data (APP) provides the first long time series of consistent, calibrated surface albedo and surface temperature data for the polar regions. Validations of these products have consisted of individual studies that analyzed algorithm performance for limited regions and or time periods. This paper reports on comparisons made between the APP-derived surface albedo and that measured at fourteen automatic weather stations (AWS) around the Greenland ice sheet from January 1997 to August 1998. Results show that satellite-derived surface albedo values are on average 10% less than those measured by the AWS stations. However, the station measurements tend to be biased high by about 4% and thus the differences in absolute albedo may be less (e.g. 6%). In regions of the ice sheet where the albedo variability is small, such as the dry snow facies, the APP albedo uncertainty exceeds the natural variability. Further work is needed to improve the absolute accuracy of the APP-derived surface albedo. Even so, the data provide temporally and spatially consistent estimates of the Greenland ice sheet albedo.

  19. ALBEDO MODELS FOR SNOW AND ICE ON A FRESHWATER LAKE. (R824801)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Snow and ice albedo measurements were taken over a freshwater lake in Minnesota for three months during the winter of 1996¯1997 for use in a winter lake water quality model. The mean albedo of new snow was measured as 0.83±0.028, while the...

  20. Surface Roughness of the Moon Derived from Multi-frequency Radar Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fa, W.

    2011-12-01

    globally using the regolith composition and the relation among the dielectric constant, bulk density, and regolith composition. The statistical properties of lunar surface roughness are described by the root mean square (RMS) height and correlation length, which represent the vertical and horizontal scale of the roughness. The correlation length and its scale dependence are studied using the topography data from laser altimeter observations from recent lunar missions. As these two parameters are known, surface roughness (RMS slope) can be estimated by minimizing the difference between the observed and modeled radar echo strength. Surface roughness of several regions over Oceanus Procellarum and southeastern highlands on lunar nearside are studied, and preliminary results show that maira is smoother than highlands at 70 cm scale, whereas the situation turns opposite at 12 and 4 cm scale. Surface roughness of young craters is in general higher than that of maria and highlands, indicating large rock population produced during impacting process.

  1. Multi-modal albedo distributions in the ablation area of the southwestern Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moustafa, S. E.; Rennermalm, A. K.; Smith, L. C.; Miller, M. A.; Mioduszewski, J. R.; Koenig, L. S.; Hom, M. G.; Shuman, C. A.

    2015-05-01

    Surface albedo is a key variable controlling solar radiation absorbed at the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) surface and, thus, meltwater production. Recent decline in surface albedo over the GrIS has been linked to enhanced snow grain metamorphic rates, earlier snowmelt, and amplified melt-albedo feedback from atmospheric warming. However, the importance of distinct surface types on ablation area albedo and meltwater production is still relatively unknown. In this study, we analyze albedo and ablation rates using in situ and remotely sensed data. Observations include (1) a new high-quality in situ spectral albedo data set collected with an Analytical Spectral Devices Inc. spectroradiometer measuring at 325-1075 nm along a 1.25 km transect during 3 days in June 2013; (2) broadband albedo at two automatic weather stations; and (3) daily MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) albedo (MOD10A1) between 31 May and 30 August 2012 and 2013. We find that seasonal ablation area albedos in 2013 have a bimodal distribution, with snow and ice facies characterizing the two peaks. Our results show that a shift from a distribution dominated by high to low albedos corresponds to an observed melt rate increase of 51.5% (between 10-14 July and 20-24 July 2013). In contrast, melt rate variability caused by albedo changes before and after this shift was much lower and varied between ~10 and 30% in the melting season. Ablation area albedos in 2012 exhibited a more complex multimodal distribution, reflecting a transition from light to dark-dominated surface, as well as sensitivity to the so called "dark-band" region in southwest Greenland. In addition to a darkening surface from ice crystal growth, our findings demonstrate that seasonal changes in GrIS ablation area albedos are controlled by changes in the fractional coverage of snow, bare ice, and impurity-rich surface types. Thus, seasonal variability in ablation area albedos appears to be regulated primarily as a function

  2. Surface Albedo in Cities: Case Study in Sapporo and Tokyo, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugawara, Hirofumi; Takamura, Tamio

    2014-12-01

    The surface albedo of two large cities in Japan was measured using a pyranometer mounted on a helicopter to avoid the bidirectional reflectance distribution. The daytime albedo was 0.12 in the cities, which was less than that of a nearby forest (0.16). The albedo was dependent on building structure in the cities; the albedo was lower in areas with more buildings, and decreased as the aspect ratio of street canyons increased. There are two reasons for this dependency: the multiple reflection of radiation in the building canopy, as has been shown in many previous studies, and the sparse vegetation in urban areas. These two factors concurrently determine the albedo in a real city, where the vegetation amount decreases as the plan roof ratio increases.

  3. ARM Climate Research Facility Spectral Surface Albedo Value-Added Product (VAP) Report

    SciTech Connect

    McFarlane, S; Gaustad, K; Long, C; Mlawer, E

    2011-07-15

    This document describes the input requirements, output data products, and methodology for the Spectral Surface Albedo (SURFSPECALB) value-added product (VAP). The SURFSPECALB VAP produces a best-estimate near-continuous high spectral resolution albedo data product using measurements from multifilter radiometers (MFRs). The VAP first identifies best estimates for the MFR downwelling and upwelling shortwave irradiance values, and then calculates narrowband spectral albedo from these best-estimate irradiance values. The methodology for finding the best-estimate values is based on a simple process of screening suspect data and backfilling screened and missing data with estimated values when possible. The resulting best-estimate MFR narrowband spectral albedos are used to determine a daily surface type (snow, 100% vegetation, partial vegetation, or 0% vegetation). For non-snow surfaces, a piecewise continuous function is used to estimate a high spectral resolution albedo at 1 min temporal and 10 cm-1 spectral resolution.

  4. Impact of Surface Roughness and Soil Texture on Mineral Dust Emission Fluxes Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menut, Laurent; Perez, Carlos; Haustein, Karsten; Bessagnet, Bertrand; Prigent, Catherine; Alfaro, Stephane

    2013-01-01

    Dust production models (DPM) used to estimate vertical fluxes of mineral dust aerosols over arid regions need accurate data on soil and surface properties. The Laboratoire Inter-Universitaire des Systemes Atmospheriques (LISA) data set was developed for Northern Africa, the Middle East, and East Asia. This regional data set was built through dedicated field campaigns and include, among others, the aerodynamic roughness length, the smooth roughness length of the erodible fraction of the surface, and the dry (undisturbed) soil size distribution. Recently, satellite-derived roughness length and high-resolution soil texture data sets at the global scale have emerged and provide the opportunity for the use of advanced schemes in global models. This paper analyzes the behavior of the ERS satellite-derived global roughness length and the State Soil Geographic data base-Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (STATSGO-FAO) soil texture data set (based on wet techniques) using an advanced DPM in comparison to the LISA data set over Northern Africa and the Middle East. We explore the sensitivity of the drag partition scheme (a critical component of the DPM) and of the dust vertical fluxes (intensity and spatial patterns) to the roughness length and soil texture data sets. We also compare the use of the drag partition scheme to a widely used preferential source approach in global models. Idealized experiments with prescribed wind speeds show that the ERS and STATSGO-FAO data sets provide realistic spatial patterns of dust emission and friction velocity thresholds in the region. Finally, we evaluate a dust transport model for the period of March to July 2011 with observed aerosol optical depths from Aerosol Robotic Network sites. Results show that ERS and STATSGO-FAO provide realistic simulations in the region.

  5. Fault slip distribution and fault roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candela, Thibault; Renard, François; Schmittbuhl, Jean; Bouchon, Michel; Brodsky, Emily E.

    2011-11-01

    We present analysis of the spatial correlations of seismological slip maps and fault topography roughness, illuminating their identical self-affine exponent. Though the complexity of the coseismic spatial slip distribution can be intuitively associated with geometrical or stress heterogeneities along the fault surface, this has never been demonstrated. Based on new measurements of fault surface topography and on statistical analyses of kinematic inversions of slip maps, we propose a model, which quantitatively characterizes the link between slip distribution and fault surface roughness. Our approach can be divided into two complementary steps: (i) Using a numerical computation, we estimate the influence of fault roughness on the frictional strength (pre-stress). We model a fault as a rough interface where elastic asperities are squeezed. The Hurst exponent ?, characterizing the self-affinity of the frictional strength field, approaches ?, where ? is the roughness exponent of the fault surface in the direction of slip. (ii) Using a quasi-static model of fault propagation, which includes the effect of long-range elastic interactions and spatial correlations in the frictional strength, the spatial slip correlation is observed to scale as ?, where ? represents the Hurst exponent of the slip distribution. Under the assumption that the origin of the spatial fluctuations in frictional strength along faults is the elastic squeeze of fault asperities, we show that self-affine geometrical properties of fault surface roughness control slip correlations and that ?. Given that ? for a wide range of faults (various accumulated displacement, host rock and slip movement), we predict that ?. Even if our quasi-static fault model is more relevant for creeping faults, the spatial slip correlations observed are consistent with those of seismological slip maps. A consequence is that the self-affinity property of slip roughness may be explained by fault geometry without considering

  6. The work budget of rough faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Patrick J.; Ashley Griffith, W.

    2014-12-01

    Faults in nature have measurable roughness at many scales and are not planar as generally idealized. We utilize the boundary element method to model the geomechanical response of synthetic rough faults in an isotropic, linear elastic continuum to external tectonic loading in terms of the work budget. Faults are generated with known fractal roughness parameters, including the root mean square slope (β), a measure of roughness amplitude, and the Hurst exponent (H), a measure of geometric self-similarity. Energy within the fault models is partitioned into external work (Wext), internal elastic strain energy (Wint), gravitational work (Wgrav), frictional work (Wfric), and seismic energy (Wseis). Results confirm that Wext, or work done on the external model boundaries, is smallest for a perfectly planar fault, and steadily increases with increasing β. This pattern is also observed in Wint, the energy expended in deforming the host rock. The opposite is true for gravitational work, or work done against gravity in uplifting host rock, as well as with frictional work, or energy dissipated with frictional slip on the fault, and Wseis, or seismic energy released during slip events. Effects of variation in H are not as large as for β, but Wgrav, Wfric, and Wseis increase with increasing H, with Wint and Wext decreasing across the same range. Remarkably, however, for a narrow range of roughness amplitudes which are commonly observed along natural faults, the total work of the system remains approximately constant, while slightly larger than the total work of a planar fault. Faults evolve toward the most mechanically efficient configuration; therefore we argue that this range of roughness amplitudes may represent an energy barrier, preventing faults from removing asperities and evolving to smooth, planar discontinuities. A similar conclusion is drawn from simulations at relatively shallow depths, with results showing that shallower faults have larger energy barriers, and can

  7. The albedos of Pluto and Charon - Wavelength dependence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marcialis, Robert L.; Lebofsky, Larry A.; Disanti, Michael A.; Fink, Uwe; Tedesco, Edward F.; Africano, John

    1992-01-01

    The March 3, 1987 occultation of Charon by Pluto was monitored simultaneously with three telescopes. Each site covered a distinct wavelength interval with the total range spanning 0.44-2.4 microns. Observing the same event ensures an identical sun-Pluto-earth geometry for all three sites, and minimizes the assumptions which must be made to combine results. This spectrophotometry is used to derive the individual geometric albedos of Pluto and Charon over a factor of at least 5 in wavelength. Combining the results with those of Binzel (1988) improved (B - V) color estimates (on the 'Johnson Pluto' system) are obtained for the components of the system at rotational phase 0.75: (Pluto + Charon) = 0.843 +/- 0.006; Pluto alone = 0.866 +/- 0.007; and Charon alone = 0.702 +/- 0.010.

  8. Color and albedo heterogeneity of Vesta from Dawn.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Vishnu; Nathues, Andreas; Le Corre, Lucille; Sierks, Holger; Li, Jian-Yang; Gaskell, Robert; McCoy, Timothy; Beck, Andrew W; Schröder, Stefan E; Pieters, Carle M; Becker, Kris J; Buratti, Bonnie J; Denevi, Brett; Blewett, David T; Christensen, Ulrich; Gaffey, Michael J; Gutierrez-Marques, Pablo; Hicks, Michael; Keller, Horst Uwe; Maue, Thorsten; Mottola, Stefano; McFadden, Lucy A; McSween, Harry Y; Mittlefehldt, David; O'Brien, David P; Raymond, Carol; Russell, Christopher

    2012-05-11

    Multispectral images (0.44 to 0.98 μm) of asteroid (4) Vesta obtained by the Dawn Framing Cameras reveal global color variations that uncover and help understand the north-south hemispherical dichotomy. The signature of deep lithologies excavated during the formation of the Rheasilvia basin on the south pole has been preserved on the surface. Color variations (band depth, spectral slope, and eucrite-diogenite abundance) clearly correlate with distinct compositional units. Vesta displays the greatest variation of geometric albedo (0.10 to 0.67) of any asteroid yet observed. Four distinct color units are recognized that chronicle processes--including impact excavation, mass wasting, and space weathering--that shaped the asteroid's surface. Vesta's color and photometric diversity are indicative of its status as a preserved, differentiated protoplanet. PMID:22582258

  9. Global Monitoring of Martian Surface Albedo Changes from Orbital Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geissler, P.; Enga, M.; Mukherjee, P.

    2013-12-01

    Martian surface changes were first observed from orbit during the Mariner 9 and Viking Orbiter missions. They were found to be caused by eolian processes, produced by deposition of dust during regional and global dust storms and subsequent darkening of the surface through erosion and transportation of dust and sand. The albedo changes accumulated in the 20 years between Viking and Mars Global Surveyor were sufficient to alter the global circulation of winds and the climate of Mars according to model calculations (Fenton et al., Nature 2007), but little was known about the timing or frequency of the changes. Since 1999, we have had the benefit of continuous monitoring by a series of orbiting spacecraft that continues today with Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, Mars Odyssey, and Mars Express. Daily synoptic observations enable us to determine whether the surface albedo changes are gradual or episodic in nature and to record the seasons that the changes take place. High resolution images of surface morphology and atmospheric phenomena help identify the physical mechanisms responsible for the changes. From these data, we hope to learn the combinations of atmospheric conditions and sediment properties that produce surface changes on Mars and possibly predict when they will take place in the future. Martian surface changes are particularly conspicuous in low albedo terrain, where even a thin layer of bright dust brightens the surface drastically. Equatorial dark areas are repeatedly coated and recoated by dust, which is later shed from the surface by a variety of mechanisms. An example is Syrtis Major, suddenly buried in bright dust by the global dust storm of 2001. Persistent easterly winds blew much of the dust cover away over the course of the next Martian year, but episodic changes continue today, particularly during southern summer when regional dust storms are rife. Another such region is Solis Planum, south of the Valles Marineris, where changes take place

  10. The Albedo Dichotomy of Iapetus Measured at UV Wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendrix, Amanda R.; Hansen, Candice J.

    2007-01-01

    The dramatic hemispheric dichotomy in albedo displayed by Saturn's moon Iapetus has intrigued astronomers for centuries. Here we report on far-ultraviolet observations of Iapetus' bright and dark terrains from Cassini. We compare the reflectance spectra of Iapetus's dark terrain, Hyperion and Phoebe and find that both Phoebe and Hyperion are richer in water ice than Iapetus' dark terrain. Spectra of the lowest latitudes of the dark terrain display the diagnostic water ice absorption feature; water ice amounts increase within the dark material away from the apex (at 90 deg W longitude, the center of the dark leading hemisphere), consistent with thermal segregation of water ice. The water ice in the darkest, warmest low latitude regions is not expected to be stable and may be a sign of ongoing or recent emplacement of the dark material from an exogenic source.

  11. Cassini VIMS Preliminary Exploration of Titan's Surface Hemispheric Albedo Dichotomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, R. M.; Brown, R. H.; Hapke, B. W.; Smythe, W. D.; Kamp, L.; Boryta, M.; Baines, K. H.; Bellucci, G.; Bibring, J.-P.; Buratti, B. J.

    2005-01-01

    We present preliminary evidence that suggests a hemispheric albedo dichotomy on Titan, the largest planetary satellite in the Solar System. We have also studied the photometric properties of several dark circular features on Titan's surface to test if they might be of impact origin. The evidence is derived from photometric analysis of selected surface regions taken at different Titanian longitudes and solar phase angles using images from the Cassini Saturn Orbiter Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS). The VIMS instrument is able to image Titan's surface at spectral windows (e.g. 2.02 microns) in its atmosphere where methane, the principal atmospheric absorber is transparent. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  12. Phase curve and albedo of asteroid 5534 Annefrank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newburn, R. L., Jr.; Duxbury, T. C.; Hanner, M.; Semenov, B. V.; Hirst, E. E.; Bhat, R. S.; Bhaskaran, S.; Wang, T. M.

    2003-01-01

    Seventy-two images of the S-class asteroid 5535 Annefrank, acquired on 2 November 2002 at target ranges of 11,415??8.5 km, were transmitted to Earth as a part of an engineering readiness test of the Stardust mission. Forty-four of these were used to create a phase curve extending to 134, the largest angle yet achieved for any S-class asteroid. Flux fell by more than six magnitudes between the extrapolated 0 and 134. A maximum illuminated cross section of 16 km2 was seen at a phase angle of 47.2. Assuming a camera efficiency of 75%, a broadband (470?? nm) geometric albedo of 0.24 was derived for Annefrank.

  13. Correlating Pluto's Albedo Distribution to Long Term Insolation Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Earle, Alissa M.; Binzel, Richard P.; Stern, S. Alan; Young, Leslie A.; Buratti, Bonnie J.; Ennico, Kimberly; Grundy, Will M.; Olkin, Catherine B.; Spencer, John R.; Weaver, Hal A.

    2015-11-01

    NASA's New Horizons' reconnaissance of the Pluto system has revealed striking albedo contrasts from polar to equatorial latitudes on Pluto, as well as sharp boundaries for longitudinal variations. These contrasts suggest Pluto undergoes dynamic evolution that drives the redistribution of volatiles. Using the New Horizons results as a template, in this talk we will explore the volatile migration process driven seasonally on Pluto considering multiple timescales. These timescales include the current orbit (248 years) as well as the timescales for obliquity precession (amplitude of 23 degrees over 3 Myrs) and regression of the orbital longitude of perihelion (3.7 Myrs). We will build upon the long-term insolation history model described by Earle and Binzel (2015, Icarus 250, 405-412) with the goal of identifying the most critical timescales that drive the features observed in Pluto’s current post-perihelion epoch. This work was supported by the NASA New Horizons Project.

  14. Contribution to polar albedo from a mesospheric aerosol layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hummel, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    An examination is made of the impact of a layer of particulate matter, assumed to be ice crystals, on the albedo of the polar region. The model is time dependent, includes the growth of the layer, and incorporates the diffuse nature of radiation reflected from the surface and atmosphere. Although the magnitude of the effect is about an order of magnitude less than previous results, the impact is one of heating instead of cooling. It is also shown that ignoring the diffuse nature of the radiation reflected from the underlying earth-atmosphere system, as has been done in many previous simple models, can result in overestimation of the climatological impact of aerosols in sign and magnitude by a factor of up to 4-6.

  15. A digital file of the lunar normal Albedo

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wildey, R.L.

    1977-01-01

    A digital file of the normal albedo of the Moon has been produced at a resolution of about 1/550 of a lunar diameter (about 6.3 km). The file was produced from five photographs taken with the 61-cm reflector of the Northern Arizona University Astrophysical Observatory. No mosaicking was necessary. Spatial control is selenodetic rather than landmark-morphologic. Photometric control is provided through a combination of electrography and regular photoelectric photometry. Pixel photometric function corrections are employed. The file was provided as data base for the Lunar Consortium. Brief discussion of the scientific implications of the frequency histogram is offered, and the negligibility of lunar limb darkening below e{open} = 77?? is affirmed. It is specifically desired not to withhold these data from publication while more significant and detailed scientific interpretation is carried on. ?? 1977 D. Reidel Publishing Company, Dordrecht-Holland.

  16. The Diversity of Hydrated Material on Low-Albedo Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivkin, Andrew S.

    2010-10-01

    Introduction: Low albedo asteroids are associated with the carbonaceous chondrites. They dominate the asteroid belt, with the C complex the most common spectral class in the middle to outer belt [1]. Water/OH as ice or bound into minerals strongly absorbs in the 3-µm spectral region. While water in the Earth's atmosphere makes this spectral region a relatively difficult one to work in, decades of successful observations have been obtained [2-5], mostly using the NASA IRTF on Mauna Kea, with the SpeX instrument the main workhorse during the 21st century [6]. Results: We have made over 100 observations of several dozen low albedo asteroids since 2002. This survey has led to the identification of ice on the surface of 24 Themis [7] and the identification of brucite and carbonates on the surface of 1 Ceres [8,9]. It has also demonstrated the diversity of hydrated material in the asteroid belt, with spectral shapes ranging from CM-like to Ceres-like, and other yet-unidentified materials. There appear to be at least 4 plausible spectral classes, including one "anhydrous” group. I will present the results of the survey so far, implications of what we have found so far, and future directions. This work is supported by the NASA Planetary Astronomy Program.References: [1] Bus S. J and Binzel R. P. 2002, Icarus. [2] Lebofsky L. A. 1978, Mon. Notes Royal Ast. Soc.. [3] Feierberg, M. A., et al. 1981, Geochem Cosmochem. Acta. [4] Jones T. D. et al. 1990, Icarus. [5] Rivkin A. S. et al. 2003, Met. Plan. Sci. . [6] Rayner, J. T. et al. 2003, Pub. Ast. Soc. Pac. . [7] Rivkin, A. S. and Emery, J. P. 2010, Nature. [8] Rivkin A. S. et al. 2006, Icarus . [9] Milliken, R. E. and Rivkin, A. S. 2009, Nature Geosc. .

  17. Water Ice Albedo Variations on the Martian Northern Polar Cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hale, A. S.; Bass, D. S.; Tamppari, L. K.

    2003-01-01

    The Viking Orbiters determined that the surface of Mars northern residual cap is water ice. Many researchers have related observed atmospheric water vapor abundances to seasonal exchange between reservoirs such as the polar caps, but the extent to which the exchange between the surface and the atmosphere remains uncertain. Early studies of the ice coverage and albedo of the northern residual Martian polar cap using Mariner 9 and Viking images reported that there were substantial internannual differences in ice deposition on the polar cap, a result which suggested a highly variable Martian climate. However, some of the data used in these studies were obtained at differing values of heliocentric solar longitude (L(sub s)). Reevaluation of this dataset indicated that the residual cap undergoes seasonal brightening throughout the summer, and indicated that this process repeats from year to year. In this study we continue to compare Mariner 9 and Viking Orbiter imaging observations and thermal data of the north residual polar cap to data acquired with Mars Global Surveyor s Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) instrument. In the current study, our goal is to examine all released data from MGS MOC in the northern summer season, along with applicable TES data in order to better understand the albedo variations in the northern summer and their implications on water transport. To date, work has focused primarily on the MOC dataset. In 1999, data acquisition of the northern polar regions began at L(sub s) = 107, although there was little north polar data acquired from L(sub s)= 107 to L(sub s) = 109. We examined a total of 409 images from L(sub s) = 107 to L(sub s)=148. We have also examined data from 2000 from L(sub s)= 93 to L(sub s)= 110; additional progress is ongoing. Here we present a progress report of our observations, and continue to determine their implications for the Martian water cycle.

  18. Mars: Correcting surface albedo observations for effects of atmospheric dust loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S. W.; Clancy, R. T.

    1992-01-01

    We have developed a radiative transfer model which allows the effects of atmospheric dust loading on surface albedo to be investigated. This model incorporates atmospheric dust opacity, the single scattering albedo and particle phase function of atmospheric dust, the bidirectional reflectance of the surface, and variable lighting and viewing geometry. The most recent dust particle properties are utilized. The spatial and temporal variability of atmospheric opacity (Tan) strongly influences the radiative transfer modelling results. We are currently using the approach described to determine Tan for IRTM mapping sequences of selected regions. This approach allows Tan to be determined at the highest spatial and temporal resolution supported by the IRTM data. Applying the radiative transfer modelling and determination of Tan described, IRTM visual brightness observations can be corrected for the effects of atmospheric dust loading a variety of locations and times. This approach allows maps of 'dust-corrected surface albedo' to be constructed for selected regions. Information on the variability of surface albedo and the amount of dust deposition/erosion related to such variability results. To date, this study indicates that atmospheric dust loading has a significant effect on observations of surface albedo, amounting to albedo corrections of as much as several tens of percent. This correction is not constant or linear, but depends upon surface albedo, viewing and lighting geometry, the dust and surface phase functions, and the atmospheric opacity. It is clear that the quantitative study of surface albedo, especially where small variations in observed albedo are important (such as photometric analyses), needs to account for the effects of the atmospheric dust loading. Maps of 'dust-corrected surface albedo' will be presented for a number of regions.

  19. Surface albedo darkening from wildfires in northern sub-Saharan Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatebe, C. K.; Ichoku, C. M.; Poudyal, R.; Román, M. O.; Wilcox, E.

    2014-05-01

    Northern sub-Saharan Africa (NSSA) has a wide variety of climate zones or biomes, where albedo dynamics are highly coupled with vegetation dynamics and fire disturbances. Quantifying surface albedo variations due to fire disturbances on time scales of several months to several years is complex and is made worse by lack of accurate and spatially consistent surface albedo data. Here, we estimate the surface albedo effect from wildfires in different land cover types in the NSSA region using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) multi-year observational data (2003-11). The average decrease in albedo after fires at the scale of 1 km MODIS footprint is -0.002 02 ± 0.000 03 for woody savanna and -0.002 22 ± 0.000 03 for savanna. These two land cover types together account for >86% of the total MODIS fire count between 2003 and 2011. We found that only a small fraction of the pixels (≦̸10%) burn in two successive years and about 47% had any fire recurrence in 9 years. The study also derived the trajectories of post-fire albedo dynamics from the percentages of pixels that recover to pre-fire albedo values each year. We found that the persistence of surface albedo darkening in most land cover types in the NSSA region is limited to about 6-7 years, after which at least 99% of the burnt pixels recover to their pre-fire albedo. Our results provide critical information for deriving necessary input to various models used in determining the effects of albedo change due to wild fires in the NSSA region.

  20. Hypersonic Viscous Flow Over Large Roughness Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Chau-Lyan; Choudhari, Meelan M.

    2009-01-01

    Viscous flow over discrete or distributed surface roughness has great implications for hypersonic flight due to aerothermodynamic considerations related to laminar-turbulent transition. Current prediction capability is greatly hampered by the limited knowledge base for such flows. To help fill that gap, numerical computations are used to investigate the intricate flow physics involved. An unstructured mesh, compressible Navier-Stokes code based on the space-time conservation element, solution element (CESE) method is used to perform time-accurate Navier-Stokes calculations for two roughness shapes investigated in wind tunnel experiments at NASA Langley Research Center. It was found through 2D parametric study that at subcritical Reynolds numbers, spontaneous absolute instability accompanying by sustained vortex shedding downstream of the roughness is likely to take place at subsonic free-stream conditions. On the other hand, convective instability may be the dominant mechanism for supersonic boundary layers. Three-dimensional calculations for both a rectangular and a cylindrical roughness element at post-shock Mach numbers of 4.1 and 6.5 also confirm that no self-sustained vortex generation from the top face of the roughness is observed, despite the presence of flow unsteadiness for the smaller post-shock Mach number case.

  1. Correlation of Windspeed and Antarctic Surface Roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockham, Mark; Anita Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    When electromagnetic waves interact with a media interface the transmitted and reflected portions of the incoming wave depend on the incident angle of the wave and wavelength (as well as the material properties of the media). The roughness of the surface of Antarctica affects the radio frequency signals received by airborne experiments, such as the balloon-borne experiment ANITA (ANtarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna) which observes the reflected radio waves from cosmic ray-induced extensive air showers (EAS). Roughness of a given scale can cause decoherence of the reflected signal and is an important effect to understand when estimating the amplitude of the incoming wave based on the reflected wave. It is challenging to get a survey of surface roughness over many of the areas that these experiments are likely to pass over. Correlating historical wind speed records with statistical roughness as observed by the backscatter of satellite [Rémy F, Parouty S. Remote Sensing. 2009] and airborne experiments operating at different frequencies can possibly be used to predict time-dependent surface roughness with surface wind speed as the input. These correlations will be presented for a variety of areas on the Antarctic ice shelf. NASA Grant NNX11AC47G.

  2. Interfacial roughness in ceramic matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Jero, P.D.; Parthasarathy, T.A.; Kerans, R.J.

    1992-08-01

    Recent work using push-out and push-back tests has shown that interfacial roughness contributes substantially to the sliding friction in at least some ceramic matrix composites (CMC's). Other work examining frictional heating of CMC's during cyclic fatigue has shown the important role that interfacial friction plays, and further that the interface is degraded upon extended cycling. From this it is apparent that interfacial roughness may play a key role in determining composite behavior. Although the observation of a seating drop during fiber push-back gives some information about the amplitude and spatial extent of the interfacial roughness, actual measurement of the roughness has proven difficult due to its extremely fine scale. In the present work, a laser interferometer has been used to examine the roughness of composite interfaces (both fiber and matrix) as well as virgin fibers. In addition, long range (mm scale) push-out tests have been followed by interferometric characterization to examine the severity and rate of interfacial degradation associated with fiber sliding. 4 refs.

  3. Document Length Normalization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singhal, Amit; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Describes a study that investigated document retrieval relevance based on document length in an experimental text collection. Topics include term weighting and document ranking, retrieval strategies such as the vector-space cosine match, and a modified technique called the pivoted cosine normalization. (LRW)

  4. Albedo estimates for land surface models and support for a new paradigm based on foliage nitrogen concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Hollinger, D.; Ollinger, S. V.; Richardson, A. D.; Martin, M. E.; Meyers, T. P.; Dail, D. B.; Scott, N. A.; Arkebauer, T. J.; Baldocchi, D. D.; Clark, K. L.; Curtis, Peter; Davis, K. J.; Desai, Desai Ankur R.; Dragoni, Danilo; Goulden, M. L.; Gu, Lianhong; Katul, G. G.; Pallardy, Stephen G.; Pawu, K. T.; Schmid, H. P.; Stoy, P. C.; Suyker, A. E.; Verma, Shashi

    2009-02-01

    Vegetation albedo is a critical component of the Earth s climate system, yet efforts to evaluate and improve albedo parameterizations in climate models have lagged relative to other aspects of model development. Here, we calculated growing season albedos for deciduous and evergreen forests, crops, and grasslands based on over 40 site-years of data from the AmeriFlux network and compared them with estimates presently used in the land surface formulations of a variety of climate models. Generally, the albedo estimates used in land surface models agreed well with this data compilation. However, a variety of models using fixed seasonal estimates of albedo overestimated the growing season albedo of northerly evergreen trees. In contrast, climatemodels that rely on a common two-stream albedo submodel provided accurate predictions of boreal needle-leaf evergreen albedo but overestimated grassland albedos. Inverse analysis showed that parameters of the two-stream model were highly correlated. Consistent with recent observations based on remotely sensed albedo, the AmeriFlux dataset demonstrated a tight linear relationship between canopy albedo and foliage nitrogen concentration (for forest vegetation: albedo 50.0110.071%N, r250.91; forests, grassland, and maize: albedo50.0210.067%N, r250.80). However, this relationship saturated at the higher nitrogen concentrations displayed by soybean foliage. We developed similar relationships between a foliar parameter used in the two-stream albedo model and foliage nitrogen concentration. These nitrogen-based relationships can serve as the basis for a new approach to land surface albedo modeling that simplifies albedo estimation while providing a link to other important ecosystem processes.

  5. On roughness-induced transition - Facts, views, and speculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morkovin, Mark V.

    1990-01-01

    Roughness is considered as a steady passive device, and it is shown that roughness-induced separation is specifically sensitive to unsteady environmental forcing. The two-dimensional isolated roughness causing local upstream and downstream separations is considered, along with flows associated with the two-dimensional roughness and their relevance to the problem of distributed roughness. The difference between the two-dimensional isolated roughness and a three-dimensional isolated roughness at all Reynolds numbers is underlined, and the mechanisms and parameter conditions of a sudden breakdown of hairpin eddies are discussed, as well as flows over distributed roughness.

  6. A Simple Method to Assess Surface Roughness by Photothermal Investigation (PTR) Using an Effective Semitransparent Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoniow, J. S.; Chirtoc, M.; Drevet, R.; Jensen, C.; Benhayoune, H.

    2012-11-01

    Samples of a titanium-aluminum-vanadium alloy (Ti6Al4V) having different values of roughness are studied by photothermal radiometry. Among the numerous studies carried out on the influence of surface roughness on the photothermal signal, those that relate the air/substrate interfacial volume to an apparent homogeneous layer with effective thermal properties are considered. For such a system, a one-dimensional heat transfer model can successfully be used to describe the response to harmonic excitation up to high frequencies where the thermal diffusion length is of the order of magnitude as the roughness. The breakdown of the effective layer model at high frequencies has prompted some authors to develop more sophisticated methods to describe the complex phenomena encountered. In this study, it is proposed to keep the simple, effective layer model, but also to modify it by including an effective optical absorption coefficient and a reflection coefficient closely related to the surface characteristics. The effective layer becomes semitransparent to the excitation as it turns thermally thick (thickness/thermal diffusion length >1). The apparent thickness of the layer is shown to be directly related to the average difference between the maximum peak and the minimum trough of the surface profile and linearly correlated with the average roughness. This model can be used over a wide range of roughnesses.

  7. The minimal channel: a fast and direct method for characterising roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, Michael; Chung, Daniel; Hutchins, Nicholas; Chan, Leon; Ooi, Andrew; García-Mayoral, Ricardo

    2016-04-01

    Roughness only alters the near-wall region of turbulent flow and leaves the outer-layer unaffected, making it a prime candidate for the minimal-span channel framework which only captures the near-wall flow. Recently, Chung et al. (J. Fluid Mech., vol. 773, 2015, pp. 418-431) showed that the minimal-span channel can accurately characterise the hydraulic behaviour of roughness. Following on from this, we aim to further optimise the minimal-span channel framework by primarily noting that the outer layer it produces is inherently incorrect, and as such modifications to this region can be made to improve performance. Firstly, a half-height channel with slip wall is shown to reproduce the near-wall behaviour seen in a standard channel, but with half the number of grid points. Next, a forcing model is introduced into the outer layer of a half-height channel. This reduces the high streamwise velocity associated with the minimal channel and allows for a larger computational time step. The streamwise length of the channel is also investigated independent of the previous improvements, and suggests the minimum length should be at least 3 times the spanwise width and also 1000 viscous-units long, whichever is longer. Finally, an investigation is conducted to see if varying the roughness Reynolds number with time is a feasible method for obtaining the full hydraulic behaviour of a rough surface, instead of running multiple simulations at fixed roughness Reynolds numbers.

  8. A Study of the Mean Force Structure of Rough-Wall Turbulent Boundary Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehdi, Faraz; Klewicki, Joseph

    2011-11-01

    Analysis of existing data by Mehdi, Klewicki & White [Physica D 239(2010)] provides evidence that the traditional classifications do not fully account for the combined effects of roughness and Reynolds number. We continue to explore this further, and in the present talk report on experiments that used 24-grit sandpaper and pea gravel for roughness over an 8m fetch. Two-component LDV measurements are used to acquire well-resolved mean velocity and Reynolds stress profiles over a modest range of Reynolds numbers. These data are used to estimate the terms in the appropriate mean statement of dynamics, which directly reveals the operative time-averaged balance of forces. The present results further reinforce the previous observation that the mean viscous force retains dominant order above (and often well-above) the roughness elements. Force balance data are shown to be usefully organized relative to the length scale that defines the region from the wall to where the leading order mean dynamics are described by a balance between mean advection and the mean effect of turbulent inertia. In the smooth-wall flow, this length scale is only a function of Reynolds number. In rough-wall flows, the data indicate it to be a function of roughness and Reynolds number. The support of the ONR (N000140810836, grant monitor Ronald Joslin) is gratefully acknowledged.

  9. Landsat Estimate of Albedo Change from Fire in the Alaskan Boreal Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, N. H.

    2001-05-01

    The impact of fire on boreal land cover is substantial with dramatic implications for the exchange of carbon and energy between the land and atmosphere. One of the primary mechanisms through which ecosystem characteristics are able to influence surface-atmosphere energy exchange is by influencing the radiation balance. Land surface albedo defines how much shortwave energy is "captured" by the system and is key in determining surface net radiation. The purpose of this study is to quantify and map the change in summertime land surface albedo from fire disturbance in a black spruce dominated landscape in Alaska. The study was conducted at a set of three fire-disturbed sites located near the town of Delta Junction. Five Landsat TM and ETM images from late August/early September for 1986 to 1999 were the primary data used. Albedo change was derived using the six reflective bands of Landsat (bands 1-5 and 7). The images were used to map albedo change at each of the three burn sites from the fire disturbance itself and from vegetation regrowth at the two older burn scars. Field measurements of albedo were also collected and are used to complement the remote sensing-based results. The results show that albedo change is spatially and temporally variable based on pre-burn vegetation, canopy density, burn severity, and site age. In moderately burned, medium density black spruce, the most typical burn conditions in Alaska, no significant change in albedo was found within the first year after the burn (+/-1%). At sites with some deciduous vegetation in the pre-burn canopy, albedo decreased (4%). In areas of severe burn, albedo increased (2-3%). Most notably, at all sites albedo increased after several years of vegetation growth (7 to 10%) due to the transition to herbaceous and deciduous vegetation. Similar results were found with the tower-based measurements at these sites. The albedo changes measured in this study have important implications for net radiation and surface

  10. The dependence of the ice-albedo feedback on atmospheric properties.

    PubMed

    von Paris, P; Selsis, F; Kitzmann, D; Rauer, H

    2013-10-01

    Ice-albedo feedback is a potentially important destabilizing effect for the climate of terrestrial planets. It is based on the positive feedback between decreasing surface temperatures, an increase of snow and ice cover, and an associated increase in planetary albedo, which then further decreases surface temperature. A recent study shows that for M stars, the strength of the ice-albedo feedback is reduced due to the strong spectral dependence of stellar radiation and snow/ice albedos; that is, M stars primarily emit in the near IR, where the snow and ice albedo is low, and less in the visible, where the snow/ice albedo is high. This study investigates the influence of the atmosphere (in terms of surface pressure and atmospheric composition) on this feedback, since an atmosphere was neglected in previous studies. A plane-parallel radiative transfer model was used for the calculation of planetary albedos. We varied CO₂ partial pressures as well as the H₂O, CH₄, and O₃ content in the atmosphere for planets orbiting Sun-like and M type stars. Results suggest that, for planets around M stars, the ice-albedo effect is significantly reduced, compared to planets around Sun-like stars. Including the effects of an atmosphere further suppresses the sensitivity to the ice-albedo effect. Atmospheric key properties such as surface pressure, but also the abundance of radiative trace gases, can considerably change the strength of the ice-albedo feedback. For dense CO₂ atmospheres of the order of a few to tens of bar, atmospheric rather than surface properties begin to dominate the planetary radiation budget. At high CO₂ pressures, the ice-albedo feedback is strongly reduced for planets around M stars. The presence of trace amounts of H₂O and CH₄ in the atmosphere also weakens the ice-albedo effect for both stellar types considered. For planets around Sun-like stars, O₃ could also lead to a very strong decrease of the ice-albedo feedback at high CO₂ pressures

  11. The Dependence of the Ice-Albedo Feedback on Atmospheric Properties

    PubMed Central

    Selsis, F.; Kitzmann, D.; Rauer, H.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Ice-albedo feedback is a potentially important destabilizing effect for the climate of terrestrial planets. It is based on the positive feedback between decreasing surface temperatures, an increase of snow and ice cover, and an associated increase in planetary albedo, which then further decreases surface temperature. A recent study shows that for M stars, the strength of the ice-albedo feedback is reduced due to the strong spectral dependence of stellar radiation and snow/ice albedos; that is, M stars primarily emit in the near IR, where the snow and ice albedo is low, and less in the visible, where the snow/ice albedo is high. This study investigates the influence of the atmosphere (in terms of surface pressure and atmospheric composition) on this feedback, since an atmosphere was neglected in previous studies. A plane-parallel radiative transfer model was used for the calculation of planetary albedos. We varied CO2 partial pressures as well as the H2O, CH4, and O3 content in the atmosphere for planets orbiting Sun-like and M type stars. Results suggest that, for planets around M stars, the ice-albedo effect is significantly reduced, compared to planets around Sun-like stars. Including the effects of an atmosphere further suppresses the sensitivity to the ice-albedo effect. Atmospheric key properties such as surface pressure, but also the abundance of radiative trace gases, can considerably change the strength of the ice-albedo feedback. For dense CO2 atmospheres of the order of a few to tens of bar, atmospheric rather than surface properties begin to dominate the planetary radiation budget. At high CO2 pressures, the ice-albedo feedback is strongly reduced for planets around M stars. The presence of trace amounts of H2O and CH4 in the atmosphere also weakens the ice-albedo effect for both stellar types considered. For planets around Sun-like stars, O3 could also lead to a very strong decrease of the ice-albedo feedback at high CO2 pressures. Key Words

  12. Development of a high spectral resolution surface albedo product for the ARM Southern Great Plains Central Facility

    SciTech Connect

    McFarlane, Sally A.; Gaustad, Krista L.; Mlawer, Eli J.; Long, Charles N.; Delamere, Jennifer

    2011-09-01

    We present a method for identifying dominant surface type and estimating high spectral resolution surface albedo at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) facility at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in Oklahoma for use in radiative transfer calculations. Given a set of 6-channel narrowband visible and near-infrared irradiance measurements from upward and downward looking multi-filter radiometers (MFRs), four different surface types (snow-covered, green vegetation, partial vegetation, non-vegetated) can be identified. A normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) is used to distinguish between vegetated and non-vegetated surfaces, and a scaled NDVI index is used to estimate the percentage of green vegetation in partially vegetated surfaces. Based on libraries of spectral albedo measurements, a piecewise continuous function is developed to estimate the high spectral resolution surface albedo for each surface type given the MFR albedo values as input. For partially vegetated surfaces, the albedo is estimated as a linear combination of the green vegetation and non-vegetated surface albedo values. The estimated albedo values are evaluated through comparison to high spectral resolution albedo measurements taken during several Intensive Observational Periods (IOPs) and through comparison of the integrated spectral albedo values to observed broadband albedo measurements. The estimated spectral albedo values agree well with observations for the visible wavelengths constrained by the MFR measurements, but have larger biases and variability at longer wavelengths. Additional MFR channels at 1100 nm and/or 1600 nm would help constrain the high resolution spectral albedo in the near infrared region.

  13. Development of a high spectral resolution surface albedo product for the ARM Southern Great Plains central facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFarlane, S. A.; Gaustad, K. L.; Mlawer, E. J.; Long, C. N.; Delamere, J.

    2011-05-01

    We present a method for identifying dominant surface type and estimating high spectral resolution surface albedo at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) facility at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in Oklahoma for use in radiative transfer calculations. Given a set of 6-channel narrowband visible and near-infrared irradiance measurements from upward and downward looking multi-filter radiometers (MFRs), four different surface types (snow-covered, green vegetation, partial vegetation, non-vegetated) can be identified. A normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) is used to distinguish between vegetated and non-vegetated surfaces, and a scaled NDVI index is used to estimate the percentage of green vegetation in partially vegetated surfaces. Based on libraries of spectral albedo measurements, a piecewise continuous function is developed to estimate the high spectral resolution surface albedo for each surface type given the MFR albedo values as input. For partially vegetated surfaces, the albedo is estimated as a linear combination of the green vegetation and non-vegetated surface albedo values. The estimated albedo values are evaluated through comparison to high spectral resolution albedo measurements taken during several Intensive Observational Periods (IOPs) and through comparison of the integrated spectral albedo values to observed broadband albedo measurements. The estimated spectral albedo values agree well with observations for the visible wavelengths constrained by the MFR measurements, but have larger biases and variability at longer wavelengths. Additional MFR channels at 1100 nm and/or 1600 nm would help constrain the high resolution spectral albedo in the near infrared region.

  14. Development of a high spectral resolution surface albedo product for the ARM Southern Great Plains central facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFarlane, S. A.; Gaustad, K. L.; Mlawer, E. J.; Long, C. N.; Delamere, J.

    2011-09-01

    We present a method for identifying dominant surface type and estimating high spectral resolution surface albedo at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) facility at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in Oklahoma for use in radiative transfer calculations. Given a set of 6-channel narrowband visible and near-infrared irradiance measurements from upward and downward looking multi-filter radiometers (MFRs), four different surface types (snow-covered, green vegetation, partial vegetation, non-vegetated) can be identified. A normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) is used to distinguish between vegetated and non-vegetated surfaces, and a scaled NDVI index is used to estimate the percentage of green vegetation in partially vegetated surfaces. Based on libraries of spectral albedo measurements, a piecewise continuous function is developed to estimate the high spectral resolution surface albedo for each surface type given the MFR albedo values as input. For partially vegetated surfaces, the albedo is estimated as a linear combination of the green vegetation and non-vegetated surface albedo values. The estimated albedo values are evaluated through comparison to high spectral resolution albedo measurements taken during several Intensive Observational Periods (IOPs) and through comparison of the integrated spectral albedo values to observed broadband albedo measurements. The estimated spectral albedo values agree well with observations for the visible wavelengths constrained by the MFR measurements, but have larger biases and variability at longer wavelengths. Additional MFR channels at 1100 nm and/or 1600 nm would help constrain the high resolution spectral albedo in the near infrared region.

  15. The geological interpretation of photometric surface roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helfenstein, Paul

    1988-01-01

    A computer-generated km-scale relief map, whose topographic facets on scales of less than a few m are assumed to have smooth particulate surfaces, is the basis of the present investigation of the relationship between photometrically-derived values of Hapke's (1984) roughness parameter theta and topographic scale. The addition of m-km scale-range relief to the otherwise smooth surface alters integral photometric behavior in a way that is consistent with Hapke's equation; the roughness characterized by theta is an integral property over all scales up to the resolution limit of the photometric data used in its determination. With sufficient phase angle coverage, theta can distinguish terrains with very different integral roughnesses.

  16. Surface roughness effects on equilibrium temperature.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houchens, A. F.; Hering, R. G.

    1972-01-01

    An analysis is presented for evaluation of equilibrium temperature distribution on radiatively adiabatic, adjoint planes which are uniformly irradiated by a collimated solar flux. The analysis employs a semigrey spectral model. Radiation properties for surface emitted radiation are obtained from the expressions of electromagnetic theory for smooth surfaces. Rough surface properties for solar radiation are given by the Beckmann bidirectional reflectance model. Numerical solutions to the governing equations yield equilibrium temperature distributions for a range of the influencing parameters. Surface roughness has little influence on equilibrium temperature for materials with high values for solar absorptance. However, for low or intermediate values of solar absorptance, roughness effects on the spatial distribution of reflected solar radiation can significantly alter equilibrium temperature particularly at surface elements where radiant interaction is small.

  17. Discrete Roughness Transition for Hypersonic Flight Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott A.; Horvath, Thomas J.

    2007-01-01

    The importance of discrete roughness and the correlations developed to predict the onset of boundary layer transition on hypersonic flight vehicles are discussed. The paper is organized by hypersonic vehicle applications characterized in a general sense by the boundary layer: slender with hypersonic conditions at the edge of the boundary layer, moderately blunt with supersonic, and blunt with subsonic. This paper is intended to be a review of recent discrete roughness transition work completed at NASA Langley Research Center in support of agency flight test programs. First, a review is provided of discrete roughness wind tunnel data and the resulting correlations that were developed. Then, results obtained from flight vehicles, in particular the recently flown Hyper-X and Shuttle missions, are discussed and compared to the ground-based correlations.

  18. Mask roughness induced LER control and mitigation: aberrations sensitivity study and alternate illumination scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClinton, Brittany M.; Naulleau, Patrick P.

    2011-04-01

    Here we conduct a mask-roughness-induced line-edge-roughness (LER) aberrations sensitivity study both as a random distribution amongst the first 16 Fringe Zernikes (for overall aberration levels of 0.25, 0.50, and 0.75nm rms) as well as an individual aberrations sensitivity matrix over the first 37 Fringe Zernikes. Full 2D aerial image modeling for an imaging system with NA = 0.32 was done for both the 22-nm and 16-nm half-pitch nodes on a rough mask with a replicated surface roughness (RSR) of 100 pm and a correlation length of 32 nm at the nominal extreme-ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) wavelength of 13.5nm. As the ideal RSR value for commercialization of EUVL is 50 pm and under, and furthermore as has been shown elsewhere, a correlation length of 32 nm of roughness on the mask sits on the peak LER value for an NA = 0.32 imaging optic, these mask roughness values and consequently the aberration sensitivity study presented here, represent a worst-case scenario. The illumination conditions were chosen based on the possible candidates for the 22-nm and 16-nm half-pitch nodes, respectively. In the 22-nm case, a disk illumination setting of σ = 0.50 was used, and for the 16-nm case, crosspole illumination with σ = 0.10 at an optimum offset of dx = 0 and dy = .67 in sigma space. In examining how to mitigate mask roughness induced LER, we considered an alternate illumination scheme whereby a traditional dipole's angular spectrum is extended in the direction parallel to the line-and-space mask absorber pattern to represent a "strip". While this illumination surprisingly provides minimal improvement to the LER as compared to several alternate illumination schemes, the overall imaging quality in terms of image-log-slope (ILS) and contrast is improved.

  19. Roughness measurements over an agricultural soil surface with Structure from Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snapir, B.; Hobbs, S.; Waine, T. W.

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents an accessible and reliable method to measure surface roughness of agricultural soils with a setup designed to tackle some of the challenges posed by roughness to SAR remote sensing. The method relies on Structure from Motion (SfM). From a large collection of unconstrained images (∼700 images) acquired with a commercial-grade camera, digital elevation models (DEMs) are generated for a SAR-pixel-size plot (2 × 11 m), with horizontal and vertical RMS errors of respectively 1.5 mm and 3.1 mm. Example results highlight the need for individually detrending all sampled sub-DEMs when studying the convergence of the roughness parameters for increasing DEM length. This point appears to be missing in previous publications. The efficiency of the Fourier-based method used to compute the roughness parameters allows investigating anisotropy at a 1° angular resolution. This could benefit investigations on the flashing fields phenomenon observed within narrow direction bands over tilled fields. The inclusion of permanent reference targets into the soil makes multitemporal measurements over the same plot straightforward. Ten acquisitions from April to July 2013 show noticeable natural changes in roughness with cracking during dry periods and smoothing during rainfalls. As expected, changes in RMS height and correlation length appear inversely correlated and can be related to in situ measurements of soil moisture, soil temperature, and rainfall. Analysis of changes in power spectral density indicates that the observed roughness changes only affect scales below 50 cm, i.e. scales relevant for microwave scattering. Even though it seems that millimetric changes for horizontal scales below 1 cm are not observable, measurement performance could be improved by adding more detailed pictures to the image set. This SfM-based method appears to be well-suited to study the dynamics and characterization of roughness for SAR and more generally for geosciences.

  20. Mask roughness induced LER control and mitigation: aberrations sensitivity study and alternate illumination scheme

    SciTech Connect

    McClinton, Brittany M.; Naulleau, Patrick P.

    2011-03-11

    Here we conduct a mask-roughness-induced line-edge-roughness (LER) aberrations sensitivity study both as a random distribution amongst the first 16 Fringe Zernikes (for overall aberration levels of 0.25, 0.50, and 0.75nm rms) as well as an individual aberrations sensitivity matrix over the first 37 Fringe Zernikes. Full 2D aerial image modeling for an imaging system with NA = 0.32 was done for both the 22-nm and 16-nm half-pitch nodes on a rough mask with a replicated surface roughness (RSR) of 100 pm and a correlation length of 32 nm at the nominal extreme-ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) wavelength of 13.5nm. As the ideal RSR value for commercialization of EUVL is 50 pm and under, and furthermore as has been shown elsewhere, a correlation length of 32 nm of roughness on the mask sits on the peak LER value for an NA = 0.32 imaging optic, these mask roughness values and consequently the aberration sensitivity study presented here, represent a worst-case scenario. The illumination conditions were chosen based on the possible candidates for the 22-nm and 16-nm half-pitch nodes, respectively. In the 22-nm case, a disk illumination setting of {sigma} = 0.50 was used, and for the 16-nm case, crosspole illumination with {sigma} = 0.10 at an optimum offset of dx = 0 and dy = .67 in sigma space. In examining how to mitigate mask roughness induced LER, we considered an alternate illumination scheme whereby a traditional dipole's angular spectrum is extended in the direction parallel to the line-and-space mask absorber pattern to represent a 'strip'. While this illumination surprisingly provides minimal improvement to the LER as compared to several alternate illumination schemes, the overall imaging quality in terms of image-log-slope (ILS) and contrast is improved.

  1. Rough and Steep Terrain Lunar Surface Mobility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, Brian

    2005-01-01

    In the summer of 2004, the NASA Exploration Systems Mission Directorate conducted an open call for projects relevant to human and robotic exploration of the Earth-Moon and Mars systems. A project entitled 'Rough and Steep Terrain Lunar Surface Mobility' was submitted by JPL and accepted by NASA. The principal investigator of this project describes the robotic vehicle being developed for this effort, which includes six 'wheels-on-legs' so that it can roll efficiently on relatively smooth terrain but walk (using locked wheels as footpads) when "the going gets rough".

  2. Roughness Perception of Haptically Displayed Fractal Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costa, Michael A.; Cutkosky, Mark R.; Lau, Sonie (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Surface profiles were generated by a fractal algorithm and haptically rendered on a force feedback joystick, Subjects were asked to use the joystick to explore pairs of surfaces and report to the experimenter which of the surfaces they felt was rougher. Surfaces were characterized by their root mean square (RMS) amplitude and their fractal dimension. The most important factor affecting the perceived roughness of the fractal surfaces was the RMS amplitude of the surface. When comparing surfaces of fractal dimension 1.2-1.35 it was found that the fractal dimension was negatively correlated with perceived roughness.

  3. Rough Fresnel zone plates over metallic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Salgado-Remacha, Francisco Javier; Sanchez-Brea, Luis Miguel; Alvarez-Rios, Francisco Javier; Bernabeu, Eusebio

    2010-04-01

    We analyze the focusing properties of Fresnel zone plates fabricated over steel tapes using laser ablation. Our intention is to implement the use of micro-optical elements when the use of conventional chrome-glass elements is not indicated. Because of the manufacture process, the surface presents a certain anisotropic roughness, which reduces the focusing properties. First, we develop numerical simulations by means of the Rayleigh-Sommerfeld approach, showing how roughness in both levels of the Fresnel zone plate affects the focalization of the lens. We also manufacture Fresnel zone plates over steel tape, and perform experimental verification that corroborates the numerical results. PMID:20357856

  4. Evaluation of Dry, Rough Vacuum Pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Brian

    2006-01-01

    This document provides information on the testing and evaluation of thirteen dry rough vacuum pumps of various designs and from various manufacturers. Several types of rough vacuum pumps were evaluated, including scroll, roots, and diaphragm pumps. Tests included long term testing, speed curve generation, voltage variance, vibrations emissions and susceptibility, electromagnetic interference emissions and susceptibility, static leak rate, exhaust restriction, response/recovery time tests, and a contamination analysis for scroll pumps. Parameters were found for operation with helium, which often is not provided from the manufacturer

  5. Surface roughness effects in elastohydrodynamic contacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripp, J. H.; Hamrock, B. J.

    1985-01-01

    Surface roughness effects in full-film EHL contacts were studied. A flow factor modification to the Reynolds equation was applied to piezoviscous-elastic line contacts. Results for ensemble-averaged film shape, pressure distribution, and other mechanical quantities were obtained. Asperities elongated in the flow direction by a factor exceeding two decreased both film shape and pressure extrema at constant load; isotropic or transverse asperities increased these extrema. The largest effects are displayed by traction, which increased by over 5% for isotropic or transverse asperities and by slightly less for longitudinal roughness.

  6. Fused silica fine grinding with low roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Lei; Gu, Yongqiang; Wu, Di

    2014-08-01

    Lithography-optics is one of the most complex optical systems. The fine grinding process is the most important step before polishing. Roughness and sub-surface damage (SSD) are essential outputs of fine grinding. We demonstrate the method that use fix abrasive cup tool with CNC grinding machine to complete the fine grinding process, even instead of lapping process. And experiment sample roughness can reach 23.40nm rms and Ra 18.554nm. The SSD estimate is about 2 μm which is also smaller than commercial lapping process. The fine grinding output can satisfy the lithography optic fabrication demands and efficiently reduce the polishing time.

  7. Elastoplastic deformation of a roughness element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murashov, M. V.; Kornev, Yu. V.

    2014-03-01

    The problem of using the mechanical properties determined in a macroexperiment in contact models for micron-sized roughness elements is considered. For a sample of commercial-purity AD1 aluminum, the penetration depths of an indenter into a rough surface element that are determined in a physical experiment and in a three-dimensional finite element simulation are compared. It is found that, with allowance for certain assumptions, the application of the properties determined in a macroexperiment requires their correction to take into account the cold work hardening of the surface layer in the sample material and the size effect.

  8. Surface roughness evolution of nanocomposite thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Turkin, A. A.; Pei, Y. T.; Shaha, K. P.; Chen, C. Q.; Vainshtein, D. I.; Hosson, J. Th. M. de

    2009-01-01

    An analysis of dynamic roughening and smoothening mechanisms of thin films grown with pulsed-dc magnetron sputtering is presented. The roughness evolution has been described by a linear stochastic equation, which contains the second- and fourth-order gradient terms. Dynamic smoothening of the growing interface is explained by ballistic effects resulting from impingements of ions to the growing thin film. These ballistic effects are sensitive to the flux and energy of impinging ions. The predictions of the model are compared with experimental data, and it is concluded that the thin film roughness can be further controlled by adjusting waveform, frequency, and width of dc pulses.

  9. Venus surface roughness and Magellan stereo data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maurice, Kelly E.; Leberl, Franz W.; Norikane, L.; Hensley, Scott

    1994-01-01

    Presented are results of some studies to develop tools useful for the analysis of Venus surface shape and its roughness. Actual work was focused on Maxwell Montes. The analyses employ data acquired by means of NASA's Magellan satellite. The work is primarily concerned with deriving measurements of the Venusian surface using Magellan stereo SAR. Roughness was considered by means of a theoretical analyses based on digital elevation models (DEM's), on single Magellan radar images combined with radiometer data, and on the use of multiple overlapping Magellan radar images from cycles 1, 2, and 3, again combined with collateral radiometer data.

  10. Nanoscale Roughness and Morphology Affect the IsoElectric Point of Titania Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Borghi, Francesca; Vyas, Varun; Podestà, Alessandro; Milani, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    We report on the systematic investigation of the role of surface nanoscale roughness and morphology on the charging behaviour of nanostructured titania (TiO2) surfaces in aqueous solutions. IsoElectric Points (IEPs) of surfaces have been characterized by direct measurement of the electrostatic double layer interactions between titania surfaces and the micrometer-sized spherical silica probe of an atomic force microscope in NaCl aqueous electrolyte. The use of a colloidal probe provides well-defined interaction geometry and allows effectively probing the overall effect of nanoscale morphology. By using supersonic cluster beam deposition to fabricate nanostructured titania films, we achieved a quantitative control over the surface morphological parameters. We performed a systematical exploration of the electrical double layer properties in different interaction regimes characterized by different ratios of characteristic nanometric lengths of the system: the surface rms roughness Rq, the correlation length ξ and the Debye length λD. We observed a remarkable reduction by several pH units of IEP on rough nanostructured surfaces, with respect to flat crystalline rutile TiO2. In order to explain the observed behavior of IEP, we consider the roughness-induced self-overlap of the electrical double layers as a potential source of deviation from the trend expected for flat surfaces. PMID:23874708

  11. The effect of inhomogeneous roughness on radar backscattering from slightly deformed sea ice

    SciTech Connect

    Dierking, W.; Carlstroem, A.; Ulander, L.M.H.

    1997-01-01

    This paper focuses on the spatially varying backscattering signature of an area of refrozen brash ice observed by a ship based scatterometer. The measurements were carried out as part of the Baltic Experiment for ERS-1 in 1994. The scatterometer was operated at 5.4 GHz at different incidence angles and polarizations. By analyzing the scatterometer data over azimuth scans, it was found that the backscattering variabilities are not only due to fading but also contain a textural component. Surface height profiles were measured using a laser. The observed ice surface roughness was nonstationary over the measurement area. The ice surface can be approximated by adjacent patches of stationary roughness with patch dimensions of about 4.5 m. From the roughness spectra of different stationary patches, two roughness classes can be distinguished. The implications of estimating the roughness parameters from relatively short profile lengths is discussed and the effect on theoretical predictions of the backscattering coefficient is investigated. The texture variance is evaluated theoretically on the basis of the simulated backscattering coefficients of the two observed roughness classes and is found to compare with the scatterometer data.

  12. Experimental analysis of the surface roughness evolution of etched glass for micro/nanofluidic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, J.; Ganapathysubramanian, B.; Sundararajan, S.

    2011-02-01

    Roughness of channel surfaces, both deterministic and random, is known to affect the fluid flow behavior in micro/nanoscale fluidic devices. This has relevance particularly for applications involving non-Newtonian fluids, such as in biomedical lab-on-chip devices. While several studies have investigated effects of relative large, deterministic surface structures on fluid flow, the effect of random roughness on microfluidic flow remains relatively unexplored. In this study, the effects of processing conditions for wet etching of glass including etching time and etching orientation on centre-line average (Ra) and the autocorrelation length (ACL) were investigated. Statistical distribution of the roughness was also studied. Results indicated that ACL can be tailored in the range of 1-4 µm by changing etching time in horizontal etching while Ra was found to increase weakly with etching time in all three etching orientations. Analysis of the experimental data using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov goodness-of-fit hypothesis test shows that the glass surface roughness does not follow a Gaussian distribution, as is typically assumed in the literature. Instead, the T location-scale distribution fits the roughness data with 1.11% error. These results provide promising insights into tailoring surface roughness for improving microfluidic devices.

  13. Model for continuously scanning ultrasound vibrometer sensing displacements of randomly rough vibrating surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ratilal, Purnima; Andrews, Mark; Donabed, Ninos; Galinde, Ameya; Rappaport, Carey; Fenneman, Douglas

    2007-02-01

    An analytic model is developed for the time-dependent ultrasound field reflected off a randomly rough vibrating surface for a continuously scanning ultrasound vibrometer system in bistatic configuration. Kirchhoff's approximation to Green's theorem is applied to model the three-dimensional scattering interaction of the ultrasound wave field with the vibrating rough surface. The model incorporates the beam patterns of both the transmitting and receiving ultrasound transducers and the statistical properties of the rough surface. Two methods are applied to the ultrasound system for estimating displacement and velocity amplitudes of an oscillating surface: incoherent Doppler shift spectra and coherent interferometry. Motion of the vibrometer over the randomly rough surface leads to time-dependent scattering noise that causes a randomization of the received signal spectrum. Simulations with the model indicate that surface displacement and velocity estimation are highly dependent upon the scan velocity and projected wavelength of the ultrasound vibrometer relative to the roughness height standard deviation and correlation length scales of the rough surface. The model is applied to determine limiting scan speeds for ultrasound vibrometer measuring ground displacements arising from acoustic or seismic excitation to be used in acoustic landmine confirmation sensing. PMID:17348511

  14. Correction of broadband snow albedo measurements affected by unknown slope and sensor tilts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiser, Ursula; Olefs, Marc; Schöner, Wolfgang; Weyss, Gernot; Hynek, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    Geometric effects induced by the underlying terrain slope or by tilt errors of the radiation sensors lead to an erroneous measurement of snow or ice albedo. Consequently, artificial diurnal albedo variations in the order of 1-20 % are observed. The present paper proposes a general method to correct tilt errors of albedo measurements in cases where tilts of both the sensors and the slopes are not accurately measured or known. We demonstrate that atmospheric parameters for this correction model can either be taken from a nearby well-maintained and horizontally levelled measurement of global radiation or alternatively from a solar radiation model. In a next step the model is fitted to the measured data to determine tilts and directions of sensors and the underlying terrain slope. This then allows us to correct the measured albedo, the radiative balance and the energy balance. Depending on the direction of the slope and the sensors a comparison between measured and corrected albedo values reveals obvious over- or underestimations of albedo. It is also demonstrated that differences between measured and corrected albedo are generally highest for large solar zenith angles.

  15. Atmospheric and Surface Contributions to Planetary Albedo and their Relationship to the Total Meridional Energy Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donohoe, A.; Battisti, D. S.

    2010-12-01

    The meridional distribution of incident solar radiation and planetary albedo both contribute to the equator-to-pole gradient in absorbed solar radiation (ASR) in the observed climate system. While the former component is determined by the Earth-Sun geometry and composes 60% of the equator-to-pole gradient in ASR, the latter component makes a significant (40%) contribution to the ASR gradient and is potentially a function of climate state due to its dependence on both atmospheric and surface albedo. In turn, the equator-to-pole gradient in planetary albedo is found to be primarily (86% -89%) dictated by atmospheric albedo with meridional gradients in surface albedo playing a much smaller role in forcing the climate system on the equator-to-pole scale. Simulations of the pre-industrial climate system using the CMIP3 coupled models show large differences in the equator-to-pole gradient in planetary albedo which are mainly due to differences in the simulated cloud distribution, with surface processes playing a much smaller role. The inter-model spread in total meridional heat transport is also primarily (85% of the inter-model spread) due to differences in the simulated cloud distribution. Further model simulations demonstrate that the surface albedo changes associated with moving from the present climate to an ice free climate have a small effect on the equator-to-pole gradient of ASR as compared to the uncertainty in simulated cloud distributions, and hence a small effect on the meridional heat transport.

  16. Variation in foliar nitrogen and albedo in response to nitrogen fertilization and elevated CO2.

    PubMed

    Wicklein, Haley F; Ollinger, Scott V; Martin, Mary E; Hollinger, David Y; Lepine, Lucie C; Day, Michelle C; Bartlett, Megan K; Richardson, Andrew D; Norby, Richard J

    2012-08-01

    Foliar nitrogen has been shown to be positively correlated with midsummer canopy albedo and canopy near infrared (NIR) reflectance over a broad range of plant functional types (e.g., forests, grasslands, and agricultural lands). To date, the mechanism(s) driving the nitrogen–albedo relationship have not been established, and it is unknown whether factors affecting nitrogen availability will also influence albedo. To address these questions, we examined variation in foliar nitrogen in relation to leaf spectral properties, leaf mass per unit area, and leaf water content for three deciduous species subjected to either nitrogen (Harvard Forest, MA, and Oak Ridge, TN) or CO(2) fertilization (Oak Ridge, TN). At Oak Ridge, we also obtained canopy reflectance data from the airborne visible/infrared imaging spectrometer (AVIRIS) to examine whether canopy-level spectral responses were consistent with leaf-level results. At the leaf level, results showed no differences in reflectance or transmittance between CO(2) or nitrogen treatments, despite significant changes in foliar nitrogen. Contrary to our expectations, there was a significant, but negative, relationship between foliar nitrogen and leaf albedo, a relationship that held for both full spectrum leaf albedo as well as leaf albedo in the NIR region alone. In contrast, remote sensing data indicated an increase in canopy NIR reflectance with nitrogen fertilization. Collectively, these results suggest that altered nitrogen availability can affect canopy albedo, albeit by mechanisms that involve canopy-level processes rather than changes in leaf-level reflectance. PMID:22294028

  17. A global assessment of forest surface albedo and its relationships with climate and atmospheric nitrogen deposition.

    PubMed

    Leonardi, Stefano; Magnani, Federico; Nolè, Angelo; Van Noije, Twan; Borghetti, Marco

    2015-01-01

    We present a global assessment of the relationships between the short-wave surface albedo of forests, derived from the MODIS satellite instrument product at 0.5° spatial resolution, with simulated atmospheric nitrogen deposition rates (Ndep ), and climatic variables (mean annual temperature Tm and total annual precipitation P), compiled at the same spatial resolution. The analysis was performed on the following five forest plant functional types (PFTs): evergreen needle-leaf forests (ENF); evergreen broad-leaf forests (EBF); deciduous needle-leaf forests (DNF); deciduous broad-leaf forests (DBF); and mixed-forests (MF). Generalized additive models (GAMs) were applied in the exploratory analysis to assess the functional nature of short-wave surface albedo relations to environmental variables. The analysis showed evident correlations of albedo with environmental predictors when data were pooled across PFTs: Tm and Ndep displayed a positive relationship with forest albedo, while a negative relationship was detected with P. These correlations are primarily due to surface albedo differences between conifer and broad-leaf species, and different species geographical distributions. However, the analysis performed within individual PFTs, strengthened by attempts to select 'pure' pixels in terms of species composition, showed significant correlations with annual precipitation and nitrogen deposition, pointing toward the potential effect of environmental variables on forest surface albedo at the ecosystem level. Overall, our global assessment emphasizes the importance of elucidating the ecological mechanisms that link environmental conditions and forest canopy properties for an improved parameterization of surface albedo in climate models. PMID:25044609

  18. A controlled snowmaking experiment testing the relation between black carbon content and reduction of snow albedo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, Richard E.; Warren, Stephen G.; Clarke, Antony D.

    2011-04-01

    Radiative transfer modeling of the reduction of snow albedo by black carbon (BC) requires experimental verification. In natural snow the albedo reduction is at most a few percent, and even with accurate measurements, attribution is ambiguous because snow albedo depends on other variables. In this experiment, artificial snowpacks are made by freezing of water droplets produced by a snowmaking machine in an open field, using water with and without added soot, in amounts about 100 times natural background soot levels, so as to obtain a large signal on albedo. The optically effective snow grain size is determined from the measured near-infrared albedo; matching the measured visible albedo then requires addition of BC to the radiative transfer model. The BC content of the artificial snowpacks is measured by filtering the meltwater; the filters are analyzed by a laboratory spectrophotometer as is done for filters from samples of natural snow. The BC content indicated by the filters agrees with that required in the model to match the observed albedo, but significant uncertainties remain, so further experiments are needed.

  19. Estimation of Instantaneous TOA Albedo at 670 nm over Ice Clouds from POLDER Multidirectional Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, W.; Loeb, N. G.; Kato, S.

    2003-01-01

    An algorithm that determines the 670-nm top-of-atmosphere (TOA) albedo of ice clouds over ocean using Polarization and Directionality of the Earth's Reflectance ( POLDER) multidirectional measurements is developed. A plane-parallel layer of ice cloud with various optical thicknesses and light scattering phase functions is assumed. For simplicity, we use a double Henyey-Greenstein phase function to approximate the volume-averaged phase function of the ice clouds. A multidirectional reflectance best-fit match between theoretical and POLDER reflectances is used to infer effective cloud optical thickness, phase function and TOA albedo. Sensitivity tests show that while the method does not provide accurate independent retrievals of effective cloud optical depth and phase function, TOA albedo retrievals are accurate to within similar to 3% for both a single layer of ice clouds or a multilayer system of ice clouds and water clouds. When the method is applied to POLDER measurements and retrieved albedos are compared with albedos based on empirical angular distribution models (ADMs), zonal albedo differences are generally smaller than similar to 3%. When albedos are compared with those on the POLDER-I ERB and Cloud product, the differences can reach similar to 15% at small solar zenith angles.

  20. Albedo of Surface CO2 Deposits in Mars' Residual South Polar Cap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, P. B.; Wolff, M. J.; Bonev, B.

    2014-12-01

    The albedo of surface CO2 deposits in the Residual South Polar Cap (RSPC) of Mars controls their net condensation / sublimation over a martian year and is therefore a crucial parameter in determining RSPC stability. The albedo used in previous analyses is obtained by dividing I/F, determined from radiometrically calibrated imaging data, by the cosine of the incidence angle. Because of atmospheric aerosols, the albedo calculated from I/F above the atmosphere is not the surface albedo that enters into stability considerations. In order to determine the surface albedo, we interpolate optical depths determined from CRISM EPF measurements to provide estimates of the dust and ice opacities over the RSPC (Wolff et al., 2009) and use these to determine the actual surface albedos from MARCI images using the radiative transport program DISORT (Stamnes et al., 1988). Assuming that dust is the only contributor to atmospheric opacity, the retrieved surface albedos for the longer wavelength MARCI filters in MY 28 and 29 are found to be consistent despite very different dust opacities in the two years (James et al., 2014). However, this model fails to reproduce the short wavelength behavior in early summer. We consider possible modifications of the dust only model that could explain the discrepancy.