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Sample records for albedo thermal inertia

  1. Atmospheric effects on the mapping of Martian thermal inertia and thermally derived albedo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayashi, Joan N.; Jakosky, Bruce M.; Haberle, Robert M.

    1995-01-01

    We examine the effects of a dusty CO2 atmosphere on the thermal inertia and thermally derived albedo of Mars and we present a new map of thermal inertias. This new map was produced using a coupled surface atmosphere (CSA) model, dust opacities from Viking infrared thermal mapper (IRTM) data, and CO2 columns based on topography. The CSA model thermal inertias are smaller than the 2% model thermal inertias, with the difference largest at large thermal inertia. Although the difference between the thermal inertias obtained with the two models is moderate for much of the region studied, it is largest in regions of either high dust opacity or of topographic lows, including the Viking Lander 1 site and some geologically interesting regions. The CSA model thermally derived albedos do not acurately predict the IRTM measured albedos and are very similar to the thermally derived albedos obtained with models making the 2% assumption.

  2. Atmospheric effects on the mapping of Martian thermal inertia and thermally derived albedo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayashi, Joan N.; Jakosky, Bruce M.; Haberle, Robert M.

    1995-01-01

    We examine the effects of a dusty C02 atmosphere on the thermal inertia and thermally derived albedo of Mars and we present a new map of thermal inertias. This new map was produced using a coupled surface atmosphere (CSA) model, dust opacities from Viking infrared thermal mapper (IRTM) data, and C02 columns based on topography. The CSA model thermal inertias are smaller than the 2% model thermal inertias, with the difference largest at large thermal inertia. Although the difference between the thermal inertias obtained with the two models is moderate for much of the region studied, it is largest in regions of either high dust opacity or of topographic lows, including the Viking Lander 1 site and some geologically interesting regions. The CSA model thermally derived albedos do not accurately predict the IRTM measured albedos and are very similar to the thermally derived albedos obtained with models making the 2% assumption.

  3. Mars Polar Thermal Inertia and Albedo Properties Using TES Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherbenski, J. M.; Paige, D. A.

    2002-12-01

    We present north and south polar thermal inertia and albedo maps derived from MGS TES observations. The maps were derived using the same robust approach developed to make polar thermal and inertia and albedo maps using IRTM observationsby Paige, Bachman, and Keegan (1994) and Paige and Keegan (1994). The data processing approach involved reading TES reduced data records in PDS format using the Vanilla software tool, and sending the data down a processing pipeline that constrains and bins the data, and compares it to the results of a diurnal and seasonal thermal model to obtain the best fit thermal inertia and apparent albedo. To facilitate comparison, the TES maps were created at the same Ls ranges as the published IRTM maps using TES spectral surface temperature results. The north polar maps used TES nadir observations obtained during a 50-day period from Ls 98.39 to Ls 121.25. The south polar maps used TES nadir observations obtained during a 30-day period from Ls 321.58 to 338.07. The creation of these maps employ a basic thermal model that does not include the effects of the atmosphere, as well as a one-dimensional radiative-convective model that does include the effects of the atmosphere. The spatial resolution of the north polar maps is 0.1 degrees of latitude and 1.0 degrees of longitude. The spatial resolution of the south polar maps is 2 degrees of latitude and 2 degrees of longitude. The TES north polar maps show the residual cap area in significantly greater detail than has been available previously. The IRTM maps showed that the north polar sand sea that surrounds the cap has unusually low thermal inertia. The TES maps confirm this conclusion, but also show that the dark renetrant features in chama boreal and elsewhere on the cap also have low thermal inertias. This strongly supports the proposal that these dark rentrants are the sources of the dune material. The TES maps also show that the darker layered deposits which are found at the periphery of the

  4. Atmospheric effects on the mapping of Martian thermal inertia and thermally derived albedo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayashi, J. N.; Jakosky, B. M.; Haberle, R. M.

    1994-01-01

    The most widely used thermal inertia data for Mars assumes the atmospheric contribution is constant and equal to 2 percent of the maximum solar insolation. Haberle and Jakosky investigated the effect of including a dusty CO2 atmosphere and sensible heat exchange with the surface on thermal inertia. We recently utilized Haberle and Jakosky's coupled surface-atmosphere model to investigate the effects of such an atmosphere on the thermally derived albedo. The thermally derived albedo is the albedo which, together with the thermal inertia, provides model surface temperatures which best match the observed temperatures. New maps are presented of thermal inertia and thermally derived albedo which incorporate dust opacities derived from IRTM data.

  5. Albedo, thermal inertia and rotation of ring particles (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morishima, R.; Spilker, L. J.; Ohtsuki, K.; Cassini Cirs Ring Team

    2010-12-01

    Since the Saturn orbit insertion of the Cassini spacecraft in mid-2004 up to now, the Cassini composite infrared spectrometer (CIRS) has measured temperatures of Saturn's main rings at various observational geometries. We present results of parameter fits using our new thermal model (Morishima et al. 2009). Our model is based on classical radiative transfer and takes into account the heat transport due to particle motion in the azimuthal and vertical directions. The model assumes a bimodal size distribution consisting of small fast rotators and large slow rotators. Important parameters are the Bolometric bond albedo, A_V, the fraction of fast rotators in cross section, f_fast, and the thermal inertia, Γ. Two different data sets are used to estimate these parameters. The first set, which consists of four radial scans obtained at low and high solar phases both on the lit and unlit faces of rings (Spilker et al. 2006), is suitable for accurate estimations of A_V and f_fast with high radial resolution. Another one, which consists of azimuthal scans that include data in Saturn shadow (Leyrat et al. 2008), is suitable for estimations of Γ. The estimated parameters are shown in Fig.1. The albedo is 0.1-0.4, 0.5-0.7, 0.4, 0.5 for the C ring, the B ring, the Cassini division, and the A ring, respectively. The fraction of fast rotators is roughly half for all the rings. The thermal inertia is 7-21 in MKS units. For the mid B ring, values of parameters obtained from two data sets are consistent with each other if ring particles are assumed to bounce at the midplane due to mutual collisions. We also find that fits to azimuthal scans are improved if Γ for fast rotators is larger than that for slow rotators. Albedo, fraction of fast rotators in cross section, and thermal inertia estimated from parameter fits. Two different thermal data sets are used: radial scans at four different geometries (solid curves) and azimuthal scans including data in Saturn shadow (diamonds). Dashed

  6. Parameterization of albedo, thermal inertia, and surface roughness of desert scrub/sandy soil surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otterman, J.; Mccumber, M.

    1986-01-01

    Spectral albedo, A sub n, for the direct solar beam is defined as A sub n (r sub i,s, theta sub 0) = r sub i exp(-s tan theta sub 0)1-I(s) where I(s) is the integral over all reflection angles describing the interception by the absorbing plants of the flux reflected from the soil, r sub i soil reflectance, assumed Lambertian, S the projection on a vertical plane of plants per unit surface area, and theta sub 0 is the solar zenith angle. Hemispheric reflectance for the direct solar beam equals 1-I(s) times the reflectance to the zenith. The values of s of 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3 respectively quantify sparse, moderately dense, and very dense desert scrub. Thin plants are assumed to be of negligible thermal inertia, and thus directly yield the absorbed insolation to the atmosphere. Surface thermal inertia is therefore effectively reduced. The ratio of surface roughness height to plant height is parameterized for sparse, moderately dense, and very dense desert-scrub as a function of s based on data expressing the dependence of this ratio on plant silhouette.

  7. Mars Thermal Inertia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This image shows the global thermal inertia of the Martian surface as measured by the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) instrument on the Mars Global Surveyor. The data were acquired during the first 5000 orbits of the MGS mapping mission. The pattern of inertia variations observed by TES agrees well with the thermal inertia maps made by the Viking Infrared Thermal Mapper experiment, but the TES data shown here are at significantly higher spatial resolution (15 km versus 60 km).

    The TES instrument was built by Santa Barbara Remote Sensing and is operated by Philip R. Christensen, of Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ.

  8. Novel method of thermal-inertia determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLennan, E.; Emery, J.

    2014-07-01

    makes it possible to accurately constrain the surface temperature distribution of an asteroid, and thus thermal inertia, without knowing an object's spin axis. To test the validity of this method we select objects that have previous spin axis and shape information from the DAMIT website [4] and estimate thermal inertia using both the traditional and multi-epoch method. We present thermal inertia, size and albedo results for over a dozen such objects observed by WISE and compare to previous thermal inertia estimates of other objects. The future application of this method to asteroids with undetermined spin axes is sure to dramatically increase the number of asteroid thermal-inertia estimates.

  9. Thermal Inertia of Rocks and Rock Populations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golombek, M. P.; Jakosky, B. M.; Mellon, M. T.

    2001-01-01

    The effective thermal inertia of rock populations on Mars and Earth is derived from a model of effective inertia versus rock diameter. Results allow a parameterization of the effective rock inertia versus rock abundance and bulk and fine component inertia. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  10. High-Resolution Thermal Inertia Mapping from the Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mellon, M.T.; Jakosky, B.M.; Kieffer, H.H.; Christensen, P.R.

    2000-01-01

    High-resolution thermal inertia mapping results are presented, derived from Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) observations of the surface temperature of Mars obtained during the early portion of the MGS mapping mission. Thermal inertia is the key property controlling the diurnal surface temperature variations, and is dependent on the physical character of the top few centimeters of the surface. It represents a complex combination of particle size, rock abundance, exposures of bedrock, and degree of induration. In this work we describe the derivation of thermal inertia from TES data, present global scale analysis, and place these results into context with earlier work. A global map of nighttime thermal-bolometer-based thermal inertia is presented at 14?? per pixel resolution, with approximately 63% coverage between 50??S and 70??N latitude. Global analysis shows a similar pattern of high and low thermal inertia as seen in previous Viking low-resolution mapping. Significantly more detail is present in the high-resolution TES thermal inertia. This detail represents horizontal small-scale variability in the nature of the surface. Correlation with albedo indicates the presence of a previously undiscovered surface unit of moderate-to-high thermal inertia and intermediate albedo. This new unit has a modal peak thermal inertia of 180-250 J m-2 K-1 s-12 and a narrow range of albedo near 0.24. The unit, covering a significant fraction of the surface, typically surrounds the low thermal inertia regions and may comprise a deposit of indurated fine material. Local 3-km-resolution maps are also presented as examples of eolian, fluvial, and volcanic geology. Some impact crater rims and intracrater dunes show higher thermal inertias than the surrounding terrain; thermal inertia of aeolian deposits such as intracrater dunes may be related to average particle size. Outflow channels and valleys consistently show higher thermal inertias than the

  11. Global Surface Thermal Inertia Derived from Dawn VIR Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titus, T. N.; Becker, K. J.; Anderson, J.; Capria, M.; Tosi, F.; Prettyman, T. H.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Palomba, E.; Grassi, D.; Capaccioni, F.; Ammannito, E.; Combe, J.; McCord, T. B.; Li, J. Y.; Russell, C. T.; Raymond, C. A.

    2012-12-01

    Comparisons of surface temperatures, derived from Dawn [1] Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIR-MS) [2] observations , to thermal models suggest that Vesta generally has a low-thermal-inertia surface, between 25 and 35 J m^-2 K^-1 s^-½, consistent with a thick layer of fine-grain material [3]. Temperatures were calculated using a Bayesian approach to nonlinear inversion as described by Tosi et al. [4]. In order to compare observed temperatures of Vesta to model calculations, several geometric and photometric parameters must be known or estimated. These include local mean solar time, latitude, local slope, bond bolometric albedo, and the effective emissivity at 5μm. Local time, latitude, and local slope are calculated using the USGS ISIS software system [5]. We employ a multi-layered thermal-diffusion model called 'KRC' [6], which has been used extensively in the study of Martian thermophysical properties. This thermal model is easily modified for use with Vesta by replacing the Martian ephemeris input with the Vesta ephemeris and disabling the atmosphere. This model calculates surface temperatures throughout an entire Vesta year for specific sets of slope, azimuth, latitude and elevation, and a range of albedo and thermal-inertia values. The ranges of albedo and thermal inertia values create temperature indices that are closely matched to the dates and times observed by VIR. Based on observed temperatures and best-fit KRC thermal models, estimates of the annual mean surface temperatures were found to range from 176 K - 188 K for flat zenith-facing equatorial surfaces, but these temperatures can drop as low as 112 K for polar-facing slopes at mid-latitudes. [7] In this work, we will compare observed temperatures of the surface of Vesta (using data acquired by Dawn VIR-MS [2] during the approach, survey, high-altitude mapping and departure phases) to model temperature results using the KRC thermal model [5]. Where possible, temperature observations from

  12. The thermal inertia of Mars from the Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jakosky, Bruce M.; Mellon, Michael T.; Kieffer, Hugh H.; Christensen, Philip R.; Varnes, E. Stacy; Lee, Steven W.

    2000-01-01

    We have used Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Thermal Emission Spectrometer thermal emission measurements to derive the thermal inertia of the Martian surface at the ∼100-km spatial scale. We have validated the use of nighttime-only measurements to derive thermal inertia as well as the use of a single wavelength band versus bolometric thermal emission measurements. We have also reanalyzed the Viking Infrared Thermal Mapper data set in a similar manner in order to allow a direct comparison between the two. Within the uncertainties of the fit of the data to the model, and the uncertainties inherent in the model, the thermal inertia has not changed substantially in the 21 years between the Viking and the MGS measurements. Although some differences are seen, they are most likely due to changes in albedo during the intervening years or to residual effects of airborne dust that are not fully accounted for in the thermal models. The thermal inertia values that we derive, between about 24 and 800 J m-2 s-1/2 K-1, are thought to better represent the actual thermal inertia of the Martian surface than previous estimates.

  13. Conductivity Cell Thermal Inertia Correction Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksen, C. C.

    2012-12-01

    Salinity measurements made with a CTD (conductivity-temperature-depth instrument) rely on accurate estimation of water temperature within their conductivity cell. Lueck (1990) developed a theoretical framework for heat transfer between the cell body and water passing through it. Based on this model, Lueck and Picklo (1990) introduced the practice of correcting for cell thermal inertia by filtering a temperature time series using two parameters, an amplitude α and a decay time constant τ, a practice now widely used. Typically these two parameters are chosen for a given cell configuration and internal flushing speed by a statistical method applied to a particular data set. Here, thermal inertia correction theory has been extended to apply to flow speeds spanning well over an order of magnitude, both within and outside a conductivity cell, to provide predictions of α and τ from cell geometry and composition. The extended model enables thermal inertia correction for the variable flows encountered by conductivity cells on autonomous gliders and floats, as well as tethered platforms. The length scale formed as the product of cell encounter speed of isotherms, α, and τ can be used to gauge the size of the temperature correction for a given thermal stratification. For cells flushed by dynamic pressure variation induced by platform motion, this length varies by less than a factor of 2 over more than a decade of speed variation. The magnitude of correction for free-flow flushed sensors is comparable to that of pumped cells, but at an order of magnitude in energy savings. Flow conditions around a cell's exterior are found to be of comparable importance to thermal inertia response as flushing speed. Simplification of cell thermal response to a single normal mode is most valid at slow speed. Error in thermal inertia estimation arises from both neglect of higher modes and numerical discretization of the correction scheme, both of which can be easily quantified

  14. Geologic applications of thermal-inertia mapping from satellite. [Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Offield, T. W. (Principal Investigator); Miller, S. H.; Watson, K.

    1979-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. After digitization, a noise rejection filter was applied to data obtained by USGS aircraft. An albedo image was formed by combining three bands of visible data. Along with the day and nighttime thermal data, the albedo image was used to construct a relative thermal-inertia image. This image, registered to a topographic base, shows there are thermal property differences in the vicinity of the contact between the Fort Union and Wasatch formations in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming.

  15. Thermal mapping of mountain slopes on Mars by application of a Differential Apparent Thermal Inertia technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubiak, Marta; Mège, Daniel; Gurgurewicz, Joanna; Ciazela, Jakub

    2015-04-01

    Thermal inertia (P) is an important property of geologic surfaces that essentially describes the resistance to temperature (T) change as heat is added. Most remote sensing data describe the surface only. P is a volume property that is sensitive to the composition of the subsurface, down to a depth reached by the diurnal heating wave. As direct measurement of P is not possible on Mars, thermal inertia models (Fergason et al., 2006) and deductive methods (the Apparent Thermal Inertia: ATI and Differential Apparent Thermal Inertia: DATI) are used to estimate it. ATI is computed as (1 - A) / (Tday - Tnight), where A is albedo. Due to the lack of the thermal daytime images with maximum land surface temperature (LST) and nighttime images with minimum LST in Valles Marineris region, the ATI method is difficult to apply. Instead, we have explored the DATI technique (Sabol et al., 2006). DATI is calculated based on shorter time (t) intervals with a high |ΔT/Δt| gradient (in the morning or in the afternoon) and is proportional to the day/night temperature difference (ATI), and hence P. Mars, which exhibits exceptionally high |ΔT/Δt| gradients due to the lack of vegetation and thin atmosphere, is especially suitable for the DATI approach. Here we present a new deductive method for high-resolution differential apparent thermal inertia (DATI) mapping for areas of highly contrasted relief (e.g., Valles Marineris). Contrary to the thermal inertia models, our method takes local relief characteristics (slopes and aspects) into account. This is crucial as topography highly influences A and ΔT measurements. In spite of the different approach, DATI values in the flat areas are in the same range as the values obtained by Fergason et al. (2006). They provide, however, more accurate information for geological interpretations of hilly or mountainous terrains. Sabol, D. E., Gillespie, A. R., McDonald, E., and Danilina, I., 2006. Differential Thermal Inertia of Geological Surfaces. In

  16. Delamination detection in reinforced concrete using thermal inertia

    SciTech Connect

    Del Grande, N K; Durbin, P F

    1998-11-30

    We investigated the feasibility of thermal inertia mapping for bridge deck inspections. Using pulsed thermal imaging, we heat-stimulated surrogate delaminations in reinforced concrete and asphalt-concrete slabs. Using a dual-band infrared camera system, we measured thermal inertia responses of Styrofoam implants under 5 cm of asphalt, 5 cm of concrete, and 10 cm of asphalt and concrete. We compared thermal maps from solar-heated concrete and asphalt-concrete slabs with thermal inertia maps from flash-heated concrete and asphalt-concrete slabs. Thermal inertia mapping is a tool for visualizing and quantifying subsurface defects. Physically, thermal inertia is a measure of the resistance of the bridge deck to temperature change. Experimentally, it is determined from the inverse slope of the surface temperature versus the inverse square root of time. Mathematically, thermal inertia is the square root of the product of thermal conductivity, density, and heat capacity. Thermal inertia mapping distinguishes delaminated decks which have below-average thermal inertias from normal or shaded decks. Key Words: Pulsed Thermal Imaging, Thermal Inertia, Detection Of Concrete Bridgedeck Delaminations

  17. Delamination detection in reinforced concrete using thermal inertia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DelGrande, Nancy; Durbin, Philip F.

    1999-02-01

    We investigated the feasibility of thermal inertia mapping for bridge deck inspections. Using pulsed thermal imaging, we heat-stimulated surrogate delaminations in reinforced concrete and asphalt-concrete slabs. Using a dual-band infrared camera system, we measured thermal inertia responses of Styrofoam implants under 5 cm of asphalt, 5 cm of concrete, and 10 cm of asphalt and concrete. We compared thermal maps from solar-heated concrete and asphalt-concrete slabs with thermal inertia maps from flash-heated concrete and asphalt-concrete slabs. Thermal inertia mapping is a tool for visualizing and quantifying subsurface defects. Physically, thermal inertia is a measure of the resistance of the bridge deck to temperature change. Experimentally, it is determined from the inverse slope of the surface temperature versus the inverse square root of time. Mathematically, thermal inertia is the square root of the product of thermal conductivity, density, and heat capacity. Thermal inertia mapping distinguishes delaminated decks which have below-average thermal inertias from normal or shaded decks.

  18. THERMAL PHASES OF EARTH-LIKE PLANETS: ESTIMATING THERMAL INERTIA FROM ECCENTRICITY, OBLIQUITY, AND DIURNAL FORCING

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, Nicolas B.; Voigt, Aiko; Abbot, Dorian S.

    2012-09-20

    In order to understand the climate on terrestrial planets orbiting nearby Sun-like stars, one would like to know their thermal inertia. We use a global climate model to simulate the thermal phase variations of Earth analogs and test whether these data could distinguish between planets with different heat storage and heat transport characteristics. In particular, we consider a temperate climate with polar ice caps (like the modern Earth) and a snowball state where the oceans are globally covered in ice. We first quantitatively study the periodic radiative forcing from, and climatic response to, rotation, obliquity, and eccentricity. Orbital eccentricity and seasonal changes in albedo cause variations in the global-mean absorbed flux. The responses of the two climates to these global seasons indicate that the temperate planet has 3 Multiplication-Sign the bulk heat capacity of the snowball planet due to the presence of liquid water oceans. The obliquity seasons in the temperate simulation are weaker than one would expect based on thermal inertia alone; this is due to cross-equatorial oceanic and atmospheric energy transport. Thermal inertia and cross-equatorial heat transport have qualitatively different effects on obliquity seasons, insofar as heat transport tends to reduce seasonal amplitude without inducing a phase lag. For an Earth-like planet, however, this effect is masked by the mixing of signals from low thermal inertia regions (sea ice and land) with that from high thermal inertia regions (oceans), which also produces a damped response with small phase lag. We then simulate thermal light curves as they would appear to a high-contrast imaging mission (TPF-I/Darwin). In order of importance to the present simulations, which use modern-Earth orbital parameters, the three drivers of thermal phase variations are (1) obliquity seasons, (2) diurnal cycle, and (3) global seasons. Obliquity seasons are the dominant source of phase variations for most viewing angles. A

  19. Coupling diffusion and maximum entropy models to estimate thermal inertia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thermal inertia is a physical property of soil at the land surface related to water content. We have developed a method for estimating soil thermal inertia using two daily measurements of surface temperature, to capture the diurnal range, and diurnal time series of net radiation and specific humidi...

  20. A Novel and Simple Means to Estimate Asteroid Thermal Inertia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drube, Line; Harris, Alan

    2016-10-01

    Calculating accurate values of thermal inertia for asteroids is a difficult process requiring a shape model, thermal-infrared observations of the object obtained over broad ranges of rotation period and aspect angle, and detailed thermophysical modeling. Consequently, reliable thermal inertia values are currently available for relatively few asteroids. On the basis of simple asteroid thermal modeling we have developed an empirical relationship enabling the thermal inertia of an asteroid to be estimated given adequate measurements of its thermal-infrared continuum and knowledge of its spin vector. In particular, our thermal-inertia estimator can be applied to hundreds of objects in the WISE cryogenic archive (limited by the availability of spin vectors). To test the accuracy of our thermal-inertia estimator we have used it to estimate thermal inertia for near-Earth asteroids, main-belt asteroids, Centaurs, and trans-Neptunian objects with known thermal inertia values derived from detailed thermophysical modeling. In nearly all cases the estimates agree within the error bars with the values derived from thermophysical modeling.

  1. Discovery of Spin-Rate-Dependent Asteroid Thermal Inertia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Alan; Drube, Line

    2016-10-01

    Knowledge of the surface thermal inertia of an asteroid can provide insight into surface structure: porous material has a lower thermal inertia than rock. Using WISE/NEOWISE data and our new asteroid thermal-inertia estimator we show that the thermal inertia of main-belt asteroids (MBAs) appears to increase with spin period. Similar behavior is found in the case of thermophysically-modeled thermal inertia values of near-Earth objects (NEOs). We interpret our results in terms of rapidly increasing material density and thermal conductivity with depth, and provide evidence that thermal inertia increases by factors of 10 (MBAs) to 20 (NEOs) within a depth of just 10 cm. On the basis of a picture of depth-dependent thermal inertia our results suggest that, in general, thermal inertia values representative of solid rock are reached some tens of centimeters to meters below the surface in the case of MBAs (the median diameter in our dataset = 24 km). In the case of the much smaller (km-sized) NEOs a thinner porous surface layer is indicated, with large pieces of solid rock possibly existing just a meter or less below the surface. These conclusions are consistent with our understanding from in-situ measurements of the surfaces of the Moon, and a few asteroids, and suggest a very general picture of rapidly changing material properties in the topmost regolith layers of asteroids. Our results have important implications for calculations of the Yarkovsky effect, including its perturbation of the orbits of potentially hazardous objects and those of asteroid family members after the break-up event. Evidence of a rapid increase of thermal inertia with depth is also an important result for studies of the ejecta-enhanced momentum transfer of impacting vehicles ("kinetic impactors") in planetary defense.

  2. Estimating Asteroid Thermal Inertia from Multi-epoch Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLennan, Eric M.; Emery, Joshua P.

    2014-11-01

    Granular material, or regolith, is observed to be ubiquitous on asteroid surfaces. To date, two feasible mechanisms of regolith generation have been proposed: recurrent impacts and thermal fracturing. By combining thermal infrared observations and a thermophysical model (TPM), the thermal inertia of an asteroid surface can be used to infer its physical properties, including the average regolith grain size. With the regolith properties of a large population of diverse asteroids (i.e. different spectral class, size, rotation period etc.), information regarding the details of regolith generation can be inferred.Traditional thermal inertia determination methods use a TPM with a previously derived asteroid shape model and spin axis for constraining the observed surface temperature distribution. TPMs invoke the heat diffusion equation to calculate surface temperatures for a rotating asteroid. An asteroid spin axis provide the boundary condition needed to calculate the surface energy balance in a TPM. However the limited amount of objects with a shape model and thermal infrared observations inhibit the number of thermal inertias that can potentially be calculated. Here, a technique using WISE (12 & 22 μm) observations taken before or after opposition is employed to derive thermal inertias of asteroids without using a shape model. By gathering thermal infrared data at multiple viewing geometries the temperature distribution, thus thermal inertia, is constrained.We first demonstrate the validity of this method on objects with a previously determined shape model and spin axis from the DAMIT website. Our analyses show that not knowing an asteroid’s shape does not significantly affect the resulting thermal inertia estimates. Additionally, we apply our TPM to WISE multi-epoch thermal observations to place estimates for the thermal inertia for more than 100 objects. The set of objects used samples many sizes, spectral classes and rotation periods, which may be important

  3. Thermal inertia characteristics of the Martian crater Curie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horner, V. M.; Zimbelman, J. R.

    1987-01-01

    Thermal inertia characteristics have been determined for the martian crater Curie from high resolution groundtracks of Viking Thermal Infrared Mapper (IRTM) data. Flow features near the southeastern edge of the ejecta indicate that at least part of the Curie ejecta was emplaced in a manner similar to the ejecta of rampart craters. Within the study region there appears to be a general southeastern trend towards lower thermal inertia values. This trend may be related to the proximity of the Arabia region, which is mainly to the south and east of Curie. Curie is in a region where the overall thermal inertias change over relatively short distances radial to Arabia. Therefore, the observed general decrease in thermal inertia may represent increasing regional dust accumulation in the direction of Arabia.

  4. The effect of inertia in thermal convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breuer, M.; Wessling, S.; Schmalzl, J.; Hansen, U.

    2003-04-01

    Thermal convection is one of the dominant processes governing transport of mass and heat in geophysical systems. One example is the Earth'{}s outer core which builds the driving engine for the geodynamo. Other examples are atmospheric and oceanographic circulations and creeping flows in the viscous Earth'{}s mantle. In thermal convection the importance of mechanical inertia and thus the strength of non-linearity in the momentum equations can be expressed by the Prandtl number (Pr=ν / κ). The Prandtl number is a material parameter and measures the importance of diffusive transport of momentum relative to diffusive heat transport. Geophysical systems show a wide range of Prandtl numbers. For the Earth'{}s outer core, mainly consisting of molten iron, a Prandtl number between 0.01-1 is realistic. Water has a Prandtl number of 7, whereas molten magmas have a Prandtl number around 100. Finally the Earth'{}s mantle can be characterized by a nearly infinite Prandtl number (Pr=O(1023)). We will present a numerical study where we investigated the influence of the Prandtl number on the style of thermal convection in a three-dimensional Rayleigh-Bénard configuration. We varied the Prandtl number (Pr) between 10-2 and 102. The Rayleigh number was fixed at a value of Ra=10^6 large enough to ensure strong time-dependent flow behavior. Our main focus lied on the question how the Prandtl number affects the spatial structure of the flow. We also investigated the functional dependence of the Nusselt number (Nu, the efficiency of advective heat transport) on the value of the Prandtl number and compared our results with a recent theoretical approach from Grossmann &Lohse (Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 2001). We identified two different regimes. For low Prandtl numbers, Pr << 1, advective heat transport is mainly due to a large-scale recircularisation cell. In this regime there is a high fraction of toroidal energy on the total kinetic energy. The effective heat transport (Nu) increases

  5. Evaluation of algorithms for geological thermal-inertia mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, S. H.; Watson, K.

    1977-01-01

    The errors incurred in producing a thermal inertia map are of three general types: measurement, analysis, and model simplification. To emphasize the geophysical relevance of these errors, they were expressed in terms of uncertainty in thermal inertia and compared with the thermal inertia values of geologic materials. Thus the applications and practical limitations of the technique were illustrated. All errors were calculated using the parameter values appropriate to a site at the Raft River, Id. Although these error values serve to illustrate the magnitudes that can be expected from the three general types of errors, extrapolation to other sites should be done using parameter values particular to the area. Three surface temperature algorithms were evaluated: linear Fourier series, finite difference, and Laplace transform. In terms of resulting errors in thermal inertia, the Laplace transform method is the most accurate (260 TIU), the forward finite difference method is intermediate (300 TIU), and the linear Fourier series method the least accurate (460 TIU).

  6. Modelling apparent low thermal inertia by layered structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Akari; Toyota, Takenori; Kurita, Kei

    2013-04-01

    Thermal inertia of planetary surface is a physical property that controls the diurnal and seasonal cycles in the surface temperature. At the same time it provides a unique window into geologic structure of the surface and the nature of geologic processes that shapes the planetary surface. Especially on Mars, it has been extensively derived from spacecraft remote-sensing observations. It shows existence of the area with very low thermal inertia in the equatorial and middle latitudes, which at the same time display complicated heterogeneous characteristics(Putzig and Mellon, 2007). This is one of the enigma about the surface state of Mars. Physical interpretation about the origin of this heterogeneous nature of the thermal inertia is needed. In this study, we discuss a possibility of apparent low thermal inertia when there exists a layered structure having contrasting thermal conductivities based on laboratory experiments. The layered structure we examined in the experiments are an acrylic plate(3.2mm , 5mm , 10mm in thickness) on top of Polystyrene foam block or vesiculated particle layer. In both cases the lower layer has lower thermal conductivity. They are heated periodically by a infrared lump from above(period from 10 to 600 sec.). We measured the temperature at the surface, bottom of the acrylic plate and inside the lower Polystyrene foam and the granular layer using the thermocouples and infrared thermometer. From amplitude of temperature variation, we estimated the thermal inertia. The important controlling factor in this experimental design is a thermal relaxation time of the surface layer, which is controlled by period of the applied heating cycle and the thickness. At the fixed layer thickness thermal structure changes drastically between the periods below and above the relaxation time. We estimated variation of apparent thermal inertia with period. In a homogeneous semi-infinite layer the amplitude of variation of the surface temperature induced by

  7. Estimating Thermal Inertia with a Maximum Entropy Boundary Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nearing, G.; Moran, M. S.; Scott, R.; Ponce-Campos, G.

    2012-04-01

    Thermal inertia, P [Jm-2s-1/2K-1], is a physical property the land surface which determines resistance to temperature change under seasonal or diurnal heating. It is a function of volumetric heat capacity, c [Jm-3K-1], and thermal conductivity, k [Wm-1K-1] of the soil near the surface: P=√ck. Thermal inertia of soil varies with moisture content due the difference between thermal properties of water and air, and a number of studies have demonstrated that it is feasible to estimate soil moisture given thermal inertia (e.g. Lu et al, 2009, Murray and Verhoef, 2007). We take the common approach to estimating thermal inertia using measurements of surface temperature by modeling the Earth's surface as a 1-dimensional homogeneous diffusive half-space. In this case, surface temperature is a function of the ground heat flux (G) boundary condition and thermal inertia and a daily value of P was estimated by matching measured and modeled diurnal surface temperature fluctuations. The difficulty is in measuring G; we demonstrate that the new maximum entropy production (MEP) method for partitioning net radiation into surface energy fluxes (Wang and Bras, 2011) provides a suitable boundary condition for estimating P. Adding the diffusion representation of heat transfer in the soil reduces the number of free parameters in the MEP model from two to one, and we provided a sensitivity analysis which suggests that, for the purpose of estimating P, it is preferable to parameterize the coupled MEP-diffusion model by the ratio of thermal inertia of the soil to the effective thermal inertia of convective heat transfer to the atmosphere. We used this technique to estimate thermal inertia at two semiarid, non-vegetated locations in the Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed in southeast AZ, USA and compared these estimates to estimates of P made using the Xue and Cracknell (1995) solution for a linearized ground heat flux boundary condition, and we found that the MEP-diffusion model produced

  8. Using Simple Shapes to Constrain Asteroid Thermal Inertia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLennan, Eric M.; Emery, Joshua P.

    2015-11-01

    With the use of remote thermal infrared observations and a thermophysical model (TPM), the thermal inertia of an asteroid surface can be determined. The thermal inertia, in turn, can be used to infer physical properties of the surface, specifically to estimate the average regolith grain size. Since asteroids are often non-spherical techniques for incorporating modeled (non-spherical) shapes into calculating thermal inertia have been established. However, using a sphere as input for TPM is beneficial in reducing running time and shape models are not generally available for all (or most) objects that are observed in the thermal-IR. This is particularly true, as the pace of infrared observations has recently dramatically increased, notably due to the WISE mission, while the time to acquire sufficient light curves for accurate shape inversion remains relatively long. Here, we investigate the accuracy of using both a spherical and ellipsoidal TPM, with infrared observations obtained at pre- and post-opposition (hereafter multi-epoch) geometries to constrain the thermal inertias of a large number of asteroids.We test whether using multi-epoch observations combined with a spherical and ellipsoidal shape TPM can constrain the thermal inertia of an object without a priori knowledge of its shape or spin state. The effectiveness of this technique is tested for 16 objects with shape models from DAMIT and WISE multi-epoch observations. For each object, the shape model is used as input for the TPM to generate synthetic fluxes for different values of thermal inertia. The input spherical and ellipsoidal shapes are then stepped through different spin vectors as the TPM is used to generate best-fit thermal inertia and diameter to the synthetically generated fluxes, allowing for a direct test of the approach’s effectiveness. We will discuss whether the precision of the thermal inertia constraints from the spherical TPM analysis of multi- epoch observations is comparable to works

  9. Indication of Melt Sheets on Vesta from Thermal Inertia Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Eric; Sykes, M. V.; Robert, G.; Li, J.; Dawn VIR Team

    2013-10-01

    We combined data from Dawn Framing Camera (FC) and Visual and Infrared Spectrometer (VIR) to identify possible melt sheets in the Cornelia crater on Vesta. First, we extracted the thermal spectra from four VIR cubes of Cornelia and matched a thermal curve to get a spatially resolved surface temperature for each observation. Second, we used stereophotoclinometry (SPC) to derive high resolution (16 m) topography and surface reflectance using FC images (Gaskell, et al., 2010). We calculated the absorbed thermal flux over the course of a full rotation that also included shadowing. Third, we ran a suite of diurnal 1-D thermal models with thermal inertia values of 21, 50, 100, 200, 357, 715 [J m-2 K-1 s-1/2] for every pixel of the crater. Then, we remapped the results to match the exact location and resolution of the VIR data so we could compare the data sets directly. We fit a thermal inertia value for each pixel using the observed surface temperature and the different model simulations. Finally, we grouped pixels with similar thermal inertia values to define different units. Higher thermal inertia units indicate more coherent rock (less porous) that could be melt sheets (such as on the crater rim) or exposed bedrock (rock ledges in the crater).

  10. Thermal and albedo mapping of the polar regions of Mars using Viking thermal mapper observations: 2. South polar region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paige, David A.; Keegan, Kenneth D.

    1994-01-01

    We present the first maps of the apparent thermal inertia and albedo of the south polar region of Mars. The observations used to create these maps were acquired by the infrared thermal mapper (IRTM) instruments on the two Viking Orbiters over a 30-day period in 1977 during the Martian late southern summer season. The maps cover the region from 60 deg S to the south pole at a spatial resolution of 1 deg of latitude, thus completing the initial thermal mapping of the entire planet. The analysis and interpretation of these maps is aided by the results of a one-dimensional radiative convective model, which is used to calculate diurnal variations in surface and atmospheric temperatures, and brightness temperatures at the top of the atmosphere for a range of assumptions concerning dust optical properties and dust optical depths. The maps show that apparent thermal inertias of bare ground regions decrease systematically from 60 deg S to the south pole. In unfrosted regions close to the south pole, apparent thermal inertias are among the lowest observed anywhere on the planet. On the south residual cap, apparent thermal inertias are very high due to the presence of CO2 frost. In most other regions of Mars, best fit apparent albedos based on thermal emission measurements are generally in good agreement with actual surface albedos based on broadband solar reflectance measurements. The one-dimensional atmospheric model calculations also predict anomalously cold brightness temperatures close to the pole during late summer, and after considering a number of alternatives, it is concluded that the net surface cooling due to atmospheric dust is the best explanation for this phenomenon. The region of lowest apparent thermal inertia close to the pole, which includes the south polar layered deposits, is interpreted to be mantled by a continuous layer of aeolian material that must be at least a few millimeters thick. The low thermal inertias mapped in the south polar region imply an

  11. Thermal and albedo mapping of the polar regions of Mars using Viking thermal mapper observations: 1. North polar region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paige, David A.; Bachman, Jennifer E.; Keegan, Kenneth D.

    1994-01-01

    We present the first maps of the apparent thermal inertia and albedo of the north polar region of Mars. The observations used to create these maps were acquired by the infrared thermal mapper (IRTM) instruments on the two Viking orbiters over a 50-day period in 1978 during the Martian early northern summer season. The maps cover the region from 60 deg N to the north pole at a spatial resolution of 1/2 deg of latitude. The analysis and interpretation of these maps is aided by the results of a one-dimensional radiative convective model, which is used to calculate diurnal variations in surface and atmospheric temperatures, and brightness temperatures at the top of the atmospphere for a wide range of assumptions concerning aerosol optical properties and aerosol optical depths. The results of these calculations show that the effects of the Martian atmosphere on remote determinations of surface thermal inertia are more significant than have been indicated in previous studies. The maps of apparent thermal inertia and albedo show a great deal of spatial structure that is well correlated with surface features.

  12. Thermal inertia and bulk density of near-Earth asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozitis, B.; Maclennan, E.; Emery, J.; Green, S.

    2014-07-01

    Thermal inertia and bulk density are two important properties that describe the surface morphology and internal structure of asteroids. Since thermal inertia depends predominantly on regolith particle size and depth, degree of compaction, and exposure of solid rocks and boulders within the top few centimeters of the sub-surface, it can be used to infer the presence or absence of loose material on the asteroid surface [1,2]. When the asteroid bulk density is compared with that of meteorites associated with the asteroid spectral type, then it allows the macro-porosity of the asteroid to be determined. The macro-porosity can then be used to infer whether the asteroid is predominantly a solid body throughout, a fractured body, or a rubble-pile [3]. Each structural classification gives different insights into how the asteroid formed and evolved. The thermal inertia and bulk density can be determined by simultaneous thermophysical modeling of thermal-infrared and Yarkovsky orbital drift observations. Thermal inertia is a measure of a material's resistance to temperature change and dictates the asteroid surface temperature distribution. Different thermal inertia values can be detected in thermal-infrared observations, and can be inferred by using a suitable thermophysical model that takes into account the asteroid's shape, rotation state, surface roughness, and observing geometry. The surface temperature distribution influenced by thermal inertia causes a morning-afternoon temperature asymmetry, which leads to an excess of thermally emitted photons on the afternoon side. This excess of photons applies a very small force to the afternoon side of the asteroid, which causes the orbital semimajor axis to increase or decrease slowly over time, depending on whether the asteroid is a prograde or retrograde rotator (i.e., the Yarkovsky effect [4]). The rate of Yarkovsky semimajor axis drift is dictated by the asteroid thermal inertia and bulk density, amongst other important

  13. Inertia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The resistance of a massive body to any change in its velocity. Any body will continue in a state of rest or of uniform straight-line motion unless acted upon by a force. Thus a spacecraft, when its rocket motors are switched off, follows a ballistic trajectory because of its inertia. In Newton's second law of motion, the relationship between acceleration, a, of a body and the applied force, F, i...

  14. Last call for Spitzer support of sample-return mission Hayabusa 2: measuring the thermal inertia of 1999 JU3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Michael; Emery, Joshua; Rivkin, Andrew; Trilling, David; Hora, Joe; Delbo, Marco; Sugita, Seiji; Hasegawa, Sunao; Ishiguro, Masateru; Choi, Young-Jun; Mommert, Michael

    2012-12-01

    The JAXA mission Hayabusa 2, scheduled to launch in 2014/2015, will visit the low-albedo near-Earth asteroid 1999 JU3, and will return a regolith sample to Earth in 2020. An international observation campaign has amassed a large body of data toward the physical characterization of the target asteroid, informing the mission planning and maximizing the mission's scientific return. While the physical characterization of JU3 has advanced significantly in the past years, open questions remain that only Spitzer can answer: * Just what is the object's thermal inertia? Thermal inertia governs the surface temperature distribution, crucial knowledge for near-surface operations and sampling, and is an indicator for the presence or absence of regolith. Previous thermal observations led to inconclusive results. * Is there any surface variability in thermal inertia or albedo? There is tantalizing evidence for a variable 0.7-micron spectral feature, which may indicate further reaching surface heterogeneity. The only way to answer these questions before Hayabusa-2's arrival at its target is through Spitzer observations in 2013. Only Spitzer affords the required sensitivity and repeatability at thermal-infrared wavelengths. Additionally, due to JU3's peculiar orbit, 2013 is the last chance to obtain Spitzer observations through the end of 2016 (Horizons does not provide Spitzer-centric ephemerides beyond this date). JU3 is already too poorly placed for Earth-based observations to be obtained of sufficient quality to address these critical science questions. The 2013 apparition is uniquely favorable for thermal-inertia measurements from Spizter due to the wide range spanned in solar phase angle and sub-Spitzer latitude. We propose observations at 2 times 7 phase angles, with Spitzer-centric latitudes on both the Northern and Southern hemisphere. Additional thermal lightcurves will provide evidence for the presence of absence of thermal-inertia variegation over the surface.

  15. Global distribution of bedrock exposures on Mars using THEMIS high-resolution thermal inertia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edwards, C.S.; Bandfield, J.L.; Christensen, P.R.; Fergason, R.L.

    2009-01-01

    We investigate high thermal inertia surfaces using the Mars Odyssey Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) nighttime temperature images (100 m/pixel spatial sampling). For this study, we interpret any pixel in a THEMIS image with a thermal inertia over 1200 J m-2 K-1 s-1/2 as "bedrock" which represents either in situ rock exposures or rock-dominated surfaces. Three distinct morphologies, ranked from most to least common, are associated with these high thermal inertia surfaces: (1) valley and crater walls associated with mass wasting and high surface slope angles; (2) floors of craters with diameters >25 km and containing melt or volcanics associated with larger, high-energy impacts; and (3) intercrater surfaces with compositions significantly more mafic than the surrounding regolith. In general, bedrock instances on Mars occur as small exposures (less than several square kilometers) situated in lower-albedo (<0.18), moderate to high thermal inertia (>350 J m-2 K-1 s-1/2), and relatively dust-free (dust cover index <0.95) regions; however, there are instances that do not follow these generalizations. Most instances are concentrated in the southern highlands, with very few located at high latitudes (poleward of 45oN and 58oS), suggesting enhanced mechanical breakdown probably associated with permafrost. Overall, Mars has very little exposed bedrock with only 960 instances identified from 75oS to 75oN with likely <3500 km2 exposed, representing???1% of the total surface area. These data indicate that Mars has likely undergone large-scale surface processing and reworking, both chemically and mechanically, either destroying or masking a majority of the bedrock exposures on the planet. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  16. MGS-TES thermal inertia study of the Arsia Mons Caldera

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cushing, G.E.; Titus, T.N.

    2008-01-01

    Temperatures of the Arsia Mons caldera floor and two nearby control areas were obtained by the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES). These observations revealed that the Arsia Mons caldera floor exhibits thermal behavior different from the surrounding Tharsis region when compared with thermal models. Our technique compares modeled and observed data to determine best fit values of thermal inertia, layer depth, and albedo. Best fit modeled values are accurate in the two control regions, but those in the Arsia Mons' caldera are consistently either up to 15 K warmer than afternoon observations, or have albedo values that are more than two standard deviations higher than the observed mean. Models of both homogeneous and layered (such as dust over bedrock) cases were compared, with layered-cases indicating a surface layer at least thick enough to insulate itself from diurnal effects of an underlying substrate material. Because best fit models of the caldera floor poorly match observations, it is likely that the caldera floor experiences some physical process not incorporated into our thermal model. Even on Mars, Arsia Mons is an extreme environment where CO2 condenses upon the caldera floor every night, diurnal temperatures range each day by a factor of nearly 2, and annual average atmospheric pressure is only around one millibar. Here, we explore several possibilities that may explain the poor modeled fits to caldera floor and conclude that temperature dependent thermal conductivity may cause thermal inertia to vary diurnally, and this effect may be exaggerated by presence of water-ice clouds, which occur frequently above Arsia Mons. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  17. An instrument for measuring thermal inertia in the field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, S. E.; Schieldge, J. P.; Kahle, A. B.

    1982-01-01

    Features and test results of a thermal inertial meter (TIM) for cataloging the thermal inertial of surface material in situ as a basis for satellite remote sensing of geologic materials are described. The instrument is employed to determine the temperature rise of the materials in the field, with the assumptions that the sample and a standard are homogeneous in composition, the heat flux density is constant at the surface of each material, and the specimens are thick enough to be treated as semi-infinite bodies. A formula for calculating thermal inertia is presented, and the components of the TIM are detailed. A box with three compartments, two holding standards, is placed on the sample surface with the third compartment open to the specimen. Dolomite and quartz are used as references when all samples are measured after heating. Tests with rocks and sand in Nevada and California revealed that chert has a higher thermal inertia than barite.

  18. Geologic application of thermal-inertia mapping from satellite. [Arizona and Powder River, Wyoming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Offield, T. W. (Principal Investigator); Miller, S. H.; Watson, K.

    1978-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. A theoretical evaluation of the proportional and linear relationship between absolute and relative thermal inertia was performed, and a potentially more accurate expression for absolute thermal inertia mapping was proposed.

  19. Classification of surface units in the equatorial region of Mars based on Viking Orbiter color, albedo, and thermal data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arvidson, R. E.; Guinness, E. A.; Zent, A. P.

    1982-01-01

    Clusters corresponding to mappable surface units are sought in Viking Orbiter color, albedo, and thermal inertia data for the equatorial region of Mars. A principal components analysis indicated that 84% of the variance within the data for this region can be carried along two vector directions which typify the dominant trend of Martian surface materials. These dominant trends were deemphasized by stretching the data from a five-dimensional elliptical swarm into a hypersphere, through the use of principal component techniques. The decorrelated data were then plotted in a triangle diagram with red/violet, albedo and thermal inertia apices to facilitate inherent cluster discrimination. As many as eight clusters can be identified, with important mixing between them. The three major clusters consist of red and grey material extremes, along with intermediate value materials.

  20. Thermal inertia as an indicator of rockiness variegation on near-Earth asteroid surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali-Lagoa, Victor; Delbo, Marco; Hanus, Josef

    2016-10-01

    Determining key physical properties of asteroids such as sizes and albedos or reflectance spectra is crucial to understand their origins and the processes that they have undergone during their evolution. In particular, one of the aims of NEOShield-2 project, funded by the European Union's Horizon 2020 Research and Innovation programme, is to physically characterize small near Earth asteroids (NEA) in an effort to determine effective mitigation strategies in case of impact with our planet [Harris et al. 2013 2013AcAau,90,80H].We performed thermophysical modelling of NEAs, such as (1685) Toro, and potentially hazardous asteroids (PHAs), such as (33342) 1998 WT24. In addition to size, thermophysical models (TPM) of asteroids can constrain the surface thermal inertia, which is related to the material composition and physical nature, namely its "rockiness" or typical size of the particles on its surface. These have observable effects on the surface temperature distribution as a function of time and thus on the thermal infrared fluxes we observe, to which we can fit our model.In the case of WT24, its thermal inertia has been previously constrained to be in the range 100-300 SI units [Harris et al. 2007, Icarus 188, 414H]. But this was based on a spherical shape model approximation since no shape model was available by the time. Such a low thermal inertia value seems in disagreement with a relatively high metal content of the enstatite chondrites, the meteorite type to which WT24, classified as an E-type [Lazzarin et al. 2004 A&A 425L, 25L], has been spectrally associated. Using a three-dimensional model and spin vector based on radar observations [Busch et al. 2008 Icarus 197, 375B], our TPM produces a higher best-fitting value of the thermal inertia. We also find the intriguing possibility that the hemisphere of WT24 dominated by concave terrains, possibly be the result of an impact crater, has a higher thermal inertia. This would be similar to the case of our Moon

  1. The diameter and thermal inertia of 433 Eros

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, D.

    1976-01-01

    Radiometry of Eros at 10 and 20 micrometers demonstrates that the thermal conductivity of the upper centimeter of the surface is approximately as low as that of the moon, suggesting that the asteroid has a regolith of highly porous rocky material. When combined with photoelectric photometry, these infrared measurements yield an effective diameter of Eros at maximum light of 22 plus or minus 2 km and a geometric albedo of 0.18 plus or minus 0.03.

  2. M-type asteroids in the mid-infrared: thermal inertias and emissivity spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landsman, Zoe A.; Emery, Joshua P.; Campins, Humberto

    2016-10-01

    The M-type asteroid taxon has been inferred to contain metallic asteroids. This inference comes mainly from spectral analogy to iron meteorites and from the observation of high radar albedos among M-types. There is, nevertheless, evidence for significant compositional diversity within the M-type population. Spectral signatures of both high-temperature silicates (λ~0.9 μm) and hydrated minerals (λ~3 μm) are common in this group. The nature of the M-types is, therefore, still not well understood. In order to further test the hypothesis that many M-types are metallic, we have undertaken an observational study at mid-infrared wavelengths (5.2 – 38 μm). Our aim is to characterize the silicate composition and the thermal properties of a sample of M-type asteroids. If metallic, we expect relatively high thermal inertia and an absence of silicate emissivity features. The spectra we analyze were measured with the InfraRed Spectrograph (IRS) on the Spitzer Space Telescope. We present emissivity spectra and the initial results of thermophysical modeling, including derived thermal inertias. We chose our sample because these asteroids have also been observed at complementary wavelengths, such as visible, near-infrared and radar, which places further constraints on the interpretation of our results.

  3. Calculation of thermal inertia from day-night measurements separated by days or weeks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahle, A. B.; Alley, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    The calculation of the thermal inertia of an area from remotely sensed data involves the measurement of the surface albedo and the determination of the diurnal temperature range of the surface in image format. The temperature-range image is calculated from surface thermal radiance measured as near as possible to the time of maximum surface temperature and (predawn) surface minimum temperature. Ordinarily, both surface-temperature images are measured within the same 12-hour period. If this is impossible, then the measurement of the predawn surface radiance within a 36-hour period has been considered to be adequate, although less satisfactory. The problems arising in connection with the impossibility to conduct measurements within the same 12-hour period are studied, and suggestions are made for cases in which only relative thermal inertia across an area is required. In such cases investigators should consider using the best day-night temperature pairs available, even if not acquired within a 12 to 36 hour period.

  4. A New Method for High-Resolution Apparent Thermal Inertia Mapping of Mars: Application to Valles Marineris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubiak, M.; Mège, D.; Gurgurewicz, J.; Ciążela, J.

    2014-12-01

    The minerals absorb and reflect thermal infrared (TIR) light of the different wavelengths depending on their composition and structure. Thus, every rock absorbs and reflects different wavelengths in TIR and has its own spectral signature. The TIR images are used in the thermal inertia mapping and in its approximation called apparent thermal inertia (ATI). We present the methodology and the high-resolution apparent thermal inertia maps for selected parts of Valles Marineris (Mars). ATI was calculated from surface albedo (A) and diurnal temperature difference (∆T) following the equation: ATI = (1 - A) / ∆T. Albedo was computed by dividing reflected radiation (IR) by incident radiation (II): A = IR / II. After introducing: II = F • cosIA, where F stands for solar constant and IA for incident angle (°), it develops to: A = IR / (F • cosIA). This formula allows us to calculate A on a horizontal surface. Calculating A on an inclined surface requires corrections of IA against relief characteristics (slopes, aspects): IAC = (IA - arctan(tans • cos(e + t • 15° - 180°))), where s is slope (°), e - aspect (°) and t - local solar time (h). A correction was made also for ∆T. The calibration process was more complex because it involved changes in incident radiation (II) over a given time interval (∆T = T13:00 - T6:00). II is a function of: Martian tilt, eccentricity, perihelium longitude, solar longitude (Ls, in °), latitude (φ, in °), local solar time and relief characteristics. Total II, integrated over the time interval, can be calculated following the equation [1]. The results were compared to the existing thermal inertia maps of Mars.

  5. Sensitivity of thermal inertia calculations to variations in environmental factors. [in mapping of Earth's surface by remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahle, A. B.; Alley, R. E.; Schieldge, J. P.

    1984-01-01

    The sensitivity of thermal inertia (TI) calculations to errors in the measurement or parameterization of a number of environmental factors is considered here. The factors include effects of radiative transfer in the atmosphere, surface albedo and emissivity, variations in surface turbulent heat flux density, cloud cover, vegetative cover, and topography. The error analysis is based upon data from the Heat Capacity Mapping Mission (HCMM) satellite for July 1978 at three separate test sites in the deserts of the western United States. Results show that typical errors in atmospheric radiative transfer, cloud cover, and vegetative cover can individually cause root-mean-square (RMS) errors of about 10 percent (with atmospheric effects sometimes as large as 30-40 percent) in HCMM-derived thermal inertia images of 20,000-200,000 pixels.

  6. The radiobrightness thermal inertia measure of soil moisture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    England, Anthony W.; Galantowicz, John F.; Schretter, Mindy S.

    1992-01-01

    Radiobrightness thermal inertia (RTI) is proposed as a method for using day-night differences in satellite-sensed radiobrightness to monitor the moisture of Great Plains soils. Diurnal thermal and radiobrightness models are used to examine the sensitivity of the RTI method. Model predictions favor use of the 37.0 and 85.5 GHz, H-polarized channels of the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I). The model further predicts that overflight times near 2:00 AM/PM would be nearly optimal for RTI, that midnight/noon and 4:00 AM/PM are nearly as good, but that the 6:00 AM/PM overflight times of the current SSM/I are particularly poor. Data from the 37.0 GHz channel of the Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) are used to demonstrate that the method is plausible.

  7. Martian particle size based on thermal inertia corrected for elevation-dependent atmospheric properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, N. T.

    1993-01-01

    Thermal inertia is commonly used to derive physical properties of the Martian surface. If the surface is composed of loosely consolidated grains, then the thermal conductivity derived from the inertia can theoretically be used to compute the particle size. However, one persistent difficulty associated with the interpretation of thermal inertia and the derivation of particle size from it has been the degree to which atmospheric properties affect both the radiation balance at the surface and the gas conductivity. These factors vary with atmospheric pressure so that derived thermal inertias and particle sizes are a function of elevation. By utilizing currently available thermal models and laboratory information, a fine component thermal inertia map was convolved with digital topography to produce particle size maps of the Martian surface corrected for these elevation-dependent effects. Such an approach is especially applicable for the highest elevations on Mars, where atmospheric back radiation and gas conductivity are low.

  8. Geologic application of thermal-inertia mapping from satellite. [Powder River Basin in Wyoming and Montana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Offield, T. W. (Principal Investigator); Miller, S. H.; Watson, K.

    1978-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The proportional and linear relationship between absolute and relative thermal inertia was theoretically evaluated, and a more accurate expression for thermal inertia was proposed. Radiometric and meteorological data from three stations in the Powder River Basin were acquired, as well as 400 miles of low altitude scanner data between July 25-28.

  9. The complex relationship between olivine abundance and thermal inertia on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna, Romy D.; Hamilton, Victoria E.; Putzig, Nathaniel E.

    2016-07-01

    We examine four olivine-bearing regions at a variety of spatial scales with thermal infrared, visible to near-infrared, and visible imagery data to investigate the hypothesis that the relationship between olivine abundance and thermal inertia (i.e., effective particle size) can be used to infer the occurrence of olivine chemical alteration during sediment production on Mars. As in previous work, Nili Fossae and Isidis Planitia show a positive correlation between thermal inertia and olivine abundance in Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) and Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) data, which could be interpreted as indicating olivine chemical weathering. However, geomorphological analysis reveals that relatively olivine-poor sediments are not derived from adjacent olivine-rich materials, and therefore, chemical weathering cannot be inferred based on the olivine-thermal inertia relationship alone. We identify two areas (Terra Cimmeria and Argyre Planitia) with significant olivine abundance and thermal inertias consistent with sand, but no adjacent rocky (parent) units having even greater olivine abundances. More broadly, global analysis with TES reveals that the most typical olivine abundance on Mars is ~5-7% and that olivine-bearing (5-25%) materials have a wide range of thermal inertias, commonly 25-600 J m-2 K-1 s-1/2. TES also indicates that the majority of olivine-rich (>25%) materials have apparent thermal inertias less than 400 J m-2 K-1 s-1/2. In summary, we find that the relationship between thermal inertia and olivine abundance alone cannot be used in infer olivine weathering in the examined areas, that olivine-bearing materials have a large range of thermal intertias, and therefore that a complex relationship between olivine abundance and thermal inertia exists on Mars.

  10. Thermal inertia mapping of Mars from 60°S to 60°N

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Palluconi, Frank Don; Kieffer, Hugh H.

    1981-01-01

    Twenty-micrometer brightness temperatures are used to derive the thermal inertia for 81% of the Martian surface between latitudes ±60°. These data were acquired by the two Viking Infrared Thermal Mappers in 1977 and 1978 following the two global dust storms of 1977. The spatial resolution used is 2° in latitude by 2° in longitude and the total range in derived inertia is . The distribution of thermal inertia is strongly bimodal with all values of thermal inertia less than  being associated with three disjoint bright regions mostly in the northern hemisphere. Sufficient dust is raised in global storms to provide fine material adequate to produce these low-inertia areas but the specific deposition mechanism has not been defined. At the low resolution used, no complete exposures of clean rock were found. There is some tendency for darker material to be associated with higher thermal inertia, although the trend is far from one to one. The distribution of high- and low-inertia areas is sufficiently nonrandom to produce a variation in whole-disk brightness temperature with central meridian longitude. This variation and the change in surface kinetic temperature associated with dust storms are factors in establishing the whole-disk brightness temperature at radio and infrared wavelengths and will be important for those who use Mars as a calibration source.

  11. The Negligible Role of Thermal Inertia in the Marangoni Instability and Evaporation Instability Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrefler, John; Dietze, Georg; Narayanan, Ranga

    2015-11-01

    The classical Marangoni instability problem, principally introduced by Pearson in 1958, takes the interface of two fluids heated from below to be non-deflecting and as a consequence of this assumption thermal inertia is responsible for the onset of convective flows. However, in practical problems where interfacial deflections are uncontrollable and necessarily present, we find that thermal inertia is of very little importance for a broad class of fluids. Neglecting the contribution of thermal inertia, we find that the instability persists as in the classical case. This is shown by way of an integral boundary layer method for long wavelength flows and confirmed by detailed calculations using the full equations. We aim to demonstrate that the principal result that thermal inertia is unimportant continues to hold for the evaporation instability problem, provided pure component phase change is considered. Supported by NSF 0968313 and Marie Curie IRSES grants.

  12. Observation of skin thermal inertia distribution during reactive hyperaemia using a single-hood measurement system.

    PubMed

    Hassan, M; Togawa, T

    2001-02-01

    An attempt was made to image the thermal inertia (defined as the square root of the product of thermal conductivity, specific heat and density) of the skin to observe the distribution of blood in the skin during post-occlusive reactive hyperaemia in normal healthy volunteers. The method was based on the ability to calculate thermal inertia by successive thermographic measurements of the skin after stepwise change in ambient radiation temperature surrounding the skin area. The stepwise change was achieved within 0.1 s through a single hood. Experimentation on the undisturbed volar forearm of normal subjects at the same site showed that the measurements thus achieved were reproducible. The thermal inertia values of forearm skin in normal subjects were scattered throughout the range 1.1 x 10(3) to 1.7 x 10(3) W s(1/2) m(-2) K(-1). Experiments on forearm skin subjected to arterial cuff occlusion indicated that thermal inertia can be detected at a low level of blood perfusion. A linear relationship was observed between thermal inertia and blood perfusion measured by laser Doppler imager before and during blood flow occlusion. During reactive hyperaemia, the thermal inertia image exhibited a non-uniform island-shaped pattern of distribution over the forearm, suggesting that, after release from occlusion, recovery of blood flow is non-uniform. PMID:11236879

  13. Surface energy budget and thermal inertia at Gale Crater: Calculations from ground-based measurements

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, G M; Rennó, N; Fischer, E; Borlina, C S; Hallet, B; de la Torre Juárez, M; Vasavada, A R; Ramos, M; Hamilton, V; Gomez-Elvira, J; Haberle, R M

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of the surface energy budget (SEB) yields insights into soil-atmosphere interactions and local climates, while the analysis of the thermal inertia (I) of shallow subsurfaces provides context for evaluating geological features. Mars orbital data have been used to determine thermal inertias at horizontal scales of ∼104 m2 to ∼107 m2. Here we use measurements of ground temperature and atmospheric variables by Curiosity to calculate thermal inertias at Gale Crater at horizontal scales of ∼102 m2. We analyze three sols representing distinct environmental conditions and soil properties, sol 82 at Rocknest (RCK), sol 112 at Point Lake (PL), and sol 139 at Yellowknife Bay (YKB). Our results indicate that the largest thermal inertia I = 452 J m−2 K−1 s−1/2 (SI units used throughout this article) is found at YKB followed by PL with I = 306 and RCK with I = 295. These values are consistent with the expected thermal inertias for the types of terrain imaged by Mastcam and with previous satellite estimations at Gale Crater. We also calculate the SEB using data from measurements by Curiosity's Rover Environmental Monitoring Station and dust opacity values derived from measurements by Mastcam. The knowledge of the SEB and thermal inertia has the potential to enhance our understanding of the climate, the geology, and the habitability of Mars. PMID:26213666

  14. Topographic, spectral and thermal inertia analysis of interior layered deposits in Iani Chaos, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sefton-Nash, E.; Catling, D. C.; Wood, S. E.; Grindrod, P. M.; Teanby, N. A.

    2012-09-01

    We present an analysis of Interior Layered Deposits (ILDs) in Iani Chaos using visible, infrared, hyperspectral and topographic datasets acquired by instruments aboard NASA’s Mars Global Surveyor, Mars Odyssey, Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter and ESA’s Mars Express spacecraft. We focus on four main regions where ILDs outcrop in Iani Chaos. Deposits span a ∼2 km range of elevations and exhibit moderate to high albedos, layering at sub-decameter scales, thermal inertias of 300-800 J m-2 K-1 s-1/2 and a range of surface textures. Thermal inertia calculations use slope and azimuth corrections from High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) topography. Spectral features in hyperspectral data acquired by NASA’s Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) suggest that gypsum (CaSO4·2H2O) and kieserite (MgSO4·H2O) are present in most deposits. We report absorptions typically exhibited by alunite (KAl3(SO4)2(OH)6) and jarosite KFe33+(OH)6(SO4)2 as well as a number of features that may be attributable to a wide range of mono- and polyhydrated sulphates and hydroxyl-sulphates bearing a number of cations, including Mg2+, Fe2+, Fe3+ and Ca2+. Spectral features similar to those of ammonium sulphates may also be present. Analysis of a HiRISE stereo DEM shows planar layering in some ILDs, favouring a sedimentary deposition origin. Stratigraphic mapping of hydration and sulphate spectral features in flat ILDs in central Iani Chaos suggest that specific elevation intervals in the stratigraphic column were subject to different levels of hydration, perhaps during episodes of water table elevation. This is consistent with formation models for ILDs and hydrological modelling. Geomorphic characteristics of deposits in northern and southern Iani Chaos suggest their relatively recent exhumation and significant erosion by aeolian processes. We conclude that any formation theory for ILDs in Iani Chaos should support mechanisms for different hydration states at different

  15. The role of porosity in thermal inertia variations on basaltic lavas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimbelman, James R.

    1986-01-01

    Thermal inertia, defined as the square root of the product of thermal conductivity, density, and specific heat, has been noted to vary in inverse proportion to porosity in Hawaiian basalts. It is presently suggested that porosities of the order of more than 80 percent are required if the low thermal inertias observed in Martian shield volcanoes are the result of pristine lava flow surface properties. An aeolian origin is held to be most likely in view of thermal measurements on Mars; the volcanic surfaces in question are anticipated to have a short lifetime in their environment.

  16. Atmospheric effects on the remote determination of thermal inertia on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haberle, Robert M.; Jakosky, Bruce M.

    1991-01-01

    Measurements of the IR brightness temperature at the Martian surface at many different times of day are presently compared with temperatures predicted by thermal models which allow sunlight to reach the surface unattenuated, in order to determine the thermal inertia of the uppermost 1-10 cm of the Martian surface. The consequences of the assumptions made are assessed in view of results from a different thermal model which invokes radiation-transfer through a dusty CO2 atmosphere, as well as sensible heat-exchange with the surface. Smaller thermal inertias imply smaller particle sizes; the results obtained suggest that low thermal-inertia regions consist of 5-micron, rather than 50-micron, particle sizes.

  17. Thermal inertias in the upper millimeters of the Martian surace derived using Phobus' shadow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betts, Bruce H.; Murray, Bruce C.; Svitek, Tomas

    1995-01-01

    The first thermal images of Phobos' shadow on the surface of Mars, in addition to simultaneous visible images, were obtained by the Phobus '88 Termoskan instrument. The best observed shadow occurence was on the flanks of Arsia Mons. For this occurence, we combined the observed decrease in visible illumination of the surface with the observed decrease in brightness temperature to calculate thermal inertias of the Martian surface. The most realistic of our three models of eclipse cooling improves upon our preliminary model by including nonisothermal initial conditions and downward atmospheric flux. Most of our derived inertias fall within the range 38 to 59 J/Sq m/S(exp 0.5)K (0.9 to 1.4 10(exp -3)Cal/Sq m/S(exp 0.5)/K), corresponding to dust-sized particles (for a homogeneous surface), consistent with previous theories of Tharsis as a currrent area of dust deposition. Viking infrared thermal mapper (IRTM) inertias are diurnally derived and are sensitive to centimeter depths, whereas the shadow-derived inertias sample the upper tenths of a millimeter of the surface. The shadow-derived inertias are lower than those derived from Viking IRTM measurements (84 to 147), however, uncertainties in both sets of derived inertias make conclusions about layering tenuous. Thus, near-surface millimeter versus centimeter layering may exist in this region, but if it does, it is likely not very significant. Both eclipse and diurnal inertias appear to increase near the eastern end of the shadow occurence. We also analyzed a shadow occurence near the crater Herschel that showed no observed cooling. This analysis was limited by cool morning temperatures and instrument sensitivity, but yielded a lower bound of 80 on eclipse inertias in that region. Based upon our results, we strongly recommend future spacecraft thermal observations of Phobus' shadow, and suggest that they will be most useful if they improve upon Termoskan's geographic and temporal coverage and its accuracy.

  18. Thermal inertias in the upper millimeters of the Martian surface derived using Phobos' shadow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betts, Bruce H.; Murray, Bruce C.; Svitek, Tomas

    1995-01-01

    The first thermal images of Phobos' shadow on the surface of Mars, in addition to simultaneous visible images, were obtained by the Phobos'88 Termoskan instrument. The best observed shadow occurrence was on the flanks of Arsia Mons. For this occurrence, we combined the observed decrease in visible illumination of the surface with the observed decrease in brightness temperature to calculate thermal inertias of the Martian surface. The most realistic of our three models of eclipse cooling improves upon our preliminary model by including nonisothermal initial conditions and downward atmospheric flux. Most of our derived inertias fall within the range 38 to 59 J/(sq m s(exp 1/2) K), (0.9 to 1.4 x 10(exp -3) cal/(sq cm s(exp 1/2) K)) corresponding to dust-sized particles (for a homogeneous surface), consistent with previous theories of Tharsis as a current area of dust deposition. Viking infrared thermal mapper (IRTM) inertias are diurnally derived and are sensitive to centimeter depths, whereas the shadow-derived inertias sample the upper tenths of a millimeter of the surface. The shadow-derived inertias are lower than those derived from Viking IRTM measurements (84 to 147), however, uncertainties in both sets of derived inertias make conclusions about layering tenuous. Thus, near-surface millimeter versus centimeter layering may exist in this region, but if it does, it is likely not very significant. Both eclipse and diurnal inertias appear to increase near the eastern end of the shadow occurrence. We also analyzed a shadow occurrence near the crater Herschel that showed no observed cooling. This analysis was limited by cool morning temperatures and instrument sensitivity, but yielded a lower bound of 80 on eclipse inertias in that region. Based upon our results, we strongly recommend future spacecraft thermal observations of Phobos' shadow, and suggest that they will be most useful if they improve upon Terinoskan's geographic and temporal coverage and its accuracy.

  19. THERMAL-INERTIA MAPPING IN VEGETATED TERRAIN FROM HEAT CAPACITY MAPPING MISSION SATELLITE DATA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watson, Ken; Hummer-Miller, Susanne

    1984-01-01

    Thermal-inertia data, derived from the Heat Capacity Mapping Mission (HCMM) satellite, were analyzed in areas of varying amounts of vegetation cover. Thermal differences which appear to correlate with lithologic differences have been observed previously in areas of substantial vegetation cover. However, the energy exchange occurring within the canopy is much more complex than that used to develop the methods employed to produce thermal-inertia images. Because adequate models are lacking at present, the interpretation is largely dependent on comparison, correlation, and inference. Two study areas were selected in the western United States: the Richfield, Utah and the Silver City, Arizona-New Mexico, 1 degree multiplied by 2 degree quadrangles. Many thermal-inertia highs were found to be associated with geologic-unit boundaries, faults, and ridges. Lows occur in valleys with residual soil cover.

  20. Ground-Atmosphere Interactions at Gale: Determination of the Surface Energy Budget, Thermal Inertia and Water Sorption on the Regolith

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, German; Renno, Nilton; Fischer, Erik; Borlina, Caue; Hallet, Bernard; De la Torre Juarez, Manuel; Vasavada, Aswhin; Gomez-Elvira, Javier

    2014-05-01

    The analysis of the Surface Energy Budget (SEB) yields insights into the local climate and the soil-atmosphere interactions, while the analysis of the thermal inertia of the shallow subsurface augments surface observations, providing information about the local geology. The Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer and the Mars Odyssey Thermal Emission Imaging System have measured near subsurface thermal inertia from orbit at scales of ~104 m2 to ~10 km2. Here we report analysis of the thermal inertia at a few locations at Gale Crater at scales of 100 m2. The thermal inertia is calculated by solving the heat conduction equation in the soil using hourly measurements by the Rover Environmental Station (REMS) ground temperature sensor as an upper boundary condition. Three Sols representative of different environmental conditions and soil properties, namely, Sol 82 at Rocknest (RCK), Sol 112 at Point Lake (PL) and Sol 139 at Yellowknife Bay (YKB) are analyzed in detail. The largest thermal inertia (I) value is found at YKB, I = 445 J m-2 K-1 s-1/2 or 445 tiu (thermal inertia unit), followed by PL with I= 300 tiu and RCK withI = 280 tiu [1]. These values are consistent with the type of terrain imaged by MastCam and with previous satellite estimates at Gale Crater [2,3]. The SEB is calculated by using all REMS data products as well as dust opacity values derived from MastCam measurements, whereas previously, the SEB has been calculated using numerical models only [4]. At each location and during the daytime, the SEB is dominated by the downwelling shortwave (SW) solar radiation (~450-500 W/m2) and the upwelling longwave (LW) radiation emitted by the surface (~300-400 W/m2). The sum of these two terms accounts for at least 70% of the net surface heating rate between 0900 and 1400 local solar time. At nighttime, the SEB is dominated by the upwelling LW radiation emitted by the surface (~50-100 W/m2) and the downwelling LW radiation from the atmosphere (~50 W/m2

  1. A thermal inertia model for soil water content retrieval using thermal and multispectral images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltese, A.; Minacapilli, M.; Cammalleri, C.; Ciraolo, G.; D'Asaro, F.

    2010-10-01

    Soil moisture is difficult to quantify because of its high spatial variability. Consequently, great efforts have been undertaken by the research community to develop practical remote sensing approaches to estimate the spatial distribution of surface soil moisture over large areas and with high spatial detail. Many methodologies have been developed using remote sensing data acquiring information in different parts of the electromagnetic spectrum. Conventional field measurement techniques (including gravimetric and time-domain reflectometry) are point-based, involve on-site operators, are time expensive and, in any case, do not provide exhaustive information on the spatial distribution of soil moisture because it strongly depends on pedology, soil roughness and vegetation cover. The technological development of imaging sensors acquiring in the visible (VIS), near infrared (NIR) and thermal infrared (TIR), renewed the research interest in setting up remote sensed based techniques aimed to retrieve soil water content variability in the soil-plant-atmosphere system (SPA). In this context different approaches have been widely applied at regional scale throughout synthetic indexes based on VIS, NIR and TIR spectral bands. A laboratory experiment has been carried out to verify a physically based model based on the remote estimation of the soil thermal inertia, P, to indirectly retrieve the soil surface water content, θ. The paper shows laboratory retrievals using simultaneously a FLIR A320G thermal camera, a six bands customized TETRACAM MCA II (Multiple Camera Array) multispectral camera working in the VIS/NIR part of the spectrum. Using these two type of sensors a set of VIS/NIR and TIR images were acquired as the main input dataset to retrieve the spatial variability of the thermal inertia values. Moreover, given that the accuracy of the proposed approach strongly depends on the accurate estimation of the soil thermal conductivity, a Decagon Device KD2 PRO thermal

  2. A Global Map of Thermal Inertia from Mars Global Surveyor Mapping-Mission Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mellon, M. T.; Kretke, K. A.; Smith, M. D.; Pelkey, S. M.

    2002-01-01

    TES (thermal emission spectrometry) has obtained high spatial resolution surface temperature observations from which thermal inertia has been derived. Seasonal coverage of these data now provides a nearly global view of Mars, including the polar regions, at high resolution. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  3. Thermal Inertia of Rocks and Rock Populations and Implications for Landing Hazards on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golombek, M. P.; Jakosky, B. M.; Mellon, M. T.

    2001-01-01

    Rocks represent an obvious potential hazard to a landing spacecraft. They also represent an impediment to rover travel and objects of prime scientific interest. Although Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) images are of high enough resolution to distinguish the largest rocks (an extremely small population several meters diameter or larger), traditionally the abundance and distribution of rocks on Mars have been inferred from thermal inertia and radar measurements, our meager ground truth sampling of landing sites, and terrestrial rock populations. In this abstract, we explore the effective thermal inertia of rocks and rock populations, interpret the results in terms of abundances and populations of potentially hazardous rocks, and conclude with interpretations of rock hazards on the Martian surface and in extremely high thermal inertia areas.

  4. Regional thermal-inertia mapping from an experimental satellite ( Powder River basin, Wyoming).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watson, K.

    1982-01-01

    A new experimental satellite has provided, for the first time, thermal data that should be useful in reconnaissance geologic exploration. Thermal inertia, a property of geologic materials, can be mapped from these data by applying an algorithm that has been developed using a new thermal model. A simple registration procedure was used on a pair of day and night images of the Powder River basin, Wyoming, to illustrate the method.-from Author

  5. The impact of martian mesoscale winds on surface temperature and on the determination of thermal inertia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiga, Aymeric; Forget, François; Madeleine, Jean-Baptiste; Montabone, Luca; Lewis, Stephen R.; Millour, Ehouarn

    2011-04-01

    Radiative control of surface temperature is a key characteristic of the martian environment and its low-density atmosphere. Here we show through meteorological modeling that surface temperature can be far from radiative equilibrium over numerous sloping terrains on Mars, where nighttime mesoscale katabatic winds impact the surface energy budget. Katabatic circulations induce both adiabatic atmospheric heating and enhancement of downward sensible heat flux, which then becomes comparable to radiative flux and acts to warm the ground. Through this mechanism, surface temperature can increase up to 20 K. One consequence is that warm signatures of surface temperature over slopes, observed through infrared spectrometry, cannot be systematically associated with contrasts of intrinsic soil thermal inertia. Apparent thermal inertia maps retrieved thus far possibly contain wind-induced structures. Another consequence is that surface temperature observations close to sloping terrains could allow the validation of model predictions for martian katabatic winds, provided contrasts in intrinsic thermal inertia can be ruled out. The thermal impact of winds is mostly discussed in this paper in the particular cases of Olympus Mons/Lycus Sulci and Terra Meridiani but is generally significant over any sloped terrains in low thermal inertia areas. It is even general enough to apply under daytime conditions, thereby providing a possible explanation for observed afternoon surface cooling, and to ice-covered terrains, thereby providing new insights on how winds could have shaped the present surface of Mars.

  6. Use of thermal inertia determined by HCMM to predict nocturnal cold prone areas in Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, L. H., Jr. (Principal Investigator); Chen, E.; Martsolf, J. D.; Jones, P. H.

    1981-01-01

    The HCMM transparency scenes for the available winter of 1978-1979 were evaluated; scenes were identified on processed magnetic tapes; other remote sensing information was identified; and a soil heat flux model with variable-depth thermal profile was developed. The Image 100 system was used to compare HCMM and GOES transparent images of surface thermal patterns. Excellent correspondence of patterns was found, with HCMM giving the greater resolution. One image shows details of thermal patterns in Florida that are attributable to difference in near surface water contents. The wide range of surface temperatures attributable to surface thermal inertia that exist in the relatively flat Florida topography is demonstrated.

  7. Use of thermal inertia determined by HCMM to predict nocturnal cold prone areas in Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, L. H., Jr. (Principal Investigator)

    1983-01-01

    Pairs of HCMM day-night thermal infrared (IR) data were selected during the 1978-79 winter to examine patterns of surface temperature and thermal inertia (TI) of peninsular Florida. The GOES and NOAA-6 thermal IR, as well as National Climatic Center temperatures and rainfall, were also used. The HCMM apparent thermal inertia (ATI) images closely corresponded to the general soil map of Florida, based on soil drainage classes. Areas with low ATI overlay well-drained soils, such as deep sands and drained organic soils, whereas with high ATI overlay areas with wetlands and bodies of water. The HCMM ATI images also corresponded well with GOES-detected winter nocturnal cold-prone areas. Use of HCMM data with Carlson's energy balance model showed both high moisture availability (MA) and high thermal inertia (TI) of wetland-type surfaces and low MA and low TI of upland, well-drained soils. Since soil areas with low TI develop higher temperatures during the day, then antecedent patterns of highest maximum daytime surface temperature can also be used to predict nocturnal cold-prone areas in Florida.

  8. Geologic application of thermal-inertia mapping from satellite. [Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Offield, T. W. (Principal Investigator); Miller, S. H.; Watson, K.

    1980-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Two night-time thermal images of the Powder River Basin, Wyoming distinctly show a major thermal feature. This feature is substantially coincident with a drainage divide and the southward facing slope appears cooler, suggesting a lower thermal inertia. An initial examination of regional geologic maps provides no clear evidence to suggest what type of geologic feature or structure may be present, although it can be noted that its northeastern end passes directly through Lead, South Dakota where the Homestake Gold Mine is located.

  9. Physical properties of the Mars Exploration Rover landing sites as inferred from Mini-TES-derived thermal inertia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fergason, R.L.; Christensen, P.R.; Bell, J.F.; Golombek, M.P.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Kieffer, H.H.

    2006-01-01

    The Miniature Thermal Emission Spectrometer (Mini-TES) on board the two Mars Exploration Rovers provides the first opportunity to observe thermal properties from the Martian surface, relate these properties to orbital data, and perform soil conductivity experiments under Martian conditions. The thermal inertias of soils, bedforms, and rock at each landing site were derived to quantify the physical properties of these features and understand geologic processes occurring at these localities. The thermal inertia for the. Gusev plains rock target Bonneville Beacon (???1200 J m-2 K-1 s-1/2) is consistent with a dense, basaltic rock, but the rocks at the Columbia Hills have a lower thermal inertia (???620 J m-2 K-1 s-1/2), suggesting that they have a volcaniclasic origin. Bedforms on the floors of craters at both landing sites have thermal inertias of 200 J m-2 K-1 s-1/2, consistent with a particle diameter of ???160 ??m. This diameter is comparable to the most easily moved grain size in the current atmosphere on Mars, suggesting that these bedforms may have formed under current atmospheric conditions. Along the Meridiani plains, the thermal inertia is lower than that derived from TES and Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) orbital data. This discrepancy is not well understood. Mini-TES-derived thermal inertias at Gusev along a ???2.5 km traverse follow trends in thermal inertia measured from orbit with TES and THEMIS. However, along the traverse, there are variability and mixing of particle sizes that are not resolved in the orbital thermal inertia data due to meter-scale processes that are not identifiable at larger scales. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  10. Thermal Inertia, Albedo, and MOLA-derived Roughness for Terrains in the Terra Meridiani Area, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arvidson, R. E.; Deal, K.; Hynek, B. M.; Seelos, F. P., IV; Snider, N. O.; Mellon, M. T.; Garvin, J. B.

    2002-01-01

    Surface properties of layered deposits draped on dissected, cratered terrain in the Terra Meridiani area are analyzed using remote sensing data. The etched plains are cemented and differentially eroded, and the hematite plains are loose and drifting. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  11. A simple algorithm to estimate the effective regional atmospheric parameters for thermal-inertia mapping

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watson, K.; Hummer-Miller, S.

    1981-01-01

    A method based solely on remote sensing data has been developed to estimate those meteorological effects which are required for thermal-inertia mapping. It assumes that the atmospheric fluxes are spatially invariant and that the solar, sky, and sensible heat fluxes can be approximated by a simple mathematical form. Coefficients are determined from least-squares method by fitting observational data to our thermal model. A comparison between field measurements and the model-derived flux shows the type of agreement which can be achieved. An analysis of the limitations of the method is also provided. ?? 1981.

  12. Thermal Inertia Determination of C-type Asteroid Ryugu from in-situ Surface Brightness Temperature Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamm, Maximilian; Grott, Matthias; Knollenberg, Jörg; Kührt, Ekkehard; Pelivan, Ivanka

    2016-10-01

    The Japanese Hayabusa-2 mission is a sample-return mission currently on its way to the C-type asteroid Ryugu. Hayabusa-2 carries the small lander MASCOT (Mobile Asteroid Surface Scout), whose scientific payload includes the infrared radiometer MARA. The primary science goal of MARA is to determine Ryugu's surface brightness temperatures at the landing site for a full asteroid rotation, which will be measured using a long-pass filter, an 8 to 12 µm bandpass, as well as four narrow bandpasses centered at wavelengths between 5 and 15 µm. From these measurements, surface thermal inertia will be derived, but because MARA performs single pixel measurements, heterogeneity in the field of view cannot be resolved. Yet, the surface will likely exhibit different surface textures, and thermal inertia in the field of view could vary from 600 (small rocks) to 50 Jm-2s-0.5K-1 (fine regolith grains). Sub-pixel heterogeneity is a common problem when interpreting radiometer data, since the associated ambiguities cannot be resolved without additional information on surface texture. For MARA, this information will be provided by the MASCOT camera, and in the present paper we have investigated to what extent different thermal inertias can be retrieved from MARA data. To test the applied approach, we generated synthetic MARA data using a thermal model of Ryugu, assuming different thermal inertias for sections of the field of view. We find that sub-pixel heterogeneity systematically deforms the diurnal temperature curve so that it is not possible to fit the data using a single thermal inertia value. However, including the area fractions of the different surface sections enables us to reconstruct the different thermal inertias to within 10% assuming appropriate measurement noise. The presented approach will increase robustness of the Ryugu thermal inertia determination and results will serve as a ground truth for the global measurements performed by the thermal infrared mapper (TIR) on

  13. An intertidal sea star adjusts thermal inertia to avoid extreme body temperatures.

    PubMed

    Pincebourde, Sylvain; Sanford, Eric; Helmuth, Brian

    2009-12-01

    The body temperature of ectotherms is influenced by the interaction of abiotic conditions, morphology, and behavior. Although organisms living in different thermal habitats may exhibit morphological plasticity or move from unfavorable locations, there are few examples of animals adjusting their thermal properties in response to short-term changes in local conditions. Here, we show that the intertidal sea star Pisaster ochraceus modulates its thermal inertia in response to prior thermal exposure. After exposure to high body temperature at low tide, sea stars increase the amount of colder-than-air fluid in their coelomic cavity when submerged during high tide, resulting in a lower body temperature during the subsequent low tide. Moreover, this buffering capacity is more effective when seawater is cold during the previous high tide. This ability to modify the volume of coelomic fluid provides sea stars with a novel thermoregulatory "backup" when faced with prolonged exposure to elevated aerial temperatures.

  14. Inertia-Free Thermally Driven Domain-Wall Motion in Antiferromagnets.

    PubMed

    Selzer, Severin; Atxitia, Unai; Ritzmann, Ulrike; Hinzke, Denise; Nowak, Ulrich

    2016-09-01

    Domain-wall motion in antiferromagnets triggered by thermally induced magnonic spin currents is studied theoretically. It is shown by numerical calculations based on a classical spin model that the wall moves towards the hotter regions, as in ferromagnets. However, for larger driving forces the so-called Walker breakdown-which usually speeds down the wall-is missing. This is due to the fact that the wall is not tilted during its motion. For the same reason antiferromagnetic walls have no inertia and, hence, no acceleration phase leading to higher effective mobility. PMID:27636489

  15. Inertia-Free Thermally Driven Domain-Wall Motion in Antiferromagnets.

    PubMed

    Selzer, Severin; Atxitia, Unai; Ritzmann, Ulrike; Hinzke, Denise; Nowak, Ulrich

    2016-09-01

    Domain-wall motion in antiferromagnets triggered by thermally induced magnonic spin currents is studied theoretically. It is shown by numerical calculations based on a classical spin model that the wall moves towards the hotter regions, as in ferromagnets. However, for larger driving forces the so-called Walker breakdown-which usually speeds down the wall-is missing. This is due to the fact that the wall is not tilted during its motion. For the same reason antiferromagnetic walls have no inertia and, hence, no acceleration phase leading to higher effective mobility.

  16. Inertia-Free Thermally Driven Domain-Wall Motion in Antiferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selzer, Severin; Atxitia, Unai; Ritzmann, Ulrike; Hinzke, Denise; Nowak, Ulrich

    2016-09-01

    Domain-wall motion in antiferromagnets triggered by thermally induced magnonic spin currents is studied theoretically. It is shown by numerical calculations based on a classical spin model that the wall moves towards the hotter regions, as in ferromagnets. However, for larger driving forces the so-called Walker breakdown—which usually speeds down the wall—is missing. This is due to the fact that the wall is not tilted during its motion. For the same reason antiferromagnetic walls have no inertia and, hence, no acceleration phase leading to higher effective mobility.

  17. The influence of thermal inertia on temperatures and frost stability on Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, John R.; Moore, Jeffrey M.

    1992-01-01

    It is presently argued, in view of (1) a thermal inertia model for the surface of Triton which (like previous ones) predicts a monotonic recession of permanent N2 deposits toward the poles and very little seasonal N2 frost in the southern hemisphere, and (2) new spectroscopic evidence for nonvolatile CO2 on Triton's bright southern hemisphere, that much of that bright southern material is not N2. Such bright southern hemisphere volatiles may allow the formation of seasonal frosts, thereby helping to explain the observed spectroscopic changes of Triton during the last decade.

  18. Remote sensing of the mountain cryosphere using texture filters and apparent thermal inertia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenning, A.; Fieguth, P.; Long, S.; Peña, M. A.; Soliman, A. S.

    2011-12-01

    Rock glaciers and debris-covered glaciers on Earth, and analog landforms on Mars, constitute hidden water resources and components of the cryosphere that are difficult to map or characterize using remote sensors. We utilize two innovative approaches in this field, (1) texture filters and (2) thermal features, in particular apparent thermal inertia (ATI), in order to investigate ice-debris landforms and in particular rock glaciers in the semi-arid Andes. Even though the ridge-and-furrow surface patterns are probably the most characteristic morphological features of rock glaciers, our study is the first to apply texture filters to the problem of remotely-sensed rock glacier detection. Gabor filters are designed to detect zebra-like patterns and are therefore an obvious choice for this study. Texture features derived from a Gabor filterbank were calculated from panchromatic IKONOS orthoimagery and used to discriminate rock glacier and other debris surfaces utilizing four classification methods of varying complexity: generalized linear model (GLM), generalized additive model (GAM), support vector machine (SVM), and tree ensembles (Bundling). Bundling outperformed the other methods in most situations studied, achieving an area under the ROC curve (AUROC) of 0.72-0.80 in different spatial cross-validation scenarios. This study focused on a narrow area of interest that cannot be easily identified as non-rock glacier area based on topographic criteria, and therefore significantly better results are expected in practical mapping situations in combination with terrain attributes as predictors. Thermal remote sensing has been of limited use in mountain cryospheric studies. In addition to land surface temperature (LST), ATI is of particular interest in this context. Thermal inertia is a single thermophysical material property that determines the amplitude of temperature variations at the surface of a periodically heated half-space, and shows promise in discriminating different

  19. Implications for the Daily Variation and the Low Value of Thermal Inertia at Arabia Terra on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyota, T.; Saruya, T.; Kurita, K.

    2010-12-01

    Active nature of the Martian surface is considered to be responsible for various styles of the atmosphere-surface interaction. Here, we propose an idea to interpret the daily variation and the low value of thermal inertia at Arabia Terra on Mars. Thermal inertia calculated with the surface temperature obtained by remote sensing exhibits daily variation and seasonal variation. Putzig and Mellon [1] suggested that horizontal or vertical heterogeneity may yield apparent thermal inertia which varies with time of day and season. However, their interpretation couldn’t completely explain the extent and the phase of the temporal variation of thermal inertia at Arabia Terra. We would like to propose another possibility to explain the characteristics of the thermal inertia at Arabia Terra. In addition, the value of thermal inertia is extremely low at Arabia Terra. Daytime thermal inertia at Arabia Terra is as low as 20 tiu [1,2], which is lower than the value of thermal inertia of 1 micron dust aggregates ( 61 tiu [3]). To explain these characteristics of Arabia Terra, we proposed an idea that condensation and sublimation of water ice at the granular surface cause the daily variation and the low value of the thermal inertia at Arabia Terra. At nighttime, water vapor condenses at the surface. Immediately after sunrise, water ice at the surface sublimates. Electric force and sublimating gas pressure could affect the porosity of the surface. We suppose that the daily variation of the thermal inertia is caused by presence of deposition/removal of water ice and the low value of the thermal inertia is caused by the higher value of the bulk porosity than random close packing. To substantiate the above model, there remain four main questions to be answered. 1) Is there sufficient water vapor at the atmosphere above Arabia Terra?, 2) Does the sufficient amount of water condense at the surface during the night?, 3) Can water vapor and other factors make the surface porosity higher

  20. Thermal inertia index of the ocean layer of interaction with the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherstyukov, Boris

    2013-04-01

    The ocean is one of the most important components of the climate system and one of the factors of long-term variations of climate. Huge heat capacity of the ocean are always determined by the dominance of the ocean in interaction between ocean and atmosphere. For global atmosphere the ocean can be both a source and sewer of heat. The atmosphere is in contact only with the surface of the ocean, but thermal interaction takes place with the top mixed layer of the ocean that ranges from a few hundred meters to 1.5-2 km. The depth of this layer depends on the characteristics of domestic ocean processes at each place and from time. Mixed layer depth of Ocean determines the volume layer and its thermal capacity. The ocean could take away heat from the atmosphere and can give it away. If the depth of the upper mixed layer of the oceans depends the thermal inertia, the depth of this layer can be a factor of long-term changes of climate. Modified inertia must also affect the amplitude and phase lag of seasonal temperature changes. It is very important to assess changes in ocean mixed layer depth at each location for compare with climate changes. The change of the top ocean layer depth of ocean interaction with atmosphere can be measured by changes in lag of seasonal temperature changes. The report proposes an index of inertia (depth of layer) of the thermal interaction of the ocean with the atmosphere: I=T2-T1 , were T2 - the average temperature of the ocean surface in the second half of the year (July to December), T1 is the average temperature of the ocean surface in the first half of the year (January-June). The increase of index shows increased inertia of seasonal change that indirectly reflects the increase in depth of the top layer of the ocean involved into interaction with the atmosphere. Analysis of the index changes has shown that in the 20th century was reduced the layer depth of the ocean interacting with the atmosphere. This may mean that in recent decades was

  1. Mapping the Thermal Inertia of Saturn’s Rings with Cassini CIRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Shawn M.; Spilker, L. J.; PIlorz, S. H.; Showalter, M. R.

    2013-10-01

    We use data from Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer to map out the thermal response of Saturn's ring particles passing through Saturn's shadow and to determine variations in ring thermal inertia. CIRS records far infrared radiation in three separate detectors, each of which covers a distinct wavelength range. In this work, we analyze rings spectra recorded at focal plane 1 (FP1), as its wavelength response (16.7-1000 microns) is well suited to detecting direct thermal emission from Saturn's rings. The thermal budget of the rings is typically dominated by solar radiation. When ring particles enter Saturn’s shadow this source of energy is abruptly cut off with a consequential drop in ring temperature. Likewise, temperatures rebound when particles exit the shadow. To characterize these heating and cooling events, FP1 was repeatedly scanned across the main rings. Each scan was offset from either the ingress or egress shadow boundary by an amount corresponding to a fraction of a Keplerian orbit. By resampling these scans onto a common radial grid, we can map out the rings’ response to the abrupt changes in insolation at shadow ingress and egress. Periods near equinox represent a unique situation. During this time the Sun's disk crosses the ring plane and its rays strike the rings at zero incidence. Solar heating is virtually absent, and thermal radiation from Saturn and sunlight reflected by Saturn dominate the thermal environment. While ring temperature variations at equinox are much more subtle, they represent temperature contrasts that vary at the unique timescale corresponding to variations in Saturn contributions to the rings’ thermal budget. By analyzing CIRS data at a variety of locations and epochs, we will map out thermal inertia across the rings and attempt to tease out structural information about the particles which comprise Saturn’s rings. This presentation will report upon our progress towards these ends. This research was carried out at the

  2. Geologic applications of thermal-inertia mapping from satellite. [Powder River, Wyoming; Cubeza Prieta, Arizona, and Yellowstone National Park

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Offield, T. W. (Principal Investigator); Watson, K.; Hummer-Miller, S.

    1981-01-01

    In the Powder River Basin, Wyo., narrow geologic units having thermal inertias which contrast with their surroundings can be discriminated in optimal images. A few subtle thermal inertia anomalies coincide with areas of helium leakage believed to be associated with deep oil and gas concentrations. The most important results involved delineation of tectonic framework elements some of which were not previously recognized. Thermal and thermal inertia images also permit mapping of geomorphic textural domains. A thermal lineament appears to reveal a basement discontinuity which involves the Homestake Mine in the Black Hill, a zone of Tertiary igneous activity and facies control in oil producing horizons. Applications of these data to the Cabeza Prieta, Ariz., area illustrate their potential for igneous rock type discrimination. Extension to Yellowstone National Park resulted in the detection of additional structural information but surface hydrothermal features could not be distinguished with any confidence. A thermal inertia mapping algorithm, a fast and accurate image registration technique, and an efficient topographic slope and elevation correction method were developed.

  3. Europa's Thermal Surface from Galileo PPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, N. J.; Rathbun, J. A.; Spencer, J. R.

    2009-03-01

    We present Galileo Photopolarimeter-Radiometer data of Europa and, from these, model the thermal inertia and bolometric albedo of the surface. We also derive an upper limit for detection of endogenic activity.

  4. Thermal inertia and radar reflectivity of the Martian north polar ERG: Low-density aggregates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herkenhoff, K. E.

    1993-01-01

    The north polar layered deposits on Mars appear to be the source of the dark material that comprises the north polar erg. The physical properties and chemical composition of the erg material therefore have important implications for the origin and evolution of the Martian layered deposits. Viking bistatic radar and infrared thermal mapping (IRTM) data indicate that the bulk density of the erg material is lower than that of the average Martian surface. These data are consistent with hypotheses involving formation of filamentary sublimation residue (FSR) particles from erosion of the layered deposits. The color and albedo of the erg and of the layered deposits, and the presence of magnetic material on Mars, suggest that the dark material is composed of low-density aggregates of magnetic dust grains, perhaps similar to FSR particles created in laboratory experiments.

  5. The polar layered deposits on Mars: Inference from thermal inertia modeling and geologic studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herkenhoff, K. E.

    1992-01-01

    It is widely believed that the Martian polar layered deposits record climate variations over at least the last 10 to 100 m.y., but the details of the processes involved and their relative roles in layer formation and evolution remain obscure. Weathering of the Martian layered deposits by sublimation of water ice can account for the thermal inertias, water vapor abundances, and geologic relationships observed in the Martian polar regions. The nonvolatile components of the layered deposits appears to consist mainly of bright red dust, with small amounts of dark dust. Dark dust, perhaps similar to the magnetic material found at the Viking Lander sites, may preferentially form filamentary residue particles upon weathering of the deposits. Once eroded, these particles may saltate to form the dark dunes found in both polar regions. This scenario for the origin and evolution of the dark material within the polar layered deposits is consistent with the available imaging and thermal data. Further experimental measurements of the thermophysical properties of magnetite and maghemite under Martian conditions are needed to better test this hypothesis.

  6. Thermal properties of 433 Eros

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lebofsky, L. A.; Rieke, G. H.

    1979-01-01

    Radiometric and reflected light observations of 433 Eros at high time resolution, high accuracy, and broad spectral coverage are reported. A thermal inertia model is used to estimate the thermal inertia, albedo, and size of Eros. An albedo of 0.125 plus or minus 0.025 with axes of 39.3 plus or minus 2.0 x 16.1 plus or minus 0.8 km is found. The estimate of the albedo is about 30% lower than previous estimates.

  7. Star formation through thermal instability of radiative plasma with finite electron inertia and finite Larmor radius corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaothekar, Sachin

    2016-08-01

    I have studied the effects of finite electron inertia, finite ion Larmor radius (FLR) corrections, and radiative heat-loss function on the thermal instability of an infinite homogeneous, viscous plasma incorporating the effect of thermal conductivity for star formation in interstellar medium (ISM). A general dispersion relation is derived using the normal mode analysis method with the help of relevant linearized perturbation equations of the problem. The wave propagation is discussed for longitudinal and transverse directions to the external magnetic field and the conditions of modified thermal instabilities and stabilities are discussed in different cases. We find that the thermal instability criterion is get modified into radiative instability criterion by inclusion of radiative heat-loss functions with thermal conductivity. The viscosity of medium removes the effect of FLR corrections from the condition of radiative instability. Numerical calculation shows stabilizing effect of heat-loss function, viscosity and FLR corrections, and destabilizing effect of finite electron inertia on the thermal instability. Results carried out in this paper shows that stars are formed in interstellar medium mainly due to thermal instability.

  8. Regional-scale estimates of surface moisture availability and thermal inertia using remote thermal measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, T. N.

    1986-01-01

    A review is presented of numerical models which were developed to interpret thermal IR data and to identify the governing parameters and surface energy fluxes recorded in the images. Analytic, predictive, diagnostic and empirical models are described. The limitations of each type of modeling approach are explored in terms of the error sources and inherent constraints due to theoretical or measurement limitations. Sample results of regional-scale soil moisture or evaporation patterns derived from the Heat Capacity Mapping Mission and GOES satellite data through application of the predictive model devised by Carlson (1981) are discussed. The analysis indicates that pattern recognition will probably be highest when data are collected over flat, arid, sparsely vegetated terrain. The soil moisture data then obtained may be accurate to within 10-20 percent.

  9. A validation of a thermal inertia approach to map soil water content on soils characterized by low fractional cover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltese, Antonino; Capodici, Fulvio; La Loggia, Goffredo; Corbari, Chiara; Mancini, Marco

    2013-10-01

    The assessment of the spatial distribution of soil water content could improve the effectiveness of agro-hydrological models. Although it is possible to retrieve the spatial distribution of the soil water content using thermal inertia, the main limit is its applicability to bare soils only. Recently, a variation of the thermal inertia approach has been setup also on vegetated soils characterized by low fractional cover. In particular, the methodology proposes to attenuate the solar radiation at the top of the canopy to the one reaching the soil trough an extinction factor. In situ data were acquired in June 2011 and July 2012 over two fields of maize and sunflowers; both were at their early growing stages. An airborneplatform provided images in the visible/near infrared and thermal infrared, both in day and night time. Results of the 2011 experiment demonstrated that the vegetation cover correction is required even with low fractional cover; indeed, not applying this correction would results in strong overestimation. The 2012 experiment (REFLEX) further validates the model on an independent dataset, thus, confirming the reliability of the methodology. Furthermore, a spatial resolution analysis highlighted that retrievals at low spatial resolution best compares with in situsoil water content than those obtained at high-resolution. Finally, the availability of a thermal image acquired after irrigating demonstrated the unreliability of the method when soil water content significantly changes between the two thermal acquisitions.

  10. Thermal-Infrared Surveys of Near-Earth Object Diameters and Albedos with Spitzer and IRTF/MIRSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mommert, Michael; Trilling, David; Hora, Joseph L.; Chesley, Steven; Emery, Josh; Fazio, Giovanni; Harris, Alan W.; Moskovitz, Nick; Mueller, Michael; Smith, Howard

    2015-08-01

    More than 12000 Near-Earth Objects (NEOs) have been discovered over the past few decades and current discovery surveys find on average 4 new NEOs every night. In comparison to asteroid discovery, the physical characterization of NEOs lags far behind: measured diameters and albedos exist only for roughly 10% of all known NEOs. We describe a current and a future observing program that provide diameter and albedo measurements of a large number of NEOs.In our Spitzer Space Telescope Exploration Science program 'NEOSurvey', we are performing a fast and efficient flux-limited survey in which we measure the diameters and albedos of ~600 NEOs in a total of 710 hrs of observing time. We measure the thermal emission of our targets at 4.5 micron and combine these measurements with optical data in a thermal model. Our diameters and albedos come with highly realistic uncertainties that account for a wide range of potential asteroid properties. Our primary goal is to create a large and uniform catalog of NEO properties, including diameters, albedos, and flux density data. This catalog is publicly accessible and provides the latest results usually within 2 weeks after the observation.Starting in 2016, we will also make use of the refurbished and recommissioned MIRSI mid-infrared imaging camera on NASA's InfraRed Telescope Facility (IRTF) to derive the diameters and albedos of up to 750 NEOs over a period of 3 yrs. MIRSI will be equipped with an optical camera that will allow for simultaneous optical imaging, which will improve our thermal modeling results. With MIRSI, we will focus on newly discovered NEOs that are close to Earth and hence relatively bright.The results from both programs, together with already exisiting diameter and albedo results from the literature, will form the largest database of NEO physical properties available to date. With this data set, we will be able to refine the size distribution of small NEOs and the corresponding impact frequency, and compare the

  11. Geologic application of thermal inertia imaging using HCMM data. [Walker Lane, Nevada; San Rafael, Utah; and Death Valley and Pisgah Crater, Lavic Lake Region, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahle, A. B.; Schieldge, J. P.; Abrams, M. J.; Alley, R. E.; Levine, C. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    Three test sites in the western US were selected to discriminate among surface geologic materials on the basis of their thermal properties as determined from HCMM data. Attempts to determine quantitatively accurate thermal inertia values from HCMM digital data met with only partial success due to the effects of sensor miscalibrations, radiative transfer in the atmosphere, and varying meteorology and elevation across a scene. In most instances, apparent thermal inertia was found to be an excellent qualitative representation of true thermal inertia. Computer processing of digital day and night HCMM data allowed construction of geologically useful images. At some test sites, more information was provided by data than LANDSAT data. Soil moisture effects and differences in spectrally dark materials were more effectively displayed using the thermal data.

  12. Brain thermal inertia, but no evidence for selective brain cooling, in free-ranging western grey kangaroos (Macropus fuliginosus).

    PubMed

    Maloney, Shane K; Fuller, Andrea; Meyer, Leith C R; Kamerman, Peter R; Mitchell, Graham; Mitchell, Duncan

    2009-04-01

    Marsupials reportedly can implement selective brain cooling despite lacking a carotid rete. We measured brain (hypothalamic) and carotid arterial blood temperatures every 5 min for 5, 17, and 63 days in spring in three free-living western grey kangaroos. Body temperature was highest during the night, and decreased rapidly early in the morning, reaching a nadir at 10:00. The highest body temperatures recorded occurred sporadically in the afternoon, presumably associated with exercise. Hypothalamic temperature consistently exceeded arterial blood temperature, by an average 0.3 degrees C, except during these afternoon events when hypothalamic temperature lagged behind, and was occasionally lower than, the simultaneous arterial blood temperature. The reversal in temperatures resulted from the thermal inertia of the brain; changes in the brain to arterial blood temperature difference were related to the rate of change of arterial blood temperature on both heating and cooling (P < 0.001 for all three kangaroos). We conclude that these data are not evidence for active selective brain cooling in kangaroos. The effect of thermal inertia on brain temperature is larger than might be expected in the grey kangaroo, a discrepancy that we speculate derives from the unique vascular anatomy of the marsupial brain.

  13. Effect of Finite Larmor Radius Corrections on the Thermal Instability of Thermally Conducting Viscous Plasma with Hall Current and Electron Inertia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Shweta; Sharma, Prerana; Kaothekar, Sachin; Chhajlani, R. K.

    2016-10-01

    The thermal instability of an infinite homogeneous, thermally conducting, and rotating plasma, incorporating finite electrical resistivity, finite electron inertia, and an arbitrary radiative heat-loss function in the presence of finite Larmor radius corrections and Hall current, has been studied. Analysis has been made with the help of linearized magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) equations. A general dispersion relation is obtained using the normal mode analysis method, and the dispersion relation is discussed for longitudinal propagation and transverse propagation separately. The dispersion relation has been solved numerically to obtain the dependence of the growth rate on the various parameters involved. The conditions of modified thermal instability and stability are discussed in the different cases of interest.

  14. Using CRISM and THEMIS to characterize high thermal inertia terrains in the northern Hellas region of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBeck, J.; Seelos, K. D.; Ackiss, S. E.; Buczkowski, D.

    2014-12-01

    Previous analyses of Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) data indicate that high thermal inertia (TI) materials within the cratered highlands north of Hellas are in situ bedrock units enriched in olivine. The high TI materials occur in both ~3.5 Ga infilled, flat-floored craters as well as ~3.8-4.0 Ga expanses of intercrater plains. A spatial association of the intercrater plains units with the Hellas ring structures suggests that they may have resulted from magma ascension and eruption via crustal fractures. Infilled craters may have formed after individual impact events triggered decompressional melting and effusive volcanism. Here we examine the mineralogy of both the high TI intercrater plains materials and high TI crater floor materials to the north of Hellas (30°E to 85°E and 7°S to 27°S) using Vis/NIR spectral data from the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM). We report on the spatial distribution and variability of observed mafic minerals (olivine, low-calcium pyroxene, and high-calcium pyroxene) to constrain whether the formation of these outcrops were caused or influenced by a single event (e.g., the Hellas impact), multiple individual events, or by some other means, and to provide overall insight into Noachian/Hesperian crustal evolution of Mars.

  15. Absolute magnitudes of asteroids and a revision of asteroid albedo estimates from WISE thermal observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pravec, Petr; Harris, Alan W.; Kušnirák, Peter; Galád, Adrián; Hornoch, Kamil

    2012-09-01

    We obtained estimates of the Johnson V absolute magnitudes (H) and slope parameters (G) for 583 main-belt and near-Earth asteroids observed at Ondřejov and Table Mountain Observatory from 1978 to 2011. Uncertainties of the absolute magnitudes in our sample are <0.21 mag, with a median value of 0.10 mag. We compared the H data with absolute magnitude values given in the MPCORB, Pisa AstDyS and JPL Horizons orbit catalogs. We found that while the catalog absolute magnitudes for large asteroids are relatively good on average, showing only little biases smaller than 0.1 mag, there is a systematic offset of the catalog values for smaller asteroids that becomes prominent in a range of H greater than ∼10 and is particularly big above H ∼ 12. The mean (Hcatalog - H) value is negative, i.e., the catalog H values are systematically too bright. This systematic negative offset of the catalog values reaches a maximum around H = 14 where the mean (Hcatalog - H) is -0.4 to -0.5. We found also smaller correlations of the offset of the catalog H values with taxonomic types and with lightcurve amplitude, up to ∼0.1 mag or less. We discuss a few possible observational causes for the observed correlations, but the reason for the large bias of the catalog absolute magnitudes peaking around H = 14 is unknown; we suspect that the problem lies in the magnitude estimates reported by asteroid surveys. With our photometric H and G data, we revised the preliminary WISE albedo estimates made by Masiero et al. (Masired, J.R. et al. [2011]. Astrophys. J. 741, 68-89) and Mainzer et al. (Mainzer, A. et al. [2011b]. Astrophys. J. 743, 156-172) for asteroids in our sample. We found that the mean geometric albedo of Tholen/Bus/DeMeo C/G/B/F/P/D types with sizes of 25-300 km is pV = 0.057 with the standard deviation (dispersion) of the sample of 0.013 and the mean albedo of S/A/L types with sizes 0.6-200 km is 0.197 with the standard deviation of the sample of 0.051. The standard errors of the

  16. A case for using ground-based thermal inertia measurements to detect Martian caves.

    PubMed

    Groemer, Gernot; Foresta, Luca; Turetschek, Thomas; Bothe, Claudia; Boyd, Andrea; Dinkelaker, Aline; Dissertori, Markus; Fasching, David; Fischer, Monika; Föger, Daniel; Frischauf, Norbert; Fritsch, Lukas; Fuchs, Harald; Gautsch, Christoph; Gerard, Stephan; Goetzloff, Linda; Gołebiowska, Izabella; Gorur, Paavan; Groemer, Gerhard; Groll, Petra; Haider, Christian; Haider, Olivia; Hauth, Eva; Hauth, Stefan; Hettrich, Sebastian; Jais, Wolfgang; Jones, Natalie; Taj-Eddine, Kamal; Karl, Alexander; Kauerhoff, Tilo; Khan, Muhammad Shadab; Kjeldsen, Andreas; Klauck, Jan; Losiak, Anna; Luger, Markus; Luger, Thomas; Luger, Ulrich; McArthur, Jane; Moser, Linda; Neuner, Julia; Orgel, Csilla; Ori, Gian Gabriele; Paternesi, Roberta; Peschier, Jarno; Pfeil, Isabella; Prock, Silvia; Radinger, Josef; Ragonig, Christoph; Ramirez, Barbara; Ramo, Wissam; Rampey, Mike; Sams, Arnold; Sams, Elisabeth; Sams, Sebastian; Sandu, Oana; Sans, Alejandra; Sansone, Petra; Scheer, Daniela; Schildhammer, Daniel; Scornet, Quentin; Sejkora, Nina; Soucek, Alexander; Stadler, Andrea; Stummer, Florian; Stumptner, Willibald; Taraba, Michael; Tlustos, Reinhard; Toferer, Ernst; Winter, Egon; Zanella-Kux, Katja

    2014-05-01

    Martian caves are regarded as one of the most interesting locations in which to search for life on the planet. Data obtained during the MARS2013 expedition at Hamar Laghdad Ridge in the Tafilalt region of Morocco indicate that even small cavities can display thermal behavior that is characteristic for caves. For example, temperature in a cavity equaled 14°C±0.1°C before sunrise, which was higher than the temperature of the ambient air (10°C±0.1°C) and proximate rocks (9°C±0.1°C) at the same time. Within 30 min after sunrise, when the temperature of surrounding rocks corresponded to 15°C, this thermal relationship reversed. Measurements were conducted under simulated spaceflight conditions, including near-real-time interpretation of data that were acquired in a complex flight planning environment. We conclude that using ground-based thermal contrast measurements, in 7-14 μm band before and after sunset, is an effective method for Mars astronauts to identify caves, possibly superior to usage of space-based or ground-penetrating data.

  17. Evaluation of thermal data for geologic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahle, A. B.; Palluconi, F. D.; Levine, C. J.; Abrams, M. J.; Nash, D. B.; Alley, R. E.; Schieldge, J. P.

    1982-01-01

    Sensitivity studies using thermal models indicated sources of errors in the determination of thermal inertia from HCMM data. Apparent thermal inertia, with only simple atmospheric radiance corrections to the measured surface temperature, would be sufficient for most operational requirements for surface thermal inertia. Thermal data does have additional information about the nature of surface material that is not available in visible and near infrared reflectance data. Color composites of daytime temperature, nighttime temperature, and albedo were often more useful than thermal inertia images alone for discrimination of lithologic boundaries. A modeling study, using the annual heating cycle, indicated the feasibility of looking for geologic features buried under as much as a meter of alluvial material. The spatial resolution of HCMM data is a major limiting factor in the usefulness of the data for geologic applications. Future thermal infrared satellite sensors should provide spatial resolution comparable to that of the LANDSAT data.

  18. Prediction of temperature and thermal inertia effect in the maturation stage and stockpiling of a large composting mass

    SciTech Connect

    Barrena, R.; Canovas, C.; Sanchez, A. . E-mail: asanchez@eupma.uab.es

    2006-07-01

    A macroscopic non-steady state energy balance was developed and solved for a composting pile of source-selected organic fraction of municipal solid waste during the maturation stage (13,500 kg of compost). Simulated temperature profiles correlated well with temperature experimental data (ranging from 50 to 70 deg. C) obtained during the maturation process for more than 50 days at full scale. Thermal inertia effect usually found in composting plants and associated to the stockpiling of large composting masses could be predicted by means of this simplified energy balance, which takes into account terms of convective, conductive and radiation heat dissipation. Heat losses in a large composting mass are not significant due to the similar temperatures found at the surroundings and at the surface of the pile (ranging from 15 to 40 deg. C). In contrast, thermophilic temperature in the core of the pile was maintained during the whole maturation process. Heat generation was estimated with the static respiration index, a parameter that is typically used to monitor the biological activity and stability of composting processes. In this study, the static respiration index is presented as a parameter to estimate the metabolic heat that can be generated according to the biodegradable organic matter content of a compost sample, which can be useful in predicting the temperature of the composting process.

  19. Use of Satellite Data Assimilation to Infer Land Surface Thermal Inertia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lapenta, William; McNider, Richard T.; Biazar, Arastoo; Suggs, Ron; Jedlovec, Gary; Dembek, Scott

    2002-01-01

    There are two important but observationally uncertain parameters in the grid averaged surface energy budgets of mesoscale models - surface moisture availability and thermal heat capacity. A technique has been successfully developed for assimilating Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) skin temperature tendencies during the mid-morning time frame to improve specification of surface moisture. In a new application of the technique, the use of satellite skin temperature tendencies in early evening is explored to improve specification of the surface thermal heat capacity. Together, these two satellite assimilation constraints have been shown to significantly improve the characterization of the surface energy budget of a mesoscale model on fine spatial scales. The GOES assimilation without the adjusted heat capacity was run operationally during the International H2O Project on a 12-km grid. This paper presents the results obtained when using both the moisture availability and heat capacity retrievals in concert. Preliminary results indicate that retrieved moisture availability alone improved the verification statistics of 2-meter temperature and dew point forecasts. Results from the 1.5 month long study period using the bulk heat capacity will be presented at the meeting.

  20. Idealised Simulations of Daytime Pollution Transport in a Steep Valley and its Sensitivity to Thermal Stratification and Surface Albedo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehner, M.; Gohm, A.

    2010-02-01

    Numerical simulations of tracer transport in an idealised, east-west aligned valley are performed with the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS), both two-dimensional and three-dimensional. The results are qualitatively consistent with wintertime observations in the Austrian Inn Valley. The simulations show an asymmetry in wind circulation and tracer distribution between the valley sidewalls according to the orientation of the slope with respect to the sun. Two-dimensional sensitivity experiments are run to investigate the influence of vertical inhomogeneities in thermal stratification and vegetation coverage on the slope-wind circulation and therewith the tracer transport. It is shown that a transition to a layer of higher stability or to a region with higher surface albedo causes a reduction of the mass flux in the upslope-wind layer and due to mass continuity a quasi-horizontal transport out of the slope-wind layer.

  1. Use of thermal inertia determined by HCMM to predict nocturnal cold prone areas in Florida. [The Everglades agricultural area, Lake Okeechobee, and the Suwanee River basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, L. H., Jr. (Principal Investigator); Chen, E.; Martsolf, J. D.; Jones, P. H.

    1981-01-01

    Transparencies, prints, and computer compatible tapes of temperature differential and thermal inertia for the winter of 1978 to 1979 were obtained. Thermal inertial differences in the South Florida depicted include: drained organic soils of the Everglades agricultural area, undrained organic soils of the managed water conservation areas of the South Florida water management district, the urbanized area around Miami, Lake Okeechobee, and the mineral soil west of the Everglades agricultural area. The range of wetlands and uplands conditions within the Suwanee River basin was also identified. It is shown that the combination of wetlands uplands surface features of Florida yield a wide range of surface temperatures related to wetness of the surface features.

  2. Use of thermal inertia determined by HCMM to predict nocturnal cold prone areas in Florida. [Everglades agricultural area and the west north central peninsula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, L. H., Jr. (Principal Investigator); Chen, E.; Martsolf, J. D.; Jones, P. H.

    1981-01-01

    Surface temperatures derived from HCMM data were compared with to those obtained by GOES satellite and the apparent thermal inertia (ATI) calculated. For two dates, the HCMM temperatures appear to be about 5 C lower than the GOES temperatures. The ATI for excessively-drained to well-drained mineral soils was greater than for drained organic soils possibly because of long periods of low rainfall during late 1980 and early 1981. Organic soils cropped to sugar cane showed lower ATI after a severe killing freeze. With dead leaves, there was less transpiration and more solar radiation probably reached the dark soil surface. This would explain the larger diurnal temperature amplitude observed.

  3. Incomplete cooling down of Saturn's A ring at solar equinox: Implication for seasonal thermal inertia and internal structure of ring particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morishima, Ryuji; Spilker, Linda; Brooks, Shawn; Deau, Estelle; Pilorz, Stu

    2016-11-01

    At the solar equinox in August 2009, the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) onboard Cassini showed the lowest Saturn's ring temperatures ever observed. Detailed radiative transfer models show that the observed equinox temperatures of Saturn's A ring are much higher than model predictions as long as only the flux from Saturn is taken into account. In addition, the post-equinox temperatures are lower than the pre-equinox temperatures at the same absolute solar elevation angle. These facts indicate that the A ring was not completely cooled down at the equinox and that it is possible to give constraints on the size and seasonal thermal inertia of ring particles using seasonal temperature variations around the equinox. We develop a simple seasonal model for ring temperatures and first assume that the internal density and the thermal inertia of a ring particle are uniform with depth. The particle size is estimated to be 1-2 m. The seasonal thermal inertia is found to be 30-50 J m-2 K-1 s-1/2 in the middle A ring whereas it is ∼10 J m-2 K-1 s-1/2 or as low as the diurnal thermal inertia in the inner and outermost regions of the A ring. An additional internal structure model, in which a particle has a high density core surrounded by a fluffy regolith mantle, shows that the core radius relative to the particle radius is about 0.9 for the middle A ring and is much less for the inner and outer regions of the A ring. This means that the radial variation of the internal density of ring particles exists across the A ring. Some mechanisms may be confining dense particles in the middle A ring against viscous diffusion. Alternatively, the (middle) A ring might have recently formed (<108 yr) by destruction of an icy satellite, so that dense particles have not yet diffused over the A ring and regolith mantles of particles have not grown thick. Our model results also indicate that the composition of the core is predominantly water ice, not rock.

  4. A simulation model of temperature transitory on rocks having different thermal inertia. Analysis of the theoretical capacity of rock discrimination by remote sensing data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassinis, R. (Principal Investigator); Tosi, N.

    1980-01-01

    The possibility of identifying ground surface material by measuring the surface temperature at two different and significant times of the day was investigated for the case of hypothetical island whose rocky surface contained no vegetation and consisted of dolomite, clay, and granite. The thermal dynamics of the soil surface during a day in which atmospheric conditions were average for a latitude of about 40 deg to 50 deg were numerically simulated. The line of separation between zones of different materials was delineated by the range of temperature variation. Results show that the difference between maximum and minimum value of the temperature of ground surface during the day is linked to the thermal inertia value of the material of which the rock is formed.

  5. Temporal and spatial mapping of surface albedo and atmospheric dust opacity on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S. W.; Clancy, R. T.; Gladstone, G. R.

    1993-01-01

    The Mariner 9 and Viking provided abundant evidence that eolian processes are active over much of the surface of Mars. Past studies have demonstrated that variations in regional albedo and wind-streak patterns are indicative of sediment transport through a region, while thermal inertia data (derived from the Viking Infrared Thermal Mapper (IRTM) dataset) are indicative of the degree of surface mantling by dust deposits. The visual and thermal data are therefore diagnostic of whether net erosion or deposition of dust-storm fallout is taking place currently and whether such processes have been active in a region over the long term. These previous investigations, however, have not attempted to correct for the effects of atmospheric dust loading on observations of the martian surface, so quantitative studies of current sediment transport rates have included large errors due to uncertainty in the magnitude of this 'atmospheric component' of the observations. We have developed a radiative transfer model that allows the atmospheric dust opacity to be determined from IRTM thermal observations. Corrections for the effects of atmospheric dust loading on observations of surface albedo can also be modeled. This approach to determining 'dust-corrected surface albedo' incorporates the atmospheric dust opacity, the single-scattering albedo and particle phase function of atmospheric dust, and the bidirectional reflectance of the surface, and it accounts for variable lighting and viewing geometry.

  6. Thermal cracking of CO2 slab ice as the main driving force for albedo increase of the martian seasonal polar caps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philippe, S.; Schmitt, B.; Beck, P.; Brissaud, O.

    2015-10-01

    Understanding the microphysical processes occuring on the Martian seasonal cap is critical since their radiative properties can affect the martian climate. A well documented phenomenom is the albedo increase of the Martian seasonal caps during spring, Fig.1. There are a lot of hypotheses that have been proposed as an explanation for this observation : the decrease of the CO2 grain size [2], a cleaning process of the CO2 slab that would imply either the sinking or the ejection of the dust contained in its volume ([1], [2], [5]), a water-layer accumulation on the top of the slab [5], the role played by aerosols [2] etc ... So far, no experimental simulations have been realized to discriminate between these processes. We designed an experiment to investigate the hypothesis of CO2 ice grain size decrease through thermal cracking as well as that of dust segregation as the possible reasons for albedo increase.

  7. A thermal model of Rosetta/ROSINA/DFMS to assess the effects of solar illumination and thermal inertia of the mass spectrometer on mass spectra at 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Keyser, Johan; Gibbons, Andrew; Neefs, Eddy; Equeter, Eddy; Dhooghe, Frederik; Maggiolo, Romain; Cessateur, Gaël; Gunell, Herbert; Altwegg, Kathrin; Berthelier, Jean-Jacques; Briois, Christelle; Calmonte, Ursina; Combi, Michael R.; Fiethe, Björn; Fuselier, Stephen; Gombosi, Tamas; Hässig, Myrttha; Le Roy, Léna; Rubin, Martin; Sémon, Thierry

    2016-04-01

    The coma composition of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko is being analysed in detail with the high mass resolution Double Focussing Mass Spectrometer (DFMS) that is part of the ROSINA instrument suite on board of the Rosetta spacecraft. The Rosetta spacecraft - and DFMS in particular - experiences changing behaviour as the temperature varies with illumination and distance from the Sun. This contribution highlights these changes and their practical consequences for the interpretation of the DFMS mass spectra. A thermal model is presented that addresses thermal behaviour on a long time scale, related to instrument illumination and thermal gradients inside DFMS, and on a short time scale, related to transients after on/off cycling of the instrument and thermal inertia. Both issues adversely affect the problem of establishing a proper instrument mass calibration.

  8. Inertia and Decision Making.

    PubMed

    Alós-Ferrer, Carlos; Hügelschäfer, Sabine; Li, Jiahui

    2016-01-01

    Decision inertia is the tendency to repeat previous choices independently of the outcome, which can give rise to perseveration in suboptimal choices. We investigate this tendency in probability-updating tasks. Study 1 shows that, whenever decision inertia conflicts with normatively optimal behavior (Bayesian updating), error rates are larger and decisions are slower. This is consistent with a dual-process view of decision inertia as an automatic process conflicting with a more rational, controlled one. We find evidence of decision inertia in both required and autonomous decisions, but the effect of inertia is more clear in the latter. Study 2 considers more complex decision situations where further conflict arises due to reinforcement processes. We find the same effects of decision inertia when reinforcement is aligned with Bayesian updating, but if the two latter processes conflict, the effects are limited to autonomous choices. Additionally, both studies show that the tendency to rely on decision inertia is positively associated with preference for consistency.

  9. A two-layer canopy with thermal inertia for an improved modelling of the sub-canopy snowpack energy-balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouttevin, I.; Lehning, M.; Jonas, T.; Gustafsson, D.; Mölder, M.

    2015-01-01

    A new, two-layer canopy module with thermal inertia as part of the detailed snow model SNOWPACK (version 3.2.1) is presented and evaluated. This module is designed to reproduce the difference in thermal response between leafy and woody canopy elements, and their impact on the underlying snowpack energy balance. Given the number of processes resolved, the SNOWPACK model with its enhanced canopy module constitutes a very advanced, physics-based atmosphere-to-soil-through-canopy-and-snow modelling chain. Comparisons of modelled sub-canopy thermal radiation to stand-scale observations at an Alpine site (Alptal, Switzerland) demonstrate the improvements of the new canopy module. Both thermal heat mass and the two-layer canopy formulation contribute to reduce the daily amplitude of the modelled canopy temperature signal, in agreement with observations. Particularly striking is the attenuation of the night-time drop in canopy temperature, which was a key model bias. We specifically show that a single-layered canopy model is unable to produce this limited temperature drop correctly. The impact of the new parameterizations on the modelled dynamics of the sub-canopy snowpack is analysed and yields consistent results but the frequent occurrence of mixed-precipitation events at Alptal prevents a conclusive assessment of model performance against snow data. The new model is also successfully tested without specific tuning against measured tree temperatures and biomass heat storage fluxes at the boreal site of Norunda (Sweden). This provides an independent assessment of its physical consistency and stresses the robustness and transferability of the parameterizations used.

  10. Celestial body irradiance determination from an underfilled satellite radiometer: application to albedo and thermal emission measurements of the Moon using CERES.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Grant

    2008-09-20

    The Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) is a program that measures the Earth radiation budget (ERB) from two polar orbiting satellite platforms. CERES radiometers are designed to make stable broadband measurements of scattered solar and emitted thermal radiative flux leaving Earth with an accuracy of 1% or better. Using versatile and programmable scan modes, it is also possible for every CERES instrument to view the Moon on each orbit. However, until now, it has not been possible to derive absolute measurements of lunar irradiance using CERES because the Moon's disk fills only 10% of the telescope field of view. This work presents a method of integrating CERES raster-scan data in order to obtain a measurement of the average scattered solar and emitted thermal radiance from the entire lunar disk. The technique results in excellent agreement between CERES instruments on different satellites as to lunar albedo and emitted thermal flux. The average broadband Moon albedo is measured by CERES at a value of 0.1362 (+/-2-3%) when normalized to a static lunar phase angle of 7 degrees using the U.S. Geological Survey lunar irradiance Robotic Lunar Observatory model. The method for the first time also yields very accurate measurements of the thermal irradiance emitted from the Moon. These suggest an average long-wave flux of 977 Wm(-2) (+/-2-3% at 7 degrees phase), implying an approximate mean surface temperature of around 92 degrees C. Statistical analysis on available data suggests that a CERES instrument performing monthly lunar measurements could utilize the Moon as a stability target and reduce calibration drifts to 0.3% per decade or less within an instrument's lifetime. Given the success of the technique, a solar calibration system is proposed that will allow precise tracking of an ERB instrument's optical degradation using the Sun. PMID:18806861

  11. Celestial body irradiance determination from an underfilled satellite radiometer: application to albedo and thermal emission measurements of the Moon using CERES.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Grant

    2008-09-20

    The Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) is a program that measures the Earth radiation budget (ERB) from two polar orbiting satellite platforms. CERES radiometers are designed to make stable broadband measurements of scattered solar and emitted thermal radiative flux leaving Earth with an accuracy of 1% or better. Using versatile and programmable scan modes, it is also possible for every CERES instrument to view the Moon on each orbit. However, until now, it has not been possible to derive absolute measurements of lunar irradiance using CERES because the Moon's disk fills only 10% of the telescope field of view. This work presents a method of integrating CERES raster-scan data in order to obtain a measurement of the average scattered solar and emitted thermal radiance from the entire lunar disk. The technique results in excellent agreement between CERES instruments on different satellites as to lunar albedo and emitted thermal flux. The average broadband Moon albedo is measured by CERES at a value of 0.1362 (+/-2-3%) when normalized to a static lunar phase angle of 7 degrees using the U.S. Geological Survey lunar irradiance Robotic Lunar Observatory model. The method for the first time also yields very accurate measurements of the thermal irradiance emitted from the Moon. These suggest an average long-wave flux of 977 Wm(-2) (+/-2-3% at 7 degrees phase), implying an approximate mean surface temperature of around 92 degrees C. Statistical analysis on available data suggests that a CERES instrument performing monthly lunar measurements could utilize the Moon as a stability target and reduce calibration drifts to 0.3% per decade or less within an instrument's lifetime. Given the success of the technique, a solar calibration system is proposed that will allow precise tracking of an ERB instrument's optical degradation using the Sun.

  12. Identifying ephemeral and perennial stream reaches using apparent thermal inertia for an ungauged basin: The Rio Salado, Central New Mexico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Night and day temperature images from Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) remote sensing images are used to identify ephemeral and perennial stream reaches for use in the calibration of an integrated hydrologic model of an ungauged basin. The concept is based on a...

  13. Evaluation of HCMM satellite data for estuarine tidal circulation patterns and thermal inertia soil moisture measurements. [Delaware Bay, Cooper River, and the Potomac River estuaries; Luverne, Minnesota, soil moisture, and water temperature of Lake Anna, Virginia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiesnet, D. R.; Mcginnis, D. F., Jr. (Principal Investigator); Matson, M.; Pritchard, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    Digital thermal maps of the Cooper River (SC) and the Potomac River estuaries were prepared from heat capacity mapping radiometer (HCMR) tapes. Tidal phases were correctly interpreted and verified. Synoptic surface circulation patterns were charted by location thermal fronts and water mass boundaries within the estuaries. Thermal anomalies were detected adjacent of a conventional power plant on the Potomac. Under optimum conditions, estuaries as small as the Cooper River can be monitored for generalized thermal/tidal circulation patterns by the HCMM-type IR sensors. The HCMM thermal inertia approach to estimating soil moisture at the Luverne (MN) test site was found to be unsatisfactory as a NESS operational satellite technique because of cloud cover interference. Thermal-IR data show similar structure of the Baltimore and Washington heat islands when compared to NOAA AVHRR thermal-IR data. Thermal anomalies from the warm water discharge water of a nuclear power plant were mapped in Lake Anna, Virginia.

  14. MCNP SIMULATION OF THE HP(10) ENERGY RESPONSE OF A BRAZILIAN TLD ALBEDO NEUTRON INDIVIDUAL DOSEMETER, FROM THERMAL TO 20 MeV.

    PubMed

    Freitas, B M; Martins, M M; Pereira, W W; da Silva, A X; Mauricio, C L P

    2016-09-01

    The Brazilian Instituto de Radioproteção e Dosimetria (IRD) runs a neutron individual monitoring system with a home-made TLD albedo dosemeter. It has already been characterised and calibrated in some reference fields. However, the complete energy response of this dosemeter is not known, and the calibration factors for all monitored workplace neutron fields are difficult to be obtained experimentally. Therefore, to overcome such difficulties, Monte Carlo simulations have been used. This paper describes the simulation of the HP(10) neutron response of the IRD TLD albedo dosemeter using the MCNPX transport code, for energies from thermal to 20 MeV. The validation of the MCNPX modelling is done comparing the simulated results with the experimental measurements for ISO standard neutron fields of (241)Am-Be, (252)Cf, (241)Am-B and (252)Cf(D2O) and also for (241)Am-Be source moderated with paraffin and silicone. Bare (252)Cf are used for normalisation. PMID:26276807

  15. A two-layer canopy model with thermal inertia for an improved snowpack energy balance below needleleaf forest (model SNOWPACK, version 3.2.1, revision 741)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouttevin, I.; Lehning, M.; Jonas, T.; Gustafsson, D.; Molder, M.

    2015-08-01

    A new, two-layer canopy module with thermal inertia as part of the detailed snow model SNOWPACK (version 3.2.1) is presented and evaluated. As a by-product of these new developments, an exhaustive description of the canopy module of the SNOWPACK model is provided, thereby filling a gap in the existing literature. In its current form, the two-layer canopy module is suited for evergreen needleleaf forest, with or without snow cover. It is designed to reproduce the difference in thermal response between leafy and woody canopy elements, and their impact on the underlying snowpack or ground surface energy balance. Given the number of processes resolved, the SNOWPACK model with its enhanced canopy module constitutes a sophisticated physics-based modeling chain of the continuum going from atmosphere to soil through the canopy and snow. Comparisons of modeled sub-canopy thermal radiation to stand-scale observations at an Alpine site (Alptal, Switzerland) demonstrate improvements induced by the new canopy module. Both thermal heat mass and the two-layer canopy formulation contribute to reduce the daily amplitude of the modeled canopy temperature signal, in agreement with observations. Particularly striking is the attenuation of the nighttime drop in canopy temperature, which was a key model bias. We specifically show that a single-layered canopy model is unable to produce this limited temperature drop correctly. The impact of the new parameterizations on the modeled dynamics of the sub-canopy snowpack is analyzed. The new canopy module yields consistent results but the frequent occurrence of mixed-precipitation events at Alptal prevents a conclusive assessment of model performance against snow data. The new model is also successfully tested without specific tuning against measured tree temperature and biomass heat-storage fluxes at the boreal site of Norunda (Sweden). This provides an independent assessment of its physical consistency and stresses the robustness and

  16. The influence of thermal inertia on Mars' seasonal pressure variation and the effect of the weather component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, S. E.; Paige, D. A.

    1993-01-01

    Using a Leighton-Murray type diurnal and seasonal Mars thermal model, we found that it is possible to reproduce the seasonal variation in daily-averaged pressures (approximately 680-890 Pa) measured by Viking Lander 1 (VL1), during years without global dust storms, with a standard deviation of less than 5 Pa. In this simple model, surface CO2, frost condensation, and sublimation rates at each latitude are determined by the net effects of radiation, latent heat, and heat conduction in subsurface soil layers. An inherent assumption of our model is that the seasonal pressure variation is due entirely to the exchange of mass between the atmosphere and polar caps. However, the results of recent Mars GCM modeling have made it clear that there is a significant dynamical contribution to the seasonal pressure variation. This 'weather' component is primarily due to large-scale changes in atmospheric circulation, and its magnitude depends somewhat on the dust content of the atmosphere. The overall form of the theoretical weather component at the location of VL1, as calculated by the AMES GCM, remains the same over the typical range of Mars dust opacities.

  17. Characterization of the High-Albedo NEA 3691 Bede

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wooden, Diane H.; Lederer, Susan M.; Jehin, Emmanuel; Rozitis, Benjamin; Jefferson, Jeffrey D.; Nelson, Tyler W.; Dotson, Jessie L.; Ryan, Erin L.; Howell, Ellen S.; Fernandez, Yanga R.; Lovell, Amy J.; Woodward, Charles E.; Harker, David E.

    2016-01-01

    Characterization of NEAs provides important inputs to models for atmospheric entry, risk assessment and mitigation. Diameter is a key parameter because diameter translates to kinetic energy in atmospheric entry. Diameters can be derived from the absolute magnitude, H(PA=0deg), and from thermal modeling of observed IR fluxes. For both methods, the albedo (pv) is important - high pv surfaces have cooler temperatures, larger diameters for a given Hmag, and shallower phase curves (larger slope parameter G). Thermal model parameters are coupled, however, so that a higher thermal inertia also results in a cooler surface temperature. Multiple parameters contribute to constraining the diameter. Observations made at multiple observing geometries can contribute to understanding the relationships between and potentially breaking some of the degeneracies between parameters. We present data and analyses on NEA 3691 Bede with the aim of best constraining the diameter and pv from a combination of thermal modeling and light curve analyses. We employ our UKIRT+Michelle mid-IR photometric observations of 3691 Bede's thermal emission at 2 phase angles (27&43 deg 2015-03-19 & 04-13), in addition to WISE data (33deg 2010-05-27, Mainzer+2011). Observing geometries differ by solar phase angles and by moderate changes in heliocentric distance (e.g., further distances produce somewhat cooler surface temperatures). With the NEATM model and for a constant IR beaming parameter (eta=constant), there is a family of solutions for (diameter, pv, G, eta) where G is the slope parameter from the H-G Relation. NEATM models employing Pravec+2012's choice of G=0.43, produce D=1.8 km and pv˜0.4, given that G=0.43 is assumed from studies of main belt asteroids (Warner+2009). We present an analysis of the light curve of 3691 Bede to constrain G from observations. We also investigate fitting thermophysical models (TPM, Rozitis+11) to constrain the coupled parameters of thermal inertia (Gamma) and surface

  18. Characterization of the high-albedo NEA 3691 Bede

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooden, Diane H.; Lederer, Susan M.; Jehin, Emmanuel; Rozitis, Benjamin; Jefferson, Jeffrey D.; Nelson, Tyler W.; Dotson, Jessie L.; Ryan, Erin L.; Howell, Ellen S.; Fernandez, Yanga R.; Lovell, Amy J.; Woodward, Charles E.; Harker, David Emerson

    2016-10-01

    Characterization of NEAs provides important inputs to models for atmospheric entry, risk assessment and mitigation. Diameter is a key parameter because diameter translates to kinetic energy in atmospheric entry. Diameters can be derived from the absolute magnitude, H(PA=0deg), and from thermal modeling of observed IR fluxes. For both methods, the albedo (pv) is important – high pv surfaces have cooler temperatures, larger diameters for a given Hmag, and shallower phase curves (larger slope parameter G). Thermal model parameters are coupled, however, so that a higher thermal inertia also results in a cooler surface temperature. Multiple parameters contribute to constraining the diameter.Observations made at multiple observing geometries can contribute to understanding the relationships between and potentially breaking some of the degeneracies between parameters. We present data and analyses on NEA 3691 Bede with the aim of best constraining the diameter and pv from a combination of thermal modeling and light curve analyses. We employ our UKIRT+Michelle mid-IR photometric observations of 3691 Bede's thermal emission at 2 phase angles (27&43 deg 2015-03-19 & 04-13), in addition to WISE data (33deg 2010-05-27, Mainzer+2011).Observing geometries differ by solar phase angles and by moderate changes in heliocentric distance (e.g., further distances produce somewhat cooler surface temperatures). With the NEATM model and for a constant IR beaming parameter (eta=constant), there is a family of solutions for (diameter, pv, G, eta) where G is the slope parameter from the H-G Relation. NEATM models employing Pravec+2012's choice of G=0.43, produce D=1.8 km and pv≈0.4, given that G=0.43 is assumed from studies of main belt asteroids (Warner+2009). We present an analysis of the light curve of 3691 Bede to constrain G from observations. We also investigate fitting thermophysical models (TPM, Rozitis+11) to constrain the coupled parameters of thermal inertia (Gamma) and surface

  19. Comparison of Observed Surface Temperatures of 4 Vesta to the KRC Thermal Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titus, T. N.; Becker, K. J.; Anderson, J. A.; Capria, M. T.; Tosi, F.; DeSanctis, M. C.; Palomba, E.; Grassi, D.; Capaccioni, F.; Ammannito, E.; Combe, J.-P.; McCord, T. B.; Li, J.-Y.; Russell, C. T.; Ryamond, C. A.; Mittlefehldt, D.; Toplis, M.; Forni, O.; Sykes, M. V.

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we will compare ob-served temperatures of the surface of Vesta using data acquired by the Dawn [1] Visible and Infrared Map-ping Spectrometer (VIR-MS) [2] during the approach phase to model results from the KRC thermal model. High thermal inertia materials, such as bedrock, resist changes in temperature while temperatures of low thermal inertia material, such as dust, respond quickly to changes in solar insolation. The surface of Vesta is expected to have low to medium thermal inertia values, with the most commonly used value being extremely low at 15 TIU [4]. There are several parameters which affect observed temperatures in addition to thermal inertia: bond albedo, slope, and surface roughness. In addition to these parameters, real surfaces are rarely uniform monoliths that can be described by a single thermal inertia value. Real surfaces are often vertically layered or are mixtures of dust and rock. For Vesta's surface, with temperature extremes ranging from 50 K to 275 K and no atmosphere, even a uniform monolithic surface may have non-uniform thermal inertia due to temperature dependent thermal conductivity.

  20. Inertia and Decision Making

    PubMed Central

    Alós-Ferrer, Carlos; Hügelschäfer, Sabine; Li, Jiahui

    2016-01-01

    Decision inertia is the tendency to repeat previous choices independently of the outcome, which can give rise to perseveration in suboptimal choices. We investigate this tendency in probability-updating tasks. Study 1 shows that, whenever decision inertia conflicts with normatively optimal behavior (Bayesian updating), error rates are larger and decisions are slower. This is consistent with a dual-process view of decision inertia as an automatic process conflicting with a more rational, controlled one. We find evidence of decision inertia in both required and autonomous decisions, but the effect of inertia is more clear in the latter. Study 2 considers more complex decision situations where further conflict arises due to reinforcement processes. We find the same effects of decision inertia when reinforcement is aligned with Bayesian updating, but if the two latter processes conflict, the effects are limited to autonomous choices. Additionally, both studies show that the tendency to rely on decision inertia is positively associated with preference for consistency. PMID:26909061

  1. The joint influence of albedo and insulation on roof performance: An observational study

    DOE PAGES

    Ramamurthy, P.; Sun, T.; Rule, K.; Bou-Zeid, E.

    2015-02-23

    We focus on understanding the temperature and heat flux fields in building roofs, and how they are modulated by the interacting influences of albedo and insulation at annual, seasonal and diurnal scales. High precision heat flux plates and thermocouples were installed over multiple rooftops of varying insulation thickness and albedo in the Northeastern United States to monitor the temperature and the heat flux into and out of the roof structures for a whole year. This analysis shows that while membrane reflectivity (albedo) plays a dominant role in reducing the heat conducted inward through the roof structures during the warmer months,more » insulation thickness becomes the main roof attribute in preventing heat loss from the buildings during colder months. On a diurnal scale, the thermal state of the white roof structures fluctuated little compared to black roof structures; membrane temperature over white roofs ranged between 10 °C and 45 °C during summer months compared to black membranes that ranged between 10 °C and 80 °C. Insulation thickness, apart from reducing the heat conducted through the roof structure, also delayed the transfer of heat, owing to the thermal inertia of the insulation layer. Furthermore, this has important implications for determining the peak heating and cooling times.« less

  2. The joint influence of albedo and insulation on roof performance: An observational study

    SciTech Connect

    Ramamurthy, P.; Sun, T.; Rule, K.; Bou-Zeid, E.

    2015-02-23

    We focus on understanding the temperature and heat flux fields in building roofs, and how they are modulated by the interacting influences of albedo and insulation at annual, seasonal and diurnal scales. High precision heat flux plates and thermocouples were installed over multiple rooftops of varying insulation thickness and albedo in the Northeastern United States to monitor the temperature and the heat flux into and out of the roof structures for a whole year. This analysis shows that while membrane reflectivity (albedo) plays a dominant role in reducing the heat conducted inward through the roof structures during the warmer months, insulation thickness becomes the main roof attribute in preventing heat loss from the buildings during colder months. On a diurnal scale, the thermal state of the white roof structures fluctuated little compared to black roof structures; membrane temperature over white roofs ranged between 10 °C and 45 °C during summer months compared to black membranes that ranged between 10 °C and 80 °C. Insulation thickness, apart from reducing the heat conducted through the roof structure, also delayed the transfer of heat, owing to the thermal inertia of the insulation layer. Furthermore, this has important implications for determining the peak heating and cooling times.

  3. Galileo PPR observations of Europa: Hotspot detection limits and surface thermal properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathbun, Julie A.; Rodriguez, Nathaniel J.; Spencer, John R.

    2010-12-01

    The Galileo photopolarimeter-radiometer (PPR) made over 100 observations of Europa's surface temperature. We have used these data to constrain a diurnal thermal model and, thus, map the thermal inertia and bolometric albedo over 20% of the surface. We find an increased thermal inertia at mid-latitudes that is widespread in longitude and does not appear to correlate with geology, albedo, or other observables. Our derived thermophysical properties can be used to predict volatile stability across the surface over the course of a day and in planning of infrared instruments on future missions. Furthermore, while observations in the thermal infrared can and have been used to find endogenic activity, no such activity was detected at Europa. We have calculated the detection limits of these PPR observations and find that 100 km 2 hotspots with temperatures of 116-1200 K could exist undetected on the surface, depending on the location.

  4. Physical properties (particle size, rock abundance) from thermal infrared remote observations: Implications for Mars landing sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, P. R.; Edgett, Kenneth S.

    1994-01-01

    Critical to the assessment of potential sites for the 1997 Pathfinder landing is estimation of general physical properties of the martian surface. Surface properties have been studied using a variety of spacecraft and earth-based remote sensing observations, plus in situ studies at the Viking lander sites. Because of their value in identifying landing hazards and defining scientific objectives, we focus this discussion on thermal inertia and rock abundance derived from middle-infrared (6 to 30 microns) observations. Used in conjunction with other datasets, particularly albedo and Viking orbiter images, thermal inertia and rock abundance provide clues about the properties of potential Mars landing sites.

  5. Surfaces of Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto: an investigation using Voyager IRIS thermal infrared spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    In 1979, the IRIS infrared spectrometers on the two Voyager spacecraft obtained over 1000 disk-resolved thermal emission spectra of Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto, Jupiter's three large icy satellites. This dissertation describes the first detailed analysis of this data set. Ganymede and Callisto subsolar temperatures are 10 and 5/sup 0/K, respectively, below equilibrium values. Equatorial nighttime temperatures are between 100 and 75/sup 0/K, Callisto and Europa being colder than Ganymede. The diurnal temperature profiles can be matched by 2-layer surfaces that are also consistent with the eclipse cooling observed from earth, though previous eclipse models underestimated thermal inertias by about 50%. Substrate thermal inertias in the 2-layer models are a factor of several lower than for solid ice. These are cold spots on Ganymede and Callisto that are not high-albedo regions, which may indicate large thermal inertia anomalies.

  6. Radiation Dose from Lunar Neutron Albedo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, J. H., Jr.; Bhattacharya, M.; Lin, Zi-Wei; Pendleton, G.

    2006-01-01

    The lunar neutron albedo from thermal energies to 8 MeV was measured on the Lunar Prospector Mission in 1998-1999. Using GEANT4 we have calculated the neutron albedo due to cosmic ray bombardment of the moon and found a good-agreement with the measured fast neutron spectra. We then calculated the total effective dose from neutron albedo of all energies, and made comparisons with the effective dose contributions from both galactic cosmic rays and solar particle events to be expected on the lunar surface.

  7. Structure of the Saint Francois Mountains and surrounding lead belt, S.E. Missouri: Inference from thermal IR and other data sets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arvidson, R. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    Progress in the preparation of manuscripts on the discovery of a Precambrian rift running NW-SE through Missouri as seen in free air and Bouguer gravity anomalies and in HCMM data, and on digital image processing of potential field and topographic data on the rift is reported. Copies of the papers are attached. Contrast-enhanced HCMM images that have been transformed to Mercator projections are presented. Shaded relief map overlays of thermal and apparent thermal inertia images used as part of a masers thesis examining correlations between HCMM data products, linears, and geologic units are presented. Progress in examination of the difference in information content of daytime infrared, night time infrared, albedo, and thermal inertia images and their application to he identification of linears not directly controlled by topography is reported. Thermal infrared and albedo data were coded as hue, saturation and brightness values to generate a color display, which is included.

  8. Earth's Reflection: Albedo

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillette, Brandon; Hamilton, Cheri

    2011-01-01

    When viewing objects of different colors, you might notice that some appear brighter than others. This is because light is reflected differently from various surfaces, depending on their physical properties. The word "albedo" is used to describe how reflective a surface is. The Earth-atmosphere has a combined albedo of about 30%, a number that is…

  9. Albedos. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, F.V.

    1993-07-01

    The albedo of the earth's surface varies dramatically from values of about 3 to 4 percent for calm bodies of water up to about 55 percent for gypsum sands. This rather broad range of reflected incoming solar radiation presents difficulties when attempting to define an average albedo for terrain over a large region from locally determined values. The patchwork, or checkerboard, appearance of the earth's surface as viewed from above is the result of various human activities, such as agriculture, the proliferation of urban sprawl, and road building. Each of these variable appearing surfaces will have individual albedos, rendering any attempt to determine an a real albedo almost an impossibility on the mesoscale. However, a vast data base exists for microscale applications for individual acreages, for example. A compilation of these data is presented.... Albedo, Solar radiation, Crops, Urban areas, Land uses.

  10. Observations of Surfzone Albedo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinnett, G.; Feddersen, F.

    2014-12-01

    The surfzone environment (where waves break) contains several unique and previously unconsidered processes that affect the heat budget. Entering short-wave radiation is a dominant term in both shelf and surfzone heat budgets. In contrast to the shelf, however, depth limited wave breaking in the surfzone generates spray, whitewater and suspended sediments, elevating the surface albedo (ratio of reflected to incident short-wave radiation). Elevated albedo reduces the level of solar short-wave radiation entering the water, potentially resulting in less heating. Additionally, surfzone water quality is often impacted by fecal bacteria contamination. As bacteria mortality is related to short-wave solar radiation, elevated surfzone albedo could reduce pathogen mortality, impacting human health. Albedo in the open ocean has been frequently studied and parameterizations often consider solar zenith angle, wind speed and ocean chlorophyll concentration, producing albedo values typically near 0.06. However, surfzone albedo observations have been extremely sparse, yet show depth limited wave breaking may increase the albedo by nearly a factor of 10 up to 0.5. Here, we present findings from a field study at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography pier to observe the affect of waves on surfzone albedo. Concurrent measurements were taken with a four-way radiometer (to measure both downwelling and upwelling short-wave and long wave radiation) mounted above the surfzone. A co-located GoPro camera was used to relate visual aspects of the surfzone to measured reflectance, and wave height and period were observed with a bottom mounted pressure sensor in 5 m water depth just outside the surfzone. Wind speed and direction were observed on the pier 10 m above the water surface. Here, we will examine the surfzone albedo dependence on surfzone parameters, such as wave height.

  11. Greenland Glacier Albedo Variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The program for Arctic Regional Climate Assessment (PARCA) is a NASA-funded project with the prime goal of addressing the mass balance of the Greenland ice sheet. Since the formal initiation of the program in 1995, there has been a significant improvement in the estimates of the mass balance of the ice sheet. Results from this program reveal that the high-elevation regions of the ice sheet are approximately in balance, but the margins are thinning. Laser surveys reveal significant thinning along 70 percent of the ice sheet periphery below 2000 m elevations, and in at least one outlet glacier, Kangerdlugssuaq in southeast Greenland, thinning has been as much as 10 m/yr. This study examines the albedo variability in four outlet glaciers to help separate out the relative contributions of surface melting versus ice dynamics to the recent mass balance changes. Analysis of AVHRR Polar Pathfinder albedo shows that at the Petermann and Jakobshavn glaciers, there has been a negative trend in albedo at the glacier terminus from 1981 to 2000, whereas the Stor+strommen and Kangerdlugssuaq glaciers show slightly positive trends in albedo. These findings are consistent with recent observations of melt extent from passive microwave data which show more melt on the western side of Greenland and slightly less on the eastern side. Significance of albedo trends will depend on where and when the albedo changes occur. Since the majority of surface melt occurs in the shallow sloping western margin of the ice sheet where the shortwave radiation dominates the energy balance in summer (e.g. Jakobshavn region) this region will be more sensitive to changes in albedo than in regions where this is not the case. Near the Jakobshavn glacier, even larger changes in albedo have been observed, with decreases as much as 20 percent per decade.

  12. Free piston inertia compressor

    DOEpatents

    Richards, W.D.C.; Bilodeau, D.; Marusak, T.; Dutram, L. Jr.; Brady, J.

    A free piston inertia compressor comprises a piston assembly including a connecting rod having pistons on both ends, the cylinder being split into two substantially identical portions by a seal through which the connecting rod passes. Vents in the cylinder wall are provided near the seal to permit gas to escape the cylinder until the piston covers the vent whereupon the remaining gas in the cylinder functions as a gas spring and cushions the piston against impact on the seal. The connecting rod has a central portion of relatively small diameter providing free play of the connecting rod through the seal and end portions of relatively large diameter providing a limited tolerance between the connecting rod and the seal. Finally, the seal comprises a seal ring assembly consisting of a dampener plate, a free floating seal at the center of the dampener plate and a seal retainer plate in one face of the dampener plate.

  13. Free piston inertia compressor

    DOEpatents

    Richards, William D. C.; Bilodeau, Denis; Marusak, Thomas; Dutram, Jr., Leonard; Brady, Joseph

    1981-01-01

    A free piston inertia compressor comprises a piston assembly including a connecting rod having pistons on both ends, the cylinder being split into two substantially identical portions by a seal through which the connecting rod passes. Vents in the cylinder wall are provided near the seal to permit gas to excape the cylinder until the piston covers the vent whereupon the remaining gas in the cylinder functions as a gas spring and cushions the piston against impact on the seal. The connecting rod has a central portion of relatively small diameter providing free play of the connecting rod through the seal and end portions of relatively large diameter providing a limited tolerance between the connecting rod and the seal. Finally, the seal comprises a seal ring assembly consisting of a dampener plate, a free floating seal at the center of the dampener plate and a seal retainer plate in one face of the dampener plate.

  14. "TNOs are Cool": A survey of the trans-Neptunian region. IX. Thermal properties of Kuiper belt objects and Centaurs from combined Herschel and Spitzer observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lellouch, E.; Santos-Sanz, P.; Lacerda, P.; Mommert, M.; Duffard, R.; Ortiz, J. L.; Müller, T. G.; Fornasier, S.; Stansberry, J.; Kiss, Cs.; Vilenius, E.; Mueller, M.; Peixinho, N.; Moreno, R.; Groussin, O.; Delsanti, A.; Harris, A. W.

    2013-09-01

    Aims: The goal of this work is to characterize the ensemble thermal properties of the Centaurs / trans-Neptunian population. Methods: Thermal flux measurements obtained with Herschel/PACS and Spitzer/MIPS provide size, albedo, and beaming factors for 85 objects (13 of which are presented here for the first time) by means of standard radiometric techniques. The measured beaming factors are influenced by the combination of surface roughness and thermal inertia effects. They are interpreted within a thermophysical model to constrain, in a statistical sense, the thermal inertia in the population and to study its dependence on several parameters. We use in particular a Monte-Carlo modeling approach to the data whereby synthetic datasets of beaming factors are created using random distributions of spin orientation and surface roughness. Results: Beaming factors η range from values <1 to ~2.5, but high η values (>2) are lacking at low heliocentric distances (rh < 30 AU). Beaming factors lower than 1 occur frequently (39% of the objects), indicating that surface roughness effects are important. We determine a mean thermal inertia for Centaurs/ TNO of Γ = (2.5 ± 0.5) J m-2 s-1/2 K-1, with evidence of a trend toward decreasing Γ with increasing heliocentric (by a factor ~2.5 from 8-25 AU to 41-53 AU). These thermal inertias are 2-3 orders of magnitude lower than expected for compact ices, and generally lower than on Saturn's satellites or in the Pluto/Charon system. Most high-albedo objects are found to have unusually low thermal inertias. Our results suggest highly porous surfaces, in which the heat transfer is affected by radiative conductivity within pores and increases with depth in the subsurface. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.Table 3 is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  15. ALBEDOS OF SMALL HILDA GROUP ASTEROIDS AS REVEALED BY SPITZER

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, Erin Lee; Woodward, Charles E. E-mail: chelsea@astro.umn.edu

    2011-06-15

    We present thermal 24 {mu}m observations from the Spitzer Space Telescope of 62 Hilda asteroid group members with diameters ranging from 3 to 12 km. Measurements of the thermal emission, when combined with reported absolute magnitudes, allow us to constrain the albedo and diameter of each object. From our Spitzer sample, we find the mean geometric albedo, p{sub V} = 0.07 {+-} 0.05, for small (D < 10 km) Hilda group asteroids. This Spitzer-derived value of p{sub V} is greater than and spans a larger range in albedo space than the mean albedo of large (D {approx}> 10 km) Hilda group asteroids which is p{sub V} = 0.04 {+-} 0.01. Though this difference may be attributed to space weathering, the small Hilda group population reportedly displays greater taxonomic range from C-, D-, and X-type whose albedo distributions are commensurate with the range of determined albedos. We discuss the derived Hilda size-frequency distribution, color-color space, and geometric albedo for our survey sample in the context of the expected migration induced 'seeding' of the Hilda asteroid group with outer solar system proto-planetesimals as outlined in the 'Nice' formalism.

  16. Radiative transfer in dusty nebulae. III - The effects of dust albedo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrosian, V.; Dana, R. A.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of an albedo of internal dust, such as ionization structure and temperature of dust grain, were studied by the quasi-diffusion method with an iterative technique for solving the radiative heat transfer equations. It was found that the generalized on-the-spot approximation solution is adequate for most astrophysical applications for a zero albedo; for a nonzero albedo, the Eddington approximation is more accurate. The albedo increases the average energy of the diffuse photons, increasing the ionization level of hydrogen and heavy elements if the Eddington approximation is applied; the dust thermal gradient is reduced so that the infrared spectrum approaches blackbody spectrum with an increasing albedo.

  17. Incorporating inertia into multiagent systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man, W. C.; Chau, H. F.

    2006-03-01

    We consider a model that demonstrates the crucial role of inertia and stickiness in multiagent systems, based on the minority game. The inertia of an agent is introduced into the game model by allowing agents to apply hypothesis testing when choosing their best strategies, thereby reducing their reactivity toward changes in the environment. We find by extensive numerical simulations that our game shows a remarkable improvement of global cooperation throughout the whole phase space. In other words, the maladaptation behavior due to over-reaction of agents is removed. These agents are also shown to be advantageous over the standard ones, which are sometimes too sensitive to attain a fair success rate. We also calculate analytically the minimum amount of inertia needed to achieve the above improvement. Our calculation is consistent with the numerical simulation results. Finally, we review some related works in the field that show similar behaviors and compare them to our work.

  18. Moment of Inertia by Differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizcallah, Joseph A.

    2015-11-01

    The calculation of the moment of inertia of an extended body, as presented in standard introductory-level textbooks, involves the evaluation of a definite integral—an operation often not fully mastered by beginners, let alone the conceptual difficulties it presents, even to the advanced student, in understanding and setting up the integral in the first place. We here use dimensional analysis along with elementary differentiation techniques to derive the moments of inertia of various extended bodies. The suggested method does not employ integrals and, in effect, is just a disguised application of elementary ordinary differential equations.

  19. Neutron star moments of inertia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ravenhall, D. G.; Pethick, C. J.

    1994-01-01

    An approximation for the moment of inertia of a neutron star in terms of only its mass and radius is presented, and insight into it is obtained by examining the behavior of the relativistic structural equations. The approximation is accurate to approximately 10% for a variety of nuclear equations of state, for all except very low mass stars. It is combined with information about the neutron-star crust to obtain a simple expression (again in terms only of mass and radius) for the fractional moment of inertia of the crust.

  20. Measuring the Moment of Inertia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehmberg, George L.

    1978-01-01

    Two physics experiments are described, One, involving a laboratory cart accelerated along a level surface, examines the concept of inertial mass in translation and the other, using a solid cylinder, measures the moment of inertia of a wheel. Equations and illustrations are included. (MA)

  1. Moment of Inertia by Differentiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rizcallah, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    The calculation of the moment of inertia of an extended body, as presented in standard introductory-level textbooks, involves the evaluation of a definite integral--an operation often not fully mastered by beginners, let alone the conceptual difficulties it presents, even to the advanced student, in understanding and setting up the integral in the…

  2. Effects of surface roughness on the VIRTIS/Rosetta thermal measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leyrat, C.; Erard, S.; Capria, M.; Capaccioni, F.

    2014-07-01

    Thermal emission from planetary surfaces depends on many physical processes/parameters such as the Bond albedo, the heat capacity, the thermal inertia, the sublimation of ices at the surfaces, but also on the small-scale surface roughness. Distinguishing the effect of both thermal inertia and surface roughness on the infrared measurements is not trivial. In particular, surface roughness, that cannot be resolved within the pixels of instruments frame, can produce both shadows at small scales and mutual heating, which affect the thermal flux and the temperature estimations. The effect of roughness also varies with local incidence and emission angles, and local time, being significantly stronger closed to terminator when the local hills cast their shadows at far distances. In this poster, we present a thermo-physical model based on thermal conduction of heat over several diurnal and seasonal skin depths and show how surface roughness affects the retrieved temperature, especially, in the near-infrared domain [1--5 microns], where the VIRTIS/Rosetta instrument will observe comet CG 67/P starting in July 2014. We first compute the surface temperature of CG 67P using a simple thermo-physical model that takes into account the global shape of the nucleus. Then, we investigate (1) how the surface roughness can modify the apparent surface temperature and the thermal inertia, and (2) what are the best geometries of observation to distinguish between topographic effects and physical thermal processes.

  3. MISR Level 3 Albedo and Cloud Versioning

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-09-07

    ... MIL3YALN MISR_AM1_CGAL Stage 2:  CLOUD - Wind Vectors, Height Histogram Stage 1:  ALBEDO - Expansive, ... Stage 2 CLOUD - Height Histogram Stage 1 CLOUD - Wind Vectors Stage 1 ALBEDO - Expansive and Restrictive Albedos ...

  4. Surface albedo observations at Gusev Crater and Meridiani Planum, Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bell, J.F.; Rice, M.S.; Johnson, J. R.; Hare, T.M.

    2008-01-01

    During the Mars Exploration Rover mission, the Pancam instrument has periodically acquired large-scale panoramic images with its broadband (739??338 nm) filter in order to estimate the Lambert bolometric albedo of the surface along each rover's traverse. In this work we present the full suite of such estimated albedo values measured to date by the Spirit and Opportunity rovers along their traverses in Gusev Crater and Meridiani Planum, respectively. We include estimated bolometric albedo values of individual surface features (e.g., outcrops, dusty plains, aeolian bed forms, wheel tracks, light-toned soils, and crater walls) as well as overall surface averages of the 43 total panoramic albedo data sets acquired to date. We also present comparisons to estimated Lambert albedo values taken from the Mars Global Surveyor Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) along the rovers' traverses, and to the large-scale bolometric albedos of the sites from the Viking Orbiter Infrared Thermal Mapper (IRTM) and Mars Global Surveyor/Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES). The ranges of Pancam-derived albedos at Gusev Crater (0.14 to 0.25) and in Meridiani Planum. (0.10 to 0.18) are in good agreement with IRTM, TES, and MOC orbital measurements. These data sets will be a useful tool and benchmark for future investigations of albodo variations with time, including measurements from orbital instruments like the Context Camera and High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment on Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Long-term, accurate albedo measurements could also be important for future efforts in climate modeling as well as for studies of active surface processes. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  5. The asteroid albedo scale. II - Laboratory polarimetry of dark carbon-bearing silicates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zellner, B.; Lebertre, T.; Day, K.

    1977-01-01

    Laboratory reflection polarimetry is presented for eight samples of artificial, poorly crystalline magnesian silicates with varying admixtures of carbon black. The polarimetric slope-albedo law saturates for geometric albedos lower than about 0.05, and good agreement with the telescopic polarization-phase curves of C-type asteroids is found for albedos as low as 0.02. Thus the conclusion from thermal radiometry is confirmed that the C objects are very dark, darker than any known carbonaceous chondrite.

  6. Hiding robot inertia using resonance.

    PubMed

    Vallery, Heike; Duschau-Wicke, Alexander; Riener, Robert

    2010-01-01

    To enable compliant training modes with a rehabilitation robot, an important prerequisite is that any undesired human-robot interaction forces caused by robot dynamics must be avoided, either by an appropriate mechanical design or by compensating control strategies. Our recently proposed control scheme of "Generalized Elasticities" employs potential fields to compensate for robot dynamics, including inertia, beyond what can be done using closed-loop force control. In this paper, we give a simple mechanical equivalent using the example of the gait rehabilitation robot Lokomat. The robot consists of an exoskeleton that is attached to a frame around the patient's pelvis. This frame is suspended by a springloaded parallelogram structure. The mechanism allows vertical displacement while providing almost constant robot gravity compensation. However, inertia of the device when the patient's pelvis moves up and down remains a source of large interaction forces, which are reflected in increased ground reaction forces. Here, we investigate an alternative suspension: To hide not only gravity, but also robot inertia during vertical pelvis motion, we suspend the robot frame by a stiff linear spring that allows the robot to oscillate vertically at an eigenfrequency close to the natural gait frequency. This mechanism reduces human-robot interaction forces, which is demonstrated in pilot experimental results. PMID:21095916

  7. Hiding robot inertia using resonance.

    PubMed

    Vallery, Heike; Duschau-Wicke, Alexander; Riener, Robert

    2010-01-01

    To enable compliant training modes with a rehabilitation robot, an important prerequisite is that any undesired human-robot interaction forces caused by robot dynamics must be avoided, either by an appropriate mechanical design or by compensating control strategies. Our recently proposed control scheme of "Generalized Elasticities" employs potential fields to compensate for robot dynamics, including inertia, beyond what can be done using closed-loop force control. In this paper, we give a simple mechanical equivalent using the example of the gait rehabilitation robot Lokomat. The robot consists of an exoskeleton that is attached to a frame around the patient's pelvis. This frame is suspended by a springloaded parallelogram structure. The mechanism allows vertical displacement while providing almost constant robot gravity compensation. However, inertia of the device when the patient's pelvis moves up and down remains a source of large interaction forces, which are reflected in increased ground reaction forces. Here, we investigate an alternative suspension: To hide not only gravity, but also robot inertia during vertical pelvis motion, we suspend the robot frame by a stiff linear spring that allows the robot to oscillate vertically at an eigenfrequency close to the natural gait frequency. This mechanism reduces human-robot interaction forces, which is demonstrated in pilot experimental results.

  8. Ks-BAND DETECTION OF THERMAL EMISSION AND COLOR CONSTRAINTS TO CoRoT-1b: A LOW-ALBEDO PLANET WITH INEFFICIENT ATMOSPHERIC ENERGY REDISTRIBUTION AND A TEMPERATURE INVERSION

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, Justin C.; Apai, Daniel; Lopez-Morales, Mercedes; Sing, David K.; Burrows, Adam

    2009-12-20

    We report the detection in Ks-band of the secondary eclipse of the hot Jupiter CoRoT-1b from time series photometry with the ARC 3.5 m telescope at Apache Point Observatory. The eclipse shows a depth of 0.336 +- 0.042% and is centered at phase 0.5022{sup +0.0023}{sub -0.0027}, consistent with a zero eccentricity orbit (e cos omega = 0.0035{sup +0.0036}{sub -0.0042}). We perform the first optical to near-infrared multi-band photometric analysis of an exoplanet's atmosphere and constrain the reflected and thermal emissions by combining our result with the recent 0.6, 0.71, and 2.09 mum secondary eclipse detections by Snellen et al., Gillon et al., and Alonso et al. Comparing the multi-wavelength detections to state-of-the-art radiative-convective chemical-equilibrium atmosphere models, we find the near-infrared fluxes difficult to reproduce. The closest blackbody-based and physical models provide the following atmosphere parameters: a temperature T = 2460{sup +80}{sub -160} K; a very low Bond albedo A{sub B} = 0.000{sup +0.081}{sub -0.000}; and an energy redistribution parameter P{sub n} = 0.1, indicating a small but nonzero amount of heat transfer from the day to nightside. The best physical model suggests a thermal inversion layer with an extra optical absorber of opacity kappa{sub e} = 0.05 cm{sup 2} g{sup -1}, placed near the 0.1 bar atmospheric pressure level. This inversion layer is located 10 times deeper in the atmosphere than the absorbers used in models to fit mid-infrared Spitzer detections of other irradiated hot Jupiters.

  9. Ks-Band Detection of Thermal Emission and Color Constraints to CoRoT-1b: A Low-Albedo Planet with Inefficient Atmospheric Energy Redistribution and a Temperature Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Justin C.; Apai, Dániel; López-Morales, Mercedes; Sing, David K.; Burrows, Adam

    2009-12-01

    We report the detection in Ks-band of the secondary eclipse of the hot Jupiter CoRoT-1b from time series photometry with the ARC 3.5 m telescope at Apache Point Observatory. The eclipse shows a depth of 0.336 ± 0.042% and is centered at phase 0.5022+0.0023 -0.0027, consistent with a zero eccentricity orbit (e cos ω = 0.0035+0.0036 -0.0042). We perform the first optical to near-infrared multi-band photometric analysis of an exoplanet's atmosphere and constrain the reflected and thermal emissions by combining our result with the recent 0.6, 0.71, and 2.09 μm secondary eclipse detections by Snellen et al., Gillon et al., and Alonso et al. Comparing the multi-wavelength detections to state-of-the-art radiative-convective chemical-equilibrium atmosphere models, we find the near-infrared fluxes difficult to reproduce. The closest blackbody-based and physical models provide the following atmosphere parameters: a temperature T = 2460+80 -160 K; a very low Bond albedo AB = 0.000+0.081 -0.000 and an energy redistribution parameter Pn = 0.1, indicating a small but nonzero amount of heat transfer from the day to nightside. The best physical model suggests a thermal inversion layer with an extra optical absorber of opacity κ e = 0.05 cm2 g-1, placed near the 0.1 bar atmospheric pressure level. This inversion layer is located 10 times deeper in the atmosphere than the absorbers used in models to fit mid-infrared Spitzer detections of other irradiated hot Jupiters. Based on observations obtained with the Apache Point Observatory 3.5 m telescope, which is owned and operated by the Astrophysical Research Consortium.

  10. Europa's Thermal Surface From Galileo PPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Nathaniel; Rathbun, J.; Spencer, J.

    2009-01-01

    Europa, one of the four Galilean moons of Jupiter, may harbor a subsurface ocean beneath its icy crust. We use the thermal data gathered from the Galileo spacecraft's PPR instrument to search for endogenic activity. Evidence of endogenic activity would provide direct support for a subsurface-ocean. We are modeling variations in temperature over the course of a day and then fitting these models to the PPR data. The two key variables that affect surface temperature are bolometric albedo and thermal inertia. We are determining these variables for each point on the surface, which will allow us to create a global model of exogenic activity due to sunlight. This information will allow us to analyze the threshold where endogenic activity becomes great enough to be detectable in the PPR data.

  11. Alignment Tool For Inertia Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, Gary L.

    1991-01-01

    Compact, easy-to-use tool aligns drive bar of inertia welder over hole in stub. Ensures drive bar concentric to hole within 0.002 in. (0.051 mm.). Holds two batteries and light bulb. Electrical circuit completed, providing current to bulb when pin in contact with post. When pin centered in post hole, it does not touch post, and lamp turns off. Built for use in making repair welds on liquid-oxygen-injector posts in Space Shuttle main engine. Version having suitably modified dimensions used to facilitate alignment in other forests of post.

  12. Gross shell structure of moments of inertia

    SciTech Connect

    Deleplanque, M.A.; Frauendorf, S.; Pashkevich, V.V.; Chu, S.Y.; Unzhakova, A.

    2002-07-01

    Average yrast moments of inertia at high spins, where the pairing correlations are expected to be largely absent, were found to deviate from the rigid-body values. This indicates that shell effects contribute to the moment of inertia. We discuss the gross dependence of moments of inertia and shell energies on the neutron number in terms of the semiclassical periodic orbit theory. We show that the ground-state shell energies, nuclear deformations and deviations from rigid-body moments of inertia are all due to the same periodic orbits.

  13. Spacecraft inertia estimation via constrained least squares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keim, Jason A.; Acikmese, Behcet A.; Shields, Joel F.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a new formulation for spacecraft inertia estimation from test data. Specifically, the inertia estimation problem is formulated as a constrained least squares minimization problem with explicit bounds on the inertia matrix incorporated as LMIs [linear matrix inequalities). The resulting minimization problem is a semidefinite optimization that can be solved efficiently with guaranteed convergence to the global optimum by readily available algorithms. This method is applied to data collected from a robotic testbed consisting of a freely rotating body. The results show that the constrained least squares approach produces more accurate estimates of the inertia matrix than standard unconstrained least squares estimation methods.

  14. Using Combined THEMIS Visible and Infrared Images to map Martian Topography and Slope- corrected Surface Thermal Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cushing, G. E.; Titus, T. N.; Soderblom, L. A.; Kirk, R. L.

    2007-12-01

    Kirk et al. (2005) empirically deconvolved visible and thermal-infrared THEMIS data, isolating topographic information that produced an accurate digital-terrain model (DTM). Described here is the next step wherein we use the same dataset (Columbia Hills area, Mars) in conjunction with the KRC thermal model (Kieffer et al., 1977) to quantitatively derive and map slope-corrected thermophysical properties. Observed surface temperatures, at high spatial resolution, are a function of many variables such as: slope, albedo, thermal inertia, time, season and atmospheric opacity. We constrain each of these variables to construct a DTM and maps of slope-corrected albedo, slope/albedo-corrected thermal inertia, and surface temperatures across an entire scene for any time of day or year and any atmospheric opacity. DTMs greatly facilitate analyses of the Martian surface, but generating these data is a challenge. The MOLA global dataset does not have sufficient resolution (~3 km) to be combined with newer datasets (e.g. HiRISE, CTX, THEMIS, MOC, and CRISM), so new techniques to derive high-resolution DTMs are always being explored. Stereo imaging produces quality, high-resolution DTMs but is limited in the amount of available coverage. Photoclinometry techniques on visible-wavelength images have been widely investigated with varying degrees of success, but accounting for albedo variations across a scene has been an historical weakness of this method. Here we discuss a technique of combining THEMIS visible and thermal infrared (both daytime and nighttime) observations (Christensen et al., 2004) in such a manner that albedo variations in the scene are cancelled, allowing the production of a high-resolution DTM via photoclinometry techniques that are largely free of albedo-induced errors. We employ the KRC thermal-diffusion model to generate models of slope-corrected thermal properties from the resultant DTM and THEMIS observations. This technique can provide new perspectives and

  15. (25143) Itokawa: The power of radiometric techniques for the interpretation of remote thermal observations in the light of the Hayabusa rendezvous results*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Thomas G.; Hasegawa, Sunao; Usui, Fumihiko

    2014-06-01

    The near-Earth asteroid (25143) Itokawa was characterized in great detail by the Japanese Hayabusa mission. We revisited the available thermal observations in the light of the true asteroid properties with the goal of evaluating the possibilities and limitations of thermal model techniques. In total, we used 25 published ground-based mid-infrared photometric observations and five so far unpublished measurements from the Japanese infrared astronomical satellite AKARI in combination with improved H-G values (absolute magnitude and slope parameter). Our thermophysical model (TPM) approach allowed us to determine correctly the sense of rotation, to estimate the thermal inertia and to derive robust effective size and albedo values by only using a simple spherical shape model. A more complex shape model, derived from light-curve inversion techniques, improved the quality of the predictions considerably and made the interpretation of the thermal light curve possible. The radiometrically derived effective diameter value agrees within 2% with the true Itokawa size value. The combination of our TPM and the final (25143) Itokawa in-situ shape model was then used as a benchmark for deriving and testing radiometric solutions. The consolidated value for the surface-averaged thermal inertia is Γ = 700 ± 200 J m-2 s-0.5 K-1. We found that even the high-resolution shape models still require additional small-scale roughness in order to explain the disk-integrated infrared measurements. Our description of the thermal effects as a function of wavelengths, phase angle, and rotational phase facilitates the planning of crucial thermal observations for sophisticated characterization of small bodies, including other potentially hazardous asteroids. Our analysis shows the power of radiometric techniques to derive the size, albedo, thermal inertia, and also spin-axis orientation from small sets of measurements at thermal infrared wavelengths.

  16. MAIN BELT ASTEROIDS WITH WISE/NEOWISE. I. PRELIMINARY ALBEDOS AND DIAMETERS

    SciTech Connect

    Masiero, Joseph R.; Mainzer, A. K.; Bauer, J. M.; Eisenhardt, P. R. M.; DeBaun, E.; Elsbury, D.; Gautier, T. IV; Gomillion, S.; Wilkins, A.; Cutri, R. M.; Dailey, J.; McMillan, R. S.; Spahr, T. B.; Skrutskie, M. F.; Tholen, D.; Walker, R. G.; Wright, E. L.

    2011-11-10

    We present initial results from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), a four-band all-sky thermal infrared survey that produces data well suited for measuring the physical properties of asteroids, and the NEOWISE enhancement to the WISE mission allowing for detailed study of solar system objects. Using a NEATM thermal model fitting routine, we compute diameters for over 100,000 Main Belt asteroids from their IR thermal flux, with errors better than 10%. We then incorporate literature values of visible measurements (in the form of the H absolute magnitude) to determine albedos. Using these data we investigate the albedo and diameter distributions of the Main Belt. As observed previously, we find a change in the average albedo when comparing the inner, middle, and outer portions of the Main Belt. We also confirm that the albedo distribution of each region is strongly bimodal. We observe groupings of objects with similar albedos in regions of the Main Belt associated with dynamical breakup families. Asteroid families typically show a characteristic albedo for all members, but there are notable exceptions to this. This paper is the first look at the Main Belt asteroids in the WISE data, and only represents the preliminary, observed raw size, and albedo distributions for the populations considered. These distributions are subject to survey biases inherent to the NEOWISE data set and cannot yet be interpreted as describing the true populations; the debiased size and albedo distributions will be the subject of the next paper in this series.

  17. Spectral albedos of midlatitude snowpacks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhury, B.

    1981-01-01

    Spectral albedos of impure-nonhomogeneous snowpacks, typical of midlatitudes, from 400 to 2200 nm were modeled through a numerical solution of the radiative transfer equation in the two-stream approximation. Discrete depth-dependent values of density, grain size and impurity concentration were used to characterize the snowpacks. The model is for diffuse incident radiation, and the numerical method is based on doubling and invariant imbedding. The effect of soot impurities on snowpack albedos is illustrated when a snowpack is several centimeters deep and soot reduces the albedos at visible wavelengths, however, when a snowpack is only a few centimeters deep, soot may increase the albedos at visible wavelengths. By adjusting soot content and snow grain size, good quantitative agreement with some observations at the Cascade Mountains (Washington) and at Point Barrow (Alaska) are obtained; however, the model grain sizes are found to be fifty to four hundred percent larger than the measured values. For satellite snowcover observations, a model for effective albedo of partially snow-covered areas was developed and compared with some NOAA-2 observations of the southeastern United States.

  18. NEOWISE REACTIVATION MISSION YEAR ONE: PRELIMINARY ASTEROID DIAMETERS AND ALBEDOS

    SciTech Connect

    Nugent, C. R.; Cutri, R. M.; Mainzer, A.; Masiero, J.; Bauer, J.; Kramer, E.; Sonnett, S.; Stevenson, R.; Grav, T.; Wright, E. L.

    2015-12-01

    We present preliminary diameters and albedos for 7956 asteroids detected in the first year of the NEOWISE Reactivation mission. Of those, 201 are near-Earth asteroids and 7755 are Main Belt or Mars-crossing asteroids. 17% of these objects have not been previously characterized using the Near-Earth Object Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, or “NEOWISE” thermal measurements. Diameters are determined to an accuracy of ∼20% or better. If good-quality H magnitudes are available, albedos can be determined to within ∼40% or better.

  19. A thermal model for analysis of infrared images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, K.

    1970-01-01

    A mathematical model derived from the equation of heat conduction was developed to assist in interpreting thermal infrared images acquired from aircraft and spacecraft. The model assumes steady state boundary conditions. It contains parameters of rock and soil properties, atmospheric effects, site location, and season. The results predicted provide an explanation for the thermal differences among granite, limestone, and dolomite recorded in the December 1968 daytime and predawn flights over the Mill Creek, Oklahoma test site, during which representative thermal inertia and albedo values were used. A second test of the model made use of data acquired during the June 1970 predawn overflight of Mill Creek. A simple model of transient heating of the ground was constructed as an extension of the overall model, in order to examine the effects of atmospheric perturbations. The results obtained are consistent with those of ground observations made at the time of the overflight.

  20. {ital D}-dimensional moments of inertia

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, C.M.; Mead, L.R.

    1995-11-01

    We calculate the moments of inertia of {ital D}-dimensional spheres and spherical shells, where {ital D} is a complex number. We also examine the moments of inertia of fractional-dimensional geometrical objects such as the Cantor set and the Sierpinski carpet and their {ital D}-dimensional analogs. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Association} {ital of} {ital Physics} {ital Teachers}.

  1. Thermal Properties of Unusual Local-Scale Features on Vesta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capria, M.; DeSanctis, M.; Palomba, E.; Grassi, D.; Capaccioni, F.; Ammannito, E.; Combe, J.; Sunshine, J. M.; Titus, T. N.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Li, J.; Russell, C. T.; Raymond, C. A.

    2012-01-01

    On Vesta, the thermal behavior of areas of unusual albedo seen at the local scale can be related to physical properties that can provide information about the origin of those materials. We used Dawn s Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIR) hyperspectral cubes to retrieve surface temperatures and emissivities, with high accuracy as long as temperatures are greater than 180 K. Data acquired in the Survey phase (23 July through 29 August 2011) show several unusual surface features: 1) high-albedo (bright) and low-albedo (dark) material deposits, 2) spectrally distinct ejecta and pitted materials, 3) regions suggesting finer-grained materials. Some of the unusual dark and bright features were reobserved by VIR in the subsequent High-Altitude Mapping Orbit (HAMO) and Low- Altitude Mapping Orbit (LAMO) phases at increased pixel resolution. In this work we present temperature maps and emissivities of several local-scale features that were observed by Dawn under different illumination conditions and different local solar times. Data from VIR's IR channel show that bright regions generally correspond to regions with lower thermal emission, i.e. lower temperature, while dark regions correspond to areas with higher thermal emission, i.e. higher temperature. This behavior confirms that many of the dark appearances in the VIS mainly reflect albedo variations, and not, for example, shadowing. During maximum daily insolation, dark features in the equatorial region may rise to temperatures greater than 270 K, while brightest features stop at roughly 258 K, local solar time being similar. However, pitted materials, showing relatively low reflectance, have significantly lower temperatures, as a result of differences in composition and/or structure (e.g, average grain size of the surface regolith, porosity, etc.). To complement this work, we provide preliminary values of thermal inertia for some bright and dark features.

  2. THE ALBEDOS OF KEPLER'S CLOSE-IN SUPER-EARTHS

    SciTech Connect

    Demory, Brice-Olivier

    2014-07-01

    Exoplanet research focusing on the characterization of super-Earths is currently limited to the handful of targets orbiting bright stars that are amenable to detailed study. This Letter proposes to look at alternative avenues to probe the surface and atmospheric properties of this category of planets, known to be ubiquitous in our galaxy. I conduct Markov Chain Monte Carlo light-curves analyses for 97 Kepler close-in R{sub P} ≲ 2.0 R {sub ⊕} super-Earth candidates with the aim of detecting their occultations at visible wavelengths. Brightness temperatures and geometric albedos in the Kepler bandpass are constrained for 27 super-Earth candidates. A hierarchical Bayesian modeling approach is then employed to characterize the population-level reflective properties of these close-in super-Earths. I find median geometric albedos A{sub g} in the Kepler bandpass ranging between 0.16 and 0.30, once decontaminated from thermal emission. These super-Earth geometric albedos are statistically larger than for hot Jupiters, which have medians A{sub g} ranging between 0.06 and 0.11. A subset of objects, including Kepler-10b, exhibit significantly larger albedos (A{sub g} ≳ 0.4). I argue that a better understanding of the incidence of stellar irradation on planetary surface and atmospheric processes is key to explain the diversity in albedos observed for close-in super-Earths.

  3. Main-belt asteroids with WISE/NEOWISE: Near-infrared albedos

    SciTech Connect

    Masiero, Joseph R.; Mainzer, A. K.; Nugent, C. R.; Bauer, J. M.; Stevenson, R.; Sonnett, S.

    2014-08-20

    We present revised near-infrared albedo fits of 2835 main-belt asteroids observed by WISE/NEOWISE over the course of its fully cryogenic survey in 2010. These fits are derived from reflected-light near-infrared images taken simultaneously with thermal emission measurements, allowing for more accurate measurements of the near-infrared albedos than is possible for visible albedo measurements. Because our sample requires reflected light measurements, it undersamples small, low-albedo asteroids, as well as those with blue spectral slopes across the wavelengths investigated. We find that the main belt separates into three distinct groups of 6%, 16%, and 40% reflectance at 3.4 μm. Conversely, the 4.6 μm albedo distribution spans the full range of possible values with no clear grouping. Asteroid families show a narrow distribution of 3.4 μm albedos within each family that map to one of the three observed groupings, with the (221) Eos family being the sole family associated with the 16% reflectance 3.4 μm albedo group. We show that near-infrared albedos derived from simultaneous thermal emission and reflected light measurements are important indicators of asteroid taxonomy and can identify interesting targets for spectroscopic follow-up.

  4. Spitzer Thermal Radiometry of Kuiper Belt Objects and Centaurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stansberry, John; Mueller, Michael; Cruikshank, Dale; Grundy, Will; Noll, Keith; Spencer, John; Trilling, David

    2006-05-01

    About 10 Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) have been detected at both 24 and 70um with Spitzer at high enough signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) to allow determinations of their of their albedos and diameters. While these physical parameters can be estimated from a detection at a single thermal wavelength, they are then subject to large uncertainties stemming from the assumed model for the temperature distribution on the surface. A two-color thermal detection eliminates most of the model uncertainty, and the accuracy of the derived parameters is then limited primarily by measurement and calibration errors. An added benefit of a two-color detection is that it yields some information about the temperature distribution, and therefore about the thermal parameter (or thermal inertia, if the rotation period is known) of the surface materials. We propose to use MIPS to detect 8 KBOs and 8 Centaurs at both 24 and 70um, at SNR > 5 in both bands. We base our predictions of their thermal emission, our sensitivity estimates, and our observing strategy on our past observations of KBOs with Spitzer. Our sample size is chosen to double the sample of both KBOs and Centaurs with two-color data, significantly improving our knowledge of their physical parameters, and providing enough objects to allow us to begin to look for trends in albedo vs. size and color.

  5. Flapping inertia for selected rotor blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, John D.; May, Matthew J.

    1991-01-01

    Aerodynamics of helicopter rotor systems cannot be investigated without consideration for the dynamics of the rotor. One of the principal properties of the rotor which affects the rotor dynamics is the inertia of the rotor blade about its root attachment. Previous aerodynamic investigation have been performed on rotor blades with a variety of planforms to determine the performance differences due to blade planform. The blades tested for this investigation have been tested on the U.S. Army 2 meter rotor test system (2MRTS) in the NASA Langley 14 by 22 foot subsonic tunnel for hover performance. This investigation was intended to provide fundamental information on the flapping inertia of five rotor blades with differing planforms. The inertia of the bare cuff and the cuff with a blade extension were also measured for comparison with the inertia of the blades. Inertia was determined using a swing testing technique, using the period of oscillation to determine the effective flapping inertia. The effect of damping in the swing test was measured and described. A comparison of the flapping inertials for rectangular and tapered planform blades of approximately the same mass showed the tapered blades to have a lower inertia, as expected.

  6. Low uncertainty method for inertia tensor identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barreto, J. P.; Muñoz, L. E.

    2016-02-01

    The uncertainty associated with the experimental identification of the inertia tensor can be reduced by implementing adequate rotational and translational motions in the experiment. This paper proposes a particular 3D trajectory that improves the experimental measurement of the inertia tensor of rigid bodies. Such a trajectory corresponds to a motion in which the object is rotated around a large number of instantaneous axes, while the center of gravity remains static. The uncertainty in the inertia tensor components obtained with this practice is reduced by 45% in average, compared with those calculated using simple rotations around three perpendicular axes (Roll, Pitch, Yaw).

  7. Weight, gravitation, inertia, and tides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pujol, Olivier; Lagoute, Christophe; Pérez, José-Philippe

    2015-11-01

    This paper deals with the factors that influence the weight of an object near the Earth's surface. They are: (1) the Earth's gravitational force, (2) the centrifugal force due to the Earth's diurnal rotation, and (3) tidal forces due to the gravitational field of the Moon and Sun, and other solar system bodies to a lesser extent. Each of these three contributions is discussed and expressions are derived. The relationship between weight and gravitation is thus established in a direct and pedagogical manner readily understandable by undergraduate students. The analysis applies to the Newtonian limit of gravitation. The derivation is based on an experimental (or operational) definition of weight, and it is shown that it coincides with the Earth’s gravitational force modified by diurnal rotation around a polar axis and non-uniformity of external gravitational bodies (tidal term). Two examples illustrate and quantify these modifications, respectively the Eötvös effect and the oceanic tides; tidal forces due to differential gravitation on a spacecraft and an asteroid are also proposed as examples. Considerations about inertia are also given and some comments are made about a widespread, yet confusing, explanation of tides based on a centrifugal force. Finally, the expression of the potential energy of the tide-generating force is established rigorously in the appendix.

  8. Overcome inertia: go to an amusement park!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, A. Alberto

    1994-09-01

    We describe some experiments about inertia and non-inertial forces, made in an amusement park, with an initial training class at a teacher training school. These experiments illustrate such phenomena as artificial gravity, weightlessness, `Coriolis winds' and oceanic currents.

  9. Electrohydrodynamics of a viscous drop with inertia.

    PubMed

    Nganguia, H; Young, Y-N; Layton, A T; Lai, M-C; Hu, W-F

    2016-05-01

    Most of the existing numerical and theoretical investigations on the electrohydrodynamics of a viscous drop have focused on the creeping Stokes flow regime, where nonlinear inertia effects are neglected. In this work we study the inertia effects on the electrodeformation of a viscous drop under a DC electric field using a novel second-order immersed interface method. The inertia effects are quantified by the Ohnesorge number Oh, and the electric field is characterized by an electric capillary number Ca_{E}. Below the critical Ca_{E}, small to moderate electric field strength gives rise to steady equilibrium drop shapes. We found that, at a fixed Ca_{E}, inertia effects induce larger deformation for an oblate drop than a prolate drop, consistent with previous results in the literature. Moreover, our simulations results indicate that inertia effects on the equilibrium drop deformation are dictated by the direction of normal electric stress on the drop interface: Larger drop deformation is found when the normal electric stress points outward, and smaller drop deformation is found otherwise. To our knowledge, such inertia effects on the equilibrium drop deformation has not been reported in the literature. Above the critical Ca_{E}, no steady equilibrium drop deformation can be found, and often the drop breaks up into a number of daughter droplets. In particular, our Navier-Stokes simulations show that, for the parameters we use, (1) daughter droplets are larger in the presence of inertia, (2) the drop deformation evolves more rapidly compared to creeping flow, and (3) complex distribution of electric stresses for drops with inertia effects. Our results suggest that normal electric pressure may be a useful tool in predicting drop pinch-off in oblate deformations. PMID:27300985

  10. Efficient Computation Of Manipulator Inertia Matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fijany, Amir; Bejczy, Antal K.

    1991-01-01

    Improved method for computation of manipulator inertia matrix developed, based on concept of spatial inertia of composite rigid body. Required for implementation of advanced dynamic-control schemes as well as dynamic simulation of manipulator motion. Motivated by increasing demand for fast algorithms to provide real-time control and simulation capability and, particularly, need for faster-than-real-time simulation capability, required in many anticipated space teleoperation applications.

  11. Electrohydrodynamics of a viscous drop with inertia.

    PubMed

    Nganguia, H; Young, Y-N; Layton, A T; Lai, M-C; Hu, W-F

    2016-05-01

    Most of the existing numerical and theoretical investigations on the electrohydrodynamics of a viscous drop have focused on the creeping Stokes flow regime, where nonlinear inertia effects are neglected. In this work we study the inertia effects on the electrodeformation of a viscous drop under a DC electric field using a novel second-order immersed interface method. The inertia effects are quantified by the Ohnesorge number Oh, and the electric field is characterized by an electric capillary number Ca_{E}. Below the critical Ca_{E}, small to moderate electric field strength gives rise to steady equilibrium drop shapes. We found that, at a fixed Ca_{E}, inertia effects induce larger deformation for an oblate drop than a prolate drop, consistent with previous results in the literature. Moreover, our simulations results indicate that inertia effects on the equilibrium drop deformation are dictated by the direction of normal electric stress on the drop interface: Larger drop deformation is found when the normal electric stress points outward, and smaller drop deformation is found otherwise. To our knowledge, such inertia effects on the equilibrium drop deformation has not been reported in the literature. Above the critical Ca_{E}, no steady equilibrium drop deformation can be found, and often the drop breaks up into a number of daughter droplets. In particular, our Navier-Stokes simulations show that, for the parameters we use, (1) daughter droplets are larger in the presence of inertia, (2) the drop deformation evolves more rapidly compared to creeping flow, and (3) complex distribution of electric stresses for drops with inertia effects. Our results suggest that normal electric pressure may be a useful tool in predicting drop pinch-off in oblate deformations.

  12. Osteopathic manipulative treatment for colonic inertia.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Lewe, Adam

    2013-03-01

    Surgical treatment options for patients with colonic inertia are costly and do not always relieve the pain associated with the condition. The author describes a case of a 41-year-old woman with colonic inertia who received osteopathic manipulative treatment targeted at the neuromusculoskeletal and gastrointestinal systems. The patient reported temporary improvement in pain and bowel function without pharmacotherapy or surgical intervention. Osteopathic manipulative treatment should be considered in patients with visceral as well as neuromusculoskeletal symptoms.

  13. Calibration of neutron albedo dosemeters.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, R B; Eisenhauer, C M

    2002-01-01

    It is shown that by calibrating neutron albedo dosemeters under the proper conditions, two complicating effects will essentially cancel out, allowing accurate calibrations with no need for explicit corrections. The 'proper conditions' are: a large room (> or = 8 m on a side). use of a D2O moderated 252Cf source, and a source-to-phantom calibration distance of approximately 70 cm. PMID:12212898

  14. Albedo in the ATIC Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokolskaya, N. V.; Adams, J. H., Jr.; Ahn, H. S.; Bashindzhagyan, G. L.; Batkov, K. E.; Case, G.; Christl, M.; Chang, J.; Fazely, A. R.; Ganel, O.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    ATIC(Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter) is a balloon borne experiment designed to measure the cosmic ray composition for elements from hydrogen to iron and their energy spectra from approx.50 GeV to near 100 TeV. It consists of a Si-matrix detector to determine the charge of a CR particle, a scintillator hodoscope for tracking, carbon interaction targets and a fully active BGO calorimeter. ATIC had its first 16-day flight from McMurdo, Antarctica from 28/12/2000 to 13/01/2000. The ATIC flight collected approximately 25 million events. To measure charge of primary particle in presence of radiation scattered back from the interaction and subsequent shower development in the calorimeter a charge detector must be a mosaic of small detector pads so that the pad containing the signal from the incident particle has no additional signal from albedo particles. Therefore the silicon matrix was built of 4480 individual silicon pads each 2 cm x 1.5 cm. The matrix consists of four planes of detectors and the active detector area, in these planes are partially overlapped to completely cover the aperture. The lateral and amplitude distributions of albedo signals in Si-matrix are analyzed for different primary nuclei and different energy deposits in BGO calorimeter. The greater part of albedo signals has Q near 1, where Q = square root of Amplitude(MIP). The albedo distribution exponentially decreases up to Q near 8. These high values are produced by slow protons and plans. There are also a small number of signals of Q > 8, mainly for heavy nucleus primaries. These signals are apparently generated by neutrons. The comparison of the experimental data and simulations with GEANT 3-21 code using QGSM generator for nucleus-nucleus interactions is presented.

  15. 40 CFR 1066.250 - Base inertia verification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... inertia mean values as described in 40 CFR 1065.602(b) (8) Calculate the inertia error for the final base... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Base inertia verification. 1066.250... CONTROLS VEHICLE-TESTING PROCEDURES Dynamometer Specifications § 1066.250 Base inertia verification....

  16. Experimental Study of the Moment of Inertia of a Cone--Angular Variation and Inertia Ellipsoid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pintao, Carlos A. F.; de Souza Filho, Moacir P.; Usida, Wesley F.; Xavier, Jose A.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, an experimental set-up which differs from the traditional ones is established in order to determine the moment of inertia of a right circular cone. Its angular variation and inertia ellipsoid are determined by means of an experimental study. In addition, a system that allows for the evaluation of the angular acceleration and torque…

  17. Estimating the Inertia Matrix of a Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acikmese, Behcet; Keim, Jason; Shields, Joel

    2007-01-01

    A paper presents a method of utilizing some flight data, aboard a spacecraft that includes reaction wheels for attitude control, to estimate the inertia matrix of the spacecraft. The required data are digitized samples of (1) the spacecraft attitude in an inertial reference frame as measured, for example, by use of a star tracker and (2) speeds of rotation of the reaction wheels, the moments of inertia of which are deemed to be known. Starting from the classical equations for conservation of angular momentum of a rigid body, the inertia-matrix-estimation problem is formulated as a constrained least-squares minimization problem with explicit bounds on the inertia matrix incorporated as linear matrix inequalities. The explicit bounds reflect physical bounds on the inertia matrix and reduce the volume of data that must be processed to obtain a solution. The resulting minimization problem is a semidefinite optimization problem that can be solved efficiently, with guaranteed convergence to the global optimum, by use of readily available algorithms. In a test case involving a model attitude platform rotating on an air bearing, it is shown that, relative to a prior method, the present method produces better estimates from few data.

  18. The effects of dune slopes and material heterogeneity on the thermal behavior of dune fields in Mars' Southern Hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Shea, P. M.; Putzig, N. E.; Van Kooten, S.; Fenton, L. K.

    2015-12-01

    We analyzed the effects of slopes on the thermal properties of three dune fields in Mars' southern hemisphere. Although slope has important thermal effects, it is not the main driver of observed apparent thermal inertia (ATI) for these dunes. Comparing the ATI seasonal behavior as derived from Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) data with that modeled for compositional heterogeneities, we found that TES results correlate best with models of duricrust overlying and/or horizontally mixing with fines. We measured slopes and aspects in digital terrain models created from High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) images of dunes within Proctor, Kaiser, and Wirtz craters. Using the MARSTHERM web toolset, we incorporated the slopes and aspects together with TES albedo, TES thermal inertia, surface pressure, and TES dust opacity, into models of seasonal ATI. Models that incorporate sub-pixel slopes show seasonal day and night ATI values that differ from the TES results by 0-300 J m-2 K-1 s-½. In addition, the models' day-night differences are opposite in sign from those of the TES results, indicating that factors other than slope are involved. We therefore compared the TES data to model results for a broad range of horizontally mixed and two-layered surfaces to seek other possible controls on the observed data, finding that a surface layer of higher thermal inertia is a likely contributor. However, it is clear from this study that the overall composition and morphology of the dune fields are more complex than currently available models allow. Future work will combine slopes with other model parameters such as multi-layered surfaces and lateral changes in layer thickness. Coupling these improvements with broader seasonal coverage from the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) at more thermally favorable times of day would allow more accurate characterization of dune thermal behavior.

  19. Albedo of Permanently Shadowed Regions of the Lunar Poles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riner, M. A.; Lucey, P. G.; Bussey, B.; Cahill, J. T.; McGovern, A.

    2012-12-01

    limit is due to a complete loss of received laser signal as the spacecraft crosses the terminator due to thermal contraction of insulating blankets that pull the LOLA telescope out of alignment with the detectors. Fortuitously, two of the five laser spots reposition onto detectors after a transition period, so good laser range is obtained on a portion of the lunar night side. Additional calibration of night side reflectance data pole ward of 83° is ongoing [4]. The albedo of measured permanently shaded regions is 0.31 +/- 0.031 (1σ) compared to 0.31 +/- 0.033 (1σ) for measured sunlit regions from 60-80° north and south latitudes. This suggests that the high albedo of the floor of Shackleton is either unique or that the cause of the high albedo only acts at higher latitudes. Additional study of PSRs pole ward of 83° from LOLA night side data and examination of individual orbit tracks through PSRs may help elucidate the relationship between PSRs and albedo and contribute to understanding of these unique thermal environments, distribution of ice in PSRs, and volatile delivery and retention mechanisms. [1] Ingersoll et al. (1992) Icarus, 100, 40-47. [2] Smith et al. (2010) Space Sci. Rev., 150, 209-241. [3] Riner and Lucey (2011) AGU Fall Meeting, #P13D-1707. [4] Zuber et al. (2012) Nature, 486, 378-381. [5] McGovern et al. (2012), Icarus, accepted pending final review.

  20. The Ultraviolet Albedo of Ganymede

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrath, Melissa; Hendrix, A.

    2013-10-01

    A large set of ultraviolet images of Ganymede have been acquired with the Hubble Space Telescope over the last 15 years. These images have been used almost exclusively to study Ganymede’s stunning auroral emissions (Feldman et al. 2000; Eviatar et al. 2001; McGrath et al. 2004; Saur et al. 2011; McGrath et al. 2013), and even the most basic information about Ganymede’s UV albedo has yet to be gleaned from these data. We will present a first-cut analysis of both disk-averaged and spatially-resolved UV albedos of Ganymede, with focus on the spatially-resolved Lyman-alpha albedo, which has never been considered previously for this satellite. Ganymede's visibly bright regions are known to be rich in water ice, while the visibly dark regions seem to be more carbonaceous (Carlson et al., 1996). At Lyman-alpha, these two species should also have very different albedo values. References Carlson, R. and 39 co-authors, Near-infrared spectroscopy and spectral mapping of Jupiter and the Galilean satellites: Results from Galileo’s initial orbit, Science, 274, 385-388, 1996. Eviatar, A., D. F. Strobel, B. C. Wolven, P. D. Feldman, M. A. McGrath, and D. J. Williams, Excitation of the Ganymede ultraviolet aurora, Astrophys. J, 555, 1013-1019, 2001. Feldman, P. D., M. A. McGrath, D. F. Strobel, H. W. Moos, K. D. Retherford, and B. C. Wolven, HST/STIS imaging of ultraviolet aurora on Ganymede, Astrophys. J, 535, 1085-1090, 2000. McGrath M. A., Lellouch E., Strobel D. F., Feldman P. D., Johnson R. E., Satellite Atmospheres, Chapter 19 in Jupiter: The Planet, Satellites and Magnetosphere, ed. F. Bagenal, T. Dowling, W. McKinnon, Cambridge University Press, 2004. McGrath M. A., Jia, Xianzhe; Retherford, Kurt; Feldman, Paul D.; Strobel, Darrell F.; Saur, Joachim, Aurora on Ganymede, J. Geophys. Res., doi: 10.1002/jgra.50122, 2013. Saur, J., S. Duling, S., L. Roth, P. D. Feldman, D. F. Strobel, K. D. Retherford, M. A. McGrath, A. Wennmacher, American Geophysical Union, Fall Meeting

  1. Vesta surface thermal properties map

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Capria, Maria Teresa; Tosi, F.; De Santis, Maria Cristina; Capaccioni, F.; Ammannito, E.; Frigeri, A.; Zambon, F; Fonte, S.; Palomba, E.; Turrini, D.; Titus, T.N.; Schroder, S.E.; Toplis, M.J.; Liu, J.Y.; Combe, J.-P.; Raymond, C.A.; Russell, C.T.

    2014-01-01

    The first ever regional thermal properties map of Vesta has been derived from the temperatures retrieved by infrared data by the mission Dawn. The low average value of thermal inertia, 30 ± 10 J m−2 s−0.5 K−1, indicates a surface covered by a fine regolith. A range of thermal inertia values suggesting terrains with different physical properties has been determined. The lower thermal inertia of the regions north of the equator suggests that they are covered by an older, more processed surface. A few specific areas have higher than average thermal inertia values, indicative of a more compact material. The highest thermal inertia value has been determined on the Marcia crater, known for its pitted terrain and the presence of hydroxyl in the ejecta. Our results suggest that this type of terrain can be the result of soil compaction following the degassing of a local subsurface reservoir of volatiles.

  2. The temporal scale research of MODIS albedo product authenticity verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yongxing; Xue, Zhihang; Cheng, Hui; Xiong, Yajv; Chen, Yunping; Tong, Ling

    2016-06-01

    This study introduces a method that normalizes the inversed ETM+ albedo to the local solar noon albedo for the temporal scale of the MODIS albedo validation. Firstly, the statistical relation model between the surface albedo and the solar elevation angle was set up, and then deducing relationship between ETM+ albedo and the solar elevation angle, so the ETM+ albedo at local solar noon could be got. Secondly, the ground measurement albedo at the local solar noon was used to assess the inversed ETM+ albedo and the normalized albedo. The experiment results show that the method can effectively improve the accuracy of product certification.

  3. Treating inertia in passive microbead rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indei, Tsutomu; Schieber, Jay D.; Córdoba, Andrés; Pilyugina, Ekaterina

    2012-02-01

    The dynamic modulus G* of a viscoelastic medium is often measured by following the trajectory of a small bead subject to Brownian motion in a method called “passive microbead rheology.” This equivalence between the positional autocorrelation function of the tracer bead and G* is assumed via the generalized Stokes-Einstein relation (GSER). However, inertia of both bead and medium are neglected in the GSER so that the analysis based on the GSER is not valid at high frequency where inertia is important. In this paper we show how to treat both contributions to inertia properly in one-bead passive microrheological analysis. A Maxwell fluid is studied as the simplest example of a viscoelastic fluid to resolve some apparent paradoxes of eliminating inertia. In the original GSER, the mean-square displacement (MSD) of the tracer bead does not satisfy the correct initial condition. If bead inertia is considered, the proper initial condition is realized, thereby indicating an importance of including inertia, but the MSD oscillates at a time regime smaller than the relaxation time of the fluid. This behavior is rather different from the original result of the GSER and what is observed. What is more, the discrepancy from the GSER result becomes worse with decreasing bead mass, and there is an anomalous gap between the MSD derived by naïvely taking the zero-mass limit in the equation of motion and the MSD for finite bead mass as indicated by McKinley [J. Rheol.JORHD20148-605510.1122/1.3238546 53, 1487 (2009)]. In this paper we show what is necessary to take the zero-mass limit of the bead safely and correctly without causing either the inertial oscillation or the anomalous gap, while obtaining the proper initial condition. The presence of a very small purely viscous element can be used to eliminate bead inertia safely once included in the GSER. We also show that if the medium contains relaxation times outside the window where the single-mode Maxwell behavior is observed

  4. Relations between albedos and emissivities from MODIS and ASTER data over North African Desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, L.; Dickinson, R. E.; Ogawa, K.; Tian, Y.; Jin, M.; Schmugge, T.; Tsvetsinskaya, E.

    2003-10-01

    This paper analyzes relations among MODIS surface albedos, ASTER broadband (3-14 μm) emissivities, and a soil taxonomy map over the arid areas of Algeria, Libya, and Tunisia in North Africa at 30 second (about 1 km) and 2 minute (about 4 km) spatial resolutions. The MODIS albedo data are from 7 spectral bands and 3 broadbands during dust-free seasons and the emissivity data are derived from a linear combination of the waveband emissivities of the ASTER five thermal infrared channels. Both albedo and emissivity data in the study region show similar considerable spatial variability, larger than assumed by most climate models, and such variability is related to the surface types (sands, rock, and soil orders). Emissivity over bare soils exhibits statistically significant correlations with albedos at both broadbands and most of spectral bands and decreases linearly with albedos. Albedo and emissivity are more strongly correlated with each other than either is to the surface types, apparently because of their higher resolution either spatially or in surface mineralogy. This paper provides guidance for the possible inclusion of such correlation to specify albedo and emissivity in climate models.

  5. Relations Between Albedos and Emissivities From MODIS and ASTER Data Over North African Desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, L.; Dickinson, R.; Ogawa, K.; Tian, Y.; Jin, M.; Schmugge, T.; Tsvetsinskaya, E.

    2003-12-01

    This paper analyzes relations among MODIS surface albedos, ASTER broadband (3-14 μ m) emissivities, and a soil taxonomy map over the arid areas of Algeria, Libya, and Tunisia in North Africa at 30 second (about 1 km) and 2 minute (about 4 km) spatial resolutions. The MODIS albedo data are from 7 spectral bands and 3 broadbands during dust-free seasons and the emissivity data are derived from a linear combination of the waveband emissivities of the ASTER five thermal infrared channels. Both albedo and emissivity data in the study region show similar considerable spatial variability, larger than assumed by most climate models, and such variability is related to the surface types (sands, rock, and soil orders). Emissivity over bare soils exhibits statistically significant correlations with albedos at both broadbands and most of spectral bands and decreases linearly with albedos. Albedo and emissivity are more strongly correlated with each other than either is to the surface types, apparently because of their higher resolution either spatially or in surface mineralogy. This paper provides guidance for the possible inclusion of such correlation to specify albedo and emissivity in climate models.

  6. Near-ground cooling efficacies of trees and high-albedo surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Levinson, R M

    1997-05-01

    Daytime summer urban heat islands arise when the prevalence of dark-colored surfaces and lack of vegetation make a city warmer than neighboring countryside. Two frequently-proposed summer heat island mitigation measures are to plant trees and to increase the albedo (solar reflectivity) of ground surfaces. This dissertation examines the effects of these measures on the surface temperature of an object near the ground, and on solar heating of air near the ground. Near-ground objects include people, vehicles, and buildings. The variation of the surface temperature of a near-ground object with ground albedo indicates that a rise in ground albedo will cool a near-ground object only if the object`s albedo exceeds a critical value. This critical value of object albedo depends on wind speed, object geometry, and the height of the atmospheric thermal boundary layer. It ranges from 0.15 to 0.37 for a person. If an object has typical albedo of 0.3, increasing the ground albedo by.

  7. A Model of Thermal Conductivity for Planetary Soils. 2; Theory for Cemented Soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piqueux, S.; Christensen, P. R.

    2009-01-01

    A numerical model of heat conduction through particulate media made of spherical grains cemented by various bonding agents is presented. The pore-filling gas conductivity, volume fraction, and thermal conductivity of the cementing phase are tunable parameters. Cement fractions <0.001-0.01% in volume have small effects on the soil bulk thermal conductivity. A significant conductivity increase (factor 3-8) is observed for bond fractions of 0.01 to 1% in volume. In the 1 to 15% bond fraction domain, the conductivity increases continuously but less intensely (25-100% conductivity increase compared to a 1% bond system). Beyond 15% of cements, the conductivity increases vigorously and the bulk conductivity rapidly approaches that of bedrock. The composition of the cements (i.e. conductivity) has little influence on the bulk thermal inertia of the soil, especially if the volume of bond <10%. These results indicate that temperature measurements are sufficient to detect cemented soils and quantify the amount of cementing phase, but the mineralogical nature of the bonds and the typical grain size are unlikely to be determined from orbit. On Mars, a widespread surface unit characterized by a medium albedo (0.19-0.26) and medium/high thermal inertia (200-600 J s(0.5)/sq m/K) has long been hypothesized to be associated with a duricrust. The fraction of cement required to fit the thermal data is less than approx.1-5% by volume. This small amount of material is consistent with orbital observations, confirming that soil cementation is an important factor controlling the thermal inertia of the Martian surface

  8. The albedo, effective temperature, and energy balance of Uranus, as determined from Voyager IRIS data

    SciTech Connect

    Pearl, J.C.; Conrath, B.J.; Hanel, R.A.; Pirraglia, J.A.; Coustenis, A. Paris, Observatoire, Meudon )

    1990-03-01

    The albedo, T(eff), and energy balance of Uranus are presently derived from Voyager IR Spectrometer and Radiometer data. By obtaining the absolute phase curve of Uranus, it has become possible to evaluate the Bond albedo without making separate determinations of the geometric albedo and phase integral. An orbital mean value for the bolometric Bond albedo of 0.3 + or - 0.049 yields an equilibrium temperature of 58.2 + or - 1.0 K. Thermal spectra from pole-to-pole latitude coverage establish a T(eff) of 59.1 + or - 0.3 K, leading to an energy balance of 1.06 + or - 0.08 for Uranus. 39 refs.

  9. The Near-Earth Encounter of Asteroid 308635 (2005 YU55): Thermal IR Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Lucy F.; Emery, J. P.; Moskovitz, N. A.; Busch, N. W.; Yang, B.; Granvik, M.

    2012-01-01

    The near-Earth approach (0.00217 AU, or 0.845 lunar distances) of the C-type asteroid 308635 (2005 YU55) in November 2011 presented a rare opportunity for detailed observations of a low-albedo NEA in this size range. As part of a multi-telescope campaign to measure visible and infrared spectra and photometry, we obtained mid-infrared (approx. 8 to 22 micron) photometry and spectroscopy of 2005 YU55 using Michelle on the Gemini North telescope on UT November 9 and 10,2011. An extensive radar campaign together with optical light-curves established the rotation state of YU55. In addition, the radar imaging resulted in a shape model for the asteroid, detection of numerous boulders on its surface, and a preliminary estimate of its equatorial diameter at 380 +/- 20 m. In a preliminary analysis, applying the radar and lightcurve-derived parameters to a rough-surface thermophysical model fit to the Gemini/Michelle thermal emission photometry results in a thermal inertia range of approximately 500 to 1500 J/sq m/0.5s/K, with the low-thermal-inertia solution corresponding to the small end of the radar size range and vice versa. Updates to these results will be presented and modeling of the thermal contribution to the measured near-infrared spectra from Palomar/Triplespec and IRTF/SpeX will also be discussed.

  10. Thermal Behaviour of Unusual Local-Scale Surface Features on Vesta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tosi, F.; Capria, M. T.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Palomba, E.; Grassi, D.; Capaccioni, F.; Ammannito, E.; Combe, J.-Ph.; Sunshine, J. M.; McCord, T. B.; Titus, T. N.; Russell, C. T.; Raymond, C. A.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Toplis, M. J.; Forni, O.; Sykes, M. V.

    2012-01-01

    On Vesta, the region of the infrared spectrum beyond approximately 3.5 micrometers is dominated by the thermal emission of the asteroid's surface, which can be used to determine surface temperature by means of temperature-retrieval algorithms. The thermal behavior of areas of unusual albedo seen at the local scale can be related to physical properties that can provide information about the origin of those materials. Dawn's Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIR) hyperspectral cubes are used to retrieve surface temperatures, with high accuracy as long as temperatures are greater than 180 K. Data acquired in the Survey phase (23 July through 29 August 2011) show several unusual surface features: 1) high-albedo (bright) and low-albedo (dark) material deposits, 2) spectrally distinct ejecta, 3) regions suggesting finer-grained materials. Some of the unusual dark and bright features were re-observed by VIR in the subsequent High-Altitude Mapping Orbit (HAMO) and Low-Altitude Mapping Orbit (LAMO) phases at increased pixel resolution. To calculate surface temperatures, we applied a Bayesian approach to nonlinear inversion based on the Kirchhoff law and the Planck function. These results were cross-checked through application of alternative methods. Here we present temperature maps of several local-scale features that were observed by Dawn under different illumination conditions and different local solar times. Some bright terrains have an overall albedo in the visible as much as 40% brighter than surrounding areas. Data from the IR channel of VIR show that bright regions generally correspond to regions with lower thermal emission, i.e. lower temperature, while dark regions correspond to areas with higher thermal emission, i.e. higher temperature. This behavior confirms that many of the dark appearances in the VIS mainly reflect albedo variations. In particular, it is shown that during maximum daily insolation, dark features in the equatorial region may rise to

  11. 40 CFR 1066.250 - Base inertia verification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... mean values as described in 40 CFR 1065.602(b). (7) Calculate the base inertia error, I berror, for... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Base inertia verification. 1066.250... CONTROLS VEHICLE-TESTING PROCEDURES Dynamometer Specifications § 1066.250 Base inertia verification....

  12. 40 CFR 1066.250 - Base inertia verification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... mean values as described in 40 CFR 1065.602(b). (7) Calculate the base inertia error, I berror, for... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Base inertia verification. 1066.250... CONTROLS VEHICLE-TESTING PROCEDURES Dynamometer Specifications § 1066.250 Base inertia verification....

  13. Winter Albedo Characteristics at St. Paul, Minnesota.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Donald G.; Ruschy, David L.

    1989-03-01

    Mean and median daily albedos of the November-April period are presented for a nonforested station in the North Central region of the United States where frozen soil and persistent snow cover are common winter features. Three distinct albedo periods were found, the occurrence of which can be explained by comparison with associated daily records of air temperature and snow depth. These periods are: I) Introduction to Winter, 9-22 November, a transitional period in which snowfalls begin to occur but with insufficient frequency or duration to greatly alter the mean albedo from growing season values; II) the High Albedo Season, 23 November-17 March, that is characterized by mean and median albedos of 50% or higher and by a negatively skewed distribution of albedo values in contrast to periods I and III; and III) the transition period, Introduction to Spring, 18 March-12 April, where late season snowfalls of brief duration occur, but the mean albedo is lower than in period I because of the more common occurrence of moist surfaces due to snowmelt and rains.

  14. Thermal Emission Spectroscopy (5.2 To 38 Microns) And Analysis Of 10 Near-earth Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dave, Riddhi; Emery, J.; Cruikshank, D.; Mueller, M.; Delbo, M.; Trilling, D. E.; Mommert, M.

    2010-10-01

    Near Earth Asteroids (NEAs- 0.983AUalbedo and size distribution of the NEAs is an essential prerequisite for exploring their physical nature, thermal properties, mineralogy, taxonomy and for developing reliable NEA population models. In support of the ExploreNEOs campaign of the Warm Spitzer program, we will present initial results from study of a sample of NEAs using the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) on NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope [Programs 88 and 91- Extinct Comets and Low-Albedo Asteroids]. These data were reduced with Spitzer IRS Custom Extraction (SPICE) a JAVA-based tool built for interactive extraction of Spitzer IRS spectra. The 5.2-38 m thermal emission spectra[R 60-130] have been fitted with models of the thermal continuum employing the Near Earth Asteroid Thermal Model [NEATM](Harris 1998) and a Thermophysical model. Simultaneous measurements of the asteroid flux in the thermal infrared, combined with a thermal model, allow both the diameter and the albedo to be determined. The sample of Asteroids to be a part of this study are 1602 Geographos, 1580 Betulia, 433 Eros, 2212 Hephaistos, 1685 Toro, 1917 Cuyo, 1566 Icarus, 3200 Phaethon, 7092 Cadmus and 1866 Sisyphus. This study will give in-depth understanding of the applicability of the NEATM for NEAs observed at higher phase angles, having larger thermal inertia than main-belt asteroids, and/or displaying varied geometries. This work is based on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under a contract with NASA.

  15. Variability of albedo and utility of the MODIS albedo product in forested wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sumner, David M.; Wu, Qinglong; Pathak, Chandra S.

    2011-01-01

    Albedo was monitored over a two-year period (beginning April 2008) at three forested wetland sites in Florida, USA using up- and down-ward facing pyranometers. Water level, above and below land surface, is the primary control on the temporal variability of daily albedo. Relatively low reflectivity of water accounts for the observed reductions in albedo with increased inundation of the forest floor. Enhanced canopy shading of the forest floor was responsible for lower sensitivity of albedo to water level at the most dense forest site. At one site, the most dramatic reduction in daily albedo was observed during the inundation of a highly-reflective, calcareous periphyton-covered land surface. Satellite-based Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) estimates of albedo compare favorably with measured albedo. Use of MODIS albedo values in net radiation computations introduced a root mean squared error of less than 4.7 W/m2 and a mean, annual bias of less than 2.3 W/m2 (1.7%). These results suggest that MODIS-estimated albedo values can reliably be used to capture areal and temporal variations in albedo that are important to the surface energy balance.

  16. Arctic sea ice albedo from AVHRR

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsay, R.W.; Rothrock, D.A.

    1994-11-01

    The seasonal cycle of surface albedo of sea ice in the Arctic is estimated from measurements made with the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) on the polar-orbiting satellites NOAA-10 and NOAA-11. The albedos of 145 200-km-square cells are analyzed. The cells are from March through September 1989 and include only those for which the sun is more than 10 deg above the horizon. Cloud masking is performed manually. Corrections are applied for instrument calibration, nonisotropic reflection, atmospheric interference, narrowband to broadband conversion, and normalization to a common solar zenith angle. The estimated albedos are relative, with the instrument gain set to give an albedo of 0.80 for ice floes in March and April. The mean values for the cloud-free portions of individual cells range from 0.18 to 0.91. Monthly averages of cells in the central Arctic range from 0.76 in April to 0.47 in August. The monthly averages of the within-cell standard deviations in the central Arctic are 0.04 in April and 0.06 in September. The surface albedo and surface temperature are correlated most strongly in March (R = -0.77) with little correlation in the summer. The monthly average lead fraction is determined from the mean potential open water, a scaled representation of the temperature or albedo between 0.0 (for ice) and 1.0 (for water); in the central Arctic it rises from an average 0.025 in the spring to 0.06 in September. Sparse data on aerosols, ozone, and water vapor in the atmospheric column contribute uncertainties to instantaneous, area-average albedos of 0.13, 0.04, and 0.08. Uncertainties in monthly average albedos are not this large. Contemporaneous estimation of these variables could reduce the uncertainty in the estimated albedo considerably.

  17. The drive for power and conceptual inertia.

    PubMed

    Frank, J D

    1989-01-01

    This presentation has considered only two of many psychological factors that contribute to the nuclear predicament. These are the power drive and conceptual inertia and how they encourage the propensity to violence. Psychotherapists can make an indirect but significant contribution toward human survival by calling attention particularly to the pernicious psychological effects of the misuse of language, either deliberate or resulting from conceptual inertia. We should seek to inform and educate the public, including political leaders, about this phenomenon. Those of us who have young children or grandchildren should seek to introduce into school and college curricula issues created by the splitting of the atom, since the young are best able to achieve the massive psychological changes necessary for coping with a new and unprecedented predicament.

  18. Inertia in Friedmann Universes with variable and

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultana, J.; Kazanas, D.

    2015-09-01

    In light of the recent interest in dynamical dark energy models based on a cosmology with varying gravitational and cosmological parameters and , we present here a model of inertia in a type of Friedmann universe with ; being the dimensionless scale factor, that was recently studied by Singh et al. (Astrophys. Space Sci. 345:213, 2013). The proposed Machian model of inertia utilizes the curved space generalization of Sciama's law of inertial induction, which is based on the analogy between the retarded far fields of electrodynamics and those of gravitation, and expresses the total inertial force on an accelerating mass in terms of contributions from all matter in the observable Universe. We show that for a varying Friedmann model with , inertial induction alone can account for the total inertial force on the accelerating mass. We then compare this cosmological model with current observational constraints for the variation of.

  19. On the Machian origin of inertia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berman, Marcelo Samuel

    2008-12-01

    We examine Sciama’s inertia theory: we generalise it, by combining rotation and expansion in one unique model, we find the angular speed of the Universe, and we stress that the theory is zero-total-energy valued. We compare with other theories of the same null energy background. We determine the numerical value of a constant which appears in the Machian inertial force expression devised by Graneau and Graneau (In the Grip of the Distant Universe—the Science of Inertia, World Scientific, Singapore, 2006), by introducing the above angular speed. We point out that this last theory is not restricted to Newtonian physics as those authors stated but is, in fact, compatible with other cosmological and gravitational theories. An argument by Berry (Principles of Cosmology and Gravitation, Adam Hilger, Bristol, 1989) is shown in order to “derive” Brans-Dicke relation in the present context.

  20. Nonlinear transient waves in coupled phase oscillators with inertia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jörg, David J.

    2015-05-01

    Like the inertia of a physical body describes its tendency to resist changes of its state of motion, inertia of an oscillator describes its tendency to resist changes of its frequency. Here, we show that finite inertia of individual oscillators enables nonlinear phase waves in spatially extended coupled systems. Using a discrete model of coupled phase oscillators with inertia, we investigate these wave phenomena numerically, complemented by a continuum approximation that permits the analytical description of the key features of wave propagation in the long-wavelength limit. The ability to exhibit traveling waves is a generic feature of systems with finite inertia and is independent of the details of the coupling function.

  1. Nonlinear transient waves in coupled phase oscillators with inertia.

    PubMed

    Jörg, David J

    2015-05-01

    Like the inertia of a physical body describes its tendency to resist changes of its state of motion, inertia of an oscillator describes its tendency to resist changes of its frequency. Here, we show that finite inertia of individual oscillators enables nonlinear phase waves in spatially extended coupled systems. Using a discrete model of coupled phase oscillators with inertia, we investigate these wave phenomena numerically, complemented by a continuum approximation that permits the analytical description of the key features of wave propagation in the long-wavelength limit. The ability to exhibit traveling waves is a generic feature of systems with finite inertia and is independent of the details of the coupling function.

  2. Two-fluid turbulence including electron inertia

    SciTech Connect

    Andrés, Nahuel Gómez, Daniel; Gonzalez, Carlos; Martin, Luis; Dmitruk, Pablo

    2014-12-15

    We present a full two-fluid magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) description for a completely ionized hydrogen plasma, retaining the effects of the Hall current, electron pressure, and electron inertia. According to this description, each plasma species introduces a new spatial scale: the ion inertial length λ{sub i} and the electron inertial length λ{sub e}, which are not present in the traditional MHD description. In the present paper, we seek for possible changes in the energy power spectrum in fully developed turbulent regimes, using numerical simulations of the two-fluid equations in two-and-a-half dimensions. We have been able to reproduce different scaling laws in different spectral ranges, as it has been observed in the solar wind for the magnetic energy spectrum. At the smallest wavenumbers where plain MHD is valid, we obtain an inertial range following a Kolmogorov k{sup −5∕3} law. For intermediate wavenumbers such that λ{sub i}{sup −1}≪k≪λ{sub e}{sup −1}, the spectrum is modified to a k{sup −7∕3} power-law, as has also been obtained for Hall-MHD neglecting electron inertia terms. When electron inertia is retained, a new spectral region given by k>λ{sub e}{sup −1} arises. The power spectrum for magnetic energy in this region is given by a k{sup −11∕3} power law. Finally, when the terms of electron inertia are retained, we study the self-consistent electric field. Our results are discussed and compared with those obtained in the solar wind observations and previous simulations.

  3. Spectral albedo and emissivity of CO2 in Martian polar caps - Model results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, Stephen G.; Wiscombe, Warren J.; Firestone, John F.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper, a snow albedo model previously developed for terrestrial snow is extended to the case of CO2 snow on Mars. Pure CO2 snow is calculated to have high albedo at visible wavelengths but not as high as that of water snow. At any given wavelength, the primary variable controlling albedo and emissivity is the snow grain size, with albedo decreasing and emissivity increasing as grain size increases. Observations that red albedo is much higher than blue albedo in the Martian south polar cap indicates that the snow or the atmosphere is contaminated with red dust. The absorption coefficient of CO2 ice in the thermal infrared is two to three orders of magnitude smaller than that measured for H2O ice. CO2 snow emissivity is therefore much lower than H2O snow, varying substantially with wavelength and quite sensitive to grain size and emission angle. Factors tending to increase emissivity are large grain size, small emission angle, and large concentrations of dust or water.

  4. Impact of Dust on Mars Surface Albedo and Energy Flux with LMD General Circulation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, D.; Flanner, M.; Millour, E.; Martinez, G.

    2015-12-01

    Mars, just like Earth experience different seasons because of its axial tilt (about 25°). This causes growth and retreat of snow cover (primarily CO2) in Martian Polar regions. The perennial caps are the only place on the planet where condensed H2O is available at surface. On Mars, as much as 30% atmospheric CO2 deposits in each hemisphere depending upon the season. This leads to a significant variation on planet's surface albedo and hence effecting the amount of solar flux absorbed or reflected at the surface. General Circulation Model (GCM) of Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique (LMD) currently uses observationally derived surface albedo from Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) instrument for the polar caps. These TES albedo values do not have any inter-annual variability, and are independent of presence of any dust/impurity on surface. Presence of dust or other surface impurities can significantly reduce the surface albedo especially during and right after a dust storm. This change will also be evident in the surface energy flux interactions. Our work focuses on combining earth based Snow, Ice, and Aerosol Radiation (SNICAR) model with current state of GCM to incorporate the impact of dust on Martian surface albedo, and hence the energy flux. Inter-annual variability of surface albedo and planet's top of atmosphere (TOA) energy budget along with their correlation with currently available mission data will be presented.

  5. Albedo distribution of main-belt asteroids based on IRAS, AKARI, and WISE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usui, F.; Hasegawa, S.; Ishiguro, M.; Mueller, T.; Ootsubo, T.

    2014-07-01

    Presently, the number of asteroids is known to be more than 630,000, and more than 90 % of asteroids with known orbital elements are classified as main-belt asteroids (MBAs). The spatial distribution of compositions among MBAs is of particular interest, because the main belt is the largest reservoir of asteroids in the solar system. Asteroids are thought to be the remnants of planetesimals formed in the early solar system, and allow us to study the formation and evolution of asteroids, origin of meteoroids and the near-Earth asteroids, as well as the formation of the solar system. Size and albedo are one of the most basic physical quantities of asteroid. Knowledge of size and albedo is essential in many aspects of asteroid research, such as the chemical composition and mineralogy, the size-frequency distribution of dynamical families and populations of asteroids, and the relationship between small bodies in the outer solar system and comets. Several techniques have been developed to determine the size of asteroids; by direct imaging with the Hubble Space Telescope or large ground-based telescopes with adaptive optics, radar observations, speckle interferometry, stellar occultation combined with lightcurve inversion techniques, and spacecraft flyby / rendezvous / sample return. One of the most effective methods for measuring asteroid size and albedo indirectly is through the use of radiometry, which combines information of the thermal emission (infrared flux) and the reflected sunlight (absolute magnitude). This method can provide unique data for asteroid size and albedo. Using radiometric measurements, a large number of objects can be observed in a short period of time, providing coherent data for large populations of asteroids within the asteroid belt. Infrared observations can be made still better under ideal circumstances, from space. The first space-borne infrared telescope is the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS; [1]), launched in 1983 and performed a

  6. Thermal correction of MRO CRISM data using photoclinometry and slope-dependent thermal models for the Martian surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, T. Z.

    2004-11-01

    The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter CRISM (Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars) experiment will map Mars in the 0.4-4.0 μ m range, with spatial resolution 200m for mapping and 18m for focused study targets. Surface thermal emission beyond 2.5 μ m will be removed to measure water and carbonate absorption bands correctly. That region is dominated by a broad, spatially variable band of bound water, making derivation of temperature from observed spectra difficult. As absorptions may lie in exposed sloping terrain, thermal correction must include slope effects. The CRISM spatial resolution is too fine to use the best MGS MOLA map (1/128o, 460m) for slope information. Photoclinometry is used to estimate slopes in CRISM blue images, where Martian albedo variations are subdued. Inferred slopes are combined with lower resolution MOLA data to obtain slope and azimuth input to a Martian thermal model. The resulting temperature is used to compute Planck radiance for subtraction from the observed spectrum. The algorithm incorporated into mainstream processing of the several terabit CRISM data set must be fast and require no hands-on analysis. The thermal model is a large look-up table indexed by thermal inertia, albedo, dust opacity, latitude, season, and local time. Such a table was used by M. Mellon for TES and THEMIS data processing. For a given CRISM observation season, local time, and latitude are essentially fixed, so the look-up table may be subsetted for speed. To develop and prove the PC system, we use THEMIS blue and IR data, with resolution 100m. The technique is based on that of Beyer \\textit{et al} in assessing MER landing site hazards. The thermal model with slope effects was developed by H. Kieffer for use with TES and THEMIS data. This research was funded by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter project and carried out by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology.

  7. Arctic sea ice albedo from AVHRR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindsay, R. W.; Rothrock, D. A.

    1994-01-01

    The seasonal cycle of surface albedo of sea ice in the Arctic is estimated from measurements made with the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) on the polar-orbiting satellites NOAA-10 and NOAA-11. The albedos of 145 200-km-square cells are analyzed. The cells are from March through September 1989 and include only those for which the sun is more than 10 deg above the horizon. Cloud masking is performed manually. Corrections are applied for instrument calibration, nonisotropic reflection, atmospheric interference, narrowband to broadband conversion, and normalization to a common solar zenith angle. The estimated albedos are relative, with the instrument gain set to give an albedo of 0.80 for ice floes in March and April. The mean values for the cloud-free portions of individual cells range from 0.18 to 0.91. Monthly averages of cells in the central Arctic range from 0.76 in April to 0.47 in August. The monthly averages of the within-cell standard deviations in the central Arctic are 0.04 in April and 0.06 in September. The surface albedo and surface temperature are correlated most strongly in March (R = -0.77) with little correlation in the summer. The monthly average lead fraction is determined from the mean potential open water, a scaled representation of the temperature or albedo between 0.0 (for ice) and 1.0 (for water); in the central Arctic it rises from an average 0.025 in the spring to 0.06 in September. Sparse data on aerosols, ozone, and water vapor in the atmospheric column contribute uncertainties to instantaneous, area-average albedos of 0.13, 0.04, and 0.08. Uncertainties in monthly average albedos are not this large. Contemporaneous estimation of these variables could reduce the uncertainty in the estimated albedo considerably. The poor calibration of AVHRR channels 1 and 2 is another large impediment to making accurate albedo estimates.

  8. Sea ice-albedo climate feedback mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Schramm, J.L.; Curry, J.A.; Ebert, E.E.

    1995-02-01

    The sea ice-albedo feedback mechanism over the Arctic Ocean multiyear sea ice is investigated by conducting a series of experiments using several one-dimensional models of the coupled sea ice-atmosphere system. In its simplest form, ice-albedo feedback is thought to be associated with a decrease in the areal cover of snow and ice and a corresponding increase in the surface temperature, further decreasing the area cover of snow and ice. It is shown that the sea ice-albedo feedback can operate even in multiyear pack ice, without the disappearance of this ice, associated with internal processes occurring within the multiyear ice pack (e.g., duration of the snow cover, ice thickness, ice distribution, lead fraction, and melt pond characteristics). The strength of the ice-albedo feedback mechanism is compared for several different thermodynamic sea ice models: a new model that includes ice thickness distribution., the Ebert and Curry model, the Mayjut and Untersteiner model, and the Semtner level-3 and level-0 models. The climate forcing is chosen to be a perturbation of the surface heat flux, and cloud and water vapor feedbacks are inoperative so that the effects of the sea ice-albedo feedback mechanism can be isolated. The inclusion of melt ponds significantly strengthens the ice-albedo feedback, while the ice thickness distribution decreases the strength of the modeled sea ice-albedo feedback. It is emphasized that accurately modeling present-day sea ice thickness is not adequate for a sea ice parameterization; the correct physical processes must be included so that the sea ice parameterization yields correct sensitivities to external forcing. 22 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Surface Albedo and Spectral Variability of Ceres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian-Yang; Reddy, Vishnu; Nathues, Andreas; Le Corre, Lucille; Izawa, Matthew R. M.; Cloutis, Edward A.; Sykes, Mark V.; Carsenty, Uri; Castillo-Rogez, Julie C.; Hoffmann, Martin; Jaumann, Ralf; Krohn, Katrin; Mottola, Stefano; Prettyman, Thomas H.; Schaefer, Michael; Schenk, Paul; Schröder, Stefan E.; Williams, David A.; Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.; Konopliv, Alexander S.; Park, Ryan S.; Raymond, Carol A.; Russell, Christopher T.

    2016-02-01

    Previous observations suggested that Ceres has active, but possibly sporadic, water outgassing as well as possibly varying spectral characteristics over a timescale of months. We used all available data of Ceres collected in the past three decades from the ground and the Hubble Space Telescope, as well as the newly acquired images by the Dawn  Framing Camera, to search for spectral and albedo variability on Ceres, on both a global scale and in local regions, particularly the bright spots inside the Occator crater, over timescales of a few months to decades. Our analysis has placed an upper limit on the possible temporal albedo variation on Ceres. Sporadic water vapor venting, or any possibly ongoing activity on Ceres, is not significant enough to change the albedo or the area of the bright features in the Occator crater by >15%, or the global albedo by >3% over the various timescales that we searched. Recently reported spectral slope variations can be explained by changing Sun–Ceres–Earth geometry. The active area on Ceres is less than 1 km2, too small to cause global albedo and spectral variations detectable in our data. Impact ejecta due to impacting projectiles of tens of meters in size like those known to cause observable changes to the surface albedo on Asteroid Scheila cannot cause detectable albedo change on Ceres due to its relatively large size and strong gravity. The water vapor activity on Ceres is independent of Ceres’ heliocentric distance, ruling out the possibility of the comet-like sublimation process as a possible mechanism driving the activity.

  10. Surface Albedo and Spectral Variability of Ceres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian-Yang; Reddy, Vishnu; Nathues, Andreas; Le Corre, Lucille; Izawa, Matthew R. M.; Cloutis, Edward A.; Sykes, Mark V.; Carsenty, Uri; Castillo-Rogez, Julie C.; Hoffmann, Martin; Jaumann, Ralf; Krohn, Katrin; Mottola, Stefano; Prettyman, Thomas H.; Schaefer, Michael; Schenk, Paul; Schröder, Stefan E.; Williams, David A.; Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.; Konopliv, Alexander S.; Park, Ryan S.; Raymond, Carol A.; Russell, Christopher T.

    2016-02-01

    Previous observations suggested that Ceres has active, but possibly sporadic, water outgassing as well as possibly varying spectral characteristics over a timescale of months. We used all available data of Ceres collected in the past three decades from the ground and the Hubble Space Telescope, as well as the newly acquired images by the Dawn  Framing Camera, to search for spectral and albedo variability on Ceres, on both a global scale and in local regions, particularly the bright spots inside the Occator crater, over timescales of a few months to decades. Our analysis has placed an upper limit on the possible temporal albedo variation on Ceres. Sporadic water vapor venting, or any possibly ongoing activity on Ceres, is not significant enough to change the albedo or the area of the bright features in the Occator crater by >15%, or the global albedo by >3% over the various timescales that we searched. Recently reported spectral slope variations can be explained by changing Sun-Ceres-Earth geometry. The active area on Ceres is less than 1 km2, too small to cause global albedo and spectral variations detectable in our data. Impact ejecta due to impacting projectiles of tens of meters in size like those known to cause observable changes to the surface albedo on Asteroid Scheila cannot cause detectable albedo change on Ceres due to its relatively large size and strong gravity. The water vapor activity on Ceres is independent of Ceres’ heliocentric distance, ruling out the possibility of the comet-like sublimation process as a possible mechanism driving the activity.

  11. Canned pump having a high inertia flywheel

    DOEpatents

    Veronesi, Luciano; Raimondi, ALbert A.

    1989-01-01

    A canned pump is described which includes a motor, impeller, shaft, and high inertia flywheel mounted within a hermetically sealed casing. The flywheel comprises a heavy metal disk made preferably of a uranium alloy with a stainless steel shell sealably enclosing the heavy metal. The outside surfaces of the stainless steel comprise thrust runners and a journal for mating with, respectively, thrust bearing shoes and radial bearing segments. The bearings prevent vibration of the pump and, simultaneously, minimize power losses normally associated with the flywheel resulting from frictionally pumping surrounding fluid.

  12. Canned pump having a high inertia flywheel

    DOEpatents

    Veronesi, L.; Raimondi, A.A.

    1989-12-12

    A canned pump is described which includes a motor, impeller, shaft, and high inertia flywheel mounted within a hermetically sealed casing. The flywheel comprises a heavy metal disk made preferably of a uranium alloy with a stainless steel shell sealably enclosing the heavy metal. The outside surfaces of the stainless steel comprise thrust runners and a journal for mating with, respectively, thrust bearing shoes and radial bearing segments. The bearings prevent vibration of the pump and, simultaneously, minimize power losses normally associated with the flywheel resulting from frictionally pumping surrounding fluid. 5 figs.

  13. Inertia in the Brazil nut problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahmad-Molinari, Y.; Canul-Chay, G.; Ruiz-Suárez, J. C.

    2003-10-01

    The rise dynamics of a large particle, in a granular bed under vertical vibrations, is experimentally studied with an inductive device designed to track the particle while it climbs through the granulate under different conditions. A model based on energy considerations is presented to explain our experimental data, drawing the important conclusion that it is the inertia of the particle, assisted by Reynolds dilatancy, the driven force behind its ascension mechanism. The ascension reveals a friction profile within the column which remains unchanged for different accelerations.

  14. A cavity radiometer for Earth albedo measurement, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Radiometric measurements of the directional albedo of the Earth requires a detector with a flat response from 0.2 to 50 microns, a response time of about 2 seconds, a sensitivity of the order of 0.02 mw/sq cm, and a measurement uncertainty of less than 5 percent. Absolute cavity radiometers easily meet the spectral response and accuracy requirements for Earth albedo measurements, but the radiometers available today lack the necessary sensitivity and response time. The specific innovations addressed were the development of a very low thermal mass cavity and printed/deposited thermocouple sensing elements which were incorporated into the radiometer design to produce a sensitive, fast response, absolute radiometer. The cavity is applicable to the measurement of the reflected and radiated fluxes from the Earth surface and lower atmosphere from low Earth orbit satellites. The effort consisted of requirements and thermal analysis; design, construction, and test of prototype elements of the black cavity and sensor elements to show proof-of-concept. The results obtained indicate that a black body cavity sensor that has inherently a flat response from 0.2 to 50 microns can be produced which has a sensitivity of at least 0.02 mw/sq cm per micro volt ouput and with a time constant of less than two seconds. Additional work is required to develop the required thermopile.

  15. Gamma-ray Albedo of the Moon

    SciTech Connect

    Moskalenko, Igor V.; Porter, Troy A.

    2007-06-14

    We use the GEANT4 Monte Carlo framework to calculate the gamma-ray albedo of the Moon due to interactions of cosmic ray (CR) nuclei with moon rock. Our calculation of the albedo spectrum agrees with the EGRET data. We show that the spectrum of gamma-rays from the Moon is very steep with an effective cutoff around 3 GeV (600 MeV for the inner part of the Moon disc). Since it is the only (almost) black spot in the gamma-ray sky, it provides a unique opportunity for calibration of gamma-ray telescopes, such as the forthcoming Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST). The albedo flux depends on the incident CR spectrum which changes over the solar cycle. Therefore, it is possible to monitor the CR spectrum using the albedo gamma-ray flux. Simultaneous measurements of CR proton and helium spectra by the Payload for Antimatter Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics (PAMELA), and observations of the albedo -rays by the GLAST Large Area Telescope (LAT), can be used to test the model predictions and will enable the GLAST LAT to monitor the CR spectrum near the Earth beyond the lifetime of PAMELA.

  16. On the moment of inertia of a quantum harmonic oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Khamzin, A. A. Sitdikov, A. S.; Nikitin, A. S.; Roganov, D. A.

    2013-04-15

    An original method for calculating the moment of inertia of the collective rotation of a nucleus on the basis of the cranking model with the harmonic-oscillator Hamiltonian at arbitrary frequencies of rotation and finite temperature is proposed. In the adiabatic limit, an oscillating chemical-potential dependence of the moment of inertia is obtained by means of analytic calculations. The oscillations of the moment of inertia become more pronounced as deformations approach the spherical limit and decrease exponentially with increasing temperature.

  17. Distinct thermal appearances on Vesta as inferred from the Dawn/VIR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosi, F.; Capria, M.; De Sanctis, M.; Zambon, F.; Ammannito, E.; Buczkowski, D.; Capaccioni, F.; Denevi, B.; Scully, J.; Russell, C.; Raymond, C.

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, we review some of the peculiar thermal appearances that the Dawn spacecraft has observed on Vesta at the local scale: pitted terrains, with an emphasis on the Marcia crater, olivine-rich sites, and diogenite-rich howardite craters. The information derived by the thermal infrared measured by the Visible and InfraRed mapping spectrometer [1] onboard Dawn is fully complementary to mineralogical information inferred by the same instrument at shorter wavelengths, and to geologic and topographic information derived on the basis of optical images acquired by the onboard camera. In particular, the thermal information is crucial to identify local concentrations of coherent material, and thus allow a better understanding of the observed structures. Pitted terrains were found in a few sites on Vesta [2], and display distinct thermal properties compared to other terrains. They show a reduced thermal emission at infrared wavelengths greater than 4 μ m and have distinct margins in the temperature images, being cooler than nearby terrains observed under similar solar illumination conditions. Pitted terrains can be >10 K cooler than the surroundings [3], and even cooler than bright material units found on Vesta, despite their lower albedo [4]. The Marcia crater is the largest location of pitted terrains [2]. The pitted floor of Marcia is distinct in color and albedo from its surroundings, with lower reflectance at visual wavelengths and shallower pyroxene band depths. A prominent difference in temperature is found between the pitted floor (cooler at ˜230 K) and the regions of curvilinear systems in the crater walls (hotter at ˜240--260 K). The lower temperatures of Marcia's pitted floor, as well as of other pitted sites on Vesta, suggest a higher thermal inertia, i.e., a slower thermal response to changing insolation. This is consistent with an increased local density or a higher thermal conductivity (or both), following an impact [4]: local cavities at

  18. System albedo as sensed by satellites - Its definition and variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, N. A.; Henderson-Sellers, A.

    1982-01-01

    System albedo, an important climatological and environmental parameter, is considered. Some of the problems and assumptions involved in evaluating albedo from satellite data are discussed. Clear-sky and cloud albedos over the United Kingdom and parts of northwest Europe are treated. Consideration is given to the spectral, temporal, and spatial variations and the effect of averaging. The implications of these results for those using and archiving albedo values and for future monitoring of system albedo are discussed. Normalization is of especial importance since this correction alters many albedo values. The pronounced difference in spectral albedo of the two visible channels reemphasizes the problem of attempting to calculate integrated albedo values from meteorological satellite data. The assumption of isotropic reflection is seen to be invalid, hindering the computation of accurate albedo values.

  19. Synchrophasor Measurement-Based Wind Plant Inertia Estimation: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Bank, J.; Wan, Y. H.; Muljadi, E.; Corbus, D.

    2013-05-01

    The total inertia stored in all rotating masses that are connected to power systems, such as synchronous generations and induction motors, is an essential force that keeps the system stable after disturbances. To ensure bulk power system stability, there is a need to estimate the equivalent inertia available from a renewable generation plant. An equivalent inertia constant analogous to that of conventional rotating machines can be used to provide a readily understandable metric. This paper explores a method that utilizes synchrophasor measurements to estimate the equivalent inertia that a wind plant provides to the system.

  20. Nuclear moment of inertia and spin distribution of nuclear levels

    SciTech Connect

    Alhassid, Y.; Fang, L.; Liu, S.; Bertsch, G.F.

    2005-12-15

    We introduce a simple model to calculate the nuclear moment of inertia at finite temperature. This moment of inertia describes the spin distribution of nuclear levels in the framework of the spin-cutoff model. Our model is based on a deformed single-particle Hamiltonian with pairing interaction and takes into account fluctuations in the pairing gap. We derive a formula for the moment of inertia at finite temperature that generalizes the Belyaev formula for zero temperature. We show that a number-parity projection explains the strong odd-even effects observed in shell model Monte Carlo studies of the nuclear moment of inertia in the iron region.

  1. The determination of surface albedo from meteorological satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. T.

    1977-01-01

    A surface albedo was determined from visible data collected by the NOAA-4 polar orbiting meteorological satellite. To filter out the major cause of atmospheric reflectivity, namely clouds, techniques were developed and applied to the data resulting in a map of global surface albedo. Neglecting spurious surface albedos for regions with persistent cloud cover, sun glint effects, insufficient reflected light and, at this time, some unresolved influences, the surface albedos retrieved from satellite data closely matched those of a global surface albedo map produced from surface and aircraft measurements and from characteristic albedos for land type and land use.

  2. Multiscale climatological albedo look-up maps derived from moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer BRDF/albedo products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Feng; He, Tao; Wang, Zhuosen; Ghimire, Bardan; Shuai, Yanmin; Masek, Jeffrey; Schaaf, Crystal; Williams, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Surface albedo determines radiative forcing and is a key parameter for driving Earth's climate. Better characterization of surface albedo for individual land cover types can reduce the uncertainty in estimating changes to Earth's radiation balance due to land cover change. This paper presents albedo look-up maps (LUMs) using a multiscale hierarchical approach based on moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF)/albedo products and Landsat imagery. Ten years (2001 to 2011) of MODIS BRDF/albedo products were used to generate global albedo climatology. Albedo LUMs of land cover classes defined by the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme (IGBP) at multiple spatial resolutions were generated. The albedo LUMs included monthly statistics of white-sky (diffuse) and black-sky (direct) albedo for each IGBP class for visible, near-infrared, and shortwave broadband under both snow-free and snow-covered conditions. The albedo LUMs were assessed by using the annual MODIS IGBP land cover map and the projected land use scenarios from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change land-use harmonization project. The comparisons between the reconstructed albedo and the MODIS albedo data product show good agreement. The LUMs provide high temporal and spatial resolution global albedo statistics without gaps for investigating albedo variations under different land cover scenarios and could be used for land surface modeling.

  3. Thermal Studies of Saturn's Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilorz, S.; Altobelli, N.; Leyrat, C.; Spilker, L.

    2007-12-01

    The observed thermal emission from Saturn's rings has a locational and directional variation that ultimately results from the time dependent response of individual ring particles to the quasi-periodic radiation forcing they experience as they orbit Saturn. The observed thermal emission from any radial region of the rings is representative of a large ensemble of particles or structures which are subject to statistically similar conditions as they orbit. Near any particular radius, the thermal forcing and response are quasi-periodic around an orbit, varying secularly with Saturn's twenty-nine year seasonal cycle. This talk will discuss the coupled thermal and radiative transfer processes within the rings as determined by the interplay between individual particle properties and those of the ensemble (i.e., the ring structure), and the constraints that are placed on those by the most comprehensive thermal observations of the rings to date, taken with the Cassini Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS). Over one hundred thousand thermal-infrared spectra of the rings, between 10 and 500 cm-1, have been taken with the CIRS Focal Plane 1 (FP1) detector since Cassini orbit insertion in July, 2004. They resemble scaled Planck functions with well resolved peaks indicative of temperatures between approximately 60 and 120 K. We investigate the properties of a mapping from a space of physical parameters describing ring particles and their distribution onto predicted time-dependent spectral thermal emission. Ring emission is modeled using a radiative transfer code augmented with ray tracing calculations; a thermal model is embedded within the calculation to model the particles as a thermal source, and statistical averaging is incorporated. The model is specified by a vector of parameters describing a vertically varying particle size distribution, spin distribution, thermal inertia, albedo and optical depth, and when driven by radiation calculated from ephemeris parameters it produces a self

  4. Thermal and shape properties of asteroid (21) Lutetia from Herschel observations around the Rosetta flyby

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Rourke, L.; Müller, T.; Valtchanov, I.; Altieri, B.; González-Garcia, B. M.; Bhattacharya, B.; Jorda, L.; Carry, B.; Küppers, M.; Groussin, O.; Altwegg, K.; Barucci, M. A.; Bockelee-Morvan, D.; Crovisier, J.; Dotto, E.; Garcia-Lario, P.; Kidger, M.; Llorente, A.; Lorente, R.; Marston, A. P.; Sanchez Portal, M.; Schulz, R.; Sierra, M.; Teyssier, D.; Vavrek, R.

    2012-06-01

    Prior to and around the Rosetta flyby of (21) Lutetia, the Herschel Space Observatory performed a collaborative observation campaign with its two photometers observing the asteroid in the far infrared, at wavelengths not covered by Rosetta's instruments. The Herschel observations, fed into a thermophysical model (TPM) using as input a shape model based on in-situ images, were also further correlated with ˜70 multi-wavelength observations of Lutetia. We confirm the geometric albedo measured by Rosetta, derive a H-mag value based upon the effective diameter of the asteroid and point to (21) Lutetia having an extremely low thermal inertia (5 J m-2 s-0.5 K-1). This thermal inertia is only possible through the existence of a significant amount of small scale roughness which is not directly observable by the OSIRIS (Optical, Spectroscopic, and Infrared Imaging System) instrument on-board Rosetta. In addition, our results point to the existence of a hill/crater surface feature located on the asteroids southern region not observed by Rosetta. From our results, we conclude that only through the merging of in situ and remote sensing observations can a true global picture be obtained of this asteroid.

  5. Monitoring surface albedo change with Landsat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otterman, J.

    1977-01-01

    A pronounced decrease of the surface albedo (reflectivity) has been observed in an area in the Northern Sinai, fenced-in in the summer of 1974. Analysis of the Landsat Multispectral Scanner System digital data from an April 1977 pass indicates a reduction in the albedo in the exclosure by 13%, as compared to the outside, which continues to be subjected to overgrazing and anthropogenic pressures. The reduction of reflectivity is approximately the same in all the spectral bands, and is therefore attributable to accumulation of dead plants and plant debris, and not directly to live vegetation.

  6. The ultraviolet continuum albedo of Uranus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochran, W. D.; Wagener, R.; Caldwell, J.; Fricke, K. H.

    1990-01-01

    A radiative transfer code explicitly treating the Raman scattering of solar protons by H2 is presently used to analyze the Uranus geometric albedo in the 2000-5000 A range. The Baines and Bergstralh (1986) baseline model used reproduces the geometric albedo peak produced by Raman scattering filling of solar absorption line cores, but is found to be excessively bright for wavelengths below 2400 A. This discrepancy is resolvable through inclusion of an absorbing stratospheric haze layer, and results are thereby obtained which are consistent with the Pollack et al. (1987) model, in which aerosols are generated stratospherically through photochemical effects on hydrocarbons.

  7. The ultraviolet continuum albedo of Uranus

    SciTech Connect

    Cochran, W.D.; Wagener, R.; Caldwell, J.; Fricke, K.H. New York State Univ., Stony Brook York Univ., Toronto Bonn Universitaet )

    1990-01-01

    A radiative transfer code explicitly treating the Raman scattering of solar protons by H{sub 2} is presently used to analyze the Uranus geometric albedo in the 2000-5000 A range. The Baines and Bergstralh (1986) baseline model used reproduces the geometric albedo peak produced by Raman scattering filling of solar absorption line cores, but is found to be excessively bright for wavelengths below 2400 A. This discrepancy is resolvable through inclusion of an absorbing stratospheric haze layer, and results are thereby obtained which are consistent with the Pollack et al. (1987) model, in which aerosols are generated stratospherically through photochemical effects on hydrocarbons. 20 refs.

  8. Shape, thermal and surface properties determination of a candidate spacecraft target asteroid (175706) 1996 FG3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, LiangLiang; Ji, Jianghui; Wang, Su

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, a 3D convex shape model of (175706) 1996 FG3, which consists of 2040 triangle facets and 1022 vertices, is derived from the known light curves. The best-fitting orientation of the asteroid's spin axis is determined to be λ = 237.27° and β = -83.8° considering the observation uncertainties, and its rotation period is ˜3.5935 h. Using the derived shape model, we adopt the so-called advanced thermophysical model (ATPM) to fit three published sets of mid-infrared observations of 1996 FG3, so as to evaluate its surface properties. Assuming the primary and the secondary bear identical shape, albedo, thermal inertia and surface roughness, the best-fitting parameters are obtained from the observations. The geometric albedo and effective diameter of the asteroid are reckoned to be pv = 0.045 ± 0.002, D_eff=1.69^{+0.05}_{-0.02} km. The diameters of the primary and secondary are determined to be D1=1.63^{+0.04}_{-0.03} km and D2=0.45^{+0.04}_{-0.03} km, respectively. The surface thermal inertia Γ is derived to be a low value of 80 ± 40 Jm-2 s-0.5 K-1 with a roughness fraction fR of 0.8^{+0.2}_{-0.4}. This indicates that the primary possibly has a regolith layer on its surface, which is likely to be covered by a mixture of dust, fragmentary rocky debris and sand. The minimum regolith depth is estimated to be 5-20 mm from the simulations of subsurface temperature distribution, indicating that 1996 FG3 could be a very suitable target for a sample return mission.

  9. The moments of inertia of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bills, Bruce G.

    1989-01-01

    The mean moment of inertia of Mars is, at present, very poorly constrained. The generally accepted value of 0.365 M(R-squared) is obtained by assuming that the observed second degree gravity field can be decomposed into a hydrostatic oblate spheroid and a nonhydrostatic prolate spheroid with an equatorial axis of symmetry. An alternative decomposition is advocated in the present analysis. If the nonhydrostatic component is a maximally triaxial ellipsoid (intermediate moment exactly midway between greatest and least), the hydrostatic component is consistent with a mean moment of 0.345 M(R-squared). The plausibility of this decomposition is supported by statistical arguments and comparison with the earth, moon and Venus.

  10. Using NASTRAN to model missile inertia loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marvin, R.; Porter, C.

    1985-01-01

    An important use of NASTRAN is in the area of structural loads analysis on weapon systems carried aboard aircraft. The program is used to predict bending moments and shears in missile bodies, when subjected to aircraft induced accelerations. The missile, launcher and aircraft wing are idealized, using rod and beam type elements for solution economy. Using the inertia relief capability of NASTRAN, the model is subjected to various acceleration combinations. It is found to be difficult to model the launcher sway braces and hooks which transmit compression only or tension only type forces respectively. A simple, iterative process was developed to overcome this modeling difficulty. A proposed code modification would help model compression or tension only contact type problems.

  11. Fission as diffusion of a Brownian particle with variable inertia

    SciTech Connect

    Sadhukhan, Jhilam; Pal, Santanu

    2010-08-15

    An expression for stationary fission width is obtained for systems with steep shape-dependent nuclear collective inertia by extending the work of Kramers, which was originally derived for a fixed value of the inertia. The domain of validity of the present expression is examined by comparing its predictions with widths obtained from the corresponding Langevin equations.

  12. Early Knowledge of Object Motion: Continuity and Inertia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spelke, Elizabeth; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Investigated whether infants infer that a hidden, freely moving object will move continuously and smoothly. Six- to 10- month olds inferred that the object's path would be connected and unobstructed, in accord with continuity. Younger infants did not infer this, in accord with inertia. At 8 and 10 months, knowledge of inertia emerged but remained…

  13. Moments of Inertia of Disks and Spheres without Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Seok-Cheol; Hong, Seok-In

    2013-01-01

    Calculation of moments of inertia is often challenging for introductory-level physics students due to the use of integration, especially in non-Cartesian coordinates. Methods that do not employ calculus have been described for finding the rotational inertia of thin rods and other simple bodies. In this paper we use the parallel axis theorem and…

  14. Magnetic suspension options for spacecraft inertia-wheel applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downer, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    Design criteria for spacecraft inertia-wheel suspensions are listed. The advantages of magnetic suspensions over other suspension types for spacecraft inertia-wheel applications are cited along with the functions performed by magnetic suspension. The common designs for magnetic suspensions are enumerated. Materials selection of permanent magnets and core materials is considered.

  15. Determination of physical properties of the Asteroid (41) Daphne from interferometric observations in the thermal infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matter, Alexis; Delbo, Marco; Ligori, Sebastiano; Crouzet, Nicolas; Tanga, Paolo

    2011-09-01

    We describe interferometric observations of the Asteroid (41) Daphne in the thermal infrared obtained with the Mid-Infrared Interferometric Instrument (MIDI) and the Auxiliary Telescopes (ATs) of the European Southern Observatory (ESO) Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI). We derived the size and the surface thermal properties of (41) Daphne by means of a thermophysical model (TPM), which is used for the interpretation of interferometric data for the first time. From our TPM analysis, we derived a volume equivalent diameter for (41) Daphne of 189 km, using a non-convex 3-D shape model derived from optical lightcurves and adaptive optics images (B. Carry, private communication). On the other hand, when using the convex shape of Kaasalainen et al. (Kaasalainen, M., Mottola, S., Fulchignoni, M. [2002]. Icarus 159, 369-395) in our TPM analysis, the resulting volume equivalent diameter of (41) Daphne is between 194 and 209 km, depending on the surface roughness. The shape of the asteroid is used as an a priori information in our TPM analysis. No attempt is made to adjust the shape to the data. Only the size of the asteroid and its thermal parameters such as, albedo, thermal inertia and roughness are adjusted to the data. We estimated our model systematic uncertainty to be of 4% and of 7% on the determination of the asteroid volume equivalent diameter depending on whether the non-convex or the convex shape is used, respectively. In terms of thermal properties, we derived a value of the surface thermal inertia smaller than 50 J m -2 s -0.5 K -1 and preferably in the range between 0 and ˜30 J m -2 s -0.5 K -1. Our TPM analysis also shows that Daphne has a moderate macroscopic surface roughness.

  16. UV signatures of carbonaceous species on low-albedo asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrix, A.; Vilas, F.

    2014-07-01

    Asteroids in the low-albedo classes (C, B, G, F) are known to have spectra that are relatively feature-free in the visible/near-infrared (VNIR) spectral region, making them classically difficult to study in terms of surface mineralogy. Many of these bodies exhibit a 3-micron absorption band (e.g., [1]), which can be used to study hydration and organics. The primary other spectrally active region --- less well studied so far --- is the ultraviolet (UV). In this study, we utilize UV spectra of low-albedo asteroids (C, B, G, and F class) to study surface composition. In particular, we investigate implications for the presence of carbonaceous compounds, including tholins and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs), which have unique spectral features in the UV. Low-albedo asteroids are typically rather bland spectrally at VNIR wavelengths. Many of these objects exhibit an absorption band near 3 microns, indicative of some type of hydration (OH and-or H_2O). A subset of the asteroids with the 3-micron features also exhibit absorption near 0.7 microns, due to a ferrous-ferric charge-transfer transition likely resulting from aqueous alteration (the interaction of material with liquid water formed by melting of water upon a heating event). Some asteroids likely do not exhibit these features due to a history of heating experienced at some point in the asteroid's evolution. Despite having little spectral activity in the VNIR, all low-albedo asteroids absorb at wavelengths shorter than ˜500 nm. This has been generally attributed to a ferric-iron intervalence charge-transfer transition absorption. Carbon-bearing phases have long been assumed to be important on low-albedo asteroids (e.g., [2]) due to the dark, mostly-featureless VNIR spectra of these bodies. However, there are many forms of carbonaceous species and the species are expected to undergo phase modifications (e.g., due to thermal, aqueous, and radiation processes) that affect the spectra [3,7]. Tholins are residues

  17. The albedo of fractal stratocumulus clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahalan, Robert F.; Ridgway, William; Wiscombe, Warren J.; Bell, Thomas L.; Snider, Jack B.

    1994-01-01

    An increase in the planetary albedo of the earth-atmosphere system by only 10% can decrease the equilibrium surface temperature to that of the last ice age. Nevertheless, albedo biases of 10% or greater would be introduced into large regions of current climate models if clouds were given their observed liquid water amounts, because of the treatment of clouds as plane parallel. The focus on marine stratocumulus clouds is due to their important role in cloud radiative forcing and also that, of the wide variety of earth's cloud types, they are most nearly plane parallel, so that they have the least albedo bias. The fractal model employed here reproduces both the probability distribution and the wavenumber spectrum of the stratocumulus liquid water path, as observed during the First ISCCP Regional Experiment (FIRE). A single new fractal parameter 0 less than or equal to f less than or equal to 1, is introduced and determined empirically by the variance of the logarithm of the vertically integrated liquid water. The reduced reflectivity of fractal stratocumulus clouds is approximately given by the plane-parallel reflectivity evaluated at a reduced 'effective optical thickness,' which when f = 0.5 is tau(sub eff) approximately equal to 10. Study of the diurnal cycle of stratocumulus liquid water during FIRE leads to a key unexpected result: the plane-parallel albedo bias is largest when the cloud fraction reaches 100%, that is, when any bias associated with the cloud fraction vanishes. This is primarily due to the variability increase with cloud fraction. Thus, the within-cloud fractal structure of stratocumulus has a more significant impact on estimates of its mesoscale-average albedo than does the cloud fraction.

  18. Albedo boundaries on Mars in 1972: Results from Mariner 9

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Batson, R.M.; Inge, J.L.

    1976-01-01

    A map of "albedo" boundaries (light and dark markings) on Mars was prepared from Mariner 9 images. After special digital processing, these pictures provide detailed locations of albedo boundaries, which is significant in interpreting recent eolian activity. Derivation of absolute albedo values from the spacecraft data was not attempted. The map correlates well with telescopic observations of Mars after the 1971 dust storm. ?? 1976.

  19. Measuring planetary neutron albedo fluxes by remote gamma-ray sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, E. L.; Metzger, A. E.

    1984-01-01

    In order to measure the planetary neutron albedo fluxes, a neutron-absorbing shield which emits gamma rays of characteristic energy and serves as a neutron detector, is added to a gamma-ray spectrometer (GRS). The gamma rays representing the neutron flux are observed against interference consisting of cosmic gamma rays, planetary continuum and line emission, and gamma rays arising from the interaction of cosmic rays with the GRS and the spacecraft. The uncertainty and minimum detection limits in neutron albedo fluxes are calculated for two missions, a lunar orbiter and a comet nucleus rendezvous. A GRS on a lunar orbiter at 100 km altitude detects a thermal neutron albedo flux as low as 0.002/sq cm/s and an expected flux of about 0.6/sq cm/s is measured with an uncertainty of 0.001/sq cm/s, for a 100 h observation period. For the comet nucleus, again in a 100 h observing period, a thermal neutron albedo flux is detected at a level of 0.006/sq cm/s and an expected flux of about 0.4/sq cm/s is measured with an uncertainty of 0.004/sq cm/s. The expanded geological capabilities made possible by this technique include improvements in H sensitivity, spatial resolution, and measurement depth; and an improved model of induced gamma-ray emission.

  20. Shape-Based Thermal Modeling of Three Near-Earth Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Sean; Vervack, Ronald J.; Magri, Christopher; Howell, Ellen S.; Fernandez, Yanga R.; Campbell, Donald B.; Nolan, Michael C.; Taylor, Patrick A.; Pollock, Joseph T.; Hicks, Michael D.

    2014-11-01

    Infrared observations of an asteroid can be used to estimate its size, albedo, thermal inertia, and other physical properties. However, these estimates are often based on thermal models that assume a spherical shape. Detailed shape information is only available for a small fraction of known asteroids, so making simplifying assumptions about the shape is often unavoidable. Nevertheless, it is important to quantify the errors that can arise from applying spherical thermal models to non-spherical asteroids. Here, we consider three near-Earth asteroids for which detailed radar- and lightcurve-based shape models are available: (4769) Castalia, (8567) 1996 HW1, and (162421) 2000 ET70. All three have substantial concavities: Castalia and 1996 HW1 are elongated contact binaries, and 2000 ET70 is a spheroidal object with large ridges. We observed these asteroids from the NASA InfraRed Telescope Facility (IRTF), each at multiple phase angles, as part of our campaign to obtain both radar observations and infrared spectroscopy of near-Earth asteroids. With our shape-based thermophysical model, SHERMAN, we show the range of variations in the asteroids' infrared spectra due to changes in rotation phase and viewing geometry. We also compare the thermal properties derived using the asteroids' true shapes to the thermal properties and sizes that would be derived from applying spherical thermal models to the same observations.

  1. The Albedo Dichotomy of Iapetus Measured at UV Wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendrix, Amanda R.; Hansen, Candice J.

    2007-01-01

    The dramatic hemispheric dichotomy in albedo displayed by Saturn's moon Iapetus has intrigued astronomers for centuries. Here we report on far-ultraviolet observations of Iapetus' bright and dark terrains from Cassini. We compare the reflectance spectra of Iapetus's dark terrain, Hyperion and Phoebe and find that both Phoebe and Hyperion are richer in water ice than Iapetus' dark terrain. Spectra of the lowest latitudes of the dark terrain display the diagnostic water ice absorption feature; water ice amounts increase within the dark material away from the apex (at 90 deg W longitude, the center of the dark leading hemisphere), consistent with thermal segregation of water ice. The water ice in the darkest, warmest low latitude regions is not expected to be stable and may be a sign of ongoing or recent emplacement of the dark material from an exogenic source.

  2. Thermal Studies of Near Earth Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jewitt, David

    2003-01-01

    In this proposal, we seek to apply the optical/thermal method to the measurement of the diameters and albedos of a large sample of Near Earth Objects (NEOs). Whereas main-belt asteroids have been studied in large numbers, principally using thermal detections from the IRAS satellite, relatively few thermal observations of NEOs have been secured. This program capitalizes on our access to large telescopes and imaging thermal IR detectors in pursuit of the definitive set of albedo data on the NEOs.

  3. Investigation of systematic bias in radiometric diameter determination of near-Earth asteroids: the night emission simulated thermal model (NESTM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolters, Stephen D.; Green, Simon F.

    2009-11-01

    The near-Earth asteroid thermal model (NEATM) has proven to be a reliable simple thermal model for radiometric diameter determination. However, NEATM assumes zero thermal emission on the night side of an asteroid. We investigate how this assumption affects the best-fitting beaming parameter η, overestimates the effective diameter Deff and underestimates the albedo pv at large phase angles, by testing NEATM on thermal infrared fluxes generated from simulated asteroid surfaces with different thermal inertia Γ. We compare NEATM to radar diameters and find that NEATM overestimates the diameter when η is fitted to multiwavelength observations and underestimates the diameter when default η is used. The night emission simulated thermal model (NESTM) is introduced. NESTM models the night side temperature (Tnight) as an iso-latitudinal fraction (f) of the maximum day side temperature (Tmax calculated for NEATM with η = 1): Tnight = fTmax cos1/4 φ, where φ is the latitude. A range of f is found for different thermal parameters, which depend on Γ. NESTM diameters are compared with NEATM and radar diameters, and it is shown that NESTM may reduce the systematic bias in overestimating diameters. It is suggested that a version of the NESTM which assumes Γ = 200Jm-2s-1/2K-1 is adopted as a default model when the solar phase angle is greater than 45°.

  4. Emotional inertia contributes to depressive symptoms beyond perseverative thinking.

    PubMed

    Brose, Annette; Schmiedek, Florian; Koval, Peter; Kuppens, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The autocorrelation or inertia of negative affect reflects how much negative emotions carry over from moment to moment and has been associated with increased depressive symptoms. In this study, we posed three challenges to this association by examining: (1) whether emotional inertia is relevant for depressive symptoms when assessed on a longer timescale than usual; (2) whether inertia is uniquely related to depressive symptoms after controlling for perseverative thoughts; and (3) whether inertia is related to depressive symptoms over and above the within-person association between affect and perseverative thoughts. Participants (N = 101) provided ratings of affect and perseverative thoughts for 100 days; depressive symptoms were reported before and after the study, and again after 2.5 years. Day-to-day emotional inertia was related to depressive symptoms over and above trait and state perseverative thoughts. Moreover, inertia predicted depressive symptoms when adjusting for its association with perseverative thoughts. These findings establish the relevance of emotional inertia in depressive symptoms independent of perseverative thoughts.

  5. Selective effects of weight and inertia on maximum lifting.

    PubMed

    Leontijevic, B; Pazin, N; Kukolj, M; Ugarkovic, D; Jaric, S

    2013-03-01

    A novel loading method (loading ranged from 20% to 80% of 1RM) was applied to explore the selective effects of externally added simulated weight (exerted by stretched rubber bands pulling downward), weight+inertia (external weights added), and inertia (covariation of the weights and the rubber bands pulling upward) on maximum bench press throws. 14 skilled participants revealed a load associated decrease in peak velocity that was the least associated with an increase in weight (42%) and the most associated with weight+inertia (66%). However, the peak lifting force increased markedly with an increase in both weight (151%) and weight+inertia (160%), but not with inertia (13%). As a consequence, the peak power output increased most with weight (59%), weight+inertia revealed a maximum at intermediate loads (23%), while inertia was associated with a gradual decrease in the peak power output (42%). The obtained findings could be of importance for our understanding of mechanical properties of human muscular system when acting against different types of external resistance. Regarding the possible application in standard athletic training and rehabilitation procedures, the results speak in favor of applying extended elastic bands which provide higher movement velocity and muscle power output than the usually applied weights.

  6. Two generations of Canadian active imaging systems: ALBEDOS and ELVISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larochelle, Vincent; Mathieu, Pierre; Simard, Jean-Robert

    1999-07-01

    Search and rescue and general surveillance mission pose a serious challenge to conventional imaging systems used by actual aircraft crews. These systems must often work in low- light and low-visibility conditions to find the identify targets. A new airborne imaging technology has been developed to overcome several deficiencies encountered with common CCD cameras, image intensified system and thermal imaging sensors. The recent developments in laser diode arrays, laser diode beam collimation and gatable micro- channel plate intensifier have made possible the construction of a compact active imagin system, called the Airborne Laser-Based Enhanced Detection and Observation Systems (ALBEDOS). This system proved particularly efficient at night and in degraded weather conditions. In addition, it was demonstrated that range gating, besides eliminating most of the light backscattered by aerosols, provided to some extent immunity to blooming effects specific to highly sensitive cameras. The system was installed on a helicopter and tested in various scenarios in October 1995 to demonstrate its potential. To enhance the surveillance capability over large areas of coverage, to optimize detection of humans and small objects and to improve the effectiveness of the search aircraft, a second-generation payload is presently developed and combines the benefits of two complementary imaging sensors. The Enhanced Low-Light level Visible and IR Surveillance System (ELVISS) consists of an improved range-gated active imager and a high-quality thermal imager, installed in two separate airborne platforms slaved together and controlled by a single user interface. It is expected that such a sensor systems will have a direct impact on improving the response time in finding those in need of assistance or simply in increasing the performance, reliability and efficiency of crews involved in general surveillance operations. This paper explains the concept of range gating, details a preliminary

  7. Estimating big bluestem albedo from directional reflectance measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irons, J. R.; Ranson, K. J.; Daughtry, C. S. T.

    1988-01-01

    Multidirectional reflectance factor measurements acquired in the summer of 1986 are used to make estimates of big bluestem grass albedo, evaluating the variation of albedo with changes in solar zenith angle and phenology. On any given day, the albedo was observed to increase by at least 19 percent as solar zenith angle increased. Changes in albedo were found to correspond to changes in the green leaf area index of the grass canopy. Estimates of albedo made using reflectance data acquired within only one or two azimuthal planes and at a restricted range of view zenith angle were evaluated and compared to 'true' albedos derived from all available reflectance factor data. It was found that even a limited amount of multiple direction reflectance data was preferable to a single nadir reflectance factor for the estimation of prarie grass albedo.

  8. Earth Albedo and the orbit of LAGEOS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubincam, D. P.; Weiss, N. R.

    1985-01-01

    The long-period perturbations in the orbit of the Lageos satellite due to the Earth's albedo have been found using a new analytical formalism. The Earth is assumed to be a sphere whose surface diffusely reflects sunlight according to Lambert's law. Specular reflection is not considered. The formalism is based on spherical harmonics; it produces equations which hold regardless of whether the terminator is seen by the satellite or not. Specializing to the case of a realistic zonal albedo shows that Lageos' orbital semimajor axis changes periodically by only the a few millimeters and the eccentricity by one part in 100,000. The longitude of the node increases secularly. The effect considered here can explain neither the secular decay of 1.1 mm/day in the semimajor axis nor the observed along-track variations in acceleration of order 2 x 10 to the minus 12 power/sq ms.

  9. The albedo of particles in reflection nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rush, W. F.

    1974-01-01

    The relation between the apparent angular extent of a reflection nebula and the apparent magnitude of its illuminating star was reconsidered under a less restrictive set of assumptions. A computational technique was developed which permits the use of fits to the observed m-log a values to determine the albedo of particles composing reflection nebulae, providing only that a phase function and average optical thickness are assumed. Multiple scattering, anisotropic phase functions, and illumination by the general star field are considered, and the albedo of reflection nebular particles appears to be the same as that for interstellar particles in general. The possibility of continuous fluorescence contributions to the surface brightness is also considered.

  10. Charred Forests Increase Snow Albedo Decay: Watershed-Scale Implications of the Postfire Snow Albedo Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleason, K. E.; Nolin, A. W.

    2014-12-01

    Recent work shows that after a high severity forest fire, approximately 60% more solar radiation reaches the snow surface due to the reduction in canopy density. Also, significant amounts of black carbon (BC) particles and larger burned woody debris (BWD) are shed from standing charred trees, which concentrate on the snowpack, darken its surface, and reduce snow albedo by 50% during ablation. The postfire forest environment drives a substantial increase in net shortwave radiation at the snowpack surface, driving earlier and more rapid melt, however hydrologic models do not explicitly incorporate forest fire disturbance effects to snowpack dynamics. In this study we characterized, parameterized, and validated the postfire snow albedo effect: how the deposition and concentration of charred forest debris decreases snow albedo, increases snow albedo decay rates, and drives an earlier date of snow disappearance. For three study sites in the Oregon High Cascade Mountains, a 2-yr old burned forest, a 10-yr burned forest, and a nearby unburned forest, we used a suite of empirical data to characterize the magnitude and duration of the postfire effect to snow albedo decay. For WY 2012, WY2013, and WY2014 we conducted spectral albedo measurements, snow surface sampling, in-situ snow and meteorological monitoring, and snow energy balance modeling. From these data we developed a new parameterization which represents the postfire effect to snow albedo decay as a function of days-since-snowfall. We validated our parameterization using a physically-based, spatially-distributed snow accumulation and melt model, in-situ snow monitoring, net snowpack radiation, and remote sensing data. We modeled snow dynamics across the extent of all burned area in the headwaters of the McKenzie River Basin and validated the watershed-scale implications of the postfire snow albedo effect using in-situ micrometeorological and remote sensing data. This research quantified the watershed scale postfire

  11. Spectral albedo and emissivity of CO sub 2 in Martian polar caps: Model results

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, S.G. ); Wiscombe, W.J. ); Firestone, J.F. )

    1990-08-30

    A model originally developed to explain the spectral albedo and emissivity of terrestrial snow is extended to the case of carbon dioxide snow on Mars. The variation of albedo and emissivity with wavelength is caused by the spectral variation of the absorption coefficient of solid CO{sub 2}. The most important variables controlling the radiative properties are grain size and contamination by dust or water. Solar zenith angle and snowpack thickness are of less importance. The observation that red albedo is higher than blue albedo in the Martian south polar cap indicates that the snow is contaminated with red dust. The interband absorption coefficient of CO{sub 2} ice in the thermal infrared is 2-3 orders of magnitude smaller than that of H{sub 2}O ice, due to the absence of hydrogen bonding in CO{sub 2}. This allows CO{sub 2} snow emissivity to be sensitive to grain size, emission angle, and impurities, in contrast to water snow which is nearly a blackbody under all conditions. The emissivity of CO{sub 2} snow varies substantially with wavelength, so energy budget modeling should be done in spectral detail. The addition of a thin layer of water frost over CO{sub 2} snow dramatically raises the thermal emissivity but causes little change to the spectrally averaged albedo unless the underlying CO{sub 2} snow is dirty. Remote sensing of CO{sub 2} grain size, H{sub 2}O content, and dust content may be possible. However, the design of a remote-sensing strategy awaits more accurate laboratory determination of the optical constants of CO{sub 2} ice.

  12. Space-based and Earth-based Prospects for Measuring the Moment of Inertia of Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margot, Jean-Luc; Campbell, Donald B.; Ghigo, Frank D.

    2016-10-01

    The moment of inertia is an essential integral constraint on models of planetary interiors. Our ignorance about Venus's moment of inertia prevents us from obtaining definite answers to key questions related to the size of the core, the thermal evolution history of the planet, the absence of a global magnetic field, and the evolution of the spin state. The technical challenge and cost of Venus landers make a direct measurement of the core size with seismology unlikely in the near future. For the same reasons, lander-based measurements of the spin precession rate, which yields the moment of inertia, are improbable in the near term. Tracking of the spin axis orientation with spacecraft or Earth-based radar over a decade or more offers more promising avenues. We use a precession model and the characteristics of existing data sets to quantify measurement prospects. The best Magellan estimates of the pole orientation have uncertainties of ~15 arcseconds (Konopliv et al., 1999) and an epoch that corresponds to the mid-point of the observations (~Oct. 1993). We describe achievable measurement uncertainties for a variety of scenarios including an additional spacecraft data point (e.g., at epoch 2023) with comparable or better precision than that of Magellan. Our 14 existing Earth-based radar observations obtained in 2006-2014 are sufficient to improve upon the best Magellan values and to unambiguously detect Venus's spin precession. We describe these results and quantify the uncertainties achievable on spin precession rate and moment of inertia with additional observations in the 2016-2023 interval. The Earth-based radar technique yielded a measurement of the spin axis orientation of Mercury with <5 arcsecond precision (Margot et al., 2012) that was later validated to <1 arcsecond level agreement with an independent, MESSENGER-based estimate (Stark et al., 2015).

  13. Anomaly of the moment of inertia of shape transitional nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, J. B.; Hamilton, J. H.

    2011-06-15

    The change in the structure of the collective levels with spin angular momentum in atomic nuclei is often expressed in terms of the classical concepts of the kinematic and the dynamic moments of inertia varying with spin. For the well deformed even-even nuclei the kinematic moment of inertia increases with spin up to 10%-20%, at say I{sup {pi}} = 12{sup +}. However, for the shape transitional nuclei, or almost spherical nuclei, it increases with spin much faster. The pitfalls of using the rotor model form of kinematic moment of inertia in such cases are pointed out here. Alternative methods of extracting the nuclear structure information are explored. The important role of the ground state deformation is illustrated. The use of the power index formula for evaluating the effective moment of inertia, free from the assumption of the rotor model, is described.

  14. Low-inertia stove for annealing in purified helium

    SciTech Connect

    Arbuzov, V.L.; Davletshin, A.E.

    1995-06-01

    A low-inertia stove attached to a transport helium Dewar vessel is described. It was designed for studying how point defects anneal after irradiation or quenching, ageing of alloys, segregation phenomena, ordering in solids, etc. through residual resistivity.

  15. The Moment of Inertia of a Tennis Ball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brody, Howard

    2005-11-01

    The moment of inertia of a tennis ball about its center of mass is one of the physical properties that determine how the ball reacts in play, yet there is no measurement of this parameter found in the literature nor is it mentioned in the Rules of Tennis. The moment of inertia determines how much spin the ball acquires for a given angular impulse applied by the racket's strings and also how the ball behaves when it bounces. When a ball bounces, the friction between the ball and the court surface produces a substantial torque. For a given torque, the magnitude of the moment of inertia determines whether the ball slides throughout the bounce or goes into the rolling mode, and if it does roll, the moment of inertia determines the ratio of final horizontal velocity to initial horizontal velocity.

  16. ALBEDO PROPERTIES OF MAIN BELT ASTEROIDS BASED ON THE ALL-SKY SURVEY OF THE INFRARED ASTRONOMICAL SATELLITE AKARI

    SciTech Connect

    Usui, Fumihiko; Hasegawa, Sunao; Matsuhara, Hideo; Kasuga, Toshihiro; Ishiguro, Masateru; Kuroda, Daisuke; Mueller, Thomas G.; Ootsubo, Takafumi

    2013-01-01

    We present an analysis of the albedo properties of main belt asteroids (MBAs) detected by the All-Sky Survey of the infrared astronomical satellite AKARI. The characteristics of 5120 asteroids detected by the survey, including their sizes and albedos, were cataloged in the Asteroid Catalog Using AKARI (AcuA). Size and albedo measurements were based on the standard thermal model, using inputs of infrared fluxes and absolute magnitudes measured at optical wavelengths. MBAs, which account for 4722 of the 5120 AcuA asteroids, have semimajor axes of 2.06-3.27 AU, except for the near-Earth asteroids. AcuA provides a complete data set of all MBAs brighter than the absolute magnitude of H < 10.3, which corresponds to the diameter of d > 20 km. We confirmed that the albedo distribution of the MBAs is strongly bimodal as was already known from the past observations, and that the bimodal distribution occurs not only in the total population, but also within inner, middle, and outer regions of the main belt. The bimodal distribution in each group consists of low-albedo components in C-type asteroids and high-albedo components in S-type asteroids. We found that the small asteroids have much more variety in albedo than the large asteroids. In spite of the albedo transition process like space weathering, the heliocentric distribution of the mean albedo of asteroids in each taxonomic type is nearly flat. The mean albedo of the total, on the other hand, gradually decreases with an increase in semimajor axis. This can be explained by the compositional ratio of taxonomic types; that is, the proportion of dark asteroids such as C- and D-types increases, while that of bright asteroids such as S-type decreases, with increasing heliocentric distance. The heliocentric distributions of X-subclasses: E-, M-, and P-types, which can be divided based on albedo values, are also examined. P-types, which are the major component in X-types, are distributed throughout the main belt regions, and the

  17. Baring high-albedo soils by overgrazing: a hypothesized desertification mechanism.

    PubMed

    Otterman, J

    1974-11-01

    Observations are reported of high-albedo soils denuded by overgrazing which appear bright, in high contrast to regions covered by natural vegetation. Measurements and modeling show that the denuded surfaces are cooler, when compared under sunlit conditions. This observed "thermal depression" eflect should, on theoretical grounds, result in a decreased lifting of air necessary for cloud formation and precipitation, and thus lead to regional climatic desertification. PMID:17790382

  18. Baring high-albedo soils by overgrazing - A hypothesized desertification mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otterman, J.

    1974-01-01

    Observations are reported of high-albedo soils denuded by overgrazing which appear bright, in high contrast to regions covered by natural vegetation. Measurements and modeling show that the denuded surfaces are cooler, when compared under sunlit conditions. This observed 'thermal depression' effect should, on theoretical grounds, result in a decreased lifting of air necessary for cloud formation and precipitation, and thus lead to regional climatic desertification.

  19. Physical properties of transneptunian objects, Centaurs, and Trojans from thermal observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, M.

    2014-07-01

    The most productive way to measure the size and albedo of small bodies throughout the Solar System is through studies of their thermal emission. This is complicated for the cold bodies in the outer Solar System, whose thermal emission peaks at wavelengths for which the Earth's atmosphere is opaque. While the relatively warm Trojans are marginally accessible from the ground in the Q band, the sizes of only a handful of transneptunian objects (TNOs) and Centaurs were known before Spitzer was launched in 2003. Spitzer/MIPS photometry at wavelengths of 24 and 70 microns allowed size and albedo of tens of TNOs and Centaurs to be measured. Herschel (operational in 2009--2013) allowed photometry of a total of ˜140 TNOs at wavelengths between 70 and 500 microns using PACS and SPIRE, chiefly in the framework of the Key Programme ``TNOs are Cool!''. I will present selected results from these surveys and discuss their implications on our knowledge of the origin and evolution of the Solar System, as evidenced by its coldest members. Of particular interest are the sizes of binary systems. Where their masses are known from spatially resolved observations, diameter measurements allow the bulk mass density to be determined, providing a unique probe of the object's interior. In the past few years, we have witnessed a remarkable increase in the number of successfully observed stellar occultations by TNOs and other small bodies. They provide an elegant, model-independent, and accurate way of measuring projected TNO dimensions at the time of the event and at the location of the observer(s). Even satellites or ring systems can be detected this way. However, predictable occultations are rare events and will likely stay infrequent, even in the post-Gaia era. Studies of the ensemble properties of the transneptunian populations will continue to rely on thermal observations. Reliable thermal modeling requires some knowledge of the target's temperature. Optimally, this is obtained through

  20. Sensitivity Studies of Thermal Observations of Saturn's Rings Using a Coupled Thermal/Radiative Transfer Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilorz, S.; Spilker, L.; Wallis, B.; Brooks, S.; Pearl, J.; Flasar, F. M.; CIRS Team

    2005-08-01

    Observations of Saturn's rings taken with the Cassini Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) reveal that thermal emission from the rings often has a pronounced directional variation, as well as variation with local hour angle and radius. Spectra taken with the CIRS Focal Plane 1 (FP1) detector in the thermal-infrared region (10 to 500 cm-1) resemble a scaled Planck function with a well resolved peak indicative of temperatures near those expected for the ring particles, between approximately 80 and 110 K. The size of the FP1 footprint on the rings varies from hundreds to thousands of kilometers, and the spectra are representative of an ensemble of particles, containing valuable information about the ring structure and particle properties. Simple inversion techniques are of limited use for extracting this information, so we take a forward modelling approach to the inverse problem, investigating the properties of the mapping from physical parameters onto predicted thermal emission. We model ring emission using a radiative transfer calculation that contains a thermal model for particle heating and emission, including spin effects. Given illumination conditions and a vector of parameters describing a vertically varying particle size distribution, spin distribution, thermal inertia, albedo and optical depth, it calculates a self consistent emission spectrum accounting for mutual shading, interparticle heating, and directionally varying emission. For a ringlet at a given radius, each parameter vector generates a set of predicted emission spectra varying with hour angle and direction, providing a mapping from the parameter space onto a high dimensional space of observation vectors. We present analyses of the dimensionality of some sets of Cassini observations, evaluate the agreement of some simple mono- and multi-layer toy models with these, and present sensitivity studies highlighting the interplay of parameters. Limitations of the model are discussed. This research was carried out

  1. Motion planning for variable inertia mechanical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shammas, Elie A.; Choset, Howie; Rizzi, Alfred A.

    2006-05-01

    In this paper, we generate gaits for mixed systems, that is, dynamic systems that are subject to a set of nonholonomic constraints. What is unique about mixed systems is that when we express their dynamics in body coordinates, the motion of these systems can be attributed to two decoupled terms: the geometric and dynamic phase shifts. In our prior work, we analyzed systems whose dynamic phase shift was null by definition. Purely mechanical and principally kinematic systems are two classes of mechanical systems that have this property. We generated gaits for these two classes of systems by intuitively evaluating their geometric phase shift and relating it to a volume integral under well-defined height functions. One of the contributions of this paper is to present a similar intuitive approach for computing the dynamic phase shift. We achieve this, by introducing a new scaled momentum variable that not only simplifies the momentum evolution equation but also allows us to introduce a new set of well-defined gamma functions which enable us to intuitively evaluate the dynamic phase shift. More specifically, by analyzing these novel gamma functions in a similar way to how we analyzed height functions, and by analyzing the sign-definiteness of the scaled momentum variable, we are able to ensure that the dynamic phase shift is non-zero solely along the desired fiber direction. Finally, we also introduce a novel mechanical system, the variable inertia snakeboard, which is a generalization of the original snakeboard that was previously studied in the literature. Not only does this general system help us identify regions of the base space where we can not define a certain type of gaits, but also it helps us verify the generality and applicability of our gait generation approach.

  2. Data Citation Impediments: Human and Institutional Inertia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayernik, M. S.

    2013-12-01

    Data citations are growing in visibility in scientific and public policy circles. Data citations directly link scholarship and data, and as such provide a mechanism through which data can be discovered and accessed, scholarly use of data can be tracked, and the impact of data facilities can be identified. The interest in data citations is coming from many research stakeholders, including funders, policy makers, professional societies and their publication entities, research organizations, and individual researchers. Most of the efforts to date around data citations have focused on the challenges of assigning unique identifiers to digital data sets. While these challenges are significant, an additional challenge has gone relatively unaddressed, namely, the fact that data citation is not a common practice within scientific communities. This presentation will present findings from an interview study within the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research / National Center for Atmospheric Research (UCAR/NCAR). Through interviews with 14 scientists and engineers, we have found that there is little evidence that data citations have gained momentum as a common practice. Currently, data users acknowledge their use of particular data sets in either the research methods or acknowledgements sections of their papers, not as formal citations in a paper's bibliography. Data users are often 1) unaware that they can and should cite data sets, 2) unsure of how to cite data sets, and 3) lacking career motivations to forward data citations as a common activity. Data citation initiatives will have minimal impact on the scientific community if they do not address this practical inertia. Data users are a critical stakeholder in the data citation process. Their voice needs to be central to the data citation discussion. We will discuss how outreach efforts need to focus on raising the profile of data citations by informing scientists and administrators, being proactive in providing

  3. The Very Low Albedo of an Extrasolar Planet: MOST Space-based Photometry of HD 209458

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, Jason F.; Matthews, Jaymie M.; Seager, Sara; Miller-Ricci, Eliza; Sasselov, Dimitar; Kuschnig, Rainer; Guenther, David B.; Moffat, Anthony F. J.; Rucinski, Slavek M.; Walker, Gordon A. H.; Weiss, Werner W.

    2008-12-01

    Measuring the albedo of an extrasolar planet provides insight into its atmospheric composition and its global thermal properties, including heat dissipation and weather patterns. Such a measurement requires very precise photometry of a transiting system, fully sampling many phases of the secondary eclipse. Space-based optical photometry of the transiting system HD 209458 from the MOST (Microvariablity and Oscillations of Stars) satellite, spanning 14 and 44 days in 2004 and 2005, respectively, allows us to set a sensitive limit on the optical eclipse of the hot exosolar giant planet in this system. Our best fit to the observations yields a flux ratio of the planet and star of 7 +/- 9 ppm (parts per million), which corresponds to a geometric albedo through the MOST bandpass (400-700 nm) of Ag = 0.038 +/- 0.045. This gives a 1 σ upper limit of 0.08 for the geometric albedo and a 3 σ upper limit of 0.17. HD 209458b is significantly less reflective than Jupiter (for which Ag would be about 0.5). This low geometric albedo rules out the presence of bright reflective clouds in this exoplanet's atmosphere. We determine refined parameters for the star and exoplanet in the HD 209458 system based on a model fit to the MOST light curve. MOST is a Canadian Space Agency mission, operated jointly by Dynacon, Inc., and the Universities of Toronto and British Columbia, with assistance from the University of Vienna.

  4. Instrument for measuring moment of inertia with high precision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yongjun; Lin, Min; Guo, Bin

    2010-08-01

    Accurate calculation of the moment of inertia of an irregular body is made difficult by the large number of quantities. A popular method is to use a trifilar suspension system to measure the period of oscillation of the body in the horizontal plane. In this paper, an instrument for measuring the moment of inertia based on trifilar pendulum is designed; some sources of error are discussed; three metal disks with known moments of inertia are used to calibrate the instrument, the other metal disks with known moments of inertia are used to test the accuracy of the instrument. The results are consistent when compared with calculated moment of inertia of the metal disks. In addition, the instrument could be used to measure the moment of inertia of other irregular objects. The period of oscillation is acquired by the capture mode of MSP430 microprocessor, the mass is obtained by the Electronic Balance and the data is transferred to the MSP430 via serial port.

  5. Effects of moment of inertia on restricted motion swing speed.

    PubMed

    Schorah, David; Choppin, Simon; James, David

    2015-06-01

    In many sports, the maximum swing speed of a racket, club, or bat is a key performance parameter. Previous research in multiple sports supports the hypothesis of an inverse association between the swing speed and moment of inertia of an implement. The aim of this study was to rigorously test and quantify this relationship using a restricted swinging motion. Eight visually identical rods with a common mass but variable moment of inertia were manufactured. Motion capture technology was used to record eight participants' maximal effort swings with the rods. Strict exclusion criteria were applied to data that did not adhere to the prescribed movement pattern. The study found that for all participants, swing speed decreased with respect to moment of inertia according to a power relationship. However, in contrast to previous studies, the rate of decrease varied from participant to participant. With further analysis it was found that participants performed more consistently at the higher end of the moment of inertia range tested. The results support the inverse association between swing speed and moment of inertia but only for higher moment of inertia implements.

  6. Compensations for increased rotational inertia during human cutting turns.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Mu; Brown, Brian; Jindrich, Devin L

    2014-02-01

    Locomotion in a complex environment is often not steady state, but unsteady locomotion (stability and maneuverability) is not well understood. We investigated the strategies used by humans to perform sidestep cutting turns when running. Previous studies have argued that because humans have small yaw rotational moments of inertia relative to body mass, deceleratory forces in the initial velocity direction that occur during the turning step, or 'braking' forces, could function to prevent body over-rotation during turns. We tested this hypothesis by increasing body rotational inertia and testing whether braking forces during stance decreased. We recorded ground reaction force and body kinematics from seven participants performing 45 deg sidestep cutting turns and straight running at five levels of body rotational inertia, with increases up to fourfold. Contrary to our prediction, braking forces remained consistent at different rotational inertias, facilitated by anticipatory changes to body rotational speed. Increasing inertia revealed that the opposing effects of several turning parameters, including rotation due to symmetrical anterior-posterior forces, result in a system that can compensate for fourfold changes in rotational inertia with less than 50% changes to rotational velocity. These results suggest that in submaximal effort turning, legged systems may be robust to changes in morphological parameters, and that compensations can involve relatively minor adjustments between steps to change initial stance conditions.

  7. Effects of moment of inertia on restricted motion swing speed.

    PubMed

    Schorah, David; Choppin, Simon; James, David

    2015-06-01

    In many sports, the maximum swing speed of a racket, club, or bat is a key performance parameter. Previous research in multiple sports supports the hypothesis of an inverse association between the swing speed and moment of inertia of an implement. The aim of this study was to rigorously test and quantify this relationship using a restricted swinging motion. Eight visually identical rods with a common mass but variable moment of inertia were manufactured. Motion capture technology was used to record eight participants' maximal effort swings with the rods. Strict exclusion criteria were applied to data that did not adhere to the prescribed movement pattern. The study found that for all participants, swing speed decreased with respect to moment of inertia according to a power relationship. However, in contrast to previous studies, the rate of decrease varied from participant to participant. With further analysis it was found that participants performed more consistently at the higher end of the moment of inertia range tested. The results support the inverse association between swing speed and moment of inertia but only for higher moment of inertia implements. PMID:25895860

  8. Hysteretic transitions in the Kuramoto model with inertia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torcini, Alessandro; Olmi, Simona; Navas, Adrian; Boccaletti, Stefano

    2015-03-01

    We report finite size numerical investigations and mean field analysis of a Kuramoto model with inertia for fully coupled and diluted systems. In particular, we examine the transition from incoherence to coherence for increasingly large system size and inertia. For sufficiently large inertia the transition is hysteretic and within the hysteretic region clusters of locked oscillators of various sizes and different levels of synchronization coexist. A modification of the mean field theory developed by Tanaka, Lichtenberg, and Oishi allows to derive the synchronization curve associated to each of these clusters. We have also investigated numerically the limits of existence of the coherent and of the incoherent solutions. The minimal coupling required to observe the coherent state is largely independent of the system size and it saturates to a constant value already for moderately large inertia values. The incoherent state is observable up to a critical coupling whose value saturates for large inertia and for finite system sizes, while in the thermodinamic limit this critical value diverges proportionally to the mass. By increasing the inertia the transition becomes more complex, and the synchronization occurs via the emergence of clusters of coherently drifting oscillators. Financial support has been provided by the Italian Ministry of University and Research within the project CRISIS LAB PNR 2011-2013.

  9. Effects of microscale inertia on dynamic ductile crack growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacques, N.; Mercier, S.; Molinari, A.

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the role of microscale inertia in dynamic ductile crack growth. A constitutive model for porous solids that accounts for dynamic effects due to void growth is proposed. The model has been implemented in a finite element code and simulations of crack growth in a notched bar and in an edge cracked specimen have been performed. Results are compared to predictions obtained via the Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman (GTN) model where micro-inertia effects are not accounted for. It is found that microscale inertia has a significant influence on the crack growth. In particular, it is shown that micro-inertia plays an important role during the strain localisation process by impeding void growth. Therefore, the resulting damage accumulation occurs in a more progressive manner. For this reason, simulations based on the proposed modelling exhibit much less mesh sensitivity than those based on the viscoplastic GTN model. Microscale inertia is also found to lead to lower crack speeds. Effects of micro-inertia on fracture toughness are evaluated.

  10. RECTIFIED ASTEROID ALBEDOS AND DIAMETERS FROM IRAS AND MSX PHOTOMETRY CATALOGS

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, Erin Lee; Woodward, Charles E. E-mail: chelsea@astro.umn.ed

    2010-10-15

    Rectified diameters and albedo estimates of 1517 main-belt asteroids selected from IRAS and the Mid-Course Space Experiment asteroid photometry catalogs are derived from updated infrared thermal models, the Standard Thermal Model and the Near-Earth Asteroid Thermal Model (NEATM), and Monte Carlo simulations, using new Minor Planet Center compilations of absolute magnitudes (H values) constrained by occultation- and radar-derived parameters. The NEATM approach produces a more robust estimate of albedos and diameters, yielding albedos of p{sub v} (NEATM mean) =0.081 {+-} 0.064. The asteroid beaming parameter ({eta}) for the selected asteroids has a mean value of 1.07 {+-} 0.27, and the smooth distribution of {eta} suggests that this parameter is independent of asteroid properties such as composition. No trends in {eta} due to size-dependent rotation rates are evident. Comparison of derived values of {eta} as a function of taxonomic type indicates that the beaming parameter values for S- and C-type asteroids are identical within the standard deviation of the population of beaming parameters.

  11. Rectified Asteroid Albedos and Diameters from IRAS and MSX Photometry Catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Erin Lee; Woodward, Charles E.

    2010-10-01

    Rectified diameters and albedo estimates of 1517 main-belt asteroids selected from IRAS and the Mid-Course Space Experiment asteroid photometry catalogs are derived from updated infrared thermal models, the Standard Thermal Model and the Near-Earth Asteroid Thermal Model (NEATM), and Monte Carlo simulations, using new Minor Planet Center compilations of absolute magnitudes (H values) constrained by occultation- and radar-derived parameters. The NEATM approach produces a more robust estimate of albedos and diameters, yielding albedos of pv (NEATM mean) =0.081 ± 0.064. The asteroid beaming parameter (η) for the selected asteroids has a mean value of 1.07 ± 0.27, and the smooth distribution of η suggests that this parameter is independent of asteroid properties such as composition. No trends in η due to size-dependent rotation rates are evident. Comparison of derived values of η as a function of taxonomic type indicates that the beaming parameter values for S- and C-type asteroids are identical within the standard deviation of the population of beaming parameters.

  12. Water Ice Albedo Variations on the Martian Northern Polar Cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hale, A. S.; Bass, D. S.; Tamppari, L. K.

    2003-01-01

    The Viking Orbiters determined that the surface of Mars northern residual cap is water ice. Many researchers have related observed atmospheric water vapor abundances to seasonal exchange between reservoirs such as the polar caps, but the extent to which the exchange between the surface and the atmosphere remains uncertain. Early studies of the ice coverage and albedo of the northern residual Martian polar cap using Mariner 9 and Viking images reported that there were substantial internannual differences in ice deposition on the polar cap, a result which suggested a highly variable Martian climate. However, some of the data used in these studies were obtained at differing values of heliocentric solar longitude (L(sub s)). Reevaluation of this dataset indicated that the residual cap undergoes seasonal brightening throughout the summer, and indicated that this process repeats from year to year. In this study we continue to compare Mariner 9 and Viking Orbiter imaging observations and thermal data of the north residual polar cap to data acquired with Mars Global Surveyor s Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) instrument. In the current study, our goal is to examine all released data from MGS MOC in the northern summer season, along with applicable TES data in order to better understand the albedo variations in the northern summer and their implications on water transport. To date, work has focused primarily on the MOC dataset. In 1999, data acquisition of the northern polar regions began at L(sub s) = 107, although there was little north polar data acquired from L(sub s)= 107 to L(sub s) = 109. We examined a total of 409 images from L(sub s) = 107 to L(sub s)=148. We have also examined data from 2000 from L(sub s)= 93 to L(sub s)= 110; additional progress is ongoing. Here we present a progress report of our observations, and continue to determine their implications for the Martian water cycle.

  13. Thermal infrared observations and thermophysical characterization of OSIRIS-REx target asteroid (101955) Bennu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emery, J. P.; Fernández, Y. R.; Kelley, M. S. P.; Warden (nèe Crane), K. T.; Hergenrother, C.; Lauretta, D. S.; Drake, M. J.; Campins, H.; Ziffer, J.

    2014-05-01

    Near-Earth Asteroids (NEAs) have garnered ever increasing attention over the past few years due to the insights they offer into Solar System formation and evolution, the potential hazard they pose, and their accessibility for both robotic and human spaceflight missions. Among the NEAs, carbonaceous asteroids hold particular interest because they may contain clues to how the Earth got its supplies of water and organic materials, and because none has yet been studied in detail by spacecraft. (101955) Bennu is special among NEAs in that it will not only be visited by a spacecraft, but the OSIRIS-REx mission will also return a sample of Bennu’s regolith to Earth for detailed laboratory study. This paper presents analysis of thermal infrared photometry and spectroscopy that test the hypotheses that Bennu is carbonaceous and that its surface is covered in fine-grained (sub-cm) regolith. The Spitzer Space Telescope observed Bennu in 2007, using the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) to obtain spectra over the wavelength range 5.2-38 μm and images at 16 and 22 μm at 10 different longitudes, as well as the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) to image Bennu at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 μm, also at 10 different longitudes. Thermophysical analysis, assuming a spherical body with the known rotation period and spin-pole orientation, returns an effective diameter of 484 ± 10 m, in agreement with the effective diameter calculated from the radar shape model at the orientation of the Spitzer observations (492 ± 20 m, Nolan, M.C., Magri, C., Howell, E.S., Benner, L.A.M., Giorgini, J.D., Hergenrother, C.W., Hudson, R.S., Lauretta, D.S., Margo, J.-L., Ostro, S.J., Scheeres, D.J. [2013]. Icarus 226, 629-640) and a visible geometric albedo of 0.046 ± 0.005 (using Hv = 20.51, Hergenrother, C.W. et al. [2013]. Icarus 226, 663-670). Including the radar shape model in the thermal analysis, and taking surface roughness into account, yields a disk-averaged thermal inertia of 310 ± 70 J m-2 K-1 s-1

  14. Calibrated Color and Albedo Maps of Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, M. S.; Lucey, P. G.

    1996-03-01

    In order to determine the albedo and color of the mercurian surface, we are completing calibrated mosaics of Mariner 10 image data. A set of clear filter mosaics is being compiled in such a way as to maximize the signal-to-noise-ratio of the data and to allow for a quantitative measure of the precision of the data on a pixel-by-pixel basis. Three major imaging sequences of Mercury were acquired by Mariner 10: incoming first encounter (centered at 20S, 2E), outgoing first encounter (centered at 20N, 175E), and southern hemisphere second encounter (centered at 40S, 100E). For each sequence we are making separate mosaics for each camera (A and B) in order to have independent measurements. For each mosaic, regions of overlap from frame-to-frame are being averaged and the attendant standard deviations are being calculated. Due to the highly redundant nature of the data, each pixel in each mosaic will be an average calculated from 1-10 images. Each mosaic will have a corresponding standard deviation and n (number of measurements) map. A final mosaic will be created by averaging the six independent mosaics. This procedure lessens the effects of random noise and calibration residuals. From these data an albedo map will be produced using an improved photometric function for the Moon. A similar procedure is being followed for the lower resolution color sequences (ultraviolet, blue, orange, ultraviolet polarized). These data will be calibrated to absolute units through comparison of Mariner 10 images acquired of the Moon and Jupiter. Spectral interpretation of these new color and albedo maps will be presented with an emphasis on comparison with the Moon.

  15. The Determination Mercury's Moment of Inertia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peale, S. J.

    2005-12-01

    In determining Mercury's core structure from its rotational properties, the value of C/MR2 from the location of Cassini state 1 is crucial. (C,M,R are Mercury's moment of inertia, mass and radius.) The occupancy of Cassini state 1 means the spin axis is nearly fixed in the frame precessing with the orbit and its position would thereby determine the position of the state. Although tidal and core-mantle dissipation drive the spin to the Cassini state with a time scale O(105) years, the spin might still be displaced from the Cassini state if the variations in the orbital elements induced by planetary perturbations, which change the position of the Cassini state, cause the spin to lag behind as it attempts to follow the state. The spin axis is expected to follow the Cassini state for variations with time scales long compared to the 1000 year precession period of the spin about the Cassini state because the solid angle swept out by the spin axis as it precesses is an adiabatic invariant. Short period variations in the orbital elements of small amplitude should cause displacements that are commensurate with the amplitudes of the short period terms. The exception would be if there are forcing terms in the perturbations that are nearly resonant with the 1000 year precession period. The precision of the radar and eventual spacecraft measurments of the position of Mercury's spin axis warrants a check on the likely proximity of the spin axis to the Cassini state. How confident should we be that the spin axis position defines the Cassini state sufficiently well for a precise determination of C/MR2? By following simultaneously the spin position and the Cassini state position during long time scale orbital variations over past 3 million years (Quinn et al., 1991) and short time scale variations for 20000 years (JPL Ephemeris DE 408, Standish, 2005), we show that the spin axis will remain within one arcsec of the Cassini state after it is brought there by dissipative torques. In

  16. Albedo and transmittance of inhomogeneous stratus clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Zuev, V.E.; Kasyanov, E.I.; Titov, G.A.

    1996-04-01

    A highly important topic is the study of the relationship between the statistical parameters of optical and radiative charactertistics of inhomogeneous stratus clouds. This is important because the radiation codes of general circulation models need improvement, and it is important for geophysical information. A cascade model has been developed at the Goddard Space Flight Center to treat stratocumulus clouds with the simplest geometry and horizontal fluctuations of the liquid water path (optical thickness). The model evaluates the strength with which the stochastic geometry of clouds influences the statistical characteristics of albedo and the trnasmittance of solar radiation.

  17. Global color and albedo variations on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcewen, Alfred S.

    1988-01-01

    The present Voyager imaging data multispectral mosaics of Io include global mosaics from each of the Voyager 1 and 2 data sets and a high-resolution mosaic of the region centered on the Ra Patera volcano. The constancy of the disk-integrated color and albedo of Io over recent decades despite volcanic activity may be due to the regular occurrence of large Pele-type plumes with relatively dark, red deposits. Io's intrinsic spectral variability involves continuous variation among three major spectral end members. Attention is given to the mapping of the data into five spectral units for the purposes of comparison with laboratory measurements of Io surface material candidates.

  18. Albedo maps of Pluto and Charon - Initial mutual event results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buie, Marc W.; Tholen, David J.; Horne, Keith

    1992-01-01

    By applying the technique of maximum entropy image reconstruction to invert observed lightcurves, surface maps of single-scattering albedo are obtained for the surfaces of Pluto and Charon from 1954 to 1986. The albedo features of the surface of Pluto are similar to those of the Buie and Tholen (1989) spot model maps; a south polar cap is evident. The map of Charon is somewhat darker, with single-scattering albedos as low as 0.03.

  19. THE ALBEDO-COLOR DIVERSITY OF TRANSNEPTUNIAN OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Lacerda, Pedro; Rengel, Miriam; Fornasier, Sonia; Lellouch, Emmanuel; Delsanti, Audrey; Kiss, Csaba; Vilenius, Esa; Müller, Thomas; Santos-Sanz, Pablo; Duffard, René; Guilbert-Lepoutre, Aurélie

    2014-09-20

    We analyze albedo data obtained using the Herschel Space Observatory that reveal the existence of two distinct types of surface among midsized trans-Neptunian objects. A color-albedo diagram shows two large clusters of objects, one redder and higher albedo and another darker and more neutrally colored. Crucially, all objects in our sample located in dynamically stable orbits within the classical Kuiper Belt region and beyond are confined to the bright red group, implying a compositional link. Those objects are believed to have formed further from the Sun than the dark neutral bodies. This color-albedo separation is evidence for a compositional discontinuity in the young solar system.

  20. Enhancement of the MODIS Daily Snow Albedo Product

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Dorothy K.; Schaaf, Crystal B.; Wang, Zhuosen; Riggs, George A.

    2009-01-01

    The MODIS daily snow albedo product is a data layer in the MOD10A1 snow-cover product that includes snow-covered area and fractional snow cover as well as quality information and other metadata. It was developed to augment the MODIS BRDF/Albedo algorithm (MCD43) that provides 16-day maps of albedo globally at 500-m resolution. But many modelers require daily snow albedo, especially during the snowmelt season when the snow albedo is changing rapidly. Many models have an unrealistic snow albedo feedback in both estimated albedo and change in albedo over the seasonal cycle context, Rapid changes in snow cover extent or brightness challenge the MCD43 algorithm; over a 16-day period, MCD43 determines whether the majority of clear observations was snow-covered or snow-free then only calculates albedo for the majority condition. Thus changes in snow albedo and snow cover are not portrayed accurately during times of rapid change, therefore the current MCD43 product is not ideal for snow work. The MODIS daily snow albedo from the MOD10 product provides more frequent, though less robust maps for pixels defined as "snow" by the MODIS snow-cover algorithm. Though useful, the daily snow albedo product can be improved using a daily version of the MCD43 product as described in this paper. There are important limitations to the MOD10A1 daily snow albedo product, some of which can be mitigated. Utilizing the appropriate per-pixel Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Functions (BRDFs) can be problematic, and correction for anisotropic scattering must be included. The BRDF describes how the reflectance varies with view and illumination geometry. Also, narrow-to-broadband conversion specific for snow on different surfaces must be calculated and this can be difficult. In consideration of these limitations of MOD10A1, we are planning to improve the daily snow albedo algorithm by coupling the periodic per-pixel snow albedo from MCD43, with daily surface ref|outanoom, In this paper, we

  1. A Novel Flexible Inertia Weight Particle Swarm Optimization Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Amoshahy, Mohammad Javad; Shamsi, Mousa; Sedaaghi, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Particle swarm optimization (PSO) is an evolutionary computing method based on intelligent collective behavior of some animals. It is easy to implement and there are few parameters to adjust. The performance of PSO algorithm depends greatly on the appropriate parameter selection strategies for fine tuning its parameters. Inertia weight (IW) is one of PSO's parameters used to bring about a balance between the exploration and exploitation characteristics of PSO. This paper proposes a new nonlinear strategy for selecting inertia weight which is named Flexible Exponential Inertia Weight (FEIW) strategy because according to each problem we can construct an increasing or decreasing inertia weight strategy with suitable parameters selection. The efficacy and efficiency of PSO algorithm with FEIW strategy (FEPSO) is validated on a suite of benchmark problems with different dimensions. Also FEIW is compared with best time-varying, adaptive, constant and random inertia weights. Experimental results and statistical analysis prove that FEIW improves the search performance in terms of solution quality as well as convergence rate. PMID:27560945

  2. A Novel Flexible Inertia Weight Particle Swarm Optimization Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Shamsi, Mousa; Sedaaghi, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Particle swarm optimization (PSO) is an evolutionary computing method based on intelligent collective behavior of some animals. It is easy to implement and there are few parameters to adjust. The performance of PSO algorithm depends greatly on the appropriate parameter selection strategies for fine tuning its parameters. Inertia weight (IW) is one of PSO’s parameters used to bring about a balance between the exploration and exploitation characteristics of PSO. This paper proposes a new nonlinear strategy for selecting inertia weight which is named Flexible Exponential Inertia Weight (FEIW) strategy because according to each problem we can construct an increasing or decreasing inertia weight strategy with suitable parameters selection. The efficacy and efficiency of PSO algorithm with FEIW strategy (FEPSO) is validated on a suite of benchmark problems with different dimensions. Also FEIW is compared with best time-varying, adaptive, constant and random inertia weights. Experimental results and statistical analysis prove that FEIW improves the search performance in terms of solution quality as well as convergence rate. PMID:27560945

  3. A Novel Flexible Inertia Weight Particle Swarm Optimization Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Amoshahy, Mohammad Javad; Shamsi, Mousa; Sedaaghi, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Particle swarm optimization (PSO) is an evolutionary computing method based on intelligent collective behavior of some animals. It is easy to implement and there are few parameters to adjust. The performance of PSO algorithm depends greatly on the appropriate parameter selection strategies for fine tuning its parameters. Inertia weight (IW) is one of PSO's parameters used to bring about a balance between the exploration and exploitation characteristics of PSO. This paper proposes a new nonlinear strategy for selecting inertia weight which is named Flexible Exponential Inertia Weight (FEIW) strategy because according to each problem we can construct an increasing or decreasing inertia weight strategy with suitable parameters selection. The efficacy and efficiency of PSO algorithm with FEIW strategy (FEPSO) is validated on a suite of benchmark problems with different dimensions. Also FEIW is compared with best time-varying, adaptive, constant and random inertia weights. Experimental results and statistical analysis prove that FEIW improves the search performance in terms of solution quality as well as convergence rate.

  4. Nuclear inertia from the time dependent pairing equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirea, M.

    2016-10-01

    In a dynamical system, the momenta of inertia and the effective masses are not adiabatic quantities, but are dynamical ones that depend on the dissipated energy accumulated during motion. However, these parameters are calculated for adiabatic nuclear systems, leaving no room for dissipated energy. In this work, a formalism is elaborated in order to derive simultaneously the nuclear momenta of inertia and the effective masses by taking into account the appearance of dissipated energy for large amplitude motion of the nuclear system. The expressions that define the inertia are obtained from the variational principle. The same principle manages the time dependent pairing equations, offering estimations of the averaged dissipation energy for large amplitude motions. The model is applied to 232Th fission. The fission barrier was calculated along the least action trajectory. The dissipation energy, effective mass and moment of inertia are determined for different values of the collective velocities. The dissipation increases with the internuclear velocity in binary disintegration processes and modifies the effective mass parameters. We observed that the inertia decreases as long as the collective velocity increases to some moderate values and begins to grow for larger collective velocities. So, a dependence between the cranking mass parameters and the intrinsic excitation energy is evidenced. In order to investigate the overall effect, the half-lives are predicted for adiabatic and dynamics simulations.

  5. Inertia and Double Bending of Light from Equivalence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuler, Robert L., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Careful examination of light paths in an accelerated reference frame, with use of Special Relativity, can account fully for the observed bending of light in a gravitational field, not just half of it as reported in 1911. This analysis also leads to a Machian formulation of inertia similar to the one proposed by Einstein in 1912 and later derived from gravitational field equations in Minkowsky Space by Sciama in 1953. There is a clear inference from equivalence that there is some type of inertial mass increase in a gravitational field. It is the purpose of the current paper to suggest that equivalence provides a more complete picture of gravitational effects than previously thought, correctly predicting full light bending, and that since the theory of inertia is derivable from equivalence, any theory based on equivalence must take account of it. Einstein himself clearly was not satisfied with the status of inertia in GRT, as our quotes have shown. Many have tried to account for inertia and met with less than success, for example Davidson s integration of Sciama s inertia into GRT but only for a steady state cosmology [10], and the Machian gravity theory of Brans and Dicke [11]. Yet Mach s idea hasn t gone away, and now it seems that it cannot go away without also disposing of equivalence.

  6. Thermal properties of Rhea's poles: Evidence for a meter-deep unconsolidated subsurface layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howett, C. J. A.; Spencer, J. R.; Hurford, T.; Verbiscer, A.; Segura, M.

    2016-07-01

    Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) observed both of Rhea's polar regions during a close (2000 km) flyby on 9th March 2013 during orbit 183. Rhea's southern pole was again observed during a more distant (51,000 km) flyby on 10th February 2015 during orbit 212. The results show Rhea's southern winter pole is one of the coldest places directly observed in our Solar System: surface temperatures of 25.4 ± 7.4 K and 24.7 ± 6.8 K are inferred from orbit 183 and 212 data, respectively. The surface temperature of the northern summer pole inferred from orbit 183 data is warmer: 66.6 ± 0.6 K. Assuming the surface thermophysical properties of the two polar regions are comparable then these temperatures can be considered a summer and winter seasonal temperature constraint for the polar region. Orbit 183 will provide solar longitude (LS) coverage at 133° and 313° for the summer and winter poles respectively, while orbit 212 provides an additional winter temperature constraint at LS 337°. Seasonal models with bolometric albedo values between 0.70 and 0.74 and thermal inertia values between 1 and 46 J m-2 K-1 s-1/2 (otherwise known as MKS units) can provide adequate fits to these temperature constraints (assuming the winter temperature is an upper limit). Both these albedo and thermal inertia values agree within the uncertainties with those previously observed on both Rhea's leading and trailing hemispheres. Investigating the seasonal temperature change of Rhea's surface is particularly important, as the seasonal wave is sensitive to deeper surface temperatures (∼tens of centimeters to meter depths) than the more commonly reported diurnal wave (typically less than a centimeter), the exact depth difference dependent upon the assumed surface properties. For example, if a surface porosity of 0.5 and thermal inertia of 25 MKS is assumed then the depth of the seasonal thermal wave is 76 cm, which is much deeper than the ∼0.5 cm probed by diurnal studies of Rhea

  7. Thermal infrared observations and thermophysical characterization of the OSIRIS-REx target asteroid (101955) Bennu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emery, J.; Fernandez, Y.; Kelley, M.; Warden, K.; Hergenrother, C.; Lauretta, D.; Drake, M.; Campins, H.; Ziffer, J.

    2014-07-01

    Near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) have garnered ever-increasing attention over the past few years due to the insights they offer into Solar System formation and evolution, the potential hazard they pose, and their accessibility for both robotic and human spaceflight missions. Among the NEAs, carbonaceous asteroids hold particular interest, because they may contain clues to how the Earth got its supplies of water and organic materials, and because none has yet been studied in detail by spacecraft. (101955) Bennu is special among the NEAs in that it will not only be visited by a spacecraft, but the OSIRIS-REx mission will also return a sample of Bennu's regolith to the Earth for detailed laboratory study. We present analysis of thermal infrared photometry and spectroscopy to test the hypotheses that Bennu is carbonaceous and that its surface is covered in fine-grained (sub-cm) regolith. The Spitzer Space Telescope observed Bennu in 2007, using the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) to obtain spectra over the wavelength range of 5.2-38 μ m and images at 16 and 22 μ m at 10 different longitudes, as well as the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) to image Bennu at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 μ m, also at 10 different longitudes. Thermophysical analysis, assuming a spherical body with the known rotation period and spin-pole orientation, returns an effective diameter of 484±10 m, in agreement with the effective diameter calculated from the radar shape model at the orientation of the Spitzer observations (492±20 m, Nolan et al. 2013) and a visible geometric albedo of 0.046±0.005 (using H_{V}=20.51, Hergenrother et al. 2013). Including the radar shape model in the thermal analysis, and taking surface roughness into account, yields a disk-averaged thermal inertia of 310±70 J m^{-2}K^{-1}s^{-1/2}, which is significantly lower than that for several other NEAs of comparable size. There may be a small variation of thermal inertia with rotational phase (±60 J m^{-2}K^{-1}s^{-1/2}). The spectral

  8. Surface Albedo Variations Across Opportunity's Traverse in Meridiani Planum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Studer-Ellis, G. L.; Rice, M. S.; Johnson, J. R.; Bell, J. F., III

    2015-12-01

    Surface albedo measurements from the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) Opportunity mission can be used to help understand surface-atmosphere interactions at Meridiani Planum. Opportunity has acquired 117 albedo panoramas with the Pancam instrument as of sol 3870, across the first 40 km of its traverse. To date, only the first 32 panoramas have been reported upon in previous studies [1]. Here we present an analysis of the full set of PDS-released albedo observations from Opportunity and correlate our measurements with terrain type and known atmospheric events. To acquire a 360-degree albedo observation, Pancam's L1 ("clear") filter is used to take 27 broad-spectrum images, which are stitched into a mosaic. Pancam images are calibrated to reflectance factor (R*), which is taken as an approximation of the Lambertian albedo. Areas of interest are selected and average albedo calculations are applied to all of the selections. Results include the average albedo of each scene, as well as equal-area corrections where applicable, in addition to measurements of specific classes of surface features (e.g., outcrops, dusty terrain, and rover tracks). Average scene albedo measurements range from 0.11 ± 0.04 to 0.30 ± 0.04, with the highest value observed on sol 1290 (immediately after the planet-encircling dust storm of 2007). We compare these results to distance traveled, surface morphologies, local wind driven events, and dust opacity measurements. Future work will focus on correlating Pancam albedo values with orbital data from cameras such as HiRISE, CTX, MOC, THEMIS-VIS, and MARCI, and completion of the same analysis for the full Pancam albedo dataset from Spirit. References: [1] Bell, J. F., III, M. S. Rice, J. R. Johnson, and T. M. Hare (2008), Surface albedo observations at Gusev Crater and Meridiani Planum, Mars, J. Geophys. Res., 113, E06S18, doi:10.1029/2007JE002976.

  9. From Regional Cloud-Albedo to a Global Albedo Footprint - Studying Aerosol Effects on the Radiation Budget Using the Relation Between Albedo and Cloud Fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, F.; Engström, A.; Karlsson, J.; Wood, R.; Charlson, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    Earth's albedo is the primary determinant of the amount of energy absorbed by the Earth-atmosphere system. The main factor controlling albedo is the amount of clouds present, but aerosols can affect and alter both clear-sky and cloudy-sky reflectance. How albedo depends on cloud fraction and how albedo varies at a given cloud fraction and a given cloud water content, reveals information about these aerosol effects on the radiation budget. Hence, the relation between total albedo and cloud fraction can be used for illustration and quantification of aerosol effects, and as a diagnostic tool, to test model performance. Here, we show examples of the utilisation of this relation focusing on satellite observations from CERES and MODIS on Aqua, as well as from Calipso and CloudSat, and performing comparisons with climate models on the way: In low-cloud regions in the subtropics, we find that climate models well represent a near-constant regional cloud albedo, and this representation has improved from CMIP3 to CMIP5. CMIP5 models indicate more reflective clouds in present-day climate than pre-industrial, as a result of increased aerosol burdens. On monthly mean time scale, models are found to over-estimate the regional cloud-brightening due to aerosols. On the global scale we find an increasing cloud albedo with increasing cloud fraction - a relation that is very well defined in observations, and less so in CMIP5 models. Cloud brightening from pre-industrial to present day is also seen on global scale. Further, controlling for both cloud fraction and cloud water content we can trace small variations in albedo, or perturbations of solar reflectivity, that create a near-global coherent geographical pattern that is consistent with aerosol impacts on climate, with albedo enhancement in regions dominant of known aerosol sources and suppression of albedo in regions associated with high rates of aerosol removal (deduced using CloudSat precipitation estimates). This mapping can be

  10. A microphysically-based approach to modeling emissivity and albedo of the martian seasonal caps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eluszkiewicz, J.; Moncet, J.-L.; Titus, T.N.; Hansen, G.B.

    2005-01-01

    A new model of albedo and emissivity of the martian seasonal caps represented as porous CO2 slabs containing spherical voids and dust particles is described. In the model, a radiative transfer model is coupled with a microphysical model in order to link changes in albedo and emissivity to changes in porosity caused by ice metamorphism. The coupled model is capable of reproducing temporal changes in the spectra of the caps taken by the Thermal Emission Spectrometer onboard the Mars Global Surveyor and it can be used as the forward model in the retrievals of the caps' physical properties (porosity, dust abundance, void and dust grain size) from the spectra. Preliminary results from such inversion studies are presented. ?? 2004 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The albedo, effective temperature, and energy balance of Neptune, as determined from Voyager data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearl, J. C.; Conrath, B. J.

    1991-01-01

    Data from the Voyager infrared spectrometer and radiometer (IRIS) investigation are used in determining the albedo, effective temperature, and energy balance of Neptune. From broadband radiometric observations made at phase angles of 14 deg and 134 deg, together with measurements at intermediate phase angles from the literature, an orbital mean value of 0.290 +/-0.067 is obtained for the bolometric Bond albedo. This yields an equilibrium temperature Teq = 46.6 +/-1.1 K. From thermal spectra obtained over latitudes from pole to pole an effective temperature Teff = 59.3 +/-0.8 K is derived. This represents a substantial improvement over previously determined values. The energy balance of Neptune is therefore E = 2.61 +/-0.28, which is in agreement with previous results. The reduced uncertainty in this value is due to the improved determination of the effective temperature.

  12. Survey of TES high albedo events in Mars' northern polar craters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Armstrong, J.C.; Nielson, S.K.; Titus, T.N.

    2007-01-01

    Following the work exploring Korolev Crater (Armstrong et al., 2005) for evidence of crater interior ice deposits, we have conducted a survey of Thermal Emission Spectroscopy (TES) temperature and albedo measurements for Mars' northern polar craters larger than 10 km. Specifically, we identify a class of craters that exhibits brightening in their interiors during a solar longitude, Ls, of 60 to 120 degrees, roughly depending on latitude. These craters vary in size, latitude, and morphology, but appear to have a specific regional association on the surface that correlates with the distribution of subsurface hydrogen (interpreted as water ice) previously observed on Mars. We suggest that these craters, like Korolev, exhibit seasonal high albedo frost events that indicate subsurface water ice within the craters. A detailed study of these craters may provide insight in the geographical distribution of the ice and context for future polar missions. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  13. Temperature-dependent particle-number projected moment of inertia

    SciTech Connect

    Allal, N. H.; Fellah, M.; Benhamouda, N.; Oudih, M. R.

    2008-05-15

    Expressions of the parallel and perpendicular temperature-dependent particle-number projected nuclear moment of inertia have been established by means of a discrete projection method. They generalize that of the FTBCS method and are well adapted to numerical computation. The effects of particle-number fluctuations have been numerically studied for some even-even actinide nuclei by using the single-particle energies and eigenstates of a deformed Woods-Saxon mean field. It has been shown that the parallel moment of inertia is practically not modified by the use of the projection method. In contrast, the discrepancy between the projected and FTBCS perpendicular moment of inertia values may reach 5%. Moreover, the particle-number fluctuation effects vary not only as a function of the temperature but also as a function of the deformation for a given temperature. This is not the case for the system energy.

  14. Gender in Science and Engineering Faculties: Demographic Inertia Revisited.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Nicole R; Poole, Daniel J; Herbers, Joan M

    2015-01-01

    The under-representation of women on faculties of science and engineering is ascribed in part to demographic inertia, which is the lag between retirement of current faculty and future hires. The assumption of demographic inertia implies that, given enough time, gender parity will be achieved. We examine that assumption via a semi-Markov model to predict the future faculty, with simulations that predict the convergence demographic state. Our model shows that existing practices that produce gender gaps in recruitment, retention, and career progression preclude eventual gender parity. Further, we examine sensitivity of the convergence state to current gender gaps to show that all sources of disparity across the entire faculty career must be erased to produce parity: we cannot blame demographic inertia. PMID:26488899

  15. Gender in Science and Engineering Faculties: Demographic Inertia Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Nicole R.; Poole, Daniel J.; Herbers, Joan M.

    2015-01-01

    The under-representation of women on faculties of science and engineering is ascribed in part to demographic inertia, which is the lag between retirement of current faculty and future hires. The assumption of demographic inertia implies that, given enough time, gender parity will be achieved. We examine that assumption via a semi-Markov model to predict the future faculty, with simulations that predict the convergence demographic state. Our model shows that existing practices that produce gender gaps in recruitment, retention, and career progression preclude eventual gender parity. Further, we examine sensitivity of the convergence state to current gender gaps to show that all sources of disparity across the entire faculty career must be erased to produce parity: we cannot blame demographic inertia. PMID:26488899

  16. Factors associated with clinical inertia: an integrative review.

    PubMed

    Aujoulat, Isabelle; Jacquemin, Patricia; Rietzschel, Ernst; Scheen, André; Tréfois, Patrick; Wens, Johan; Darras, Elisabeth; Hermans, Michel P

    2014-01-01

    Failure to initiate or intensify therapy according to evidence-based guidelines is increasingly being acknowledged as a phenomenon that contributes to inadequate management of chronic conditions, and is referred to as clinical inertia. However, the number and complexity of factors associated with the clinical reasoning that underlies the decision-making processes in medicine calls for a critical examination of the consistency of the concept. Indeed, in the absence of information on and justification of treatment decisions that were made, clinical inertia may be only apparent, and actually reflect good clinical practice. This integrative review seeks to address the factors generally associated with clinical inaction, in order to better delineate the concept of true clinical inertia.

  17. Gender in Science and Engineering Faculties: Demographic Inertia Revisited.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Nicole R; Poole, Daniel J; Herbers, Joan M

    2015-01-01

    The under-representation of women on faculties of science and engineering is ascribed in part to demographic inertia, which is the lag between retirement of current faculty and future hires. The assumption of demographic inertia implies that, given enough time, gender parity will be achieved. We examine that assumption via a semi-Markov model to predict the future faculty, with simulations that predict the convergence demographic state. Our model shows that existing practices that produce gender gaps in recruitment, retention, and career progression preclude eventual gender parity. Further, we examine sensitivity of the convergence state to current gender gaps to show that all sources of disparity across the entire faculty career must be erased to produce parity: we cannot blame demographic inertia.

  18. Electron inertia effects on the planar plasma sheath problem

    SciTech Connect

    Duarte, V. N.; Clemente, R. A.

    2011-04-15

    The steady one-dimensional planar plasma sheath problem, originally considered by Tonks and Langmuir, is revisited. Assuming continuously generated free-falling ions and isothermal electrons and taking into account electron inertia, it is possible to describe the problem in terms of three coupled integro-differential equations that can be numerically integrated. The inclusion of electron inertia in the model allows us to obtain the value of the plasma floating potential as resulting from an electron density discontinuity at the walls, where the electrons attain sound velocity and the electric potential is continuous. Results from numerical computation are presented in terms of plots for densities, electric potential, and particles velocities. Comparison with results from literature, corresponding to electron Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution (neglecting electron inertia), is also shown.

  19. Moment of inertia of liquid in a tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Gyeong Joong

    2014-03-01

    In this study, the inertial properties of fully filled liquid in a tank were studied based on the potential theory. The analytic solution was obtained for the rectangular tank, and the numerical solutions using Green's 2nd identity were obtained for other shapes. The inertia of liquid behaves like solid in recti-linear acceleration. But under rotational acceleration, the moment of inertia of liquid becomes small compared to that of solid. The shapes of tank investigated in this study were ellipse, rectangle, hexagon, and octagon with various aspect ratios. The numerical solu¬tions were compared with analytic solution, and an ad hoc semi-analytical approximate formula is proposed herein and this formula gives very good predictions for the moment of inertia of the liquid in a tank of several different geometrical shapes. The results of this study will be useful in analyzing of the motion of LNG/LPG tanker, liquid cargo ship, and damaged ship.

  20. Factors associated with clinical inertia: an integrative review

    PubMed Central

    Aujoulat, Isabelle; Jacquemin, Patricia; Rietzschel, Ernst; Scheen, André; Tréfois, Patrick; Wens, Johan; Darras, Elisabeth; Hermans, Michel P

    2014-01-01

    Failure to initiate or intensify therapy according to evidence-based guidelines is increasingly being acknowledged as a phenomenon that contributes to inadequate management of chronic conditions, and is referred to as clinical inertia. However, the number and complexity of factors associated with the clinical reasoning that underlies the decision-making processes in medicine calls for a critical examination of the consistency of the concept. Indeed, in the absence of information on and justification of treatment decisions that were made, clinical inertia may be only apparent, and actually reflect good clinical practice. This integrative review seeks to address the factors generally associated with clinical inaction, in order to better delineate the concept of true clinical inertia. PMID:24868181

  1. Hysteretic transitions in the Kuramoto model with inertia.

    PubMed

    Olmi, Simona; Navas, Adrian; Boccaletti, Stefano; Torcini, Alessandro

    2014-10-01

    We report finite-size numerical investigations and mean-field analysis of a Kuramoto model with inertia for fully coupled and diluted systems. In particular, we examine, for a gaussian distribution of the frequencies, the transition from incoherence to coherence for increasingly large system size and inertia. For sufficiently large inertia the transition is hysteretic, and within the hysteretic region clusters of locked oscillators of various sizes and different levels of synchronization coexist. A modification of the mean-field theory developed by Tanaka, Lichtenberg, and Oishi [Physica D 100, 279 (1997)] allows us to derive the synchronization curve associated to each of these clusters. We have also investigated numerically the limits of existence of the coherent and of the incoherent solutions. The minimal coupling required to observe the coherent state is largely independent of the system size, and it saturates to a constant value already for moderately large inertia values. The incoherent state is observable up to a critical coupling whose value saturates for large inertia and for finite system sizes, while in the thermodinamic limit this critical value diverges proportionally to the mass. By increasing the inertia the transition becomes more complex, and the synchronization occurs via the emergence of clusters of whirling oscillators. The presence of these groups of coherently drifting oscillators induces oscillations in the order parameter. We have shown that the transition remains hysteretic even for randomly diluted networks up to a level of connectivity corresponding to a few links per oscillator. Finally, an application to the Italian high-voltage power grid is reported, which reveals the emergence of quasiperiodic oscillations in the order parameter due to the simultaneous presence of many competing whirling clusters.

  2. Anthropogenic desertification by high-albedo pollution Observations and modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otterman, J.; Rosenberg, N. W.; Rosenberg, E.

    1974-01-01

    ERTS-1 MSS albedo data of Western Negev, Sinai and the Gaza strip are presented. A sharp contrast in albedo exists across the Negev-Sinai and Negev-Gaza strip borders. Anthropogenic desertification has occurred on the Arab side due to overgrazing and Bedouin agriculture, whereas natural vegetation grows much more abundantly on the Israeli side.

  3. The albedo of snow for partially cloudy skies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhury, B. J.; Chang, A. T. C.

    1980-01-01

    The input parameters of the model are atmospheric precipitable water, ozone content, turbidity, cloud optical thickness, size and shape of ice crystal of snow and surface pressure. The model outputs spectral and integrated solar flux snow reflectance as a function of solar elevation and fractional cloudcover. The model is illustrated using representative parameters for the Antarctic coastal regions. The albedo for a clear sky depends inversely on the solar elevation. At high elevation the albedo depends primarily upon the grain size; at low elevation this dependence is on grain size and shape. The gradient of the albedo-elevation curve increases as the grains get larger and faceted. The albedo for a dense overcast is a few percent higher than the clear sky albedo at high elevations. A simple relation between the grain size and the overcast albedo is obtained. For a set of grain size and shape, the albedo matrices (the albedo as a function of solar elevation and fractional cloudcover) are tabulated.

  4. Greenland surface albedo changes 1981-2012 from satellite observations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Significant melt over Greenland has been observed during the last several decades associated with extreme warming events over the northern Atlantic Ocean. An analysis of surface albedo change over Greenland is presented, using a 32-year consistent satellite albedo product from the Global Land Surfac...

  5. Seasonal evolution of the albedo of multiyear Arctic sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perovich, D. K.; Grenfell, T. C.; Light, B.; Hobbs, P. V.

    2002-10-01

    As part of ice albedo feedback studies during the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) field experiment, we measured spectral and wavelength-integrated albedo on multiyear sea ice. Measurements were made every 2.5 m along a 200-m survey line from April through October. Initially, this line was completely snow covered, but as the melt season progressed, it became a mixture of bare ice and melt ponds. Observed changes in albedo were a combination of a gradual evolution due to seasonal transitions and abrupt shifts resulting from synoptic weather events. There were five distinct phases in the evolution of albedo: dry snow, melting snow, pond formation, pond evolution, and fall freeze-up. In April the surface albedo was high (0.8-0.9) and spatially uniform. By the end of July the average albedo along the line was 0.4, and there was significant spatial variability, with values ranging from 0.1 for deep, dark ponds to 0.65 for bare, white ice. There was good agreement between surface-based albedos and measurements made from the University of Washington's Convair-580 research aircraft. A comparison between net solar irradiance computed using observed albedos and a simplified model of seasonal evolution shows good agreement as long as the timing of the transitions is accurately determined.

  6. Thermal and Physical Characterization of the OSIRIS-REx Target Asteroid (101955) 1999 RQ36

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emery, Joshua P.; Kelley, M. S.; Fernandez, Y. R.; Hergenrother, C. W.; Crane, K. T.; Ziffer, J.; Campins, H.; Lauretta, D. S.; Drake, M. J.

    2012-10-01

    The OSIRIS-REx mission, the third in NASA’s New Frontier line, will launch in 2016, visit the near-Earth asteroid (101955) 1999 RQ36, and return samples of its regolith to Earth in 2023. Ground-based observations have already revealed a great deal about 1999 RQ36, including the spectral type (B-type), size, and rotation period. To further characterize the composition, surface grain size, and thermophysical properties, we observed 1999 RQ36 with the Spitzer Space Telescope during the time period 3-9 May 2007. Thermal spectra from 5.2 to 38 μm were measured with the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) of opposite hemispheres of the body. Photometry at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 μm was obtained with the Infrared Array Camera and at 16 and 22 μm with the IRS peak-up imaging mode. With the imaging modes, we targeted 10 equally distributed longitudes in order to search for rotational heterogeneities. The thermal inertia derived from the model fit is 600 +/- 150 J m-2s-1/2K-1. This moderately high thermal inertia suggests a regolith with grains less than 2 cm in diameter. Thermal inertia an important parameter for estimating the strength of the Yarkovsky effect, and has been used with measurements of the semi-major axis drift rate to estimate the bulk density of 1999 RQ36 (Chesley et al. 2012). The inferred size of RQ36 is in excellent agreement with radar observations, and the geometric albedo is very low (pv 0.03). There is no evidence for spectral features larger than the noise (S/N 40) in the final spectrum. The imaging data show no evidence for dust around the asteroid. Additional observations with Spitzer are planned for September 2012. We will present the current results and new observations along with an analysis of the thermal lightcurve in the context of the shape model derived from radar data.

  7. Effect of inertia on model flocks in a turbulent environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, Ashok; Venkataraman, Divya; Sankar Ray, Samriddhi

    2015-10-01

    We study flocking of self-propelled, interacting microorganisms with finite sizes and mass immersed in a turbulent flow. In the presence of the competing interactions of self-propulsion and the carrier turbulent flow, as is typical in nature, we show that including the effect of inertia is essential for the stability of flocks. We examine the problem from the point of view of global as well as local order and the statistics of the velocity of the microorganisms as a function of the inertia, the interaction radius, the level of self-propulsion as well as noise.

  8. Centrifugal inertia effects in two-phase face seal films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basu, P.; Hughes, W. F.; Beeler, R. M.

    1987-01-01

    A simplified, semianalytical model has been developed to analyze the effect of centrifugal inertia in two-phase face seals. The model is based on the assumption of isothermal flow through the seal, but at an elevated temperature, and takes into account heat transfer and boiling. Using this model, seal performance curves are obtained with water as the working fluid. It is shown that the centrifugal inertia of the fluid reduces the load-carrying capacity dramatically at high speeds and that operational instability exists under certain conditions. While an all-liquid seal may be starved at speeds higher than a 'critical' value, leakage always occurs under boiling conditions.

  9. An efficient method for computation of the manipulator inertia matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fijany, Amir; Bejczy, Antal K.

    1989-01-01

    An efficient method of computation of the manipulator inertia matrix is presented. Using spatial notations, the method leads to the definition of the composite rigid-body spatial inertia, which is a spatial representation of the notion of augmented body. The previously proposed methods, the physical interpretations leading to their derivation, and their redundancies are analyzed. The proposed method achieves a greater efficiency by eliminating the redundancy in the intrinsic equations as well as by a better choice of coordinate frame for their projection. In this case, removing the redundancy leads to greater efficiency of the computation in both serial and parallel senses.

  10. Otoancorin Knockout Mice Reveal Inertia is the Force for Hearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weddell, Thomas; Legan, P. Kevin; Lukashkina, Victoria A.; Goodyear, Richard J.; Welstead, Lindsy; Petit, Chistine; Russell, Ian J.; Lukashkin, Andrei N.; Richardson, Guy P.

    2011-11-01

    We demonstrate that in Otoa-/- mice, in which the inner-ear-specific protein otoancorin is absent, excitation of the outer hair cells and cochlear amplification is normal. This finding is remarkable because the tectorial membrane (TM), although remaining functionally attached to the outer hair cell bundles, is completely detached from the spiral limbus. Therefore, as in ancestral vertebrate auditory organs, where inertia provides the excitatory force to the hair cells, it is the inertia of the TM that must be important for exciting the outer hair cells, setting the sensitivity of their transducer conductance, and determining the precise timing of cochlear amplification.

  11. Classical Rotational Inertia of Solid {sup 4}He

    SciTech Connect

    Dash, J.G.; Wettlaufer, J.S.

    2005-06-17

    The observation of reduced rotational inertia in a cell containing solid {sup 4}He has been interpreted as evidence for superfluidity of the solid. We propose an alternative explanation: slippage of the solid, due to grain boundary premelting between the solid and dense adsorbed layers at the container wall. We calculate the range of film thickness, and determine the viscosity that will account for the missing rotational inertia. Grain boundary premelting also explains inertial anomalies in an earlier study of solid helium in porous glass and indicates that the liquid is partially superfluid.

  12. Avalanches in strained amorphous solids: does inertia destroy critical behavior?

    PubMed

    Salerno, K Michael; Maloney, Craig E; Robbins, Mark O

    2012-09-01

    Simulations are used to determine the effect of inertia on athermal shear of amorphous two-dimensional solids. In the quasistatic limit, shear occurs through a series of rapid avalanches. The distribution of avalanches is analyzed using finite-size scaling with thousands to millions of disks. Inertia takes the system to a new underdamped universality class rather than driving the system away from criticality as previously thought. Scaling exponents are determined for the underdamped and overdamped limits and a critical damping that separates the two regimes. Systems are in the overdamped universality class even when most vibrational modes are underdamped.

  13. NEOWISE Reactivation Mission Year Two: Asteroid Diameters and Albedos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nugent, C. R.; Mainzer, A.; Bauer, J.; Cutri, R. M.; Kramer, E. A.; Grav, T.; Masiero, J.; Sonnett, S.; Wright, E. L.

    2016-09-01

    The Near-Earth Object Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (NEOWISE) mission continues to detect, track, and characterize minor planets. We present diameters and albedos calculated from observations taken during the second year since the spacecraft was reactivated in late 2013. These include 207 near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) and 8885 other asteroids. Of the NEAs, 84% NEAs did not have previously measured diameters and albedos by the NEOWISE mission. Comparison of sizes and albedos calculated from NEOWISE measurements with those measured by occultations, spacecraft, and radar-derived shapes shows accuracy consistent with previous NEOWISE publications. Diameters and albedos fall within ±˜20% and ±˜40%, 1-sigma, respectively, of those measured by these alternate techniques. NEOWISE continues to preferentially discover near-Earth objects which are large (>100 m), and have low albedos.

  14. The albedo effect on neutron transmission probability.

    PubMed

    Khanouchi, A; Sabir, A; Boulkheir, M; Ichaoui, R; Ghassoun, J; Jehouani, A

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the albedo effect on the neutron transmission probability through slab shields. For this reason we have considered an infinite homogeneous slab having a fixed thickness equal to 20 lambda (lambda is the mean free path of the neutron in the slab). This slab is characterized by the factor Ps (scattering probability) and contains a vacuum channel which is formed by two horizontal parts and an inclined one (David, M. C. (1962) Duc and Voids in shields. In Reactor Handbook, Vol. III, Part B, p. 166). The thickness of the vacuum channel is taken equal to 2 lambda. An infinite plane source of neutrons is placed on the first of the slab (left face) and detectors, having windows equal to 2 lambda, are placed on the second face of the slab (right face). Neutron histories are sampled by the Monte Carlo method (Booth, T. E. and Hendricks, J. S. (1994) Nuclear Technology 5) using exponential biasing in order to increase the Monte Carlo calculation efficiency (Levitt, L. B. (1968) Nuclear Science and Engineering 31, 500-504; Jehouani, A., Ghassoun, J. and Abouker, A. (1994) In Proceedings of the 6th International Symposium on Radiation Physics, Rabat, Morocco) and we have applied the statistical weight method which supposes that the neutron is born at the source with a unit statistical weight and after each collision this weight is corrected. For different values of the scattering probability and for different slopes of the inclined part of the channel we have calculated the neutron transmission probability for different positions of the detectors versus the albedo at the vacuum channel-medium interface. Some analytical representations are also presented for these transmission probabilities. PMID:9463883

  15. Global color and albedo variations on Io

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McEwen, A.S.

    1988-01-01

    Three multispectral mosaics of Io have been produced from Voyager imaging data: a global mosaic from each of the Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 data sets and a high-resolution mosaic of the region surrounding the volcano Ra Patera. The mosaics are maps of normal albedo and color in accurate geometric map formats. Io's photometric behavior, mapped with a two-image technique, is spatially variable, especially in the bright white areas. The disk-integrated color and albedo of the satellite have been remarkably constant over recent decades, despite the volcanic activity and the many differences between Voyager 1 and 2 images (acquired just 4 months apart). This constancy is most likely due to the consistent occurrence of large Pele-type plumes with relatively dark, red deposits in the region from long 240 to 360??. A transient brightening southeast of Pele during the Voyager 1 encounter was probably due to real changes in surface and/or atmospheric materials, rather than to photometric behavior. The intrinsic spectral variability of Io, as seen in a series of two-dimensional histograms of the multispectral mosaics, consists of continuous variation among three major spectral end members. The data were mapped into five spectral units to compare them with laboratory measurements of candidate surface materials and to show the planimetric distributions. Unit 1 is best fit by the spectral reflectance of ordinary elemental sulfur, and it is closely associated with the Peletype plume deposits. Unit 2 is strongly confined to the polar caps above about latitude ??50??, but its composition is unknown. Unit 5 is probably SO2 with relatively minor contamination; it is concentrated in the equatorial region and near the long-lived Prometheus-type plumes. Units 3 and 4 are gradational between units 1 and 5. In addition to SO2 and elemental sulfur, other plausible components of the surface are polysulfur oxides, FeCl2, Na2S, and NaHS. ?? 1988.

  16. Fire disturbance effects on land surface albedo in Alaskan tundra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, Nancy H. F.; Whitley, Matthew A.; Jenkins, Liza K.

    2016-03-01

    The study uses satellite Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer albedo products (MCD43A3) to assess changes in albedo at two sites in the treeless tundra region of Alaska, both within the foothills region of the Brooks Range, the 2007 Anaktuvuk River Fire (ARF) and 2012 Kucher Creek Fire (KCF). Results are compared to each other and other studies to assess the magnitude of albedo change and the longevity of impact of fire on land surface albedo. In both sites there was a marked decrease of albedo in the year following the fire. In the ARF, albedo slowly increased until 4 years after the fire, when it returned to albedo values prior to the fire. For the year immediately after the fire, a threefold difference in the shortwave albedo decrease was found between the two sites. ARF showed a 45.3% decrease, while the KCF showed a 14.1% decrease in shortwave albedo, and albedo is more variable in the KCF site than ARF site 1 year after the fire. These differences are possibly the result of differences in burn severity of the two fires, wherein the ARF burned more completely with more contiguous patches of complete burn than KCF. The impact of fire on average growing season (April-September) surface shortwave forcing in the year following fire is estimated to be 13.24 ± 6.52 W m-2 at the ARF site, a forcing comparable to studies in other treeless ecosystems. Comparison to boreal studies and the implications to energy flux are discussed in the context of future increases in fire occurrence and severity in a warming climate.

  17. Snow-albedo feedback in future climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Xin

    We quantify the two factors controlling Northern Hemisphere springtime snow-albedo feedback in transient climate change based on scenario runs of 18 climate models used in the Intergovernmental Panel of Climate Change 4th Assessment. The first factor is the dependence of planetary albedo on surface albedo. We find in all simulations surface albedo anomalies are attenuated by approximately half in Northern Hemisphere land areas as they are transformed into planetary albedo anomalies. The intermodel standard deviation in this factor is surprisingly small. Moreover, when we calculate an observational estimate of this factor using the satellite-based International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project data, we find most simulations agree with ISCCP values to within about 10%. The second factor, related exclusively to surface processes, is the change in surface albedo associated with an anthropogenically-induced temperature change in Northern Hemisphere land areas. It exhibits much more intermodel variability. This large intermodel spread is attributable mostly to a correspondingly large spread in mean effective snow albedo. Models without explicit treatment of the vegetation canopy in their surface albedo calculations typically have high effective snow albedos and strong SAF, often stronger than observed. In models with explicit canopy treatment, completely snow-covered surfaces typically have lower albedos and the simulations have weaker SAF, generally weaker than observed. These large intermodel variations in feedback strength in climate change are nearly perfectly correlated with comparably large intermodel variations in feedback strength in the context of the seasonal cycle. Moreover, the feedback strength in the real seasonal cycle can be measured and compared to simulated values. These mostly fall outside the range of the observed estimate. Because of the tight correlation between simulated feedback strength in the seasonal cycle and climate change, eliminating the

  18. Relationship between cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction and cloud albedo, and new surface-based approach for determining cloud albedo

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.; Wu, W.; Jensen, M. P.; Toto, T.

    2011-07-21

    This paper focuses on three interconnected topics: (1) quantitative relationship between surface shortwave cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo; (2) surface-based approach for measuring cloud albedo; (3) multiscale (diurnal, annual and inter-annual) variations and covariations of surface shortwave cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo. An analytical expression is first derived to quantify the relationship between cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo. The analytical expression is then used to deduce a new approach for inferring cloud albedo from concurrent surface-based measurements of downwelling surface shortwave radiation and cloud fraction. High-resolution decade-long data on cloud albedos are obtained by use of this surface-based approach over the US Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiaton Measurement (ARM) Program at the Great Southern Plains (SGP) site. The surface-based cloud albedos are further compared against those derived from the coincident GOES satellite measurements. The three long-term (1997-2009) sets of hourly data on shortwave cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction and cloud albedo collected over the SGP site are analyzed to explore the multiscale (diurnal, annual and inter-annual) variations and covariations. The analytical formulation is useful for diagnosing deficiencies of cloud-radiation parameterizations in climate models.

  19. Generating multi-scale albedo look-up maps using MODIS BRDF/Albedo products and landsat imagery

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surface albedo determines radiative forcing and is a key parameter for driving Earth’s climate. Better characterization of surface albedo for individual land cover types can reduce the uncertainty in estimating changes to Earth’s radiation balance due to land cover change. This paper presents a mult...

  20. Thermal stability of ice on Ceres with rough topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayne, P. O.; Aharonson, O.

    2015-09-01

    The dwarf planet Ceres may have an ice-rich crust, and subsurface ice exposed by impacts or endogenic activity would be subject to sublimation. We model surface and subsurface temperatures on Ceres to assess lifetimes of water ice and other volatiles. Topographic shadowing allows a small but nonnegligible fraction (˜0.4%) of Ceres' surface to be perennially below the ˜110 K criterion for 1 Gyr of stability. These areas are found above 60° latitude. Other molecules (CH3OH, NH3, SO2, and CO2) may be cold trapped in smaller abundances. A model for the transport, gravitational escape, and photoionization of H2O molecules suggests net accumulation in the cold traps. Buried ice is stable within a meter for > 1 Gyr at latitudes higher than ˜50°. An illuminated polar cap of water ice would be stable within a few degrees of the poles only if it maintained a high albedo (>0.5) at present obliquity. If the obliquity exceeded 5° in the geologically recent past, then a putative polar cap would have been erased. At latitudes 0°-30°, ice is stable under solar illumination only briefly (˜10-100 years), unless it has high albedo and thermal inertia, in which case lifetimes of > 104 years are possible. Finally, a small hemispheric asymmetry exists due to the timing of Ceres' perihelion passage, which would lead to a detectable enhancement of ice in the northern hemisphere if the orbital elements vary slowly relative to the ice accumulation rate. Our model results are potentially testable during the Dawn science mission.

  1. Hydrodynamic interactions of two nearly touching Brownian spheres in a stiff potential: Effect of fluid inertia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radiom, Milad; Robbins, Brian; Paul, Mark; Ducker, William

    2015-02-01

    The hydrodynamic interaction of two closely spaced micron-scale spheres undergoing Brownian motion was measured as a function of their separation. Each sphere was attached to the distal end of a different atomic force microscopy cantilever, placing each sphere in a stiff one-dimensional potential (0.08 Nm-1) with a high frequency of thermal oscillations (resonance at 4 kHz). As a result, the sphere's inertial and restoring forces were significant when compared to the force due to viscous drag. We explored interparticle gap regions where there was overlap between the two Stokes layers surrounding each sphere. Our experimental measurements are the first of their kind in this parameter regime. The high frequency of oscillation of the spheres means that an analysis of the fluid dynamics would include the effects of fluid inertia, as described by the unsteady Stokes equation. However, we find that, for interparticle separations less than twice the thickness of the wake of the unsteady viscous boundary layer (the Stokes layer), the hydrodynamic interaction between the Brownian particles is well-approximated by analytical expressions that neglect the inertia of the fluid. This is because elevated frictional forces at narrow gaps dominate fluid inertial effects. The significance is that interparticle collisions and concentrated suspensions at this condition can be modeled without the need to incorporate fluid inertia. We suggest a way to predict when fluid inertial effects can be ignored by including the gap-width dependence into the frequency number. We also show that low frequency number analysis can be used to determine the microrheology of mixtures at interfaces.

  2. Hydrodynamic interactions of two nearly touching Brownian spheres in a stiff potential: Effect of fluid inertia

    SciTech Connect

    Radiom, Milad Ducker, William; Robbins, Brian; Paul, Mark

    2015-02-15

    The hydrodynamic interaction of two closely spaced micron-scale spheres undergoing Brownian motion was measured as a function of their separation. Each sphere was attached to the distal end of a different atomic force microscopy cantilever, placing each sphere in a stiff one-dimensional potential (0.08 Nm{sup −1}) with a high frequency of thermal oscillations (resonance at 4 kHz). As a result, the sphere’s inertial and restoring forces were significant when compared to the force due to viscous drag. We explored interparticle gap regions where there was overlap between the two Stokes layers surrounding each sphere. Our experimental measurements are the first of their kind in this parameter regime. The high frequency of oscillation of the spheres means that an analysis of the fluid dynamics would include the effects of fluid inertia, as described by the unsteady Stokes equation. However, we find that, for interparticle separations less than twice the thickness of the wake of the unsteady viscous boundary layer (the Stokes layer), the hydrodynamic interaction between the Brownian particles is well-approximated by analytical expressions that neglect the inertia of the fluid. This is because elevated frictional forces at narrow gaps dominate fluid inertial effects. The significance is that interparticle collisions and concentrated suspensions at this condition can be modeled without the need to incorporate fluid inertia. We suggest a way to predict when fluid inertial effects can be ignored by including the gap-width dependence into the frequency number. We also show that low frequency number analysis can be used to determine the microrheology of mixtures at interfaces.

  3. Chimera states in coupled Kuramoto oscillators with inertia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olmi, Simona

    2015-12-01

    The dynamics of two symmetrically coupled populations of rotators is studied for different values of the inertia. The system is characterized by different types of solutions, which all coexist with the fully synchronized state. At small inertia, the system is no more chaotic and one observes mainly quasi-periodic chimeras, while the usual (stationary) chimera state is not anymore observable. At large inertia, one observes two different kind of chaotic solutions with broken symmetry: the intermittent chaotic chimera, characterized by a synchronized population and a population displaying a turbulent behaviour, and a second state where the two populations are both chaotic but whose dynamics adhere to two different macroscopic attractors. The intermittent chaotic chimeras are characterized by a finite life-time, whose duration increases as a power-law with the system size and the inertia value. Moreover, the chaotic population exhibits clear intermittent behavior, displaying a laminar phase where the two populations tend to synchronize, and a turbulent phase where the macroscopic motion of one population is definitely erratic. In the thermodynamic limit, these states survive for infinite time and the laminar regimes tends to disappear, thus giving rise to stationary chaotic solutions with broken symmetry contrary to what observed for chaotic chimeras on a ring geometry.

  4. Further Evidence for Cognitive Inertia of Persons with Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Norman R.; Dulaney, Cynthia L.

    1991-01-01

    Forty young adults with mental retardation (MR) were compared to 40 young adults without mental retardation in tests examining postpractice interference effects in naming colors of Stroop words. The study concluded that practice developed automatized reading suppression responses which held greater cognitive inertia for longer periods among MR…

  5. More about the moment of inertia of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaula, William M.; Sleep, Norman H.; Phillips, Roger J.

    1989-01-01

    Differences between Mars and other terrestrial planets are discussed. Unlike other terrestrial planets, Mars has two nonhydrostatic components of moments of inertia that are nearly equal. The most probable value of I/MR-squared is slightly less than 0.3650.

  6. Moment of Inertia of a Ping-Pong Ball

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cao, Xian-Sheng

    2012-01-01

    This note describes how to theoretically calculate and experimentally measure the moment of inertia of a Ping-Pong[R] ball. The theoretical calculation results are in good agreement with the experimental measurements that can be reproduced in an introductory physics laboratory.

  7. The Zone of Inertia: Absorptive Capacity and Organizational Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godkin, Lynn

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe how interruptions in organizational learning effect institutional absorptive capacity and contribute to organizational inertia. Design/methodology/approach: An exploratory model is presented as a heuristic to describe how interruptions in organizational learning affect absorptive capacity.…

  8. Chimera states in coupled Kuramoto oscillators with inertia.

    PubMed

    Olmi, Simona

    2015-12-01

    The dynamics of two symmetrically coupled populations of rotators is studied for different values of the inertia. The system is characterized by different types of solutions, which all coexist with the fully synchronized state. At small inertia, the system is no more chaotic and one observes mainly quasi-periodic chimeras, while the usual (stationary) chimera state is not anymore observable. At large inertia, one observes two different kind of chaotic solutions with broken symmetry: the intermittent chaotic chimera, characterized by a synchronized population and a population displaying a turbulent behaviour, and a second state where the two populations are both chaotic but whose dynamics adhere to two different macroscopic attractors. The intermittent chaotic chimeras are characterized by a finite life-time, whose duration increases as a power-law with the system size and the inertia value. Moreover, the chaotic population exhibits clear intermittent behavior, displaying a laminar phase where the two populations tend to synchronize, and a turbulent phase where the macroscopic motion of one population is definitely erratic. In the thermodynamic limit, these states survive for infinite time and the laminar regimes tends to disappear, thus giving rise to stationary chaotic solutions with broken symmetry contrary to what observed for chaotic chimeras on a ring geometry.

  9. Obstacles to Reasoning about Inertia in Different Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yerdelen-Damar, Sevda

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated the underlying reasons for difficulties faced by students when they applied the concept of inertia across varying contexts. The participants of the study included five high school students. Data obtained from interviews were interpreted from the perspectives of the coordination class and epistemological framing…

  10. Effect of fluid inertia on probe-tack adhesion.

    PubMed

    Dias, Eduardo O; Miranda, José A

    2012-01-01

    One way of determining the adhesive strength of liquids is provided by a probe-tack test, which involves measuring the force required to pull apart two parallel flat plates separated by a thin fluid film. The large majority of existing theoretical and experimental work on probe-tack adhesion use very viscous fluids and considers relatively low lifting plate velocities, so that effects due to fluid inertia can be neglected. However, the employment of low-viscosity fluids and the increase in operating speeds of modern lifting apparatus can modify this scenario. By dealing with a proper gap averaging of the Navier-Stokes equation, we obtain a modified Darcy-law-like description of the problem and derive an adhesion force which incorporates the effects of fluid inertia, fluid viscosity (for Newtonian and power law fluids), and the contribution of the compliance and inertia of the probe-tack apparatus. Our results indicate that fluid inertia may have a significant influence on the adhesion force profiles, inducing a considerable increase in the force peaks and producing oscillations in the force-displacement curves as the plate-plate separation is increased. The combined role of inertial and non-Newtonian fluid behaviors on the adhesion force response is also investigated. PMID:22400663

  11. A method for measuring the inertia properties of rigid bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gobbi, M.; Mastinu, G.; Previati, G.

    2011-01-01

    A method for the measurement of the inertia properties of rigid bodies is presented. Given a rigid body and its mass, the method allows to measure (identify) the centre of gravity location and the inertia tensor during a single test. The proposed technique is based on the analysis of the free motion of a multi-cable pendulum to which the body under consideration is connected. The motion of the pendulum and the forces acting on the system are recorded and the inertia properties are identified by means of a proper mathematical procedure based on a least square estimation. After the body is positioned on the test rig, the full identification procedure takes less than 10 min. The natural frequencies of the pendulum and the accelerations involved are quite low, making this method suitable for many practical applications. In this paper, the proposed method is described and two test rigs are presented: the first is developed for bodies up to 3500 kg and the second for bodies up to 400 kg. A validation of the measurement method is performed with satisfactory results. The test rig holds a third part quality certificate according to an ISO 9001 standard and could be scaled up to measure the inertia properties of huge bodies, such as trucks, airplanes or even ships.

  12. Chimera states in coupled Kuramoto oscillators with inertia

    SciTech Connect

    Olmi, Simona

    2015-12-15

    The dynamics of two symmetrically coupled populations of rotators is studied for different values of the inertia. The system is characterized by different types of solutions, which all coexist with the fully synchronized state. At small inertia, the system is no more chaotic and one observes mainly quasi-periodic chimeras, while the usual (stationary) chimera state is not anymore observable. At large inertia, one observes two different kind of chaotic solutions with broken symmetry: the intermittent chaotic chimera, characterized by a synchronized population and a population displaying a turbulent behaviour, and a second state where the two populations are both chaotic but whose dynamics adhere to two different macroscopic attractors. The intermittent chaotic chimeras are characterized by a finite life-time, whose duration increases as a power-law with the system size and the inertia value. Moreover, the chaotic population exhibits clear intermittent behavior, displaying a laminar phase where the two populations tend to synchronize, and a turbulent phase where the macroscopic motion of one population is definitely erratic. In the thermodynamic limit, these states survive for infinite time and the laminar regimes tends to disappear, thus giving rise to stationary chaotic solutions with broken symmetry contrary to what observed for chaotic chimeras on a ring geometry.

  13. Chimera states in coupled Kuramoto oscillators with inertia.

    PubMed

    Olmi, Simona

    2015-12-01

    The dynamics of two symmetrically coupled populations of rotators is studied for different values of the inertia. The system is characterized by different types of solutions, which all coexist with the fully synchronized state. At small inertia, the system is no more chaotic and one observes mainly quasi-periodic chimeras, while the usual (stationary) chimera state is not anymore observable. At large inertia, one observes two different kind of chaotic solutions with broken symmetry: the intermittent chaotic chimera, characterized by a synchronized population and a population displaying a turbulent behaviour, and a second state where the two populations are both chaotic but whose dynamics adhere to two different macroscopic attractors. The intermittent chaotic chimeras are characterized by a finite life-time, whose duration increases as a power-law with the system size and the inertia value. Moreover, the chaotic population exhibits clear intermittent behavior, displaying a laminar phase where the two populations tend to synchronize, and a turbulent phase where the macroscopic motion of one population is definitely erratic. In the thermodynamic limit, these states survive for infinite time and the laminar regimes tends to disappear, thus giving rise to stationary chaotic solutions with broken symmetry contrary to what observed for chaotic chimeras on a ring geometry. PMID:26723164

  14. The Aristotelian definition of motion and the principle of inertia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaughlin, Thomas J.

    2001-07-01

    This dissertation argues that Newton's First Law of Motion, also known as the principle of inertia, is compatible with the Aristotelian definition of motion accepted by St. Thomas Aquinas and with the mover causality principle, which follows from that definition. The argument distinguishes Aquinas' general principles of natural philosophy from his more specific principles of nature. Thus, one can abandon Aquinas' geocentric cosmology without rejecting his entire philosophy of nature, which includes principles such as the four causes, the mover causality principle, and the definitions of motion and time. That is, the Aristotelian conception of what motion is as such does not depend upon Aquinas' accounts of gravitational, projectile, and celestial motion. After explaining what Aquinas means by the definition of motion, "the act of a being in potency insofar as it is in potency," I argue that Aquinas' view of the mover causality principle, "whatever is moved is moved by another," has been frequently misunderstood. Aquinas did not hold that the mover causality principle requires a continuously acting mover to sustain a body's motion. I then show, using Newton's examples of the First Law of Motion, his conception of inertia, the common practice of physicists and astronomers, and other arguments, that the principle of inertia requires a version of the mover causality principle that is compatible with Aquinas' own understanding. I then argue that the principle of inertia is distinct from the philosophical framework within which it has been commonly and historically conceived. In this framework, motion is no longer thought of as a coming to be but is considered a first principle or an unchanging primary quality, a view that the principle of inertia seemingly instantiates through the notion of a "state." This philosophical framework distorts the understanding of the principle of inertia. I argue that the principle of inertia is more intelligibly understood in light of the

  15. The Gamma-ray Albedo of the Moon

    SciTech Connect

    Moskalenko, Igor V.; Porter, Troy A.; /UC, Santa Cruz

    2007-09-28

    We use the GEANT4 Monte Carlo framework to calculate the {gamma}-ray albedo of the Moon due to interactions of cosmic ray (CR) nuclei with moon rock. Our calculation of the albedo spectrum agrees with the EGRET data. We show that the spectrum of {gamma}-rays from the Moon is very steep with an effective cutoff around 3-4 GeV (600 MeV for the inner part of the Moon disk) and exhibits a narrow pion-decay line at 67.5 MeV, perhaps unique in astrophysics. Apart from other astrophysical sources, the albedo spectrum of the Moon is well understood, including its absolute normalization; this makes it a useful 'standard candle' for {gamma}-ray telescopes. The steep albedo spectrum also provides a unique opportunity for energy calibration of {gamma}-ray telescopes, such as the forthcoming Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST). Since the albedo flux depends on the incident CR spectrum which changes over the solar cycle, it is possible to monitor the CR spectrum using the albedo {gamma}-ray flux. Simultaneous measurements of CR proton and helium spectra by the Payload for Antimatter-Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics (PAMELA), and observations of the albedo {gamma}-rays by the GLAST Large Area Telescope (LAT), can be used to test the model predictions and will enable the LAT to monitor the CR spectrum near the Earth beyond the lifetime of the PAMELA.

  16. Arid land monitoring using Landsat albedo difference images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinove, Charles J.; Chavez, Pat S.; Gehring, Dale G.; Holmgren, Ralph

    1981-01-01

    The Landsat albedo, or percentage of incoming radiation reflected from the ground in the wavelength range of 0.5 [mu]m to 1.1 [mu]m, is calculated from an equation using the Landsat digital brightness values and solar irradiance values, and correcting for atmospheric scattering, multispectral scanner calibration, and sun angle. The albedo calculated for each pixel is used to create an albedo image, whose grey scale is proportional to the albedo. Differencing sequential registered images and mapping selected values of the difference is used to create quantitative maps of increased or decreased albedo values of the terrain. All maps and other output products are in black and white rather than color, thus making the method quite economical. Decreases of albedo in arid regions may indicate improvement of land quality; increases may indicate degradation. Tests of the albedo difference mapping method in the Desert Experimental Range in southwestern Utah (a cold desert with little long-term terrain change) for a four-year period show that mapped changes can be correlated with erosion from flash floods, increased or decreased soil moisture, and increases or decreases in the density of desert vegetation, both perennial shrubs and annual plants. All terrain changes identified in this test were related to variations in precipitation. Although further tests of this method in hot deserts showing severe "desertification" are needed, the method is nevertheless recommended for experimental use in monitoring terrain change in other arid and semiarid regions of the world.

  17. The Gamma-Ray Albedo of the Moon

    SciTech Connect

    Moskalenko, I.V.; Porter, T.A.; /UC, Santa Cruz

    2008-03-25

    We use the GEANT4 Monte Carlo framework to calculate the {gamma}-ray albedo of the Moon due to interactions of cosmic ray (CR) nuclei with moon rock. Our calculation of the albedo spectrum agrees with the EGRET data. We show that the spectrum of {gamma}-rays from the Moon is very steep with an effective cutoff around 3-4 GeV (600 MeV for the inner part of the Moon disk) and exhibits a narrow pion-decay line at 67.5 MeV, perhaps unique in astrophysics. Apart from other astrophysical sources, the albedo spectrum of the Moon is well understood, including its absolute normalization; this makes it a useful 'standard candle' for {gamma}-ray telescopes. The steep albedo spectrum also provides a unique opportunity for energy calibration of {gamma}-ray telescopes, such as the forthcoming Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST). Since the albedo flux depends on the incident CR spectrum which changes over the solar cycle, it is possible to monitor the CR spectrum using the albedo {gamma}-ray flux. Simultaneous measurements of CR proton and helium spectra by the Payload for Antimatter-Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics (PAMELA), and observations of the albedo {gamma}-rays by the GLAST Large Area Telescope (LAT), can be used to test the model predictions and will enable the LAT to monitor the CR spectrum near the Earth beyond the lifetime of the PAMELA.

  18. Smoothelin expression in the gastrointestinal tract: implication in colonic inertia.

    PubMed

    Chan, Owen T M; Chiles, Lauren; Levy, Mary; Zhai, Jing; Yerian, Lisa M; Xu, Haodong; Xiao, Shu-Yuan; Soffer, Edy E; Conklin, Jeffrey L; Dhall, Deepti; Kahn, Melissa E; Balzer, Bonnie L; Amin, Mahul B; Wang, Hanlin L

    2013-10-01

    Colonic inertia is a frustrating motility disorder to patients, clinicians, and pathologists. The pathogenesis is largely unknown. The aims of this study were to: (1) characterize the expression of smoothelin, a novel smooth muscle-specific contractile protein expressed only by terminally differentiated smooth muscle cells, in the normal gastrointestinal (GI) tract; and (2) determine whether smoothelin is aberrantly expressed in patients with colonic inertia. A total of 57 resections of the normal GI tract (distal esophagus to left colon) were obtained from patients without GI motor dysfunction. Sixty-one colon resections were obtained from patients with a clinical diagnosis of colonic inertia. Smoothelin immunostaining was conducted on full-thickness tissue sections. In the nondysmotile controls, strong and diffuse cytoplasmic staining for smoothelin was observed in both the inner circular and outer longitudinal layers of the muscularis propria (MP) throughout the entire GI tract. The muscularis mucosae (MM) and muscular vessel walls were either completely negative or only patchily and weakly stained. The 1 exception to this pattern was observed in the distal esophagus, in which the MM was also diffusely and strongly stained. In cases with colonic inertia, a moderate to marked reduction of smoothelin immunoreactivity was observed in 15 of 61 (24.6%) colon resections, selectively seen in the outer layer of the MP. The data demonstrate that smoothelin is differentially expressed in the MP and MM of the normal GI tract and suggest that defective smoothelin expression may play a role in the pathogenesis of colonic inertia in a subset of patients.

  19. Variable control of neutron albedo in toroidal fusion devices

    DOEpatents

    Jassby, Daniel L.; Micklich, Bradley J.

    1986-01-01

    An arrangement is provided for controlling neutron albedo in toroidal fusion devices having inboard and outboard vacuum vessel walls for containment of the neutrons of a fusion plasma. Neutron albedo material is disposed immediately adjacent the inboard wall, and is movable, preferably in vertical directions, so as to be brought into and out of neutron modifying communication with the fusion neutrons. Neutron albedo material preferably comprises a liquid form, but may also take pebble, stringer and curtain-like forms. A neutron flux valve, rotatable about a vertical axis is also disclosed.

  20. Aerial albedos of natural vegetation in South-eastern Australia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    Black-and-white low-level 70mm photography was used to record the track of the aircraft, which was then plotted on conventional 1:80,000 23 cm photogrammetric photographs and referenced against simultaneous measurements of the beam albedos of vegetation. Using stereoscopic pairs of the 70mm photographs, the vegetation was classified into sub-formations. Marked differences in the 'sub-formation' albedos were observed. A two-way table using stand height and crown cover of the sub-formations clearly showed a very distinctive trend of albedos. This finding may be important in other vegetal studies.

  1. Deriving surface albedo measurements from narrow band satellite data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brest, Christopher L.; Goward, Samuel N.

    1987-01-01

    A target calibration procedure for obtaining surface albedo from satellite data is presented. The methodology addresses two key issues, the calibration of remotely-sensed, discrete wavelength, digital data and the derivation of an albedo measurement (defined over the solar short wave spectrum) from spectrally limited observations. Twenty-seven Landsat observations, calibrated with urban targets (building roof-tops and parking lots), are used to derive spatial and seasonal patterns of surface reflectance and albedo for four land cover types: city, suburb, farm and forest.

  2. Lunar Terrain and Albedo Reconstruction from Apollo Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nefian, Ara V.; Kim, Taemin; Broxton, Michael; Moratto, Zach

    2010-01-01

    Generating accurate three dimensional planetary models and albedo maps is becoming increasingly more important as NASA plans more robotics missions to the Moon in the coming years. This paper describes a novel approach for separation of topography and albedo maps from orbital Lunar images. Our method uses an optimal Bayesian correlator to refine the stereo disparity map and generate a set of accurate digital elevation models (DEM). The albedo maps are obtained using a multi-image formation model that relies on the derived DEMs and the Lunar- Lambert reflectance model. The method is demonstrated on a set of high resolution scanned images from the Apollo era missions.

  3. Neutron dosimetry with TL albedo dosemeters at high energy accelerators.

    PubMed

    Haninger, T; Fehrenbacher, G

    2007-01-01

    The GSF-Personal Monitoring Service uses the TLD albedo dosemeter as standard neutron personal dosemeter. Due to its low sensitivity for fast neutrons however, it is generally not recommended for workplaces at high-energy accelerators. Test measurements with the albedo dosemeter were performed at the accelerator laboratories of GSI in Darmstadt and DESY in Hamburg to reconsider this hypothesis. It revealed that the albedo dosemeter can also be used as personal dosemeter at these workplaces, because at all measurement locations a significant part of neutrons with lower energies could be found, which were produced by scattering at walls or the ground. PMID:17766258

  4. Earth albedo neutrons from 10 to 100 MeV.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preszler, A. M.; Simnett, G. M.; White, R. S.

    1972-01-01

    We report the measurement of the energy and angular distributions of earth albedo neutrons from 10 to 100 MeV at 40 deg N geomagnetic latitude from a balloon at 120,000 ft, below 4.65 g/sq cm. The albedo-neutron omnidirectional energy distribution is flat to 50 MeV, then decreases with energy. The absolute neutron energy distribution is of the correct strength and shape for the albedo neutrons to be the source of the protons trapped in earth's inner radiation belt.

  5. 40 CFR 86.229-94 - Road load force, test weight, and inertia weight class determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... inertia weight class determination. 86.229-94 Section 86.229-94 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... § 86.229-94 Road load force, test weight, and inertia weight class determination. (a) Flywheels... vehicle weight (pounds) Equivalent test weight (pounds) Inertia weight class (pounds) Up-1,062 1,000...

  6. 40 CFR 86.229-94 - Road load force, test weight, and inertia weight class determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... inertia weight class determination. 86.229-94 Section 86.229-94 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... § 86.229-94 Road load force, test weight, and inertia weight class determination. (a) Flywheels... vehicle weight (pounds) Equivalent test weight (pounds) Inertia weight class (pounds) Up-1,062 1,000...

  7. Thermal stability of water ice in Ceres' crater Oxo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Formisano, Michelangelo; Federico, Costanzo; De Sanctis, Maria Cristina; Frigeri, Alessandro; Magni, Gianfranco; Tosi, Federico

    2016-10-01

    Dwarf planet Ceres, target of the NASA Dawn mission, exhibits evidences of ammoniated phyllosilicates on its surface [1], compatible with a likely outer Solar System origin. Considerable amounts of water ice have recently been detected in some craters by the Visible InfraRed mapping spectrometer (VIR) onboard Dawn in some small fresh crater, such as Oxo, located at about 40° N. The exposure mechanism of water ice is unknown: cryovolcanism, cometary type sublimation/recondensation [2]or impacts with other bodies are likely mechanisms. The evaluation of the time stability of the water ice is crucial to understand the plausible mechanism for its existence. For this purpose, we developed a 3D finite-elements model (FEM) by using the topography given by the shape model of Ceres derived on the basis of images acquired by the Framing Camera in the Survey mission phase. The illumination conditions are provided by the SPICE toolkit. We performed several simulations by analyzing the effect of thermal inertia and albedo on the temperature and rate of ice sublimation. The results of the simulations about the stability of water ice will be presented.[1] De Sanctis et al. NATURE, doi:10.1038/nature16172[2] Formisano et al. MNRAS, doi: 10.1093/mnras/stv2344

  8. The Albedo Distribution of Near Earth Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Edward L.

    2016-01-01

    The cryogenic WISE mission in 2010 was extremely sensitive to asteroids and not biased against detecting dark objects. Mainzer et al (2011, ApJ, 743, 156) fit the distribution of albedos of the 428 NEAs observed by WISE with a double Gaussian function with 5 parameters.This note describes a 3 parameter function that fits as well as the double Gaussian: a sum of two Rayleigh distributions. The Rayleigh distribution is zero for negative values, and follows f(x) = x exp[-x2/(2σ2)]/σ2 for positive x. The peak value is at x=σ, so the position and width are tied together. The three parameters are the fraction of the objects in the dark population, the position of the dark peak, and the position of the normal peak. 25.1% of the NEAs observed by WISE are in a very dark population peaking at pV = 0.03, while the other 74.9% of the NEAs seen by WISE are in a moderately dark population peaking at pV = 0.167.A consequence of this bimodal distribution is that the Congressional mandate to find 90% of all NEOs larger than 140 m diameter cannot be satisfied by surveying to H=22 mag, since a 140 m diameter asteroid at the very dark peak has H=23.7 mag, and more than 10% of NEAs are darker than pV = 0.03.

  9. The Albedo Distribution of Near Earth Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Edward L.; Mainzer, Amy; Masiero, Joseph; Grav, Tommy; Bauer, James

    2016-10-01

    The cryogenic Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) mission in 2010 was extremely sensitive to asteroids and not biased against detecting dark objects. The albedos of 428 near Earth asteroids (NEAs) observed by WISE during its fully cryogenic mission can be fit quite well by a three parameter function that is the sum of two Rayleigh distributions. The Rayleigh distribution is zero for negative values, and follows f(x) =x\\exp [-{x}2/(2{σ }2)]/{σ }2 for positive x. The peak value is at x = σ, so the position and width are tied together. The three parameters are the fraction of the objects in the dark population, the position of the dark peak, and the position of the brighter peak. We find that 25.3% of the NEAs observed by WISE are in a very dark population peaking at p V = 0.030, while the other 74.7% of the NEAs seen by WISE are in a moderately dark population peaking at p V = 0.168. A consequence of this bimodal distribution is that the congressional mandate to find 90% of all NEAs larger than 140 m diameter cannot be satisfied by surveying to H = 22 mag, since a 140 m diameter asteroid at the very dark peak has H = 23.7 mag, and more than 10% of NEAs are darker than p V = 0.03.

  10. Global color and albedo variations on Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcewen, Alfred S.

    1990-01-01

    Global multispectral mosaics of Triton have been produced from Voyager approach images; six spectral units are defined and mapped. The margin of the south polar cap (SPC) is scalloped and ranges in latitude from + 10 deg to -30 deg. A bright fringe is closely associated with the cap's margin; form it, diffuse bright rays extend north-northeast for hundreds of kilometers. Thus, the rays may consist of fringe materials that were redistributed by northward-going Coriolis-deflected winds. From 1977 to 1989, Triton's full-disk spectrum changed from markedly red and UV-dark to nearly neutral white and UV-bright. This spectral change can be explained by new deposition of nitrogen frost over both the northern hemisphere and parts of a formerly redder SPC. Frost deposition in the southern hemisphere during southern summer is possible over relatively high albedo areas of the cap (Stansberry et al., 1990), which helps to explain the apparent stability of the unexpectedly large SPC and the presence of the bright fringe.

  11. Use of a spherical albedo system for correcting the readings of albedo dosimeters in JINR phasotron neutron radiation fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokrov, Yu. V.; Morozova, S. V.

    2014-03-01

    Results of calibrating a spherical albedo system in the radiation fields of a Pu-Be radionuclide neutron source are presented. It is shown that it can be used for correcting the readings of the DVGN-01 albedo dosimeter. The results of measurements with the system in JINR phasotron neutron fields for the purpose of correcting the DVGN-01 readings in these fields are given. The values of the correction factors for DVGN-01 albedo dosimeters when used in personnel neutron dosimetry (PD) on the JINR phasotron are determined.

  12. A neutron Albedo system with time rejection for landmine and IED detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovaltchouk, V. D.; Andrews, H. R.; Clifford, E. T. H.; Faust, A. A.; Ing, H.; McFee, J. E.

    2011-10-01

    A neutron Albedo system has been developed for imaging of buried landmines and improvised explosive devices (IEDs). It involves irradiating the ground with fast neutrons and subsequently detecting the thermalized neutrons that return. A scintillating 6Li loaded ZnS(Ag) screen with a sensitive area of 40 cm×40 cm is used as a thermal neutron detector. Scintillation light is captured by orthogonal arrays of wavelength-shifting fibers placed on either side of the scintillator surface and then transferred to X and Y multi-pixel PMTs. A timing circuit, used with pulsed neutron sources, records the time when a neutron detection takes place relative to an external synchronization pulse from the pulsed source. Experimental tests of the Albedo system performance have been done in a sand box with a 252Cf neutron source (no time gating) and with pulsed D-D (2.6 MeV) neutrons from the Defense R&D Ottawa Van de Graaff accelerator (with time gating). Information contained in the time evolution of the thermal neutron field provided improved detection capability and image reconstruction. The detector design is described and experimental results are discussed.

  13. A preliminary global oceanic cloud climatology from satellite albedo observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, N. A.; Henderson-Sellers, A.

    1983-01-01

    A predictive relationship is developed between over-ocean cloud system albedo and the cloud amount present, using as a data base ERB satellite microwave readings at 0.5-0.7 micron and the USAF three-dimensional nephanalysis archive. The ERB data provided global coverage at a resolution of 2.5 x 2.5 deg during the 1974-78 period. Regression analyses were performed on the amounts and albedos for several years of data for one month in order to detect seasonal variations. A logarithmic relationship was found between the cloud system albedo and cloud amount over the oceans, with negligible seasonal variance. The analysis is noted to apply only where low surface albedos are encountered, and further work to extend the study to continental vegetated areas is indicated.

  14. The Changing Albedo of the Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Human, J. M.; Box, J. E.

    2009-12-01

    The study evaluates Greenland ice sheet surface albedo sensitivity to surface melt intensity, air pollution, and precipitation using data from the MODIS and MOPITT sensors operating on the NASA Terra satellite 2000-2009. Precipitation rates are simulated by the Polar WRF climate model running in data assimilation mode. Statistical regression facilitates ranking the relative importance of each of the albedo forcings in space and time. Further, quantitative estimates of the albedo sensitivity to its forcing factors are made, for the first time and over the observed inter-annual range. The work investigates regional patterns in detail to quantify melt water production associated with absorbed solar radiation variability. In-situ records are used to evaluate the cloud radiative effect as another important factor of absorbed solar radiation and ice melt. Insight into Greenland ice sheet melt-precipitation-pollution-albedo feedback is gained, key in better understanding the mass balance response of the ice sheet to future climate change.

  15. Cloud condensation nucleus-sulfate mass relationship and cloud albedo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hegg, Dean A.

    1994-01-01

    Analysis of previously published, simultaneous measurements of cloud condensation nucleus number concentration and sulfate mass concentration suggest a nonlinear relationship between the two variables. This nonlinearity reduces the sensitivity of cloud albedo to changes in the sulfur cycle.

  16. Albedo neutron dosimetry in Germany: regulations and performance.

    PubMed

    Luszik-Bhadra, M; Zimbal, A; Busch, F; Eichelberger, A; Engelhardt, J; Figel, M; Frasch, G; Günther, K; Jordan, M; Martini, E; Haninger, T; Rimpler, A; Seifert, R

    2014-12-01

    Personal neutron dosimetry has been performed in Germany using albedo dosemeters for >20 y. This paper describes the main principles, the national standards, regulations and recommendations, the quality management and the overall performance, giving some examples. PMID:24639589

  17. Albedo Pattern Recognition and Time-Series Analyses in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salleh, S. A.; Abd Latif, Z.; Mohd, W. M. N. Wan; Chan, A.

    2012-07-01

    Pattern recognition and time-series analyses will enable one to evaluate and generate predictions of specific phenomena. The albedo pattern and time-series analyses are very much useful especially in relation to climate condition monitoring. This study is conducted to seek for Malaysia albedo pattern changes. The pattern recognition and changes will be useful for variety of environmental and climate monitoring researches such as carbon budgeting and aerosol mapping. The 10 years (2000-2009) MODIS satellite images were used for the analyses and interpretation. These images were being processed using ERDAS Imagine remote sensing software, ArcGIS 9.3, the 6S code for atmospherical calibration and several MODIS tools (MRT, HDF2GIS, Albedo tools). There are several methods for time-series analyses were explored, this paper demonstrates trends and seasonal time-series analyses using converted HDF format MODIS MCD43A3 albedo land product. The results revealed significance changes of albedo percentages over the past 10 years and the pattern with regards to Malaysia's nebulosity index (NI) and aerosol optical depth (AOD). There is noticeable trend can be identified with regards to its maximum and minimum value of the albedo. The rise and fall of the line graph show a similar trend with regards to its daily observation. The different can be identified in term of the value or percentage of rises and falls of albedo. Thus, it can be concludes that the temporal behavior of land surface albedo in Malaysia have a uniform behaviours and effects with regards to the local monsoons. However, although the average albedo shows linear trend with nebulosity index, the pattern changes of albedo with respects to the nebulosity index indicates that there are external factors that implicates the albedo values, as the sky conditions and its diffusion plotted does not have uniform trend over the years, especially when the trend of 5 years interval is examined, 2000 shows high negative linear

  18. On the definition of albedo and application to irregular particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanner, M. S.; Giese, R. H.; Weiss, K.; Zerull, R.

    1981-01-01

    The various definitions of albedo used in planetary astronomy are reviewed. In particular, the Bond albedo, which refers only to the reflected and refracted components, is not applicable to small particles or highly irregular particles, where diffraction is not restricted to a well-defined lobe at small scattering angles. Measured scattering functions for irregular particles are presented in a normalized form and are applied to the case of zodiacal light.

  19. NEOWISE Diameters and Albedos V1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mainzer, A. K.; Bauer, J. M.; Cutri, R. M.; Grav, T.; Kramer, E. A.; Masiero, J. R.; Nugent, C. R.; Sonnett, S. M.; Stevenson, R. A.; Wright, E. L.

    2016-06-01

    This PDS data set represents a compilation of published diameters, optical albedos, near-infrared albedos, and beaming parameters for minor planets detected by NEOWISE during the fully cryogenic, 3-band cryo, post-cryo and NEOWISE-Reactivation Year 1 operations. It contains data covering near-Earth asteroids, Main Belt asteroids, active Main Belt objects, Hildas, Jupiter Trojans, Centaurs, and Jovian and Saturnian irregular satellites. Methodology for physical property determination is described in the referenced articles.

  20. Measurements of Black Carbon Induced Snow-Albedo Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadley, O. L.; Kirchstetter, T. W.

    2011-12-01

    Several modeling studies have indicated that black carbon (BC) reduces the albedo of snow and ice and appreciably contributes to Northern Hemisphere warming and glacier retreat. Observations of the BC impact on snow albedo are needed to verify model predictions. Whereas field studies dating back to the early 1980s measured BC concentrations in snow and ice in the arctic, the BC effect on snow albedo and melting has been difficult to observe directly because the albedo reduction is small and often masked by other natural variables. This study evaluates both the initial impact of BC on snow albedo, as well as associated feedbacks due to snow age and BC scavenging during snow melting. The first feedback is related to the increasing grain size of snow as it ages. Larger snow grains allow sunlight to penetrate farther, where it is exposed to and may be increasingly absorbed by BC. This enhances the albedo reduction attributable to the mass of BC present in the snow and deposits energy at greater depths in the snowpack, potentially increasing the melt rate and therefore the growth rate of the snow grains. The second potential feedback, associated with BC transport through a melting snowpack, occurs if BC is scavenged from the melt water by the ice grains thus increasing the BC concentration in the remaining snow. Measurement of pristine and sooty snow made in the laboratory verifies that BC reduces snow albedo to a greater extent for larger-grained snow. Experimental observations yield an empirical model of the BC snow albedo reduction. Measurements of BC transport in both laboratory and natural snow were used to develop a model of the evolution of the vertical distribution of BC in melting snow. These measurements provide the first quantification of a BC concentration enhancement in melting snow.

  1. IAU nomenclature for albedo features on the planet Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dollfus, A.; Chapman, C. R.; Davies, M. E.; Gingerich, O.; Goldstein, R.; Guest, J.; Morrison, D.; Smith, B. A.

    1978-01-01

    The International Astronomical Union has endorsed a nomenclature for the albedo features on Mercury. Designations are based upon the mythological names related to the god Hermes; they are expressed in Latin form. The dark-hued albedo features are associated with the generic term Solitudo. The light-hued areas are designated by a single name without generic term. The 32 names adopted are allocated on the Mercury map.

  2. Albedo as a modulator of climate response to tropical deforestation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dirmeyer, Paul A.; Shukla, J.

    1994-01-01

    An atmospheric general circulation model with land surface properties represented by the simplified Simple Biosphere model is used to investigate the effects on local climate due to tropical deforestation for the Amazon basin. One control and three anomaly integrations of 4 years' duration are performed. In the anomaly integrations, rain forest in South America is replaced by degraded grassland. The anomaly integrations differ only in the optical properties of the grassland vegetation, with net surface albedos ranging from the same as to 0.09 lighter than that of rain forest. It is found that the change in climate, particularly rainfall, is strongly dependent on the change in surface albedo that accompanies deforestation. Replacement of forest by grass causes a reduction in transpiration and reduces frictional convergence by decreasing surface roughness. However, precipitation averaged over the deforested area is not necessarily reduced. Average precipitation decreases when the increase in albedo is greater than 0.03. If surface albedo is not increased appreciably as a result of deforestation, moisture flux convergence driven by the increase in surface temperature can offset the other effects, and average precipitation increases. As albedo is increased, surface temperature does not change, but surface latent and sensible heat flux decreases due to reduced radiational energy absorbed at the surface, resulting in a reduction in convection and precipitation. A change in the distribution of precipitation due to deforestation that appears to be independent of the albedo is observed.

  3. Albedo as a modulator of climate response to tropical deforestation

    SciTech Connect

    Dirmeyer, P.A.; Shukla, J.

    1994-10-01

    An atmospheric general circulation model with land surface properties represented by the simplified Simple Biosphere model is used to investigate the effects on local climate due to tropical deforestation for the Amazon basin. One control and three anomaly integrations of 4 years` duration are performed. In the anomaly integrations, rain forest in South America is replaced by degraded grassland. The anomaly integrations differ only in the optical properties of the grassland vegetation, with net surface albedos ranging from the same as to 0.09 lighter than that of rain forest. It is found that the change in climate, particularly rainfall, is strongly dependent on the change in surface albedo that accompanies deforestation. Replacement of forest by grass causes a reduction in transpiration and reduces frictional convergence by decreasing surface roughness. However, precipitation averaged over the deforested area is not necessarily reduced. Average precipitation decreases when the increase in albedo is greater than 0.03. If surface albedo is not increased appreciably as a result of deforestation, moisture flux convergence driven by the increase in surface temperature can offset the other effects, and average precipitation increases. As albedo is increased, surface temperature does not change, but surface latent and sensible heat flux decreases due to reduced radiational energy absorbed at the surface, resulting in a reduction in convection and precipitation. A change in the distribution of precipitation due to deforestation that appears to be independent of the albedo is observed.

  4. Postfire influences of snag attrition on albedo and radiative forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Halloran, Thomas L.; Acker, Steven A.; Joerger, Verena M.; Kertis, Jane; Law, Beverly E.

    2014-12-01

    This paper examines albedo perturbation and radiative forcing after a high-severity fire in a mature forest in the Oregon Cascade Range. Correlations between postfire albedo and seedling, sapling, and snag (standing dead tree) density were investigated across fire severity classes and seasons for years 4-15 after fire. Albedo perturbation was 14 times larger in winter compared to summer and increased with fire severity class for the first several years. Albedo perturbation increased linearly with time over the study period. Correlations between albedo perturbations and the vegetation densities were strongest with snags, and significant in all fire classes in both summer and winter (R < -0.92, p < 0.01). The resulting annual radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere became more negative linearly at a rate of -0.86 W m-2 yr-1, reaching -15 W m-2 in year 15 after fire. This suggests that snags can be the dominant controller of postfire albedo on decadal time scales.

  5. Effects of electron inertia in collisionless magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Andrés, Nahuel Gómez, Daniel; Martin, Luis; Dmitruk, Pablo

    2014-07-15

    We present a study of collisionless magnetic reconnection within the framework of full two-fluid MHD for a completely ionized hydrogen plasma, retaining the effects of the Hall current, electron pressure and electron inertia. We performed 2.5D simulations using a pseudo-spectral code with no dissipative effects. We check that the ideal invariants of the problem are conserved down to round-off errors. Our numerical results confirm that the change in the topology of the magnetic field lines is exclusively due to the presence of electron inertia. The computed reconnection rates remain a fair fraction of the Alfvén velocity, which therefore qualifies as fast reconnection.

  6. Inertia and Compressibility Effects in the Boussinesq Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirgaonkar, Anup; Lele, Sanjiva

    2006-11-01

    The Boussinesq approximation is typically applied to flows where buoyancy is the dominant driving force. To extend its applicability to flows with substantial inertial perturbations, we examine the flow equations using perturbation analysis about the hydrostatic state. The physical effects corresponding to stratification, compressibility, small initial entropy perturbations, and inertia are characterized in terms of nondimensional parameters derived from the analysis. A simple and computationally efficient extension to the traditional Boussinesq approximation is proposed to include the interaction of buoyancy and inertia. The role of fluid compressibility in stratified low Mach number flows is highlighted and distinguished from the flow compressibility which is caused by motion. A nondimensional parameter is derived to demarcate compressible and nearly-incompressible hydrostatic states. The significance of the extended Boussinesq approximation is illustrated with numerical solutions to model problems. Application to the problem of aircraft vortex wake-exhaust jet interaction is discussed.

  7. Duration dependence in migration behaviour: cumulative inertia versus stochastic change.

    PubMed

    Gordon, I R; Molho, I

    1995-12-01

    "In this paper a new theoretical framework and supporting empirical evidence on the relationship between movement probabilities and length of stay are presented. Individuals' evaluations of the relative value of alternative locations are assumed to evolve stochastically, with a possible tendency either to cumulative inertia or to cumulative stress. In general this yields a nonmonotonic duration function, with probabilities of movement starting at zero, rising and then falling--a pattern consistent with either cumulative tendency, or neither. A version of the model fitted to data on household movement intentions, from the U.K. General Household Survey, confirms the hypothesised form of this function and indicates a dominance of cumulative stress over cumulative inertia."

  8. Bistability of patterns of synchrony in Kuramoto oscillators with inertia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belykh, Igor V.; Brister, Barrett N.; Belykh, Vladimir N.

    2016-09-01

    We study the co-existence of stable patterns of synchrony in two coupled populations of identical Kuramoto oscillators with inertia. The two populations have different sizes and can split into two clusters where the oscillators synchronize within a cluster while there is a phase shift between the dynamics of the two clusters. Due to the presence of inertia, which increases the dimensionality of the oscillator dynamics, this phase shift can oscillate, inducing a breathing cluster pattern. We derive analytical conditions for the co-existence of stable two-cluster patterns with constant and oscillating phase shifts. We demonstrate that the dynamics, that governs the bistability of the phase shifts, is described by a driven pendulum equation. We also discuss the implications of our stability results to the stability of chimeras.

  9. Dynamic moments of inertia in Xe, Cs and Ba nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    El-Samman, H.; Barci, V.; Gizon, A.; Gizon, J.; Hildingsson, L.; Jerrestam, D.; Klamra, W.; Kossakowski, R.; Lindblad, T.; Gono, Y.; Bengtsson, T.; Leander, G.A.

    1984-01-01

    The ..gamma..-rays following the reactions induced by /sup 12/C ions on /sup 115/In, /sup 112/,/sup 117/,/sup 122/Sn and /sup 123/Sb targets have been investigated using six NaI(Tl) detectors in a two-dimensional arrangement. The collective moment of inertia I(/sup 2/) /sub band/ of /sup 118/,/sup 122/Xe, /sup 123/Cs and /sup 128/,/sup 130/Ba have been extracted from the energy-correlation spectra. The behaviour of these nuclei and the observed differences are interpreted in terms of high-spin collective properties. Data are also presented on the effective moment of inertia I(/sup 2/)/sub eff/ of /sup 118/Xe and /sup 130/Ba measured by sum-spectrometer techniques. 13 references.

  10. Effect of electron inertia in two-fluid magnetic reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Daniel; Dmitruk, Pablo; Andrés, Nahuel

    2016-07-01

    In space plasmas, magnetic reconnection is an important energy conversion process. Within the traditional one-fluid resistive MHD description, the Sweet-Parker model leads to extremely low reconnection rates for virtually all space physics applications. Within the theoretical framework of two-fluid MHD, we retain the effects of the Hall current and electron inertia and neglect dissipative effects such as viscosity and electric resistivity. This description brings two new spatial scales into play, such as the ion and electron inertial lengths. In absence of resistive dissipation, reconnection can only be attained by the action of electron inertia. We performed two-fluid simulations using a pseudo-spectral code which yields exact conservation (to round-off errors) of the ideal invariants. Our simulations show that when the effects of electron inertia are retained, magnetic reconnection takes place. Moreover, in a stationary regime the reconnection rate is simply proportional to the ion inertial length, as also emerges from a scaling law derived from dimensional arguments.

  11. Testing and Validation of the Dynamic Inertia Measurement Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Alexander W.; Herrera, Claudia Y.; Spivey, Natalie D.; Fladung, William A.; Cloutier, David

    2015-01-01

    The Dynamic Inertia Measurement (DIM) method uses a ground vibration test setup to determine the mass properties of an object using information from frequency response functions. Most conventional mass properties testing involves using spin tables or pendulum-based swing tests, which for large aerospace vehicles becomes increasingly difficult and time-consuming, and therefore expensive, to perform. The DIM method has been validated on small test articles but has not been successfully proven on large aerospace vehicles. In response, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Armstrong Flight Research Center (Edwards, California) conducted mass properties testing on an "iron bird" test article that is comparable in mass and scale to a fighter-type aircraft. The simple two-I-beam design of the "iron bird" was selected to ensure accurate analytical mass properties. Traditional swing testing was also performed to compare the level of effort, amount of resources, and quality of data with the DIM method. The DIM test showed favorable results for the center of gravity and moments of inertia; however, the products of inertia showed disagreement with analytical predictions.

  12. High-albedo materials for reducing building cooling energy use

    SciTech Connect

    Taha, H.; Sailor, D.; Akbari, H.

    1992-01-01

    One simple and effective way to mitigate urban heat islands, i.e., the higher temperatures in cities compared to those of the surrounds, and their negative impacts on cooling energy consumption is to use high-albedo materials on major urban surfaces such as rooftops, streets, sidewalks, school yards, and the exposed surfaces of parking lots. High-albedo materials can save cooling energy use by directly reducing the heat gain through a building`s envelope (direct effect) and also by lowering the urban air temperature in the neighborhood of the building (indirect effect). This project is an attempt to address high-albedo materials for buildings and to perform measurements of roof coatings. We search for existing methods and materials to implement fighter colors on major building and urban surfaces. Their cost effectiveness are examined and the possible related technical, maintenance, and environmental problems are identified. We develop a method for measuring albedo in the field by studying the instrumentation aspects of such measurements. The surface temperature impacts of various albedo/materials in the actual outdoor environment are studied by measuring the surface temperatures of a variety of materials tested on an actual roof. We also generate an albedo database for several urban surfaces to serve as a reference for future use. The results indicate that high-albedo materials can have a large impact on the surface temperature regime. On clear sunny days, when the solar noon surface temperatures of conventional roofing materials were about 40{degrees}C (72{degrees}F) warmer than air, the surface temperature of high-albedo coatings were only about 5{degrees}C warmer than air. In the morning and in the late afternoon, the high-albedo materials were as cool as the air itself. While conventional roofing materials warm up by an average 0.055{degrees}C/(W m{sup {minus}2}), the high-albedo surfaces warm up by an average 0.015{degrees}C/(W m{sup {minus}2}).

  13. High-albedo materials for reducing building cooling energy use

    SciTech Connect

    Taha, H.; Sailor, D.; Akbari, H.

    1992-01-01

    One simple and effective way to mitigate urban heat islands, i.e., the higher temperatures in cities compared to those of the surrounds, and their negative impacts on cooling energy consumption is to use high-albedo materials on major urban surfaces such as rooftops, streets, sidewalks, school yards, and the exposed surfaces of parking lots. High-albedo materials can save cooling energy use by directly reducing the heat gain through a building's envelope (direct effect) and also by lowering the urban air temperature in the neighborhood of the building (indirect effect). This project is an attempt to address high-albedo materials for buildings and to perform measurements of roof coatings. We search for existing methods and materials to implement fighter colors on major building and urban surfaces. Their cost effectiveness are examined and the possible related technical, maintenance, and environmental problems are identified. We develop a method for measuring albedo in the field by studying the instrumentation aspects of such measurements. The surface temperature impacts of various albedo/materials in the actual outdoor environment are studied by measuring the surface temperatures of a variety of materials tested on an actual roof. We also generate an albedo database for several urban surfaces to serve as a reference for future use. The results indicate that high-albedo materials can have a large impact on the surface temperature regime. On clear sunny days, when the solar noon surface temperatures of conventional roofing materials were about 40{degrees}C (72{degrees}F) warmer than air, the surface temperature of high-albedo coatings were only about 5{degrees}C warmer than air. In the morning and in the late afternoon, the high-albedo materials were as cool as the air itself. While conventional roofing materials warm up by an average 0.055{degrees}C/(W m{sup {minus}2}), the high-albedo surfaces warm up by an average 0.015{degrees}C/(W m{sup {minus}2}).

  14. Standards for the validation of remotely sensed albedo products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Jennifer

    2015-04-01

    Land surface albedo is important component of the Earth's energy balance, defined as the fraction of shortwave radiation absorbed by a surface, and is one many Essential Climate Variables (ECVS) that can be retrieved from space through remote sensing. To quantify the accuracy of these products, they must be validated with respect to in-situ measurements of albedo using an albedometer. Whilst accepted standards exist for the calibration of albedometers, standards for the use of in-situ measurement schemes, and their use in validation procedures have yet to be developed. It is essential that we can assess the quality of remotely sensed albedo data, and to identify traceable sources of uncertainty during process of providing these data. As a result of the current lack of accepted standards for in-situ albedo retrieval and validation procedures, we are not yet able to identify and quantify traceable sources of uncertainty. Establishing standard protocols for in-situ retrievals for the validation of global albedo products would allow inter-product use and comparison, in addition to product standardization. Accordingly, this study aims to assess the quality of in-situ albedo retrieval schemes and identify sources of uncertainty, specifically in vegetation environments. A 3D Monte Carlo Ray Tracing Model will be used to simulate albedometer instruments in complex 3D vegetation canopies. To determine sources of uncertainty, factors that influence albedo measurement uncertainty were identified and will subsequently be examined: 1. Time of day (Solar Zenith Angle) 2. Ecosytem type 3. Placement of albedometer within the ecosystem 4. Height of albedometer above the canopy 5. Clustering within the ecosystem A variety of 3D vegetation canopies have been generated to cover the main ecosystems found globally, different seasons, and different plant distributions. Canopies generated include birchstand and pinestand forests for summer and winter, savanna, shrubland, cropland and

  15. The Annual Cycle of Water Vapor on Mars as Observed by the Thermal Emission Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Michael D.; Vondrak, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Spectra taken by the Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) have been used to monitor the latitude, longitude, and seasonal dependence of water vapor for over one full Martian year (March 1999-March 2001). A maximum in water vapor abundance is observed at high latitudes during mid-summer in both hemispheres, reaching a maximum value of approximately 100 pr-micrometer in the north and approximately 50 pr-micrometer in the south. Low water vapor abundance (<5 pr-micrometer) is observed at middle and high latitudes in the fall and winter of both hemispheres. There are large differences in the hemispheric (north versus south) and seasonal (perihelion versus aphelion) behavior of water vapor. The latitudinal and seasonal dependence of the decay of the northern summer water vapor maximum implies cross-equatorial transport of water to the southern hemisphere, while there is little or no corresponding transport during the decay of the southern hemisphere summer maximum. The latitude-longitude dependence of annually-averaged water vapor (corrected for topography) has a significant positive correlation with albedo and significant negative correlations with thermal inertia and surface pressure. Comparison of TES results with those retrieved from the Viking Orbiter Mars Atmospheric Water Detectors (MAWD) experiments shows some similar features, but also many significant differences. The southern hemisphere maximum observed by TES was not observed by MAWD and the large latitudinal gradient in annually-averaged water vapor observed by MAWD does not appear in the TES results.

  16. Preferential cooling of hot extremes from cropland albedo management

    PubMed Central

    Davin, Edouard L.; Seneviratne, Sonia I.; Ciais, Philippe; Olioso, Albert; Wang, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Changes in agricultural practices are considered a possible option to mitigate climate change. In particular, reducing or suppressing tillage (no-till) may have the potential to sequester carbon in soils, which could help slow global warming. On the other hand, such practices also have a direct effect on regional climate by altering the physical properties of the land surface. These biogeophysical effects, however, are still poorly known. Here we show that no-till management increases the surface albedo of croplands in summer and that the resulting cooling effect is amplified during hot extremes, thus attenuating peak temperatures reached during heat waves. Using a regional climate model accounting for the observed effects of no-till farming on surface albedo, as well as possible reductions in soil evaporation, we investigate the potential consequences of a full conversion to no-till agriculture in Europe. We find that the summer cooling from cropland albedo increase is strongly amplified during hot summer days, when surface albedo has more impact on the Earth’s radiative balance due to clear-sky conditions. The reduced evaporation associated with the crop residue cover tends to counteract the albedo-induced cooling, but during hot days the albedo effect is the dominating factor. For heatwave summer days the local cooling effect gained from no-till practice is of the order of 2 °C. The identified asymmetric impact of surface albedo change on summer temperature opens new avenues for climate-engineering measures targeting high-impact events rather than mean climate properties. PMID:24958872

  17. Preferential cooling of hot extremes from cropland albedo management.

    PubMed

    Davin, Edouard L; Seneviratne, Sonia I; Ciais, Philippe; Olioso, Albert; Wang, Tao

    2014-07-01

    Changes in agricultural practices are considered a possible option to mitigate climate change. In particular, reducing or suppressing tillage (no-till) may have the potential to sequester carbon in soils, which could help slow global warming. On the other hand, such practices also have a direct effect on regional climate by altering the physical properties of the land surface. These biogeophysical effects, however, are still poorly known. Here we show that no-till management increases the surface albedo of croplands in summer and that the resulting cooling effect is amplified during hot extremes, thus attenuating peak temperatures reached during heat waves. Using a regional climate model accounting for the observed effects of no-till farming on surface albedo, as well as possible reductions in soil evaporation, we investigate the potential consequences of a full conversion to no-till agriculture in Europe. We find that the summer cooling from cropland albedo increase is strongly amplified during hot summer days, when surface albedo has more impact on the Earth's radiative balance due to clear-sky conditions. The reduced evaporation associated with the crop residue cover tends to counteract the albedo-induced cooling, but during hot days the albedo effect is the dominating factor. For heatwave summer days the local cooling effect gained from no-till practice is of the order of 2 °C. The identified asymmetric impact of surface albedo change on summer temperature opens new avenues for climate-engineering measures targeting high-impact events rather than mean climate properties. PMID:24958872

  18. Global Cooling: Effect of Urban Albedo on Global Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Akbari, Hashem; Menon, Surabi; Rosenfeld, Arthur

    2007-05-22

    In many urban areas, pavements and roofs constitute over 60% of urban surfaces (roof 20-25%, pavements about 40%). The roof and the pavement albedo can be increased by about 0.25 and 0.10, respectively, resulting in a net albedo increase for urban areas of about 0.1. Many studies have demonstrated building cooling-energy savings in excess of 20% upon raising roof reflectivity from an existing 10-20% to about 60%. We estimate U.S. potential savings in excess of $1 billion (B) per year in net annual energy bills. Increasing albedo of urban surfaces can reduce the summertime urban temperature and improve the urban air quality. Increasing the urban albedo has the added benefit of reflecting more of the incoming global solar radiation and countering the effect of global warming. We estimate that increasing albedo of urban areas by 0.1 results in an increase of 3 x 10{sup -4} in Earth albedo. Using a simple global model, the change in air temperature in lowest 1.8 km of the atmosphere is estimated at 0.01K. Modelers predict a warming of about 3K in the next 60 years (0.05K/year). Change of 0.1 in urban albedo will result in 0.01K global cooling, a delay of {approx}0.2 years in global warming. This 0.2 years delay in global warming is equivalent to 10 Gt reduction in CO2 emissions.

  19. A Continental United States High Resolution NLCD Land Cover – MODIS Albedo Database to Examine Albedo and Land Cover Change Relationships

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surface albedo influences climate by affecting the amount of solar radiation that is reflected at the Earth’s surface, and surface albedo is, in turn, affected by land cover. General Circulation Models typically use modeled or prescribed albedo to assess the influence of land co...

  20. The nature of albedo features on Mercury, with maps for the telescopic observer. Part II: The nature of the albedo markings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, D. L.

    1995-04-01

    Part One of this paper (J. Brit. Astron. Assoc., 105(1), 1995) reviewed the classical telescopic observations of albedo markings on Mercury and reproduced the definitive albedo map to assist visual observers of the planet. In Part Two, an investigation into the relationship between albedo and physiography is conducted, and the significance of the historical observations is discussed.

  1. Analyzing of the Die Away Curve of the Msl Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons (dan) Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varenikov, A.; Jun, I.; Litvak, M. L.

    2012-12-01

    The Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons (DAN) is flown on board Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) to provide measurements of the dynamic albedo of thermal and epithermal neutrons induced by a pulse 14 MeV neutron generator. The DAN instrument consists of pulse neutron generator (DAN/PNG) electrically and logically combined with neutron detection system (DAN/DE). The major science objective of DAN instrument is to detect and provide quantitative estimates of the hydrogen content in the sub-surface layer of Mars. The amplitude and shape of the die-away time profile strongly depends on the content, depth and geometry distribution of water ice/bound layer. Die-away curves of thermal neutrons are simulated using a Monte Carlo transport code (MCNPX) for a homogeneous model of regolith with different contents of water. Tw different cases were considered in the initial simulations: single layered model and double layered model. In the first case, the sub-surface is modelled as a homogeneous single layer with different water contents. The preliminary results show that DAN could measure the water content as low as 0.1-0.2 weight %. The second case includes the sub-surface described by two layers. It is used to evaluate the DAN sensitivity to detect water depth (where the bottom layer is richer in water content than the upper layer).

  2. Understanding the Factors That Control Snow Albedo Over Central Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, P.; Bergin, M. H.; Dibb, J. E.; Domine, F.; Carmagnola, C.; Courville, Z.; Sokolik, I. N.; Lefer, B. L.

    2011-12-01

    Snow albedo plays a critical role in the energy balance of the Greenland Ice Sheet. In particular, the snow albedo influences the extent to which absorbing aerosols over Greenland (i.e. dust and black carbon) force climate. With this in mind the spectral snow albedo, physical snow properties, and snow chemistry were measured during May, June, and July 2011 at Summit, Greenland to investigate the variability in snow spectral albedo and its impact on aerosol direct radiative forcing. Optical and chemical properties of aerosol and aerosol optical depth were also measured as part of this study. Strellis et. al. will present a preliminary assessment of aerosol radiative forcing at Summit in summer 2011, in a separate presentation at this meeting. Spectral albedo was measured from 350-2500 nm with an ASD FieldSpec Pro spectroradiometer daily at four permanent sites and a moving fifth site where snow was sampled for characterization, as well as in more intensive diurnal and spatial surveys. Snow specific surface area (SSA), the ratio of snow crystal surface area to mass, was measured with a Dual Frequency Integrating Sphere (DUFISSS) at 1310 nm and 1550 nm, as well as with dyed and cast samples collected for stereology analysis. Snow stratigraphy, crystal size, and density were also measured on a daily basis, and snow samples will be analyzed for microstructural parameters determined from micro-CT imaging. Snow chemistry measurements include specific elements, major ions, and elemental and organic carbon. The time series of daily albedo measurements ranged from 0.88 to nearly 1.0 in visible wavelengths and from 0.42 to 0.65 in the near infrared. Changes as large as 0.1 were observed between consecutive daily measurements across the spectrum. Preliminary results show a strong correlation between variation in albedo and co-located measurements of snow specific surface area, specifically in the near infrared. By conducting our measurements near solar noon every day, and

  3. Potential effects of forest management on surface albedo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, J.; Bréon, F.-M.; Schelhaas, M.-J.; Pinty, B.; Luyssaert, S.

    2012-04-01

    Currently 70% of the world's forests are managed and this figure is likely to rise due to population growth and increasing demand for wood based products. Forest management has been put forward by the Kyoto-Protocol as one of the key instruments in mitigating climate change. For temperate and boreal forests, the effects of forest management on the stand-level carbon balance are reasonably well understood, but the biophysical effects, for example through changes in the albedo, remain elusive. Following a modeling approach, we aim to quantify the variability in albedo that can be attributed to forest management through changes in canopy structure and density. The modelling approach chains three separate models: (1) a forest gap model to describe stand dynamics, (2) a Monte-Carlo model to estimate the probability density function of the optical path length of photons through the canopy and (3) a physically-based canopy transfer model to estimate the interaction between photons and leaves. The forest gap model provides, on a monthly time step the position, height, diameter, crown size and leaf area index of individual trees. The Monte-Carlo model computes from this the probability density function of the distance a photon travels through crown volumes to determine the direct light reaching the forest floor. This information is needed by the canopy transfer model to calculate the effective leaf area index - a quantity that allows it to correctly represent a 3D process with a 1D model. Outgoing radiation is calculated as the result of multiple processes involving the scattering due to the canopy layer and the forest floor. Finally, surface albedo is computed as the ratio between incident solar radiation and calculated outgoing radiation. The study used two time series representing thinning from below of a beech and a Scots pine forest. The results show a strong temporal evolution in albedo during stand establishment followed by a relatively stable albedo once the canopy

  4. The Role of Inertia in Modeling Decisions from Experience with Instance-Based Learning

    PubMed Central

    Dutt, Varun; Gonzalez, Cleotilde

    2012-01-01

    One form of inertia is the tendency to repeat the last decision irrespective of the obtained outcomes while making decisions from experience (DFE). A number of computational models based upon the Instance-Based Learning Theory, a theory of DFE, have included different inertia implementations and have shown to simultaneously account for both risk-taking and alternations between alternatives. The role that inertia plays in these models, however, is unclear as the same model without inertia is also able to account for observed risk-taking quite well. This paper demonstrates the predictive benefits of incorporating one particular implementation of inertia in an existing IBL model. We use two large datasets, estimation and competition, from the Technion Prediction Tournament involving a repeated binary-choice task to show that incorporating an inertia mechanism in an IBL model enables it to account for the observed average risk-taking and alternations. Including inertia, however, does not help the model to account for the trends in risk-taking and alternations over trials compared to the IBL model without the inertia mechanism. We generalize the two IBL models, with and without inertia, to the competition set by using the parameters determined in the estimation set. The generalization process demonstrates both the advantages and disadvantages of including inertia in an IBL model. PMID:22685443

  5. Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer experiment: Investigation description and surface science results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christensen, P.R.; Bandfield, J.L.; Hamilton, V.E.; Ruff, S.W.; Kieffer, H.H.; Titus, T.N.; Malin, M.C.; Morris, R.V.; Lane, M.D.; Clark, R.L.; Jakosky, B.M.; Mellon, M.T.; Pearl, J.C.; Conrath, B.J.; Smith, M.D.; Clancy, R.T.; Kuzmin, R.O.; Roush, T.; Mehall, G.L.; Gorelick, N.; Bender, K.; Murray, K.; Dason, S.; Greene, E.; Silverman, S.; Greenfield, M.

    2001-01-01

    a detection limit of 7sim;10%; this lack of evidence for chemical weathering indicates a geologic history dominated by a cold, dry climate in which mechanical, rather than chemical, weathering was the significant form of erosion and sediment production. (5) There is no conclusive evidence for sulfate minerals at a detection limit of ???15%. The polar region has been studied with the following major conclusions: (1) Condensed CO2 has three distinct end-members, from fine-grained crystals to slab ice. (2) The growth and retreat of the polar caps observed by MGS is virtually the same as observed by Viking 12 Martian years ago. (3) Unique regions have been identified that appear to differ primarily in the grain size of CO2; one south polar region appears to remain as black slab CO2 ice throughout its sublimation. (4) Regional atmospheric dust is common in localized and regional dust storms around the margin and interior of the southern cap. Analysis of the thermophysical properties of the surface shows that (1) the spatial pattern of albedo has changed since Viking observations, (2) a unique cluster of surface materials with intermediate inertia and albedo occurs that is distinct from the previously identified low-inertia/bright and high-inertia/dark surfaces, and (3) localized patches of high-inertia material have been found in topographic lows and may have been formed by a unique set of aeolian, fluvial, or erosional processes or may be exposed bedrock. Copyright 2001 by the American Geophysical Union.

  6. Occurrence of lower cloud albedo in ship tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.-C.; Christensen, M. W.; Xue, L.; Sorooshian, A.; Stephens, G. L.; Rasmussen, R. M.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2012-05-01

    The concept of geoengineering by marine cloud brightening is based on seeding marine stratocumulus clouds with sub-micrometer sea-salt particles to enhance the cloud droplet number concentration and cloud albedo, thereby producing a climate cooling effect. The efficacy of this as a strategy for global cooling rests on the extent to which aerosol-perturbed marine clouds will respond with increased albedo. Ship tracks, cloud regions impacted by ship exhaust, are a well-known manifestation of the effect of aerosol injection on marine clouds. We present here an analysis of the albedo responses in ship tracks, based on in situ aircraft measurements and three years of satellite observations of 589 individual ship tracks. It is found that the sign (increase or decrease) and magnitude of the albedo response in ship tracks depends on the mesoscale cloud structure, the free tropospheric humidity, and cloud top height. In a closed cell structure (cloud cells ringed by a perimeter of clear air), nearly 30% of ship tracks exhibited a decreased albedo. Detailed cloud responses must be accounted for in global studies of the potential efficacy of sea-spray geoengineering as a means to counteract global warming.

  7. Occurrence of lower cloud albedo in ship tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.-C.; Christensen, M. W.; Xue, L.; Sorooshian, A.; Stephens, G. L.; Rasmussen, R. M.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2012-09-01

    The concept of geoengineering by marine cloud brightening is based on seeding marine stratocumulus clouds with sub-micrometer sea-salt particles to enhance the cloud droplet number concentration and cloud albedo, thereby producing a climate cooling effect. The efficacy of this as a strategy for global cooling rests on the extent to which aerosol-perturbed marine clouds will respond with increased albedo. Ship tracks, quasi-linear cloud features prevalent in oceanic regions impacted by ship exhaust, are a well-known manifestation of the effect of aerosol injection on marine clouds. We present here an analysis of the albedo responses in ship tracks, based on in situ aircraft measurements and three years of satellite observations of 589 individual ship tracks. It is found that the sign (increase or decrease) and magnitude of the albedo response in ship tracks depends on the mesoscale cloud structure, the free tropospheric humidity, and cloud top height. In a closed cell structure (cloud cells ringed by a perimeter of clear air), nearly 30% of ship tracks exhibited a decreased albedo. Detailed cloud responses must be accounted for in global studies of the potential efficacy of sea-spray geoengineering as a means to counteract global warming.

  8. Spectral surface albedo derived from GOME-2/Metop measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pflug, Bringfried; Loyola, Diego

    2009-09-01

    Spectral surface albedo is an important input for GOME-2 trace gas retrievals. An algorithm was developed for estimation of spectral surface albedo from top-of-atmosphere (TOA)-radiances measured by the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment GOME-2 flying on-board MetOp-A. The climatologically version of this algorithm estimates Minimum Lambert-Equivalent Reflectivity (MLER) for a fixed time window and can use data of many years in contrast to the Near-real time version. Accuracy of surface albedo estimated by MLER-computation increases with the amount of available data. Unfortunately, most of the large GOME pixels are partly covered by clouds, which enhance the LER-data. A plot of LER-values over cloud fraction is used within this presentation to account for this influence of clouds. This "cloud fraction plot" can be applied over all surface types. Surface albedo obtained using the "cloud fraction plot" is compared with reference surface albedo spectra and with the FRESCO climatology. There is a general good agreement; however there are also large differences for some pixels.

  9. Spitzer Space Telescope Albedo Survey of Small Jovian Trojans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, Yanga R.; Jewitt, D. C.; Grisetti, R.; Igyarto, C.

    2006-09-01

    We will present preliminary results from our Spitzer Space Telescope (SST) survey of small Jovian Trojan asteroids. For the first time, we have been able to make thermophysical measurements of objects at the faint end of the known Trojan magnitude distribution. Our scientific goal is to determine the mean albedo of these small Trojans. Our sample contains 35 objects with approximate absolute magnitudes (H) between 13 and 14 (diameter 10 to 15 km for 0.05 albedo). For this survey we obtained 24-micron (mid-IR) photometry with the MIPS instrument aboard SST, and visible-wavelength CCD photometry using the University of Hawaii 88-inch Telescope. This lets us constrain each Trojan's effective radius and geometric albedo. While the two datasets were not simultaneous, this is not detrimental to the achievement of our goal since we only need for the effect of the rotational context to average out. In an earlier survey, we found that the mean V-band geometric albedo for large Trojans (sample median diameter of 110 km) is 0.041±0.002 (Fernandez et al. 2003, AJ 126, 1563). If the small Trojans' mean albedo is significantly higher, this would be evidence for a significant volatile component in the Trojan population having survived since formation, and would have implications for the contribution of Trojan asteroids to the Jupiter-family comet population. This research was made possible through a SIRTF Fellowship to YRF and through a GO data analysis grant from SSC to YRF and DCJ.

  10. MORSE/STORM: A generalized albedo option for Monte Carlo calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Gomes, I.C.; Stevens, P.N. )

    1991-09-01

    The advisability of using the albedo procedure for the Monte Carlo solution of deep penetration shielding problems that have ducts and other penetrations has been investigated. The use of albedo data can dramatically improve the computational efficiency of certain Monte Carlo calculations. However, the accuracy of these results may be unacceptable because of lost information during the albedo event and serious errors in the available differential albedo data. This study was done to evaluate and appropriately modify the MORSE/BREESE package, to develop new methods for generating the required albedo data, and to extend the adjoint capability to the albedo-modified calculations. Major modifications to MORSE/BREESE include an option to save for further use information that would be lost at the albedo event, an option to displace the point of emergence during an albedo event, and an option to use spatially dependent albedo data for both forward and adjoint calculations, which includes the point of emergence as a new random variable to be selected during an albedo event. The theoretical basis for using TORT-generated forward albedo information to produce adjuncton albedos was derived. The MORSE/STORM package was developed to perform both forward and adjoint modes of analysis using spatially dependent albedo data. Results obtained with MORSE/STORM for both forward and adjoint modes were compared with benchmark solutions. Excellent agreement and improved computational efficiency were achieved, demonstrating the full utilization of the albedo option in the MORSE code. 7 refs., 17 figs., 15 tabs.

  11. Parallel algorithms and architectures for the manipulator inertia matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Amin-Javaheri, M.

    1989-01-01

    Several parallel algorithms and architectures to compute the manipulator inertia matrix in real time are proposed. An O(N) and an O(log{sub 2}N) parallel algorithm based upon recursive computation of the inertial parameters of sets of composite rigid bodies are formulated. One- and two-dimensional systolic architectures are presented to implement the O(N) parallel algorithm. A cube architecture is employed to implement the diagonal element of the inertia matrix in O(log{sub 2}N) time and the upper off-diagonal elements in O(N) time. The resulting K{sub 1}O(N) + K{sub 2}O(log{sub 2}N) parallel algorithm is more efficient for a cube network implementation. All the architectural configurations are based upon a VLSI Robotics Processor exploiting fine-grain parallelism. In evaluation all the architectural configurations, significant performance parameters such as I/O time and idle time due to processor synchronization as well as CPU utilization and on-chip memory size are fully included. The O(N) and O(log{sub 2}N) parallel algorithms adhere to the precedence relationships among the processors. In order to achieve a higher speedup factor; however, parallel algorithms in conjunction with Non-Strict Computational Models are devised to relax interprocess precedence, and as a result, to decrease the effective computational delays. The effectiveness of the Non-strict Computational Algorithms is verified by computer simulations, based on a PUMA 560 robot manipulator. It is demonstrated that a combination of parallel algorithms and architectures results in a very effective approach to achieve real-time response for computing the manipulator inertia matrix.

  12. Inertia effects in thin film flow with a corrugated boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serbetci, Ilter; Tichy, John A.

    1991-01-01

    An analytical solution is presented for two-dimensional, incompressible film flow between a sinusoidally grooved (or rough) surface and a flat-surface. The upper grooved surface is stationary whereas the lower, smooth surface moves with a constant speed. The Navier-Stokes equations were solved employing both mapping techniques and perturbation expansions. Due to the inclusion of the inertia effects, a different pressure distribution is obtained than predicted by the classical lubrication theory. In particular, the amplitude of the pressure distribution of the classical lubrication theory is found to be in error by over 100 perent (for modified Reynolds number of 3-4).

  13. An object oriented implementation of the Yeadon human inertia model

    PubMed Central

    Dembia, Christopher; Moore, Jason K.; Hubbard, Mont

    2015-01-01

    We present an open source software implementation of a popular mathematical method developed by M.R. Yeadon for calculating the body and segment inertia parameters of a human body. The software is written in a high level open source language and provides three interfaces for manipulating the data and the model: a Python API, a command-line user interface, and a graphical user interface. Thus the software can fit into various data processing pipelines and requires only simple geometrical measures as input. PMID:25717365

  14. On the Origin of Entropic Gravity and Inertia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae-Weon

    2012-09-01

    It was recently suggested that quantum field theory is not fundamental but emerges from the loss of phase space information about matter crossing causal horizons. Possible connections between this formalism and Verlinde's entropic gravity and Jacobson's thermodynamic gravity are proposed. The holographic screen in Verlinde's formalism can be identified as local Rindler horizons and its entropy as that of the bulk fields beyond the horizons. This naturally resolves some issues on entropic gravity. The quantum fluctuation of the fields is the origin of the thermodynamic nature of entropic gravity. It is also suggested that inertia is related to dragging Rindler horizons.

  15. Quadrupole Collective Inertia in Nuclear Fission: Cranking Approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Baran, A.; Sheikh, J. A.; Dobaczewski, J.; Nazarewicz, Witold

    2011-01-01

    Collective mass tensor derived from the cranking approximation to the adiabatic time-dependent Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (ATDHFB) approach is compared with that obtained in the Gaussian Overlap Approximation (GOA) to the generator coordinate method. Illustrative calculations are carried out for one-dimensional quadrupole fission pathways in ^{256}Fm. It is shown that the collective mass exhibits strong variations with the quadrupole collective coordinate. These variations are related to the changes in the intrinsic shell structure. The differences between collective inertia obtained in cranking and perturbative cranking approximations to ATDHFB, and within GOA, are discussed.

  16. A new parameterization of spectral and broadband ocean surface albedo.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhonghai; Qiao, Yanli; Wang, Yingjian; Fang, Yonghua; Yi, Weining

    2011-12-19

    A simple yet accurate parameterization of spectral and broadband ocean surface albedo has been developed. To facilitate the parameterization and its applications, the albedo is parameterized for the direct and diffuse incident radiation separately, and then each of them is further divided into two components: the contributions from surface and water, respectively. The four albedo components are independent of each other, hence, altering one will not affect the others. Such a designed parameterization scheme is flexible for any future update. Users can simply replace any of the adopted empirical formulations (e.g., the relationship between foam reflectance and wind speed) as desired without a need to change the parameterization scheme. The parameterization is validated by in situ measurements and can be easily implemented into a climate or radiative transfer model. PMID:22274228

  17. Moon: lunar albedo for soft x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibadov, Subhon

    2016-07-01

    Albedo of the Moon for soft X-rays (0.1-2 keV photons) is determined on the basis of the X-ray luminosity of the Moon detected and measured for the first time by orbital space telescope ROSAT in 1990. It is found that the lunar albedo for the solar soft X-rays is less than the lunar visual region albedo almost thousand times. The data allow to estimate more correctly X-ray luminosity of dusty comets like Hyakutake C/1996 B2 and Hale-Bopp C/1995 O1 due to scattering of solar soft X-rays and to reveal thus the dominant mechanism for production of X-rays in dusty comets.

  18. Cosmic Ray Albedo Proton Yield Correlated with Lunar Elemental Abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, J. K.; Spence, H. E.; Case, A. W.; Blake, J. B.; Golightly, M. J.; Kasper, J. C.; Looper, M. D.; Mazur, J. E.; Schwadron, N. A.; Townsend, L. W.; Zeitlin, C. J.

    2012-12-01

    High energy cosmic rays constantly bombard the lunar regolith, producing secondary "albedo" or "splash" particles like protons and neutrons, some of which escape back to space. Two lunar missions, Lunar Prospector and the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), have shown that the energy distribution of albedo neutrons is modulated by the elemental composition of the lunar regolith[1-4], with reduced neutron fluxes near the lunar poles being the result of collisions with hydrogen nuclei in ice deposits[5] in permanently shadowed craters. Here we investigate an analogous phenomenon with high energy (~100 MeV) lunar albedo protons. LRO has been observing the surface and environment of the Moon since June of 2009. The CRaTER instrument (Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation) on LRO is designed to characterize the lunar radiation environment and its effects on simulated human tissue. CRaTER's multiple solid-state detectors can discriminate the different elements in the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) population above ~10 MeV/nucleon, and can also distinguish between primary GCR protons arriving from deep space and albedo particles propagating up from the lunar surface. We use albedo protons with energies greater than 60 MeV to construct a cosmic ray albedo proton map of the Moon. The yield of albedo protons is proportional to the rate of lunar proton detections divided by the rate of incoming GCR detections. The map accounts for time variation in the albedo particles driven by time variations in the primary GCR population, thus revealing any true spatial variation of the albedo proton yield. Our current map is a significant improvement over the proof-of-concept map of Wilson et al.[6]. In addition to including twelve more months of CRaTER data here, we use more numerous minimum ionizing GCR protons for normalization, and we make use of all six of CRaTER's detectors to reduce contamination from spurious non-proton events in the data stream. We find find that the flux

  19. Direct determination of surface albedos from satellite imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mekler, Y.; Joseph, J. H.

    1983-01-01

    An empirical method to measure the spectral surface albedo of surfaces from Landsat imagery is presented and analyzed. The empiricism in the method is due only to the fact that three parameters of the solution must be determined for each spectral photograph of an image on the basis of independently known albedos at three points. The approach is otherwise based on exact solutions of the radiative transfer equation for upwelling intensity. Application of the method allows the routine construction of spectral albedo maps from satelite imagery, without requiring detailed knowledge of the atmospheric aerosol content, as long as the optical depth is less than 0.75, and of the calibration of the satellite sensor.

  20. Albedo control of seasonal South Polar cap recession on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Frédéric; Douté, Sylvain; Schmitt, Bernard; Vincendon, Mathieu; Bibring, Jean-Pierre; Langevin, Yves; Omega Team

    2009-04-01

    Over the last few decades, General Circulation Models (GCM) have been used to simulate the current martian climate. The calibration of these GCMs with the current seasonal cycle is a crucial step in understanding the climate history of Mars. One of the main climatic signals currently used to validate GCMs is the annual atmospheric pressure cycle. It is difficult to use changes in seasonal deposits on the surface of Mars to calibrate the GCMs given the spectral ambiguities between CO 2 and H 2O ice in the visible range. With the OMEGA imaging spectrometer covering the near infra-red range, it is now possible to monitor both types of ice at a spatial resolution of about 1 km. At global scale, we determine the change with time of the Seasonal South Polar Cap (SSPC) crocus line, defining the edge of CO 2 deposits. This crocus line is not symmetric around the geographic South Pole. At local scale, we introduce the snowdrop distance, describing the local structure of the SSPC edge. Crocus line and snowdrop distance changes can now be used to calibrate GCMs. The albedo of the seasonal deposits is usually assumed to be a uniform and constant parameter of the GCMs. In this study, albedo is found to be the main parameter controlling the SSPC recession at both global and local scale. Using a defrost mass balance model (referred to as D-frost) that incorporates the effect of shadowing induced by topography, we show that the global SSPC asymmetry in the crocus line is controlled by albedo variations. At local scale, we show that the snowdrop distance is correlated with the albedo variability. Further GCM improvements should take into account these two results. We propose several possibilities for the origin of the asymmetric albedo control. The next step will be to identify and model the physical processes that create the albedo differences.

  1. Detailed spatiotemporal albedo observations at Greenland's Mittivakkat Gletscher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mernild, Sebastian H.; Knudsen, Niels T.; Yde, Jacob C.; Malmros, Jeppe K.

    2015-04-01

    Surface albedo is defined as the reflected fraction of incoming solar shortwave radiation at the surface. On Greenland's Mittivakkat Gletscher the mean glacier-wide MODIS-estimated albedo dropped by 0.10 (2000-2013) from 0.43 to 0.33 by the end of the mass balance year (EBY). Hand-held albedo measurements as low as 0.10 were observed over debris-covered ice at the glacier margin at the EBY: these values were slightly below observed values for proglacial bedrock (~0.2). The albedo is highly variable in space - a significant variability occurred within few meters at the glacier margin area ranging from 0.10 to 0.39 due to variability in debris-cover thickness and composition, microbial activity (including algae and cyanobacteria), snow grain crystal metamorphism, bare ice exposure, and meltwater ponding. Huge dark-red-brown-colored ice algae colonies were observed. Albedo measurements on snow patches and bare glacier ice changed significant with increasing elevations (180-600 m a.s.l.) by lapse rates of 0.04 and 0.03 per 100 m, respectively, indicating values as high as 0.82 and 0.40 on the upper part of the glacier. Over a period of two weeks from early August to late August 2014 the hand-held observed mean glacier-wide albedo changed from 0.40 to 0.30 indicating that on average 10% more incoming solar shortwave radiation became available for surface ablation at the end of the melt season.

  2. Mapping global land surface albedo from NOAA AVHRR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csiszar, I.; Gutman, G.

    1999-03-01

    A set of algorithms is combined for a simple derivation of land surface albedo from measurements of reflected visible and near-infrared radiation made by the advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) onboard the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) polar orbiting satellites. The system consists of a narrowband-to-broadband conversion and bidirectional correction at the top of the atmosphere and an atmospheric correction. We demonstrate the results with 1 month worth of data from the NOAA National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (NESDIS) global vegetation index (GVI) weekly data set and the NOAA/NASA Pathfinder Atmosphere (PATMOS) project daily data. Error analysis of the methodology indicates that the surface albedo can be retrieved with 10-15% relative accuracy. Monthly albedo maps derived from September 1989 GVI and PATMOS data agree well except for small discrepancies attributed mainly to different preprocessing and residual atmospheric effects. A 5-year mean September map derived from the GVI multiannual time series is consistent with that derived from low-resolution Earth Radiation Budget Experiment data as well as with a September map compiled from ground observations and used in many numerical weather and climate models. Instantaneous GVI-derived albedos were found to be consistent with surface albedo measurements over various surface types. The discrepancies found can be attributed to differences in areal coverage and representativeness of the satellite and ground data. The present pilot study is a prototype for a routine real-time production of high-resolution global surface albedo maps from NOAA AVHRR Global Area Coverage (GAC) data.

  3. Bolometric albedos and diurnal temperatures of the brightest regions on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonelli, Damon P.; Veverka, Joseph

    1988-01-01

    Cylindrical maps of the locations and estimated Bond albedos of the brightest regions on the Io surface have been constructed on the basis of Voyager data; the albedos are then rescaled to correct for radiometric calibration uncertainties. The highest surface albedos are found to be only moderately higher than the Bond albedo of Io as a whole. The brightest regions include two bright patches southeast of the Maui and Amirani active vents, as well as a large equatorial field of high-albedo material and a lone bright patch at high northern latitudes. These maps indicate that Io's albedos are strongly latitude-dependent.

  4. Transformation of surface albedo to surface: Atmosphere surface and irradiance, and their spectral and temporal averages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nack, M. L.; Curran, R. J.

    1978-01-01

    The dependence of the albedo at the top of a realistic atmosphere upon the surface albedo, solar zenith angle, and cloud optical thickness is examined for the cases of clear sky, total cloud cover, and fractional cloud cover. The radiative transfer calculations of Dave and Braslau (1975) for particular values of surface albedo and solar zenith angle, and a single value of cloud optical thickness are used as the basis of a parametric albedo model. The question of spectral and temporal averages of albedos and reflected irradiances is addressed, and unique weighting functions for the spectral and temporal albedo averages are developed.

  5. Inertia effects on strategy updating in emergency evacuation from a room with multiple exits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yang; Li, Yuanzhen

    2014-03-01

    The inertia effects on strategy updating in emergency evacuation from a room with multiple exits is studied using the modified floor field model. Game theory is adopted to deal with conflict resolving process of evacuees and inertia effects are introduced in both exit choosing and conflict resolving process. From simulation results, the influences of inertia effects on the evacuation times and cooperation frequencies have been discussed. Interestingly, it can be found that inertia effects in exit choosing may lead more evacuation times, while inertia effects in conflict resolving may lead more evacuation times and higher cooperation frequencies. This study provides a new perspective to understand how the inertia of changing status quo acts on the strategy evolution in emergency circumstances.

  6. In the Grip of the Distant Universe: The Science of Inertia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graneau, Peter; Graneau, Neal

    ch. 1. All matter instantaneously senses all other matter in the universe -- ch. 2. Johannes Kepler - The astronomer who coined the word inertia -- ch. 3. Free Fall - A hardly believable story of science -- ch. 4. The Cartesian interlude - a novel cosmology -- ch. 5. Newton's force of inertia - the basis of dynamics -- ch. 6. A century of consolidation - the early practitioners of Newtonian dynamics -- ch. 7. Mach's magic principle - the unique inertial system -- ch. 8. Albert Einstein - inertia obscured by gravitation -- ch. 9. Inducing inertia - an electromagnetic analogy -- ch. 10. Retarded action at a distance - a short lived misnomer -- ch. 11. Clock confusion in the 20th century - the connection between inertia and timekeeping -- ch. 12. Machian inertia and the isotropic universe - a new force law.

  7. Mariner 9 high-resolution albedo mapping of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devaucouleurs, G.

    1974-01-01

    Large and small scale albedo markings obtained from Mariner 9 photographs and ground based telescope observations are shown on quadrangle charts with a scale of 1:5,000,000. Mercator and stereographic projections at the same scale are presented of the various regions of Mars along with explanatory information about their preparation. Changes in the albedo for the Solis Lacus area were observed and are compared with previous data for the same region. Large scale relief maps covering up to 1.7 million sq miles of the Martian surface are included.

  8. Modeling the thermal emission from asteroid 3 Juno using ALMA observations and the KRC thermal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titus, Timothy N.; Li, Jian-Yang; Moullet, Arielle; Sykes, Mark V.

    2015-11-01

    Asteroid 3 Juno (hereafter referred to as Juno), discovered 1 September 1804, is the 11th largest asteroid in the Main Asteroid Belt (MAB). Containing approximately 1% of the mass in the MAB [1], Juno is the second largest S-type [2].As part of the observations acquired from Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) [3], 10 reconstructed images at ~60km/pixel resolution were acquired of Juno [4] that showed significant deviations from the Standard Thermal Model (STM) [5]. These deviations could be a result of surface topography, albedo variations, emissivity variations, thermal inertia variations, or any combination.The KRC thermal model [6, 7], which has been extensively used for Mars [e.g. 8, 9] and has been applied to Vesta [10] and Ceres [11], will be used to compare model thermal emission to that observed by ALMA at a wavelength of 1.33 mm [4]. The 10 images, acquired over a four hour period, captured ~55% of Juno’s 7.21 hour rotation. Variations in temperature as a function of local time will be used to constrain the source of the thermal emission deviations from the STM.This work is supported by the NASA Solar System Observations Program.References:[1] Pitjeva, E. V. (2005) Solar System Research 39(3), 176. [2] Baer, J. and S. R. Chesley (2008) Celestial Mechanics and Dynamical Astronomy, 100, 27-42. [3] Wootten A. et al. (2015) IAU General Assembly, Meeting #29, #2237199 [4] arXiv:1503.02650 [astro-ph.EP] doi: 10.1088/2041-8205/808/1/L2 [5] Lebofsky, L.A. eta al. (1986) Icarus, 68, 239-251. [6] Kieffer, H. H., et al. (1977) J. Geophys. Res., 82, 4249-4291. [7] Kieffer, Hugh H., (2013) Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets, Volume 118, Issue 3, pp. 451-470 [8] Titus, T. N., H. H. Kieffer, and P. N. Christensen (2003) Science, 299, 1048-1051. [9] Fergason, R. L. et al. (2012) Space Sci. Rev, 170, 739-773, doi:10.1007/s11214-012-9891-3. [10] Titus, T. N. et al. (2012) 43rd LPSC, held March 19-23, 2012 at The Woodlands, Texas. LPI Contribution No

  9. Improvement and calibration of a SSNT personal dosemeter and study of importance of albedo factor for dose calculation.

    PubMed

    Torkzadeh, F; Taheri, M

    2007-01-01

    The Neutriran albedo neutron dosemeter has been improved and calibrated for neutron personal dosimetry. The Monte Carlo code MCNP4b was used to calculate the thermal neutrons backscattered from the body (albedo factor). Backscattering from the wall, ceiling and floor in calibration room was considered also via simulation by MCNP4C. A semi automated counting system applying a high-resolution scanner was used for counting of tracks. An 241Am source was used to produce similar alpha particles from 10B (n,alpha)7Li reaction for the optimisation of scanner parameters to distinguish and separate the tracks in SSNTD, which lead to a better distinction between etched alpha tracks and, consequently, a higher linear region of dose characteristic. PMID:16980708

  10. Size, Albedo, and Taxonomy of the Don Quijote Space Mission Target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Alan; Mueller, Michael; Fitzsimmons, Alan

    2006-03-01

    Rendezvous and lander missions are a very effective but very expensive way of investigating Solar-System bodies. The planning, optimization and success of space missions depends crucially on prior remotely-sensed knowledge of target bodies. Near-Earth asteroids (NEAs), which are mainly fragments of main-belt asteroids, are seen as important goals for investigation by space missions, mainly due to the role their forebears played in planet formation and the evolution of the Solar System, but also for the pragmatic reason that these objects can collide with the Earth with potentially devastating consequences. The European Space Agency is currently planning the Don Quijote mission to a NEA, which includes a rendezvous (and perhaps a lander) spacecraft and an impactor vehicle. The aim is to study the physical properties of the target asteroid and the effects of the impact on its dynamical state, as a first step in considering realistic mitigation measures against an eventual hazardous NEA. Two potential targets have been selected for the mission, the preferred one being (10302) 1989 ML, which is energetically easier to reach and is possibly a scientifically interesting primitive asteroid. However, due to the ambiguity of available spectral data, it is currently not possible to confidently determine the taxonomic type and mineralogy of this object. Crucially, the albedo is uncertain by a factor of 10, which leads to large uncertainties in the size and mass and hence the planned near-surface operations of Don Quijote. Thermal-infrared observations are urgently required for accurate size and albedo determination. These observations, which can only be carried out by Spitzer and would require only a modest amount of observing time, would enable an accurate diameter to be derived for the first time and the resulting albedo would remove the taxonomic ambiguity. The proposed Spitzer observations are critical for effective mission planning and would greatly increase our

  11. Effect of inertia properties on attitude stability of nonrigid spin-stabilized spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, W. E.; Young, J. P.

    1974-01-01

    The phenomenon of energy dissipation in spinning spacecraft is discussed with particular reference to its dependence on spacecraft inertia properties. Specific dissipation mechanisms are identified. The effect of external environmental factors on spin stability is also discussed. Generalized curves are presented relating system stability to the principal inertia ratio for various forms of energy dissipation. Dual-spin systems and the effect of lateral inertia asymmetry are also reviewed.

  12. "TNOs are Cool": A survey of the trans-Neptunian region. IV. Size/albedo characterization of 15 scattered disk and detached objects observed with Herschel-PACS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos-Sanz, P.; Lellouch, E.; Fornasier, S.; Kiss, C.; Pal, A.; Müller, T. G.; Vilenius, E.; Stansberry, J.; Mommert, M.; Delsanti, A.; Mueller, M.; Peixinho, N.; Henry, F.; Ortiz, J. L.; Thirouin, A.; Protopapa, S.; Duffard, R.; Szalai, N.; Lim, T.; Ejeta, C.; Hartogh, P.; Harris, A. W.; Rengel, M.

    2012-05-01

    Context. Physical characterization of trans-Neptunian objects, a primitive population of the outer solar system, may provide constraints on their formation and evolution. Aims: The goal of this work is to characterize a set of 15 scattered disk (SDOs) and detached objects, in terms of their size, albedo, and thermal properties. Methods: Thermal flux measurements obtained with the Herschel-PACS instrument at 70, 100 and 160 μm, and whenever applicable, with Spitzer-MIPS at 24 and 70 μm, are modeled with radiometric techniques, in order to derive the objects' individual size, albedo and when possible beaming factor. Error bars are obtained from a Monte-Carlo approach. We look for correlations between these and other physical and orbital parameters. Results: Diameters obtained for our sample range from 100 to 2400 km, and the geometric albedos (in V band) vary from 3.8% to 84.5%. The unweighted mean V geometric albedo for the whole sample is 11.2% (excluding Eris); 6.9% for the SDOs, and 17.0% for the detached objects (excluding Eris). We obtain new bulk densities for three binary systems: Ceto/Phorcys, Typhon/Echidna and Eris/Dysnomia. Apart from correlations clearly due to observational bias, we find significant correlations between albedo and diameter (more reflective objects being bigger), and between albedo, diameter and perihelion distance (brighter and bigger objects having larger perihelia). We discuss possible explanations for these correlations. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA. PACS: The Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer is one of Herschel's instruments.Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  13. Maximum mass, moment of inertia and compactness of relativistic stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breu, Cosima; Rezzolla, Luciano

    2016-06-01

    A number of recent works have highlighted that it is possible to express the properties of general-relativistic stellar equilibrium configurations in terms of functions that do not depend on the specific equation of state employed to describe matter at nuclear densities. These functions are normally referred to as `universal relations' and have been found to apply, within limits, both to static or stationary isolated stars, as well as to fully dynamical and merging binary systems. Further extending the idea that universal relations can be valid also away from stability, we show that a universal relation is exhibited also by equilibrium solutions that are not stable. In particular, the mass of rotating configurations on the turning-point line shows a universal behaviour when expressed in terms of the normalized Keplerian angular momentum. In turn, this allows us to compute the maximum mass allowed by uniform rotation, Mmax, simply in terms of the maximum mass of the non-rotating configuration, M_{_TOV}, finding that M_max ≃ (1.203 ± 0.022) M_{_TOV} for all the equations of state we have considered. We further introduce an improvement to previously published universal relations by Lattimer & Schutz between the dimensionless moment of inertia and the stellar compactness, which could provide an accurate tool to constrain the equation of state of nuclear matter when measurements of the moment of inertia become available.

  14. Inertia dominated thin-film flows over microdecorated surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dressaire, Emilie; Courbin, Laurent; Crest, Jérome; Stone, Howard A.

    2010-07-01

    We analyze the inertia dominated flow of thin liquid films on microtextured substrates, which here are assemblies of micron-size posts arranged on regular lattices. We focus on situations for which the thin-film thickness and the roughness characteristic length scale are of the same order of magnitude, i.e., a few hundred microns. We assume that the liquid flows isotropically through the roughness at a flow rate that depends on the geometrical features of the porous layer; above the texture, the flow is characterized by a larger Reynolds number and modeled using a boundary layer approach. The influence of the microtexture on the thin-film flow above the microposts is captured by a reduction of the flow rate due to the leakage flow through the texture and a slip boundary condition, which depends on the flow direction as well as on the lattice properties. In this way, the velocity field in the free surface flow adopts the symmetry of the microtexture underneath. The results of this model are in good agreement with experimental observations obtained for thin-film flows formed upon jet impact on microtextures. The characteristics of the polygonal hydraulic jumps that we obtain depend on both the jet parameters and the topographical features of the surface roughness. We use the measurements and the numerical predictions to estimate the flow rate through the shallow porous layer and the effective slip length for this inertia dominated flow regime. We also discuss the limitations of the model.

  15. Changes in inertia and effect on turning effort across different wheelchair configurations.

    PubMed

    Caspall, Jayme J; Seligsohn, Erin; Dao, Phuc V; Sprigle, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    When executing turning maneuvers, manual wheelchair users must overcome the rotational inertia of the wheelchair system. Differences in wheelchair rotational inertia can result in increases in torque required to maneuver, resulting in greater propulsion effort and stress on the shoulder joints. The inertias of various configurations of an ultralightweight wheelchair were measured using a rotational inertia-measuring device. Adjustments in axle position, changes in wheel and tire type, and the addition of several accessories had various effects on rotational inertias. The configuration with the highest rotational inertia (solid tires, mag wheels with rearward axle) exceeded the configuration with the lowest (pneumatic tires, spoke wheels with forward axle) by 28%. The greater inertia requires increased torque to accelerate the wheelchair during turning. At a representative maximum acceleration, the reactive torque spanned the range of 11.7 to 15.0 N-m across the wheelchair configurations. At higher accelerations, these torques exceeded that required to overcome caster scrub during turning. These results indicate that a wheelchair's rotational inertia can significantly influence the torque required during turning and that this influence will affect active users who turn at higher speeds. Categorizing wheelchairs using both mass and rotational inertia would better represent differences in effort during wheelchair maneuvers. PMID:24699971

  16. Physician and patient characteristics associated with clinical inertia in blood pressure control.

    PubMed

    Harle, Christopher A; Harman, Jeffrey S; Yang, Shuo

    2013-11-01

    Clinical inertia, the failure to adjust antihypertensive medications during patient visits with uncontrolled hypertension, is thought to be a common problem. This retrospective study used 5 years of electronic medical records from a multispecialty group practice to examine the association between physician and patient characteristics and clinical inertia. Hierarchical linear models (HLMs) were used to examine (1) differences in physician and patient characteristics among patients with and without clinical inertia, and (2) the association between clinical inertia and future uncontrolled hypertension. Overall, 66% of patients experienced clinical inertia. Clinical inertia was associated with one physician characteristic, patient volume (odds ratio [OR]=0.998). However, clinical inertia was associated with multiple patient characteristics, including patient age (OR=1.021), commercial insurance (OR=0.804), and obesity (OR=1.805). Finally, patients with clinical inertia had 2.9 times the odds of uncontrolled hypertension at their final visit in the study period. These findings may aid the design of interventions to reduce clinical inertia.

  17. Changes in inertia and effect on turning effort across different wheelchair configurations.

    PubMed

    Caspall, Jayme J; Seligsohn, Erin; Dao, Phuc V; Sprigle, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    When executing turning maneuvers, manual wheelchair users must overcome the rotational inertia of the wheelchair system. Differences in wheelchair rotational inertia can result in increases in torque required to maneuver, resulting in greater propulsion effort and stress on the shoulder joints. The inertias of various configurations of an ultralightweight wheelchair were measured using a rotational inertia-measuring device. Adjustments in axle position, changes in wheel and tire type, and the addition of several accessories had various effects on rotational inertias. The configuration with the highest rotational inertia (solid tires, mag wheels with rearward axle) exceeded the configuration with the lowest (pneumatic tires, spoke wheels with forward axle) by 28%. The greater inertia requires increased torque to accelerate the wheelchair during turning. At a representative maximum acceleration, the reactive torque spanned the range of 11.7 to 15.0 N-m across the wheelchair configurations. At higher accelerations, these torques exceeded that required to overcome caster scrub during turning. These results indicate that a wheelchair's rotational inertia can significantly influence the torque required during turning and that this influence will affect active users who turn at higher speeds. Categorizing wheelchairs using both mass and rotational inertia would better represent differences in effort during wheelchair maneuvers.

  18. Greenland ice sheet albedo feedback: mass balance implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Box, J. E.; Tedesco, M.; Fettweis, X.; Hall, D. K.; Steffen, K.; Stroeve, J. C.

    2012-12-01

    Greenland ice sheet mass loss has accelerated responding to combined glacier discharge and surface melt water runoff increases. During summer, absorbed solar energy, modulated at the surface primarily by albedo, is the dominant factor governing surface melt variability in the ablation area. NASA MODIS data spanning 13 summers (2000 - 2012), indicate that mid-summer (July) ice sheet albedo declined by 0.064 from a value of 0.752 in the early 2000s. The ice sheet accordingly absorbed 100 EJ more solar energy for the month of July in 2012 than in the early 2000s. This additional energy flux during summer doubled melt rates in the ice sheet ablation area during the observation period. Abnormally strong anticyclonic circulation, associated with a persistent summer North Atlantic Oscillation extreme 2007-2012, enabled 3 amplifying mechanisms to maximize the albedo feedback: 1) increased warm (south) air advection along the western ice sheet increased surface sensible heating that in turn enhanced snow grain metamorphic rates, further reducing albedo; 2) increased surface downward shortwave flux, leading to more surface heating and further albedo reduction; and 3) reduced snowfall rates sustained low albedo, maximizing surface solar heating, progressively lowering albedo over multiple years. The summer net infrared and solar radiation for the high elevation accumulation area reached positive values during this period, contributing to an abrupt melt area increase in 2012. A number of factors make it reasonable to expect more melt episodes covering 100% of the ice sheet area in coming years: 1) the past 13 y of increasing surface air temperatures have eroded snowpack 'cold content', preconditioning the ice sheet for earlier melt onset. Less heat is required to bring the surface to melting; 2) Greenland temperatures, have lagged the N Hemisphere average in the 2000s, need to increase further for Greenland to be in phase with the N Hemisphere average. 3) Arctic amplification

  19. Observations of NEAs at Arecibo Observatory and NASA's IRTF: Combining Radar and Thermal Measurements to Better Understand NEA Physical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolan, Michael C.; Vervack, R. J.; Howell, E. S.; Magri, C.; Fernandez, Y. R.; Taylor, P. A.; Mueller, M.; Rivkin, A. S.; Benner, L. A. M.

    2010-10-01

    As we sample ever-smaller sizes of near-Earth asteroids (NEAs), we see an increasing variation in the range of physical properties. Radar experiments show a diverse range of shapes, surface features, and rotation states among NEAs. Infrared observations of these objects are equally varied, illustrating a range of spectral types and thermal characteristics. While spacecraft missions will reveal details of a few NEAs, only ground-based observations will provide an overall understanding of the population of these small bodies, for which the size and albedo distributions are still poorly understood. The goal of our investigation is to use both radar images and near-IR spectra to better understand the regolith of different types and shapes of NEAs. The regolith on an asteroid surface controls its thermal properties and often its radar reflectance as well, and at smaller sizes the irregular shape plays an increasingly important role. To accomplish our goal, we have established a program in which we choose NEAs that will be observed well enough with radar to have high-quality shape models and also observe these objects with SpeX at the NASA IRTF (2-4 microns) at several different viewing geometries and rotation phases to see how the inferred thermal properties depend on the detailed shape. We then use this knowledge to quantify the systematic biases in existing thermal models that are based on simple assumptions such as spherical shape or zero thermal inertia. We will present a summary of our observations to date and preliminary results of the thermal modeling.

  20. Thermal studies of Martian channels and valleys using Termoskan data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betts, B. H.; Murray, B. C.

    1994-01-01

    The Termoskan instrument on board the Phobos '88 spacecraft acquired the highest spatial resolution thermal infrared emission data ever obtained for Mars. Included in the thermal images 2 km/pixel, midday observations of several major channel and valley systems including significant portions of Shalbatana, Ravi, Al-Qahira, and Ma'adim Valles, the channel connecting Valles Marineris with Hydraotes Chaos, and channel material in Eos Chasma. Termoskan also observed small portions of the southern beginnings of Simud, Tiu, and Ares Valles and some channel material in Gangis Chasma. Simultaneous broadband visible reflectance data were obtained for all but Ma'adim Vallis. We find that most of the channels and valleys have higher thermal inertias than their surroundings, consistent with previous thermal studies. We show for the first time that the thermal inertia boundaries closely match flat channel floor boundaries. Also, buttes within channels have inertias similiar to the plains surrounding the channels, suggesting the buttes are remnants of a contiguous plains surface. Lower bounds on typical channel thermal inertias range from 8.4 to 12.5 (10-3 cal cm-2 s-1/2/K) (352 to 523 in SI units of J m-2 s-1/2/K). Lower bounds on inertia differences with the surrounding heavily cratered plains range from 1.1 to 3.5 (46 to 147 SI). Atmospheric and geometric effects are not sufficient to cause the observed channel inertia enhancements. We favor nonaeolian explanations of the overall channel inertia enhancements based primarily upon the channel floors' thermal homogeneity and the strong correlation of thermal boundaries with floor boundaries. However, localized, dark regions within some channels are likely aeolian in nature as reported previously. Most channels with increased inertias have fretted morphologies such as flat floors with steep walls. Eastern Ravi and southern Ares Valles, the only major channel sections observed that have obvious catastrophic flood bedforms, do not

  1. Thermal Stability of Ice on Ceres with Rough Topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayne, Paul O.; Aharonson, Oded

    2015-11-01

    The dwarf planet Ceres may have an ice-rich crust, and subsurface ice exposed by impacts or endogenic activity would be subject to sublimation. The “bright spots” recently discovered by the Dawn mission on the illuminated surface of Ceres have prompted speculation regarding their possible icy composition and the youthful age this might imply. Furthermore, sublimation of ice at the surface or in the interior of Ceres could explain water vapor observed on more than one occasion in the exosphere. We investigated the possible distribution and lifetimes of water ice and other volatiles on Ceres using detailed thermal models, including realistic thermophysical properties and surface roughness.Topographic shadowing creates polar cold traps where a small, but non-negligible fraction (~0.4%) of Ceres' surface is perennially below the ~110 K criterion for 1 Gyr of H2O ice stability. These areas are found above 60° latitude. Other molecules (CH3OH, NH3, SO2, CO2) may be cold-trapped in smaller abundances. A model for the transport, gravitational escape and photoionization of H2O molecules suggests net accumulation in the cold traps. At latitudes 0° - 30°, ice is stable under solar illumination only briefly (~10-100 yr), unless it has high albedo and thermal inertia, in which case lifetimes of > 104 yr are possible.Buried ice is stable within a meter for > 1 Gyr at latitudes higher than ~50°. An illuminated polar cap of water ice would be stable within a few degrees of the poles only if it maintained a high albedo (> 0.5) at present obliquity. If the obliquity exceeded 5° in the geologically recent past, then a putative polar cap would have been erased. Finally, a small hemispheric asymmetry exists due to the timing of Ceres' perihelion passage, which would lead to a detectable enhancement of ice in the northern hemisphere if the orbital elements vary slowly relative to the ice accumulation rate. Our model results are potentially testable during the Dawn science

  2. The Reiner Gamma Albedo Marking on Earth's Moon: Old or Young?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholas, J. B.; Purucker, M. E.; Sabaka, T. J.

    2007-03-01

    A minimum magnetization necessary to explain the Reiner Gamma albedo feature was determined, and estimates made of spatial distribution of magnetization, depth of source and magnetization direction. The evidence suggests that the albedo feature arises fro

  3. Albedo Study of the Depositional Fans Associated with Martian Gullies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, J.; Sears, D. W. G.

    2005-03-01

    This work is a two-part investigation of the albedo of the depositional aprons or fans associated with Martian gully features. Using Adobe Systems Photoshop 5.0 software we analyzed numerous Mars Global Surveyor MOC and Mars Odyssey THEMIS images.

  4. Variable control of neutron albedo in toroidal fusion devices

    DOEpatents

    Jassby, D.L.; Micklich, B.J.

    1983-06-01

    This invention pertains to methods of controlling in the steady state, neutron albedo in toroidal fusion devices, and in particular, to methods of controlling the flux and energy distribution of collided neutrons which are incident on an outboard wall of a toroidal fusion device.

  5. Albedo and color maps of the Saturnian satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buratti, Bonnie J.; Mosher, Joel A.; Johnson, Torrence V.

    1990-01-01

    The paper discusses the production of maps of the albedos and colors of Mimas, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione, and Rhea over the full range of their imaged surfaces. Voyager images were used to prepare maps of the normal reflectances and color ratios (0.58/0.41 micron) of these satelites.

  6. Detection of light transformations and concomitant changes in surface albedo

    PubMed Central

    Gerhard, Holly E.; Maloney, Laurence T.

    2010-01-01

    We report two experiments demonstrating that (1) observers are sensitive to information about changes in the light field not captured by local scene statistics and that (2) they can use this information to enhance detection of changes in surface albedo. Observers viewed scenes consisting of matte surfaces at many orientations illuminated by a collimated light source. All surfaces were achromatic, all lights neutral. In the first experiment, observers attempted to discriminate small changes in direction of the collimated light source (light transformations) from matched changes in the albedos of all surfaces (non-light transformations). Light changes and non-light changes shared the same local scene statistics and edge ratios, but the latter were not consistent with any change in direction to the collimated source. We found that observers could discriminate light changes as small as 5 degrees with sensitivity d′ > 1 and accurately judge the direction of change. In a second experiment, we measured observers' ability to detect a change in the surface albedo of an isolated surface patch during either a light change or a surface change. Observers were more accurate in detecting isolated albedo changes during light changes. Measures of sensitivity d′ were more than twice as great. PMID:20884599

  7. Asteroid magnitudes, UBV colors, and IRAS albedos and diameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tedesco, Edward F.

    1989-01-01

    This paper lists absolute magnitudes and slope parameters for known asteroids numbered through 3318. The values presented are those used in reducing asteroid IR flux data obtained with the IRAS. U-B colors are given for 938 asteroids, and B-V colors are given for 945 asteroids. The IRAS albedos and diameters are tabulated for 1790 asteroids.

  8. Effective Albedo of Vegetated Terrain at L-Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurum, Mehmet; O'Neill, Peggy E.; Lang, Roger H.

    2011-01-01

    This paper derives an explicit expression for an effective albedo of vegetated terrain from the zero- and multiple- order radiative transfer (RT) model comparison. The formulation establishes a direct physical link between the effective vegetation parameterization and the theoretical description of absorption and scattering within the canopy. The paper will present an evaluation of the derived albedo for corn canopies with data taken during an experiment at Alabama A&M Winfield A. Thomas Agricultural Research Station near Huntsville, Alabama in June, 1998. The test site consisted of two 50-m x 60-m plots - one with a bare surface and the other with grass cover - and four 30-m x 50-m plots of corn at different planting densities. One corn field was planted at a full density of 9.5 plants/sq m while the others were planted at 1/3, 1/2 and 2/3 of the full density. The fields were observed with a truck-mounted L-band radiometer at incident angle of 15 degree for the period of two weeks. Soil moisture (SM) changed daily due to irrigation and natural rainfall. Variations in gravimetric SM from 18 % to 34 % were seen during this period. Ground truth data, including careful characterization of the corn size and orientation statistics, and its dielectric, was also collected and used to simulate the effective albedo for the vegetation. The single-scattering albedo is defined as the fractional power scattered from individual vegetation constituents with respect to canopy extinction. It represents single-scattering properties of vegetation elements only, and is independent of ground properties. The values of the albedo get higher when there is dense vegetation (i.e. forest, mature corn, etc.) with scatterers, such as branches and trunks (or stalks in the case of corn), which are large with respect to the wavelength. This large albedo leads to a reduction in brightness temperature in the zero-order RT solution (known as tau-omega model). Higher-order multiple-scattering RT

  9. A quantification of errors in surface albedo due to common assumptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arduini, Robert F.; Suttles, J. T.

    1990-01-01

    A study comparing the performance of three approaches to estimating the spectral albedo of a typical land surface is presented. The most accurate albedo estimates under all atmospheric situations are those for which the scattering properties of the atmosphere can be used. Simply utilizing the direct-to-total ratio as a weight between direct and Lambertian albedos reduced the errors in broadband albedo to less than one percent for almost all simulated atmospheric conditions.

  10. Searching for Thermal Anomalies on Icy Satellites: Step 1- Validation of the Three Dimensional Volatile-Transport (VT3D)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, Gary G.; Howett, Carly J. A.; Young, Leslie A.; Spencer, John R.

    2015-11-01

    In the last few decades, thermal data from the Galileo and Cassini spacecraft have detected various anomalies on Jovian and Saturnian satellites, including the thermally anomalous “PacMan” regions on Mimas and Tethys and the Pwyll anomaly on Europa (Howett et al. 2011, Howett et al. 2012, Spencer et al. 1999). Yet, the peculiarities of some of these anomalies, like the weak detection of the “PacMan” anomalies on Rhea and Dione and the low thermal inertia values of the widespread anomalies on equatorial Europa, are subjects for on-going research (Howett et al. 2014, Rathbun et al. 2010). Further, analysis and review of all the data both Galileo and Cassini took of these worlds will provide information of the thermal inertia and albedos of their surfaces, perhaps highlighting potential targets of interest for future Jovian and Saturnian system missions. Many previous works have used a thermophysical model for airless planets developed by Spencer (1990). However, the Three Dimensional Volatile-Transport (VT3D) model proposed by Young (2012) is able to predict surface temperatures in significantly faster computation time, incorporating seasonal and diurnal insolation variations. This work is the first step in an ongoing investigation, which will use VT3D’s capabilities to reanalyze Galileo and Cassini data. VT3D, which has already been used to analyze volatile transport on Pluto, is validated by comparing its results to that of the Spencer thermal model. We will also present our initial results using VT3D to reanalyze the thermophysical properties of the PacMan anomaly previous discovered on Mimas by Howett et al. (2011), using temperature constraints of diurnal data from Cassini/CIRS. VT3D is expected to be an efficient tool in identifying new thermal anomalies in future Saturnian and Jovian missions.Bibliography:C.J.A. Howett et al. (2011), Icarus 216, 221.C.J.A. Howett et al. (2012), Icarus 221, 1084.C.J.A. Howett et al. (2014), Icarus 241, 239.J

  11. Albedo Response of Native and Artificial Soils to a Wetting Event: Implications for Critical Zone Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovell, L.; Sanchez-Mejia, Z. M.; Papuga, S. A.

    2012-12-01

    The Landscape Evolution Observatory (LEO) at Biosphere 2 is composed of three experimental hill slopes filled to one meter depth of a ground basaltic tephra soil, set up to investigate critical zone processes. Our goal is to understand the energy aspects of this artificial LEO soil; surfaces with a high surface reflectance (albedo) may limit energy available for critical zone processes. The albedo of a surface can change, e.g. by vegetation growth or soil wetting, which can further influence available energy. Here, we examine the soil moisture and albedo response of LEO soil to a 10 mm rainfall event, and compare the results to those found using traditional potting and native desert soils that differ in color and texture. We hypothesized that: 1) increased soil moisture would decrease albedo for all soil types; 2) a smaller wetting front would maximize any decrease in albedo, and 3) albedo will reach a minimum within hours of a rainstorm, returning to a maximum albedo value within the day. We found that albedo was lowest under wet conditions for all soils, regardless of initial color and texture. Additionally, the LEO soil experienced the shallowest wetting front and also showed the most significant decrease in albedo following rainfall. After the rainfall event, all soils showed an initial decrease in albedo, followed by an increase in albedo as the soil dried. While the albedo and soil moisture of each soil reacted similarly, the very dark and fine LEO soil showed the strongest response to wetting.

  12. Comet 67P: Thermal Maps and Local Properties as Derived from Rosetta/VIRTIS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosi, Federico; Capria, Maria Teresa; Capaccioni, Fabrizio; Filacchione, Gianrico; Erard, Stéphane; Leyrat, Cédric; Bockelée-Morvan, Dominique; De Sanctis, Maria Cristina; Raponi, Andrea; Ciarniello, Mauro; Schmitt, Bernard; Arnold, Gabriele; Mottola, Stefano; Fonti, Sergio; Palomba, Ernesto; Longobardo, Andrea; Cerroni, Priscilla; Piccioni, Giuseppe; Drossart, Pierre; Kuehrt, Ekkehard

    2015-04-01

    Comet 67P is shown to be everywhere rich in organic materials with little to no water ice visible on the surface. In the range of heliocentric distances from 3.59 to 2.74 AU, daytime observed surface temperatures retrieved from VIRTIS data are overall comprised in the range between 180 and 220 K, which is incompatible with large exposures of water ice and is consistent with a low-albedo, organics-rich surface. The accuracy of temperature retrieval is as good as a few K in regions of the comet unaffected by shadowing or limb proximity. Maximum temperature values as high as 230 K have been recorded in very few places. The highest values of surface temperature in the early Mapping phase were obtained in August 2014, during observations at small phase angles implying that the observed surface has a large predominance of small incidence angles, and local solar times (LST) centered around the maximum daily insolation. In all cases, direct correlation with topographic features is observed, i.e. largest temperature values are generally associated with the smallest values of illumination angles. So far, there is no evidence of thermal anomalies, i.e. places of the surface that are intrinsically warmer or cooler than surrounding terrains observed at the same local solar time and under similar solar illumination. For a given LST, the maximum temperature mainly depends on the solar incidence angle and on surface properties such as thermal inertia and albedo. Since VIRTIS is able to observe the same point of the surface on various occasions under different conditions of solar illumination and LST, it is possible to reconstruct the temperature of that point at different times of the comet's day, thus building diurnal profiles of temperature that are useful to constrain thermal inertia. The availability of spatially-resolved, accurate temperature observations, significantly spaced out in local solar time, provides clues to the physical structure local features, which complements

  13. Giant pulsar glitches and the inertia of neutron star crusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delsate, T.; Chamel, N.; Gürlebeck, N.; Fantina, A. F.; Pearson, J. M.; Ducoin, C.

    2016-07-01

    Giant pulsar frequency glitches as detected in the emblematic Vela pulsar have long been thought to be the manifestation of a neutron superfluid permeating the inner crust of a neutron star. However, this superfluid has been recently found to be entrained by the crust, and as a consequence it does not carry enough angular momentum to explain giant glitches. The extent to which pulsar-timing observations can be reconciled with the standard vortex-mediated glitch theory is studied considering the current uncertainties on dense-matter properties. To this end, the crustal moment of inertia of glitching pulsars is calculated employing a series of different unified dense-matter equations of state.

  14. The Inertia Coefficients of an Airship in a Frictionless Fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bateman, H.

    1979-01-01

    The apparent inertia of an airship hull is examined. The exact solution of the aerodynamical problem is studied for hulls of various shapes with special attention given to the case of an ellipsoidal hull. So that the results for the ellipsoidal hull may be readily adapted to other cases, they are expressed in terms of the area and perimeter of the largest cross section perpendicular to the direction of motion by means of a formula involving a coefficient kappa which varies only slowly when the shape of the hull is changed, being 0.637 for a circular or elliptic disk, 0.5 for a sphere, and about 0.25 for a spheroid of fineness ratio. The case of rotation of an airship hull is investigated and a coefficient is defined with the same advantages as the corresponding coefficient for rectilinear motion.

  15. Vibrating Systems with Singular Mass-Inertia Matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakrishnan, A. V.

    1996-01-01

    Vibrating systems with singular mass-inertia matrices arise in recent continuum models of Smart Structures (beams with PZT strips) in assessing the damping attainable with rate feedback. While they do not quite yield 'distributed' controls, we show that they can provide a fixed nonzero lower bound for the damping coefficient at all mode frequencies. The mathematical machinery for modelling the motion involves the theory of Semigroups of Operators. We consider a Timoshenko model for torsion only, a 'smart string,' where the damping coefficient turns out to be a constant at all frequencies. We also observe that the damping increases initially with the feedback gain but decreases to zero eventually as the gain increases without limit.

  16. Preliminary investigation of inertia friction welding B2 aluminides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittenberger, J. Daniel; Moore, Thomas J.; Kuruzar, Daniel L.

    1987-01-01

    An attempt is made to achieve inertia friction-welding in FeAl and NiAl samples, taking into account their intermetallics' compositions, extrusion parameters, and microstructural data. The energy required for the weld is stored in a rotating flywheel mass attached to one of the two pieces to be joined; when enough energy is introduced, the flywheel is disconnected and an axial load is applied which forces the spinning piece against the stationary one, converting the energy into heat by means of friction. Due to the inherent brittleness of the aluminides, a step-load program was used in which an initial, low-pressure heat buildup increased the work pieces' ductility.

  17. The earth's equatorial principal axes and moments of inertia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, H. S.; Chao, B. F.

    1991-01-01

    The earth's equatorial principal moments of inertia are given as A and B, where A is less than B, and the corresponding principal axes are given as a and b. Explicit formulas are derived for determining the orientation of a and b axes and the difference B - A using C(22) and S(22), the two gravitational harmonic coefficients of degree 2 and order 2. For the earth, the a axis lies along the (14.93 deg W, 165.07 deg E) diameter, and the b axis lies perpendicular to it along the (75.07 deg E, 104.93 deg W) diameter. The difference B - A is 7.260 x 10 to the -6th MR2. These quantities for other planets are contrasted, and geophysical implications are discussed.

  18. Parallel algorithms for computation of the manipulator inertia matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amin-Javaheri, Masoud; Orin, David E.

    1989-01-01

    The development of an O(log2N) parallel algorithm for the manipulator inertia matrix is presented. It is based on the most efficient serial algorithm which uses the composite rigid body method. Recursive doubling is used to reformulate the linear recurrence equations which are required to compute the diagonal elements of the matrix. It results in O(log2N) levels of computation. Computation of the off-diagonal elements involves N linear recurrences of varying-size and a new method, which avoids redundant computation of position and orientation transforms for the manipulator, is developed. The O(log2N) algorithm is presented in both equation and graphic forms which clearly show the parallelism inherent in the algorithm.

  19. Shear-induced amyloid fibrillization: the role of inertia.

    PubMed

    McBride, Samantha A; Sanford, Sean P; Lopez, Juan M; Hirsa, Amir H

    2016-04-14

    Agitation of protein is known to induce deleterious effects on protein stability and structure, with extreme agitation sometimes resulting in complete aggregation into amyloid fibrils. Many mechanisms have been proposed to explain how protein becomes unstable when subjected to flow, including alignment of protein species, shear-induced unfolding, simple mixing, or fragmentation of existing fibrils to create new seeds. Here a shearing flow was imposed on a solution of monomeric human insulin via a rotating Couette device with a small hydrophobic fluid interface. The results indicate that even very low levels of shear are capable of accelerating amyloid fibril formation. Simulations of the flow suggest that the shear enhances fibrillization kinetics when flow inertia is non-negligible and the resulting meridional circulation allows for advection of bulk protein to the hydrophobic interface.

  20. The Problem of Inertia in a Friedmann Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazanas, Demosthenes

    2012-01-01

    In this talk I will discuss the origin of inertia in a curved spacetime, particularly the spatially flat, open and closed Friedmann universes. This is done using Sciama's law of inertial induction, which is based on Mach's principle, and expresses the analogy between the retarded far fields of electrodynamics and those of gravitation. After obtaining covariant expressions for electromagnetic fields due to an accelerating point charge in Friedmann models, we adopt Sciama's law to obtain the inertial force on an accelerating mass $m$ by integrating over the contributions from all the matter in the universe. The resulting inertial force has the form $F = -kma$ where the constant $k < 1 $ depends on the choice of the cosmological parameters such as $\\Omega_{M},\\ \\Omega_{\\Lambda}, $ and $\\Omega_{R}$. The values of $k$ obtained suggest that inertial contribution from dark matter can be the source for the missing part of the inertial force.

  1. Shear-induced amyloid fibrillization: the role of inertia.

    PubMed

    McBride, Samantha A; Sanford, Sean P; Lopez, Juan M; Hirsa, Amir H

    2016-04-14

    Agitation of protein is known to induce deleterious effects on protein stability and structure, with extreme agitation sometimes resulting in complete aggregation into amyloid fibrils. Many mechanisms have been proposed to explain how protein becomes unstable when subjected to flow, including alignment of protein species, shear-induced unfolding, simple mixing, or fragmentation of existing fibrils to create new seeds. Here a shearing flow was imposed on a solution of monomeric human insulin via a rotating Couette device with a small hydrophobic fluid interface. The results indicate that even very low levels of shear are capable of accelerating amyloid fibril formation. Simulations of the flow suggest that the shear enhances fibrillization kinetics when flow inertia is non-negligible and the resulting meridional circulation allows for advection of bulk protein to the hydrophobic interface. PMID:26956731

  2. The Early Lunar Orbit and Principal Moments of Inertia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrick-Bethell, I.; Zuber, M. T.

    2007-12-01

    If taken at face value, the principal lunar moments of inertia suggest that the Moon froze in a past tidal and rotational state during a high eccentricity orbit [1]. At this time the Moon may have been in either synchronous rotation or in a 3:2 resonance of spin and mean motion. We have performed further investigations of the plausibility of past high eccentricity lunar orbits on the basis of orbital evolution, the dynamics of entry into any past 3:2 resonance, and tidal dissipation. We have found that the requisite permanent (B-A)/C (where A, B, and C are the principal moments of inertia) for a 3:2 resonance can be achieved in a magma ocean if a density anomaly is present shortly after lunar accretion. In a high eccentricity orbit, tidal dissipation will affect the Moon's ability to develop lithospheric strength. The Moon is presently able to support degree-two loads, while Io, which is approximately the same size as the Moon and strongly heated by tidal dissipation, probably cannot [2]. Therefore, somewhere between the present lunar radioactive heating rate (~1012 W), and Io's observed dissipation (~1014 W), the Moon may develop lithospheric strength. We use 1014 W as a loose upper bound on where freeze-in may begin and find that in a 3:2 resonance tidal dissipation [3] can drop below 1014 W at a = 25 RE and e = 0.17, and the present moments of inertia can be approximately reproduced for lunar values of QM = 475 (where a is the lunar semimajor axis, RE is the Earth radius, and Q is the specific dissipation function). This value of QM is somewhat large, but the biggest problem with a 3:2 resonance that lasts until 25 RE is how to achieve the current low eccentricity synchronous orbit. The required damping cannot be easily achieved unless the Moon is knocked out of a 3:2 resonance by an impactor that would produce a crater approximately 800 km in diameter. In sum, there is no single strong constraint that completely rules out a 3:2 resonance, but it would require a

  3. 40 CFR 86.129-00 - Road load power, test weight, and inertia weight class determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Road load power, test weight, and inertia weight class determination. 86.129-00 Section 86.129-00 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... power, test weight, and inertia weight class determination. Applicability. Section 86.129-94 (a)...

  4. An approximate method for solution to variable moment of inertia problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beans, E. W.

    1981-01-01

    An approximation method is presented for reducing a nonlinear differential equation (for the 'weather vaning' motion of a wind turbine) to an equivalent constant moment of inertia problem. The integrated average of the moment of inertia is determined. Cycle time was found to be the equivalent cycle time if the rotating speed is 4 times greater than the system's minimum natural frequency.

  5. 40 CFR 86.129-00 - Road load power, test weight, and inertia weight class determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Road load power, test weight, and inertia weight class determination. 86.129-00 Section 86.129-00 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... power, test weight, and inertia weight class determination. Applicability. Section 86.129-94 (a)...

  6. Emotional inertia prospectively predicts the onset of depressive disorder in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Kuppens, Peter; Sheeber, Lisa B; Yap, Marie B H; Whittle, Sarah; Simmons, Julian G; Allen, Nicholas B

    2012-04-01

    Emotional inertia refers to the degree to which a person's current emotional state is predicted by their prior emotional state, reflecting how much it carries over from one moment to the next. Recently, in a cross-sectional study, we showed that high inertia is an important characteristic of the emotion dynamics observed in psychological maladjustment such as depression. In the present study, we examined whether emotional inertia prospectively predicts the onset of first-episode depression during adolescence. Emotional inertia was assessed in a sample of early adolescents (N = 165) based on second-to-second behavioral coding of videotaped naturalistic interactions with a parent. Greater inertia of both negative and positive emotional behaviors predicted the emergence of clinical depression 2.5 years later. The implications of these findings for the understanding of the etiology and early detection of depression are discussed. PMID:21988744

  7. Model-independent inference of neutron star radii from moment of inertia measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raithel, Carolyn A.; Özel, Feryal; Psaltis, Dimitrios

    2016-03-01

    A precise moment of inertia measurement for PSR J0737-3039A in the double pulsar system is expected within the next five years. We present here a new method of mapping the anticipated measurement of the moment of inertia directly into the neutron star structure. We determine the maximum and minimum values possible for the moment of inertia of a neutron star of a given radius based on physical stability arguments, assuming knowledge of the equation of state only at densities below the nuclear saturation density. If the equation of state is trusted up to the nuclear saturation density, we find that a measurement of the moment of inertia will place absolute bounds on the radius of PSR J0737-3039A to within ±1 km. The resulting combination of moment of inertia, mass, and radius measurements for a single source will allow for new, stringent constraints on the dense-matter equation of state.

  8. Effects of fluid inertia and turbulence on force coefficients for squeeze film dampers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andres, L. S.; Vance, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of fluid inertia and turbulence on the force coefficients of squeeze film dampers are investigated analytically. Both the convective and the temporal terms are included in the analysis of inertia effects. The analysis of turbulence is based on friction coefficients currently found in the literature for Poiseuille flow. The effect of fluid inertia on the magnitude of the radial direct inertia coefficient (i.e., to produce an apparent added mass at small eccentricity ratios, due to the temporal terms) is found to be completely reversed at large eccentricity ratios. The reversal is due entirely to the inclusion of the convective inertia terms in the analysis. Turbulence is found to produce a large effect on the direct damping coefficient at high eccentricity ratios. For the long or sealed squeeze film damper at high eccentricity ratios, the damping prediction with turbulence included is an order of magnitude higher than the laminar solution.

  9. Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons (DAN) Experiment Onboard NASA's Mars Science Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitrofanov, I. G.; Litvak, M. L.; Varenikov, A. B.; Barmakov, Y. N.; Behar, A.; Bobrovnitsky, Y. I.; Bogolubov, E. P.; Boynton, W. V.; Harshman, K.; Kan, E.; Kozyrev, A. S.; Kuzmin, R. O.; Malakhov, A. V.; Mokrousov, M. I.; Ponomareva, S. N.; Ryzhkov, V. I.; Sanin, A. B.; Smirnov, G. A.; Shvetsov, V. N.; Timoshenko, G. N.; Tomilina, T. M.; Tret'yakov, V. I.; Vostrukhin, A. A.

    2012-09-01

    The description of Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons (DAN) experiment is presented, as a part of the NASA's Mars Science Laboratory mission onboard the mars rover Curiosity. The instrument DAN includes Pulsing Neutron Generator (PNG) producing pulses of 14.1 MeV neutrons for irradiation of subsurface material below the rover, and Detectors and Electronics (DE) unit, which operates the instrument itself and measures the die-away time profiles of epithermal and thermal neutrons following each neutron pulse. It is shown that the DAN investigation will measure a content of hydrogen along the path of the MSL rover, and it will also provide information about a depth distribution of hydrogen at 10-20 regions selected for the detailed studies and sampling analysis.

  10. Long term surface albedo datasets generated with Meteosat images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lattanzio, A.; Govaerts, Y. M.; Theodore, B.

    2009-04-01

    The Global Climate Observing System (GCOS) has recognized the importance and the key-role of the surface albedo in the study of the climate change. This and the other climate variables, called Essential Climate Variables (ECVs), must satisfy the following requirements: (i) a global coverage over long-term periods with adequate spatial and temporal resolution, (ii) reliability and accuracy as well as a (iii) quality control. The Coordination Group for Meteorological Satellites (CGMS) assigned to EUMETSAT an action (T18 (TF7)) in order to prototype and test a new algorithm able to retrieve surface albedo using geostationary satellites as described in the "Implementation plan for the global observing system for climate in support of the UNFCCC" document (WMO/TD No. 1219). In this frame EUMETSAT decided to develop a new specific algorithm, named Meteosat Surface Albedo (MSA), based on a method proposed by Pinty et al. The MSA algorithm is currently running in the operational reprocessing facility of EUMETSAT in order to generate reliable albedo data set starting from 1982. These data have been acquired by six different radiometers. As Meteosat first generation satellites have not been designed for climate monitoring, before proceeding with the interpretation of the complete archive (~ 25 years of data), a detailed temporal consistency analysis of the albedo data set generated with the MSA algorithm has been performed in order to check the compliance with points (ii) and (iii). Specific efforts have been put on the estimation of the measurement error accounting for the observation uncertainties and retrieval method assumptions. Currently 100% of the archive for the prime mission at 0 degree has been processed and the albedo data set can be requested from the EUMETSAT archive facility. This paper will present the method elaborated for the evaluation of the temporal consistency of the MSA data set and illustrate typical problems raising from the processing of old data and

  11. Family Physician Clinical Inertia in Glycemic Control among Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Valerija Bralić; Marković, Biserka Bergman; Kranjčević, Ksenija

    2015-01-01

    Background Many patients with diabetes do not achieve target values. One of the reasons for this is clinical inertia. The correct explanation of clinical inertia requires a conjunction of patient with physician and health care system factors. Our aim was to determine the rate of clinical inertia in treating diabetes in primary care and association of patient, physician, and health care setting factors with clinical inertia. Material/Methods This was a national, multicenter, observational, cross-sectional study in primary care in Croatia. Each family physician (FP) provided professional data and collected clinical data on 15–25 type 2 diabetes (T2DM) patients. Clinical inertia was defined as a consultation in which treatment change based on glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels was indicated but did not occur. Results A total of 449 FPs (response rate 89.8%) collected data on 10275 patients. Mean clinical inertia per FP was 55.6% (SD ±26.17) of consultations. All of the FPs were clinically inert with some patients, and 9% of the FPs were clinically inert with all patients. The main factors associated with clinical inertia were: higher percentage of HbA1c, oral anti-diabetic drug initiated by diabetologist, increased postprandial glycemia and total cholesterol, physical inactivity of patient, and administration of drugs other than oral antidiabetics. Conclusions Clinical inertia in treating patients with T2DM is a serious problem. Patients with worse glycemic control and those whose therapy was initiated by a diabetologist experience more clinical inertia. More research on causes of clinical inertia in treating patients with T2DM should be conducted to help achieve more effective diabetes control. PMID:25652941

  12. Cassini Imaging of Iapetus and Solution of the Albedo Asymmetry Enigma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denk, Tilmann; Spencer, John

    2014-05-01

    Cassini imaging of Iapetus during one close and several more distant flybys mainly in the first years of the mission revealed an alien and often unique landscape of this third-largest moon in the Saturnian system [1]. The data show numerous impact craters on the bright and dark terrain, equator-facing dark and pole-facing bright crater walls, huge impact basins, rather minor endogenic geologic features, a non-spherical, but ellipsoidal shape, a giant ridge which spans across half of Iapetus' circumference exactly along the equator, a newly detected global 'color dichotomy' presumably formed by dust from retrograde irregular moons, and of course the famous extreme global albedo asymmetry which has been an enigma for more than three centuries. Revealing the cause of this 'albedo dichotomy' enigma of Iapetus, where the trailing side and poles are more than 10x brighter than the leading side, was one of the major tasks for the Cassini mission. It has now been solved successfully. In the mid-1970es, deposition of exogenic dark material on the leading side, originating from outer retrograde moon Phoebe, was proposed as the cause. But this alone could not explain the global shape, sharpness, and complexity of the transition between Iapetus' bright and dark terrain. Mainly with Cassini spectrometer (CIRS) and imaging (ISS) data, all these characteristics and the asymmetry's large amplitude are now plausibly explained by runaway global thermal migration of water ice, triggered by the deposition of dark material on the leading hemisphere. This mechanism is unique to Iapetus among the Saturnian satellites for many reasons. Most important are Iapetus' slow rotation which produces unusually high daytime temperatures and water ice sublimation rates, and the size (gravity) of Iapetus which is small enough for global migration of water ice but large enough that much of the ice is retained on the surface [2]. References: [1] Denk, T., Neukum, G., Roatsch, Th., Porco, C.C., Burns, J

  13. Effect of land cover change on snow free surface albedo across the continental United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickham, J.; Nash, M. S.; Barnes, C. A.

    2016-11-01

    Land cover changes (e.g., forest to grassland) affect albedo, and changes in albedo can influence radiative forcing (warming, cooling). We empirically tested albedo response to land cover change for 130 locations across the continental United States using high resolution (30 m-×-30 m) land cover change data and moderate resolution (~ 500 m-×-500 m) albedo data. The land cover change data spanned 10 years (2001 - 2011) and the albedo data included observations every eight days for 13 years (2001 - 2013). Empirical testing was based on autoregressive time series analysis of snow free albedo for verified locations of land cover change. Approximately one-third of the autoregressive analyses for woody to herbaceous or forest to shrub change classes were not significant, indicating that albedo did not change significantly as a result of land cover change at these locations. In addition, ~ 80% of mean differences in albedo arising from land cover change were less than ± 0.02, a nominal benchmark for precision of albedo measurements that is related to significant changes in radiative forcing. Under snow free conditions, we found that land cover change does not guarantee a significant albedo response, and that the differences in mean albedo response for the majority of land cover change locations were small.

  14. Durability of high-albedo roof coatings and implications for cooling energy savings. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bretz, S.E.; Akbari, H.

    1994-06-01

    Twenty-six spot albedo measurements of roofs were made using a calibrated pyranometer. The roofs were surfaced with either an acrylic elastomeric coating, a polymer coating with an acrylic base, or a cementitious coating. Some of the roofs` albedos were measured before and after washing to determine whether the albedo decrease was permanent. Data indicated that most of the albedo degradation occurred within the first year, and even within the first two months. On one roof, 70% of one year`s albedo degradation occurred in the first two months. After the first year, the degradation slowed, with data indicating small losses in albedo after the second year. Measurements of seasonal cooling energy savings by Akbari et al. (1993) included the effects of over two months of albedo degradation. We estimated {approximately}20% loss in cooling-energy savings after the first year because of dirt accumulation. For most of the roofs we cleaned, the albedo was restored to within 90% of its initial value. Although washing is effective at restoring albedo, the increase in energy savings is temporary and labor costs are significant in comparison to savings. By our calculations, it is not cost-effective to hire someone to clean a high-albedo roof only to achieve energy savings. Thus, it would be useful to develop and identify dirt-resistant high-albedo coatings.

  15. Effect of canopy structure and the presence of snow on the albedo of boreal conifer forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Wenge; Woodcock, Curtis E.

    2000-05-01

    A Geometric-Optical and Radiative Transfer (GORT) approach for modeling the radiation regime within plant canopies is capable of predicting temporal variation in the albedo of boreal conifer forests. Model predictions of daily surface albedo patterns and reflected solar radiation during the winter and summer seasons were validated using field measurements from two forest stands in the northern study area of BOReal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) in 1995. The model is able to predict the "W" shape for the daily albedo over the sparse old jack pine forest stand during the snow season and the "bowl" shape of daily albedo during clear days in the summer. Results immediately following new snow and at the end of the snowmelt season indicate the sensitivity of overall forest albedos to the albedo of snow. Incorporation of time-varying values for snow albedo may improve future efforts to estimate forest albedos in the winter. Forest albedos are a complicated function of the canopy structure, the presence or absence of snow on the ground and the angular distribution of irradiance. These effects differ for the visible, near-infrared and midinfrared portions of the solar spectrum. Forest albedos vary dramatically as a function of canopy cover when snow covers the ground, but very little when snow is not present. It is found that for tree cover over about 70%, the presence of snow has little effect on albedo.

  16. Albedo of coastal landfast sea ice in Prydz Bay, Antarctica: Observations and parameterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qinghua; Liu, Jiping; Leppäranta, Matti; Sun, Qizhen; Li, Rongbin; Zhang, Lin; Jung, Thomas; Lei, Ruibo; Zhang, Zhanhai; Li, Ming; Zhao, Jiechen; Cheng, Jingjing

    2016-05-01

    The snow/sea-ice albedo was measured over coastal landfast sea ice in Prydz Bay, East Antarctica (off Zhongshan Station) during the austral spring and summer of 2010 and 2011. The variation of the observed albedo was a combination of a gradual seasonal transition from spring to summer and abrupt changes resulting from synoptic events, including snowfall, blowing snow, and overcast skies. The measured albedo ranged from 0.94 over thick fresh snow to 0.36 over melting sea ice. It was found that snow thickness was the most important factor influencing the albedo variation, while synoptic events and overcast skies could increase the albedo by about 0.18 and 0.06, respectively. The in-situ measured albedo and related physical parameters (e.g., snow thickness, ice thickness, surface temperature, and air temperature) were then used to evaluate four different snow/ice albedo parameterizations used in a variety of climate models. The parameterized albedos showed substantial discrepancies compared to the observed albedo, particularly during the summer melt period, even though more complex parameterizations yielded more realistic variations than simple ones. A modified parameterization was developed, which further considered synoptic events, cloud cover, and the local landfast sea-ice surface characteristics. The resulting parameterized albedo showed very good agreement with the observed albedo.

  17. Albedo maps of Comets P/Giacobini-Zinner and P/Halley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammel, H. B.; Storrs, A. D.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Telesco, C. M.; Decher, R. M.; Campins, H.

    1986-01-01

    Near-simultaneous infrared and visual maps of P/Giacobini-Zinner (P/G-Z) and P/Halley are combined to create maps of the spatial variation of geometric albedo. Giacobini-Zinner shows a minimum in albedo near 0.07 with an increase of a factor of 2 over 30 arcsec. The lowest albedos are offset from the nucleus in the antisunward direction, coincident with a dust tail observed in the IR. The P/Halley albedos are higher than those for P/G-Z and range from 0.2 to 0.4, but the trend of darker albedo in the antisunward direction (along the tail) is the same. The albedo distribution is attributed to large, dark, fluffy grains confined to the orbital plane close to the nucleus. The high albedo values in P/Halley may be due to enhanced flux in the visual image because of the comet's very small phase angle.

  18. Reentrant albedo proton fluxes measured by the PAMELA experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adriani, O.; Barbarino, G. C.; Bazilevskaya, G. A.; Bellotti, R.; Boezio, M.; Bogomolov, E. A.; Bongi, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Bottai, S.; Bruno, A.; Cafagna, F.; Campana, D.; Carlson, P.; Casolino, M.; Castellini, G.; Donato, C. De; De Santis, C.; De Simone, N.; Di Felice, V.; Formato, V.; Galper, A. M.; Karelin, A. V.; Koldashov, S. V.; Koldobskiy, S.; Krutkov, S. Y.; Kvashnin, A. N.; Leonov, A.; Malakhov, V.; Marcelli, L.; Martucci, M.; Mayorov, A. G.; Menn, W.; Mergé, M.; Mikhailov, V. V.; Mocchiutti, E.; Monaco, A.; Mori, N.; Munini, R.; Osteria, G.; Palma, F.; Panico, B.; Papini, P.; Pearce, M.; Picozza, P.; Ricci, M.; Ricciarini, S. B.; Sarkar, R.; Scotti, V.; Simon, M.; Sparvoli, R.; Spillantini, P.; Stozhkov, Y. I.; Vacchi, A.; Vannuccini, E.; Vasilyev, G. I.; Voronov, S. A.; Yurkin, Y. T.; Zampa, G.; Zampa, N.

    2015-05-01

    We present a precise measurement of downward going albedo proton fluxes for kinetic energy above ˜70 MeV performed by the Payload for Antimatter Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics (PAMELA) experiment at an altitude between 350 and 610 km. On the basis of a trajectory tracing simulation, the analyzed protons were classified into quasi-trapped, concentrating in the magnetic equatorial region, and untrapped spreading over all latitudes, including both short-lived (precipitating) and long-lived (pseudotrapped) components. In addition, features of the penumbra region around the geomagnetic cutoff were investigated in detail. PAMELA results significantly improve the characterization of the high-energy albedo proton populations at low-Earth orbits.

  19. NEOWISE diameters and albedos: now available on PDS!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masiero, Joseph R.; Mainzer, Amy K.; Bauer, James M.; Cutri, Roc M.; Grav, Tommy; Kramer, Emily A.; Nugent, Carolyn; Sonnett, Sarah M.; Stevenson, Rachel; Wright, Edward L.

    2016-10-01

    We present the recent PDS release of minor planet physical property data from the WISE/NEOWISE fully cryogenic, 3-band cryo, and post-cryo surveys as well as the first year of the NEOWISE-Reactivation survey. This release includes 165,865 diameters, visible albedos, near-infrared albedos, and/or beaming parameters for 140,493 unique minor planets. The published data include near-Earth asteroids, Main Belt asteroids, Hildas, Jupiter Trojans, Centaurs, active Main Belt objects and irregular satellites of Jupiter and Saturn. We provide an overview of the available data and discuss the key features of the PDS data set. The data are available online at: http://sbn.psi.edu/pds/resource/neowisediam.html.

  20. Exogenic and endogenic albedo and color patterns on Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcewen, A. S.

    1986-01-01

    New global and high-resolution multispectral mosaics of Europa have been produced from the Voyager imaging data. Photometric normalizations are based on multiple-image techniques that explicitly account for intrinsic albedo variations through pixel-by-pixel solutions. The exogenic color and albedo pattern on Europa is described by a second-order function of the cosine of the angular distance from the apex of orbital motion. On the basis of this second-order function and of color trends that are different on the leading and trailing hemispheres, the exogenic pattern is interpreted as being due to equilibrium between two dominant processes: (1) impact gardening and (2) magnetospheric interactions, including sulfur-ion implantation and sputtering redistribution. Removal of the model exogenic pattern in the mosaics reveals the endogenic variations, consisting of only two major units: darker (redder) and bright materials. Therefore Europa's visual spectral reflectivity is simple, having one continuous exogenic pattern and two discrete endogenic units.

  1. Land Surface Albedo from MERIS Reflectances Using MODIS Directional Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaaf, Crystal L. B.; Gao, Feng; Strahler, Alan H.

    2004-01-01

    MERIS Level 2 surface reflectance products are now available to the scientific community. This paper demonstrates the production of MERIS-derived surface albedo and Nadir Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) adjusted reflectances by coupling the MERIS data with MODIS BRDF products. Initial efforts rely on the specification of surface anisotropy as provided by the global MODIS BRDF product for a first guess of the shape of the BRDF and then make use all of the coincidently available, partially atmospherically corrected, cloud cleared, MERIS observations to generate MERIS-derived BRDF and surface albedo quantities for each location. Comparisons between MODIS (aerosol-corrected) and MERIS (not-yet aerosol-corrected) surface values from April and May 2003 are also presented for case studies in Spain and California as well as preliminary comparisons with field data from the Devil's Rock Surfrad/BSRN site.

  2. Deriving Albedo from Coupled MERIS and MODIS Surface Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Feng; Schaaf, Crystal; Jin, Yu-Fang; Lucht, Wolfgang; Strahler, Alan

    2004-01-01

    MERIS Level 2 surface reflectance products are now available to the scientific community. This paper demonstrates the production of MERIS-derived surface albedo and Nadir Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) adjusted reflectances by coupling the MERIS data with MODIS BRDF products. Initial efforts rely on the specification of surface anisotropy as provided by the global MODIS BRDF product for a first guess of the shape of the BRDF and then make use all of the coincidently available, partially atmospherically corrected, cloud cleared, MERIS observations to generate MERIS-derived BRDF and surface albedo quantities for each location. Comparisons between MODIS (aerosol-corrected) and MERIS (not-yet aerosol-corrected) surface values from April and May 2003 are also presented for case studies in Spain and California as well as preliminary comparisons with field data from the Devil's Rock Surfrad/BSRN site.

  3. a Generalized Albedo Option for Forward and Adjoint Monte Carlo Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, Itacil Chiari

    1991-02-01

    The advisability of using the albedo procedure for the Monte Carlo solution of deep penetration shielding problems which have ducts and other penetrations is investigated. It is generally accepted that the use of albedo data can dramatically improve the computational efficiency of certain Monte Carlo calculations--however the accuracy of these results may be unacceptable because of lost information during the albedo event and serious errors in the available differential albedo data. This study has been done to evaluate and appropriately modify the MORSE/BREESE package, to develop new methods for generating the required albedo data, and to extend the adjoint capability to the albedo-modified calculations. The major modifications include an option to save for further use information that would be lost at the albedo event, an option to displace the emergent point during an albedo event, and an option to read spatially -dependent albedo data for both forward and adjoint calculations --which includes the emergent point as a new random variable to be selected during an albedo reflection event. The theoretical basis for using TORT-generated forward albedo information to produce adjuncton-albedos is derived. The MORSE/STORM code was developed to perform both forward and adjoint modes of analysis using spatially-dependent albedo data. The results obtained using the MORSE/STORM code package for both forward and adjoint modes were compared with benchmark solutions--excellent agreements along with improved computational efficiencies were achieved demonstrating the full utilization of the albedo option in the MORSE code.

  4. Third-Order Development of Shape, Gravity, and Moment of Inertia of Ceres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rambaux, N.; Chambat, F.; Castillo, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    Ceres is the target of the space mission Dawn. It is a protoplanet that is left over from the formation of the solar System about 4.6 billion years ago and its study could improve our knowledge of the early solar system. Quantifying these properties under the assumption of hydrostatic equilibrium forms the basis for interpreting shape and gravity data in terms of interior structure and infer deviations from hydrostaticity that can bring information on the thermal and chemical history of the planet. Here, we investigate the hydrostatic shape and gravitational potential coefficients of Ceres that is large enough to have undergone internal differentiation and chemical stratification. The Dawn spacecraft is expected to obtained a high-resolution shape data, with an accuracy better than 200 m/pixel. In order to reach an accuracy of few tens of meters for this 9 hours self-gravitating body, the shape models developed up to first order are not enough because they attain an accuracy of 1.8 km. Therefore, we numerically integrate Clairaut's equations of rotational equilibrium expanded up to third order in a small parameter m, the geodetic parameter, to reach an accuracy of 25 meters. The following geodetical quantities under the hydrostatic hypothesis are derived: flattening and other shape parameters, gravitational potential coefficients, and moments of inertia. This type of modeling will be instrumental to the estimation of non-hydrostatic contributions to Ceres' shape to be measured by Dawn.

  5. Gamma-ray Albedo of Small Solar System Bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Moskalenko, I.V.

    2008-03-25

    We calculate the {gamma}-ray albedo flux from cosmic-ray (CR) interactions with the solid rock and ice in Main Belt asteroids and Kuiper Belt objects (KBOs) using the Moon as a template. We show that the {gamma}-ray albedo for the Main Belt and KBOs strongly depends on the small-body mass spectrum of each system and may be detectable by the forthcoming Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST). If detected, it can be used to derive the mass spectrum of small bodies in the Main Belt and Kuiper Belt and to probe the spectrum of CR nuclei at close-to-interstellar conditions. The orbits of the Main Belt asteroids and KBOs are distributed near the ecliptic, which passes through the Galactic center and high Galactic latitudes. Therefore, the {gamma}-ray emission by the Main Belt and Kuiper Belt has to be taken into account when analyzing weak {gamma}-ray sources close to the ecliptic. The asteroid albedo spectrum also exhibits a 511 keV line due to secondary positrons annihilating in the rock. This may be an important and previously unrecognized celestial foreground for the INTErnational Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) observations of the Galactic 511 keV line emission including the direction of the Galactic center. For details of our calculations and references see [1].

  6. Albedo polarimétrico de asteroides del grupo Hungaria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil-Hutton, R.; Benavidez, P.

    La región del cinturón de asteroides en donde se encuentra el grupo de los Hungarias (a= 1.79 a 1.98 UA, i=15 a 40 grados) es la única zona donde es común encontrar objetos de tipo taxonómico E, caracterizados por altos albedos, colores relativamente neutros y espectros sin detalles. Este tipo de asteroides está relacionado espectralmente con ciertos meteoritos (aubritas) que indican la existencia de episodios de gran calentamiento que ocurrieron durante la formación del Sistema Solar. Como el espectro de los asteroides de tipo E es idéntico a los de tipo M y P, la única forma de clasificar un asteroide en alguno de estos tres tipos taxonómicos es mediante el albedo. En este trabajo se presentan resultados preliminares sobre la determinación polarimétrica de albedos para objetos de este grupo utilizando el polarímetro CASPROF de CASLEO.

  7. Supercritical Salt Spray for the Implementation of Cloud Albedo Modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neukermans, A. P.; Cooper, G.; Foster, J. D.; Galbraith, L.; Ormond, B.; Wang, Q.; Johnston, D.; Cloud Brightening Research

    2011-12-01

    Of all the geo-engineering schemes proposed so far, the Latham-Salter cloud albedo modification scheme is perhaps the most benign and "natural" method. In its full deployment, it proposes to densify and thereby modify the albedo of low-hanging marine boundary clouds by a few percent such that the overall earth albedo might be changed by 1%. The scheme would require the production of vast numbers of salt cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), in one implementation on the order of 10^17 per second from each of some 1500 autonomous sailing vessels. We have investigated a number of possible techniques to create these nuclei. We reported previously the laboratory production of suitable nuclei from saltwater using Taylor cones. This method would require about 10^8 Taylor cones per vessel to get to the required CCN production rate, and hence needs a very extensive scale-up effort. We report here on the use of saltwater sprayed at or near its critical temperature and pressure through small nozzles. Although a number of technical problems remain, results to date suggest that this method might be suitable, at least for research purposes. The mean particle size distributions of nuclei generated (40-100 nm) are acceptable, and the scale-up effort to the estimated number of nozzles required (1000-2000) seems reasonable.

  8. Signatures of volatiles in the lunar proton albedo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwadron, N. A.; Wilson, J. K.; Looper, M. D.; Jordan, A. P.; Spence, H. E.; Blake, J. B.; Case, A. W.; Iwata, Y.; Kasper, J. C.; Farrell, W. M.; Lawrence, D. J.; Livadiotis, G.; Mazur, J.; Petro, N.; Pieters, C.; Robinson, M. S.; Smith, S.; Townsend, L. W.; Zeitlin, C.

    2016-07-01

    We find evidence for hydrated material in the lunar regolith using "albedo protons" measured with the Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation (CRaTER) on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO). Fluxes of these albedo protons, which are emitted from the regolith due to steady bombardment by high energy radiation (Galactic Cosmic Rays), are observed to peak near the poles, and are inconsistent with the latitude trends of heavy element enrichment (e.g., enhanced Fe abundance). The latitudinal distribution of albedo protons anti-correlates with that of epithermal or high energy neutrons. The high latitude enhancement may be due to the conversion of upward directed secondary neutrons from the lunar regolith into tertiary protons due to neutron-proton collisions in hydrated regolith that is more prevalent near the poles. The CRaTER instrument may thus provide important measurements of volatile distributions within regolith at the Moon and potentially, with similar sensors and observations, at other bodies within the Solar System.

  9. Possible Albedo Proton Signature of Hydrated Lunar Surface Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwadron, N.; Wilson, J. K.; Looper, M. D.; Jordan, A.; Spence, H. E.; Blake, J. B.; Case, A. W.; Iwata, Y.; Kasper, J. C.; Farrell, W. M.; Lawrence, D. J.; Livadiotis, G.; Mazur, J. E.; Petro, N. E.; Pieters, C. M.; Robinson, M. S.; Smith, S. S.; Townsend, L. W.; Zeitlin, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    We find evidence for a surface layer of hydrated material in the lunar regolith using "albedo protons" measured by the Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation (CRaTER) on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO). Fluxes of these albedo protons, which are emitted from the regolith due to steady bombardment by high-energy radiation (Galactic Cosmic Rays), are observed to peak near the poles, and cannot be accounted for by either heavy element enrichment (e.g., enhanced Fe abundance), or by deeply buried (> 50 cm) hydrogenous material. The latitudinal distribution of albedo protons does not correlate with that of epithermal or high-energy neutrons. The high latitude enhancement may be due to the conversion of upward directed secondary neutrons from the lunar regolith into tertiary protons due to neutron-proton collisions in a thin (~ 1-10 cm) layer of hydrated regolith near the surface that is more prevalent near the poles. The CRaTER instrument thus provides critical measurements of volatile distributions within lunar regolith and potentially, with similar sensors and observations, at other bodies within the Solar System.

  10. Multiple asteroid systems: Dimensions and thermal properties from Spitzer Space Telescope and ground-based observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchis, F.; Enriquez, J. E.; Emery, J. P.; Mueller, M.; Baek, M.; Pollock, J.; Assafin, M.; Vieira Martins, R.; Berthier, J.; Vachier, F.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Lim, L. F.; Reichart, D. E.; Ivarsen, K. M.; Haislip, J. B.; LaCluyze, A. P.

    2012-11-01

    We collected mid-IR spectra from 5.2 to 38 μm using the Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Spectrograph of 28 asteroids representative of all established types of binary groups. Photometric lightcurves were also obtained for 14 of them during the Spitzer observations to provide the context of the observations and reliable estimates of their absolute magnitudes. The extracted mid-IR spectra were analyzed using a modified standard thermal model (STM) and a thermophysical model (TPM) that takes into account the shape and geometry of the large primary at the time of the Spitzer observation. We derived a reliable estimate of the size, albedo, and beaming factor for each of these asteroids, representing three main taxonomic groups: C, S, and X. For large (volume-equivalent system diameter Deq > 130 km) binary asteroids, the TPM analysis indicates a low thermal inertia (Γ ⩽ ∼100 J s-1/2 K-1 m-2) and their emissivity spectra display strong mineral features, implying that they are covered with a thick layer of thermally insulating regolith. The smaller (surface-equivalent system diameter Deff < 17 km) asteroids also show some emission lines of minerals, but they are significantly weaker, consistent with regoliths with coarser grains, than those of the large binary asteroids. The average bulk densities of these multiple asteroids vary from 0.7-1.7 g/cm3 (P-, C-type) to ∼2 g/cm3 (S-type). The highest density is estimated for the M-type (22) Kalliope (3.2 ± 0.9 g/cm3). The spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and emissivity spectra, made available as a supplement document, could help to constrain the surface compositions of these asteroids.

  11. Multiple Asteroid Systems: Dimensions and Thermal Properties from Spitzer Space Telescope and Ground-based Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marchis, F.; Enriquez, J. E.; Emery, J. P.; Mueller, M.; Baek, M.; Pollock, J.; Assafin, M.; Matins, R. Vieira; Berthier, J.; Vachier, F.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Lim, L. F.; Reichart, D. E.; Ivarsen, K. M.; Haislip, J. B.; LaCluyze, A. P.

    2012-01-01

    We collected mid-IR spectra from 5.2 to 38 microns using the Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Spectrograph of 28 asteroids representative of all established types of binary groups. Photometric light curves were also obtained for 14 of them during the Spitzer observations to provide the context of the observations and reliable estimates of their absolute magnitudes. The extracted mid-IR spectra were analyzed using a modified standard thermal model (STM) and a thermophysical model (TPM) that takes into account the shape and geometry of the large primary at the time of the Spitzer observation. We derived a reliable estimate of the size, albedo, and beaming factor for each of these asteroids, representing three main taxonomic groups: C, S, and X. For large (volume-equivalent system diameter Deq > 130 km) binary asteroids, the TPM analysis indicates a low thermal inertia (Lambda < or = approx.100 J/1/2 s/K/sq m2) and their emissivity spectra display strong mineral features, implying that they are covered with a thick layer of thermally insulating regolith. The smaller (surface-equivalent system diameter Deff < 17 km) asteroids also show some emission lines of minerals, but they are significantly weaker, consistent with regoliths with coarser grains, than those of the large binary asteroids. The average bulk densities of these multiple asteroids vary from 0.7-1.7 g/cu cm (P-, C-type) to approx. 2 g/cu cm (S-type). The highest density is estimated for the M-type (22) Kalliope (3.2 +/- 0.9 g/cu cm). The spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and emissivity spectra, made available as a supplement document, could help to constrain the surface compositions of these asteroids.

  12. Emotional Inertia is Associated with Lower Well-Being when Controlling for Differences in Emotional Context.

    PubMed

    Koval, Peter; Sütterlin, Stefan; Kuppens, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have linked higher emotional inertia (i.e., a stronger autoregressive slope of emotions) with lower well-being. We aimed to replicate these findings, while extending upon previous research by addressing a number of unresolved issues and controlling for potential confounds. Specifically, we report results from two studies (Ns = 100 and 202) examining how emotional inertia, assessed in response to a standardized sequence of emotional stimuli in the lab, correlates with several measures of well-being. The current studies build on previous research by examining how inertia of both positive emotions (PE) and negative emotions (NE) relates to positive (e.g., life satisfaction) and negative (e.g., depressive symptoms) indicators of well-being, while controlling for between-person differences in the mean level and variability of emotions. Our findings replicated previous research and further revealed that (a) NE inertia was more strongly associated with lower well-being than PE inertia; (b) emotional inertia correlated more consistently with negative indicators (e.g., depressive symptoms) than positive indicators (e.g., life satisfaction) of well-being; and (c) these relationships were independent of individual differences in mean level and variability of emotions. We conclude, in line with recent findings, that higher emotional inertia, particularly of NE, may be an indicator of increased vulnerability to depression.

  13. Emotional Inertia is Associated with Lower Well-Being when Controlling for Differences in Emotional Context

    PubMed Central

    Koval, Peter; Sütterlin, Stefan; Kuppens, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have linked higher emotional inertia (i.e., a stronger autoregressive slope of emotions) with lower well-being. We aimed to replicate these findings, while extending upon previous research by addressing a number of unresolved issues and controlling for potential confounds. Specifically, we report results from two studies (Ns = 100 and 202) examining how emotional inertia, assessed in response to a standardized sequence of emotional stimuli in the lab, correlates with several measures of well-being. The current studies build on previous research by examining how inertia of both positive emotions (PE) and negative emotions (NE) relates to positive (e.g., life satisfaction) and negative (e.g., depressive symptoms) indicators of well-being, while controlling for between-person differences in the mean level and variability of emotions. Our findings replicated previous research and further revealed that (a) NE inertia was more strongly associated with lower well-being than PE inertia; (b) emotional inertia correlated more consistently with negative indicators (e.g., depressive symptoms) than positive indicators (e.g., life satisfaction) of well-being; and (c) these relationships were independent of individual differences in mean level and variability of emotions. We conclude, in line with recent findings, that higher emotional inertia, particularly of NE, may be an indicator of increased vulnerability to depression. PMID:26779099

  14. Albedo of bare ice near the Trans-Antarctic Mountains as an analogue of sea-glaciers on the tropical ocean of Snowball Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadic, R.; Mullen, P.; Schneebeli, M.; Brandt, R. E.; Fitzpatric, M.; Carns, R.; Warren, S. G.

    2012-04-01

    weighted by the spectral solar flux to obtain broadband albedos. These range from 0.8 for snow to 0.55 for blue ice. Although what determines the albedo is the SSA of bubbles or snow grains, the broadband albedo also shows a systematic relation to the snow or ice density, suggesting that density might serve as a surrogate variable that will be easier to predict than SSA in an ice-sheet model, using a parameterization for firn densification. The ice cores were analyzed by micro-CT (computer tomography) for bubble morphology, cracks (mainly thermal cracks), and SSA. The SSA is used in a radiative transfer model to explain the measured albedo spectra. We found that thermal cracks in the Allan Hills may be more important than in the equatorial region of Snowball Earth. We tried to separate the effects of cracks from original air bubbles by separately computing their individual SSAs in the CT images, and using those SSAs in the albedo model. These methods allow us to estimate a range of albedos for the different possible regions and climatic conditions on low latitudes of Snowball Earth.

  15. Multidecadal analysis of forest growth and albedo in boreal Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukeš, Petr; Stenberg, Pauline; Mõttus, Matti; Manninen, Terhikki; Rautiainen, Miina

    2016-10-01

    It is well known that forests serve as carbon sinks. However, the balancing effect of afforestation and increased forest density on global warming due to carbon storage may be lost by low albedo (thus high absorption) of the forests. In the last 30 years, there has been a steady increase in the growing stock of Finnish forests by nearly a quarter while the area of the forests has remained virtually unchanged. Such increase in forest density together with the availability of detailed forest inventories provided by the Multi-Source National Forest Inventory (MS-NFI) in high spatial resolution makes Finland an ideal candidate for exploring the effects of increased forest density on satellite derived estimates of bio-geochemical products e.g. albedo (directional-hemispherical reflectance, DHR), fraction of photosynthetically active radiation absorbed by canopies (fAPAR), leaf area index (LAI) and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) in both current and long-term perspective. In this study, we first used MODIS-based vegetation satellite products for Finnish forests to study their seasonal patterns and interrelations. Next, the peak growing season observations are linked to the MS-NFI database to yield the generic relationships between forest density and the satellite-derived vegetation indicators. Finally, long-term GIMMS3g datasets between 1982 and 2011 (2008 for DHR) are analyzed and interpreted using forest inventory data. The vegetation peak growing season NIR DHR and VIS DHR showed weak to moderate negative correlation with fAPAR, whereas there was no correlation between NIR DHR and fAPAR. Next, we show that the spectral albedos in the near-infrared region (NIR DHR) showed weak negative correlation with forest biomass, basal area or canopy cover whereas, as expected, the spectral albedo in the visible region (VIS DHR) correlated negatively with these measures of forest density. Interestingly, the increase in forest density (biomass per ha) of Finnish

  16. Moments of Inertia: Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle (UAV) Dryden Remotely Operated Integrated Drone (DROID)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haro, Helida C.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this research effort is to determine the most appropriate, cost efficient, and effective method to utilize for finding moments of inertia for the Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle (UAV) Dryden Remotely Operated Integrated Drone (DROID). A moment is a measure of the body's tendency to turn about its center of gravity (CG) and inertia is the resistance of a body to changes in its momentum. Therefore, the moment of inertia (MOI) is a body's resistance to change in rotation about its CG. The inertial characteristics of an UAV have direct consequences on aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, and control. Therefore, it is imperative to determine the precise inertial characteristics of the DROID.

  17. Moments of Inertia - Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle (UAV) Dryden Remotely Operated Integrated Drone (DROID)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haro, Helida C.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this research effort is to determine the most appropriate, cost efficient, and effective method to utilize for finding moments of inertia for the Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle (UAV) Dryden Remotely Operated Integrated Drone (DROID). A moment is a measure of the body's tendency to turn about its center of gravity (CG) and inertia is the resistance of a body to changes in its momentum. Therefore, the moment of inertia (MOI) is a body's resistance to change in rotation about its CG. The inertial characteristics of an UAV have direct consequences on aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, and control. Therefore, it is imperative to determine the precise inertial characteristics of the DROID.

  18. Model reduction of multibody systems by the removal of generalized forces of inertia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, Stephen Michael

    2000-09-01

    Multibody models are often constructed with moving intermediate reference frames to characterize critical forces and moments. Ideally, these reference frames would be described by rigid bodies with zero inertia. However, existing equation formulation methods require that the accelerations of all bodies be resisted by inertia; singularities result otherwise. Thus, models are often given bodies with ``small'' inertias to serve as such reference frames. In these cases, small inertias contribute high-frequency dynamics to the system that are not of interest. The high-frequency dynamics are undesirable because they require the use of small integration time steps or sophisticated numerical integration methods. This dissertation presents a new method of model reduction for multibody systems that allows masses and rotational inertias of the bodies to be set to zero. The method forms constraint equations that are solved to eliminate singularities, due to the zero inertias by eliminating the degrees of freedom with which the singularities are associated. A computer program, based on the AutoSimTM multibody program, called ``AutoSimIR'' (the ``IR'' denotes ``inertia removal'') was created to implement the new formulation method. Procedures and data structures developed for AutoSimIR are presented. The method is demonstrated for two example multibody models: (1)a four-body heavy-truck suspension, and (2)a twelve-body three-dimensional vehicle model of a 5-axle tractor-semitrailer, similar to the one in the TruckSimTM software package. For each system, the equations of motion are formulated for the full model (small inertias are kept in the model) and for the reduced model (small inertias are removed). The example simulations show that the modeling assumption of removing inertias is sometimes beneficial, and sometimes detrimental. The reasons for this are shown to be related to the amount of rate-dependent damping in the system. A ``rule of thumb'' is proposed for predicting

  19. A class of parallel algorithms for computation of the manipulator inertia matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fijany, Amir; Bejczy, Antal K.

    1989-01-01

    Parallel and parallel/pipeline algorithms for computation of the manipulator inertia matrix are presented. An algorithm based on composite rigid-body spatial inertia method, which provides better features for parallelization, is used for the computation of the inertia matrix. Two parallel algorithms are developed which achieve the time lower bound in computation. Also described is the mapping of these algorithms with topological variation on a two-dimensional processor array, with nearest-neighbor connection, and with cardinality variation on a linear processor array. An efficient parallel/pipeline algorithm for the linear array was also developed, but at significantly higher efficiency.

  20. A Change of Inertia-Supporting the Thrust Vector Control of the Space Launch System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dziubanek, Adam J.

    2012-01-01

    The Space Launch System (SLS) is America's next launch vehicle. To utilize the vehicle more economically, heritage hardware from the Space Transportation System (STS) will be used when possible. The Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) actuators could possibly be used in the core stage of the SLS. The dynamic characteristics of the SRB actuator will need to be tested on an Inertia Load Stand (ILS) that has been converted to Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME). The inertia on the pendulum of the ILS will need to be changed to match the SSME inertia. In this testing environment an SRB actuator can be tested with the equivalent resistence of an SSME.

  1. Information transfer and behavioural inertia in starling flocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attanasi, Alessandro; Cavagna, Andrea; Del Castello, Lorenzo; Giardina, Irene; Grigera, Tomas S.; Jelić, Asja; Melillo, Stefania; Parisi, Leonardo; Pohl, Oliver; Shen, Edward; Viale, Massimiliano

    2014-09-01

    Collective decision-making in biological systems requires all individuals in the group to go through a behavioural change of state. During this transition fast and robust transfer of information is essential to prevent cohesion loss. The mechanism by which natural groups achieve such robustness, however, is not clear. Here we present an experimental study of starling flocks performing collective turns. We find that information about direction changes propagates across the flock with a linear dispersion law and negligible attenuation, hence minimizing group decoherence. These results contrast starkly with present models of collective motion, which predict diffusive transport of information. Building on spontaneous symmetry breaking and conservation-law arguments, we formulate a theory that correctly reproduces linear and undamped propagation. Essential to this framework is the inclusion of the birds' behavioural inertia. The theory not only explains the data, but also predicts that information transfer must be faster the stronger the group's orientational order, a prediction accurately verified by the data. Our results suggest that swift decision-making may be the adaptive drive for the strong behavioural polarization observed in many living groups.

  2. Review. Do hormonal control systems produce evolutionary inertia?

    PubMed

    Adkins-Regan, Elizabeth

    2008-05-12

    Hormonal control systems are complex in design and well integrated. Concern has been raised that these systems might act as evolutionary constraints when animals are subject to anthropogenic environmental change. Three systems are examined in vertebrates, especially birds, that are important for assessing this possibility: (i) the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis, (ii) the activational effects of sex steroids on mating effort behaviour, and (iii) sexual differentiation. Consideration of how these systems actually work that takes adequate account of the brain's role and mechanisms suggests that the first two are unlikely to be impediments to evolution. The neural and molecular networks that regulate the HPG provide both phenotypic and evolutionary flexibility, and rapid evolutionary responses to selection have been documented in several species. The neuroendocrine and molecular cascades for behaviour provide many avenues for evolutionary change without requiring a change in peripheral hormone levels. Sexual differentiation has some potential to be a source of evolutionary inertia in birds and could contribute to the lack of diversity in certain reproductive (including life history) traits. It is unclear, however, whether that lack of diversity would impede adaptation to rapid environmental change given the role of behavioural flexibility in avian reproduction.

  3. SPIN STATE AND MOMENT OF INERTIA CHARACTERIZATION OF 4179 TOUTATIS

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Yu; Scheeres, D. J.; Busch, Michael W.

    2013-10-01

    The 4.5 km long near-Earth asteroid 4179 Toutatis has made close Earth flybys approximately every four years between 1992 and 2012, and has been observed with high-resolution radar imaging during each approach. Its most recent Earth flyby in 2012 December was observed extensively at the Goldstone and Very Large Array radar telescopes. In this paper, Toutatis' spin state dynamics are estimated from observations of five flybys between 1992 and 2008. Observations were used to fit Toutatis' spin state dynamics in a least-squares sense, with the solar and terrestrial tidal torques incorporated in the dynamical model. The estimated parameters are Toutatis' Euler angles, angular velocity, moments of inertia, and the center-of-mass-center-of-figure offset. The spin state dynamics as well as the uncertainties of the Euler angles and angular velocity of the converged solution are then propagated to 2012 December in order to compare the dynamical model to the most recent Toutatis observations. The same technique of rotational dynamics estimation can be applied to any other tumbling body, given sufficiently accurate observations.

  4. Inertia and chiral edge modes of a skyrmion magnetic bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makhfudz, Imam; Krueger, Benjamin; Tchernyshyov, Oleg

    2013-03-01

    Dynamics of topological defects is a topic of longstanding interest in magnetism. The attention to it stems from rich basic physics as well as from its connection to technological applications. The dynamics of a vortex in a thin-film ferromagnet resembles the motion of a charged massless particle in a uniform magnetic field. Similar dynamics is expected for other magnetic textures with a nonzero skyrmion number. However, recent numerical simulations revealed that skyrmion magnetic bubbles show significant deviations from this model. In this talk we present the derivation of the correct dynamical model of a skyrmion magnetic bubble. We first introduce our model phenomenologically and then derive it from the standard theory of a thin-film ferromagnet. This allows us to characterize not only the center-of-mass motion of the bubble but also the dynamics of its shape within the same framework.We show that a skyrmion bubble possesses inertia and derive its mass from the standard theory of a thin-film ferromagnet. Besides center-of-mass motion, other low energy modes are waves on the edge of the bubble traveling with different speeds in opposite directions. US National Science Foundation under Award No. DMR-1104753 (Imam Makhfudz and Oleg Tchernyshyov),

  5. Information transfer and behavioural inertia in starling flocks.

    PubMed

    Attanasi, Alessandro; Cavagna, Andrea; Del Castello, Lorenzo; Giardina, Irene; Grigera, Tomas S; Jelić, Asja; Melillo, Stefania; Parisi, Leonardo; Pohl, Oliver; Shen, Edward; Viale, Massimiliano

    2014-09-01

    Collective decision-making in biological systems requires all individuals in the group to go through a behavioural change of state. During this transition fast and robust transfer of information is essential to prevent cohesion loss. The mechanism by which natural groups achieve such robustness, though, is not clear. Here we present an experimental study of starling flocks performing collective turns. We find that information about direction changes propagates across the flock with a linear dispersion law and negligible attenuation, hence minimizing group decoherence. These results contrast starkly with current models of collective motion, which predict diffusive transport of information. Building on spontaneous symmetry breaking and conservation laws arguments, we formulate a new theory that correctly reproduces linear and undamped propagation. Essential to the new framework is the inclusion of the birds' behavioural inertia. The new theory not only explains the data, but also predicts that information transfer must be faster the stronger the group's orientational order, a prediction accurately verified by the data. Our results suggest that swift decision-making may be the adaptive drive for the strong behavioural polarization observed in many living groups. PMID:25264452

  6. Decoupling the Roles of Inertia and Gravity on Particle Dispersion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groszmann, D. E.; Thompson, J. H.; Coppen, S. W.; Rogers, C. B.

    1999-01-01

    Inertial and gravitational forces determine a particle's motion in a turbulent flow field. Gravity plays the dominant role in this motion by pulling the particles through adjacent regions of fluid turbulence. To better understand and model how a particle's inertia effects its displacement, one must examine the dispersion in a turbulent flow in the absence of gravity. In this paper, we present the particle experiments planned for NASA's KC-135 Reduced-Gravity Aircraft, which generates microgravity conditions for about 20 seconds. We also predict the particle behavior using simulation and ground-based experiments. We will release particles with Stokes numbers of 0.1, 1, and 10 into an enclosed tank of near-isotropic, stationary, and homogenous turbulence. These particle Stoke numbers cover a broad range of flow regimes of interest. Two opposed grids oscillating back and forth generate the turbulent field in the tank with a range of turbulence scales that covers about three orders of magnitude and with turbulence intensities of about ten times the mean velocity. The motion of the particles will be tracked using a stereo image velocimetry technique.

  7. Decoupling the Role of Inertia and Gravity on Particle Dispersion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Chris; Squires, Kyle

    1996-01-01

    Turbulent gas flows laden with small, dense particles are encountered in a wide number of important applications in both industrial settings and aerodynamics applications. Particle interactions with the underlying turbulent flow are exceedingly complex and, consequently, difficult to accurately model. The difficulty arises primarily due to the fact that response of a particle to the local environment is dictated by turbulence properties in the reference frame moving with the particle (particle-Lagrangian). The particle-Lagrangian reference frame is in turn dependent upon the particle relaxation time (time constant) as well as gravitational drift. The combination of inertial and gravitational effects in this frame complicates our ability to accurately predict particle-laden flows since measurements in the particle-Lagrangian reference frame are difficult to obtain. Therefore, in this work we will examine separately the effects of inertia and gravitational drift on particle dispersion through a combination of physical and numerical experiments. In this study, particle-Lagrangian measurements will be obtained in physical experiments using stereo image velocimetry. Gravitational drift will be varied in the variable-g environments of the NASA DC-9 and in the zero-g environment at the drop tower at NASA-Lewis. Direct numerical simulations will be used to corroborate the measurements from the variable-g experiments. We expect that this work will generate new insight into the underlying physics of particle dispersion and will, in turn, lead to more accurate models of particle transport in turbulent flows.

  8. Spectra of Baroclinic Inertia-Gravity Wave Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glazman, Roman E.

    1996-01-01

    Baroclinic inertia-gravity (IG) waves form a persistent background of thermocline depth and sea surface height oscillations. They also contribute to the kinetic energy of horizontal motions in the subsurface layer. Measured by the ratio of water particle velocity to wave phase speed, the wave nonlinearity may be rather high. Given a continuous supply of energy from external sources, nonlinear wave-wave interactions among IG waves would result in inertial cascades of energy, momentum, and wave action. Based on a recently developed theory of wave turbulence in scale-dependent systems, these cascades are investigated and IG wave spectra are derived for an arbitrary degree of wave nonlinearity. Comparisons with satellite-altimetry-based spectra of surface height variations and with energy spectra of horizontal velocity fluctuations show good agreement. The well-known spectral peak at the inertial frequency is thus explained as a result of the inverse cascade. Finally, we discuss a possibility of inferring the internal Rossby radius of deformation and other dynamical properties of the upper thermocline from the spectra of SSH (sea surface height) variations based on altimeter measurements.

  9. Geometrodynamic steering principle reveals the determiners of inertia

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, J.A. . Dept. of Physics)

    1988-01-01

    What shall the authors need to grasp the essence of quantum gravity One requirement, at least, is essential: to understand the steering principle of classical geometrodynamics. The authors outline here the physical content of that steering principle - heat of the so-called initial value problem - in its J.W. York, Jr. formulation. The central idea epitomizes itself in a single simple sentence: Mass-energy there determines inertia here. They spell out this steering principle both in its precise form and in its poor man's version. At both levels of analysis considerations of physics and mathematics alike require that the effective mass-energy of gravity waves must make itself felt on the spacetime geometry - and therefore on the gyro-defined local inertial frame of reference - on the same level as matter itself. Additional to the (mass)/(distance) Newtonian potential so familiar as measure of the effect of a nearby mass on the local frame is the Thirring and Lense gravitomagnetic potential, proportional to (angular momentum) x (distance vector)/(distance). The recent proposal of Ciufolini for a dual laser-ranged LAGEOS satellite to detect the thus-predicted gravitomagnetism of the earth is briefly described.

  10. Assessment of VIIRS daily BRDF/Albedo product using in situ measurement of SURFRAD sites and MODIS V006 daily BRDF/Albedo product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Wang, Z.; Sun, Q.; Schaaf, C.; Roman, M. O.

    2014-12-01

    Surface albedo is defined as the ratio of upwelling to downwelling radiative flux. It's important for understanding the global energy budget. Remote sensing albedo products provide global time continuous coverage to help capture global energy variability and change. The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) on the Suomi-NPP satellite, launched on October 28, 2011, is aiming to provide continues data record with the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), which has been providing Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF)/Albedo product since 2000. By utilizing the same approach that was used for the most recently V006 daily MODIS BRDF/Albedo product, VIIRS has the ability to keep providing products for research and operational users. Validating albedo product of VIIRS using in situmeasured albedo can assure the quality for land surface climate and biosphere models, and comparing with MODIS product can assure time continues of BRDF/albedo product. The daily BRDF/Albedo product still uses 16-day period multispectral, cloud-cleared, atmospherically-corrected surface reflectances to fit the Ross-Thick/Li-Sparse-Reciprocal semi-empirical BRDF model. But the multiday observations are also weighted based on proximity to the production date in order to emphasis on that individual day. Surface Radiation Budget Network (SURFRAD) was established in 1993 through the support of NOAA's Office of Global Programs. In situ albedo was driven from downwelling and upwelling radiative flux measured from the towers. Fraction of diffuse sky light was calculated using the direct and diffuse solar recorded in the data. It was further used to translate VIIRS, MODIS black sky and white sky albedos into actual albedo at local solar noon. Results show that VIIRS, MODIS and in situ albedo agree well at SURFARD spatially representative sites. While the VIIRS surface reflectance, snow, and cloud algorithms are still undergoing revision, the result shows that

  11. Quantifying the Impacts of Surface Albedo on Climate Using the WRF Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlosser, C. A.; Xu, L.; Xu, X.; Gregory, J.; Kirchain, R.

    2015-12-01

    Surface albedo is an important part of the energy budget in shaping local and regional climate. It could also be a potential tool to mitigate the anthropogenic effect on climate change. However, the current level of scientific understanding of surface albedo on global warming potential is medium to low. In order to investigate the anthropogenic impact of surface albedo on climate, different scenarios of urban surface albedo over continental US using the WRF model are simulated. In this study, the change in surface albedo applies to rooftops, pavements, and walls of urban land cover grid cells. The two groups of simulations (low and high albedo) were compared to determine the impacts of elevating urban surface albedo and to account for the uncertainty in the errors or noise introduced by the slightly different initial conditions. The results are represented as the differences in surface temperature and the top of the atmosphere radiation between the two scenarios when urban surface albedos are elevated from 0.15 to 0.40. The ensemble mean of all potential outcomes as a whole, instead of individual initial conditions, shows that the impact of elevating surface albedo has a cooling effect that is robust at both local and regional scales during the summer season. More refined analyses of urban areas will provide insights on surface albedo impacts in specific regions. Future analyses may address changes in CO2 equivalence.

  12. Robust estimation of albedo for illumination-invariant matching and shape recovery.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Soma; Aggarwal, Gaurav; Chellappa, Rama

    2009-05-01

    We present a nonstationary stochastic filtering framework for the task of albedo estimation from a single image. There are several approaches in the literature for albedo estimation, but few include the errors in estimates of surface normals and light source direction to improve the albedo estimate. The proposed approach effectively utilizes the error statistics of surface normals and illumination direction for robust estimation of albedo, for images illuminated by single and multiple light sources. The albedo estimate obtained is subsequently used to generate albedo-free normalized images for recovering the shape of an object. Traditional Shape-from-Shading (SFS) approaches often assume constant/piecewise constant albedo and known light source direction to recover the underlying shape. Using the estimated albedo, the general problem of estimating the shape of an object with varying albedo map and unknown illumination source is reduced to one that can be handled by traditional SFS approaches. Experimental results are provided to show the effectiveness of the approach and its application to illumination-invariant matching and shape recovery. The estimated albedo maps are compared with the ground truth. The maps are used as illumination-invariant signatures for the task of face recognition across illumination variations. The recognition results obtained compare well with the current state-of-the-art approaches. Impressive shape recovery results are obtained using images downloaded from the Web with little control over imaging conditions. The recovered shapes are also used to synthesize novel views under novel illumination conditions. PMID:19299862

  13. [Temporal and Spatial Characteristics of Lake Taihu Surface Albedo and Its Impact Factors].

    PubMed

    Cao, Chang; Li, Xu-hui; Zhang, Mi; Liu, Shou-dong; Xiao, Wei; Xiao, Qi-tao; Xu, Jia-ping

    2015-10-01

    Lake surface albedo determines energy balance of water-atmospheric interface and water physical environment. Solar elevation angle, cloudiness, wind speed, water quality and other factors can affect lake surface albedo. Using solar radiation, wind speed, and water quality data (turbidity and chlorophyll-a concentration) which were observed in four eddy covariance sites (Meiliangwan, Dapukou, Bifenggang and Xiaoleishan i. e. MLW, DPK, BFG and XLS) in Lake Taihu and clearness index (k(t)), the influence of these factors on Lake Taihu surface albedo and the reasons that led to its spatial difference were investigated. The results showed that solar elevation angle played a leading role in the diurnal and seasonal change of lake surface albedo; lake surface albedo reached two peaks in 0 < k(t) < 0.1 and 0.4 < k(t) < 0.6 respectively, when solar elevation angle was below 35 degrees. The surface albedo increased with the increasing wind speed, turbidity and chlorophyll-a concentration. However, wind could indirectly affect surface albedo through leading to the changes in sediment resuspension and chlorophyll-a distribution. The sequence of albedo in the four sites was XLS > BFG > DPK > MLW. XLS and BFG belonged to the higher albedo group, while DPK and MLW belonged to the lower albedo group. The different biological environments caused by aquatic macrophytes and algae resulting in the spatial variation of Lake Taihu surface albedo. The relationship between albedo and chlorophyll-a concentration was not a very sensitive factor for indicating the outbreak of algae. This study can provide theoretical reference for lake albedo parameterization. PMID:26841592

  14. [Temporal and Spatial Characteristics of Lake Taihu Surface Albedo and Its Impact Factors].

    PubMed

    Cao, Chang; Li, Xu-hui; Zhang, Mi; Liu, Shou-dong; Xiao, Wei; Xiao, Qi-tao; Xu, Jia-ping

    2015-10-01

    Lake surface albedo determines energy balance of water-atmospheric interface and water physical environment. Solar elevation angle, cloudiness, wind speed, water quality and other factors can affect lake surface albedo. Using solar radiation, wind speed, and water quality data (turbidity and chlorophyll-a concentration) which were observed in four eddy covariance sites (Meiliangwan, Dapukou, Bifenggang and Xiaoleishan i. e. MLW, DPK, BFG and XLS) in Lake Taihu and clearness index (k(t)), the influence of these factors on Lake Taihu surface albedo and the reasons that led to its spatial difference were investigated. The results showed that solar elevation angle played a leading role in the diurnal and seasonal change of lake surface albedo; lake surface albedo reached two peaks in 0 < k(t) < 0.1 and 0.4 < k(t) < 0.6 respectively, when solar elevation angle was below 35 degrees. The surface albedo increased with the increasing wind speed, turbidity and chlorophyll-a concentration. However, wind could indirectly affect surface albedo through leading to the changes in sediment resuspension and chlorophyll-a distribution. The sequence of albedo in the four sites was XLS > BFG > DPK > MLW. XLS and BFG belonged to the higher albedo group, while DPK and MLW belonged to the lower albedo group. The different biological environments caused by aquatic macrophytes and algae resulting in the spatial variation of Lake Taihu surface albedo. The relationship between albedo and chlorophyll-a concentration was not a very sensitive factor for indicating the outbreak of algae. This study can provide theoretical reference for lake albedo parameterization.

  15. Emotion regulation and the temporal dynamics of emotions: Effects of cognitive reappraisal and expressive suppression on emotional inertia.

    PubMed

    Koval, Peter; Butler, Emily A; Hollenstein, Tom; Lanteigne, Dianna; Kuppens, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The tendency for emotions to be predictable over time, labelled emotional inertia, has been linked to low well-being and is thought to reflect impaired emotion regulation. However, almost no studies have examined how emotion regulation relates to emotional inertia. We examined the effects of cognitive reappraisal and expressive suppression on the inertia of behavioural, subjective and physiological measures of emotion. In Study 1 (N = 111), trait suppression was associated with higher inertia of negative behaviours. We replicated this finding experimentally in Study 2 (N = 186). Furthermore, in Study 2, instructed suppressors and reappraisers both showed higher inertia of positive behaviours, and reappraisers displayed higher inertia of heart rate. Neither suppression nor reappraisal were associated with the inertia of subjective feelings in either study. Thus, the effects of suppression and reappraisal on the temporal dynamics of emotions depend on the valence and emotional response component in question.

  16. Climatic Benefit of Swiss Forest Cover Change: Including Albedo Change into Net Carbon Balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwaab, J.; Lehning, M.; Bebi, P.

    2012-12-01

    Forests influence climate through physical, chemical and biological processes. It has been shown that warming caused by the comparatively low albedo of forests (albedo-effect), can reduce or even exceed cooling caused by carbon storage in forests (CO2-effect). Although warming caused by albedo and the amount of carbon storage depend on local characteristics, studies are lacking that investigate the combined local patterns of albedo and CO2-effect. Our study area, Switzerland, provides a variety of geographical features and thus the possibility to show how different geographical variables influence the two effects. We used the concept of radiative forcing to compare the effect of a changing albedo and a change in atmospheric CO2 concentration due to land cover change in the past. The change of forest cover was analysed over a period of 12 years based on aerial photographs. We estimate the albedo-effect by combining albedo data derived from the satellite sensor MODIS and data on snow cover derived from the satellite sensor AVHRR. Changes in carbon storage were calculated as differences in biomass and soil stocks of specific land cover classes. We found carbon storage induced cooling to be higher than albedo induced warming everywhere in Switzerland. However, especially in altitudes over 1200 m the albedo-effect reduced the benefits of carbon storage by more than 50%. In lower altitudes the albedo change was less important. The albedo-effect in altitudes above 1200 m was more relevant because of a more persistent snow-cover, a slightly higher global radiation and less additional carbon storage. The relevance of warming caused by an albedo change did not only depend on altitude, but also on the characteristics of forest cover change. While transitions from open land to open forest were accompanied by high albedo changes, the albedo change was only marginal if open forest turned into closed forest. Since snow cover has a large influence on the albedo effect, we included

  17. Review and critical analysis of mass and moments of inertia of the LAGEOS and LAGEOS II satellites for the LARASE program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visco, Massimo; Lucchesi, David M.

    2016-05-01

    The two LAGEOS satellites, currently the best tracked satellites by the stations of the International Laser Ranging Service (ILRS), play a significant role in the fields of space geodesy and geophysics as well as in very precise measurements and constraints in fundamental physics. Specifically, for the measurements of tiny relativistic effects it is mandatory to build accurate models for the dynamics of the satellites, in particular concerning their spin evolution and the determination of their temperature distribution and thermal behavior under different physical conditions. Consequently, an accurate knowledge of both the external and internal structure of the laser-ranged satellites, and of their main dynamic parameters to be used within the orbit models, is of crucial importance. In this work we reconstruct information about the structure, the materials used, and the moments of inertia of the two LAGEOS satellites. The moments of inertia of LAGEOS resulted to be 11.42 ± 0.03 kg m2 for the cylindrical symmetry axis and 10.96 ± 0.03 kg m2 for the other two main axes. The analogous quantities for LAGEOS II are 11.45 ± 0.03 kg m2 and 11.00 ± 0.03 kg m2. We also built a 3D-CAD model of the satellites structure which is useful for finite element-based analysis. We tried to solve contradictions and overcome several misunderstanding present in the historical literature of the older LAGEOS, carefully reanalyzing the earlier technical papers. To test the results we obtained, we used our moments of inertia to compute the spin evolution of the two satellites obtaining a good agreement between measured and estimated values for the spin direction and the rotational period. We believe we now have accurate knowledge of the mass, moments of inertia, and composition of both LAGEOS satellites.

  18. Long-term influence of fluid inertia on the diffusion of a Brownian particle.

    PubMed

    Pesce, Giuseppe; Volpe, Giorgio; Volpe, Giovanni; Sasso, Antonio

    2014-10-01

    We experimentally measure the effects of fluid inertia on the diffusion of a Brownian particle at very long time scales. In previous experiments, the use of standard optical tweezers introduced a cutoff in the free diffusion of the particle, which limited the measurement of these effects to times comparable with the relaxation time of the fluid inertia, i.e., a few milliseconds. Here, by using blinking optical tweezers, we detect these inertial effects on time scales several orders longer up to a few seconds. The measured mean square displacement of a freely diffusing Brownian particle in a liquid shows a deviation from the Einstein-Smoluchowsky theory that diverges with time. These results are consistent with a generalized theory that takes into account not only the particle inertia but also the inertia of the surrounding fluid.

  19. Patient inertia and the status quo bias: when an inferior option is preferred.

    PubMed

    Suri, Gaurav; Sheppes, Gal; Schwartz, Carey; Gross, James J

    2013-09-01

    Medical noncompliance is a major public-health problem. One potential source of this noncompliance is patient inertia. It has been hypothesized that one cause of patient inertia might be the status quo bias-which is the tendency to select the default choice among a set of options. To test this hypothesis, we created a laboratory analogue of the decision context that frequently occurs in situations involving patient inertia, and we examined whether participants would stay with a default option even when it was clearly inferior to other available options. Specifically, in Studies 1 and 2, participants were given the option to reduce their anxiety while waiting for an electric shock. When doing nothing was the status quo option, participants frequently did not select the option that would reduce their anxiety. In Study 3, we demonstrated a simple way to overcome status quo bias in a context relevant to patient inertia.

  20. Nonlinear Observability Analysis of Spacecraft Attitude and Angular Rate with Inertia Uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmi, Avishy; Oshman, Yaakov

    2009-01-01

    The observability of spacecraft attitude and angular rate is analyzed using notions from nonlinear systems theory. Exploiting the distinctive structure of the system, expressions for its Lie derivatives of any order are derived. The observability mapping is then constructed and analyzed, yielding that the system is nonuniformly observable. Necessary and sufficient conditions for the system to become unobservable are derived. It is further shown that the angular rate unobservability conditions, thus derived, are a generalization of previously obtained results. Additionally, the observability of the inertia tensor is examined, and it is shown that the inertia is nonuniformly observable. A sufficient condition is given under which the control input (generated, e.g., by the momentum wheel) renders the inertia unobservable. This phenomenon is numerically demonstrated using a Bayesian grid-based filter that is applied to the estimation of the attitude and angular rate of a spacecraft subjected to inertia tensor uncertainty.