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Sample records for albert edward wiggam

  1. Albert Nawahi Like

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nishimoto, Warren

    2007-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Albert Nawahi Like, Hawai'i Department of Education teacher from 1927 to 1965. Albert Nawahi Like was born 1900 in Honolulu's Chinatown. When Like was eight years old, his family moved to Kalihi. After the death in 1912 of his father, Edward Like, who was editor of the Hawaiian-language newspaper "Ke…

  2. Albert's Alphabet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erickson, Ann R.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how she introduced a lesson called Albert's Alphabet to her kindergarten students. This lesson introduces the design thinking process to kindergartners in a developmentally appropriate way. She began the lesson by reading Leslie Tyron's book "Albert's Alphabet," which tells the story of Albert Goose,…

  3. Edwards' syndrome.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Doreen; Dearmun, Annette

    2016-12-08

    Edwards' syndrome is a serious genetic condition that affects fetal cellular functions, tissue development and organogenesis. Most infants with the syndrome are female, but there is no race predominance.

  4. Albert Behnke: nitrogen narcosis.

    PubMed

    Grover, Casey A; Grover, David H

    2014-02-01

    As early as 1826, divers diving to great depths noted that descent often resulted in a phenomenon of intoxication and euphoria. In 1935, Albert Behnke discovered nitrogen as the cause of this clinical syndrome, a condition now known as nitrogen narcosis. Nitrogen narcosis consists of the development of euphoria, a false sense of security, and impaired judgment upon underwater descent using compressed air below 3-4 atmospheres (99 to 132 feet). At greater depths, symptoms can progress to loss of consciousness. The syndrome remains relatively unchanged in modern diving when compressed air is used. Behnke's use of non-nitrogen-containing gas mixtures subsequent to his discovery during the 1939 rescue of the wrecked submarine USS Squalus pioneered the use of non-nitrogen-containing gas mixtures, which are used by modern divers when working at great depth to avoid the effects of nitrogen narcosis.

  5. Walter C. Williams with Brig. General Albert Boyd

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1950-01-01

    Walter C. Williams, (behind airplane model) Head of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics High-Speed Flight Research Station at Edwards Air Force Base in California is examining a Northrop X-4 research airplane with Brig. Gen. Albert Boyd, Commander of Edwards Air Force Base. At Edwards, the Air Force Air Material Command ran a brief program on the X-4 during the summer of 1950 before delivering it to the NACA. Data was collected on these 14 flights, so they were logged as NACA test flights. General Boyd made flight number 13. Air Force and NACA pilots completed a total of 82 flights on X-4 #2 (46-677) between August 1950 and September 1953. There are three things that made the Mojave Desert, where Edwards Air Force Base is located, so well suited for flight research. The first was the area's flying conditions--clear skies with great visibility almost every day of the year. The second was the 44-square-mile Rogers Dry Lake, a natural landing site that General Boyd referred to as 'God's gift to the Air Force.' The third was the unpopulated area surrounding the lakebed, which led to fewer complaints about aircraft noise (including sonic booms) than would have occurred in more populated areas. There was also less chance of injury to the surrounding population in the event of an aircraft accident.

  6. [Albert Bandura and his work].

    PubMed

    Guerrin, Brigitte

    2012-03-01

    The Canadian psychologist Albert Bandura (1925) author of the concept of self-efficacy is still not much known of nurses. This article offers an outline of his biography and his work. Theories of Albert Bandura provide a positive, dynamic relationship with the agentivity human control over events that affect their existence. The concept of vicarious learning, self-efficacy and agency can enrich nursing research.

  7. Sylvanus Albert Reed Award: Eastman N. Jacobs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1937-01-01

    Sylvanus Albert Reed Award - Eastman N. Jacobs: In 1937, Eastman N. Jacobs, one of Langley's most adventurous researchers, received the Sylvanus Albert Reed Award for his contributions to the aerodynamic improvement of airfoils.

  8. Edward Hopper: The Watercolors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Mark M.

    2000-01-01

    Provides information on Edward Hopper, focusing on his use of watercolors. Explores five of his watercolor paintings: (1) "The Mansard Roof"; (2) "House on Pamet River"; (3) "Light at Two Lights"; (4) "Saltillo Mansion"; and (5) "Roofs of Washington Square." Addresses the exhibition "Edward…

  9. Prince Edward Island.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timmons, Vianne

    2003-01-01

    This article profiles the educational system of Prince Edward Island and discusses initiatives for students who are at-risk. It describes programs and services for students who are at-risk, relevant educational legislation, areas of strength, challenges that need to be overcome, and areas of action. (Contains references.) (CR)

  10. Extensional Tectonics and Paleoclimate of the Albertine and Edward Rifts: Constraints from Integrated Seismic Reflection and Topographic Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karp, T.; McGlue, M. M.; Scholz, C. A.; Kasande, R.; Mugisha, F.

    2004-12-01

    Lakes Albert and Edward are among the largest lakes in Africa and form substantial reservoirs for tropical precipitation within the Upper Nile Watershed (UNW), the equatorial headwaters supporting annual discharge of the main Nile River into the Mediterranean Sea. Extensional processes forming Lakes Albert and Edward have driven landscape evolution, manifested in significant topography and reversed drainages networks. Consequently, the UNW, including Lakes Albert, Edward, Victoria, and Kyoga, and their riverine connections, provide an important case study for drainage basin evolution in actively extending continental lithosphere. In addition to multiple scales of tectonic deformation, high frequency climate change affects the basins in the UNW, which record moisture signals from both the Indian and Atlantic Oceans. Paleoclimate proxy data indicate the desiccation of Lake Victoria and cessation of Victoria Nile flow during the Last Glacial Maximum (22 - 18 ka). However, the response of Lakes Albert and Edward during this time period is not fully resolved. In 2003, 1600 line km of multichannel seismic reflection and high resolution echo-sounder data were collected from Lake Albert, while 200 km of 1 kHz seismic reflection data were collected from Lake Edward. In conjunction with recently released digital elevation models, we investigate both tectonic and climatic processes operative in the basins. In Lake Albert, we are able to map depth to pre-rift basement, basin boundary fault as well as intrabasinal fault geometries that control both bathymetry and sediment distribution. Shallow reflections suggest desiccation of the lake, probably during the LGM; these results tie well with published sediment core data. Acoustic data from Lake Edward record two regression events, although this lake apparently escaped LGM desiccation, and may contain a complete, high-resolution archive of Quaternary climate change in its deep-water sequences. Our interpretations provide another

  11. The development of the Starr-Edwards heart valve.

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, A M

    1998-01-01

    Development of the Starr-Edwards heart valve marked a new era in the treatment of valvular heart disease. Until the development of the Starr-Edwards valve, there were no published reports of patients who had lived longer than 3 months with a prosthetic valve in the mitral position. This valve was the result of a unique partnership between a young surgeon, Dr. Albert Starr, and an experienced engineer, Mr. Lowell Edwards. Working as a team, these 2 men developed and successfully implanted the 1st Starr-Edwards valve within less than 2 years of their 1st meeting. Their key to success was their willingness and ability to make repeated modifications to their design to solve each clinical problem as it arose. Their constant focus on the clinical goal aided the rapid transformation of their design from a leaflet valve to a shielded ball valve, and finally to an unshielded ball valve suitable for implantation in a human being. Along the way, they abandoned the idea of imitating the appearance of native valves, in favor of developing valves that would be clinically successful. Their work has provided help and hope for patients who otherwise would have died from the complications of rheumatic heart disease and other valvular disorders for which valve replacement is the only treatment. Images PMID:9885105

  12. Albert Einstein:. Opportunity and Perception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chen Ning

    2013-05-01

    The year 1905 has been called Albert Einstein's "Annus Mirabilis." It was during that year that he caused revolutionary changes in man's primordial concepts about the physical world: space, time, energy, light and matter. How could a 26-year-old clerk, previously unknown, cause such profound conceptual changes, and thereby open the door to the era of modern scientific technological world? No one, of course, can answer that question. But one can, perhaps, analyze some factors that were essential to his stepping into such a historic role...

  13. Edward Teller's Scientific Life

    SciTech Connect

    Libby, S B; Weiss, M S

    2004-04-15

    Edward Teller was one of the great physicists of the twentieth century. His career began just after the key ideas of the quantum revolution of the 1920's were completed, opening vast areas of physics and chemistry to detailed understanding. Thus, his early work in theoretical physics focused on applying the new quantum theory to the understanding of diverse phenomena. These topics included chemical physics, diamagnetism, and nuclear physics. Later, he made key contributions to statistical mechanics, surface physics, solid state, and plasma physics. In many cases, the ideas in these papers are still rich with important ramifications.

  14. Tribute: Remembering Albert Greve (1938-2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baars, Jaap

    2012-02-01

    With the sudden death of Albert Greve on 13 June 2011, caused by a massive heart attack, the radio astronomy community lost a remarkable member, and many of us a very good friend. The career of Albert was characterized by a broad array of activities, all performed at a high level of professionalism and an enduring wit.

  15. Correcting the record on Watson, Rayner, and Little Albert: Albert Barger as "psychology's lost boy".

    PubMed

    Powell, Russell A; Digdon, Nancy; Harris, Ben; Smithson, Christopher

    2014-09-01

    In 1920, John B. Watson and Rosalie Rayner attempted to condition a phobia in a young infant named "Albert B." In 2009, Beck, Levinson, and Irons proposed that Little Albert, as he is now known, was actually an infant named Douglas Merritte. More recently, Fridlund, Beck, Goldie, and Irons (2012) claimed that Little Albert (Douglas) was neurologically impaired at the time of the experiment. They also alleged that Watson, in a severe breach of ethics, probably knew of Little Albert's condition when selecting him for the study and then fraudulently hid this fact in his published accounts of the case. In this article, we present the discovery of another individual, Albert Barger, who appears to match the characteristics of Little Albert better than Douglas Merritte does. We examine the evidence for Albert Barger as having been Little Albert and, where relevant, contrast it with the evidence for Douglas Merritte. As for the allegations of fraudulent activity by Watson, we offer comments at the end of this article. We also present evidence concerning whether Little Albert (Albert Barger) grew up with the fear of furry animals, as Watson and Rayner speculated he might.

  16. Edward (Ed) T. Schneider

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    NASA research pilot Edward T. Schneider in the cockpit of an F-104. Schneider served as a U.S. Navy pilot from 1968 to 1983, during which time he trained at the U.S. Naval Test Pilot School, and received assignments as an engineering test pilot, as a test pilot school instructor, and as a Naval Liaison Officer at what was then called the Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (now the Dryden Flight Research Center). Schneider joined NASA as a research pilot in 1983. Over the next 17 years, he was a project pilot on the F-18 High Angle-of-Attack program, the F-15 aeronautical research aircraft, the B-52 launch aircraft, and the NASA SR-71s. He retired as a NASA research pilot in September 2000.

  17. Edward Teller Biographical Memoir

    SciTech Connect

    Libby, S B; Sessler, A M

    2009-07-27

    Edward Teller died on September 9, 2003 in Stanford, California at the age of 95. He was both one of the great theoretical physicists of the twentieth century and a leading figure in the development of nuclear weapons and broader defense advocacy. Teller's work in physics, spanning many decades of the twentieth century, includes some of the most fundamental insights in the quantum behaviors of molecules and their spectra, nuclei, surfaces, solid state and spin systems, and plasmas. In the defense arena, Teller is best known for his key insight that made thermonuclear weapons possible. Teller was both a great scientific collaborator and physics teacher at all levels, known for his openness, generosity, personal warmth, and powerful physical intuition. Many of his graduate students went on to illustrious careers.

  18. Obituary: Albert G. Petschek, 1928-2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colgate, Stirling A.; Petschek, Rolfe G.; Libersky, Larry D.

    2005-12-01

    Albert G. Petschek died suddenly 8 July 2004. He enjoyed good health and was very active professionally and personally until his death. He was highly respected, particularly in theoretical physics, for his deep, broad-ranging analytical powers, which resulted in contributions to nuclear physics, astrophysics, atmospheric physics, quantum mechanics, and quantum computing. Albert was born in Prague, Czechoslovakia in 1928. His extended family left Czechoslovakia when its sovereignty was threatened by Germany in 1938 and settled throughout the Western Hemisphere. Albert's father, a banker, settled in Scarsdale, near New York City. Albert graduated from White Plains High School and obtained his BS from MIT in a program accelerated during World War II. While getting his masters degree at the University of Michigan, Albert met his wife, Marilyn, also a physics masters student. In 1953, Albert obtained his PhD from the University of Rochester working with Robert Marshak on aspects of nuclear theory, and joined Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), then Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. Soon thereafter, Albert's younger brother, Harry, also became a PhD physicist. Harry is now well known in plasma physics for reconnection theory. At Los Alamos, Albert worked closely with Carson Mark, Marshall Rosenbluth, and Conrad Longmire designing the first thermonuclear weapons. His derivation of several radiation diffusion solutions, later published as LAMS 2421, remains a classic in its field, as does work on nuclear theory done with Baird Brandow and Hans Bethe during a sabbatical at Cornell in 1961. Bethe was a frequent visitor to Los Alamos and a close friend. A devoted family man, Albert also valued Los Alamos as a safe, stimulating environment for raising an active family. Like many of the scientists at Los Alamos, Albert enjoyed its ready access to outdoor activities such as hiking and skiing. Albert often combined his passions for intellectual activity and the outdoors

  19. 02-NIF Dedication: Edward Moses

    ScienceCinema

    Edward Moses

    2016-07-12

    The National Ignition Facility, the world's largest laser system, was dedicated at a ceremony on May 29, 2009 at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. These are the remarks by NIF Director Edward Moses.

  20. 02-NIF Dedication: Edward Moses

    SciTech Connect

    Edward Moses

    2009-07-02

    The National Ignition Facility, the world's largest laser system, was dedicated at a ceremony on May 29, 2009 at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. These are the remarks by NIF Director Edward Moses.

  1. Edward A. Bouchet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickens, R. E.

    2002-04-01

    Edward A. Bouchet was the first African American to receive the doctorate in any field of knowledge in the United States and that area was physics. He was granted the degree in 1876 from Yale University making him at that time one of the few persons to hold the physics doctorate from an American university. His prior education included the Hopkins Grammar School and Yale College (BA in 1874). After Yale, Bouchet taught mathematics, physics, and chemistry for over twenty-five years at the Institute for Colored Youth in Philadelphia. During the following two decades, he was employed in positions ranging from high school principal to employment by the federal government. Bouchet played a significant role in the education of African Americans through his teaching and mentoring activities. He was one among a small group of African Americans who achieved advanced training and education within decades of the American civil war. These individuals provided direction, leadership, and role models for what eventually became the civil/human rights movements. The year 2001 marks the 125th celebration of his receiving the doctorate. We present details of his life and career with an emphasis on the influence of the political and social forces exerted on him by society.

  2. Edward (Ed) T. Schneider

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Research Pilot Edward T. Schneider is shown sitting in the cockpit of a McDonnell Douglas F/A-18 Hornet that was used in the High Angle-of-Attack Research Vehicle (HARV) program at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Ames - Dryden Flight Research Facility. When the aircraft arrived at the Dryden Facility in 1987, from the US Naval Air Test Center, Patuxent River, Maryland, it consisted of parts in crates. The aircraft crew made an airplane from those parts, and in doing so they took a 'sow's ear' and created a 'silk purse', thus the name on the side of the aircraft. Ed's helmet is from his time in the Navy. The design was taken from the Flag that is flown on the bow of a Navy ship, referred to as the Jack, and is navy blue with the 50 States being represented by the white stars. Ed arrived at the NASA Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (later renamed the Dryden Flight Research Center) on July 5, 1982, as a Navy Liaison Officer, becoming a NASA research pilot one year later. Ed was the project pilot for the F-18 High Angle-of-Attack program and later served as a project pilot for the F-15 aeronautical research aircraft, the NASA B-52 launch aircraft, and the SR-71 'Blackbird' aircraft. He served on active duty with the U.S. Navy from 1968 to 1983. Following squadron service he graduated from the U.S. Naval Test Pilot School, Patuxent River, Maryland, in 1973, and then served as an engineering test pilot, and test pilot school instructor at the Naval Air Test Center. Ed has been an active member of the Society of Experimental Test Pilots since 1974. He was made a Fellow of the Society in 1993 and served as its President in 1993/94. In 1996 he was awarded the NASA Exceptional Service Medal and the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics' Chanute Flight Award. He retired as a NASA research pilot in September 2000.

  3. Foreword by Edward Michael Campbell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Edward Michael

    2016-10-01

    The Edward Teller medal has evolved into one of the most prestigious awards that recognizes the outstanding contributions to the field of inertial confinement fusion and high energy density science. It is appropriate that this international award be named after Teller, who with extraordinary vision and scientific insight, anticipated and then played a major role in the creation of this field...

  4. 76 FR 11789 - Albert Poet: Debarment Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-03

    ... of TRI- Toxin, a Botulinum Toxin Type A drug manufactured by Toxin Research International, Inc. TRI... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Albert Poet: Debarment Order AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing an order...

  5. Albert Shanker's Legacy: A Critical Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiner, Lois

    Albert Shanker headed the American Federation of Teachers for 22 years and was president of the New York City teachers union. Both organizations were transformed by his presence. Shanker altered the politics of education and teacher unionism. During his tenure, American political life encountered the birth of social movements challenging the…

  6. [Albert Einstein and his abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Cervantes Castro, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    The interesting case of Albert Einstein's abdominal aortic aneurysm is presented. He was operated on at age 69 and, finding that the large aneurysm could not be removed, the surgeon elected to wrap it with cellophane to prevent its growth. However, seven years later the aneurysm ruptured and caused the death of the famous scientist.

  7. Capital Punishment for Juveniles: Albert French's "Billy."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darlington, Sonja

    1998-01-01

    Analyzes Albert French's novel "Billy" and its exploration of the United States' use of capital punishment for young criminals. Addresses the underlying causes of Billy's execution. Discusses specific themes and issues that teachers can use for classroom discussions of capital punishment. (RS)

  8. Albert Einstein's Magic Mountain: An Aarau Education*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunziker, Herbert

    2015-03-01

    For economic reasons, the electrotechnical factory J. Einstein & Cie. (co-owned by Albert Einstein's father Hermann) had to be closed in the summer of 1894. While Albert's parents emigrated to Italy to build a new existence, he remained in Munich to complete his studies at the Gymnasium. Left behind, however, he had a difficult time with what he considered the rigid educational practices at the Munich Luitpold-Gymnasium and quit without a diploma. The present article discusses Einstein's richly winding path to the Aargau Cantonal School (Switzerland), especially its history and educational philosophy during the time of his stay in Aarau. There, Einstein met some outstanding teachers, who could serve him as models of scholars and human beings. In spite of Einstein's distinct independence of mind, these personalities may well have had a significant influence on the alignment of his inner compass.

  9. El destino del asteroide Albert (719)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orellana, R. B.; Melita, M. D.; Brunini, A.

    Albert is the only numbered asteroid that remains lost at present. This object has been discovered while it was making a close apporach to the Earth by Johann Palisa in the Imperial Observatory of Vienna. According to the standard procedure of the time, a number was assigned to it shortly after a preliminar orbit has been obtained and it was named after a great benefactor of Imperial Observatory, Baron Albert von Rothschild. In this work we analyze why this body could not be recovered in its subsequent approaches to the Earth. Basicaly the cause of the loss can be summarized as follows. Given the high absolute magnitude of the object it can only be observed when it is close to the Earth. But naturally, at the close approches, the uncertanty in the position in the celestial sphere is the greatest due to a parallax effect. We have estimated the uncertanty in R.A. and declination by the non-linear propagation of the initial obervational uncertanty. We have determined that, when the aparent magnitude was low enough to observe the object with the instruments available at the time, the uncertainty region exceeded noticeably the region where it was searched. Regarding its possible recovery at present, the uncertainty in its position practicaly covers the whole sky. Nevertheless, the plane of the orbit is bounded in a narrow strip for a considerable length of time, which makes its recovery posible in old plates. The causes of the loss of Albert (719) are common to all NEO's, which is distintive about it is that it was numbered after just a few obervations, while at present the standard procedure requires that the orbit should be very well established before a denomination is given. Given the almost imposibility of its systematic recovery, in the future Albert (719) might be the first asteroid whose denomination is reassigned to another object.

  10. 20. Historic American Buildings Survey Albert S. Burns, Photographer September ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. Historic American Buildings Survey Albert S. Burns, Photographer September 30, 1935. MAIN ENTRANCE - SOUTH FACADE - The Maples, 630 South Carolina Avenue Southeast, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  11. 17. Historic American Buildings Survey Albert S. Burns, Photographer September ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. Historic American Buildings Survey Albert S. Burns, Photographer September 30, 1935. DETAIL OF WEST ELEVATION - The Maples, 630 South Carolina Avenue Southeast, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  12. 15. Historic American Buildings Survey Albert S. Burns, Photographer October ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Historic American Buildings Survey Albert S. Burns, Photographer October 1, 1935. GENERAL VIEW, SOUTH ELEVATION - The Maples, 630 South Carolina Avenue Southeast, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  13. 27. Historic American Buildings Survey Albert S. Burns, Photographer September ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. Historic American Buildings Survey Albert S. Burns, Photographer September 30, 1935. PLASTER CORNICE - MUSIC ROOM - The Maples, 630 South Carolina Avenue Southeast, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  14. 13. Historic American Buildings Survey Albert S. Burns, Photographer C. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Historic American Buildings Survey Albert S. Burns, Photographer C. 1934 - 1935 WHEEL PIT UNDER RESTORATION - Pierce Mill, Tilden Street & Beach Drive Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  15. 7. Historic American Buildings Survey Albert S. Burns, Photographer C. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Historic American Buildings Survey Albert S. Burns, Photographer C. 1934, 1935. CREEK SIDE DURING RESTORATION - Pierce Mill, Tilden Street & Beach Drive Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  16. Ground water geology of Edwards County, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Long, Archie T.

    1963-01-01

    About 150,000 acre-feet of water is recharged annually to and discharged from the Edwards and associated limestones in Edwards County. Most of this water is available for additional development inasmuch as only about 900 acre-feet per year is currently being used; however, additional development of ground water will result in a reduction in streamflow.

  17. Clarence Edwards Middle School: Success through Transformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massachusetts 2020, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Just a few years ago, Boston's Clarence Edwards Middle School was on the verge of being shut down. By 2009, a renaissance at the Edwards made it one of the highest performing and most desired middle schools in Boston, dramatically narrowing and even eliminating academic achievement gaps while delivering a far more well-rounded education to its…

  18. Obituary: Albert Gray Mowbray, 1916-2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hockey, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Albert G. Mowbray was born on 23 June 1916. He was the son of Albert Henry Mowbray, a professor of economics at the University of California, Berkeley [UCB], and Elizabeth Gray Mowbray. He had one sister, Mary Elizabeth. Mowbray did undergraduate and graduate work at UCB. His 1943 PhD. dissertation had to do with the apparent sizes of globular clusters. Mowbray became an observing assistant at Lick Observatory in about 1942; later that year he went to the Perkins Observatory, operated for Ohio Wesleyan University by the Ohio State University [OSU]. Due to the wartime shortage of instructors, he also taught physics at OSU. In 1946 Mowbray joined the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. By 1948 he lived in Pasadena California, and was a volunteer observer at the Mount Wilson Observatory. Later, until 1956, he was employed by UCB professor Leland Cunningham, a solar-system dynamicist. Mowbray did computations and measured plates for Cunningham. Mowbray joined the physics faculty at San Jose State College (now California State University, San Jose) in 1957. In addition to the AAS, Mowbray was a member of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific. He died in San Francisco, California, on 21 August 2002. The kind assistance of George Herbig, Virginia Trimble, and Elizabeth Roemer is acknowledged.

  19. Little Albert from the Viewpoint of Abnormal Psychology Textbook Authors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeUnes, Arnold

    1983-01-01

    Watson and Rayner's study of Little Albert and conditioned emotional reactions is unquestionably a classic in psychology. Observations are made on what authors of 27 college textbooks in abnormal psychology have to say or not to say about Little Albert. (RM)

  20. Dr. Albert Carr--Science Educator 1930-2000

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez, Leslie

    2013-01-01

    The very first issue of "Educational Perspectives" was published in October of 1962. Dr. Albert Carr wrote one of the inaugural essays on the topic of current developments in science education, and he went on to write several other articles for the journal. This article shares why Dr. Albert Carr's colleagues remember him for his…

  1. Albert Schweitzer's Legacy for Education: Reverence for Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rud, A. G.

    2010-01-01

    "Albert Schweitzer's Legacy for Education" is the first book devoted to the study of the thought and deeds of Albert Schweitzer in relation to education. Schweitzer's life and work offer both inspiration and timely insights for educational thought and practice in the twenty-first century. Focusing on Schweitzer's central thought,…

  2. Policing epistemic deviance: Albert Von Schrenck-Notzing and Albert Moll(1).

    PubMed

    Sommer, Andreas

    2012-04-01

    Shortly after the death of Albert von Schrenck-Notzing (1862-1929), the doyen of early twentieth century German para psychology, his former colleague in hypnotism and sexology Albert Moll (1862-1939) published a treatise on the psychology and pathology of parapsychologists, with Schrenck-Notzing serving as a prototype of a scientist suffering from an 'occult complex'. Moll's analysis concluded that parapsychologists vouching for the reality of supernormal phenomena, such as telepathy, clairvoyance, telekinesis and materialisations, suffered from a morbid will to believe, which paralysed their critical faculties and made them cover obvious mediumistic fraud. Using Moll's treatment of Schrenck-Notzing as an historical case study of boundary disputes in science and medicine, this essay traces the career of Schrenck-Notzing as a researcher in hypnotism, sexology and parapsychology; discusses the relationship between Moll and Schrenck-Notzing; and problematises the pathologisation and defamation strategies of deviant epistemologies by authors such as Moll.

  3. Albert Einstein - And the Frontiers of Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernstein, Jeremy

    1997-11-01

    Albert Einstein did not impress his first teachers. They found him a dreamy child without an especially promising future. But some time in his early years he developed what he called "wonder" about the world. Later in life, he remembered two instances from his childhood--his fascination at age five with a compass and his introduction to the lucidity and certainty of geometry--that may have been the first signs of what was to come. From these ordinary beginnings, Einstein became one of the greatest scientific thinkers of all time. This illuminating biography describes in understandable language the experiments and revolutionary theories that flowed from Einstein's imagination and intellect--from his theory of relativity, which changed our conception of the universe and our place in it, to his search for a unified field theory that would explain all of the forces in the universe.

  4. Edward Wheeler Hones Jr. (1922-2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Daniel N.; McPherron, Robert L.; Birn, Joachim

    2013-02-01

    Space physicist Edward Wheeler Hones Jr. died on 17 September 2012 at his home in Los Alamos, N. M. He was 90 years old. The cause of death was a heart attack that came following a brief hospitalization.

  5. Sturckow Recaps Last Shuttle Landing at Edwards

    NASA Video Gallery

    When Space Shuttle Discovery touched down at Edwards Air Force Base in Southern California on Sept. 11, 2009 to conclude mission STS-128, no one foresaw that it would be the last of 54 such landing...

  6. Space Radar Image of Prince Albert, Canada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This is a false-color composite of Prince Albert, Canada, centered at 53.91 north latitude and 104.69 west longitude. This image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar(SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard space shuttle Endeavour on its 20th orbit. The area is located 40 kilometers (25 miles) north and 30 kilometers (20 miles) east of the town of Prince Albert in the Saskatchewan province of Canada. The image covers the area east of the Candle lake, between gravel surface highways 120 and 106 and west of 106. The area in the middle of the image covers the entire Nipawin (Narrow Hills) provincial park. The look angle of the radar is 30 degrees and the size of the image is approximately 20 kilometers by 50 kilometers (12 by 30 miles). The image was produced by using only the L-band. The three polarization channels HH, HV and VV are illustrated by red, green and blue respectively. The changes in the intensity of each color are related to various surface conditions such as variations in forest stands, frozen or thawed condition of the surface, disturbances (fire and deforestation), and areas of regrowth. Most of the dark areas in the image are the ice-covered lakes in the region. The dark area on the top right corner of the image is the white Gull Lake north of the intersection of highway 120 and 913. The right middle part of the image shows Lake Ispuchaw and Lower Fishing Lake. The deforested areas are also shown by dark areas in the image. Since most of the logging practice at the Prince Albert area is around the major highways, the deforested areas can be easily detected as small geometrically shaped dark regions along the roads. At the time of the SIR-C/X-SAR overpass a major part of the forest is either frozen or undergoing the spring thaw. The L-band HH shows a high return in the jack pine forest. The reddish areas in the image are old jack pine forest, 12 to 17 meters (40to 55 feet) in height and 60 to 75 years old. The orange

  7. 14. BRIDGE TENDER ALBERT REEVES (RIGHT) AND YOUTHFUL HELPER (WALLY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. BRIDGE TENDER ALBERT REEVES (RIGHT) AND YOUTHFUL HELPER (WALLY HALES), HANDLING HUGE 'KEY' TO WIND OPEN THE CENTER SWING SPAN. - Maurice River Pratt Through-Truss Swing Bridge, Spanning Maurice River, Mauricetown, Cumberland County, NJ

  8. Albert Gallatin and the Movement for Peace with Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mannix, Richard

    1969-01-01

    An account of Albert Gallatin's efforts at promoting peace during the Mexican American war in 1847: In particular, the pamphlet Gallatin authored as an appeal for peace is discussed in terms of its distribution and impact. (AP)

  9. Biographical sketch: John Albert Key, 1890-1955.

    PubMed

    Brand, Richard A

    2013-07-01

    This biographical sketch on John Albert Key corresponds to the historic text, The Classic: Epiphyseal coxa vara or displacement of the capital epiphysis of the femur in adolescence, available at DOI 10.1007/s11999-013-2913-y.

  10. 19. Historic American Buildings Survey Albert S. Burns, Photographer September ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. Historic American Buildings Survey Albert S. Burns, Photographer September 30, 1935. VIEW OF SOUTHEAST CORNER, COURT YARD - The Maples, 630 South Carolina Avenue Southeast, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  11. 29. Historic American Buildings Survey Albert S. Burns, Photographer September ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. Historic American Buildings Survey Albert S. Burns, Photographer September 30, 1935. MANTEL, SOUTHWEST BEDROOM - 2d FLOOR - The Maples, 630 South Carolina Avenue Southeast, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  12. 28. Historic American Buildings Survey Albert S. Burns, Photographer September ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. Historic American Buildings Survey Albert S. Burns, Photographer September 30, 1935. MANTEL, SECOND FLOOR LIVING ROOM - The Maples, 630 South Carolina Avenue Southeast, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  13. 25. Historic American Buildings Survey Albert S. Burns, Photographer September ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. Historic American Buildings Survey Albert S. Burns, Photographer September 30, 1935. CEILING AND CHANDELIER IN MUSIC ROOM - The Maples, 630 South Carolina Avenue Southeast, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  14. 26. Historic American Buildings Survey Albert S. Burns, Photographer September ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. Historic American Buildings Survey Albert S. Burns, Photographer September 30, 1935. FRAGMENTS OF PLASTER CEILING ROSETTE - MUSIC ROOM - The Maples, 630 South Carolina Avenue Southeast, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  15. 18. Historic American Buildings Survey Albert S. Burns, Photographer October ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Historic American Buildings Survey Albert S. Burns, Photographer October 1, 1935. DETAIL OF NORTH ELEVATION AT COURT WALL. - The Maples, 630 South Carolina Avenue Southeast, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  16. 4. Historic American Buildings Survey Albert S. Burns Photographer c. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Historic American Buildings Survey Albert S. Burns Photographer c. 1934-35 PIERCE MILL (Before restoration) - Pierce Mill, Tilden Street & Beach Drive Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  17. 12. Photocopy of drawing, measured and drawn by Albert P. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Photocopy of drawing, measured and drawn by Albert P. Erb. WEST ELEVATION - Dr. David Ross House, Annapolis Road (moved to Preservation Hill, Western Run Road, Cockeysville), Bladensburg, Prince George's County, MD

  18. 8. Historic American Buildings Survey Albert S. Burns, Photographer September ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Historic American Buildings Survey Albert S. Burns, Photographer September 30, 1935. LIVING ROOM MANTLE (DINING ROOM SAME) - Captain Joseph Johnson House, 49 T Street Southwest, Buzzards Point, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  19. 7. Photocopied 1973 from original owned by Albert M. Stiles, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Photocopied 1973 from original owned by Albert M. Stiles, Jr., Parkersburg, WV, 1880's. VOLCANO LITTLE THEATRE GUILD. SOME CAST. - West Oil Company Endless Wire Pumping Station, U.S. Route 50 (Volcano vicinity), Petroleum, Ritchie County, WV

  20. 19. Photocopied 1973 from original owned by Albert M. Stiles, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. Photocopied 1973 from original owned by Albert M. Stiles, Jr., Parkersburg, WV, 1907. THE OLD STILES HOUSE, LOOKING WEST. - West Oil Company Endless Wire Pumping Station, U.S. Route 50 (Volcano vicinity), Petroleum, Ritchie County, WV

  1. 9. Photocopied 1973 from original owned by Albert M. Stiles, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Photocopied 1973 from original owned by Albert M. Stiles, Jr., Parkersburg, WV, 1907. VIEW LOOKING NORTH. - West Oil Company Endless Wire Pumping Station, U.S. Route 50 (Volcano vicinity), Petroleum, Ritchie County, WV

  2. 16. Photocopied 1973 from original owned by Albert M. Stiles, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Photocopied 1973 from original owned by Albert M. Stiles, Jr., Parkersburg, WV, 1907. STILES RESIDENCE, THORNHILL FARM. - West Oil Company Endless Wire Pumping Station, U.S. Route 50 (Volcano vicinity), Petroleum, Ritchie County, WV

  3. 17. Photocopied 1973 from original owned by Albert M. Stiles, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. Photocopied 1973 from original owned by Albert M. Stiles, Jr., Parkersburg, WV, 1907. THE OLD STILES HOUSE LOOKING EAST. - West Oil Company Endless Wire Pumping Station, U.S. Route 50 (Volcano vicinity), Petroleum, Ritchie County, WV

  4. 5. Photocopied 1973 from original owned by Albert M. Stiles, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Photocopied 1973 from original owned by Albert M. Stiles, Jr., Parkersburg, WV, 1880. VOLCANO TOWN HALL. BLACKLIN HOUSE AT LEFT. - West Oil Company Endless Wire Pumping Station, U.S. Route 50 (Volcano vicinity), Petroleum, Ritchie County, WV

  5. 1. Photocopied 1973 from original owned by Albert M. Stiles, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Photocopied 1973 from original owned by Albert M. Stiles, Jr., Parkersburg, WV, 1907. VIEW LOOKING SOUTH. - West Oil Company Endless Wire Pumping Station, U.S. Route 50 (Volcano vicinity), Petroleum, Ritchie County, WV

  6. 14. Photocopied 1973 from original owned by Albert M. Stiles, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Photocopied 1973 from original owned by Albert M. Stiles, Jr., Parkersburg, WV, 1907. MOUNT FARM OIL COMPANY. - West Oil Company Endless Wire Pumping Station, U.S. Route 50 (Volcano vicinity), Petroleum, Ritchie County, WV

  7. 12. Photocopied 1973 from original owned by Albert M. Stiles, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Photocopied 1973 from original owned by Albert M. Stiles, Jr., Parkersburg, WV, 1907. THORNHILL STORE. - West Oil Company Endless Wire Pumping Station, U.S. Route 50 (Volcano vicinity), Petroleum, Ritchie County, WV

  8. [Albert Schweitzer. The man as a symbol].

    PubMed

    Urdaneta-Carruyo, Eliexer

    2007-01-01

    Albert Schweitzer, the great missionary physician from the XXth century, had a versatile personality that integrated multiple talents, leading to the slightly frequent conjunction of the thinker with the man of action, and the humanist with the scientist and the artist. He studied all these disciplines in a brilliant manner: Philosophy, Theology, Music and Medicine; he was also a great scholar of Bach's work, Jesus Christ and the civilization history. In his maturity, this great man renounced to the fame and glory gained as intellectual and musician, to dedicate his life as a physician for the forgotten African natives. His deeply religious spirit allowed him to penetrate into the most recondite of the human soul; in his personality, he expressed in its entire dimension the eternally unsatisfied desire of the solitary man, against the immensity of the universe. His philosophy, based on the respect for life, was realized throughout the practice of the medical profession. His noble character and personality was based on the man as symbol, since it was not so much what he did helping people but what people could do to others due to him. His singular example represented a moral force in the world, superior to millions of men armed for a war. In 1953, he received the Nobel Peace Prize for his philanthropic work in Africa during more that fifty years, and for his deep love to the living beings. He was transformed in a perennial legend as the Lambaréné doctor.

  9. New Information about Albert Einstein's Brain.

    PubMed

    Falk, Dean

    2009-01-01

    In order to glean information about hominin (or other) brains that no longer exist, details of external neuroanatomy that are reproduced on endocranial casts (endocasts) from fossilized braincases may be described and interpreted. Despite being, of necessity, speculative, such studies can be very informative when conducted in light of the literature on comparative neuroanatomy, paleontology, and functional imaging studies. Albert Einstein's brain no longer exists in an intact state, but there are photographs of it in various views. Applying techniques developed from paleoanthropology, previously unrecognized details of external neuroanatomy are identified on these photographs. This information should be of interest to paleoneurologists, comparative neuroanatomists, historians of science, and cognitive neuroscientists. The new identifications of cortical features should also be archived for future scholars who will have access to additional information from improved functional imaging technology. Meanwhile, to the extent possible, Einstein's cerebral cortex is investigated in light of available data about variation in human sulcal patterns. Although much of his cortical surface was unremarkable, regions in and near Einstein's primary somatosensory and motor cortices were unusual. It is possible that these atypical aspects of Einstein's cerebral cortex were related to the difficulty with which he acquired language, his preference for thinking in sensory impressions including visual images rather than words, and his early training on the violin.

  10. STS-66 Edwards Landing Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The space shuttle Atlantis approaches runway 22 at Edwards, California, to complete the STS-66 mission dedicated to the third flight of the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science-3 (ATLAS-3), part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth program. The astronauts also deployed and retrieved a free-flying satellite designed to study the middle and lower thermospheres and perform a series of experiments covering life sciences research and microgravity processing. The landing was at 7:34 a.m. (PST) 14 November 1994, after being waved off from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, due to adverse weather. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on

  11. Shuttle Atlantis Landing at Edwards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    NASA's Space Shuttle Atlantis touched down on the lakebed runway at Edwards Air Force Base in California's Mojave Desert Tuesday, 3 December 1985 at 1:33:49 p.m. Pacific Standard Time, concluding the STS 61-B international mission. The eight-day mission successfully deployed three communications satellites including the Mexican Morelos B, the Australian Aussat 2 and an RCA Satcom K-2 satellite. In addition, two spacewalks were performed to experiment with construction of structures in space. Crew of the 61-B mission included Commander Brewster H. Shaw, Jr.; Pilot Bryan D. O'Connor; Mission Specialists Mary L. Cleave, Sherwood C. Spring and Jerry L. Ross; and Payload Specialists Rudolfo Neri Vela of Mexico and Charles Walker of McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Co. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories

  12. Policing Epistemic Deviance: Albert von Schrenck-Notzing and Albert Moll1

    PubMed Central

    Sommer, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Shortly after the death of Albert von Schrenck-Notzing (1862–1929), the doyen of early twentieth century German para psychology, his former colleague in hypnotism and sexology Albert Moll (1862–1939) published a treatise on the psychology and pathology of parapsychologists, with Schrenck-Notzing serving as a prototype of a scientist suffering from an ‘occult complex’. Moll’s analysis concluded that parapsychologists vouching for the reality of supernormal phenomena, such as telepathy, clairvoyance, telekinesis and materialisations, suffered from a morbid will to believe, which paralysed their critical faculties and made them cover obvious mediumistic fraud. Using Moll’s treatment of Schrenck-Notzing as an historical case study of boundary disputes in science and medicine, this essay traces the career of Schrenck-Notzing as a researcher in hypnotism, sexology and parapsychology; discusses the relationship between Moll and Schrenck-Notzing; and problematises the pathologisation and defamation strategies of deviant epistemologies by authors such as Moll. PMID:23002296

  13. Little Albert's alleged neurological impairment: Watson, Rayner, and historical revision.

    PubMed

    Digdon, Nancy; Powell, Russell A; Harris, Ben

    2014-11-01

    In 2012, Fridlund, Beck, Goldie, and Irons (2012) announced that "Little Albert"-the infant that Watson and Rayner used in their 1920 study of conditioned fear (Watson & Rayner, 1920)-was not the healthy child the researchers described him to be, but was neurologically impaired almost from birth. Fridlund et al. also alleged that Watson had committed serious ethical breaches in regard to this research. Our article reexamines the evidentiary bases for these claims and arrives at an alternative interpretation of Albert as a normal infant. In order to set the stage for our interpretation, we first briefly describe the historical context for the Albert study, as well as how the study has been construed and revised since 1920. We then discuss the evidentiary issues in some detail, focusing on Fridlund et al.'s analysis of the film footage of Albert, and on the context within which Watson and Rayner conducted their study. In closing, we return to historical matters to speculate about why historiographical disputes matter and what the story of neurologically impaired Albert might be telling us about the discipline of psychology today.

  14. In Tribute: Senator Edward M. Kennedy, Friend of NIH

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn Javascript on. In Tribute: Senator Edward M. Kennedy, Friend of NIH Past Issues / Fall 2009 ... Human Development (NICHD) in Shriver's honor. Senator Edward M. Kennedy, Friend of NIH "… deep compassion for those ...

  15. Edward Weston and the "Modern" Galvanometer Movement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    One of my favorite 19th century electrical scientists is Edward Weston, and one of my favorite devices for teaching the topics of electromagnetic forces and torques is the D'Arsonval galvanometer. The junction of these two topics is Weston's improved meter movement that has been used in analog meters for the past 125 years.

  16. Edward Weston and the ``Modern'' Galvanometer Movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenslade, Thomas B.

    2008-03-01

    One of my favorite 19th century electrical scientists is Edward Weston, and one of my favorite devices for teaching the topics of electromagnetic forces and torques is the D'Arsonval galvanometer. The junction of these two topics is Weston's improved meter movement that has been used in analog meters for the past 125 years.

  17. Prince Edward Island. Reference Series No. 33.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of External Affairs, Ottawa (Ontario).

    This booklet, one of a series featuring the Canadian provinces, presents a brief overview of Prince Edward Island and is suitable for teacher reference or student reading. Separate sections discuss geography, climate, history, early trade, development, agriculture, the potato industry, forests, fisheries, aquaculture, industry, tourism, energy,…

  18. Prince Edward Island's School Psychology Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matters, Rhonda

    2016-01-01

    The Prince Edward Island (PEI) school system has been struggling with issues of recruitment and particularly retention for psychologists. Reasons include concerns about professional autonomy; having more limited roles, which are heavily assessment focused; reduced job satisfaction; and restrictions on additional private practice work. The waiting…

  19. [Interculturality in the medical practice of Dr. Albert Schweitzer].

    PubMed

    Campos-Navarro, Roberto; Ruiz-Llanos, Adriana

    2004-01-01

    Albert Schweitzer (1875-1965) was a young and promising German who at age 29 decided to undertake the profession of Medical Doctor at the University of Strassburg after finishing a career in musical studies in Paris (1899) and obtaining in Berlin a doctoral degree in Philosophy and Theology. Surprisingly, Albert Schweitzer, despite his comfortable life in Europe, decided in 1913 to practice his medical career in a remote and small Equatorial African country. He devoted nearly 50 years of his life caring for the Black population at Lamaberene, where he built a hospital. In this paper, we attempt to develop some theoretical aspects related with interculturality in the medical practice of Dr. Albert Schweitzer. We begin by considering certain sociocultural variables in hospitals that give care to patients with cultural characteristics that are substantially different from those of the health care personnel who organize, administer, and execute medical functions.

  20. Teaching, Learning and Ethical Dilemmas: Lessons from Albert Camus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Over the past half century, Albert Camus's story "The Guest" has attracted a great deal of scholarly attention. "The Guest" focuses on the ethical dilemmas faced by Daru, a school teacher in Algeria, and the two visitors he receives one day: Balducci, a gendarme, and an unnamed Arab prisoner. This paper addresses Camus's text from an educational…

  1. 76 FR 66072 - Albert Ronald Cioffi: Debarment Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-25

    ... unapproved drug derived from Botulinum Toxin Type A (TRI-toxin), sold by Toxin Research International (TRI... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Albert Ronald Cioffi: Debarment Order AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing an order...

  2. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey Albert S. Burns, Photographer C. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey Albert S. Burns, Photographer C. 1934, 1935 COPY OF PRINT LOANED BY MR. POLLEN JEWETT, NYACK, N.Y. TAKEN ABOUT 1900 VIEW ACROSS ROCK CREEK - Pierce Mill, Tilden Street & Beach Drive Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  3. View northeast, overview of Albert Thacker building group: chicken house ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View northeast, overview of Albert Thacker building group: chicken house (HABS No. WV-267-D), wash house (267-C), privy (HABS No. WV-268-B), and house (267-A) (left to right in photograph) - 3249 Cyrus Road (House), Cyrus, Wayne County, WV

  4. 15. BRIDGE TENDER ALBERT REEVES OF MAURICETOWN AND HELPER WALLY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. BRIDGE TENDER ALBERT REEVES OF MAURICETOWN AND HELPER WALLY HALES HOLDING HUGE KEY ABOVE HOLE IN DECK OF CENTER SWING SPAN TO REVEAL KEY BASETHE KEY IS SET UPON A MALE FITTING USED TO OPEN THE SPAN - Maurice River Pratt Through-Truss Swing Bridge, Spanning Maurice River, Mauricetown, Cumberland County, NJ

  5. The Continuing Saga of Little Albert in Introductory Psychology Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griggs, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    Inaccuracies, especially concerning the stimulus generalization findings, in textbook descriptions of the Little Albert study have been well documented since the 1970s. However, there has not been a systematic examination of introductory psychology textbooks since the 1980s to determine whether such inaccuracies still persist. This study filled…

  6. Albert Sidney Beckham: The First African American School Psychologist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graves, Scott L., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    Albert Sidney Beckham was the first African American to hold the title school psychologist. This article examines the life and professional career of Beckham in the context of his contributions to the field of school psychology. It explores his graduate education, the founding of Howard University's Psychological Laboratory and his research and…

  7. Let's Nuke the Transpersonalists: A Response to Albert Ellis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilber, Ken

    1989-01-01

    Responds to Albert Ellis' 1986 article which proposed to use rational-emotive therapy (RET) to save the world from religious and psychological fanatics and nuclear war. Attempts to provide a more balanced view of religion, RET, non-RET therapies, and the role of psychology in averting nuclear war. (Author/ABL)

  8. Albert Einstein and LD: An Evaluation of the Evidence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Marlin

    2000-01-01

    This article refutes claims that Albert Einstein had a learning disability and argues the claim derives its force not from evidence but from belief that the greatest among us suffer from some impairment and from desire to enhance the status of a marginalized group by including exceptional individuals. (Contains references.) (Author/CR)

  9. Albert Ellis Revisited: Vague, General or Mild Religion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Floyd, William A.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the writings of Albert Ellis dealing with religion and psychotherapy. Advocates a liberal form of theism in which (1) the use of symbolism and ritual are stressed; (2) faith is taken seriously but not as history or science; and (3) the importance of theology is affirmed. (JAC)

  10. Cereal Building (1926, Albert Kahn), with corner of Meat Products ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Cereal Building (1926, Albert Kahn), with corner of Meat Products Building at left, looking northeast from Heinz Street. Heinz Lofts archway added ca. 2005. The bridge in the rear connects to the Bean Building. - H.J. Heinz Company Factories, 300 Heinz Street, Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, PA

  11. 222. BUILDINGS 44 AND 42 (ENLISTED BARRACKS), 194041. ALBERT KAHN, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    222. BUILDINGS 44 AND 42 (ENLISTED BARRACKS), 1940-41. ALBERT KAHN, INC., ARCHITECTS. VIEW FROM THE WEST SHOWING ENCLOSED CORRIDOR CONNECTING BUILDING 44 (ON LEFT) AND BUILDING 42. - Quonset Point Naval Air Station, Roger Williams Way, North Kingstown, Washington County, RI

  12. 6. Photocopied 1973 from original owned by Albert M. Stiles, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Photocopied 1973 from original owned by Albert M. Stiles, Jr., Parkersburg, WV, 1907. STAGE, VOLCANO TOWN HALL. OLD GLORY, GETTING THE WORST OF IT. - West Oil Company Endless Wire Pumping Station, U.S. Route 50 (Volcano vicinity), Petroleum, Ritchie County, WV

  13. 10. Photocopied 1973 from original owned by Albert M. Stiles, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Photocopied 1973 from original owned by Albert M. Stiles, Jr., Parkersburg, WV. EPISCOPAL CHURCH AND GATES RESIDENCE AT LEFT (n.d.). - West Oil Company Endless Wire Pumping Station, U.S. Route 50 (Volcano vicinity), Petroleum, Ritchie County, WV

  14. 8. Photocopied 1973 from original owned by Albert M. Stiles, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Photocopied 1973 from original owned by Albert M. Stiles, Jr., Parkersburg, WV, 1907. INTERIOR VOLCANO TOWN HALL FROM STAGE SHOWING RAISED SEATS. - West Oil Company Endless Wire Pumping Station, U.S. Route 50 (Volcano vicinity), Petroleum, Ritchie County, WV

  15. 3. Photocopied 1973 from original owned by Albert M. Stiles, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Photocopied 1973 from original owned by Albert M. Stiles, Jr., Parkersburg, WV. LOOKING DOWN THE CREEK, WEST BACK OF THE STORES, BEFORE THE FIRE (n.d.). - West Oil Company Endless Wire Pumping Station, U.S. Route 50 (Volcano vicinity), Petroleum, Ritchie County, WV

  16. 2. Photocopied 1973 from original owned by Albert M. Stiles, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Photocopied 1973 from original owned by Albert M. Stiles, Jr., Parkersburg, WV, 1898. LARGE TANK, VOLOCANO STATION AND BAND HOUSE, AFTER THE RR WAS DISMANTLED. - West Oil Company Endless Wire Pumping Station, U.S. Route 50 (Volcano vicinity), Petroleum, Ritchie County, WV

  17. 23. Photocopied 1973 from original owned by Albert M. Stiles, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. Photocopied 1973 from original owned by Albert M. Stiles, Jr., Parkersburg, WV, 1897. TAKEN AT WATER TANKS NEAR THE HIGH TRESTLE. BOB FLEMING-ENGINEER, WILSH (?) ROLLINS-FIREMAN, OTH (?) COLLINS-PASSENGER (WITH CANE). - West Oil Company Endless Wire Pumping Station, U.S. Route 50 (Volcano vicinity), Petroleum, Ritchie County, WV

  18. 11. Photocopied 1973 from original owned by Albert M. Stiles, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Photocopied 1973 from original owned by Albert M. Stiles, Jr., Parkersburg, WV, 1907. JOHN SHAFFER'S STORE AND JOHN WILSON'S BOWLING ALLEY AND SALOON IN FOREGROUND. - West Oil Company Endless Wire Pumping Station, U.S. Route 50 (Volcano vicinity), Petroleum, Ritchie County, WV

  19. 21. Photocopied 1973 from original owned by Albert M. Stiles, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. Photocopied 1973 from original owned by Albert M. Stiles, Jr., Parkersburg, WV. 'JOHN NOON L(*(. SAYS HE DROVE THE FIRST SPIKE AND I SAW HIM PULL THE LAST ONE AT VOLCANO JUNCTION' SBS. - West Oil Company Endless Wire Pumping Station, U.S. Route 50 (Volcano vicinity), Petroleum, Ritchie County, WV

  20. 18. Photocopied 1973 from original owned by Albert M. Stiles, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Photocopied 1973 from original owned by Albert M. Stiles, Jr., Parkersburg, WV, 1998. THIS ENGINE HAD CAB KNOCKED OFF AND TIRES USED ON OTHER ENGINE, SO JOHN NOON AND PAT O'BRIEN WERE SCRAPING IT. - West Oil Company Endless Wire Pumping Station, U.S. Route 50 (Volcano vicinity), Petroleum, Ritchie County, WV

  1. 13. Photocopied 1973 from original owned by Albert M. Stiles, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Photocopied 1973 from original owned by Albert M. Stiles, Jr., Parkersburg, WV, 1907. VOLCANO SCHOOL HOUSE, ME. CHURCH IN WOODS AT LEFT. - West Oil Company Endless Wire Pumping Station, U.S. Route 50 (Volcano vicinity), Petroleum, Ritchie County, WV

  2. 22. Photocopied 1973 from original owned by Albert M. Stiles, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. Photocopied 1973 from original owned by Albert M. Stiles, Jr., Parkersburg, WV, 1898. TANK, VOLCANO PUMPING STATION, AND BARNE HOUSE STILL STANDING AND IN USE. THIS SHOWS THE OLD RR LINE. (1934 CAPTION). - West Oil Company Endless Wire Pumping Station, U.S. Route 50 (Volcano vicinity), Petroleum, Ritchie County, WV

  3. 15. Photocopied 1973 from original owned by Albert M. Stiles, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Photocopied 1973 from original owned by Albert M. Stiles, Jr., Parkersburg, WV, UP THE HILL, SOUTH OF THE TOWN (n.d.). - West Oil Company Endless Wire Pumping Station, U.S. Route 50 (Volcano vicinity), Petroleum, Ritchie County, WV

  4. 24. Photocopied 1973 from original owned by Albert M. Stiles, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. Photocopied 1973 from original owned by Albert M. Stiles, Jr., Parkersburg, WV, 1907. JIM RIDGE'S CARPENTER SHOP, LOOKING UP THE CREEK, EAST. - West Oil Company Endless Wire Pumping Station, U.S. Route 50 (Volcano vicinity), Petroleum, Ritchie County, WV

  5. 4. Photocopied 1973 from original owned by Albert M. Stiles, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Photocopied 1973 from original owned by Albert M. Stiles, Jr., Parkersburg, WV, 1907. CORNER OF THORNHILL STORE AND TOWN HALL. MRS. GATES AND JOHN SCHAFFER. - West Oil Company Endless Wire Pumping Station, U.S. Route 50 (Volcano vicinity), Petroleum, Ritchie County, WV

  6. 20. Photocopied 1973 from original owned by Albert M. Stiles, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. Photocopied 1973 from original owned by Albert M. Stiles, Jr., Parkersburg, WV, 1907. RESIDENCE OF E.W. STAPLES AND DR. W.H. SHARP. - West Oil Company Endless Wire Pumping Station, U.S. Route 50 (Volcano vicinity), Petroleum, Ritchie County, WV

  7. The Lake Albert Rift (uganda, East African Rift System): Deformation, Basin and Relief Evolution Since 17 Ma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brendan, Simon; François, Guillocheau; Cécile, Robin; Olivier, Dauteuil; Thierry, Nalpas; Martin, Pickford; Brigitte, Senut; Philippe, Lays; Philippe, Bourges; Martine, Bez

    2016-04-01

    This study is based on a coupled basin infilling study and a landforms analysis of the Lake Albert Rift located at the northern part of the western branch of the East African Rift. The basin infilling study is based on both subsurface data and outcrops analysis. The objective was to (1) obtain an age model based on onshore mammals biozones, (2) to reconstruct the 3D architecture of the rift using sequence stratigraphy correlations and seismic data interpretation, (3) to characterize the deformation and its changes through times and (4) to quantify the accommodation for several time intervals. The infilling essentially consists of isopach fault-bounded units composed of lacustrine deposits wherein were characterized two major unconformities dated at 6.2 Ma (Uppermost Miocene) and 2.7 Ma (Pliocene-Pleistocene boundary), coeval with major subsidence and climatic changes. The landforms analysis is based on the characterization and relative dating (geometrical relationships with volcanism) of Ugandan landforms which consist of stepped planation surfaces (etchplains and peplians) and incised valleys. We here proposed a seven-steps reconstruction of the deformation-erosion-sedimentation relationships of the Lake Albert Basin and its catchments: - 55-45 Ma: formation of laterites corresponding to the African Surface during the very humid period of the Lower-Middle Eocene; - 45-22: stripping of the African Surface in response of the beginning of the East-African Dome uplift and formation of a pediplain which associated base level is the Atlantic Ocean; - 17-2.5 Ma: Initiation of the Lake Albert Basin around 17 Ma and creation of local base levels (Lake Albert, Edward and George) on which three pediplains tend to adapt; - 18 - 16 Ma to 6.2 Ma: "Flexural" stage (subsidence rate: 150-200 m/Ma; sedimentation rate 1.3 km3/Ma between 17 and 12 Ma and 0.6 km3/Ma from 12 to 6 Ma) - depocenters location (southern part of Lake Albert Basin) poorly controlled by fault; - 6.2 Ma to 2

  8. Edward Teller Returns to LOS Alamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecker, Siegfried S.

    2010-01-01

    I was asked to share some reflections of Edward Teller's return to Los Alamos during my directorship. I met Teller late in his life. My comments focus on that time and they will be mostly in the form of stories of my interactions and those of my colleagues with Teller. Although the focus of this symposium is on Teller's contributions to science, at Los Alamos it was never possible to separate Teller's science from policy and controversy ...

  9. Robert Edwards: the path to IVF☆

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Martin H

    2011-01-01

    The early influences on Robert Edwards’ approach to the scientific research that led to human IVF are described. His interest as a graduate student in the genetics of early mammalian development stimulated him later to investigate whether the origins of human genetic diseases such as Down, Klinefelter and Turner syndromes might be explained by events during egg maturation. This clinical problem provided the most powerful stimulus to achieve both oocyte maturation and fertilization in vitro in humans. Indeed, preimplantation genetic diagnosis was his main goal until he met Patrick Steptoe in 1968. A re-evaluation of his meeting with Steptoe suggests that initially Steptoe’s laparoscopic skill was of interest for its potential to solve the sperm capacitation problem. Steptoe’s impact on Edwards was twofold. First, Steptoe’s long-held interest in infertility raised this application of IVF higher in Edwards’ priorities. Second, Steptoe offered a long-term partnership, in which oocyte collection without in-vitro maturation was a possibility. The professional criticism generated by their work together encouraged Edwards to pursue a deliberate programme of public education about the issues raised and to challenge and develop professional bioethical thought and discourse about reproduction. The early life and career of Robert Edwards are described and re-evaluated in the light of documentary evidence. His early interest in the genetics of development provided the major motivation behind his goal of achieving IVF in humans. Through this work, he aimed to understand and hopefully to reduce the transmission of genetic disease in humans. His meeting with Patrick Steptoe, the details of which are re-examined, increased the significance for Edwards of infertility as an outcome of IVF. It also led to a creative long-term research partnership, initiated a long-term programme of public education in the UK about reproductive science and stimulated the development of

  10. 26. "AIR INSTALLATIONS; EDWARDS AIR FORCE BASE, CALIFORNIA; HIGH SPEED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. "AIR INSTALLATIONS; EDWARDS AIR FORCE BASE, CALIFORNIA; HIGH SPEED TEST TRACK." Drawing No. 10-259. One inch to 400 feet plan of original 10,000-foot sled track. No date. No D.O. series number. No headings as above. - Edwards Air Force Base, South Base Sled Track, Edwards Air Force Base, North of Avenue B, between 100th & 140th Streets East, Lancaster, Los Angeles County, CA

  11. Edward P. Ney (1920-1996)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Tom

    On July 9, 1996, Edward P. Ney, whose research spanned many disciplines across physics, astronomy, and geophysics, succumbed to a long battle with congestive heart disease at his home in Minneapolis at the age of 75.Ney was a member of both the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He was regents' professor emeritus of physics and astronomy at the University of Minnesota, where he had been a member of the faculty since 1947. Although he retired from teaching in 1990, Ney remained active in research until his death.

  12. Ethical reflections on Edward Jenner's experimental treatment

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Hugh

    2007-01-01

    In 1798 Dr Edward Jenner published his famous account of “vaccination”. Some claim that a Research Ethics Committee, had it existed in the 1790s, might have rejected his work. I provide the historical context of his work and argue that it addressed a major risk to the health of the community, and, given the devastating nature of smallpox and the significant risk of variolation, the only alternative preventative measure, Jenner's study had purpose, justification and a base in the practice of the day. PMID:17329392

  13. Majority-Vote on Directed BARABÁSI-ALBERT Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, F. W. S.

    On directed Barabási-Albert networks with two and seven neighbours selected by each added site, the Ising model was seen not to show a spontaneous magnetisation. Instead, the decay time for flipping of the magnetisation followed an Arrhenius law for Metropolis and Glauber algorithms, but for Wolff cluster flipping the magnetisation decayed exponentially with time. On these networks the Majority-vote model with noise is now studied through Monte Carlo simulations. However, in this model, the order-disorder phase transition of the order parameter is well defined in this system. We calculate the value of the critical noise parameter qc for several values of connectivity z of the directed Barabási-Albert network. The critical exponentes β/ν, γ/ν and 1/ν were calculated for several values of z.

  14. Robert Edwards: the path to IVF.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Martin H

    2011-08-01

    The early influences on Robert Edwards’ approach to the scientific research that led to human IVF are described. His interest as a graduate student in the genetics of early mammalian development stimulated him later to investigate whether the origins of human genetic diseases such as Down, Klinefelter and Turner syndromes might be explained by events during egg maturation. This clinical problem provided the most powerful stimulus to achieve both oocyte maturation and fertilization in vitro in humans. Indeed,preimplantation genetic diagnosis was his main goal until he met Patrick Steptoe in 1968. A re-evaluation of his meeting with Steptoe suggests that initially Steptoe’s laparoscopic skill was of interest for its potential to solve the sperm capacitation problem. Steptoe’simpact on Edwards was twofold. First, Steptoe’s long-held interest in infertility raised this application of IVF higher in Edwards’priorities. Second, Steptoe offered a long-term partnership, in which oocyte collection without in-vitro maturation was a possibility.The professional criticism generated by their work together encouraged Edwards to pursue a deliberate programme of public education about the issues raised and to challenge and develop professional bioethical thought and discourse about reproduction.

  15. Edward F. Diener: Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions.

    PubMed

    2012-11-01

    Presents Edward F. Diener as one of the winners of the American Psychological Association's Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions (2012). Edward F. Diener has been a leader in every aspect of well-being research. He provided an influential conception of well-being as consisting of cognitive and emotional elements. A citation, biography, and selected bibliography are presented here.

  16. Edward F. Diener: Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Presents Edward F. Diener as one of the winners of the American Psychological Association's Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions (2012). Edward F. Diener has been a leader in every aspect of well-being research. He provided an influential conception of well-being as consisting of cognitive and emotional elements. A citation, biography,…

  17. Edward Jenner and the Small Pox Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Kendall A.

    2011-01-01

    Edward Jenner, who discovered that it is possible to vaccinate against Small Pox using material from Cow Pox, is rightly the man who started the science of immunology. However, over the passage of time many of the details surrounding his astounding discovery have been lost or forgotten. Also, the environment within which Jenner worked as a physician in the countryside, and the state of the art of medicine and society are difficult to appreciate today. It is important to recall that people were still being bled at the time, to relieve the presence of evil humors. Accordingly, this review details Jenner’s discovery and attempts to place it in historical context. Also, the vaccine that Jenner used, which decreased the prevalence of Small Pox worldwide in his own time, and later was used to eradicate Small Pox altogether, is discussed in light of recent data. PMID:22566811

  18. Edward o. Wilson and the organicist tradition.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Abraham H

    2013-01-01

    Edward O. Wilson's recent decision to abandon kin selection theory has sent shockwaves throughout the biological sciences. Over the past two years, more than a hundred biologists have signed letters protesting his reversal. Making sense of Wilson's decision and the controversy it has spawned requires familiarity with the historical record. This entails not only examining the conditions under which kin selection theory first emerged, but also the organicist tradition against which it rebelled. In similar fashion, one must not only examine Wilson's long career, but also those thinkers who influenced him most, especially his intellectual grandfather, William Morton Wheeler (1865-1937). Wilson belongs to a long line of organicists, biologists whose research highlighted integration and coordination, many of whom struggled over the exact same biological riddles that have long defined Wilson's career. Drawing inspiration (and sometimes ideas) from these intellectual forebears, Wilson is confident that he has finally identified the origin of the social impulse.

  19. Edward jenner and the small pox vaccine.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kendall A

    2011-01-01

    Edward Jenner, who discovered that it is possible to vaccinate against Small Pox using material from Cow Pox, is rightly the man who started the science of immunology. However, over the passage of time many of the details surrounding his astounding discovery have been lost or forgotten. Also, the environment within which Jenner worked as a physician in the countryside, and the state of the art of medicine and society are difficult to appreciate today. It is important to recall that people were still being bled at the time, to relieve the presence of evil humors. Accordingly, this review details Jenner's discovery and attempts to place it in historical context. Also, the vaccine that Jenner used, which decreased the prevalence of Small Pox worldwide in his own time, and later was used to eradicate Small Pox altogether, is discussed in light of recent data.

  20. [A biographical sketch of Albert Szent-Györgyi].

    PubMed

    Berger, Zoltán; Berger Salinas, Alexandra; Szánthó Pongrácz, György

    2015-08-01

    Albert Szent-Györgyi was a Hungarian biochemist and physiologist. He identified the structure and function of vitamin C, naming it as ascorbic acid. His research on cellular respiration and oxidation provided the basis for Krebs' citric acid cycle. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in 1937. With his collaborators, he discovered the biochemical basis of muscle contractility, isolating the basic proteins, giving them the name myosin and actin. Later on, he worked on the theory of carcinogenesis, linked to electron movements. He was one of the first researchers to describe the connection between free radicals and cancer. He lived a long, very complete life, defending always his opinion and freedom.

  1. Albert Einstein and LD: an evaluation of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Thomas, M

    2000-01-01

    Historical figures suspected of having learning disabilities are often subjected to retrospective diagnoses. One such figure is Albert Einstein. Several organizations that promote the interests of individuals with learning disabilities claim that Einstein had a learning disability. A review of biographical sources, however, provides little or no evidence to support this claim. The claim derives its force not from evidence but from a powerful belief--that the greatest among us suffer from some impairment--and from an equally powerful desire to enhance the status of a marginalized group by including within it exceptional individuals.

  2. Scanning transmission electron microscopy: Albert Crewe's vision and beyond.

    PubMed

    Krivanek, Ondrej L; Chisholm, Matthew F; Murfitt, Matthew F; Dellby, Niklas

    2012-12-01

    Some four decades were needed to catch up with the vision that Albert Crewe and his group had for the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) in the nineteen sixties and seventies: attaining 0.5Å resolution, and identifying single atoms spectroscopically. With these goals now attained, STEM developments are turning toward new directions, such as rapid atomic resolution imaging and exploring atomic bonding and electronic properties of samples at atomic resolution. The accomplishments and the future challenges are reviewed and illustrated with practical examples.

  3. Remembering Albert deutsch, an advocate for mental health.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Kenneth J

    2011-12-01

    Albert Deutsch, journalist, advocate for the mentally ill, and honorary APA Fellow died 50 years ago. Author of The Mentally Ill in America and The Shame of the States, he believed in the obligation of individuals and institutions to advocate for patients. In 1961, he was in the midst of a vast project to assess the state of the art in psychiatric research. This article recalls aspects of Deutsch's life and work and places him in the historical context of individuals who have shown great compassion for disabled persons.

  4. Three frequency false-color image of Prince Albert, Canada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is a three-frequency, false color image of Prince Albert, Canada, centered at 53.91 north latitude and 104.69 west longitude. It was produced using data from the X-band, C-band and L-band radars that comprise the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR). SIR-C/X-SAR acquired this image on the 20th orbit of the Shuttle Endeavour. The area is located 40 km north and 30 km east of the town of Prince Albert in the Saskatchewan province of Canada. The image covers the area east of the Candle Lake, between gravel surface highways 120 and 106 and west of 106. The area in the middle of the image covers the entire Nipawin (Narrow Hills) provincial park. Most of the dark blue areas in the image are the ice covered lakes. The dark area on the top right corner of the image is the White Gull Lake north of the intersection of highway 120 and 913. The right middle part of the image shows Lake Ispuchaw and Lower Fishing Lake. The deforested areas are shown by light

  5. False-color composite image of Prince Albert, Canada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is a false color composite of Prince Albert, Canada, centered at 53.91 north latitude and 104.69 west longitude. This image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) on the 20th orbit of the Shuttle Endeavour. The area is located 40 km north and 30 km east of the town of Prince Albert in the Saskatchewan province of Canada. The image covers the area east of the Candle Lake, between gravel surface highways 120 and 106 and west of 106. The area in the middle of the image covers the entire Nipawin (Narrow Hills) provincial park. The look angle of the radar is 30 degrees and the size of the image is approximately 20 kilometers by 50 kilometers (12 by 30 miles). Most of the dark areas in the image are the ice-covered lakes in the region. The dark area on the top right corner of the image is the White Gull Lake north of the intersection of Highway 120 and 913. The right middle part of the image shows Lake Ispuchaw and Lower Fishing Lake

  6. Psychology's Lost Boy: Will the Real Little Albert Please Stand Up?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griggs, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    This article is concerned with the recent debate about the identity of psychology's lost boy-Little Albert, the infant subject in Watson and Rayner's classic experiment on fear conditioning. For decades, psychologists and psychology students have been intrigued by the mystery of Albert's fate. Now two evidentiary-based solutions to…

  7. Finding Little Albert: A Journey to John B. Watson's Infant Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Hall P.; Levinson, Sharman; Irons, Gary

    2009-01-01

    In 1920, John Watson and Rosalie Rayner claimed to have conditioned a baby boy, Albert, to fear a laboratory rat. In subsequent tests, they reported that the child's fear generalized to other furry objects. After the last testing session, Albert disappeared, creating one of the greatest mysteries in the history of psychology. This article…

  8. Albert W. Frenkel (1919-2015): photosynthesis research pioneer, much-loved teacher, and scholar.

    PubMed

    Govindjee; Frenkel, Susanna

    2015-06-01

    Albert W. Frenkel, a pioneer in photosynthesis research, and discoverer of photophosphorylation in photosynthetic bacteria, is remembered here by two of us: Govindjee (historical corner editor of photosynthesis research) and Susanna Frenkel (SF; Albert Frenkel's daughter, who provided most of the family information).

  9. Meet Cover Directors--Steve Albert, Rainbow School, Kahuku, Hawaii; Chuck Larson, Seagull Schools, Honolulu, Hawaii.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child Care Information Exchange, 1994

    1994-01-01

    Profiles Chuck Larson and Steve Albert, each of whom directs a multi-site child care organization in Hawaii. Larson directs Rainbow School, dedicated to the idea that learning is a natural, joyful accomplishment of living. Albert directs Seagull School, responding to the early educational needs of Hawaii's diverse community by offering affordable,…

  10. 3. Photocopy of lithograph by Edward A. Wilson, owned by ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Photocopy of lithograph by Edward A. Wilson, owned by Mrs. Arthur Williams, owner of the house in 1960. JOSHUA DYER HOUSE FROM THE REAR - Joshua Dyer House, North Pamet Road, Truro, Barnstable County, MA

  11. EPA Seeks Public Input on Modified Training at Camp Edwards

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    BOSTON - EPA is seeking public comment on a proposed agreement to allow the Massachusetts Army National Guard to train with a Percussion Activated Neutralizer at the Camp Edwards portion of Joint Base Cape Cod (JBCC).

  12. EPA Seeks Public Input on Modified Training at Camp Edwards

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA is seeking public comment on a proposed agreement to allow the Massachusetts Army National Guard to train with a Percussion Activated Neutralizer at the Camp Edwards portion of Joint Base Cape Cod.

  13. Brenda K. Edwards, PhD | DCCPS/NCI/NIH

    Cancer.gov

    Brenda K. Edwards, PhD, has been with the Surveillance Research Program (SRP) and its predecessor organizations at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) since 1989, serving as SRP’s Associate Director from 1990-2011.

  14. 16. Photocopy of illustration from Rattray, Jeannette Edwards, Gardiner's Island, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Photocopy of illustration from Rattray, Jeannette Edwards, Gardiner's Island, East Hampton, 1958; Photograph by Morton Pennypacker of painting MANOR HOUSE, GARDINER'S ISLAND, 1639 - Gardiner's Island Windmill, Napeague, Suffolk County, NY

  15. Edward Mills Purcell, August 30, 1912-March 7, 1997

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigden, John S.

    2011-03-01

    I discuss the life, education, personality, and contributions of Edward Mills Purcell (1912-1997) to physics, radio astronomy, astrophysics, biological physics, physics teaching and education, and to the nation.

  16. 7. MOTION PICTURE CAMERA STAND AT BUILDING 8768. Edwards ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. MOTION PICTURE CAMERA STAND AT BUILDING 8768. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Observation Bunkers for Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  17. 5Q4: Chris Edwards - Child Presence Sensor

    NASA Video Gallery

    Five Questions For (5Q4) Chris Edwards, NASA engineer who was the team lead of a group that invented a child presence sensor designed to alert parents if they've inadvertently left their child in h...

  18. 14. Photocopy of Illustration from Buffet, Edward P., 'Some Long ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Photocopy of Illustration from Buffet, Edward P., 'Some Long Island Windmills,' American Machinist, 17 October 1918, p. 728 STONE CRANE AT THE SHELTER ISLAND WINDMILL - Shelter Island Windmill, Manwaring Road, Shelter Island, Suffolk County, NY

  19. Edward Teller Medal: Laudations and Citations 2005-2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hora, Heinrich; Miley, George H.

    2016-10-01

    The following sections are included: * Max Tabak * Joseph D. Kilkenny * Kunioki Mima * Brian R. Thomas * Ricardo Betti * Edward I. Moses * Christine Garban-Labaune * Bruce A. Remington * James Hammer * Richard Petrasso * Jie Zhang * Hiroshi Azechi

  20. 4. BUILDING 8767, INTERIOR. Looking west. Edwards Air Force ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. BUILDING 8767, INTERIOR. Looking west. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Observation Bunkers for Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  1. 6. BUILDING 8768, NORTHWEST SIDE AND SOUTHWEST FRONT. Edwards ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. BUILDING 8768, NORTHWEST SIDE AND SOUTHWEST FRONT. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Observation Bunkers for Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  2. SOUTHEAST AND NORTHEAST SIDES. Looking west Edwards Air Force ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SOUTHEAST AND NORTHEAST SIDES. Looking west - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Fuel & Water Tank, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  3. SOUTH FRONT AND EAST SIDE. January, 1998 Edwards Air ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SOUTH FRONT AND EAST SIDE. January, 1998 - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Electrical Substation, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  4. 8. BUILDING 8769, WEST FRONT AND SOUTH SIDE. Edwards ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. BUILDING 8769, WEST FRONT AND SOUTH SIDE. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Observation Bunkers for Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  5. 2. BUILDING 8767, SOUTH FRONT AND EAST SIDE. Edwards ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. BUILDING 8767, SOUTH FRONT AND EAST SIDE. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Observation Bunkers for Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  6. 1. NORTHWEST SIDE AND SOUTHWEST FRONT. Looking east. Edwards ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. NORTHWEST SIDE AND SOUTHWEST FRONT. Looking east. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Firing Control Building, Test Area 1-100, northeast end of Test Area 1-100 Road, Boron, Kern County, CA

  7. 5. EAST SIDE, TEST STAND AND ITS SUPERSTRUCTURE. Edwards ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. EAST SIDE, TEST STAND AND ITS SUPERSTRUCTURE. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  8. 4. DETAIL SHOWING FLAME DEFLECTOR. Looking southeast. Edwards Air ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. DETAIL SHOWING FLAME DEFLECTOR. Looking southeast. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  9. 8. SOUTH REAR, SUPERSTRUCTURE. Looking north from deck. Edwards ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. SOUTH REAR, SUPERSTRUCTURE. Looking north from deck. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  10. DETAIL, CONTROL BOOTH, RP1 TANK FARM Edwards Air Force ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL, CONTROL BOOTH, RP1 TANK FARM - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Combined Fuel Storage Tank Farm, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  11. CONTROL BUILDING, WEST FRONT SHOWING ENTRANCE Edwards Air Force ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CONTROL BUILDING, WEST FRONT SHOWING ENTRANCE - Edwards Air Force Base, X-15 Engine Test Complex, Firing Control Building, Rogers Dry Lake, east of runway between North Base & South Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  12. NORTHWEST FRONT AND SOUTHWEST SIDE, BUILDING 1933 Edwards Air ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    NORTHWEST FRONT AND SOUTHWEST SIDE, BUILDING 1933 - Edwards Air Force Base, X-15 Engine Test Complex, Observation Bunker Types, Rogers Dry Lake, east of runway between North Base & South Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  13. 3. SOUTH SIDE. Edwards Air Force Base, South Base ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. SOUTH SIDE. - Edwards Air Force Base, South Base Sled Track, Firing & Control Blockhouse for 10,000-foot Track, South of Sled Track at midpoint of 20,000-foot track, Lancaster, Los Angeles County, CA

  14. 6. OUTER BLAST DOOR, WEST REAR. Edwards Air Force ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. OUTER BLAST DOOR, WEST REAR. - Edwards Air Force Base, South Base Sled Track, Firing & Control Blockhouse for 10,000-foot Track, South of Sled Track at midpoint of 20,000-foot track, Lancaster, Los Angeles County, CA

  15. 5. NORTH SIDE AND WEST REAR. Edwards Air Force ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. NORTH SIDE AND WEST REAR. - Edwards Air Force Base, South Base Sled Track, Firing & Control Blockhouse for 10,000-foot Track, South of Sled Track at midpoint of 20,000-foot track, Lancaster, Los Angeles County, CA

  16. Craniofacial abnormalities among patients with Edwards Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Rafael Fabiano M.; Rosa, Rosana Cardoso M.; Lorenzen, Marina Boff; Zen, Paulo Ricardo G.; Graziadio, Carla; Paskulin, Giorgio Adriano

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the frequency and types of craniofacial abnormalities observed in patients with trisomy 18 or Edwards syndrome (ES). METHODS This descriptive and retrospective study of a case series included all patients diagnosed with ES in a Clinical Genetics Service of a reference hospital in Southern Brazil from 1975 to 2008. The results of the karyotypic analysis, along with clinical data, were collected from medical records. RESULTS: The sample consisted of 50 patients, of which 66% were female. The median age at first evaluation was 14 days. Regarding the karyotypes, full trisomy of chromosome 18 was the main alteration (90%). Mosaicism was observed in 10%. The main craniofacial abnormalities were: microretrognathia (76%), abnormalities of the ear helix/dysplastic ears (70%), prominent occiput (52%), posteriorly rotated (46%) and low set ears (44%), and short palpebral fissures/blepharophimosis (46%). Other uncommon - but relevant - abnormalities included: microtia (18%), orofacial clefts (12%), preauricular tags (10%), facial palsy (4%), encephalocele (4%), absence of external auditory canal (2%) and asymmetric face (2%). One patient had an initial suspicion of oculo-auriculo-vertebral spectrum (OAVS) or Goldenhar syndrome. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the literature description of a characteristic clinical presentation for ES, craniofacial alterations may be variable among these patients. The OAVS findings in this sample are noteworthy. The association of ES with OAVS has been reported once in the literature. PMID:24142310

  17. Malfunctioning Starr-Edwards mitral valve 21 years after installation.

    PubMed

    Sakata, K; Ishikawa, S; Ohtaki, A; Otani, Y; Suzuki, M; Kawashima, O; Morishita, Y

    1997-02-01

    Two cases of malfunctioning Starr-Edwards cloth-covered mitral valve prostheses requiring reoperation are presented. Both cases underwent successful surgical repair 21 years after the valve replacement. The causes were a disturbance of the poppet during the opening movement due to excessive tissue ingrowth and a paravalvular leak associated with a tear of the valve seat. Replacement of the Starr-Edwards valve prosthesis more than 20 years after the initial installation has not been reported.

  18. [Albert-Jean-Louis Brun, pharmacist of Geneva and vulcanologist].

    PubMed

    Chaigneau, M

    1996-01-01

    Albert-Jean-Louis Brun (1851-1929), was chemist of the University of Bern (Switzerland) and "licencié ès sciences" of the University of Sorbonne (France). In Paris he was a faithful follower of Charles Friedel. In Coutance (Genève), where he was working in his own chemistry, he realised all his researchs. After a trip to Stromboli in 1901, he studied the volcanic phenomena as a chemist, as a mineralogist and as a geophysicist. His researchs brought him till the mediterranean volcanos--Vesuve, Etna, Santorin--, till Java and Krakatoa, then Canarian islands, and the lava lake of Kilauea, etc. The results of his works are collected in a big book called "Recherches sur l'exhalaison volcanique": he presents a theory which was the subject of a polemic with the professor Henri Gautier of the professor Henri Gautier of the Faculty of Pharmacy of Paris.

  19. Albert Einstein and Friedrich Dessauer: Political Views and Political Practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goenner, Hubert

    In this case study I compare the political views of the physicists Albert Einstein and Friedrich Dessauer between the first and second world wars, and I investigate their translation into concrete political practice. Both departed from their roles as experts in physics in favor of political engagement. The essence of Einstein's political practice seems to have been a form of political participation in exerting moral influence on people and organizations through public declarations and appeals in isolation from political mass movements. Dessauer exerted political influence both through public office (as a member of Parliament for the Catholic Center Party) and by acquiring a newspaper. The different political practice of both Einstein and Dessauer were unsuccessful in thwarting the Nazi takeover.

  20. Albert Ross Tilley: The legacy of a Canadian plastic surgeon.

    PubMed

    Mowbrey, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    The present article chronicles the career of Dr Albert Ross Tilley, one of the most important Canadian plastic surgeons of the 20th century. Tilley is most well known for his innovations of burn management during World War II and his treatment of a group of burn patients known affectionately as the 'Guinea Pig Club'. In addition to the superb surgical skills he applied to the physical wounds of his patients, Tilley was also a pioneer of caring for the emotional and psychological afflictions suffered by many airmen of World War II. As one of the founding fathers of the Canadian Society of Plastic Surgeons, Tilley's work was instrumental in establishing the specialty and ensured its prosperity for years to come. Serving in the capacity of leader, educator and innovator, Tilley remains one of Canada's most decorated physicians, and his body of work encompasses contributions to the medical field that remain significant and beneficial to patient care to this day.

  1. Wealth condensation in a Barabasi-Albert network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez-Montejo, J.; Huerta-Quintanilla, R.; Rodríguez-Achach, M.

    2010-04-01

    We study the flow of money among agents in a Barabasi-Albert (BA) scale free network, where each network node represents an agent and money exchange interactions are established through links. The system allows money trade between two agents at a time, betting a fraction f of the poorer’s agent wealth. We also allow for the bet to be biased, giving the poorer agent a winning probability p. In the no network case there is a phase transition involving a relationship between p and f. In the networked case, we also found a condensation interface, however, this is not a complete condensation due to the presence of clusters in the network and its topology. As can be expected, the winner is always a well-connected agent, but we also found that the mean wealth decreases with the agents’ connectivity.

  2. Sir Charles Edward Saunders, Dominion cerealist.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Malcolm J

    2008-06-01

    Charles Edward Saunders was born in London, Ontario, in 1867. His father, Sir William Saunders, was the first director of the Dominion Experimental Farms (1886-1911). Charles received his B.A. with honours in science from the University of Toronto in 1888 and his Ph.D. in chemistry from Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland, in 1891. He attempted a career in music, his first love, from 1893 to 1902. With his father, Charles attended the 1902 International Conference on Plant Breeding and Hybridization in New York, where he learned of Mendel's theories of inheritance and their applicability to plant breeding. When he began work in 1903 in the Division of Cereal Breeding and Experimentation at the Central Experimental Farm in Ottawa, he used the knowledge he had gained at that conference. It was Charles's goal to achieve "fixity" in the varieties that had been bred and released using phenotypic mass selection, prior to his tenure as Cerealist. He selected four heads from the wheat variety Markham and in the winter of 1904 he performed a "chewing test" to select for gluten elasticity and colour. Seeds from two heads were chosen, and seeds from one went on to produce the variety Marquis after extensive yield trials on the Prairies. Marquis was 7 to 10 days earlier than Red Fife, the standard bread wheat of the Prairies. The earliness and tremendous yield of Marquis wheat resulted in the rapid and successful settlement of the Great Plains and countless billions of dollars in revenue to Canada. By 1923, 90% of the spring wheat in Canada and 70% in the USA was Marquis. Charles continued as Dominion Cerealist until his retirement in 1922. He was knighted in 1934, and died in 1937.

  3. 13. Photocopy of drawing (Original by Albert P.Erb) SOUTH ELEVATION,FIRST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Photocopy of drawing (Original by Albert P.Erb) SOUTH ELEVATION,FIRST FLOOR PLAN AND SECOND FLOOR PLAN - Dr. David Ross House, Annapolis Road (moved to Preservation Hill, Western Run Road, Cockeysville), Bladensburg, Prince George's County, MD

  4. Mathematical Existence Results for the Doi-Edwards Polymer Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chupin, Laurent

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we present some mathematical results on the Doi-Edwards model describing the dynamics of flexible polymers in melts and concentrated solutions. This model, developed in the late 1970s, has been used and extensively tested in modeling and simulation of polymer flows. From a mathematical point of view, the Doi-Edwards model consists in a strong coupling between the Navier-Stokes equations and a highly nonlinear constitutive law. The aim of this article is to provide a rigorous proof of the well-posedness of the Doi-Edwards model, namely that it has a unique regular solution. We also prove, which is generally much more difficult for flows of viscoelastic type, that the solution is global in time in the two dimensional case, without any restriction on the smallness of the data.

  5. Albert Ross Tilley: The legacy of a Canadian plastic surgeon

    PubMed Central

    Mowbrey, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    The present article chronicles the career of Dr Albert Ross Tilley, one of the most important Canadian plastic surgeons of the 20th century. Tilley is most well known for his innovations of burn management during World War II and his treatment of a group of burn patients known affectionately as the ‘Guinea Pig Club’. In addition to the superb surgical skills he applied to the physical wounds of his patients, Tilley was also a pioneer of caring for the emotional and psychological afflictions suffered by many airmen of World War II. As one of the founding fathers of the Canadian Society of Plastic Surgeons, Tilley’s work was instrumental in establishing the specialty and ensured its prosperity for years to come. Serving in the capacity of leader, educator and innovator, Tilley remains one of Canada’s most decorated physicians, and his body of work encompasses contributions to the medical field that remain significant and beneficial to patient care to this day. PMID:24431953

  6. Cleveland's Multicultural Librarian: Eleanor (Edwards) Ledbetter, 1870-1954

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Plummer Alston, Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Eleanor (Edwards) Ledbetter, who served immigrant populations in Cleveland throughout most of the Progressive Era and the Great Depression, was one of the first librarians to advocate for multiculturalism (then called cultural pluralism) as opposed to Americanism. In providing multicultural and multilingual library services for immigrants,…

  7. Edward Adrian Wilson (1872-1912): polar explorer and artist.

    PubMed

    Brown, Kevin

    2012-11-01

    Dr Edward Wilson was a polar explorer who accompanied Robert Falcon Scott (1868-1912) on his expeditions to Antarctica in 1900 and 1910. He went with Scott to the South Pole and died with him on the return journey in 1912. Although medically qualified, he is now remembered more as a naturalist and as a talented artist recording the Antarctic expeditions.

  8. Edwards Personality Inventory, Booklet IV: Faking and Faking Detection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun, John R.

    1970-01-01

    Control subjects completed Book IV of the Edwards Personality Inventory under instructions to be honest while experimental subjects were instructed to fake so as to make an excellent impression while also concealing their faking. Differences between group means were small. (Author/EK)

  9. Moyers receives Edward A. Flinn III Award: Citation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J.; Duce, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    Jarvis L. Moyers received the Edward A. Flinn III Award posthumously at the 2011 AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, held on 7 December 2011 in San Francisco, Calif. The award honors "individuals who personify the Union's motto `unselfish cooperation in research' through their facilitating, coordinating, and implementing activities."

  10. Increasing Student Success: An Interview with Edward A. Morante.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spann, Milton G.; Calderwood, Barbara J.

    1998-01-01

    Presents an interview with Edward Morante, Dean of Student Services and Learning Resources at College of the Desert (California), regarding the needs of high-risk community college students. Morante focuses on assessment, placement, basic-skills courses, student-support services, the learning-community concept, student involvement, and evaluation,…

  11. Edward Lear, Limericks, and Nonsense: A Little Nonsense. [Lesson Plan].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    British poet Edward Lear (1812-1888) is widely recognized as the father of the limerick form of poetry and is well known for his nonsense poems. In the first lesson for grades 3-5, which focuses on Lear's nonsense poem "The Owl and the Pussy Cat," students learn about nonsense poetry as well as the various poetic techniques and devices…

  12. Quality in Higher Education: The Contribution of Edward Demings Principles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redmond, Richard; Curtis, Elizabeth; Noone, Tom; Keenan, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Purpose--There can be little doubt about the importance and relevance of quality for any service industry. One of the most influential contributors to service quality developments was W. Edwards Deming (1900-1993). An important component of Demings philosophy is reflected in his 14-principles for transforming a service as they indicate what…

  13. The Small Rural Schools of Prince Edward Island.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edmonds, E. L.

    In 1973, there were 56 one- and two-room elementary schools in Prince Edward Island (Canada). As part of a descriptive survey of these schools, now closed by consolidation, researchers visited each school in 1973 and recorded details of the buildings, facilities, and school organizations. Teachers from 47 schools and their 737 students in grades…

  14. What's Wrong with "Edward the Unready"? Our Responsibility for Readiness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graue, M. Elizabeth

    1998-01-01

    Describes how Rosemary Wells's new books about "Edward Unready" explain children and readiness; explores the problems with her message, and suggests new endings that are more supportive of all children. Asserts that variability in development should not be mistaken for deficit, and recommends changing the focus from judging children to…

  15. STS-67 landing at Edwards Air Force Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Endeavour, after completing a mission of almost 17 days duration in space, touches down on runway 22 at Edwards Air Force Base in southern California. Landing occurred at 1:46 p.m. (EST), March 18, 1995. In this photo the nose gear is still in the air as the orbiter touches down.

  16. STS-66 landing at Edwards Air Force Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The main landing gear is on the ground and the nose gear is about to touch down as the Space Shuttle Atlantis heads toward a stop at Edwards Air Force Base in southern California, ending a successful 10 day, 22 hour and 34 minute space mission. Landing occured at 7:34 a.m. (PST), November 14, 1994.

  17. STS-67 landing at Edwards Air Force Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The drag chute is fully deployed in this view of the Space Shuttle Endeavour as it completes a mission of almost 17 days duration in space on runway 22 at Edwards Air Force Base in southern California. Landing occurred at 1:46 p.m. (EST), March 18, 1995.

  18. STS-66 landing at Edwards Air Force Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The drag chute is fully deployed as the Space Shuttle Atlantis heads toward a stop at Edwards Air Force Base in southern California, ending a successful 10 day, 22 hour and 34 minute space mission. Landing occured at 7:34 a.m. (PST), November 14, 1994.

  19. Dr. Edward de Bono's Six Thinking Hats and Numeracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paterson, Anne

    2006-01-01

    In education, the term "metacognition" describes thinking about thinking. Within mathematics, the term "metacomputation" describes thinking about computational methods and tools. This article shows how Dr. Edward de Bono's Six Thinking Hats can be used to demonstrate metacognition and metacomputation in the primary classroom. The article suggests…

  20. Reception of Edward Bernays' Doctrine of "Manipulating Public Opinion."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olasky, Marvin N.

    Ivy Lee and Edward Bernays are generally regarded as the founding fathers of modern public relations. While Lee has been the subject of a full biography that included contemporary reaction to his ideas, there has been no similar work on how Bernays' ideas were received, though his ideas were in some ways more radical. He believed that propaganda…

  1. A tumor profile in Edwards syndrome (trisomy 18).

    PubMed

    Satgé, Daniel; Nishi, Motoi; Sirvent, Nicolas; Vekemans, Michel

    2016-09-01

    Constitutional trisomy 18 causes Edwards syndrome, which is characterized by intellectual disability and a particular set of malformations. Although this condition carries high mortality during prenatal and early postnatal life, some of the rare infants who survive the first months develop benign and malignant tumors. To determine the tumor profile associated with Edwards syndrome, we performed a systematic review of the literature. This review reveals a tumor profile differing from those of Down (trisomy 21) and Patau (trisomy 13) syndromes. The literature covers 45 malignancies: 29 were liver cancers, mainly hepatoblastomas found in Japanese females; 13 were kidney tumors, predominantly nephroblastomas; 1 was neuroblastoma; 1 was a Hodgkin disease; and 1 was acute myeloid leukemia in an infant with both trisomy 18 and type 1 neurofibromatosis. No instances of the most frequent malignancies of early life-cerebral tumors, germ cell tumors, or leukemia--are reported in children with pure trisomy 18. Tumor occurrence does not appear to correlate with body weight, tissue growth, or cancer genes mapping to chromosome 18. Importantly, the most recent clinical histories report successful treatment; this raises ethical concerns about cancer treatment in infants with Edwards syndrome. In conclusion, knowledge of the Edwards' syndrome tumor profile will enable better clinical surveillance in at-risk organs (i.e., liver, kidney). This knowledge also provides clues to understanding oncogenesis, including the probably reduced frequency of some neoplasms in infants and children with this genetic condition. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. A tribute to Robert Edwards and Howard Jones Jr

    PubMed Central

    Ombelet, W.

    2011-01-01

    “2010 was a fascinating year. Robert Edwards finally received the Nobel prize for Medicine and his friend in the United States, Howard W. Jones Jr. was honored in Denver by the American Society of Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) upon his Centennial Birthday. He turned 100 on December 30th” PMID:24753845

  3. Obituary: Harrison Edward Radford, 1927-2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, James Michael; Kirby, Kate Page; Chance, Kelly V.; Brown, Campbell

    2003-12-01

    Harrison Edward ``Harry" Radford, a noted laboratory spectroscopist and pioneer in the application of magnetic resonance techniques to spectroscopy, died on 5 May 2000, after a long battle with amyotropic lateral sclerosis (ALS). During a 37-year career at the National Bureau of Standards and the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, Harry measured the frequencies of numerous molecular transitions which aided the emerging field of astrochemistry. Harry was both an excellent theoretician and a preeminently skilled experimentalist. He has several major spectroscopic achievements to his credit. He performed the first study of a short-lived molecular free radical, OH, by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, opening up a huge and important field of research. Together with colleagues he made the first observation of the rotational spectrum of CH by far infrared laser magnetic resonance spectroscopy and extended the technique to other molecules such as CH3O. Harry was born in Peterborough, New Hampshire, on 26 July 1927. He was the son of Harrison Edwin Radford, a roofer, and Dorothy (née Cole) Radford. He dropped out of high school to join the Navy in 1944 as an electronics technician's mate. After his discharge in 1946 he worked in the family construction business for four years as a roofer. In 1950 he entered the University of New Hampshire and graduated four years later, Summa Cum Laude, with a degree in physics. As a graduate student at Yale from 1954 to 1959 he wrote his PhD thesis under the supervision of V.W. Hughes on the microwave Zeeman spectra of oxygen and fluorine where he used the technique of paramagnetic resonance absorption in atomic vapors. In 1954 he married Mildred Spofford. They had three daughters, Susan (born in 1955), Amy (1957), and Sarah (1960). In 1974 he married Alfa Goldthwaithe Morrison, who survived him. From 1959 until 1969 Harry worked at the National Bureau of Standards (now the National Institute of Standards and Technology

  4. 75 FR 49991 - Beverley P. Edwards, M.D.; Revocation of Registration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-16

    ... Enforcement Administration Beverley P. Edwards, M.D.; Revocation of Registration On January 21, 2010, I, the... Suspension of Registration to Beverly P. Edwards, M.D. (Respondent), of Indianapolis, Indiana. The Show Cause... DEA Certificate of Registration, BE8619667, issued to Beverly P. Edwards, M.D., be, and it hereby...

  5. Vision and cognition in the natural philosophy of Albert the Great (Albertus Magnus).

    PubMed

    Theiss, P; Grüsser, O J

    1994-01-01

    Albert the Great (Albertus Magnus, ca. 1197-1280) descended from a nobleman's family in Upper Suebia and studied natural philosophy and theology at the University of Padova, where he joined the Dominican order. Confronted with Aristotelian thought mainly in its Arabic modification (Avicenna, Al-Farabi, Averroes, Alhazen, Costa ben Luca and others) from his days in Padova, he elaborated in several books on the principles of natural philosophy, biology, brain and sense functions and psychology in addition to his theological and exegetic works. His observations and concepts on vision are discussed in detail. It is pointed out that Albert discovered some phenomena of vision not before known such as vestibular nystagmus and rod monochromacy, i.e. total colour blindness accompanied by photophobia. Based on clinical observations Albert also postulated a decussation of the optic nerve fibres at the optic chiasm. Albert's concept of higher order cognitive function is discussed and some of his explanations of dreams and neuropsychiatric disease on the basis of his cognitive model are mentioned. Albert's thoughts on vision and other sense perceptions, higher brain functions and cognition are considered as progressive elaborations of Galenic concepts as adapted by some Patristic theologians and the Arabic natural scientists and philosophers of the 9th-11th century.

  6. Putting agent-based modeling to work: results of the 4th International Project Albert Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horne, Gary E.; Bjorkman, Eileen A.; Colton, Trevor

    2002-07-01

    Project Albert is an initiative of the US Marine Corps which uses a series of new models and tools, multidisciplinary teams, and the scientific method to explore questions of interest to military planners. Project Albert attempts to address key areas that traditional modeling and simulation techniques often do not capture satisfactorily and uses two data management concepts, data farming and data mining, to assist in identifying areas of interest. The current suite of models used by Project Albert includes four agent-based models that allow agents to interact with each other and produce emergent behaviors. The 4th International Project Albert Workshop was held 6-9 August 2001 in Australia. Workshop participants split into five groups, each of which attempted to apply various combinations of the Project Albert models to answer a series of questions in five areas: Control Operations; Reconnaissance, Surveillance, and Intelligence Force Mix; Precision Maneuver; Mission Area Analysis; and Peace Support Operations. This paper focuses on the methodology used during the workshop, the results of the workshop, and a summary of follow-on work since the workshop.

  7. Obituary: Donald Edward Osterbrock, 1924-2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veilleux, Sylvain

    2007-12-01

    Donald Edward Osterbrock, one of the leading figures of post-World War II astronomy, died suddenly of a heart attack on 11 January 2007, while walking near his office at the University of California, Santa Cruz. He was 82 years old. His initials spelled D.E.O. (God in latin!), but he was known simply as Don to his many friends and colleagues. Don's long and productive career spanned five decades. His scientific work helped shape our understanding of lower main-sequence stars, the ionized interstellar medium, and active galactic nuclei. He was also a highly respected historian of astronomy who shed new light on 19th- and 20th-century astronomy. Don was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, on 13 July 1924. Both of his parents were of German descent and valued hard work, education, and science. They both completed their high-school education at night while working full-time during the day. His father eventually became a professor of electrical engineering at the University of Cincinnati. Don's plan to become an astronomer was put on hold when the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor in 1941. After graduation from high school, Don joined the United States Army and trained as a meteorologist, taking all of the physics and mathematics courses required for a bachelor's degree in physics from the University of Chicago. He was eventually sent to islands in the Pacific Ocean but never was in harm's way. After three years of service, Don returned to Chicago to obtain his bachelor's degree in 1948, his M.S. in astronomy in 1949, and a Ph.D. in astronomy in 1952. Don's years at the University of Chicago and the University's Yerkes Observatory in Williams Bay, Wisconsin, were pivotal for his career and personal life. He came in contact with such luminaries as Otto Struve, Bengt Strömgren, Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar, and William W. Morgan. At Yerkes, he also met and married Irene L. Hansen, a native of Williams Bay, who was employed as a member of the Yerkes staff. They had a son, William, now

  8. Paul Ehrenfest, Niels Bohr, and Albert Einstein: Colleagues and Friends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Martin J.

    2010-09-01

    In May 1918 Paul Ehrenfest received a monograph from Niels Bohr in which Bohr had used Ehrenfest's adiabatic principle as an essential assumption for understanding atomic structure. Ehrenfest responded by inviting Bohr, whom he had never met, to give a talk at a meeting in Leiden in late April 1919, which Bohr accepted; he lived with Ehrenfest, his mathematician wife Tatyana, and their young family for two weeks. Albert Einstein was unable to attend this meeting, but in October 1919 he visited his old friend Ehrenfest and his family in Leiden, where Ehrenfest told him how much he had enjoyed and profited from Bohr's visit. Einstein first met Bohr when Bohr gave a lecture in Berlin at the end of April 1920, and the two immediately proclaimed unbounded admiration for each other as physicists and as human beings. Ehrenfest hoped that he and they would meet at the Third Solvay Conference in Brussels in early April 1921, but his hope was unfulfilled. Einstein, the only physicist from Germany who was invited to it in this bitter postwar atmosphere, decided instead to accompany Chaim Weizmann on a trip to the United States to help raise money for the new Hebrew University in Jerusalem. Bohr became so overworked with the planning and construction of his new Institute for Theoretical Physics in Copenhagen that he could only draft the first part of his Solvay report and ask Ehrenfest to present it, which Ehrenfest agreed to do following the presentation of his own report. After recovering his strength, Bohr invited Ehrenfest to give a lecture in Copenhagen that fall, and Ehrenfest, battling his deep-seated self-doubts, spent three weeks in Copenhagen in December 1921 accompanied by his daughter Tanya and her future husband, the two Ehrenfests staying with the Bohrs in their apartment in Bohr's new Institute for Theoretical Physics. Immediately after leaving Copenhagen, Ehrenfest wrote to Einstein, telling him once again that Bohr was a prodigious physicist, and again

  9. Unusual clinical history of a male infant with Edwards syndrome.

    PubMed

    Surányi, Andrea; Bitó, Tamás; Vajda, György; Kaiser, László; Gáspár, Gábor; Katona, Márta; Szabó, János; Pál, Attila

    2009-03-01

    Edwards syndrome (trisomy of chromosome 18) is generally characterized by the disorders of central nervous system, as well as the musculoskeletal and genitourinary systems. In majority of the cases with trisomy 18 the following malformations can be found: ventricular septal defect, horseshoe kidneys, oesophageal atresia, omphalocele, facial clefts, diaphragmatic hernias and genital hypoplasia. We report a male patient with Edwards syndrome. The boy had a partial agenesis of corpus callosum, oesophageal atresia with tracheo-oesophageal fistula, renal agenesis, ventricular septal defect, Dandy-Walker cyst and low-set malformed ears. The first three features are unique based on previous literature reports on trisomy 18. This report allows a further delineation of the trisomy 18 syndrome.

  10. Selected Scientific and Technical Contributions of Edward C. Polhamus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luckring, James M.

    2016-01-01

    Edward C. Polhamus joined the NACA Langley Research Center staff in 1944 and was active in a broad range of aerodynamic research related to high-speed aircraft technology, aerodynamic prediction methods, and cryogenic wind-tunnel development. This lecture will focus on his 'leading-edge suction analogy' for the prediction of vortex-lift effects on slender wings. Briefer treatment of his contributions to variable-sweep aircraft and cryogenic wind tunnels is also included.

  11. Bibliography of the Edwards Aquifer, Texas, through 1993

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Menard, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    The bibliography comprises 1,022 multidisciplinary references to technical and general literature for the three regions of the Edwards aquifer, Texas-San Antonio area; Barton Springs segment, Austin area; and northern segment, Austin area. The references in the bibliography were compiled from computerized data bases and from published bibliographies and reports. Dates of references range from the late 1800's through 1993. Subject and author indexes are included.

  12. 1995 Edward Teller Lecture Patience and Optimism (LIRPP Vol. 12)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miley, George H.

    2016-10-01

    Remarks made in the author's acceptance lecture for the 1995 Edward Teller Medal are presented and expanded. Topics covered include research on nuclear-pumped lasers, the first direct e-beam-pumped laser, direct energy conversion and advanced fuel fusion, plus recent work on inertial electrostatic confinement. "Patience" and "optimism" are viewed as essential elements needed by scientists following the "zig-zag" path to fusion energy production.

  13. Air Force Research Laboratory, Edwards Air Force Base, CA

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-27

    Air Force Research Laboratory (AFMC) AFRL /RZS 1 Ara Road Edwards AFB CA 93524-7013 AFRL -RZ-ED-VG-2011-269 9...SPONSORING / MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) Air Force Research Laboratory (AFMC) AFRL /RZS 11. SPONSOR...Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. 239.18 Air Force Research Laboratory Ed d Ai F B CA Col Mike Platt war s r orce

  14. Edwards syndrome in a 6-year old girl.

    PubMed

    Raczkowski, Jan W; Daniszewska, Barbara; Paradecka, Anna

    2010-01-01

    Trisomy 18 (Edwards syndrome - ES) is the second most common trisomy. It occurs in 1/3 000 to 1/8 000 births. ES is a cause of numerous developmental disorders and malformations. The median life span of children with ES is about 2 weeks and only 5%-10% will survive their first year of life. The report presents a case of a 6-year-old girl with ES.

  15. Space Radar Image of Prince Albert, Canada, seasonal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is a comparison of images over Prince Albert, produced by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on its 20th orbit on April 10, 1994, and again on orbit 20 of the second flight of Endeavour on October 1, 1994. The area is centered at 53.91 degrees north latitude and 104.69 degrees west longitude and is located 40 kilometers (25 miles) north and 30 kilometers (18.5 miles) east of the town of Prince Albert in the Saskatchewan province of Canada. The image covers the area east of Candle Lake, between the gravel highway of 120 and west of highway 106. The area imaged is near the southern limit of the boreal forest. The boreal forest of North America is a continuous vegetation belt at high latitudes stretching across the continent from the Atlantic shoreline of central Labrador and then westward across Canada to the interior mountains and central coastal plains of Alaska. The forest is also part of a larger northern hemisphere circumpolar boreal forest belt. Coniferous trees dominate the entire forest but deciduous trees are also present. During the month of April, the forest experiences seasonal changes from a frozen condition to a thawed condition. The trees are completely frozen over the winter season and the forest floor is covered by snow. As the average temperature rises in the spring, the trees are thawed and the snow melts. This transition has an impact on the rate of moisture evaporation and release of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. In late September and early October, the boreal forest experiences a relatively different seasonal change. At this time, the leaves on deciduous trees start changing color and dropping off. The soil and trees are quite often moist due to frequent rainfall and cloud cover. The evaporation of moisture and carbon dioxide into the atmosphere also diminishes at this time. SIR-C/X-SAR is sensitive to the moisture of soil and vegetation and can sense this freeze

  16. Space Radar Image of Prince Albert, Canada, seasonal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is a comparison of images over Prince Albert, produced by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on its 20th orbit on April 10, 1994, and again on orbit 20 of the second flight of Endeavour on October 1, 1994. The area is centered at 53.91 degrees north latitude and 104.69 degrees west longitude and is located 40 kilometers (25 miles) north and 30 kilometers (18.5 miles) east of the town of Prince Albert in the Saskatchewan province of Canada. The image covers the area east of Candle Lake, between the gravel highway of 120 and west of highway 106. The area imaged is near the southern limit of the boreal forest. The boreal forest of North America is a continuous vegetation belt at high latitudes stretching across the continent from the Atlantic shoreline of central Labrador and then westward across Canada to the interior mountains and central coastal plains of Alaska. The forest is also part of a larger northern hemisphere circumpolar boreal forest belt. Coniferous trees dominate the entire forest but deciduous trees are also present. During the month of April, the forest experiences seasonal changes from a frozen condition to a thawed condition. The trees are completely frozen over the winter season and the forest floor is covered by snow. As the average temperature rises in the spring, the trees are thawed and the snow melts. This transition has an impact on the rate of moisture evaporation and release of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. In late September and early October, the boreal forest experiences a relatively different seasonal change. At this time, the leaves on deciduous trees start changing color and dropping off. The soil and trees are quite often moist due to frequent rainfall and cloud cover. The evaporation of moisture and carbon dioxide into the atmosphere also diminishes at this time. SIR-C/X-SAR is sensitive to the moisture of soil and vegetation and can sense this freeze

  17. Photographic copy of photograph, view looking northeast of JPL Edwards ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photographic copy of photograph, view looking northeast of JPL Edwards Test Station as it looked in 1945. To the immediate right of the Test Stand 'A' tower stands a concrete monitor building or blockhouse (now Building 4203/E-4) for observation and control of tests. Other frame buildings housed workshop and administrative functions. Long structure behind automobiles was designated 4207/E-8 and was used for instrument repair and storage, a cafeteria, machine and welding shops. To the immediate south of 4207/E-8 were 4200/E-1 (used as an office and photographic laboratory) and 4205/E-6 (guardhouse, with fire extinguisher mounted on it). To the northeast of 4205/E-6 was 4204/E-5 (a propellant storage dock, with shed roof). Buildings 4200/E-1, 4205/E-6 and 4207/E-8 were demolished in 1983. Note the absence of trees. (JPL negative no. 383-1297, July 1946) - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  18. Robert G Edwards and the Roman Catholic Church.

    PubMed

    Benagiano, Giuseppe; Carrara, Sabina; Filippi, Valentina

    2011-06-01

    The Roman Catholic Church reacted negatively to the announcement that the Nobel Prize for Medicine had been awarded to Robert G Edwards. Thirty-three years ago, Cardinal Albino Luciani, on the eve of his election to become Pope, stated that, whereas progress is certainly a beautiful thing, mankind has not always benefited from progress. Catholic criticism has raised seven points: (i) God wants human life to begin through the 'conjugal act' and not artificially; (ii) artificial interventions at the beginning of human life are dangerous and ethically unacceptable; (iii) limits can be imposed even upon an individual's freedom to achieve a legitimate goal, such as having a child within marriage; (iv) the massive loss of preimplantation embryos characterizing IVF must be considered as a tragic loss of 'nascent' human persons; (v) Edwards bears a moral responsibility for all subsequent developments in assisted reproduction technology and for all 'abuses' made possible by IVF; (vi) there can be deleterious consequences for offspring of assisted reproduction technology; and (vii) Edwards' discovery did not eliminate the causes of infertility. This article elaborates from the Roman Catholic perspective on each of these points, some of which are found to be more substantial than others.

  19. Socioeconomic Status, Risk of Obesity, and the Importance of Albert J. Stunkard

    PubMed Central

    Pavela, Gregory; Lewis, Dwight W.; Locher, Julie; Allison, David B.

    2015-01-01

    Albert J. Stunkard's influential career in obesity research spanned over fifty years and included several landmark studies on social factors related to obesity. This review discusses the important contributions Stunkard made to research on the relationship between socioeconomic status SES and obesity, extensions of his work, and reflects on Stunkard's role in the mentoring of succeeding generations of scientists. PMID:26746415

  20. The Albert Shanker Institute Five-Year Report, 2003-2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albert Shanker Institute, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This report describes the Albert Shanker Institute's activities over the past five years in the areas of education, labor, and democracy. In the area of education, the Institute has sponsored a wide range of forums, seminars, reports, and other activities that highlight the best thinking and solid research on the most effective ways to improve…

  1. Democracy's Champion: Albert Shanker and the International Impact of the American Federation of Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chenoweth, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Albert Shanker (1928-1997) is known mainly for his successful struggle to obtain collective bargaining for teachers, his leadership of teacher unions, and his championship of education reform. Shanker built large and powerful city, state, and national unions of teachers and other public employees that still stand as models both for union democracy…

  2. In the Beginning--Albert McKinley and the Founding of "The Social Studies"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keels, Oliver M.

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses the founding of "The Social Studies" by Albert E. McKinley. The author briefly introduces McKinley's life and examines the evolution of the magazine. He identifies the conflicts and struggles between the historians and social studies educators for the magazine. The author concludes that the magazine has served both history…

  3. [ISO 9002 at the Center of Pediatric Intensive Care at the Albert Einstein Israeli Hospital].

    PubMed

    Gé Lacerda, D P; Rocha, M L; Santos, R P

    2000-01-01

    This study shows the process of implementation of a quality program in Pediatric Intensive Therapy Center of "Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein" which resulted in the certification of this service for the Standards ISO 9002/94. It points out the nurse's role as a leader in this process.

  4. Distorting the Historical Record: One Detailed Example from the Albert Shanker Institute's Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Educator, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a detailed example from the Albert Shanker Institute's report that shows the error of U.S. history textbooks and how it is distorting the historical record. One of the most glaring errors in textbooks is the treatment of the role that unions and labor activists played as key participants in the civil rights movement. The…

  5. The Gendering of Albert Einstein and Marie Curie in Children's Biographies: Some Tensions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Rachel E.; Jarrard, Amber R.; Tippins, Deborah J.

    2009-01-01

    Few twentieth century scientists have generated as much interest as Albert Einstein and Marie Currie. Their lives are centrally depicted in numerous children's biographies of famous scientists. Yet their stories reflect interesting paradoxes and tacit sets of unexplored sociocultural assumptions about gender in science education and the larger…

  6. A Common Language: British and American English, Conversations Between Albert H. Marckwardt and Randolph Quirk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marckwardt, Albert H.; Quirk, Randolph

    This transcription of radio conversations on the English language between Albert H. Marckwardt and Randolph Quirk, jointly produced by The British Broadcasting Corporation and The Voice of America, indicates that American and British English have never been so different as people have imagined and that the dominant tendency has been toward…

  7. Albert Gallatin: Champion of American Democracy. Friendship Hill National Historic Site Educational Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Register of Historic Places, Washington, DC. Interagency Resources Div.

    This teacher's guide is designed to prepare teachers and their students for a rewarding experience when visiting the Friendship Hill National Historic Site, the home of Albert Gallatin (1761-1849). Gallatin was a financier, entrepreneur, politician, diplomat, scholar, and colleague of Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, and James Monroe. The guide…

  8. Albert J. Beveridge as Imperialist and Progressive: The Means Justify the End.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, A. Cheree

    1988-01-01

    Describes Senator Albert Jerimiah Beveridge as a leader in two early twentieth-century movements: imperialism and progressivism. Indicates that Beveridge's success demonstrates the possibility that rhetors can adapt to changes in the rhetorical situation without surrendering their personal convictions. (JK)

  9. Ground winds and winds aloft for Edwards AFB, California (1978 revision)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, D. L.; Brown, S. C.

    1978-01-01

    Ground level runway wind statistics for the Edwards AFB, California area are presented. Crosswind, headwind, tailwind, and headwind reversal percentage frequencies are given with respect to month and hour for the two major Edwards AFB runways. Also presented are Edwards AFB bivariate normal wind statistics for a 90 degree flight azimuth for altitudes 0 through 27 km. Wind probability distributions and statistics for any rotation of axes can be computed from the five given parameters.

  10. John Goodricke, Edward Pigott, and Their Study of Variable Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, Linda M.

    2011-05-01

    John Goodricke (1764-1786) and Edward Pigott (1753-1825) are credited with determining the first accurate periods for several important variable stars. Goodricke's name is associated with the determination of the period of the eclipsing binary Algol (Beta Persei); for this he was awarded the Copley Prize of the Royal Society of London. He also determined the periods of the contact binary Beta Lyrae and of Delta Cephei, the prototype Cepheid variable. Around the same time, Edward Pigott obtained the period of Eta Aquilae, another Cepheid. In actuality, the two collaborated on all these observations; today we would call them co-discoverers. Goodricke is the better known of the two, in part because he won the Copley Medal, in part because of his tragically short life, and in part because he was deaf. Edward Pigott was the more experienced observer, having worked with his father Nathaniel on determining the longitudes of several cities on the Continent. Evidence shows, however, that Goodricke had some astronomical experience while a student at the Warrington Academy. The journals of the two show that they developed a partnership that made the most of both their talents over the brief time (less than five years) they worked together before Goodricke's death. Today, the two are remembered as having suggested eclipses as the cause for the periodic dimming of Algol. This explanation is accepted today as the correct one. In their day, however, most eminent astronomers believed that starspots were a more likely cause for the dimming. By the time of John Goodricke's death, he seems to have accepted that explanation as well. A study of the work of Goodricke and Pigott contains many lessons for today's observers of variable stars. This work was supported by an AAS Small Research Grant and by the Pollack Award of the Dudley Observatory.

  11. A very rare entity of diabetes insipidus associated with Edwards syndrome.

    PubMed

    Demir, Nihat; Doğan, Murat; Peker, Erdal; Bulan, Keziban; Tuncer, Oğuz

    2013-08-01

    Edwards syndrome is the second most commonly seen trisomy. It was first described by John Hamilton Edwards in 1960. Although most cases result in termination or foetal loss, live births have been documented in 5%. Edwards syndrome is characterized by multisystem anomalies, of which holoprosencephaly (HPE) is observed in 4-8% of cases. The clinical findings correspond to the degree of HPE malformation. Convulsions and endocrinopathies are among the severe clinical findings. The most common endocrinopathies are central diabetes insipidus (DI), hypothyroidism, hypocortisolism and growth hormone deficiency. The coexistence of holoproencephaly and DI in Edwards syndrome was discussed under the light of literature.

  12. Salutary swan song for the Starr Edwards valve.

    PubMed

    Masilonyane-Jones, Taolo Vijay; Blackham, Ruth; Alvarez, John

    2010-07-01

    The Starr-Edwards valve was the first manufactured valve to be used successfully as a cardiac valve replacement in 1960. Although superseded by newer valves over the decades it has achieved an excellent track record. It has unique features, namely a protective metal casing around the ball poppet and a large and thick sewing ring. We describe the last implant of this valve in Australia; it has now been withdrawn by the manufacturer. In this particular case, the unique features of this valve made the required surgery quite simple and avoided the need for complex mitral valve surgery in a very high-risk patient.

  13. The contributions of Edward H. Angle to dental public health.

    PubMed

    Peck, S

    2009-09-01

    The genius of Edward Hartley Angle, (1855-1930), the founder of the dental specialty of orthodontics, to create order from chaos in the study and treatment of positional discrepancies of the teeth, jaws and face advanced greatly the cause of dental public health. Angle's innovations that had the most public health impact were (1) his identification of dental occlusion, not simply tooth irregularity, as a prime concern, (2) his development of an uncomplicated classification system for occlusal conditions, (3) his introduction of prefabricated orthodontic appliances and (4) his framing of orthodontics as a dental specialty by organizing the world's first educational program to train orthodontists.

  14. The portrait of Dr Edward Harrison MD (1766-1838).

    PubMed

    Bovine, Gary

    2010-08-01

    The portrait of the London and Horncastle Physician Edward Harrison, painted and displayed in 1823, was editorially criticized by one of the medical journals of the time. After Harrison died the portrait remained in the family estate until 1938, after which it was presented to the National Gallery of Ireland. The image of Dr Harrison had never been displayed in any of his medical writings, nor in any other medical historical works, until 2008. This paper provides some history of the criticism of the portrait, similar to the historical vignette of the portraiture of William Harvey and outlines the detective work to track down the location of the portrait.

  15. John Goodricke, Edward Pigott, and Their Study of Variable Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, Linda M.

    2012-06-01

    John Goodricke and Edward Pigott, working in York, England, between 1781 and 1786, determined the periods of variation of eclipsing binaries such as Algol and Beta Lyrae and speculated that the eclipses of Algol might be caused by a "dark body," perhaps even a planet. They also determined the periods of variation of the first two known Cepheid variables, the stars whose period-luminosity relation today enables astronomers to determine distances to distant galaxies. Goodricke holds special interest because he was completely deaf and because he died at the age of 21. The lives and work of these two astronomers are described.

  16. Griffith Edwards' work on the life course of alcohol dependence.

    PubMed

    Marshall, E Jane

    2015-07-01

    In 1976 Edwards & Gross proposed the concept of the alcohol dependence syndrome, based on the clinical observation that heavy drinkers manifested an inter-related clustering of signs and symptoms. That this modest 'provisional description' turned out to be so significant and influential is perhaps unsurprising when the context in which it was made is appreciated. Griffith Edwards and his colleagues at the Maudsley Hospital had undergone a rigorous 3-year training in clinical psychiatry, during which they had been taught to think critically and were grounded in the art of clinical observation. As he assessed patients for various alcohol research studies he realized that there was a clustering of certain elements. Thus clinical observation and an appreciation of the patient's drinking history contributed to the genesis of the concept. This paper reflects on the integration of his rigorous training at the Maudsley, his enquiring mind and encyclopaedic knowledge of the historical and research literature which enabled him to formulate a testable hypothesis about the alcohol dependence syndrome.

  17. A long telephoto lens captured Space Shuttle Endeavour landing at Edwards Air Force Base, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    A long telephoto lens captured Space Shuttle Endeavour landing at Edwards Air Force Base, California, on May 1, 2001. NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards would subsequently service the shuttle and mount it on a 747 for the ferry flight to the Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

  18. Struggles for Educational Equity in Prince Edward County, VA: Resistance, Southern Manifesto Ideologies, and School Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tillerson-Brown, Amy

    2016-01-01

    In light of contemporary school choice proposals and the 60th anniversary of the Southern Manifesto, the Prince Edward County, Virginia public schools crisis provides interesting historical discussion. Prince Edward County (PEC), a rural community in central Virginia, was one of five school districts represented in the 1954 "Brown v. Board of…

  19. Geologic framework and hydrogeologic characteristics of the Edwards Aquifer outcrop, Comal County, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Small, T.A.; Hanson, J.A.

    1994-01-01

    In Comal County, the Edwards aquifer is probably most vulnerable to surface contamination in the rapidly urbanizing areas on the Edwards aquifer outcrop. Possible contamination can result from spills, leakage of hazardous materials, or runoff onto the intensely faulted and fractured, karstic limestone outcrops characteristic of the recharge zone.

  20. Albert Szent-Györgyi (1893-1986): the scientist who discovered vitamin C.

    PubMed

    Grzybowski, Andrzej; Pietrzak, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    Albert Szent-Györgyi, a Hungarian biochemist, discovered vitamin C and rutin (vitamin P). The role of these vitamins in the body and their application to dermatology is vast. For the discovery of vitamin C and the description of oxidation, Albert Szent-Györgyi received a Nobel Prize in medicine in 1937. He discovered the role of adenosine triphosphate, actin-myosin, and many phases of the Krebs cycle, and also initiated studies on the influence of free radicals in the formation of tumors. Between 1918 and 1946, he worked in many European research centers and between 1947 and 1986, in the United States. His achievements were made possible due to his perseverance, which allowed him to overcome many maelstroms that plagued his scientific career.

  1. Analytic solutions for links and triangles distributions in finite Barabási-Albert networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Ricardo M.; de Almeida, Rita M. C.; Brunnet, Leonardo G.

    2017-01-01

    Barabási-Albert model describes many different natural networks, often yielding sensible explanations to the subjacent dynamics. However, finite size effects may prevent from discerning among different underlying physical mechanisms and from determining whether a particular finite system is driven by Barabási-Albert dynamics. Here we propose master equations for the evolution of the degrees, links and triangles distributions, solve them both analytically and by numerical iteration, and compare with numerical simulations. The analytic solutions for all these distributions predict the network evolution for systems as small as 100 nodes. The analytic method we developed is applicable for other classes of networks, representing a powerful tool to investigate the evolution of natural networks.

  2. Parameter specification for the degree distribution of simulated Barabási-Albert graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohd-Zaid, Fairul; Kabban, Christine M. Schubert; Deckro, Richard F.; White, Edward D.

    2017-01-01

    The degree distribution of a simulated Barabási-Albert graph under linear preferential attachment is investigated. Specifically, the parameters of the power law distribution are estimated and compared against the theoretical values derived using mean field theory. Least squares method and MLE-nonparametric method were utilized to estimate the distribution parameters on 1000 simulated Barabási-Albert graphs for edge parameter m ∈ { 2 , 4 , 6 } and size n ∈ {2k : k = 5 , 6 , … , 14 , 15 } . Goodness of fit metrics were computed on a second set of simulated graphs for the median of the estimated parameters and other hypothetical values for the distribution parameters. The results suggest that the distribution of the parameters from simulated graphs are significantly different from the theoretical distribution and is also dependent on m. Further results confirm the finding that the parameter of the power law distribution, β, increases as m increases.

  3. Ising Model Spin S = 1 ON Directed BARABÁSI-ALBERT Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, F. W. S.

    On directed Barabási-Albert networks with two and seven neighbours selected by each added site, the Ising model with spin S = 1/2 was seen not to show a spontaneous magnetisation. Instead, the decay time for flipping of the magnetisation followed an Arrhenius law for Metropolis and Glauber algorithms, but for Wolff cluster flipping the magnetisation decayed exponentially with time. On these networks the Ising model spin S = 1 is now studied through Monte Carlo simulations. However, in this model, the order-disorder phase transition is well defined in this system. We have obtained a first-order phase transition for values of connectivity m = 2 and m = 7 of the directed Barabási-Albert network.

  4. [The blindness in the literature-Jose Saramago: blindness and Albert Bang: the blind witness].

    PubMed

    Permin, H; Norn, M

    2001-01-01

    Two novels with different aspects of blindness seen through the doctors eyes. The Portuguese Nobel-prize winner José Saramago's story of a city struck by an epidemic of "white blindness", where the truth is what we cannot bear to see. The Danish author and unskilled labourer Albert Bang's (synonym with Karl E. Rasmussen) crime novel describes a blind or pretend to be blind butcher, who is a witness to a murder. Both novels are lyric, thought-provoking and insightful.

  5. Finite-size effects on semi-directed Barabási-Albert networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radwan, M. A.; Sumour, Muneer A.; Elbitar, A. M.; Shabat, M. M.; Lima, F. W. S.

    2016-04-01

    In scale-free Barabási-Albert (BA) networks, we study the finite-size effect at different number m of neighbors. So, we investigate the effects of finite network size N for the recently developed semi-directed BA networks (SDBA1 and SDBA2) at fixed 2≤m≤300) and show and explain the gap in the distribution of the number k(i) of neighbors of the nodes i.

  6. Identification and Characterization of Multidrug-Resistant Salmonella enterica Serotype Albert Isolates in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Davina; Grass, Julian; Brown, Allison C.; Bicknese, Amelia; Tolar, Beth; Joseph, Lavin A.; Plumblee, Jodie R.; Walker, Carrie; Fedorka-Cray, Paula J.; Whichard, Jean M.

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica is one of the most common causes of bacterial foodborne illness in the United States. Although most Salmonella infections are self-limiting, antimicrobial treatment of invasive salmonellosis is critical. The primary antimicrobial treatment options include fluoroquinolones or extended-spectrum cephalosporins, and resistance to these antimicrobial drugs may complicate treatment. At present, S. enterica is composed of more than 2,600 unique serotypes, which vary greatly in geographic prevalence, ecological niche, and the ability to cause human disease, and it is important to understand and mitigate the source of human infection, particularly when antimicrobial resistance is found. In this study, we identified and characterized 19 S. enterica serotype Albert isolates collected from food animals, retail meat, and humans in the United States during 2005 to 2013. All five isolates from nonhuman sources were obtained from turkeys or ground turkey, and epidemiologic data suggest poultry consumption or live-poultry exposure as the probable source of infection. S. enterica serotype Albert also appears to be geographically localized to the midwestern United States. All 19 isolates displayed multidrug resistance, including decreased susceptibility to fluoroquinolones and resistance to extended-spectrum cephalosporins. Turkeys are a likely source of multidrug-resistant S. enterica serotype Albert, and circulation of resistance plasmids, as opposed to the expansion of a single resistant strain, is playing a role. More work is needed to understand why these resistance plasmids spread and how their presence and the serotype they reside in contribute to human disease. PMID:25733501

  7. Compatibility of Ugandan Schistosoma mansoni isolates with Biomphalaria snail species from Lake Albert and Lake Victoria.

    PubMed

    Adriko, Moses; Standley, Claire J; Tinkitina, Benjamin; Mwesigwa, Gerald; Kristensen, Thomas K; Stothard, J Russell; Kabatereine, Narcis B

    2013-11-01

    In order to investigate the capacity of being intermediate host for Schistosoma mansoni, the Ugandan F1 generation of Biomphalaria snail species that were laboratory-bred from parent populations originally collected from either Lake Victoria or Lake Albert was challenged with sympatric and non-sympatric S. mansoni isolates. After a prepatent period of 20 days, a daily 10-hourly snail shedding for cercariae was done to determine the infection rate, cercarial production per hour and survival period of infected snails. The study suggests that when parasite strains from a different geographical origin is used for infection, survival of infected snails increase, leading to an increased transmission potential. Although earlier literature had indicated that the Lake Victoria Biomphalaria sudanica is refractory to S. mansoni, we showed that all Ugandan Biomphalaria spp., including B. sudanica from all locations, were highly susceptible to the S. mansoni isolates. Thus if B. choanomphala, which is an efficient intermediate host in Lake Victoria, is given an opportunity to occupy Lake Albert, it will most likely be compatible with the Albertine S. mansoni parasites. Equally, if B. stanleyi, currently restricted to Lake Albert invades Lake Victoria, it is likely to act as an efficient intermediate host. Future work should concentrate on intraspecific population-level differences in compatibility.

  8. Identification and characterization of multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serotype Albert isolates in the United States.

    PubMed

    Folster, Jason P; Campbell, Davina; Grass, Julian; Brown, Allison C; Bicknese, Amelia; Tolar, Beth; Joseph, Lavin A; Plumblee, Jodie R; Walker, Carrie; Fedorka-Cray, Paula J; Whichard, Jean M

    2015-05-01

    Salmonella enterica is one of the most common causes of bacterial foodborne illness in the United States. Although most Salmonella infections are self-limiting, antimicrobial treatment of invasive salmonellosis is critical. The primary antimicrobial treatment options include fluoroquinolones or extended-spectrum cephalosporins, and resistance to these antimicrobial drugs may complicate treatment. At present, S. enterica is composed of more than 2,600 unique serotypes, which vary greatly in geographic prevalence, ecological niche, and the ability to cause human disease, and it is important to understand and mitigate the source of human infection, particularly when antimicrobial resistance is found. In this study, we identified and characterized 19 S. enterica serotype Albert isolates collected from food animals, retail meat, and humans in the United States during 2005 to 2013. All five isolates from nonhuman sources were obtained from turkeys or ground turkey, and epidemiologic data suggest poultry consumption or live-poultry exposure as the probable source of infection. S. enterica serotype Albert also appears to be geographically localized to the midwestern United States. All 19 isolates displayed multidrug resistance, including decreased susceptibility to fluoroquinolones and resistance to extended-spectrum cephalosporins. Turkeys are a likely source of multidrug-resistant S. enterica serotype Albert, and circulation of resistance plasmids, as opposed to the expansion of a single resistant strain, is playing a role. More work is needed to understand why these resistance plasmids spread and how their presence and the serotype they reside in contribute to human disease.

  9. Environmental Assessment: For the Testing and Evaluation of Directed Energy System Using Laser Technology, Edwards Air Force Base

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    Test Center Edwards Air Force Base, California Final August 2006 Edwards AFB 95th Air Base Wing Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704...light amplification by stimulated emission of rad iation (laser) technology at Edwards Air Force Base (AFB), California , and w ithin the R-2508 Complex...Force Flight Test Center, Edwards AFB, California . 2.0 DESCRIPTION OF THE PROPOSED ACTION AND ALTERN A TJVES CONSIDERED The Proposed Action would

  10. A psychoanalytic study of Edward de Vere's The Tempest.

    PubMed

    Waugaman, Richard M

    2009-01-01

    There is now abundant evidence that Freud was correct in believing Edward de Vere (1550-1604) wrote under the pseudonym "William Shakespeare." One common reaction is "What difference does it make?" I address that question by examining many significant connections between de Vere's life and The Tempest. Such studies promise to bring our understanding of Shakespeare's works back into line with our usual psychoanalytic approach to literature, which examines how a great writer's imagination weaves a new creation out of the threads of his or her life experiences. One source of the intense controversy about de Vere's authorship is our idealization of the traditional author, about whom we know so little that, as Freud noted, we can imagine his personality was as fine as his works.

  11. F-18 HARV final flight over Edwards AFB

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The final flight for the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) took place at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, on May 29, 1996 and was flown by NASA pilot Ed Schneider. The highly modified F-18 airplane flew 383 flights over a nine year period and demonstrated concepts that greatly increase fighter maneuverability. Among concepts proven in the aircraft is the use of paddles to direct jet engine exhaust in cases of extreme altitudes where conventional control surfaces lose effectiveness. Another concept, developed by NASA Langley Research Center, is a deployable wing-like surface installed on the nose of the aircraft for increased right and left (yaw) control on nose-high flight angles.

  12. Sexual portraits: Edward Melcarth and homoeroticism in modern American art.

    PubMed

    Griffey, Erin; Reay, Barry

    2012-01-01

    Although one will not find Edward Melcarth (1914-73) in the best recent histories of male homosexuality and American art, he was not always so spectral. Named in Life magazine in 1950 as one of the best young American artists, he exhibited as a painter, draftsman and sculptor and also practised as an illustrator, photographer and designer. His work survives in the Forbes Collection, in the Smithsonian Institution and in the art archives at the Kinsey Institute. We argue that Melcarth’s vision of the erotic was far broader than the traditional categories of sexuality that are perpetuated in art histories of homoeroticism in modern America – and that such a revisioning enables a reinterpretation of some of the better known images of homosexual art.

  13. Oslo model, hyperuniformity, and the quenched Edwards-Wilkinson model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassberger, Peter; Dhar, Deepak; Mohanty, P. K.

    2016-10-01

    We present simulations of the one-dimensional Oslo rice pile model in which the critical height at each site is randomly reset after each toppling. We use the fact that the stationary state of this sand-pile model is hyperuniform to reach system of sizes >107 . Most previous simulations were seriously flawed by important finite-size corrections. We find that all critical exponents have values consistent with simple rationals: ν =4/3 for the correlation length exponent, D =9/4 for the fractal dimension of avalanche clusters, and z =10/7 for the dynamical exponent. In addition, we relate the hyperuniformity exponent to the correlation length exponent ν . Finally, we discuss the relationship with the quenched Edwards-Wilkinson model, where we find in particular that the local roughness exponent is αloc=1 .

  14. Edward Meryon (1809-1880) and muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Emery, A E; Emery, M L

    1993-01-01

    Edward Meryon was an English physician of Huguenot stock. He studied medicine at University College, London, and his chief appointments were at St Thomas's Hospital and the London Infirmary for Epilepsy and Paralysis. In a communication to the Royal Medical and Chirurgical Society in December 1851, which was published in the Transactions of the Society the following year, he described in detail eight boys in three families with a disease later to be associated with the name of Duchenne. He was particularly impressed by the predilection for males and its familial nature. He appears to have been the first physician to make a systematic study of the disorder some years before Duchenne. Images PMID:8326496

  15. Phenotypic extremes in liveborn monozygotic twins with mosaic Edwards syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bussmann, Neidin; Cunningham, Katie; Green, Andrew; Ryan, C Anthony

    2015-11-11

    Mosaic trisomy 18 (Edwards syndrome) in monozygotic diamniotic liveborn twins is rare. We describe such a case involving preterm male infants. Although both infants had a low percentage of trisomy 18 cells in peripheral blood leucocytes, their varied phenotypic presentation of mosaic trisomy 18 resulted in one twin surviving, with the other twin's demise at 1 month of age. Despite the presence of trisomy 18 in peripheral leucocytes, further analysis of a buccal smear and skin biopsy of the surviving twin did not show evidence of trisomy 18. Establishing such diagnoses in a timely manner is imperative for the child, parents and clinicians. The clinical course of these twins reflects the unpredictable prognosis associated with the diagnosis of mosaic trisomy 18, and emphasises the challenges that can be encountered when counselling parents.

  16. Hydrogeological framework of the Edwards-Trinity aquifer system, west-central Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barker, Rene A.; Ardis, Ann F.

    1996-01-01

    The Edwards-Trinity aquifer system underlies about 42,000 square miles of west-central Texas, where mostly gently dipping Lower Cretaceous strata comprise three regional aquifers and two regional confining units. The aquifers are the Edwards Aquifer of the Balcones fault zone, the Trinity Aquifer of the Balcones fault zone and Hill County, and the Edwards-Trinity Aquifer of the Edwards Plateau and Trans-Pecos. The Navarro-Del Rio confining unit confines the downdip part of the Edwards Aquifer, and the Hammett confining unit confines the updip, basal part of the Trinity Aquifer and a small southeastern fringe of the Edwards-Trinity Aquifer. Transmissivity averages less than 10,000 feet squared per day throughout more than 90 percent of the study area as the result of widespread cementation and secondary mineral growth. However, in fractured and leached rocks in the Balcones fault zone, transmissivity averages about 750,000 feet squared per day in the Edwards aquifer, which occupies less than 10 percent of the area.

  17. Prince Edward Island Heart Health Dissemination Research Project: establishing a sustainable community mobilization initiative.

    PubMed

    White, R; Mitchell, T; Gyorfi-Dyke, E; Sweet, L; Hebert, R; Moase, O; MacPhee, R; MacDonald, B

    2001-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the Prince Edward Island Heart Health Program (PEIHHP) Dissemination Research Project. Prince Edward Island (PEI) is a small province in the Atlantic region of Canada with a population of 137,980. The Island's economy is dependent on the fishery, agriculture, and tourism industries. Although unemployment rates are high (14.4%), Prince Edward Island has the lowest poverty rate in the country at 15.2%, high levels of social support (86%), and the second lowest rate of high chronic stress (Report on the Health of Canadians, 1996, 1999).

  18. Using Geophysics to Define Hydrostratigraphic Units in the Edwards and Trinity Aquifers, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, B. D.; Blome, C. D.; Clark, A. K.; Kress, W.; Smith, D. V.

    2007-05-01

    Airborne and ground geophysical surveys conducted in Uvalde, Medina, and northern Bexar counties, Texas, can be used to define and characterize hydrostratigraphic units of the Edwards and Trinity aquifers. Airborne magnetic surveys have defined numerous Cretaceous intrusive stocks and laccoliths, mainly in Uvalde County, that influence local hydrology and perhaps regional ground-water flow paths. Depositional environments in the aquifers can be classified as shallow water platforms (San Marcos Platform, Edwards Group), shoal and reef facies (Devils River Trend, Devils River Formation), and deeper water basins (Maverick Basin, West Nueces, McKnight, and Salmon Peak Formations). Detailed airborne and ground electromagnetic surveys have been conducted over the Edwards aquifer catchment zone (exposed Trinity aquifer rocks), recharge zone (exposed Edwards aquifer rocks), and artesian zone (confined Edwards) in the Seco Creek area (northeast Uvalde and Medina Counties; Devils River Trend). These geophysical survey data have been used to divide the Edwards exposed within the Balcones fault zone into upper and lower hydrostratigraphic units. Although both units are high electrical resistivity, the upper unit has slightly lower resistivity than the lower unit. The Georgetown Formation, at the top of the Edwards Group has a moderate resistivity. The formations that comprise the upper confining units to the Edwards aquifer rocks have varying resistivities. The Eagleford and Del Rio Groups (mainly clays) have very low resistivities and are excellent electrical marker beds in the Seco Creek area. The Buda Limestone is characterized by high resistivities. Moderate resistivities characterize the Austin Group rocks (mainly chalk). The older Trinity aquifer, underlying the Edwards aquifer rocks, is characterized by less limestone (electrically resistive or low conductivity units) and greater quantities of mudstones (electrically conductive or low resistivity units). In the western

  19. Recharge to and discharge from the Edwards aquifer in the San Antonio area, Texas, 1995

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, D.S.; Patton, J.T.

    1996-01-01

    The Edwards aquifer is the sole source of public water supply for more than 1 million people in the San Antonio area and supplies large quantities of water for agriculture, industry, and the military. The dissolutioned, faulted limestone aquifer is the major source of water for Bexar, Comal, Hays, Medina, and Uvalde Counties. The annual compilation of estimates of ground-water recharge to and discharge from the Edwards aquifer is part of a continuing program of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation wilh the Edwards Underground Water District (EUWD).

  20. Occurrence of Culex (Culiciomyia) Spathifurca (Edwards) (Diptera: Culicidae) in India--new country record.

    PubMed

    Rajavel, A R; Natarajan, R; Munirathinam, A

    1998-09-01

    Culex (Culiciomyia) spathifurca (Edwards) is recorded for the 1st time in India. Immature specimens of this species were collected from tree holes in a mangrove forest. Notes on the larval habitat are given.

  1. 4. INSTRUMENT ROOM,INTERIOR, MAIN SPACE. Looking northeast. Edwards Air ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. INSTRUMENT ROOM,INTERIOR, MAIN SPACE. Looking northeast. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Firing Control Building, Test Area 1-100, northeast end of Test Area 1-100 Road, Boron, Kern County, CA

  2. Evolution of egoism on semi-directed and undirected Barabási-Albert networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, F. W. S.

    2015-05-01

    Through Monte Carlo simulations, we study the evolution of the four strategies: Ethnocentric, altruistic, egoistic and cosmopolitan in one community of individuals. Interactions and reproduction among computational agents are simulated on undirected and semi-directed Barabási-Albert (BA) networks. We study the Hammond-Axelrod (HA) model on undirected and semi-directed BA networks for the asexual reproduction case. With a small modification in the traditional HA model, our simulations showed that egoism wins, differently from other results found in the literature where ethnocentric strategy is common. Here, mechanisms such as reciprocity are absent.

  3. Alterations in cortical thickness and neuronal density in the frontal cortex of Albert Einstein.

    PubMed

    Anderson, B; Harvey, T

    1996-06-07

    Neuronal density, neuron size, and the number of neurons under 1 mm2 of cerebral cortical surface area were measured in the right pre-frontal cortex of Albert Einstein and five elderly control subjects. Measurement of neuronal density used the optical dissector technique on celloidin-embedded cresyl violet-stained sections. The neurons counted provided a systematic random sample for the measurement of cell body cross-sectional area. Einstein's cortex did not differ from the control subjects in the number of neurons under 1 mm2 of cerebral cortex or in mean neuronal size. Because Einstein's cortex was thinner than the controls he had a greater neuronal density.

  4. Albert Einstein and his mentor Max Talmey. The seventh Charles B. Snyder Lecture.

    PubMed

    Ravin, J G

    1997-01-01

    While he was a student at the Munich medical school, Max Talmey strongly influenced the education of Albert Einstein. Their association occurred during five years of Einstein's second decade. They lost contact for many years after each left Munich. Talmey emigrated to the United States and practiced medicine, mainly ophthalmology, in New York City. He made significant contributions to medicine, to the popularization of Einstein's work, and to the development of international languages. The relationship of Talmey and Einstein was rekindled when Einstein visited and later moved to the United States.

  5. Biohistorical materials and contemporary privacy concerns-the forensic case of King Albert I.

    PubMed

    Larmuseau, Maarten H D; Bekaert, Bram; Baumers, Maarten; Wenseleers, Tom; Deforce, Dieter; Borry, Pascal; Decorte, Ronny

    2016-09-01

    The rapid advancement of technology in genomic analysis increasingly allows researchers to study human biohistorical materials. Nevertheless, little attention has been paid to the privacy of the donor's living relatives and the negative impact they might experience from the (public) availability of genetic results, even in cases of scientific, forensic or historical relevance. This issue has become clear during a cold case investigation of a relic attributed to Belgian King and World War I-hero Albert I who died, according to the official version, in a solo climbing accident in 1934. Authentication of the relic with blood stains assigned to the King and collected on the place where his body was discovered is recognised as one of the final opportunities to test the plausibility of various conspiracy theories on the King's demise. While the historical value and current technological developments allow the genomic analysis of this relic, publication of genetic data would immediately lead to privacy concerns for living descendants and relatives of the King, including the Belgian and British royal families, even after more than 80 years. Therefore, the authentication study of the relic of King Albert I has been a difficult exercise towards balancing public research interests and privacy interests. The identification of the relic was realised by using a strict genetic genealogical approach including Y-chromosome and mitochondrial genome comparison with living relatives, thereby limiting the analysis to genomic regions relevant for identification. The genetic results combined with all available historical elements concerning the relic, provide strong evidence that King Albert I was indeed the donor of the blood stains, which is in line with the official climbing accident hypothesis and contradicts widespread 'mise-en-scène' scenarios. Since publication of the haploid data of the blood stains has the potential to violate the privacy of living relatives, we opted for

  6. Mistaken Identity and Mirror Images: Albert and Carl Einstein, Leiden and Berlin, Relativity and Revolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dongen, Jeroen

    2012-06-01

    Albert Einstein accepted a "special" visiting professorship at the University of Leiden in the Netherlands in February 1920. Although his appointment should have been a mere formality, it took until October of that year before Einstein could occupy his special chair. Why the delay? The explanation involves a case of mistaken identity with Carl Einstein, Dadaist art, and a particular Dutch fear of revolutions. But what revolutions was one afraid of? The story of Einstein's Leiden chair throws new light on the reception of relativity and its creator in the Netherlands and in Germany.

  7. Rational emotive therapy-a study of initial therapy sessions of Albert Ellis.

    PubMed

    Becker, I M; Rosenfeld, J G

    1976-10-01

    Because psychotherapy is what a therapist does, and not necessarily what he says he does, it is important to observe the activity of leaders in the field during their sessions. Twenty taped initial psychotherapy sessions by Albert Ellis were selected randomly from 70 recently recorded ones. Typescripts of each session were made, and two raters naive to the purposes were trained to place each of Ellis' statements into 1 of 17 categories. Each category consisted of a therapeutic technique. Some of these were ones that Ellis did during the 20 sessions examined was related very closely to what he has claimed to do, but that he did vary considerably from client to client.

  8. Water Resources Investigations at Edwards Air Force Base since 1988

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sneed, Michelle; Nishikawa, Tracy; Martin, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB) in southern California (fig. 1) has relied on ground water to meet its water-supply needs. The extraction of ground water has led to two major problems that can directly affect the mission of EAFB: declining water levels (more than 120 ft since the 1920s) and land subsidence, a gradual downward movement of the land surface (more than 4 ft since the late 1920s). As water levels decline, this valuable resource becomes depleted, thus requiring mitigating measures. Land subsidence has caused cracked (fissured) runways and accelerated erosion on Rogers lakebed. In 1988, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the U.S. Air Force, began investigations of the effects of declining water levels and land subsidence at EAFB and possible mitigation measures, such as the injection of imported surface water into the ground-water system. The cooperative investigations included data collection and analyses, numerical simulations of ground-water flow and land subsidence, and development of a preliminary simulation-optimization model. The results of these investigations indicate that the injection of imported water may help to control land subsidence; however, the potential ground-water-quality impacts are unknown.

  9. The JIM interview. Edward M. Kennedy, United States Senator.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, E M

    2000-05-01

    Senator Edward M. Kennedy has represented Massachusetts in the United States Senate for thirty-six years. He was first elected in 1962 to finish the term of his brother, President John F. Kennedy. Since then, he has been elected to six full terms, and he is now the third most senior member of the senate. The efforts to bring quality health care to every American is a battle that Kennedy has been waging ever since he arrived in the Senate. Recent achievements include the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996, which makes it easier for those who change their job or lose their job to keep their health insurance, and the Children's Health Insurance Act of 1997, which makes health insurance more widely available to children through age 18 in all 50 states. A strong supporter of clinical research, Senator Kennedy cosponsored the Clinical Research Enhancement Act and has been a vocal advocate of stem cell research. He is currently the senior Democrat on the Labor and Human Resources committee in the Senate.

  10. Flow dynamics over a foredune at Prince Edward Island, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesp, Patrick A.; Davidson-Arnott, Robin; Walker, Ian J.; Ollerhead, Jeff

    2005-02-01

    Time-averaged windspeed profiles at eight locations over a relatively high (8 m), vegetated, topographically simple foredune were measured using cup and ultrasonic anemometry during an onshore wind event in May 2002. The experiment was part of a larger study on the sedimentary dynamics of a beach-dune complex in the Greenwich Dunes, Prince Edward Island (PEI), Canada. The foredune is vegetated with Ammophila breviligulata, and vegetation density ranged from 0% on the foredune ramp to upward of 70% at the dune crest. Topographic forcing and resulting flow acceleration was observed distinctly in windspeed profiles, and linear speedup occurred for all elevations above the vegetation canopy. A distinct inflection point is evident in normalized windspeed profiles over the dune indicating a net momentum sink below the vegetation canopy top, and systematic speed-down within the vegetation was observed up the foredune stoss slope. Wind speed profile structure was consistent for the range of incident wind speeds measured. A comparison of normal and slightly oblique incident winds indicated that for similar approach winds, wind speeds are consistently higher during oblique flow conditions. The implications for foredune morphodynamics and sedimentation are discussed.

  11. Edward Burne-Jones' Heavenly Conception: A Biblical Cosmos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheney, L. D. G.

    2016-01-01

    Edward Burne-Jones was a Pre-Raphaelite artist and designer, who collaborated with William Morris on many decorative arts (stained glass windows, book illustrations, ceramic and tapestry designs). He was a founding partner in the firm Morris, Marshall, Faulkner & Company. Burne-Jones composed The Days of Creation between 1870 and 1876 for the Morris firm. These paintings were executed in gouache and gold paint, and cartoons were made for tile and in stained glass, for the Church of St. Editha at Tamworth in Staffordshire. Burne-Jones' creation was highly praised and elegantly described by Oscar Wilde: “The picture is divided into six compartments, each representing a day in the Creation of the World, under the symbol of an angel holding a crystal globe, within which is shown the work of a day.” This paper will examine how Burne-Jones visualized an unusual celestial creation where angels holding magical spheres unveil the divine manifestation for the creation of a terrestrial realm. He created a cosmic utopia of the natural world.

  12. When Cri du chat syndrome meets Edwards syndrome.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yingjun; Zhou, Yi; Wu, Jianzhu; Sun, Yunxia; Chen, Yongzhen; Chen, Baojiang

    2015-03-01

    It has been well established that the 5p deletion causes Cri du chat syndrome, typically characterized by a cat‑like cry, and that duplication of 18q causes Edwards syndrome; the two are rare genetic abnormalities that separately lead to physical and mental impairments. However, the severity of the clinicopathological characteristics that arise when these two aberrations occur in one patient is unknown. Here, the first case in our knowledge of a single patient (a two‑year‑old female) with 5p partial monosomy and 18q partial trisomy is described. In the present study, chromosome microarray analysis was performed, which identified the imbalance of chromosomes 5 and 18 in the patient. The chromosome aberrations were further confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization. By comparing the phenotypes of combined case with those of the individual syndromes, severe clinical phenotypes of the 5p (5p15.33‑p13.3) deletion were confirmed, however, the net effect of the duplication of 18q22.3‑q23 was not determined, as this duplication only appeared to have a weak effect on the patient's phenotypes. The correlation between these chromosomal aberrations and their clinical features has implications for the identification of critical regions of 5p and 18q, particularly for the functional mapping of chromosome 18.

  13. Edward (Ed) T. Schneider preparing for an F-104 flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    NASA research pilot Edward T. Scheider is shown standing in the cockpit of a two-seat F-104. He is wearing a full pressure suit, which is required on all flights above 50,000 feet. Ed served in the U.S. Navy from 1968 to 1983. He attended the U.S. Naval Test Pilot School and graduated in 1973. He was then assigned as an engineering test pilot, and as an instructor at the Naval Test Pilot School. He first arrived at what was then called the Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (now the Dryden Flight Research Center) as a Navy Liaison Officer on July 5, 1982. He joined NASA as a research pilot a year later. Ed was a project pilot on the F-18 High Angle-of-Attack program, the F-15 aeronautical research aircraft, the B-52 launch aircraft, and the NASA-operated SR-71 Blackbirds. Ed retired as a NASA research pilot in September 2000.

  14. Recharge zone of the Edwards aquifer hydrologically associated with Barton springs in the Austin area, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slagle, Diana L.; Ardis, Ann F.; Slade, Raymond M.

    1986-01-01

    The Edwards aquifer extends in a narrow belt from Bell County in the northeast to Kinney County in the southwest (index map) and provides water for at least nine counties in south-central Texas. Hydrologic boundaries divide the Edwards aquifer in the Austin area for which Barton Springs is the major discharge point. This part of the Edwards aquifer provides the municipal, industrial, domestic, and agricultural water supplies for about 30,000 people in the Austin area (southern Travis and northern Hays counties). Discharge from Barton Springs sustains streamflow at the mouth of Barton Creek and flows into Town Lake. Much of the land use within the outcrop area of the Edwards aquifer near Austin is rapidly changing from natural woodland and grassland to commercial and residential developments. Because urban development can result in a substantial degradation of the quality of water that recharges the aquifer, the extent of the recharge zone of the Edwards aquifer was delineated to provide information to the City of Austin for their use in formulating a plan for protecting and managing groundwater quality. The purpose of this report is to define and delineate the areal extent of the recharge zone of the Edwards aquifer in southern Travis and northern Hays Counties. The areal boundary of the recharge zone was determined by: (1) geologic mapping of the aquifer area; (2) interpretation of aerial photographs; (3) field verification of existing geologic maps; and (4) streamflow-loss studies. 

  15. Compliance through pollution prevention opportunity assessments at Edwards AFB -- Development, results and lessons learned

    SciTech Connect

    Beutelman, H.P.; Lawrence, A.

    1999-07-01

    Edwards Air Force Base (AFB), located in the Mojave Desert of southern California, is required to comply with environmental requirements for air pollution emissions, hazardous waste disposal, and clean water. The resources required to meet these many compliance requirements represents an ever increasing financial burden to the base, and to the Department of Defense. A recognized superior approach to environmental management is to achieve compliance through a proactive pollution prevention (P2) program which mitigates, and when possible, eliminates compliance requirements and costs, while at the same time reducing pollution released to the environment. At Edwards AFB, the Environmental Management Office P2 Branch developed and implemented a strategy that addresses this concept, better known as Compliance Through Pollution Prevention (CTP2). At the 91st AWMA Annual Meeting and Exhibition, Edwards AFB presented a paper on its strategy and implementation of its CTP2 concept. Part of that strategy and implementation included accomplishment of process specific focused P2 opportunity assessments (OAs). Starting in 1998, Edwards AFB initiated a CTP2 OA project where OAs were targeted on those operational processes, identified as compliance sites, that contributed most to the compliance requirements and costs at Edwards AFB. The targeting of these compliance sites was accomplished by developing a compliance matrix that prioritized processes in accordance with an operational risk management approach. The Edwards AFB CTP2 PPOA project is the first of its kind within the Air Force Material Command, and is serving as a benchmark for establishment of the CTP2 OA process.

  16. Simulations of flow in the Edwards-Trinity aquifer system and contiguous hydraulically connected units, west-central Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuniansky, E.L.; Holligan, K.Q.

    1994-01-01

    The transmissivity values used in the simulations were within estimated ranges and generally are: 1,000 to 10,000 ft2/d (feet squared per day) for the Edwards-Trinity and Trinity aquifers; 100,000 to greater than 1 million ft2/d for the Edwards aquifer; and less than 500 to 10,000 ft2/d in contiguous hydraulically connected units. Simulated flow through the Edwards-Trinity aquifer system and contiguous hydraulically connected units is about 3 million acre-feet per year. Estimates of areally distributed recharge from the simulations range from 0.1 to 1 inch per year for the Edwards-Trinity aquifer and increase to 4 inches per year for the Trinity aquifer. Recharge to the Edwards aquifer occurs along streambeds that cross outcropped high-permeability rocks of the Edwards Group through joints and faults. Many of the streams are diverted completely underground during periods of no precipitation. The movement of a substantial quantity of water (about 400 cubic feet per second) from the Trinity and Edwards-Trinity aquifers into the Edwards aquifer was simulated. Results of the simulations indicate that anisotropy strongly influences flow in the Edwards aquifer. In the San Antonio and Austin areas, the Edwards aquifer is the most active part of the ground-water flow system with one-third of ground-water discharge occurring in 5 percent of the modeled area for both simulations.

  17. Short-term hemodynamic performance of the mitral Carpentier-Edwards PERIMOUNT pericardial valve. Carpentier-Edwards PERIMOUNT Investigators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Firstenberg, M. S.; Morehead, A. J.; Thomas, J. D.; Smedira, N. G.; Cosgrove, D. M. 3rd; Marchand, M. A.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although long-term durability data exist, little data are available concerning the hemodynamic performance of the Carpentier-Edwards PERIMOUNT pericardial valve in the mitral position. METHODS: Sixty-nine patients who were implanted with mitral PERIMOUNT valves at seven international centers between January 1996 and February 1997 consented to participate in a short-term echocardiography follow-up. Echocardiographs were collected at a mean of 600+/-133 days after implantation (range, 110 to 889 days); all underwent blinded core lab analysis. RESULTS: At follow-up, peak gradients were 9.09+/-3.43 mm Hg (mean, 4.36+/-1.79 mm Hg) and varied inversely with valve size (p < 0.05). The effective orifice areas were 2.5+/-0.6 cm2 and tended to increase with valve size (p = 0.08). Trace mitral regurgitation (MR) was common (n = 48), 9 patients had mild MR, 1 had moderate MR, none had severe MR. All MR was central (n = 55) or indeterminate (n = 3). No paravalvular leaks were observed. Mitral regurgitation flow areas were 3.4+/-2.8 cm2 and were without significant volumes. CONCLUSIONS: In this multicenter study, these mitral valves are associated with trace, although physiologically insignificant, central MR. Despite known echocardiographic limitations, the PERIMOUNT mitral valves exhibit similar hemodynamics to other prosthetic valves.

  18. Conceptualization and simulation of the Edwards aquifer, San Antonio region, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindgren, K.J.; Dutton, A.R.; Hovorka, S.D.; Worthington, S.R.H.; Painter, S.; ,

    2005-01-01

    Numerical ground-water flow models for the Edwards aquifer in the San Antonio region of Texas generally have been based on a diffuse-flow conceptualization. That is, although conduits likely are present, the assumption is that flow in the aquifer predominantly is through a network of small fractures and openings sufficiently numerous that the aquifer can be considered a porous-media continuum at the regional scale. Whether flow through large fractures and conduits or diffuse flow predominates in the Edwards aquifer at the regional scale is an open question. A new numerical ground-water-flow model (Edwards aquifer model) that incorporates important components of the latest information and an alternate conceptualization of the Edwards aquifer was developed. The conceptualization upon which the Edwards aquifer model is based emphasizes conduit development and conduit flow, and the model can be considered a test of one of two reasonable conceptualizations. The model incorporates conduits simulated as generally continuously connected, one-cell-wide (1,320 feet) zones with very large hydraulic-conductivity values (as much as 300,000 feet per day). The locations of the conduits are based on a number of factors, including major potentiometric-surface troughs in the aquifer, the presence of sinking streams, geochemical information, and geologic structures (for example, faults and grabens). The model includes both the San Antonio and Barton Springs segments of the Edwards aquifer in the San Antonio region, Texas, and was calibrated for steady-state (1939-46) and transient (1947-2000) conditions. Transient simulations were conducted using monthly recharge and pumpage (withdrawals) data. The predominantly conduit-flow conceptualization incorporated in the Edwards aquifer model yielded a reasonably good match between measured and simulated hydraulic heads in the confined part of the aquifer and between measured and simulated springflows. The simulated directions of flow in the

  19. Dryden B-52 Launch Aircraft on Edwards AFB Runway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    NASA's venerable workhorse, the B-52 mothership, rolls out on the Edwards AFB runway after a test flight in 1996. Over the course of more than 40 years, the B-52 launched numerous experimental aircraft, ranging from the X-15 to the X-38, and was also used as a flying testbed for a variety of other research projects. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket

  20. STS-1 landing at Edwards - first orbital mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    shuttles without power--and therefore without the weight penalty of an additional engine and fuel--was based on previous experience at the Flight Research Center with piloted lifting bodies that also landed without power, as had the X-15s. Dryden and Edwards Air Force Base (AFB) had also hosted the approach and landing tests of the shuttle prototype Enterprise in 1977 and had tested the computers used for the shuttles' flight control systems in the F-8 Digital Fly-By-Wire aircraft, which also contributed to the solution of a dangerous pilot induced oscillation that occurred on the final approach and landing test. In this clip Young and Crippen fly the orbiter Columbia to a picture-perfect, unpowered landing on the dry lakebed runway 23 at Edwards AFB, CA, after it's first orbital flight, which ended on April 14.

  1. [Edward Blyth (1810-1873). Father of the Indian ornitology].

    PubMed

    Malec, Grzegorz

    2014-01-01

    Edward Blyth was born on 23 December 1810. When he was ayoung man he took an interest with the zoology which became his life's passion. As a young naturalist he was a conscientious observer of the nature and a man gifted with a superb memory. Unfortunately his career was not successful in London because of the conflict with the younger of the Gray brothers. Facing the prospect of no employment in The British Museum, Blyth decided to leave England for Calcutta where he was offered a post of a museum curator. The English naturalist spent in India the years from 1841 to 1862. During that time he greatly enriched the zoological collection of the museum and consequently the place had much more visitors. Regarding his private life he got married in 1854 to Elisabeth Mary Turner Hodges. Undoubtedly the next four year were the happiest in Blyth's life. After his wife's death Blyth's health condition deteriorated. The ongoing conflicts he kept having while the first stay in India and constant struggle to improve his financial status made him decide to return to England. Blyth left India in 1862. After coming back to his homeland he continued the naturalistic passions. Nevertheless Blyth was constantly troubled by the financial problems. Also, his health, both mental and physical, systematically deteriorated. Finally the death came on 27 December 1873, in London. Blyth tried in vain to gain the recognition and join the scientific establishment of the 19th century England. Constant lack of satisfactory income and often problems with health prevented the ornithologist to be fully devote to his passion. The aim of this article is to highlight some of the most important and interesting events of Blyth's life. Moreover, another objective is to popularise Blyth and his work since he was one of the greatest naturalists of that time.

  2. The Impact of the Prince Edward Island School Library Policy on the Development of School Library Programs across Prince Edward Island.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doiron, Ray; Davies, Judy

    In Canada's smallest province, Prince Edward Island (PEI), the "PEI School Library Policy" and its supporting documents have guided the development of school library programs since 1989. This study explores the impact that policy has had on school library programs in PEI. The "Survey of School Library Resource Centers" probed…

  3. Geologic framework of the Edwards Aquifer and upper confining unit, and hydrogeologic characteristics of the Edwards Aquifer, south-central Uvalde County, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Allan K.; Small, Ted A.

    1997-01-01

    The stratigraphic units of the Edwards aquifer in south-central Uvalde County generally are porous and permeable. The stratigraphic units that compose the Edwards aquifer in south-central Uvalde County are the Devils River Formation in the Devils River trend; and the West Nueces, McKnight, and Salmon Peak Formations in the Maverick Basin. The Balcones fault zone is the principal structural feature in Uvalde County; however, the displacement along the fault zone is less in Uvalde County than in adjacent Medina and Bexar Counties to the east. The Uvalde Salient is a structural high in south-central Uvalde County, and consists of several closely connected crustal uplifts that bring Edwards aquifer strata to the surface generally forming prominent hills. The crustal uplifts forming this structural high are the remnants of intrusive and extrusive magnatic activity. Six primary faults—Cooks, Black Mountain, Blue Mountain, Uvalde, Agape, and Connor—cross the length of the study area from the southwest to the northeast juxtaposing the Lower Cretaceous Salmon Peak Formation at the surface in the northwestern part of the study area against Upper Cretaceous formations in the central part of the study area. In the study area, the porosity of the rocks in the Edwards aquifer is related to depositional or diagenetic elements along specific stratigraphic horizons (fabric selective) and to dissolution and structural elements that can occur in any lithostratigraphic horizon (not fabric selective). Permeability depends on the physical properties of the rock such as size, shape, distribution of pores, and fissuring and dissolution. The middle 185 feet of the lower part of the Devils River Formation, the upper part of the Devils River Formation, and the upper unit of the Salmon Peak Formation probably are the most porous and permeable stratigraphic zones of the Edwards aquifer in south-central Uvalde County.

  4. [Albert Schweitzer's MD thesis on Criticism of the medical pathographies on Jesus].

    PubMed

    Seidel, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The prominent philosopher, theologian, physician, musicologist and organ soloist Albert Schweitzer (14. 1. 1875-4. 9. 1965) submitted his MD thesis Kritik der von medizinischer Seite veröffentlichten Pathographien uber Jesus (Criticism of the medical pathographies on Jesus) in 1913. Very soon he published this work under the title Die psychiatrische Beurteilung Jesu. Darstellung und Kritik (The psychiatric evaluation of Jesus. Description and criticism) in order to reach a broader audience. Schweitzer's explicit motive for selecting this topic was to influence the theological debate by means of a M. D. thesis on psychiatric pathographies on Jesus. He was confronted with a lot of reproaches. These reproaches contended that his theological opinions had been supporting tendencies to describe Jesus as a mentally ill person or a religious fanatic. In addition, some authors of pathographies on Jesus (De Loosten, Binet-Sanglé, Hirsch, Rasmussen) characterized Jesus as mentally ill, suffering from paranoia. Schweitzer intended to reject the reproaches considering himself and the postulates of the authors of the pathographies. Schweitzer combined in a transdisciplinary way theological, psychiatric and psychopathological arguments. He did this in a very convincing way. Although Schweitzer did not deal with a central or explicit psychiatric question, he implicitly postulated transdisciplinary approaches for proper retrospective pathographies on historic persons. At the age of thirty, Schweitzer decided to finish his academic career and to begin studies in medicine as a preparation for work as a physician in Africa. This decision provoked much lack of understanding in his personal environment. Therefore it may be possible that a very personal motive contributed to the selection of the topic of the MD thesis. Among psychiatric authorities, Albert Schweitzer's interest in the criticisms of psychiatric pathographies and his transdisciplinary approach to this topic encountered

  5. Quality of water in the Trinity and Edwards aquifers, south-central Texas, 1996-98

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fahlquist, Lynne; Ardis, Ann F.

    2004-01-01

    During 1996?98, the U.S. Geological Survey studied surface- and ground-water quality in south-central Texas. The ground-water components included the upper and middle zones (undifferentiated) of the Trinity aquifer in the Hill Country and the unconfined part (recharge zone) and confined part (artesian zone) of the Edwards aquifer in the Balcones fault zone of the San Antonio region. The study was supplemented by information compiled from four ground-water-quality studies done during 1996?98. Trinity aquifer waters are more mineralized and contain larger dissolved solids, sulfate, and chloride concentrations compared to Edwards aquifer waters. Greater variability in water chemistry in the Trinity aquifer likely reflects the more variable lithology of the host rock. Trace elements were widely detected, mostly at small concentrations. Median total nitrogen was larger in the Edwards aquifer than in the Trinity aquifer. Ammonia nitrogen was detected more frequently and at larger concentrations in the Trinity aquifer than in the Edwards aquifer. Although some nitrate nitrogen concentrations in the Edwards aquifer exceeded a U.S. Geological Survey national background threshold concentration, no concentrations exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency public drinking-water standard. Synthetic organic compounds, such as pesticides and volatile organic compounds, were detected in the Edwards aquifer and less frequently in the Trinity aquifer, mostly at very small concentrations (less than 1 microgram per liter). These compounds were detected most frequently in urban unconfined Edwards aquifer samples. Atrazine and its breakdown product deethylatrazine were the most frequently detected pesticides, and trihalomethanes were the most frequently detected volatile organic compounds. Widespread detections of these compounds, although at small concentrations, indicate that anthropogenic activities affect ground-water quality. Radon gas was detected throughout the Trinity

  6. Filling-In Models of Completion: Rejoinder to Kellman, Garrigan, Shipley, and Keane (2007) and Albert (2007)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Barton L.

    2007-01-01

    There has been a growing interest in understanding the computations involved in the processes underlying visual segmentation and interpolation in conditions of occlusion. P. J. Kellman, P. Garrigan, T. F. Shipley, and B. P. Keane and M. K. Albert defended the view that identical contour interpolation mechanisms underlie modal and amodal…

  7. It Gets Me Upset Talking about the Royal Albert: Collaborative Analysis of the Ethics of an Oral History Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mee, Steve

    2012-01-01

    An ongoing oral history project at the University of Cumbria seeks to uncover the lived experiences of people with learning difficulties who lived at the Royal Albert Hospital. A recently made video exposed the apparent distress this caused one of the participants. Ethical discussions about the project reached a point of being "stuck".…

  8. From the National Academies: A Tribute to the Science Education Legacy of National Academy of Sciences President Bruce Alberts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labov, Jay B.

    2005-01-01

    This column, "From the National Academies," was Bruce Alberts' idea, one of so many for improving education. As a long-standing member of the American Society for Cell Biology, the namesake for the prize that is awarded annually to cell biologists for excellence in science education, and one of the founding editors of this journal, Alberts…

  9. Molecular epidemiology of Schistosoma mansoni in Uganda: DNA barcoding reveals substantial genetic diversity within Lake Albert and Lake Victoria populations.

    PubMed

    Stothard, J R; Webster, B L; Weber, T; Nyakaana, S; Webster, J P; Kazibwe, F; Kabatereine, N B; Rollinson, D

    2009-11-01

    Representative samples of Ugandan Schistosoma mansoni from Lake Albert and Lake Victoria were examined using DNA barcoding, sequence analysis of two partially overlapping regions - ASMIT (396 bp) & MORGAN (617 bp) - of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit I (cox1). The Victorian sample exhibited greater nucleotide diversity, 1.4% vs. 1.0%, and a significant population partition appeared as barcodes did not cross-over between lakes. With one exception, Lake Albert populations were more mixed by sampled location, while those from Lake Victoria appeared more secluded. Using statistical parsimony, barcode ASMIT 1 was putatively ancestral to all others and analysis of MORGAN cox1 confirmed population diversity. All samples fell into two of five well-resolved lineages; sub-lineages therein broadly partitioning by lake. It seems that barcode ASMIT 1 (and close variants) was likely widely dispersed throughout the Nilotic environment but later diversified in situ, and in parallel, within Lake Albert and Lake Victoria. The genetic uniformity of Ugandan S. mansoni can no longer be assumed, which might better explain known epidemiological heterogeneities. While it appears plausible that locally evolved heritable traits could spread through most of the Lake Albert populations, it seems unlikely they could quickly homogenise into Lake Victoria or amongst populations therein.

  10. Albert Einstein Distinguished Educators Fellowship Act of 1994. Report To Accompany S. 2104. 103D Congress, 2d Session, Senate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources.

    This document contains the text of the "Albert Einstein Distinguished Educators Fellowship Act of 1994" (S. 2104) along with related analysis. The bill establishes a Department of Energy (DOE) fellowship program for math and science teachers that provides them opportunities to work at DOE labs in order to enhance coordination and…

  11. Altus I aircraft landing on Edwards lakebed runway 23

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The remotely-piloted Altus I aircraft lands on Rogers Dry Lake adjacent to NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif. The short series of test flights sponsored by the Naval Postgraduate School in early August, 1997, were designed to demonstrate the ability of the experimental craft to cruise at altitudes above 40,000 feet for sustained durations. On its final flight Aug. 15, the Altus I reached an altitude of 43,500 feet. The Altus I and its sister ship, the Altus II, are variants of the Predator surveillance drone built by General Atomics/Aeronautical Systems, Inc. They are designed for high-altitude, long-duration scientific sampling missions, and are powered by turbocharged piston engines. The Altus I incorporates a single-stage turbocharger, while the Altus II, built for NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology program, sports a two-stage turbocharger to enable the craft to fly at altitudes above 55,000 feet. The Altus II, the first of the two craft to be completed, made its first flight on May 1, 1996. With its engine augmented by a single-stage turbocharger, the Altus II reached an altitude of 37,000 ft during its first series of development flights at Dryden in Aug., 1996. In Oct. of that year, the Altus II was flown in an Atmospheric Radiation Measurement study for the Department of Energy's Sandia National Laboratory in Oklahoma. During the course of those flights, the Altus II set a single-flight endurance record for remotely-operated aircraft of more than 26 hours. The Altus I, completed in 1997, flew a series of development flights at Dryden that summer. Those test flights culminated with the craft reaching an altitude of 43,500 ft while carrying a simulated 300-lb payload, a record for an unmanned aircraft powered by a piston engine augmented with a single-stage turbocharger. The Altus II sustained an altitudeof 55,000 feet for four hours in 1999. A pilot in a control station on the ground flies the craft by radio

  12. Geohydrologic Framework of the Edwards and Trinity Aquifers, South-Central Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blome, Charles D.; Faith, Jason R.; Ozuna, George B.

    2007-01-01

    This five-year USGS project, funded by the National Cooperative Geologic Mapping Program, is using multidisciplinary approaches to reveal the surface and subsurface geologic architecture of two important Texas aquifers: (1) the Edwards aquifer that extends from south of Austin to west of San Antonio and (2) the southern part of the Trinity aquifer in the Texas Hill Country west and south of Austin. The project's principal areas of research include: Geologic Mapping, Geophysical Surveys, Geochronology, Three-dimensional Modeling, and Noble Gas Geochemistry. The Edwards aquifer is one of the most productive carbonate aquifers in the United States. It also has been designated a sole source aquifer by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and is the primary source of water for San Antonio, America's eighth largest city. The Trinity aquifer forms the catchment area for the Edwards aquifer and it intercepts some surface flow above the Edwards recharge zone. The Trinity may also contribute to the Edwards water budget by subsurface flow across formation boundaries at considerable depths. Dissolution, karst development, and faulting and fracturing in both aquifers directly control aquifer geometry by compartmentalizing the aquifer and creating unique ground-water flow paths.

  13. Albert Sabin and the Coalition to Eliminate Polio from the Americas.

    PubMed

    Hampton, Lee

    2009-01-01

    Albert B. Sabin, MD, developer of the oral polio vaccine, was also a major proponent of its use in annual vaccination campaigns aimed at the elimination of polio. Sabin argued that administering his vaccine simultaneously to every child in a country would break polio's chains of transmission. Although he was already promoting mass vaccination by the 1960s, Sabin's efforts expanded considerably when he became an adviser to groups fighting polio in the Americas in the 1980s. Sabin's experiences provide a window into both the formation of the coalition that eliminated poliomyelitis from the Western Hemisphere and what can happen when biomedical researchers become public health policy advisers. Although the polio elimination coalition succeeded in part because member groups often accommodated each other's priorities, Sabin was often limited by his indifference to the interests of those he was advising and to the shortcomings of his vaccine.

  14. Albert H. Munsell: A sense of color at the interface of art and science

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landa, E.R.

    2004-01-01

    The color theory conceived and commercialized by Albert H. Munsell (1858-1918) has become a universal part of the lexicon of soil science. An American painter noted for his seascapes and portraits, he had a long-standing interest in the description of color. Munsell began studies aimed at standardizing color description, using hue, value, and chroma scales, around 1898. His landmark treatise, "A Color Notation," was published in 1905. Munsell died about 30 years before his color charts came into wide-spread use in soil survey programs in the United States. Dorothy Nickerson, who began her career as secretary and laboratory assistant to Munsell's son, and later spent 37 years at USDA as a color-science specialist, did much to adapt the Munsell Color System to soil-color usage. The legacy of color research pioneered by A.H. Munsell is honored today by the Munsell Color Science Laboratory established in 1983 at the Rochester Institute of Technology.

  15. Evolution of ethnocentrism on undirected and directed Barabási-Albert networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, F. W. S.; Hadzibeganovic, Tarik; Stauffer, Dietrich

    2009-12-01

    Using Monte Carlo simulations, we study the evolution of contingent cooperation and ethnocentrism in the one-shot game. Interactions and reproduction among computational agents are simulated on undirected and directed Barabási-Albert (BA) networks. We first replicate the Hammond-Axelrod model of in-group favoritism on a square lattice and then generalize this model on undirected and directed BA networks for both asexual and sexual reproduction cases. Our simulations demonstrate that irrespective of the mode of reproduction, the ethnocentric strategy becomes common even though cooperation is individually costly and mechanisms such as reciprocity or conformity are absent. Moreover, our results indicate that the spread of favoritism towards similar others highly depends on the network topology and the associated heterogeneity of the studied population.

  16. Fordism in the hospital: Albert Kahn and the design of Old Main, 1917-25.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, Nitin K

    2012-07-01

    The 1917-25 planning and construction at the University of Michigan of a new University Hospital, later dubbed Old Main, offers a noteworthy case study of the formal convergence of hospital and factory in early twentieth-century America. Designed by Albert Kahn, the architect responsible for Ford Motor Company's archetypal automobile plants, and located in Ann Arbor, Michigan, less than forty miles from Detroit's burgeoning factory landscape, Old Main was well positioned to reflect the values of industry in both appearance and operation. The building's outer surface represents a striking departure from the historicism that characterized several other hospitals of this period, while plans for the building's novel diagnostic unit demonstrate unique operational parallels to the assembly line model of production. Ultimately, Old Main's industrial design similarities cast it as a precociously modernist hospital, relating streamlined form to function more explicitly than many of its contemporary institutions.

  17. Local versus global knowledge in the Barabási-Albert scale-free network model.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Gardeñes, Jesús; Moreno, Yamir

    2004-03-01

    The scale-free model of Barabási and Albert (BA) gave rise to a burst of activity in the field of complex networks. In this paper, we revisit one of the main assumptions of the model, the preferential attachment (PA) rule. We study a model in which the PA rule is applied to a neighborhood of newly created nodes and thus no global knowledge of the network is assumed. We numerically show that global properties of the BA model such as the connectivity distribution and the average shortest path length are quite robust when there is some degree of local knowledge. In contrast, other properties such as the clustering coefficient and degree-degree correlations differ and approach the values measured for real-world networks.

  18. Perseus B Heads for Landing on Edwards AFB Runway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The Perseus B remotely piloted aircraft nears touchdown at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif. at the conclusion of a development flight at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center. The Perseus B is the latest of three versions of the Perseus design developed by Aurora Flight Sciences under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) program. Perseus B is a remotely piloted aircraft developed as a design-performance testbed under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. Perseus is one of several flight vehicles involved in the ERAST project. A piston engine, propeller-powered aircraft, Perseus was designed and built by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation, Manassas, Virginia. The objectives of Perseus B's ERAST flight tests have been to reach and maintain horizontal flight above altitudes of 60,000 feet and demonstrate the capability to fly missions lasting from 8 to 24 hours, depending on payload and altitude requirements. The Perseus B aircraft established an unofficial altitude record for a single-engine, propeller-driven, remotely piloted aircraft on June 27, 1998. It reached an altitude of 60,280 feet. In 1999, several modifications were made to the Perseus aircraft including engine, avionics, and flight-control-system improvements. These improvements were evaluated in a series of operational readiness and test missions at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Perseus is a high-wing monoplane with a conventional tail design. Its narrow, straight, high-aspect-ratio wing is mounted atop the fuselage. The aircraft is pusher-designed with the propeller mounted in the rear. This design allows for interchangeable scientific-instrument payloads to be placed in the forward fuselage. The design also allows for unobstructed airflow to the sensors and other devices mounted in the payload compartment. The Perseus B that underwent test and development in 1999 was the third generation of the Perseus design

  19. Perseus B Heads for Landing on Edwards AFB Runway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The Perseus B remotely piloted aircraft approaches the runway at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif. at the conclusion of a development flight at NASA's Dryden flight Research Center in April 1998. The Perseus B is the latest of three versions of the Perseus design developed by Aurora Flight Sciences under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) program. Perseus B is a remotely piloted aircraft developed as a design-performance testbed under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. Perseus is one of several flight vehicles involved in the ERAST project. A piston engine, propeller-powered aircraft, Perseus was designed and built by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation, Manassas, Virginia. The objectives of Perseus B's ERAST flight tests have been to reach and maintain horizontal flight above altitudes of 60,000 feet and demonstrate the capability to fly missions lasting from 8 to 24 hours, depending on payload and altitude requirements. The Perseus B aircraft established an unofficial altitude record for a single-engine, propeller-driven, remotely piloted aircraft on June 27, 1998. It reached an altitude of 60,280 feet. In 1999, several modifications were made to the Perseus aircraft including engine, avionics, and flight-control-system improvements. These improvements were evaluated in a series of operational readiness and test missions at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Perseus is a high-wing monoplane with a conventional tail design. Its narrow, straight, high-aspect-ratio wing is mounted atop the fuselage. The aircraft is pusher-designed with the propeller mounted in the rear. This design allows for interchangeable scientific-instrument payloads to be placed in the forward fuselage. The design also allows for unobstructed airflow to the sensors and other devices mounted in the payload compartment. The Perseus B that underwent test and development in 1999 was the third generation

  20. Obituary: Edward W. Burke, Jr. (1924-2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloomer, Raymond, Jr.

    2011-12-01

    Dr. Edward W. Burke Jr. passed away on June 15, 2011, after suffering a heart attack. Dr. Burke devoted his professional life to the research and teaching of physics and astronomy at King College in Bristol, Tennessee. Edward W. Burke, Jr., was born in Macon, Georgia, on September 16, 1924. He was a Navy veteran, having been commissioned as an ensign in 1944. He served in the Pacific near the end of World War II. He proceeded to complete his undergraduate degree in mathematics from Presbyterian College in 1947 and pursued the M.S. and Ph.D. in physics (1949 and 1954, respectively) at the University of Wisconsin. Under the direction of Professor Julian Mack, his thesis was titled "Isotope Shift in the Spectra of Boron." Although he did research in atomic spectra in the early part of his career, his interest in astronomy and variable stars in particular were his primary interests during his long academic career. Dr. Burke began his illustrious career at King College in 1949. He initiated the astronomy program there in 1950, included constructing a 12.5 inch Newtonian telescope, homemade as was most everything in those days. Many of his students learned about photometry at the Burke Observatory on the college campus. Burke was known for his trips to the Kitt Peak and Lowell observatories accompanied by undergraduate students on his trips, all of which were made by automobile which he preferred over flying. His initial interest in Ap stars later broadened into variable and especially eclipsing binary stars. His motivation was maintained by his desire to have his students experience basic research and to spark their interest in advanced degrees. Numerous students achieved advanced science and medical degrees because of Burke's encouragement and mentoring. In 1959, Dr. Burke was awarded a Fulbright professorship and traveled to Chile where he taught physics for a year in the Engineering School at the University of Chile in Santiago. He worked to establish a physics

  1. Perseus B Heads for Landing on Edwards AFB Runway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The Perseus B remotely piloted aircraft nears touchdown at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif. at the conclusion of a development flight at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center. The Perseus B is the latest of three versions of the Perseus design developed by Aurora Flight Sciences under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) program. Perseus B is a remotely piloted aircraft developed as a design-performance testbed under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. Perseus is one of several flight vehicles involved in the ERAST project. A piston engine, propeller-powered aircraft, Perseus was designed and built by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation, Manassas, Virginia. The objectives of Perseus B's ERAST flight tests have been to reach and maintain horizontal flight above altitudes of 60,000 feet and demonstrate the capability to fly missions lasting from 8 to 24 hours, depending on payload and altitude requirements. The Perseus B aircraft established an unofficial altitude record for a single-engine, propeller-driven, remotely piloted aircraft on June 27, 1998. It reached an altitude of 60,280 feet. In 1999, several modifications were made to the Perseus aircraft including engine, avionics, and flight-control-system improvements. These improvements were evaluated in a series of operational readiness and test missions at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Perseus is a high-wing monoplane with a conventional tail design. Its narrow, straight, high-aspect-ratio wing is mounted atop the fuselage. The aircraft is pusher-designed with the propeller mounted in the rear. This design allows for interchangeable scientific-instrument payloads to be placed in the forward fuselage. The design also allows for unobstructed airflow to the sensors and other devices mounted in the payload compartment. The Perseus B that underwent test and development in 1999 was the third generation of the Perseus design

  2. Perseus B Heads for Landing on Edwards AFB Runway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The Perseus B remotely piloted aircraft approaches the runway at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif. at the conclusion of a development flight at NASA's Dryden flight Research Center in April 1998. The Perseus B is the latest of three versions of the Perseus design developed by Aurora Flight Sciences under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) program. Perseus B is a remotely piloted aircraft developed as a design-performance testbed under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. Perseus is one of several flight vehicles involved in the ERAST project. A piston engine, propeller-powered aircraft, Perseus was designed and built by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation, Manassas, Virginia. The objectives of Perseus B's ERAST flight tests have been to reach and maintain horizontal flight above altitudes of 60,000 feet and demonstrate the capability to fly missions lasting from 8 to 24 hours, depending on payload and altitude requirements. The Perseus B aircraft established an unofficial altitude record for a single-engine, propeller-driven, remotely piloted aircraft on June 27, 1998. It reached an altitude of 60,280 feet. In 1999, several modifications were made to the Perseus aircraft including engine, avionics, and flight-control-system improvements. These improvements were evaluated in a series of operational readiness and test missions at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Perseus is a high-wing monoplane with a conventional tail design. Its narrow, straight, high-aspect-ratio wing is mounted atop the fuselage. The aircraft is pusher-designed with the propeller mounted in the rear. This design allows for interchangeable scientific-instrument payloads to be placed in the forward fuselage. The design also allows for unobstructed airflow to the sensors and other devices mounted in the payload compartment. The Perseus B that underwent test and development in 1999 was the third generation

  3. SR-71 Tail #844 Landing at Edwards Air Force Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    With distinctive heat waves trailing behind its engines, NASA Dryden Flight Research Center's SR-71A, tail number 844, lands at the Edwards AFB runway after a 1996 flight. Two SR-71 aircraft have been used by NASA as testbeds for high-speed and high-altitude aeronautical research. The aircraft, an SR-71A and an SR-71B pilot trainer aircraft, have been based here at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. They were transferred to NASA after the U.S. Air Force program was cancelled. As research platforms, the aircraft can cruise at Mach 3 for more than one hour. For thermal experiments, this can produce heat soak temperatures of over 600 degrees Fahrenheit (F). This operating environment makes these aircraft excellent platforms to carry out research and experiments in a variety of areas -- aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, thermal protection materials, high-speed and high-temperature instrumentation, atmospheric studies, and sonic boom characterization. The SR-71 was used in a program to study ways of reducing sonic booms or over pressures that are heard on the ground, much like sharp thunderclaps, when an aircraft exceeds the speed of sound. Data from this Sonic Boom Mitigation Study could eventually lead to aircraft designs that would reduce the 'peak' overpressures of sonic booms and minimize the startling affect they produce on the ground. One of the first major experiments to be flown in the NASA SR-71 program was a laser air data collection system. It used laser light instead of air pressure to produce airspeed and attitude reference data, such as angle of attack and sideslip, which are normally obtained with small tubes and vanes extending into the airstream. One of Dryden's SR-71s was used for the Linear Aerospike Rocket Engine, or LASRE Experiment. Another earlier project consisted of a series of flights using the SR-71 as a science camera platform for NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. An upward

  4. Edward (Ed) T. Schneider in Front of SR-71 Blackbird

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    SR-71 research pilot Ed Schneider is pictured here in front of an SR-71 Blackbird on the ramp at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Schneider became a NASA research pilot at Dryden in 1983. Data from the SR-71 program will be used to aid designers of future supersonic aircraft and propulsion systems. He retired as a NASA research pilot in September 2000. Two SR-71 aircraft have been used by NASA as testbeds for high-speed and high-altitude aeronautical research. The aircraft, an SR-71A and an SR-71B pilot trainer aircraft, have been based here at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. They were transferred to NASA after the U.S. Air Force program was cancelled. As research platforms, the aircraft can cruise at Mach 3 for more than one hour. For thermal experiments, this can produce heat soak temperatures of over 600 degrees Fahrenheit (F). This operating environment makes these aircraft excellent platforms to carry out research and experiments in a variety of areas -- aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, thermal protection materials, high-speed and high-temperature instrumentation, atmospheric studies, and sonic boom characterization. The SR-71 was used in a program to study ways of reducing sonic booms or over pressures that are heard on the ground, much like sharp thunderclaps, when an aircraft exceeds the speed of sound. Data from this Sonic Boom Mitigation Study could eventually lead to aircraft designs that would reduce the 'peak' overpressures of sonic booms and minimize the startling affect they produce on the ground. One of the first major experiments to be flown in the NASA SR-71 program was a laser air data collection system. It used laser light instead of air pressure to produce airspeed and attitude reference data, such as angle of attack and sideslip, which are normally obtained with small tubes and vanes extending into the airstream. One of Dryden's SR-71s was used for the Linear Aerospike Rocket Engine, or

  5. STS-31 on Runway 22 at Edwards with Recovery Personnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Personnel and equipment converge on the orbiter Discovery to begin servicing the spacecraft following its landing April 29, 1990, at NASA's then Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility, Edwards, California. Post-landing servicing by the recovery convoy is carried out after each Space Shuttle landing and includes safety checks for flammable and toxic gases escaping from systems aboard the orbiters, hooking up engine fuel purge and equipment coolant lines, and inspecting the brakes before the vehicle is towed from the runway to the shuttle facility at Dryden where it is prepared for the ferry flight back to the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Up to 24 vehicles and scores of personnel make up the landing recovery convoys at Dryden. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain

  6. STS-36 on Edwards Runway with Recovery Personnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Personnel and equipment converge on the orbiter Atlantis to begin servicing the spacecraft following its landing 4 March 1990, at NASA's then Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility, Edwards, California. Mission elapsed time for the Department of Defense mission was 4 days, 10 hours, 19 minutes and 15 seconds. Actual landing time was 10:08 a.m. Post-landing servicing by the recovery convoy is carried out after each Space Shuttle landing and includes safety checks for flammable and toxic gases escaping from systems aboard the orbiters, hooking up engine fuel purge and equipment coolant lines, and inspecting the brakes before the vehicle is towed from the runway to the shuttle facility at Dryden where it is prepared for the ferry flight back to the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Up to 24 vehicles and scores of personnel make up the landing recovery convoys at Dryden. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed

  7. Generalized Edwards thermodynamics and marginal stability in a driven system with dry and viscous friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gradenigo, Giacomo; Bertin, Eric

    2017-03-01

    We consider a spring-block model with both dry and viscous frictions, subjected to a periodic driving allowing mechanically stable configurations to be sampled. We show that under strong driving, the scaling of the correlation length with the energy density is incompatible with the prediction of the Edwards statistical approach, which assumes a uniform sampling of mechanically stable configurations. A crossover between the Edwards scaling and nonstandard high-energy scaling is observed at energy scales that depend on the viscous friction coefficient. Generalizing Edwards thermodynamics, we propose a statistical framework, based on a sampling of marginally stable states, that is able to describe the scaling of the correlation length in the highly viscous regime.

  8. Investigating groundwater flow between Edwards and Trinity aquifers in central Texas.

    PubMed

    Wong, C I; Kromann, J S; Hunt, B B; Smith, B A; Banner, J L

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the nature of communication between aquifers can be challenging when using traditional physical and geochemical groundwater sampling approaches. This study uses two multiport wells completed within Edwards and Trinity aquifers in central Texas to determine the degree of groundwater inter-flow between adjacent aquifers. Potentiometric surfaces, hydraulic conductivities, and groundwater major ion concentrations and Sr isotope values were measured from multiple zones within three hydrostratigraphic units (Edwards and Upper and Middle Trinity aquifers). Physical and geochemical data from the multiport wells were combined with historical measurements of groundwater levels and geochemical compositions from the region to characterize groundwater flow and identify controls on the geochemical compositions of the Edwards and Trinity aquifers. Our results suggest that vertical groundwater flow between Edwards and Middle Trinity aquifers is likely limited by low permeability, evaporite-rich units within the Upper and Middle Trinity. Potentiometric surface levels in both aquifers vary with changes in wet vs. dry conditions, indicating that recharge to both aquifers occurs through distinct recharge areas. Geochemical compositions in the Edwards, Upper, and Middle Trinity aquifers are distinct and likely reflect groundwater interaction with different lithologies (e.g., carbonates, evaporites, and siliceous sediments) as opposed to mixing of groundwater between the aquifers. These results have implications for the management of these aquifers as they indicate that, under current conditions, pumping of either aquifer will likely not induce vertical cross-formational flow between the aquifers. Inter-flow between the Trinity and the Edwards aquifers, however, should be reevaluated as pumping patterns and hydrogeologic conditions change.

  9. Invited commentary on 'Robert G Edwards and the Roman Catholic Church'.

    PubMed

    Serour, Gamal

    2011-06-01

    The paper 'Robert G. Edwards and the Roman Catholic Church' by Benagiano and colleagues in this issue of Reproductive BioMedicine Online is a very important and timely article published by well-informed authors on the occasion of the long-awaited award of the Nobel Prize to a well-deserved scientist, Bob Edwards. I found it very interesting and challenging that the authors went through all the arguments and criticism made by the Catholic and Orthodox Churches and other agents against the newly developed techniques of assisted reproductive technology.

  10. Pioneering contributions by Robert Edwards to oocyte in vitro maturation (IVM).

    PubMed

    Thompson, J G; Gilchrist, R B

    2013-12-01

    The history of in vitro maturation (IVM) of mammalian oocytes, especially of human oocytes, holds a special place for Robert Edwards. He was the first to comprehensively examine and demonstrate maturation of human oocytes in vitro and in so doing he changed the course of medicine by fertilizing them in vitro. In reviewing his contribution, we have examined the state of the field at the time and discuss his pioneering insights into mammalian oocyte biology. We will also discuss how some of the major concepts and challenges identified by Edwards 50 years ago remain among the major challenges facing IVM today.

  11. Geologic history and hydrogeologic setting of the Edwards-Trinity aquifer system, west-central Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barker, R.A.; Bush, P.W.; Baker, E.T.

    1994-01-01

    Because the diagenetic effects of cementation, recrystallization, and mineral replacement diminish the hydraulic conductivity of most rocks composing the Trinity and Edwards-Trinity aquifers, transmissivity values average less than 10,000 feet squared per day over more than 90 percent of the study area. However, the effects of tectonic fractures and dissolution in the Balcones fault zone cause transmissivity values to average about 750,000 feet squared per day in the Edwards aquifer, which occupies less than 10 percent of the study area.

  12. President Edwards and the Sage of Highgate: Determinism, Depravity, and the Supernatural Will.

    PubMed

    Bannon, Brad

    2016-01-01

    Scarce attention has been given to Samuel Taylor Coleridge's engagement with the philosophical theology of Jonathan Edwards, and yet a clear understanding of each thinker's position on determinism and Original Sin is of vital importance if we are understand the lasting significance of their disagreements. There have been a number of studies to take up Coleridge's influence on the American Romantics, but there is no scholarship that has taken into account how the reception of this influence was inflected both by the legacy of Edwards and by the critical response that his theology elicited from Coleridge.

  13. Final Environmental Assessment to Modernize Storage Facilities in the Munitions Complex and Throughout Edwards Air Force Base, California

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    EDWARDS AIR FORCE BASE, CALIFORNIA June 2006 95th Air Base Wing Civil Engineer Directorate...documentation. For: 95th Air Base Wing Civil Engineer Directorate Environmental Management Division Edwards AFB CA FINAL iii Munitions...be renovated as part of this project. Under Alternative A, the Preferred Alternative, the 95th Air Base Wing, Civil Engineer Directorate

  14. 75 FR 8106 - Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge, Alameda, Santa Clara, and San Mateo...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-23

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge, Alameda, Santa Clara... located in Alameda, Santa Clara, and San Mateo Counties of California. We provide this notice in..., we initiate our process for developing a CCP for Don Edwards San Francisco Bay NWR in Alameda,...

  15. Geologic framework and hydrogeologic characteristics of the Edwards aquifer outcrop (Barton Springs segment), northeastern Hays and southwestern Travis Counties, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Small, Ted A.; Hanson, John A.; Hauwert, Nico M.

    1996-01-01

    In the Barton Springs segment of the Edwards aquifer, the aquifer probably is most vulnerable to surface contamination in the rapidly urbanizing areas on the Edwards aquifer outcrop. Contamination can result from spills or leakage of hazardous materials; or runoff on the intensely faulted and fractured, karstic limestone outcrops characteristic of the recharge zone.

  16. Diffuse-flow conceptualization and simulation of the Edwards Aquifer, San Antonio Region, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindgren, R.J.

    2006-01-01

    A numerical ground-water-flow model (hereinafter, the conduit-flow Edwards aquifer model) of the karstic Edwards aquifer in south-central Texas was developed for a previous study on the basis of a conceptualization emphasizing conduit development and conduit flow, and included simulating conduits as one-cell-wide, continuously connected features. Uncertainties regarding the degree to which conduits pervade the Edwards aquifer and influence ground-water flow, as well as other uncertainties inherent in simulating conduits, raised the question of whether a model based on the conduit-flow conceptualization was the optimum model for the Edwards aquifer. Accordingly, a model with an alternative hydraulic conductivity distribution without conduits was developed in a study conducted during 2004-05 by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the San Antonio Water System. The hydraulic conductivity distribution for the modified Edwards aquifer model (hereinafter, the diffuse-flow Edwards aquifer model), based primarily on a conceptualization in which flow in the aquifer predominantly is through a network of numerous small fractures and openings, includes 38 zones, with hydraulic conductivities ranging from 3 to 50,000 feet per day. Revision of model input data for the diffuse-flow Edwards aquifer model was limited to changes in the simulated hydraulic conductivity distribution. The root-mean-square error for 144 target wells for the calibrated steady-state simulation for the diffuse-flow Edwards aquifer model is 20.9 feet. This error represents about 3 percent of the total head difference across the model area. The simulated springflows for Comal and San Marcos Springs for the calibrated steady-state simulation were within 2.4 and 15 percent of the median springflows for the two springs, respectively. The transient calibration period for the diffuse-flow Edwards aquifer model was 1947-2000, with 648 monthly stress periods, the same as for the conduit-flow Edwards

  17. Edward Bellamy's "Looking Backward" and the American Ideology of Progress through Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segal, Howard P.

    1989-01-01

    Examines Edward Bellamy's "Looking Backward" as the most popular U.S. utopian novel, and a major expander of the ideology of progress through technology. Provides an explanation for the book's popularity, and compares it to other utopian novels. Warns against using "Looking Backward" as a substitute for full-scale historical…

  18. Edward Albee's "The Zoo Story": Echo/es of Contemporary Subversive Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nabi, Naqibun; Ahmed, Firoz

    2016-01-01

    The post-world war II American social and cultural setting was ambiguously featured with enforced conformity in the name of prosperity and Americanization of the nation. Despite of this fact, American writers, especially, dramatists conveyed their message against this fixation through variety and intellectuality. Edward Albee's "The Zoo…

  19. Understanding "Together and Apart": A Case Study of Edward's Explorations at Nursery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Cath

    2009-01-01

    Edward was one of 58 children studied by workers and parents as part of a study on Well-being and Resilience at the Pen Green Nursery. Within the larger study, eight children were studied in greater depth in order to explore connections between cognitive and emotional development. Schematic theory and attachment theory were used as frameworks for…

  20. Dyadic Power Theory, Touch, and Counseling Psychology: A Response to Smith, Vogel, Madon, and Edwards (2011)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunbar, Norah E.; Abra, Gordon

    2012-01-01

    Smith, Vogel, Madon, and Edwards' (2011) recent article tested dyadic power theory (DPT) by examining the use of touch as a compliance-gaining tactic in the conflicts of married couples. In this response, we raise a methodological issue about the touch behaviors examined by Smith et al. and also pose a theoretical critique that their test of DPT…

  1. [Book review] Fish and fishes of Saint Helena Island, by Alasdair J. Edwards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith-Vaniz, W.F.

    1991-01-01

    Review of: FISH AND FISHERIES OF SAINT HELENA ISLAND. By AlasdairJ. Edwards. 1990. Available from the author, Department of Biology, Ridley Building, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU, England, 152 p., 24 p. color plates, £14.50 (or US$25.) surface, £17.00 (or US$30.)

  2. On the Production of Expert Knowledge: Revisiting Edward Said's Work on the Intellectual

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dimitriadis, Greg

    2006-01-01

    Edward Said is deservedly well known for his literary insights on Orientalism. Yet, his work on the nature of the intellectual is equally important and particularly critical for navigating this moment of political, cultural, and economic retrenchment. In this essay I will explore the contours of Said's work on the intellectual. I argue that Said…

  3. Enhancing Undergraduates' Capabilities through Team-Based Competitions: The Edward Jones Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Umble, Elisabeth J.; Umble, Michael; Artz, Kendall

    2008-01-01

    The Edward Jones Company recently initiated financial sponsorship of team-based competitions in six undergraduate business core classes at Baylor University. The challenges were chosen to take place in an introductory freshman business class, Managerial Accounting, Principles of Marketing, Corporate Finance, Operations Management, and Strategic…

  4. Thirty-Seven-Year Durability of a Starr-Edwards Aortic Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Ozkokeli, Mehmet; Ates, Mehmet; Ekinci, Abdurrahman; Akcar, Murat

    2005-01-01

    We report the case of a patient who was diagnosed with prosthetic valve endocarditis caused by Staphylococcus aureus. He had undergone aortic valve replacement with a Starr-Edwards prosthesis 37 years earlier. Because of uncontrolled infection despite antibiotic treatment, the patient underwent successful surgical replacement of the prosthetic valve. PMID:15902834

  5. Southern Stalemate: Five Years without Public Education in Prince Edward County, Virginia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonastia, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    In 1959, Virginia's Prince Edward County closed its public schools rather than obey a court order to desegregate. For five years, black children were left to fend for themselves while the courts decided if the county could continue to deny its citizens public education. Investigating this remarkable and nearly forgotten story of local, state, and…

  6. Edward Y. Hartshorne and the Reopening of German Universities, 1945-1946: His Personal Account.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tent, James F.

    1997-01-01

    Characterizes U.S. Edward Y. Hartshorne as a "manager of German social recovery." An instructor at Harvard University and protege of sociologist Talcott Parsons, Hartshorne was instrumental in the post-war reopening of German universities. Discusses Hartshorne's activities in military intelligence and psychological warfare, as well as…

  7. The Use of Technology in Prince Edward Island (Canada) High Schools: Perceptions of School Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preston, Jane P; Moffatt, Lyndsay; Wiebe, Sean; McAuley, Alexander; Campbell, Barbara; Gabriel, Martha

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to document the perceptions of school leaders regarding the technological use, skills, and attitudes of high school teachers. Using a qualitative research approach, 11 educational leaders from Prince Edward Island (Canada) were individually interviewed. Participants represented the Department of Education, principals,…

  8. STS 51-G Discovery lands at Edwards Air Force Base, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    STS 51-G Discovery lands at Edwards Air Force Base, California. In these side views its main landing gear has touched down, kicking up a cloud of dirt. Its nose gear is still in the air (224); Closer view of the Discovery with its main landing gear down and its nose wheels in the air (225).

  9. Landing of the Shuttle Challenger at Edwards AFB and end of STS 51-F mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    View of the landing of the Shuttle Challenger at Edwards Air Force Base and end of STS 51-F mission. The orbiter is just above the runway with its main landing gear about to touch down (160); Challenger's rear wheels touch down, causing clouds of dirt to appear (161).

  10. 76 FR 53961 - Harold Edward Smith, M.D.; Revocation Of Registration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-30

    ... Enforcement Administration Harold Edward Smith, M.D.; Revocation Of Registration On April 17, 2009, the Deputy... proposed the revocation of Respondent's DEA Certificate of Registration, BS4681979, and the denial of any pending applications to renew or modify the registration, on the grounds that Respondent had...

  11. Edward Tuohy: the man, his needle, and its place in obstetric analgesia.

    PubMed

    Martini, Joshua A; Bacon, Douglas R; Vasdev, Gary M

    2002-01-01

    The introduction of a needle designed by Ralph Huber and Edward Tuohy made continuous epidural anesthesia for labor possible. Neither the needle nor the regional anesthetic technique evolved in a vacuum; both were the culmination of a range of ideas developed by individuals around the world.

  12. Landing of STS-59 Shuttle Endeavour at Edwards Air Force Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The main landing gear of the Space Shuttle Endeavour touches down at Edwards Air Force Base to complete the 11 day STS-59/SRL-1 mission. Landing occured at 9:54 a.m., April 20, 1994. Mission duration was 11 days, 5 hours, 49 minutes.

  13. 3 CFR 8403 - Proclamation 8403 of August 26, 2009. Death of Senator Edward M. Kennedy

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    .... Kennedy, I hereby order, by the authority vested in me by the Constitution and laws of the United States of America, that the flag of the United States shall be flown at half-staff at the White House and... August 26, 2009 Proc. 8403 Death of Senator Edward M. KennedyBy the President of the United States...

  14. Tackling Problems through Lateral Thinking. An Interview with Edward de Bono.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodinsky, Ben

    1985-01-01

    In this interview, Edward de Bono says critical or logical thinking in lockstep fashion is necessary but not sufficient because we need not only the ability to critique ideas, but to create them. Creative or lateral thinking arrives at solutions by attacking problems "laterally" or "sideways." (DCS)

  15. STS-29 Discovery, OV-103, lands on Edwards AFB concrete runway 22

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    STS-29 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, main landing gear (MLG) touches down at a speed of approximately 205 knots (235 miles per hour) on concrete runway 22 at Edwards Air Force Base (AFB), California. Nose landing gear (NLG) is deployed and rides above runway surface prior touchdown. Mojave desert scrub brush appears in the foreground with mountain range appearing in the background.

  16. The Empty Cup: "Teaching for Understanding" at 21st Century Edward Waters College. Occasional Paper #6

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fluellen, Jerry E., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    What happens in a final project that fosters teaching for understanding? That inquiry calls to mind the Taoist belief that emptiness makes a cup useful. In the context of this paper, the inquiry organizes a narrative about how teaching for understanding surfaced in a "Theories of Learning" course at Edward Waters College. At a deeper…

  17. Robert Cooper Liebermann Receives 2012 Edward A. Flinn III Award: Citation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bass, Jay; Duffy, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Robert Cooper Liebermann received the 2012 Edward A. Flinn III Award at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, held on 5 December 2012 in San Francisco, Calif. The award honors "individuals who personify the Union's motto `unselfish cooperation in research' through their facilitating, coordinating, and implementing activities."

  18. This Earthly World: Edward Said, the Praxis of Secular Humanisms and Situated Cosmopolitanisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Leslie G.

    2006-01-01

    This essay unearths the educational and socio-political implications of Edward W. Said's work for our understanding of what a secular humanism might mean in the highly charged atmosphere of the post-Cold War and September 11 discourses that have pervaded the USA and, to varying degrees, other parts of the world. It asks what it means to move…

  19. James Edward Scott: The Leadership Journey of a Senior-Level African American Student Affairs Officer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Salatha T.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine, understand, and describe the life, leadership, and influence of Dr. James Edward Scott on higher education and more specifically student affairs; as one of the most well-known and respected African American male chief student affairs officers in the late 20th and early 21st centuries. Using a qualitative…

  20. "Affection in Education": Edward Carpenter, John Addington Symonds and the Politics of Greek Love

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinn, Josephine Crawley; Brooke, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    The paper examines Edward Carpenter's 1899 essay on education that defended the value of powerful same-sex attachments, either between older and younger boys or between teachers and pupils, in the context of Victorian ideologies of same-sex affection. Linda Dowling has described how "a homosexual counterdiscourse able to justify male love in…

  1. Vulnerability of ground water to contamination, Edwards Aquifer recharge zone, Bexar County, Texas, 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Allan K.

    2000-01-01

    The Edwards aquifer, one of the most productive carbonate-rock aquifers in the Nation, is composed of the Kainer and Person Formations of the Edwards Group plus the overlying Georgetown Formation. Most recharge to the Edwards aquifer results from the percolation of streamflow loss and the infiltration of precipitation through porous parts of the recharge zone. Residential and commercial development is increasing, particularly in Bexar County in south-central Texas, atop the densely fractured and steeply faulted recharge zone. The increasing development has increased the vulnerability of ground water to contamination by spillage or leakage of waste materials, particularly fluids associated with urban runoff and (or) septic-tank leachate. This report describes a method of assessing the vulnerability of ground water to contamination in the Edwards aquifer recharge zone. The method is based on ratings of five natural features of the area: (1) hydraulic properties of outcropping hydrogeologic units; (2) presence or absence of faults; (3) presence or absence of caves and (or) sinkholes; (4) slope of land surface; and (5) permeability of soil. The sum of the ratings for the five natural features was used to develop a map showing the recharge zone's vulnerability to ground-water contamination.

  2. It Really Is All about the Child: An Interview with Dr. Edward Hallowell

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Dane L.

    2012-01-01

    In a decade when brain research has helped people understand learning difficulties in children, and people have seen increased media attention on the use of medications to treat attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children and adults, Dr. Edward (Ned) Hallowell has worked tirelessly to educate the medical profession, parents,…

  3. Diaspora as Catastrophe, Diaspora as a Mission and the Post-Colonial Philosophy of Edward Said

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pappe, Ilan

    2010-01-01

    Edward Said the refugee could not easily allow himself to join in the celebration of demythologizing nationalism. His Palestinianism had to coexist, uncomfortably, with his universalism. Time made this necessary coexistence an asset, not a liability, and this in fact was his political legacy for the future: Jews and Palestinians would have to…

  4. Perseus B over Edwards AFB on a Development Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    A long, slender wing and a pusher propeller at the rear characterize the Perseus B remotely-piloted research aircraft, seen here during a test flight in April1998. Perseus B is a remotely piloted aircraft developed as a design-performance testbed under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. Perseus is one of several flight vehicles involved in the ERAST project. A piston engine, propeller-powered aircraft, Perseus was designed and built by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation, Manassas, Virginia. The objectives of Perseus B's ERAST flight tests have been to reach and maintain horizontal flight above altitudes of 60,000 feet and demonstrate the capability to fly missions lasting from 8 to 24 hours, depending on payload and altitude requirements. The Perseus B aircraft established an unofficial altitude record for a single-engine, propeller-driven, remotely piloted aircraft on June 27, 1998. It reached an altitude of 60,280 feet. In 1999, several modifications were made to the Perseus aircraft including engine, avionics, and flight-control-system improvements. These improvements were evaluated in a series of operational readiness and test missions at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Perseus is a high-wing monoplane with a conventional tail design. Its narrow, straight, high-aspect-ratio wing is mounted atop the fuselage. The aircraft is pusher-designed with the propeller mounted in the rear. This design allows for interchangeable scientific-instrument payloads to be placed in the forward fuselage. The design also allows for unobstructed airflow to the sensors and other devices mounted in the payload compartment. The Perseus B that underwent test and development in 1999 was the third generation of the Perseus design, which began with the Perseus Proof-Of-Concept aircraft. Perseus was initially developed as part of NASA's Small High-Altitude Science Aircraft (SHASA) program, which later evolved into the ERAST

  5. Obituary: Edward R. (Ted) Harrison, 1919-2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irvine, William M.; Arny, Thomas T.; Trimble, Virginia

    2007-12-01

    Cosmologist Edward R. (Ted) Harrison, emeritus Distinguished University Professor of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, died on 29 January 2007 in his retirement city of Tucson, Arizona, where he was adjunct professor at the Steward Observatory, University of Arizona. The cause of death was colon cancer. He is survived by a sister, brother, and daughter. (A son died in 2000.) Perhaps best known for his work on the growth of fluctuations in the expanding universe and his books on cosmology for the dedicated layperson, Ted had extremely broad interests, and he published more than 200 papers in space sciences, plasma physics, high-energy physics, physical chemistry, and, principally, many aspects of astrophysics. He was a Fellow of the American Physical Society, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Royal Astronomical Society, and the Institute of Physics (UK). Ted Harrison was born 8 January 1919 in London, England. His parents were Robert Harrison and Daisy Harrison (nee White). His education at Sir John Cass College, London University, was interrupted by the Second World War, during which he served for six years with the British Army in various campaigns, ultimately acting as Radar Adviser to the Northern Area of the Egyptian Army. It was during the latter service that he met his wife Photeni (nee Marangas). Following the War, Ted became a British Civil Servant, at first with the Atomic Energy Research Establishment in Harwell and then at the Rutherford High Energy Laboratory. During this period he acquired the equivalent of university degrees, becoming a graduate, then an Associate, and finally a Fellow of the Institute of Physics. His somewhat unorthodox education may have contributed to his broad interests and his very intuitive and physical approach to scientific problems. The latter became the bane of generations of graduate students, who might find themselves asked on their physics qualifying exams to

  6. Perseus B over Edwards AFB on a Development Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    A long, slender wing and a pusher propeller at the rear characterize the Perseus B remotely-piloted research aircraft, seen here during a test flight in April1998. Perseus B is a remotely piloted aircraft developed as a design-performance testbed under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. Perseus is one of several flight vehicles involved in the ERAST project. A piston engine, propeller-powered aircraft, Perseus was designed and built by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation, Manassas, Virginia. The objectives of Perseus B's ERAST flight tests have been to reach and maintain horizontal flight above altitudes of 60,000 feet and demonstrate the capability to fly missions lasting from 8 to 24 hours, depending on payload and altitude requirements. The Perseus B aircraft established an unofficial altitude record for a single-engine, propeller-driven, remotely piloted aircraft on June 27, 1998. It reached an altitude of 60,280 feet. In 1999, several modifications were made to the Perseus aircraft including engine, avionics, and flight-control-system improvements. These improvements were evaluated in a series of operational readiness and test missions at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Perseus is a high-wing monoplane with a conventional tail design. Its narrow, straight, high-aspect-ratio wing is mounted atop the fuselage. The aircraft is pusher-designed with the propeller mounted in the rear. This design allows for interchangeable scientific-instrument payloads to be placed in the forward fuselage. The design also allows for unobstructed airflow to the sensors and other devices mounted in the payload compartment. The Perseus B that underwent test and development in 1999 was the third generation of the Perseus design, which began with the Perseus Proof-Of-Concept aircraft. Perseus was initially developed as part of NASA's Small High-Altitude Science Aircraft (SHASA) program, which later evolved into the ERAST

  7. Mont Albert to Buck Mountain: Provenance of Appalachian Ophiolite Chromites Using Osmium Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minarik, W. G.; Gale, A.; Booker, C.

    2003-12-01

    Osmium 187Os/188Os isotopic ratios have been determined for chrome-rich spinels from a suite of Appalachian ophiolites thought to represent Iapetus margin mantle formed and emplaced during the Ordovician. Because Re is incompatible during mantle melting while Os is compatible, non-radiogenic initial 187Os/188Os can constrain the average source and the timing of melt extraction, especially as Os is concentrated in chromite. Radiogenic ratios indicate contamination from aged sources with high Re/Os, such as mafic or continental crust. In rocks where spinel is the only remaining primary mineral, these properties can constrain the tectonic environment of formation as well as active-margin Os transport. There is little correction for 187Os in-growth since the Ordovician due to very low sample Re. Each ultramafic unit (from Mont Albert on the Gaspé Peninsula of Québec down to the Blue Ridge of North Carolina) forms a unique cluster of 187Os/188Os ratios, spanning 1 to 3%, but the whole range is about 10%. This corresponds to a range of initial γ Os of -1 to +9, where γ Os is the percent deviation from a chondritic source at the age of formation (roughly 500 Ma). Within ophiolites where detailed mapping and other geochemical information are available, there is a correlation between mantle-like Os and tholeiitic basalts; radiogenic Os and boninites (Thetford Mines). Continental arc-related mantle chromites (Baltimore Mafic Complex; γ Os +4 to +7) are the most radiogenic. The least radiogenic are chromites from the Staten Island serpentinite and Mont Albert (γ Os -1 and 0, respectively), either indicating formation from a previously depleted source or that they predate the other Taconic ophiolites. The restricted range of each ophiolite, compared to the whole of the data set, allow provenance links to be made between isolated bodies. For example, the Buck Creek, NC ultramafic complex, which has undergone granulite facies metamorphism, (Tenthorey et al., 1996) has a

  8. Turbidite systems of lacustrine rift basins: Examples from the Lake Kivu and Lake Albert rifts, East Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuewei; Scholz, Christopher A.

    2015-07-01

    The Holocene turbidite systems of Lake Kivu and the Pliocene turbidite systems of Lake Albert in the East African Rift were examined using high-resolution 2-D and 3-D seismic reflection data and sediment core information. Based on investigations of seismic facies and lithofacies, several key turbidity-flow depositional elements were observed, including channels, overbank levees with sediment waves, and depositional lobes. Analyses of the sources of the recent and ancient turbidite systems in these two extensional basins suggest that flood-induced hyperpycnal flows are important triggers of turbidity currents in lacustrine rift basins. From source to sink, sediment dispersal, facies distribution, and depositional thickness of the turbidite systems are strongly influenced by rift topography. The Lake Kivu and Lake Albert rifts serve as excellent analogues for understanding the sedimentary patterns of lacustrine turbidites in extensional basins.

  9. History and perspectives of medical research at the Albert Schweitzer Hospital in Lambaréné, Gabon.

    PubMed

    Ramharter, Michael; Adegnika, Ayola A; Agnandji, Selidji T; Matsiegui, Pierre Blaise; Grobusch, Martin P; Winkler, Stefan; Graninger, Wolfgang; Krishna, Sanjeev; Yazdanbakhsh, Maria; Mordmüller, Benjamin; Lell, Bertrand; Missinou, Michel A; Mavoungou, Elie; Issifou, Saadou; Kremsner, Peter G

    2007-01-01

    In 1913 Albert Schweitzer founded one of the first modern hospitals in Africa dedicated to the health of the local population. The Albert Schweitzer Hospital is located in Lambaréné, a small town in Gabon. In 1981 a research department--the Medical Research Unit--was established with the aim to perform research in the field of infectious diseases ( www.lambarene.org ). The main focus lies on clinical research on malaria and other parasitic diseases. Studies on the molecular biology and immunology of parasitic diseases are fostered since the inauguration of a novel building dedicated for basic science. A training program in clinical research in tropical diseases for African scientists has been set up recently.

  10. Albert Chalmers: Perpetual honours for a prominent tropical medicine career in the Sudan

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This article starts with brief review of Albert Chalmers’ early career in tropical medicine until he was appointed Director of the Wellcome Tropical Research Laboratories in Khartoum (WTRLK) in 1913, succeeding Andrew Balfour. Then the article explores how Chalmers faced the challenges and managed to establish a solid research base under very harsh conditions. Most of his directorship was during the First World War, with shortage of staff and increased routine work load. In spite of these constraints, Chalmers managed to establish a base for research in tropical medicine in WTRK. Chalmers’ research concentrated on the taxonomy and pathogenicity of bacteria and fungi but he also worked on miscellaneous dermatological disorders and on sleeping sickness. His papers reflect a wide range of knowledge and deep understanding of the topics he was covering. His work on the classification of pathogenic fungi was widely recognized. He tried different preparations of vaccines for cerebrospinal meningitis but with the technology available at the time he could not produce a potent vaccine. Chalmers’ papers reflect the tremendous effort exerted in their production. Chamers resigned from WTRLK in 1920 and died of acute infective jaundice in the same year. In 1921 his widow, gave £500 to the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (RSTMH) in memory of her husband. The RSTMH Council decided to devote this money to the foundation of the Chalmers Memorial Medal. PMID:27493397

  11. Sexual Science and Sexual Forensics in 1920s Germany: Albert Moll as (S)Expert

    PubMed Central

    Conn, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Using court records involving the expert testimony of the Berlin sexologist Albert Moll, my article demonstrates that during the early 1920s a shift in the ‘epistemologies of justice’ concerning the adjudication of sex crimes took place within German courtrooms. Namely, presiding judges considered a greater number of sexual acts as punishable, despite no change in the laws themselves. Central to my argument is the role of expert testimony in practice and its critical reception. By focusing upon the rhetorical strategies presented by attorneys, judges and expert witnesses (as well as defendants themselves and their relatives), it illustrates the functions of expert and tacit knowledge in court, which were often not mutually exclusive. Moll’s stature also enabled him to translate his scientific–medical expertise into state support for his testimonies, as well as the rebuilding of an international community of sexological authorities. It was only under Moll’s leadership that the First International Sexology Congress could take place in 1926, an event that marked the apex of his prestige. PMID:23002293

  12. The powers of suggestion: Albert Moll and the debate on hypnosis.

    PubMed

    Maehle, Andreas-Holger

    2014-03-01

    The Berlin physician Albert Moll (1862-1939) was an advocate of hypnotic suggestion therapy and a prolific contributor to the medical, legal and public discussions on hypnotism from the 1880s to the 1920s. While his work in other areas, such as sexology, medical ethics and parapsychology, has recently attracted scholarly attention, this paper for the first time comprehensively examines Moll's numerous publications on hypnotism and places them in their contemporary context. It covers controversies over the therapeutic application of hypnosis, the reception of Moll's monograph Der Hypnotismus (1889), his research on the rapport between hypnotizer and subject, his role as an expert on 'hypnotic crime', and his views on the historical influence of hypnotism on the development of psychotherapy. My findings suggest that Moll rose to prominence due to the strong late-nineteenth-century public and medical interest in the phenomena of hypnosis, but that his work was soon overshadowed by new, non-hypnotic psychotherapeutic approaches, particularly Freud's psychoanalysis.

  13. Remembering Our Forebears: Albert Jan Kluyver and the Unity of Life.

    PubMed

    Singleton, Rivers; Singleton, David R

    2017-02-01

    The Dutch microbiologist/biochemist Albert Jan Kluyver (1888-1956) was an early proponent of the idea of biochemical unity, and how that concept might be demonstrated through the careful study of microbial life. The fundamental relatedness of living systems is an obvious correlate of the theory of evolution, and modern attempts to construct phylogenetic schemes support this relatedness through comparison of genomes. The approach of Kluyver and his scientific descendants predated the tools of modern molecular biology by decades. Kluyver himself is poorly recognized today, yet his influence at the time was profound. Through lens of today however, it has been argued that the focus by Kluyver and others to create taxonomic and phylogenetic schemes using morphology and biochemistry distorted and hindered progress of the discipline of microbiology, because of a perception that the older approaches focused too much on a reductionist worldview. This essay argues that in contrast the careful characterization of fundamental microbial metabolism and physiology by Kluyver made many of the advances of the latter part of the twentieth century possible, by offering a framework which in many respects anticipated our current view of phylogeny, and by directly and indirectly training a generation of scientists who became leaders in the explosive growth of biotechnology.

  14. Laparoscopic Appendectomy in Children: Preliminary Study in Pediatric Hospital Albert Royer, Dakar

    PubMed Central

    Fall, Mbaye; Gueye, Doudou; Wellé, Ibrahima Bocar; Lo, Faty Balla; Sagna, Aloise; Diop, Marie; Fall, Ibrahima

    2015-01-01

    Appendiceal pathology's management has benefited in recent years from the advent of laparoscopic surgery. This study is to make a preliminary assessment of laparoscopic management of acute and complicated appendicitis in children after a few months of practice at the University Hospital Albert Royer, Dakar. This is a retrospective study of 22 cases of patients, all operated on by the same surgeon. The parameters studied were age, sex, clinical data and laboratory features, radiological data, and results of surgical treatment. The mean age of patients was 9.5 years with a male predominance. The series includes 14 cases of acute appendicitis and 8 complicated cases. Appendectomy anterograde is practiced in 81% of cases. Appendectomy was associated with peritoneal wash in 17 patients including 9 cases of acute appendicitis. Drainage of Douglas pouch is performed in 2 patients with complicated appendicitis; the average production was 300 cc of turbid liquids and any complications were not founded. An abscess of Douglas pouch is noted in 2 patients with complicated appendicitis undrained. These Douglas abscesses were treated medically. No conversion of laparotomy was performed in the series. After an average of 8 months no other problems were noted. PMID:26448743

  15. Sexual science and sexual forensics in 1920s Germany: Albert Moll as (S)expert.

    PubMed

    Conn, Matthew

    2012-04-01

    Using court records involving the expert testimony of the Berlin sexologist Albert Moll, my article demonstrates that during the early 1920s a shift in the 'epistemologies of justice' concerning the adjudication of sex crimes took place within German courtrooms. Namely, presiding judges considered a greater number of sexual acts as punishable, despite no change in the laws themselves. Central to my argument is the role of expert testimony in practice and its critical reception. By focusing upon the rhetorical strategies presented by attorneys, judges and expert witnesses (as well as defendants themselves and their relatives), it illustrates the functions of expert and tacit knowledge in court, which were often not mutually exclusive. Moll's stature also enabled him to translate his scientific-medical expertise into state support for his testimonies, as well as the rebuilding of an international community of sexological authorities. It was only under Moll's leadership that the First International Sexology Congress could take place in 1926, an event that marked the apex of his prestige.

  16. Sexual modernity in the works of Richard von Krafft-Ebing and Albert Moll.

    PubMed

    Oosterhuis, Harry

    2012-04-01

    The modern notion of sexuality took shape at the end of the nineteenth century, especially in the works of Richard von Krafft-Ebing and Albert Moll. This modernisation of sexuality was closely linked to the recognition of sexual diversity, as it was articulated in the medical-psychiatric understanding of what, at that time, was labelled as perversion. From around 1870, psychiatrists shifted the focus from immoral acts, a temporary deviation of the norm, to an innate morbid condition. In the late nineteenth century, several psychiatrists, collecting and publishing more and more case histories, classified and explained the wide range of deviant sexual behaviours they traced. The emergence of medical sexology meant that perversions could be diagnosed and discussed. Against this background both Krafft-Ebing and Moll articulated a new perspective, not only on perversion, but also on sexuality in general. Krafft-Ebing initiated and Moll elaborated a shift from a psychiatric perspective in which deviant sexuality was explained as a derived, episodic and more or less singular symptom of a more fundamental mental disorder, to a consideration of perversion as an integral part of a more general, autonomous and continuous sexual instinct. Before Sigmund Freud and others had expressed similar views, it was primarily through the writings of Krafft-Ebing and Moll that a new understanding of human sexuality emerged.

  17. ‘God’s Ethicist’: Albert Moll and His Medical Ethics in Theory and Practice

    PubMed Central

    Maehle, Andreas-Holger

    2012-01-01

    In 1902, Albert Moll, who at that time ran a private practice for nervous diseases in Berlin, published his comprehensive book on medical ethics, Ärztliche Ethik. Based on the concept of a contractual relationship between doctor and client, it gave more room to the self-determination of patients than the contemporary, usually rather paternalistic, works of this genre. In the first part of the present paper this is illustrated by examining Moll’s views and advice on matters such as truthfulness towards patients, euthanasia, and abortion. The second part of this article discusses how Moll engaged with the then publicly debated issues of experimentation on hospital patients and the ‘trade’ of foreign private patients between agents and medical consultants. In both matters Moll collected evidence of unethical practices and tried to use it to bring about change without damaging his or the profession’s reputation. However, with his tactical manoeuvres, Moll made no friends for himself among his colleagues or the authorities; his book on ethics also met with a generally cool response from the medical profession and seems to have been more appreciated by lawyers than by other doctors. PMID:23002294

  18. The Sexologist Albert Moll – between Sigmund Freud and Magnus Hirschfeld

    PubMed Central

    Sigusch, Volkmar

    2012-01-01

    Albert Moll was one of the most influential sexologists during the first three decades of the twentieth century. In contrast to his rivals Sigmund Freud and Magnus Hirschfeld, his achievements have not yet been recognised adequately. The author gives a comparative account of the work of these three protagonists. This shows that Moll formed some ideas which are regarded as psychoanalytical today before Freud, and that he, in contrast to Hirschfeld, was able to reflect critically on contemporary discourses, such as the debates on racial improvement through eugenics. As scientific theories, Freud’s psychoanalysis represented the unconscious, fantasy, experience and latency, while Moll’s sexology represented consciousness, ontological reality, behaviour and manifestation. Moll’s major disagreement with Hirschfeld’s sexology was his advocacy of apolitical and impartial science, whereas Hirschfeld’s aim was to achieve sexual reforms politically. Added to these differences were strong personal animosities. Freud called Moll a ‘beast’ and ‘pettifogger’; and Moll complained about Hirschfeld’s ‘problematic’ character. When Hirschfeld escaped the Nazi terror and went to Paris, Moll denounced him in order to prevent him rebuilding a new existence in exile. PMID:23002292

  19. Albert Chalmers: Perpetual honours for a prominent tropical medicine career in the Sudan.

    PubMed

    Adeel, Ahmed Awad A

    2014-01-01

    This article starts with brief review of Albert Chalmers' early career in tropical medicine until he was appointed Director of the Wellcome Tropical Research Laboratories in Khartoum (WTRLK) in 1913, succeeding Andrew Balfour. Then the article explores how Chalmers faced the challenges and managed to establish a solid research base under very harsh conditions. Most of his directorship was during the First World War, with shortage of staff and increased routine work load. In spite of these constraints, Chalmers managed to establish a base for research in tropical medicine in WTRK. Chalmers' research concentrated on the taxonomy and pathogenicity of bacteria and fungi but he also worked on miscellaneous dermatological disorders and on sleeping sickness. His papers reflect a wide range of knowledge and deep understanding of the topics he was covering. His work on the classification of pathogenic fungi was widely recognized. He tried different preparations of vaccines for cerebrospinal meningitis but with the technology available at the time he could not produce a potent vaccine. Chalmers' papers reflect the tremendous effort exerted in their production. Chamers resigned from WTRLK in 1920 and died of acute infective jaundice in the same year. In 1921 his widow, gave £500 to the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (RSTMH) in memory of her husband. The RSTMH Council decided to devote this money to the foundation of the Chalmers Memorial Medal.

  20. Implementing competency based admissions at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine.

    PubMed

    Kerrigan, Noreen; Akabas, Myles H; Betzler, Thomas F; Castaldi, Maria; Kelly, Mary S; Levy, Adam S; Reichgott, Michael J; Ruberman, Louise; Dolan, Siobhan M

    2016-01-01

    The Albert Einstein College of Medicine (Einstein) was founded in 1955 during an era of limited access to medical school for women, racial minorities, and many religious and ethnic groups. Located in the Bronx, NY, Einstein seeks to educate physicians in an environment of state-of-the-art scientific inquiry while simultaneously fulfilling a deep commitment to serve its community by providing the highest quality clinical care. A founding principle of Einstein, the basis upon which Professor Einstein agreed to allow the use of his name, was that admission to the student body would be based entirely on merit. To accomplish this, Einstein has long used a 'holistic' approach to the evaluation of its applicants, actively seeking a diverse student body. More recently, in order to improve its ability to identify students with the potential to be outstanding physicians, who will both advance medical knowledge and serve the pressing health needs of a diverse community, the Committee on Admissions reexamined and restructured the requirements for admission. These have now been categorized as four 'Admissions Competencies' that an applicant must demonstrate. They include: 1) cocurricular activities and relevant experiences; 2) communication skills; 3) personal and professional development; and 4) knowledge. The purpose of this article is to describe the process that resulted in the introduction and implementation of this competency based approach to the admission process.

  1. The sexologist Albert Moll--between Sigmund Freud and Magnus Hirschfeld.

    PubMed

    Sigusch, Volkmar

    2012-04-01

    Albert Moll was one of the most influential sexologists during the first three decades of the twentieth century. In contrast to his rivals Sigmund Freud and Magnus Hirschfeld, his achievements have not yet been recognised adequately. The author gives a comparative account of the work of these three protagonists. This shows that Moll formed some ideas which are regarded as psychoanalytical today before Freud, and that he, in contrast to Hirschfeld, was able to reflect critically on contemporary discourses, such as the debates on racial improvement through eugenics. As scientific theories, Freud's psychoanalysis represented the unconscious, fantasy, experience and latency, while Moll's sexology represented consciousness, ontological reality, behaviour and manifestation. Moll's major disagreement with Hirschfeld's sexology was his advocacy of apolitical and impartial science, whereas Hirschfeld's aim was to achieve sexual reforms politically. Added to these differences were strong personal animosities. Freud called Moll a 'beast' and 'pettifogger'; and Moll complained about Hirschfeld's 'problematic' character. When Hirschfeld escaped the Nazi terror and went to Paris, Moll denounced him in order to prevent him rebuilding a new existence in exile.

  2. Sexual Modernity in the Works of Richard von Krafft-Ebing and Albert Moll

    PubMed Central

    Oosterhuis, Harry

    2012-01-01

    The modern notion of sexuality took shape at the end of the nineteenth century, especially in the works of Richard von Krafft-Ebing and Albert Moll. This modernisation of sexuality was closely linked to the recognition of sexual diversity, as it was articulated in the medical–psychiatric understanding of what, at that time, was labelled as perversion. From around 1870, psychiatrists shifted the focus from immoral acts, a temporary deviation of the norm, to an innate morbid condition. In the late nineteenth century, several psychiatrists, collecting and publishing more and more case histories, classified and explained the wide range of deviant sexual behaviours they traced. The emergence of medical sexology meant that perversions could be diagnosed and discussed. Against this background both Krafft-Ebing and Moll articulated a new perspective, not only on perversion, but also on sexuality in general. Krafft-Ebing initiated and Moll elaborated a shift from a psychiatric perspective in which deviant sexuality was explained as a derived, episodic and more or less singular symptom of a more fundamental mental disorder, to a consideration of perversion as an integral part of a more general, autonomous and continuous sexual instinct. Before Sigmund Freud and others had expressed similar views, it was primarily through the writings of Krafft-Ebing and Moll that a new understanding of human sexuality emerged. PMID:23002290

  3. The powers of suggestion: Albert Moll and the debate on hypnosis

    PubMed Central

    Maehle, Andreas-Holger

    2014-01-01

    The Berlin physician Albert Moll (1862–1939) was an advocate of hypnotic suggestion therapy and a prolific contributor to the medical, legal and public discussions on hypnotism from the 1880s to the 1920s. While his work in other areas, such as sexology, medical ethics and parapsychology, has recently attracted scholarly attention, this paper for the first time comprehensively examines Moll’s numerous publications on hypnotism and places them in their contemporary context. It covers controversies over the therapeutic application of hypnosis, the reception of Moll’s monograph Der Hypnotismus (1889), his research on the rapport between hypnotizer and subject, his role as an expert on ‘hypnotic crime’, and his views on the historical influence of hypnotism on the development of psychotherapy. My findings suggest that Moll rose to prominence due to the strong late-nineteenth-century public and medical interest in the phenomena of hypnosis, but that his work was soon overshadowed by new, non-hypnotic psychotherapeutic approaches, particularly Freud’s psychoanalysis. PMID:24594818

  4. 'God's ethicist': Albert Moll and his medical ethics in theory and practice.

    PubMed

    Maehle, Andreas-Holger

    2012-04-01

    In 1902, Albert Moll, who at that time ran a private practice for nervous diseases in Berlin, published his comprehensive book on medical ethics, Ärztliche Ethik. Based on the concept of a contractual relationship between doctor and client, it gave more room to the self-determination of patients than the contemporary, usually rather paternalistic, works of this genre. In the first part of the present paper this is illustrated by examining Moll's views and advice on matters such as truthfulness towards patients, euthanasia, and abortion. The second part of this article discusses how Moll engaged with the then publicly debated issues of experimentation on hospital patients and the 'trade' of foreign private patients between agents and medical consultants. In both matters Moll collected evidence of unethical practices and tried to use it to bring about change without damaging his or the profession's reputation. However, with his tactical manoeuvres, Moll made no friends for himself among his colleagues or the authorities; his book on ethics also met with a generally cool response from the medical profession and seems to have been more appreciated by lawyers than by other doctors.

  5. Friedrich Albert Lange on neo-Kantianism, socialist Darwinism, and a psychology without a soul.

    PubMed

    Teo, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    Friedrich Albert Lange was a German philosopher, political theorist, educator, and psychologist who outlined an objective psychology in the 1860s. This article shows how some of the most important worldviews of the nineteenth century (Kantianism, Marxism, and Darwinism) were combined creatively in his thought system. He was crucial in the development of neo-Kantianism and incorporated psycho-physiological research on sensation and perception in order to defend Kant's epistemological idealism. Based on a critique of phrenology and philosophical psychology of his time, Lange developed a program of a psychology without a soul. He suggested that only those phenomena that can be observed and controlled should be studied, that psychology should focus on actions and speech, and that for each psychological event the corresponding physical or physiological processes should be identified. Lange opposed introspection and subjective accounts and promoted experiments and statistics. He also promoted Darwinism for psychology while developing a socialist progressive-democratic reading of Darwin in his social theory. The implications of socialist Darwinism on Lange's conceptualization of race are discussed and his prominence in nineteenth century philosophy and psychology is summarized.

  6. Loss of innocence: Albert Moll, Sigmund Freud and the invention of childhood sexuality around 1900.

    PubMed

    Sauerteig, Lutz D H

    2012-04-01

    This paper analyses how, prior to the work of Sigmund Freud, an understanding of infant and childhood sexuality emerged during the nineteenth century. Key contributors to the debate were Albert Moll, Max Dessoir and others, as fin-de-siècle artists and writers celebrated a sexualised image of the child. By the beginning of the twentieth century, most paediatricians, sexologists, psychologists, psychiatrists, psychoanalysts and pedagogues agreed that sexuality formed part of a child's 'normal' development. This paper argues that the main disagreements in discourses about childhood sexuality related to different interpretations of children's sexual experiences. On the one hand stood an explanation that argued for a homology between children's and adults' sexual experiences, on the other hand was an understanding that suggested that adults and children had distinct and different experiences. Whereas the homological interpretation was favoured by the majority of commentators, including Moll, Freud, and to some extent also by C.G. Jung, the heterological interpretation was supported by a minority, including childhood psychologist Charlotte Bühler.

  7. Loss of Innocence: Albert Moll, Sigmund Freud and the Invention of Childhood Sexuality Around 1900

    PubMed Central

    Sauerteig, Lutz D.H.

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyses how, prior to the work of Sigmund Freud, an understanding of infant and childhood sexuality emerged during the nineteenth century. Key contributors to the debate were Albert Moll, Max Dessoir and others, as fin-de-siècle artists and writers celebrated a sexualised image of the child. By the beginning of the twentieth century, most paediatricians, sexologists, psychologists, psychiatrists, psychoanalysts and pedagogues agreed that sexuality formed part of a child’s ‘normal’ development. This paper argues that the main disagreements in discourses about childhood sexuality related to different interpretations of children’s sexual experiences. On the one hand stood an explanation that argued for a homology between children’s and adults’ sexual experiences, on the other hand was an understanding that suggested that adults and children had distinct and different experiences. Whereas the homological interpretation was favoured by the majority of commentators, including Moll, Freud, and to some extent also by C.G. Jung, the heterological interpretation was supported by a minority, including childhood psychologist Charlotte Bühler. PMID:23002291

  8. Mixed Algorithms in the Ising Model on Directed BARABÁSI-ALBERT Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, F. W. S.

    On directed Barabási-Albert networks with two and seven neighbours selected by each added site, the Ising model does not seem to show a spontaneous magnetisation. Instead, the decay time for flipping of the magnetisation follows an Arrhenius law for Metropolis and Glauber algorithms, but for Wolff cluster flipping the magnetisation decays exponentially with time. On these networks the magnetisation behaviour of the Ising model, with Glauber, HeatBath, Metropolis, Wolf or Swendsen-Wang algorithm competing against Kawasaki dynamics, is studied by Monte Carlo simulations. We show that the model exhibits the phenomenon of self-organisation (= stationary equilibrium) defined in Ref. 8 when Kawasaki dynamics is not dominant in its competition with Glauber, HeatBath and Swendsen-Wang algorithms. Only for Wolff cluster flipping the magnetisation, this phenomenon occurs after an exponentially decay of magnetisation with time. The Metropolis results are independent of competition. We also study the same process of competition described above but with Kawasaki dynamics at the same temperature as the other algorithms. The obtained results are similar for Wolff cluster flipping, Metropolis and Swendsen-Wang algorithms but different for HeatBath.

  9. Implementing competency based admissions at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Kerrigan, Noreen; Akabas, Myles H.; Betzler, Thomas F.; Castaldi, Maria; Kelly, Mary S.; Levy, Adam S.; Reichgott, Michael J.; Ruberman, Louise; Dolan, Siobhan M.

    2016-01-01

    The Albert Einstein College of Medicine (Einstein) was founded in 1955 during an era of limited access to medical school for women, racial minorities, and many religious and ethnic groups. Located in the Bronx, NY, Einstein seeks to educate physicians in an environment of state-of-the-art scientific inquiry while simultaneously fulfilling a deep commitment to serve its community by providing the highest quality clinical care. A founding principle of Einstein, the basis upon which Professor Einstein agreed to allow the use of his name, was that admission to the student body would be based entirely on merit. To accomplish this, Einstein has long used a ‘holistic’ approach to the evaluation of its applicants, actively seeking a diverse student body. More recently, in order to improve its ability to identify students with the potential to be outstanding physicians, who will both advance medical knowledge and serve the pressing health needs of a diverse community, the Committee on Admissions reexamined and restructured the requirements for admission. These have now been categorized as four ‘Admissions Competencies’ that an applicant must demonstrate. They include: 1) cocurricular activities and relevant experiences; 2) communication skills; 3) personal and professional development; and 4) knowledge. The purpose of this article is to describe the process that resulted in the introduction and implementation of this competency based approach to the admission process. PMID:26847852

  10. Evidence of Non-Mean-Field-Like Low-Temperature Behavior in the Edwards-Anderson Spin-Glass Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yucesoy, B.; Katzgraber, Helmut G.; Machta, J.

    2012-10-01

    The three-dimensional Edwards-Anderson and mean-field Sherrington-Kirkpatrick Ising spin glasses are studied via large-scale Monte Carlo simulations at low temperatures, deep within the spin-glass phase. Performing a careful statistical analysis of several thousand independent disorder realizations and using an observable that detects peaks in the overlap distribution, we show that the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick and Edwards-Anderson models have a distinctly different low-temperature behavior. The structure of the spin-glass overlap distribution for the Edwards-Anderson model suggests that its low-temperature phase has only a single pair of pure states.

  11. Invited commentary on 'Robert G Edwards and the Roman Catholic Church'.

    PubMed

    Head, Ivan Francis

    2011-06-01

    In this issue of Reproductive BioMedicine Online, Benagiano, Carrara and Filippi have produced a clearly written and comprehensive account of why the Roman Catholic Church has not welcomed the award of the 2010 Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine to Dr Robert G Edwards for the development of human IVF. I commend the article for its clarity and lucidity but attempt to point out some areas where disagreement even with its nuanced opposition to IVF may be legitimate. I try to make some simple comments that explain why this is so and I suggest some areas to which contemporary theology and philosophy can commit itself. But it is good to see even a nuanced response to the work of Robert G Edwards rather than a blanket condemnation.

  12. Hot, cold, and annual reference atmospheres for Edwards Air Force Base, California (1975 version)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, D. L.

    1975-01-01

    Reference atmospheres pertaining to summer (hot), winter (cold), and mean annual conditions for Edwards Air Force Base, California, are presented from surface to 90 km altitude (700 km for the annual model). Computed values of pressure, kinetic temperature, virtual temperature, and density and relative differences percentage departure from the Edwards reference atmospheres, 1975 (ERA-75) of the atmospheric parameters versus altitude are tabulated in 250 m increments. Hydrostatic and gas law equations were used in conjunction with radiosonde and rocketsonde thermodynamic data in determining the vertical structure of these atmospheric models. The thermodynamic parameters were all subjected to a fifth degree least-squares curve-fit procedure, and the resulting coefficients were incorporated into Univac 1108 computer subroutines so that any quantity may be recomputed at any desired altitude using these subroutines.

  13. The cerebral cortex of Albert Einstein: a description and preliminary analysis of unpublished photographs.

    PubMed

    Falk, Dean; Lepore, Frederick E; Noe, Adrianne

    2013-04-01

    Upon his death in 1955, Albert Einstein's brain was removed, fixed and photographed from multiple angles. It was then sectioned into 240 blocks, and histological slides were prepared. At the time, a roadmap was drawn that illustrates the location within the brain of each block and its associated slides. Here we describe the external gross neuroanatomy of Einstein's entire cerebral cortex from 14 recently discovered photographs, most of which were taken from unconventional angles. Two of the photographs reveal sulcal patterns of the medial surfaces of the hemispheres, and another shows the neuroanatomy of the right (exposed) insula. Most of Einstein's sulci are identified, and sulcal patterns in various parts of the brain are compared with those of 85 human brains that have been described in the literature. To the extent currently possible, unusual features of Einstein's brain are tentatively interpreted in light of what is known about the evolution of higher cognitive processes in humans. As an aid to future investigators, these (and other) features are correlated with blocks on the roadmap (and therefore histological slides). Einstein's brain has an extraordinary prefrontal cortex, which may have contributed to the neurological substrates for some of his remarkable cognitive abilities. The primary somatosensory and motor cortices near the regions that typically represent face and tongue are greatly expanded in the left hemisphere. Einstein's parietal lobes are also unusual and may have provided some of the neurological underpinnings for his visuospatial and mathematical skills, as others have hypothesized. Einstein's brain has typical frontal and occipital shape asymmetries (petalias) and grossly asymmetrical inferior and superior parietal lobules. Contrary to the literature, Einstein's brain is not spherical, does not lack parietal opercula and has non-confluent Sylvian and inferior postcentral sulci.

  14. NASA's Boeing 747 SCA with the Space Shuttle Endeavour on top climbs out after takeoff from Edwards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    NASA's modified Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft with the Space Shuttle Endeavour on top climbs out after takeoff from Edwards Air Force Base on the first leg of its ferry flight back to the Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

  15. Vertical Migration Potential of Metal Contaminants at Small Arms Firing Ranges, Camp Edwards Military Reservation, Massachusetts.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-03-01

    Vertical Migration Potential of Metal Contaminants at Small Arms Firing Ranges. Camp Edwards Military Reservation, Massachusetts by R. Mark Bricka , Yilda...Military Reservation, Massachusetts by R. Mark Bricka , Yilda B. Rivera, Patrick N. Deliman U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Waterways Experiment...Reservation, Massachusetts / by R. Mark Bricka , Yiida B. Rivera, Patrick N. Deliman; prepared for Massachusetts Military Reservation. 198 p.: ill.; 28

  16. Cloth destruction and haemolysis with totally cloth-covered Starr-Edwards prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Schottenfeld, M.; Wisheart, J. D.; Ross, J. K.; Lincoln, J. C. R.; Ross, D. N.

    1971-01-01

    Four cases are described in which totally cloth-covered Starr-Edwards valves (model 2300) had to be removed. All were causing significant haemolysis, two in the absence of a peripheral leak. The principal operative finding was destruction of the Dacron covering the struts. Following replacement of these prostheses there was complete resolution of signs and symptoms. The possible causes of haemolysis and consequences of cloth destruction are discussed. Images PMID:5576531

  17. Crew of the STS 51-I Discovery mission egress the orbiter at Edwards AFB

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Crew of the STS 51-I Discovery mission egress the orbiter on the desert lake bed at Edwards Air Force Base. Astronaut Joe H. Engle, mission commander, hugs George W.S. Abbey, Director of Flight Crew Operations at JSC. Others descending the steps behind Engle (in order from the bottom) are Astronauts James D. van Hoften, John M. (Mike) Lounge, Richard O. Covey, and Willam F. Fisher.

  18. Edward E. Azar’s Early Warning Model - Does It Work

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-09-01

    EARLY WARNING MODEL - DOES IT WORK? THESIS Donald E. Childre, Jr. Captain, USAF AFIT/GLM/LSM...Avaii ):id/or A-iA AFIT/GLM/LSM/90S-10 EDWARD E. AZAR’S EARLY WARNING MODEL - DOES IT WORK? THESIS Presented to the Faculty of the School of Systems... Early Warning Model of International Hostilities .... 18 Overview of Azar’s Early Warning Model. 22 Assumptions Considered for Azar’s Model 28

  19. [A case of Edwards' syndrome in pregnancy complicated by serologic incompatibility and preeclampsia].

    PubMed

    Murawski, Marek; Gryboś, Marian; Zalewska, Dominika; Symonowicz, Krzysztof

    2006-12-01

    A case of Edwards' syndrome (trisomy 18) diagnosed in the third pregnancy trimester is described. The diagnosis was based on sonographic examination and cytogenetic amniocentesis. Lethal genetic fetal malformation determined the medical indication to preterm delivery. Additionally, serologic incompatibility during pregnancy was observed, as well as pregnancy induced hypertension turning into preeclampsia after the labour action was evoked. A caesarean section due to obstetric indications was done. Phenotype and lethal congenital malformations in the newborn have confirmed of the chromosome aberration prenatally diagnosed.

  20. Molecular mapping of the Edwards syndrome phenotype to two noncontiguous regions on chromosome 18

    SciTech Connect

    Boghosian-Sell, L.; Mewar, R.; Harrison, W.; Shapiro, R.M.; Zackai, E.H.; Carey, J.; Davis-Keppen, L.; Hudgins, L.; Overhauser, J.

    1994-09-01

    In an effort to identify regions on chromosome 18 that may be critical in the appearance of the Edwards syndrome phenotype, the authors have analyzed six patients with partial duplication of chromosome 18. Four of the patients have duplications involving the distal half of 18q (18q21.1-qter) and are very mildly affected. The remaining two patients have most of 18q (18q12.1-qter) duplicated, are severely affected, and have been diagnosed with Edwards syndrome. The authors have employed FISH, using DNA probes from a chromosome 18-specific library, for the precise determination of the duplicated material in each of these patients. The clinical features and the extent of the chromosomal duplication in these patients were compared with four previously reported partial trisomy 18 patients, to identify regions of chromosome 18 that may be responsible for certain clinical features of trisomy 18. The comparative analysis confirmed that there is no single region on 18q that is sufficient to produce the trisomy 18 phenotype and identified two regions on 18q that may work in conjunction to produce the Edwards syndrome phenotype. In addition, correlative analysis indicates that duplication of 18q12.3-q22.1 may be associated with more severe mental retardation in trisomy 18 individuals. 25 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  1. The Edwards Aquifer Water Resource Conflict: USDA Farm Program resource-use incentives?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaible, Glenn D.; McCarl, Bruce A.; Lacewell, Ronald D.

    1999-10-01

    This paper summarizes economic and hydrological analyses of the impacts of the 1990 and 1996 U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) farm programs on irrigation water withdrawals from the Edwards Aquifer in south central Texas and on aquifer-dependent spring flows that support threatened and endangered species. Economic modeling, a regional producer behavioral survey, as well as institutional and farm characteristic analyses are used to examine likely irrigation water-use impacts. Hydrologie modeling is used to examine spring flow effects. Study results show that 1990 USDA commodity programs caused producers to require less irrigation water, in turn increasing rather than decreasing aquifer spring flows. Market economic factors are the dominant criteria influencing producer irrigation decisions. Farm-tenure arrangements and aquifer management responsibilities of the Edwards Aquifer Authority indicate that the 1996 Farm Act's PFC payment program will not cause an increase in irrigation withdrawals. Broader actions such as long-term water supply enhancement/conservation programs, dry-year water-use reduction incentives and water markets all provide tools for Edwards water-use conflict resolution. USDA farm programs do not apparently play a material part in the total debate.

  2. Molecular mapping of the Edwards syndrome phenotype to two noncontiguous regions on chromosome 18.

    PubMed Central

    Boghosian-Sell, L.; Mewar, R.; Harrison, W.; Shapiro, R. M.; Zackai, E. H.; Carey, J.; Davis-Keppen, L.; Hudgins, L.; Overhauser, J.

    1994-01-01

    In an effort to identify regions on chromosome 18 that may be critical in the appearance of the Edwards syndrome phenotype, we have analyzed six patients with partial duplication of chromosome 18. Four of the patients have duplications involving the distal half of 18q (18q21.1-qter) and are very mildly affected. The remaining two patients have most of 18q (18q12.1-qter) duplicated, are severely affected, and have been diagnosed with Edwards syndrome. We have employed FISH, using DNA probes from a chromosome 18-specific library, for the precise determination of the duplicated material in each of these patients. The clinical features and the extent of the chromosomal duplication in these patients were compared with four previously reported partial trisomy 18 patients, to identify regions of chromosome 18 that may be responsible for certain clinical features of trisomy 18. The comparative analysis confirmed that there is no single region on 18q that is sufficient to produce the trisomy 18 phenotype and identified two regions on 18q that may work in conjunction to produce the Edwards syndrome phenotype. In addition, correlative analysis indicates that duplication of 18q12.3-q22.1 may be associated with more severe mental retardation in trisomy 18 individuals. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 PMID:8079991

  3. A Redescription of the Holotype Male of Aedes (Stegomyia) Tongae Edwards with a Note on Two Topotypic Females (Diptera: Culicidae)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1972-09-01

    A REDESCRIPTION OF THE HOLOTYPE MALE OF AEDES (STEGOMYIA) TONGAE EDWARDS WITH A NOTE ON TWO TOPOTYPIC FEMALES ( DIPTERA : CULICIDAE ) YIAU-MIN...Stegomyia) Tongae Edwards with a Note on Two Topotypic Females 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d... FEMALES ( DIPTERA : CULICIDAE ) ‘v2 YIAU-MIN HUANG, Southeast Asia Mosquito Project, Department of Entomology, Smithsonian Institution, Washington

  4. Geologic Map of the Edwards Aquifer In Northern Medina and Northeastern Uvalde Counties, South-central Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Allan K.; Faith, Jason R.; Blome, Charles D.; Pedraza, Diana E.

    2006-01-01

    The southern segment of the Edwards aquifer in south-central Texas is one of the most productive subsurface reservoirs of potable water in the world, providing water of excellent quality to more than a million people in the San Antonio region, where the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has declared it to be a sole-source aquifer (van der Leeden and others, 1990). Depending on the depositional province within which the associated carbonate rocks originated (Maclay and Small, 1984), the Edwards aquifer is composed of several geologic formations (primarily limestone and dolostone) of Early Cretaceous age. Most water pumped from the Edwards aquifer comes form the Person and Kainer Formations, which were deposited over the San Marcos Platform. The principal source of ground water in study area is the Devils River Formation, which was deposited in the Devils River trend. The Devils River Formation provides large quantities of irrigation water to fertile bottomland areas of Medina and Uvalde Counties, where the success of farming and ranching activities has long depended upon water from the Edwards aquifer. The study area includes all of the Edwards aquifer recharge zone between the Sabinal River (on the west) and the Medina River (on the east) plus an updip fringe of the confined zone in east-central Uvalde and central Medina Counties. Over about ninety percent of the study area--within the Devils River trend--the Edwards aquifer is composed of the Georgetown Formation plus the underlying Devils River Formation. Over the remaining area--over the southwestern margin of the San Marcos platform--the Edwards aquifer consists of the Georgetown Formation plus the underlying Edwards Group (Rose, 1972), which comprises the Kainer and Person Formations.

  5. [Edwards syndrome--most frequent indications for genetic amniocentesis. Analysis of the last 5 years].

    PubMed

    Chuchracki, Marek; Janiak, Justyna; Ziółkowska, Katarzyna; Sedziak, Anna; Opala, Tomasz

    2012-01-01

    Edwards syndrome (trisomy 18) occurs in 1: 8000 live births and is closely related to the mother's age. Most of the embryos and fetuses with trisomy of 18 chromosome pair undergo natural abortion. Change in number and structure of chromosomes usually takes place spontaneously. However, the incidence of chromosome mutations increases with the presence of mutagenic factors. One of the chemical mutagenic factors is benzopyrene - present in cigarette smoke. Prenatal cytogenetic diagnostic is used for detecting diseases and clinical syndromes conditioned by chromosome aberrations. To this date the "golden standard" of this diagnostic is the assessment of the fetus karyotype by means of analysis of chromosome banding pattern from amniotic fluid-derived cells. The aim of the study was the analysis of indications for genetic amniocenteses carried out in the last 5 years and in case of which trisomy of chromosome 18 (Edwards syndrome) was diagnosed. The analysis covered 1593 results of fetus karyotypes obtained from Cytogenetic Laboratory of the Central Gynecological-Obstetric Clinical Hospital in Poznań over the last 5 years. The study procedure consisted in producing cell culture from amniotic fluid, appliance of appropriate color techniques and thorough microscopic analysis of chromosome banding pattern. As a result of the analysis it was discovered that in 1538 cases the karyotype was normal, and in 55 cases trisomy 18 was diagnosed, which constituted 3% of all cytogenetic tests. The highest number of trisomy 18 cases was noted in 2009 - 19 cases, which constitutes 5% of all tests. In 2010 and 2011 the results included respectively 2% and 3% of diagnosed trisomy 18 (Edwards syndrome). In the last 5 years normal results for karyotypes constituted 87%, in 10% cases other aberrations were diagnosed through cystogenetic tests, whereas 3% of the results have shown trisomy 18 (Edwards syndrome The most frequent indications for performing genetic amniocentesis, as a result of

  6. Geologic framework and hydrogeologic characteristics of the Edwards aquifer, Uvalde County, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Allan K.

    2003-01-01

    The Edwards aquifer in Uvalde County is composed of Lower Cretaceous carbonate (mostly dolomitic limestone) strata of the Devils River Formation in the Devils River trend and of the West Nueces, McKnight, and Salmon Peak Formations in the Maverick basin. Rocks in the Devils River trend are divided at the bottom of the Devils River Formation into the (informal) basal nodular unit. Maverick basin rocks are divided (informally) into the basal nodular unit of the West Nueces Formation; into lower, middle, and upper units of the McKnight Formation; and into lower and upper units of the Salmon Peak Formation. The Edwards aquifer overlies the (Lower Cretaceous) Glen Rose Limestone, which composes the lower confining unit of the Edwards aquifer. The Edwards aquifer is overlain by the (Upper Cretaceous) Del Rio Clay, the basal formation of the upper confining unit. Upper Cretaceous and (or) Lower Tertiary igneous rocks intrude all stratigraphic units that compose the Edwards aquifer, particularly in the southern part of the study area.The Balcones fault zone and the Uvalde salient are the principal structural features in the study area. The fault zone comprises mostly en echelon, high-angle, and down-to-the-southeast normal faults that trend mostly from southwest to northeast. The Uvalde salient—resulting apparently from a combination of crustal uplift, diverse faulting, and igneous activity—elevates the Edwards aquifer to the surface across the central part of Uvalde County. Downfaulted blocks associated with six primary faults—Cooks, Black Mountain, Blue Mountain, Uvalde, Agape, and Connor—juxtapose the Salmon Peak Formation (Lower Cretaceous) in central parts of the study area against Upper Cretaceous strata in the southeastern part.The carbonate rocks of the Devils River trend and the Maverick basin are products of assorted tectonic and depositional conditions that affected the depth and circulation of the Cretaceous seas. The Devils River Formation formed in a

  7. Haemolysis with Björk-Shiley and Starr-Edwards prosthetic heart valves: a comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Slater, S. D.; Sallam, I. A.; Bain, W. H.; Turner, M. A.; Lawrie, T. D. V.

    1974-01-01

    Slater, S. D., Sallam, I. A., Bain, W. H., Turner, M. A., and Lawrie, T. D. V. (1974).Thorax, 29, 624-632. Haemolysis with Björk-Shiley and Starr-Edwards prosthetic heart valves: a comparative study. A comparison was made of the haemolytic complications in 85 patients with two different types of Starr-Edwards cloth-covered ball and cage prosthesis with those in 44 patients with the Björk-Shiley tilting disc valve. Intravascular haemolysis, as detected by the presence of haemosiderinuria, occurred significantly less often with the Björk-Shiley than with the Starr-Edwards valve, the overall incidence with aortic, mitral or multiple replacements being 31%, 15%, and 20% for Björk-Shiley and 94%, 92%, and 88% for Starr-Edwards valves respectively. There was no significant difference in the frequency of haemolysis between each of the two types of Starr-Edwards prosthesis studied at either the aortic (2300 versus 2310 model) or mitral (6300 versus 6310) site. Haemolytic anaemia developed in only one patient with a Björk-Shiley valve but was common though usually mild with Starr-Edwards prostheses, particularly aortic valve replacements with the 2300 model and in aortic plus mitral (± tricuspid) replacements. The greater severity of haemolysis produced by Starr-Edwards valves, again especially of the latter types, was further demonstrated by higher serum lactate dehydrogenase and 24-hour urinary iron levels. It is concluded that the Björk-Shiley tilting disc valve represents a significant advance in the amelioration of the haemolytic complications of prosthetic valves. PMID:4450173

  8. Albert Einstein and Wernher von Braun - the two great German-American physicists seen in a historical perspective.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winterberg, Friedwardt

    2008-04-01

    It was Albert Einstein who for the first time changed our view of the universe to be a non-euclidean curved space-time. And it was Wernher von Braun who blazed the trail to take us into this universe, leaving for the first time the gravitational field of our planet earth, with the landing a man on the moon the greatest event in human history. Both these great physicists did this on the shoulders of giants. Albert Einstein on the shoulders of his landsman, the mathematician Bernhard Riemann, and Wernher von Braun on the shoulders of Goddard and Oberth. Both Einstein and von Braun made a Faustian pact with the devil, von Braun by accepting research funds from Hitler, and Einstein by urging Roosvelt to build the atom bomb (against Hitler). Both of these great men later regretted the use of their work for the killing of innocent bystanders, even though in the end the invention of nuclear energy and space flight is for the benefit of man. Their example serves as a warning for all of us. It can be formulated as follows: ``Can I in good conscience accept research funds from the military to advance scientific knowledge, for weapons developed against an abstract enemy I never have met in person?'' Weapons if used do not differentiate between the scientist, who invented these weapons, and the non-scientist.

  9. Eating Behaviors and Weight Development in Obesity-Prone Children and the Importance of the Research of Albert J. Stunkard.

    PubMed

    Kral, Tanja V E

    2016-03-01

    Albert J. Stunkard, MD, was an internationally recognized leader and pioneer in the field of obesity and eating disorders research. He was also among the first scientists to study eating phenotypes and early life risk factors for childhood obesity at a time when childhood obesity prevalence rates were still comparatively low. The aim of this review is to highlight select findings from the work of Albert J. Stunkard which significantly advanced our understanding of eating traits of children with a different familial predisposition to obesity and genetic and environmental influences on weight outcomes. Collectively, Stunkard's early work on childhood obesity had a significant impact on the field of ingestive behavior and obesity research in that he was one of the first investigators who pointed to genetic influences underlying behavioral eating traits and child weight status. His work also inspired numerous subsequent investigations on the relative contributions of specific genes (e.g., polymorphisms in the fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO) gene) on individual differences in child eating traits (e.g., satiety responsiveness, eating in the absence of hunger) and body weight.

  10. ‘Trick’, ‘Manipulation’ and ‘Farce’: Albert Moll’s Critique of Occultism

    PubMed Central

    Wolffram, Heather

    2012-01-01

    In July 1925, the psychiatrist Albert Moll appeared before the district court in Berlin-Schöneberg charged with having defamed the medium Maria Vollhardt (alias Rudloff) in his 1924 book Der Spiritismus [Spiritism]. Supported by some of Berlin’s most prominent occultists, the plaintiff – the medium’s husband – argued that Moll’s use of terms such as ‘trick’, ‘manipulation’ and ‘farce’ in reference to Vollhardt’s phenomena had been libellous. In the three-part trial that followed, however, Moll’s putative affront to the medium – of which he was eventually acquitted – was overshadowed, on the one hand, by a debate over the scientific status of parapsychology, and on the other, by the question of who – parapsychologists, occultists, psychiatrists or jurists – was entitled to claim epistemic authority over the occult. This paper will use the Rudloff–Moll trial as a means of examining Moll’s critique of occultism, not only as it stood in the mid-1920s, but also as it had developed since the 1880s. It will also provide insight into the views of Germany’s occultists and parapsychologists, who argued that their legitimate bid for scientific credibility was hindered by Dunkelmänner [obscurantists] such as Albert Moll. PMID:23002297

  11. Rational Emotive Behavioural Therapy: The Evolution of a Revolution: Interview With Dr. Debbie Joffe Ellis, Work Partner and Wife of Dr. Albert Ellis, the Creator of REBT.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Debbie Joffe; Rovira, Montse

    2015-02-01

    Recognized as one of the most influential thinkers and psychologists, Albert Ellis PhD (1913-2007) revolutionized Psychology when he created the first cognitive psychotherapy, Rational Emotive Behavioral Therapy. After he passed away, Dr. Debbie Joffe Ellis continues spreading his legacy around the world. Psychologist, lecturer, writer, trainer, she dedicates her life to disseminate REBT and extend it through different statements, from the social to the educational, from the academic to the clinical. In this interview, she goes through her own history and her husband's one, bringing us closer to understanding Albert Ellis as the leading figure in his field, and the oneness they experienced through their professional and personal relationship.

  12. Regional economic impacts of current and proposed management alternatives for Don Edwards National Wildlife Refuge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richardson, Leslie; Huber, Chris; Koontz, Lynne

    2012-01-01

    The National Wildlife Refuge System Improvement Act of 1997 requires all units of the National Wildlife Refuge System to be managed under a Comprehensive Conservation Plan. The Comprehensive Conservation Plan must describe the desired future conditions of a Refuge and provide long-range guidance and management direction to achieve refuge purposes. The Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge, located at the south end of California's San Francisco Bay and one of seven refuges in the San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge Complex, is in the process of developing a range of management goals, objectives, and strategies for the Comprehensive Conservation Plan. The Comprehensive Conservation Plan must contain an analysis of expected effects associated with current and proposed Refuge management strategies. For Refuge Comprehensive Conservation Plan planning, a regional economic analysis provides a means of estimating how current management (No Action Alternative) and proposed management activities (alternatives) affect the local economy. This type of analysis provides two critical pieces of information: (1) it illustrates the Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge's contribution to the local community, and (2) it can help in determining whether economic effects are or are not a real concern in choosing among management alternatives. This report first presents a description of the local community and economy near the Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge. Next, the methods used to conduct a regional economic impact analysis are described. An analysis of the final Comprehensive Conservation Plan management strategies that could affect stakeholders, residents, and the local economy is then presented. The management activities of economic concern in this analysis are: * Spending in the local community by Refuge visitors; * Refuge personnel salary spending; and * Refuge purchases of goods and services within the local

  13. Edward D. Goldberg's proposal of "the Mussel Watch": Reflections after 40years.

    PubMed

    Farrington, John W; Tripp, Bruce W; Tanabe, Shinsuke; Subramanian, Annamalai; Sericano, José L; Wade, Terry L; Knap, Anthony H

    2016-09-15

    We chronicle the extensive influence over the past forty years of Professor Edward D. Goldberg and his call in 1975 for a "Mussel Watch" or bivalve sentinel organism approach to assess geographic status and temporal trends of several chemicals of environmental concern in the coastal ocean. Examples of local, regional, national and international programs are discussed briefly as are examples of interesting useful findings and limitations to the Mussel Watch concept. Mussel Watch continues to provide useful data about status and trends of chemical contamination in coastal ecosystems.

  14. "Smite this sleeping world awake": Edward Burne-Jones and "The legend of the briar rose".

    PubMed

    Rager, Andrea Wolk

    2009-01-01

    Challenging entrenched preconceptions about the supposed escapism and conservatism of Edward Burne-Jones's art, this paper seeks to establish his monumental painted series, "The Legend of the Briar Rose," as a fundamentally radical and confrontational work. Critics have long viewed it as an endorsement of sleepy stasis, antithetical to the political activism espoused by his friend William Morris. By unraveling the intertwining themes of the series -- the transformative dream vision, artistic labor, the decorative mode, and social egalitarianism -- the "Briar Rose" series is revealed instead to be dramatization of the struggle for personal, social, artistic, and even environmental awakening.

  15. Geology, hydrology, and water supply of Edwards Air Force Base, Kern County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dutcher, Lee Carlton; Warts, G.F.

    1963-01-01

    Edwards Air Force Base occupies the northern part of Antelope Valley, California. As a result of large-scale and increasing agricultural pumping in the valley, the net draft has exceeded the perennial supply since about 1930 and was about 170,000 acre-feet in 1951--at least three times the estimated yield. As a result, there has been a continuing depletion of ground water stored in all the unconsolidated deposits, including the principal aquifers contained in the younger and older alluvium.

  16. Science and Technology Review, July-August 1998: Celebrating Edward Teller at 90

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Smart, J.

    1998-07-01

    On the occasion of Edward Teller's 90th birthday, Science and Technology Review (S&TR) has the pleasure of honoring Lawrence Livermore's co-founder and most influential scientist. Teller is known for his inventive work in physics, his concepts leading to thermonuclear explosions, and his strong stands on such issues as science education, the nation's strategic defense, the needs for science in the future, and sharing scientific information. The articles in this issue also show him, as always, tirelessly moving forward with his new and changing interests.

  17. Fractured occluder disc: a previously unrecognized complication of the Starr-Edwards disc prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Malouf, J F; Hannoush, H M; Odell, J A

    2001-01-01

    Fracture of the occluder disc of a low-profile Starr-Edwards prosthesis is a hitherto unrecognized complication. We describe a patient who presented with right heart failure and severe pulmonary hypertension 27 years after mitral valve replacement with a model 6520 caged-disc prosthesis. At surgery, there was a longitudinal split in the occluder disc, and organized thrombus was lodged between the split segments. This case offers a unique opportunity to study the long-term effects of wear on the polyethylene poppet and Stellite cage.

  18. Long-term follow-up of cloth-covered Starr-Edwards prostheses.

    PubMed

    Carey, J S

    1976-05-01

    One hundred patients in whom cloth-covered Starr-Edwards prostheses were implanted have now been followed for 3 to 7 years. The hospital mortality rate was 5 per cent, and survival at five years was 70 per cent. Complications related to valve design occurred in 8 per cent (4 per cent fatal). The majority of late deaths and poor results were related to progressive cardiac disease rather than valve-related complications. The results indicate that cloth-covered prostheses have significantly lowered the incidence of thromboembolism and eliminated poppet dysfunction. The problem of strut cloth wear was clinically observed only twice in 500 patient-years of follow-up.

  19. A non-linear mathematical model for a three species ecosystem: Hippos in Lake Edward.

    PubMed

    Bologna, Mauro; Chandía, Kristopher J; Flores, J C

    2016-01-21

    In this work we study a non-linear mathematical model based on three different interacting species. We apply our model to Lake Edward ecosystem consisting in hippos, tilapia fishes and human inhabitants. In this case, we estimate the values of the key parameters using actual data and show the reliability of the proposed model as a predictive tool. We also show, via numerical calculations and parameter values that the ecosystem associated to the lake is very far from reaching a stable equilibrium. Through our analysis we provide the conditions for a possible coexistence among the three species.

  20. Perchlorate in the San Antonio Segment of the Edwards Aquifer, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahlquist, L.; Rajagapolan, S.; Jackson, W. A.

    2007-12-01

    Perchlorate has been detected in drinking-water supplies and can have adverse health effects on humans by disrupting thyroid function. Perchlorate and other constituents were analyzed from ground-water samples that were collected in 2004-06 from 99 wells completed in the San Antonio segment of the Edwards aquifer as part of the U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment Program. The fractured karstic carbonate Edwards aquifer, declared a sole-source aquifer by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, supplies nearly one-half million acre-feet per year for drinking water and other uses. Wells were located in a variety of land-use settings that included rangeland, agriculture, and urban; well types included domestic, public, and observation. Perchlorate was detected in 98 percent of the samples, and concentrations ranged from less than 0.05 to 3 micrograms per liter (μg/L). Five samples contained concentrations greater than 1 μg/L and were from wells in the urban northern San Antonio area. The results from three samples that contained perchlorate at concentrations greater than 2 μg/L are anomalous. Chloride concentration ranged from 5.6 to 69 milligrams per liter, typical for freshwater in the Edwards aquifer. No significant (r2 greater than 0.7) correlations were observed when perchlorate concentrations were correlated with depth to water, total depth of well, or concentrations of bicarbonate, nitrate, phosphate, sulfate, bromide, chloride, fluoride, calcium, magnesium, potassium, sodium, strontium, and dissolved solids. Tritium concentrations ranged from 1.2 to 2.9 tritium units in 31 of the 99 samples and indicate at least some fraction of modern water (post-atmospheric nuclear tests). No correlation between apparent tritium age and perchlorate concentration was observed, a possible indication that anthropogenic influences are not affecting observed perchlorate concentrations. The molar ratio of chloride to perchlorate ranged from 17,000 to 320

  1. Edward Gantt (1742-1837): US senate chaplain and first White House physician to Thomas Jefferson.

    PubMed

    Cavanagh, Harrison Dwight

    2015-10-27

    In his long and eventful life, Edward Gantt (1742-1837) made important contributions to the newly independent American Republic, as well as to the development of scientific evidence-based American medicine. Unfortunately, his achievements have gone unrecognized and unreported in mainstream historical publications. Specifically, his service as the first designated White House doctor, and personal physician to President Thomas Jefferson from 1801 to 1809 has not been reported. The purpose of this paper is to document the biographical and scientific details of his extraordinary life and notable contributions.

  2. STS-28 crew egresses Columbia, OV-102, at Edwards Air Force Base, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    STS-28 crewmembers are greeted by NASA Associate Administrator for Space Flight William B. Lenoir, NASA Administrator Richard H. Truly, and Flight Operations Directorate (FCOD) Director Donald R. Puddy as they egress Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB), California. The crew spent five days in Earth orbit for a Department of Defense (DOD) dedicated mission. The astronauts, wearing navy blue flight coveralls (jumpsuits) are, from left to right, Mission Specialist (MS) Mark N. Brown, Pilot Richard N. Richards, MS David C. Leestma, MS James C. Adamson, and Commander Brewster H. Shaw. Visible in the background are OV-102's wing and tail section and ground servicing vehicles.

  3. A Left-to-Right Shunt After Transfemoral TAVR Using Edwards SAPIEN 3.

    PubMed

    Steffen, Julius; Köhler, Anton; Schwarz, Florian; Sadoni, Sebastian; Hagl, Christian; Massberg, Steffen; Greif, Martin

    2016-07-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is used for the treatment of aortic stenosis (AS). Besides major bleeding, conduction blocks, stroke or atrial fibrillation, complications include cardiac perforation with possible left-to-right-shunts. Herein is reported the sixth case of a left-to-right shunt in an 87-year-old man who underwent TAVR using a 29 mm Edwards SAPIEN S3 prosthesis to treat AS. Soon after the procedure, a small channel evolving from the right coronary cusp could be detected on echocardiography. The patient was managed medically.

  4. Getting to grips with the cannabis problem: the evolving contributions and impact of Griffith Edwards.

    PubMed

    Hall, Wayne

    2015-07-01

    Griffith Edwards played an important role in cannabis policy debates within government advisory committees in the United Kingdom from the early 1970s until the early 1980s. This has largely been hidden from public knowledge by the confidentiality of these committee discussions. The purpose of this paper is to use Griffith's writings and the results of recent historical scholarship to outline the views he expressed, the reasons he gave for them, and to provide a brief assessment of his contribution to the development of British cannabis policy.

  5. STS-29 Discovery, OV-103, lands on Edwards AFB concrete runway 22

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    STS-29 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, main landing gear (MLG) touches down at a speed of approximately 205 knots (235 miles per hour) on concrete runway 22 at Edwards Air Force Base (AFB), California. Nose landing gear (NLG) is deployed and rides above runway surface prior touchdown. Rear view captures OV-103 as it glides past photographer to wheel stop showing the tail section (speedbrake/rudder) and three space shuttle main engines (SSMEs). Mojave desert scrub brush appears in the foreground with aircraft hangar appearing in the background.

  6. A trap, neuter, and release program for feral cats on Prince Edward Island.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Karen L; Keizer, Karen; Golding, Christine

    2002-09-01

    A new program to address the feral cat population on Prince Edward Island was undertaken during the spring and summer of 2001. Feral cats from specific geographic areas were trapped, sedated, and tested for feline leukemia virus and feline immunodeficiency virus. Healthy cats were neutered, dewermed, vaccinated, tattooed, and released to their area of origin. A total of 185 cats and kittens were trapped and tested during a 14-week period; 158 cats and kittens as young as 6 weeks of age were neutered and released. Twenty-three adult cats were positive for feline leukemia virus, feline immunodeficiency virus, or both, and were euthanized.

  7. Edward Ortiz.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stover, Del

    1989-01-01

    Describes a retiring superintendent's efforts to dismantle factory-style schooling and empower teachers. The Santa Fe (New Mexico) Schools' teacher/principal management teams have already instituted interdisciplinary teaching and ungraded, multi-age elementary classes. The latest project involved empowering teachers to select the next…

  8. Geologic framework and hydrostratigraphy of the Edwards and Trinity aquifers within northern Bexar and Comal Counties, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Allan K.; Golab, James A.; Morris, Robert R.

    2016-11-28

    During 2014–16, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Edwards Aquifer Authority, documented the geologic framework and hydrostratigraphy of the Edwards and Trinity aquifers within northern Bexar and Comal Counties, Texas. The Edwards and Trinity aquifers are major sources of water for agriculture, industry, and urban and rural communities in south-central Texas. Both the Edwards and Trinity are classified as major aquifers by the State of Texas.The purpose of this report is to present the geologic framework and hydrostratigraphy of the Edwards and Trinity aquifers within northern Bexar and Comal Counties, Tex. The report includes a detailed 1:24,000-scale hydrostratigraphic map, names, and descriptions of the geology and hydrostratigraphic units (HSUs) in the study area.The scope of the report is focused on geologic framework and hydrostratigraphy of the outcrops and hydrostratigraphy of the Edwards and Trinity aquifers within northern Bexar and Comal Counties, Tex. In addition, parts of the adjacent upper confining unit to the Edwards aquifer are included.The study area, approximately 866 square miles, is within the outcrops of the Edwards and Trinity aquifers and overlying confining units (Washita, Eagle Ford, Austin, and Taylor Groups) in northern Bexar and Comal Counties, Tex. The rocks within the study area are sedimentary and range in age from Early to Late Cretaceous. The Miocene-age Balcones fault zone is the primary structural feature within the study area. The fault zone is an extensional system of faults that generally trends southwest to northeast in south-central Texas. The faults have normal throw, are en echelon, and are mostly downthrown to the southeast.The Early Cretaceous Edwards Group rocks were deposited in an open marine to supratidal flats environment during two marine transgressions. The Edwards Group is composed of the Kainer and Person Formations. Following tectonic uplift, subaerial exposure, and erosion near the end of

  9. Simulation of groundwater flow in the Edwards-Trinity and related aquifers in the Pecos County region, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, Jonathan V.

    2014-01-01

    The Edwards-Trinity aquifer, a major aquifer in the Pecos County region of western Texas, is a vital groundwater resource for agricultural, industrial, and public supply uses. Resource managers would like to better understand the future availability of water in the Edwards-Trinity aquifer in the Pecos County region and the effects of the possible increase or temporal redistribution of groundwater withdrawals. To that end, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Middle Pecos Groundwater Conservation District, Pecos County, City of Fort Stockton, Brewster County, and Pecos County Water Control and Improvement District No. 1, completed a comprehensive, integrated analysis of available hydrogeologic data to develop a groundwater-flow model of the Edwards-Trinity and related aquifers in parts of Brewster, Jeff Davis, Pecos, and Reeves Counties. Following calibration, the model was used to evaluate the sustainability of recent (2008) and projected water-use demands on groundwater resources in the study area.

  10. Bed-material entrainment and associated transportation infrastructure problems in streams of the Edwards Plateau, central Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heitmuller, Franklin T.; Asquith, William H.

    2008-01-01

    The Texas Department of Transportation commonly builds and maintains low-water crossings (LWCs) over streams in the Edwards Plateau in Central Texas. LWCs are low-height structures, typically constructed of concrete and asphalt, that provide acceptable passage over seasonal rivers or streams with relatively low normal-depth flow. They are designed to accommodate flow by roadway overtopping during high-flow events. The streams of the Edwards Plateau are characterized by cobble- and gravel-sized bed material and highly variable flow regimes. Low base flows that occur most of the time occasionally are interrupted by severe floods. The floods entrain and transport substantial loads of bed material in the stream channels. As a result, LWCs over streams in the Edwards Plateau are bombarded and abraded by bed material during floods and periodically must be maintained or even replaced.

  11. Evidence of Non-Mean-Field-Like Low-Temperature Behavior in the Edwards-Anderson Spin-Glass Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yucesoy, Burcu; Katzgraber, Helmut G.; Machta, Jonathan

    2013-03-01

    The three and four-dimensional Edwards-Anderson and mean-field Sherrington-Kirkpatrick Ising spin glasses are studied via large-scale Monte Carlo simulations at low temperatures, deep within the spin-glass phase. Performing a careful statistical analysis of several thousand independent disorder realizations and using an observable that detects peaks in the overlap distribution, we show that the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick and Edwards-Anderson models have a distinctly different low-temperature behavior. The structure of the spin-glass overlap distribution for the Edwards-Anderson model suggests that its low-temperature phase has only a single pair of pure states. J. M. and B. Y. are supported in part by the NSF (Grant No. DMR-0907235 and DMR-1208046).

  12. New insights into the Edwards Aquifer—Brackish-water simulation, drought, and the role of uncertainty analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foster, Linzy K.; White, Jeremy T.

    2016-02-03

    The Edwards aquifer consists of three water-quality zones. The freshwater zone of the Edwards aquifer is bounded to the south by a zone of brackish water (transition zone) where the aquifer transitions from fresh to saline water. The saline zone is downdip from the transition zone. There is concern that a recurrence of extreme drought, such as the 7-year drought from 1950 through 1956, could cause the transition zone to move toward (encroach upon) the freshwater zone, causing production wells near the transition zone to pump saltier water. There is also concern of drought effects on spring flows from Comal and San Marcos Springs. These concerns were evaluated through the development of a new numerical model of the Edwards aquifer.

  13. Oil production and groundwater quality in the Edwards-Trinity Plateau Aquifer, Texas.

    PubMed

    Hudak, Paul F

    2003-11-13

    Chloride concentrations and chloride/bromide ratios from 198 water wells in the Edwards-Trinity Plateau Aquifer were compiled, mapped, and evaluated within the context of regional geology and land use. The study area occupies eight counties in west-central Texas, within which oil production and agriculture are predominant land uses. Samples from 49 wells had chloride concentrations above the 250 mg/l secondary drinking water standard, 22 samples had greater than 500 mg/l chloride, and 9 samples exceeded 1000 mg/l chloride. Of the 22 samples above 500 mg/l chloride, 10 had relatively low chloride/bromide ratios of less than 300, consistent with oilfield brine, and 2 had ratios above 2000, consistent with groundwater impacted by evaporite dissolution. The remaining ten samples had chloride/bromide ratios ranging from 300 to 2000, consistent with partial mixing of unimpaired groundwater with evaporite-laden water. There were no significant correlations between chloride concentration and well depth, inconsistent with contaminants originating at the land surface. Results of this study suggest that evaporite dissolution and oilfield brine locally impact the Edwards-Trinity Plateau Aquifer, but the problem is not regionally pervasive.

  14. [Edward Grzegorzewski (1906-1982)--Poland's delegate to the founding conference of the World Health Organization].

    PubMed

    Cianciara, Dorota; Muszyńska, Jolanta

    2011-01-01

    Early years of Edward Grzegorzewski's professional work were associated with the National Institute of Hygiene (NIH) in Warsaw, Poland. This fact and Grzegorzewski's professional achievements and uniqueness of his life lead to dedicate him a separate article. A search of archival materials was guided by information from the prof. Zbigniew Machaliński article--a historian from Gdansk. Insight into the personal files and the archives of NIH was obtained and some other attempts to find factual data were undertaken. A numerous works written by Grzegorzewski were found and read. The article is complementary to the previously described facts, especially in the context of his relationship with the NIH. Repetitions of the information resulted from the need to preserve the chronological order of events or to highlight the context. In the years 1932-1942 Edward Grzegorzewski worked in National Institute of Hygiene, at the beginning as volunteer. During this time he studied the hygiene in the USA and periodically worked in the city board in Warsaw. He worked in the Department of Social Hygiene and published approximately 30 articles and reports, and dealt with health education as well. After the WWII he served on many post, eg. he was the rector of the Medical Academy in Gdańsk, director of the Department of Education and Training in the WHO and professor at Johns Hopkins University. In 1946 he signed the WHO Constitution for Poland. He was a prominent Polish hygienist.

  15. Insects attracted to Maple Sap: Observations from Prince Edward Island, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Majka, Christopher G.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The collection of maple sap for the production of maple syrup is a large commercial enterprise in Canada and the United States. In Canada, which produces 85% of the world’s supply, it has an annual value of over $168 million CAD. Over 38 million trees are tapped annually, 6.5% of which use traditional buckets for sap collection. These buckets attract significant numbers of insects. Despite this, there has been very little investigation of the scale of this phenomenon and the composition of insects that are attracted to this nutrient source. The present paper reports the results of a preliminary study conducted on Prince Edward Island, Canada. Twenty-eight species of Coleoptera, Lepidoptera, and Trichoptera were found in maple sap buckets, 19 of which are known to be attracted to saps and nectars. The physiological role of sap feeding is discussed with reference to moths of the tribe Xylenini, which are active throughout the winter, and are well documented as species that feed on sap flows. Additionally, 18 of the 28 species found in this study are newly recorded in Prince Edward Island. PMID:21594122

  16. Rehabilitation of the Rocket Vehicle Integration Test Stand at Edwards Air Force Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Daniel S.; Ray, Ronald J.; Phillips, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Since initial use in 1958 for the X-15 rocket-powered research airplane, the Rocket Engine Test Facility has proven essential for testing and servicing rocket-powered vehicles at Edwards Air Force Base. For almost two decades, several successful flight-test programs utilized the capability of this facility. The Department of Defense has recently demonstrated a renewed interest in propulsion technology development with the establishment of the National Aerospace Initiative. More recently, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration is undergoing a transformation to realign the organization, focusing on the Vision for Space Exploration. These initiatives provide a clear indication that a very capable ground-test stand at Edwards Air Force Base will be beneficial to support the testing of future access-to-space vehicles. To meet the demand of full integration testing of rocket-powered vehicles, the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, the Air Force Flight Test Center, and the Air Force Research Laboratory have combined their resources in an effort to restore and upgrade the original X-15 Rocket Engine Test Facility to become the new Rocket Vehicle Integration Test Stand. This report describes the history of the X-15 Rocket Engine Test Facility, discusses the current status of the facility, and summarizes recent efforts to rehabilitate the facility to support potential access-to-space flight-test programs. A summary of the capabilities of the facility is presented and other important issues are discussed.

  17. Ten year clinical evaluation of Starr-Edwards 2400 and 1260 aortic valve prostheses.

    PubMed Central

    Hackett, D; Fessatidis, I; Sapsford, R; Oakley, C

    1987-01-01

    The long term performance characteristics of the 2400 and 1260 series of Starr-Edwards aortic prostheses were investigated by a follow up study of clinical outcome of 327 patients discharged from hospital with isolated aortic valve replacement. Follow up lasted for up to 10 years and was based on 1616 patient-years. The 2400 series cloth covered tracked valve was implanted in 182 patients from 1974 to 1980 and the 1260 series bare strut silastic ball valve was inserted in 145 patients from 1979 to 1983. Total 10 year mortality and valve related morbidity were low and no cases of mechanical valve failure were recorded. There were no significant actuarial differences in mortality or valve related morbidity between the 2400 and 1260 valves. Starr-Edwards models 2400 and 1260 aortic valve prostheses showed excellent durability without any mechanical failures over a 10 year period. The long term outcome of isolated aortic valve replacement with these models is associated with a low frequency of valve related complications. PMID:3580223

  18. Sir Edward Abraham's contribution to the development of the cephalosporins: a reassessment.

    PubMed

    Hamilton-Miller, J M

    2000-08-01

    This paper is based on an invited lecture given at the 21st International Congress of Chemotherapy in July 1999, as part of a Symposium entitled '50 years of cephalosporins: their use the next 50 years', (Hamilton-Miller JMT, Cephalosporins: from mould to drug. Sardinia to Oxford and beyond, J Antimicr Chemother 1999;44(A):26). Celebration of this Golden Anniversary was made more poignant by the death of the last major participant, Sir Edward Abraham, in May 1999. This history has been told before, but mainly by Sir Edward, who being a very modest man (to which his obituaries graphically attest) consistently underplayed the role that he and Newton had in the discovery of cephalosporin C, that led to all the cephalosporins now in use. I had the privilege of working at the Dunn School from 1967 to 1970, with Abraham and Newton, where I met Brotzu, Florey and Dorothy Hodgkin, all of whom had important roles in this story. Other workers at the Dunn School at that time, e.g. Heatley, Sanders and Jennings (who became Lady Florey), helped develop penicillin. Such a galaxy of stars of the antibiotic firmament will never again be assembled. "Let us now praise famous men... these were honoured in their generation, and were the glory of their times" - Ecclesiasticus XLIV. vv 1.7.

  19. Babesia (Theileria) annae in a red fox (Vulpes vulpes) from Prince Edward Island, Canada.

    PubMed

    Clancey, Noel; Horney, Barbara; Burton, Shelley; Birkenheuer, Adam; McBurney, Scott; Tefft, Karen

    2010-04-01

    A 4-6-mo-old female red fox (Vulpes vulpes) was presented to the Atlantic Veterinary College (AVC) Teaching Hospital, Prince Edward Island, Canada. On presentation, the fox was weak and had pale mucous membranes. A complete blood count and a serum biochemistry profile were performed. Blood smear examination revealed low numbers of erythrocytes containing centrally to paracentrally located, single, rarely multiple, approximately 1 x 2 microm, oval to round organisms with morphology similar to Babesia microti. Polymerase chain reaction testing and DNA sequencing of the Babesia species 18S rRNA gene were performed on DNA extracted from whole blood. Results were positive for a Babesia microti-like parasite genetically identical to Babesia (Theileria) annae. The fox was euthanized due to poor prognosis for recovery. Necropsy examination revealed multifocal to locally extensive subacute nonsuppurative meningoencephalitis, an eosinophilic broncho-pneumonia, a moderate diffuse vacuolar hepatopathy, and lesions associated with blunt trauma to the left abdominal region. This is the first reported case of a red fox in Canada infected with a piroplasm. It remains uncertain whether the presence of this hemoparasite in this fox was pathogenic or an incidental finding. The potential for competent vectors of Babesia species on Prince Edward Island, the potential for this Babesia microti-like parasite to infect other wild and domestic canids, and the significance of this parasite to the health of infected individuals are yet to be determined.

  20. Generalized Deam-Edwards approach to the statistical mechanics of randomly crosslinked systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Xiangjun; Lu, Bing-Sui; Ye, Fangfu; Goldbart, Paul M.

    2013-08-01

    We address the statistical mechanics of randomly and permanently crosslinked networks. We develop a theoretical framework (vulcanization theory) which can be used to systematically analyze the correlation between the statistical properties of random networks and their histories of formation. Generalizing the original idea of Deam and Edwards, we consider an instantaneous crosslinking process, where all crosslinkers (modeled as Gaussian springs) are introduced randomly at once in an equilibrium liquid state, referred to as the preparation state. The probability that two functional sites are crosslinked by a spring exponentially decreases with their distance squared. After formally averaging over network connectivity, we obtained an effective theory with all degrees of freedom replicated 1 + n times. Two thermodynamic ensembles, the preparation ensemble and the measurement ensemble, naturally appear in this theory. The former describes the thermodynamic fluctuations in the state of preparation, while the latter describes the thermodynamic fluctuations in the state of measurement. We classify various correlation functions and discuss their physical significances. In particular, the memory correlation functions characterize how the properties of networks depend on their method of preparation, and are the hallmark properties of all randomly crosslinked materials. We clarify the essential difference between our approach and that of Deam-Edwards, and discuss the saddle-point order parameters and its physical significance. Finally we also discuss the connection between saddle-point approximation of vulcanization theory, and the classical theory of rubber elasticity as well as the neo-classical theory of nematic elastomers.

  1. Microbiological quality of bulk tank raw milk in Prince Edward Island dairy herds.

    PubMed

    Elmoslemany, A M; Keefe, G P; Dohoo, I R; Dingwell, R T

    2009-09-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate microbiological quality of bulk tank milk in Prince Edward Island, to evaluate correlation among milk quality criteria, and to determine seasonal effects on milk quality parameters. Bulk tank raw milk quality was evaluated on all Prince Edward Island dairy herds (n = 235) over a 2-yr period (March 2005 to March 2007). Biweekly total aerobic (TAC), preliminary incubation (PIC), laboratory pasteurization, and coliform (CC) counts were determined using a Petrifilm culture system. Additionally, bulk tank somatic cell count was determined weekly. The mean and median values were 12.8 x 10(3) and 4.9 x 10(3) cfu/mL for TAC, 29.6 x 10(3) and 13 x 10(3) cfu/mL for PIC, 87 and 12 cfu/mL for laboratory pasteurization count, 21 and 5 cfu/mL for CC, and 218 x 10(3) and 187 x 10(3) cells/mL for somatic cell count. There was moderate correlation (0.57) between TAC and PIC. All other correlation coefficients were low (<0.26). Correlation results suggest that a single quality parameter could not predict others used in this study. Seasonal data indicate that 1) in general, all counts tended to be low in winter, 2) the CC and somatic cell count were always high in summer, and 3) TAC tended to be high during summer.

  2. [Never forget this in making your drawings and equations! A conversation with Albert Einstein on learning, teaching and the secrets of the world].

    PubMed

    Brunner, A

    2009-03-01

    Albert Einstein, the genius--this aspect often has been noted. A neglected aspect is Einstein's role as student and teacher. For this reason, Einstein's notes have been looked at once again. The selected original quotes are composed into the format of a fictive dialogue. The original context and coherence of his comments have thereby been respected carefully.

  3. An Integration of the Visual Media Via "Fat Albert and the Cosby Kids" into the Elementary School Curriculum as a Teaching Aid and Vehicle to Achieve Increased Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cosby, William Henry, Jr.

    This study examines the failure of urban schools to meet the educational needs of minority children and explores the possibilities of using television as a tool for educational change. It discusses three television series ("Sesame Street,""The Electric Company," and "Fat Albert and the Cosby Kids") with regard to their success as teaching/learning…

  4. Triumphs Show: What Makes Art History? Year 7 Exploit the Resources of the Victoria and Albert Museum's Medieval Gallery to Create and Curate Their Own Answer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copsey, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    What do 14 Year 7 students, an art teacher, a history teacher and the Victoria and Albert Museum have in common? They are all part of the "Stronger Together" Museum Champion project run by The Langley Academy and the River & Rowing Museum and supported by Arts Council England, designed to engage students, teachers and museum staff…

  5. Description and Evaluation of Numerical Groundwater Flow Models for the Edwards Aquifer, South-Central Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindgren, Richard J.; Taylor, Charles J.; Houston, Natalie A.

    2009-01-01

    A substantial number of public water system wells in south-central Texas withdraw groundwater from the karstic, highly productive Edwards aquifer. However, the use of numerical groundwater flow models to aid in the delineation of contributing areas for public water system wells in the Edwards aquifer is problematic because of the complex hydrogeologic framework and the presence of conduit-dominated flow paths in the aquifer. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, evaluated six published numerical groundwater flow models (all deterministic) that have been developed for the Edwards aquifer San Antonio segment or Barton Springs segment, or both. This report describes the models developed and evaluates each with respect to accessibility and ease of use, range of conditions simulated, accuracy of simulations, agreement with dye-tracer tests, and limitations of the models. These models are (1) GWSIM model of the San Antonio segment, a FORTRAN computer-model code that pre-dates the development of MODFLOW; (2) MODFLOW conduit-flow model of San Antonio and Barton Springs segments; (3) MODFLOW diffuse-flow model of San Antonio and Barton Springs segments; (4) MODFLOW Groundwater Availability Modeling [GAM] model of the Barton Springs segment; (5) MODFLOW recalibrated GAM model of the Barton Springs segment; and (6) MODFLOW-DCM (dual conductivity model) conduit model of the Barton Springs segment. The GWSIM model code is not commercially available, is limited in its application to the San Antonio segment of the Edwards aquifer, and lacks the ability of MODFLOW to easily incorporate newly developed processes and packages to better simulate hydrologic processes. MODFLOW is a widely used and tested code for numerical modeling of groundwater flow, is well documented, and is in the public domain. These attributes make MODFLOW a preferred code with regard to accessibility and ease of use. The MODFLOW conduit-flow model

  6. Hydrogeologic factors that affect the flowpath of water in selected zones of the Edwards Aquifer, San Antonio region, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Groschen, G.E.

    1996-01-01

    The Edwards aquifer in the San Antonio region supplies drinking water for more than 1 million people. Proper development and protection of the aquifer is a high priority for local and State authorities. To better understand the flow of water in two major flowpaths in the Edwards aquifer, stratigraphic, structural, hydrologic, and geochemical data were analyzed. The western Medina flowpath is in parts of Uvalde, Medina, and Bexar Counties, and the eastern flowpath is in northern Bexar and central Comal Counties. A major hydrogeologic factor that affects the pattern of flow in the Edwards aquifer is the spatial and temporal distribution of recharge. Other hydrogeologic factors that affect flowpaths include internal boundaries and the location and rate of spring discharge. The relative displacement of faults and the high permeability layers have substantial control on the discharge at springs and on the flowpaths in the Edwards aquifer. Analysis of the estimated recharge to the Edwards aquifer during 1982 89 indicated that during years of substantial precipitation, a large part of the net recharge probably is diffuse infiltration of precipitation over large parts of the recharge area. During years with below-normal precipitation, most recharge is leakage from rivers and streams that drain the catchment subbasins. In the western Medina flowpath, concentrations of major ions indicate saturation of calcite and undersaturation of dolomite the two minerals that constitute most of the Edwards aquifer matrix. Concentrations of dissolved calcium, alkalinity, and dissolved chloride in the eastern flowpath are greater than those in the western Medina flowpath. These upward trends in concentrations might result in part from: (1) increased development in the recharge area, (2) mineralized effluent from developed areas, or (3) increased dissolution of aquifer material. Tritium data from wells sampled in and near the western Medina flowpath indicate no vertical stratification of

  7. Water quality of the Edwards Aquifer and streams recharging the aquifer in the San Antonio region, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roddy, W.R.

    1992-01-01

    The Edwards aquifer in south-central Texas is one of the most productive and most important aquifers in the State, with an average annual discharge of about 608,000 acre-ft of water during 1932-82 (Reeves and Ozuna, 1985).  The Edwards aquifer is the principal source of water for municipal, industrial, and irrigation use in all or parts of five counties- Bexar, Comal, hays, Medina, and Uvalde- and is the only source of water for San Antonio, the tenth-largest city in the United States (1980 population, 786,000) (A.H. Belo Corporation, 1985).

  8. Collaboration of Art and Science in Albert Edelfelt's Portrait of Louis Pasteur: The Making of an Enduring Medical Icon.

    PubMed

    Weisberg, Richard E; Hansen, Bert

    2015-01-01

    Historians of medicine--and even Louis Pasteur's biographers--have paid little attention to his close relationship with the Finnish artist Albert Edelfelt. A new look at Edelfelt's letters to his mother, written in Swedish and never quoted at length in English, reveals important aspects of Pasteur's working habits and personality. By understanding the active collaboration through which this very famous portrait was made, we also discover unnoticed things in the painting itself, gain a new appreciation of its original impact on the French public's image of science, and better understand its enduring influence on the portrayal of medicine in the art and the popular culture of many countries even to the present day.

  9. Direct physical formation of anatomical structures by cell traction forces. An interview with Albert Harris by Lev Beloussov.

    PubMed

    Harris, Albert

    2006-01-01

    Albert Harris was educated at The Norfolk Academy, Norfolk, Virginia, USA (1961). He then earned a Batchelor of Arts Degree in Biology from Swarthmore College, in Pennsylvania, USA (1965), followed by a Ph.D. in Biology (1971) from Yale University, where his Dissertation Advisor was the great John Phillip Trinkaus. He held a Damon-Runyon Postdoctoral Fellowship in Cancer Research in 1970-72, under Michael Abercrombie, FRS, at the Strangeways Research Laboratory of Cambridge University, England. Then he accepted a position as Assistant Professor in the Zoology Department of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, N.C. USA. In 1977, he was promoted to Associate Professor of Zoology, and in 1983 was promoted to Full Professor of Biology. In Oct.-Nov. 1991 he was honored to be Distinguished Visiting Professor of Zoology at the University of California at Davis.

  10. Bridging the knowledge gap: An analysis of Albert Einstein's popularized presentation of the equivalence of mass and energy.

    PubMed

    Kapon, Shulamit

    2014-11-01

    This article presents an analysis of a scientific article written by Albert Einstein in 1946 for the general public that explains the equivalence of mass and energy and discusses the implications of this principle. It is argued that an intelligent popularization of many advanced ideas in physics requires more than the simple elimination of mathematical formalisms and complicated scientific conceptions. Rather, it is shown that Einstein developed an alternative argument for the general public that bypasses the core of the formal derivation of the equivalence of mass and energy to provide a sense of derivation based on the history of science and the nature of scientific inquiry. This alternative argument is supported and enhanced by variety of explanatory devices orchestrated to coherently support and promote the reader's understanding. The discussion centers on comparisons to other scientific expositions written by Einstein for the general public.

  11. Sexological Deliberation and Social Engineering: Albert Moll and the Sterilisation Debate in Late Imperial and Weimar Germany

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The physician and sexologist Albert Moll, from Berlin, was one of the main protagonists within the German discourse on the opportunities and dangers of social engineering, by eugenic interventions into human life in general, as well as into reproductive hygiene and healthcare policy in particular. One of the main sexological topics that were discussed intensively during the late-Wilhelminian German Reich and the Weimar Republic was the question of the legalisation of voluntary and compulsory sterilisations on the basis of medical, social, eugenic, economic or criminological indications. As is clear from Moll’s conservative principles of medical ethics, and his conviction that the genetic knowledge required for eugenically indicated sterilisations was not yet sufficiently elaborated, he had doubts and worries about colleagues who were exceedingly zealous about these surgical sterilisations – especially Gustav Boeters from Saxony. PMID:23002295

  12. Potential for bed-material entrainment in selected streams of the Edwards Plateau - Edwards, Kimble, and Real Counties, Texas, and vicinity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heitmuller, Franklin T.; Asquith, William H.

    2008-01-01

    The Texas Department of Transportation spends considerable money for maintenance and replacement of low-water crossings of streams in the Edwards Plateau in Central Texas as a result of damages caused in part by the transport of cobble- and gravel-sized bed material. An investigation of the problem at low-water crossings was made by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Texas Department of Transportation, and in collaboration with Texas Tech University, Lamar University, and the University of Houston. The bed-material entrainment problem for low-water crossings occurs at two spatial scales - watershed scale and channel-reach scale. First, the relative abundance and activity of cobble- and gravel-sized bed material along a given channel reach becomes greater with increasingly steeper watershed slopes. Second, the stresses required to mobilize bed material at a location can be attributed to reach-scale hydraulic factors, including channel geometry and particle size. The frequency of entrainment generally increases with downstream distance, as a result of decreasing particle size and increased flood magnitudes. An average of 1 year occurs between flows that initially entrain bed material as large as the median particle size, and an average of 1.5 years occurs between flows that completely entrain bed material as large as the median particle size. The Froude numbers associated with initial and complete entrainment of bed material up to the median particle size approximately are 0.40 and 0.45, respectively.

  13. Extreme drought causes distinct water acidification and eutrophication in the Lower Lakes (Lakes Alexandrina and Albert), Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Siyue; Bush, Richard T.; Mao, Rong; Xiong, Lihua; Ye, Chen

    2017-01-01

    Droughts are set to increase in frequency and magnitude with climate change and water extraction, and understanding their influence on ecosystems is urgent in the Holocene. Low rainfall across the Murray-Darling Basin (MDB) of Australia resulted in an unprecedented water level decline in the Lower Lakes (Lakes Alexandrina and Albert) at the downstream end of the river system. A comprehensive data covering pre-drought (2004-2006), drought (2007-2010) and post-drought (2010-2013) was firstly used to unravel drought effects on water quality in the contrasting main parts and margins of the two Lakes, particularly following water acidification resulting from acid sulfate soil oxidation. Salinity, nutrients and Chl-a significantly increased during the drought in the Lake main waterbody, while pH remained stable or showed minor shifts. In contrast to the Lake Alexandrina, total dissolved solid (TDS) and electrical conductivity (EC) during the post-drought more than doubled the pre-drought period in the Lake Albert as being a terminal lake system with narrow and shallow entrance. Rewetting of the exposed pyrite-containing sediment resulted in very low pH (below 3) in Lake margins, which positively contributed to salinity increases via SO42- release and limestone dissolution. Very acidic water (pH 2-3) was neutralised naturally by lake refill, but aerial limestone dosing was required for neutralisation of water acidity during the drought period. The Lower Lakes are characterized as hypereutrophic with much higher salinity, nutrient and algae concentrations than guideline levels for aquatic ecosystem. These results suggest that, in the Lower Lakes, drought could cause water quality deterioration through water acidification and increased nutrient and Chl-a concentrations, more effective water management in the lake catchment is thus crucial to prevent the similar water quality deterioration since the projected intensification of droughts. A comparative assessment on lake

  14. Linking climate change and karst hydrology to evaluate species vulnerability: The Edwards and Madison aquifers (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahler, B. J.; Long, A. J.; Stamm, J. F.; Poteet, M.; Symstad, A.

    2013-12-01

    Karst aquifers present an extreme case of flow along structurally variable pathways, making them highly dynamic systems and therefore likely to respond rapidly to climate change. In turn, many biological communities and ecosystems associated with karst are sensitive to hydrologic changes. We explored how three sites in the Edwards aquifer (Texas) and two sites in the Madison aquifer (South Dakota) might respond to projected climate change from 2011 to 2050. Ecosystems associated with these karst aquifers support federally listed endangered and threatened species and state-listed species of concern, including amphibians, birds, insects, and plants. The vulnerability of selected species associated with projected climate change was assessed. The Advanced Research Weather and Research Forecasting (WRF) model was used to simulate projected climate at a 36-km grid spacing for three weather stations near the study sites, using boundary and initial conditions from the global climate model Community Climate System Model (CCSM3) and an A2 emissions scenario. Daily temperature and precipitation projections from the WRF model were used as input for the hydrologic Rainfall-Response Aquifer and Watershed Flow (RRAWFLOW) model and the Climate Change Vulnerability Index (CCVI) model. RRAWFLOW is a lumped-parameter model that simulates hydrologic response at a single site, combining the responses of quick and slow flow that commonly characterize karst aquifers. CCVI uses historical and projected climate and hydrologic metrics to determine the vulnerability of selected species on the basis of species exposure to climate change, sensitivity to factors associated with climate change, and capacity to adapt to climate change. An upward trend in temperature was projected for 2011-2050 at all three weather stations; there was a trend (downward) in annual precipitation only for the weather station in Texas. A downward trend in mean annual spring flow or groundwater level was projected for

  15. Missions and Medicine at Amherst: Family Ties to Edward Hitchcock Jr., the Missionary Movement, and the American University of Beirut

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorman, John M.

    2011-01-01

    The Haystack Movement began at Williams College in 1805, occasioning the spread of American missions throughout the world. A half century later, two graduates of nearby Amherst College, Edward Hitchcock Jr. and Daniel Bliss, laid the foundations for college health services in this country and for mission work and education in the Middle East. The…

  16. Sediment yield dynamics during the 1950s multi-year droughts from two ungauged basins in the Edwards Plateau, Texas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sediment yield dynamics on the Edwards Plateau region of Texas was dramatically influenced by a multi-year drought that occurred there during the 1950s. To assess the effect of this drought on sediment yield, we used the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) to identify the factors that contributed...

  17. How Direct Descendants of a School Lockout Achieved Academic Success: Resilience in the Educational Attainments of Prince Edward County's Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Randolph, Jr.

    2013-01-01

    From 1959 to 1964, approximately 1,700 Black children in Prince Edward County, Virginia were denied schooling, due to the county leaders' decision to close schools--a defiant response to federal racial desegregation mandates stemming from "Brown v. Board of Education" (1954, 1955). Yet from one of the most extreme cases of injustice in…

  18. Assessment Literacy for Educators: Q&A with Edward Roeber, Ph.D. 2016 Educator Effectiveness Webinar Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roeber, Edward

    2016-01-01

    In this webinar, Dr. Edward Roeber, Assessment Director for the Michigan Assessment Consortium, addressed what educators need to know about formative, summative, and interim assessments and how each functions in a coherent assessment system. This Q&A addressed the questions participants had for Dr. Roeber following the webinar. The webinar…

  19. The Writing Life: Narrative, Metaphor, and Emotion in the Spiritual Autobiographies of Teresa of Avila and Sarah Edwards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friend, Elizabeth Ford

    2012-01-01

    In this dissertation, I analyze the spiritual autobiographies of Teresa of Avila (1515-1582) and Sarah Edwards (1710-1758) through the methodological lenses of autobiography studies and cognitive linguistics in order to identify key narratives and metaphors for the spiritual life and explore the significance of the interpretation process for lived…

  20. Selected Annotated Bibliography of Recent Research on Rural Life on Prince Edward Island. Community Studies, Report No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacDonald, Allan F.; O'Connell, Harold J.

    A review of research literature was the first step in a program of rural development and planning on Prince Edward Island. This bibliography containing 80 annotations of extended research reports from 1960-71 is the result of that search. The bibliography is divided into 4 main subject areas within which the annotations appear in alphabetical…

  1. G. Stanley Hall and Edward Thorndike on the Education of Women: Theory and Policy in the Progressive Era.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seller, Maxine S.

    During the Progressive Era (late 19th and early 20th Centuries), the theories of educational psychologists G. Stanley Hall and Edward L. Thorndike provided a basis for educational policy formation. It is hypothesized that their educational policies led to separate and unequal educational programs for women. Review of their writing indicates that…

  2. Edward D. Churchill as a combat consultant: lessons for the senior visiting surgeons and today's military medical corps.

    PubMed

    Cannon, Jeremy W; Fischer, Josef E

    2010-03-01

    In World War II, Edward D. Churchill volunteered as a combat consultant. In this role, he mentored many junior surgeons and challenged the Army leadership to treat hemorrhagic shock with blood rather than plasma. These lessons have continued relevance for today's Senior Visiting Surgeons and our military medical corps.

  3. Native Agency and the Making of "The North American Indian": Alexander B. Upshaw and Edward S. Curtis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zamir, Shamoon

    2007-01-01

    The twenty volumes of ethnographic text and pictorial photography and the twenty portfolios of large, finely printed photogravures that together comprise "The North American Indian" were the product of an extraordinary labor by Edward S. Curtis, an extensive and shifting team of co-workers, and the participation of hundreds of Native Americans. By…

  4. Historical potentiometric surface of the Edwards-Trinity aquifer system and contiguous hydraulically connected units, west-central Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bush, Peter W.; Ardis, Ann F.; Wynn, Kirby H.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to present a potentiometric-surface map of the principal aquifers of the Edwards-Trinity aquifer system based on the earliest available data; to explain in general terms what the potentiometric surface represents relative to rainfall conditions and ground-water withdrawals; and to discuss the major factors that control the configuration of the potentiometric surface.

  5. Relation of precipitation to annual ground-water recharge in the Edwards Aquifer, San Antonio area, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Puente, Celso

    1975-01-01

    The report includes a brief review of the geology and hydrology of the Edwards aquifer, a discussion of the preparation and evaluation of the precipitation data used in the regression analyses, and a brief summary of the method previously used to estimate recharge.

  6. Infectious disease prevalence in a feral cat population on Prince Edward Island, Canada.

    PubMed

    Stojanovic, Vladimir; Foley, Peter

    2011-09-01

    Ninety-six feral cats from Prince Edward Island were used to determine the prevalence of selected infectious agents. The prevalence rates were 5.2% for feline immunodeficiency virus, 3.1% for feline leukemia virus, 3.1% for Mycoplasma haemofelis, 8.4% for Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum, 2.1% for Bartonella spp. and 29.8% for exposure to Toxoplasma gondii. Oocysts of T. gondii were detected in 1.3% of the fecal samples that were collected. Gender and retroviral status of the cats were significantly correlated with hemoplasma infections. Use of a flea comb showed that 9.6% of the cats had fleas; however, flea infestation was not associated with any of the infectious agents.

  7. Infectious disease prevalence in a feral cat population on Prince Edward Island, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Stojanovic, Vladimir; Foley, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Ninety-six feral cats from Prince Edward Island were used to determine the prevalence of selected infectious agents. The prevalence rates were 5.2% for feline immunodeficiency virus, 3.1% for feline leukemia virus, 3.1% for Mycoplasma haemofelis, 8.4% for Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum, 2.1% for Bartonella spp. and 29.8% for exposure to Toxoplasma gondii. Oocysts of T. gondii were detected in 1.3% of the fecal samples that were collected. Gender and retroviral status of the cats were significantly correlated with hemoplasma infections. Use of a flea comb showed that 9.6% of the cats had fleas; however, flea infestation was not associated with any of the infectious agents. PMID:22379197

  8. The Elegance of Disordered Granular Packings: A Validation of Edwards' Hypothesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metzger, Philip T.; Donahue, Carly M.

    2004-01-01

    We have found a way to analyze Edwards' density of states for static granular packings in the special case of round, rigid, frictionless grains assuming constant coordination number. It obtains the most entropic density of single grain states, which predicts several observables including the distribution of contact forces. We compare these results against empirical data obtained in dynamic simulations of granular packings. The agreement between theory and the empirics is quite good, helping validate the use of statistical mechanics methods in granular physics. The differences between theory and empirics are mainly due to the variable coordination number, and when the empirical data are sorted by that number we obtain several insights that suggest an underlying elegance in the density of states

  9. Sawfly taxa (Hymenoptera, Symphyta) described by Edward Newman and Charles Healy

    PubMed Central

    Liston, Andrew D.; Prous, Marko

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Type specimens of seven nominal species of sawfly described by Edward Newman and one by Charles Healy were studied. This material is housed in the Oxford University Museum of Natural History, United Kingdom. The following new synonymies are proposed (valid names in parentheses): Hartigia Schiødte, 1839 (Phylloecus Newman, 1838), Cephus helleri Taschenberg, 1871 (Phylloecus faunus Newman, 1838) and Euura gallae Newman, 1837 (Euura mucronata (Hartig, 1837)). The type species of Euura Newman, 1837 and Euura subgenus Gemmura E. L. Smith, 1968 belong to the same taxonomic species, Euura mucronata (Hartig, 1837), so that these genus group names become new synonyms. Lectotypes are designated for Phyllotoma tormentillae Healy, 1868, Fenusa ianthe Newman, 1837, Fenusa parviceps Newman, 1837, Selandria pallida Newman, 1837 and Phylloecus faunus Newman, 1838. 26 new combinations are proposed for species formerly placed in Hartigia and here transferred to Phylloecus, and 4 original combinations are re-instated as valid. PMID:24715803

  10. Measuring the Edwards-Anderson order parameter of the Bose glass: A quantum gas microscope approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, S. J.; Walker, L. S.; Harte, T. L.; Bruce, G. D.

    2016-11-01

    With the advent of spatially resolved fluorescence imaging in quantum gas microscopes, it is now possible to directly image glassy phases and probe the local effects of disorder in a highly controllable setup. Here we present numerical calculations using a spatially resolved local mean-field theory, show that it captures the essential physics of the disordered system, and use it to simulate the density distributions seen in single-shot fluorescence microscopy. From these simulated images we extract local properties of the phases which are measurable by a quantum gas microscope and show that unambiguous detection of the Bose glass is possible. In particular, we show that experimental determination of the Edwards-Anderson order parameter is possible in a strongly correlated quantum system using existing experiments. We also suggest modifications to the experiments which will allow further properties of the Bose glass to be measured.

  11. The Immortal Fire Within: the life and work of Edward Emerson Barnard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheehan, William

    1995-06-01

    This first full-length biography of Edward Emerson Barnard tells the remarkable tale of endurance and achievement of one of the leading astronomers of the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. As "a man who was never known to sleep", Barnard scoured the heavens endlessly, leaving an astonishing legacy of observations that make him one of the greatest observers of all time. This book traces Barnard's life from impoverished origins to status as an internationally recognized astronomer. His success as a professional astronomer unfolds in 1842 as he discovers the fifth satellite of Jupiter (the first since Galileo) and pioneers wide-angle photography of the Milky Way, which leads to the recognition of dark nebulae--clouds of dust on the galactic plane. Beautifully illustrated throughout, this book provides a complete history of Barnard's fascinating life and work, based largely on previously unpublished archival material, that will be of interest to astronomers and historians of science.

  12. Cuff leakage, not paravalvular leakage, in the Carpentier Edwards PERIMOUNT Magna Ease aortic bioprosthesis.

    PubMed

    Tokunaga, Shigehiko; Cho, Tomoki; Izubuchi, Ryo; Masuda, Munetaka

    2015-12-01

    Though the Carpentier Edwards PERIMOUNT Magna Ease valve is a bioprosthesis with documented excellent haemodynamics and easy implantability, this valve has a gap between the cobalt-chromium-nickel alloy stent and silicone sewing ring. This gap, which is widest just below each of the three commissural struts, lacks silicone and leaves the two-layer polytetrafluoroethylene fabric unsupported and unprotected. If the needle of a valve suture is placed in this structurally weak area of the sewing ring, the resultant fabric tear may result in a true cuff leakage, not the usual paravalvular leakage. We describe this pitfall in the context of a recent operation to alert surgeons everywhere that suture placement too close to the stent (missing the silicone sewing ring) can result in postoperative cuff leakage. We need to be very careful to include the silicone ring in each stitch to prevent injury to the valve cuff of this prosthesis and to avoid cuff leakage.

  13. Sonic booms of space shuttles approaching Edwards Air Force Base, 1988-1993.

    PubMed

    Young, Robert W

    2002-01-01

    From 1988 to 1993 13 sonic booms of space shuttles approaching Edwards Air Force Base were measured at a site 10 miles west of EAFB, with one to seven different sound level meters for each measurement. Results from five of these measurements are here presented. Maximum differences in measured levels between instruments for the same flight varied from 0 to 6 dB depending on the measurement descriptor and model of sound level meter. The average difference between predicted and measured values was 0.7+/-1.5 dB. For sound level meters with adequate bandwidth the waveforms measured varied from a near perfect N-wave to a more distorted form reflecting the influence of the varying condition of the atmosphere during propagation to the ground.

  14. Empowerment through education and science: three intersecting strands in the career of Griffith Edwards.

    PubMed

    Crome, Ilana

    2015-07-01

    This paper describes three important strands in the career of Griffith Edwards that define him as a leader and an innovator. Believing that education and science were critical for the development of addiction as a profession and as a field of inquiry, his approach was multi-faceted: educating all doctors to appreciate the fundamental issues in addiction; training psychiatrists in the complexity of 'dual diagnosis' and specific specialist intervention; and teaching that addiction could be a chronic condition which required care management over the life course. These three inter-related areas are directly related to the need for a range of practitioners to have an understanding of addiction so that patients can be properly managed. The greater our understanding of the nature of addiction behaviour, the more likely the potential to optimize treatment and train practitioners from different professional disciplines.

  15. Diastolic murmurs in the presence of Starr-Edwards mitral prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, R A; McAnulty, J H; Starr, A; Rahimtoola, S H

    1975-03-01

    Diastolic murmurs associated with the Starr-Edwards mitral prosthesis have not been described previously. In this report, five patients with mitral prostheses are described in whom apical mid-diastolic and presystolic murmurs resulted from two different causes. Three patients had clots obstructing the prosthetic orifice. The other two had normally functioning protheses and moderately severe aortic insufficiency. The occurrence of mid-diastolic and presystolic murmurs in the presence of a normally functioning prosthetic mitral valve demonstrates that 1) the mid-diastolic Austin Flint murmur can occur in the absence of incomplete mitral valve opening, premature mitral valve closure, vibrating mitral leaflets, or relative mitral stenosis and 2) the presystolic Austin Flint murmur can occur in the absence of incomplete valve opening or presystolic mitral regurgitation. However, the presystolic murmur was associated with early closure movement of the presthetic poppet.

  16. Personality characteristics in heroin addicts and nonaddicted prisoners using the Edwards Personality Preference Schedule.

    PubMed

    Reith, G; Crockett, D; Craig, K

    1975-01-01

    The present study compares the self-reported personality characteristics of heroin addict and nonaddict prisoners using the Edwards Personality Preference Schedule (EPPS) which was corrected for social desirability. Seventy pairs of addicted and nonaddicted criminal offenders were matched for age, education, intelligence, and home environment. The addicted offenders were identified by the pattern of their response to the EPPS as reflected by the significant multivariate results. In addition, significant univariate differences consistent with those previously reported were found. Addicted criminals had stronger succorance, heterosexuality, and aggression needs and less abasement and endurance needs than nonaddicted offenders. Age, educational achievment, intelligence,and home environment had little influence on the prisoners' response to this self-report personality inventory.

  17. Deserts on the sea floor: Edward Forbes and his azoic hypothesis for a lifeless deep ocean.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Thomas R; Rice, Tony

    2006-12-01

    While dredging in the Aegean Sea during the mid-19th century, Manxman Edward Forbes noticed that plants and animals became progressively more impoverished the greater the depth they were from the surface of the water. By extrapolation Forbes proposed his now infamous azoic hypothesis, namely that life would be extinguished altogether in the murky depths of the deep ocean. The whole idea seemed so entirely logical given the enormous pressure, cold and eternal darkness of this apparently uninhabitable environment. Yet we now know that the sea floor is teeming with life. Curiously, it took 25 years for the azoic hypothesis to fall from grace. This was despite the presence of ample contrary evidence, including starfishes, worms and other organisms that seemingly originated from the deep seabed. This is a tale of scientists ignoring observations that ran counter to their deep-seated, yet entirely erroneous, beliefs.

  18. Hydrochemical data for the Edwards aquifer in the San Antonio area, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maclay, R.W.; Rettman, P.L.; Small, T.A.

    1980-01-01

    This report presents hydrochemical data that was collected as part of the investigations of the Edwards aquifer in the San Antonio area, Te xas, during 1970-78 and indicates other sources of available data. The report includes the results of chemical analyses of 159 water samples from 123 well s and springs; tritium analyses for 242 water samples from 120 wells and springs; isotope and redox-potential analyses of 31 water samples from wells, springs, and streams; and calculated dissolved carbonate, partial C02 pressures, and saturation indices of selected minerals in 98 water samples from 81 wells, springs, and streams. The water types and hydrochemical facies are given for six zones of the aquifer.

  19. A review of Edward Flatau's 1894 Atlas of the Human Brain by the neurologist Sigmund Freud.

    PubMed

    Triarhou, Lazaros C

    2011-01-01

    In 1894, the Polish neurologist Edward Flatau (1868-1932), working in Berlin, published an exquisite photographic atlas of the unfixed human brain, preceding by 2 years Das Menschenhirn, the reference work of Gustaf Retzius (1842-1919) in Stockholm. In his early career as a neuroanatomist and neurologist, Sigmund Freud (1856-1939) wrote a review of Flatau's atlas for the Internationale klinische Rundschau, which has not been included in the 'Standard Edition of the Complete Psychological Works'. The aim of the present paper is twofold: to document Freud's review, and to revive the largely forgotten atlas of Flatau. The full text of Freud is presented in translation. Further, one element Flatau, Retzius and Freud had in common is discussed: their early role as protagonists and firm supporters of Ramón y Cajal's neuron theory, the cornerstone of modern neuroscience.

  20. Estimating transmissivity in the Edwards Aquifer using upscaling, geostatistics, and Bayesian updating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Painter, S. L.; Jiang, Y.; Woodbury, A. D.

    2002-12-01

    The Edwards Aquifer, a highly heterogeneous karst aquifer located in south central Texas, is the sole source of drinking water for more than one million people. Hydraulic conductivity (K) measurements in the Edwards Aquifer are sparse, highly variable (log-K variance of 6.4), and are mostly from single-well drawdown tests that are appropriate for the spatial scale of a few meters. To support ongoing efforts to develop a groundwater management (MODFLOW) model of the San Antonio segment of the Edwards Aquifer, a multistep procedure was developed to assign hydraulic parameters to the 402 m x 402 m computational cells intended for the management model. The approach used a combination of nonparametric geostatistical analysis, stochastic simulation, numerical upscaling, and automatic model calibration based on Bayesian updating [1,2]. Indicator correlograms reveal a nested spatial structure in the well-test K of the confined zone, with practical correlation ranges of 3,600 and 15,000 meters and a large nugget effect. The fitted geostatistical model was used in unconditional stochastic simulations by the sequential indicator simulation method. The resulting realizations of K, defined at the scale of the well tests, were then numerically upscaled to the block scale. A new geostatistical model was fitted to the upscaled values. The upscaled model was then used to cokrige the block-scale K based on the well-test K. The resulting K map was then converted to transmissivity (T) using deterministically mapped aquifer thickness. When tested in a forward groundwater model, the upscaled T reproduced hydraulic heads better than a simple kriging of the well-test values (mean error of -3.9 meter and mean-absolute-error of 12 meters, as compared with -13 and 17 meters for the simple kriging). As the final step in the study, the upscaled T map was used as the prior distribution in an inverse procedure based on Bayesian updating [1,2]. When input to the forward groundwater model, the

  1. Using Edward de Bono's six hats game to aid critical thinking and reflection in palliative care.

    PubMed

    Kenny, Lesley J

    2003-03-01

    This article describes the use of a creative thinking game to stimulate critical thinking and reflection with qualified health professionals undertaking palliative care education. The importance of reflective practice in nursing is well documented and numerous models are available. However, the author as a nurse teacher has found that many of these models are either too simple or too complex to be valuable in practice. The six hats game, devised by Edward de Bono, is a method that stimulates a variety of types of thinking and when used as a means of reflection helps students to become more critical about their practice. Using this game with a palliative care case study the author demonstrates how thinking more creatively about the patients' perceived needs and problems can assist in developing reflective skills. The article concludes with a discussion on some of the challenges of using this method and suggestions for future practical uses.

  2. John L. LaBrecque Receives 2013 Edward A. Flinn III Award: Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaBrecque, John L.

    2014-01-01

    Thank you, Jean Bernard Minster and those who supported my nomination for the Edward A. Flinn III Award. We owe so much to colleagues such as Bernard Minster who support NASA and Earth Science with unrelenting and unselfish service. I am also grateful to my parents, the people of Lewiston, Maine, and the National Defense Education Act (NDEA) of 1958 for nurturing my early interest in science with an education that ultimately led me to Columbia University and the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory. Lamont for me was a scientific wonderland tended by scientists with global appetites for discovery and adventure. Marine geophysics, geomagnetism, and satellite altimetry of the oceans were creating a revolution of discovery, and Lamont was the center of this revolution. I owe so much to my mentor and dear friend, Walter C. Pitman III, who showed me that great science was accomplished through boundless curiosity, perseverance, and, most of all, humility.

  3. Spectral characterization and classification of Carpentier-Edwards heart valves implanted in the aortic position.

    PubMed

    Sava, H P; Grant, P M; McDonnell, J T

    1996-10-01

    This paper demonstrates an improvement in the performance of spectral phonocardiography, combined with pattern recognition techniques for monitoring the condition of bioprosthetic heart valves. The analysis of the heart sounds is performed using a modified forward-backward overdetermined Prony's method. Results show that the condition of the bioprosthesis affects mostly the higher part of the spectrum (i.e., above 250 Hz) where no frequency components were found for malfunctioning cases. Therefore, the amplitudes of the three highest frequency components are used as the input vector of an adaptive single layer perceptron-based classifier to identify normal and malfunctioning classes. For the sample set examined, this method gives 100% correct discrimination between normal and malfunctioning Carpentier-Edwards (C-E) valves.

  4. Numerical results for the Edwards-Anderson spin-glass model at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Julio F.; Alonso, Juan J.

    2013-04-01

    We have simulated Edwards-Anderson (EA) as well as Sherrington-Kirkpatrick systems of L3 spins. After averaging over large sets of EA system samples of 3≤L≤10, we obtain accurate numbers for distributions p(q) of the overlap parameter q at very low-temperature T. We find p(0)/T→0.233(4) as T→0. This is in contrast with the droplet scenario of spin glasses. We also study the number of mismatched links—between replica pairs—that come with large scale excitations. Contributions from small scale excitations are discarded. We thus obtain for the fractal dimension of outer surfaces of q˜0 excitations in the EA model ds→2.59(3) as T→0. This is in contrast with ds→3 as T→0 that is predicted by mean-field theory for the macroscopic limit.

  5. Mary Edwards Walker, M.D.: a feminist physician a century ahead of her time.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, A D; Suskind, P B

    1996-06-01

    In her teens, Mary Edwards Walker already wore the "bloomer" outfit began to campaign for reforming the "unhygienic" clothing of women. Assertively, she attended medical school and earned her M.D. degree. Due to prejudice, her practice did not flourish and she moved to Washington to offer her medical services to the Union as the Civil War began. Rebuffed by the male medical bureaucrats, she volunteered her services anyway. Eventually, she was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor, the only women to ever gain such distinction. After the war, Walker became a journalist, an author of two sensational books, a political lobbyist, a suffrage campaigner, a professional and public lecturer, an ardent dress reformer, a peace activist, a Utopianist and a women's right advocate. Light-years ahead of her times, Dr. Walker was an intelligent, independent, irrepressible and indefatigable proponent for a host of worthy causes.

  6. Sir Edward Appleton and Joseph Priestley: two giants of electrical science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Excell, P. S.

    The life of Sir Edward Appleton is reviewed, in commemoration of the recent centenary of his birth. Appleton discovered the ionosphere and devoted much of his life to investigations of its properties, receiving the Nobel Prize for physics as a result. He became a senior government scientist in World War II and afterwards was appointed Vice-Chancellor of Edinburgh University. The influence of his roots in the city of Bradford is emphasized and compared with the case of Joseph Priestley, also born near Bradford some 160 yr earlier. Priestley was a major early investigator of electrical phenomena and compiled a comprehensive treatise on the electrical knowledge of his day. He was the first person to present an experimental proof of the inverse-square law of electrostatic force, although he is usually better remembered as the discoverer of oxygen.

  7. Fosthiazate for Suppression of Pratylenchus penetrans in Potato on Prince Edward Island

    PubMed Central

    Kimpinski, J.; Arsenault, W. J.; Sanderson, J. B.

    1997-01-01

    The impacts of fosthiazate on potato (Solanum tuberosum) tuber yields and populations of root lesion nematodes (primarily Pratylenchus penetrans) were studied during 1991-1994 in experimental plots on Prince Edward Island. Tuber yields were greater in treated plots when compared to untreated plots by 8% and 30% during 1991 and 1993, respectively. Numbers of nematodes in roots were reduced by the treatments in every year, and nematode populations in soil were suppressed in 1991, 1993, and 1994. Tuber yields in 1993 and 1994 were higher, and nematode counts in soil and roots in 1991, 1993, and 1994 were lower in plots treated with the emulsifiable concentrate formulations of fosthiazate than in plots treated with the granular formulations. Yields of plots treated with fosthiazate did not differ consistently from yields of plots treated with aldicarb. The results indicated that fosthiazate should be useful for potato production in the Maritime region of Canada. PMID:19274269

  8. Three-dimensional geologic framework modeling of faulted hydrostratigraphic units within the Edwards Aquifer, Northern Bexar County, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pantea, Michael P.; Cole, James C.

    2004-01-01

    This report describes a digital, three-dimensional faulted hydrostratigraphic model constructed to represent the geologic framework of the Edwards aquifer system in the area of San Antonio, northern Bexar County, Texas. The model is based on mapped geologic relationships that reflect the complex structures of the Balcones fault zone, detailed lithologic descriptions and interpretations of about 40 principal wells (and qualified data from numerous other wells), and a conceptual model of the gross geometry of the Edwards Group units derived from prior interpretations of depositional environments and paleogeography. The digital model depicts the complicated intersections of numerous major and minor faults in the subsurface, as well as their individual and collective impacts on the continuity of the aquifer-forming units of the Edwards Group and the Georgetown Formation. The model allows for detailed examination of the extent of fault dislocation from place to place, and thus the extent to which the effective cross-sectional area of the aquifer is reduced by faulting. The model also depicts the internal hydrostratigraphic subdivisions of the Edwards aquifer, consisting of three major and eight subsidiary hydrogeologic units. This geologic framework model is useful for visualizing the geologic structures within the Balcones fault zone and the interactions of en-echelon fault strands and flexed connecting fault-relay ramps. The model also aids in visualizing the lateral connections between hydrostratigraphic units of relatively high and low permeability across the fault strands. Introduction The Edwards aquifer is the principal source of water for municipal, agricultural, industrial, and military uses by nearly 1.5 million inhabitants of the greater San Antonio, Texas, region (Hovorka and others, 1996; Sharp and Banner, 1997). Discharges from the Edwards aquifer also support local recreation and tourism industries at Barton, Comal, and San Marcos Springs located

  9. Source, variability, and transformation of nitrate in a regional karst aquifer: Edwards aquifer, central Texas.

    PubMed

    Musgrove, M; Opsahl, S P; Mahler, B J; Herrington, C; Sample, T L; Banta, J R

    2016-10-15

    Many karst regions are undergoing rapid population growth and expansion of urban land accompanied by increases in wastewater generation and changing patterns of nitrate (NO3(-)) loading to surface and groundwater. We investigate variability and sources of NO3(-) in a regional karst aquifer system, the Edwards aquifer of central Texas. Samples from streams recharging the aquifer, groundwater wells, and springs were collected during 2008-12 from the Barton Springs and San Antonio segments of the Edwards aquifer and analyzed for nitrogen (N) species concentrations and NO3(-) stable isotopes (δ(15)N and δ(18)O). These data were augmented by historical data collected from 1937 to 2007. NO3(-) concentrations and discharge data indicate that short-term variability (days to months) in groundwater NO3(-) concentrations in the Barton Springs segment is controlled by occurrence of individual storms and multi-annual wet-dry cycles, whereas the lack of short-term variability in groundwater in the San Antonio segment indicates the dominance of transport along regional flow paths. In both segments, longer-term increases (years to decades) in NO3(-) concentrations cannot be attributed to hydrologic conditions; rather, isotopic ratios and land-use change indicate that septic systems and land application of treated wastewater might be the source of increased loading of NO3(-). These results highlight the vulnerability of karst aquifers to NO3(-) contamination from urban wastewater. An analysis of N-species loading in recharge and discharge for the Barton Springs segment during 2008-10 indicates an overall mass balance in total N, but recharge contains higher concentrations of organic N and lower concentrations of NO3(-) than does discharge, consistent with nitrification of organic N within the aquifer and consumption of dissolved oxygen. This study demonstrates that subaqueous nitrification of organic N in the aquifer, as opposed to in soils, might be a previously unrecognized

  10. Groundwater ages from the freshwater zone of the Edwards aquifer, Uvalde County, Texas—Insights into groundwater flow and recharge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunt, Andrew G.; Landis, Gary P.; Faith, Jason R.

    2016-02-23

    Tritium–helium-3 groundwater ages of the Edwards aquifer in south-central Texas were determined as part of a long-term study of groundwater flow and recharge in the Edwards and Trinity aquifers. These ages help to define groundwater residence times and to provide constraints for calibration of groundwater flow models. A suite of 17 samples from public and private supply wells within Uvalde County were collected for active and noble gases, and for tritium–helium-3 analyses from the confined and unconfined parts of the Edwards aquifer. Samples were collected from monitoring wells at discrete depths in open boreholes as well as from integrated pumped well-head samples. The data indicate a fairly uniform groundwater flow system within an otherwise structurally complex geologic environment comprised of regionally and locally faulted rock units, igneous intrusions, and karst features within carbonate rocks. Apparent ages show moderate, downward average, linear velocities in the Uvalde area with increasing age to the east along a regional groundwater flow path. Though the apparent age data show a fairly consistent distribution across the study area, many apparent ages indicate mixing of both modern (less than 60 years) and premodern (greater than 60 years) waters. This mixing is most evident along the “bad water” line, an arbitrary delineation of 1,000 milligrams per liter dissolved solids that separates the freshwater zone of the Edwards aquifer from the downdip saline water zone. Mixing of modern and premodern waters also is indicated within the unconfined zone of the aquifer by high excess helium concentrations in young waters. Excess helium anomalies in the unconfined aquifer are consistent with possible subsurface discharge of premodern groundwater from the underlying Trinity aquifer into the younger groundwater of the Edwards aquifer.

  11. Air-water CO2 outgassing in the Lower Lakes (Alexandrina and Albert, Australia) following a millennium drought.

    PubMed

    Li, Siyue; Bush, Richard T; Ward, Nicholas J; Sullivan, Leigh A; Dong, Fangyong

    2016-01-15

    Lakes are an important source and sink of atmospheric CO2, and thus are a vital component of the global carbon cycle. However, with scarce data on potentially important subtropical and tropical areas for whole continents such as Australia, the magnitude of large-scale lake CO2 emissions is unclear. This study presents spatiotemporal changes of dissolved inorganic carbon and water - to - air interface CO2 flux in the two of Australia's largest connected, yet geomorphically different freshwater lakes (Lake Alexandrina and Lake Albert, South Australia), during drought (2007 to September-2010) and post-drought (October 2010 to 2013). Lake levels in the extreme drought were on average approximately 1m lower than long-term average (0.71 m AHD). Drought was associated with an increase in the concentrations of dissolved inorganic species, organic carbon, nitrogen, Chl-a and major ions, as well as water acidification as a consequence of acid sulfate soil (ASS) exposure, and hence, had profound effects on lake pCO2 concentrations. Lakes Alexandrina and Albert were a source of CO2 to the atmosphere during the drought period, with efflux ranging from 0.3 to 7.0 mmol/m(2)/d. The lake air-water CO2 flux was negative in the post-drought, ranging between -16.4 and 0.9 mmol/m(2)/d. The average annual CO2 emission was estimated at 615.5×10(6) mol CO2/y during the drought period. These calculated emission rates are in the lower range for lakes, despite the potential for drought conditions that shift the lakes from sink to net source for atmospheric CO2. These observations have significant implications in the context of predicted increasing frequency and intensity of drought as a result of climate change. Further information on the spatial and temporal variability in CO2 flux from Australian lakes is urgently warranted to revise the global carbon budget for lakes.

  12. National Program for Inspection of Non-Federal Dams. Albert Davenport Dam (MA 00507), Connecticut River Basin, Shelburne Falls, Massachusetts. Phase I Inspection Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-01

    Earth l Cone. Masonry_ Stone Masonry_.’. Timber Rockfill Other_________ No Core Wall 9. A. Description of present land usage downstream of dam : 40...Mechanic Street Brook , Date of Inspection: December 2, 1980 BRIEF ASSESSMENT Albert Davenport Dam is an earth embankment approximately 330 feet long...Location: jown of Sholburne Falls, MA Type of Dam : EARTH FILL Inspection Date(s): December 2, 1980 S Weather: 1verea$ ’a / 󈧧 °’- Pool Elevation: 445t

  13. Environmental epidemiology of intestinal schistosomiasis in Uganda: population dynamics of biomphalaria (gastropoda: planorbidae) in Lake Albert and Lake Victoria with observations on natural infections with digenetic trematodes.

    PubMed

    Rowel, Candia; Fred, Besigye; Betson, Martha; Sousa-Figueiredo, Jose C; Kabatereine, Narcis B; Stothard, J Russell

    2015-01-01

    This study documented the population dynamics of Biomphalaria and associated natural infections with digenetic trematodes, along the shores of Lake Albert and Lake Victoria, recording local physicochemical factors. Over a two-and-a-half-year study period with monthly sampling, physicochemical factors were measured at 12 survey sites and all freshwater snails were collected. Retained Biomphalaria were subsequently monitored in laboratory aquaria for shedding trematode cercariae, which were classified as either human infective (Schistosoma mansoni) or nonhuman infective. The population dynamics of Biomphalaria differed by location and by lake and had positive relationship with pH (P < 0.001) in both lakes and negative relationship with conductivity (P = 0.04) in Lake Albert. Of the Biomphalaria collected in Lake Albert (N = 6,183), 8.9% were infected with digenetic trematodes of which 15.8% were shedding S. mansoni cercariae and 84.2% with nonhuman infective cercariae. In Lake Victoria, 2.1% of collected Biomphalaria (N = 13,172) were infected with digenetic trematodes with 13.9% shedding S. mansoni cercariae, 85.7% shedding nonhuman infective cercariae, and 0.4% of infected snails shedding both types of cercariae. Upon morphological identification, species of Biomphalaria infected included B. sudanica, B. pfeifferi, and B. stanleyi in Lake Albert and B. sudanica, B. pfeifferi, and B. choanomphala in Lake Victoria. The study found the physicochemical factors that influenced Biomphalaria population and infections. The number and extent of snails shedding S. mansoni cercariae illustrate the high risk of transmission within these lake settings. For better control of this disease, greater effort should be placed on reducing environmental contamination by improvement of local water sanitation and hygiene.

  14. Propane tank explosion (2 deaths, 7 injuries) at Herrig Brothers Feather Creek Farm, Albert City, Iowa, April 9, 1998. Investigation report

    SciTech Connect

    1999-09-01

    This report explains the explosion/BLEVE that took place on April 9, 1998, at the Herrig Brothers Feather Creek Farm, located in Albert City, Iowa. Two volunteer fire fighters were killed and seven other emergency response personnel were injured. Safety issues covered in the report include protection of propane storage tanks and piping, state regulatory oversight of such installations, and fire fighter response to propane storage tank fires.

  15. Fixed-points in random Boolean networks: The impact of parallelism in the Barabási-Albert scale-free topology case.

    PubMed

    Moisset de Espanés, P; Osses, A; Rapaport, I

    2016-12-01

    Fixed points are fundamental states in any dynamical system. In the case of gene regulatory networks (GRNs) they correspond to stable genes profiles associated to the various cell types. We use Kauffman's approach to model GRNs with random Boolean networks (RBNs). In this paper we explore how the topology affects the distribution of the number of fixed points in randomly generated networks. We also study the size of the basins of attraction of these fixed points if we assume the α-asynchronous dynamics (where every node is updated independently with probability 0≤α≤1). It is well-known that asynchrony avoids the cyclic attractors into which parallel dynamics tends to fall. We observe the remarkable property that, in all our simulations, if for a given RBN with Barabási-Albert topology and α-asynchronous dynamics an initial configuration reaches a fixed point, then every configuration also reaches a fixed point. By contrast, in the parallel regime, the percentage of initial configurations reaching a fixed point (for the same networks) is dramatically smaller. We contrast the results of the simulations on Barabási-Albert networks with the classical Erdös-Rényi model of random networks. Everything indicates that Barabási-Albert networks are extremely robust. Finally, we study the mean and maximum time/work needed to reach a fixed point when starting from randomly chosen initial configurations.

  16. Niels Bohr's discussions with Albert Einstein, Werner Heisenberg, and Erwin Schroedinger: the origins of the principles of uncertainty and complementarity

    SciTech Connect

    Mehra, J.

    1987-05-01

    In this paper, the main outlines of the discussions between Niels Bohr with Albert Einstein, Werner Heisenberg, and Erwin Schroedinger during 1920-1927 are treated. From the formulation of quantum mechanics in 1925-1926 and wave mechanics in 1926, there emerged Born's statistical interpretation of the wave function in summer 1926, and on the basis of the quantum mechanical transformation theory - formulated in fall 1926 by Dirac, London, and Jordan - Heisenberg formulated the uncertainty principle in early 1927. At the Volta Conference in Como in September 1927 and at the fifth Solvay Conference in Brussels the following month, Bohr publicly enunciated his complementarity principle, which had been developing in his mind for several years. The Bohr-Einstein discussions about the consistency and completeness of quantum mechanics and of physical theory as such - formally begun in October 1927 at the fifth Solvay Conference and carried on at the sixth Solvay Conference in October 1930 - were continued during the next decades. All these aspects are briefly summarized.

  17. The scientific legacy of Little Hans and Little Albert: future directions for research on specific phobias in youth.

    PubMed

    Ollendick, Thomas H; Muris, Peter

    2015-01-01

    We review issues associated with the phenomenology, etiology, assessment, and treatment of specific phobias in children and adolescents and provide suggestions for future research and clinical practice. In doing so, we highlight the early case studies of Little Hans and Little Albert and the advances that have been made following the publication of these seminal cases. In recent years, we have witnessed a deeper understanding of the etiology of specific phobias and developed a rich array of evidence-based assessments and treatments with which to address specific phobias in youth. Although much has been accomplished in this area of inquiry, we also note that much remains to be done before we can advance more fully our understanding, assessment, and treatment of specific phobias in youth. It will be important for future work to build more firmly on these developments and to better determine the moderators and mediators of change with our evidence-based treatments and to more vigorously pursue their dissemination in real-word settings.

  18. Predictive testing and existential absurdity: resonances between experiences around genetic diagnosis and the philosophy of Albert Camus.

    PubMed

    Porz, Rouven; Widdershoven, Guy

    2011-07-01

    Predictive genetic testing may confront those affected with difficult life situations that they have not experienced before. These life situations may be interpreted as 'absurd'. In this paper we present a case study of a predictive test situation, showing the perspective of a woman going through the process of deciding for or against taking the test, and struggling with feelings of alienation. To interpret her experiences, we refer to the concept of absurdity, developed by the French Philosopher Albert Camus. Camus' writings on absurdity appear to resonate with patients' stories when they talk about their body and experiences of illness. In this paper we draw on Camus' philosophical essay 'The Myth of Sisyphus' (1942), and compare the absurd experiences of Sisyphus with the interviewee's story. This comparison opens up a field of ethical reflection. We demonstrate that Camus' concept of absurdity offers a new and promising approach to understanding the fragility of patients' situations, especially in the field of predictive testing. We show that people affected might find new meaning through narratives that help them to reconstruct the absurd without totally overcoming it. In conclusion, we will draw out some normative consequences of our narrative approach.

  19. Accumulation of tocopherols and tocotrienols during seed development of grape (Vitis vinifera L. cv. Albert Lavallée).

    PubMed

    Horvath, G; Wessjohann, L; Bigirimana, J; Monica, H; Jansen, M; Guisez, Y; Caubergs, R; Horemans, N

    2006-01-01

    Tocopherols and tocotrienols are present in mature seeds. Yet, little is known about the physiological role and the metabolism of these compounds during seed development. Here we present data on tocopherol and tocotrienol accumulation during seed development in Vitis vinifera L. cv. Albert Lavallée (Royal). This species was chosen for its ability to synthesize both tocopherols and tocotrienols. It is shown here for the first time that during seed development there are significant differences in localization and accumulation kinetics of tocopherols and tocotrienols. Tocopherols are found homogeneously dispersed throughout all tissues of the seed, in concentrations ranging from 20 to 100 microg tocopherol per g dry weight. Tocopherol levels decrease gradually during seed development. In contrast, tocotrienols are only found in the endosperm of the seeds, accumulating in a sigmoid fashion during the maturation period of seed development. Tocotrienol levels were found to be (54+/-7.4) microg/g dry seed in 90-day-old seeds of V. vinifera L. Furthermore, tocotrienol biosynthesis is demonstrated in these seeds during tocotrienol accumulation and in an endosperm fraction isolated at 75 days after flowering.

  20. The structure and function of roots of woody species on the Edwards Plateau, Texas, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pockman, W. T.; McElrone, A. J.; Bleby, T. M.; Jackson, R. B.

    2008-05-01

    The Edwards Plateau in central Texas USA, supports woody vegetation in savannas and woodlands despite characteristically shallow soils. Surveys using caves to access greater depths have shown that roots of all dominant woody species can reach 7 m below the surface while some species reliably reach depths as great as 20 m. Comparative studies showed that deep roots were structurally distinct from shallow roots of similar diameter. Deep roots had larger xylem conducting elements resulting in more than 2-fold greater hydraulic conductance than their shallow counterparts. To understand the relationship between environmental fluctuations and deep root function in these species, we directly measured water transport in deep roots accessed via caves for comparison with similar measurements in shallow roots and stems. Long term measurements of Juniperus ashei, one of the most abundant species on the Edwards plateau, showed that the contribution of roots 7 m below the surface fluctuated with the volumetric water content (VWC) of surface soils. During prolonged drought, upward flow in deep roots accounted for as much as 60% of total daily transpiration and occurred not only during the day when the canopy was transpiring but also throughout the night when hydraulic redistribution from deep to shallow soil maintained flow through the roots. Hydraulic redistribution was suppressed immediately after precipitation until nocturnal flow gradually increased as VWC decreased. In a cave system where roots reach a stream 18-20 m below the surface, hydraulic redistribution was observed year-round in all measured individuals of three additional dominant species (Quercus fusiformis, Bumelia lanuginosa and Prosopis glandulosa). Like J. ashei, upward hydraulic redistribution was observed when surface soils were dry. More complex patterns of redistribution were also observed, including downward redistribution of soil water following precipitation, and continuing redistribution of soil water

  1. X-43A Undergoing Controlled Radio Frequency Testing in the Benefield Anechoic Facility at Edwards Ai

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The X-43A Hypersonic Experimental (Hyper-X) Vehicle hangs suspended in the cavernous Benefield Aenechoic Facility at Edwards Air Force Base during radio frequency tests in January 2000. Hyper-X, the flight vehicle for which is designated as X-43A, is an experimental flight-research program seeking to demonstrate airframe-integrated, 'air-breathing' engine technologies that promise to increase payload capacity for future vehicles, including hypersonic aircraft (faster than Mach 5) and reusable space launchers. This multiyear program is currently underway at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The Hyper-X schedule calls for its first flight later this year (2000). Hyper-X is a joint program, with Dryden sharing responsibility with NASA's Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia. Dryden's primary role is to fly three unpiloted X-43A research vehicles to validate engine technologies and hypersonic design tools as well as the hypersonic test facility at Langley. Langley manages the program and leads the technology development effort. The Hyper-X Program seeks to significantly expand the speed boundaries of air-breathing propulsion by being the first aircraft to demonstrate an airframe-integrated, scramjet-powered free flight. Scramjets (supersonic-combustion ramjets) are ramjet engines in which the airflow through the whole engine remains supersonic. Scramjet technology is challenging because only limited testing can be performed in ground facilities. Long duration, full-scale testing requires flight research. Scramjet engines are air-breathing, capturing their oxygen from the atmosphere. Current spacecraft, such as the Space Shuttle, are rocket powered, so they must carry both fuel and oxygen for propulsion. Scramjet technology-based vehicles need to carry only fuel. By eliminating the need to carry oxygen, future hypersonic vehicles will be able to carry heavier payloads. Another unique aspect of the X-43A vehicle is the airframe integration

  2. Effects of altered soil moisture on respiratory quotient in the Edwards Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellers, M. A.; Hawkes, C.; Breecker, D.

    2014-12-01

    Climate change is expected to alter precipitation patterns around the world. The impacts of altered precipitation on ecosystem function will be partly controlled by soil microbes because of their primary role in soil carbon cycling. However, microbial responses to drought remain poorly understood, particularly local responses that might partly reflect specialization based on historical conditions. Here, we investigated the respiratory response of microbial communities originating from historically wetter and drier sites to both low and high soil moistures. We focused on the respiratory quotient (RQ= moles of CO2 produced per mole of O2 consumed), which varies with the oxidation state of organic carbon being respired and/or the compounds being synthesized by soil microbes. We hypothesized that there would be a shift in RQ across the gradient of soil moisture. Soils were collected from 13 sites across a steep precipitation gradient on the Edwards plateau in central Texas, air-dried, rewet at low or high soil moisture (6% or 24% gravimetric, respectively), and incubated in an atmosphere of 21% O2, 1% Ar, and balance He. After eight weeks, CO2, O2 and Ar in the headspace of incubation vials were measured by gas chromatography after separation of Ar and O2 at subambient temperature. Because of the high calcite content in soils on the Edwards plateau, we corrected the RQ values by assuming pH was buffered at 8 and then adding the calculated amount of CO2 dissolved in water in the incubations vials to the measured CO2 in the headspace. We found that uncorrected RQ values were slightly less than one and increased significantly with increasing mean annual precipitation. In contrast, corrected RQ values were greater than one and decreased with increasing mean annual precipitation. In both cases, we see a shift in RQ across the gradient, suggesting that differences in substrate utilization may vary based on origin across the gradient and with current level of soil moisture

  3. Source, variability, and transformation of nitrate in a regional karst aquifer: Edwards aquifer, central Texas.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Musgrove, Marylynn; Opsahl, Stephen P.; Mahler, Barbara J.; Herrington, Chris; Sample, Thomas; Banta, John (Ryan)

    2016-01-01

    Many karst regions are undergoing rapid population growth and expansion of urban land accompanied by increases in wastewater generation and changing patterns of nitrate (NO3−) loading to surface and groundwater. We investigate variability and sources of NO3− in a regional karst aquifer system, the Edwards aquifer of central Texas. Samples from streams recharging the aquifer, groundwater wells, and springs were collected during 2008–12 from the Barton Springs and San Antonio segments of the Edwards aquifer and analyzed for nitrogen (N) species concentrations and NO3− stable isotopes (δ15N and δ18O). These data were augmented by historical data collected from 1937 to 2007. NO3− concentrations and discharge data indicate that short-term variability (days to months) in groundwater NO3− concentrations in the Barton Springs segment is controlled by occurrence of individual storms and multi-annual wet-dry cycles, whereas the lack of short-term variability in groundwater in the San Antonio segment indicates the dominance of transport along regional flow paths. In both segments, longer-term increases (years to decades) in NO3− concentrations cannot be attributed to hydrologic conditions; rather, isotopic ratios and land-use change indicate that septic systems and land application of treated wastewater might be the source of increased loading of NO3−. These results highlight the vulnerability of karst aquifers to NO3− contamination from urban wastewater. An analysis of N-species loading in recharge and discharge for the Barton Springs segment during 2008–10 indicates an overall mass balance in total N, but recharge contains higher concentrations of organic N and lower concentrations of NO3−than does discharge, consistent with nitrification of organic N within the aquifer and consumption of dissolved oxygen. This study demonstrates that subaqueous nitrification of organic N in the aquifer, as opposed to in soils, might be a previously

  4. Twenty-four years' implant duration of the aortic Starr-Edwards Silastic ball prosthesis: a valve of the past?

    PubMed

    Mächler, H E; Schmidt, C H; Neuner, P; Iberer, F; Anelli-Monti, M; Dacar, D; Rigler, B; Kraft-Kinz, J

    1993-01-01

    Six years after the first aortic valve replacement with the Starr-Edwards Silastic ball prosthesis at Oregon Health Sciences University, the model 1260 was implanted in a 44-year-old patient at our department. During 24 years no signs of dysfunction, thromboembolism, thrombosis, periprosthetic leaks or hemolysis were observed. Material test showed no signs of fatigue. The dimension of the Silastic poppet was found to be one millimeter less than the original specifications of these poppets and there were some lipid infiltrations. Functionally the poppet was found to be nonvariant. Histologic findings detected focal hyalinization and giant cells without signs of acute inflammation or ulceration. With regard to its reliability and durability, the Starr-Edwards valve prosthesis should not be viewed with disfavor.

  5. Preserving a Well-Functioning 33-Year-Old Starr-Edwards Aortic Prosthesis in Repeat Aortic Root Aneurysm Repair

    PubMed Central

    Alimov, Victor K.; Rousou, John A.; Pluchino, Fabrizio I.

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 61-year-old obese male patient in whom we found a well-functioning 33-year-old Starr-Edwards aortic prosthesis during repeat aortic surgery. Rather than explant the prosthesis, we remodeled the aortic root, almost completely removing the aortic sinuses and leaving only a pillar of aortic tissue around the coronary ostia. The proximal end of a Hemashield tube-graft was then scalloped to accommodate the remaining aortic tissue. The patient's heart function was excellent after his weaning from cardiopulmonary bypass. Simplifying the repeat aortic root repair, by preserving a well-functioning Starr-Edwards valve, might lead to a better outcome in similar cases. We also discuss other instances of this valve's durability. PMID:28100977

  6. Investigation of seismicity and related effects at NASA Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility, Computer Center, Edwards, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cousineau, R. D.; Crook, R., Jr.; Leeds, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    This report discusses a geological and seismological investigation of the NASA Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility site at Edwards, California. Results are presented as seismic design criteria, with design values of the pertinent ground motion parameters, probability of recurrence, and recommended analogous time-history accelerograms with their corresponding spectra. The recommendations apply specifically to the Dryden site and should not be extrapolated to other sites with varying foundation and geologic conditions or different seismic environments.

  7. Final Environmental Assessment for the Integration and Developmental Testing of High Power Microwave Systems at Edwards Air Force Base

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-16

    3-24 14 3.5.1 Topography —Restricted Area R-2515 and Edwards AFB Area......................3-24 15 3.5.2 Geology—Restricted...emission rates of the pollutant source, (3) the proximity of project emission sources to other 23 emission sources, (4) topography , and (5) local and...the geologic setting, which could either affect or be affected by a proposed project, 6 include topography and soil erosion on base. Normal military

  8. Thrombo-embolic complications of the cloth-covered Starr-Edwards prostheses No. 2300 aortic and No. 6300 mitral

    PubMed Central

    Cleland, J.; Molloy, P. J.

    1973-01-01

    The thrombo-embolic complications of the cloth-covered Starr-Edwards prostheses No. 2300 aortic and No. 6300 mitral followed for an average of 14 months in 155 patients are reviewed. There was a high incidence of early fatal and disabling thrombo-embolus in patients having mitral valve replacement. Late emboli were more common after aortic valve replacement. Anticoagulant control was unsatisfactory and not without hazards. PMID:4685210

  9. Effects of trichloroethylene and perchloroethylene on wild rodents at Edwards Air Force Base, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spring, Sarah E.; Miles, A. Keith; Anderson, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    Effects of inhalation of volatilized trichloroethylene (TCE) or perchloroethylene (PCE) were assessed based on the health and population size of wild, burrowing mammals at Edwards Air Force Base (CA, USA). Organic soil-vapor concentrations were measured at three sites with aquifer contamination of TCE or PCE of 5.5 to 77 mg/L and at two uncontaminated reference sites. Population estimates of kangaroo rats (Dipodomys merriami and D. panamintinus) as well as hematology, blood chemistry, and histopathology of kangaroo rats and deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) were compared between contaminated and uncontaminated populations. Maximum soil-gas concentrations associated with groundwater contamination were less than 1.5 μl/L of TCE and 0.07 μl/L of PCE. Population estimates of kangaroo rats were similar at contaminated and reference sites. Hematology, blood chemistry, and histopathology of kangaroo rats and deer mice indicated no evidence of health effects caused by exposure. Trichloroethylene or PCE in groundwater and in related soil gas did not appear to reduce the size of small mammal populations or impair the health of individuals.

  10. Emanuel Edward Klein, a diligent and industrious plodder or the father of British microbiology.

    PubMed

    Atalic, Bruno; Peric, Ines Drenjancevic; Ferencic, Stella Fatovic

    2010-08-01

    Emanuel Edward Klein (Osijek, 1844 - Hove, 1925) was a British microbiologist of Croatian origin. He completed his medical studies in Vienna in 1869. In 1869 he was sent to England to determine terms for the translation of Samuel Stricker's manual Handbuch von den Geweben des Menchen und der Tiere. During his visit he made a good impression on John Burdon Sanderson and John Simon, which was the main reason why he was invited to London in 1871 to conduct investigations under their guidance. In 1873 Klein began his collaboration with the Saint Bartholomew's Hospital, where he was appointed as a Joint Professor of General Anatomy and Physiology. His researches were in the fields of anatomy, histology, pathology, embryology, physiology, and especially microbiology. He did a great deal to its development in Britain. He has written about 260 scientific papers on a broad range of different topics. Despite all the aforementioned facts, his work was never properly studied, and he is almost unknown outside academic circles. For that reason, attitudes towards him still range between the extremes of calling him the father of British microbiology on one side, and attributing him as a diligent and industrious plodder on the other. In this paper we will try to prove the first attitude. We will put his researches in a general context. Finally we will highlight his original achievements in the isolation of new microbes.

  11. Edward Walter Maunder FRAS (1851-1928): his life and times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinder, A. J.

    2008-02-01

    The year 2001 saw the sesquicentenary of the birth of Edward Walter Maunder, and 2004 the centenary of the publication of his Butterfly Diagram and the experiment on the canals of Mars. Despite his holding a pivotal place in the history of British amateur astronomy, so far no major treatment of his life has appeared. Although a prolific writer, virtually no reference appears in any modern work today; even his work in solar astronomy and geophysics is generally unacknowledged. Sheehan's portrayal of Maunder as '...a good example of the way in which fame and oblivion are inequably distributed among scientists... though he accomplished a great deal of... work of the very first rank... he is relatively unknown today' is very pertinent. However this appears to be changing as research is currently in progress respecting his work in solar astronomy and his investigations of the history of the origins of constellations. It is however as the founder of the British Astronomical Association that he is remembered.

  12. A newly identified apothecary in Boswell's Life of Johnson: Edward Ferrand (1691-1769).

    PubMed

    Caudle, James J; Bundock, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Ever since the publication of James Boswell's Life of Samuel Johnson (1791), it has been known that Johnson's young servant, the former slave Francis Barber 'ran away' at one point and worked for a London apothecary. But the apothecary was not named by Boswell and has not been identified by any of Johnson's numerous biographers nor in recent studies of Francis Barber. Research in surviving Boswell manuscripts, 18th-century London guides and the archives of the Society of Apothecaries prove the apothecary to have been Edward Ferrand. This article sets out the circumstances in which the reference to the anonymous apothecary came to appear in the Life of Johnson and reconstructs Ferrand's life and career. Examining Ferrand's origins, his social circumstances and his career, a case study is presented of a successful practitioner of the profession of apothecary in early Georgian Britain and a suggestion made as to why the distinguished apothecary came to provide a place of refuge for a teenaged runaway servant who had been a slave until he was about nine years old.

  13. A cohort study of coagulase negative staphylococcal mastitis in selected dairy herds in Prince Edward Island.

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, T J; Dohoo, I R; Donald, A W; Hariharan, H; Collins, K

    1992-01-01

    The epidemiology and importance of coagulase negative staphylococcal (CNS) mastitis in Prince Edward Island had not been documented. To investigate this, a cohort of 84 cows at seven farms were quarter sampled eight times over a lactation, commencing with samples taken prior to drying off in the previous lactation. Thirteen species of CNS were isolated. The quarter prevalence of CNS mastitis varied from 4.8% to 6.4% in the first five months of lactation and increased to 14.2 to 16.6% in the last four months of lactation. The geometric mean somatic cell counts (SCC) for quarters infected with CNS and uninfected quarters were 90 x 10(3) and 64 x 10(3) respectively (difference significant at p > 0.005). The two month new infection risk of CNS was 9.0% while the two month elimination risk was 74.4%. Infection with CNS did not alter the risk of subsequent infection with Staphylococcus aureus. The results from this project support the classification of CNS as a minor pathogen in mastitis control programs. PMID:1477796

  14. Correction of Down syndrome and Edwards syndrome aneuploidies in human cell cultures

    PubMed Central

    Amano, Tomokazu; Jeffries, Emiko; Amano, Misa; Ko, Akihiro C.; Yu, Hong; Ko, Minoru S. H.

    2015-01-01

    Aneuploidy, an abnormal number of chromosomes, has previously been considered irremediable. Here, we report findings that euploid cells increased among cultured aneuploid cells after exposure to the protein ZSCAN4, encoded by a mammalian-specific gene that is ordinarily expressed in preimplantation embryos and occasionally in stem cells. For footprint-free delivery of ZSCAN4 to cells, we developed ZSCAN4 synthetic mRNAs and Sendai virus vectors that encode human ZSCAN4. Applying the ZSCAN4 biologics to established cultures of mouse embryonic stem cells, most of which had become aneuploid and polyploid, dramatically increased the number of euploid cells within a few days. We then tested the biologics on non-immortalized primary human fibroblast cells derived from four individuals with Down syndrome—the most frequent autosomal trisomy of chromosome 21. Within weeks after ZSCAN4 application to the cells in culture, fluorescent in situ hybridization with a chromosome 21-specific probe detected the emergence of up to 24% of cells with only two rather than three copies. High-resolution G-banded chromosomes further showed up to 40% of cells with a normal karyotype. These findings were confirmed by whole-exome sequencing. Similar results were obtained for cells with the trisomy 18 of Edwards syndrome. Thus a direct, efficient correction of aneuploidy in human fibroblast cells seems possible in vitro using human ZSCAN4. PMID:26324424

  15. Oocyte number per live birth in IVF: were Steptoe and Edwards less wasteful?

    PubMed

    Inge, George B; Brinsden, Peter R; Elder, Kay T

    2005-03-01

    As part of a learning exercise to assess the efficiency of oocyte utilization after controlled ovarian stimulation, we compared historical data from the publications of Steptoe and Edwards describing their early experiences in Oldham and at Bourn Hall with retrospective data from IVF and ICSI cycles carried out at Bourn Hall Clinic during the year 2000. For the purpose of analysing the more recent data, patients were subdivided into groups by age (< or = 37 years and > or = 38 years) and by oocyte yield (low, intermediate and high). In patients less than 38 years of age, live birth rates were equivalent in each group, irrespective of the number of oocytes retrieved. Patients who yielded low numbers of oocytes (1-5) utilized an average of 9.6 oocytes per live birth, compared with 25.1 and 51.5 in those who yielded intermediate (6-16) and high (16+) numbers of oocytes. The comparison with historical data suggests that the 'efficiency' of oocyte utilization has not improved significantly since the early 1980s, despite 25 years' experience of controlled ovarian stimulation for IVF treatment.

  16. Communication skills training at the Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Darcy H; Ihle, Sherri L

    2006-01-01

    Communication skills are considered a core clinical skill in human medicine. Recognizing the importance of communication skills and addressing them in veterinary curricula, however, is just beginning. In the fall of 2003, the Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, markedly changed the way in which it approaches communication teaching. An intensive one-week elective rotation on client communication was offered in the senior year. This rotation made extensive use of experiential techniques through the use of role plays and videotaped real client interactions. A group of faculty and hospital staff members were trained as coaches to support students as they practiced their communication in various client scenarios. The skills taught were based on the Calgary-Cambridge Observation Guide, which outlines observable behaviors that contribute to effective medical communication. Student response to and feedback on the rotation have been very positive. As a result, the number of rotations given per year has been increased. Long-term plans include expanding communication skills teaching into other years of the DVM program and incorporating simulated clients into the teaching program. Challenges that lie ahead include the development of a fully integrated communication teaching program that spans the whole curriculum, addressing the ongoing need for the professional development of coaches, improving methods of student assessment, and recruiting/training a sufficient number of coaches.

  17. Statistical Short-Range Guidance for Peak Wind Speed Forecasts at Edwards Air Force Base, CA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreher, Joseph G.; Crawford, Winifred; Lafosse, Richard; Hoeth, Brian; Burns, Kerry

    2009-01-01

    The peak winds near the surface are an important forecast element for space shuttle landings. As defined in the Flight Rules (FR), there are peak wind thresholds that cannot be exceeded in order to ensure the safety of the shuttle during landing operations. The National Weather Service Spaceflight Meteorology Group (SMG) is responsible for weather forecasts for all shuttle landings, and is required to issue surface average and 10-minute peak wind speed forecasts. They indicate peak winds are a challenging parameter to forecast. To alleviate the difficulty in making such wind forecasts, the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) developed a PC-based graphical user interface (GUI) for displaying peak wind climatology and probabilities of exceeding peak wind thresholds for the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) at Kennedy Space Center (KSC; Lambert 2003). However, the shuttle occasionally may land at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB) in southern California when weather conditions at KSC in Florida are not acceptable, so SMG forecasters requested a similar tool be developed for EAFB.

  18. The three-dimensional Edwards-Anderson spin glass in an external magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yllanes, David; Janus Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    Spin glasses are a longstanding model for the sluggish dynamics that appears at the glass transition. However, in order for spin glasses to be a faithful model for general glassy physics, we need to introduce an external magnetic field to eliminate their time-reversal symmetry. Unfortunately, little is known about the critical behavior of a spin glass in a field in three spatial dimensions. We have carried out a dynamical study combining equilibrium and non-equilibrium data. In particular, using the Janus computer, we have been able to simulate one thousand samples, each with half a million spins, along a time window spanning ten orders of magnitude for several magnetic fields and temperature protocols. Our main conclusion is that the system has a clearly identifiable dynamical transition, which we discuss in terms of different possibilities for the underlying physics (from a thermodynamical spin-glass transition to a mode-coupling crossover). In fact, we are able to make quantitative connections between the Edwards-Anderson spin glass and the physics of supercooled liquids. We also discuss ongoing work in equilibrium from parallel tempering simulations. Supported by the ERC, grant agreement no. 247328.

  19. Editorial - Climate change impacts on rural poverty in low-elevation coastal zones, Edward B. Barbier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, Michael; Wolanski, Eric

    2015-11-01

    In the Invited Feature Article in this issue of Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science, we are extremely grateful to Edward Barbier for performing the major task of increasing our awareness of the hazards and risks faced by all communities on low lying coasts but especially the poor, rural communities (Barbier, 2015). Against a background of climate-induced change, we now have a good and increasing evidence of the way the natural estuarine, coastal and marine system will respond (Elliott et al, 2015). However, more importantly Barbier (2015) highlights the way in which poor, rural coastal communities will be affected and will need to respond or will need help from the developed world to respond. It is axiomatic that while those communities are having less impact than more developed countries on the causes of climate change they are more affected and so have to respond to its consequences, what have been called exogenic unmanaged pressures. Hence they need to rely on mechanisms, techniques, technologies and approaches to help them cope with such change (see also Wolanski and Elliott 2015).

  20. Demographics, management, and welfare of nonracing horses in Prince Edward Island.

    PubMed

    Christie, Julie L; Hewson, Caroline J; Riley, Christopher B; Mcniven, Mary A; Dohoo, Ian R; Bate, Luis A

    2004-12-01

    There are no detailed, representative, horse-level data about equine management practices in different parts of Canada. To help address this, the demographics, management, and welfare of 312 nonracing horses in Prince Edward Island were examined in a randomized, horse-level survey during summer 2002. Owners completed a pretested questionnaire, and a veterinarian examined each horse. Owners were experienced caregivers and the horses were generally in good condition. Areas for improvement included parasite control, dental and hoof care, and tail docking. The mean fecal egg count was 428 eggs per gram; 76% of owners never removed manure from the pasture. Sixty-two percent of horses had never had a veterinary dental examination. Many horses had hoof defects (excessively long hooves, 26.8%; hoof wall breaks, 32.0%; and white line disease, 8.5%). Many (54.9%) draft horses had docked tails. These results suggest owners might benefit their horses by receiving education in aspects of equine care.

  1. A serological survey of leptospirosis in Prince Edward Island swine herds and its association with infertility.

    PubMed Central

    Van Til, L D; Dohoo, I R

    1991-01-01

    A serological survey was undertaken to determine the prevalence of leptospirosis, and to investigate associations between leptospiral antibody titers, and herd measures of reproduction. Production records and leptospirosis serology were analyzed for 25 slaughter hogs from each of eleven randomly sampled farrow-finish operations on Prince Edward Island. The effect of selected leptospiral serovars on nonproductive sow days per parity (NPSD/P) and the proportion of pigs born dead was evaluated. The four most common serovars to which antibodies were detected were Leptospira icterohaemorrhagiae, L. bratislava, L. autumnalis and L. pomona, with respective prevalences of 57.1%, 35.1%, 3.4% and 1.5% of PEI slaughter hogs. None of these serovars was associated with increased frequency of stillbirths (p greater than 0.05). However, farms with a higher prevalence of L. bratislava antibody titers tended to have more infertility, as measured by NPSD/P (r = 0.738, p = 0.036 with Bonferroni adjustment). Also, farms with L. pomona antibody titers had higher NPSD/P than farms without L. pomona antibody titers (p = 0.0008 with Bonferroni adjustment). There was no association between NPSD/P and antibodies to either L. autumnalis or L. icterohaemorrhagiae (p greater than 0.05). PMID:1790491

  2. A pilot survey of trial court judges' opinions on pro se competence after Indiana v. Edwards.

    PubMed

    Knoll, James L; Leonard, Cecilia; Kaufman, Andrew R; Way, Bruce B

    2010-01-01

    In Indiana v. Edwards, the U.S. Supreme Court held that a higher standard may be required for pro se competence (PSC) than for competence to stand trial (CST). However, the Court refrained from elaborating a specific standard. The trial judge is in the best position to make more fine-tuned mental capacity decisions. This pilot study surveyed trial judges' opinions about PSC to help forensic evaluators structure their assessments. Eighteen of 400 New York State trial judges surveyed replied. Trial judges regarded disorders of cognitive impairment (n = 10) and psychosis (n = 4) to be potentially limiting for PSC. Responses relating to which domains should be assessed were heterogeneous, but the most common were intellectual and analytic abilities (n = 10), legal knowledge/experience (n = 9), and language abilities (n = 8). Several judges listed factors that are not traditionally part of CST evaluations, such as having a rational reason for proceeding pro se and a willingness to accept the assistance of standby counsel.

  3. Finite-size corrections for ground states of Edwards-Anderson spin glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boettcher, Stefan; Falkner, Stefan

    2012-05-01

    Extensive computations of ground-state energies of the Edwards-Anderson spin glass on bond-diluted, hypercubic lattices are conducted in dimensions d=3, ..., 7. Results are presented for bond densities exactly at the percolation threshold, p=pc, and deep within the glassy regime, p>pc, where finding ground states is one of the hardest combinatorial optimization problems. Finite-size corrections of the form 1/Nω are shown to be consistent throughout with the prediction ω=1-y/d, where y refers to the "stiffness" exponent that controls the formation of domain wall excitations at low temperatures. At p=pc, an extrapolation for d→∞ appears to match our mean-field results for these corrections. In the glassy phase, however, ω does not approach its anticipated mean-field value of 2/3, obtained from simulations of the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick spin glass on an N-clique graph. Instead, the value of ω reached at the upper critical dimension matches another type of mean-field spin glass models, namely those on sparse random networks of regular degree called Bethe lattices.

  4. Numerical evidence against both mean field and droplet scenarios of the Edwards-Anderson model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, Julio F.; Alonso, Juan J.

    2013-03-01

    From tempered Monte Carlo simulations, we have obtained accurate probability distributions p (q) of the spin-overlap parameter q for finite Edwards-Anderson (EA) and Sherrington-Kirkpatrick (SK) spin-glass systems at low temperatures. Our results for p (q) follow from averages over 105 disordered samples of linear sizes L = 4 - 8 and over 15 000 samples for L = 10 . In both the SK and EA models, at temperatures as low as 0 . 2Tsg , where Tsg is the transition temperature, p (q) varies insignificantly with L. This does not fit the trend that the droplet model predicts for large L. We have also calculated correlation functions, F (q1 ,q2) , from which rms deviations, δp , over different realizations of quenched disorder, as well as thermal fluctuations, w, of q values, follow. Our numerical results for δp and w scale as √{ L} and 1 / L , respectively, in the SK model. This fits in well with mean field predictions. On the other hand, our data for w and δp vary little, if at all, for the EA model.

  5. Weather Research and Forecasting Model Wind Sensitivity Study at Edwards Air Force Base, CA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Leela R.; Bauman, William H., III; Hoeth, Brian

    2009-01-01

    This abstract describes work that will be done by the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) in assessing the success of different model configurations in predicting "wind cycling" cases at Edwards Air Force Base, CA (EAFB), in which the wind speeds and directions oscillate among towers near the EAFB runway. The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model allows users to choose among two dynamical cores - the Advanced Research WRF (ARW) and the Non-hydrostatic Mesoscale Model (NMM). There are also data assimilation analysis packages available for the initialization of the WRF model - the Local Analysis and Prediction System (LAPS) and the Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS) Data Analysis System (ADAS). Having a series of initialization options and WRF cores, as well as many options within each core, creates challenges for local forecasters, such as determining which configuration options are best to address specific forecast concerns. The goal of this project is to assess the different configurations available and determine which configuration will best predict surface wind speed and direction at EAFB.

  6. Weather Research and Forecasting Model Wind Sensitivity Study at Edwards Air Force Base, CA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Leela R.; Bauman, William H., III

    2008-01-01

    NASA prefers to land the space shuttle at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). When weather conditions violate Flight Rules at KSC, NASA will usually divert the shuttle landing to Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB) in Southern California. But forecasting surface winds at EAFB is a challenge for the Spaceflight Meteorology Group (SMG) forecasters due to the complex terrain that surrounds EAFB, One particular phenomena identified by SMG is that makes it difficult to forecast the EAFB surface winds is called "wind cycling". This occurs when wind speeds and directions oscillate among towers near the EAFB runway leading to a challenging deorbit bum forecast for shuttle landings. The large-scale numerical weather prediction models cannot properly resolve the wind field due to their coarse horizontal resolutions, so a properly tuned high-resolution mesoscale model is needed. The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model meets this requirement. The AMU assessed the different WRF model options to determine which configuration best predicted surface wind speed and direction at EAFB, To do so, the AMU compared the WRF model performance using two hot start initializations with the Advanced Research WRF and Non-hydrostatic Mesoscale Model dynamical cores and compared model performance while varying the physics options.

  7. A Green's function decoupling scheme for the Edwards fermion-boson model.

    PubMed

    Edwards, D M; Ejima, S; Alvermann, A; Fehske, H

    2010-11-03

    Holes in a Mott insulator are represented by spinless fermions in the fermion-boson model introduced by Edwards. Although the physically interesting regime is for low to moderate fermion density, the model has interesting properties over the whole density range. It has previously been studied at half-filling in the one-dimensional (1D) case by numerical methods, in particular using exact diagonalization and the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG). In the present study the one-particle Green's function is calculated analytically by means of a decoupling scheme for the equations of motion, valid for arbitrary density in 1D, 2D and 3D with fairly large boson energy and zero boson relaxation parameter. The Green's function is used to compute some ground state properties, and the one-fermion spectral function, for fermion densities n = 0.1, 0.5 and 0.9 in the 1D case. The results are generally in good agreement with numerical results obtained using the DMRG and dynamical DMRG, and new light is shed on the nature of the ground state at different fillings. The Green's function approximation is sufficiently successful in 1D to justify future application to the 2D and 3D cases.

  8. Correction of Down syndrome and Edwards syndrome aneuploidies in human cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Amano, Tomokazu; Jeffries, Emiko; Amano, Misa; Ko, Akihiro C; Yu, Hong; Ko, Minoru S H

    2015-10-01

    Aneuploidy, an abnormal number of chromosomes, has previously been considered irremediable. Here, we report findings that euploid cells increased among cultured aneuploid cells after exposure to the protein ZSCAN4, encoded by a mammalian-specific gene that is ordinarily expressed in preimplantation embryos and occasionally in stem cells. For footprint-free delivery of ZSCAN4 to cells, we developed ZSCAN4 synthetic mRNAs and Sendai virus vectors that encode human ZSCAN4. Applying the ZSCAN4 biologics to established cultures of mouse embryonic stem cells, most of which had become aneuploid and polyploid, dramatically increased the number of euploid cells within a few days. We then tested the biologics on non-immortalized primary human fibroblast cells derived from four individuals with Down syndrome—the most frequent autosomal trisomy of chromosome 21. Within weeks after ZSCAN4 application to the cells in culture, fluorescent in situ hybridization with a chromosome 21-specific probe detected the emergence of up to 24% of cells with only two rather than three copies. High-resolution G-banded chromosomes further showed up to 40% of cells with a normal karyotype. These findings were confirmed by whole-exome sequencing. Similar results were obtained for cells with the trisomy 18 of Edwards syndrome. Thus a direct, efficient correction of aneuploidy in human fibroblast cells seems possible in vitro using human ZSCAN4.

  9. Monitoring stream sediment loads in response to agriculture in Prince Edward Island, Canada.

    PubMed

    Alberto, Ashley; St-Hilaire, Andre; Courtenay, Simon C; van den Heuvel, Michael R

    2016-07-01

    Increased agricultural land use leads to accelerated erosion and deposition of fine sediment in surface water. Monitoring of suspended sediment yields has proven challenging due to the spatial and temporal variability of sediment loading. Reliable sediment yield calculations depend on accurate monitoring of these highly episodic sediment loading events. This study aims to quantify precipitation-induced loading of suspended sediments on Prince Edward Island, Canada. Turbidity is considered to be a reasonably accurate proxy for suspended sediment data. In this study, turbidity was used to monitor suspended sediment concentration (SSC) and was measured for 2 years (December 2012-2014) in three subwatersheds with varying degrees of agricultural land use ranging from 10 to 69 %. Comparison of three turbidity meter calibration methods, two using suspended streambed sediment and one using automated sampling during rainfall events, revealed that the use of SSC samples constructed from streambed sediment was not an accurate replacement for water column sampling during rainfall events for calibration. Different particle size distributions in the three rivers produced significant impacts on the calibration methods demonstrating the need for river-specific calibration. Rainfall-induced sediment loading was significantly greater in the most agriculturally impacted site only when the load per rainfall event was corrected for runoff volume (total flow minus baseflow), flow increase intensity (the slope between the start of a runoff event and the peak of the hydrograph), and season. Monitoring turbidity, in combination with sediment modeling, may offer the best option for management purposes.

  10. Prince Edward Island: building capacity--the implementation of a critical care/emergency program.

    PubMed

    Cotton, Judith

    2012-03-01

    Like other Canadian provinces, Prince Edward Island has a shortage of experienced nurses, especially in critical and emergency care. To increase the numbers of competent nurses, a PEI-based nursing course in these areas was identified as key to building capacity. This Research to Action pilot program successfully involved nurses in PEI-based emergency and critical care courses developed by the Nova Scotia Registered Nurses Professional Development Centre and funded by Human Resources and Skills Development Canada. The programs were offered on a full-time basis, lasted 14 weeks and included classroom and simulation laboratory time, along with a strong clinical component.Sixteen RNs graduated from the courses and became Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support (ACLS) certified. An additional 12 RNs were trained as preceptors. Feedback from participants indicates greater job satisfaction and increased confidence in providing patient assessments and care. Based on the program's success, the RTA partners proposed the establishment of an ongoing, PEI-based critical care and emergency nursing program utilizing 80/20 staffing models and mentorship. Their proposal was approved, with courses set to resume in January, 2012.

  11. A retrospective review of maternal and child health services at the Albert Schweitzer Hospital in rural Haiti.

    PubMed

    Wallace, C E; Marshall, F N; Robinson, C

    1982-01-01

    For the past 25 years the Albert Schweitzer Hospital in Deschapelles, Haiti has been providing a wide range of maternal and child health services to the people of its rural district. Numerous special services for mothers and children have been added over the years, but these began to realize considerably greater potential with the creation of the hospital's Community Health Department in 1967. This department has carried out numerous preventive health programs and services designed to accommodate these groups' special health needs. Attention is directed to neonatal tetanus control; surveillance, treatment, and prevention of malnutrition; and other maternal and child health services (school programs, immunization activities, prenatal and postnatal care, family planning, the midwives' program, the "cord-cut" unit, the low birth weight project, and dispensaries and health agents). In 1967 the hospital began to develop programs especially designed to control neonatal tetanus. Communities were immunized systematically. By establishing outdoor immunization clinics at the hospital and at major marketplaces in the district and by working with traditional midwives, these programs were responsible for a sharp decline in the incidence of neonatal tetanus. Malnutrition has remained the most frequently occurring health problem among children in the hospital district. Several services and programs have been established throughout the years to meet the identified needs. These include the following which are described: the nutrition clinic; courtyard education; "weigh-ins;" nutrition recovery centers; the 3-day center at Deschapelles; nutrition intervention and case follow-up program; and malnutrition treatment. The hospital's family planning program has gradually increased its use of community education to reach the population and to try to gain acceptance of the need to space and limit births. This community education has been disseminated by dispensaries, mobile health team

  12. Interprofessional student education: exchange program between Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Pacific College of Oriental Medicine.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Belinda J; Herron, Patrick D; Downie, Sherry A; Myers, Daniel C; Milan, Felise B; Olson, Todd R; Kligler, Ben E; Sierpina, Victor S; Kreitzer, Mary Jo

    2012-01-01

    The growing popularity of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), of which estimated 38% of adults in the United States used in 2007, has engendered changes in medical school curricula to increase students' awareness of it. Exchange programs between conventional medical schools and CAM institutions are recognized as an effective method of interprofessional education. The exchange program between Albert Einstein College of Medicine (Einstein, Yeshiva University) and Pacific College of Oriental Medicine, New York campus (PCOM-NY) is in its fifth year and is part of a broader relationship between the schools encompassing research, clinical training, interinstitutional faculty and board appointments, and several educational activities. The Einstein/PCOM-NY student education exchange program is part of the Einstein Introduction to Clinical Medicine Program and involves students from Einstein learning about Chinese medicine through a lecture, the experience of having acupuncture, and a four-hour preceptorship at the PCOM outpatient clinic. The students from PCOM learn about allopathic medicine training through an orientation lecture, a two-and-a-half-hour dissection laboratory session along side Einstein student hosts, and a tour of the clinical skills center at the Einstein campus. In the 2011/2012 offering of the exchange program, the participating Einstein and PCOM students were surveyed to assess the educational outcomes. The data indicate that the exchange program was highly valued by all students and provided a unique learning experience. Survey responses from the Einstein students indicated the need for greater emphasis on referral information, which has been highlighted in the literature as an important medical curriculum integrative medicine competency.

  13. Dolomite dissolution rates and possible Holocene dedolomitization of water-bearing units in the Edwards aquifer, south-central Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Deike, R.G.

    1990-01-01

    Rates of dolomite dissolution can be used to test the concept, based on geomorphologic evidence, that a major part of the Edwards aquifer could have formed within the Holocene, a timeframe of approximately 10,000 years. During formation of the aquifer in the Edwards limestone (Cretaceous, Albian) of the Balcones fault zone, dolomite dissolution and porosity development were synchronous and the result of mixing-zone dedolomitization. Initiation of the mixing zone in the early Holocene (???11,000 years before present) is suggested by the maximum age of formation of major discharge sites that allowed the influx of meteoric water into brine-filled, dolomitic preaquifer units. Dedolomitization, the dissolution of dolomite and net precipitation of calcite, has left aquifer units that are calcitic, and 40 vol.% interconnected pore space. The mass of dolomite missing is obtained by comparison of stratigraphically equivalent altered and unaltered units. One dissolution rate (1.76 ?? 10-4 mmol dolomite kgH2O-1yr-1) is determined from this mass, 104yr reaction time, and a log-linear function describing the increase in mass discharge (three orders of magnitude) during aquifer formation. The second estimated dissolution rate is obtained from the mass transfer of dolomite to solution calculated from the increase in magnesium in pore fluids selected from the modern aquifer to represent a typical flowpath during aquifer formation. A reaction time of 104yr for this mass transfer yields a rate of 0.56 ?? 10-4 mmol dolomite kgH2O-1yr-1. Both of these rates are comparable to modern rates of dolomite dissolution (0.3 to 4.5 ?? 10-4 mmol dolomite kgH2O-1yr-1) calculated from measured reaction times in the Tertiary Floridan aquifer system in Florida and the Madison aquifer in the Mississippian Madison Limestone of the Northern Great Plains. Similarity of these rates to the estimated paleo-rates of dolomite dissolution supports a 104 yr reaction timeframe. The Holocene reaction time also

  14. Effects of contaminants on reproductive success of aquatic birds nesting at Edwards Air Force Base, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hothem, R.L.; Crayon, J.J.; Law, M.A.

    2006-01-01

    Contamination by organochlorine pesticides (OCs), polychlorinated biphenyls, metals, and trace elements at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB), located in the Mojave Desert, could adversely affect nesting aquatic birds, especially at the sewage lagoons that comprise Piute Ponds. Estimates of avian reproduction, in conjunction with analyses of eggs and avian foods for contaminant residues, may indicate the potential for negative effects on avian populations. From 1996 to 1999, we conducted studies at the Piute Ponds area of EAFB to evaluate the impacts of contaminants on nesting birds. Avian reproduction was evaluated in 1999. Eggs were collected for chemical analyses in 1996 and 1999, and African clawed frogs (Xenopus laevis), a likely food source, were collected for chemical analyses in 1998. Avian species occupying the higher trophic levels-black-crowned night-heron (Nycticorax nycticorax), white-faced ibis (Plegadis chihi), and American avocet (Recurvirostra americana)-generally bioaccumulated higher concentrations of contaminants in their eggs. Reproductive success and egg hatchability of night-herons and white-faced ibises in the Piute Ponds were similar to results observed at other western colonies. Deformities were observed in only one embryo in this study, but concentrations of contaminants evaluated in this ibis embryo were considered insufficient to have caused the deformities. Because clawed frogs, a primary prey item for night-herons at Piute Ponds, had no detectable levels of any OCs, it is likely that OCs found in night-heron eggs were acquired from the wintering grounds rather than from EAFB. The presence of isomers of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) in ibis eggs indicated recent exposure, but invertebrates used for food by ibises were not sampled at Piute Ponds, and conclusions about the source of OCs in ibis eggs could not be made. Concentrations of contaminants in random and failed eggs of individual species were not different, and we concluded

  15. Groundwater nitrate concentration evolution under climate change and agricultural adaptation scenarios: Prince Edward Island, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paradis, Daniel; Vigneault, Harold; Lefebvre, René; Savard, Martine M.; Ballard, Jean-Marc; Qian, Budong

    2016-03-01

    Nitrate (N-NO3) concentration in groundwater, the sole source of potable water in Prince Edward Island (PEI, Canada), currently exceeds the 10 mg L-1 (N-NO3) health threshold for drinking water in 6 % of domestic wells. Increasing climatic and socio-economic pressures on PEI agriculture may further deteriorate groundwater quality. This study assesses how groundwater nitrate concentration could evolve due to the forecasted climate change and its related potential changes in agricultural practices. For this purpose, a tridimensional numerical groundwater flow and mass transport model was developed for the aquifer system of the entire Island (5660 km2). A number of different groundwater flow and mass transport simulations were made to evaluate the potential impact of the projected climate change and agricultural adaptation. According to the simulations for year 2050, N-NO3 concentration would increase due to two main causes: (1) the progressive attainment of steady-state conditions related to present-day nitrogen loadings, and (2) the increase in nitrogen loadings due to changes in agricultural practices provoked by future climatic conditions. The combined effects of equilibration with loadings, climate and agricultural adaptation would lead to a 25 to 32 % increase in N-NO3 concentration over the Island aquifer system. The change in groundwater recharge regime induced by climate change (with current agricultural practices) would only contribute 0 to 6 % of that increase for the various climate scenarios. Moreover, simulated trends in groundwater N-NO3 concentration suggest that an increased number of domestic wells (more than doubling) would exceed the nitrate drinking water criteria. This study underlines the need to develop and apply better agricultural management practices to ensure sustainability of long-term groundwater resources. The simulations also show that observable benefits from positive changes in agricultural practices would be delayed in time due to

  16. Groundwater nitrate concentration evolution under climate change and agricultural adaptation scenarios: Prince Edward Island, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paradis, D.; Vigneault, H.; Lefebvre, R.; Savard, M. M.; Ballard, J.-M.; Qian, B.

    2015-08-01

    Nitrate (N-NO3) concentration in groundwater, the sole source of potable water in Prince Edward Island (PEI, Canada), currently exceeds the 10 mg L-1 (N-NO3) health threshold for drinking water in 6 % of domestic wells. Increasing climatic and socio-economic pressures on PEI agriculture may further deteriorate groundwater quality. This study assesses how groundwater nitrate concentrations could evolve due to the forecasted climate change and its related potential changes in agricultural practices. For this purpose, a tridimensional numerical groundwater flow and mass transport model was developed for the aquifer system of the entire Island (5660 km2). A number of different groundwater flow and mass transport simulations were made to evaluate the potential impact of the projected climate change and agricultural adaptation. According to the simulations for year 2050, N-NO3 concentration would increase due to two main causes: (1) the progressive attainment of steady-state conditions related to present-day nitrogen loadings, and (2) the increase in nitrogen loadings due to changes in agricultural practices provoked by future climatic conditions. The combined effects of equilibration with loadings, climate and agricultural adaptation would lead to a 25 to 32 % increase in N-NO3 concentration over the Island aquifer system. Climate change alone (practices maintained at their current level) would contribute only 0 to 6 % to that increase according to the various climate scenarios. Moreover, simulated trends in groundwater N-NO3 concentration suggest that an increased number of domestic wells (more than doubling) would exceed the nitrate drinking water criteria. This study underlines the need to develop and apply better agricultural management practices to ensure sustainability of long-term groundwater resources. The simulations also show that observable benefits from positive changes in agricultural practices would be delayed in time due to the slow dynamics of nitrate

  17. Effects of contaminants on reproductive success of aquatic birds nesting at Edwards Air Force Base, California.

    PubMed

    Hothem, R L; Crayon, J J; Law, M A

    2006-11-01

    Contamination by organochlorine pesticides (OCs), polychlorinated biphenyls, metals, and trace elements at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB), located in the Mojave Desert, could adversely affect nesting aquatic birds, especially at the sewage lagoons that comprise Piute Ponds. Estimates of avian reproduction, in conjunction with analyses of eggs and avian foods for contaminant residues, may indicate the potential for negative effects on avian populations. From 1996 to 1999, we conducted studies at the Piute Ponds area of EAFB to evaluate the impacts of contaminants on nesting birds. Avian reproduction was evaluated in 1999. Eggs were collected for chemical analyses in 1996 and 1999, and African clawed frogs (Xenopus laevis), a likely food source, were collected for chemical analyses in 1998. Avian species occupying the higher trophic levels--black-crowned night-heron (Nycticorax nycticorax), white-faced ibis (Plegadis chihi), and American avocet (Recurvirostra americana)--generally bioaccumulated higher concentrations of contaminants in their eggs. Reproductive success and egg hatchability of night-herons and white-faced ibises in the Piute Ponds were similar to results observed at other western colonies. Deformities were observed in only one embryo in this study, but concentrations of contaminants evaluated in this ibis embryo were considered insufficient to have caused the deformities. Because clawed frogs, a primary prey item for night-herons at Piute Ponds, had no detectable levels of any OCs, it is likely that OCs found in night-heron eggs were acquired from the wintering grounds rather than from EAFB. The presence of isomers of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) in ibis eggs indicated recent exposure, but invertebrates used for food by ibises were not sampled at Piute Ponds, and conclusions about the source of OCs in ibis eggs could not be made. Concentrations of contaminants in random and failed eggs of individual species were not different, and we concluded

  18. Prevalence of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis in three species of wild frogs on Prince Edward Island, Canada.

    PubMed

    Forzán, M J; Vanderstichel, R; Hogan, N S; Teather, K; Wood, J

    2010-09-02

    Chytridiomycosis, caused by the fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), has resulted in the decline or extinction of approximately 200 frog species worldwide. It has been reported throughout much of North America, but its presence on Prince Edward Island (PEI), on the eastern coast of Canada, was unknown. To determine the presence and prevalence of Bd on PEI, skin swabs were collected from 115 frogs from 18 separate sites across the province during the summer of 2009. The swabs were tested through single round end-point PCR for the presence of Bd DNA. Thirty-one frogs were positive, including 25/93 (27%) green frogs Lithobates (Rana) clamitans, 5/20 (25%) northern leopard frogs L. (R.) pipiens, and 1/2 (50%) wood frogs L. sylvaticus (formerly R. sylvatica); 12 of the 18 (67%) sites had at least 1 positive frog. The overall prevalence of Bd infection was estimated at 26.9% (7.2-46.7%, 95% CI). Prevalence amongst green frogs and leopard frogs was similar, but green frogs had a stronger PCR signal when compared to leopard frogs, regardless of age (p < 0.001) and body length (p = 0.476). Amongst green frogs, juveniles were more frequently positive than adults (p = 0.001). Green frogs may be the most reliable species to sample when looking for Bd in eastern North America. The 1 wood frog positive for Bd was found dead from chytridiomycosis; none of the other frogs that were positive for Bd by PCR showed any obvious signs of illness. Further monitoring will be required to determine what effect Bd infection has on amphibian population health on PEI.

  19. Occurrence of Giardia and Cryptosporidium in pigs on Prince Edward Island, Canada.

    PubMed

    Budu-Amoako, Ebo; Greenwood, Spencer J; Dixon, Brent R; Barkema, Herman W; Hurnik, Daniel; Estey, Chelsie; McClure, J T

    2012-02-28

    In a cross-sectional study of 633 pigs from 21 herds on Prince Edward Island, Canada (PEI), the prevalence of infection with Cryptosporidium and Giardia, and the genotypes and species of isolates were determined in order to establish the zoonotic potential of pigs in this region. As determined by direct immunofluorescence microscopy (DFA), 18 herds (86%) and 163 animals (26%; 95% CI: 22-29%) tested positive for Cryptosporidium, while just 3 herds (14%) and 6 animals (1%; 95% CI: 0.4-2%) tested positive for Giardia. Cryptosporidium spp. isolates were detected in 39% (95% CI: 34-44%) of weanlings (1-3 months of age) and 9% (95% CI: 6-13) of sows (>8months of age). Molecular characterization using the 18S rDNA and HSP70 gene fragments revealed the presence of Cryptosporidium sp. pig genotype II, C. suis, C. parvum, and Cryptosporidium sp. mouse genotype. Among the 113 isolates of Cryptosporidium spp. successfully genotyped, pig genotype II (61%) predominated, with C. suis (36%) being the next most prominant isolate. C. parvum (2%; two isolates) and Cryptosporidium sp. mouse genotype (0.9%; one isolate) were only occasionally isolated. The only two Cryptosporidium-positive genotyped isolates from sows included one each of C. suis and Cryptosporidium sp. pig genotype II. All but one of the six Giardia positive isolates were detected in weanling pigs. None of the Giardia-positive isolates was amenable to PCR. This study demonstrates that Cryptosporidium spp. are highly prevalent in pigs on PEI, Canada, are found mostly in weanlings (1-3 months of age). Furthermore, the pigs are primarily infected by the host-specific genotypes and species, Cryptosporidium sp. pig genotype II and C. suis, whereas the zoonotic C. parvum is rare. Giardia duodenalis is only occasionally found in pigs. These findings suggest that domestic pigs on PEI, Canada, likely do not pose a significant health risk to humans from these parasites.

  20. A Biography of Distinguished Scientist Gilbert Newton Lewis (by Edward S. Lewis)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Reviewed By Harold H.

    1999-11-01

    The Edward Mellen Press: Lewiston, NY, 1998. 114 pp + index. ISBN 0-7734-8284-9. $69.95. There may not be a surname better known to students of chemistry than Lewis, from the Lewis electron-dot diagrams and the Lewis theory of acids and bases. More advanced students may know of the groundbreaking textbook Thermodynamics, by Lewis and Randall. Yet few Americans know much about this remarkable U.S.-born scholar, whose contributions equal those of the greatest scientists. He is a chemist-educator of whom we should be as proud and as well informed as we are of Linus Pauling, who was part of the westward movement of science in this country that G. N. Lewis began, or of the recently deceased Glenn Seaborg, who was one of the many students of Lewis who achieved renown. Gilbert N. Lewis was born in Weymouth, Massachusetts, in 1875, but his family moved to near Lincoln, Nebraska, in 1884. He spent two years at the University of Nebraska, but then moved to Harvard when his father became an executive at Merchants Trust Company in Boston. Young Lewis (then only 17) was also said to have been disappointed with the quality of education in Nebraska, and this may have been part of the impetus for the family's move east. After earning his baccalaureate at Harvard, he taught for a year at Phillips Andover Academy before returning to Harvard to study for his doctorate, which he completed 100 years ago, in 1899, under T. W. Richards. Lewis's doctoral work was on the thermodynamics of zinc and cadmium amalgams. At that time, physical chemistry was only beginning to achieve recognition as a branch of science, and its boundaries were ill defined. Edward Lewis quotes his father as often saying, "Physical chemistry is anything interesting." Like many chemists of his time, Lewis went to Europe to complete his preparation for a career; he was in the laboratories of Ostwald in Leipzig and Nernst in Göttingen in 1900-1901. On his return to the United States, he was an instructor at Harvard