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Sample records for albeit small quantum

  1. Small quantum absorption refrigerator with reversed couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Ralph; Skrzypczyk, Paul; Brunner, Nicolas

    2015-07-01

    Small quantum absorption refrigerators have recently attracted renewed attention. Here we present a missing design of a two-qubit fridge, the main feature of which is that one of the two machine qubits is itself maintained at a temperature colder than the cold bath. This is achieved by "reversing" the couplings to the baths compared to previous designs, where only a transition is maintained cold. We characterize the working regime and the efficiency of the fridge. We demonstrate the soundness of the model by deriving and solving a master equation. Finally, we discuss the performance of the fridge, in particular the heat current extracted from the cold bath. We show that our model performs comparably to the standard three-level quantum fridge and thus appears appealing for possible implementations of nanoscale thermal machines.

  2. Small bright charged colloidal quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Qin, Wei; Liu, Heng; Guyot-Sionnest, Philippe

    2014-01-28

    Using electrochemical charge injection, the fluorescence lifetimes of negatively charged core/shell CdTe/CdSe QDs are measured as a function of core size and shell thickness. It is found that the ensemble negative trion lifetimes reach a maximum (∼4.5 ns) for an intermediate shell thickness. This leads to the smallest particles (∼4.5 nm) with the brightest trion to date. Single dot measurements show that the negative charge suppresses blinking and that the trion can be as bright as the exciton at room temperature. In contrast, the biexciton lifetimes remain short and exhibit only a monotonous increase with shell thickness, showing no correlation with the negative trion decays. The suppression of the Auger process in small negatively charged CdTe/CdSe quantum dots is unprecedented and a significant departure from prior results with ultrathick CdSe/CdS core/shell or dot-in-rod structures. The proposed reason for the optimum shell thickness is that the electron-hole overlap is restricted to the CdTe core while the electron is tuned to have zero kinetic energy in the core for that optimum shell thickness. The different trend of the biexciton lifetime is not explained but tentatively attributed to shorter-lived positive trions at smaller sizes. These results improve our understanding of multiexciton recombination in colloidal quantum dots and may lead to the design of bright charged QDs for more efficient light-emitting devices.

  3. Demonstration of a small programmable quantum computer with atomic qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debnath, S.; Linke, N. M.; Figgatt, C.; Landsman, K. A.; Wright, K.; Monroe, C.

    2016-08-01

    Quantum computers can solve certain problems more efficiently than any possible conventional computer. Small quantum algorithms have been demonstrated on multiple quantum computing platforms, many specifically tailored in hardware to implement a particular algorithm or execute a limited number of computational paths. Here we demonstrate a five-qubit trapped-ion quantum computer that can be programmed in software to implement arbitrary quantum algorithms by executing any sequence of universal quantum logic gates. We compile algorithms into a fully connected set of gate operations that are native to the hardware and have a mean fidelity of 98 per cent. Reconfiguring these gate sequences provides the flexibility to implement a variety of algorithms without altering the hardware. As examples, we implement the Deutsch–Jozsa and Bernstein–Vazirani algorithms with average success rates of 95 and 90 per cent, respectively. We also perform a coherent quantum Fourier transform on five trapped-ion qubits for phase estimation and period finding with average fidelities of 62 and 84 per cent, respectively. This small quantum computer can be scaled to larger numbers of qubits within a single register, and can be further expanded by connecting several such modules through ion shuttling or photonic quantum channels.

  4. Demonstration of a small programmable quantum computer with atomic qubits.

    PubMed

    Debnath, S; Linke, N M; Figgatt, C; Landsman, K A; Wright, K; Monroe, C

    2016-08-01

    Quantum computers can solve certain problems more efficiently than any possible conventional computer. Small quantum algorithms have been demonstrated on multiple quantum computing platforms, many specifically tailored in hardware to implement a particular algorithm or execute a limited number of computational paths. Here we demonstrate a five-qubit trapped-ion quantum computer that can be programmed in software to implement arbitrary quantum algorithms by executing any sequence of universal quantum logic gates. We compile algorithms into a fully connected set of gate operations that are native to the hardware and have a mean fidelity of 98 per cent. Reconfiguring these gate sequences provides the flexibility to implement a variety of algorithms without altering the hardware. As examples, we implement the Deutsch-Jozsa and Bernstein-Vazirani algorithms with average success rates of 95 and 90 per cent, respectively. We also perform a coherent quantum Fourier transform on five trapped-ion qubits for phase estimation and period finding with average fidelities of 62 and 84 per cent, respectively. This small quantum computer can be scaled to larger numbers of qubits within a single register, and can be further expanded by connecting several such modules through ion shuttling or photonic quantum channels. PMID:27488798

  5. Demonstration of a small programmable quantum computer with atomic qubits.

    PubMed

    Debnath, S; Linke, N M; Figgatt, C; Landsman, K A; Wright, K; Monroe, C

    2016-08-03

    Quantum computers can solve certain problems more efficiently than any possible conventional computer. Small quantum algorithms have been demonstrated on multiple quantum computing platforms, many specifically tailored in hardware to implement a particular algorithm or execute a limited number of computational paths. Here we demonstrate a five-qubit trapped-ion quantum computer that can be programmed in software to implement arbitrary quantum algorithms by executing any sequence of universal quantum logic gates. We compile algorithms into a fully connected set of gate operations that are native to the hardware and have a mean fidelity of 98 per cent. Reconfiguring these gate sequences provides the flexibility to implement a variety of algorithms without altering the hardware. As examples, we implement the Deutsch-Jozsa and Bernstein-Vazirani algorithms with average success rates of 95 and 90 per cent, respectively. We also perform a coherent quantum Fourier transform on five trapped-ion qubits for phase estimation and period finding with average fidelities of 62 and 84 per cent, respectively. This small quantum computer can be scaled to larger numbers of qubits within a single register, and can be further expanded by connecting several such modules through ion shuttling or photonic quantum channels.

  6. Demonstration of a small programmable quantum computer with atomic qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debnath, S.; Linke, N. M.; Figgatt, C.; Landsman, K. A.; Wright, K.; Monroe, C.

    2016-08-01

    Quantum computers can solve certain problems more efficiently than any possible conventional computer. Small quantum algorithms have been demonstrated on multiple quantum computing platforms, many specifically tailored in hardware to implement a particular algorithm or execute a limited number of computational paths. Here we demonstrate a five-qubit trapped-ion quantum computer that can be programmed in software to implement arbitrary quantum algorithms by executing any sequence of universal quantum logic gates. We compile algorithms into a fully connected set of gate operations that are native to the hardware and have a mean fidelity of 98 per cent. Reconfiguring these gate sequences provides the flexibility to implement a variety of algorithms without altering the hardware. As examples, we implement the Deutsch-Jozsa and Bernstein-Vazirani algorithms with average success rates of 95 and 90 per cent, respectively. We also perform a coherent quantum Fourier transform on five trapped-ion qubits for phase estimation and period finding with average fidelities of 62 and 84 per cent, respectively. This small quantum computer can be scaled to larger numbers of qubits within a single register, and can be further expanded by connecting several such modules through ion shuttling or photonic quantum channels.

  7. On the photoelectric quantum yield of small dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    Photoelectron emission is crucial to electric charging of dust particles around main-sequence stars and gas heating in various dusty environments. An estimate of the photoelectric processes contains an ill-defined parameter called the photoelectric quantum yield, which is the total number of electrons ejected from a dust particle per absorbed photon. Here we revisit the so-called small particle effect of photoelectron emission and provide an analytical model to estimate photoelectric quantum yields of small dust particles in sizes down to nanometers. We show that the small particle effect elevates the photoelectric quantum yields of nanoparticles up to by a factor of 103 for carbon, water ice, and organics, and a factor of 102 for silicate, silicon carbide, and iron. We conclude the surface curvature of the particles is a quantity of great importance to the small particle effect, unless the particles are submicrometers in radius or larger.

  8. Controllable multiple-quantum transitions in a T-shaped small quantum dot-ring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiongwen; Chen, Baoju; Song, Kehui; Zhou, Guanghui

    2016-05-01

    Based on the tight-binding model and the slave boson mean field approximation, we investigate the electron transport properties in a small quantum dot (QD)-ring system. Namely, a strongly correlated QD not only attaches directly to two normal metallic electrodes, but also forms a magnetic control Aharonov-Bohm quantum ring with a few noninteracting QDs. We show that the parity effect, the Kondo effect, and the multiple Fano effects coexist in our system. Moreover, the parities, defined by the odd- and even-numbered energy levels in this system, can be switched by adjusting magnetic flux phase ϕ located at the center of the quantum ring, which induces multiple controllable Fano-interference energy pathways. Therefore, the constructive and destructive multi-Fano interference transition, the Kondo and Fano resonance transition at the Fermi level, the Fano resonance and ani-resonance transition are realized in the even parity system. They can also be observed in the odd parity system when one adjusts the phase ϕ and the gate voltage Vg applied to the noninteracting QDs. The multi-quantum transitions determine some interesting transport properties such as the current switch and its multi-flatsteps, the differential conductance switch at zero bias voltage and its oscillation or quantization at the low bias voltage. These results may be useful for the observation of multiple quantum effect interplays experimentally and the design of controllable QD-based device.

  9. Conformational analysis of small molecules: NMR and quantum mechanics calculations.

    PubMed

    Tormena, Cláudio F

    2016-08-01

    This review deals with conformational analysis in small organic molecules, and describes the stereoelectronic interactions responsible for conformational stability. Conformational analysis is usually performed using NMR spectroscopy through measurement of coupling constants at room or low temperature in different solvents to determine the populations of conformers in solution. Quantum mechanical calculations are used to address the interactions responsible for conformer stability. The conformational analysis of a large number of small molecules is described, using coupling constant measurements in different solvents and at low temperature, as well as recent applications of through-space and through-hydrogen bond coupling constants JFH as tools for the conformational analysis of fluorinated molecules. Besides NMR parameters, stereoelectronic interactions such as conjugative, hyperconjugative, steric and intramolecular hydrogen bond interactions involved in conformational preferences are discussed.

  10. Conformational analysis of small molecules: NMR and quantum mechanics calculations.

    PubMed

    Tormena, Cláudio F

    2016-08-01

    This review deals with conformational analysis in small organic molecules, and describes the stereoelectronic interactions responsible for conformational stability. Conformational analysis is usually performed using NMR spectroscopy through measurement of coupling constants at room or low temperature in different solvents to determine the populations of conformers in solution. Quantum mechanical calculations are used to address the interactions responsible for conformer stability. The conformational analysis of a large number of small molecules is described, using coupling constant measurements in different solvents and at low temperature, as well as recent applications of through-space and through-hydrogen bond coupling constants JFH as tools for the conformational analysis of fluorinated molecules. Besides NMR parameters, stereoelectronic interactions such as conjugative, hyperconjugative, steric and intramolecular hydrogen bond interactions involved in conformational preferences are discussed. PMID:27573182

  11. Quantum Dots for In Vivo Small-Animal Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Bentolila, Laurent A.; Ebenstein, Yuval; Weiss, Shimon

    2011-01-01

    Nanotechnology is poised to transform research, prevention, and treatment of cancer through the development of novel diagnostic imaging methods and targeted therapies. In particular, the use of nanoparticles for imaging has gained considerable momentum in recent years. This review focuses on the growing contribution of quantum dots (QDs) for in vivo imaging in small-animal models. Fluorescent QDs, which are small nanocrystals (1–10 nm) made of inorganic semiconductor materials, possess several unique optical properties best suited for in vivo imaging. Because of quantum confinement effects, the emission color of QDs can be precisely tuned by size from the ultraviolet to the near-infrared. QDs are extremely bright and photostable. They are also characterized by a wide absorption band and a narrow emission band, which makes them ideal for multiplexing. Finally, the large surface area of QDs permits the assembly of various contrast agents to design multimodality imaging probes. To date, biocompatible QD conjugates have been used successfully for sentinel lymph node mapping, tumor targeting, tumor angiogenesis imaging, and metastatic cell tracking. Here we consider these novel breakthroughs in light of their potential clinical applications and discuss how QDs might offer a suitable platform to unite disparate imaging modalities and provide information along a continuum of length scales. PMID:19289434

  12. Time dependent quantum thermodynamics of a coupled quantum oscillator system in a small thermal environment

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, George L.; Kellman, Michael E.

    2013-12-07

    Simulations are performed of a small quantum system interacting with a quantum environment. The system consists of various initial states of two harmonic oscillators coupled to give normal modes. The environment is “designed” by its level pattern to have a thermodynamic temperature. A random coupling causes the system and environment to become entangled in the course of time evolution. The approach to a Boltzmann distribution is observed, and effective fitted temperatures close to the designed temperature are obtained. All initial pure states of the system are driven to equilibrium at very similar rates, with quick loss of memory of the initial state. The time evolution of the von Neumann entropy is calculated as a measure of equilibration and of quantum coherence. It is pointed out using spatial density distribution plots that quantum interference is eliminated only with maximal entropy, which corresponds thermally to infinite temperature. Implications of our results for the notion of “classicalizing” behavior in the approach to thermal equilibrium are briefly considered.

  13. Renormalization and small-world model of fractal quantum repeater networks.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zong-Wen; Wang, Bing-Hong; Han, Xiao-Pu

    2013-01-01

    Quantum networks provide access to exchange of quantum information. The primary task of quantum networks is to distribute entanglement between remote nodes. Although quantum repeater protocol enables long distance entanglement distribution, it has been restricted to one-dimensional linear network. Here we develop a general framework that allows application of quantum repeater protocol to arbitrary quantum repeater networks with fractal structure. Entanglement distribution across such networks is mapped to renormalization. Furthermore, we demonstrate that logarithmical times of recursive such renormalization transformations can trigger fractal to small-world transition, where a scalable quantum small-world network is achieved. Our result provides new insight into quantum repeater theory towards realistic construction of large-scale quantum networks.

  14. Renormalization and small-world model of fractal quantum repeater networks

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Zong-Wen; Wang, Bing-Hong; Han, Xiao-Pu

    2013-01-01

    Quantum networks provide access to exchange of quantum information. The primary task of quantum networks is to distribute entanglement between remote nodes. Although quantum repeater protocol enables long distance entanglement distribution, it has been restricted to one-dimensional linear network. Here we develop a general framework that allows application of quantum repeater protocol to arbitrary quantum repeater networks with fractal structure. Entanglement distribution across such networks is mapped to renormalization. Furthermore, we demonstrate that logarithmical times of recursive such renormalization transformations can trigger fractal to small-world transition, where a scalable quantum small-world network is achieved. Our result provides new insight into quantum repeater theory towards realistic construction of large-scale quantum networks. PMID:23386977

  15. A quantum watermarking scheme using simple and small-scale quantum circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyake, S.; Nakamae, K.

    2016-05-01

    A new quantum gray-scale image watermarking scheme by using simple and small-scale quantum circuits is proposed. The NEQR representation for quantum images is used. The image sizes for carrier and watermark are assumed to be 2n × 2n and n × n, respectively. At first, a classical watermark with n × n image size and 8 bits gray scale is expanded to an image with 2n × 2n image size and 2 bits gray scale. Then the expanded image is scrambled to be a meaningless image by the SWAP gates that controlled by the keys only known to the operator. The scrambled image is embedded into the carrier image by the CNOT gates (XOR operation). The watermark is extracted from the watermarked image by applying operations in the reverse order. Simulation-based experimental results show that our proposed scheme is excellent in terms of three items, visual quality, robustness performance under noises, and computational complexity.

  16. Fault-tolerant linear optical quantum computing with small-amplitude coherent States.

    PubMed

    Lund, A P; Ralph, T C; Haselgrove, H L

    2008-01-25

    Quantum computing using two coherent states as a qubit basis is a proposed alternative architecture with lower overheads but has been questioned as a practical way of performing quantum computing due to the fragility of diagonal states with large coherent amplitudes. We show that using error correction only small amplitudes (alpha>1.2) are required for fault-tolerant quantum computing. We study fault tolerance under the effects of small amplitudes and loss using a Monte Carlo simulation. The first encoding level resources are orders of magnitude lower than the best single photon scheme.

  17. Quantum simulations of small electron-hole complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, M.A.; Kalia, R.K.; Vashishta, P.D.

    1984-09-01

    The Green's Function Monte Carlo method is applied to the calculation of the binding energies of electron-hole complexes in semiconductors. The quantum simulation method allows the unambiguous determination of the ground state energy and the effects of band anisotropy on the binding energy. 22 refs., 1 fig.

  18. Quantum Decoherence and Thermalization at Finite Temperatures of Non-Degenerate Spin Systems via Small Spin Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novotny, M. A.; Jin, F.; De Raedt, H.; Michielsen, K.

    2016-09-01

    We study the case of a small quantum spin system S with a non-degenerate groundstate coupled to a small quantum spin bath. Finite temperature measures for both quantum decoherence and thermalization are studied. The computational results, obtained from exact diagonalization, compare well with a recent perturbation theory prediction, even when the system and bath are of comparable sizes.

  19. Quantum dots in bio-imaging: Revolution by the small

    SciTech Connect

    Arya, Harinder; Kaul, Zeenia; Wadhwa, Renu; Taira, Kazunari; Hirano, Takashi; Kaul, Sunil C. . E-mail: s-kaul@aist.go.jp

    2005-04-22

    Visual analysis of biomolecules is an integral avenue of basic and applied biological research. It has been widely carried out by tagging of nucleotides and proteins with traditional fluorophores that are limited in their application by features such as photobleaching, spectral overlaps, and operational difficulties. Quantum dots (QDs) are emerging as a superior alternative and are poised to change the world of bio-imaging and further its applications in basic and applied biology. The interdisciplinary field of nanobiotechnology is experiencing a revolution and QDs as an enabling technology have become a harbinger of this hybrid field. Within a decade, research on QDs has evolved from being a pure science subject to the one with high-end commercial applications.

  20. Fault-tolerant quantum computation and communication on a distributed 2D array of small local systems

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, K.; Yamamoto, T.; Imoto, N.; Koashi, M.

    2014-12-04

    We propose a scheme for distributed quantum computation with small local systems connected via noisy quantum channels. We show that the proposed scheme tolerates errors with probabilities ∼30% and ∼ 0.1% in quantum channels and local operations, respectively, both of which are improved substantially compared to the previous works.

  1. New quantum oscillations in current driven small junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ben-Jacob, E.; Gefen, Y.

    1985-01-01

    The response of current-biased Josephson and normal tunnel junctions (JJs and NTJs) such as those fabricated by Voss and Webb (1981) is predicted from a quantum-mechanical description based on the observation that the response of a current-driven open system is equivalent to that of a closed system subject to an external time-dependent voltage bias. Phenomena expected include voltage oscillations with no dc voltage applied, inverse Shapiro steps of dc voltage in the presence of microwave radiation, voltage oscillation in a JJ and an NTJ coupled by a capacitance to a current-biased junction, JJ voltage oscillation frequency = I/e rather than I/2e, and different NTJ resistance than in the voltage-driven case. The effects require approximate experimental parameter values Ic = 15 nA, C = 1 fF, and T much less than 0.4 K for JJs and Ic = a few nA, C = 1 fF, and R = 3 kiloohms for 100-microV inverse Shapiro steps at 10 GHz in NTJs.

  2. Grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering: application to the study of quantum dot lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Buljan, Maja Radić, Nikola; Bernstorff, Sigrid; Dražić, Goran; Bogdanović-Radović, Iva; Holý, Václav

    2012-01-01

    The modelling of grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) from three-dimensional quantum dot lattices is described. The ordering of quantum dots in three-dimensional quantum dot lattices is investigated by grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS). Theoretical models describing GISAXS intensity distributions for three general classes of lattices of quantum dots are proposed. The classes differ in the type of disorder of the positions of the quantum dots. The models enable full structure determination, including lattice type, lattice parameters, the type and degree of disorder in the quantum dot positions and the distributions of the quantum dot sizes. Applications of the developed models are demonstrated using experimentally measured data from several types of quantum dot lattices formed by a self-assembly process.

  3. Optimal discrimination of M coherent states with a small quantum computer

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, Marcus P. da; Guha, Saikat; Dutton, Zachary

    2014-12-04

    The ability to distinguish between coherent states optimally plays in important role in the efficient usage of quantum resources for classical communication and sensing applications. While it has been known since the early 1970’s how to optimally distinguish between two coherent states, generalizations to larger sets of coherent states have so far failed to reach optimality. In this work we outline how optimality can be achieved by using a small quantum computer, building on recent proposals for optimal qubit state discrimination with multiple copies.

  4. Quantum-mechanical diffraction theory of light from a small hole: Extinction-theorem approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Jesper; Keller, Ole

    2015-07-01

    In a recent paper [Phys. Rev. A 90, 043830 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevA.90.043830] it was shown that the so-called aperture response tensor is the central concept in the microscopic quantum theory of light diffraction from a small hole in a flat screen. It was further shown that the quantum mechanical theory of diffraction only requires a preknowledge of the incident field plus the electronic properties of identical screens with and without a hole. Starting from the quantum mechanical expression for the linear conductivity tensor, we study the related causal conductivity tensor paying particular attention to diamagnetic electron dynamics. Using a nonlocal-potential separation assumption, we present a calculation of the diamagnetic causal surface conductivity for a jellium quantum-well screen using a two-dimensional Hartree-Fock model. In the diamagnetic case the difference between the light-unperturbed electron densities for screens with (n0) and without (n∞0) holes are the primary quantities for the diffraction theory. In a central part (Sec. IV) of this article we determine n0 via a quantum-mechanical two-dimensional extinction-theorem approach related to elastic electron scattering from a hole with an electronic selvedge. For heuristic purposes we illustrate aspects of the extinction-theorem theory by applying the approach for an infinitely high potential barrier to the vacuum hole. Finally, we calculate and discuss the aperture response tensor in the small hole limit and in the zeroth-order Born approximation. Our final result for the aperture response tensor establishes the bridge to the anisotropic electric dipole polarizability tensor of the hole. It turns out that the effective optical aperture (hole) size relates closely to the extension of the relevant electronic wave functions scattered from the hole.

  5. Small quantum absorption refrigerator in the transient regime: Time scales, enhanced cooling, and entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brask, Jonatan Bohr; Brunner, Nicolas

    2015-12-01

    A small quantum absorption refrigerator, consisting of three qubits, is discussed in the transient regime. We discuss time scales for coherent dynamics, damping, and approach to the steady state, and we study cooling and entanglement. We observe that cooling can be enhanced in the transient regime, in the sense that lower temperatures can be achieved compared to the steady-state regime. This is a consequence of coherent dynamics but can occur even when this dynamics is strongly damped by the dissipative thermal environment, and we note that precise control over couplings or timing is not needed to achieve enhanced cooling. We also show that the amount of entanglement present in the refrigerator can be much larger in the transient regime compared to the steady state. These results are of relevance to future implementations of quantum thermal machines.

  6. Universality in the equilibration of quantum systems after a small quench

    SciTech Connect

    Campos Venuti, Lorenzo; Zanardi, Paolo

    2010-03-15

    A sudden change in the Hamiltonian parameter drives a quantum system out of equilibrium. For a finite-size system, expectations of observables start fluctuating in time without converging to a precise limit. A new equilibrium state emerges only in the probabilistic sense, when the probability distribution for the observable expectations over long times concentrates around their mean value. In this paper we study the full statistic of generic observables after a small quench. When the quench is performed around a regular (i.e., noncritical) point of the phase diagram, generic observables are expected to be characterized by Gaussian distribution functions ('good equilibration'). Instead, when quenching around a critical point a new, universal, double-peaked distribution function emerges for relevant perturbations. Our analytic predictions are numerically checked for a nonintegrable extension of the quantum Ising model.

  7. Small quantum absorption refrigerator in the transient regime: Time scales, enhanced cooling, and entanglement.

    PubMed

    Brask, Jonatan Bohr; Brunner, Nicolas

    2015-12-01

    A small quantum absorption refrigerator, consisting of three qubits, is discussed in the transient regime. We discuss time scales for coherent dynamics, damping, and approach to the steady state, and we study cooling and entanglement. We observe that cooling can be enhanced in the transient regime, in the sense that lower temperatures can be achieved compared to the steady-state regime. This is a consequence of coherent dynamics but can occur even when this dynamics is strongly damped by the dissipative thermal environment, and we note that precise control over couplings or timing is not needed to achieve enhanced cooling. We also show that the amount of entanglement present in the refrigerator can be much larger in the transient regime compared to the steady state. These results are of relevance to future implementations of quantum thermal machines.

  8. Arbitrarily small amount of measurement independence is sufficient to manifest quantum nonlocality.

    PubMed

    Pütz, Gilles; Rosset, Denis; Barnea, Tomer Jack; Liang, Yeong-Cherng; Gisin, Nicolas

    2014-11-01

    The use of Bell's theorem in any application or experiment relies on the assumption of free choice or, more precisely, measurement independence, meaning that the measurements can be chosen freely. Here, we prove that even in the simplest Bell test-one involving 2 parties each performing 2 binary-outcome measurements-an arbitrarily small amount of measurement independence is sufficient to manifest quantum nonlocality. To this end, we introduce the notion of measurement dependent locality and show that the corresponding correlations form a convex polytope. These correlations can thus be characterized efficiently, e.g., using a finite set of Bell-like inequalities-an observation that enables the systematic study of quantum nonlocality and related applications under limited measurement independence. PMID:25415887

  9. Small and arbitrary shock structures in spin 1/2 magnetohydrodynamic quantum plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Sahu, Biswajit; Choudhury, Sourav; Sinha, Anjana

    2015-02-15

    The shock structures in spin-1/2 quantum plasma, in the presence of magnetic diffusivity, are studied in the framework of the quantum magnetohydrodynamic model. Linear dispersion relation for the system is carried out analytically, and the results are plotted numerically for several values of the plasma parameters. Numerical analysis for arbitrary amplitude waves is carried out, whereas for waves of small amplitude, the reductive perturbation technique is applied to obtain the Korteweg-de Vries-Burgers equation. Both the analyses are observed to give the same qualitative picture. Most importantly, the different plasma parameters are found to play significant roles in determining the nature of the shock waves. The parametric ranges for which monotonic shock and oscillatory shock solutions are observed, are found analytically.

  10. Exponentially small dependence of the Q-function on quantum coherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewster, R. A.; Franson, J. D.

    We show that the Huisimi Q-function has an exponentially small dependence on the relative phase of a Schrodinger cat state, as might be expected from its definition. This raises the question as to whether or not the Q-function provides a complete description of the coherence of quantum states. We calculate the Q-function for a cat state and then invert it by first calculating the Glauber-Sudarshan P-function using a Fourier transform, which can then be used to calculate the state itself. This process is shown to multiply the small phase-dependent terms in the Q-function by an exponentially large factor as needed in order to obtain the original state once again. This exponential factor is strongly degraded by decoherence, such as by amplification of the original state. Funded by the Office of Naval Research.

  11. Macroscopic quantum tunneling in Josephson tunnel junctions and Coulomb blockade in single small tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Cleland, A.N.

    1991-04-01

    Experiments investigating the process of macroscopic quantum tunneling in a moderately-damped, resistively shunted, Josephson junction are described, followed by a discussion of experiments performed on very small capacitance normal-metal tunnel junctions. The experiments on the resistively-shunted Josephson junction were designed to investigate a quantum process, that of the tunneling of the Josephson phase variable under a potential barrier, in a system in which dissipation plays a major role in the dynamics of motion. All the parameters of the junction were measured using the classical phenomena of thermal activation and resonant activation. Theoretical predictions are compared with the experimental results, showing good agreement with no adjustable parameters; the tunneling rate in the moderately damped (Q {approx} 1) junction is seen to be reduced by a factor of 300 from that predicted for an undamped junction. The phase is seen to be a good quantum-mechanical variable. The experiments on small capacitance tunnel junctions extend the measurements on the larger-area Josephson junctions from the region in which the phase variable has a fairly well-defined value, i.e. its wavefunction has a narrow width, to the region where its value is almost completely unknown. The charge on the junction becomes well-defined and is predicted to quantize the current through the junction, giving rise to the Coulomb blockade at low bias. I present the first clear observation of the Coulomb blockade in single junctions. The electrical environment of the tunnel junction, however, strongly affects the behavior of the junction: higher resistance leads are observed to greatly sharpen the Coulomb blockade over that seen with lower resistance leads. I present theoretical descriptions of how the environment influences the junctions; comparisons with the experimental results are in reasonable agreement.

  12. Quantum Chemical Studies of Actinides and Lanthanides: From Small Molecules to Nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlaisavljevich, Bess

    Research into actinides is of high interest because of their potential applications as an energy source and for the environmental implications therein. Global concern has arisen since the development of the actinide concept in the 1940s led to the industrial scale use of the commercial nuclear energy cycle and nuclear weapons production. Large quantities of waste have been generated from these processes inspiring efforts to address fundamental questions in actinide science. In this regard, the objective of this work is to use theory to provide insight and predictions into actinide chemistry, where experimental work is extremely challenging because of the intrinsic difficulties of the experiments themselves and the safety issues associated with this type of chemistry. This thesis is a collection of theoretical studies of actinide chemistry falling into three categories: quantum chemical and matrix isolation studies of small molecules, the electronic structure of organoactinide systems, and uranyl peroxide nanoclusters and other solid state actinide compounds. The work herein not only spans a wide range of systems size but also investigates a range of chemical problems. Various quantum chemical approaches have been employed. Wave function-based methods have been used to study the electronic structure of actinide containing molecules of small to middle-size. Among these methods, the complete active space self consistent field (CASSCF) approach with corrections from second-order perturbation theory (CASPT2), the generalized active space SCF (GASSCF) approach, and Moller-Plesset second-order perturbation theory (MP2) have been employed. Likewise, density functional theory (DFT) has been used along with analysis tools like bond energy decomposition, bond orders, and Bader's Atoms in Molecules. From these quantum chemical results, comparison with experimentally obtained structures and spectra are made.

  13. Extracellular bio-production and characterization of small monodispersed CdSe quantum dot nanocrystallites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh, Anil K.

    2014-09-01

    Engineered nanoparticles of diverse forms are being profoundly used for various applications and demand ecologically benign synthesis processes. Conventional chemical methods employed for the syntheses of nanoparticles are environmentally unfriendly and energy intensive. Biologically inspired biofabrication approaches that utilize naturally existing microorganisms or plant extracts or biomaterials might overcome these issues. The present investigation for the first time shows the synthesis of small and monodispersed cadmium selenide nanoparticles utilizing the plant pathogenic fungus, Helminthosporum solani upon incubating with an aqueous solution of CdCl2 and SeCl4 under ambient conditions. Multiple physical characterizations involving ultraviolet-visible and photoluminescence spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed the production, purity, optical and surface characteristics, crystalline nature, size and shape distributions, and elemental composition of the nanoparticles. Pluralities of the particles are monodisperse spheres with a mean diameter of 5.5 ± 2 nm, are hydrophilic, highly stable with a broad photoluminescence and 1% quantum yield. This approach provides an alternative facile route for the biofabrication of quantum dot that is reliable, environmentally friendly, and lends itself directly for the creation of fluorescent biological labels.

  14. Criteria for the accuracy of small polaron quantum master equation in simulating excitation energy transfer dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Hung-Tzu; Cheng, Yuan-Chung; Zhang, Pan-Pan

    2013-12-14

    The small polaron quantum master equation (SPQME) proposed by Jang et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 129, 101104 (2008)] is a promising approach to describe coherent excitation energy transfer dynamics in complex molecular systems. To determine the applicable regime of the SPQME approach, we perform a comprehensive investigation of its accuracy by comparing its simulated population dynamics with numerically exact quasi-adiabatic path integral calculations. We demonstrate that the SPQME method yields accurate dynamics in a wide parameter range. Furthermore, our results show that the accuracy of polaron theory depends strongly upon the degree of exciton delocalization and timescale of polaron formation. Finally, we propose a simple criterion to assess the applicability of the SPQME theory that ensures the reliability of practical simulations of energy transfer dynamics with SPQME in light-harvesting systems.

  15. Vertical nano superconducting quantum interference device based on Josepshon tunnel nanojunctions for small spin cluster detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granata, Carmine; Vettoliere, Antonio; Fretto, Matteo; Leo, Natascia De; Vincenzo, Lacquaniti

    2015-06-01

    The ultra high sensitivity exhibited by Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUIDs) could be the key to explore new field of nanoscience such as the investigation of small cluster of elementary magnetic moments. In this paper, an ultra high sensitive niobium nanoSQUID based on submicron Josephson tunnel junction is presented. It has been fabricated in a vertical configuration by using a three-dimensional focused ion beam sculpting technique. In such a configuration, the nanosensor loop (area of 0.25 μm2) is perpendicular to the substrate plane allowing to drastically reduce the spurious effects of the external magnetic field employed to excite the nano-objects under investigation. Main device characteristics have been measured at T=4.2 K by using a low noise readout electronics. Due to high voltage responsivity, the nanosensor has exhibited a spectral density of the magnetic flux noise as low as 1.6 μΦ0/Hz1/2.

  16. Small GSH-Capped CuInS2 Quantum Dots: MPA-Assisted Aqueous Phase Transfer and Bioimaging Applications.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chuanzhen; Bai, Zelong; Liu, Xiangyou; Zhang, Yijia; Zou, Bingsuo; Zhong, Haizheng

    2015-08-19

    An efficient ligand exchange strategy for aqueous phase transfer of hydrophobic CuInS2/ZnS quantum dots was developed by employing glutathione (GSH) and mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) as the ligands. The whole process takes less than 20 min and can be scaled up to gram amount. The material characterizations show that the final aqueous soluble samples are solely capped with GSH on the surface. Importantly, these GSH-capped CuInS2/ZnS quantum dots have small size (hydrodynamic diameter <10 nm), moderate fluorescent properties (up to 34%) as well as high stability in aqueous solutions (stable for more than three months in 4 °C without any significant fluorescence quenching). Moreover, this ligand exchange strategy is also versatile for the aqueous phase transfer of other hydrophobic quantum dots, for instance, CuInSe2 and CdSe/ZnS quantum dots. We further demonstrated that GSH-capped quantum dots could be suitable fluorescence markers to penetrate cell membrane and image the cells. In addition, the GSH-capped CuInS2 quantum dots also have potential use in other fields such as photocatalysis and quantum dots sensitized solar cells.

  17. General Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer Homogeneous Immunoassay for Small Molecules Based on Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xuezhi; Wen, Kai; Wang, Zhanhui; Zhang, Xiya; Li, Chenglong; Zhang, Suxia; Shen, Jianzhong

    2016-04-01

    Here, we describe a general bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) homogeneous immunoassay based on quantum dots (QDs) as the acceptor and Renilla luciferase (Rluc) as the donor (QD-BRET) for the determination of small molecules. The ratio of the donor-acceptor that could produce energy transfer varied in the presence of different concentrations of free enrofloxacin (ENR), an important small molecule in food safety. The calculated Förster distance (R0) was 7.86 nm. Under optimized conditions, the half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) for ENR was less than 1 ng/mL and the linear range covered 4 orders of magnitude (0.023 to 25.60 ng/mL). The cross-reactivities (CRs) of seven representative fluoroquinolones (FQs) were similar to the data obtained by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The average intra- and interassay recoveries from spiked milk of were 79.8-118.0%, and the relative standard deviations (RSDs) were less than 10%, meeting the requirement of residue detection, which was a satisfactory result. Furthermore, we compared the influence of different luciferase substrates on the performance of the assay. Considering sensitivity and stability, coelenterazine-h was the most appropriate substrate. The results from this study will enable better-informed decisions on the choice of Rluc substrate for QD-BRET systems. For the future, the QD-BRET immunosensor could easily be extended to other small molecules and thus represents a versatile strategy in food safety, the environment, clinical diagnosis, and other fields.

  18. Simulation of Ultra-Small MOSFETs Using a 2-D Quantum-Corrected Drift-Diffusion Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biegel, Bryan A.; Rafferty, Conor S.; Yu, Zhiping; Dutton, Robert W.; Ancona, Mario G.; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    We describe an electronic transport model and an implementation approach that respond to the challenges of device modeling for gigascale integration. We use the density-gradient (DG) transport model, which adds tunneling and quantum smoothing of carrier density profiles to the drift-diffusion model. We present the current implementation of the DG model in PROPHET, a partial differential equation solver developed by Lucent Technologies. This implementation approach permits rapid development and enhancement of models, as well as run-time modifications and model switching. We show that even in typical bulk transport devices such as P-N diodes and BJTs, DG quantum effects can significantly modify the I-V characteristics. Quantum effects are shown to be even more significant in small, surface transport devices, such as sub-0.1 micron MOSFETs. In thin-oxide MOS capacitors, we find that quantum effects may reduce gate capacitance by 25% or more. The inclusion of quantum effects in simulations dramatically improves the match between C-V simulations and measurements. Significant quantum corrections also occur in the I-V characteristics of short-channel MOSFETs due to the gate capacitance correction.

  19. Quantum spectral curve at work: from small spin to strong coupling in = 4 SYM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gromov, Nikolay; Levkovich-Maslyuk, Fedor; Sizov, Grigory; Valatka, Saulius

    2014-07-01

    We apply the recently proposed quantum spectral curve technique to the study of twist operators in planar = 4 SYM theory. We focus on the small spin expansion of anomalous dimensions in the sl(2) sector and compute its first two orders exactly for any value of the `t Hooft coupling. At leading order in the spin S we reproduced Basso's slope function. The next term of order S 2 structurally resembles the Beisert-Eden-Staudacher dressing phase and takes into account wrapping contributions. This expansion contains rich information about the spectrum of local operators at strong coupling. In particular, we found a new coefficient in the strong coupling expansion of the Konishi operator dimension and confirmed several previously known terms. We also obtained several new orders of the strong coupling expansion of the BFKL pomeron intercept. As a by-product we formulated a prescription for the correct analytical continuation in S which opens a way for deriving the BFKL regime of twist two anomalous dimensions from AdS/CFT integrability.

  20. Quantum monte carlo study of the energetics of small hydrogenated and fluoride lithium clusters.

    PubMed

    Moreira, N L; Brito, B G A; Rabelo, J N Teixeira; Cândido, Ladir

    2016-06-30

    An investigation of the energetics of small lithium clusters doped either with a hydrogen or with a fluorine atom as a function of the number of lithium atoms using fixed-node diffusion quantum Monte Carlo (DMC) simulation is reported. It is found that the binding energy (BE) for the doped clusters increases in absolute values leading to a more stable system than for the pure ones in excellent agreement with available experimental measurements. The BE increases for pure, remains almost constant for hydrogenated, and decreases rapidly toward the bulk lithium for the fluoride as a function of the number of lithium atoms in the clusters. The BE, dissociation energy as well as the second difference in energy display a pronounced odd-even oscillation with the number of lithium atoms. The electron correlation inverts the odd-even oscillation pattern for the doped in comparison with the pure clusters and has an impact of 29%-83% to the BE being higher in the pure cluster followed by the hydrogenated and then by the fluoride. The dissociation energy and the second difference in energy indicate that the doped cluster Li3 H is the most stable whereas among the pure ones the more stable are Li2 , Li4 , and Li6 . The electron correlation energy is crucial for the stabilization of Li3 H. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26992447

  1. Photoluminescence and electro-optic properties of small (25-35 nm diameter) quantum boxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, L.; Ko, K. K.; Li, W.-Q.; Sun, H. C.; Lam, Y.; Brock, T.; Pang, S. W.; Bhattacharya, P. K.; Rooks, M. J.

    1993-05-01

    The luminescence and electro-optic properties of buried 25-35 nm quantum boxes have been measured. The quantum boxes were defined by a combination of molecular beam epitaxial growth and regrowth, electron beam lithography, and dry etching. The photoluminescence from 35 nm boxes shows a blue shift of about 15 meV compared to the bulk luminescence and an enhancement, taking into account the fill factor. An enhanced effective linear electrooptic coefficient is observed for the quantum boxes.

  2. First-principle study of quantum confinement effect on small sized silicon quantum dots using density-functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Anas, M. M.; Othman, A. P.; Gopir, G.

    2014-09-03

    Density functional theory (DFT), as a first-principle approach has successfully been implemented to study nanoscale material. Here, DFT by numerical basis-set was used to study the quantum confinement effect as well as electronic properties of silicon quantum dots (Si-QDs) in ground state condition. Selection of quantum dot models were studied intensively before choosing the right structure for simulation. Next, the computational result were used to examine and deduce the electronic properties and its density of state (DOS) for 14 spherical Si-QDs ranging in size up to ∼ 2 nm in diameter. The energy gap was also deduced from the HOMO-LUMO results. The atomistic model of each silicon QDs was constructed by repeating its crystal unit cell of face-centered cubic (FCC) structure, and reconstructed until the spherical shape obtained. The core structure shows tetrahedral (T{sub d}) symmetry structure. It was found that the model need to be passivated, and hence it was noticed that the confinement effect was more pronounced. The model was optimized using Quasi-Newton method for each size of Si-QDs to get relaxed structure before it was simulated. In this model the exchange-correlation potential (V{sub xc}) of the electrons was treated by Local Density Approximation (LDA) functional and Perdew-Zunger (PZ) functional.

  3. Simulation of Ultra-Small MOSFETs Using a 2-D Quantum-Corrected Drift-Diffusion Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biegal, Bryan A.; Rafferty, Connor S.; Yu, Zhiping; Ancona, Mario G.; Dutton, Robert W.; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The continued down-scaling of electronic devices, in particular the commercially dominant MOSFET, will force a fundamental change in the process of new electronics technology development in the next five to ten years. The cost of developing new technology generations is soaring along with the price of new fabrication facilities, even as competitive pressure intensifies to bring this new technology to market faster than ever before. To reduce cost and time to market, device simulation must become a more fundamental, indeed dominant, part of the technology development cycle. In order to produce these benefits, simulation accuracy must improve markedly. At the same time, device physics will become more complex, with the rapid increase in various small-geometry and quantum effects. This work describes both an approach to device simulator development and a physical model which advance the effort to meet the tremendous electronic device simulation challenge described above. The device simulation approach is to specify the physical model at a high level to a general-purpose (but highly efficient) partial differential equation solver (in this case PROPHET, developed by Lucent Technologies), which then simulates the model in 1-D, 2-D, or 3-D for a specified device and test regime. This approach allows for the rapid investigation of a wide range of device models and effects, which is certainly essential for device simulation to catch up with, and then stay ahead of, electronic device technology of the present and future. The physical device model used in this work is the density-gradient (DG) quantum correction to the drift-diffusion model [Ancona, Phys. Rev. B 35(5), 7959 (1987)]. This model adds tunneling and quantum smoothing of carrier density profiles to the drift-diffusion model. We used the DG model in 1-D and 2-D (for the first time) to simulate both bipolar and unipolar devices. Simulations of heavily-doped, short-base diodes indicated that the DG quantum

  4. Quantum chemical calculation of the equilibrium structures of small metal atom clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, L. R.

    1982-01-01

    Metal atom clusters are studied based on the application of ab initio quantum mechanical approaches. Because these large 'molecular' systems pose special practical computational problems in the application of the quantum mechanical methods, there is a special need to find simplifying techniques that do not compromise the reliability of the calculations. Research is therefore directed towards various aspects of the implementation of the effective core potential technique for the removal of the metal atom core electrons from the calculations.

  5. Impact of small-angle scattering on ballistic transport in quantum dots.

    PubMed

    See, A M; Pilgrim, I; Scannell, B C; Montgomery, R D; Klochan, O; Burke, A M; Aagesen, M; Lindelof, P E; Farrer, I; Ritchie, D A; Taylor, R P; Hamilton, A R; Micolich, A P

    2012-05-11

    Disorder increasingly affects performance as electronic devices are reduced in size. The ionized dopants used to populate a device with electrons are particularly problematic, leading to unpredictable changes in the behavior of devices such as quantum dots each time they are cooled for use. We show that a quantum dot can be used as a highly sensitive probe of changes in disorder potential and that, by removing the ionized dopants and populating the dot electrostatically, its electronic properties become reproducible with high fidelity after thermal cycling to room temperature. Our work demonstrates that the disorder potential has a significant, perhaps even dominant, influence on the electron dynamics, with important implications for "ballistic" transport in quantum dots.

  6. Electrochemical synthesis of small-sized red fluorescent graphene quantum dots as a bioimaging platform.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiaoyun; Li, Yunchao; Li, Xiaohong; Zhou, Shixin; Fan, Louzhen; Yang, Shihe

    2015-02-14

    We report water-soluble, 3 nm uniform-sized graphene quantum dots (GQDs) with red emission prepared by electrochemical exfoliation of graphite in K2S2O8 solution. Such GQDs show a great potential as biological labels for cellular imaging.

  7. Application of photostable quantum dots for indirect immunofluorescent detection of specific bacterial serotypes on small marine animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decho, Alan W.; Beckman, Erin M.; Chandler, G. Thomas; Kawaguchi, Tomohiro

    2008-06-01

    An indirect immunofluorescence approach was developed using semiconductor quantum dot nanocrystals to label and detect a specific bacterial serotype of the bacterial human pathogen Vibrio parahaemolyticus, attached to small marine animals (i.e. benthic harpacticoid copepods), which are suspected pathogen carriers. This photostable labeling method using nanotechnology will potentially allow specific serotypes of other bacterial pathogens to be detected with high sensitivity in a range of systems, and can be easily applied for sensitive detection to other Vibrio species such as Vibrio cholerae.

  8. What is behind small deviations of quantum mechanics theory from experiments? Observer's mathematics point of view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khots, Boris; Khots, Dmitriy

    2014-12-01

    Certain results that have been predicted by Quantum Mechanics (QM) theory are not always supported by experiments. This defines a deep crisis in contemporary physics and, in particular, quantum mechanics. We believe that, in fact, the mathematical apparatus employed within today's physics is a possible reason. In particular, we consider the concept of infinity that exists in today's mathematics as the root cause of this problem. We have created Observer's Mathematics that offers an alternative to contemporary mathematics. This paper is an attempt to relay how Observer's Mathematics may explain some of the contradictions in QM theory results. We consider the Hamiltonian Mechanics, Newton equation, Schrodinger equation, two slit interference, wave-particle duality for single photons, uncertainty principle, Dirac equations for free electron in a setting of arithmetic, algebra, and topology provided by Observer's Mathematics (see www.mathrelativity.com). Certain results and communications pertaining to solution of these problems are provided.

  9. What is behind small deviations of quantum mechanics theory from experiments? Observer's mathematics point of view

    SciTech Connect

    Khots, Boris; Khots, Dmitriy

    2014-12-10

    Certain results that have been predicted by Quantum Mechanics (QM) theory are not always supported by experiments. This defines a deep crisis in contemporary physics and, in particular, quantum mechanics. We believe that, in fact, the mathematical apparatus employed within today's physics is a possible reason. In particular, we consider the concept of infinity that exists in today's mathematics as the root cause of this problem. We have created Observer's Mathematics that offers an alternative to contemporary mathematics. This paper is an attempt to relay how Observer's Mathematics may explain some of the contradictions in QM theory results. We consider the Hamiltonian Mechanics, Newton equation, Schrodinger equation, two slit interference, wave-particle duality for single photons, uncertainty principle, Dirac equations for free electron in a setting of arithmetic, algebra, and topology provided by Observer's Mathematics (see www.mathrelativity.com). Certain results and communications pertaining to solution of these problems are provided.

  10. Min-entropy and quantum key distribution: Nonzero key rates for ''small'' numbers of signals

    SciTech Connect

    Bratzik, Sylvia; Mertz, Markus; Kampermann, Hermann; Bruss, Dagmar

    2011-02-15

    We calculate an achievable secret key rate for quantum key distribution with a finite number of signals by evaluating the quantum conditional min-entropy explicitly. The min-entropy for a classical random variable is the negative logarithm of the maximal value in its probability distribution. The quantum conditional min-entropy can be expressed in terms of the guessing probability, which we calculate for d-dimensional systems. We compare these key rates to previous approaches using the von Neumann entropy and find nonzero key rates for a smaller number of signals. Furthermore, we improve the secret key rates by modifying the parameter estimation step. Both improvements taken together lead to nonzero key rates for only 10{sup 4}-10{sup 5} signals. An interesting conclusion can also be drawn from the additivity of the min-entropy and its relation to the guessing probability: for a set of symmetric tensor product states, the optimal minimum-error discrimination (MED) measurement is the optimal MED measurement on each subsystem.

  11. Quantum Hall effect with small numbers of vortices in Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrnes, Tim; Dowling, Jonathan P.

    2015-08-01

    When vortices are displaced in Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs), the Magnus force gives the system a momentum transverse in the direction to the displacement. We show that BECs in long channels with vortices exhibit a quantization of the current response with respect to the spatial vortex distribution. The quantization originates from the well-known topological property of the phase around a vortex; it is an integer multiple of 2 π . In a way similar to that of the integer quantum Hall effect, the current along the channel is related to this topological phase and can be extracted from two experimentally measurable quantities: the total momentum of the BEC and the spatial distribution. The quantization is in units of m /2 h , where m is the mass of the atoms and h is Planck's constant. We derive an exact vortex momentum-displacement relation for BECs in long channels under general circumstances. Our results present the possibility that the configuration described here can be used as a novel way of measuring the mass of the atoms in the BEC using a topological invariant of the system. If an accurate determination of the plateaus are experimentally possible, this gives the possibility of a topological quantum mass standard and precise determination of the fine structure constant.

  12. Small divergence substrate emitting quantum cascade laser by subwavelength metallic grating.

    PubMed

    Yao, Dan-Yang; Zhang, Jin-Chuan; Liu, Ying-Hui; Zhuo, Ning; Jia, Zhi-Wei; Liu, Feng-Qi; Wang, Zhan-Guo

    2015-05-01

    Metallic periodic structure in subwavelength scale offers an exciting way to couple light into surface plasmons (SPs), thus manipulating the properties of near-field optics. We show that subwavelength metallic grating (SMG) defined on the substrate side of substrate emitting quantum cascade lasers enables far-field improvement in mid-infrared spectrum. The SMG is designed to tailor the interaction of SPs with single mode transverse magnetic light. The experiment results are in good agreement with the simulated model. A far-field full width at half maximum (FWHM) divergence angle of 3.9 ° in the direction perpendicular to the laser waveguide layers is obtained, improved by a factor of 8.5 compared with traditional surface emitting device.

  13. Quantum chemical calculation of the equilibrium structures of small metal atom clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, L. R.

    1981-01-01

    The application of ab initio quantum mechanical approaches in the study of metal atom clusters requires simplifying techniques that do not compromise the reliability of the calculations. Various aspects of the implementation of the effective core potential (ECP) technique for the removal of the metal atom core electrons from the calculation were examined. The ECP molecular integral formulae were modified to bring out the shell characteristics as a first step towards fulfilling the increasing need to speed up the computation of the ECP integrals. Work on the relationships among the derivatives of the molecular integrals that extends some of the techniques pioneered by Komornicki for the calculation of the gradients of the electronic energy was completed and a formulation of the ECP approach that quite naturally unifies the various state-of-the-art "shape- and Hamiltonian-consistent" techniques was discovered.

  14. Spin-polarized Rb2 interacting with bosonic He atoms: potential energy surface and quantum structures of small clusters.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Cantano, R; López-Durán, David; González-Lezana, T; Delgado-Barrio, G; Villarreal, P; Yurtsever, E; Gianturco, F A

    2012-03-15

    A new full-dimension potential energy surface of the three-body He-Rb₂(³Σ(u)(+)) complex and a quantum study of small (⁴He)(N)-Rb₂(³Σ(u)(+)) clusters, 1 ≤ N ≤ 4, are presented. We have accurately fitted the ab initio points of the interaction to an analytical form and addressed the dopant's vibration, which is found to be negligible. A Variational approach and a Diffusion Monte Carlo technique have been applied to yield energy and geometric properties of the selected species. Our quantum structure calculations show a transition in the arrangements of the helium atoms from N = 2, where they tend to be separated across the diatomic bond, to N = 4, in which a closer packing of the rare gas particles is reached, guided by the dominance of the He-He potential over the weaker interaction of the latter adatoms with the doping dimer. The deepest well of the He-Rb₂ interaction is placed at the T-shape configuration, a feature which causes the dopant to be located as parallel to the helium "minidroplet". Our results are shown to agree with previous findings on this and on similar systems.

  15. Real applications of quantum imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genovese, Marco

    2016-07-01

    In previous years the possibility of creating and manipulating quantum states of light has paved the way for the development of new technologies exploiting peculiar properties of quantum states, such as quantum information, quantum metrology and sensing, quantum imaging, etc. In particular quantum imaging addresses the possibility of overcoming limits of classical optics by using quantum resources such as entanglement or sub-Poissonian statistics. Albeit, quantum imaging is a more recent field than other quantum technologies, e.g. quantum information, it is now mature enough for application. Several different protocols have been proposed, some of them only theoretically, others with an experimental implementation and a few of them pointing to a clear application. Here we present a few of the most mature protocols ranging from ghost imaging to sub shot noise imaging and sub-Rayleigh imaging.

  16. 10-W pulsed operation of substrate emitting photonic-crystal quantum cascade laser with very small divergence.

    PubMed

    Yao, Dan-Yang; Zhang, Jin-Chuan; Cathabard, Olivier; Zhai, Shen-Qiang; Liu, Ying-Hui; Jia, Zhi-Wei; Liu, Feng-Qi; Wang, Zhan-Guo

    2015-01-01

    High-power broad area substrate emitting photonic-crystal distributed feedback (DFB) quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) emitting around 4.73 μm is reported. Two-dimensional centered rectangular photonic-crystal (CRPC) grating is introduced to enhance optical coherence in large area device. Main lobe far-field radiation pattern with a very small divergence angle of about 0.65° × 0.31° is obtained. A record peak output power for vertical emitting QCLs exceeding 10 W is obtained with high reflectivity (HR) coating. Robust single longitudinal mode emission with a side mode suppression ratio (SMSR) of 30 dB is continuously tunable by the heat sink temperature up to 65°C. PMID:25977652

  17. Direct observation of the size dependence of Dexter energy transfer from polymer to small PbS quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yating; Xu, Zhangcheng

    2008-08-01

    Small PbS quantum dots (QDs) with diameters ranging from 2.5 to 3 nm were synthesized directly in the conjugated polymer poly[2-methoxy-5-(2'-ethyl-hexyloxy)-p-phenylene vinylene] (MEH-PPV) at 70 °C. To monitor the size dependence of Dexter energy transfer [D. L. Dexter, J. Chem. Phys. 21, 836 (1953)] from MEH-PPV to PbS QDs, the photoluminescence of MEH-PPV is measured for a series of samples with varying QD sizes controlled by the reaction time. A decreased transfer rate is observed for PbS QDs with a diameter of about 2.65 nm due to the minimum overlap between the emission spectrum of MEH-PPV and the 1Se-1Sh and 1Pe-1Sh transitions of PbS QDs.

  18. Small molecule-assisted fabrication of black phosphorus quantum dots with a broadband nonlinear optical response.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lin-Feng; Xu, Jing-Yin; Zhu, Zhi-Yuan; Hu, Chen-Xia; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Qiang; Zhang, Hao-Li

    2016-08-18

    Ultrathin BP QDs with a uniform size of ∼3.4 nm were prepared via small molecule-assisted liquid phase exfoliation and they exhibited superior broadband nonlinear saturable absorption promising for nonlinear optical applications. Laser photolysis measurement implied that the nonlinear response origin was related to the long-lived electron-hole pairs delocalized within the BP QDs. PMID:27491959

  19. Hydrogen-bond cooperative effects in small cyclic water clusters as revealed by the interacting quantum atoms approach.

    PubMed

    Guevara-Vela, José Manuel; Chávez-Calvillo, Rodrigo; García-Revilla, Marco; Hernández-Trujillo, Jesús; Christiansen, Ove; Francisco, Evelio; Martín Pendás, Angel; Rocha-Rinza, Tomás

    2013-10-11

    The cooperative effects of hydrogen bonding in small water clusters (H2 O)n (n=3-6) have been studied by using the partition of the electronic energy in accordance with the interacting quantum atoms (IQA) approach. The IQA energy splitting is complemented by a topological analysis of the electron density (ρ(r)) compliant with the quantum theory of atoms-in-molecules (QTAIM) and the calculation of electrostatic interactions by using one- and two-electron integrals, thereby avoiding convergence issues inherent to a multipolar expansion. The results show that the cooperative effects of hydrogen bonding in small water clusters arise from a compromise between: 1) the deformation energy (i.e., the energy necessary to modify the electron density and the configuration of the nuclei of the isolated water molecules to those within the water clusters), and 2) the interaction energy (Eint ) of these contorted molecules in (H2 O)n . Whereas the magnitude of both deformation and interaction energies is enhanced as water molecules are added to the system, the augmentation of the latter becomes dominant when the size of the cluster is increased. In addition, the electrostatic, classic, and exchange components of Eint for a pair of water molecules in the cluster (H2 O)n-1 become more attractive when a new H2 O unit is incorporated to generate the system (H2 O)n with the last-mentioned contribution being consistently the most important part of Eint throughout the hydrogen bonds under consideration. This is opposed to the traditional view, which regards hydrogen bonding in water as an electrostatically driven interaction. Overall, the trends of the delocalization indices, δ(Ω,Ω'), the QTAIM atomic charges, the topology of ρ(r), and the IQA results altogether show how polarization, charge transfer, electrostatics, and covalency contribute to the cooperative effects of hydrogen bonding in small water clusters. It is our hope that the analysis presented in this paper could

  20. Theoretical study of small sodium-potassium alloy clusters through genetic algorithm and quantum chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Silva, Mateus X; Galvão, Breno R L; Belchior, Jadson C

    2014-05-21

    Genetic algorithm is employed to survey an empirical potential energy surface for small Na(x)K(y) clusters with x + y ≤ 15, providing initial conditions for electronic structure methods. The minima of such empirical potential are assessed and corrected using high level ab initio methods such as CCSD(T), CR-CCSD(T)-L and MP2, and benchmark results are obtained for specific cases. The results are the first calculations for such small alloy clusters and may serve as a reference for further studies. The validity and choice of a proper functional and basis set for DFT calculations are then explored using the benchmark data, where it was found that the usual DFT approach may fail to provide the correct qualitative result for specific systems. The best general agreement to the benchmark calculations is achieved with def2-TZVPP basis set with SVWN5 functional, although the LANL2DZ basis set (with effective core potential) and SVWN5 functional provided the most cost-effective results. PMID:24691391

  1. An investigation of equilibration in small quantum systems: the example of a particle in a 1D random potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luck, J. M.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the equilibration of a small isolated quantum system by means of its matrix of asymptotic transition probabilities in a preferential basis. The trace of this matrix is shown to measure the degree of equilibration of the system launched from a typical state, from the standpoint of the chosen basis. This approach is substantiated by an in-depth study of the example of a tight-binding particle in one dimension. In the regime of free ballistic propagation, the above trace saturates to a finite limit, testifying good equilibration. In the presence of a random potential, the trace grows linearly with the system size, testifying poor equilibration in the insulating regime induced by Anderson localization. In the weak-disorder situation of most interest, a universal finite-size scaling law describes the crossover between the ballistic and localized regimes. The associated crossover exponent 2/3 is dictated by the anomalous band-edge scaling characterizing the most localized energy eigenstates.

  2. Stability of core/shell quantum dots--role of pH and small organic ligands.

    PubMed

    Domingos, Rute F; Franco, Cristiana; Pinheiro, José P

    2013-07-01

    The improvement of knowledge about the toxicity and even processability, and stability of quantum dots (QD) requires the understanding of the relationship between the QD binding head group, surface structure, and interligand interaction. The scanned stripping chronopotentiometry and absence of gradients and Nernstian equilibrium stripping techniques were used to determine the concentration of Cd dissolved from a polyacrylate-stabilized CdTe/CdS QD. The effects of various concentrations of small organic ligands such as citric acid, glycine, and histidine and the roles of pH (4.5-8.5) and exposure time (0-48 h) were evaluated. The highest QD dissolution was obtained at the more acidic pH in absence of the ligands (52%) a result of the CdS shell solubility. At pH 8.5 the largest PAA ability to complex the dissolved Cd leads to a further QD solubility until the equilibrium is reached (24% of dissolved Cd vs. 4% at pH 6.0). The citric acid presence resulted in greater QD dissolution, whereas glycine, an amino acid, acts against QD dissolution. Surprisingly, the presence of histidine, an amino acid with an imidazole functional group, leads to the formation of much strong Cd complexes over time, which may be non-labile, inducing variations in the local environment of the QD surface.

  3. Quantum Dots: Growth of InAs Quantum Dots on GaAs (511)A Substrates: The Competition between Thermal Dynamics and Kinetics (Small 31/2016).

    PubMed

    Wen, Lei; Gao, Fangliang; Zhang, Shuguang; Li, Guoqiang

    2016-08-01

    On page 4277, G. Li and co-workers aim to promote III-V compound semiconductors and devices for a broad range of applications with various technologies. The growth process of InAs quantum dots on GaAs (511)A substrates is systematically studied. By carefully controlling the competition between growth thermal-dynamics and kinetics, InAs quantum dots with high size uniformity are prepared, which are highly desirable for the fabrication of high-efficiency solar cells. PMID:27510365

  4. Quantum volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabov, V. A.

    2015-08-01

    Quantum systems in a mechanical embedding, the breathing mode of a small particles, optomechanical system, etc. are far not the full list of examples in which the volume exhibits quantum behavior. Traditional consideration suggests strain in small systems as a result of a collective movement of particles, rather than the dynamics of the volume as an independent variable. The aim of this work is to show that some problem here might be essentially simplified by introducing periodic boundary conditions. At this case, the volume is considered as the independent dynamical variable driven by the internal pressure. For this purpose, the concept of quantum volume based on Schrödinger’s equation in 𝕋3 manifold is proposed. It is used to explore several 1D model systems: An ensemble of free particles under external pressure, quantum manometer and a quantum breathing mode. In particular, the influence of the pressure of free particle on quantum oscillator is determined. It is shown also that correction to the spectrum of the breathing mode due to internal degrees of freedom is determined by the off-diagonal matrix elements of the quantum stress. The new treatment not using the “force” theorem is proposed for the quantum stress tensor. In the general case of flexible quantum 3D dynamics, quantum deformations of different type might be introduced similarly to monopole mode.

  5. Quantum memory Quantum memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Gouët, Jean-Louis; Moiseev, Sergey

    2012-06-01

    Interaction of quantum radiation with multi-particle ensembles has sparked off intense research efforts during the past decade. Emblematic of this field is the quantum memory scheme, where a quantum state of light is mapped onto an ensemble of atoms and then recovered in its original shape. While opening new access to the basics of light-atom interaction, quantum memory also appears as a key element for information processing applications, such as linear optics quantum computation and long-distance quantum communication via quantum repeaters. Not surprisingly, it is far from trivial to practically recover a stored quantum state of light and, although impressive progress has already been accomplished, researchers are still struggling to reach this ambitious objective. This special issue provides an account of the state-of-the-art in a fast-moving research area that makes physicists, engineers and chemists work together at the forefront of their discipline, involving quantum fields and atoms in different media, magnetic resonance techniques and material science. Various strategies have been considered to store and retrieve quantum light. The explored designs belong to three main—while still overlapping—classes. In architectures derived from photon echo, information is mapped over the spectral components of inhomogeneously broadened absorption bands, such as those encountered in rare earth ion doped crystals and atomic gases in external gradient magnetic field. Protocols based on electromagnetic induced transparency also rely on resonant excitation and are ideally suited to the homogeneous absorption lines offered by laser cooled atomic clouds or ion Coulomb crystals. Finally off-resonance approaches are illustrated by Faraday and Raman processes. Coupling with an optical cavity may enhance the storage process, even for negligibly small atom number. Multiple scattering is also proposed as a way to enlarge the quantum interaction distance of light with matter. The

  6. Quantum seismography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzagorta, Marco; Jitrik, Oliverio; Uhlmann, Jeffrey; Venegas, Salvador

    2016-05-01

    A major scientific thrust from recent years has been to try to harness quantum phenomena to increase the performance of a wide variety of information processing devices. In particular, quantum radar has emerged as an intriguing theoretical concept that could revolutionize electromagnetic standoff sensing. In this paper we will discuss how the techniques developed for quantum radar could also be used towards the design of novel seismographs able to detect small ground vibrations., We use a hypothetical earthquake warning system in order to compare quantum seismography with traditional seismographic techniques.

  7. Universal quantum dot-based sandwich-like immunoassay strategy for rapid and ultrasensitive detection of small molecules using portable and reusable optofluidic nano-biosensing platform.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Liping; Zhu, Anna; Lou, Xuening; Song, Dan; Yang, Rong; Shi, Hanchang; Long, Feng

    2016-01-28

    A universal sandwich-like immunoassay strategy based on quantum-dots immunoprobe (QD-labeled anti-mouse IgG antibody) was developed for rapid and ultrasensitive detection of small molecules. A portable and reusable optofluidic nano-biosensing platform was applied to investigate the sandwich-like immunoassay mechanism and format of small molecules, as well as the binding kinetics between QD immunoprobe and anti-small molecule antibody. A two-step immunoassay method that involves pre-incubation mixture of different concentration of small molecule and anti-small molecule antibody, and subsequent introduction of QD immunoprobe into the optofluidic cell was conducted for small molecule determination. Compared with the one-step immunoassay method, the two-step immunoassay method can obtain higher fluorescence signal and higher sensitivity index, thus improving the nano-biosensing performance. Based on the proposed strategy, two mode targets, namely, microcystin-LR (MC-LR) and Bisphenol A (BPA) were tested with high sensitivity, rapidity, and ease of use. A higher concentration of small molecules in the sample led to less anti-small molecule antibody bound with antigen-carrier protein conjugate immobilized onto the sensor surface, and less QD immunoprobes bound with anti-small molecule antibody. This phenomenon lowered the fluorescence signal detected by nano-biosensing platform. Under optimal operating conditions, MC-LR and BPA exhibited a limit of detection of 0.003 and 0.04 μg/L, respectively. The LODs were better than those of the indirect competitive immunoassay method for small molecules via Cy5.5-labeled anti-small molecule antibody. The proposed QD-based sandwich-like immunoassay strategy was evaluated in spiked water samples, and showed good recovery, precision and accuracy without complicated sample pretreatments. All these results demonstrate that the new detection strategy could be readily applied to the other trace small molecules in real water samples.

  8. Quantum size effect as evidenced by small-angle X-ray scattering of In{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Souza, E. C. C.; Rey, J. F. Q.; Muccillo, E. N. S.

    2009-01-29

    Indium oxide nanoparticles were synthesized by a surfactant-free room-temperature soft chemistry route. The medium particle size of the thermally treated gel was evaluated by X-ray diffraction experiments, nitrogen adsorption measurements, transmission electron microscopy observations and small-angle X-ray scattering using synchrotron radiation. The main results show the single-crystalline nature of the prepared nanoparticles with 8 nm in diameter. The photoluminescence emission spectrum at room-temperature shows a broad peak with onset at, approximately, 315 nm as a result of quantum size effect produced by a small population of nanoparticles with average size of about 2.8 nm as revealed by small-angle X-ray scattering.

  9. Observation of electron states of small period artificial graphene in nano-patterned GaAs quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Sheng; Scarabelli, Diego; Kuznetsova, Yuliya Y.; Wind, Shalom J.; Pinczuk, Aron; Pellegrini, Vittorio; Manfra, Michael J.; Gardner, Geoff C.; Pfeiffer, Loren N.; West, Ken W.

    2016-09-01

    Engineered honeycomb lattices, called artificial graphene (AG), are tunable platforms for the study of novel electronic states related to Dirac physics. In this work, we report the achievement of electronic bands of the honeycomb topology with the period as low as 40 nm on the nano-patterned modulation-doped AlGaAs/GaAs quantum wells. Resonant inelastic light scattering spectra reveal peaks which are interpreted as combined electronic transitions between subbands of the quantum well confinement with a change in the AG band index. Spectra lineshapes are explained by joint density of states obtained from the calculated AG electron band structures. These results provide a basis for further advancements in AG physics.

  10. Small Atomic Orbital Basis Set First-Principles Quantum Chemical Methods for Large Molecular and Periodic Systems: A Critical Analysis of Error Sources.

    PubMed

    Sure, Rebecca; Brandenburg, Jan Gerit; Grimme, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    In quantum chemical computations the combination of Hartree-Fock or a density functional theory (DFT) approximation with relatively small atomic orbital basis sets of double-zeta quality is still widely used, for example, in the popular B3LYP/6-31G* approach. In this Review, we critically analyze the two main sources of error in such computations, that is, the basis set superposition error on the one hand and the missing London dispersion interactions on the other. We review various strategies to correct those errors and present exemplary calculations on mainly noncovalently bound systems of widely varying size. Energies and geometries of small dimers, large supramolecular complexes, and molecular crystals are covered. We conclude that it is not justified to rely on fortunate error compensation, as the main inconsistencies can be cured by modern correction schemes which clearly outperform the plain mean-field methods. PMID:27308221

  11. Small Atomic Orbital Basis Set First-Principles Quantum Chemical Methods for Large Molecular and Periodic Systems: A Critical Analysis of Error Sources.

    PubMed

    Sure, Rebecca; Brandenburg, Jan Gerit; Grimme, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    In quantum chemical computations the combination of Hartree-Fock or a density functional theory (DFT) approximation with relatively small atomic orbital basis sets of double-zeta quality is still widely used, for example, in the popular B3LYP/6-31G* approach. In this Review, we critically analyze the two main sources of error in such computations, that is, the basis set superposition error on the one hand and the missing London dispersion interactions on the other. We review various strategies to correct those errors and present exemplary calculations on mainly noncovalently bound systems of widely varying size. Energies and geometries of small dimers, large supramolecular complexes, and molecular crystals are covered. We conclude that it is not justified to rely on fortunate error compensation, as the main inconsistencies can be cured by modern correction schemes which clearly outperform the plain mean-field methods.

  12. Small Atomic Orbital Basis Set First‐Principles Quantum Chemical Methods for Large Molecular and Periodic Systems: A Critical Analysis of Error Sources

    PubMed Central

    Sure, Rebecca; Brandenburg, Jan Gerit

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In quantum chemical computations the combination of Hartree–Fock or a density functional theory (DFT) approximation with relatively small atomic orbital basis sets of double‐zeta quality is still widely used, for example, in the popular B3LYP/6‐31G* approach. In this Review, we critically analyze the two main sources of error in such computations, that is, the basis set superposition error on the one hand and the missing London dispersion interactions on the other. We review various strategies to correct those errors and present exemplary calculations on mainly noncovalently bound systems of widely varying size. Energies and geometries of small dimers, large supramolecular complexes, and molecular crystals are covered. We conclude that it is not justified to rely on fortunate error compensation, as the main inconsistencies can be cured by modern correction schemes which clearly outperform the plain mean‐field methods. PMID:27308221

  13. Small-signal modulation and differential gain of red-emitting (λ = 630 nm) InGaN/GaN quantum dot lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Frost, Thomas; Banerjee, Animesh; Bhattacharya, Pallab

    2013-11-18

    We report small-signal modulation bandwidth and differential gain measurements of a ridge waveguide In{sub 0.4}Ga{sub 0.6}N/GaN quantum dot laser grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The laser peak emission is at λ = 630 nm. The −3 dB bandwidth of an 800 μm long device was measured to be 2.4 GHz at 250 mA under pulsed biasing, demonstrating the possibility of high-speed operation of these devices. The differential gain was measured to be 5.3 × 10{sup −17} cm{sup 2}, and a gain compression factor of 2.87 × 10{sup −17} cm{sup 3} is also derived from the small-signal modulation response.

  14. Quantum Feynman Ratchet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyal, Ketan; Kawai, Ryoichi

    As nanotechnology advances, understanding of the thermodynamic properties of small systems becomes increasingly important. Such systems are found throughout physics, biology, and chemistry manifesting striking properties that are a direct result of their small dimensions where fluctuations become predominant. The standard theory of thermodynamics for macroscopic systems is powerless for such ever fluctuating systems. Furthermore, as small systems are inherently quantum mechanical, influence of quantum effects such as discreteness and quantum entanglement on their thermodynamic properties is of great interest. In particular, the quantum fluctuations due to quantum uncertainty principles may play a significant role. In this talk, we investigate thermodynamic properties of an autonomous quantum heat engine, resembling a quantum version of the Feynman Ratchet, in non-equilibrium condition based on the theory of open quantum systems. The heat engine consists of multiple subsystems individually contacted to different thermal environments.

  15. Optical Properties of Gold Nanoclusters Functionalized with a Small Organic Compound: Modeling by an Integrated Quantum-Classical Approach.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Carravetta, Vincenzo; Li, Cui; Monti, Susanna; Rinkevicius, Zilvinas; Ågren, Hans

    2016-07-12

    Motivated by the growing importance of organometallic nanostructured materials and nanoparticles as microscopic devices for diagnostic and sensing applications, and by the recent considerable development in the simulation of such materials, we here choose a prototype system - para-nitroaniline (pNA) on gold nanoparticles - to demonstrate effective strategies for designing metal nanoparticles with organic conjugates from fundamental principles. We investigated the motion, adsorption mode, and physical chemistry properties of gold-pNA particles, increasing in size, through classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in connection with quantum chemistry (QC) calculations. We apply the quantum mechanics-capacitance molecular mechanics method [Z. Rinkevicius et al. J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2014, 10, 989] for calculations of the properties of the conjugate nanoparticles, where time dependent density functional theory is used for the QM part and a capacitance-polarizability parametrization of the MM part, where induced dipoles and charges by metallic charge transfer are considered. Dispersion and short-range repulsion forces are included as well. The scheme is applied to one- and two-photon absorption of gold-pNA clusters increasing in size toward the nanometer scale. Charge imaging of the surface introduces red-shifts both because of altered excitation energy dependence and variation of the relative intensity of the inherent states making up for the total band profile. For the smaller nanoparticles the difference in the crystal facets are important for the spectral outcome which is also influenced by the surrounding MM environment. PMID:27224666

  16. Optical Properties of Gold Nanoclusters Functionalized with a Small Organic Compound: Modeling by an Integrated Quantum-Classical Approach.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Carravetta, Vincenzo; Li, Cui; Monti, Susanna; Rinkevicius, Zilvinas; Ågren, Hans

    2016-07-12

    Motivated by the growing importance of organometallic nanostructured materials and nanoparticles as microscopic devices for diagnostic and sensing applications, and by the recent considerable development in the simulation of such materials, we here choose a prototype system - para-nitroaniline (pNA) on gold nanoparticles - to demonstrate effective strategies for designing metal nanoparticles with organic conjugates from fundamental principles. We investigated the motion, adsorption mode, and physical chemistry properties of gold-pNA particles, increasing in size, through classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in connection with quantum chemistry (QC) calculations. We apply the quantum mechanics-capacitance molecular mechanics method [Z. Rinkevicius et al. J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2014, 10, 989] for calculations of the properties of the conjugate nanoparticles, where time dependent density functional theory is used for the QM part and a capacitance-polarizability parametrization of the MM part, where induced dipoles and charges by metallic charge transfer are considered. Dispersion and short-range repulsion forces are included as well. The scheme is applied to one- and two-photon absorption of gold-pNA clusters increasing in size toward the nanometer scale. Charge imaging of the surface introduces red-shifts both because of altered excitation energy dependence and variation of the relative intensity of the inherent states making up for the total band profile. For the smaller nanoparticles the difference in the crystal facets are important for the spectral outcome which is also influenced by the surrounding MM environment.

  17. The HD molecule in small and medium cages of clathrate hydrates: Quantum dynamics studied by neutron scattering measurements and computation

    SciTech Connect

    Colognesi, Daniele; Celli, Milva; Ulivi, Lorenzo; Powers, Anna; Xu, Minzhong; Bačić, Zlatko

    2014-10-07

    We report inelastic neutron scattering (INS) measurements on molecular hydrogen deuteride (HD) trapped in binary cubic (sII) and hexagonal (sH) clathrate hydrates, performed at low temperature using two different neutron spectrometers in order to probe both energy and momentum transfer. The INS spectra of binary clathrate samples exhibit a rich structure containing sharp bands arising from both the rotational transitions and the rattling modes of the guest molecule. For the clathrates with sII structure, there is a very good agreement with the rigorous fully quantum simulations which account for the subtle effects of the anisotropy, angular and radial, of the host cage on the HD microscopic dynamics. The sH clathrate sample presents a much greater challenge, due to the uncertainties regarding the crystal structure, which is known only for similar crystals with different promoter, but nor for HD (or H{sub 2}) plus methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE-d12)

  18. The HD molecule in small and medium cages of clathrate hydrates: Quantum dynamics studied by neutron scattering measurements and computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colognesi, Daniele; Powers, Anna; Celli, Milva; Xu, Minzhong; Bačić, Zlatko; Ulivi, Lorenzo

    2014-10-01

    We report inelastic neutron scattering (INS) measurements on molecular hydrogen deuteride (HD) trapped in binary cubic (sII) and hexagonal (sH) clathrate hydrates, performed at low temperature using two different neutron spectrometers in order to probe both energy and momentum transfer. The INS spectra of binary clathrate samples exhibit a rich structure containing sharp bands arising from both the rotational transitions and the rattling modes of the guest molecule. For the clathrates with sII structure, there is a very good agreement with the rigorous fully quantum simulations which account for the subtle effects of the anisotropy, angular and radial, of the host cage on the HD microscopic dynamics. The sH clathrate sample presents a much greater challenge, due to the uncertainties regarding the crystal structure, which is known only for similar crystals with different promoter, but nor for HD (or H2) plus methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE-d12).

  19. Macroscopic quantum tunneling and thermal activation in a small mesa structured Bi2Sr2CaCu2Oy intrinsic Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitano, H.; Ota, K.; Hamada, K.; Takemura, R.; Ohmaki, M.; Maeda, A.; Suzuki, M.

    2009-03-01

    A nanometer-thick small mesa consiting of only two or three Bi2Sr2CaCu2Oy intrinsic Josephson junctions (IJJs) is studied through the switching current distribution measurements down to 0.4 K. Experimental results clearly show that the first switching events from the zero-voltage state for 1 K < T < 4 K are successfully described by a conventional thermal activation (TA) theory for a single Josephson junction, and that they become independent of temperature below T* ~ 0.7 K. We observe the microwave-induced peak in the switching distribution at 0.4 K, which is induced by the microwave irradiation at 55 GHz. These results strongly suggest that the system crossovers to macroscopic quantum tunneling (MQT) regime below T*, which is as high as the previously reported value for a stacked IJJs with several tens of junctions, in contrast to the recent result on a similar mesa-structured surface IJJ.

  20. Thermal Effects and Small Signal Modulation of 1.3-μm InAs/GaAs Self-Assembled Quantum-Dot Lasers.

    PubMed

    Zhao, H X; Yoon, S F; Tong, C Z; Liu, C Y; Wang, R; Cao, Q

    2011-12-01

    We investigate the influence of thermal effects on the high-speed performance of 1.3-μm InAs/GaAs quantum-dot lasers in a wide temperature range (5-50°C). Ridge waveguide devices with 1.1 mm cavity length exhibit small signal modulation bandwidths of 7.51 GHz at 5°C and 3.98 GHz at 50°C. Temperature-dependent K-factor, differential gain, and gain compression factor are studied. While the intrinsic damping-limited modulation bandwidth is as high as 23 GHz, the actual modulation bandwidth is limited by carrier thermalization under continuous wave operation. Saturation of the resonance frequency was found to be the result of thermal reduction in the differential gain, which may originate from carrier thermalization.

  1. Microwave Levitation Of Small Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, John L.; Jackson, Henry W.

    1991-01-01

    Microwave radiation in resonant cavities used to levitate small objects, according to proposal. Feedback control and atmosphere not needed. Technique conceived for use in experiments on processing of materials in low gravitation of outer space, also used in normal Earth gravitation, albeit under some limitations.

  2. Synthesis, solubilization, and surface functionalization of highly fluorescent quantum dots for cellular targeting through a small molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galloway, Justin F.

    To achieve long-term fluorescence imaging with quantum dots (QDs), a CdSe core/shell must first be synthesized. The synthesis of bright CdSe QDs is not trivial and as a consequence, the role of surfactant in nucleation and growth was investigated. It was found that the type of surfactant used, either phosphonic or fatty acid, played a pivotal role in the size of the CdSe core. The study of surfactant on CdSe synthesis, ultimately led to an electrical passivation method that utilized a short-chained phosphonic acid and highly reactive organometallic precursors to achieve high quantum yield (QY) as has been previously described. The synthesis of QDs using organometallic precursors and a phosphonic acid for passivation resulted in 4 out of 9 batches of QDs achieving QYs greater than 50% and 8 out of 9 batches with QYs greater than 35%. The synthesis of CdSe QDs was done in organic solutions rendering the surface of the particle hydrophobic. To perform cell-targeting experiments, QDs must be transferred to water. The transfer of QDs to water was successfully accomplished by using single acyl chain lipids. A systematic study of different lipid combinations and coatings demonstrated that 20-40 mol% single acyl chained lipids were able to transfer QDs to water resulting in monodispersed, stable QDs without adversely affecting the QY. The advantage to water solubilization using single acyl chain lipids is that the QD have a hydrodynamic radius less than 15 nm, QYs that can exceed 50% and additional surface functionalization can be down using the reactive sites incorporated into the lipid bilayer. QDs that are bright and stable in water were studied for the purpose of targeting G protein-coupled Receptors (GPCR). GPCRs are transmembrane receptors that internalize extracellular cues, and thus mediate signal transduction. The cyclic Adenosine Monophosphate Receptor 1 of the model organism Dictyostelium disodium was the receptor of interest. The Halo protein, a genetically

  3. Reducing Blinking in Small Core-Multishell Quantum Dots by Carefully Balancing Confinement Potential and Induced Lattice Strain: The "Goldilocks" Effect.

    PubMed

    Omogo, Benard; Gao, Feng; Bajwa, Pooja; Kaneko, Mizuho; Heyes, Colin D

    2016-04-26

    Currently, the most common way to reduce blinking in quantum dots (QDs) is accomplished by using very thick and/or perfectly crystalline CdS shells on CdSe cores. Ideally, a nontoxic material such as ZnS is preferred to be the outer material in order to reduce environmental and cytotoxic effects. Blinking suppression with multishell configurations of CdS and ZnS has been reported only for "giant" QDs of 15 nm or more. One of the main reasons for the limited progress is that the role that interfacial trap states play in blinking in these systems is not very well understood. Here, we show a "Goldilocks" effect to reduce blinking in small (∼7 nm) QDs by carefully controlling the thicknesses of the shells in multishell QDs. Furthermore, by correlating the fluorescence lifetime components with the fraction of time that a QD spends in the on-state, both with and without applying a threshold, we found evidence for two types of blinking that separately affect the average fluorescence lifetime of a single QD. A thorough characterization of the time-resolved fluorescence at the ensemble and single-particle level allowed us to propose a detailed physical model involving both short-lived interfacial trap states and long-lived surface trap states that are coupled. This model highlights a strategy of reducing QD blinking in small QDs by balancing the magnitude of the induced lattice strain, which results in the formation of interfacial trap states between the inner shell and the outer shell, and the confinement potential that determines how accessible the interfacial trap states are. The combination of reducing blinking while maintaining a small overall QD size and using a Cd-free outer shell of ZnS will be useful in a wide array of applications, particularly for advanced bioimaging. PMID:27058120

  4. Surface-supported Ag islands stabilized by a quantum size effect: Their interaction with small molecules relevant to ethylene epoxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Dahai

    2013-05-15

    This dissertation focuses on how QSE-stabilized, surface-supported Ag nanoclusters will interact with ethylene or oxygen. Experiments are performed to determine whether the QSE-mediated Ag islands react differently toward adsorption of ethylene or oxygen, or whether the adsorption of these small molecules will affect the QSE-mediated stability of Ag islands. Studies of the interaction of oxygen with Ag/Si(111)-7×7 were previously reported, but these studies were performed at a low Ag coverage where 3D Ag islands were not formed. So the study of such a system at a higher Ag coverage will be a subject of this work. The interaction of ethylene with Ag/Si(111)-7×7, as well as the interaction of oxygen with Ag/NiAl(110) are also important parts of this study.

  5. Removal of mercury from the environment: a quantum-chemical study with the normalized elimination of the small component method.

    PubMed

    Zou, Wenli; Filatov, Michael; Atwood, David; Cremer, Dieter

    2013-03-01

    1,3-Benzenediamidoethanethiolatemercury [BDT-Hg or BD(S)-Hg] and its derivatives are investigated utilizing the Dirac exact relativistic normalized elimination of the small component method in connection with B3LYP, CCSD(T), and polarizable continuum calculations. It is shown that the chelating energy of BDT-Hg can be significantly increased by replacing sulfur with selenium or tellurium, thus leading to BD(Se)-Hg or BD(Te)-Hg. In this particular case, the chalcogenophilicity of mercury increases from S to Te because increasing the E-Hg bond lengths leads to a reduction of ring strain. Various possibilities of increasing the metal (M) chelating strength in BDT-M complexes are investigated, and suggestions for new chelating agents based on the BDT-M template are made.

  6. Pure and N-substituted Small Cyclic Hydrocarbon Cations and Anions Synthesis in The Ionosphere of Titan: An Ab-Initio Quantum Chemical Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bera, P. P.

    2015-12-01

    The instruments on board the CASSINI spacecraft observed large carbonaceous molecules in the upper atmosphere of Titan. How these large polyatomic molecules are synthesized in such exotic conditions is, thus far, unknown. Molecular ions, including positive and negative ions, especially large anions, are in abundance in the ionosphere of Titan. Barrier-less ion-molecule interactions may play a major role ­- ions provide electrostatic steering force - in guiding molecules towards each other and initiating reactions. We study these condensation pathways to determine whether they are a viable means of forming large pure hydrocarbon molecules, and nitrogen-containing carbonaceous chains, stacks, and even cyclic compounds. We employ accurate quantum chemical methods to investigate the processes of growth, structures, nature of bonding, mechanisms, and spectroscopic properties of the ensuing ionic products after pairing small carbon, hydrogen, and nitrogen-containing molecules with major ions observed in the upper atmosphere of Titan, e.g. C2H5+ and HCNH+, apart from a whole host of small hydrocarbons. We also studied the ion-neutral association pathways involving pure-carbon molecules e.g. acetylene, ethylene and other hydrocarbons, and their dissociation fragments in a plasma discharge. We found the molecular building blocks of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons such as phenyl cations can form very easily by the combination of smaller hydrocarbons followed by hydrogen loss. We have investigated how nitrogen atoms are incorporated into the carbon ring during growth. Specifically, we explored the mechanisms by which the synthesis of pyrimidine will be feasible in the atmosphere of Titan in conjunction with ion-mobility experiments. Futher, we study the formation process of anions, and study their potential energy surfaces. We have used accurate ab initio coupled cluster theory, Møller-Plesset perturbation theory, density functional theory (DFT), and coupled cluster theory

  7. Self-dual black holes in loop quantum gravity: Theory and phenomenology

    SciTech Connect

    Modesto, Leonardo; Premont-Schwarz, Isabeau

    2009-09-15

    In this paper we have recalled the semiclassical metric obtained from a classical analysis of the loop quantum black hole (LQBH). We show that the regular Reissner-Nordstroem-like metric is self-dual in the sense of T-duality: the form of the metric obtained in loop quantum gravity is invariant under the exchange r{yields}a{sub 0}/r where a{sub 0} is proportional to the minimum area in loop quantum gravity and r is the standard Schwarzschild radial coordinate at asymptotic infinity. Of particular interest, the symmetry imposes that if an observer in r{yields}+{infinity} sees a black hole of mass m an observer in the other asymptotic infinity beyond the horizon (at r{approx_equal}0) sees a dual mass m{sub P}/m. We then show that small LQBH are stable and could be a component of dark matter. Ultralight LQBHs created shortly after the big bang would now have a mass of approximately 10{sup -5}m{sub P} and emit radiation with a typical energy of about 10{sup 13}-10{sup 14} eV but they would also emit cosmic rays of much higher energies, albeit few of them. If these small LQBHs form a majority of the dark matter of the Milky Way's Halo, the production rate of ultra-high-energy-cosmic-rays (UHECR) by these ultralight black holes would be compatible with the observed rate of the Auger detector.

  8. Enhancement of the photovoltaic performance in P3HT: PbS hybrid solar cells using small size PbS quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Firdaus, Yuliar; Van der Auweraer, Mark; Vandenplas, Erwin; Gehlhaar, Robert; Cheyns, David; Justo, Yolanda; Hens, Zeger

    2014-09-07

    Different approaches of surface modification of the quantum dots (QDs), namely, solution-phase (octylamine, octanethiol) and post-deposition (acetic acid, 1,4-benzenedithiol) ligand exchange were used in the fabrication of hybrid bulk heterojunction solar cell containing poly (3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and small (2.4 nm) PbS QDs. We show that replacing oleic acid by shorter chain ligands improves the figures of merit of the solar cells. This can possibly be attributed to a combination of a reduced thickness of the barrier for electron transfer and an optimized phase separation. The best results were obtained for post-deposition ligand exchange by 1,4-benzenedithiol, which improves the power conversion efficiency of solar cells based on a bulk heterojunction of lead sulfide (PbS) QDs and P3HT up to two orders of magnitude over previously reported hybrid cells based on a bulk heterojunction of P3HT:PbS QDs, where the QDs are capped by acetic acid ligands. The optimal performance was obtained for solar cells with 69 wt. % PbS QDs. Besides the ligand effects, the improvement was attributed to the formation of an energetically favorable bulk heterojunction with P3HT, when small size (2.4 nm) PbS QDs were used. Dark current density-voltage (J-V) measurements carried out on the device provided insight into the working mechanism: the comparison between the dark J-V characteristics of the bench mark system P3HT:PCBM and the P3HT:PbS blends allows us to conclude that a larger leakage current and a more efficient recombination are the major factors responsible for the larger losses in the hybrid system.

  9. Quantum Walk Schemes for Universal Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Underwood, Michael S.

    Random walks are a powerful tool for the efficient implementation of algorithms in classical computation. Their quantum-mechanical analogues, called quantum walks, hold similar promise. Quantum walks provide a model of quantum computation that has recently been shown to be equivalent in power to the standard circuit model. As in the classical case, quantum walks take place on graphs and can undergo discrete or continuous evolution, though quantum evolution is unitary and therefore deterministic until a measurement is made. This thesis considers the usefulness of continuous-time quantum walks to quantum computation from the perspectives of both their fundamental power under various formulations, and their applicability in practical experiments. In one extant scheme, logical gates are effected by scattering processes. The results of an exhaustive search for single-qubit operations in this model are presented. It is shown that the number of distinct operations increases exponentially with the number of vertices in the scattering graph. A catalogue of all graphs on up to nine vertices that implement single-qubit unitaries at a specific set of momenta is included in an appendix. I develop a novel scheme for universal quantum computation called the discontinuous quantum walk, in which a continuous-time quantum walker takes discrete steps of evolution via perfect quantum state transfer through small 'widget' graphs. The discontinuous quantum-walk scheme requires an exponentially sized graph, as do prior discrete and continuous schemes. To eliminate the inefficient vertex resource requirement, a computation scheme based on multiple discontinuous walkers is presented. In this model, n interacting walkers inhabiting a graph with 2n vertices can implement an arbitrary quantum computation on an input of length n, an exponential savings over previous universal quantum walk schemes. This is the first quantum walk scheme that allows for the application of quantum error correction

  10. Quantum discord with weak measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Uttam Pati, Arun Kumar

    2014-04-15

    Weak measurements cause small change to quantum states, thereby opening up the possibility of new ways of manipulating and controlling quantum systems. We ask, can weak measurements reveal more quantum correlation in a composite quantum state? We prove that the weak measurement induced quantum discord, called as the “super quantum discord”, is always larger than the quantum discord captured by the strong measurement. Moreover, we prove the monotonicity of the super quantum discord as a function of the measurement strength and in the limit of strong projective measurement the super quantum discord becomes the normal quantum discord. We find that unlike the normal discord, for pure entangled states, the super quantum discord can exceed the quantum entanglement. Our results provide new insights on the nature of quantum correlation and suggest that the notion of quantum correlation is not only observer dependent but also depends on how weakly one perturbs the composite system. We illustrate the key results for pure as well as mixed entangled states. -- Highlights: •Introduced the role of weak measurements in quantifying quantum correlation. •We have introduced the notion of the super quantum discord (SQD). •For pure entangled state, we show that the SQD exceeds the entanglement entropy. •This shows that quantum correlation depends not only on observer but also on measurement strength.

  11. Quantum skew divergence

    SciTech Connect

    Audenaert, Koenraad M. R.

    2014-11-15

    In this paper, we study the quantum generalisation of the skew divergence, which is a dissimilarity measure between distributions introduced by Lee in the context of natural language processing. We provide an in-depth study of the quantum skew divergence, including its relation to other state distinguishability measures. Finally, we present a number of important applications: new continuity inequalities for the quantum Jensen-Shannon divergence and the Holevo information, and a new and short proof of Bravyi's Small Incremental Mixing conjecture.

  12. Quantum computing

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shu-Shen; Long, Gui-Lu; Bai, Feng-Shan; Feng, Song-Lin; Zheng, Hou-Zhi

    2001-01-01

    Quantum computing is a quickly growing research field. This article introduces the basic concepts of quantum computing, recent developments in quantum searching, and decoherence in a possible quantum dot realization. PMID:11562459

  13. Quantum phase slip noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, Andrew G.; Zaikin, Andrei D.

    2016-07-01

    Quantum phase slips (QPSs) generate voltage fluctuations in superconducting nanowires. Employing the Keldysh technique and making use of the phase-charge duality arguments, we develop a theory of QPS-induced voltage noise in such nanowires. We demonstrate that quantum tunneling of the magnetic flux quanta across the wire yields quantum shot noise which obeys Poisson statistics and is characterized by a power-law dependence of its spectrum SΩ on the external bias. In long wires, SΩ decreases with increasing frequency Ω and vanishes beyond a threshold value of Ω at T →0 . The quantum coherent nature of QPS noise yields nonmonotonous dependence of SΩ on T at small Ω .

  14. Quantum computing. Defining and detecting quantum speedup.

    PubMed

    Rønnow, Troels F; Wang, Zhihui; Job, Joshua; Boixo, Sergio; Isakov, Sergei V; Wecker, David; Martinis, John M; Lidar, Daniel A; Troyer, Matthias

    2014-07-25

    The development of small-scale quantum devices raises the question of how to fairly assess and detect quantum speedup. Here, we show how to define and measure quantum speedup and how to avoid pitfalls that might mask or fake such a speedup. We illustrate our discussion with data from tests run on a D-Wave Two device with up to 503 qubits. By using random spin glass instances as a benchmark, we found no evidence of quantum speedup when the entire data set is considered and obtained inconclusive results when comparing subsets of instances on an instance-by-instance basis. Our results do not rule out the possibility of speedup for other classes of problems and illustrate the subtle nature of the quantum speedup question.

  15. Intermediate quantum maps for quantum computation

    SciTech Connect

    Giraud, O.; Georgeot, B.

    2005-10-15

    We study quantum maps displaying spectral statistics intermediate between Poisson and Wigner-Dyson. It is shown that they can be simulated on a quantum computer with a small number of gates, and efficiently yield information about fidelity decay or spectral statistics. We study their matrix elements and entanglement production and show that they converge with time to distributions which differ from random matrix predictions. A randomized version of these maps can be implemented even more economically and yields pseudorandom operators with original properties, enabling, for example, one to produce fractal random vectors. These algorithms are within reach of present-day quantum computers.

  16. Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auletta, Gennaro; Fortunato, Mauro; Parisi, Giorgio

    2014-01-01

    Introduction; Part I. Basic Features of Quantum Mechanics: 1. From classical mechanics to quantum mechanics; 2. Quantum observable and states; 3. Quantum dynamics; 4. Examples of quantum dynamics; 5. Density matrix; Part II. More Advanced Topics: 6. Angular momentum and spin; 7. Identical particles; 8. Symmetries and conservation laws; 9. The measurement problem; Part III. Matter and Light: 10. Perturbations and approximation methods; 11. Hydrogen and helium atoms; 12. Hydrogen molecular ion; 13. Quantum optics; Part IV. Quantum Information: State and Correlations: 14. Quantum theory of open systems; 15. State measurement in quantum mechanics; 16. Entanglement: non-separability; 17. Entanglement: quantum information; References; Index.

  17. Quantum Information Processing with Trapped Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roos, Christian

    Trapped ions constitute a well-isolated small quantum system that offers low decoherence rates and excellent opportunities for quantum control and measurement by laser-induced manipulation of the ions. These properties make trapped ions an attractive system for experimental investigations of quantum information processing. In the following, the basics of storing, manipulating and measuring quantum information encoded in a string of trapped ions will be discussed. Based on these techniques, entanglement can be created and simple quantum protocols like quantum teleportation be realized. This chapter concludes with a discussion of the use of entangling laser-ion interactions for quantum simulations and quantum logic spectroscopy.

  18. Quantum Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinfurter, Harald; Zeilinger, Anton

    Quantum entanglement lies at the heart of the new field of quantum communication and computation. For a long time, entanglement was seen just as one of those fancy features which make quantum mechanics so counterintuitive. But recently, quantum information theory has shown the tremendous importance of quantum correlations for the formulation of new methods of information transfer and for algorithms exploiting the capabilities of quantum computers.This chapter describes the first experimental realizations of quantum communication schemes using entangled photon pairs. We show how to make communication secure against eavesdropping using entanglement-based quantum cryptography, how to increase the information capacity of a quantum channel by quantum dense coding and, finally, how to communicate quantum information itself in the process of quantum teleportation.

  19. Visualization of enantiomers using natural abundant (13)C-filtered single and double quantum selective refocusing experiments: Application to small chiral molecules.

    PubMed

    Nath, Nilamoni; Baishya, Bikash; Suryaprakash, N

    2009-09-01

    The routine use of proton NMR for the visualization of enantiomers, aligned in the chiral liquid crystal solvent poly-gamma-benzyl-l-glutamate (PBLG), is restricted due to severe loss of resolution arising from large number of pair wise interaction of nuclear spins. In the present study, we have designed two experimental techniques for their visualization utilizing the natural abundance (13)C edited selective refocusing of single quantum (CH-SERF) and double quantum (CH-DQSERF) coherences. The methods achieve chiral discrimination and aid in the simultaneous determination of homonuclear couplings between active and passive spins and heteronuclear couplings between the excited protons and the participating (13)C spin. The CH-SERF also overcomes the problem of overlap of central transitions of the methyl selective refocusing (SERF) experiment resulting in better chiral discrimination. Theoretical description of the evolution of magnetization in both the sequences has been discussed using polarization operator formalism.

  20. Gravimetry with Quantum Methods and Quantum Standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flury, J.

    2015-12-01

    Quantum metrology enables new methods for measuring gravitational quantities. Currently, significant progress in the development of quantum gravimeters, quantum optical clocks, and optical frequency transfer is underway. Quantum gravimeters use a variety of techniques to determine the gravity acceleration acting on clouds of atoms with coherent matter wave phase. We discuss configurations with very small and very large trajectories. Optical atomic clocks and optical frequency transfer allow the determination of gravity potential differences through the gravitational frequency redshift. Recent progress in clock development and in frequency transfer through optical fiber is leading to results with high relevance for geodesy. First experiments for long distance clock comparisons and chronometric leveling are underway. Concepts for geodetic modeling with relativistic quantities are being investigated.

  1. Inflation from quantum geometry.

    PubMed

    Bojowald, Martin

    2002-12-23

    Quantum geometry predicts that a universe evolves through an inflationary phase at small volume before exiting gracefully into a standard Friedmann phase. This does not require the introduction of additional matter fields with ad hoc potentials; rather, it occurs because of a quantum gravity modification of the kinetic part of ordinary matter Hamiltonians. An application of the same mechanism can explain why the present day cosmological acceleration is so tiny.

  2. Quantum simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgescu, I. M.; Ashhab, S.; Nori, Franco

    2014-01-01

    Simulating quantum mechanics is known to be a difficult computational problem, especially when dealing with large systems. However, this difficulty may be overcome by using some controllable quantum system to study another less controllable or accessible quantum system, i.e., quantum simulation. Quantum simulation promises to have applications in the study of many problems in, e.g., condensed-matter physics, high-energy physics, atomic physics, quantum chemistry, and cosmology. Quantum simulation could be implemented using quantum computers, but also with simpler, analog devices that would require less control, and therefore, would be easier to construct. A number of quantum systems such as neutral atoms, ions, polar molecules, electrons in semiconductors, superconducting circuits, nuclear spins, and photons have been proposed as quantum simulators. This review outlines the main theoretical and experimental aspects of quantum simulation and emphasizes some of the challenges and promises of this fast-growing field.

  3. Quantum ultracold atomtronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, M. K.; Bradley, A. S.

    2015-04-01

    It is known that a semiclassical analysis is not always adequate for atomtronics devices, but that a fully quantum analysis is often necessary to make reliable predictions. While small numbers of atoms at a small number of sites are tractable using the density matrix, a fully quantum analysis is often not straightforward as the system becomes larger. We show that the fully quantum positive-P representation is then a viable calculational tool. We postulate an atomtronic phase gate consisting of four wells in a Bose-Hubbard configuration, for which the semiclassical dynamics are controllable using the phase of the atomic mode in one of the wells. We show that the quantum predictions of the positive-P representation for the performance of this device have little relation to those found semiclassically, and that the performance depends markedly on the actual quantum states of the initially occupied modes. We find that initial coherent states lead to closest to classical dynamics, but that initial Fock states give results that are quite different. A fully quantum analysis also opens the door for deeply quantum atomtronics, in which properties such as entanglement and Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen steering become valuable technical attributes of a device.

  4. A quantum renaissance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aspelmeyer, Markus; Zeilinger, Anton

    2008-07-01

    Pure curiosity has been the driving force behind many groundbreaking experiments in physics. This is no better illustrated than in quantum mechanics, initially the physics of the extremely small. Since its beginnings in the 1920s and 1930s, researchers have wanted to observe the counterintuitive properties of quantum mechanics directly in the laboratory. However, because experimental technology was not sufficiently developed at the time, people like Niels Bohr, Albert Einstein, Werner Heisenberg and Erwin Schrödinger relied instead on "gedankenexperiments" (thought experiments) to investigate the quantum physics of individual particles, mainly electrons and photons.

  5. Error thresholds for Abelian quantum double models: Increasing the bit-flip stability of topological quantum memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrist, Ruben S.; Wootton, James R.; Katzgraber, Helmut G.

    2015-04-01

    Current approaches for building quantum computing devices focus on two-level quantum systems which nicely mimic the concept of a classical bit, albeit enhanced with additional quantum properties. However, rather than artificially limiting the number of states to two, the use of d -level quantum systems (qudits) could provide advantages for quantum information processing. Among other merits, it has recently been shown that multilevel quantum systems can offer increased stability to external disturbances. In this study we demonstrate that topological quantum memories built from qudits, also known as Abelian quantum double models, exhibit a substantially increased resilience to noise. That is, even when taking into account the multitude of errors possible for multilevel quantum systems, topological quantum error-correction codes employing qudits can sustain a larger error rate than their two-level counterparts. In particular, we find strong numerical evidence that the thresholds of these error-correction codes are given by the hashing bound. Considering the significantly increased error thresholds attained, this might well outweigh the added complexity of engineering and controlling higher-dimensional quantum systems.

  6. Emergence of quantum mechanics from a sub-quantum statistical mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grössing, Gerhard

    2014-07-01

    A research program within the scope of theories on "Emergent Quantum Mechanics" is presented, which has gained some momentum in recent years. Via the modeling of a quantum system as a non-equilibrium steady-state maintained by a permanent throughput of energy from the zero-point vacuum, the quantum is considered as an emergent system. We implement a specific "bouncer-walker" model in the context of an assumed sub-quantum statistical physics, in analogy to the results of experiments by Couder and Fort on a classical wave-particle duality. We can thus give an explanation of various quantum mechanical features and results on the basis of a "21st century classical physics", such as the appearance of Planck's constant, the Schrödinger equation, etc. An essential result is given by the proof that averaged particle trajectories' behaviors correspond to a specific type of anomalous diffusion termed "ballistic" diffusion on a sub-quantum level. It is further demonstrated both analytically and with the aid of computer simulations that our model provides explanations for various quantum effects such as double-slit or n-slit interference. We show the averaged trajectories emerging from our model to be identical to Bohmian trajectories, albeit without the need to invoke complex wavefunctions or any other quantum mechanical tool. Finally, the model provides new insights into the origins of entanglement, and, in particular, into the phenomenon of a "systemic" non-locality.

  7. Type-II Quantum Computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yepez, Jeffrey

    This paper discusses a computing architecture that uses both classical parallelism and quantum parallelism. We consider a large parallel array of small quantum computers, connected together by classical communication channels. This kind of computer is called a type-II quantum computer, to differentiate it from a globally phase-coherent quantum computer, which is the first type of quantum computer that has received nearly exclusive attention in the literature. Although a hybrid, a type-II quantum computer retains the crucial advantage allowed by quantum mechanical superposition that its computational power grows exponentially in the number of phase-coherent qubits per node, only short-range and short time phase-coherence is needed, which significantly reduces the level of engineering facility required to achieve its construction. Therefore, the primary factor limiting its computational power is an economic one and not a technological one, since the volume of its computational medium can in principle scale indefinitely.

  8. Quantum ontologies

    SciTech Connect

    Stapp, H.P.

    1988-12-01

    Quantum ontologies are conceptions of the constitution of the universe that are compatible with quantum theory. The ontological orientation is contrasted to the pragmatic orientation of science, and reasons are given for considering quantum ontologies both within science, and in broader contexts. The principal quantum ontologies are described and evaluated. Invited paper at conference: Bell's Theorem, Quantum Theory, and Conceptions of the Universe, George Mason University, October 20-21, 1988. 16 refs.

  9. Environmental noise reduction for holonomic quantum gates

    SciTech Connect

    Parodi, Daniele; Zanghi, Nino; Sassetti, Maura; Solinas, Paolo

    2007-07-15

    We study the performance of holonomic quantum gates, driven by lasers, under the effect of a dissipative environment modeled as a thermal bath of oscillators. We show how to enhance the performance of the gates by a suitable choice of the loop in the manifold of the controllable parameters of the laser. For a simplified, albeit realistic model, we find the surprising result that for a long time evolution the performance of the gate (properly estimated in terms of average fidelity) increases. On the basis of this result, we compare holonomic gates with the so-called stimulated raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP) gates.

  10. Quantum Computer Games: Quantum Minesweeper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Michal; Gordon, Goren

    2010-01-01

    The computer game of quantum minesweeper is introduced as a quantum extension of the well-known classical minesweeper. Its main objective is to teach the unique concepts of quantum mechanics in a fun way. Quantum minesweeper demonstrates the effects of superposition, entanglement and their non-local characteristics. While in the classical…

  11. Gravity and Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blencowe, Miles

    The emergence of the macroscopic classical world from the microscopic quantum world is commonly understood to be a consequence of the fact that any given quantum system is open, unavoidably interacting with unobserved environmental degrees of freedom that will cause initial quantum superposition states of the system to decohere, resulting in classical mixtures of either-or alternatives. A fundamental question concerns how large a macroscopic object can be placed in a manifest quantum state, such as a center of mass quantum superposition state, under conditions where the effects of the interacting environmental degrees of freedom are reduced (i.e. in ultrahigh vacuum and at ultralow temperatures). Recent experiments have in fact demonstrated manifest quantum behavior in nano-to-micron-scale mechanical systems. Gravity has been invoked in various ways as playing a possible fundamental role in enforcing classicality of matter systems beyond a certain scale. Adopting the viewpoint that the standard perturbative quantization of general relativity provides an effective description of quantum gravity that is valid at ordinary energies, we show that it is possible to describe quantitatively how gravity as an environment can induce the decoherence of matter superposition states. The justification for such an approach follows from the fact that we are considering laboratory scale systems, where the matter is localized to regions of small curvature. As with other low energy effects, such as the quantum gravity correction to the Newtonian potential between two ordinary masses, it should be possible to quantitatively evaluate gravitationally induced decoherence rates by employing standard perturbative quantum gravity as an effective field theory; whatever the final form the eventual correct quantum theory of gravity takes, it must converge in its predictions with the effective field theory description at low energies. Research supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF

  12. PERTURBATION APPROACH FOR QUANTUM COMPUTATION

    SciTech Connect

    G. P. BERMAN; D. I. KAMENEV; V. I. TSIFRINOVICH

    2001-04-01

    We discuss how to simulate errors in the implementation of simple quantum logic operations in a nuclear spin quantum computer with many qubits, using radio-frequency pulses. We verify our perturbation approach using the exact solutions for relatively small (L = 10) number of qubits.

  13. Quantum memristors

    PubMed Central

    Pfeiffer, P.; Egusquiza, I. L.; Di Ventra, M.; Sanz, M.; Solano, E.

    2016-01-01

    Technology based on memristors, resistors with memory whose resistance depends on the history of the crossing charges, has lately enhanced the classical paradigm of computation with neuromorphic architectures. However, in contrast to the known quantized models of passive circuit elements, such as inductors, capacitors or resistors, the design and realization of a quantum memristor is still missing. Here, we introduce the concept of a quantum memristor as a quantum dissipative device, whose decoherence mechanism is controlled by a continuous-measurement feedback scheme, which accounts for the memory. Indeed, we provide numerical simulations showing that memory effects actually persist in the quantum regime. Our quantization method, specifically designed for superconducting circuits, may be extended to other quantum platforms, allowing for memristor-type constructions in different quantum technologies. The proposed quantum memristor is then a building block for neuromorphic quantum computation and quantum simulations of non-Markovian systems. PMID:27381511

  14. Quantum memristors.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, P; Egusquiza, I L; Di Ventra, M; Sanz, M; Solano, E

    2016-01-01

    Technology based on memristors, resistors with memory whose resistance depends on the history of the crossing charges, has lately enhanced the classical paradigm of computation with neuromorphic architectures. However, in contrast to the known quantized models of passive circuit elements, such as inductors, capacitors or resistors, the design and realization of a quantum memristor is still missing. Here, we introduce the concept of a quantum memristor as a quantum dissipative device, whose decoherence mechanism is controlled by a continuous-measurement feedback scheme, which accounts for the memory. Indeed, we provide numerical simulations showing that memory effects actually persist in the quantum regime. Our quantization method, specifically designed for superconducting circuits, may be extended to other quantum platforms, allowing for memristor-type constructions in different quantum technologies. The proposed quantum memristor is then a building block for neuromorphic quantum computation and quantum simulations of non-Markovian systems. PMID:27381511

  15. Quantum memristors.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, P; Egusquiza, I L; Di Ventra, M; Sanz, M; Solano, E

    2016-07-06

    Technology based on memristors, resistors with memory whose resistance depends on the history of the crossing charges, has lately enhanced the classical paradigm of computation with neuromorphic architectures. However, in contrast to the known quantized models of passive circuit elements, such as inductors, capacitors or resistors, the design and realization of a quantum memristor is still missing. Here, we introduce the concept of a quantum memristor as a quantum dissipative device, whose decoherence mechanism is controlled by a continuous-measurement feedback scheme, which accounts for the memory. Indeed, we provide numerical simulations showing that memory effects actually persist in the quantum regime. Our quantization method, specifically designed for superconducting circuits, may be extended to other quantum platforms, allowing for memristor-type constructions in different quantum technologies. The proposed quantum memristor is then a building block for neuromorphic quantum computation and quantum simulations of non-Markovian systems.

  16. Quantum memristors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeiffer, P.; Egusquiza, I. L.; di Ventra, M.; Sanz, M.; Solano, E.

    2016-07-01

    Technology based on memristors, resistors with memory whose resistance depends on the history of the crossing charges, has lately enhanced the classical paradigm of computation with neuromorphic architectures. However, in contrast to the known quantized models of passive circuit elements, such as inductors, capacitors or resistors, the design and realization of a quantum memristor is still missing. Here, we introduce the concept of a quantum memristor as a quantum dissipative device, whose decoherence mechanism is controlled by a continuous-measurement feedback scheme, which accounts for the memory. Indeed, we provide numerical simulations showing that memory effects actually persist in the quantum regime. Our quantization method, specifically designed for superconducting circuits, may be extended to other quantum platforms, allowing for memristor-type constructions in different quantum technologies. The proposed quantum memristor is then a building block for neuromorphic quantum computation and quantum simulations of non-Markovian systems.

  17. Beyond the Quantum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieuwenhuizen, Theo M.; Mehmani, Bahar; Špička, Václav; Aghdami, Maryam J.; Khrennikov, Andrei Yu

    2007-09-01

    pt. A. Introductions. The mathematical basis for deterministic quantum mechanics / G.'t Hooft. What did we learn from quantum gravity? / A. Ashtekar. Bose-Einstein condensates and EPR quantum non-locality / F. Laloe. The quantum measurement process: lessons from an exactly solvable model / A.E. Allahverdyan, R. Balian and Th. M. Nieuwenhuizen -- pt. B. Quantum mechanics and quantum information. POVMs: a small but important step beyond standard quantum mechanics / W. M. de Muynck. State reduction by measurements with a null result / G. Nienhuis. Solving open questions in the Bose-Einstein condensation of an ideal gas via a hybrid mixture of laser and statistical physics / M. Kim, A. Svidzinsky and M.O. Scully. Twin-Photon light scattering and causality / G. Puentes, A. Aiello and J. P. Woerdman. Simultaneous measurement of non-commuting observables / G. Aquino and B. Mehmani. Quantum decoherence and gravitational waves / M.T. Jaekel ... [et al.]. Role of various entropies in the black hole information loss problem / Th. M. Nieuwenhuizen and I.V. Volovich. Quantum and super-quantum correlations / G.S. Jaeger -- pt. C. Long distance correlations and bell inequalities. Understanding long-distance quantum correlations / L. Marchildon. Connection of probability models to EPR experiments: probability spaces and Bell's theorem / K. Hess and W. Philipp. Fair sampling vs no-signalling principle in EPR experiments / G. Adenier and A. Yu. Khrennikov -- pt. D. Mathematical foundations. Where the mathematical structure of quantum mechanics comes from / G.M. D'Ariano. Phase space description of quantum mechanics and non-commutative geometry: Wigner-Moyal and Bohm in a wider context / B.J. Hiley. Quantum mechanics as simple algorithm for approximation of classical integrals / A. Yu. Khrennikov. Noncommutative quantum mechanics viewed from Feynman Formalism / J. Lages ... [et al.]. Beyond the quantum in Snyder space / J.F.S. van Huele and M. K. Transtrum -- pt. E. Stochastic

  18. Quantum Teardrops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzeziński, Tomasz; Fairfax, Simon A.

    2012-11-01

    Algebras of functions on quantum weighted projective spaces are introduced, and the structure of quantum weighted projective lines or quantum teardrops is described in detail. In particular the presentation of the coordinate algebra of the quantum teardrop in terms of generators and relations and classification of irreducible *-representations are derived. The algebras are then analysed from the point of view of Hopf-Galois theory or the theory of quantum principal bundles. Fredholm modules and associated traces are constructed. C*-algebras of continuous functions on quantum weighted projective lines are described and their K-groups computed.

  19. Adiabatic quantum simulation of quantum chemistry.

    PubMed

    Babbush, Ryan; Love, Peter J; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2014-10-13

    We show how to apply the quantum adiabatic algorithm directly to the quantum computation of molecular properties. We describe a procedure to map electronic structure Hamiltonians to 2-body qubit Hamiltonians with a small set of physically realizable couplings. By combining the Bravyi-Kitaev construction to map fermions to qubits with perturbative gadgets to reduce the Hamiltonian to 2-body, we obtain precision requirements on the coupling strengths and a number of ancilla qubits that scale polynomially in the problem size. Hence our mapping is efficient. The required set of controllable interactions includes only two types of interaction beyond the Ising interactions required to apply the quantum adiabatic algorithm to combinatorial optimization problems. Our mapping may also be of interest to chemists directly as it defines a dictionary from electronic structure to spin Hamiltonians with physical interactions.

  20. Adiabatic Quantum Simulation of Quantum Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babbush, Ryan; Love, Peter J.; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2014-10-01

    We show how to apply the quantum adiabatic algorithm directly to the quantum computation of molecular properties. We describe a procedure to map electronic structure Hamiltonians to 2-body qubit Hamiltonians with a small set of physically realizable couplings. By combining the Bravyi-Kitaev construction to map fermions to qubits with perturbative gadgets to reduce the Hamiltonian to 2-body, we obtain precision requirements on the coupling strengths and a number of ancilla qubits that scale polynomially in the problem size. Hence our mapping is efficient. The required set of controllable interactions includes only two types of interaction beyond the Ising interactions required to apply the quantum adiabatic algorithm to combinatorial optimization problems. Our mapping may also be of interest to chemists directly as it defines a dictionary from electronic structure to spin Hamiltonians with physical interactions.

  1. Quantum Compiling for Topological Quantum Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svore, Krysta

    2014-03-01

    In a topological quantum computer, universality is achieved by braiding and quantum information is natively protected from small local errors. We address the problem of compiling single-qubit quantum operations into braid representations for non-abelian quasiparticles described by the Fibonacci anyon model. We develop a probabilistically polynomial algorithm that outputs a braid pattern to approximate a given single-qubit unitary to a desired precision. We also classify the single-qubit unitaries that can be implemented exactly by a Fibonacci anyon braid pattern and present an efficient algorithm to produce their braid patterns. Our techniques produce braid patterns that meet the uniform asymptotic lower bound on the compiled circuit depth and thus are depth-optimal asymptotically. Our compiled circuits are significantly shorter than those output by prior state-of-the-art methods, resulting in improvements in depth by factors ranging from 20 to 1000 for precisions ranging between 10-10 and 10-30.

  2. Quantum dynamics of H2, D2, and HD in the small dodecahedral cage of clathrate hydrate: evaluating H2-water nanocage interaction potentials by comparison of theory with inelastic neutron scattering experiments.

    PubMed

    Xu, Minzhong; Sebastianelli, Francesco; Bacić, Zlatko

    2008-06-28

    We have performed rigorous quantum five-dimensional (5D) calculations and analysis of the translation-rotation (T-R) energy levels of one H(2), D(2), and HD molecule inside the small dodecahedral (H(2)O)(20) cage of the structure II clathrate hydrate, which was treated as rigid. The H(2)- cage intermolecular potential energy surface (PES) used previously in the molecular dynamics simulations of the hydrogen hydrates [Alavi et al., J. Chem. Phys. 123, 024507 (2005)] was employed. This PES, denoted here as SPC/E, combines an effective, empirical water-water pair potential [Berendsen et al., J. Phys. Chem. 91, 6269 (1987)] and electrostatic interactions between the partial charges placed on H(2)O and H(2). The 5D T-R eigenstates of HD were calculated also on another 5D H(2)-cage PES denoted PA-D, used by us earlier to investigate the quantum T-R dynamics of H(2) and D(2) in the small cage [Xu et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 110, 24806 (2006)]. In the PA-D PES, the hydrogen-water pair potential is described by the ab initio 5D PES of the isolated H(2)-H(2)O dimer. The quality of the SPC/E and the PA-D H(2)-cage PESs was tested by direct comparison of the T-R excitation energies calculated on them to the results of two recent inelastic neutron scattering (INS) studies of H(2) and HD inside the small clathrate cage. The translational fundamental and overtone excitations, as well as the triplet splittings of the j=0-->j=1 rotational transitions, of H(2) and HD in the small cage calculated on the SPC/E PES agree very well with the INS results and represent a significant improvement over the results computed on the PA-D PES. Our calculations on the SPC/E PES also make predictions about several spectroscopic observables for the encapsulated H(2), D(2), and HD, which have not been measured yet. PMID:18601373

  3. Are Very Small Emission Quantum Yields Characteristic of Pure Metal-to-Ligand Charge-Transfer Excited States of Ruthenium(II)-(Acceptor Ligand) Chromophores?

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chia Nung; Mazumder, Shivnath; Zhang, Xiu Zhu; Schlegel, H Bernhard; Chen, Yuan Jang; Endicott, John F

    2016-08-01

    Metal to ligand charge-transfer (MLCT) excited state emission quantum yields, ϕem, are reported in 77 K glasses for a series of pentaammine and tetraammine ruthenium(II) complexes with monodentate aromatic acceptor ligands (Ru-MDA) such as pyridine and pyrazine. These quantum yields are only about 0.2-1% of those found for their Ru-bpy (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine) analogs in similar excited state energy ranges (hνem). The excited state energy dependencies of the emission intensity are characterized by mean radiative decay rate constants, kRAD, resolved from ϕem/τobs = kRAD (τobs = the observed emission decay lifetime; τobs(-1) = kRAD + kNRD; kNRD = nonradiative decay rate constant). Except for the Ru-pz chromophores in alcohol glasses, the values of kNRD for the Ru-MDA chromophores are slightly smaller, and their dependences on excited state energies are very similar to those of related Ru-bpy chromophores. In principle, one expects kRAD to be proportional to the product of (hνem)(3) and the square of the transition dipole moment (Me,g).(2) However, from experimental studies of Ru-bpy chromophores, an additional hνem dependence has been found that originates in an intensity stealing from a higher energy excited state with a much larger value of Me,g. This additional hνem dependence is not present in the kRAD energy dependence for Ru-MDA chromophores in the same energy regime. Intensity stealing in the phosphorescence of these complexes is necessary since the triplet-to-singlet transition is only allowed through spin-orbit coupling and since the density functional theory modeling implicates configurational mixing between states in the triplet spin manifold; this is treated by setting Me,g equal to the product of a mixing coefficient and the difference between the molecular dipole moments of the states involved, which implicates an experimental first order dependence of kRAD on hνem. The failure to observe intensity stealing for the Ru-MDA complexes suggests

  4. Are Very Small Emission Quantum Yields Characteristic of Pure Metal-to-Ligand Charge-Transfer Excited States of Ruthenium(II)-(Acceptor Ligand) Chromophores?

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chia Nung; Mazumder, Shivnath; Zhang, Xiu Zhu; Schlegel, H Bernhard; Chen, Yuan Jang; Endicott, John F

    2016-08-01

    Metal to ligand charge-transfer (MLCT) excited state emission quantum yields, ϕem, are reported in 77 K glasses for a series of pentaammine and tetraammine ruthenium(II) complexes with monodentate aromatic acceptor ligands (Ru-MDA) such as pyridine and pyrazine. These quantum yields are only about 0.2-1% of those found for their Ru-bpy (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine) analogs in similar excited state energy ranges (hνem). The excited state energy dependencies of the emission intensity are characterized by mean radiative decay rate constants, kRAD, resolved from ϕem/τobs = kRAD (τobs = the observed emission decay lifetime; τobs(-1) = kRAD + kNRD; kNRD = nonradiative decay rate constant). Except for the Ru-pz chromophores in alcohol glasses, the values of kNRD for the Ru-MDA chromophores are slightly smaller, and their dependences on excited state energies are very similar to those of related Ru-bpy chromophores. In principle, one expects kRAD to be proportional to the product of (hνem)(3) and the square of the transition dipole moment (Me,g).(2) However, from experimental studies of Ru-bpy chromophores, an additional hνem dependence has been found that originates in an intensity stealing from a higher energy excited state with a much larger value of Me,g. This additional hνem dependence is not present in the kRAD energy dependence for Ru-MDA chromophores in the same energy regime. Intensity stealing in the phosphorescence of these complexes is necessary since the triplet-to-singlet transition is only allowed through spin-orbit coupling and since the density functional theory modeling implicates configurational mixing between states in the triplet spin manifold; this is treated by setting Me,g equal to the product of a mixing coefficient and the difference between the molecular dipole moments of the states involved, which implicates an experimental first order dependence of kRAD on hνem. The failure to observe intensity stealing for the Ru-MDA complexes suggests

  5. Quantum Darwinism

    SciTech Connect

    Zurek, Wojciech H

    2008-01-01

    Quantum Darwinism - proliferation, in the environment, of multiple records of selected states of the system (its information-theoretic progeny) - explains how quantum fragility of individual state can lead to classical robustness of their multitude.

  6. Quantum memristors

    DOE PAGES

    Pfeiffer, P.; Egusquiza, I. L.; Di Ventra, M.; Sanz, M.; Solano, E.

    2016-07-06

    Technology based on memristors, resistors with memory whose resistance depends on the history of the crossing charges, has lately enhanced the classical paradigm of computation with neuromorphic architectures. However, in contrast to the known quantized models of passive circuit elements, such as inductors, capacitors or resistors, the design and realization of a quantum memristor is still missing. Here, we introduce the concept of a quantum memristor as a quantum dissipative device, whose decoherence mechanism is controlled by a continuous-measurement feedback scheme, which accounts for the memory. Indeed, we provide numerical simulations showing that memory effects actually persist in the quantummore » regime. Our quantization method, specifically designed for superconducting circuits, may be extended to other quantum platforms, allowing for memristor-type constructions in different quantum technologies. As a result, the proposed quantum memristor is then a building block for neuromorphic quantum computation and quantum simulations of non-Markovian systems.« less

  7. Simulations of Quantum Spin Models on 2D Frustrated Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melko, Roger

    2006-03-01

    Algorithmic advances in quantum Monte Carlo techniques have opened up the possibility of studying models in the general class of the S=1/2 XXZ model (equivalent to hard-core bosons) on frustrated lattices. With an antiferromagnetic diagonal interaction (Jz), these models can be solved exactly with QMC, albeit with some effort required to retain ergodicity in the near-degenerate manifold of states that exists for large Jz. The application of the quantum (ferromagnetic off-diagonal) interaction to this classically degenerate manifold produces a variety of intriguing physics, including an order-by-disorder supersolid phase, novel insulating states, and possible exotic quantum critical phenomena. We discuss numerical results for the triangular and kagome lattices with nearest and next-nearest neighbor exchange interactions, and focus on the relevance of the simulations to related areas of physics, such as experiments of cold trapped atomic gasses and the recent theory of deconfined quantum criticality.

  8. Quantum criticality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, Piers; Schofield, Andrew J.

    2005-01-01

    As we mark the centenary of Albert Einstein's seminal contribution to both quantum mechanics and special relativity, we approach another anniversary - that of Einstein's foundation of the quantum theory of solids. But 100 years on, the same experimental measurement that puzzled Einstein and his contemporaries is forcing us to question our understanding of how quantum matter transforms at ultra-low temperatures.

  9. Efficient compression of quantum information

    SciTech Connect

    Plesch, Martin; Buzek, Vladimir

    2010-03-15

    We propose a scheme for an exact efficient transformation of a tensor product state of many identically prepared qubits into a state of a logarithmically small number of qubits. Using a quadratic number of elementary quantum gates we transform N identically prepared qubits into a state, which is nontrivial only on the first [log{sub 2}(N+1)] qubits. This procedure might be useful for quantum memories, as only a small portion of the original qubits has to be stored. Another possible application is in communicating a direction encoded in a set of quantum states, as the compressed state provides a high-effective method for such an encoding.

  10. Quantum frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Matthew J.

    2014-02-01

    The framework of quantum frames can help unravel some of the interpretive difficulties i the foundation of quantum mechanics. In this paper, I begin by tracing the origins of this concept in Bohr's discussion of quantum theory and his theory of complementarity. Engaging with various interpreters and followers of Bohr, I argue that the correct account of quantum frames must be extended beyond literal space-time reference frames to frames defined by relations between a quantum system and the exosystem or external physical frame, of which measurement contexts are a particularly important example. This approach provides superior solutions to key EPR-type measurement and locality paradoxes.

  11. Quantum cheques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moulick, Subhayan Roy; Panigrahi, Prasanta K.

    2016-06-01

    We propose the idea of a quantum cheque scheme, a cryptographic protocol in which any legitimate client of a trusted bank can issue a cheque, that cannot be counterfeited or altered in anyway, and can be verified by a bank or any of its branches. We formally define a quantum cheque and present the first unconditionally secure quantum cheque scheme and show it to be secure against any no-signalling adversary. The proposed quantum cheque scheme can been perceived as the quantum analog of Electronic Data Interchange, as an alternate for current e-Payment Gateways.

  12. Quantum Darwinism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurek, Wojciech Hubert

    2009-03-01

    Quantum Darwinism describes the proliferation, in the environment, of multiple records of selected states of a quantum system. It explains how the quantum fragility of a state of a single quantum system can lead to the classical robustness of states in their correlated multitude; shows how effective `wave-packet collapse' arises as a result of the proliferation throughout the environment of imprints of the state of the system; and provides a framework for the derivation of Born's rule, which relates the probabilities of detecting states to their amplitudes. Taken together, these three advances mark considerable progress towards settling the quantum measurement problem.

  13. Quantum Cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fehr, Serge

    2010-05-01

    Quantum cryptography makes use of the quantum-mechanical behavior of nature for the design and analysis of cryptographic schemes. Optimally (but not always), quantum cryptography allows for the design of cryptographic schemes whose security is guaranteed solely by the laws of nature. This is in sharp contrast to standard cryptographic schemes, which can be broken in principle, i.e., when given sufficient computing power. From a theory point of view, quantum cryptography offers a beautiful interplay between the mathematics of adversarial behavior and quantum information theory. In this review article, we discuss the traditional application of quantum cryptography, quantum key distribution (QKD), from a modern perspective, and we discuss some recent developments in the context of quantum two-party cooperation (2PC). QKD allows two distant parties to communicate in a provably-secure way in the presence of an outside eavesdropper, whereas 2PC is concerned with protecting information against possibly malicious insiders. We show the basic idea of constructing quantum cryptographic schemes, but we also show some connections to quantum information theory as needed for the rigorous security analyses, and we discuss some of the relevant quantum-information-theoretic results.

  14. Quantum Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orvil Scully, Marlan; Zubairy, Muhammad Suhail

    1997-09-01

    Quantum optics has witnessed significant theoretical and experimental developments in recent years. This book provides an in-depth and wide-ranging introduction to the subject, emphasizing throughout the basic principles and their applications. The book begins by developing the basic tools of quantum optics, and goes on to show the application of these tools in a variety of quantum optical systems, including lasing without inversion, squeezed states, and atom optics. The final four chapters discuss quantum optical tests of the foundations of quantum mechanics, and particular aspects of measurement theory. Assuming only a background of standard quantum mechanics and electromagnetic theory, and containing many problems and references, this book will be invaluable to graduate students of quantum optics, as well as to researchers in this field.

  15. Unexpectedly strong energy stabilization inside the hydrophobic core of small protein rubredoxin mediated by aromatic residues: correlated ab initio quantum chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Vondrásek, Jirí; Bendová, Lada; Klusák, Vojtech; Hobza, Pavel

    2005-03-01

    The formation of a hydrophobic core of globular proteins is believed to be the consequence of exterior hydrophobic forces of entropic nature. This, together with the low occurrence of hydrogen bonds in the protein core, leads to the opinion that the energy contribution of core formation to protein folding and stability is negligible. We show that stabilization inside the hydrophobic core of a small protein, rubredoxin, determined by means of high-level correlated ab initio calculations (complete basis set limit of MP2 stabilization energy + CCSD(T) correction term), amounted to approximately 50 kcal/mol. These results clearly demonstrate strong attraction inside a hydrophobic core. This finding may lead to substantial changes in the current view of protein folding. We also point out the inability of the DFT/B3LYP method to describe a strong attraction between studied amino acids.

  16. Communication: dynamical embedding: correct quantum response from coupling TDDFT for a small cluster with classical near-field electrodynamics for an extended region.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yi; Neuhauser, Daniel

    2013-05-14

    We show how to obtain the correct electronic response of a large system by embedding; a small region is propagated by TDDFT (time-dependent density functional theory) simultaneously with a classical electrodynamics evolution using the Near-Field method over a larger external region. The propagations are coupled through a combined time-dependent density yielding a common Coulomb potential. We show that the embedding correctly describes the plasmonic response of a Mg(0001) slab and its influence on the dynamical charge transfer between an adsorbed H2O molecule and the substrate, giving the same spectral shape as full TDDFT (similar plasmon peak and molecular-dependent differential spectra) with much less computational effort. The results demonstrate that atomistic embedding electrodynamics is promising for nanoplasmonics and nanopolaritonics.

  17. Communication: Dynamical embedding: Correct quantum response from coupling TDDFT for a small cluster with classical near-field electrodynamics for an extended region

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Yi; Neuhauser, Daniel

    2013-05-14

    We show how to obtain the correct electronic response of a large system by embedding; a small region is propagated by TDDFT (time-dependent density functional theory) simultaneously with a classical electrodynamics evolution using the Near-Field method over a larger external region. The propagations are coupled through a combined time-dependent density yielding a common Coulomb potential. We show that the embedding correctly describes the plasmonic response of a Mg(0001) slab and its influence on the dynamical charge transfer between an adsorbed H{sub 2}O molecule and the substrate, giving the same spectral shape as full TDDFT (similar plasmon peak and molecular-dependent differential spectra) with much less computational effort. The results demonstrate that atomistic embedding electrodynamics is promising for nanoplasmonics and nanopolaritonics.

  18. Quantum positron acoustic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Metref, Hassina; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2014-12-15

    Nonlinear quantum positron-acoustic (QPA) waves are investigated for the first time, within the theoretical framework of the quantum hydrodynamic model. In the small but finite amplitude limit, both deformed Korteweg-de Vries and generalized Korteweg-de Vries equations governing, respectively, the dynamics of QPA solitary waves and double-layers are derived. Moreover, a full finite amplitude analysis is undertaken, and a numerical integration of the obtained highly nonlinear equations is carried out. The results complement our previously published results on this problem.

  19. Quantum entanglement, quantum communication and the limits of quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambainis, Andris

    Quantum entanglement is a term describing the quantum correlations between different parts of a quantum system. Quantum information theory has developed sophisticated techniques to quantify and study quantum entanglement. In this thesis, we show how to apply those techniques to problems in quantum algorithms, complexity theory, communication and cryptography. The main results are: (1) quantum communication protocols that are exponentially more efficient that conventional (classical) communication protocols, (2) unconditionally secure quantum protocols for cryptographic problems, (3) a new "quantum adversary" method for proving lower bounds on quantum algorithms, (4) a study of "one clean qubit computation", a model related to the experimental implementation of quantum computers using NMR (nucleo-magnetic resonance) technology.

  20. Quantum chemical study of the interaction of elemental Hg with small neutral, anionic and cationic Au{sub n} (n = 1–6) clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Siddiqui, Shamoon Ahmad; Bouarissa, Nadir; Rasheed, Tabish; Al-Assiri, M.S.

    2013-03-15

    Graphical abstract: Binding energies as a function of cluster size for Au{sub n}Hg, Au{sub n}Hg{sup +} and Au{sub n}Hg{sup −} complexes. Highlights: ► Hg adsorption of neutral and charged Au{sub n} (n = 1–6) clusters has been discussed. ► Size and charged state of cluster significantly affect the Hg adsorption. ► Transfer of electron mainly found from s orbital of Hg to s orbital of Au. - Abstract: Adsorption of elemental mercury (Hg) on small neutral, cationic and anionic gold clusters (Au{sub n}, n = 1–6) has been studied by using the density functional theory (DFT). Results of this investigation show that frontier molecular orbital theory is a useful tool to predict the selectivity of Hg adsorption. It is found that adsorption of Hg on neutral, cationic and anionic Au{sub n} (n = 1–6) clusters are thermodynamically favorable. The binding energies of Hg on the cationic Au{sub n} clusters are greater than those on the neutral and anionic clusters. Natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis indicates that the flow of electrons in the neutral and charged clusters is mainly due to the s orbitals of Hg and Au. Results of NBO analysis also indicate that the binding energy of Hg with Au{sub n} clusters is directly proportional to the charge transfer, i.e. greater is the charge transfer, higher is the binding energy.

  1. Quantum flywheel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Amikam; Diósi, Lajos; Kosloff, Ronnie

    2016-05-01

    In this work we present the concept of a quantum flywheel coupled to a quantum heat engine. The flywheel stores useful work in its energy levels, while additional power is extracted continuously from the device. Generally, the energy exchange between a quantum engine and a quantized work repository is accompanied by heat, which degrades the charging efficiency. Specifically when the quantum harmonic oscillator acts as a work repository, quantum and thermal fluctuations dominate the dynamics. Quantum monitoring and feedback control are applied to the flywheel in order to reach steady state and regulate its operation. To maximize the charging efficiency one needs a balance between the information gained by measuring the system and the information fed back to the system. The dynamics of the flywheel are described by a stochastic master equation that accounts for the engine, the external driving, the measurement, and the feedback operations.

  2. Quantum criticality.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Piers; Schofield, Andrew J

    2005-01-20

    As we mark the centenary of Albert Einstein's seminal contribution to both quantum mechanics and special relativity, we approach another anniversary--that of Einstein's foundation of the quantum theory of solids. But 100 years on, the same experimental measurement that puzzled Einstein and his contemporaries is forcing us to question our understanding of how quantum matter transforms at ultra-low temperatures. PMID:15662409

  3. Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartakovskii, Alexander

    2012-07-01

    Part I. Nanostructure Design and Structural Properties of Epitaxially Grown Quantum Dots and Nanowires: 1. Growth of III/V semiconductor quantum dots C. Schneider, S. Hofling and A. Forchel; 2. Single semiconductor quantum dots in nanowires: growth, optics, and devices M. E. Reimer, N. Akopian, M. Barkelid, G. Bulgarini, R. Heeres, M. Hocevar, B. J. Witek, E. Bakkers and V. Zwiller; 3. Atomic scale analysis of self-assembled quantum dots by cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy and atom probe tomography J. G. Keizer and P. M. Koenraad; Part II. Manipulation of Individual Quantum States in Quantum Dots Using Optical Techniques: 4. Studies of the hole spin in self-assembled quantum dots using optical techniques B. D. Gerardot and R. J. Warburton; 5. Resonance fluorescence from a single quantum dot A. N. Vamivakas, C. Matthiesen, Y. Zhao, C.-Y. Lu and M. Atature; 6. Coherent control of quantum dot excitons using ultra-fast optical techniques A. J. Ramsay and A. M. Fox; 7. Optical probing of holes in quantum dot molecules: structure, symmetry, and spin M. F. Doty and J. I. Climente; Part III. Optical Properties of Quantum Dots in Photonic Cavities and Plasmon-Coupled Dots: 8. Deterministic light-matter coupling using single quantum dots P. Senellart; 9. Quantum dots in photonic crystal cavities A. Faraon, D. Englund, I. Fushman, A. Majumdar and J. Vukovic; 10. Photon statistics in quantum dot micropillar emission M. Asmann and M. Bayer; 11. Nanoplasmonics with colloidal quantum dots V. Temnov and U. Woggon; Part IV. Quantum Dot Nano-Laboratory: Magnetic Ions and Nuclear Spins in a Dot: 12. Dynamics and optical control of an individual Mn spin in a quantum dot L. Besombes, C. Le Gall, H. Boukari and H. Mariette; 13. Optical spectroscopy of InAs/GaAs quantum dots doped with a single Mn atom O. Krebs and A. Lemaitre; 14. Nuclear spin effects in quantum dot optics B. Urbaszek, B. Eble, T. Amand and X. Marie; Part V. Electron Transport in Quantum Dots Fabricated by

  4. Power of one bit of quantum information in quantum metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cable, Hugo; Gu, Mile; Modi, Kavan

    2016-04-01

    We present a model of quantum metrology inspired by the computational model known as deterministic quantum computation with one quantum bit (DQC1). Using only one pure qubit together with l fully mixed qubits we obtain measurement precision (defined as root-mean-square error for the parameter being estimated) at the standard quantum limit, which is typically obtained using the same number of uncorrelated qubits in fully pure states. In principle, the standard quantum limit can be exceeded using an additional qubit which adds only a small amount of purity. We show that the discord in the final state vanishes only in the limit of attaining infinite precision for the parameter being estimated.

  5. Quantum Computing's Classical Problem, Classical Computing's Quantum Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Meter, Rodney

    2014-08-01

    Tasked with the challenge to build better and better computers, quantum computing and classical computing face the same conundrum: the success of classical computing systems. Small quantum computing systems have been demonstrated, and intermediate-scale systems are on the horizon, capable of calculating numeric results or simulating physical systems far beyond what humans can do by hand. However, to be commercially viable, they must surpass what our wildly successful, highly advanced classical computers can already do. At the same time, those classical computers continue to advance, but those advances are now constrained by thermodynamics, and will soon be limited by the discrete nature of atomic matter and ultimately quantum effects. Technological advances benefit both quantum and classical machinery, altering the competitive landscape. Can we build quantum computing systems that out-compute classical systems capable of some logic gates per month? This article will discuss the interplay in these competing and cooperating technological trends.

  6. Graphene quantum interference photodetector

    PubMed Central

    Voss, Paul L

    2015-01-01

    Summary In this work, a graphene quantum interference (QI) photodetector was simulated in two regimes of operation. The structure consists of a graphene nanoribbon, Mach–Zehnder interferometer (MZI), which exhibits a strongly resonant transmission of electrons of specific energies. In the first regime of operation (that of a linear photodetector), low intensity light couples two resonant energy levels, resulting in scattering and differential transmission of current with an external quantum efficiency of up to 5.2%. In the second regime of operation, full current switching is caused by the phase decoherence of the current due to a strong photon flux in one or both of the interferometer arms in the same MZI structure. Graphene QI photodetectors have several distinct advantages: they are of very small size, they do not require p- and n-doped regions, and they exhibit a high external quantum efficiency. PMID:25821713

  7. Graphene quantum interference photodetector.

    PubMed

    Alam, Mahbub; Voss, Paul L

    2015-01-01

    In this work, a graphene quantum interference (QI) photodetector was simulated in two regimes of operation. The structure consists of a graphene nanoribbon, Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI), which exhibits a strongly resonant transmission of electrons of specific energies. In the first regime of operation (that of a linear photodetector), low intensity light couples two resonant energy levels, resulting in scattering and differential transmission of current with an external quantum efficiency of up to 5.2%. In the second regime of operation, full current switching is caused by the phase decoherence of the current due to a strong photon flux in one or both of the interferometer arms in the same MZI structure. Graphene QI photodetectors have several distinct advantages: they are of very small size, they do not require p- and n-doped regions, and they exhibit a high external quantum efficiency.

  8. Dissipative quantum computing with open quantum walks

    SciTech Connect

    Sinayskiy, Ilya; Petruccione, Francesco

    2014-12-04

    An open quantum walk approach to the implementation of a dissipative quantum computing scheme is presented. The formalism is demonstrated for the example of an open quantum walk implementation of a 3 qubit quantum circuit consisting of 10 gates.

  9. Quantum dots: Rethinking the electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishnoi, Dimple

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate theoretically that the Quantum dots are quite interesting for the electronics industry. Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are nanometer-scale crystals, which have unique photo physical, quantum electrical properties, size-dependent optical properties, There small size means that electrons do not have to travel as far as with larger particles, thus electronic devices can operate faster. Cheaper than modern commercial solar cells while making use of a wider variety of photon energies, including "waste heat" from the sun's energy. Quantum dots can be used in tandem cells, which are multi junction photovoltaic cells or in the intermediate band setup. PbSe (lead selenide) is commonly used in quantum dot solar cells.

  10. Quantum coding with finite resources

    PubMed Central

    Tomamichel, Marco; Berta, Mario; Renes, Joseph M.

    2016-01-01

    The quantum capacity of a memoryless channel determines the maximal rate at which we can communicate reliably over asymptotically many uses of the channel. Here we illustrate that this asymptotic characterization is insufficient in practical scenarios where decoherence severely limits our ability to manipulate large quantum systems in the encoder and decoder. In practical settings, we should instead focus on the optimal trade-off between three parameters: the rate of the code, the size of the quantum devices at the encoder and decoder, and the fidelity of the transmission. We find approximate and exact characterizations of this trade-off for various channels of interest, including dephasing, depolarizing and erasure channels. In each case, the trade-off is parameterized by the capacity and a second channel parameter, the quantum channel dispersion. In the process, we develop several bounds that are valid for general quantum channels and can be computed for small instances. PMID:27156995

  11. Universality of quantum gravity corrections.

    PubMed

    Das, Saurya; Vagenas, Elias C

    2008-11-28

    We show that the existence of a minimum measurable length and the related generalized uncertainty principle (GUP), predicted by theories of quantum gravity, influence all quantum Hamiltonians. Thus, they predict quantum gravity corrections to various quantum phenomena. We compute such corrections to the Lamb shift, the Landau levels, and the tunneling current in a scanning tunneling microscope. We show that these corrections can be interpreted in two ways: (a) either that they are exceedingly small, beyond the reach of current experiments, or (b) that they predict upper bounds on the quantum gravity parameter in the GUP, compatible with experiments at the electroweak scale. Thus, more accurate measurements in the future should either be able to test these predictions, or further tighten the above bounds and predict an intermediate length scale between the electroweak and the Planck scale.

  12. Coupled Quantum Fluctuations and Quantum Annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hormozi, Layla; Kerman, Jamie

    We study the relative effectiveness of coupled quantum fluctuations, compared to single spin fluctuations, in the performance of quantum annealing. We focus on problem Hamiltonians resembling the the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model of Ising spin glass and compare the effectiveness of different types of fluctuations by numerically calculating the relative success probabilities and residual energies in fully-connected spin systems. We find that for a small class of instances coupled fluctuations can provide improvement over single spin fluctuations and analyze the properties of the corresponding class. Disclaimer: This research was funded by ODNI, IARPA via MIT Lincoln Laboratory under Air Force Contract No. FA8721-05-C-0002. The views and conclusions contained herein are those of the authors and should not be interpreted as necessarily representing the official policies or endorsements, either expressed or implied, of ODNI, IARPA, or the US Government.

  13. Quantum metrology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, H.; Kok, P.; Dowling, J. P.

    2002-01-01

    This paper addresses the formal equivalence between the Mach-Zehnder interferometer, the Ramsey spectroscope, and a specific quantum logical gate. Based on this equivalence we introduce the quantum Rosetta Stone, and we describe a projective measurement scheme for generating the desired correlations between the interferometric input states in order to achieve Heisenberg-limited sensitivity.

  14. Quantum microbiology.

    PubMed

    Trevors, J T; Masson, L

    2011-01-01

    During his famous 1943 lecture series at Trinity College Dublin, the reknown physicist Erwin Schrodinger discussed the failure and challenges of interpreting life by classical physics alone and that a new approach, rooted in Quantum principles, must be involved. Quantum events are simply a level of organization below the molecular level. This includes the atomic and subatomic makeup of matter in microbial metabolism and structures, as well as the organic, genetic information code of DNA and RNA. Quantum events at this time do not elucidate, for example, how specific genetic instructions were first encoded in an organic genetic code in microbial cells capable of growth and division, and its subsequent evolution over 3.6 to 4 billion years. However, due to recent technological advances, biologists and physicists are starting to demonstrate linkages between various quantum principles like quantum tunneling, entanglement and coherence in biological processes illustrating that nature has exerted some level quantum control to optimize various processes in living organisms. In this article we explore the role of quantum events in microbial processes and endeavor to show that after nearly 67 years, Schrödinger was prophetic and visionary in his view of quantum theory and its connection with some of the fundamental mechanisms of life. PMID:21368338

  15. Quantum picturalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coecke, Bob

    2010-01-01

    Why did it take us 50 years since the birth of the quantum mechanical formalism to discover that unknown quantum states cannot be cloned? Yet, the proof of the 'no-cloning theorem' is easy, and its consequences and potential for applications are immense. Similarly, why did it take us 60 years to discover the conceptually intriguing and easily derivable physical phenomenon of 'quantum teleportation'? We claim that the quantum mechanical formalism doesn't support our intuition, nor does it elucidate the key concepts that govern the behaviour of the entities that are subject to the laws of quantum physics. The arrays of complex numbers are kin to the arrays of 0s and 1s of the early days of computer programming practice. Using a technical term from computer science, the quantum mechanical formalism is 'low-level'. In this review we present steps towards a diagrammatic 'high-level' alternative for the Hilbert space formalism, one which appeals to our intuition. The diagrammatic language as it currently stands allows for intuitive reasoning about interacting quantum systems, and trivialises many otherwise involved and tedious computations. It clearly exposes limitations such as the no-cloning theorem, and phenomena such as quantum teleportation. As a logic, it supports 'automation': it enables a (classical) computer to reason about interacting quantum systems, prove theorems, and design protocols. It allows for a wider variety of underlying theories, and can be easily modified, having the potential to provide the required step-stone towards a deeper conceptual understanding of quantum theory, as well as its unification with other physical theories. Specific applications discussed here are purely diagrammatic proofs of several quantum computational schemes, as well as an analysis of the structural origin of quantum non-locality. The underlying mathematical foundation of this high-level diagrammatic formalism relies on so-called monoidal categories, a product of a fairly

  16. Taming catalysts in quantum thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skrzypczyk, Paul

    2015-08-01

    Auxiliary quantum systems which can be borrowed to help facilitate thermodynamic processes but must be returned almost undisturbed—i.e. catalysts—are very powerful objects in quantum thermodynamics. In fact, they appear almost too powerful, since they allow for any state transformation to be carried out while being disturbed by an arbitrarily small amount. In their recent paper Ng et al (2015 New J. Phys. 17 085004) show how to tame catalysts in quantum thermodynamics by placing additional physical constraints on them, in terms of dimension and energy.

  17. Quantum Chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casati, Giulio; Chirikov, Boris

    2006-11-01

    Preface; Acknowledgments; Introduction: 1. The legacy of chaos in quantum mechanics G. Casati and B. V. Chirikov; Part I. Classical Chaos and Quantum Localization: 2. Stochastic behaviour of a quantum pendulum under a periodic perturbation G. Casati, B. V. Chirikov, F. M. Izrailev and J. Ford; 3. Quantum dynamics of a nonintegrable system D. R. Grempel, R. E. Prange and S. E. Fishman; 4. Excitation of molecular rotation by periodic microwave pulses. A testing ground for Anderson localization R. Blümel, S. Fishman and U. Smilansky; 5. Localization of diffusive excitation in multi-level systems D. K. Shepelyansky; 6. Classical and quantum chaos for a kicked top F. Haake, M. Kus and R. Scharf; 7. Self-similarity in quantum dynamics L. E. Reichl and L. Haoming; 8. Time irreversibility of classically chaotic quantum dynamics K. Ikeda; 9. Effect of noise on time-dependent quantum chaos E. Ott, T. M. Antonsen Jr and J. D. Hanson; 10. Dynamical localization, dissipation and noise R. F. Graham; 11. Maximum entropy models and quantum transmission in disordered systems J.-L. Pichard and M. Sanquer; 12. Solid state 'atoms' in intense oscillating fields M. S. Sherwin; Part II. Atoms in Strong Fields: 13. Localization of classically chaotic diffusion for hydrogen atoms in microwave fields J. E. Bayfield, G. Casati, I. Guarneri and D. W. Sokol; 14. Inhibition of quantum transport due to 'scars' of unstable periodic orbits R. V. Jensen, M. M. Sanders, M. Saraceno and B. Sundaram; 15. Rubidium Rydberg atoms in strong fields G. Benson, G. Raithel and H. Walther; 16. Diamagnetic Rydberg atom: confrontation of calculated and observed spectra C.-H. Iu, G. R. Welch, M. M. Kash, D. Kleppner, D. Delande and J. C. Gay; 17. Semiclassical approximation for the quantum states of a hydrogen atom in a magnetic field near the ionization limit M. Y. Kuchiev and O. P. Sushkov; 18. The semiclassical helium atom D. Wintgen, K. Richter and G. Tanner; 19. Stretched helium: a model for quantum chaos

  18. Quantum Chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casati, Giulio; Chirikov, Boris

    1995-04-01

    Preface; Acknowledgments; Introduction: 1. The legacy of chaos in quantum mechanics G. Casati and B. V. Chirikov; Part I. Classical Chaos and Quantum Localization: 2. Stochastic behaviour of a quantum pendulum under a periodic perturbation G. Casati, B. V. Chirikov, F. M. Izrailev and J. Ford; 3. Quantum dynamics of a nonintegrable system D. R. Grempel, R. E. Prange and S. E. Fishman; 4. Excitation of molecular rotation by periodic microwave pulses. A testing ground for Anderson localization R. Blümel, S. Fishman and U. Smilansky; 5. Localization of diffusive excitation in multi-level systems D. K. Shepelyansky; 6. Classical and quantum chaos for a kicked top F. Haake, M. Kus and R. Scharf; 7. Self-similarity in quantum dynamics L. E. Reichl and L. Haoming; 8. Time irreversibility of classically chaotic quantum dynamics K. Ikeda; 9. Effect of noise on time-dependent quantum chaos E. Ott, T. M. Antonsen Jr and J. D. Hanson; 10. Dynamical localization, dissipation and noise R. F. Graham; 11. Maximum entropy models and quantum transmission in disordered systems J.-L. Pichard and M. Sanquer; 12. Solid state 'atoms' in intense oscillating fields M. S. Sherwin; Part II. Atoms in Strong Fields: 13. Localization of classically chaotic diffusion for hydrogen atoms in microwave fields J. E. Bayfield, G. Casati, I. Guarneri and D. W. Sokol; 14. Inhibition of quantum transport due to 'scars' of unstable periodic orbits R. V. Jensen, M. M. Sanders, M. Saraceno and B. Sundaram; 15. Rubidium Rydberg atoms in strong fields G. Benson, G. Raithel and H. Walther; 16. Diamagnetic Rydberg atom: confrontation of calculated and observed spectra C.-H. Iu, G. R. Welch, M. M. Kash, D. Kleppner, D. Delande and J. C. Gay; 17. Semiclassical approximation for the quantum states of a hydrogen atom in a magnetic field near the ionization limit M. Y. Kuchiev and O. P. Sushkov; 18. The semiclassical helium atom D. Wintgen, K. Richter and G. Tanner; 19. Stretched helium: a model for quantum chaos

  19. Quantum strategies of quantum measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chuan-Feng; Zhang, Yong-Sheng; Huang, Yun-Feng; Guo, Guang-Can

    2001-03-01

    In the classical Monty Hall problem, one player can always win with probability 2/3. We generalize the problem to the quantum domain and show that a fair two-party zero-sum game can be carried out if the other player is permitted to adopt quantum measurement strategy.

  20. Recoverability in quantum information theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilde, Mark

    The fact that the quantum relative entropy is non-increasing with respect to quantum physical evolutions lies at the core of many optimality theorems in quantum information theory and has applications in other areas of physics. In this work, we establish improvements of this entropy inequality in the form of physically meaningful remainder terms. One of the main results can be summarized informally as follows: if the decrease in quantum relative entropy between two quantum states after a quantum physical evolution is relatively small, then it is possible to perform a recovery operation, such that one can perfectly recover one state while approximately recovering the other. This can be interpreted as quantifying how well one can reverse a quantum physical evolution. Our proof method is elementary, relying on the method of complex interpolation, basic linear algebra, and the recently introduced Renyi generalization of a relative entropy difference. The theorem has a number of applications in quantum information theory, which have to do with providing physically meaningful improvements to many known entropy inequalities. This is based on arXiv:1505.04661, now accepted for publication in Proceedings of the Royal Society A. I acknowledge support from startup funds from the Department of Physics and Astronomy at LSU, the NSF under Award No. CCF-1350397, and the DARPA Quiness Program through US Army Research Office award W31P4Q-12-1-0019.

  1. Quantum physics without quantum philosophy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dürr, Detlef; Goldstein, Sheldon; Zanghì, Nino

    Quantum philosophy, a peculiar twentieth-century malady, is responsible for most of the conceptual muddle plaguing the foundations of quantum physics. When this philosophy is eschewed, one naturally arrives at Bohmian mechanics, which is what emerges from Schrödinger's equation for a nonrelativistic system of particles when we merely insist that 'particles' means particles. While distinctly non-Newtonian, Bohmian mechanics is a fully deterministic theory of particles in motion, a motion choreographed by the wave function. The quantum formalism emerges when measurement situations are analyzed according to this theory. When the quantum formalism is regarded as arising in this way, the paradoxes and perplexities so often associated with quantum theory simply evaporate.

  2. Quantum solvent states and rovibrational spectra of small doped (3)He clusters through the full-configuration-interaction nuclear orbital approach: The ((3)He)(N)-Cl(2)(X) case (N

    PubMed

    de Lara-Castells, María Pilar; Aguirre, Néstor F; Villarreal, Pablo; Barrio, Gerardo Delgado; Mitrushchenkov, Alexander O

    2010-05-21

    A full-configuration-interaction nuclear orbital treatment has been recently developed as a benchmark quantum-chemistry-like method to study small doped (3)He clusters [M. P. de Lara-Castells et al., J. Chem. Phys. 125, 221101 (2006)]. Our objective in this paper is to extend our previous study on ((3)He)(N)-Cl(2)(B) clusters, using an enhanced implementation that allows employing very large one-particle basis sets [M. P. de Lara-Castells et al., J. Chem. Phys. 131, 194101 (2009)], and apply the method to the ((3)He)(N)-Cl(2)(X) case, using both a semiempirical T-shaped and an ab initio He-dopant potential with minima at both T-shaped and linear conformations. Calculations of the ground and low-lying excited solvent states stress the key role played by the anisotropy of the He-dopant interaction in determining the global energies and the structuring of the (3)He atoms around the dopant. Whereas (3)He atoms are localized in a broad belt around the molecular axis in ground-state N-sized complexes with N=1-3, irrespective of using the T-shaped or the ab initio He-dopant potential function, the dopant species becomes fully coated by just four (3)He atoms when the He-dopant potential also has a minimum at linear configurations. However, excited solvent states with a central ring-type clustering of the host molecule are found to be very close in energy with the ground state by using the ab initio potential function. A microscopic analysis of this behavior is provided. Additional simulations of the molecular rovibrational Raman spectra, also including excited solvent states, provide further insights into the importance of proper modeling the anisotropy of the He-dopant interaction in these weakly bound systems and of taking into account the low-lying excitations.

  3. Cyclic universe from Loop Quantum Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cianfrani, Francesco; Kowalski-Glikman, Jerzy; Rosati, Giacomo

    2016-02-01

    We discuss how a cyclic model for the flat universe can be constructively derived from Loop Quantum Gravity. This model has a lower bounce, at small values of the scale factor, which shares many similarities with that of Loop Quantum Cosmology. We find that Quantum Gravity corrections can be also relevant at energy densities much smaller than the Planckian one and that they can induce an upper bounce at large values of the scale factor.

  4. Quantum Baseball.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Ivars

    1989-01-01

    An analogy from the game of baseball can be used to examine the philosophy involved in statistics surrounding quantum mechanical events. The "Strong Baseball Principle" is proposed and discussed. (CW)

  5. Quantum Locality?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stapp, Henry P.

    2012-05-01

    Robert Griffiths has recently addressed, within the framework of a `consistent quantum theory' that he has developed, the issue of whether, as is often claimed, quantum mechanics entails a need for faster-than-light transfers of information over long distances. He argues that the putative proofs of this property that involve hidden variables include in their premises some essentially classical-physics-type assumptions that are not entailed by the precepts of quantum mechanics. Thus whatever is proved is not a feature of quantum mechanics, but is a property of a theory that tries to combine quantum theory with quasi-classical features that go beyond what is entailed by quantum theory itself. One cannot logically prove properties of a system by establishing, instead, properties of a system modified by adding properties alien to the original system. Hence Griffiths' rejection of hidden-variable-based proofs is logically warranted. Griffiths mentions the existence of a certain alternative proof that does not involve hidden variables, and that uses only macroscopically described observable properties. He notes that he had examined in his book proofs of this general kind, and concluded that they provide no evidence for nonlocal influences. But he did not examine the particular proof that he cites. An examination of that particular proof by the method specified by his `consistent quantum theory' shows that the cited proof is valid within that restrictive version of quantum theory. An added section responds to Griffiths' reply, which cites general possibilities of ambiguities that might make what is to be proved ill-defined, and hence render the pertinent `consistent framework' ill defined. But the vagaries that he cites do not upset the proof in question, which, both by its physical formulation and by explicit identification, specify the framework to be used. Griffiths confirms the validity of the proof insofar as that pertinent framework is used. The section also shows

  6. Quantum correlations and distinguishability of quantum states

    SciTech Connect

    Spehner, Dominique

    2014-07-15

    A survey of various concepts in quantum information is given, with a main emphasis on the distinguishability of quantum states and quantum correlations. Covered topics include generalized and least square measurements, state discrimination, quantum relative entropies, the Bures distance on the set of quantum states, the quantum Fisher information, the quantum Chernoff bound, bipartite entanglement, the quantum discord, and geometrical measures of quantum correlations. The article is intended both for physicists interested not only by collections of results but also by the mathematical methods justifying them, and for mathematicians looking for an up-to-date introductory course on these subjects, which are mainly developed in the physics literature.

  7. Towards Quantum Experiments with Human Eye Detectors Based on Cloning via Stimulated Emission ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Martini, Francesco

    2010-05-01

    In a recent theoretical paper published in Physical Review Letters, Sekatsky, Brunner, Branciard, Gisin, Simon report an extended investigation on some properties of the human eye that affect its behavior as a quantum detector. We believe that the content of this work, albeit appealing at fist sight, is highly questionable simply because the human eye cannot be adopted as a sensing device within any quantum measurement apparatus. Furthermore, the criticism raised by these Authors against a real experiment on Micro—Macro entanglement recently published in Physical Review Letters (100, 253601, 2008) is found misleading and misses its target.

  8. Nonperturbative β-FUNCTION in Quantum Chromodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sissakian, A. N.; Solovtsov, I. L.; Solovtsova, O. P.

    We propose a method by which it is possible to go beyond the scope of quantum chromodynamics perturbation theory. By using a new small parameter we formulate a systematic nonperturbative expansion and derive a renormalization β-function in quantum chromodynamics.

  9. Realizing Controllable Quantum States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takayanagi, Hideaki; Nitta, Junsaku

    -- 4. Mesoscopic superconductivity with unconventional superconductor or ferromagnet. Ultraefficient microrefrigerators realized with ferromagnet-superconductor junctions / F. Giazotto et al. Anomalous charge transport in triplet superconductor junctions by the synergy effect of the proximity effect and the mid gap Andreev resonant states / Y. Tanaka and S. Kashiwaya. Paramagnetic and glass states in superconductive YBa[symbol]Cu[symbol]O[symbol] ceramics of sub-micron scale grains / H. Deguchi et al. Quantum properties of single-domain triplet superconductors / A. M. Gulian and K. S. Wood. A numerical study of Josephson current in p wave superconducting junctions / Y. Asano et al. Tilted bi-crystal sapphire substrates improve properties of grain boundary YBa[symbol]Cu[symbol]O[symbol] junctions and extend their Josephson response to THZ frequencies / E. Stepantsov et al. Circuit theory analysis of AB-plane tunnel junctions of unconventional superconductor Bi[symbol]Sr[symbol]Ca[symbol]Cu[symbol]O[symbol] / I. Shigeta et al. Transport properties of normal metal/anisotropic superconductor junctions in the eutectic system Sr[symbol]RuO[symbol]Ru / M. Kawamura et al. Macroscopic quantum tunneling in d-wave superconductor Josephson / S. Kawabata et al. Quasiparticle states of high-T[symbol] oxides observed by a Zeeman magnetic field response / S. Kashiwaya et al. Experimentally realizable devices for controlling the motion of magnetic flux quanta in anisotropic superconductors: vortex lenses, vortex diodes and vortex pumps / S. Savel'ev and F. Nori. Stability of vortex-antivortex "molecules" in mesoscopic superconducting triangles / V. R. Misko et al. Superconducting network with magnetic decoration - Hofstadter butterfly in spatially modulated magnetic field / Y. Iye et al. Observation of paramagnetic supercurrent in mesoscopic superconducting rings and disks using multiple-small-tunnel-junction method / A. Kanda et al. Guidance of vortices in high

  10. Theory of Quantum Measurement in Terms of Quantum Chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saitô, Nobuhiko

    2004-06-01

    Quantum non-integrable systems have pseudochaos in the phase of the eigenfunctions. In particular, correlation function of wave functions at two different points disappears, when observation process, which requires space and/or time average over a small range, is taken into account. This gives rise to the realization of decoherence in measuring processes. By virtue of this property of quantum chaos, various problems and paradoxes are explained in the framework of conventional quantum mechanics. The subjects treated here are the duality of wave and particle, the wave function collapse in measurement, Stern-Gerlach experiments, Schrödinger’s cat paradox, the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox and quantum Zeno effect.

  11. Breaking scale invariance with quantum gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Amendola, L.; Occhionero, F.; Saez, D. )

    1990-02-01

    It is argued that the closed, nonsingular cosmological model of Starobinsky (1980) allows a self-consistent, albeit schematic, description of the history of the universe from its beginning to now and even provides, given a suitable scenario, the possibility of breaking in a natural way the scale invariance of the perturbation spectrum. A double inflationary scenario is specified in detail to explain the anomalous power observed in the large-scale astronomical structures by assuming that the first inflation is driven by quantum gravity and that the second inflation is driven by the usual inflation. An example of a power spectrum where the scale invariance has been broken and extra power is put above 10 Mpc is presented. The model is now compatible with the observed upper limits from the large angular scale isotropy of the microwave background. 52 refs.

  12. Hybrid Quantum-Classical Approach to Correlated Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Bela; Wecker, Dave; Millis, Andrew J.; Hastings, Matthew B.; Troyer, Matthias

    2016-07-01

    Recent improvements in the control of quantum systems make it seem feasible to finally build a quantum computer within a decade. While it has been shown that such a quantum computer can in principle solve certain small electronic structure problems and idealized model Hamiltonians, the highly relevant problem of directly solving a complex correlated material appears to require a prohibitive amount of resources. Here, we show that by using a hybrid quantum-classical algorithm that incorporates the power of a small quantum computer into a framework of classical embedding algorithms, the electronic structure of complex correlated materials can be efficiently tackled using a quantum computer. In our approach, the quantum computer solves a small effective quantum impurity problem that is self-consistently determined via a feedback loop between the quantum and classical computation. Use of a quantum computer enables much larger and more accurate simulations than with any known classical algorithm, and will allow many open questions in quantum materials to be resolved once a small quantum computer with around 100 logical qubits becomes available.

  13. Hybrid quantum-classical approach to correlated materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Bela; Wecker, Dave; Millis, Andrew J.; Hastings, Matthew B.; Troyer, Matthias

    Recent improvements in control of quantum systems make it seem feasible to finally build a programmable general-purpose quantum computer within a decade. While it has been shown that such a quantum computer can in principle solve certain small electronic structure problems and idealized model Hamiltonians, the highly relevant problem of directly solving a complex correlated material appears to require a prohibitive amount of resources. Here, we show that by using a hybrid quantum-classical algorithm that incorporates the power of a small quantum computer into a framework of classical embedding algorithms, the electronic structure of complex correlated materials can be efficiently tackled using a quantum computer. In our approach, the quantum computer solves a small effective quantum impurity problem that is self-consistently determined via a feedback loop between the quantum and classical computation. Use of a quantum computer enables much larger and more accurate simulations than with any known classical algorithm, and will allow many open questions in quantum materials to be resolved once a small quantum computer with around one hundred logical qubits becomes available.

  14. Non-linear Langmuir waves in a warm quantum plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Dubinov, Alexander E. Kitaev, Ilya N.

    2014-10-15

    A non-linear differential equation describing the Langmuir waves in a warm quantum electron-ion plasma has been derived. Its numerical solutions of the equation show that ordinary electronic oscillations, similar to the classical oscillations, occur along with small-scale quantum Langmuir oscillations induced by the Bohm quantum force.

  15. Quantum computation with optical coherent states

    SciTech Connect

    Ralph, T.C.; Gilchrist, A.; Milburn, G.J.; Munro, W.J.; Glancy, S.

    2003-10-01

    We show that quantum computation circuits using coherent states as the logical qubits can be constructed from simple linear networks, conditional photon measurements, and 'small' coherent superposition resource states.

  16. The case for biological quantum computer elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baer, Wolfgang; Pizzi, Rita

    2009-05-01

    An extension to vonNeumann's analysis of quantum theory suggests self-measurement is a fundamental process of Nature. By mapping the quantum computer to the brain architecture we will argue that the cognitive experience results from a measurement of a quantum memory maintained by biological entities. The insight provided by this mapping suggests quantum effects are not restricted to small atomic and nuclear phenomena but are an integral part of our own cognitive experience and further that the architecture of a quantum computer system parallels that of a conscious brain. We will then review the suggestions for biological quantum elements in basic neural structures and address the de-coherence objection by arguing for a self- measurement event model of Nature. We will argue that to first order approximation the universe is composed of isolated self-measurement events which guaranties coherence. Controlled de-coherence is treated as the input/output interactions between quantum elements of a quantum computer and the quantum memory maintained by biological entities cognizant of the quantum calculation results. Lastly we will present stem-cell based neuron experiments conducted by one of us with the aim of demonstrating the occurrence of quantum effects in living neural networks and discuss future research projects intended to reach this objective.

  17. Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandl, F.

    1992-07-01

    The Manchester Physics Series General Editors: D. J. Sandiford; F. Mandl; A. C. Phillips Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester Properties of Matter B. H. Flowers and E. Mendoza Optics Second Edition F. G. Smith and J. H. Thomson Statistical Physics Second Edition F. Mandl Electromagnetism Second Edition I. S. Grant and W. R. Phillips Statistics R. J. Barlow Solid State Physics Second Edition J. R. Hook and H. E. Hall Quantum Mechanics F. Mandl Particle Physics Second Edition B. R. Martin and G. Shaw The Physics of Stars Second Edition A. C. Phillips Computing for Scientists R. J. Barlow and A. R. Barnett Quantum Mechanics aims to teach those parts of the subject which every physicist should know. The object is to display the inherent structure of quantum mechanics, concentrating on general principles and on methods of wide applicability without taking them to their full generality. This book will equip students to follow quantum-mechanical arguments in books and scientific papers, and to cope with simple cases. To bring the subject to life, the theory is applied to the all-important field of atomic physics. No prior knowledge of quantum mechanics is assumed. However, it would help most readers to have met some elementary wave mechanics before. Primarily written for students, it should also be of interest to experimental research workers who require a good grasp of quantum mechanics without the full formalism needed by the professional theorist. Quantum Mechanics features: A flow diagram allowing topics to be studied in different orders or omitted altogether. Optional "starred" and highlighted sections containing more advanced and specialized material for the more ambitious reader. Sets of problems at the end of each chapter to help student understanding. Hints and solutions to the problems are given at the end of the book.

  18. An Introduction to Quantum Probability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fannes, Mark

    Using quantum mechanical devices for handling information is not a recent proposal. Recent experimental progress has, however, narrowed the gap with reality, even if there is still a very long way to go in order to achieve the most far-stretching proposals. Modern techniques now really allow to handle very small systems—the paradigms of the Gedankenexperimente in the standard textbooks on quantum mechanics—in an increasingly controlled manner. Because of the counter-intuitive aspects of quantum mechanics, experimental and theoretical aspects have to be developed more or less simultaneously, certainly in order to build complex systems. The renewed interest in theoretical and mathematical aspects of quantum theory is then a natural consequence.

  19. Introduction to Quantum Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Colin P.

    2005-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation addresses the problem of efficiently simulating the evolution of a quantum system. The contents include: 1) Quantum Simulation; 2) Extracting Answers from Quantum Simulations; 3) Quantum Fourier Transform; 4) Eigenvalue Estimation; 5) Fermionic Simulations.

  20. Quantum Physics for Beginners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strand, J.

    1981-01-01

    Suggests a new approach for teaching secondary school quantum physics. Reviews traditional approaches and presents some characteristics of the three-part "Quantum Physics for Beginners" project, including: quantum physics, quantum mechanics, and a short historical survey. (SK)

  1. Free Quantum Field Theory from Quantum Cellular Automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisio, Alessandro; D'Ariano, Giacomo Mauro; Perinotti, Paolo; Tosini, Alessandro

    2015-10-01

    After leading to a new axiomatic derivation of quantum theory (see D'Ariano et al. in Found Phys, 2015), the new informational paradigm is entering the domain of quantum field theory, suggesting a quantum automata framework that can be regarded as an extension of quantum field theory to including an hypothetical Planck scale, and with the usual quantum field theory recovered in the relativistic limit of small wave-vectors. Being derived from simple principles (linearity, unitarity, locality, homogeneity, isotropy, and minimality of dimension), the automata theory is quantum ab-initio, and does not assume Lorentz covariance and mechanical notions. Being discrete it can describe localized states and measurements (unmanageable by quantum field theory), solving all the issues plaguing field theory originated from the continuum. These features make the theory an ideal framework for quantum gravity, with relativistic covariance and space-time emergent solely from the interactions, and not assumed a priori. The paper presents a synthetic derivation of the automata theory, showing how the principles lead to a description in terms of a quantum automaton over a Cayley graph of a group. Restricting to Abelian groups we show how the automata recover the Weyl, Dirac and Maxwell dynamics in the relativistic limit. We conclude with some new routes about the more general scenario of non-Abelian Cayley graphs. The phenomenology arising from the automata theory in the ultra-relativistic domain and the analysis of corresponding distorted Lorentz covariance is reviewed in Bisio et al. (Found Phys 2015, in this same issue).

  2. Quantum Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Bellac, Michel

    2006-03-01

    Quantum physics allows us to understand the nature of the physical phenomena which govern the behavior of solids, semi-conductors, lasers, atoms, nuclei, subnuclear particles and light. In Quantum Physics, Le Bellac provides a thoroughly modern approach to this fundamental theory. Throughout the book, Le Bellac teaches the fundamentals of quantum physics using an original approach which relies primarily on an algebraic treatment and on the systematic use of symmetry principles. In addition to the standard topics such as one-dimensional potentials, angular momentum and scattering theory, the reader is introduced to more recent developments at an early stage. These include a detailed account of entangled states and their applications, the optical Bloch equations, the theory of laser cooling and of magneto-optical traps, vacuum Rabi oscillations, and an introduction to open quantum systems. This is a textbook for a modern course on quantum physics, written for advanced undergraduate and graduate students. Completely original and contemporary approach, using algebra and symmetry principles Introduces recent developments at an early stage, including many topics that cannot be found in standard textbooks. Contains 130 physically relevant exercises

  3. The equivalence principle in a quantum world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjerrum-Bohr, N. E. J.; Donoghue, John F.; El-Menoufi, Basem Kamal; Holstein, Barry R.; Planté, Ludovic; Vanhove, Pierre

    2015-09-01

    We show how modern methods can be applied to quantum gravity at low energy. We test how quantum corrections challenge the classical framework behind the equivalence principle (EP), for instance through introduction of nonlocality from quantum physics, embodied in the uncertainty principle. When the energy is small, we now have the tools to address this conflict explicitly. Despite the violation of some classical concepts, the EP continues to provide the core of the quantum gravity framework through the symmetry — general coordinate invariance — that is used to organize the effective field theory (EFT).

  4. Measurement theory for closed quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wouters, Michiel

    2015-07-01

    We introduce the concept of a “classical observable” as an operator with vanishingly small quantum fluctuations on a set of density matrices. Their study provides a natural starting point to analyse the quantum measurement problem. In particular, it allows to identify Schrödinger cats and the associated projection operators intrinsically, without the need to invoke an environment. We discuss how our new approach relates to the open system analysis of quantum measurements and to thermalization studies in closed quantum systems.

  5. Quantum walk computation

    SciTech Connect

    Kendon, Viv

    2014-12-04

    Quantum versions of random walks have diverse applications that are motivating experimental implementations as well as theoretical studies. Recent results showing quantum walks are “universal for quantum computation” relate to algorithms, to be run on quantum computers. We consider whether an experimental implementation of a quantum walk could provide useful computation before we have a universal quantum computer.

  6. Large & Small: Exploring the Laws of Nature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creutz, E.

    1976-01-01

    Illustrates how both large entities (such as stars and galaxies) and small entities (such as fundamental particles) obey the same physical laws. Discusses quantum mechanics, Newton's laws, and general relativity. (MLH)

  7. Teaching Quantum Nonlocalitya)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobson, Art

    2012-05-01

    Nonlocality arises from the unified "all or nothing" interactions of a spatially extended field quantum such as a photon or an electron.2 In the double-slit experiment with light, for example, each photon comes through both slits and arrives at the viewing screen as an extended but unified energy bundle or "field quantum." When the photon interacts (randomly2) with the screen, field quantization requires it to alter its state instantaneously rather than gradually. Thus if the photon is absorbed, it must vanish or "collapse" nonlocally and instantaneously across a macroscopic portion of the screen, even across many kilometers in the case of interference patterns of light from a small distant star. The interaction instantly transfers the photons energy to a single atom of the screen. But a quantized field can contain any whole number of "excitations" (particles such as photons or electrons). If a single field quantum contains, say, two excitations, then generally the unified all-or-nothing character of quanta implies that any interaction of one excitation must also instantaneously affect the other excitation, regardless of the distance between them. The particles are then said to be "entangled" (see the "Background" section for a more precise definition of this term). Particles can become entangled by being created together in a single microscopic process, or by interacting with each other. Quantum entanglement is at least as fundamental as quantum uncertainty but is seldom mentioned in physics courses, although it has received broad attention recently in a wonderful book by Louisa Gilder.3 A recent paper in this journal presents entanglement in a manner that is useful for high school and college physics teachers.4 This paper builds on that presentation and looks at a different, more intuitive entanglement experiment that should be accessible to both scientists and nonscientists.

  8. Quantum Uniqueness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sych, Denis; Leuchs, Gerd

    2015-12-01

    Classical physics allows for the existence of pairs of absolutely identical systems. Pairwise application of identical measurements to each of those systems always leads to exactly alike results irrespectively of the choice of measurements. Here we ask a question how the picture looks like in the quantum domain. Surprisingly, we get a counterintuitive outcome. Pairwise application of identical (but a priori unknown) measurements cannot always lead to exactly alike results. We interpret this as quantum uniqueness—a feature that has no classical analog.

  9. Quantum Foam

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2014-10-24

    The laws of quantum mechanics and relativity are quite perplexing however it is when the two theories are merged that things get really confusing. This combined theory predicts that empty space isn’t empty at all – it’s a seething and bubbling cauldron of matter and antimatter particles springing into existence before disappearing back into nothingness. Scientists call this complicated state of affairs “quantum foam.” In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln discusses this mind-bending idea and sketches some of the experiments that have convinced scientists that this crazy prediction is actually true.

  10. Entanglement enhances cooling in microscopic quantum refrigerators.

    PubMed

    Brunner, Nicolas; Huber, Marcus; Linden, Noah; Popescu, Sandu; Silva, Ralph; Skrzypczyk, Paul

    2014-03-01

    Small self-contained quantum thermal machines function without external source of work or control but using only incoherent interactions with thermal baths. Here we investigate the role of entanglement in a small self-contained quantum refrigerator. We first show that entanglement is detrimental as far as efficiency is concerned-fridges operating at efficiencies close to the Carnot limit do not feature any entanglement. Moving away from the Carnot regime, we show that entanglement can enhance cooling and energy transport. Hence, a truly quantum refrigerator can outperform a classical one. Furthermore, the amount of entanglement alone quantifies the enhancement in cooling.

  11. Quantum control limited by quantum decoherence

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Fei; Sun, C. P.; Yu, S. X.

    2006-01-15

    We describe quantum controllability under the influences of the quantum decoherence induced by the quantum control itself. It is shown that, when the controller is considered as a quantum system, it will entangle with its controlled system and then cause quantum decoherence in the controlled system. In competition with this induced decoherence, the controllability will be limited by some uncertainty relation in a well-armed quantum control process. In association with the phase uncertainty and the standard quantum limit, a general model is studied to demonstrate the possibility of realizing a decoherence-free quantum control with a finite energy within a finite time. It is also shown that if the operations of quantum control are to be determined by the initial state of the controller, then due to the decoherence which results from the quantum control itself, there exists a low bound for quantum controllability.

  12. Deterministic quantum teleportation of photonic quantum bits by a hybrid technique.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Shuntaro; Mizuta, Takahiro; Fuwa, Maria; van Loock, Peter; Furusawa, Akira

    2013-08-15

    Quantum teleportation allows for the transfer of arbitrary unknown quantum states from a sender to a spatially distant receiver, provided that the two parties share an entangled state and can communicate classically. It is the essence of many sophisticated protocols for quantum communication and computation. Photons are an optimal choice for carrying information in the form of 'flying qubits', but the teleportation of photonic quantum bits (qubits) has been limited by experimental inefficiencies and restrictions. Main disadvantages include the fundamentally probabilistic nature of linear-optics Bell measurements, as well as the need either to destroy the teleported qubit or attenuate the input qubit when the detectors do not resolve photon numbers. Here we experimentally realize fully deterministic quantum teleportation of photonic qubits without post-selection. The key step is to make use of a hybrid technique involving continuous-variable teleportation of a discrete-variable, photonic qubit. When the receiver's feedforward gain is optimally tuned, the continuous-variable teleporter acts as a pure loss channel, and the input dual-rail-encoded qubit, based on a single photon, represents a quantum error detection code against photon loss and hence remains completely intact for most teleportation events. This allows for a faithful qubit transfer even with imperfect continuous-variable entangled states: for four qubits the overall transfer fidelities range from 0.79 to 0.82 and all of them exceed the classical limit of teleportation. Furthermore, even for a relatively low level of the entanglement, qubits are teleported much more efficiently than in previous experiments, albeit post-selectively (taking into account only the qubit subspaces), and with a fidelity comparable to the previously reported values. PMID:23955230

  13. Deterministic quantum teleportation of photonic quantum bits by a hybrid technique.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Shuntaro; Mizuta, Takahiro; Fuwa, Maria; van Loock, Peter; Furusawa, Akira

    2013-08-15

    Quantum teleportation allows for the transfer of arbitrary unknown quantum states from a sender to a spatially distant receiver, provided that the two parties share an entangled state and can communicate classically. It is the essence of many sophisticated protocols for quantum communication and computation. Photons are an optimal choice for carrying information in the form of 'flying qubits', but the teleportation of photonic quantum bits (qubits) has been limited by experimental inefficiencies and restrictions. Main disadvantages include the fundamentally probabilistic nature of linear-optics Bell measurements, as well as the need either to destroy the teleported qubit or attenuate the input qubit when the detectors do not resolve photon numbers. Here we experimentally realize fully deterministic quantum teleportation of photonic qubits without post-selection. The key step is to make use of a hybrid technique involving continuous-variable teleportation of a discrete-variable, photonic qubit. When the receiver's feedforward gain is optimally tuned, the continuous-variable teleporter acts as a pure loss channel, and the input dual-rail-encoded qubit, based on a single photon, represents a quantum error detection code against photon loss and hence remains completely intact for most teleportation events. This allows for a faithful qubit transfer even with imperfect continuous-variable entangled states: for four qubits the overall transfer fidelities range from 0.79 to 0.82 and all of them exceed the classical limit of teleportation. Furthermore, even for a relatively low level of the entanglement, qubits are teleported much more efficiently than in previous experiments, albeit post-selectively (taking into account only the qubit subspaces), and with a fidelity comparable to the previously reported values.

  14. Can Nonprivate Channels Transmit Quantum Information?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Graeme; Smolin, John A.

    2009-01-01

    We study the power of quantum channels with little or no capacity for private communication. Because privacy is a necessary condition for quantum communication, one might expect that such channels would be of little use for transmitting quantum states. Nevertheless, we find strong evidence that there are pairs of such channels that, when used together, can transmit far more quantum information than the sum of their individual private capacities. Because quantum transmissions are necessarily private, this would imply a large violation of additivity for the private capacity. Specifically, we present channels which display either (1) a large joint quantum capacity but very small individual private capacities or (2) a severe violation of additivity for the Holevo information.

  15. Adiabatic Quantum Search in Open Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wild, Dominik S.; Gopalakrishnan, Sarang; Knap, Michael; Yao, Norman Y.; Lukin, Mikhail D.

    2016-10-01

    Adiabatic quantum algorithms represent a promising approach to universal quantum computation. In isolated systems, a key limitation to such algorithms is the presence of avoided level crossings, where gaps become extremely small. In open quantum systems, the fundamental robustness of adiabatic algorithms remains unresolved. Here, we study the dynamics near an avoided level crossing associated with the adiabatic quantum search algorithm, when the system is coupled to a generic environment. At zero temperature, we find that the algorithm remains scalable provided the noise spectral density of the environment decays sufficiently fast at low frequencies. By contrast, higher order scattering processes render the algorithm inefficient at any finite temperature regardless of the spectral density, implying that no quantum speedup can be achieved. Extensions and implications for other adiabatic quantum algorithms will be discussed.

  16. Quantum turbulence in trapped atomic Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsatsos, Marios C.; Tavares, Pedro E. S.; Cidrim, André; Fritsch, Amilson R.; Caracanhas, Mônica A.; dos Santos, F. Ednilson A.; Barenghi, Carlo F.; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.

    2016-03-01

    Turbulence, the complicated fluid behavior of nonlinear and statistical nature, arises in many physical systems across various disciplines, from tiny laboratory scales to geophysical and astrophysical ones. The notion of turbulence in the quantum world was conceived long ago by Onsager and Feynman, but the occurrence of turbulence in ultracold gases has been studied in the laboratory only very recently. Albeit new as a field, it already offers new paths and perspectives on the problem of turbulence. Herein we review the general properties of quantum gases at ultralow temperatures paying particular attention to vortices, their dynamics and turbulent behavior. We review the recent advances both from theory and experiment. We highlight, moreover, the difficulties of identifying and characterizing turbulence in gaseous Bose-Einstein condensates compared to ordinary turbulence and turbulence in superfluid liquid helium and spotlight future possible directions.

  17. Entropy for quantum pure states and quantum H theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xizhi; Wu, Biao

    2015-06-01

    We construct a complete set of Wannier functions that are localized at both given positions and momenta. This allows us to introduce the quantum phase space, onto which a quantum pure state can be mapped unitarily. Using its probability distribution in quantum phase space, we define an entropy for a quantum pure state. We prove an inequality regarding the long-time behavior of our entropy's fluctuation. For a typical initial state, this inequality indicates that our entropy can relax dynamically to a maximized value and stay there most of time with small fluctuations. This result echoes the quantum H theorem proved by von Neumann [Zeitschrift für Physik 57, 30 (1929), 10.1007/BF01339852]. Our entropy is different from the standard von Neumann entropy, which is always zero for quantum pure states. According to our definition, a system always has bigger entropy than its subsystem even when the system is described by a pure state. As the construction of the Wannier basis can be implemented numerically, the dynamical evolution of our entropy is illustrated with an example.

  18. Quantum dice

    SciTech Connect

    Sassoli de Bianchi, Massimiliano

    2013-09-15

    In a letter to Born, Einstein wrote [42]: “Quantum mechanics is certainly imposing. But an inner voice tells me that it is not yet the real thing. The theory says a lot, but does not really bring us any closer to the secret of the ‘old one.’ I, at any rate, am convinced that He does not throw dice.” In this paper we take seriously Einstein’s famous metaphor, and show that we can gain considerable insight into quantum mechanics by doing something as simple as rolling dice. More precisely, we show how to perform measurements on a single die, to create typical quantum interference effects, and how to connect (entangle) two identical dice, to maximally violate Bell’s inequality. -- Highlights: •Rolling a die is a quantum process admitting a Hilbert space representation. •Rolling experiments with a single die can produce interference effects. •Two connected dice can violate Bell’s inequality. •Correlations need to be created by the measurement, to violate Bell’s inequality.

  19. Quantum wormholes

    SciTech Connect

    Visser, M. )

    1991-01-15

    This paper presents an application of quantum-mechanical principles to a microscopic variant of the traversable wormholes recently introduced by Morris and Thorne. The analysis, based on the surgical grafting of two Reissner-Nordstroem spacetimes, proceeds by using a minisuperspace model to approximate the geometry of these wormholes. The thin shell'' formalism is applied to this minisuperspace model to extract the effective Lagrangian appropriate to this one-degree-of-freedom system. This effective Lagrangian is then quantized and the wave function for the wormhole is explicitly exhibited. A slightly more general class of wormholes---corresponding to the addition of some dust'' to the wormhole throat---is analyzed by recourse to WKB techniques. In all cases discussed in this paper, the expectation value of the wormhole radius is calculated to be of the order of the Planck length. Accordingly, though these quantum wormholes are of considerable theoretical interest they do not appear to be useful as a means for interstellar travel. The results of this paper may also have a bearing on the question of topological fluctuations in quantum gravity. These calculations serve to suggest that topology-changing effects might in fact be {ital suppressed} by quantum-gravity effects.

  20. Quantum abacus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheon, Taksu; Tsutsui, Izumi; Fülöp, Tamás

    2004-09-01

    We show that the point interactions on a line can be utilized to provide U(2) family of qubit operations for quantum information processing. Qubits are realized as states localized in either side of the point interaction which represents a controllable gate. The qubit manipulation proceeds in a manner analogous to the operation of an abacus.

  1. Quantum Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goradia, Shantilal

    2009-11-01

    The continuing search for quantum gravity and never ending attempts to unify gravity with other forces of nature represent tremendous waste of public and private funds directing students' energy towards non-creative manipulative work instead of learning from the scientific creativity in Einstein's 1919 paper that unifies gravity with nuclear force. It reflects Einstein's 1919 jump beyond his own 1915 theory of gravity, including that of Newton as implicitly demanded by Newton in 1686. Einstein corrected and retracted his 1917 introduction of cosmological constant in 1919. Dislike of the fact that Einstein did not use quantum mechanics to prove his point has no real value now, because we will use key ingredients (Planck scale and probabilistic aspect) of quantum mechanics and show that they reach the same conclusion. Newton explained the solar system known after Kepler. Likewise, our quantum mechanical approach explains the strong coupling as well the solar system and shows new horizons, otherwise unexplained. Explanation of unexplained observations need no prediction per Hawking, and obviously otherwise.

  2. Quantum Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowling, Jonathan P.

    2000-01-01

    Recently, several researchers, including yours truly, have been able to demonstrate theoretically that quantum photon entanglement has the potential to also revolutionize the entire field of optical interferometry, by providing many orders of magnitude improvement in interferometer sensitivity. The quantum entangled photon interferometer approach is very general and applies to many types of interferometers. In particular, without nonlocal entanglement, a generic classical interferometer has a statistical-sampling shot-noise limited sensitivity that scales like 1/Sqrt[N], where N is the number of particles (photons, electrons, atoms, neutrons) passing through the interferometer per unit time. However, if carefully prepared quantum correlations are engineered between the particles, then the interferometer sensitivity improves by a factor of Sqrt[N] (square root of N) to scale like 1/N, which is the limit imposed by the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle. For optical (laser) interferometers operating at milliwatts of optical power, this quantum sensitivity boost corresponds to an eight-order-of-magnitude improvement of signal to noise. Applications are to tests of General Relativity such as ground and orbiting optical interferometers for gravity wave detection, Laser Interferometer Gravity Observatory (LIGO) and the European Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA), respectively.

  3. Quantum transformations

    SciTech Connect

    Faraggi, A.E.; Matone, M.

    1998-01-09

    We show that the quantum Hamilton-Jacobi equation can be written in the classical form with the spatial derivative {partial_derivative}{sub q} replaced by {partial_derivative}{sub q} with dq = dq/{radical}1{minus}{beta}{sup 2}(q), where {beta}{sup 2}(q) is strictly related to the quantum potential. This can be seen as the opposite of the problem of finding the wave function representation of classical mechanics as formulated by Schiller and Rosen. The structure of the above {open_quotes}quantum transformation{close_quotes}, related to the recently formulated equivalence principle, indicates that the potential deforms space geometry. In particular, a result by Flanders implies that both W(q) = V(q) {minus} E and the quantum potential Q are proportional to the curvatures {kappa}{sub W} and {kappa}{sub Q} which arise as natural invariants in an equivalence problem for curves in the projective line. In this formulation the Schroedinger equation takes the geometrical form ({partial_derivative}{sub q}{sup 2} + {kappa}{sub W}){psi} = 0.

  4. Quantum rendering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzagorta, Marco O.; Gomez, Richard B.; Uhlmann, Jeffrey K.

    2003-08-01

    In recent years, computer graphics has emerged as a critical component of the scientific and engineering process, and it is recognized as an important computer science research area. Computer graphics are extensively used for a variety of aerospace and defense training systems and by Hollywood's special effects companies. All these applications require the computer graphics systems to produce high quality renderings of extremely large data sets in short periods of time. Much research has been done in "classical computing" toward the development of efficient methods and techniques to reduce the rendering time required for large datasets. Quantum Computing's unique algorithmic features offer the possibility of speeding up some of the known rendering algorithms currently used in computer graphics. In this paper we discuss possible implementations of quantum rendering algorithms. In particular, we concentrate on the implementation of Grover's quantum search algorithm for Z-buffering, ray-tracing, radiosity, and scene management techniques. We also compare the theoretical performance between the classical and quantum versions of the algorithms.

  5. Quantum roulette: an extended quantum strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiang-Bin; Kwek, L. C.; Oh, C. H.

    2000-12-01

    In a recent paper, Meyer demonstrated that with a quantum computer, an analogous zero-sum classically strategic game played with quantum strategy essentially become a bias game under a mixture of quantum and classical strategy. To illustrate his point, Meyer used a quantum coin tossing event. In this Letter, we generalize Meyer's argument to an N-state game.

  6. Quantum state and quantum entanglement protection using quantum measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuchao; Li, Ying; Wang, Xiangbin; Kwek, Leong Chuan; Yu, Zongwen; Zou, Wenjie

    2015-03-01

    The time evolution of some quantum states can be slowed down or even stopped under frequent measurements. This is the usual quantum Zeno effect. Here we report an operator quantum Zeno effect, in which the evolution of some physical observables is slowed down through measurements even though thequantum state changes randomly with time. Based on the operator quantum Zeno effect, we show how we can protect quantum information from decoherence with two-qubit measurements, realizable with noisy two-qubit interactions. Besides, we report the quantum entanglement protection using weak measurement and measurement reversal scheme. Exposed in the nonzero temperature environment, a quantum system can both lose and gain excitations by interacting with the environment. In this work, we show how to optimally protect quantum states and quantum entanglement in such a situation based on measurement reversal from weak measurement. In particular, we present explicit formulas of protection. We find that this scheme can circumvent the entanglement sudden death in certain conditions.

  7. Finite groups and quantum physics

    SciTech Connect

    Kornyak, V. V.

    2013-02-15

    Concepts of quantum theory are considered from the constructive 'finite' point of view. The introduction of a continuum or other actual infinities in physics destroys constructiveness without any need for them in describing empirical observations. It is shown that quantum behavior is a natural consequence of symmetries of dynamical systems. The underlying reason is that it is impossible in principle to trace the identity of indistinguishable objects in their evolution-only information about invariant statements and values concerning such objects is available. General mathematical arguments indicate that any quantum dynamics is reducible to a sequence of permutations. Quantum phenomena, such as interference, arise in invariant subspaces of permutation representations of the symmetry group of a dynamical system. Observable quantities can be expressed in terms of permutation invariants. It is shown that nonconstructive number systems, such as complex numbers, are not needed for describing quantum phenomena. It is sufficient to employ cyclotomic numbers-a minimal extension of natural numbers that is appropriate for quantum mechanics. The use of finite groups in physics, which underlies the present approach, has an additional motivation. Numerous experiments and observations in the particle physics suggest the importance of finite groups of relatively small orders in some fundamental processes. The origin of these groups is unclear within the currently accepted theories-in particular, within the Standard Model.

  8. Quantum phases in intrinsic Josephson junctions: Quantum magnetism analogy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machida, Masahiko; Kobayashi, Keita; Koyama, Tomio

    2013-08-01

    We explore quantum phases in intrinsic Josephson junction (IJJ) stacks, whose in-plane area is so small that the capacitive coupling has a dominant role in the superconducting phase dynamics. In such cases, the effective Hamiltonian for the superconducting phase can be mapped onto that of one-dimensional ferromagnetically-interacting spin model, whose spin length S depends on the magnitude of the on-site Coulomb repulsion. The ferromagnetic model for IJJ’s prefers synchronized quantum features in contrast to the antiferromagnetically-interacting model in the conventional Josephson junction arrays.

  9. Efficient quantum walk on a quantum processor.

    PubMed

    Qiang, Xiaogang; Loke, Thomas; Montanaro, Ashley; Aungskunsiri, Kanin; Zhou, Xiaoqi; O'Brien, Jeremy L; Wang, Jingbo B; Matthews, Jonathan C F

    2016-01-01

    The random walk formalism is used across a wide range of applications, from modelling share prices to predicting population genetics. Likewise, quantum walks have shown much potential as a framework for developing new quantum algorithms. Here we present explicit efficient quantum circuits for implementing continuous-time quantum walks on the circulant class of graphs. These circuits allow us to sample from the output probability distributions of quantum walks on circulant graphs efficiently. We also show that solving the same sampling problem for arbitrary circulant quantum circuits is intractable for a classical computer, assuming conjectures from computational complexity theory. This is a new link between continuous-time quantum walks and computational complexity theory and it indicates a family of tasks that could ultimately demonstrate quantum supremacy over classical computers. As a proof of principle, we experimentally implement the proposed quantum circuit on an example circulant graph using a two-qubit photonics quantum processor. PMID:27146471

  10. Efficient quantum walk on a quantum processor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, Xiaogang; Loke, Thomas; Montanaro, Ashley; Aungskunsiri, Kanin; Zhou, Xiaoqi; O'Brien, Jeremy L.; Wang, Jingbo B.; Matthews, Jonathan C. F.

    2016-05-01

    The random walk formalism is used across a wide range of applications, from modelling share prices to predicting population genetics. Likewise, quantum walks have shown much potential as a framework for developing new quantum algorithms. Here we present explicit efficient quantum circuits for implementing continuous-time quantum walks on the circulant class of graphs. These circuits allow us to sample from the output probability distributions of quantum walks on circulant graphs efficiently. We also show that solving the same sampling problem for arbitrary circulant quantum circuits is intractable for a classical computer, assuming conjectures from computational complexity theory. This is a new link between continuous-time quantum walks and computational complexity theory and it indicates a family of tasks that could ultimately demonstrate quantum supremacy over classical computers. As a proof of principle, we experimentally implement the proposed quantum circuit on an example circulant graph using a two-qubit photonics quantum processor.

  11. Efficient quantum walk on a quantum processor.

    PubMed

    Qiang, Xiaogang; Loke, Thomas; Montanaro, Ashley; Aungskunsiri, Kanin; Zhou, Xiaoqi; O'Brien, Jeremy L; Wang, Jingbo B; Matthews, Jonathan C F

    2016-05-05

    The random walk formalism is used across a wide range of applications, from modelling share prices to predicting population genetics. Likewise, quantum walks have shown much potential as a framework for developing new quantum algorithms. Here we present explicit efficient quantum circuits for implementing continuous-time quantum walks on the circulant class of graphs. These circuits allow us to sample from the output probability distributions of quantum walks on circulant graphs efficiently. We also show that solving the same sampling problem for arbitrary circulant quantum circuits is intractable for a classical computer, assuming conjectures from computational complexity theory. This is a new link between continuous-time quantum walks and computational complexity theory and it indicates a family of tasks that could ultimately demonstrate quantum supremacy over classical computers. As a proof of principle, we experimentally implement the proposed quantum circuit on an example circulant graph using a two-qubit photonics quantum processor.

  12. Efficient quantum walk on a quantum processor

    PubMed Central

    Qiang, Xiaogang; Loke, Thomas; Montanaro, Ashley; Aungskunsiri, Kanin; Zhou, Xiaoqi; O'Brien, Jeremy L.; Wang, Jingbo B.; Matthews, Jonathan C. F.

    2016-01-01

    The random walk formalism is used across a wide range of applications, from modelling share prices to predicting population genetics. Likewise, quantum walks have shown much potential as a framework for developing new quantum algorithms. Here we present explicit efficient quantum circuits for implementing continuous-time quantum walks on the circulant class of graphs. These circuits allow us to sample from the output probability distributions of quantum walks on circulant graphs efficiently. We also show that solving the same sampling problem for arbitrary circulant quantum circuits is intractable for a classical computer, assuming conjectures from computational complexity theory. This is a new link between continuous-time quantum walks and computational complexity theory and it indicates a family of tasks that could ultimately demonstrate quantum supremacy over classical computers. As a proof of principle, we experimentally implement the proposed quantum circuit on an example circulant graph using a two-qubit photonics quantum processor. PMID:27146471

  13. Quantum error correction for quantum memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terhal, Barbara M.

    2015-04-01

    Active quantum error correction using qubit stabilizer codes has emerged as a promising, but experimentally challenging, engineering program for building a universal quantum computer. In this review the formalism of qubit stabilizer and subsystem stabilizer codes and their possible use in protecting quantum information in a quantum memory are considered. The theory of fault tolerance and quantum error correction is reviewed, and examples of various codes and code constructions, the general quantum error-correction conditions, the noise threshold, the special role played by Clifford gates, and the route toward fault-tolerant universal quantum computation are discussed. The second part of the review is focused on providing an overview of quantum error correction using two-dimensional (topological) codes, in particular, the surface code architecture. The complexity of decoding and the notion of passive or self-correcting quantum memories are discussed. The review does not focus on a particular technology but discusses topics that will be relevant for various quantum technologies.

  14. Quantum random walks using quantum accelerator modes

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Z.-Y.; Burnett, K.; D'Arcy, M. B.; Gardiner, S. A.

    2006-01-15

    We discuss the use of high-order quantum accelerator modes to achieve an atom optical realization of a biased quantum random walk. We first discuss how one can create coexistent quantum accelerator modes, and hence how momentum transfer that depends on the atoms' internal state can be achieved. When combined with microwave driving of the transition between the states, a different type of atomic beam splitter results. This permits the realization of a biased quantum random walk through quantum accelerator modes.

  15. Transport in small and/or random systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lax, M.

    1987-05-14

    This report discusses: transport in small systems; electron-phonon interactions in quantum wells; noise in small systems; laser propagation in the atmosphere; laser-aerosol interactions; transport properties of carriers in semiconductor quantum wells; light transmission in a particulate medium; and laser generation of shock waves in droplets. (LSP)

  16. Feynman's simple quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Edwin F.

    1997-03-01

    This sample class presents an alternative to the conventional introduction to quantum mechanics and describes its current use in a credit course. This alternative introduction rests on theory presented in professional and popular writings by Richard Feynman. Feynman showed that Nature gives a simple command to the electron: "Explore all paths." All of nonrelativistic quantum mechanics, among other fundamental results, comes from this command. With a desktop computer the student points and clicks to tell a modeled electron which paths to follow. The computer then shows the results, which embody the elemental strangeness and paradoxical behaviors of the world of the very small. Feynman's approach requires few equations and provides a largely non-mathematical introduction to the wave function of conventional quantum mechanics. Draft software and materials already used for two semesters in an e-mail computer conference credit university course show that Feynman's approach works well with a variety of students. The sample class explores computer and written material and describes the next steps in its development.

  17. Adiabatically implementing quantum gates

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Jie; Lu, Songfeng Liu, Fang

    2014-06-14

    We show that, through the approach of quantum adiabatic evolution, all of the usual quantum gates can be implemented efficiently, yielding running time of order O(1). This may be considered as a useful alternative to the standard quantum computing approach, which involves quantum gates transforming quantum states during the computing process.

  18. Quantum gate decomposition algorithms.

    SciTech Connect

    Slepoy, Alexander

    2006-07-01

    Quantum computing algorithms can be conveniently expressed in a format of a quantum logical circuits. Such circuits consist of sequential coupled operations, termed ''quantum gates'', or quantum analogs of bits called qubits. We review a recently proposed method [1] for constructing general ''quantum gates'' operating on an qubits, as composed of a sequence of generic elementary ''gates''.

  19. Quantum Foam

    ScienceCinema

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-07-12

    The laws of quantum mechanics and relativity are quite perplexing however it is when the two theories are merged that things get really confusing. This combined theory predicts that empty space isn’t empty at all – it’s a seething and bubbling cauldron of matter and antimatter particles springing into existence before disappearing back into nothingness. Scientists call this complicated state of affairs “quantum foam.” In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln discusses this mind-bending idea and sketches some of the experiments that have convinced scientists that this crazy prediction is actually true.

  20. Quantum nonlocality

    SciTech Connect

    Stapp, H.P.

    1988-04-01

    It is argued that the validity of the predictions of quantum theory in certain spin-correlation experiments entails a violation of Einstein's locality idea that no causal influence can act outside the forward light cone. First, two preliminary arguments suggesting such a violation are reviewed. They both depend, in intermediate stages, on the idea that the results of certain unperformed experiments are physically determinate. The second argument is entangled also with the problem of the meaning of physical reality. A new argument having neither of these characteristics is constructed. It is based strictly on the orthodox ideas of Bohr and Heisenberg, and has no realistic elements, or other ingredients, that are alien to orthodox quantum thinking.

  1. Exotic quantum holonomy and higher-order exceptional points in quantum kicked tops.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Atushi; Kim, Sang Wook; Cheon, Taksu

    2014-04-01

    The correspondence between exotic quantum holonomy, which occurs in families of Hermitian cycles, and exceptional points (EPs) for non-Hermitian quantum theory is examined in quantum kicked tops. Under a suitable condition, an explicit expression of the adiabatic parameter dependencies of quasienergies and stationary states, which exhibit anholonomies, is obtained. It is also shown that the quantum kicked tops with the complexified adiabatic parameter have a higher-order EP, which is broken into lower-order EPs with the application of small perturbations. The stability of exotic holonomy against such bifurcation is demonstrated.

  2. Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    A development of quantum theory that was initiated in the 1920s by Werner Heisenberg (1901-76) and Erwin Schrödinger (1887-1961). The theory drew on a proposal made in 1925 Prince Louis de Broglie (1892-1987), that particles have wavelike properties (the wave-particle duality) and that an electron, for example, could in some respects be regarded as a wave with a wavelength that depended on its mo...

  3. Efficient Quantum Information Processing via Quantum Compressions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Y.; Luo, M. X.; Ma, S. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Our purpose is to improve the quantum transmission efficiency and reduce the resource cost by quantum compressions. The lossless quantum compression is accomplished using invertible quantum transformations and applied to the quantum teleportation and the simultaneous transmission over quantum butterfly networks. New schemes can greatly reduce the entanglement cost, and partially solve transmission conflictions over common links. Moreover, the local compression scheme is useful for approximate entanglement creations from pre-shared entanglements. This special task has not been addressed because of the quantum no-cloning theorem. Our scheme depends on the local quantum compression and the bipartite entanglement transfer. Simulations show the success probability is greatly dependent of the minimal entanglement coefficient. These results may be useful in general quantum network communication.

  4. Biologically inspired path to quantum computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogryzko, Vasily; Ozhigov, Yuri

    2014-12-01

    We describe an approach to quantum computer inspired by the information processing at the molecular level in living cells. It is based on the separation of a small ensemble of qubits inside the living system (e.g., a bacterial cell), such that coherent quantum states of this ensemble remain practically unchanged for a long time. We use the notion of a quantum kernel to describe such an ensemble. Quantum kernel is not strictly connected with certain particles; it permanently exchanges atoms and molecules with the environment, which makes quantum kernel a virtual notion. There are many reasons to expect that the state of quantum kernel of a living system can be treated as the stationary state of some Hamiltonian. While the quantum kernel is responsible for the stability of dynamics at the time scale of cellular life, at the longer inter-generation time scale it can change, varying smoothly in the course of biological evolution. To the first level of approximation, quantum kernel can be described in the framework of qubit modification of Jaynes-Cummings-Hubbard model, in which the relaxation corresponds to the exchange of matter between quantum kernel and the rest of the cell and is represented as Lindblad super-operators.

  5. Quantum Locality?

    SciTech Connect

    Stapp, Henry

    2011-11-10

    Robert Griffiths has recently addressed, within the framework of a ‘consistent quantum theory’ (CQT) that he has developed, the issue of whether, as is often claimed, quantum mechanics entails a need for faster-than-light transfers of information over long distances. He argues, on the basis of his examination of certain arguments that claim to demonstrate the existence of such nonlocal influences, that such influences do not exist. However, his examination was restricted mainly to hidden-variable-based arguments that include in their premises some essentially classical-physics-type assumptions that are fundamentally incompatible with the precepts of quantum physics. One cannot logically prove properties of a system by attributing to the system properties alien to that system. Hence Griffiths’ rejection of hidden-variable-based proofs is logically warranted. Griffiths mentions the existence of a certain alternative proof that does not involve hidden variables, and that uses only macroscopically described observable properties. He notes that he had examined in his book proofs of this general kind, and concluded that they provide no evidence for nonlocal influences. But he did not examine the particular proof that he cites. An examination of that particular proof by the method specified by his ‘consistent quantum theory’ shows that the cited proof is valid within that restrictive framework. This necessary existence, within the ‘consistent’ framework, of long range essentially instantaneous influences refutes the claim made by Griffiths that his ‘consistent’ framework is superior to the orthodox quantum theory of von Neumann because it does not entail instantaneous influences. An added section responds to Griffiths’ reply, which cites a litany of ambiguities that seem to restrict, devastatingly, the scope of his CQT formalism, apparently to buttress his claim that my use of that formalism to validate the nonlocality theorem is flawed. But the

  6. Quantum Russian roulette

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Alexandre G. M.; da Silva, Ladário

    2013-01-01

    We quantize the gamble known as Russian roulette and we study it in two versions for two- and three-persons when: (i) players use a fully loaded quantum gun; (ii) the quantum gun has only one quantum bullet.

  7. Interpreting quantum discord through quantum state merging

    SciTech Connect

    Madhok, Vaibhav; Datta, Animesh

    2011-03-15

    We present an operational interpretation of quantum discord based on the quantum state merging protocol. Quantum discord is the markup in the cost of quantum communication in the process of quantum state merging, if one discards relevant prior information. Our interpretation has an intuitive explanation based on the strong subadditivity of von Neumann entropy. We use our result to provide operational interpretations of other quantities like the local purity and quantum deficit. Finally, we discuss in brief some instances where our interpretation is valid in the single-copy scenario.

  8. Quantum probability and quantum decision-making.

    PubMed

    Yukalov, V I; Sornette, D

    2016-01-13

    A rigorous general definition of quantum probability is given, which is valid not only for elementary events but also for composite events, for operationally testable measurements as well as for inconclusive measurements, and also for non-commuting observables in addition to commutative observables. Our proposed definition of quantum probability makes it possible to describe quantum measurements and quantum decision-making on the same common mathematical footing. Conditions are formulated for the case when quantum decision theory reduces to its classical counterpart and for the situation where the use of quantum decision theory is necessary.

  9. Bridging quantum and classical plasmonics with a quantum-corrected model.

    PubMed

    Esteban, Ruben; Borisov, Andrei G; Nordlander, Peter; Aizpurua, Javier

    2012-01-01

    Electromagnetic coupling between plasmonic resonances in metallic nanoparticles allows for engineering of the optical response and generation of strong localized near-fields. Classical electrodynamics fails to describe this coupling across sub-nanometer gaps, where quantum effects become important owing to non-local screening and the spill-out of electrons. However, full quantum simulations are not presently feasible for realistically sized systems. Here we present a novel approach, the quantum-corrected model (QCM), that incorporates quantum-mechanical effects within a classical electrodynamic framework. The QCM approach models the junction between adjacent nanoparticles by means of a local dielectric response that includes electron tunnelling and tunnelling resistivity at the gap and can be integrated within a classical electrodynamical description of large and complex structures. The QCM predicts optical properties in excellent agreement with fully quantum mechanical calculations for small interacting systems, opening a new venue for addressing quantum effects in realistic plasmonic systems.

  10. Quantum key distribution based on orthogonal states allows secure quantum bit commitment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Guang Ping

    2011-11-01

    For more than a decade, it was believed that unconditionally secure quantum bit commitment (QBC) is impossible. But based on a previously proposed quantum key distribution scheme using orthogonal states, here we build a QBC protocol in which the density matrices of the quantum states encoding the commitment do not satisfy a crucial condition on which the no-go proofs of QBC are based. Thus, the no-go proofs could be evaded. Our protocol is fault-tolerant and very feasible with currently available technology. It reopens the venue for other ‘post-cold-war’ multi-party cryptographic protocols, e.g. quantum bit string commitment and quantum strong coin tossing with an arbitrarily small bias. This result also has a strong influence on the Clifton-Bub-Halvorson theorem which suggests that quantum theory could be characterized in terms of information-theoretic constraints.

  11. The decoupling approach to quantum information theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupuis, Frédéric

    2010-04-01

    Quantum information theory studies the fundamental limits that physical laws impose on information processing tasks such as data compression and data transmission on noisy channels. This thesis presents general techniques that allow one to solve many fundamental problems of quantum information theory in a unified framework. The central theorem of this thesis proves the existence of a protocol that transmits quantum data that is partially known to the receiver through a single use of an arbitrary noisy quantum channel. In addition to the intrinsic interest of this problem, this theorem has as immediate corollaries several central theorems of quantum information theory. The following chapters use this theorem to prove the existence of new protocols for two other types of quantum channels, namely quantum broadcast channels and quantum channels with side information at the transmitter. These protocols also involve sending quantum information partially known by the receiver with a single use of the channel, and have as corollaries entanglement-assisted and unassisted asymptotic coding theorems. The entanglement-assisted asymptotic versions can, in both cases, be considered as quantum versions of the best coding theorems known for the classical versions of these problems. The last chapter deals with a purely quantum phenomenon called locking. We demonstrate that it is possible to encode a classical message into a quantum state such that, by removing a subsystem of logarithmic size with respect to its total size, no measurement can have significant correlations with the message. The message is therefore "locked" by a logarithmic-size key. This thesis presents the first locking protocol for which the success criterion is that the trace distance between the joint distribution of the message and the measurement result and the product of their marginals be sufficiently small.

  12. A general method for selecting quantum channel for bidirectional controlled state teleportation and other schemes of controlled quantum communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thapliyal, Kishore; Verma, Amit; Pathak, Anirban

    2015-12-01

    Recently, a large number of protocols for bidirectional controlled state teleportation (BCST) have been proposed using n-qubit entangled states (nin {5,6,7}) as quantum channel. Here, we propose a general method of selecting multiqubit (n>4) quantum channels suitable for BCST and show that all the channels used in the existing protocols of BCST can be obtained using the proposed method. Further, it is shown that the quantum channels used in the existing protocols of BCST form only a negligibly small subset of the set of all the quantum channels that can be constructed using the proposed method to implement BCST. It is also noted that all these quantum channels are also suitable for controlled bidirectional remote state preparation. Following the same logic, methods for selecting quantum channels for other controlled quantum communication tasks, such as controlled bidirectional joint remote state preparation and controlled quantum dialogue, are also provided.

  13. Relativistic quantum cryptography

    SciTech Connect

    Molotkov, S. N.

    2011-03-15

    A new protocol of quantum key distribution is proposed to transmit keys through free space. Along with quantum-mechanical restrictions on the discernibility of nonorthogonal quantum states, the protocol uses additional restrictions imposed by special relativity theory. Unlike all existing quantum key distribution protocols, this protocol ensures key secrecy for a not strictly one-photon source of quantum states and an arbitrary length of a quantum communication channel.

  14. Stability, gain, and robustness in quantum feedback networks

    SciTech Connect

    D'Helon, C.; James, M. R.

    2006-05-15

    In this paper we are concerned with the problem of stability for quantum feedback networks. We demonstrate in the context of quantum optics how stability of quantum feedback networks can be guaranteed using only simple gain inequalities for network components and algebraic relationships determined by the network. Quantum feedback networks are shown to be stable if the loop gain is less than one--this is an extension of the famous small gain theorem of classical control theory. We illustrate the simplicity and power of the small gain approach with applications to important problems of robust stability and robust stabilization.

  15. Cat-qubits for quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirrahimi, Mazyar

    2016-08-01

    The development of quantum Josephson circuits has created a strong expectation for reliable processing of quantum information. While this progress has already led to various proof-of-principle experiments on small-scale quantum systems, a major scaling step is required towards many-qubit protocols. Fault-tolerant computation with protected logical qubits usually comes at the expense of a significant overhead in the hardware. Each of the involved physical qubits still needs to satisfy the best achieved properties (coherence times, coupling strengths and tunability). Here, and in the aim of addressing alternative approaches to deal with these obstacles, I overview a series of recent theoretical proposals, and the experimental developments following these proposals, to enable a hardware-efficient paradigm for quantum memory protection and universal quantum computation.

  16. Quantum information does exist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duwell, Armond

    2008-01-01

    This paper advocates a concept of quantum information whose origins can be traced to Schumacher [1995. Quantum coding. Physical Review A 51, 2738-2747]. The concept of quantum information advocated is elaborated using an analogy to Shannon's theory provided by Schumacher coding. In particular, this paper extends Timpson's [2004. Quantum information theory and the foundations of quantum mechanics. Ph.D. dissertation, University of Oxford. Preprint, quant-ph/0412063] framework for interpreting Shannon information theory to the quantum context. Entanglement fidelity is advocated as the appropriate success criterion for the reproduction of quantum information. The relationship between the Shannon theory and quantum information theory is discussed.

  17. Interference of quantum market strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piotrowski, Edward W.; Sładkowski, Jan; Syska, Jacek

    2003-02-01

    Recent development in quantum computation and quantum information theory allows to extend the scope of game theory for the quantum world. The paper is devoted to the analysis of interference of quantum strategies in quantum market games.

  18. Phonon-mediated generation of quantum correlations between quantum dot qubits

    PubMed Central

    Krzywda, Jan; Roszak, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    We study the generation of quantum correlations between two excitonic quantum dot qubits due to their interaction with the same phonon environment. Such generation results from the fact that during the pure dephasing process at finite temperatures, each exciton becomes entangled with the phonon environment. We find that for a wide range of temperatures quantum correlations are created due to the interaction. The temperature-dependence of the level of correlations created displays a trade-off type behaviour; for small temperatures the phonon-induced distrubance of the qubit states is too small to lead to a distinct change of the two-qubit state, hence, the level of created correlations is small, while for large temperatures the pure dephasing is not accompanied by the creation of entanglement between the qubits and the environment, so the environment cannot mediate qubit-qubit quantum correlations. PMID:27033973

  19. Faster than Hermitian Quantum Mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, Carl M.; Brody, Dorje C.; Jones, Hugh F.; Meister, Bernhard K.

    2007-01-26

    Given an initial quantum state vertical bar {psi}{sub I}> and a final quantum state vertical bar {psi}{sub F}>, there exist Hamiltonians H under which vertical bar {psi}{sub I}> evolves into vertical bar {psi}{sub F}>. Consider the following quantum brachistochrone problem: subject to the constraint that the difference between the largest and smallest eigenvalues of H is held fixed, which H achieves this transformation in the least time {tau}? For Hermitian Hamiltonians {tau} has a nonzero lower bound. However, among non-Hermitian PT-symmetric Hamiltonians satisfying the same energy constraint, {tau} can be made arbitrarily small without violating the time-energy uncertainty principle. This is because for such Hamiltonians the path from vertical bar {psi}{sub I}> to vertical bar {psi}{sub F}> can be made short. The mechanism described here is similar to that in general relativity in which the distance between two space-time points can be made small if they are connected by a wormhole. This result may have applications in quantum computing.

  20. Quantum recurrences: probe to study quantum chaos

    PubMed

    Saif

    2000-11-01

    We study the phase space of periodically modulated gravitational cavity by means of quantum recurrence phenomena. We report that the quantum recurrences serve as a tool to connect phase space of the driven system with a spectrum in the quantum domain. With the help of quantum recurrences we investigate the quasienergy spectrum of the system for a certain fixed modulation strength. In addition, we study transition of spectrum from discrete to continuum as a function of modulation strength. PMID:11101963

  1. Quantum teleportation of optical quantum gates.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Stephen D; Munro, William J

    2003-03-21

    We show that a universal set of gates for quantum computation with optics can be quantum teleported through the use of EPR entangled states, homodyne detection, and linear optics and squeezing operations conditioned on measurement outcomes. This scheme may be used for fault-tolerant quantum computation in any optical scheme (qubit or continuous-variable). The teleportation of nondeterministic nonlinear gates employed in linear optics quantum computation is discussed.

  2. Nuclear magnetic resonance quantum information processing

    PubMed Central

    Serra, R. M.; Oliveira, I. S.

    2012-01-01

    For the past decade, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has been established as a main experimental technique for testing quantum protocols in small systems. This Theme Issue presents recent advances and major challenges of NMR quantum information possessing (QIP), including contributions by researchers from 10 different countries. In this introduction, after a short comment on NMR-QIP basics, we briefly anticipate the contents of this issue. PMID:22946031

  3. Universal quantum computation with little entanglement.

    PubMed

    Van den Nest, Maarten

    2013-02-01

    We show that universal quantum computation can be achieved in the standard pure-state circuit model while the entanglement entropy of every bipartition is small in each step of the computation. The entanglement entropy required for large-scale quantum computation even tends to zero. Moreover we show that the same conclusion applies to many entanglement measures commonly used in the literature. This includes e.g., the geometric measure, localizable entanglement, multipartite concurrence, squashed entanglement, witness-based measures, and more generally any entanglement measure which is continuous in a certain natural sense. These results demonstrate that many entanglement measures are unsuitable tools to assess the power of quantum computers.

  4. Heisenberg scaling in Gaussian quantum metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friis, Nicolai; Skotiniotis, Michalis; Fuentes, Ivette; Dür, Wolfgang

    2015-08-01

    We address the issue of precisely estimating small parameters encoded in a general linear transformation of the modes of a bosonic quantum field. Such Bogoliubov transformations frequently appear in the context of quantum optics. We provide a set of instructions for computing the quantum Fisher information for arbitrary pure initial states. We show that the maximally achievable precision of estimation is inversely proportional to the squared average particle number and that such Heisenberg scaling requires nonclassical but not necessarily entangled states. Our method further allows us to quantify losses in precision arising from being able to monitor only finitely many modes, for which we identify a lower bound.

  5. Quantum Steganography and Quantum Error-Correction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Bilal A.

    2010-01-01

    Quantum error-correcting codes have been the cornerstone of research in quantum information science (QIS) for more than a decade. Without their conception, quantum computers would be a footnote in the history of science. When researchers embraced the idea that we live in a world where the effects of a noisy environment cannot completely be…

  6. Quantum Hall effect in quantum electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Penin, Alexander A.

    2009-03-15

    We consider the quantum Hall effect in quantum electrodynamics and find a deviation from the quantum-mechanical prediction for the Hall conductivity due to radiative antiscreening of electric charge in an external magnetic field. A weak dependence of the universal von Klitzing constant on the magnetic field strength, which can possibly be observed in a dedicated experiment, is predicted.

  7. Quantum Error Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lidar, Daniel A.; Brun, Todd A.

    2013-09-01

    Prologue; Preface; Part I. Background: 1. Introduction to decoherence and noise in open quantum systems Daniel Lidar and Todd Brun; 2. Introduction to quantum error correction Dave Bacon; 3. Introduction to decoherence-free subspaces and noiseless subsystems Daniel Lidar; 4. Introduction to quantum dynamical decoupling Lorenza Viola; 5. Introduction to quantum fault tolerance Panos Aliferis; Part II. Generalized Approaches to Quantum Error Correction: 6. Operator quantum error correction David Kribs and David Poulin; 7. Entanglement-assisted quantum error-correcting codes Todd Brun and Min-Hsiu Hsieh; 8. Continuous-time quantum error correction Ognyan Oreshkov; Part III. Advanced Quantum Codes: 9. Quantum convolutional codes Mark Wilde; 10. Non-additive quantum codes Markus Grassl and Martin Rötteler; 11. Iterative quantum coding systems David Poulin; 12. Algebraic quantum coding theory Andreas Klappenecker; 13. Optimization-based quantum error correction Andrew Fletcher; Part IV. Advanced Dynamical Decoupling: 14. High order dynamical decoupling Zhen-Yu Wang and Ren-Bao Liu; 15. Combinatorial approaches to dynamical decoupling Martin Rötteler and Pawel Wocjan; Part V. Alternative Quantum Computation Approaches: 16. Holonomic quantum computation Paolo Zanardi; 17. Fault tolerance for holonomic quantum computation Ognyan Oreshkov, Todd Brun and Daniel Lidar; 18. Fault tolerant measurement-based quantum computing Debbie Leung; Part VI. Topological Methods: 19. Topological codes Héctor Bombín; 20. Fault tolerant topological cluster state quantum computing Austin Fowler and Kovid Goyal; Part VII. Applications and Implementations: 21. Experimental quantum error correction Dave Bacon; 22. Experimental dynamical decoupling Lorenza Viola; 23. Architectures Jacob Taylor; 24. Error correction in quantum communication Mark Wilde; Part VIII. Critical Evaluation of Fault Tolerance: 25. Hamiltonian methods in QEC and fault tolerance Eduardo Novais, Eduardo Mucciolo and

  8. Quantum superreplication of states and gates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiribella, Giulio; Yang, Yuxiang

    2016-06-01

    Although the no-cloning theorem forbids perfect replication of quantum information, it is sometimes possible to produce large numbers of replicas with vanishingly small error. This phenomenon, known as quantum superreplication, can occur for both quantum states and quantum gates. The aim of this paper is to review the central features of quantum superreplication and provide a unified view of existing results. The paper also includes new results. In particular, we show that when quantum superreplication can be achieved, it can be achieved through estimation up to an error of size O(M/ N 2), where N and M are the number of input and output copies, respectively. Quantum strategies still offer an advantage for superreplication in that they allow for exponentially faster reduction of the error. Using the relation with estimation, we provide i) an alternative proof of the optimality of Heisenberg scaling in quantum metrology, ii) a strategy for estimating arbitrary unitary gates with a mean square error scaling as log N/ N 2, and iii) a protocol that generates O(N 2) nearly perfect copies of a generic pure state U |0> while using the corresponding gate U only N times. Finally, we point out that superreplication can be achieved using interactions among k systems, provided that k is large compared to M 2/ N 2.

  9. Quantum superreplication of states and gates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiribella, Giulio; Yang, Yuxiang

    2016-06-01

    Although the no-cloning theorem forbids perfect replication of quantum information, it is sometimes possible to produce large numbers of replicas with vanishingly small error. This phenomenon, known as quantum superreplication, can occur for both quantum states and quantum gates. The aim of this paper is to review the central features of quantum superreplication and provide a unified view of existing results. The paper also includes new results. In particular, we show that when quantum superreplication can be achieved, it can be achieved through estimation up to an error of size O( M/ N 2), where N and M are the number of input and output copies, respectively. Quantum strategies still offer an advantage for superreplication in that they allow for exponentially faster reduction of the error. Using the relation with estimation, we provide i) an alternative proof of the optimality of Heisenberg scaling in quantum metrology, ii) a strategy for estimating arbitrary unitary gates with a mean square error scaling as log N/ N 2, and iii) a protocol that generates O( N 2) nearly perfect copies of a generic pure state U |0> while using the corresponding gate U only N times. Finally, we point out that superreplication can be achieved using interactions among k systems, provided that k is large compared to M 2/ N 2.

  10. Quantum vacuum noise in physics and cosmology.

    PubMed

    Davies, P. C. W.

    2001-09-01

    The concept of the vacuum in quantum field theory is a subtle one. Vacuum states have a rich and complex set of properties that produce distinctive, though usually exceedingly small, physical effects. Quantum vacuum noise is familiar in optical and electronic devices, but in this paper I wish to consider extending the discussion to systems in which gravitation, or large accelerations, are important. This leads to the prediction of vacuum friction: The quantum vacuum can act in a manner reminiscent of a viscous fluid. One result is that rapidly changing gravitational fields can create particles from the vacuum, and in turn the backreaction on the gravitational dynamics operates like a damping force. I consider such effects in early universe cosmology and the theory of quantum black holes, including the possibility that the large-scale structure of the universe might be produced by quantum vacuum noise in an early inflationary phase. I also discuss the curious phenomenon that an observer who accelerates through a quantum vacuum perceives a bath of thermal radiation closely analogous to Hawking radiation from black holes, even though an inertial observer registers no particles. The effects predicted raise very deep and unresolved issues about the nature of quantum particles, the role of the observer, and the relationship between the quantum vacuum and the concepts of information and entropy. (c) 2001 American Institute of Physics. PMID:12779491

  11. The quantum pinch effect in semiconducting quantum wires: A bird’s-eye view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushwaha, Manvir S.

    2016-01-01

    Those who measure success with culmination do not seem to be aware that life is a journey not a destination. This spirit is best reflected in the unceasing failures in efforts for solving the problem of controlled thermonuclear fusion for even the simplest pinches for over decades; and the nature keeps us challenging with examples. However, these efforts have permitted researchers the obtention of a dense plasma with a lifetime that, albeit short, is sufficient to study the physics of the pinch effect, to create methods of plasma diagnostics, and to develop a modern theory of plasma processes. Most importantly, they have impregnated the solid state plasmas, particularly the electron-hole plasmas in semiconductors, which do not suffer from the issues related with the confinement and which have demonstrated their potential not only for the fundamental physics but also for the device physics. Here, we report on a two-component, cylindrical, quasi-one-dimensional quantum plasma subjected to a radial confining harmonic potential and an applied magnetic field in the symmetric gauge. It is demonstrated that such a system, as can be realized in semiconducting quantum wires, offers an excellent medium for observing the quantum pinch effect at low temperatures. An exact analytical solution of the problem allows us to make significant observations: Surprisingly, in contrast to the classical pinch effect, the particle density as well as the current density display a determinable maximum before attaining a minimum at the surface of the quantum wire. The effect will persist as long as the equilibrium pair density is sustained. Therefore, the technological promise that emerges is the route to the precise electronic devices that will control the particle beams at the nanoscale.

  12. Quantum algorithms for quantum field theories.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Stephen P; Lee, Keith S M; Preskill, John

    2012-06-01

    Quantum field theory reconciles quantum mechanics and special relativity, and plays a central role in many areas of physics. We developed a quantum algorithm to compute relativistic scattering probabilities in a massive quantum field theory with quartic self-interactions (φ(4) theory) in spacetime of four and fewer dimensions. Its run time is polynomial in the number of particles, their energy, and the desired precision, and applies at both weak and strong coupling. In the strong-coupling and high-precision regimes, our quantum algorithm achieves exponential speedup over the fastest known classical algorithm. PMID:22654052

  13. Quantum algorithms for quantum field theories.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Stephen P; Lee, Keith S M; Preskill, John

    2012-06-01

    Quantum field theory reconciles quantum mechanics and special relativity, and plays a central role in many areas of physics. We developed a quantum algorithm to compute relativistic scattering probabilities in a massive quantum field theory with quartic self-interactions (φ(4) theory) in spacetime of four and fewer dimensions. Its run time is polynomial in the number of particles, their energy, and the desired precision, and applies at both weak and strong coupling. In the strong-coupling and high-precision regimes, our quantum algorithm achieves exponential speedup over the fastest known classical algorithm.

  14. Small Wins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhatigan, James J.; Schuh, John H.

    2003-01-01

    Examines how it easy for people to overlook small successes when they are overwhelmed by and preoccupied with large projects and goals. Explores the concept of "small wins" in organizational theory, which have the potential to become a prominent part of institutional culture and impact organizational behavior and change. (GCP)

  15. Small Cultures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holliday, Adrian

    1999-01-01

    Presents a notion of small culture as an alternative to what has become the default notion of large culture in applied linguistics, social science, and popular usage. A small-culture view of English-language curriculum settings reveals mismatches between professional-academic and organizational cultures at the mezzo level of the institution. (VWL)

  16. Quantum Matching Pennies Game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, Azhar; Abbott, Derek

    2009-01-01

    A quantum version of the matching pennies (MP) game is proposed that is played using an Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen-Bohm (EPR-Bohm) setting. We construct the quantum game without using state vectors, while considering only the quantum mechanical joint probabilities relevant to the EPR-Bohm setting. We embed the classical game within the quantum game such that the classical MP game results when the quantum mechanical joint probabilities become factorizable. We report new Nash equilibria in the quantum MP game that emerge when the quantum mechanical joint probabilities maximally violate the Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt form of Bell’s inequality.

  17. Universal quantum computation by discontinuous quantum walk

    SciTech Connect

    Underwood, Michael S.; Feder, David L.

    2010-10-15

    Quantum walks are the quantum-mechanical analog of random walks, in which a quantum ''walker'' evolves between initial and final states by traversing the edges of a graph, either in discrete steps from node to node or via continuous evolution under the Hamiltonian furnished by the adjacency matrix of the graph. We present a hybrid scheme for universal quantum computation in which a quantum walker takes discrete steps of continuous evolution. This ''discontinuous'' quantum walk employs perfect quantum-state transfer between two nodes of specific subgraphs chosen to implement a universal gate set, thereby ensuring unitary evolution without requiring the introduction of an ancillary coin space. The run time is linear in the number of simulated qubits and gates. The scheme allows multiple runs of the algorithm to be executed almost simultaneously by starting walkers one time step apart.

  18. Secure quantum signatures using insecure quantum channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiri, Ryan; Wallden, Petros; Kent, Adrian; Andersson, Erika

    2016-03-01

    Digital signatures are widely used in modern communication to guarantee authenticity and transferability of messages. The security of currently used classical schemes relies on computational assumptions. We present a quantum signature scheme that does not require trusted quantum channels. We prove that it is unconditionally secure against the most general coherent attacks, and show that it requires the transmission of significantly fewer quantum states than previous schemes. We also show that the quantum channel noise threshold for our scheme is less strict than for distilling a secure key using quantum key distribution. This shows that "direct" quantum signature schemes can be preferable to signature schemes relying on secret shared keys generated using quantum key distribution.

  19. Randomness: Quantum versus classical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khrennikov, Andrei

    2016-05-01

    Recent tremendous development of quantum information theory has led to a number of quantum technological projects, e.g. quantum random generators. This development had stimulated a new wave of interest in quantum foundations. One of the most intriguing problems of quantum foundations is the elaboration of a consistent and commonly accepted interpretation of a quantum state. Closely related problem is the clarification of the notion of quantum randomness and its interrelation with classical randomness. In this short review, we shall discuss basics of classical theory of randomness (which by itself is very complex and characterized by diversity of approaches) and compare it with irreducible quantum randomness. We also discuss briefly “digital philosophy”, its role in physics (classical and quantum) and its coupling to the information interpretation of quantum mechanics (QM).

  20. Hierarchical theory of quantum adiabatic evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qi; Gong, Jiangbin; Wu, Biao

    2014-12-01

    Quantum adiabatic evolution is a dynamical evolution of a quantum system under slow external driving. According to the quantum adiabatic theorem, no transitions occur between nondegenerate instantaneous energy eigenstates in such a dynamical evolution. However, this is true only when the driving rate is infinitesimally small. For a small nonzero driving rate, there are generally small transition probabilities between the energy eigenstates. We develop a classical mechanics framework to address the small deviations from the quantum adiabatic theorem order by order. A hierarchy of Hamiltonians is constructed iteratively with the zeroth-order Hamiltonian being determined by the original system Hamiltonian. The kth-order deviations are governed by a kth-order Hamiltonian, which depends on the time derivatives of the adiabatic parameters up to the kth-order. Two simple examples, the Landau-Zener model and a spin-1/2 particle in a rotating magnetic field, are used to illustrate our hierarchical theory. Our analysis also exposes a deep, previously unknown connection between classical adiabatic theory and quantum adiabatic theory.

  1. quantum mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Bender, Carl M; DeKieviet, Maarten; Klevansky, S. P.

    2013-01-01

    -symmetric quantum mechanics (PTQM) has become a hot area of research and investigation. Since its beginnings in 1998, there have been over 1000 published papers and more than 15 international conferences entirely devoted to this research topic. Originally, PTQM was studied at a highly mathematical level and the techniques of complex variables, asymptotics, differential equations and perturbation theory were used to understand the subtleties associated with the analytic continuation of eigenvalue problems. However, as experiments on -symmetric physical systems have been performed, a simple and beautiful physical picture has emerged, and a -symmetric system can be understood as one that has a balanced loss and gain. Furthermore, the phase transition can now be understood intuitively without resorting to sophisticated mathe- matics. Research on PTQM is following two different paths: at a fundamental level, physicists are attempting to understand the underlying mathematical structure of these theories with the long-range objective of applying the techniques of PTQM to understanding some of the outstanding problems in physics today, such as the nature of the Higgs particle, the properties of dark matter, the matter–antimatter asymmetry in the universe, neutrino oscillations and the cosmological constant; at an applied level, new kinds of -synthetic materials are being developed, and the phase transition is being observed in many physical contexts, such as lasers, optical wave guides, microwave cavities, superconducting wires and electronic circuits. The purpose of this Theme Issue is to acquaint the reader with the latest developments in PTQM. The articles in this volume are written in the style of mini-reviews and address diverse areas of the emerging and exciting new area of -symmetric quantum mechanics. PMID:23509390

  2. Massage induces an immediate, albeit short-term, reduction in muscle stiffness.

    PubMed

    Eriksson Crommert, M; Lacourpaille, L; Heales, L J; Tucker, K; Hug, F

    2015-10-01

    Using ultrasound shear wave elastography, the aims of this study were: (a) to evaluate the effect of massage on stiffness of the medial gastrocnemius (MG) muscle and (b) to determine whether this effect (if any) persists over a short period of rest. A 7-min massage protocol was performed unilaterally on MG in 18 healthy volunteers. Measurements of muscle shear elastic modulus (stiffness) were performed bilaterally (control and massaged leg) in a moderately stretched position at three time points: before massage (baseline), directly after massage (follow-up 1), and following 3 min of rest (follow-up 2). Directly after massage, participants rated pain experienced during the massage. MG shear elastic modulus of the massaged leg decreased significantly at follow-up 1 (-5.2 ± 8.8%, P = 0.019, d = -0.66). There was no difference between follow-up 2 and baseline for the massaged leg (P = 0.83) indicating that muscle stiffness returned to baseline values. Shear elastic modulus was not different between time points in the control leg. There was no association between perceived pain during the massage and stiffness reduction (r = 0.035; P = 0.89). This is the first study to provide evidence that massage reduces muscle stiffness. However, this effect is short lived and returns to baseline values quickly after cessation of the massage.

  3. Reliability, Dimensionality, and Internal Consistency as Defined by Cronbach: Distinct Albeit Related Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davenport, Ernest C.; Davison, Mark L.; Liou, Pey-Yan; Love, Quintin U.

    2015-01-01

    This article uses definitions provided by Cronbach in his seminal paper for coefficient a to show the concepts of reliability, dimensionality, and internal consistency are distinct but interrelated. The article begins with a critique of the definition of reliability and then explores mathematical properties of Cronbach's a. Internal consistency…

  4. Nitrofurantoin-induced interstitial pneumonitis: albeit rare, should not be missed.

    PubMed

    Syed, Haamid; Bachuwa, Ghassan; Upadhaya, Sunil; Abed, Firas

    2016-01-01

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is a rare adverse effect of nitrofurantoin and can range from benign infiltrates to a fatal condition. Nitrofurantoin acts via inhibiting the protein synthesis in bacteria by helping reactive intermediates and is known to produce primary lung parenchymal injury through an oxidant mechanism. Stopping the drug leads to complete recovery of symptoms. In this report, we present a case of nitrofurantoin-induced ILD with the recovery of symptoms and disease process after stopping the drug. PMID:26912767

  5. Periodontal Disease as a Specific, albeit Chronic, Infection: Diagnosis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Loesche, Walter J.; Grossman, Natalie S.

    2001-01-01

    Periodontal disease is perhaps the most common chronic infection in adults. Evidence has been accumulating for the past 30 years which indicates that almost all forms of periodontal disease are chronic but specific bacterial infections due to the overgrowth in the dental plaque of a finite number of mostly anaerobic species such as Porphyromonas gingivalis, Bacteroides forsythus, and Treponema denticola. The success of traditional debridement procedures and/or antimicrobial agents in improving periodontal health can be associated with the reduction in levels of these anaerobes in the dental plaque. These findings suggest that patients and clinicians have a choice in the treatment of this overgrowth, either a debridement and surgery approach or a debridement and antimicrobial treatment approach. However, the antimicrobial approach, while supported by a wealth of scientific evidence, goes contrary to centuries of dental teaching that states that periodontal disease results from a “dirty mouth.” If periodontal disease is demonstrated to be a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and stroke, it will be a modifiable risk factor since periodontal disease can be prevented and treated. Since the antimicrobial approach may be as effective as a surgical approach in the restoration and maintenance of a periodontally healthy dentition, this would give a cardiac or stroke patient and his or her physician a choice in the implementation of treatment seeking to improve the patient's periodontal condition so as to reduce and/or delay future cardiovascular events. PMID:11585783

  6. Queer (v.) Queer (v.): Biology as Curriculum, Pedagogy, and Being albeit Queer (v.)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broadway, Francis S.

    2011-01-01

    In order to advance the purpose of education as creating a sustainable world yet to be imagined, educationally, queer (v.) queer (v.) expounds curriculum, pedagogy and being, which has roots in sexuality--the public face of the private confluence of sexuality, gender, race and class, are a necessary framework for queer. If queer is a complicated…

  7. Queer (v.) queer (v.): biology as curriculum, pedagogy, and being albeit queer (v.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broadway, Francis S.

    2011-06-01

    In order to advance the purpose of education as creating a sustainable world yet to be imagined, educationally, queer (v.) queer (v.) expounds curriculum, pedagogy and being, which has roots in sexuality—the public face of the private confluence of sexuality, gender, race and class, are a necessary framework for queer. If queer is a complicated conversation of strangers' eros, then queer facilitates the creation of space, revolution and transformation. In other words, queer, for science education, is more than increasing and privileging the heteronormative and non-heteronormative science content that extends capitalism's hegemony, but rather science as the dignity, identity, and loving and caring of and by one's self and fellow human beings as strangers.

  8. Quantum Particles from Classical Probabilities in Phase Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetterich, C.

    2012-10-01

    Quantum particles in a potential are described by classical statistical probabilities. We formulate a basic time evolution law for the probability distribution of classical position and momentum such that all known quantum phenomena follow, including interference or tunneling. The appropriate quantum observables for position and momentum contain a statistical part which reflects the roughness of the probability distribution. "Zwitters" realize a continuous interpolation between quantum and classical particles. Such objects may provide for an effective one-particle description of classical or quantum collective states as droplets of a liquid, macromolecules or a Bose-Einstein condensate. They may also be used for quantitative fundamental tests of quantum mechanics. We show that the ground state for zwitters has no longer a sharp energy. This feature permits to put quantitative experimental bounds on a small parameter for possible deviations from quantum mechanics.

  9. Quantum State Magnification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelsen, Nils; Hosten, Onur; Krishnakumar, Rajiv; Kasevich, Mark

    2016-05-01

    The standard quantum limit (SQL) for quantum metrology has been surpassed by as much as a factor of 100 using entangled states. However, in order to utilize these states, highly engineered, low-noise state readout is required. Here we present a new method to bypass this requirement in a wide variety of physical systems. We implement the protocol experimentally in a system using the clock states of 5 ×105 87 Rb atoms. Through a nonlinear, optical cavity-mediated interaction we generate spin squeezed states. A small microwave rotation followed by an additional optical cavity interaction stage allow us to exploit the full sensitivity of the squeezed states with a fluorescence detection system. Though the technical noise floor of our fluorescence detection is 15dB above the SQL, we show metrology at 8dB below the SQL. This is the first time squeezed states prepared in a cavity are read out by fluorescence imaging. The method described can be used in any system with a suitable nonlinear interaction.

  10. Black hole mass threshold from nonsingular quantum gravitational collapse.

    PubMed

    Bojowald, Martin; Goswami, Rituparno; Maartens, Roy; Singh, Parampreet

    2005-08-26

    Quantum gravity is expected to remove the classical singularity that arises as the end state of gravitational collapse. To investigate this, we work with a toy model of a collapsing homogeneous scalar field. We show that nonperturbative semiclassical effects of loop quantum gravity cause a bounce and remove the black hole singularity. Furthermore, we find a critical threshold scale below which no horizon forms: quantum gravity may exclude very small astrophysical black holes.

  11. Quantum computing classical physics.

    PubMed

    Meyer, David A

    2002-03-15

    In the past decade, quantum algorithms have been found which outperform the best classical solutions known for certain classical problems as well as the best classical methods known for simulation of certain quantum systems. This suggests that they may also speed up the simulation of some classical systems. I describe one class of discrete quantum algorithms which do so--quantum lattice-gas automata--and show how to implement them efficiently on standard quantum computers.

  12. What are Quantum Jumps?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Richard J.

    1988-01-01

    This paper answers the title question by giving an operational definition of quantum jumps based on measurement theory. This definition forms the basis of a theory of quantum jumps which leads to a number of testable predictions. Experiments are proposed to test the theory. The suggested experiments also test the quantum Zeno paradox, i.e., they test the proposition that frequent observation of a quantum system inhibits quantum jumps in that system.

  13. Diagrammatic quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauffman, Louis H.; Lomonaco, Samuel J.

    2015-05-01

    This paper explores how diagrams of quantum processes can be used for modeling and for quantum epistemology. The paper is a continuation of the discussion where we began this formulation. Here we give examples of quantum networks that represent unitary transformations by dint of coherence conditions that constitute a new form of non-locality. Local quantum devices interconnected in space can form a global quantum system when appropriate coherence conditions are maintained.

  14. Simulation of n-qubit quantum systems. I. Quantum registers and quantum gates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radtke, T.; Fritzsche, S.

    2005-12-01

    with 9.0 and 8.0, too) Memory and time required to execute with typical data:Storage and time requirements critically depend on the number of qubits, n, in the quantum registers due to the exponential increase of the associated Hilbert space. In particular, complex algebraic operations may require large amounts of memory even for small qubit numbers. However, most of the standard commands (see Section 4 for simple examples) react promptly for up to five qubits on a normal single-processor machine ( ⩾1GHz with 512 MB memory) and use less than 10 MB memory. No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 8864 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 493 182 Distribution format: tar.gz Nature of the physical problem:During the last decade, quantum computing has been found to provide a revolutionary new form of computation. The algorithms by Shor [P.W. Shor, SIAM J. Sci. Statist. Comput. 26 (1997) 1484] and Grover [L.K. Grover, Phys. Rev. Lett. 79 (1997) 325. [2

  15. Probabilistic Cloning and Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Ting; Yan, Feng-Li; Wang, Zhi-Xi

    2004-06-01

    We discuss the usefulness of quantum cloning and present examples of quantum computation tasks for which the cloning offers an advantage which cannot be matched by any approach that does not resort to quantum cloning. In these quantum computations, we need to distribute quantum information contained in the states about which we have some partial information. To perform quantum computations, we use a state-dependent probabilistic quantum cloning procedure to distribute quantum information in the middle of a quantum computation.

  16. Advancements in the Field of Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Sambeet; Tripathy, Pratyasha; Sinha, Swami Prasad.

    2012-08-01

    Quantum dots are defined as very small semiconductor crystals of size varying from nanometer scale to a few micron i.e. so small that they are considered dimensionless and are capable of showing many chemical properties by virtue of which they tend to be lead at one minute and gold at the second minute.Quantum dots house the electrons just the way the electrons would have been present in an atom, by applying a voltage. And therefore they are very judiciously given the name of being called as the artificial atoms. This application of voltage may also lead to the modification of the chemical nature of the material anytime it is desired, resulting in lead at one minute to gold at the other minute. But this method is quite beyond our reach. A quantum dot is basically a semiconductor of very tiny size and this special phenomenon of quantum dot, causes the band of energies to change into discrete energy levels. Band gaps and the related energy depend on the relationship between the size of the crystal and the exciton radius. The height and energy between different energy levels varies inversely with the size of the quantum dot. The smaller the quantum dot, the higher is the energy possessed by it.There are many applications of the quantum dots e.g. they are very wisely applied to:Light emitting diodes: LEDs eg. White LEDs, Photovoltaic devices: solar cells, Memory elements, Biology : =biosensors, imaging, Lasers, Quantum computation, Flat-panel displays, Photodetectors, Life sciences and so on and so forth.The nanometer sized particles are able to display any chosen colour in the entire ultraviolet visible spectrum through a small change in their size or composition.

  17. Quantum walks on quotient graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Krovi, Hari; Brun, Todd A.

    2007-06-15

    A discrete-time quantum walk on a graph {gamma} is the repeated application of a unitary evolution operator to a Hilbert space corresponding to the graph. If this unitary evolution operator has an associated group of symmetries, then for certain initial states the walk will be confined to a subspace of the original Hilbert space. Symmetries of the original graph, given by its automorphism group, can be inherited by the evolution operator. We show that a quantum walk confined to the subspace corresponding to this symmetry group can be seen as a different quantum walk on a smaller quotient graph. We give an explicit construction of the quotient graph for any subgroup H of the automorphism group and illustrate it with examples. The automorphisms of the quotient graph which are inherited from the original graph are the original automorphism group modulo the subgroup H used to construct it. The quotient graph is constructed by removing the symmetries of the subgroup H from the original graph. We then analyze the behavior of hitting times on quotient graphs. Hitting time is the average time it takes a walk to reach a given final vertex from a given initial vertex. It has been shown in earlier work [Phys. Rev. A 74, 042334 (2006)] that the hitting time for certain initial states of a quantum walks can be infinite, in contrast to classical random walks. We give a condition which determines whether the quotient graph has infinite hitting times given that they exist in the original graph. We apply this condition for the examples discussed and determine which quotient graphs have infinite hitting times. All known examples of quantum walks with hitting times which are short compared to classical random walks correspond to systems with quotient graphs much smaller than the original graph; we conjecture that the existence of a small quotient graph with finite hitting times is necessary for a walk to exhibit a quantum speedup.

  18. Gravitationally induced quantum transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, A.; Paranjape, M. B.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we calculate the probability for resonantly inducing transitions in quantum states due to time-dependent gravitational perturbations. Contrary to common wisdom, the probability of inducing transitions is not infinitesimally small. We consider a system of ultracold neutrons, which are organized according to the energy levels of the Schrödinger equation in the presence of the Earth's gravitational field. Transitions between energy levels are induced by an oscillating driving force of frequency ω . The driving force is created by oscillating a macroscopic mass in the neighborhood of the system of neutrons. The neutron lifetime is approximately 880 sec while the probability of transitions increases as t2. Hence, the optimal strategy is to drive the system for two lifetimes. The transition amplitude then is of the order of 1.06 ×10-5, and hence with a million ultracold neutrons, one should be able to observe transitions.

  19. Autonomous quantum thermal machines and quantum to classical energy flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frenzel, Max; Jennings, David; Rudolph, Terry

    We address the issue of autonomous quantum thermal machines that are tailored to achieve some specific thermodynamic primitive, such as work extraction in the presence of a thermal environment, while having minimal or no control from the macroscopic regime. Beyond experimental implementations, this provides an arena in which to address certain foundational aspects such as the role of coherence in thermodynamics, the use of clock degrees of freedom and the simulation of local time-dependent Hamiltonians in a particular quantum subsystem. For small-scale systems additional issues arise. Firstly, it is not clear to what degree genuine ordered thermodynamic work has been extracted, and secondly non-trivial back-actions on the thermal machine must be accounted for. We find that both these aspects can be resolved through a judicious choice of quantum measurements that magnify thermodynamic properties up the ladder of length-scales, while simultaneously stabilizing the quantum thermal machine. Within this framework we show that thermodynamic reversibility is obtained in a particular Zeno limit, and finally illustrate these concepts with a concrete example involving spin-systems.

  20. On the robustness of bucket brigade quantum RAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arunachalam, Srinivasan; Gheorghiu, Vlad; Jochym-O'Connor, Tomas; Mosca, Michele; Varshinee Srinivasan, Priyaa

    2015-12-01

    We study the robustness of the bucket brigade quantum random access memory model introduced by Giovannetti et al (2008 Phys. Rev. Lett.100 160501). Due to a result of Regev and Schiff (ICALP ’08 733), we show that for a class of error models the error rate per gate in the bucket brigade quantum memory has to be of order o({2}-n/2) (where N={2}n is the size of the memory) whenever the memory is used as an oracle for the quantum searching problem. We conjecture that this is the case for any realistic error model that will be encountered in practice, and that for algorithms with super-polynomially many oracle queries the error rate must be super-polynomially small, which further motivates the need for quantum error correction. By contrast, for algorithms such as matrix inversion Harrow et al (2009 Phys. Rev. Lett.103 150502) or quantum machine learning Rebentrost et al (2014 Phys. Rev. Lett.113 130503) that only require a polynomial number of queries, the error rate only needs to be polynomially small and quantum error correction may not be required. We introduce a circuit model for the quantum bucket brigade architecture and argue that quantum error correction for the circuit causes the quantum bucket brigade architecture to lose its primary advantage of a small number of ‘active’ gates, since all components have to be actively error corrected.

  1. Quantum Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bojowald, Martin

    The universe, ultimately, is to be described by quantum theory. Quantum aspects of all there is, including space and time, may not be significant for many purposes, but are crucial for some. And so a quantum description of cosmology is required for a complete and consistent worldview. At any rate, even if we were not directly interested in regimes where quantum cosmology plays a role, a complete physical description could not stop at a stage before the whole universe is reached. Quantum theory is essential in the microphysics of particles, atoms, molecules, solids, white dwarfs and neutron stars. Why should one expect this ladder of scales to end at a certain size? If regimes are sufficiently violent and energetic, quantum effects are non-negligible even on scales of the whole cosmos; this is realized at least once in the history of the universe: at the big bang where the classical theory of general relativity would make energy densities diverge. 1.Lachieze-Rey, M., Luminet, J.P.: Phys. Rept. 254,135 (1995), gr-qc/9605010 2.BSDeWitt1967Phys. Rev.160511131967PhRv..160.1113D0158.4650410.1103/PhysRev.160.1113DeWitt, B.S.: Phys. Rev. 160(5), 1113 (1967) 3.Wiltshire, D.L.: In: Robson B., Visvanathan N., Woolcock W.S. (eds.) Cosmology: The Physics of the Universe, pp. 473-531. World Scientific, Singapore (1996

  2. Quantum optics, cavity QED, and quantum optomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meystre, Pierre

    2013-05-01

    Quantum optomechanics provides a universal tool to achieve the quantum control of mechanical motion. It does that in devices spanning a vast range of parameters, with mechanical frequencies from a few Hertz to GHz, and with masses from 10-20 g to several kilos. Its underlying ideas can be traced back to the study of gravitational wave antennas, quantum optics, cavity QED and laser cooling which, when combined with the recent availability of advanced micromechanical and nanomechanical devices, opens a path to the realization of macroscopic mechanical systems that operate deep in the quantum regime. At the fundamental level this development paves the way to experiments that will lead to a more profound understanding of quantum mechanics; and from the point of view of applications, quantum optomechanical techniques will provide motion and force sensing near the fundamental limit imposed by quantum mechanics (quantum metrology) and significantly expand the toolbox of quantum information science. After a brief summary of key historical developments, the talk will give a broad overview of the current state of the art of quantum optomechanics, and comment on future prospects both in applied and in fundamental science. Work supported by NSF, ARO and the DARPA QuASAR and ORCHID programs.

  3. Dissipative time-dependent quantum transport theory: Quantum interference and phonon induced decoherence dynamics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Yam, ChiYung; Chen, GuanHua

    2015-04-28

    A time-dependent inelastic electron transport theory for strong electron-phonon interaction is established via the equations of motion method combined with the small polaron transformation. In this work, the dissipation via electron-phonon coupling is taken into account in the strong coupling regime, which validates the small polaron transformation. The corresponding equations of motion are developed, which are used to study the quantum interference effect and phonon-induced decoherence dynamics in molecular junctions. Numerical studies show clearly quantum interference effect of the transport electrons through two quasi-degenerate states with different couplings to the leads. We also found that the quantum interference can be suppressed by the electron-phonon interaction where the phase coherence is destroyed by phonon scattering. This indicates the importance of electron-phonon interaction in systems with prominent quantum interference effect.

  4. Dissipative time-dependent quantum transport theory: Quantum interference and phonon induced decoherence dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yu Chen, GuanHua; Yam, ChiYung

    2015-04-28

    A time-dependent inelastic electron transport theory for strong electron-phonon interaction is established via the equations of motion method combined with the small polaron transformation. In this work, the dissipation via electron-phonon coupling is taken into account in the strong coupling regime, which validates the small polaron transformation. The corresponding equations of motion are developed, which are used to study the quantum interference effect and phonon-induced decoherence dynamics in molecular junctions. Numerical studies show clearly quantum interference effect of the transport electrons through two quasi-degenerate states with different couplings to the leads. We also found that the quantum interference can be suppressed by the electron-phonon interaction where the phase coherence is destroyed by phonon scattering. This indicates the importance of electron-phonon interaction in systems with prominent quantum interference effect.

  5. The Forbidden Quantum Adder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Rodriguez, U.; Sanz, M.; Lamata, L.; Solano, E.

    2015-07-01

    Quantum information provides fundamentally different computational resources than classical information. We prove that there is no unitary protocol able to add unknown quantum states belonging to different Hilbert spaces. This is an inherent restriction of quantum physics that is related to the impossibility of copying an arbitrary quantum state, i.e., the no-cloning theorem. Moreover, we demonstrate that a quantum adder, in absence of an ancillary system, is also forbidden for a known orthonormal basis. This allows us to propose an approximate quantum adder that could be implemented in the lab. Finally, we discuss the distinct character of the forbidden quantum adder for quantum states and the allowed quantum adder for density matrices.

  6. Expected number of quantum channels in quantum networks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Wang, He-Ming; Ji, Dan-Tong; Mu, Liang-Zhu; Fan, Heng

    2015-01-01

    Quantum communication between nodes in quantum networks plays an important role in quantum information processing. Here, we proposed the use of the expected number of quantum channels as a measure of the efficiency of quantum communication for quantum networks. This measure quantified the amount of quantum information that can be teleported between nodes in a quantum network, which differs from classical case in that the quantum channels will be consumed if teleportation is performed. We further demonstrated that the expected number of quantum channels represents local correlations depicted by effective circles. Significantly, capacity of quantum communication of quantum networks quantified by ENQC is independent of distance for the communicating nodes, if the effective circles of communication nodes are not overlapped. The expected number of quantum channels can be enhanced through transformations of the lattice configurations of quantum networks via entanglement swapping. Our results can shed lights on the study of quantum communication in quantum networks.

  7. Expected number of quantum channels in quantum networks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Wang, He-Ming; Ji, Dan-Tong; Mu, Liang-Zhu; Fan, Heng

    2015-01-01

    Quantum communication between nodes in quantum networks plays an important role in quantum information processing. Here, we proposed the use of the expected number of quantum channels as a measure of the efficiency of quantum communication for quantum networks. This measure quantified the amount of quantum information that can be teleported between nodes in a quantum network, which differs from classical case in that the quantum channels will be consumed if teleportation is performed. We further demonstrated that the expected number of quantum channels represents local correlations depicted by effective circles. Significantly, capacity of quantum communication of quantum networks quantified by ENQC is independent of distance for the communicating nodes, if the effective circles of communication nodes are not overlapped. The expected number of quantum channels can be enhanced through transformations of the lattice configurations of quantum networks via entanglement swapping. Our results can shed lights on the study of quantum communication in quantum networks. PMID:26173556

  8. Expected number of quantum channels in quantum networks

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xi; Wang, He-Ming; Ji, Dan-Tong; Mu, Liang-Zhu; Fan, Heng

    2015-01-01

    Quantum communication between nodes in quantum networks plays an important role in quantum information processing. Here, we proposed the use of the expected number of quantum channels as a measure of the efficiency of quantum communication for quantum networks. This measure quantified the amount of quantum information that can be teleported between nodes in a quantum network, which differs from classical case in that the quantum channels will be consumed if teleportation is performed. We further demonstrated that the expected number of quantum channels represents local correlations depicted by effective circles. Significantly, capacity of quantum communication of quantum networks quantified by ENQC is independent of distance for the communicating nodes, if the effective circles of communication nodes are not overlapped. The expected number of quantum channels can be enhanced through transformations of the lattice configurations of quantum networks via entanglement swapping. Our results can shed lights on the study of quantum communication in quantum networks. PMID:26173556

  9. Reliable quantum communication over a quantum relay channel

    SciTech Connect

    Gyongyosi, Laszlo; Imre, Sandor

    2014-12-04

    We show that reliable quantum communication over an unreliable quantum relay channels is possible. The coding scheme combines the results on the superadditivity of quantum channels and the efficient quantum coding approaches.

  10. Quantum coherence down the wormhole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawking, S. W.

    1987-09-01

    It is shown that pure quantum states will appear to decay into mixed states in any theory of quantum gravity that allows the topology of spacetime to be non simply connected. The reason is that the final state may contain little closed universes. There is no way one can detect the existence of these closed universes, or measure their quantum state. This means that the part of the final state that is in asymptotically flat spacetime, appears to be in a mixed state. The loss of quantum coherence in particle collisions is estimated. It comes from a wormhole connecting two asymptotically euclidean regions. The effect would be significant for scalar particles. It would make any scalar field that was not coupled to a Yang-Mills field constant throughout spacetime. It could have an important effect on Higgs particles but the effect would be small for particles of higher spin. I am grateful to Raymond Laflamme for checking my calculations and to Sidney Coleman for discussions. Further details will be published elsewhere.

  11. Geometric quantum noise of spin.

    PubMed

    Shnirman, Alexander; Gefen, Yuval; Saha, Arijit; Burmistrov, Igor S; Kiselev, Mikhail N; Altland, Alexander

    2015-05-01

    The presence of geometric phases is known to affect the dynamics of the systems involved. Here, we consider a quantum degree of freedom, moving in a dissipative environment, whose dynamics is described by a Langevin equation with quantum noise. We show that geometric phases enter the stochastic noise terms. Specifically, we consider small ferromagnetic particles (nanomagnets) or quantum dots close to Stoner instability, and investigate the dynamics of the total magnetization in the presence of tunneling coupling to the metallic leads. We generalize the Ambegaokar-Eckern-Schön effective action and the corresponding semiclassical equations of motion from the U(1) case of the charge degree of freedom to the SU(2) case of the magnetization. The Langevin forces (torques) in these equations are strongly influenced by the geometric phase. As a first but nontrivial application, we predict low temperature quantum diffusion of the magnetization on the Bloch sphere, which is governed by the geometric phase. We propose a protocol for experimental observation of this phenomenon.

  12. Quantum thermodynamics of general quantum processes.

    PubMed

    Binder, Felix; Vinjanampathy, Sai; Modi, Kavan; Goold, John

    2015-03-01

    Accurately describing work extraction from a quantum system is a central objective for the extension of thermodynamics to individual quantum systems. The concepts of work and heat are surprisingly subtle when generalizations are made to arbitrary quantum states. We formulate an operational thermodynamics suitable for application to an open quantum system undergoing quantum evolution under a general quantum process by which we mean a completely positive and trace-preserving map. We derive an operational first law of thermodynamics for such processes and show consistency with the second law. We show that heat, from the first law, is positive when the input state of the map majorizes the output state. Moreover, the change in entropy is also positive for the same majorization condition. This makes a strong connection between the two operational laws of thermodynamics. PMID:25871066

  13. Exciton Dynamics in InSb Colloidal Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Sills, Andrew; Harrison, Paul; Califano, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Extraordinarily fast biexciton decay times and unexpectedly large optical gaps are two striking features observed in InSb colloidal quantum dots that have remained so far unexplained. The former, should its origin be identified as an Auger recombination process, would have important implications regarding carrier multiplication efficiency, suggesting these nanostructures as potentially ideal active materials in photovoltaic devices. The latter could offer new insights into the factors that influence the electronic structure and consequently the optical properties of systems with reduced dimensionality and provide additional means to fine-tune them. Using the state-of-the-art atomistic semiempirical pseudopotential method we unveil the surprising origins of these features and show that a comprehensive explanation for these properties requires delving deep into the atomistic detail of these nanostructures and is, therefore, outside the reach of less sophisticated, albeit more popular, theoretical approaches. PMID:26650516

  14. New method for calculating binding energies in quantum mechanics and quantum field theories

    SciTech Connect

    Gat, G.; Rosenstein, B. Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei, 11529 )

    1993-01-04

    We propose a systematic perturbative method for calculating the binding energy of threshold bound states---states which exist for arbitrary small coupling. The starting point is a (regularized) free theory. Explicit calculations are performed for quantum mechanics with arbitrary short-range potential in 1D and various (1+1)-dimensional quantum field theories. We check the method by comparing the results with exact formulas available in solvable models.

  15. Quantum Dimension and Quantum Projective Spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matassa, Marco

    2014-09-01

    We show that the family of spectral triples for quantum projective spaces introduced by D'Andrea and Dąbrowski, which have spectral dimension equal to zero, can be reconsidered as modular spectral triples by taking into account the action of the element K_{2rho} or its inverse. The spectral dimension computed in this sense coincides with the dimension of the classical projective spaces. The connection with the well known notion of quantum dimension of quantum group theory is pointed out.

  16. Quantum and Classical Electrostatics Among Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doerr, T. P.; Obolensky, O. I.; Ogurtsov, A. Y.; Yu, Yi-Kuo

    Quantum theory has been unquestionably successful at describing physics at the atomic scale. However, it becomes more difficult to apply as the system size grows. On the other hand, classical physics breaks down at sufficiently short length scales but is clearly correct at larger distances. The purpose of methods such as QM/MM is to gain the advantages of both quantum and classical regimes: quantum theory should provide accuracy at the shortest scales, and classical theory, with its somewhat more tractable computational demands, allows results to be computed for systems that would be inaccessible with a purely quantum approach. This strategy will be most effective when one knows with good accuracy the length scale at which quantum calculations are no longer necessary and classical calculations are sufficient. To this end, we have performed both classical and quantum calculations for systems comprising a small number of atoms for which experimental data is also available. The classical calculations are fully exact; the quantum calculations are at the MP4(SDTQ)/aug-cc-pV5Z and CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pV5Z levels. The precision of both sets of calculations along with the existence of experimental results allows us to draw conclusions about the range of utility of the respective calculations. This research was supported by the Intramural Research Program of the NIH, NLM and utilized the computational resources of the NIH HPC Biowulf cluster.

  17. Controlling charge quantization with quantum fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jezouin, S.; Iftikhar, Z.; Anthore, A.; Parmentier, F. D.; Gennser, U.; Cavanna, A.; Ouerghi, A.; Levkivskyi, I. P.; Idrisov, E.; Sukhorukov, E. V.; Glazman, L. I.; Pierre, F.

    2016-08-01

    In 1909, Millikan showed that the charge of electrically isolated systems is quantized in units of the elementary electron charge e. Today, the persistence of charge quantization in small, weakly connected conductors allows for circuits in which single electrons are manipulated, with applications in, for example, metrology, detectors and thermometry. However, as the connection strength is increased, the discreteness of charge is progressively reduced by quantum fluctuations. Here we report the full quantum control and characterization of charge quantization. By using semiconductor-based tunable elemental conduction channels to connect a micrometre-scale metallic island to a circuit, we explore the complete evolution of charge quantization while scanning the entire range of connection strengths, from a very weak (tunnel) to a perfect (ballistic) contact. We observe, when approaching the ballistic limit, that charge quantization is destroyed by quantum fluctuations, and scales as the square root of the residual probability for an electron to be reflected across the quantum channel; this scaling also applies beyond the different regimes of connection strength currently accessible to theory. At increased temperatures, the thermal fluctuations result in an exponential suppression of charge quantization and in a universal square-root scaling, valid for all connection strengths, in agreement with expectations. Besides being pertinent for the improvement of single-electron circuits and their applications, and for the metal–semiconductor hybrids relevant to topological quantum computing, knowledge of the quantum laws of electricity will be essential for the quantum engineering of future nanoelectronic devices.

  18. Controlling charge quantization with quantum fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Jezouin, S; Iftikhar, Z; Anthore, A; Parmentier, F D; Gennser, U; Cavanna, A; Ouerghi, A; Levkivskyi, I P; Idrisov, E; Sukhorukov, E V; Glazman, L I; Pierre, F

    2016-08-01

    In 1909, Millikan showed that the charge of electrically isolated systems is quantized in units of the elementary electron charge e. Today, the persistence of charge quantization in small, weakly connected conductors allows for circuits in which single electrons are manipulated, with applications in, for example, metrology, detectors and thermometry. However, as the connection strength is increased, the discreteness of charge is progressively reduced by quantum fluctuations. Here we report the full quantum control and characterization of charge quantization. By using semiconductor-based tunable elemental conduction channels to connect a micrometre-scale metallic island to a circuit, we explore the complete evolution of charge quantization while scanning the entire range of connection strengths, from a very weak (tunnel) to a perfect (ballistic) contact. We observe, when approaching the ballistic limit, that charge quantization is destroyed by quantum fluctuations, and scales as the square root of the residual probability for an electron to be reflected across the quantum channel; this scaling also applies beyond the different regimes of connection strength currently accessible to theory. At increased temperatures, the thermal fluctuations result in an exponential suppression of charge quantization and in a universal square-root scaling, valid for all connection strengths, in agreement with expectations. Besides being pertinent for the improvement of single-electron circuits and their applications, and for the metal-semiconductor hybrids relevant to topological quantum computing, knowledge of the quantum laws of electricity will be essential for the quantum engineering of future nanoelectronic devices.

  19. Controlling charge quantization with quantum fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jezouin, S.; Iftikhar, Z.; Anthore, A.; Parmentier, F. D.; Gennser, U.; Cavanna, A.; Ouerghi, A.; Levkivskyi, I. P.; Idrisov, E.; Sukhorukov, E. V.; Glazman, L. I.; Pierre, F.

    2016-08-01

    In 1909, Millikan showed that the charge of electrically isolated systems is quantized in units of the elementary electron charge e. Today, the persistence of charge quantization in small, weakly connected conductors allows for circuits in which single electrons are manipulated, with applications in, for example, metrology, detectors and thermometry. However, as the connection strength is increased, the discreteness of charge is progressively reduced by quantum fluctuations. Here we report the full quantum control and characterization of charge quantization. By using semiconductor-based tunable elemental conduction channels to connect a micrometre-scale metallic island to a circuit, we explore the complete evolution of charge quantization while scanning the entire range of connection strengths, from a very weak (tunnel) to a perfect (ballistic) contact. We observe, when approaching the ballistic limit, that charge quantization is destroyed by quantum fluctuations, and scales as the square root of the residual probability for an electron to be reflected across the quantum channel; this scaling also applies beyond the different regimes of connection strength currently accessible to theory. At increased temperatures, the thermal fluctuations result in an exponential suppression of charge quantization and in a universal square-root scaling, valid for all connection strengths, in agreement with expectations. Besides being pertinent for the improvement of single-electron circuits and their applications, and for the metal-semiconductor hybrids relevant to topological quantum computing, knowledge of the quantum laws of electricity will be essential for the quantum engineering of future nanoelectronic devices.

  20. Controlling charge quantization with quantum fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Jezouin, S; Iftikhar, Z; Anthore, A; Parmentier, F D; Gennser, U; Cavanna, A; Ouerghi, A; Levkivskyi, I P; Idrisov, E; Sukhorukov, E V; Glazman, L I; Pierre, F

    2016-08-01

    In 1909, Millikan showed that the charge of electrically isolated systems is quantized in units of the elementary electron charge e. Today, the persistence of charge quantization in small, weakly connected conductors allows for circuits in which single electrons are manipulated, with applications in, for example, metrology, detectors and thermometry. However, as the connection strength is increased, the discreteness of charge is progressively reduced by quantum fluctuations. Here we report the full quantum control and characterization of charge quantization. By using semiconductor-based tunable elemental conduction channels to connect a micrometre-scale metallic island to a circuit, we explore the complete evolution of charge quantization while scanning the entire range of connection strengths, from a very weak (tunnel) to a perfect (ballistic) contact. We observe, when approaching the ballistic limit, that charge quantization is destroyed by quantum fluctuations, and scales as the square root of the residual probability for an electron to be reflected across the quantum channel; this scaling also applies beyond the different regimes of connection strength currently accessible to theory. At increased temperatures, the thermal fluctuations result in an exponential suppression of charge quantization and in a universal square-root scaling, valid for all connection strengths, in agreement with expectations. Besides being pertinent for the improvement of single-electron circuits and their applications, and for the metal-semiconductor hybrids relevant to topological quantum computing, knowledge of the quantum laws of electricity will be essential for the quantum engineering of future nanoelectronic devices. PMID:27488797

  1. Colloquium: Non-Markovian dynamics in open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breuer, Heinz-Peter; Laine, Elsi-Mari; Piilo, Jyrki; Vacchini, Bassano

    2016-04-01

    The dynamical behavior of open quantum systems plays a key role in many applications of quantum mechanics, examples ranging from fundamental problems, such as the environment-induced decay of quantum coherence and relaxation in many-body systems, to applications in condensed matter theory, quantum transport, quantum chemistry, and quantum information. In close analogy to a classical Markovian stochastic process, the interaction of an open quantum system with a noisy environment is often modeled phenomenologically by means of a dynamical semigroup with a corresponding time-independent generator in Lindblad form, which describes a memoryless dynamics of the open system typically leading to an irreversible loss of characteristic quantum features. However, in many applications open systems exhibit pronounced memory effects and a revival of genuine quantum properties such as quantum coherence, correlations, and entanglement. Here recent theoretical results on the rich non-Markovian quantum dynamics of open systems are discussed, paying particular attention to the rigorous mathematical definition, to the physical interpretation and classification, as well as to the quantification of quantum memory effects. The general theory is illustrated by a series of physical examples. The analysis reveals that memory effects of the open system dynamics reflect characteristic features of the environment which opens a new perspective for applications, namely, to exploit a small open system as a quantum probe signifying nontrivial features of the environment it is interacting with. This Colloquium further explores the various physical sources of non-Markovian quantum dynamics, such as structured environmental spectral densities, nonlocal correlations between environmental degrees of freedom, and correlations in the initial system-environment state, in addition to developing schemes for their local detection. Recent experiments addressing the detection, quantification, and control of

  2. Counterfactual quantum cryptography.

    PubMed

    Noh, Tae-Gon

    2009-12-01

    Quantum cryptography allows one to distribute a secret key between two remote parties using the fundamental principles of quantum mechanics. The well-known established paradigm for the quantum key distribution relies on the actual transmission of signal particle through a quantum channel. In this Letter, we show that the task of a secret key distribution can be accomplished even though a particle carrying secret information is not in fact transmitted through the quantum channel. The proposed protocols can be implemented with current technologies and provide practical security advantages by eliminating the possibility that an eavesdropper can directly access the entire quantum system of each signal particle.

  3. Quantum chimera states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viennot, David; Aubourg, Lucile

    2016-02-01

    We study a theoretical model of closed quasi-hermitian chain of spins which exhibits quantum analogues of chimera states, i.e. long life classical states for which a part of an oscillator chain presents an ordered dynamics whereas another part presents a disordered dynamics. For the quantum analogue, the chimera behaviour deals with the entanglement between the spins of the chain. We discuss the entanglement properties, quantum chaos, quantum disorder and semi-classical similarity of our quantum chimera system. The quantum chimera concept is novel and induces new perspectives concerning the entanglement of multipartite systems.

  4. Counterfactual quantum cryptography.

    PubMed

    Noh, Tae-Gon

    2009-12-01

    Quantum cryptography allows one to distribute a secret key between two remote parties using the fundamental principles of quantum mechanics. The well-known established paradigm for the quantum key distribution relies on the actual transmission of signal particle through a quantum channel. In this Letter, we show that the task of a secret key distribution can be accomplished even though a particle carrying secret information is not in fact transmitted through the quantum channel. The proposed protocols can be implemented with current technologies and provide practical security advantages by eliminating the possibility that an eavesdropper can directly access the entire quantum system of each signal particle. PMID:20366133

  5. Quantum information causality.

    PubMed

    Pitalúa-García, Damián

    2013-05-24

    How much information can a transmitted physical system fundamentally communicate? We introduce the principle of quantum information causality, which states the maximum amount of quantum information that a quantum system can communicate as a function of its dimension, independently of any previously shared quantum physical resources. We present a new quantum information task, whose success probability is upper bounded by the new principle, and show that an optimal strategy to perform it combines the quantum teleportation and superdense coding protocols with a task that has classical inputs. PMID:23745844

  6. Multiscale quantum optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaroszkiewicz, George

    2007-04-01

    Quantum experiments are described in terms of time-dependent networks of quantum bits, each qubit representing an elementary information gateway. The emphasis is on the signal properties of apparatus rather than on systems under observation (SUOs), with the quantum states of the theory (the labstates) representing the observer's information about the state of their apparatus, rather than of any SUO. The formalism gives an efficient quantum register description related to the formalism of quantum computation. Experiments conventionally described by the PVM and POVM formalisms are treated in identical terms, the formalism providing an efficient modular approach to quantum optics experiments of arbitrary complexity.

  7. A multiplexed quantum memory.

    PubMed

    Lan, S-Y; Radnaev, A G; Collins, O A; Matsukevich, D N; Kennedy, T A; Kuzmich, A

    2009-08-01

    A quantum repeater is a system for long-distance quantum communication that employs quantum memory elements to mitigate optical fiber transmission losses. The multiplexed quantum memory (O. A. Collins, S. D. Jenkins, A. Kuzmich, and T. A. B. Kennedy, Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 060502 (2007)) has been shown theoretically to reduce quantum memory time requirements. We present an initial implementation of a multiplexed quantum memory element in a cold rubidium gas. We show that it is possible to create atomic excitations in arbitrary memory element pairs and demonstrate the violation of Bell's inequality for light fields generated during the write and read processes.

  8. Quantum spin hall insulator state in HgTe quantum wells.

    PubMed

    König, Markus; Wiedmann, Steffen; Brüne, Christoph; Roth, Andreas; Buhmann, Hartmut; Molenkamp, Laurens W; Qi, Xiao-Liang; Zhang, Shou-Cheng

    2007-11-01

    Recent theory predicted that the quantum spin Hall effect, a fundamentally new quantum state of matter that exists at zero external magnetic field, may be realized in HgTe/(Hg,Cd)Te quantum wells. We fabricated such sample structures with low density and high mobility in which we could tune, through an external gate voltage, the carrier conduction from n-type to p-type, passing through an insulating regime. For thin quantum wells with well width d < 6.3 nanometers, the insulating regime showed the conventional behavior of vanishingly small conductance at low temperature. However, for thicker quantum wells (d > 6.3 nanometers), the nominally insulating regime showed a plateau of residual conductance close to 2e(2)/h, where e is the electron charge and h is Planck's constant. The residual conductance was independent of the sample width, indicating that it is caused by edge states. Furthermore, the residual conductance was destroyed by a small external magnetic field. The quantum phase transition at the critical thickness, d = 6.3 nanometers, was also independently determined from the magnetic field-induced insulator-to-metal transition. These observations provide experimental evidence of the quantum spin Hall effect.

  9. Generalized effective description of loop quantum cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashtekar, Abhay; Gupt, Brajesh

    2015-10-01

    The effective description of loop quantum cosmology (LQC) has proved to be a convenient platform to study phenomenological implications of the quantum bounce that resolves the classical big bang singularity. Originally, this description was derived using Gaussian quantum states with small dispersions. In this paper we present a generalization to incorporate states with large dispersions. Specifically, we derive the generalized effective Friedmann and Raychaudhuri equations and propose a generalized effective Hamiltonian which are being used in an ongoing study of the phenomenological consequences of a broad class of quantum geometries. We also discuss an interesting interplay between the physics of states with larger dispersions in standard LQC, and of sharply peaked states in (hypothetical) LQC theories with larger area gap.

  10. Parallel Quantum Circuit in a Tunnel Junction.

    PubMed

    Faizy Namarvar, Omid; Dridi, Ghassen; Joachim, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Spectral analysis of 1 and 2-states per line quantum bus are normally sufficient to determine the effective Vab(N) electronic coupling between the emitter and receiver states through the bus as a function of the number N of parallel lines. When Vab(N) is difficult to determine, an Heisenberg-Rabi time dependent quantum exchange process must be triggered through the bus to capture the secular oscillation frequency Ωab(N) between those states. Two different linear and regimes are demonstrated for Ωab(N) as a function of N. When the initial preparation is replaced by coupling of the quantum bus to semi-infinite electrodes, the resulting quantum transduction process is not faithfully following the Ωab(N) variations. Because of the electronic transparency normalisation to unity and of the low pass filter character of this transduction, large Ωab(N) cannot be captured by the tunnel junction. The broadly used concept of electrical contact between a metallic nanopad and a molecular device must be better described as a quantum transduction process. At small coupling and when N is small enough not to compensate for this small coupling, an N(2) power law is preserved for Ωab(N) and for Vab(N). PMID:27453262

  11. Parallel Quantum Circuit in a Tunnel Junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faizy Namarvar, Omid; Dridi, Ghassen; Joachim, Christian

    2016-07-01

    Spectral analysis of 1 and 2-states per line quantum bus are normally sufficient to determine the effective Vab(N) electronic coupling between the emitter and receiver states through the bus as a function of the number N of parallel lines. When Vab(N) is difficult to determine, an Heisenberg-Rabi time dependent quantum exchange process must be triggered through the bus to capture the secular oscillation frequency Ωab(N) between those states. Two different linear and regimes are demonstrated for Ωab(N) as a function of N. When the initial preparation is replaced by coupling of the quantum bus to semi-infinite electrodes, the resulting quantum transduction process is not faithfully following the Ωab(N) variations. Because of the electronic transparency normalisation to unity and of the low pass filter character of this transduction, large Ωab(N) cannot be captured by the tunnel junction. The broadly used concept of electrical contact between a metallic nanopad and a molecular device must be better described as a quantum transduction process. At small coupling and when N is small enough not to compensate for this small coupling, an N2 power law is preserved for Ωab(N) and for Vab(N).

  12. Parallel Quantum Circuit in a Tunnel Junction.

    PubMed

    Faizy Namarvar, Omid; Dridi, Ghassen; Joachim, Christian

    2016-07-25

    Spectral analysis of 1 and 2-states per line quantum bus are normally sufficient to determine the effective Vab(N) electronic coupling between the emitter and receiver states through the bus as a function of the number N of parallel lines. When Vab(N) is difficult to determine, an Heisenberg-Rabi time dependent quantum exchange process must be triggered through the bus to capture the secular oscillation frequency Ωab(N) between those states. Two different linear and regimes are demonstrated for Ωab(N) as a function of N. When the initial preparation is replaced by coupling of the quantum bus to semi-infinite electrodes, the resulting quantum transduction process is not faithfully following the Ωab(N) variations. Because of the electronic transparency normalisation to unity and of the low pass filter character of this transduction, large Ωab(N) cannot be captured by the tunnel junction. The broadly used concept of electrical contact between a metallic nanopad and a molecular device must be better described as a quantum transduction process. At small coupling and when N is small enough not to compensate for this small coupling, an N(2) power law is preserved for Ωab(N) and for Vab(N).

  13. Parallel Quantum Circuit in a Tunnel Junction

    PubMed Central

    Faizy Namarvar, Omid; Dridi, Ghassen; Joachim, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Spectral analysis of 1 and 2-states per line quantum bus are normally sufficient to determine the effective Vab(N) electronic coupling between the emitter and receiver states through the bus as a function of the number N of parallel lines. When Vab(N) is difficult to determine, an Heisenberg-Rabi time dependent quantum exchange process must be triggered through the bus to capture the secular oscillation frequency Ωab(N) between those states. Two different linear and regimes are demonstrated for Ωab(N) as a function of N. When the initial preparation is replaced by coupling of the quantum bus to semi-infinite electrodes, the resulting quantum transduction process is not faithfully following the Ωab(N) variations. Because of the electronic transparency normalisation to unity and of the low pass filter character of this transduction, large Ωab(N) cannot be captured by the tunnel junction. The broadly used concept of electrical contact between a metallic nanopad and a molecular device must be better described as a quantum transduction process. At small coupling and when N is small enough not to compensate for this small coupling, an N2 power law is preserved for Ωab(N) and for Vab(N). PMID:27453262

  14. Quantum capacity of quantum black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adami, Chris; Bradler, Kamil

    2014-03-01

    The fate of quantum entanglement interacting with a black hole has been an enduring mystery, not the least because standard curved space field theory does not address the interaction of black holes with matter. We discuss an effective Hamiltonian of matter interacting with a black hole that has a precise analogue in quantum optics and correctly reproduces both spontaneous and stimulated Hawking radiation with grey-body factors. We calculate the quantum capacity of this channel in the limit of perfect absorption, as well as in the limit of a perfectly reflecting black hole (a white hole). We find that the white hole is an optimal quantum cloner, and is isomorphic to the Unruh channel with positive quantum capacity. The complementary channel (across the horizon) is entanglement-breaking with zero capacity, avoiding a violation of the quantum no-cloning theorem. The black hole channel on the contrary has vanishing capacity, while its complement has positive capacity instead. Thus, quantum states can be reconstructed faithfully behind the black hole horizon, but not outside. This work sheds new light on black hole complementarity because it shows that black holes can both reflect and absorb quantum states without violating the no-cloning theorem, and makes quantum firewalls obsolete.

  15. Quantum optics. Gravity meets quantum physics

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Bernhard W.

    2015-02-27

    Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity is a classical formulation but a quantum mechanical description of gravitational forces is needed, not only to investigate the coupling of classical and quantum systems but simply to give a more complete description of our physical surroundings. In this issue of Nature Photonics, Wen-Te Liao and Sven Ahrens reveal a link between quantum and gravitational physics. They propose that in the quantum-optical effect of superradiance, the world line of electromagnetic radiation is changed by the presence of a gravitational field.

  16. Work and quantum phase transitions: quantum latency.

    PubMed

    Mascarenhas, E; Bragança, H; Dorner, R; França Santos, M; Vedral, V; Modi, K; Goold, J

    2014-06-01

    We study the physics of quantum phase transitions from the perspective of nonequilibrium thermodynamics. For first-order quantum phase transitions, we find that the average work done per quench in crossing the critical point is discontinuous. This leads us to introduce the quantum latent work in analogy with the classical latent heat of first order classical phase transitions. For second order quantum phase transitions the irreversible work is closely related to the fidelity susceptibility for weak sudden quenches of the system Hamiltonian. We demonstrate our ideas with numerical simulations of first, second, and infinite order phase transitions in various spin chain models.

  17. Quantum Darwinism in Quantum Brownian Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blume-Kohout, Robin; Zurek, Wojciech H.

    2008-12-01

    Quantum Darwinism—the redundant encoding of information about a decohering system in its environment—was proposed to reconcile the quantum nature of our Universe with apparent classicality. We report the first study of the dynamics of quantum Darwinism in a realistic model of decoherence, quantum Brownian motion. Prepared in a highly squeezed state—a macroscopic superposition—the system leaves records whose redundancy increases rapidly with initial delocalization. Redundancy appears rapidly (on the decoherence time scale) and persists for a long time.

  18. Quantum Darwinism in quantum Brownian motion.

    PubMed

    Blume-Kohout, Robin; Zurek, Wojciech H

    2008-12-12

    Quantum Darwinism--the redundant encoding of information about a decohering system in its environment--was proposed to reconcile the quantum nature of our Universe with apparent classicality. We report the first study of the dynamics of quantum Darwinism in a realistic model of decoherence, quantum Brownian motion. Prepared in a highly squeezed state--a macroscopic superposition--the system leaves records whose redundancy increases rapidly with initial delocalization. Redundancy appears rapidly (on the decoherence time scale) and persists for a long time.

  19. Quantum Kolmogorov complexity and bounded quantum memory

    SciTech Connect

    Miyadera, Takayuki

    2011-04-15

    The effect of bounded quantum memory in a primitive information protocol has been examined using the quantum Kolmogorov complexity as a measure of information. We employed a toy two-party protocol in which Bob, by using a bounded quantum memory and an unbounded classical memory, estimates a message that was encoded in qubits by Alice in one of the bases X or Z. Our theorem gave a nontrivial effect of the memory boundedness. In addition, a generalization of the uncertainty principle in the presence of quantum memory has been obtained.

  20. Converting Coherence to Quantum Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jiajun; Yadin, Benjamin; Girolami, Davide; Vedral, Vlatko; Gu, Mile

    2016-04-01

    Recent results in quantum information theory characterize quantum coherence in the context of resource theories. Here, we study the relation between quantum coherence and quantum discord, a kind of quantum correlation which appears even in nonentangled states. We prove that the creation of quantum discord with multipartite incoherent operations is bounded by the amount of quantum coherence consumed in its subsystems during the process. We show how the interplay between quantum coherence consumption and creation of quantum discord works in the preparation of multipartite quantum correlated states and in the model of deterministic quantum computation with one qubit.

  1. Converting Coherence to Quantum Correlations.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jiajun; Yadin, Benjamin; Girolami, Davide; Vedral, Vlatko; Gu, Mile

    2016-04-22

    Recent results in quantum information theory characterize quantum coherence in the context of resource theories. Here, we study the relation between quantum coherence and quantum discord, a kind of quantum correlation which appears even in nonentangled states. We prove that the creation of quantum discord with multipartite incoherent operations is bounded by the amount of quantum coherence consumed in its subsystems during the process. We show how the interplay between quantum coherence consumption and creation of quantum discord works in the preparation of multipartite quantum correlated states and in the model of deterministic quantum computation with one qubit.

  2. Quantum analogue computing.

    PubMed

    Kendon, Vivien M; Nemoto, Kae; Munro, William J

    2010-08-13

    We briefly review what a quantum computer is, what it promises to do for us and why it is so hard to build one. Among the first applications anticipated to bear fruit is the quantum simulation of quantum systems. While most quantum computation is an extension of classical digital computation, quantum simulation differs fundamentally in how the data are encoded in the quantum computer. To perform a quantum simulation, the Hilbert space of the system to be simulated is mapped directly onto the Hilbert space of the (logical) qubits in the quantum computer. This type of direct correspondence is how data are encoded in a classical analogue computer. There is no binary encoding, and increasing precision becomes exponentially costly: an extra bit of precision doubles the size of the computer. This has important consequences for both the precision and error-correction requirements of quantum simulation, and significant open questions remain about its practicality. It also means that the quantum version of analogue computers, continuous-variable quantum computers, becomes an equally efficient architecture for quantum simulation. Lessons from past use of classical analogue computers can help us to build better quantum simulators in future.

  3. Entanglement, the quantum formalism and the classical world

    SciTech Connect

    Matzkin, A.

    2011-09-23

    75 years after the term 'entanglement' was coined to a peculiar feature inherent to quantum systems, the connection between quantum and classical mechanics remains an open problem. Drawing on recent results obtained in semiclassical systems, we discuss here the fate of entanglement in a closed system as Planck's constant becomes vanishingly small. In that case the generation of entanglement in a quantum system is perfectly reproduced by properly defined correlations of the corresponding classical system. We speculate on what these results could imply regarding the status of entanglement and of the ensuing quantum correlations.

  4. Spectrum of surface plasmons excited by spontaneous quantum dot transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Andrianov, E. S. Pukhov, A. A. Dorofeenko, A. V.; Vinogradov, A. P.; Lisyansky, A. A.

    2013-08-15

    We consider quantum fluctuations of near fields of a quantum emitter (two-level system (TLS) with population inversion sustained by incoherent pumping) in the near-field zone of a plasmon (metallic) nanoparticle. The spectrum of surface plasmons excited by spontaneous transitions in the quantum emitter is obtained below the lasing threshold of such a system (spaser) in the approximation of a small number of plasmons. It is shown that the relaxation rate is the sum of the quantum emitter's rates of relaxation to its thermal reservoir and the plasmon cavity. The resulting dependence of the average number of plasmons on the pump intensity indicates the nonthreshold nature of the process.

  5. Ion acoustic shock waves in weakly relativistic multicomponent quantum plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, T. S.; Bains, A. S.; Bedi, C.

    2010-02-01

    Ion acoustic Shock waves (IASWs) are studied in an collisionless unmagnetized relativistic quantum electron-positron-ion(e-p-i) plasma employing the quantum hydro -dynamic(QHD) model. Korteweg-deVries- Burger equation(KdVB) is derived using small amplitude perturbation expansion method to study the nonlinear propagation of the quantum IASWs. It is found that the coefficients of the KdVB equation are significantely modified by the positron density p, relativistic factor(Ur), temperatures σ, kinematic viscosity η and quantum factor(H).

  6. Towards photonic quantum simulation of ground states of frustrated Heisenberg spin systems.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiao-song; Dakić, Borivoje; Kropatschek, Sebastian; Naylor, William; Chan, Yang-hao; Gong, Zhe-xuan; Duan, Lu-ming; Zeilinger, Anton; Walther, Philip

    2014-01-01

    Photonic quantum simulators are promising candidates for providing insight into other small- to medium-sized quantum systems. Recent experiments have shown that photonic quantum systems have the advantage to exploit quantum interference for the quantum simulation of the ground state of Heisenberg spin systems. Here we experimentally characterize this quantum interference at a tuneable beam splitter and further investigate the measurement-induced interactions of a simulated four-spin system by comparing the entanglement dynamics using pairwise concurrence. We also study theoretically a four-site square lattice with next-nearest neighbor interactions and a six-site checkerboard lattice, which might be in reach of current technology.

  7. Multistage quantum absorption heat pumps.

    PubMed

    Correa, Luis A

    2014-04-01

    It is well known that heat pumps, while being all limited by the same basic thermodynamic laws, may find realization on systems as "small" and "quantum" as a three-level maser. In order to quantitatively assess how the performance of these devices scales with their size, we design generalized N-dimensional ideal heat pumps by merging N-2 elementary three-level stages. We set them to operate in the absorption chiller mode between given hot and cold baths and study their maximum achievable cooling power and the corresponding efficiency as a function of N. While the efficiency at maximum power is roughly size-independent, the power itself slightly increases with the dimension, quickly saturating to a constant. Thus, interestingly, scaling up autonomous quantum heat pumps does not render a significant enhancement beyond the optimal double-stage configuration.

  8. Efficient Quantum Pseudorandomness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandão, Fernando G. S. L.; Harrow, Aram W.; Horodecki, Michał

    2016-04-01

    Randomness is both a useful way to model natural systems and a useful tool for engineered systems, e.g., in computation, communication, and control. Fully random transformations require exponential time for either classical or quantum systems, but in many cases pseudorandom operations can emulate certain properties of truly random ones. Indeed, in the classical realm there is by now a well-developed theory regarding such pseudorandom operations. However, the construction of such objects turns out to be much harder in the quantum case. Here, we show that random quantum unitary time evolutions ("circuits") are a powerful source of quantum pseudorandomness. This gives for the first time a polynomial-time construction of quantum unitary designs, which can replace fully random operations in most applications, and shows that generic quantum dynamics cannot be distinguished from truly random processes. We discuss applications of our result to quantum information science, cryptography, and understanding the self-equilibration of closed quantum dynamics.

  9. Pulsed Quantum Optomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanner, Michael R.; Pikovski, Igor; Cole, Garrett D.; Kim, Myungshik; Brukner, Caslav; Hammerer, Klemens; Milburn, Gerard J.; Aspelmeyer, Markus

    2011-03-01

    By combining quantum optics with mechanical resonators an avenue is opened to extend investigations of quantum behavior into unprecendented mass regimes. The field resulting from this combination - ``cavity quantum optomechanics'' -- is receiving a surge of interest for its potential to contribute to quantum measurement and control, studies of decoherence and non-classical state preparation of macroscopic objects. However, quantum state preparation and especially quantum state reconstruction of mechanical oscillators is currently a significant challenge. We are pursuing a scheme that employs short optical pulses to realize quantum state tomography, squeezing via measurement and state purifcation of a mechanical resonator. The pulsed scheme has considerable resilience to initial thermal occupation, provides a promising means to explore the quantum nature of massive oscillators and can be applied to other systems such as trapped ions. Our theoretical proposal and experimental results will be discussed.

  10. Quantum Stochastic Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Spring, William Joseph

    2009-04-13

    We consider quantum analogues of n-parameter stochastic processes, associated integrals and martingale properties extending classical results obtained in [1, 2, 3], and quantum results in [4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10].

  11. Efficient Quantum Pseudorandomness.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Fernando G S L; Harrow, Aram W; Horodecki, Michał

    2016-04-29

    Randomness is both a useful way to model natural systems and a useful tool for engineered systems, e.g., in computation, communication, and control. Fully random transformations require exponential time for either classical or quantum systems, but in many cases pseudorandom operations can emulate certain properties of truly random ones. Indeed, in the classical realm there is by now a well-developed theory regarding such pseudorandom operations. However, the construction of such objects turns out to be much harder in the quantum case. Here, we show that random quantum unitary time evolutions ("circuits") are a powerful source of quantum pseudorandomness. This gives for the first time a polynomial-time construction of quantum unitary designs, which can replace fully random operations in most applications, and shows that generic quantum dynamics cannot be distinguished from truly random processes. We discuss applications of our result to quantum information science, cryptography, and understanding the self-equilibration of closed quantum dynamics. PMID:27176509

  12. The quantum space race

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennewein, Thomas; Higgins, Brendon

    2013-03-01

    Sending satellites equipped with quantum technologies into space will be the first step towards a global quantum-communication network. As Thomas Jennewein and Brendon Higgins explain, these systems will also enable physicists to test fundamental physics in new regimes.

  13. Quantum information and computation

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, C.H.

    1995-10-01

    A new quantum theory of communication and computation is emerging, in which the stuff transmitted or processed is not classical information, but arbitrary superpositions of quantum states. {copyright} 1995 {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  14. Efficient Quantum Pseudorandomness.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Fernando G S L; Harrow, Aram W; Horodecki, Michał

    2016-04-29

    Randomness is both a useful way to model natural systems and a useful tool for engineered systems, e.g., in computation, communication, and control. Fully random transformations require exponential time for either classical or quantum systems, but in many cases pseudorandom operations can emulate certain properties of truly random ones. Indeed, in the classical realm there is by now a well-developed theory regarding such pseudorandom operations. However, the construction of such objects turns out to be much harder in the quantum case. Here, we show that random quantum unitary time evolutions ("circuits") are a powerful source of quantum pseudorandomness. This gives for the first time a polynomial-time construction of quantum unitary designs, which can replace fully random operations in most applications, and shows that generic quantum dynamics cannot be distinguished from truly random processes. We discuss applications of our result to quantum information science, cryptography, and understanding the self-equilibration of closed quantum dynamics.

  15. Quantum Spread Spectrum Communication

    SciTech Connect

    Humble, Travis S

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate that spectral teleportation can coherently dilate the spectral probability amplitude of a single photon. In preserving the encoded quantum information, this variant of teleportation subsequently enables a form of quantum spread spectrum communication.

  16. Satellite-Based Quantum Communications

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, Richard J; Nordholt, Jane E; McCabe, Kevin P; Newell, Raymond T; Peterson, Charles G

    2010-09-20

    Single-photon quantum communications (QC) offers the attractive feature of 'future proof', forward security rooted in the laws of quantum physics. Ground based quantum key distribution (QKD) experiments in optical fiber have attained transmission ranges in excess of 200km, but for larger distances we proposed a methodology for satellite-based QC. Over the past decade we have devised solutions to the technical challenges to satellite-to-ground QC, and we now have a clear concept for how space-based QC could be performed and potentially utilized within a trusted QKD network architecture. Functioning as a trusted QKD node, a QC satellite ('QC-sat') could deliver secret keys to the key stores of ground-based trusted QKD network nodes, to each of which multiple users are connected by optical fiber or free-space QC. A QC-sat could thereby extend quantum-secured connectivity to geographically disjoint domains, separated by continental or inter-continental distances. In this paper we describe our system concept that makes QC feasible with low-earth orbit (LEO) QC-sats (200-km-2,000-km altitude orbits), and the results of link modeling of expected performance. Using the architecture that we have developed, LEO satellite-to-ground QKD will be feasible with secret bit yields of several hundred 256-bit AES keys per contact. With multiple ground sites separated by {approx} 100km, mitigation of cloudiness over any single ground site would be possible, potentially allowing multiple contact opportunities each day. The essential next step is an experimental QC-sat. A number of LEO-platforms would be suitable, ranging from a dedicated, three-axis stabilized small satellite, to a secondary experiment on an imaging satellite. to the ISS. With one or more QC-sats, low-latency quantum-secured communications could then be provided to ground-based users on a global scale. Air-to-ground QC would also be possible.

  17. Inconstancy-theory/quantum-gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murtaza, Faheem

    1999-05-01

    Inconstancy-theory is the union of "relativity" and "quantum" theories which rests upon the answers of the simple questions. 1) That if only the simple motion of a particle can not be observed without the "reference-frame" then how the whole universe can be expected to be observable without any "reference-frame". 2) Does not the inter-influence (Unity) of space-time-mass suggest that these are generated by common source and might not there be some invisible "flow" (dynamical-equilibrium) that is the cause of space-time-mass,as time itself is a flow. "Inconstancy" proposes, interalia, the principle that "relativity (generalised) is the universal law of nature in each and every respect". For that "inconstancy" admits only the light, being absolute, a real reference-frame and medium(mirror) for the display of relative "space-time-mass". Light as reference-frame in "Inconstancy" unifies "relativity" and "quantum" theories and establishes the inter-connection between "quantum-gravity" and strong-nuclear interactions, which offers the velocity of light in terms of physical and spatial-temporal components. "Inconstancy" introduces another "constant" operative in "quantum-gravity" and unveils the "graviton" location for its novel range as previously "relativity" escaped detection for v<<quantum" for h<<<1. "Inconstancy" predictions. 1) Gravity abolition hypothesis of "static" particles as the dynamical property of the particle influences the space around it through "graviton" in the similar fashion as previously mass-variation was replaced by "momentum-variation" in special relativity. 2) Due to new constant of inconstancy, negligibly small angular motion of rectilinearly moving particle occurs.

  18. Economical quantum cloning in any dimension

    SciTech Connect

    Durt, Thomas; Fiurasek, Jaromir; Cerf, Nicolas J.

    2005-11-15

    The possibility of cloning a d-dimensional quantum system without an ancilla is explored, extending on the economical phase-covariant cloning machine for qubits found in Phys. Rev. A 60, 2764 (1999). We prove the impossibility of constructing an economical version of the optimal universal 1{yields}2 cloning machine in any dimension. We also show, using an ansatz on the generic form of cloning machines, that the d-dimensional 1{yields}2 phase-covariant cloner, which optimally clones all balanced superpositions with arbitrary phases, can be realized economically only in dimension d=2. The used ansatz is supported by numerical evidence up to d=7. An economical phase-covariant cloner can nevertheless be constructed for d>2, albeit with a slightly lower fidelity than that of the optimal cloner requiring an ancilla. Finally, using again an ansatz on cloning machines, we show that an economical version of the 1{yields}2 Fourier-covariant cloner, which optimally clones the computational basis and its Fourier transform, is also possible only in dimension d=2.

  19. Quantum dots as active material for quantum cascade lasers: comparison to quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, Stephan; Chow, Weng W.; Schneider, Hans Christian

    2016-03-01

    We review a microscopic laser theory for quantum dots as active material for quantum cascade lasers, in which carrier collisions are treated at the level of quantum kinetic equations. The computed characteristics of such a quantum-dot active material are compared to a state-of-the-art quantum-well quantum cascade laser. We find that the current requirement to achieve a comparable gain-length product is reduced compared to that of the quantum-well quantum cascade laser.

  20. Simulation of Chemical Isomerization Reaction Dynamics on a NMR Quantum Simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Dawei; Xu, Nanyang; Xu, Ruixue; Chen, Hongwei; Gong, Jiangbin; Peng, Xinhua; Du, Jiangfeng

    2011-07-01

    Quantum simulation can beat current classical computers with minimally a few tens of qubits. Here we report an experimental demonstration that a small nuclear-magnetic-resonance quantum simulator is already able to simulate the dynamics of a prototype laser-driven isomerization reaction using engineered quantum control pulses. The experimental results agree well with classical simulations. We conclude that the quantum simulation of chemical reaction dynamics not computable on current classical computers is feasible in the near future.

  1. Geometry of Quantum States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bengtsson, Ingemar; Zyczkowski, Karol

    2007-12-01

    Preface; 1. Convexity, colours and statistics; 2. Geometry of probability distributions; 3. Much ado about spheres; 4. Complex projective spaces; 5. Outline of quantum mechanics; 6. Coherent states and group actions; 7. The stellar representation; 8. The space of density matrices; 9. Purification of mixed quantum states; 10. Quantum operations; 11. Duality: maps versus states; 12. Density matrices and entropies; 13. Distinguishability measures; 14. Monotone metrics and measures; 15. Quantum entanglement; Epilogue; Appendices; References; Index.

  2. Relativistic Quantum Scars

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Liang; Lai Yingcheng; Ferry, David K.; Goodnick, Stephen M.; Akis, Richard

    2009-07-31

    The concentrations of wave functions about classical periodic orbits, or quantum scars, are a fundamental phenomenon in physics. An open question is whether scarring can occur in relativistic quantum systems. To address this question, we investigate confinements made of graphene whose classical dynamics are chaotic and find unequivocal evidence of relativistic quantum scars. The scarred states can lead to strong conductance fluctuations in the corresponding open quantum dots via the mechanism of resonant transmission.

  3. Introduction to Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekert, A.

    A computation is a physical process. It may be performed by a piece of electronics or on an abacus, or in your brain, but it is a process that takes place in nature and as such it is subject to the laws of physics. Quantum computers are machines that rely on characteristically quantum phenomena, such as quantum interference and quantum entanglement in order to perform computation. In this series of lectures I want to elaborate on the computational power of such machines.

  4. Quantum computing and probability.

    PubMed

    Ferry, David K

    2009-11-25

    Over the past two decades, quantum computing has become a popular and promising approach to trying to solve computationally difficult problems. Missing in many descriptions of quantum computing is just how probability enters into the process. Here, we discuss some simple examples of how uncertainty and probability enter, and how this and the ideas of quantum computing challenge our interpretations of quantum mechanics. It is found that this uncertainty can lead to intrinsic decoherence, and this raises challenges for error correction.

  5. Is quantum probability rational?

    PubMed

    Houston, Alasdair I; Wiesner, Karoline

    2013-06-01

    We concentrate on two aspects of the article by Pothos & Busemeyer (P&B): the relationship between classical and quantum probability and quantum probability as a basis for rational decisions. We argue that the mathematical relationship between classical and quantum probability is not quite what the authors claim. Furthermore, it might be premature to regard quantum probability as the best practical rational scheme for decision making.

  6. Tipping Time of a Quantum Rod

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parrikar, Onkar

    2010-01-01

    The behaviour of a quantum rod, pivoted at its lower end on an impenetrable floor and restricted to moving in the vertical plane under the gravitational potential, is studied analytically under the approximation that the rod is initially localized to a "small-enough" neighbourhood around the point of classical unstable equilibrium. It is shown…

  7. Quantum Erasure Cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salih, Hatim

    2016-05-01

    The phenomenon of quantum erasure has long intrigued physicists, but has surprisingly found limited practical application. Here, we propose a protocol for quantum key distribution (QKD) based on quantum erasure, promising inherent security against detector attacks. We particularly demonstrate its security against a powerful detector-blinding attack.

  8. Eavesdropping without quantum memory

    SciTech Connect

    Bechmann-Pasquinucci, H.

    2006-04-15

    In quantum cryptography the optimal eavesdropping strategy requires that the eavesdropper uses ancillas and quantum memories in order to optimize her information. What happens if the eavesdropper has no quantum memory? It is shown that in this case the eavesdropper obtains a better information/disturbance trade-off by adopting the simple intercept/resend strategy.

  9. Quantum phenomena in superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, J.

    1987-08-01

    This paper contains remarks by the author on aspects of macroscopic quantum phenomena in superconductors. Some topics discussed are: Superconducting low-inductance undulatory galvanometer (SLUGS), charge imbalance, cylindrical dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUIDS), Geophysics, noise theory, magnetic resonance with SQUIDS, and macroscopic quantum tunneling. 23 refs., 4 figs. (LSP)

  10. Darwinism in quantum systems?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, A.; Toor, A. H.

    2002-03-01

    We investigate the role of quantum mechanical effects in the central stability concept of evolutionary game theory, i.e., an evolutionarily stable strategy (ESS). Using two and three-player symmetric quantum games we show how the presence of quantum phenomenon of entanglement can be crucial to decide the course of evolutionary dynamics in a population of interacting individuals.

  11. Room temperature synthesis of ultra-small, near-unity single-sized lead halide perovskite quantum dots with wide color emission tunability, high color purity and high brightness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Lucheng; Geng, Jing; Ai, Lisha; Zhang, Ying; Xie, Renguo; Yang, Wensheng

    2016-08-01

    Phosphor with extremely narrow emission line widths, high brightness, and wide color emission tunability in visible regions is required for display and lighting applications, yet none has been reported in the literature so far. In the present study, single-sized lead halide perovskite (APbX 3; A = CH3NH3 and Cs; X = Cl, Br, and I) nanocrystalline (NC) phosphors were achieved for the first time in a one-pot reaction at room temperature (25 °C). The size-dependent samples, which included four families of CsPbBr3 NCs and exhibited sharp excitonic absorption peaks and pure band gap emission, were directly obtained by simply varying the concentration of ligands. The continuity of the optical spectrum can be successively tuned over the entire UV–visible spectral region (360–610 nm) by preparing CsPbCl3, CsPbI3, and CsPb(Y/Br)3 (Y = Cl and I) NCs with the use of CsPbBr3 NCs as templates by anion exchange while maintaining the size of NCs and high quantum yields of up to 80%. Notably, an emission line width of 10–24 nm, which is completely consistent with that of their single particles, indicates the formation of single-sized NCs. The versatility of the synthetic strategy was validated by extending it to the synthesis of single-sized CH3NH3PbX 3 NCs by simply replacing the cesium precursor by the CH3NH3 X precursor.

  12. Room temperature synthesis of ultra-small, near-unity single-sized lead halide perovskite quantum dots with wide color emission tunability, high color purity and high brightness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Lucheng; Geng, Jing; Ai, Lisha; Zhang, Ying; Xie, Renguo; Yang, Wensheng

    2016-08-01

    Phosphor with extremely narrow emission line widths, high brightness, and wide color emission tunability in visible regions is required for display and lighting applications, yet none has been reported in the literature so far. In the present study, single-sized lead halide perovskite (APbX 3; A = CH3NH3 and Cs; X = Cl, Br, and I) nanocrystalline (NC) phosphors were achieved for the first time in a one-pot reaction at room temperature (25 °C). The size-dependent samples, which included four families of CsPbBr3 NCs and exhibited sharp excitonic absorption peaks and pure band gap emission, were directly obtained by simply varying the concentration of ligands. The continuity of the optical spectrum can be successively tuned over the entire UV-visible spectral region (360-610 nm) by preparing CsPbCl3, CsPbI3, and CsPb(Y/Br)3 (Y = Cl and I) NCs with the use of CsPbBr3 NCs as templates by anion exchange while maintaining the size of NCs and high quantum yields of up to 80%. Notably, an emission line width of 10-24 nm, which is completely consistent with that of their single particles, indicates the formation of single-sized NCs. The versatility of the synthetic strategy was validated by extending it to the synthesis of single-sized CH3NH3PbX 3 NCs by simply replacing the cesium precursor by the CH3NH3 X precursor.

  13. Room temperature synthesis of ultra-small, near-unity single-sized lead halide perovskite quantum dots with wide color emission tunability, high color purity and high brightness.

    PubMed

    Peng, Lucheng; Geng, Jing; Ai, Lisha; Zhang, Ying; Xie, Renguo; Yang, Wensheng

    2016-08-19

    Phosphor with extremely narrow emission line widths, high brightness, and wide color emission tunability in visible regions is required for display and lighting applications, yet none has been reported in the literature so far. In the present study, single-sized lead halide perovskite (APbX 3; A = CH3NH3 and Cs; X = Cl, Br, and I) nanocrystalline (NC) phosphors were achieved for the first time in a one-pot reaction at room temperature (25 °C). The size-dependent samples, which included four families of CsPbBr3 NCs and exhibited sharp excitonic absorption peaks and pure band gap emission, were directly obtained by simply varying the concentration of ligands. The continuity of the optical spectrum can be successively tuned over the entire UV-visible spectral region (360-610 nm) by preparing CsPbCl3, CsPbI3, and CsPb(Y/Br)3 (Y = Cl and I) NCs with the use of CsPbBr3 NCs as templates by anion exchange while maintaining the size of NCs and high quantum yields of up to 80%. Notably, an emission line width of 10-24 nm, which is completely consistent with that of their single particles, indicates the formation of single-sized NCs. The versatility of the synthetic strategy was validated by extending it to the synthesis of single-sized CH3NH3PbX 3 NCs by simply replacing the cesium precursor by the CH3NH3 X precursor.

  14. Room temperature synthesis of ultra-small, near-unity single-sized lead halide perovskite quantum dots with wide color emission tunability, high color purity and high brightness.

    PubMed

    Peng, Lucheng; Geng, Jing; Ai, Lisha; Zhang, Ying; Xie, Renguo; Yang, Wensheng

    2016-08-19

    Phosphor with extremely narrow emission line widths, high brightness, and wide color emission tunability in visible regions is required for display and lighting applications, yet none has been reported in the literature so far. In the present study, single-sized lead halide perovskite (APbX 3; A = CH3NH3 and Cs; X = Cl, Br, and I) nanocrystalline (NC) phosphors were achieved for the first time in a one-pot reaction at room temperature (25 °C). The size-dependent samples, which included four families of CsPbBr3 NCs and exhibited sharp excitonic absorption peaks and pure band gap emission, were directly obtained by simply varying the concentration of ligands. The continuity of the optical spectrum can be successively tuned over the entire UV-visible spectral region (360-610 nm) by preparing CsPbCl3, CsPbI3, and CsPb(Y/Br)3 (Y = Cl and I) NCs with the use of CsPbBr3 NCs as templates by anion exchange while maintaining the size of NCs and high quantum yields of up to 80%. Notably, an emission line width of 10-24 nm, which is completely consistent with that of their single particles, indicates the formation of single-sized NCs. The versatility of the synthetic strategy was validated by extending it to the synthesis of single-sized CH3NH3PbX 3 NCs by simply replacing the cesium precursor by the CH3NH3 X precursor. PMID:27383631

  15. Mesoscopic cavity quantum electrodynamics with quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Childress, L.; Soerensen, A.S.; Lukin, M.D.

    2004-04-01

    We describe an electrodynamic mechanism for coherent, quantum-mechanical coupling between spatially separated quantum dots on a microchip. The technique is based on capacitive interactions between the electron charge and a superconducting transmission line resonator, and is closely related to atomic cavity quantum electrodynamics. We investigate several potential applications of this technique which have varying degrees of complexity. In particular, we demonstrate that this mechanism allows design and investigation of an on-chip double-dot microscopic maser. Moreover, the interaction may be extended to couple spatially separated electron-spin states while only virtually populating fast-decaying superpositions of charge states. This represents an effective, controllable long-range interaction, which may facilitate implementation of quantum information processing with electron-spin qubits and potentially allow coupling to other quantum systems such as atomic or superconducting qubits.

  16. Noninformative prior in the quantum statistical model of pure states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Fuyuhiko

    2012-06-01

    In the present paper, we consider a suitable definition of a noninformative prior on the quantum statistical model of pure states. While the full pure-states model is invariant under unitary rotation and admits the Haar measure, restricted models, which we often see in quantum channel estimation and quantum process tomography, have less symmetry and no compelling rationale for any choice. We adopt a game-theoretic approach that is applicable to classical Bayesian statistics and yields a noninformative prior for a general class of probability distributions. We define the quantum detection game and show that there exist noninformative priors for a general class of a pure-states model. Theoretically, it gives one of the ways that we represent ignorance on the given quantum system with partial information. Practically, our method proposes a default distribution on the model in order to use the Bayesian technique in the quantum-state tomography with a small sample.

  17. Disciplines, models, and computers: the path to computational quantum chemistry.

    PubMed

    Lenhard, Johannes

    2014-12-01

    Many disciplines and scientific fields have undergone a computational turn in the past several decades. This paper analyzes this sort of turn by investigating the case of computational quantum chemistry. The main claim is that the transformation from quantum to computational quantum chemistry involved changes in three dimensions. First, on the side of instrumentation, small computers and a networked infrastructure took over the lead from centralized mainframe architecture. Second, a new conception of computational modeling became feasible and assumed a crucial role. And third, the field of computa- tional quantum chemistry became organized in a market-like fashion and this market is much bigger than the number of quantum theory experts. These claims will be substantiated by an investigation of the so-called density functional theory (DFT), the arguably pivotal theory in the turn to computational quantum chemistry around 1990.

  18. Quantum dot spectroscopy using a single phosphorus donor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Büch, Holger; Fuechsle, Martin; Baker, William; House, Matthew G.; Simmons, Michelle Y.

    2015-12-01

    Using a deterministic single P donor placed with atomic precision accuracy next to a nanoscale silicon quantum dot, we present a way to analyze the energy spectrum of small quantum dots in silicon by tunnel-coupled transport measurements. The energy-level structure of the quantum dot is observed as resonance features within the transport bias triangles when the donor chemical potential is aligned with states within the quantum dot as confirmed by a numeric rate equation solver SIMON. This technique allows us to independently extract the quantum dot level structure irrespective of the density of states in the leads. Such a method is useful for the investigation of silicon quantum dots in the few-electron regime where the level structure is governed by an intricate interplay between the spin- and the valley-orbit degrees of freedom.

  19. Quasi-periodic behavior of ion acoustic solitary waves in electron-ion quantum plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Biswajit; Poria, Swarup; Narayan Ghosh, Uday; Roychoudhury, Rajkumar

    2012-05-01

    The ion acoustic solitary waves are investigated in an unmagnetized electron-ion quantum plasmas. The one dimensional quantum hydrodynamic model is used to study small as well as arbitrary amplitude ion acoustic waves in quantum plasmas. It is shown that ion temperature plays a critical role in the dynamics of quantum electron ion plasma, especially for arbitrary amplitude nonlinear waves. In the small amplitude region Korteweg-de Vries equation describes the solitonic nature of the waves. However, for arbitrary amplitude waves, in the fully nonlinear regime, the system exhibits possible existence of quasi-periodic behavior for small values of ion temperature.

  20. Small satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, P.; Veverka, J.; Dermott, S.

    1986-01-01

    Satellites smaller than Mimas (r = 195 km) are distinguished by irregular overall shapes and by rough limb topography. Material properties and impact cratering dominate the shaping of these objects. Long fragmentation histories can produce a variety of internal structures, but so far there is no direct evidence that any small satellite is an equilibrium ellipsoid made up of noncohesive gravitationally bound rubble. One many bodies that orbit close to their primary the tidal and rotational components of surface gravity strongly affect the directions of local g and thereby affect the redistribution of regolith by mass wasting. Downslope movement of regolith is extensive on Deimos, and is probably effective on many other small satellites. It is shown that in some cases observed patterns of downslope mass wasting cold produce useful constraints on the satellite's mean density. The diversity of features seen in the few high-resolution images of small satellites currently available suggests that these objects have undergone complex histories of cratering, fragmentation, and regolith evolution.

  1. PREFACE: The Quantum Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, Stephen L.; Bassi, Angelo; Dowker, Fay; Dürr, Detlef

    2007-03-01

    This special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical entitled 'The Quantum Universe' is dedicated to Professor Giancarlo Ghirardi on the occasion of his 70th birthday. Giancarlo Ghirardi has made many important contributions to the foundations of quantum mechanics including the celebrated Ghirardi Rimini Weber (GRW) model of spontaneous wavefunction collapse. However, although Professor Ghirardi's birthday is the inspiration for this issue, it has a much broader scope than the area traditionally known as Foundations of Quantum Mechanics. All invited authors are experts in areas of physics in which quantum theory is fundamental: non relativistic quantum mechanics, quantum computation and information, quantum field theory, quantum gravity, quantum cosmology and philosophy of science. The issue was conceived as an opportunity for workers in these diverse areas to share with the widest possible readership their views on quantum theory. Authors were encouraged to give their personal assessment of the role of quantum theory in their work particularly as it pertains to a vision of the global aims of their research. The articles are accessible to any physicist with a solid knowledge of quantum mechanics, and many contain an emphasis on conceptual developments, both those achieved and those hoped for. One theme that runs throughout Giancarlo Ghirardi's contributions to science is the unity of physics: the development of the GRW model itself was motivated by the conviction that the same physics should govern microscopic and macroscopic systems. However, readers of this special issue will clearly see that there is no unity as yet in the views of workers on fundamental quantum theories. Indeed the diversity of the articles, ranging from technical developments in well defined approaches, to new proposals for interpretations of quantum mechanics, indicates the state of fundamental physics: healthily active and yet lacking the consensus we seek in science

  2. Quantum Tomograms and Their Application in Quantum Information Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, Aleksey K.; Yurchenko, Stanislav O.

    2013-02-01

    This note is devoted to quantum tomograms application in quantum information science. Representation for quantum tomograms of continuous variables via Feynman path integrals is considered. Due to this construction quantum tomograms of harmonic oscillator are obtained. Application tomograms in causal analysis of quantum states is presented. Two qubit maximum entangled and "quantum-classical" states have been analyzed by tomographic causal analysis of quantum states.

  3. Robust quantum spatial search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulsi, Avatar

    2016-07-01

    Quantum spatial search has been widely studied with most of the study focusing on quantum walk algorithms. We show that quantum walk algorithms are extremely sensitive to systematic errors. We present a recursive algorithm which offers significant robustness to certain systematic errors. To search N items, our recursive algorithm can tolerate errors of size O(1{/}√{ln N}) which is exponentially better than quantum walk algorithms for which tolerable error size is only O(ln N{/}√{N}). Also, our algorithm does not need any ancilla qubit. Thus our algorithm is much easier to implement experimentally compared to quantum walk algorithms.

  4. Scalable optical quantum computer

    SciTech Connect

    Manykin, E A; Mel'nichenko, E V

    2014-12-31

    A way of designing a scalable optical quantum computer based on the photon echo effect is proposed. Individual rare earth ions Pr{sup 3+}, regularly located in the lattice of the orthosilicate (Y{sub 2}SiO{sub 5}) crystal, are suggested to be used as optical qubits. Operations with qubits are performed using coherent and incoherent laser pulses. The operation protocol includes both the method of measurement-based quantum computations and the technique of optical computations. Modern hybrid photon echo protocols, which provide a sufficient quantum efficiency when reading recorded states, are considered as most promising for quantum computations and communications. (quantum computer)

  5. Quantum Operation Time Reversal

    SciTech Connect

    Crooks, Gavin E.

    2008-03-25

    The dynamics of an open quantum system can be described by a quantum operation: A linear, complete positive map of operators. Here, I exhibit a compact expression for the time reversal of a quantum operation, which is closely analogous to the time reversal of a classical Markov transition matrix. Since open quantum dynamics are stochastic, and not, in general, deterministic, the time reversal is not, in general, an inversion of the dynamics. Rather, the system relaxes toward equilibrium in both the forward and reverse time directions. The probability of a quantum trajectory and the conjugate, time reversed trajectory are related by the heat exchanged with the environment.

  6. Complementarity and quantum walks

    SciTech Connect

    Kendon, Viv; Sanders, Barry C.

    2005-02-01

    We show that quantum walks interpolate between a coherent 'wave walk' and a random walk depending on how strongly the walker's coin state is measured; i.e., the quantum walk exhibits the quintessentially quantum property of complementarity, which is manifested as a tradeoff between knowledge of which path the walker takes vs the sharpness of the interference pattern. A physical implementation of a quantum walk (the quantum quincunx) should thus have an identifiable walker and the capacity to demonstrate the interpolation between wave walk and random walk depending on the strength of measurement.

  7. PREFACE Quantum Groups, Quantum Foundations and Quantum Information: a Festschrift for Tony Sudbery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigert, Stefan

    2010-11-01

    me? and why is my world so classical?'. Tony was a teacher of the old school. His lectures were inspiring and fun. He believed that the personal element is central to understanding and inspiration, shown by his whole-hearted commitment to small group teaching. Tony's experience of teaching quantum physics to mathematicians is reflected in his widely known text on quantum mechanics for mathematicians entitled Quantum Mechanics and the Particles of Nature (Cambridge 1986). In 1994, Tony succeeded John Fountain as Head of Department. The 1990s had been a difficult decade for universities in Britain but John had managed to keep the Department on a sound footing, providing foundations which enabled Tony to develop a growth strategy and realise new opportunities when they arose. Despite these challenges Tony was not to be distracted from his scientific work but started to make his significant contributions to quantum information science. Tony's interests extend beyond mathematics, physics and philosophy: to science fiction, music (both classical and jazz) and theatre - he exercised his thespian talents in his lectures and as a member of the York Shakespeare Project. And his lively mind is matched by a lively body: Tony still plays a mean game of squash and of tennis, and his enthusiastic and acrobatic dancing is most remarkable - it would be no surprise if he were to appear on the popular British TV show 'Strictly Come Dancing'. A man of many parts... On behalf of all contributors to the Festschrift it remains for us to wish Tony many productive and happy years to come in this new phase of his life that he himself characterises with the word 'freedom' (and that surely doesn't match the definition of 'retirement'). There is no doubt that he will utilise this newly-gained freedom to continue to inspire and challenge his fellow scientists with his inquisitive mind and cheerful spirit. York, October 2010 Paul Busch, Maurice Dodson and Atsushi Higuchi Stefan Weigert (editor)

  8. Duality quantum computer and the efficient quantum simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Shi-Jie; Long, Gui-Lu

    2016-03-01

    Duality quantum computing is a new mode of a quantum computer to simulate a moving quantum computer passing through a multi-slit. It exploits the particle wave duality property for computing. A quantum computer with n qubits and a qudit simulates a moving quantum computer with n qubits passing through a d-slit. Duality quantum computing can realize an arbitrary sum of unitaries and therefore a general quantum operator, which is called a generalized quantum gate. All linear bounded operators can be realized by the generalized quantum gates, and unitary operators are just the extreme points of the set of generalized quantum gates. Duality quantum computing provides flexibility and a clear physical picture in designing quantum algorithms, and serves as a powerful bridge between quantum and classical algorithms. In this paper, after a brief review of the theory of duality quantum computing, we will concentrate on the applications of duality quantum computing in simulations of Hamiltonian systems. We will show that duality quantum computing can efficiently simulate quantum systems by providing descriptions of the recent efficient quantum simulation algorithm of Childs and Wiebe (Quantum Inf Comput 12(11-12):901-924, 2012) for the fast simulation of quantum systems with a sparse Hamiltonian, and the quantum simulation algorithm by Berry et al. (Phys Rev Lett 114:090502, 2015), which provides exponential improvement in precision for simulating systems with a sparse Hamiltonian.

  9. Quantum robots plus environments.

    SciTech Connect

    Benioff, P.

    1998-07-23

    A quantum robot is a mobile quantum system, including an on board quantum computer and needed ancillary systems, that interacts with an environment of quantum systems. Quantum robots carry out tasks whose goals include making specified changes in the state of the environment or carrying out measurements on the environment. The environments considered so far, oracles, data bases, and quantum registers, are seen to be special cases of environments considered here. It is also seen that a quantum robot should include a quantum computer and cannot be simply a multistate head. A model of quantum robots and their interactions is discussed in which each task, as a sequence of alternating computation and action phases,is described by a unitary single time step operator T {approx} T{sub a} + T{sub c} (discrete space and time are assumed). The overall system dynamics is described as a sum over paths of completed computation (T{sub c}) and action (T{sub a}) phases. A simple example of a task, measuring the distance between the quantum robot and a particle on a 1D lattice with quantum phase path dispersion present, is analyzed. A decision diagram for the task is presented and analyzed.

  10. Sorting quantum systems efficiently.

    PubMed

    Ionicioiu, Radu

    2016-01-01

    Measuring the state of a quantum system is a fundamental process in quantum mechanics and plays an essential role in quantum information and quantum technologies. One method to measure a quantum observable is to sort the system in different spatial modes according to the measured value, followed by single-particle detectors on each mode. Examples of quantum sorters are polarizing beam-splitters (PBS) - which direct photons according to their polarization - and Stern-Gerlach devices. Here we propose a general scheme to sort a quantum system according to the value of any d-dimensional degree of freedom, such as spin, orbital angular momentum (OAM), wavelength etc. Our scheme is universal, works at the single-particle level and has a theoretical efficiency of 100%. As an application we design an efficient OAM sorter consisting of a single multi-path interferometer which is suitable for a photonic chip implementation. PMID:27142705

  11. Quantum Social Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haven, Emmanuel; Khrennikov, Andrei

    2013-01-01

    Preface; Part I. Physics Concepts in Social Science? A Discussion: 1. Classical, statistical and quantum mechanics: all in one; 2. Econophysics: statistical physics and social science; 3. Quantum social science: a non-mathematical motivation; Part II. Mathematics and Physics Preliminaries: 4. Vector calculus and other mathematical preliminaries; 5. Basic elements of quantum mechanics; 6. Basic elements of Bohmian mechanics; Part III. Quantum Probabilistic Effects in Psychology: Basic Questions and Answers: 7. A brief overview; 8. Interference effects in psychology - an introduction; 9. A quantum-like model of decision making; Part IV. Other Quantum Probabilistic Effects in Economics, Finance and Brain Sciences: 10. Financial/economic theory in crisis; 11. Bohmian mechanics in finance and economics; 12. The Bohm-Vigier Model and path simulation; 13. Other applications to economic/financial theory; 14. The neurophysiological sources of quantum-like processing in the brain; Conclusion; Glossary; Index.

  12. Adiabatic topological quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesare, Chris; Landahl, Andrew J.; Bacon, Dave; Flammia, Steven T.; Neels, Alice

    2015-07-01

    Topological quantum computing promises error-resistant quantum computation without active error correction. However, there is a worry that during the process of executing quantum gates by braiding anyons around each other, extra anyonic excitations will be created that will disorder the encoded quantum information. Here, we explore this question in detail by studying adiabatic code deformations on Hamiltonians based on topological codes, notably Kitaev's surface codes and the more recently discovered color codes. We develop protocols that enable universal quantum computing by adiabatic evolution in a way that keeps the energy gap of the system constant with respect to the computation size and introduces only simple local Hamiltonian interactions. This allows one to perform holonomic quantum computing with these topological quantum computing systems. The tools we develop allow one to go beyond numerical simulations and understand these processes analytically.

  13. Superradiant Quantum Heat Engine.

    PubMed

    Hardal, Ali Ü C; Müstecaplıoğlu, Özgür E

    2015-01-01

    Quantum physics revolutionized classical disciplines of mechanics, statistical physics, and electrodynamics. One branch of scientific knowledge however seems untouched: thermodynamics. Major motivation behind thermodynamics is to develop efficient heat engines. Technology has a trend to miniaturize engines, reaching to quantum regimes. Development of quantum heat engines (QHEs) requires emerging field of quantum thermodynamics. Studies of QHEs debate whether quantum coherence can be used as a resource. We explore an alternative where it can function as an effective catalyst. We propose a QHE which consists of a photon gas inside an optical cavity as the working fluid and quantum coherent atomic clusters as the fuel. Utilizing the superradiance, where a cluster can radiate quadratically faster than a single atom, we show that the work output becomes proportional to the square of the number of the atoms. In addition to practical value of cranking up QHE, our result is a fundamental difference of a quantum fuel from its classical counterpart. PMID:26260797

  14. The New Quantum Logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, Robert B.

    2014-06-01

    It is shown how all the major conceptual difficulties of standard (textbook) quantum mechanics, including the two measurement problems and the (supposed) nonlocality that conflicts with special relativity, are resolved in the consistent or decoherent histories interpretation of quantum mechanics by using a modified form of quantum logic to discuss quantum properties (subspaces of the quantum Hilbert space), and treating quantum time development as a stochastic process. The histories approach in turn gives rise to some conceptual difficulties, in particular the correct choice of a framework (probabilistic sample space) or family of histories, and these are discussed. The central issue is that the principle of unicity, the idea that there is a unique single true description of the world, is incompatible with our current understanding of quantum mechanics.

  15. Superradiant Quantum Heat Engine.

    PubMed

    Hardal, Ali Ü C; Müstecaplıoğlu, Özgür E

    2015-08-11

    Quantum physics revolutionized classical disciplines of mechanics, statistical physics, and electrodynamics. One branch of scientific knowledge however seems untouched: thermodynamics. Major motivation behind thermodynamics is to develop efficient heat engines. Technology has a trend to miniaturize engines, reaching to quantum regimes. Development of quantum heat engines (QHEs) requires emerging field of quantum thermodynamics. Studies of QHEs debate whether quantum coherence can be used as a resource. We explore an alternative where it can function as an effective catalyst. We propose a QHE which consists of a photon gas inside an optical cavity as the working fluid and quantum coherent atomic clusters as the fuel. Utilizing the superradiance, where a cluster can radiate quadratically faster than a single atom, we show that the work output becomes proportional to the square of the number of the atoms. In addition to practical value of cranking up QHE, our result is a fundamental difference of a quantum fuel from its classical counterpart.

  16. Superradiant Quantum Heat Engine

    PubMed Central

    Hardal, Ali Ü. C.; Müstecaplıoğlu, Özgür E.

    2015-01-01

    Quantum physics revolutionized classical disciplines of mechanics, statistical physics, and electrodynamics. One branch of scientific knowledge however seems untouched: thermodynamics. Major motivation behind thermodynamics is to develop efficient heat engines. Technology has a trend to miniaturize engines, reaching to quantum regimes. Development of quantum heat engines (QHEs) requires emerging field of quantum thermodynamics. Studies of QHEs debate whether quantum coherence can be used as a resource. We explore an alternative where it can function as an effective catalyst. We propose a QHE which consists of a photon gas inside an optical cavity as the working fluid and quantum coherent atomic clusters as the fuel. Utilizing the superradiance, where a cluster can radiate quadratically faster than a single atom, we show that the work output becomes proportional to the square of the number of the atoms. In addition to practical value of cranking up QHE, our result is a fundamental difference of a quantum fuel from its classical counterpart. PMID:26260797

  17. Holographic Quantum States

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, Tobias J.; Eisert, Jens; Verstraete, Frank

    2010-12-31

    We show how continuous matrix product states of quantum fields can be described in terms of the dissipative nonequilibrium dynamics of a lower-dimensional auxiliary boundary field by demonstrating that the spatial correlation functions of the bulk field correspond to the temporal statistics of the boundary field. This equivalence (1) illustrates an intimate connection between the theory of continuous quantum measurement and quantum field theory, (2) gives an explicit construction of the boundary field allowing the extension of real-space renormalization group methods to arbitrary dimensional quantum field theories without the introduction of a lattice parameter, and (3) yields a novel interpretation of recent cavity QED experiments in terms of quantum field theory, and hence paves the way toward observing genuine quantum phase transitions in such zero-dimensional driven quantum systems.

  18. Sorting quantum systems efficiently

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionicioiu, Radu

    2016-05-01

    Measuring the state of a quantum system is a fundamental process in quantum mechanics and plays an essential role in quantum information and quantum technologies. One method to measure a quantum observable is to sort the system in different spatial modes according to the measured value, followed by single-particle detectors on each mode. Examples of quantum sorters are polarizing beam-splitters (PBS) – which direct photons according to their polarization – and Stern-Gerlach devices. Here we propose a general scheme to sort a quantum system according to the value of any d-dimensional degree of freedom, such as spin, orbital angular momentum (OAM), wavelength etc. Our scheme is universal, works at the single-particle level and has a theoretical efficiency of 100%. As an application we design an efficient OAM sorter consisting of a single multi-path interferometer which is suitable for a photonic chip implementation.

  19. Sorting quantum systems efficiently

    PubMed Central

    Ionicioiu, Radu

    2016-01-01

    Measuring the state of a quantum system is a fundamental process in quantum mechanics and plays an essential role in quantum information and quantum technologies. One method to measure a quantum observable is to sort the system in different spatial modes according to the measured value, followed by single-particle detectors on each mode. Examples of quantum sorters are polarizing beam-splitters (PBS) – which direct photons according to their polarization – and Stern-Gerlach devices. Here we propose a general scheme to sort a quantum system according to the value of any d-dimensional degree of freedom, such as spin, orbital angular momentum (OAM), wavelength etc. Our scheme is universal, works at the single-particle level and has a theoretical efficiency of 100%. As an application we design an efficient OAM sorter consisting of a single multi-path interferometer which is suitable for a photonic chip implementation. PMID:27142705

  20. Spectral methods in quantum field theory and quantum cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Giampiero; Fucci, Guglielmo; Kamenshchik, Alexander Yu; Kirsten, Klaus

    2012-09-01

    We review the application of the spectral zeta function to the one-loop properties of quantum field theories on manifolds with boundary, with emphasis on Euclidean quantum gravity and quantum cosmology. As was shown in the literature some time ago, the only boundary conditions that are completely invariant under infinitesimal diffeomorphisms on metric perturbations suffer from a drawback, i.e. lack of strong ellipticity of the resulting boundary-value problem. Nevertheless, at least on the Euclidean 4-ball background, it remains possible to evaluate the ζ(0) value, which describes in this case a universe which, in the limit of small 3-geometry, has vanishing probability of approaching the cosmological singularity. An assessment of this result is performed here, discussing its physical and mathematical implications. This article is part of a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical in honour of Stuart Dowker’s 75th birthday devoted to ‘Applications of zeta functions and other spectral functions in mathematics and physics’.

  1. Recent progress of quantum annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Sei

    2015-03-10

    We review the recent progress of quantum annealing. Quantum annealing was proposed as a method to solve generic optimization problems. Recently a Canadian company has drawn a great deal of attention, as it has commercialized a quantum computer based on quantum annealing. Although the performance of quantum annealing is not sufficiently understood, it is likely that quantum annealing will be a practical method both on a conventional computer and on a quantum computer.

  2. Quantum Information and Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accardi, L.; Ohya, Masanori; Watanabe, N.

    2006-03-01

    Preface -- Coherent quantum control of [symbol]-atoms through the stochastic limit / L. Accardi, S. V. Kozyrev and A. N. Pechen -- Recent advances in quantum white noise calculus / L. Accardi and A. Boukas -- Control of quantum states by decoherence / L. Accardi and K. Imafuku -- Logical operations realized on the Ising chain of N qubits / M. Asano, N. Tateda and C. Ishii -- Joint extension of states of fermion subsystems / H. Araki -- Quantum filtering and optimal feedback control of a Gaussian quantum free particle / S. C. Edwards and V. P. Belavkin -- On existence of quantum zeno dynamics / P. Exner and T. Ichinose -- Invariant subspaces and control of decoherence / P. Facchi, V. L. Lepore and S. Pascazio -- Clauser-Horner inequality for electron counting statistics in multiterminal mesoscopic conductors / L. Faoro, F. Taddei and R. Fazio -- Fidelity of quantum teleportation model using beam splittings / K.-H. Fichtner, T. Miyadera and M. Ohya -- Quantum logical gates realized by beam splittings / W. Freudenberg ... [et al.] -- Information divergence for quantum channels / S. J. Hammersley and V. P. Belavkin -- On the uniqueness theorem in quantum information geometry / H. Hasegawa -- Noncanonical representations of a multi-dimensional Brownian motion / Y. Hibino -- Some of future directions of white noise theory / T. Hida -- Information, innovation and elemental random field / T. Hida -- Generalized quantum turing machine and its application to the SAT chaos algorithm / S. Iriyama, M. Ohya and I. Volovich -- A Stroboscopic approach to quantum tomography / A. Jamiolkowski -- Positive maps and separable states in matrix algebras / A. Kossakowski -- Simulating open quantum systems with trapped ions / S. Maniscalco -- A purification scheme and entanglement distillations / H. Nakazato, M. Unoki and K. Yuasa -- Generalized sectors and adjunctions to control micro-macro transitions / I. Ojima -- Saturation of an entropy bound and quantum Markov states / D. Petz -- An

  3. Quantum coherence and quantum phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan-Chao; Lin, Hai-Qing

    2016-05-01

    We study the connections between local quantum coherence (LQC) based on Wigner-Yanase skew information and quantum phase transitions (QPTs). When applied on the one-dimensional Hubbard, XY spin chain with three-spin interaction, and Su-Schrieffer-Heeger models, the LQC and its derivatives are used successfully to detect different types of QPTs in these spin and fermionic systems. Furthermore, the LQC is effective as the quantum discord (QD) in detecting QPTs at finite temperatures, where the entanglement has lost its effectiveness. We also demonstrate that the LQC can exhibit different behaviors in many forms compared with the QD.

  4. Quantum gravitational contributions to quantum electrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Toms, David J

    2010-11-01

    Quantum electrodynamics describes the interactions of electrons and photons. Electric charge (the gauge coupling constant) is energy dependent, and there is a previous claim that charge is affected by gravity (described by general relativity) with the implication that the charge is reduced at high energies. However, that claim has been very controversial and the matter has not been settled. Here I report an analysis (free from the earlier controversies) demonstrating that quantum gravity corrections to quantum electrodynamics have a quadratic energy dependence that result in the electric charge vanishing at high energies, a result known as asymptotic freedom.

  5. Lateral Quantum Dots for Quantum Information Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    House, Matthew Gregory

    The possibility of building a computer that takes advantage of the most subtle nature of quantum physics has been driving a lot of research in atomic and solid state physics for some time. It is still not clear what physical system or systems can be used for this purpose. One possibility that has been attracting significant attention from researchers is to use the spin state of an electron confined in a semiconductor quantum dot. The electron spin is magnetic in nature, so it naturally is well isolated from electrical fluctuations that can a loss of quantum coherence. It can also be manipulated electrically, by taking advantage of the exchange interaction. In this work we describe several experiments we have done to study the electron spin properties of lateral quantum dots. We have developed lateral quantum dot devices based on the silicon metal-oxide-semiconductor transistor, and studied the physics of electrons confined in these quantum dots. We measured the electron spin excited state lifetime, which was found to be as long as 30 ms at the lowest magnetic fields that we could measure. We fabricated and characterized a silicon double quantum dot. Using this double quantum dot design, we fabricated devices which combined a silicon double quantum dot with a superconducting microwave resonator. The microwave resonator was found to be sensitive to two-dimensional electrons in the transistor channel, which we measured and characterized. We developed a new method for extracting information from random telegraph signals, which are produced when we observe thermal fluctuations of electrons in quantum dots. The new statistical method, based on the hidden Markov model, allows us to detect spin-dependent effects in such fluctuations even though we are not able to directly observe the electron spin. We use this analysis technique on data from two experiments involving gallium arsenide quantum dots and use it to measure spin-dependent tunneling rates. Our results advance the

  6. Transport in small and/or random systems. Progress report, June 1986--May 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Lax, M.

    1987-05-14

    This report discusses: transport in small systems; electron-phonon interactions in quantum wells; noise in small systems; laser propagation in the atmosphere; laser-aerosol interactions; transport properties of carriers in semiconductor quantum wells; light transmission in a particulate medium; and laser generation of shock waves in droplets. (LSP)

  7. Wave turbulence in quantum fluids

    PubMed Central

    Kolmakov, German V.; McClintock, Peter Vaughan Elsmere; Nazarenko, Sergey V.

    2014-01-01

    Wave turbulence (WT) occurs in systems of strongly interacting nonlinear waves and can lead to energy flows across length and frequency scales much like those that are well known in vortex turbulence. Typically, the energy passes although a nondissipative inertial range until it reaches a small enough scale that viscosity becomes important and terminates the cascade by dissipating the energy as heat. Wave turbulence in quantum fluids is of particular interest, partly because revealing experiments can be performed on a laboratory scale, and partly because WT among the Kelvin waves on quantized vortices is believed to play a crucial role in the final stages of the decay of (vortex) quantum turbulence. In this short review, we provide a perspective on recent work on WT in quantum fluids, setting it in context and discussing the outlook for the next few years. We outline the theory, review briefly the experiments carried out to date using liquid H2 and liquid 4He, and discuss some nonequilibrium excitonic superfluids in which WT has been predicted but not yet observed experimentally. By way of conclusion, we consider the medium- and longer-term outlook for the field. PMID:24704881

  8. Quantum chaos in nanoelectromechanical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusso, André; da Luz, M. G. E.; Rego, Luis G. C.

    2006-01-01

    We present a theoretical study of the electron-phonon coupling in suspended nanoelectromechanical systems and investigate the resulting quantum chaotic behavior. The phonons are associated with the vibrational modes of a suspended rectangular dielectric plate, with free or clamped boundary conditions, whereas the electrons are confined to a large quantum dot (QD) on the plate’s surface. The deformation potential and piezoelectric interactions are considered. By performing standard energy-level statistics we demonstrate that the spectral fluctuations exhibit the same distributions as those of the Gaussian orthogonal ensemble or the Gaussian unitary ensemble (GUE), therefore evidencing the emergence of quantum chaos. That is verified for a large range of material and geometry parameters. In particular, the GUE statistics occurs only in the case of a circular QD. It represents an anomalous phenomenon, previously reported for just a small number of systems, since the problem is time-reversal invariant. The obtained results are explained through a detailed analysis of the Hamiltonian matrix structure.

  9. Dissipative Properties of Quantum Systems

    PubMed Central

    Grecos, A. P.; Prigogine, I.

    1972-01-01

    We consider the dissipative properties of large quantum systems from the point of view of kinetic theory. The existence of a nontrivial collision operator imposes restrictions on the possible collisional invariants of the system. We consider a model in which a discrete level is coupled to a set of quantum states and which, in the limit of a large “volume,” becomes the Friedrichs model. Because of its simplicity this model allows a direct calculation of the collision operator as well as of related operators and the constants of the motion. For a degenerate spectrum the calculations become more involved but the conclusions remain simple. The special role played by the invariants that are functions of the Hamiltonion is shown to be a direct consequence of the existence of a nonvanishing collision operator. For a class of observables we obtain ergodic behavior, and this reformulation of the ergodic problem may be used in statistical mechanics to study the ergodicity of large quantum systems containing a small physical parameter such as the coupling constant or the concentration. PMID:16591994

  10. Cyclic groups and quantum logic gates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourkia, Arash; Batle, J.; Raymond Ooi, C. H.

    2016-10-01

    We present a formula for an infinite number of universal quantum logic gates, which are 4 by 4 unitary solutions to the Yang-Baxter (Y-B) equation. We obtain this family from a certain representation of the cyclic group of order n. We then show that this discrete family, parametrized by integers n, is in fact, a small sub-class of a larger continuous family, parametrized by real numbers θ, of universal quantum gates. We discuss the corresponding Yang-Baxterization and related symmetries in the concomitant Hamiltonian.

  11. Quantum gravity extension of the inflationary scenario.

    PubMed

    Agullo, Ivan; Ashtekar, Abhay; Nelson, William

    2012-12-21

    Since the standard inflationary paradigm is based on quantum field theory on classical space-times, it excludes the Planck era. Using techniques from loop quantum gravity, the paradigm is extended to a self-consistent theory from the Planck scale to the onset of slow roll inflation, covering some 11 orders of magnitude in energy density and curvature. This preinflationary dynamics also opens a small window for novel effects, e.g., a source for non-Gaussianities, which could extend the reach of cosmological observations to the deep Planck regime of the early Universe. PMID:23368448

  12. Quantum Plasma Effects in the Classical Regime

    SciTech Connect

    Brodin, G.; Marklund, M.; Manfredi, G.

    2008-05-02

    For quantum effects to be significant in plasmas it is often assumed that the temperature over density ratio must be small. In this paper we challenge this assumption by considering the contribution to the dynamics from the electron spin properties. As a starting point we consider a multicomponent plasma model, where electrons with spin-up and spin-down are regarded as different fluids. By studying the propagation of Alfven wave solitons we demonstrate that quantum effects can survive in a relatively high-temperature plasma. The consequences of our results are discussed.

  13. Quantum gravity extension of the inflationary scenario.

    PubMed

    Agullo, Ivan; Ashtekar, Abhay; Nelson, William

    2012-12-21

    Since the standard inflationary paradigm is based on quantum field theory on classical space-times, it excludes the Planck era. Using techniques from loop quantum gravity, the paradigm is extended to a self-consistent theory from the Planck scale to the onset of slow roll inflation, covering some 11 orders of magnitude in energy density and curvature. This preinflationary dynamics also opens a small window for novel effects, e.g., a source for non-Gaussianities, which could extend the reach of cosmological observations to the deep Planck regime of the early Universe.

  14. Geometry of Quantum States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bengtsson, Ingemar; Zyczkowski, Karol

    2006-05-01

    Quantum information theory is at the frontiers of physics, mathematics and information science, offering a variety of solutions that are impossible using classical theory. This book provides an introduction to the key concepts used in processing quantum information and reveals that quantum mechanics is a generalisation of classical probability theory. After a gentle introduction to the necessary mathematics the authors describe the geometry of quantum state spaces. Focusing on finite dimensional Hilbert spaces, they discuss the statistical distance measures and entropies used in quantum theory. The final part of the book is devoted to quantum entanglement - a non-intuitive phenomenon discovered by Schrödinger, which has become a key resource for quantum computation. This richly-illustrated book is useful to a broad audience of graduates and researchers interested in quantum information theory. Exercises follow each chapter, with hints and answers supplied. The first book to focus on the geometry of quantum states Stresses the similarities and differences between classical and quantum theory Uses a non-technical style and numerous figures to make the book accessible to non-specialists

  15. Quantum digital signatures without quantum memory.

    PubMed

    Dunjko, Vedran; Wallden, Petros; Andersson, Erika

    2014-01-31

    Quantum digital signatures (QDSs) allow the sending of messages from one sender to multiple recipients, with the guarantee that messages cannot be forged or tampered with. Additionally, messages cannot be repudiated--if one recipient accepts a message, she is guaranteed that others will accept the same message as well. While messaging with these types of security guarantees are routinely performed in the modern digital world, current technologies only offer security under computational assumptions. QDSs, on the other hand, offer security guaranteed by quantum mechanics. All thus far proposed variants of QDSs require long-term, high quality quantum memory, making them unfeasible in the foreseeable future. Here, we present a QDS scheme where no quantum memory is required, which also needs just linear optics. This makes QDSs feasible with current technology.

  16. Towards quantum chemistry on a quantum computer.

    PubMed

    Lanyon, B P; Whitfield, J D; Gillett, G G; Goggin, M E; Almeida, M P; Kassal, I; Biamonte, J D; Mohseni, M; Powell, B J; Barbieri, M; Aspuru-Guzik, A; White, A G

    2010-02-01

    Exact first-principles calculations of molecular properties are currently intractable because their computational cost grows exponentially with both the number of atoms and basis set size. A solution is to move to a radically different model of computing by building a quantum computer, which is a device that uses quantum systems themselves to store and process data. Here we report the application of the latest photonic quantum computer technology to calculate properties of the smallest molecular system: the hydrogen molecule in a minimal basis. We calculate the complete energy spectrum to 20 bits of precision and discuss how the technique can be expanded to solve large-scale chemical problems that lie beyond the reach of modern supercomputers. These results represent an early practical step toward a powerful tool with a broad range of quantum-chemical applications. PMID:21124400

  17. Quantum secret sharing with minimized quantum communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortescue, Ben; Gour, Gilad

    2013-03-01

    Standard techniques for sharing a quantum secret among multiple players (such that certain subsets of the players can recover the secret while others are denied all knowledge of the secret) require a large amount of quantum communication to distribute the secret, which is likely to be the most costly resource in any practical scheme. Two known methods for reducing this cost are the use of imperfect ``ramp'' secret sharing (in which security is sacrificed for efficiency) and classical encryption (in which certain elements of the players' shares consist of classical information only). We demonstrate how one may combine these methods to reduce the required quantum communication below what has been previously achieved, in some cases to a provable minimum, without any loss of security. The techniques involved are closely-related to the properties of stabilizer codes, and thus have strong potential for being adapted to a wide range of quantum secret sharing schemes.

  18. Decoherence in quantum mechanics and quantum cosmology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartle, James B.

    1992-01-01

    A sketch of the quantum mechanics for closed systems adequate for cosmology is presented. This framework is an extension and clarification of that of Everett and builds on several aspects of the post-Everett development. It especially builds on the work of Zeh, Zurek, Joos and Zeh, and others on the interactions of quantum systems with the larger universe and on the ideas of Griffiths, Omnes, and others on the requirements for consistent probabilities of histories.

  19. Quantum discord and Maxwell's demons

    SciTech Connect

    Zurek, Wojciech Hubert

    2003-01-01

    Quantum discord was proposed as an information-theoretic measure of the 'quantumness' of correlations. I show that discord determines the difference between the efficiency of quantum and classical Maxwell's demons - that is, entities that can or cannot measure nonlocal observables or carry out conditional quantum operations - in extracting work from collections of correlated quantum systems.

  20. Quantum Paradoxes: Quantum Theory for the Perplexed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aharonov, Yakir; Rohrlich, Daniel

    2003-09-01

    A Guide through the Mysteries of Quantum Physics! Yakir Aharonov is one of the pioneers in measuring theory, the nature of quantum correlations, superselection rules, and geometric phases and has been awarded numerous scientific honors. The author has contributed monumental concepts to theoretical physics, especially the Aharonov-Bohm effect and the Aharonov-Casher effect. Together with Daniel Rohrlich of the Weizmann Institute, Israel, he has written a pioneering work on the remaining mysteries of quantum mechanics. From the perspective of a preeminent researcher in the fundamental aspects of quantum mechanics, the text combines mathematical rigor with penetrating and concise language. More than 200 problem sets introduce readers to the concepts and implications of quantum mechanics that have arisen from the experimental results of the recent two decades. With students as well as researchers in mind, the authors give an insight into that part of the field, which led Feynman to declare that "nobody understands quantum mechanics". For a solutions manual, lecturers should contact the editorial department at vch-physics@wiley-vch.de, stating their affiliation and the course in which they wish to use the book.

  1. Theory of Quantum Loschmidt Echoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosen, T.; Seligman, T. H.; Žnidarič, M.

    In this paper we review our recent work on the theoretical approach to quantum Loschmidt echoes, i.e., various properties of the so-called echo dynamics -- the composition of forward and backward time evolutions generated by two slightly different Hamiltonians, such as the state autocorrelation function (fidelity) and the purity of a reduced density matrix traced over a subsystem (purity fidelity). Our main theoretical result is a linear response formalism, expressing the fidelity and purity fidelity in terms of integrated time autocorrelation function of the generator of the perturbation. Surprisingly, this relation predicts that the decay of fidelity is the slower the faster the decay of correlations. In particular for a static (time-independent) perturbation, and for non-ergodic and non-mixing dynamics where asymptotic decay of correlations is absent, a qualitatively different and faster decay of fidelity is predicted on a time scale ∝ 1/δ as opposed to mixing dynamics where the fidelity is found to decay exponentially on a time-scale ∝ 1/δ2, where δ is a strength of perturbation. A detailed discussion of a semi-classical regime of small effective values of Planck constant hbar is given where classical correlation functions can be used to predict quantum fidelity decay. Note that the correct and intuitively expected classical stability behavior is recovered in the classical limit hbarto 0, as the two limits δto 0 and hbarto 0 do not commute. The theoretical results are demonstrated numerically for two models, the quantized kicked top and the multi-level Jaynes Cummings model. Our method can for example be applied to the stability analysis of quantum computation and quantum information processing.

  2. Varying constants quantum cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Leszczyńska, Katarzyna; Balcerzak, Adam; Dabrowski, Mariusz P. E-mail: abalcerz@wmf.univ.szczecin.pl

    2015-02-01

    We discuss minisuperspace models within the framework of varying physical constants theories including Λ-term. In particular, we consider the varying speed of light (VSL) theory and varying gravitational constant theory (VG) using the specific ansätze for the variability of constants: c(a) = c{sub 0} a{sup n} and G(a)=G{sub 0} a{sup q}. We find that most of the varying c and G minisuperspace potentials are of the tunneling type which allows to use WKB approximation of quantum mechanics. Using this method we show that the probability of tunneling of the universe ''from nothing'' (a=0) to a Friedmann geometry with the scale factor a{sub t} is large for growing c models and is strongly suppressed for diminishing c models. As for G varying, the probability of tunneling is large for G diminishing, while it is small for G increasing. In general, both varying c and G change the probability of tunneling in comparison to the standard matter content (cosmological term, dust, radiation) universe models.

  3. Quantum random oracle model for quantum digital signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Tao; Lei, Qi; Liu, Jianwei

    2016-10-01

    The goal of this work is to provide a general security analysis tool, namely, the quantum random oracle (QRO), for facilitating the security analysis of quantum cryptographic protocols, especially protocols based on quantum one-way function. QRO is used to model quantum one-way function and different queries to QRO are used to model quantum attacks. A typical application of quantum one-way function is the quantum digital signature, whose progress has been hampered by the slow pace of the experimental realization. Alternatively, we use the QRO model to analyze the provable security of a quantum digital signature scheme and elaborate the analysis procedure. The QRO model differs from the prior quantum-accessible random oracle in that it can output quantum states as public keys and give responses to different queries. This tool can be a test bed for the cryptanalysis of more quantum cryptographic protocols based on the quantum one-way function.

  4. Procedural Quantum Programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ömer, Bernhard

    2002-09-01

    While classical computing science has developed a variety of methods and programming languages around the concept of the universal computer, the typical description of quantum algorithms still uses a purely mathematical, non-constructive formalism which makes no difference between a hydrogen atom and a quantum computer. This paper investigates, how the concept of procedural programming languages, the most widely used classical formalism for describing and implementing algorithms, can be adopted to the field of quantum computing, and how non-classical features like the reversibility of unitary transformations, the non-observability of quantum states or the lack of copy and erase operations can be reflected semantically. It introduces the key concepts of procedural quantum programming (hybrid target architecture, operator hierarchy, quantum data types, memory management, etc.) and presents the experimental language QCL, which implements these principles.

  5. Quantum Entanglement and Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeilinger, Anton

    2002-04-01

    The development of quantum entanglement presents a very interesting and typical case how fundamental reasearch leads to new technologically interesting concepts. Initially it was introduced by Einstein and Schroedinger because of its philosophical interest. This, together with Bell's theorem, led to experiments beginning in the early 1970-s which also were only motivated by their importance for the foundations of physics. Most remarkably, in recent years people discovered that quantum entanglement can be useful in completely novel ways of transmitting and processing of information with no analog in classical physics. Here the most developed areas are quantum communication, quantum cryptography, quantum teleportation and quantum computation. In the talk I will present the basics of these applications of entanglement and I will discuss some existing experimental realisations. Finally I will argue that, while it is impossible to foresee where the present development will lead us, it is very likely that in the end a novel kind of information technology will emerge.

  6. Towards Quantum Plasmonic Networks

    DOE PAGES

    Holtfrerich, M.W.; Dowran, M.; Lawrie, Benjamin J; Pooser, Raphael C; Marino, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the transduction of macroscopic quantum entanglement by independent, distant plasmonic structures embedded in separate thin silver films. In particular, we show that the plasmon-mediated transmission through each film conserves spatially dependent, entangled quantum images, opening the door for the implementation of parallel quantum protocols, super-resolution imaging, and quantum plasmonic sensing geometries at the nanoscale level. The conservation of quantum information by the transduction process shows that continuous variable multi-mode entanglement is momentarily transferred from entangled beams of light to the space-like separated, completely independent plasmonic structures, thus providing a first important step toward establishing a multichannel quantum networkmore » across separate solid-state substrates.« less

  7. Practical quantum digital signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Hua-Lei; Fu, Yao; Chen, Zeng-Bing

    2016-03-01

    Guaranteeing nonrepudiation, unforgeability as well as transferability of a signature is one of the most vital safeguards in today's e-commerce era. Based on fundamental laws of quantum physics, quantum digital signature (QDS) aims to provide information-theoretic security for this cryptographic task. However, up to date, the previously proposed QDS protocols are impractical due to various challenging problems and most importantly, the requirement of authenticated (secure) quantum channels between participants. Here, we present the first quantum digital signature protocol that removes the assumption of authenticated quantum channels while remaining secure against the collective attacks. Besides, our QDS protocol can be practically implemented over more than 100 km under current mature technology as used in quantum key distribution.

  8. Towards Quantum Plasmonic Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Holtfrerich, M.W.; Dowran, M.; Lawrie, Benjamin J; Pooser, Raphael C; Marino, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the transduction of macroscopic quantum entanglement by independent, distant plasmonic structures embedded in separate thin silver films. In particular, we show that the plasmon-mediated transmission through each film conserves spatially dependent, entangled quantum images, opening the door for the implementation of parallel quantum protocols, super-resolution imaging, and quantum plasmonic sensing geometries at the nanoscale level. The conservation of quantum information by the transduction process shows that continuous variable multi-mode entanglement is momentarily transferred from entangled beams of light to the space-like separated, completely independent plasmonic structures, thus providing a first important step toward establishing a multichannel quantum network across separate solid-state substrates.

  9. Quantum Zeno effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrosky, T.; Tasaki, S.; Prigogine, I.

    1991-01-01

    In 1977, Misra and Sudarshan showed, based on the quantum measurement theory, that an unstable particle will never be found to decay when it is continuously observed. They called it the quantum Zeno effect (or paradox). More generally the quantum Zeno effect is associated to the inhibition of transitions by frequent measurements. This possibility has attracted much interest over the last years. Recently, Itano, Heinzen, Bollinger and Wineland have reported that they succeeded in observing the quantum Zeno effect. This would indeed be an important step towards the understanding of the role of the observer in quantum mechanics. However, in the present paper, we will show that their results can be recovered through conventional quantum mechanics and do not involve a repeated reduction (or collapse) of the wave function.

  10. Focus on quantum efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchleitner, Andreas; Burghardt, Irene; Cheng, Yuan-Chung; Scholes, Gregory D.; Schwarz, Ulrich T.; Weber-Bargioni, Alexander; Wellens, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    Technologies which convert light into energy, and vice versa, rely on complex, microscopic transport processes in the condensed phase, which obey the laws of quantum mechanics, but hitherto lack systematic analysis and modeling. Given our much improved understanding of multicomponent, disordered, highly structured, open quantum systems, this ‘focus on’ collection collects cutting-edge research on theoretical and experimental aspects of quantum transport in truly complex systems as defined, e.g., by the macromolecular functional complexes at the heart of photosynthesis, by organic quantum wires, or even photovoltaic devices. To what extent microscopic quantum coherence effects can (be made to) impact on macroscopic transport behavior is an equally challenging and controversial question, and this ‘focus on’ collection provides a setting for the present state of affairs, as well as for the ‘quantum opportunities’ on the horizon.

  11. Quantum physics meets biology.

    PubMed

    Arndt, Markus; Juffmann, Thomas; Vedral, Vlatko

    2009-12-01

    Quantum physics and biology have long been regarded as unrelated disciplines, describing nature at the inanimate microlevel on the one hand and living species on the other hand. Over the past decades the life sciences have succeeded in providing ever more and refined explanations of macroscopic phenomena that were based on an improved understanding of molecular structures and mechanisms. Simultaneously, quantum physics, originally rooted in a world-view of quantum coherences, entanglement, and other nonclassical effects, has been heading toward systems of increasing complexity. The present perspective article shall serve as a "pedestrian guide" to the growing interconnections between the two fields. We recapitulate the generic and sometimes unintuitive characteristics of quantum physics and point to a number of applications in the life sciences. We discuss our criteria for a future "quantum biology," its current status, recent experimental progress, and also the restrictions that nature imposes on bold extrapolations of quantum theory to macroscopic phenomena.

  12. Asymptotically Disjoint Quantum States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Primas, Hans

    A clarification of the heuristic concept of decoherence requires a consistent description of the classical behavior of some quantum Systems. We adopt algebraic quantum mechanics since it includes not only classical physics, but also permits a judicious concept of a classical mixture and explains the possibility of the emergence of a classical behavior of quantum Systems. A nonpure quantum state tan be interpreted as a classical mixture if and only if its components are disjoint. Here, two pure quantum states are called disjoint if there exists an element of the Center of the algebra of observables such that its expectation values with respect to these states are different. An appropriate automorphic dynamics tan transform a factor state into a classical mixture of asymptotically disjoint final states. Such asymptotically disjoint quantum states lead to regular decision Problems while exactly disjoint states evoke Singular Problems which engineers reject as improperly posed.

  13. Complex quantum network geometries: Evolution and phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Bianconi, Ginestra; Rahmede, Christoph; Wu, Zhihao

    2015-08-01

    Networks are topological and geometric structures used to describe systems as different as the Internet, the brain, or the quantum structure of space-time. Here we define complex quantum network geometries, describing the underlying structure of growing simplicial 2-complexes, i.e., simplicial complexes formed by triangles. These networks are geometric networks with energies of the links that grow according to a nonequilibrium dynamics. The evolution in time of the geometric networks is a classical evolution describing a given path of a path integral defining the evolution of quantum network states. The quantum network states are characterized by quantum occupation numbers that can be mapped, respectively, to the nodes, links, and triangles incident to each link of the network. We call the geometric networks describing the evolution of quantum network states the quantum geometric networks. The quantum geometric networks have many properties common to complex networks, including small-world property, high clustering coefficient, high modularity, and scale-free degree distribution. Moreover, they can be distinguished between the Fermi-Dirac network and the Bose-Einstein network obeying, respectively, the Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein statistics. We show that these networks can undergo structural phase transitions where the geometrical properties of the networks change drastically. Finally, we comment on the relation between quantum complex network geometries, spin networks, and triangulations.

  14. Complex quantum network geometries: Evolution and phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianconi, Ginestra; Rahmede, Christoph; Wu, Zhihao

    2015-08-01

    Networks are topological and geometric structures used to describe systems as different as the Internet, the brain, or the quantum structure of space-time. Here we define complex quantum network geometries, describing the underlying structure of growing simplicial 2-complexes, i.e., simplicial complexes formed by triangles. These networks are geometric networks with energies of the links that grow according to a nonequilibrium dynamics. The evolution in time of the geometric networks is a classical evolution describing a given path of a path integral defining the evolution of quantum network states. The quantum network states are characterized by quantum occupation numbers that can be mapped, respectively, to the nodes, links, and triangles incident to each link of the network. We call the geometric networks describing the evolution of quantum network states the quantum geometric networks. The quantum geometric networks have many properties common to complex networks, including small-world property, high clustering coefficient, high modularity, and scale-free degree distribution. Moreover, they can be distinguished between the Fermi-Dirac network and the Bose-Einstein network obeying, respectively, the Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein statistics. We show that these networks can undergo structural phase transitions where the geometrical properties of the networks change drastically. Finally, we comment on the relation between quantum complex network geometries, spin networks, and triangulations.

  15. Relationship between quantum repeating devices and quantum seals

    SciTech Connect

    He Guangping

    2009-07-15

    It is revealed that quantum repeating devices and quantum seals have a very close relationship, thus the theory in one field can be applied to the other. Consequently, it is shown that the fidelity bounds and optimality of quantum repeating devices for decoding quantum information can be violated when they are used for decoding classical information from quantum states and the security bounds for protocols sealing quantum data exist.

  16. Relating quantum discord with the quantum dense coding capacity

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xin; Qiu, Liang Li, Song; Zhang, Chi; Ye, Bin

    2015-01-15

    We establish the relations between quantum discord and the quantum dense coding capacity in (n + 1)-particle quantum states. A necessary condition for the vanishing discord monogamy score is given. We also find that the loss of quantum dense coding capacity due to decoherence is bounded below by the sum of quantum discord. When these results are restricted to three-particle quantum states, some complementarity relations are obtained.

  17. Secure quantum key distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Hoi-Kwong; Curty, Marcos; Tamaki, Kiyoshi

    2014-08-01

    Secure communication is crucial in the Internet Age, and quantum mechanics stands poised to revolutionize cryptography as we know it today. In this Review, we introduce the motivation and the current state of the art of research in quantum cryptography. In particular, we discuss the present security model together with its assumptions, strengths and weaknesses. After briefly introducing recent experimental progress and challenges, we survey the latest developments in quantum hacking and countermeasures against it.

  18. Quantum Spread Spectrum Communication

    SciTech Connect

    Humble, Travis S

    2011-01-01

    We show that communication of single-photon quantum states in a multi-user environment is improved by using spread spectrum communication techniques. We describe a framework for spreading, transmitting, despreading, and detecting single-photon spectral states that mimics conventional spread spectrum techniques. We show in the cases of inadvertent detection, unintentional interference, and multi-user management, that quantum spread spectrum communications may minimize receiver errors by managing quantum channel access.

  19. Unconditional quantum teleportation

    PubMed

    Furusawa; Sorensen; Braunstein; Fuchs; Kimble; Polzik

    1998-10-23

    Quantum teleportation of optical coherent states was demonstrated experimentally using squeezed-state entanglement. The quantum nature of the achieved teleportation was verified by the experimentally determined fidelity Fexp = 0.58 +/- 0.02, which describes the match between input and output states. A fidelity greater than 0.5 is not possible for coherent states without the use of entanglement. This is the first realization of unconditional quantum teleportation where every state entering the device is actually teleported.

  20. Simulation on quantum authentication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobšíček, M.

    2007-03-01

    This paper divides into two main parts. The first one discusses authentication of quantum messages. The protocol proposed in [1] for one qubit message-length case is especially considered. The protocol uses a shared EPR pair as a secret key. In the second part, it is shown how such a protocol can be simulated using the Quantum-Octave package. Quantum-Octave is a set of functions for a Matlab-like numerical environment allowing calculations with general density matrices.

  1. Facing quantum mechanical reality.

    PubMed

    Rohrlich, F

    1983-09-23

    Two recent precision experiments provide conclusive evidence against any local hidden variables theory and in favor of standard quantum mechanics. Therefore the epistemology and the ontology of quantum mechanics must now be taken more seriously than ever before. The consequences of the standard interpretation of quantum mechanics are summarized in nontechnical language. The implications of the finiteness of Planck's constant (h > 0) for the quantum world are as strange as the implications of the finiteness of the speed of light (c < infinity for space and time in relativity theory. Both lead to realities beyond our common experience that cannot be rejected.

  2. Irreversibility with quantum trajectories.

    PubMed

    Wisniacki, D A; Borondo, F; Benito, R M

    2005-10-01

    Irreversibility is an important issue for many quantum processes. Loschmidt echoes, originally introduced as a way to gauge sensitivity to perturbations in quantum mechanics, have turned out to be a useful tool for its investigation. Following the philosophy supporting this idea, and using quantum trajectories as defined in the causal interpretation of quantum mechanics due to Bohm, we introduce in this paper a more informative alternative measure for irreversibility. The method is applied to the Bunimovich stadium billiard, a paradigmatic example of chaotic system, that constitutes an excellent model for mesoscopic devices.

  3. Quantum wave turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haeri, M. B.; Putterman, S. J.; Garcia, A.; Roberts, P. H.

    1993-01-01

    The nonlinear quantum kinetic equation for the interaction of sound waves is solved via analytic and numerical techniques. In the classical regime energy cascades to higher frequency (ω) according to the steady-state power law ω-3/2. In the quantum limit, the system prefers a reverse cascade of energy which follows the power law ω-6. Above a critical flux, a new type of spectrum appears which is neither self-similar nor close to equilibrium. This state of nonlinear quantum wave turbulence represents a flow of energy directly from the classical source to the quantum degrees of freedom.

  4. Quantum Game of Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glick, Aaron; Carr, Lincoln; Calarco, Tommaso; Montangero, Simone

    2014-03-01

    In order to investigate the emergence of complexity in quantum systems, we present a quantum game of life, inspired by Conway's classic game of life. Through Matrix Product State (MPS) calculations, we simulate the evolution of quantum systems, dictated by a Hamiltonian that defines the rules of our quantum game. We analyze the system through a number of measures which elicit the emergence of complexity in terms of spatial organization, system dynamics, and non-local mutual information within the network. Funded by NSF

  5. Noisy quantum game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jing-Ling; Kwek, L. C.; Oh, C. H.

    2002-05-01

    In a recent paper [D. A. Meyer, Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 1052 (1999)], it has been shown that a classical zero-sum strategic game can become a winning quantum game for the player with a quantum device. Nevertheless, it is well known that quantum systems easily decohere in noisy environments. In this paper, we show that if the handicapped player with classical means can delay his action for a sufficiently long time, the quantum version reverts to the classical zero-sum game under decoherence.

  6. The quantum Arnold transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldaya, V.; Cossío, F.; Guerrero, J.; López-Ruiz, F. F.

    2011-02-01

    Using a quantum version of the Arnold transformation of classical mechanics, all quantum dynamical systems whose classical equations of motion are non-homogeneous linear second-order ordinary differential equations, including systems with friction linear in velocity, can be related to the quantum free-particle dynamical system. This transformation provides a basic (Heisenberg-Weyl) algebra of quantum operators, along with well-defined Hermitian operators which can be chosen as evolution-like observables and complete the entire Schrödinger algebra. It also proves to be very helpful in performing certain computations quickly, to obtain, for example, wavefunctions and closed analytic expressions for time-evolution operators.

  7. Quantum causal modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Fabio; Shrapnel, Sally

    2016-06-01

    Causal modelling provides a powerful set of tools for identifying causal structure from observed correlations. It is well known that such techniques fail for quantum systems, unless one introduces ‘spooky’ hidden mechanisms. Whether one can produce a genuinely quantum framework in order to discover causal structure remains an open question. Here we introduce a new framework for quantum causal modelling that allows for the discovery of causal structure. We define quantum analogues for core features of classical causal modelling techniques, including the causal Markov condition and faithfulness. Based on the process matrix formalism, this framework naturally extends to generalised structures with indefinite causal order.

  8. Strain balanced quantum posts

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso-Alvarez, D.; Alen, B.; Ripalda, J. M.; Llorens, J. M.; Taboada, A. G.; Briones, F.; Roldan, M. A.; Hernandez-Saz, J.; Hernandez-Maldonado, D.; Herrera, M.; Molina, S. I.

    2011-04-25

    Quantum posts are assembled by epitaxial growth of closely spaced quantum dot layers, modulating the composition of a semiconductor alloy, typically InGaAs. In contrast with most self-assembled nanostructures, the height of quantum posts can be controlled with nanometer precision, up to a maximum value limited by the accumulated stress due to the lattice mismatch. Here, we present a strain compensation technique based on the controlled incorporation of phosphorous, which substantially increases the maximum attainable quantum post height. The luminescence from the resulting nanostructures presents giant linear polarization anisotropy.

  9. Photonic quantum technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Jeremy

    2013-03-01

    Of the approaches to quantum computing, photons are appealing for their low-noise properties and ease of manipulation, and relevance to other quantum technologies, including communication, metrology and measurement. We report an integrated waveguide approach to photonic quantum circuits for high performance, miniaturization and scalability [6-10]. We address the challenges of scaling up quantum circuits using new insights into how controlled operations can be efficiently realised, demonstrating Shor's algorithm with consecutive CNOT gates and the iterative phase estimation algorithm. We have shown how quantum circuits can be reconfigured, using thermo-optic phase shifters to realise a highly reconfigurable quantum circuit, and electro-optic phase shifters in lithium niobate to rapidly manipulate the path and polarisation of telecomm wavelength single photons. We have addressed miniaturisation using multimode interference architectures to directly implement NxN Hadamard operations, and by using high refractive index contrast materials such as SiOxNy, in which we have implemented quantum walks of correlated photons, and Si, in which we have demonstrated generation of orbital angular momentum states of light. We have incorporated microfluidic channels for the delivery of samples to measure the concentration of a blood protein with entangled states of light. We have begun to address the integration of superconducting single photon detectors and diamond and non-linear single photon sources. Finally, we give an overview of recent work on fundamental aspects of quantum measurement, including a quantum version of Wheeler's delayed choice experiment.

  10. Integrated photonic quantum walks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gräfe, Markus; Heilmann, René; Lebugle, Maxime; Guzman-Silva, Diego; Perez-Leija, Armando; Szameit, Alexander

    2016-10-01

    Over the last 20 years quantum walks (QWs) have gained increasing interest in the field of quantum information science and processing. In contrast to classical walkers, quantum objects exhibit intrinsic properties like non-locality and non-classical many-particle correlations, which renders QWs a versatile tool for quantum simulation and computation as well as for a deeper understanding of genuine quantum mechanics. Since they are highly controllable and hardly interact with their environment, photons seem to be ideally suited quantum walkers. In order to study and exploit photonic QWs, lattice structures that allow low loss coherent evolution of quantum states are demanded. Such requirements are perfectly met by integrated optical waveguide devices that additionally allow a substantial miniaturization of experimental settings. Moreover, by utilizing the femtosecond direct laser writing technique three-dimensional waveguide structures are capable of analyzing QWs also on higher dimensional geometries. In this context, advances and findings of photonic QWs are discussed in this review. Various concepts and experimental results are presented covering, such as different quantum transport regimes, the Boson sampling problem, and the discrete fractional quantum Fourier transform.

  11. Quantum Physics in School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrence, I.

    1996-01-01

    Discusses a teaching strategy for introducing quantum ideas into the school classroom using modern devices. Develops the concepts of quantization, wave-particle duality, nonlocality, and tunneling. (JRH)

  12. Threshold quantum cryptography

    SciTech Connect

    Tokunaga, Yuuki; Okamoto, Tatsuaki; Imoto, Nobuyuki

    2005-01-01

    We present the concept of threshold collaborative unitary transformation or threshold quantum cryptography, which is a kind of quantum version of threshold cryptography. Threshold quantum cryptography states that classical shared secrets are distributed to several parties and a subset of them, whose number is greater than a threshold, collaborates to compute a quantum cryptographic function, while keeping each share secretly inside each party. The shared secrets are reusable if no cheating is detected. As a concrete example of this concept, we show a distributed protocol (with threshold) of conjugate coding.

  13. Stark echo modulation for quantum memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arcangeli, A.; Ferrier, A.; Goldner, Ph.

    2016-06-01

    Quantum memories for optical and microwave photons provide key functionalities in quantum processing and communications. Here we propose a protocol well adapted to solid-state ensemble-based memories coupled to cavities. It is called Stark echo modulation memory (SEMM) and allows large storage bandwidths and low noise. This is achieved in an echo-like sequence combined with phase shifts induced by small electric fields through the linear Stark effect. We investigated the protocol for rare-earth nuclear spins and found a high suppression of unwanted collective emissions that is compatible with single-photon-level operation. Broadband storage together with high fidelity for the Stark retrieval process is also demonstrated. SEMM could be used to store optical or microwave photons in ions and/or spins. This includes nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond and rare-earth-doped crystals, which are among the most promising solid-state quantum memories.

  14. Association of scattering matrices in quantum networks

    SciTech Connect

    Almeida, F.A.G.; Macêdo, A.M.S.

    2013-06-15

    Algorithms based on operations that associate scattering matrices in series or in parallel (analogous to impedance association in a classical circuit) are developed here. We exemplify their application by calculating the total scattering matrix of several types of quantum networks, such as star graphs and a chain of chaotic quantum dots, obtaining results with good agreement with the literature. Through a computational-time analysis we compare the efficiency of two algorithms for the simulation of a chain of chaotic quantum dots based on series association operations of (i) two-by-two centers and (ii) three-by-three ones. Empirical results point out that the algorithm (ii) is more efficient than (i) for small number of open scattering channels. A direct counting of floating point operations justifies quantitatively the superiority of the algorithm (i) for large number of open scattering channels.

  15. Quantum limited quasiparticle mixers at 100 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Mears, C.A; Hu, Qing; Richards, P.L. ); Worsham, A.H.; Prober, D.E. . Dept. of Applied Physics); Raeisaenen, A.V. . Radio Lab.)

    1990-09-01

    We have made accurate measurements of the noise and gain of superconducting-insulating-superconducting (SIS) mixers employing small area (1{mu}m{sup 2}) Ta/Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}/Pb{sub 0.9}Bi{sub 0.1} tunnel junctions. We have measured an added mixer noise of 0.61 +/{minus} 0.31 quanta at 95.0 GHz, which is within 25 percent of the quantum limit of 0.5 quanta. We have carried out a detailed comparison between theoretical predictions of the quantum theory of mixing and experimentally measured noise and gain. We used the shapes of I-V curves pumped at the upper and lower sideband frequencies to deduce values of the embedding admittances at these frequencies. Using these admittances, the mixer noise and gain predicted by quantum theory are in excellent agreement with experiment. 21 refs., 9 figs.

  16. Anomalous quantum criticality in an itinerant ferromagnet.

    PubMed

    Huang, C L; Fuchs, D; Wissinger, M; Schneider, R; Ling, M C; Scheurer, M S; Schmalian, J; Löhneysen, H V

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of continuous phase transitions is governed by the dynamic scaling exponent relating the correlation length and correlation time. For transitions at finite temperature, thermodynamic critical properties are independent of the dynamic scaling exponent. In contrast, at quantum phase transitions where the transition temperature becomes zero, static and dynamic properties are inherently entangled by virtue of the uncertainty principle. Consequently, thermodynamic scaling equations explicitly contain the dynamic exponent. Here we report on thermodynamic measurements (as a function of temperature and magnetic field) for the itinerant ferromagnet Sr1-xCaxRuO3 where the transition temperature becomes zero for x=0.7. We find dynamic scaling of the magnetization and specific heat with highly unusual quantum critical dynamics. We observe a small dynamic scaling exponent of 1.76 strongly deviating from current models of ferromagnetic quantum criticality and likely being governed by strong disorder in conjunction with strong electron-electron coupling. PMID:26348932

  17. Semiclassical Foundation of Universality in Quantum Chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Sebastian; Heusler, Stefan; Braun, Petr; Haake, Fritz; Altland, Alexander

    2004-07-01

    We sketch the semiclassical core of a proof of the so-called Bohigas-Giannoni-Schmit conjecture: A dynamical system with full classical chaos has a quantum energy spectrum with universal fluctuations on the scale of the mean level spacing. We show how in the semiclassical limit all system specific properties fade away, leaving only ergodicity, hyperbolicity, and combinatorics as agents determining the contributions of pairs of classical periodic orbits to the quantum spectral form factor. The small-time form factor is thus reproduced semiclassically. Bridges between classical orbits and (the nonlinear sigma model of) quantum field theory are built by revealing the contributing orbit pairs as topologically equivalent to Feynman diagrams.

  18. Entanglement and adiabatic quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahrensmeier, D.

    2006-06-01

    Adiabatic quantum computation provides an alternative approach to quantum computation using a time-dependent Hamiltonian. The time evolution of entanglement during the adiabatic quantum search algorithm is studied, and its relevance as a resource is discussed.

  19. Quantum communications: Teleportation becomes streetwise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosshans, Frédéric

    2016-10-01

    Quantum teleportation is at the heart of many quantum information protocols. Two teams have now performed it over several kilometres of metropolitan fibre networks, paving the way for future quantum technologies on the city scale.

  20. Velocity-dependent quantum phase slips in 1D atomic superfluids.

    PubMed

    Tanzi, Luca; Scaffidi Abbate, Simona; Cataldini, Federica; Gori, Lorenzo; Lucioni, Eleonora; Inguscio, Massimo; Modugno, Giovanni; D'Errico, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    Quantum phase slips are the primary excitations in one-dimensional superfluids and superconductors at low temperatures but their existence in ultracold quantum gases has not been demonstrated yet. We now study experimentally the nucleation rate of phase slips in one-dimensional superfluids realized with ultracold quantum gases, flowing along a periodic potential. We observe a crossover between a regime of temperature-dependent dissipation at small velocity and interaction and a second regime of velocity-dependent dissipation at larger velocity and interaction. This behavior is consistent with the predicted crossover from thermally-assisted quantum phase slips to purely quantum phase slips.

  1. Collective decoherence of the superpositional entangled states in the quantum Shor algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, G.P.; Kamenev, D.I.; Tsifrinovich, V. I.

    2005-03-01

    We consider collective decoherence for the quantum Shor algorithm. A quantum computer which interacts with its environment is modeled by a spin-1/2 chain interacting with harmonic oscillators at a given temperature. We calculate the nondiagonal matrix elements of the density matrix which are important for implementation of the quantum Shor algorithm, and study the decay rate and the Lamb phase shift for these elements. It is shown that the probability of superdecoherence in the quantum Shor algorithm is extremely small. The conditions for preserving quantum entanglement are formulated.

  2. Linear and nonlinear quantum ion-acoustic waves in dense magnetized electron-positron-ion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, S. A.; Masood, W.

    2008-06-15

    The linear and nonlinear quantum ion-acoustic waves propagating obliquely in two dimensions in superdense, magnetized electron-positron-ion quantum plasma are investigated on the basis of quantum hydrodynamic model. It is found in linear analysis that the quantum corrections of diffraction are important in the very short wavelength regime that may be found in dense astrophysical plasmas. To investigate the solitary waves, the Zakharov-Kuznetsov equation is derived and the solution is presented in the small amplitude limit. By numerical analysis, it is found that the soliton structure of the ion acoustic wave depends upon quantum pressure, concentration of positrons, strength of magnetic field, and the propagation angle.

  3. Linear and nonlinear quantum ion-acoustic waves in dense magnetized electron-positron-ion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, S. A.; Masood, W.

    2008-06-01

    The linear and nonlinear quantum ion-acoustic waves propagating obliquely in two dimensions in superdense, magnetized electron-positron-ion quantum plasma are investigated on the basis of quantum hydrodynamic model. It is found in linear analysis that the quantum corrections of diffraction are important in the very short wavelength regime that may be found in dense astrophysical plasmas. To investigate the solitary waves, the Zakharov-Kuznetsov equation is derived and the solution is presented in the small amplitude limit. By numerical analysis, it is found that the soliton structure of the ion acoustic wave depends upon quantum pressure, concentration of positrons, strength of magnetic field, and the propagation angle.

  4. Velocity-dependent quantum phase slips in 1D atomic superfluids.

    PubMed

    Tanzi, Luca; Scaffidi Abbate, Simona; Cataldini, Federica; Gori, Lorenzo; Lucioni, Eleonora; Inguscio, Massimo; Modugno, Giovanni; D'Errico, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    Quantum phase slips are the primary excitations in one-dimensional superfluids and superconductors at low temperatures but their existence in ultracold quantum gases has not been demonstrated yet. We now study experimentally the nucleation rate of phase slips in one-dimensional superfluids realized with ultracold quantum gases, flowing along a periodic potential. We observe a crossover between a regime of temperature-dependent dissipation at small velocity and interaction and a second regime of velocity-dependent dissipation at larger velocity and interaction. This behavior is consistent with the predicted crossover from thermally-assisted quantum phase slips to purely quantum phase slips. PMID:27188334

  5. Velocity-dependent quantum phase slips in 1D atomic superfluids

    PubMed Central

    Tanzi, Luca; Scaffidi Abbate, Simona; Cataldini, Federica; Gori, Lorenzo; Lucioni, Eleonora; Inguscio, Massimo; Modugno, Giovanni; D’Errico, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    Quantum phase slips are the primary excitations in one-dimensional superfluids and superconductors at low temperatures but their existence in ultracold quantum gases has not been demonstrated yet. We now study experimentally the nucleation rate of phase slips in one-dimensional superfluids realized with ultracold quantum gases, flowing along a periodic potential. We observe a crossover between a regime of temperature-dependent dissipation at small velocity and interaction and a second regime of velocity-dependent dissipation at larger velocity and interaction. This behavior is consistent with the predicted crossover from thermally-assisted quantum phase slips to purely quantum phase slips. PMID:27188334

  6. Quantum variance: A measure of quantum coherence and quantum correlations for many-body systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frérot, Irénée; Roscilde, Tommaso

    2016-08-01

    Quantum coherence is a fundamental common trait of quantum phenomena, from the interference of matter waves to quantum degeneracy of identical particles. Despite its importance, estimating and measuring quantum coherence in generic, mixed many-body quantum states remains a formidable challenge, with fundamental implications in areas as broad as quantum condensed matter, quantum information, quantum metrology, and quantum biology. Here, we provide a quantitative definition of the variance of quantum coherent fluctuations (the quantum variance) of any observable on generic quantum states. The quantum variance generalizes the concept of thermal de Broglie wavelength (for the position of a free quantum particle) to the space of eigenvalues of any observable, quantifying the degree of coherent delocalization in that space. The quantum variance is generically measurable and computable as the difference between the static fluctuations and the static susceptibility of the observable; despite its simplicity, it is found to provide a tight lower bound to most widely accepted estimators of "quantumness" of observables (both as a feature as well as a resource), such as the Wigner-Yanase skew information and the quantum Fisher information. When considering bipartite fluctuations in an extended quantum system, the quantum variance expresses genuine quantum correlations among the two parts. In the case of many-body systems, it is found to obey an area law at finite temperature, extending therefore area laws of entanglement and quantum fluctuations of pure states to the mixed-state context. Hence the quantum variance paves the way to the measurement of macroscopic quantum coherence and quantum correlations in most complex quantum systems.

  7. Relativistic quantum information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, R. B.; Ralph, T. C.

    2012-11-01

    Over the past few years, a new field of high research intensity has emerged that blends together concepts from gravitational physics and quantum computing. Known as relativistic quantum information, or RQI, the field aims to understand the relationship between special and general relativity and quantum information. Since the original discoveries of Hawking radiation and the Unruh effect, it has been known that incorporating the concepts of quantum theory into relativistic settings can produce new and surprising effects. However it is only in recent years that it has become appreciated that the basic concepts involved in quantum information science undergo significant revision in relativistic settings, and that new phenomena arise when quantum entanglement is combined with relativity. A number of examples illustrate that point. Quantum teleportation fidelity is affected between observers in uniform relative acceleration. Entanglement is an observer-dependent property that is degraded from the perspective of accelerated observers moving in flat spacetime. Entanglement can also be extracted from the vacuum of relativistic quantum field theories, and used to distinguish peculiar motion from cosmological expansion. The new quantum information-theoretic framework of quantum channels in terms of completely positive maps and operator algebras now provides powerful tools for studying matters of causality and information flow in quantum field theory in curved spacetimes. This focus issue provides a sample of the state of the art in research in RQI. Some of the articles in this issue review the subject while others provide interesting new results that will stimulate further research. What makes the subject all the more exciting is that it is beginning to enter the stage at which actual experiments can be contemplated, and some of the articles appearing in this issue discuss some of these exciting new developments. The subject of RQI pulls together concepts and ideas from

  8. Exponential rise of dynamical complexity in quantum computing through projections.

    PubMed

    Burgarth, Daniel Klaus; Facchi, Paolo; Giovannetti, Vittorio; Nakazato, Hiromichi; Pascazio, Saverio; Yuasa, Kazuya

    2014-10-10

    The ability of quantum systems to host exponentially complex dynamics has the potential to revolutionize science and technology. Therefore, much effort has been devoted to developing of protocols for computation, communication and metrology, which exploit this scaling, despite formidable technical difficulties. Here we show that the mere frequent observation of a small part of a quantum system can turn its dynamics from a very simple one into an exponentially complex one, capable of universal quantum computation. After discussing examples, we go on to show that this effect is generally to be expected: almost any quantum dynamics becomes universal once 'observed' as outlined above. Conversely, we show that any complex quantum dynamics can be 'purified' into a simpler one in larger dimensions. We conclude by demonstrating that even local noise can lead to an exponentially complex dynamics.

  9. Exponential rise of dynamical complexity in quantum computing through projections

    PubMed Central

    Burgarth, Daniel Klaus; Facchi, Paolo; Giovannetti, Vittorio; Nakazato, Hiromichi; Pascazio, Saverio; Yuasa, Kazuya

    2014-01-01

    The ability of quantum systems to host exponentially complex dynamics has the potential to revolutionize science and technology. Therefore, much effort has been devoted to developing of protocols for computation, communication and metrology, which exploit this scaling, despite formidable technical difficulties. Here we show that the mere frequent observation of a small part of a quantum system can turn its dynamics from a very simple one into an exponentially complex one, capable of universal quantum computation. After discussing examples, we go on to show that this effect is generally to be expected: almost any quantum dynamics becomes universal once ‘observed’ as outlined above. Conversely, we show that any complex quantum dynamics can be ‘purified’ into a simpler one in larger dimensions. We conclude by demonstrating that even local noise can lead to an exponentially complex dynamics. PMID:25300692

  10. Mean Field Analysis of Quantum Annealing Correction.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Shunji; Nishimori, Hidetoshi; Albash, Tameem; Lidar, Daniel A

    2016-06-01

    Quantum annealing correction (QAC) is a method that combines encoding with energy penalties and decoding to suppress and correct errors that degrade the performance of quantum annealers in solving optimization problems. While QAC has been experimentally demonstrated to successfully error correct a range of optimization problems, a clear understanding of its operating mechanism has been lacking. Here we bridge this gap using tools from quantum statistical mechanics. We study analytically tractable models using a mean-field analysis, specifically the p-body ferromagnetic infinite-range transverse-field Ising model as well as the quantum Hopfield model. We demonstrate that for p=2, where the phase transition is of second order, QAC pushes the transition to increasingly larger transverse field strengths. For p≥3, where the phase transition is of first order, QAC softens the closing of the gap for small energy penalty values and prevents its closure for sufficiently large energy penalty values. Thus QAC provides protection from excitations that occur near the quantum critical point. We find similar results for the Hopfield model, thus demonstrating that our conclusions hold in the presence of disorder.

  11. Weyl, Dirac and Maxwell Quantum Cellular Automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisio, Alessandro; D'Ariano, Giacomo Mauro; Perinotti, Paolo; Tosini, Alessandro

    2015-10-01

    Recent advances on quantum foundations achieved the derivation of free quantum field theory from general principles, without referring to mechanical notions and relativistic invariance. From the aforementioned principles a quantum cellular automata (QCA) theory follows, whose relativistic limit of small wave-vector provides the free dynamics of quantum field theory. The QCA theory can be regarded as an extended quantum field theory that describes in a unified way all scales ranging from an hypothetical discrete Planck scale up to the usual Fermi scale. The present paper reviews the automaton theory for the Weyl field, and the composite automata for Dirac and Maxwell fields. We then give a simple analysis of the dynamics in the momentum space in terms of a dispersive differential equation for narrowband wave-packets. We then review the phenomenology of the free-field automaton and consider possible visible effects arising from the discreteness of the framework. We conclude introducing the consequences of the automaton dispersion relation, leading to a deformed Lorentz covariance and to possible effects on the thermodynamics of ideal gases.

  12. Topological phases of shaken quantum Ising lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Lorenzo, Samuel; José García-Ripoll, Juan; Porras, Diego

    2016-02-01

    The quantum compass model consists of a two-dimensional square spin lattice where the orientation of the spin-spin interactions depends on the spatial direction of the bonds. It has remarkable symmetry properties and the ground state shows topological degeneracy. The implementation of the quantum compass model in quantum simulation setups like ultracold atoms and trapped ions is far from trivial, since spin interactions in those systems typically are independent of the spatial direction. Ising spin interactions, on the contrary, can be induced and controlled in atomic setups with state-of-the art experimental techniques. In this work, we show how the quantum compass model on a rectangular lattice can be simulated by the use of the photon-assisted tunneling induced by periodic drivings on a quantum Ising spin model. We describe a procedure to adiabatically prepare one of the doubly degenerate ground states of this model by adiabatically ramping down a transverse magnetic field, with surprising differences depending on the parity of the lattice size. Exact diagonalizations confirm the validity of this approach for small lattices. Specific implementations of this scheme are presented with ultracold atoms in optical lattices in the Mott insulator regime, as well as with Rydberg atoms.

  13. Some New Aspects of Degenerate Quantum Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Tsintsadze, Nodar L.

    2010-12-14

    Answers to some salient questions, which arise in quantum plasmas, are given. Starting from the Schroedinger equation for a single particle it is demonstrated how the Wigner-Moyal equation can be derived. It is shown that the Wigner-Moyal type of equation also exists in the classical field theory. As an example, from the Maxwell equations the Wigner-Moyal type of equation is obtained for a dense photon gas, which is classical, concluding that the Wigner-Moyal type of equation can be derived for any system, classical or quantum. A new type of quantum kinetic equations are presented. These novel kinetic equations allows to obtain a set of quantum hydrodynamic equations, which is impossible to derive by the Wigner-Moyal equation. The propagation of small perturbations and instabilities of these perturbations are then discussed, presenting new modes of quantum plasma waves. In the case of low frequency oscillations with ions, a new Bogolyubov type of spectrum is found. Furthermore, the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation is derived and the contribution of the Madelung term in the formation of the KdV solitons is discussed.

  14. Trading Classical and Quantum Computational Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravyi, Sergey; Smith, Graeme; Smolin, John A.

    2016-04-01

    We propose examples of a hybrid quantum-classical simulation where a classical computer assisted by a small quantum processor can efficiently simulate a larger quantum system. First, we consider sparse quantum circuits such that each qubit participates in O (1 ) two-qubit gates. It is shown that any sparse circuit on n +k qubits can be simulated by sparse circuits on n qubits and a classical processing that takes time 2O (k )poly (n ) . Second, we study Pauli-based computation (PBC), where allowed operations are nondestructive eigenvalue measurements of n -qubit Pauli operators. The computation begins by initializing each qubit in the so-called magic state. This model is known to be equivalent to the universal quantum computer. We show that any PBC on n +k qubits can be simulated by PBCs on n qubits and a classical processing that takes time 2O (k )poly (n ). Finally, we propose a purely classical algorithm that can simulate a PBC on n qubits in a time 2α npoly (n ) , where α ≈0.94 . This improves upon the brute-force simulation method, which takes time 2npoly (n ). Our algorithm exploits the fact that n -fold tensor products of magic states admit a low-rank decomposition into n -qubit stabilizer states.

  15. Self-tallying quantum anonymous voting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qingle; Yu, Chaohua; Gao, Fei; Qi, Haoyu; Wen, Qiaoyan

    2016-08-01

    Anonymous voting is a voting method of hiding the link between a vote and a voter, the context of which ranges from governmental elections to decision making in small groups like councils and companies. In this paper, we propose a quantum anonymous voting protocol assisted by two kinds of entangled quantum states. Particularly, we provide a mechanism of opening and permuting the ordered votes of all the voters in an anonymous manner; any party who is interested in the voting results can acquire a permutation copy and then obtains the voting result through a simple calculation. Unlike all previous quantum works on anonymous voting, our quantum anonymous protocol possesses the properties of privacy, self-tallying, nonreusability, verifiability, and fairness at the same time. In addition, we demonstrate that the entanglement of the quantum states used in our protocol makes an attack from an outside eavesdropper and inside dishonest voters impossible. We also generalize our protocol to execute the task of anonymous multiparty computation, such as anonymous broadcast and anonymous ranking.

  16. Projected Dipole Model for Quantum Plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Yan, Wei; Wubs, Martijn; Asger Mortensen, N

    2015-09-25

    Quantum effects of plasmonic phenomena have been explored through ab initio studies, but only for exceedingly small metallic nanostructures, leaving most experimentally relevant structures too large to handle. We propose instead an effective description with the computationally appealing features of classical electrodynamics, while quantum properties are described accurately through an infinitely thin layer of dipoles oriented normally to the metal surface. The nonlocal polarizability of the dipole layer-the only introduced parameter-is mapped from the free-electron distribution near the metal surface as obtained with 1D quantum calculations, such as time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT), and is determined once and for all. The model can be applied in two and three dimensions to any system size that is tractable within classical electrodynamics, while capturing quantum plasmonic aspects of nonlocal response and a finite work function with TDDFT-level accuracy. Applying the theory to dimers, we find quantum corrections to the hybridization even in mesoscopic dimers, as long as the gap itself is subnanometric. PMID:26451583

  17. Mean Field Analysis of Quantum Annealing Correction.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Shunji; Nishimori, Hidetoshi; Albash, Tameem; Lidar, Daniel A

    2016-06-01

    Quantum annealing correction (QAC) is a method that combines encoding with energy penalties and decoding to suppress and correct errors that degrade the performance of quantum annealers in solving optimization problems. While QAC has been experimentally demonstrated to successfully error correct a range of optimization problems, a clear understanding of its operating mechanism has been lacking. Here we bridge this gap using tools from quantum statistical mechanics. We study analytically tractable models using a mean-field analysis, specifically the p-body ferromagnetic infinite-range transverse-field Ising model as well as the quantum Hopfield model. We demonstrate that for p=2, where the phase transition is of second order, QAC pushes the transition to increasingly larger transverse field strengths. For p≥3, where the phase transition is of first order, QAC softens the closing of the gap for small energy penalty values and prevents its closure for sufficiently large energy penalty values. Thus QAC provides protection from excitations that occur near the quantum critical point. We find similar results for the Hopfield model, thus demonstrating that our conclusions hold in the presence of disorder. PMID:27314705

  18. Projected Dipole Model for Quantum Plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Yan, Wei; Wubs, Martijn; Asger Mortensen, N

    2015-09-25

    Quantum effects of plasmonic phenomena have been explored through ab initio studies, but only for exceedingly small metallic nanostructures, leaving most experimentally relevant structures too large to handle. We propose instead an effective description with the computationally appealing features of classical electrodynamics, while quantum properties are described accurately through an infinitely thin layer of dipoles oriented normally to the metal surface. The nonlocal polarizability of the dipole layer-the only introduced parameter-is mapped from the free-electron distribution near the metal surface as obtained with 1D quantum calculations, such as time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT), and is determined once and for all. The model can be applied in two and three dimensions to any system size that is tractable within classical electrodynamics, while capturing quantum plasmonic aspects of nonlocal response and a finite work function with TDDFT-level accuracy. Applying the theory to dimers, we find quantum corrections to the hybridization even in mesoscopic dimers, as long as the gap itself is subnanometric.

  19. Mean Field Analysis of Quantum Annealing Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, Shunji; Nishimori, Hidetoshi; Albash, Tameem; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2016-06-01

    Quantum annealing correction (QAC) is a method that combines encoding with energy penalties and decoding to suppress and correct errors that degrade the performance of quantum annealers in solving optimization problems. While QAC has been experimentally demonstrated to successfully error correct a range of optimization problems, a clear understanding of its operating mechanism has been lacking. Here we bridge this gap using tools from quantum statistical mechanics. We study analytically tractable models using a mean-field analysis, specifically the p -body ferromagnetic infinite-range transverse-field Ising model as well as the quantum Hopfield model. We demonstrate that for p =2 , where the phase transition is of second order, QAC pushes the transition to increasingly larger transverse field strengths. For p ≥3 , where the phase transition is of first order, QAC softens the closing of the gap for small energy penalty values and prevents its closure for sufficiently large energy penalty values. Thus QAC provides protection from excitations that occur near the quantum critical point. We find similar results for the Hopfield model, thus demonstrating that our conclusions hold in the presence of disorder.

  20. Quasi-autonomous quantum thermal machines and quantum to classical energy flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frenzel, Max F.; Jennings, David; Rudolph, Terry

    2016-02-01

    There are both practical and foundational motivations to consider the thermodynamics of quantum systems at small scales. Here we address the issue of autonomous quantum thermal machines that are tailored to achieve some specific thermodynamic primitive, such as work extraction in the presence of a thermal environment, while having minimal or no control from the macroscopic regime. Beyond experimental implementations, this provides an arena in which to address certain foundational aspects such as the role of coherence in thermodynamics, the use of clock degrees of freedom and the simulation of local time-dependent Hamiltonians in a particular quantum subsystem. For small-scale systems additional issues arise. Firstly, it is not clear to what degree genuine ordered thermodynamic work has been extracted, and secondly non-trivial back-actions on the thermal machine must be accounted for. We find that both these aspects can be resolved through a judicious choice of quantum measurements that magnify thermodynamic properties up the ladder of length-scales, while simultaneously stabilising the quantum thermal machine. Within this framework we show that thermodynamic reversibility is obtained in a particular Zeno limit, and finally illustrate these concepts with a concrete example involving spin systems.

  1. Active quantum walks: a framework for quantum walks with adiabatic quantum evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Nan; Song, Fangmin; Li, Xiangdong

    2016-05-01

    We study a new methodology for quantum walk based algorithms. Different from the passive quantum walk, in which a walker is guided by a quantum walk procedure, the new framework that we developed allows the walker to move by an adiabatic procedure of quantum evolution, as an active way. The use of this active quantum walk is helpful to develop new quantum walk based searching and optimization algorithms.

  2. Quantum cellular automaton theory of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisio, Alessandro; D'Ariano, Giacomo Mauro; Perinotti, Paolo

    2016-05-01

    We present a quantum theory of light based on the recent derivation of Weyl and Dirac quantum fields from general principles ruling the interactions of a countable set of abstract quantum systems, without using space-time and mechanics (D'Ariano and Perinotti, 2014). In a Planckian interpretation of the discreteness, the usual quantum field theory corresponds to the so-called relativistic regime of small wave-vectors. Within the present framework the photon is a composite particle made of an entangled pair of free Weyl Fermions, and the usual Bosonic statistics is recovered in the low photon density limit, whereas the Maxwell equations describe the relativistic regime. We derive the main phenomenological features of the theory in the ultra-relativistic regime, consisting in a dispersive propagation in vacuum, and in the occurrence of a small longitudinal polarization, along with a saturation effect originated by the Fermionic nature of the photon. We then discuss whether all these effects can be experimentally tested, and observe that only the dispersive effects are accessible to the current technology via observations of gamma-ray bursts.

  3. Biosynthesis of cadmium sulphide quantum semiconductor crystallites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dameron, C. T.; Reese, R. N.; Mehra, R. K.; Kortan, A. R.; Carroll, P. J.; Steigerwald, M. L.; Brus, L. E.; Winge, D. R.

    1989-04-01

    NANOMETRE-SCALE semiconductor quantum crystallites exhibit size-dependent and discrete excited electronic states which occur at energies higher than the band gap of the corresponding bulk solid1-4. These crystallites are too small to have continuous energy bands, even though a bulk crystal structure is present. The onset of such quantum properties sets a fundamental limit to device miniaturization in microelectronics5. Structures with either one, two or all three dimensions on the nanometer scale are of particular interest in solid state physics6. We report here our discovery of the biosynthesis of quantum crystallites in yeasts Candida glabrata and Schizosaccharomyces pombe, cultured in the presence of cad-mium salts. Short chelating peptides of general structure (γ-Glu-Cys)n-Gly control the nucleation and growth of CdS crystallites to peptide-capped intracellular particles of diameter 20 Å. These quantum CdS crystallites are more monodisperse than CdS par-ticles synthesized chemically. X-ray data indicate that, at this small size, the CdS structure differs from that of bulk CdS and tends towards a six-coordinate rock-salt structure.

  4. Quantum Permanents and Hafnians via Pfaffians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Naihuan; Zhang, Jian

    2016-10-01

    Quantum determinants and Pfaffians or permanents and Hafnians are introduced on the two-parameter quantum general linear group. Fundamental identities among quantum Pf, Hf, and det are proved in the general setting. We show that there are two special quantum algebras among the quantum groups, where the quantum Pfaffians have integral Laurent polynomials as coefficients. As a consequence, the quantum Hafnian is computed by a closely related quantum permanent and identical to the quantum Pfaffian on this special quantum algebra.

  5. Experimental Satellite Quantum Communications.

    PubMed

    Vallone, Giuseppe; Bacco, Davide; Dequal, Daniele; Gaiarin, Simone; Luceri, Vincenza; Bianco, Giuseppe; Villoresi, Paolo

    2015-07-24

    Quantum communication (QC), namely, the faithful transmission of generic quantum states, is a key ingredient of quantum information science. Here we demonstrate QC with polarization encoding from space to ground by exploiting satellite corner cube retroreflectors as quantum transmitters in orbit and the Matera Laser Ranging Observatory of the Italian Space Agency in Matera, Italy, as a quantum receiver. The quantum bit error ratio (QBER) has been kept steadily low to a level suitable for several quantum information protocols, as the violation of Bell inequalities or quantum key distribution (QKD). Indeed, by taking data from different satellites, we demonstrate an average value of QBER=4.6% for a total link duration of 85 s. The mean photon number per pulse μ_{sat} leaving the satellites was estimated to be of the order of one. In addition, we propose a fully operational satellite QKD system by exploiting our communication scheme with orbiting retroreflectors equipped with a modulator, a very compact payload. Our scheme paves the way toward the implementation of a QC worldwide network leveraging existing receivers. PMID:26252672

  6. Quantum Complexity in Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskaran, G.

    Carbon has a unique position among elements in the periodic table. It produces an allotrope, graphene, a mechanically robust two dimensional semimetal. The multifarious properties that graphene exhibits has few parallels among elemental metals. From simplicity, namely carbon atoms connected by pure sp2 bonds, a wealth of novel quantum properties emerge. In classical complex systems such as a spin glass or a finance market, several competing agents or elements are responsible for unanticipated and difficult to predict emergent properties. The complex (sic) structure of quantum mechanics is responsbile for an unanticipated set of emergent properties in graphene. We call this quantum complexity. In fact, most quantum systems, phenomena and modern quantum field theory could be viewed as examples of quantum complexity. After giving a brief introduction to the quantum complexity we focus on our own work, which indicates the breadth in the type of quantum phenomena that graphene could support. We review our theoretical suggestions of, (i) spin-1 collective mode in netural graphene, (ii) relativistic type of phenomena in crossed electric and magnetic fields, (iii) room temperature superconductivity in doped graphene and (iv) composite Fermi sea in neutral graphene in uniform magnetic field and (v) two-channel Kondo effect. Except for the relativistic type of phenomena, the rest depend in a fundamental way on a weak electron correlation that exists in the broad two-dimensional band of graphene.

  7. Squeezing and quantum groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celeghini, E.; Rasetti, M.; Vitiello, G.

    1991-04-01

    Generalized quasicoherent states for the Weyl-Heisenberg quantum group have been defined by Biedenharn and MacFarlane. In this Letter other quantum Weyl-Heisenberg coherent states are defined for complex q in the usual Fock space. Such states are shown to exhibit interesting squeezing properties, in particular when ||q||~=1, for the q analog to the harmonic oscillator.

  8. Hybrid quantum information processing

    SciTech Connect

    Furusawa, Akira

    2014-12-04

    I will briefly explain the definition and advantage of hybrid quantum information processing, which is hybridization of qubit and continuous-variable technologies. The final goal would be realization of universal gate sets both for qubit and continuous-variable quantum information processing with the hybrid technologies. For that purpose, qubit teleportation with a continuousvariable teleporter is one of the most important ingredients.

  9. Quantum theory of gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, S.M.

    1984-01-01

    The book of essay entitled Quantum Theory of Gravity, edited by Steven M. Christensen is reviewed. The book contains over thirty papers dealing with the subject of the unification of quantum field theory and general relativity theory. Contributions include discussions of non-Abelian gauge theories, supersymmetry, issues in renormalization and quantization and matters related to the interpretation of theories.

  10. Quantum reinforcement learning.

    PubMed

    Dong, Daoyi; Chen, Chunlin; Li, Hanxiong; Tarn, Tzyh-Jong

    2008-10-01

    The key approaches for machine learning, particularly learning in unknown probabilistic environments, are new representations and computation mechanisms. In this paper, a novel quantum reinforcement learning (QRL) method is proposed by combining quantum theory and reinforcement learning (RL). Inspired by the state superposition principle and quantum parallelism, a framework of a value-updating algorithm is introduced. The state (action) in traditional RL is identified as the eigen state (eigen action) in QRL. The state (action) set can be represented with a quantum superposition state, and the eigen state (eigen action) can be obtained by randomly observing the simulated quantum state according to the collapse postulate of quantum measurement. The probability of the eigen action is determined by the probability amplitude, which is updated in parallel according to rewards. Some related characteristics of QRL such as convergence, optimality, and balancing between exploration and exploitation are also analyzed, which shows that this approach makes a good tradeoff between exploration and exploitation using the probability amplitude and can speedup learning through the quantum parallelism. To evaluate the performance and practicability of QRL, several simulated experiments are given, and the results demonstrate the effectiveness and superiority of the QRL algorithm for some complex problems. This paper is also an effective exploration on the application of quantum computation to artificial intelligence.

  11. Quantum Analog Computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, M.

    1998-01-01

    Quantum analog computing is based upon similarity between mathematical formalism of quantum mechanics and phenomena to be computed. It exploits a dynamical convergence of several competing phenomena to an attractor which can represent an externum of a function, an image, a solution to a system of ODE, or a stochastic process.

  12. Hybrid quantum information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furusawa, Akira

    2014-12-01

    I will briefly explain the definition and advantage of hybrid quantum information processing, which is hybridization of qubit and continuous-variable technologies. The final goal would be realization of universal gate sets both for qubit and continuous-variable quantum information processing with the hybrid technologies. For that purpose, qubit teleportation with a continuousvariable teleporter is one of the most important ingredients.

  13. Quantum reinforcement learning.

    PubMed

    Dong, Daoyi; Chen, Chunlin; Li, Hanxiong; Tarn, Tzyh-Jong

    2008-10-01

    The key approaches for machine learning, particularly learning in unknown probabilistic environments, are new representations and computation mechanisms. In this paper, a novel quantum reinforcement learning (QRL) method is proposed by combining quantum theory and reinforcement learning (RL). Inspired by the state superposition principle and quantum parallelism, a framework of a value-updating algorithm is introduced. The state (action) in traditional RL is identified as the eigen state (eigen action) in QRL. The state (action) set can be represented with a quantum superposition state, and the eigen state (eigen action) can be obtained by randomly observing the simulated quantum state according to the collapse postulate of quantum measurement. The probability of the eigen action is determined by the probability amplitude, which is updated in parallel according to rewards. Some related characteristics of QRL such as convergence, optimality, and balancing between exploration and exploitation are also analyzed, which shows that this approach makes a good tradeoff between exploration and exploitation using the probability amplitude and can speedup learning through the quantum parallelism. To evaluate the performance and practicability of QRL, several simulated experiments are given, and the results demonstrate the effectiveness and superiority of the QRL algorithm for some complex problems. This paper is also an effective exploration on the application of quantum computation to artificial intelligence. PMID:18784007

  14. Introducing Quantum Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogborn, Jon

    1974-01-01

    Describes the way in which quantum ideas are incorporated into the Nuffield advanced physics course. Quantum theory is presented as an enormous intellectual leap to be excited by, puzzled over and thought about, not as a set of results and equations to be packed away in the mind. (Author/MLH)

  15. Quantum reverse hypercontractivity

    SciTech Connect

    Cubitt, Toby; Kastoryano, Michael; Montanaro, Ashley; Temme, Kristan

    2015-10-15

    We develop reverse versions of hypercontractive inequalities for quantum channels. By generalizing classical techniques, we prove a reverse hypercontractive inequality for tensor products of qubit depolarizing channels. We apply this to obtain a rapid mixing result for depolarizing noise applied to large subspaces and to prove bounds on a quantum generalization of non-interactive correlation distillation.

  16. Teaching Quantum Nonlocality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobson, Art

    2012-01-01

    Nonlocality arises from the unified "all or nothing" interactions of a spatially extended field quantum such as a photon or an electron. In the double-slit experiment with light, for example, each photon comes through both slits and arrives at the viewing screen as an extended but unified energy bundle or "field quantum." When the photon interacts…

  17. Quantum Dots: Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Vukmirovic, Nenad; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2009-11-10

    This review covers the description of the methodologies typically used for the calculation of the electronic structure of self-assembled and colloidal quantum dots. These are illustrated by the results of their application to a selected set of physical effects in quantum dots.

  18. Introduction to Quantum Intelligence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, Michail

    1996-01-01

    An impact of ideas associated with the concept of a hypothetical quantum computer upon classical computing is analyzed. Two fundamental properties of quantum computing: direct simulations of probabilities, and influence between different branches of probabilistic scenarios, as well as their classical versions, are discussed.

  19. Experimental Satellite Quantum Communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallone, Giuseppe; Bacco, Davide; Dequal, Daniele; Gaiarin, Simone; Luceri, Vincenza; Bianco, Giuseppe; Villoresi, Paolo

    2015-07-01

    Quantum communication (QC), namely, the faithful transmission of generic quantum states, is a key ingredient of quantum information science. Here we demonstrate QC with polarization encoding from space to ground by exploiting satellite corner cube retroreflectors as quantum transmitters in orbit and the Matera Laser Ranging Observatory of the Italian Space Agency in Matera, Italy, as a quantum receiver. The quantum bit error ratio (QBER) has been kept steadily low to a level suitable for several quantum information protocols, as the violation of Bell inequalities or quantum key distribution (QKD). Indeed, by taking data from different satellites, we demonstrate an average value of QBER =4.6 % for a total link duration of 85 s. The mean photon number per pulse μsat leaving the satellites was estimated to be of the order of one. In addition, we propose a fully operational satellite QKD system by exploiting our communication scheme with orbiting retroreflectors equipped with a modulator, a very compact payload. Our scheme paves the way toward the implementation of a QC worldwide network leveraging existing receivers.

  20. Experimental Satellite Quantum Communications.

    PubMed

    Vallone, Giuseppe; Bacco, Davide; Dequal, Daniele; Gaiarin, Simone; Luceri, Vincenza; Bianco, Giuseppe; Villoresi, Paolo

    2015-07-24

    Quantum communication (QC), namely, the faithful transmission of generic quantum states, is a key ingredient of quantum information science. Here we demonstrate QC with polarization encoding from space to ground by exploiting satellite corner cube retroreflectors as quantum transmitters in orbit and the Matera Laser Ranging Observatory of the Italian Space Agency in Matera, Italy, as a quantum receiver. The quantum bit error ratio (QBER) has been kept steadily low to a level suitable for several quantum information protocols, as the violation of Bell inequalities or quantum key distribution (QKD). Indeed, by taking data from different satellites, we demonstrate an average value of QBER=4.6% for a total link duration of 85 s. The mean photon number per pulse μ_{sat} leaving the satellites was estimated to be of the order of one. In addition, we propose a fully operational satellite QKD system by exploiting our communication scheme with orbiting retroreflectors equipped with a modulator, a very compact payload. Our scheme paves the way toward the implementation of a QC worldwide network leveraging existing receivers.

  1. 2D quantum gravity from quantum entanglement.

    PubMed

    Gliozzi, F

    2011-01-21

    In quantum systems with many degrees of freedom the replica method is a useful tool to study the entanglement of arbitrary spatial regions. We apply it in a way that allows them to backreact. As a consequence, they become dynamical subsystems whose position, form, and extension are determined by their interaction with the whole system. We analyze, in particular, quantum spin chains described at criticality by a conformal field theory. Its coupling to the Gibbs' ensemble of all possible subsystems is relevant and drives the system into a new fixed point which is argued to be that of the 2D quantum gravity coupled to this system. Numerical experiments on the critical Ising model show that the new critical exponents agree with those predicted by the formula of Knizhnik, Polyakov, and Zamolodchikov.

  2. Quantum supersymmetric Bianchi IX cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damour, Thibault; Spindel, Philippe

    2014-11-01

    effect" between small-volume universes and large-volume ones, and to a possible reduction of the continuous spectrum to a discrete spectrum of quantum states looking like excited versions of the Planckian-size universes described by the discrete states at fermionic levels NF=0 and 1.

  3. Quantum Theory and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastin, Ted

    2009-07-01

    List of participants; Preface; Part I. Introduction: 1. The function of the colloquium - editorial; 2. The conceptual problem of quantum theory from the experimentalist's point of view O. R. Frisch; Part II. Niels Bohr and Complementarity: The Place of the Classical Language: 3. The Copenhagen interpretation C. F. von Weizsäcker; 4. On Bohr's views concerning the quantum theory D. Bohm; Part III. The Measurement Problem: 5. Quantal observation in statistical interpretation H. J. Groenewold; 6. Macroscopic physics, quantum mechanics and quantum theory of measurement G. M. Prosperi; 7. Comment on the Daneri-Loinger-Prosperi quantum theory of measurement Jeffrey Bub; 8. The phenomenology of observation and explanation in quantum theory J. H. M. Whiteman; 9. Measurement theory and complex systems M. A. Garstens; Part IV. New Directions within Quantum Theory: What does the Quantum Theoretical Formalism Really Tell Us?: 10. On the role of hidden variables in the fundamental structure of physics D. Bohm; 11. Beyond what? Discussion: space-time order within existing quantum theory C. W. Kilmister; 12. Definability and measurability in quantum theory Yakir Aharonov and Aage Petersen; 13. The bootstrap idea and the foundations of quantum theory Geoffrey F. Chew; Part V. A Fresh Start?: 14. Angular momentum: an approach to combinatorial space-time Roger Penrose; 15. A note on discreteness, phase space and cohomology theory B. J. Hiley; 16. Cohomology of observations R. H. Atkin; 17. The origin of half-integral spin in a discrete physical space Ted Bastin; Part VI. Philosophical Papers: 18. The unity of physics C. F. von Weizsäcker; 19. A philosophical obstacle to the rise of new theories in microphysics Mario Bunge; 20. The incompleteness of quantum mechanics or the emperor's missing clothes H. R. Post; 21. How does a particle get from A to B?; Ted Bastin; 22. Informational generalization of entropy in physics Jerome Rothstein; 23. Can life explain quantum mechanics? H. H

  4. Invisibility of quantum systems to tunneling of matter waves

    SciTech Connect

    Cordero, Sergio; Garcia-Calderon, Gaston

    2009-05-15

    We show that an appropriate choice of the potential parameters in one-dimensional quantum systems allows for unity transmission of the tunneling particle at all incident tunneling energies, except at controllable exceedingly small incident energies. The corresponding dwell time and the transmission amplitude are indistinguishable from those of a free particle in the unity-transmission regime. This implies the possibility of designing quantum systems that are invisible to tunneling by a passing wave packet.

  5. Los Alamos Quantum Dots for Solar, Display Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Klimov, Victor

    2015-04-13

    Quantum dots are ultra-small bits of semiconductor matter that can be synthesized with nearly atomic precision via modern methods of colloidal chemistry. Their emission color can be tuned by simply varying their dimensions. Color tunability is combined with high emission efficiencies approaching 100 percent. These properties have recently become the basis of a new technology – quantum dot displays – employed, for example, in the newest generation of e-readers and video monitors.

  6. Time independent universal computing with spin chains: quantum plinko machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, K. F.; Gokler, C.; Lloyd, S.; Shor, P. W.

    2016-07-01

    We present a scheme for universal quantum computing using XY Heisenberg spin chains. Information is encoded into packets propagating down these chains, and they interact with each other to perform universal quantum computation. A circuit using g gate blocks on m qubits can be encoded into chains of length O({g}3+δ {m}3+δ ) for all δ \\gt 0 with vanishingly small error.

  7. Probing for quantum speedup in spin-glass problems with planted solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hen, Itay; Job, Joshua; Albash, Tameem; Rønnow, Troels F.; Troyer, Matthias; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2015-10-01

    The availability of quantum annealing devices with hundreds of qubits has made the experimental demonstration of a quantum speedup for optimization problems a coveted, albeit elusive goal. Going beyond earlier studies of random Ising problems, here we introduce a method to construct a set of frustrated Ising-model optimization problems with tunable hardness. We study the performance of a D-Wave Two device (DW2) with up to 503 qubits on these problems and compare it to a suite of classical algorithms, including a highly optimized algorithm designed to compete directly with the DW2. The problems are generated around predetermined ground-state configurations, called planted solutions, which makes them particularly suitable for benchmarking purposes. The problem set exhibits properties familiar from constraint satisfaction (SAT) problems, such as a peak in the typical hardness of the problems, determined by a tunable clause density parameter. We bound the hardness regime where the DW2 device either does not or might exhibit a quantum speedup for our problem set. While we do not find evidence for a speedup for the hardest and most frustrated problems in our problem set, we cannot rule out that a speedup might exist for some of the easier, less frustrated problems. Our empirical findings pertain to the specific D-Wave processor and problem set we studied and leave open the possibility that future processors might exhibit a quantum speedup on the same problem set.

  8. Evolution of {lambda} black holes in the minisuperspace approximation of loop quantum gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Brannlund, J.; Kloster, S.; DeBenedictis, A.

    2009-04-15

    Using the improved quantization technique to the minisuperspace approximation of loop quantum gravity, we study the evolution of black holes supported by a cosmological constant. The addition of a cosmological constant allows for classical solutions with planar, cylindrical, toroidal, and higher-genus black holes. Here we study the quantum analog of these space-times. In all scenarios studied, the singularity present in the classical counterpart is avoided in the quantized version and is replaced by a bounce, and in the late evolution, a series of less severe bounces. Interestingly, although there are differences during the evolution between the various symmetries and topologies, the evolution on the other side of the bounce asymptotes to space-times of Nariai-type, with the exception of the planar black hole analyzed here, whose T-R=constant subspaces seem to continue expanding in the long-term evolution. For the other cases, Nariai-type universes are attractors in the quantum evolution, albeit with different parameters. We study here the quantum evolution of each symmetry in detail.

  9. Surface Enhanced Quantum Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangan, Chitra

    2013-05-01

    Miniaturization of quantum technologies have led to physics that require the marriage of atomic physics and nanomaterials science. Some of the resulting areas of research are hybrid quantum devices, single-molecule spectroscopies, table-top intense field generators, etc. I will present an area of research that I dub ``Surface-enhanced quantum control'' that is an exciting way of controlling light and nanomatter. By combining the electromagnetic enhancement properties of plasmonic nanomaterials with the modification of the atomic properties, we can achieve an unprecedented level of control over quantum dynamics. I will present examples of surface-enhanced state purification, in which quantum states near metal nanostructures can be rapidly purified by the application of a weak near-resonant control field. We gratefully acknowledge support from the NSERC Discovery Grant Program and the NSERC Strategic Network for Bioplasmonic Systems.

  10. Artificial Quantum Thermal Bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabani, Alireza; Neven, Hartmut

    In this talk, we present a theory for engineering the temperature of a quantum system different from its ambient temperature, that is basically an analog version of the quantum metropolis algorithm. We define criteria for an engineered quantum bath that, when couples to a quantum system with Hamiltonian H, drives the system to the equilibrium state e/- H / T Tr (e - H / T) with a tunable parameter T. For a system of superconducting qubits, we propose a circuit-QED approximate realization of such an engineered thermal bath consisting of driven lossy resonators. We consider an artificial thermal bath as a simulator for many-body physics or a controllable temperature knob for a hybrid quantum-thermal annealer.

  11. Chiral quantum walks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Dawei; Biamonte, Jacob D.; Li, Jun; Li, Hang; Johnson, Tomi H.; Bergholm, Ville; Faccin, Mauro; Zimborás, Zoltán; Laflamme, Raymond; Baugh, Jonathan; Lloyd, Seth

    2016-04-01

    Given its importance to many other areas of physics, from condensed-matter physics to thermodynamics, time-reversal symmetry has had relatively little influence on quantum information science. Here we develop a network-based picture of time-reversal theory, classifying Hamiltonians and quantum circuits as time symmetric or not in terms of the elements and geometries of their underlying networks. Many of the typical circuits of quantum information science are found to exhibit time asymmetry. Moreover, we show that time asymmetry in circuits can be controlled using local gates only and can simulate time asymmetry in Hamiltonian evolution. We experimentally implement a fundamental example in which controlled time-reversal asymmetry in a palindromic quantum circuit leads to near-perfect transport. Our results pave the way for using time-symmetry breaking to control coherent transport and imply that time asymmetry represents an omnipresent yet poorly understood effect in quantum information science.

  12. Quantum plasmonic sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Wenjiang; Lawrie, Benjamin J.; Pooser, Raphael C.

    2015-11-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensors can reach the quantum noise limit of the optical readout field in various configurations. We demonstrate that two-mode intensity squeezed states produce a further enhancement in sensitivity compared with a classical optical readout when the quantum noise is used to transduce an SPR sensor signal in the Kretschmann configuration. The quantum noise reduction between the twin beams when incident at an angle away from the plasmonic resonance, combined with quantum noise resulting from quantum anticorrelations when on resonance, results in an effective SPR-mediated modulation that yields a measured sensitivity 5 dB better than that with a classical optical readout in this configuration. The theoretical potential of this technique points to resolving particle concentrations with more accuracy than is possible via classical approaches to optical transduction.

  13. Quantum Image Location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Nan; Dang, Yijie; Zhao, Na

    2016-10-01

    Quantum image processing has been a hot topic as a consequence of the development of quantum computation. Many quantum image processing algorithms have been proposed, whose efficiency are theoretically higher than their corresponding classical algorithms. However, most of the quantum schemes do not consider the problem of measurement. If users want to get the results, they must measure the final state many times to get all the pixels' values. Moreover, executing the algorithm one time, users can only measure the final state one time. In order to measure it many times, users must execute the algorithms many times. If the measurement process is taken into account, whether or not the algorithms are really efficient needs to be reconsidered. In this paper, we try to solve the problem of measurement and give a quantum image location algorithm. This scheme modifies the probability of pixels to make the target pixel to be measured with higher probability. Furthermore, it only has linear complexity.

  14. Probabilistic authenticated quantum dialogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Tzonelih; Luo, Yi-Ping

    2015-12-01

    This work proposes a probabilistic authenticated quantum dialogue (PAQD) based on Bell states with the following notable features. (1) In our proposed scheme, the dialogue is encoded in a probabilistic way, i.e., the same messages can be encoded into different quantum states, whereas in the state-of-the-art authenticated quantum dialogue (AQD), the dialogue is encoded in a deterministic way; (2) the pre-shared secret key between two communicants can be reused without any security loophole; (3) each dialogue in the proposed PAQD can be exchanged within only one-step quantum communication and one-step classical communication. However, in the state-of-the-art AQD protocols, both communicants have to run a QKD protocol for each dialogue and each dialogue requires multiple quantum as well as classical communicational steps; (4) nevertheless, the proposed scheme can resist the man-in-the-middle attack, the modification attack, and even other well-known attacks.

  15. Quantum random number generation

    DOE PAGES

    Ma, Xiongfeng; Yuan, Xiao; Cao, Zhu; Zhang, Zhen; Qi, Bing

    2016-06-28

    Here, quantum physics can be exploited to generate true random numbers, which play important roles in many applications, especially in cryptography. Genuine randomness from the measurement of a quantum system reveals the inherent nature of quantumness -- coherence, an important feature that differentiates quantum mechanics from classical physics. The generation of genuine randomness is generally considered impossible with only classical means. Based on the degree of trustworthiness on devices, quantum random number generators (QRNGs) can be grouped into three categories. The first category, practical QRNG, is built on fully trusted and calibrated devices and typically can generate randomness at amore » high speed by properly modeling the devices. The second category is self-testing QRNG, where verifiable randomness can be generated without trusting the actual implementation. The third category, semi-self-testing QRNG, is an intermediate category which provides a tradeoff between the trustworthiness on the device and the random number generation speed.« less

  16. Quantum plasmonic sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Wenjiang; Lawrie, Benjamin J.; Pooser, Raphael C.

    2015-11-04

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensors can reach the quantum noise limit of the optical readout field in various configurations. We demonstrate that two-mode intensity squeezed states produce a further enhancement in sensitivity compared with a classical optical readout when the quantum noise is used to transduce an SPR sensor signal in the Kretschmann configuration. The quantum noise reduction between the twin beams when incident at an angle away from the plasmonic resonance, combined with quantum noise resulting from quantum anticorrelations when on resonance, results in an effective SPR-mediated modulation that yields a measured sensitivity 5 dB better than that with a classical optical readout in this configuration. Furthermore, the theoretical potential of this technique points to resolving particle concentrations with more accuracy than is possible via classical approaches to optical transduction.

  17. Toward quantum plasmonic networks

    DOE PAGES

    Holtfrerich, M. W.; Dowran, M.; Davidson, R.; Lawrie, B. J.; Pooser, R. C.; Marino, A. M.

    2016-08-30

    Here, we demonstrate the transduction of macroscopic quantum entanglement by independent, distant plasmonic structures embedded in separate thin silver films. In particular, we show that the plasmon-mediated transmission through each film conserves spatially dependent, entangled quantum images, opening the door for the implementation of parallel quantum protocols, super-resolution imaging, and quantum plasmonic sensing geometries at the nanoscale level. The conservation of quantum information by the transduction process shows that continuous variable multi-mode entanglement is momentarily transferred from entangled beams of light to the space-like separated, completely independent plasmonic structures, thus providing a first important step toward establishing a multichannel quantummore » network across separate solid-state substrates.« less

  18. Quantum plasmonic sensing

    DOE PAGES

    Fan, Wenjiang; Lawrie, Benjamin J.; Pooser, Raphael C.

    2015-11-04

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensors can reach the quantum noise limit of the optical readout field in various configurations. We demonstrate that two-mode intensity squeezed states produce a further enhancement in sensitivity compared with a classical optical readout when the quantum noise is used to transduce an SPR sensor signal in the Kretschmann configuration. The quantum noise reduction between the twin beams when incident at an angle away from the plasmonic resonance, combined with quantum noise resulting from quantum anticorrelations when on resonance, results in an effective SPR-mediated modulation that yields a measured sensitivity 5 dB better than that withmore » a classical optical readout in this configuration. Furthermore, the theoretical potential of this technique points to resolving particle concentrations with more accuracy than is possible via classical approaches to optical transduction.« less

  19. Practical quantum retrieval games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrazola, Juan Miguel; Karasamanis, Markos; Lütkenhaus, Norbert

    2016-06-01

    Complex cryptographic protocols are often constructed from simpler building blocks. In order to advance quantum cryptography, it is important to study practical building blocks that can be used to develop new protocols. An example is quantum retrieval games (QRGs), which have broad applicability and have already been used to construct quantum money schemes. In this work, we introduce a general construction of quantum retrieval games based on the hidden matching problem and show how they can be implemented in practice using available technology. More precisely, we provide a general method to construct (1-out-of-k ) QRGs, proving that their cheating probabilities decrease exponentially in k . In particular, we define QRGs based on coherent states of light, which can be implemented even in the presence of experimental imperfections. Our results constitute a tool in the arsenal of the practical quantum cryptographer.

  20. Quantum origins of objectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horodecki, R.; Korbicz, J. K.; Horodecki, P.

    2015-03-01

    In spite of all of its successes, quantum mechanics leaves us with a central problem: How does nature create a bridge from fragile quanta to the objective world of everyday experience? Here we find that a basic structure within quantum mechanics that leads to the perceived objectivity is a so-called spectrum broadcast structure. We uncover this based on minimal assumptions, without referring to any dynamical details or a concrete model. More specifically, working formally within the decoherence theory setting with multiple environments (called quantum Darwinism), we show how a crucial for quantum mechanics notion of nondisturbance due to Bohr [N. Bohr, Phys. Rev. 48, 696 (1935), 10.1103/PhysRev.48.696] and a natural definition of objectivity lead to a canonical structure of a quantum system-environment state, reflecting objective information records about the system stored in the environment.