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Sample records for alberta health services

  1. Alberta Health Services: journey to accreditation.

    PubMed

    Mumme, Susan; Nicklin, Wendy

    2012-01-01

    In October 2010, Alberta Health Services (AHS) successfully completed phase one of its journey to accreditation, meeting 683 of 774 criteria and earning Accreditation with Condition. AHS entered accreditation during its infancy (18 months, to be exact) in an environment shaped by seismic organizational and structural changes. In this article, the authors share some of the successes, challenges and ongoing opportunities that have emerged during the first years of AHS's accreditation journey, as well as details of the strong collaborative relationship between AHS and Accreditation Canada.

  2. A Survey of Mental Health Services at Post-Secondary Institutions in Alberta

    PubMed Central

    Heck, Emma; Jaworska, Natalia; DeSomma, Elisea; Dhoopar, Arjun Sunny; MacMaster, Frank P; Dewey, Deborah; MacQueen, Glenda

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The relatively high prevalence of mental health problems among students at post-secondary institutions in Canada is well documented; in contrast, less is known about the adequacy of mental health services available to Canadian post-secondary students on campuses. Our study sought to examine the current state of campus mental health initiatives and services in Alberta as well as the extent to which resources identified in mental health literature as being key in mental health problem prevention and promotion appear to be available. Methods: A 60-question, online survey was sent to staff (primarily front-line workers; n = 45) at Alberta’s 26 publicly funded post-secondary institutions. Responses were organized according to small (less than 2000 students), medium (2000 to 10 000 students), and large (10 000 or more students) institutions. Results: All of Alberta’s post-secondary institutions were represented in the responses. Mental health initiatives and services are available, to varying extent, at all of Alberta’s post-secondary institutions. However, many institutions do not have initiatives and (or) services aimed at identifying students with mental health problems or policies for monitoring their mental health services. Additionally, smaller institutions are less likely to offer certain services (for example, gatekeeper training and campus medical services), compared with larger ones. Finally, a systematic review or an evaluation of services appears to be infrequently conducted. Conclusions: These findings highlight the need for post-secondary institutions in Alberta, and by extension in Canada, to develop and institute a comprehensive strategy to evaluate and optimize the delivery of mental health initiatives and services. PMID:25007278

  3. An audit of health products and services marketed on chiropractic websites in Alberta and consideration of these practices in the context of chiropractic codes of conduct and ethics

    PubMed Central

    Page, Stacey A.

    2007-01-01

    Background Chiropractic’s success as a health care profession is evidenced in part by the rising number of practitioners. Paradoxically, this success may start to cost the profession, as the number of consumers may not be increasing proportionally. Fewer patients mean less income for practitioners. Some chiropractors are responding to these pressures by marketing health products, and services Objectives To describe the extent to which Alberta chiropractors with websites sold health products and the extent to which fee discounts/service inducements were advertised. To consider these practices in the context of chiropractic codes of conduct and ethics. Methods Chiropractic websites in the province of Alberta were identified using the online Telus Business Finder and cross-referenced with the Yellow Pages print directories. The websites were searched and an inventory of the health products for sale was recorded. Fee discounts and service inducements were also recorded. Results 56 websites were identified and reviewed. Just under two-thirds of the chiropractic websites surveyed contained information on health products for sale. Orthotics were sold most often (N = 29 practices; 51.8%), followed by pillows and supports (N = 15: 26.8%), vitamins/nutritional supplements (N = 15; 26.8%) and exercise/rehabilitation products (N = 10; 17.9%). Nine practices (16.1%) offered some type of inducement to potential customers. These included discounts on treatment packages (N = 2; 3.6%), free gait/ posture analyses (N = 2; 3.6%) and free general consultations with the chiropractors (N = 3; 5.4%) Conclusions The marketing of health care products and services by chiropractors in Alberta is common. Such practices raise ethical considerations for the profession. Professional guidelines vary on the acceptability of these practices. Consumer and practitioner perspectives and practices regarding retailing need to be further examined. PMID:17657302

  4. Community mental health nursing in Alberta, Canada: an oral history.

    PubMed

    Boschma, Geertje

    2012-01-01

    Community mental health nurses had a central role in the construction of new rehabilitative practices and community mental health services in the 1960s and 1970s. The purpose of this article is, first, to explore how nurses understood and created their new role and identity in the turbulent context of deinstitutionalization. The development of after care services for patients discharged from Alberta Hospital in Ponoka (AH-Ponoka), a large mental institution in Calgary, in the Canadian province of Alberta, will be used as a case study. I specifically focus on the establishment of outpatient services in a new psychiatric department at Foothills General Hospital in Calgary. Second, I examine how deinstitutionalization itself shaped community mental health nurses' work. Oral history interviews with nurses and other mental health professionals, who had a central role in this transformation process, provide a unique lens through which to explore this social change. The article concludes that new rehabilitative, community-based mental health services can better be understood as a transformation of former institutional practices rather than as a definite break with them.

  5. Alberta Healthy Living Program--a model for successful integration of chronic disease management services.

    PubMed

    Morrin, Louise; Britten, Judith; Davachi, Shahnaz; Knight, Holly

    2013-08-01

    The most common presentation of chronic disease is multimorbidity. Disease management strategies are similar across most chronic diseases. Given the prevalence of multimorbidity and the commonality in approaches, fragmented single disease management must be replaced with integrated care of the whole person. The Alberta Healthy Living Program, a community-based chronic disease management program, supports adults with, or at risk for, chronic disease to improve their health and well being. Participants gain confidence and skills in how to manage their chronic disease(s) by learning to understand their health condition, make healthy eating choices, exercise safely and cope emotionally. The program includes 3 service pillars: disease-specific and general health patient education, disease-spanning supervised exercise and Better Choices, Better Health(TM) self-management workshops. Services are delivered in the community by an interprofessional team and can be tailored to target specific diverse and vulnerable populations, such as Aboriginal, ethno-cultural and francophone groups and those experiencing homelessness. Programs may be offered as a partnership between Alberta Health Services, primary care and community organizations. Common standards reduce provincial variation in care, yet maintain sufficient flexibility to meet local and diverse needs and achieve equity in care. The model has been implemented successfully in 108 communities across Alberta. This approach is associated with reduced acute care utilization and improved clinical indicators, and achieves efficiencies through an integrated, disease-spanning patient-centred approach.

  6. Health care delivery for head-and-neck cancer patients in Alberta: a practice guideline

    PubMed Central

    Harris, J.R.; Lau, H.; Surgeoner, B.V.; Chua, N.; Dobrovolsky, W.; Dort, J.C.; Kalaydjian, E.; Nesbitt, M.; Scrimger, R.A.; Seikaly, H.; Skarsgard, D.; Webster, M.A.

    2014-01-01

    Background The treatment of head-and-neck cancer is complex and requires the involvement of various health care professionals with a wide range of expertise. We describe the process of developing a practice guideline with recommendations about the organization and delivery of health care services for head-and-neck cancer patients in Alberta. Methods Outcomes of interest included composition of the health care team, qualification requirements for team members, cancer centre and team member volumes, infrastructure needs, and wait times. A search for existing practice guidelines and a systematic review of the literature addressing the organization and delivery of health care services for head-and-neck cancer patients were conducted. The search included the Standards and Guidelines Evidence (sage) directory of cancer guidelines and PubMed. Results One practice guideline was identified for adaptation. Three additional practice guidelines provided supplementary evidence to inform guideline recommendations. Members of the Alberta Provincial Head and Neck Tumour Team (consisting of various health professionals from across the province) provided expert feedback on the adapted recommendations through an online and in-person review process. Selected experts in head-and-neck cancer from outside the province participated in an external online review. SUMMARY The recommendations outlined in this practice guideline are based on existing guidelines that have been modified to fit the Alberta context. Although specific to Alberta, the recommendations lend credence to similar published guidelines and could be considered for use by groups lacking the resources of appointed guideline panels. The recommendations are meant to be a guide rather than a fixed protocol. The implementation of this practice guideline will depend on many factors, including but not limited to availability of trained personnel, adequate funding of infrastructure, and collaboration with other associations of

  7. Descriptive analysis of the inequalities of health information resources between Alberta's rural and urban health regions.

    PubMed

    Stieda, Vivian; Colvin, Barb

    2009-01-01

    In an effort to understand the extent of the inequalities in health information resources across Alberta, SEARCH Custom, HKN (Health Knowledge Network) and IRREN (Inter-Regional Research and Evaluation Network) conducted a survey in December 2007 to determine what library resources currently existed in Alberta's seven rural health regions and the two urban health regions. Although anecdotal evidence indicated that these gaps existed, the analysis was undertaken to provide empirical evidence of the exact nature of these gaps. The results, coupled with the published literature on the impact, effectiveness and value of information on clinical practice and administrative decisions in healthcare management, will be used to build momentum among relevant stakeholders to support a vision of equitably funded health information for all healthcare practitioners across the province of Alberta.

  8. Neo-Conservatism and Child Care Services in Alberta: A Case Study. Occasional Paper No. 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayden, Jacqueline

    The development and delivery of child care services in Canada has never been without controversy. This case study examines the development of the child care system in Alberta, Canada, showing how the role of the government proceeded through four distinct phases, each determining a different outcome for child care stakeholders. Power mechanisms and…

  9. Fire, Aim… Ready? Alberta's Big Bang Approach to Healthcare Disintegration.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, Cam

    2010-08-01

    Alberta's abolition in 2008 of its health regions and the creation of Alberta Health Services (AHS) was a bold move, but the reasons for the change remain hazy. The stated goals were to "help make Alberta's … system more effective and efficient" and to "provide equitable access to health services and long-term sustainability." Data show, however, that Alberta's health regions were already performing well on these goals relative to other provinces, and where changes have since occurred, they cannot necessarily be attributed to AHS.

  10. A Healthy Communities Initiative in Rural Alberta: Building Rural Capacity for Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GermAnn, Kathy; Smith, Neale; Littlejohns, Lori Baugh

    Efforts of health professionals are shifting away from programs that "deliver health" toward those that build the capacity of communities to work together to create healthy places. The Healthy Communities Initiative (HCI) is a community development model in central Alberta (Canada) that involves the creation of a widely shared vision of a…

  11. Development, testing and implementation of an emergency services methodology in Alberta.

    PubMed

    Eliasoph, H; Ashdown, C

    1995-01-01

    Alberta was the first province in Canada to mandate reporting of hospital-based emergency services. This reporting is based on a workload measurement system that groups emergency visits into five discreet workload levels/classes driven by ICD-9-CM diagnoses. Other related workload measurement variables are incorporated, including admissions, transfers, maintenance monitoring, nursing and non-nursing patient support activities, trips, staff replacement, and personal fatigue and delay. The methodology used to design the reporting system has been subjected to extensive testing, auditing and refinement. The results of one year of province-wide data collection yielded approximately 1.5 million emergency visits. These data reveal consistent patterns/trends of workload that vary by hospital size and type. Although this information can assist in utilization management efforts to predict and compare workload and staffing levels, the impetus for establishing this system derived from its potential for funding hospital-based emergency services. This would be the first time that such services would be funded on a systemic, system-wide basis whereby hospitals would be reimbursed in relation to workload. This proposed funding system would distribute available funding in a consistent, fair and equitable manner across all hospitals providing a similar set of services, thus achieving one of the key goals of the Alberta Acute Care Funding Plan. Ultimately, this proposed funding methodology would be integrated into a broader Ambulatory Care Funding system currently being developed in Alberta.

  12. Development, testing and implementation of an emergency services methodology in Alberta.

    PubMed

    Eliasoph, H; Ashdown, C

    1995-01-01

    Alberta was the first province in Canada to mandate reporting of hospital-based emergency services. This reporting is based on a workload measurement system that groups emergency visits into five discreet workload levels/classes driven by ICD-9-CM diagnoses. Other related workload measurement variables are incorporated, including admissions, transfers, maintenance monitoring, nursing and non-nursing patient support activities, trips, staff replacement, and personal fatigue and delay. The methodology used to design the reporting system has been subjected to extensive testing, auditing and refinement. The results of one year of province-wide data collection yielded approximately 1.5 million emergency visits. These data reveal consistent patterns/trends of workload that vary by hospital size and type. Although this information can assist in utilization management efforts to predict and compare workload and staffing levels, the impetus for establishing this system derived from its potential for funding hospital-based emergency services. This would be the first time that such services would be funded on a systemic, system-wide basis whereby hospitals would be reimbursed in relation to workload. This proposed funding system would distribute available funding in a consistent, fair and equitable manner across all hospitals providing a similar set of services, thus achieving one of the key goals of the Alberta Acute Care Funding Plan. Ultimately, this proposed funding methodology would be integrated into a broader Ambulatory Care Funding system currently being developed in Alberta. PMID:10142620

  13. The Support Service Approach to University Education for Native Students in Alberta.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore-Eyman, Evelyn

    Of the four universities within the Province of Alberta, the University of Calgary has most effectively met the bicultural needs of Native students. Athabasca University's correspondence courses are usually not effective for Native students. The University of Alberta's "Morningstar" program allows teacher certification before completion of degrees…

  14. Estimating Health Services Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, H. M.

    1985-01-01

    In computer program NOROCA populations statistics from National Center for Health Statistics used with computational procedure to estimate health service utilization rates, physician demands (by specialty) and hospital bed demands (by type of service). Computational procedure applicable to health service area of any size and even used to estimate statewide demands for health services.

  15. Toward a model for effectiveness. What Alberta occupational health nurses think.

    PubMed

    Skillen, D Lynn; Anderson, Marjorie C; Seglie, JoAnne; Gilbert, Julie

    2002-02-01

    Effectiveness is difficult to define or measure, but is frequently associated with cost. A two phase study conducted with occupational health nurses in Alberta, Canada resulted in a beginning model for effectiveness. In 1997, Phase One of an exploratory descriptive study focused on physical assessment by occupational health nurses (N = 137) and perceptions of effectiveness in practice (n = 104). In 2001, Phase Two used focus groups (n = 7) to determine occupational health nurses' reactions to the preliminary analysis of questionnaire responses on effectiveness. The focus groups confirmed and expanded categories, and reconfigured the developing model. The model makes explicit the foundations, functions, relationships, and goals for effectiveness in occupational health nursing practice. The foundation includes registered nurse (RN) experience and baseline competence comprising occupational health nursing education, RN and occupational health nurse experience, and multidisciplinary knowledge. Ten specific functions and nine relationships describe the occupational health nursing specialty practice and promote achievement of five goals: balance, communication, continuing competence, leadership, and trust. The goal of balance needs articulation in the nursing literature.

  16. Knowledge, attitudes and behaviours related to climate change in Alberta, Canada: implications for public health policy and practice.

    PubMed

    Plotnikoff, Ronald C; Wright, Mary-Frances; Karunamuni, Nandini

    2004-06-01

    Climate change has received recent extensive media attention (e.g., Kyoto Protocol) and is currently on the international public health agenda. The purpose of this study was to survey knowledge, attitudes and behaviours related to climate change in the province of Alberta, Canada. A random sample of 600 Alberta households, using proportional quotas based on the Canada Census of the Alberta population, was surveyed on knowledge, attitudes and behaviours related to climate change using a computer-assisted telephone interviewing protocol. Albertans are highly concerned, particularly about health problems related to the environment and air pollution; yet are only moderately informed about a variety of environmental issues. While the great majority of Albertans appear to be engaged in environmental behaviours at home, fewer consider energy efficiency when purchasing consumer goods. An even smaller percentage makes environmentally conscious transportation decisions. To encourage the population to make recommended environmental behaviours, mass media approaches may do well to target the specific beliefs that were deemed salient (e.g., promote the association between environment issues and health). The public health sector has a major role in working with inter-sectoral groups to address this significant public health issue.

  17. Trade in health services.

    PubMed

    Chanda, Rupa

    2002-01-01

    In light of the increasing globalization of the health sector, this article examines ways in which health services can be traded, using the mode-wise characterization of trade defined in the General Agreement on Trade in Services. The trade modes include cross- border delivery of health services via physical and electronic means, and cross-border movement of consumers, professionals, and capital. An examination of the positive and negative implications of trade in health services for equity, efficiency, quality, and access to health care indicates that health services trade has brought mixed benefits and that there is a clear role for policy measures to mitigate the adverse consequences and facilitate the gains. Some policy measures and priority areas for action are outlined, including steps to address the "brain drain"; increasing investment in the health sector and prioritizing this investment better; and promoting linkages between private and public health care services to ensure equity. Data collection, measures, and studies on health services trade all need to be improved, to assess better the magnitude and potential implications of this trade. In this context, the potential costs and benefits of trade in health services are shaped by the underlying structural conditions and existing regulatory, policy, and infrastructure in the health sector. Thus, appropriate policies and safeguard measures are required to take advantage of globalization in health services.

  18. Trade in health services.

    PubMed Central

    Chanda, Rupa

    2002-01-01

    In light of the increasing globalization of the health sector, this article examines ways in which health services can be traded, using the mode-wise characterization of trade defined in the General Agreement on Trade in Services. The trade modes include cross- border delivery of health services via physical and electronic means, and cross-border movement of consumers, professionals, and capital. An examination of the positive and negative implications of trade in health services for equity, efficiency, quality, and access to health care indicates that health services trade has brought mixed benefits and that there is a clear role for policy measures to mitigate the adverse consequences and facilitate the gains. Some policy measures and priority areas for action are outlined, including steps to address the "brain drain"; increasing investment in the health sector and prioritizing this investment better; and promoting linkages between private and public health care services to ensure equity. Data collection, measures, and studies on health services trade all need to be improved, to assess better the magnitude and potential implications of this trade. In this context, the potential costs and benefits of trade in health services are shaped by the underlying structural conditions and existing regulatory, policy, and infrastructure in the health sector. Thus, appropriate policies and safeguard measures are required to take advantage of globalization in health services. PMID:11953795

  19. Small mammals as sentinels of oil sands related contaminants and health effects in northeastern Alberta, Canada.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Estival, Jaime; Smits, Judit E G

    2016-02-01

    The extraction of bitumen in areas of northeastern Alberta (Canada) has been associated with the release of complex mixtures of metals, metalloids, and polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs) to the environment. To mitigate effects on ecosystems, Canadian legislation mandates that disturbed areas be reclaimed to an ecologically sustainable state after active operations. However, as part of reclamation activities, exposure to, and effects on wildlife living in these areas is not generally assessed. To support successful reclamation, the development of efficient methods to assess exposure and health effects in potentially exposed wildlife is required. In the present study, we investigated the usefulness of two native mammalian species (deer mouse Peromyscus maniculatus, and meadow vole Microtus pennsylvanicus) as sentinels of oil sands related contaminants by examining biomarkers of exposure and indicators of biological costs. Tissue residues of 31 metals and metalloids in kidneys and muscle, activity of the hepatic detoxification enzyme EROD (as a biomarker of exposure to organic contaminants), body condition, and the relative mass of liver, kidney, spleen, and testes were compared in animals from one reclaimed area and a reference site. Deer mice from the reclaimed site had higher renal levels of Co, Se and Tl compared to animals from the reference site, which was associated with reduced body condition. Lower testis mass was another feature that distinguished mice from the reclaimed site in comparison to those from the reference site. One mouse and one vole from the reclaimed site also showed increased hepatic EROD activity. In marked contrast, no changes were evident for these variables in meadow voles. Our results show that deer mouse is a sensitive sentinel species and that the biomarkers and indicators used here are efficient means to detect local contamination and associated biological effects in native mammals inhabiting reclaimed areas on active oil sands mine

  20. Air quality in the Industrial Heartland of Alberta, Canada and potential impacts on human health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, Isobel J.; Marrero, Josette E.; Batterman, Stuart; Meinardi, Simone; Barletta, Barbara; Blake, Donald R.

    2013-12-01

    The “Industrial Heartland” of Alberta is Canada's largest hydrocarbon processing center, with more than 40 major chemical, petrochemical, and oil and gas facilities. Emissions from these industries affect local air quality and human health. This paper characterizes ambient levels of 77 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the region using high-precision measurements collected in summer 2010. Remarkably strong enhancements of 43 VOCs were detected, and concentrations in the industrial plumes were often similar to or even higher than levels measured in some of the world's largest cities and industrial regions. For example maximum levels of propene and i-pentane exceeded 100 ppbv, and 1,3-butadiene, a known carcinogen, reached 27 ppbv. Major VOC sources included propene fractionation, diluent separation and bitumen processing. Emissions of the measured VOCs increased the hydroxyl radical reactivity (kOH), a measure of the potential to form downwind ozone, from 3.4 s-1 in background air to 62 s-1 in the most concentrated plumes. The plume value was comparable to polluted megacity values, and acetaldehyde, propene and 1,3-butadiene contributed over half of the plume kOH. Based on a 13-year record (1994-2006) at the county level, the incidence of male hematopoietic cancers (leukemia and non-Hodgkin lymphoma) was higher in communities closest to the Industrial Heartland compared to neighboring counties. While a causal association between these cancers and exposure to industrial emissions cannot be confirmed, this pattern and the elevated VOC levels warrant actions to reduce emissions of known carcinogens, including benzene and 1,3-butadiene.

  1. Air quality in the Industrial Heartland of Alberta, Canada and potential impacts on human health

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Isobel J.; Marrero, Josette E.; Batterman, Stuart; Meinardi, Simone; Barletta, Barbara; Blake, Donald R.

    2015-01-01

    The “Industrial Heartland” of Alberta is Canada’s largest hydrocarbon processing center, with more than 40 major chemical, petrochemical, and oil and gas facilities. Emissions from these industries affect local air quality and human health. This paper characterizes ambient levels of 77 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the region using high-precision measurements collected in summer 2010. Remarkably strong enhancements of 43 VOCs were detected, and concentrations in the industrial plumes were often similar to or even higher than levels measured in some of the world’s largest cities and industrial regions. For example maximum levels of propene and i-pentane exceeded 100 ppbv, and 1,3-butadiene, a known carcinogen, reached 27 ppbv. Major VOC sources included propene fractionation, diluent separation and bitumen processing. Emissions of the measured VOCs increased the hydroxyl radical reactivity (kOH), a measure of the potential to form downwind ozone, from 3.4 s−1 in background air to 62 s−1 in the most concentrated plumes. The plume value was comparable to polluted megacity values, and acetaldehyde, propene and 1,3-butadiene contributed over half of the plume kOH. Based on a 13-year record (1994–2006) at the county level, the incidence of male hematopoietic cancers (leukemia and non-Hodgkin lymphoma) was higher in communities closest to the Industrial Heartland compared to neighboring counties. While a causal association between these cancers and exposure to industrial emissions cannot be confirmed, this pattern and the elevated VOC levels warrant actions to reduce emissions of known carcinogens, including benzene and 1,3-butadiene. PMID:25685050

  2. Small mammals as sentinels of oil sands related contaminants and health effects in northeastern Alberta, Canada.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Estival, Jaime; Smits, Judit E G

    2016-02-01

    The extraction of bitumen in areas of northeastern Alberta (Canada) has been associated with the release of complex mixtures of metals, metalloids, and polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs) to the environment. To mitigate effects on ecosystems, Canadian legislation mandates that disturbed areas be reclaimed to an ecologically sustainable state after active operations. However, as part of reclamation activities, exposure to, and effects on wildlife living in these areas is not generally assessed. To support successful reclamation, the development of efficient methods to assess exposure and health effects in potentially exposed wildlife is required. In the present study, we investigated the usefulness of two native mammalian species (deer mouse Peromyscus maniculatus, and meadow vole Microtus pennsylvanicus) as sentinels of oil sands related contaminants by examining biomarkers of exposure and indicators of biological costs. Tissue residues of 31 metals and metalloids in kidneys and muscle, activity of the hepatic detoxification enzyme EROD (as a biomarker of exposure to organic contaminants), body condition, and the relative mass of liver, kidney, spleen, and testes were compared in animals from one reclaimed area and a reference site. Deer mice from the reclaimed site had higher renal levels of Co, Se and Tl compared to animals from the reference site, which was associated with reduced body condition. Lower testis mass was another feature that distinguished mice from the reclaimed site in comparison to those from the reference site. One mouse and one vole from the reclaimed site also showed increased hepatic EROD activity. In marked contrast, no changes were evident for these variables in meadow voles. Our results show that deer mouse is a sensitive sentinel species and that the biomarkers and indicators used here are efficient means to detect local contamination and associated biological effects in native mammals inhabiting reclaimed areas on active oil sands mine

  3. College Health: Health Services and Common Health Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions Nutrition & Fitness Emotional Health College Health: Health Services and Common Health Problems Posted under Health Guides . ... March 2015. +Related Content What are student health services? The student health services (sometimes called the student ...

  4. WiFi in Schools, Electromagnetic Fields and Cell Phones: Alberta Health Fact Sheet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Wireless devices and the networks that support them are becoming more common in Alberta schools. WiFi is a wireless networking technology that allows computers and other devices to communicate over a wireless signal. Typically the signal is carried by radio waves over an area of up to 100 meters. Through the implementation of a WiFi network,…

  5. [Marketing in health service].

    PubMed

    Ameri, Cinzia; Fiorini, Fulvio

    2014-01-01

    The gradual emergence of marketing activities in public health demonstrates an increased interest in this discipline, despite the lack of an adequate and universally recognized theoretical model. For a correct approach to marketing techniques, it is opportune to start from the health service, meant as a service rendered. This leads to the need to analyse the salient features of the services. The former is the intangibility, or rather the ex ante difficulty of making the patient understand the true nature of the performance carried out by the health care worker. Another characteristic of all the services is the extreme importance of the regulator, which means who performs the service (in our case, the health care professional). Indeed the operator is of crucial importance in health care: being one of the key issues, he becomes a part of the service itself. Each service is different because the people who deliver it are different, furthermore there are many variables that can affect the performance. Hence it arises the difficulty in measuring the services quality as well as in establishing reference standards.

  6. Alberta's new health research paradigms: Are graduate students being prepared for interdisciplinary team research?

    PubMed

    Duthie, Katherine; Riddell, Meghan; Weller, Carol; Coltan, Lavinia I; Benzies, Karen; Olson, David M

    2010-01-01

    Strategic prioritization of research agendas to address health problems with a large social and economic burden has increased the demand for interdisciplinary research. Universities have addressed the need for interdisciplinary research in their strategic documents. However, research training to equip graduates for careers in interdisciplinary research teams has not kept pace. We offer recommendations to graduate students, universities, health services organizations, and health research funders designed to increase the capacity for interdisciplinary research team training, and provide an example of an existing training program. PMID:20519101

  7. Franchising Reproductive Health Services

    PubMed Central

    Stephenson, Rob; Tsui, Amy Ong; Sulzbach, Sara; Bardsley, Phil; Bekele, Getachew; Giday, Tilahun; Ahmed, Rehana; Gopalkrishnan, Gopi; Feyesitan, Bamikale

    2004-01-01

    Objectives Networks of franchised health establishments, providing a standardized set of services, are being implemented in developing countries. This article examines associations between franchise membership and family planning and reproductive health outcomes for both the member provider and the client. Methods Regression models are fitted examining associations between franchise membership and family planning and reproductive health outcomes at the service provider and client levels in three settings. Results Franchising has a positive association with both general and family planning client volumes, and the number of family planning brands available. Similar associations with franchise membership are not found for reproductive health service outcomes. In some settings, client satisfaction is higher at franchised than other types of health establishments, although the association between franchise membership and client outcomes varies across the settings. Conclusions Franchise membership has apparent benefits for both the provider and the client, providing an opportunity to expand access to reproductive health services, although greater attention is needed to shift the focus from family planning to a broader reproductive health context. PMID:15544644

  8. Consumer Health: Products and Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haag, Jessie Helen

    This book presents a general overview of consumer health, its products and services. Consumer health is defined as those topics dealing with a wise selection of health products and services, agencies concerned with the control of these products and services, evaluation of quackery and health misconceptions, health careers, and health insurance.…

  9. Health information services technologies.

    PubMed

    McCracken, S B

    1996-01-01

    Increasing demands for provider profiling have led to the growth of health information services units within payers and health plans. An important decision faced by these groups is whether to buy or build the information infrastructure necessary to support the activities of the department. The article offers an overview of a system that was collaboratively designed and built by Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Iowa and the Dartmouth Medical School. A case study illustrating the flexibility of the information system in adapting ambulatory care groups to the fee-for-service payer industry is reviewed. PMID:10154373

  10. Health Occupations Education. Health Services Careers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    Twenty-four units on health service careers are presented in this teacher's guide. The units are organized into four sections as follow: Section A--Orientation (health careers, career success, Health Occupations Students of America); Section B--Health and First Aid (personal health, community health, and first aid); Section C--Body Structure and…

  11. Senior friendly health services.

    PubMed

    Hart, Brian; Frank, Christopher; Hoffman, Jennifer; Dickey, Donna; Kristjansson, Joyce

    2006-01-01

    As our population continues to age and to put increasing pressures on the health care system, we need to evolve the system to be sensitive to the unique needs of seniors. There are many examples of innovative, evidence-based strategies that have been shown to improve outcomes for elderly individuals utilizing health services. The association between the physical environment and its negative impact on outcomes for hospitalized geriatric patients is well recognized. The use of strategies such as an audit tool to guide modifications of the physical environment or formal programs such as HELP, are good examples of practical approaches that can be implemented. The challenge today is for leaders in the healthcare system to champion and develop principles and a vision of care that supports implementation of these elder-friendly approaches.

  12. [Terrorism, public health and health services].

    PubMed

    Arcos González, Pedro; Castro Delgado, Rafael; Cuartas Alvarez, Tatiana; Pérez-Berrocal Alonso, Jorge

    2009-01-01

    Today the terrorism is a problem of global distribution and increasing interest for the international public health. The terrorism related violence affects the public health and the health care services in an important way and in different scopes, among them, increase mortality, morbidity and disability, generates a context of fear and anxiety that makes the psychopathological diseases very frequent, seriously alters the operation of the health care services and produces important social, political and economic damages. These effects are, in addition, especially intense when the phenomenon takes place on a chronic way in a community. The objective of this paper is to examine the relation between terrorism and public health, focusing on its effects on public health and the health care services, as well as to examine the possible frames to face the terrorism as a public health concern, with special reference to the situation in Spain. To face this problem, both the public health systems and the health care services, would have to especially adapt their approaches and operational methods in six high-priority areas related to: (1) the coordination between the different health and non health emergency response agencies; (2) the reinforcement of the epidemiological surveillance systems; (3) the improvement of the capacities of the public health laboratories and response emergency care systems to specific types of terrorism as the chemical or biological terrorism; (3) the mental health services; (4) the planning and coordination of the emergency response of the health services; (5) the relations with the population and mass media and, finally; (6) a greater transparency in the diffusion of the information and a greater degree of analysis of the carried out health actions in the scope of the emergency response.

  13. Fostering Innovation in Alberta

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Online Submission, 2005

    2005-01-01

    In 2005, the Minister of Alberta Advanced Education initiated a comprehensive exercise to establish a new direction for Alberta's advanced education system. Through the A Learning Alberta review, a new vision and policy outcomes for the advanced education system will be articulated. The process provides an opportunity for government, stakeholders,…

  14. Health care's service fanatics.

    PubMed

    Merlino, James I; Raman, Ananth

    2013-05-01

    The Cleveland Clinic has long had a reputation for medical excellence. But in 2009 the CEO acknowledged that patients did not think much of their experience there and decided to act. Since then the Clinic has leaped to the top tier of patient-satisfaction surveys, and it now draws hospital executives from around the world who want to study its practices. The Clinic's journey also holds Lessons for organizations outside health care that must suddenly compete by creating a superior customer experience. The authors, one of whom was critical to steering the hospital's transformation, detail the processes that allowed the Clinic to excel at patient satisfaction without jeopardizing its traditional strengths. Hospital leaders: Publicized the problem internally. Seeing the hospital's dismal service scores shocked employees into recognizing that serious flaws existed. Worked to understand patients' needs. Management commissioned studies to get at the root causes of dissatisfaction. Made everyone a caregiver. An enterprisewide program trained everyone, from physicians to janitors, to put the patient first. Increased employee engagement. The Clinic instituted a "caregiver celebration" program and redoubled other motivational efforts. Established new processes. For example, any patient, for any reason, can now make a same-day appointment with a single call. Set patients' expectations. Printed and online materials educate patients about their stays--before they're admitted. Operating a truly patient-centered organization, the authors conclude, isn't a program; it's a way of life. PMID:23898737

  15. The Alberta Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Ambassador Program: The Development of a Contextually Relevant, Multidisciplinary Clinical Practice Guideline for Non-specific Low Back Pain: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Peter, Aaron; Taenzer, Paul

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To describe the development of a contextually relevant multidisciplinary clinical practice guideline (CPG) for non-specific low back pain (LBP) and to discuss its value to the management of LBP and the practice of physiotherapy. Method: To mitigate an identified knowledge gap for Alberta primary-care practitioners in the management of non-specific LBP, a collaborative process was developed to engage multidisciplinary health care providers in designing a primary-care CPG for non-specific LBP. A comprehensive review of published LBP guidelines identified the seven highest-quality CPGs; these were used to inform a multidisciplinary guideline development group (GDG) as they developed the CPG. Results: The GDG constructed a CPG for non-specific LBP along with point-of-care decision-support and patient-education tools. Conclusions: The Ambassador Program on Low Back Pain worked with front-line clinicians from across Alberta to review the best available evidence in developing a CPG responsive to the Alberta context. This CPG is intervention specific and provides a wide range of primary-care practitioners with the best available evidence to inform their clinical decisions in managing non-specific LBP. PMID:22654233

  16. [Coverage of health services].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Narváez, G

    1992-01-01

    In this paper the concepts and criteria related to health coverage are discussed in the context of the organization of national health systems. The main international agreements based on WHO/PAHO proposals are also described. The relationship between primary health care and health coverage is analyzed and the evolution of the programs for the extension of health coverage in Mexico are discussed, with emphasis on the problems of overlap and definition of the universe in the several institutions of the health sector. Finally, the author reviews the problems to measure coverage in order to guarantee social and operative efficiency of the Mexican health system. PMID:1411776

  17. The Alberta Mental Health Act 2010 and Revolving Door Syndrome: Control, Care, and Identity in Making up People.

    PubMed

    Barron, Gary R S

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, I describe dividing practices in making up a specific medical-legal category-the revolving door patient-to identify, label, and direct the actions of particular people living with mental illness. The revolving door patient was a category that had been spoken of for some time, but became a formal legal subject with the introduction of the Alberta Mental Health Act 2010 and Community Treatment Orders (CTOs). I demonstrate how a rationale of control over unpredictable and dangerous individuals was primary in creating this new category, and that the characterization of the revolving door patient required a disciplinary technology to reduce danger. I argue that the CTO is a medical-legal technology that solves the problem of governing a subject in order to produce a patient that manages mental illness. I conclude by reflecting on how the narrative of the revolving door patient, and of mental illness more broadly, has implications for personal identity and tensions between care and control. Dans cet article, je décris comment des 'pratiques divisées' ont créé une catégorie spécifique médico-légale - le « revolving door patient » - afin d'identifier, d'étiqueter et de contrôler les comportements de certains individus vivants avec une maladie mentale. Le «revolving door patient», une catégorie dont on avait parlé depuis un certain temps, est devenu un sujet juridique formel par l'introduction de la loi de la santé mentale de l'Alberta 2010 et de l'Ordre de Traitement Communautaire (OCT). Je démontre comment une logique de contrôle sur les individus imprévisibles et dangereux eu un rôle prépondérant lors de la création de cette catégorie et que la caractérisation du «revolving door patient», entant que telle, a nécessité une technologie disciplinaire pour réduire le danger social. Je soutiens que le OTC est une technologie médico-légale qui résout le problème de contrôle d'un sujet en produisant un patient qui gère une

  18. School Health Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Charles C., Ed.

    A comprehensive guide for health procedures in small and large school systems, this volume emphasizes the need for coordination of school efforts with those of parents, departments of health, private practitioners of medicine and dentistry, and community health agencies. Particular attention is given to the role of the teacher in school health…

  19. Guidelines for School Health Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dougherty, Sarah; And Others

    This publication was designed to assist chief school administrators, school nurses, school physicians, staff, and other school health personnel in developing, implementing, and evaluating sound school health programs for New Jersey public school students. Section I delineates responsibility for school health services, discussing the role of…

  20. Health services research and health policy.

    PubMed

    Banta, H D; Bauman, P

    1976-01-01

    Health services research (HSR) has the potential to influence the decision-making process in a health services system that is acutelearchers feel, with some truth, that their research has had only a limited effect on health policy. Some reasons for this are described, including the primacy of political, rather than technical, considerations in policy making, the lack of a comprehensive health policy, and the poor quality and irrelevance of much HSR. The role of funding for HSR by the Federal government is described; it is shown that the Federal effort is fragmented, despite the consolidation efforts made in 1968. Increased support for specific targeted, problem-solving health services research is proposed, and some possible methods to achieve this are described.

  1. Mobile Health (mHealth) Services and Online Health Educators.

    PubMed

    Anshari, Muhammad; Almunawar, Mohammad Nabil

    2016-01-01

    Mobile technology enables health-care organizations to extend health-care services by providing a suitable environment to achieve mobile health (mHealth) goals, making some health-care services accessible anywhere and anytime. Introducing mHealth could change the business processes in delivering services to patients. mHealth could empower patients as it becomes necessary for them to become involved in the health-care processes related to them. This includes the ability for patients to manage their personal information and interact with health-care staff as well as among patients themselves. The study proposes a new position to supervise mHealth services: the online health educator (OHE). The OHE should be occupied by special health-care staffs who are trained in managing online services. A survey was conducted in Brunei and Indonesia to discover the roles of OHE in managing mHealth services, followed by a focus group discussion with participants who interacted with OHE in a real online health scenario. Data analysis showed that OHE could improve patients' confidence and satisfaction in health-care services.

  2. Mobile Health (mHealth) Services and Online Health Educators

    PubMed Central

    Anshari, Muhammad; Almunawar, Mohammad Nabil

    2016-01-01

    Mobile technology enables health-care organizations to extend health-care services by providing a suitable environment to achieve mobile health (mHealth) goals, making some health-care services accessible anywhere and anytime. Introducing mHealth could change the business processes in delivering services to patients. mHealth could empower patients as it becomes necessary for them to become involved in the health-care processes related to them. This includes the ability for patients to manage their personal information and interact with health-care staff as well as among patients themselves. The study proposes a new position to supervise mHealth services: the online health educator (OHE). The OHE should be occupied by special health-care staffs who are trained in managing online services. A survey was conducted in Brunei and Indonesia to discover the roles of OHE in managing mHealth services, followed by a focus group discussion with participants who interacted with OHE in a real online health scenario. Data analysis showed that OHE could improve patients’ confidence and satisfaction in health-care services. PMID:27257387

  3. Health Services and Collective Bargaining

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torrence, William D.

    1974-01-01

    A rationale is suggested for designing and developing education and training programs in labor relations for hospital managements. Also, federal work stoppage data are identified as they relate to medical and other health services. (AG)

  4. Mental health services. Poor relations.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, J; Sashidharan, S

    1999-04-01

    The case for London requiring greater resources for mental health services than other parts of the country has not been proved. Liverpool, Birmingham and Manchester are among the six most deprived areas in England. Spending per capita on mental health services in inner London is double that in Birmingham and Liverpool and 40 per cent higher than in Manchester. A national strategy is needed to address inequities in funding.

  5. The CADET Project: Computer Assisted Distance Education Telecommunication for Post Secondary Education in Alberta. A Report to the Program Planning and Development Branch, Alberta Department of Advanced Education, Program Services Division, February 28, 1985. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirman, Joseph M.; Goldberg, Jack

    Since its inception in 1984, the CADET (Computer-Assisted Distance Education Telecommunications), a micro to mainframe computer program developed by the University of Oklahoma but modified for use at the University of Alberta in Canada, has achieved major results. Its successful use in delivering a distance education graduate course in which both…

  6. Health services in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Kosen, S; Gunawan, S

    In Indonesia, rapid economic development has led to a reduction in poverty among the 195 million inhabitants. While population increased more than 50% from 1971 to 1990, the annual growth rate, crude birth rate, and total fertility rates have declined rapidly. Life expectancy has increased from 45.7 years in 1971 to 62.7 in 1994 as crude death rates and infant and child mortality rates have declined. Causes of death have shifted from infectious to chronic diseases, but in 1992 major causes of death in children under 5 years old were preventable, and the maternal mortality rate was 425/100,000. Policies which guide the development of health care call for improvements in quality of life, adherence to humanitarian principles, use of scientifically approved traditional medicine, and provision of public health through a three-tiered system. Health care is financed by the government and the community, and managed care has been encouraged. Foreign aid has bolstered development in the health sector. Adequate sanitation has been achieved for 35% of the population, and 65% of urban and 35% of rural residents have reasonable access to clean water. Improvements in health indicators include 55% contraceptive prevalence, reduction in prevalence of anemia during pregnancy, 55.8% of pregnant women receiving prenatal care, a decrease in protein-energy malnutrition among children under five, and high vaccination coverage. Remaining public health problems include malaria, tuberculosis, dengue hemorrhagic fever, an increase in HIV/AIDS, iodine-deficiency, an increasing number of traffic fatalities, and an increasing number of smokers. New health policies have been instituted to meet these challenges as Indonesia's need for a productive and competitive labor force increases.

  7. Social insurance for health service.

    PubMed

    Roemer, M I

    1997-06-01

    Implementation of social insurance for financing health services has yielded different patterns depending on a country's economic level and its government's political ideology. By the late 19th century, thousands of small sickness funds operated in Europe, and in 1883 Germany's Chancellor Bismarck led the enactment of a law mandating enrollment by low-income workers. Other countries followed, with France completing Western European coverage in 1928. The Russian Revolution in 1917 led to a National Health Service covering everyone from general revenues by 1937. New Zealand legislated universal population coverage in 1939. After World War II, Scandinavian countries extended coverage to everyone and Britain introduced its National Health Service covering everyone with comprehensive care and financed by general revenues in 1948. Outside of Europe Japan adopted health insurance in 1922, covering everyone in 1946. Chile was the first developing country to enact statutory health insurance in 1924 for industrial workers, with extension to all low-income people with its "Servicio Nacional de Salud" in 1952. India covered 3.5 percent of its large population with the Employees' State Insurance Corporation in 1948, and China after its 1949 revolution developed four types of health insurance for designated groups of workers and dependents. Sub-Saharan African countries took limited health insurance actions in the late 1960s and 1970s. By 1980, some 85 countries had enacted social security programs to finance or deliver health services or both.

  8. Electronic Health Services

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Mounir M; Jones, Ray

    2007-01-01

    Information and communication technologies have made dramatic changes in our lives. Healthcare communities also made use of these technologies. Using computerized medical knowledge, electronic patients’ information and telecommunications a lot of applications are now established throughout the world. These include better ways of information management, remote education, telemedicine and public services. Yet, a lot of people don't know about these technologies and their applications. Understanding the concepts and ideologies behind these terms, knowing how they will be implemented, what is it like to use them and what benefit will be gained, are basic knowledge steps approaching these technologies. Difficulties using these services, especially in developing countries should not be neglected or underestimated. PMID:21503245

  9. 34 CFR 303.16 - Health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Health services. 303.16 Section 303.16 Education... DISABILITIES General Definitions Used in This Part § 303.16 Health services. (a) Health services mean services..., the changing of dressings or colostomy collection bags, and other health services; and...

  10. 34 CFR 303.16 - Health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Health services. 303.16 Section 303.16 Education... DISABILITIES General Definitions Used in This Part § 303.16 Health services. (a) Health services mean services..., the changing of dressings or colostomy collection bags, and other health services; and...

  11. 34 CFR 303.16 - Health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Health services. 303.16 Section 303.16 Education... DISABILITIES General Definitions Used in This Part § 303.16 Health services. (a) Health services mean services..., the changing of dressings or colostomy collection bags, and other health services; and...

  12. [Mental health services in Australia].

    PubMed

    Kisely, Steve; Lesage, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Canada is 1.5 times the size of Australia. Australia's population of 20 million is located principally on the east coast. Like Canada, the Australia has a federal system of Government with 5 States and two territories. Each State and territory has its own legislation on mental health. The federal (Commonwealth) Government is responsible for health care planning. In addition, the federal Government subsidizes an insurance program (Medicare) that covers visits to specialists and family physicians, while provincial governments are involved in the provision of hospital care and community mental health services. The Commonwealth government also subsidises the cost of medication through the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme. These funds are supplemented by private health insurance. Mental health costs account for 6.5 per cent of all health care costs. Primary care treats the majority of common psychological disorders such as anxiety or depression, while specialist mental health services concentrate on those with severe mental illness. There have been 4 national mental health plans since 1992 with the long term aims of promoting mental health, increasing the quality and responsiveness of services, and creating a consistent approach to mental health service system reform among Australian states and territories. These systematic cycles of planning have first allowed a shift from psychiatric hospitals to community services, from reliance on psychiatric hospitals as pivotal to psychiatric care system. Community care budgets have increased, but overall have decreased with money not following patients; but recent deployment of federally funded through Medicare access to psychotherapy by psychologists for common mental disorders in primary care have increased overall budget. Concerns remain that shift to youth first onset psychosis clinics may come from older long-term psychotic patients, a form of discrimination whilst evidence amount of excess mortality by cardio

  13. [Mental health services in Australia].

    PubMed

    Kisely, Steve; Lesage, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Canada is 1.5 times the size of Australia. Australia's population of 20 million is located principally on the east coast. Like Canada, the Australia has a federal system of Government with 5 States and two territories. Each State and territory has its own legislation on mental health. The federal (Commonwealth) Government is responsible for health care planning. In addition, the federal Government subsidizes an insurance program (Medicare) that covers visits to specialists and family physicians, while provincial governments are involved in the provision of hospital care and community mental health services. The Commonwealth government also subsidises the cost of medication through the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme. These funds are supplemented by private health insurance. Mental health costs account for 6.5 per cent of all health care costs. Primary care treats the majority of common psychological disorders such as anxiety or depression, while specialist mental health services concentrate on those with severe mental illness. There have been 4 national mental health plans since 1992 with the long term aims of promoting mental health, increasing the quality and responsiveness of services, and creating a consistent approach to mental health service system reform among Australian states and territories. These systematic cycles of planning have first allowed a shift from psychiatric hospitals to community services, from reliance on psychiatric hospitals as pivotal to psychiatric care system. Community care budgets have increased, but overall have decreased with money not following patients; but recent deployment of federally funded through Medicare access to psychotherapy by psychologists for common mental disorders in primary care have increased overall budget. Concerns remain that shift to youth first onset psychosis clinics may come from older long-term psychotic patients, a form of discrimination whilst evidence amount of excess mortality by cardio

  14. Utility of telephone survey methods in population-based health studies of older adults: an example from the Alberta Older Adult Health Behavior (ALERT) study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Random digit dialing is often used in public health research initiatives to accrue and establish a study sample; however few studies have fully described the utility of this approach. The primary objective of this paper was to describe the implementation and utility of using random digit dialing and Computer Assisted Telephone Interviewing (CATI) for sampling, recruitment and data collection in a large population-based study of older adults [Alberta Older Adult Health Behavior (ALERT) study]. Methods Using random digit dialing, older adults (> = 55 years) completed health behavior and outcome and demographic measures via CATI. After completing the CATI, participants were invited to receive a step pedometer and waist circumference tape measure via mail to gather objectively derived ambulatory activity and waist circumference assessments. Results Overall, 36,000 telephone numbers were called of which 7,013 were deemed eligible for the study. Of those, 4,913 (70.1%) refused to participate in the study and 804 (11.4%) participants were not included due to a variety of call dispositions (e.g., difficult to reach, full quota for region). A total of 1,296 participants completed telephone interviews (18.5% of those eligible and 3.6% of all individuals approached). Overall, 22.8% of households did not have an age 55+ resident and 13.6% of individuals refused to participate, Average age was 66.5 years, and 43% were male. A total of 1,081 participants (83.4%) also submitted self-measured ambulatory activity (i.e., via step pedometer) and anthropometric data (i.e., waist circumference). With the exception of income (18.7%), the rate of missing data for demographics, health behaviors, and health measures was minimal (<1%). Conclusions Older adults are willing to participate in telephone-based health surveys when randomly contacted. Researchers can use this information to evaluate the feasibility and the logistics of planned studies using a similar population

  15. Child Mental Health Services, Inc.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milner, Betty

    School and residential therapeutic programs of Child Health Mental Services, Inc. serving schizophrenic, autistic, and emotionally disturbed children and youth (2-21 years old) are described. The residential components include a family unit home as well as a supervised apartment living program. Admissions procedures for the school program are…

  16. Community Education and Health Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Elizabeth

    Because it is based on the premise that learning is a lifelong process and that citizen involvement is essential to neighborhood problem solving, community education is particularly attuned to the current needs of cities and can be a major vehicle for cities attempting to provide convenient, comprehensive health services in an efficient,…

  17. Evolving Nature of School Psychology in Alberta: Politics and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, R. Coranne; Zwiers, Michael L.

    2016-01-01

    Over the past 15 years, the practice of school psychology in the province of Alberta reflects the entrenchment of assessment with the emerging possibility of a broader service provider role. This article articulates the influence that politics and government has had on the role of school psychologists in Alberta schools as special education…

  18. [Smart cards in health services].

    PubMed

    Rienhoff, O

    2001-10-01

    Since the early 1980-ties it has been tried to utilise smart cards in health care. All industrialised countries participated in those efforts. The most sustainable analyses took place in Europe--specifically in the United Kingdom, France, and Germany. The first systems installed (the service access cards in F and G, the Health Professional Card in F) are already conceptionally outdated today. The senior understanding of the great importance of smart cards for security of electronic communication in health care does contrast to a hesitating behaviour of the key players in health care and health politics in Germany. There are clear hints that this may relate to the low informatics knowledge of current senior management.

  19. "A Work Second to None": Positioning Extension at the University of Alberta, 1912-75

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLean, Scott

    2007-01-01

    From 1912 to 1975 the Department of Extension at the University of Alberta provided an impressive range of programmes and services to people across the Canadian province of Alberta. The four Directors of Extension at the University of Alberta during this period became leading figures in the history of adult education in Canada. They positioned…

  20. Abortion health services in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Norman, Wendy V.; Guilbert, Edith R.; Okpaleke, Christopher; Hayden, Althea S.; Steven Lichtenberg, E.; Paul, Maureen; White, Katharine O’Connell; Jones, Heidi E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine the location of Canadian abortion services relative to where reproductive-age women reside, and the characteristics of abortion facilities and providers. Design An international survey was adapted for Canadian relevance. Public sources and professional networks were used to identify facilities. The bilingual survey was distributed by mail and e-mail from July to November 2013. Setting Canada. Participants A total of 94 abortion facilities were identified. Main outcome measures The number and location of services were compared with the distribution of reproductive-age women by location of residence. Results We identified 94 Canadian facilities providing abortion in 2012, with 48.9% in Quebec. The response rate was 83.0% (78 of 94). Facilities in every jurisdiction with services responded. In Quebec and British Columbia abortion services are nearly equally present in large urban centres and rural locations throughout the provinces; in other Canadian provinces services are chiefly located in large urban areas. No abortion services were identified in Prince Edward Island. Respondents reported provision of 75 650 abortions in 2012 (including 4.0% by medical abortion). Canadian facilities reported minimal or no harassment, in stark contrast to American facilities that responded to the same survey. Conclusion Access to abortion services varies by region across Canada. Services are not equitably distributed in relation to the regions where reproductive-age women reside. British Columbia and Quebec have demonstrated effective strategies to address disparities. Health policy and service improvements have the potential to address current abortion access inequity in Canada. These measures include improved access to mifepristone for medical abortion; provincial policies to support abortion services; routine abortion training within family medicine residency programs; and increasing the scope of practice for nurses and midwives to include abortion

  1. Developing School Health Services in Massachusetts: A Public Health Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheetz, Anne H.

    2003-01-01

    In 1993 the Massachusetts Department of Public Health (MDPH) began defining essential components of school health service programs, consistent with the public health model. The MDPH designed and funded the Enhanced School Health Service Programs to develop 4 core components of local school health services: (a) strengthening the administrative…

  2. 34 CFR 303.13 - Health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Health services. 303.13 Section 303.13 Education... DISABILITIES General Purpose, Eligibility, and Other General Provisions § 303.13 Health services. (a) As used in this part, health services means services necessary to enable a child to benefit from the...

  3. 34 CFR 303.13 - Health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2011-07-01 2010-07-01 true Health services. 303.13 Section 303.13 Education... DISABILITIES General Purpose, Eligibility, and Other General Provisions § 303.13 Health services. (a) As used in this part, health services means services necessary to enable a child to benefit from the...

  4. Alberta Congenital Anomalies Surveillance System.

    PubMed Central

    Lowry, R B; Thunem, N Y; Anderson-Redick, S

    1989-01-01

    The Alberta Congenital Anomalies Surveillance System was started in 1966 in response to the thalidomide tragedy earlier in the decade. It was one of four provincial surveillance systems on which the federal government relied for baseline statistics of congenital anomalies. The government now collects data from six provinces and one territory. The Alberta Congenital Anomaly Surveillance System originally depended on three types of notification to the Division of Vital Statistics, Department of Health, Government of Alberta: birth notice and certificates of death and stillbirth; increased sources of ascertainment have greatly improved data quality. We present the data for 1980-86 and compare the prevalence rates of selected anomalies with the rates from three other surveillance systems. Surveillance systems do not guarantee that a new teratogen will be detected, but they are extremely valuable for testing hypotheses regarding causation. At the very least they provide baseline data with which to compare any deviation or trend. For many, if not most, congenital anomalies total prevention is not possible; however, surveillance systems can be used to measure progress in prevention. PMID:2819634

  5. Evaluating a health service taskforce.

    PubMed

    Moullin, Max

    2004-01-01

    A large number of taskforces and other quality improvement teams have been set up to achieve change in recent years, both in health and elsewhere, but there has been relatively little systematic evaluation of the benefits obtained. This paper discusses alternative methodologies and frameworks for assessing the value of taskforces and other quality improvement teams in the public sector and concludes that the Performance Prism, used in conjunction with the public sector scorecard, a variant of the balanced scorecard, is most appropriate. The paper then describes a case study on the evaluation of a UK health service taskforce using the recommended approach and reflects on its successes and limitations. PMID:15481691

  6. Prevention and dental health services.

    PubMed

    Widström, Eeva

    2004-01-01

    There has been, and still is a firm belief that regular use of dental services is beneficial for all. Thus governments in most European countries have shown some interest in training oral health care professionals, distributing the dental workforce and cost sharing. Constantly evolving treatment options and the introduction of new methods make dental clinicians feel uncertain as to which treatments are most useful, who would benefit from them, and which treatments will achieve cost-effective health gain. Although there is a considerable quantity of scientific literature showing that most available preventive measures are effective, and the number of sensible best-practice guidelines in prevention is growing, there are few studies on cost-efficiency of different methods and, secondly, the prevention and treatment guidelines are poorly known among general practitioners. In the eyes of the public, it is obvious that preventive methods practised by patients at home have been eclipsed by clinical procedures performed in dental clinics. Reliance on an increasingly individualistic approach to health care leads to the medicalisation of issues that are not originally health or medical problems. It is important to move general oral disease prevention back to the people who must integrate this in their daily routines. Prevention primarily based on healthy lifestyles, highlighted in the new public health strategy of the European Union (EU), is the key to future health policy.

  7. 42 CFR 136.24 - Authorization for contract health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Authorization for contract health services. 136.24 Section 136.24 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH Contract Health Services §...

  8. Education in Alberta: Facts and Figures, 1989.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Dept. of Education, Edmonton.

    A statistical overview of the educational system in Alberta (Canada) for 1989 is presented. The report includes data and analyses concerning demographics; family and social structure; economy and workforce; early childhood services enrollments and projections; public and separate school enrollments and projections; private school enrollments;…

  9. A Guide to Native Organizations in Alberta.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Dept. of Native Affairs, Edmonton.

    Names, addresses, names of directors, and telephone numbers for 182 organizations formed by or serving Canada Natives in Alberta are presented, grouped by their area of interest. Listed are 17 arts and crafts organizations, 10 business and employment development services, 8 radio stations and newspapers, 12 cultural groups, 19 educational…

  10. 45 CFR 96.45 - Preventive health and health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Preventive health and health services. 96.45 Section 96.45 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION BLOCK GRANTS Direct Funding of Indian Tribes and Tribal Organizations § 96.45 Preventive health and health...

  11. 45 CFR 96.45 - Preventive health and health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Preventive health and health services. 96.45 Section 96.45 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION BLOCK GRANTS Direct Funding of Indian Tribes and Tribal Organizations § 96.45 Preventive health and health...

  12. 45 CFR 96.45 - Preventive health and health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Preventive health and health services. 96.45 Section 96.45 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION BLOCK GRANTS Direct Funding of Indian Tribes and Tribal Organizations § 96.45 Preventive health and health...

  13. 45 CFR 96.45 - Preventive health and health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Preventive health and health services. 96.45 Section 96.45 Public Welfare Department of Health and Human Services GENERAL ADMINISTRATION BLOCK GRANTS Direct Funding of Indian Tribes and Tribal Organizations § 96.45 Preventive health and health...

  14. 45 CFR 96.45 - Preventive health and health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Preventive health and health services. 96.45 Section 96.45 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION BLOCK GRANTS Direct Funding of Indian Tribes and Tribal Organizations § 96.45 Preventive health and health...

  15. Homeless health needs: shelter and health service provider perspective.

    PubMed

    Hauff, Alicia J; Secor-Turner, Molly

    2014-01-01

    The effects of homelessness on health are well documented, although less is known about the challenges of health care delivery from the perspective of service providers. Using data from a larger health needs assessment, the purpose of this study was to describe homeless health care needs and barriers to access utilizing qualitative data collected from shelter staff (n = 10) and health service staff (n = 14). Shelter staff members described many unmet health needs and barriers to health care access, and discussed needs for other supportive services in the area. Health service providers also described multiple health and service needs, and the need for a recuperative care setting for this population. Although a variety of resources are currently available for homeless health service delivery, barriers to access and gaps in care still exist. Recommendations for program planning are discussed and examined in the context of contributing factors and health care reform.

  16. Quetiapine use in adults in the community: a population-based study in Alberta, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Diane; Cooke, Lara; Symonds, Chris; Gardner, David; Pringsheim, Tamara

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate trends in prescribing of the second-generation antipsychotic medication quetiapine to adults in the province of Alberta from 2008 to 2013 through examination of dispensed prescriptions, and diagnoses associated with users of quetiapine in 2013. Methods We analysed administrative data from Alberta Health; the Alberta Pharmaceutical Information Network (PIN) Dispenses health data set, the Practitioner Payments (Fee-For-Service claims) health data set and the Population Registry health data set. These data sets allowed us to identify discrete quetiapine recipients for each calendar year from 2008 to 2013. To evaluate diagnoses associated with users of quetiapine, we evaluated diagnostic codes used by physicians in billings claims in 2013. Results Quetiapine use increased over the 6-year time period studied. In 2008, there were 16 087 unique quetiapine recipients in Alberta (7.2 per 1000). By 2013, there were 35 314 unique quetiapine recipients (13.3 per 1000). Use by women was higher than men at all time points. Depression was most common diagnosis associated with quetiapine recipients, which was present in 56% of users of quetiapine. Other common diagnoses associated with quetiapine use included neurotic disorders, bipolar disorder and sleep disturbances. Conclusions The current study of quetiapine use in the province of Alberta provides confirmatory data of the increasing use of quetiapine for the treatment of depression and anxiety disorders. Safe and rational prescribing practices must be encouraged in light of the modest advantages of quetiapine over no treatment as an adjunctive treatment of major depression, and the known harms of this medication. PMID:27000788

  17. Health Services Manual. Hicksville Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1987

    This procedure manual describes the uniform procedures used by the Hicksville, New York School District's Health Services Program. Its objectives are to establish a uniform set of health services guidelines and procedures, to update all health forms, to maintain an awareness of the current changes in health laws that govern school districts, and…

  18. Health Service Delivery in Developing Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benyoussef, Amor

    1977-01-01

    Reviews recent work dealing with methodological and technical issues in health and development; presents examples of the application of social sciences, including health demography and economics, in questions of health services delivery; and analyzes delivery of health services to rural and nomadic populations in Africa, Asia, and Latin America.…

  19. Guidelines for Health Services for Migrant Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strazicich, Mirko, Ed.

    This publication provides a standard by which California migrant education health staff can plan, implement, and evaluate a health program for students in grades K-12. Following sections which describe current state legislation, the need for health services, and California's objectives and activities regarding health services for migrant students…

  20. 42 CFR 136a.15 - Health Service Delivery Areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Health Service Delivery Areas. 136a.15 Section 136a.15 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH What Services Are Available and Who Is Eligible...

  1. 42 CFR 136a.15 - Health Service Delivery Areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Health Service Delivery Areas. 136a.15 Section 136a.15 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH What Services Are Available and Who Is Eligible...

  2. 42 CFR 136a.13 - Authorization for contract health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Authorization for contract health services. 136a.13 Section 136a.13 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH What Services Are Available and Who...

  3. 42 CFR 136a.15 - Health Service Delivery Areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Health Service Delivery Areas. 136a.15 Section 136a.15 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH What Services Are Available and Who Is Eligible...

  4. 42 CFR 136a.15 - Health Service Delivery Areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Health Service Delivery Areas. 136a.15 Section 136a.15 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH What Services Are Available and Who Is Eligible...

  5. 42 CFR 136a.15 - Health Service Delivery Areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Health Service Delivery Areas. 136a.15 Section 136a.15 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH What Services Are Available and Who Is Eligible...

  6. [Patient-Proposed Health Services].

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Yasuhiro

    2016-06-01

    The Patient-Proposed Health Services(PPHS)was launched in April 2016. PPHS was proposed by the Council for Regulatory Reform, which was established in January 2013 under the Second Abe Administration. After discussion within the council, PPHS was published in the Japan Revitalization Strategy(2014 revised edition), which was endorsed by the Cabinet on June 24, 2014. PPHS was proposed therein as a new mechanism within the mixed billing system to apply for a combination of treatment not covered by the public health insurance with treatment covered by the insurance. Subsequently, PPHS was submitted for diet deliberations in April and May 2015 and inserted into article 63 of the health insurance act in accordance with "a law for making partial amendments to the National Health Insurance Act, etc., in order to create a sustainable medical insurance system", which was promulgated on May 29, 2015. In this paper I will review the background of the birth of PPHS and discuss its overview. PMID:27306801

  7. Pharmaceutical services in the United States Public Health Service.

    PubMed

    Paavola, F G; Dermanoski, K R; Pittman, R E

    1997-04-01

    The status of pharmaceutical services in the United States Public Health Service (PHS) is described. The PHS has been the principal health agency of the United States for nearly 200 years, directing its resources to meeting the nation's changing health needs. Pharmacists are assigned to all eight operating divisions of the PHS (a major component of the Department of Health and Human Services), as well as other federal agencies and programs. Pharmacists assigned to the Indian Health Service, the National Institutes of Health, the United States Coast Guard, the Immigration and Naturalization Service, the Federal Bureau of Prisons, and Saint Elizabeths Hospital provide pharmaceutical services to a broad range of patients and settings. Some PHS pharmacists are involved in bringing new drugs to market in the Food and Drug Administration, participating in research protocols at the National Institutes of Health, and helping the underserved populations through the programs of the Health Resources and Services Administration. Still other PHS pharmacists provide leadership and program management at the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research, the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, and the Health Care Financing Administration. Pharmacists in the PHS work in a broad array of settings, in many cases providing care for the underserved.

  8. Empowerment and the performance of health services.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, P; Braithwaite, J; Southon, G

    1999-01-01

    Addresses the issue of empowerment and its possible role in promoting the effectiveness of health services. Empowerment represents the ability of people within organisations to use their own initiative to further organisational interests. However, despite its apparent simplicity, the concept turns out to be quite complex and to have unanticipated implications. We explore some of these implications in health service organisations, and their consequences for health policy. Our conclusion is that many health policies may well act to degrade the empowerment of health service workers, and hence the performance of health service organisations.

  9. Echinococcus multilocularis in urban coyotes, Alberta, Canada.

    PubMed

    Catalano, Stefano; Lejeune, Manigandan; Liccioli, Stefano; Verocai, Guilherme G; Gesy, Karen M; Jenkins, Emily J; Kutz, Susan J; Fuentealba, Carmen; Duignan, Padraig J; Massolo, Alessandro

    2012-10-01

    Echinococcus multilocularis is a zoonotic parasite in wild canids. We determined its frequency in urban coyotes (Canis latrans) in Alberta, Canada. We detected E. multilocularis in 23 of 91 coyotes in this region. This parasite is a public health concern throughout the Northern Hemisphere, partly because of increased urbanization of wild canids.

  10. Factors associated with serum immunoglobulin levels in beef calves from Alberta and Saskatchewan and association between passive transfer and health outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Waldner, Cheryl L.; Rosengren, Leigh B.

    2009-01-01

    Inadequate consumption of colostrum can negatively affect calf health and survival. The serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) concentrations of 935 beef calves from 152 herds in Alberta and Saskatchewan have been described, using radial immunodiffusion. The determinants and health effects of serum IgG concentrations were studied in 601 calves sampled between 2 and 8 days of age. Of these calves, 6% had failure of passive transfer and an additional 10% had marginal passive transfer. Serum IgG concentrations were lower in calves born to a heifer, as a twin, or experiencing dystocia. The odds of both calf death and treatment were increased in calves with serum IgG concentrations below 24 g/L; a threshold notably higher than the 16 g/L usually considered as providing adequate passive transfer. The finding of 1/3 of calves with serum IgG concentrations less than 24 g/L suggests that calfhood treatments and mortality could be decreased by ensuring that high risk calves consume colostrum. PMID:19436479

  11. Mental Health Service Delivery Systems and Perceived Qualifications of Mental Health Service Providers in School Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dixon, Decia Nicole

    2009-01-01

    Latest research on the mental health status of children indicates that schools are key providers of mental health services (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2003). The push for school mental health services has only increased as stakeholders have begun to recognize the significance of sound mental health as an essential part of…

  12. Care of the elderly program at the University of Alberta

    PubMed Central

    Charles, Lesley; Dobbs, Bonnie; Triscott, Jean; McKay, Rhianne

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Problem addressed The population is aging rapidly and there are implications for health care delivery in the face of few physicians specializing in care of the elderly (COE). Objective of program To train physicians wishing to provide COE services. Program description The COE program at the University of Alberta in Edmonton is an enhanced skills diploma program lasting 6 months to 1 year, with core program requirements including geriatric inpatient care, geriatric psychiatry, ambulatory care, continuing care, and outreach. There is a longitudinal clinic component and a research project requirement. The program is designed to cover the 85 core competencies in the CanMEDS– Family Medicine roles. Conclusion There is a need for COE physicians to provide clinical care as well as fill educational, administrative, and research roles to meet the health care needs of medically complex seniors. These physicians require alternative funding and a departmental home within a university if they are to provide an academic service. PMID:25551143

  13. Regional health library service in northern Ireland.

    PubMed

    Crawford, D S

    1990-10-01

    The regional medical library service provided to physicians, hospitals, nurses, social workers, and health care administrators throughout Northern Ireland by the Queen's University of Belfast is described. A brief outline of the National Health Service in the United Kingdom is given, and the library service is described in terms of collections, cataloging, interlibrary loan, and reference. PMID:2224299

  14. Improving Coordination of Addiction Health Services Organizations with Mental Health and Public Health Services.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Erick G; Andrews, Christina; Harris, Lesley; Padwa, Howard; Kong, Yinfei; M S W, Karissa Fenwick

    2016-01-01

    In this mixed-method study, we examined coordination of mental health and public health services in addiction health services (AHS) in low-income racial and ethnic minority communities in 2011 and 2013. Data from surveys and semistructured interviews were used to evaluate the extent to which environmental and organizational characteristics influenced the likelihood of high coordination with mental health and public health providers among outpatient AHS programs. Coordination was defined and measured as the frequency of interorganizational contact among AHS programs and mental health and public health providers. The analytic sample consisted of 112 programs at time 1 (T1) and 122 programs at time 2 (T2), with 61 programs included in both periods of data collection. Forty-three percent of AHS programs reported high frequency of coordination with mental health providers at T1 compared to 66% at T2. Thirty-one percent of programs reported high frequency of coordination with public health services at T1 compared with 54% at T2. Programs with culturally responsive resources and community linkages were more likely to report high coordination with both services. Qualitative analysis highlighted the role of leadership in leveraging funding and developing creative solutions to deliver coordinated care. Overall, our findings suggest that AHS program funding, leadership, and cultural competence may be important drivers of program capacity to improve coordination with health service providers to serve minorities in an era of health care reform.

  15. [Communication in the health service].

    PubMed

    Panini, Roberta; Fiorini, Fulvio

    2014-01-01

    In the last twenty years, the hospitals have become firms, therefore they have had the necessity to differentiate from each other.Thus, as it is done in the commercial firms, in the health service different formality of communication are studied and introduced in order to attract new consumers and to maintain their trust. Furthermore, due to the introduction of the digitization in the Public Administrations, the communication has become more transparent.A systematic application of communication tools is more and more spread among the Sanitary Firms, whether they are Local Firm or Hospital Firm.Regarding the reference population, communication tools are used with different purposes such as educational and informative. In addition, they are applied as institutional marketing tool, in order to show the offered potentialities and also to increase the level of satisfaction in the patients/consumers who perceive the typology of reception and treatment during the sanitary performance. PMID:25098464

  16. Charter Schools in Alberta.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bosetti, Lynn

    At the heart of the controversy over public education in a democratic system is the tension between majority rules and minority rights, and public and individual interests. This contextual framework sets the stage for the emergence of charter schools in Alberta, Canada. This paper describes the establishment and characteristics of the first…

  17. Internships in Alberta.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McConaghy, Tom

    1987-01-01

    Reviews Canadian educational levels and teacher preparation. The professional level of teacher preparation programs in Alberta is probably the highest in North America. Education internships are part of teacher training and take place after the granting of a degree and temporary teaching certificate. (MD)

  18. Children's Health Services Manual. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Dept. of Health and Environmental Control, Columbia.

    This manual for South Carolina's child health personnel covers program planning, evaluation, monitoring, and administration, and provides standards, procedures, policies, and regulations concerning health services for children in the state. An initial section on children's health services covers eligibility; the Women, Infants and Children…

  19. Hispanics and Culturally Sensitive Mental Health Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hispanic Research Center Research Bulletin, 1985

    1985-01-01

    The objective of improving mental health care for Hispanics has been reviewed, most often, as dependent upon the provision of culturally sensitive mental health services. "Cultural sensitivity," however, is an imprecise term, especially when efforts are made to put it into operation when providing mental health services to Hispanic clients.…

  20. Health Services Assistant. Revised. Instructor Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This color-coded curriculum guide was developed to help health services educators prepare students for health services occupations. The curriculum is organized in 20 units that cover the following topics: interpersonal relationships and the health care team; communication and observation skills; safety considerations; microbiology; the body as a…

  1. Public Service Ethics in Health Sciences Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, M. Sandra

    1991-01-01

    Discussion of ethics in libraries focuses on health sciences libraries. Highlights include distinguishing features of reference services in health sciences libraries, including the technical nature of the literature and pressures and time constraints on health care personnel; quality of service; access to information; confidentiality; intellectual…

  2. Preventive Health Services Utilization Among Korean Americans.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyeongmo; Casado, Banghwa Lee

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the use of preventive health services among Korean American adults. Data were drawn from a cross-sectional survey of 212 Korean Americans in the Chicago, Illinois, metropolitan area. Guided by the Andersen's behavioral model, the authors examined whether predisposing (age, gender, marital status, household size, education), enabling (income, health insurance, English proficiency, citizenship, social network), and need (health status) factors are predictive of Korean Americans' preventive health services utilization. A binomial logistic regression showed that younger age, male, noncitizen, low income, no insurance, a larger family network, and better perceived health were associated with decreased odds of using preventive health services. PMID:27171558

  3. Indian Health Trends and Services, 1974 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Public Health Service (DHEW), Washington, DC. Div. of Indian Health.

    The American Indian Health Service (AIHS), subsidiary of the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, is dedicated to elevating the health status of Indian and Alaskan Native peoples by: developing modern health facilities; encouraging Indian acquaintance with and participation in existing programs; being responsive to the concept of…

  4. 42 CFR 93.220 - Public Health Service or PHS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Public Health Service or PHS. 93.220 Section 93.220 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH ASSESSMENTS AND HEALTH EFFECTS STUDIES OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES RELEASES AND FACILITIES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE POLICIES...

  5. 42 CFR 93.220 - Public Health Service or PHS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Health, and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, and the offices of the... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Public Health Service or PHS. 93.220 Section 93.220 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH ASSESSMENTS...

  6. 42 CFR 93.220 - Public Health Service or PHS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Health, and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, and the offices of the... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Public Health Service or PHS. 93.220 Section 93.220 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH ASSESSMENTS...

  7. 42 CFR 93.220 - Public Health Service or PHS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Health, and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, and the offices of the... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Public Health Service or PHS. 93.220 Section 93.220 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH ASSESSMENTS...

  8. Communication Access to Health and Social Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parr, Susie; Pound, Carole; Hewitt, Alan

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the efforts of a group of people in the United Kingdom at Connect-the communication disability network-to make health and social services more communicatively accessible to people with aphasia. The project involved listening to people with aphasia talk about their experiences with health and social care services and working…

  9. A School Health Service for Children?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayall, Berry; Storey, Pamela

    1998-01-01

    The Children's Health in Primary Schools Study used questionnaires from 620 schools and six case studies to examine school health services in England and Wales. Findings revealed variation in quantity and quality of service. This article argues, on grounds of efficiency, convenience, and complementarity, that children should have access to school…

  10. Acceptance of Swedish e-health services

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Mary-Louise; Loria, Karla

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate older people’s acceptance of e-health services, in order to identify determinants of, and barriers to, their intention to use e-health. Method: Based on one of the best-established models of technology acceptance, Technology Acceptance Model (TAM), in-depth exploratory interviews with twelve individuals over 45 years of age and of varying backgrounds are conducted. Results: This investigation could find support for the importance of usefulness and perceived ease of use of the e-health service offered as the main determinants of people’s intention to use the service. Additional factors critical to the acceptance of e-health are identified, such as the importance of the compatibility of the services with citizens’ needs and trust in the service provider. Most interviewees expressed positive attitudes towards using e-health and find these services useful, convenient, and easy to use. Conclusion: E-health services are perceived as a good complement to traditional health care service delivery, even among older people. These people, however, need to become aware of the e-health alternatives that are offered to them and the benefits they provide. PMID:21289860

  11. Private equity investment in health care services.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Catherine J; Rudsenske, Todd; Vaughan, James S

    2008-01-01

    Sophisticated private equity investors in health services provide venture capital for early-stage companies, growth capital for mid-stage companies, and equity capital for buyouts of mid-stage and mature companies. They pursue opportunities in provider sectors that are large and have a stable reimbursement environment, such as acute care services; sectors with room to execute consolidation strategies, such as labs; alternative-site sectors, such as "storefront" medicine; and clinical services, such as behavioral health, that are subject to profitably increasing quality and lowering costs. The innovations created through private equity investments could challenge established health services organizations.

  12. Local Government Health Services in Interwar England:

    PubMed Central

    Gorsky, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Summary This article provides a critical discussion of recent work on local government health care and health services in interwar England. A literature review examines case study approaches and comparative quantitative surveys, highlighting conventional and revisionist interpretations. Noting the differing selection criteria evident in some works, it argues that studies based upon a limited number of personal health services provide an insufficient basis for assessing local health activity and policy. There follows a regional study demonstrating various discrepancies between health financing data in local sources and those in nationally collated returns. These in turn give rise to various problems of assessment and interpretation in works relying on the latter, particularly with respect to services for schoolchildren and long-stay patients. The case study points to the importance of integrating poor law medical services in evaluations, and of learning more about the role of government subsidy in supporting expanding services. PMID:22080797

  13. Designing online health services for patients.

    PubMed

    Crotty, Bradley H; Slack, Warner V

    2016-01-01

    Patients are increasingly interacting with their healthcare system through online health services, such as patient portals and telehealth programs. Recently, Shabrabani and Mizrachi provided data outlining factors that are most important for users or potential users of these online services. The authors conclude convincingly that while online health services have great potential to be helpful to their users, they could be better designed. As patients and their families play an increasingly active role in their health care, online health services should be made easier for them to use and better suited to their health-related needs. Further, the online services should be more welcoming to people of all literacy levels and from all socioeconomic backgrounds. PMID:27307985

  14. Group Health Cooperative's community services initiative.

    PubMed

    Hildebrandt, K M; Beery, W L; Pearson, D C

    1993-12-01

    Service to the broader community is an important component of Group Health Cooperative's (GHC's) tradition, values, and mission. The role and potential of community services in a staff model HMO requires consensus, careful planning and communication, and attention to results. This paper describes GHC's efforts to define, implement, and sustain its community services initiative.

  15. First impressions: towards becoming a health-literate health service.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Anne

    2014-05-01

    A 'health-literate organisation' recognises that miscommunication is very common and can negatively affect consumer care and outcomes, and makes it easier for people to navigate, understand, and use health information and services. This paper reports on the First Impressions Activities conducted by consumers to assess aspects of the literacy environment of a rural health service. The First Impressions Activities consists of three tools to assist health services to begin to consider some of the characteristics of their organisation that help and hinder a consumer's ability to physically navigate their way to and about the health service. The results show that navigation to and within the rural health service was made more complex due to lack of information, difficulty finding information, inconsistent terminology used in signage, missing signage, signage obscured by foliage, and incorrect signage.

  16. Health care reform and family planning services.

    PubMed

    Policar, M

    1993-01-01

    With the reforms expected for US health care, the question remains as to the impact on family planning services. Although the focus is on health care finance reform, the mix of patients seen, the incentives for decision making, and the interactions between health care providers will change. Definition of key concepts is provided for universal access, managed competition, and managed care. The position of the obstetrician/gynecologist (Ob/Gyn) does not fit well within the scheme for managed health care, because Ob/Gyns are both primary care providers and specialists in women's health care. Most managed health care systems presently consider Ob/Gyn to be a specialty. Public family planning clinics, which have a client constituency of primarily uninsured women, may have to compete with traditional private sector providers. "Ambulatory health care providers" have developed a reputation for high quality, cost effective preventive health care services; this record should place providers with a range of services in a successful position. Family planning providers in a managed competition system will be at a disadvantage. 3 scenarios possible under managed competition are identified as the best case, out of the mainstream, and most likely. The best case is when primary reproductive health care services, contraception, sexually transmitted disease screening and management, and preventive services are all obtained directly from reproductive health care providers. Under managed care, this means allowing for an additional entry gatekeeper to specialized services. The benefits are to clients who prefer seeing reproductive health care providers first; reproductive services would be separated from medical services. The out of the mainstream scenario would place contraceptive services and other preventive services as outside the mandated benefits. The government would still provide Title X type programs for the indigent. The most likely scenario is one where primary care providers

  17. Health and health services in Central America.

    PubMed

    Garfield, R M; Rodriguez, P F

    1985-08-16

    Despite rapid economic growth since World War II, health conditions improved only slowly in most of Central America. This is a result of poor medical, social, and economic infrastructure, income maldistribution, and the poor utilization of health investments. The economic crisis of the 1980s and civil strife have further endangered health in the region. Life expectancy has fallen among men in El Salvador and civil strife has become the most common cause of death in Guatemala, Nicaragua, and El Salvador. Large-scale US assistance has done little to improve conditions, and refugees continue to pour into North America. It is estimated that there are more than a million refugees within Central America, while a million have fled to the United States. Costa Rica and Nicaragua are partial exceptions to this dismal health picture. An effective approach to the many health problems in Central America will require joint planning and cooperation among all countries in the region.

  18. Health and health services in Central America.

    PubMed

    Garfield, R M; Rodriguez, P F

    1985-08-16

    Despite rapid economic growth since World War II, health conditions improved only slowly in most of Central America. This is a result of poor medical, social, and economic infrastructure, income maldistribution, and the poor utilization of health investments. The economic crisis of the 1980s and civil strife have further endangered health in the region. Life expectancy has fallen among men in El Salvador and civil strife has become the most common cause of death in Guatemala, Nicaragua, and El Salvador. Large-scale US assistance has done little to improve conditions, and refugees continue to pour into North America. It is estimated that there are more than a million refugees within Central America, while a million have fled to the United States. Costa Rica and Nicaragua are partial exceptions to this dismal health picture. An effective approach to the many health problems in Central America will require joint planning and cooperation among all countries in the region. PMID:4021026

  19. Mental health services in the Solomon Islands.

    PubMed

    Orotaloa, Paul; Blignault, Ilse

    2012-06-01

    The Solomon Islands comprise an archipelago of nearly 1,000 islands and coral atolls and have an estimated population of 549,574 people. Formal mental health services date back to 1950 when an asylum was established. Since then the process of mental health service development has been largely one of incremental change, with a major boost to community services in the last two decades. During the 1990s a mental health outpatient clinic was established in Honiara, together with attempts to recruit nursing staff as psychiatric coordinators in the provinces. In 1996, the Ministry commenced sending registered nurses for psychiatric training in Papua New Guinea. By 2010, there were 13 psychiatric nurses and one psychiatrist, with a second psychiatrist in training. A National Mental Health Policy was drafted in 2009 but is yet to be endorsed by Cabinet. A significant portion of the population still turns to traditional healers or church leaders for purposes of healing, seeking help from Western medicine only after all other alternatives in the community have been exhausted. There is still a long way to go before mental health services are available, affordable and accessible to the whole population, including people living in geographically remote areas. Realization of this vision requires increased resourcing for mental health services; improved communication and collaboration between the centrally-based, national mental health services and the provincial health services; and closer, ongoing relationships between all stakeholders and partners, both locally and internationally. PMID:26767360

  20. Mental health services in the Solomon Islands.

    PubMed

    Orotaloa, Paul; Blignault, Ilse

    2012-06-01

    The Solomon Islands comprise an archipelago of nearly 1,000 islands and coral atolls and have an estimated population of 549,574 people. Formal mental health services date back to 1950 when an asylum was established. Since then the process of mental health service development has been largely one of incremental change, with a major boost to community services in the last two decades. During the 1990s a mental health outpatient clinic was established in Honiara, together with attempts to recruit nursing staff as psychiatric coordinators in the provinces. In 1996, the Ministry commenced sending registered nurses for psychiatric training in Papua New Guinea. By 2010, there were 13 psychiatric nurses and one psychiatrist, with a second psychiatrist in training. A National Mental Health Policy was drafted in 2009 but is yet to be endorsed by Cabinet. A significant portion of the population still turns to traditional healers or church leaders for purposes of healing, seeking help from Western medicine only after all other alternatives in the community have been exhausted. There is still a long way to go before mental health services are available, affordable and accessible to the whole population, including people living in geographically remote areas. Realization of this vision requires increased resourcing for mental health services; improved communication and collaboration between the centrally-based, national mental health services and the provincial health services; and closer, ongoing relationships between all stakeholders and partners, both locally and internationally.

  1. Mental Health Care in a High School Based Health Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jepson, Lisa; Juszczak, Linda; Fisher, Martin

    1998-01-01

    Describes the mental-health and medical services provided at a high-school-based service center. Five years after the center's inception mental health visits had quadrupled. One third of students utilizing the center reported substance abuse within their family. Other reasons for center use included pregnancy, suicidal ideation, obesity,…

  2. Health Services for Migrant Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bove, Beverly A.

    Intended as a resource for administrators, teachers, nurses, paraprofessionals, health coordinators, and community action personnel who are interested in meeting the health needs of migrant children, this handbook offers suggestions for organizing community resources in providing health care to migrant children. Poor nutrition, the lack of dental…

  3. A Learning Alberta: Fostering Innovation in Alberta. A Discussion Document

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Advanced Education, 2005

    2005-01-01

    The Minister has initiated a comprehensive exercise to establish a new direction for Alberta's advanced education system. Through "A Learning Alberta," a new vision and policy outcomes for the advanced education system will be articulated. The process provides an opportunity for government, stakeholders, and the public to consider how the advanced…

  4. Planning Campus Health Care Services 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglas, Bruce L.

    1975-01-01

    In a context of forecasts of major changes for America's entire health care system, colleges and universities are exploring the implications of new trends in campus health care delivery. On January 30-31, 1975, the Society for College and University Planning sponsored a workshop on "Campus Health Care Services" in Chicago to discuss such issues as…

  5. Health services accessibility among Spanish elderly.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Mayoralas, G; Rodríguez, V; Rojo, F

    2000-01-01

    The paper aims to identify the variables that best explain the use of health services by people aged 65 and over in Spain. The data comes from the 1993 Spanish National Health Survey (ENSE 93). The conceptual framework is the model proposed by Andersen, who suggests that utilisation is a function of predisposition to use the services, the ability to use them and of need. A bivariate and multivariate analysis (SPSS-X Discriminant Procedure) is conducted to define the predictors that best discriminate users and non-users. The use of each health service is explained by a different set of variables. The need variables play a more important role in predicting the use of non-discretionary services that are more closely related to healing processes (medical consultations, emergencies and hospitalisation). The predisposing and enabling variables are more relevant in explaining the use of dental services, indicating a certain degree of inequity of these discretionary services. PMID:10622691

  6. Including customers in health service design.

    PubMed

    Perrott, Bruce E

    2013-01-01

    This article will explore the concept and meaning of codesign as it applies to the delivery of health services. The results of a pilot study in health codesign will be used as a research based case discussion, thus providing a platform to suggest future research that could lead to building more robust knowledge of how the consumers of health services may be more effectively involved in the process of developing and delivering the type of services that are in line with expectations of the various stakeholder groups.

  7. Including customers in health service design.

    PubMed

    Perrott, Bruce E

    2013-01-01

    This article will explore the concept and meaning of codesign as it applies to the delivery of health services. The results of a pilot study in health codesign will be used as a research based case discussion, thus providing a platform to suggest future research that could lead to building more robust knowledge of how the consumers of health services may be more effectively involved in the process of developing and delivering the type of services that are in line with expectations of the various stakeholder groups. PMID:23697852

  8. 42 CFR 441.15 - Home health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Home health services. 441.15 Section 441.15 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Provisions § 441.15 Home health services. With respect to the services defined in § 440.70 of this...

  9. 42 CFR 440.70 - Home health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Home health services. 440.70 Section 440.70 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS SERVICES: GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 440.70 Home health services....

  10. 42 CFR 440.70 - Home health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Home health services. 440.70 Section 440.70 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS SERVICES: GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 440.70 Home health services....

  11. 42 CFR 440.70 - Home health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Home health services. 440.70 Section 440.70 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS SERVICES: GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 440.70 Home health services....

  12. 42 CFR 441.15 - Home health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Home health services. 441.15 Section 441.15 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Provisions § 441.15 Home health services. With respect to the services defined in § 440.70 of this...

  13. 42 CFR 440.70 - Home health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Home health services. 440.70 Section 440.70 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS SERVICES: GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 440.70 Home health services....

  14. 42 CFR 441.15 - Home health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Home health services. 441.15 Section 441.15 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Provisions § 441.15 Home health services. With respect to the services defined in § 440.70 of this...

  15. 42 CFR 441.15 - Home health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Home health services. 441.15 Section 441.15 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Provisions § 441.15 Home health services. With respect to the services defined in § 440.70 of this...

  16. 42 CFR 440.70 - Home health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Home health services. 440.70 Section 440.70 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS SERVICES: GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 440.70 Home health services....

  17. 42 CFR 441.15 - Home health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Home health services. 441.15 Section 441.15 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Provisions § 441.15 Home health services. With respect to the services defined in § 440.70 of this...

  18. Clinical Preventive Services for Older Adults: The Interface Between Personal Health Care and Public Health Services

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Chesley L.; Shenson, Douglas

    2012-01-01

    Healthy aging must become a priority objective for both population and personal health services, and will require innovative prevention programming to span those systems. Uptake of essential clinical preventive services is currently suboptimal among adults, owing to a number of system- and office-based care barriers. To achieve maximum health results, prevention must be integrated across community and clinical settings. Many preventive services are portable, deliverable in either clinical or community settings. Capitalizing on that flexibility can improve uptake and health outcomes. Significant reductions in health disparities, mortality, and morbidity, along with decreases in health spending, are achievable through improved collaboration and synergy between population health and personal health systems. PMID:22390505

  19. [Integration of the delivery of health services].

    PubMed

    Frenk, J

    1992-01-01

    In Mexico the Constitution defines the right to health care as a social right and, as such, confers to the state the guiding role in the access of the population to health services. Unfortunately, this constitutional principle has not been fully met. One of the reasons for this is the fragmentation of public action in health and the continuous postponement of the integration of health services. In this paper the conceptual and practical limits of integration of health services are discussed, using as starting point a brief diagnosis of inequity and fragmentation of the health system in Mexico. The doctrinaire principles of integration are also described, as well as its practical advantages and disadvantages. Finally, a typology of forms of integration and previous integration experiences in Mexico are discussed. In the concluding remarks the integration prospects for Mexico are analyzed. PMID:1411782

  20. Alberta Demographics and the Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun, Shepard

    University education in Alberta during the next two decades is addressed in relation to the increasing in-migration and uncertain participation. Although Alberta has the highest rate of net population gain among all provinces due to in-migration, it is not clear how many of the 18-24-year-old cohort will be job-seekers rather than potential…

  1. Emergency Health Services Selected Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health Services and Mental Health Administration (DHEW), Bethesda, MD.

    This annotated bibliography contains books, journal articles, visual aids, and other documents pertaining to emergency health care, which are organized according to: (1) publications dealing with day-to-day health emergencies that occur at home, work, and play, (2) documents that will help communities prepare for emergencies, including natural…

  2. [Reembursing health-care service provider networks].

    PubMed

    Binder, A; Braun, G E

    2015-03-01

    Health-care service provider networks are regarded as an important instrument to overcome the widely criticised fragmentation and sectoral partition of the German health-care system. The first part of this paper incorporates health-care service provider networks in the field of health-care research. The system theoretical model and basic functions of health-care research are used for this purpose. Furthermore already established areas of health-care research with strong relations to health-care service provider networks are listed. The second part of this paper introduces some innovative options for reimbursing health-care service provider networks which can be regarded as some results of network-oriented health-care research. The origins are virtual budgets currently used in part to reimburse integrated care according to §§ 140a ff. SGB V. Describing and evaluating this model leads to real budgets (capitation) - a reimbursement scheme repeatedly demanded by SVR-Gesundheit (German governmental health-care advisory board), for example, however barely implemented. As a final step a direct reimbursement of networks by the German sickness fund is discussed. Advantages and challenges are shown. The development of the different reimbursement schemes is partially based on models from the USA.

  3. Health Behavior, Health Education, Health Service Utilization and Compliance with Health Regimes: An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toledo, J. R.; Hughes, Howard

    This bibliography includes references from major articles, Index Medicus (1972- 1977), and Psychological Abstracts (1967-1977). The material is arranged under four major headings--health behavior, health education, health services utilization, and compliance with health regimes. It will be of interest to persons working in medical settings and…

  4. Health services under the General Agreement on Trade in Services.

    PubMed Central

    Adlung, R.; Carzaniga, A.

    2001-01-01

    The potential for trade in health services has expanded rapidly in recent decades. More efficient communication systems have helped to reduce distance-related barriers to trade; rising incomes and enhanced information have increased the mobility of patients; and internal cost pressures have led various governments to consider possibilities for increased private participation. As yet, however, health services have played only a modest role in the General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS). It is possible that Members of the World Trade Organization have been discouraged from undertaking access commitments by the novelty of the Agreement, coordination problems between relevant agencies, widespread inexperience in concepts of services trade, a traditionally strong degree of government involvement in the health sector, and concerns about basic quality and social objectives. However, more than five years have passed since GATS entered into force, allowing hesitant administrations to familiarize themselves with its main elements and its operation in practice. The present paper is intended to contribute to this process. It provides an overview of the basic structure of GATS and of the patterns of current commitments in health services and of limitations frequently used in this context. The concluding section discusses possibilities of pursuing basic policy objectives in a more open environment and indicates issues that may have to be dealt with in current negotiations on services. PMID:11357215

  5. Socialism and the British National Health Service.

    PubMed

    Powell, M

    1997-09-01

    This paper examines some of the key characteristics of a socialist health care system using the example of the British National Health Service (NHS). It has been claimed that the NHS has socialist principles, and represents an island of socialism in a capitalist sea. However, using historical analysis, this paper argues that while the NHS claims some socialist ends, they could never be fully achieved because of the lack of socialist means. The socialist mechanisms which were associated with earlier plans for a national health service such as salaried service, health centres, elected health authorities and divorcing private practice from the public service were discarded in negotiation. Moreover, even these would have achieved socialism merely in the sense of distributing health care, without any deeper transformation associated with doctor-patient relationships and prevention. In short, the NHS is more correctly seen as nationalised rather than socialised medicine, achieving the first three levels of a socialist health service identified here. It can be said to have socialist principles in the limited distributional sense and has some socialist means to achieve these. However, it lacks the stronger means to fully achieve its distributional goals, and is very distant from the third level of a radical transformation of health care.

  6. [About mental health outreach services in Japan].

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Shunichi; Fujieda, Yumiko; Shimizu, Kimiko; Ishibashi, Aya; Eguchi, Satoshi

    2013-04-01

    Outreach services are very important in community mental health care. There are two types for outreach services. One is mental health activities, such as early intervention and consultation, and the other is intended to prevent recurrence and readmission by supporting the daily living activities of a patient in a community. We have 2.73 psychiatric care beds in hospitals per 1,000 population. So, it is just the beginning in changing from hospital centered psychiatry to community mental health care. Outreach services are being tried in several places in our country. In this essay, we describe mental health outreach services in Japan and we have illustrated vocational rehabilitation and outreach job support in our day treatment program.

  7. Mental health services research with forensic populations.

    PubMed

    Williams, M H; Bloom, J D

    1989-01-01

    Research on the management and treatment of insanity acquittees and the right to refuse treatment illustrates the need for empirical analysis in the overlapping areas of law, mental health services, and public policy issues.

  8. [Health and the development of a rural health service system].

    PubMed

    Echeverri, O; de Salazar, L M

    1980-01-01

    The first part of this article reviews the interesting experience of the Center for Multidisciplinary Research in Rural Development (CIMDER) of Cali, Colombia, in the application of a model for the integrated development of health services. The strategies used in the model were: services available to all individuals and families in the community, use of accessible technology, community participation, and cooperation between the health sector and other development sectors. The second part briefly reviews the role of the nurse in health and development and takes issue with the traditional narrow view of the sphere of action of nursing as a profession. It is asserted that, in order to bring about the extension of health services and community development, it is necessary that the nurse serve in a position of leadership on a multidisciplinary team as either coordinator of services, supervisor of personnel, or education, and as liaison for the formal health care system with the community to enlist its active participation.

  9. [Effective access to health services: operationalizing universal health coverage].

    PubMed

    Fajardo-Dolci, Germán; Gutiérrez, Juan Pablo; García-Saisó, Sebastián

    2015-01-01

    The right to health and its operational form, as an organized social response to health: the right to health protection, are the mainstay for the global push towards universal health coverage. The path to achieve this goal is particular to each country and relates to the baseline and specific context in relation to what is feasible. In practical terms, universal coverage involves the correlation between demand and supply of services (promotion, prevention, and care), expressed by the ability for each individual to make use of services when these are required. In those terms universal coverage is then effective access. The objective of the paper is to explore the conceptualization of effective access to health services and propose a definition that allows its operationalization thereof. This definition considers key elements of supply and demand of services, including the availability of resources and adequate provision (quality), as well as barriers to use them. PMID:26235780

  10. Combating health care fragmentation through integrated health services delivery networks

    PubMed Central

    Ramagem, Caroline; Urrutia, Soledad; Griffith, Tephany; Cruz, Mario; Fabrega, Ricardo; Holder, Reynaldo; Montenegro, Hernán

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Despite existing initiatives to integrate health services in the Americas Health Care fragmentation remains a significant challenge. Excessive fragmentation leads to difficulties in access to services, delivery of services of poor technical quality, inefficient use of resources, increases in production costs, and low user satisfaction. To address this problem, the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) has launched the Integrated Health Services Delivery Networks (IHSDN) Initiative to support the development of more accessible, equitable and efficient health care models in the Region [1]. Theory/conceptual framework IHSDN are defined as a network of organizations that provides, or makes arrangements to provide, equitable, comprehensive, and integrated health services to a defined population and is willing to be held accountable for its clinical and economic outcomes and the health status of the population served. IHSDN require 14 essential attributes for their adequate operation grouped according to four principal domains: model of care, governance and strategy, organization and management, and financial allocation and incentives [1]. Methods An extensive literature review, expert meetings and country consultations (national, subregional and regional) in the Americas resulted in a set of consensus-based essential attributes and policy options for implementing IHSDN. Results and conclusions The research and evidence on health services integration remains limited; however, several studies suggest that IHSDN could improve health systems performance. Principal lessons learned include: i) integration processes are difficult, complex and long term; ii) integration requires extensive systemic changes and a commitment by health workers, health service managers and policymakers; and iii) multiple modalities and degrees of integration can coexist within a single system. The public policy objective is to propose a design that meets each system’s specific

  11. Customer complaints in the National Health Service.

    PubMed

    Reid, N; Reid, R; Morris, D

    1995-11-01

    This paper addresses the role of consumer complaints in the flourishing quality assurance industry within the National Health Service (NHS), and considers the traditional ethos of complaints within the service. The advent of the internal market is considered as one of a range of factors which may change attitudes of NHS staff to complaints. In evaluating how complaints services might develop relevant literature is reviewed and recent national data on complaints procedures are cited. PMID:8548145

  12. Department of Agriculture, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service

    MedlinePlus

    ... Focus Animal Health Animal Welfare Biotechnology Business Services Civil Rights Emergency Response Imports & Exports International Services Plant ... Focus Animal Health Animal Welfare Biotechnology Business Services Civil Rights Emergency Response Imports & Exports International Services Plant ...

  13. An Analysis of Canadian Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing through the Junctures of History, Gender, Nursing Education, and Quality of Work Life in Ontario, Manitoba, Alberta, and Saskatchewan

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A society that values mental health and helps people live enjoyable and meaningful lives is a clear aspiration echoed throughout our Canadian health care system. The Mental Health Commission of Canada has put forth a framework for a mental health strategy with goals that reflect the virtue of optimal mental health for all Canadians (Mental Health Commission Canada, 2009). Canadian nurses, the largest group of health care workers, have a vital role in achieving these goals. In Canada, two-thirds of those who experience mental health problems do not receive mental health services (Statistics Canada, 2003). Through a gendered, critical, and sociological perspective the goal of this paper is to further understand how the past has shaped the present state of psychiatric mental health nursing (PMHN). This integrative literature review offers a depiction of Canadian PMHN in light of the intersections of history, gender, education, and quality of nursing work life. Fourteen articles were selected, which provide a partial reflection of contemporary Canadian PMHN. Findings include the association between gender and professional status, inconsistencies in psychiatric nursing education, and the limitations for Canadian nurse practitioners to advance the role of the psychiatric mental health nurse practitioner. PMID:23710367

  14. Green Infrastructure, Ecosystem Services, and Human Health.

    PubMed

    Coutts, Christopher; Hahn, Micah

    2015-08-18

    Contemporary ecological models of health prominently feature the natural environment as fundamental to the ecosystem services that support human life, health, and well-being. The natural environment encompasses and permeates all other spheres of influence on health. Reviews of the natural environment and health literature have tended, at times intentionally, to focus on a limited subset of ecosystem services as well as health benefits stemming from the presence, and access and exposure to, green infrastructure. The sweeping influence of green infrastructure on the myriad ecosystem services essential to health has therefore often been underrepresented. This survey of the literature aims to provide a more comprehensive picture-in the form of a primer-of the many simultaneously acting health co-benefits of green infrastructure. It is hoped that a more accurately exhaustive list of benefits will not only instigate further research into the health co-benefits of green infrastructure but also promote consilience in the many fields, including public health, that must be involved in the landscape conservation necessary to protect and improve health and well-being.

  15. Green Infrastructure, Ecosystem Services, and Human Health.

    PubMed

    Coutts, Christopher; Hahn, Micah

    2015-08-01

    Contemporary ecological models of health prominently feature the natural environment as fundamental to the ecosystem services that support human life, health, and well-being. The natural environment encompasses and permeates all other spheres of influence on health. Reviews of the natural environment and health literature have tended, at times intentionally, to focus on a limited subset of ecosystem services as well as health benefits stemming from the presence, and access and exposure to, green infrastructure. The sweeping influence of green infrastructure on the myriad ecosystem services essential to health has therefore often been underrepresented. This survey of the literature aims to provide a more comprehensive picture-in the form of a primer-of the many simultaneously acting health co-benefits of green infrastructure. It is hoped that a more accurately exhaustive list of benefits will not only instigate further research into the health co-benefits of green infrastructure but also promote consilience in the many fields, including public health, that must be involved in the landscape conservation necessary to protect and improve health and well-being. PMID:26295249

  16. Green Infrastructure, Ecosystem Services, and Human Health

    PubMed Central

    Coutts, Christopher; Hahn, Micah

    2015-01-01

    Contemporary ecological models of health prominently feature the natural environment as fundamental to the ecosystem services that support human life, health, and well-being. The natural environment encompasses and permeates all other spheres of influence on health. Reviews of the natural environment and health literature have tended, at times intentionally, to focus on a limited subset of ecosystem services as well as health benefits stemming from the presence, and access and exposure to, green infrastructure. The sweeping influence of green infrastructure on the myriad ecosystem services essential to health has therefore often been underrepresented. This survey of the literature aims to provide a more comprehensive picture—in the form of a primer—of the many simultaneously acting health co-benefits of green infrastructure. It is hoped that a more accurately exhaustive list of benefits will not only instigate further research into the health co-benefits of green infrastructure but also promote consilience in the many fields, including public health, that must be involved in the landscape conservation necessary to protect and improve health and well-being. PMID:26295249

  17. Early Intervention Services in Youth Mental Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wade, Darryl; Johnston, Amy; Campbell, Bronwyn; Littlefield, Lyn

    2007-01-01

    Mental and substance use disorders are leading contributors to the burden of disease among young people in Australia, but young people experience a range of barriers to accessing appropriate treatment for their mental health concerns. The development of early intervention services that provide accessible and effective mental health care has the…

  18. Diabetes and Adult Day Health Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dabelko, Holly I.; DeCoster, Vaughn A.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to provide a profile of individuals with diabetes who receive services in adult day centers. This exploratory study uses an administrative data set (N = 280) from five programs in central Ohio to examine four areas: demographics, health and mental health, financial and social resources, and disenrollment status. Older…

  19. Mental Health Services for Children and Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane

    This article reviews the progress made in meeting United States' existing mental health goals for adolescents, and identifies issues that will have to be considered in setting new goals. The article examines the substantial need for child mental health services, particularly among young, socioeconomically disadvantaged youth. The unmet need for…

  20. Profiles of Grant Programs: Public Health Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Health , Education, and Welfare, Washington., DC. Office of the Secretary.

    For potential grant applicants and for the general public, the booklet describes the programs of the six Public Health Service agencies in the American health care system. Each program is described concisely in terms of: its purpose and legal basis; applicants' eligibility for grants and the basis for their award; the special requirements made of…

  1. 45 CFR 1308.18 - Disabilities/health services coordination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Disabilities/health services coordination. 1308.18... DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN, YOUTH AND... DISABILITIES Health Services Performance Standards § 1308.18 Disabilities/health services coordination. (a)...

  2. 45 CFR 1308.18 - Disabilities/health services coordination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Disabilities/health services coordination. 1308.18... DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN, YOUTH AND... DISABILITIES Health Services Performance Standards § 1308.18 Disabilities/health services coordination. (a)...

  3. 45 CFR 1308.18 - Disabilities/health services coordination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Disabilities/health services coordination. 1308.18... DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN, YOUTH AND... DISABILITIES Health Services Performance Standards § 1308.18 Disabilities/health services coordination. (a)...

  4. 45 CFR 1308.18 - Disabilities/health services coordination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Disabilities/health services coordination. 1308.18... DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN, YOUTH AND... DISABILITIES Health Services Performance Standards § 1308.18 Disabilities/health services coordination. (a)...

  5. 45 CFR 1308.18 - Disabilities/health services coordination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Disabilities/health services coordination. 1308.18... DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN, YOUTH AND... DISABILITIES Health Services Performance Standards § 1308.18 Disabilities/health services coordination. (a)...

  6. Health Services and Rural America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rural Housing Alliance, Washington, DC.

    Rural people lose more days of school and work due to illness than do urban people; have higher infant mortality rates, and have more work-related injuries, all of which are aggravated by lack of access to or even the absence of medical services. Lack of doctors is the most glaring problem (in 1973 there were 138 U.S. counties which had no…

  7. Commitment and concern in the health service.

    PubMed

    Weir, R D

    1976-01-01

    As part of a general review of the use of local health services resources, a specific enquiry was mounted to examine the recurring complaint of a lack of identity or sense of belonging made by staff working in the largest district of the Grampian Health Board. The investigation pointed to clearly identifiable sources of confusion and concern: (a) a need to identify with and feel committed to the health service; (b) a sense of purpose and direction; (c) satisfaction with the conditions of service; (d) an understanding of an individual's role and its relationship to others'. It is relatively easy to list the problems, such as friction between occupational groups, lack of commitment, uncertainty over duties and authority, reluctance to delegate and resistance to, or even outright rejection of, decisions apparently at variance with professional advice. In addition to these internal stresses the health service is perpetually beset by two other external problems, namely what it is expected to achieve and the finance allowed to attain its goals. The various groups within the service are in no way agreed on roles and responsibilities, Without agreement goals cannot be defined. Without goals, use of resources cannot be rationalized. Without a demonstrably fair distribution of resources, neither the public nor health service staff will feel confident or committed. Somewhere this cycle must be broken.

  8. PLANNING FOR RURAL HEALTH SERVICES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CHAPMAN, A.L.

    THE RURAL POPULATION HAS BEEN SHIFTING TOWARD THE URBAN CENTERS OF OUR COUNTRY. SOME EVIDENCE INDICATES A REVERSAL OF THIS SITUATION IN THE NEAR FUTURE. INDUSTRY IS MOVING AWAY FROM THE CITIES TO AVOID WATER POLLUTION, TRAFFIC CONGESTION, AND HIGHER OPERATIONAL COSTS. PLANNED CITIES WHICH INCLUDE COMPREHENSIVE HEALTH PLANS ARE BEING CONSTRUCTED IN…

  9. Exploring Principals' Perceptions of Applications, Benefits, and Barriers of Alberta's SuperNet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Terry; Christiansen, Jo-An

    2007-01-01

    The Alberta SuperNet, a very high speed, broadband network, was built to bring high-speed connectivity to every school, library, and municipal office in Alberta. This CDN $294 million investment was made based on the perceived need for high-speed connectivity to stimulate economic and community development and to enhance government services,…

  10. Sustaining an Aboriginal mental health service partnership.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Jeffrey D; Martinez, Lee; Muyambi, Kuda; Verran, Kathy; Ryan, Bronwyn; Klee, Ruth

    2005-11-21

    The Regional Aboriginal Integrated Social and Emotional (RAISE) Wellbeing program commenced in February 2003 as an Aboriginal mental health service partnership between one Aboriginal Health Service and three mainstream services: a community mental health team, a hospital mental health liaison, and an "outback" community counselling service. A case study method was used to describe the drivers (incentives for program development), linkage processes (structures and activities through which the partnership operated), and sustainability of the program. Program drivers were longstanding problems with Aboriginal peoples' access to mental health care, policy direction favouring shared service responsibility, and a relatively small amount of new funding for mental health that allowed the program to commence. Linkage processes were the important personal relationships between key individuals. Developing the program as a part of routine practice within and across the partner organisations is now needed through formal agreements, common care-management tools, and training. The program's sustainability will depend on this development occurring, as well as better collection and use of data to communicate the value of the program and support calls for adequate recurrent funds. The development of care-management tools, training and data systems will require a longer period of start-up funding as well as some external expertise.

  11. [Marketing mix in health service].

    PubMed

    Ameri, Cinzia; Fiorini, Fulvio

    2015-01-01

    The marketing mix is the combination of the marketing variables that a firm employs with the purpose to achieve the expected volume of business within its market. In the sale of goods, four variables compose the marketing mix (4 Ps): Product, Price, Point of sale and Promotion. In the case of providing services, three further elements play a role: Personnel, Physical Evidence and Processes (7 Ps). The marketing mix must be addressed to the consumers as well as to the employees of the providing firm. Furthermore, it must be interpreted as employees ability to satisfy customers (interactive marketing).

  12. [Marketing mix in health service].

    PubMed

    Ameri, Cinzia; Fiorini, Fulvio

    2015-01-01

    The marketing mix is the combination of the marketing variables that a firm employs with the purpose to achieve the expected volume of business within its market. In the sale of goods, four variables compose the marketing mix (4 Ps): Product, Price, Point of sale and Promotion. In the case of providing services, three further elements play a role: Personnel, Physical Evidence and Processes (7 Ps). The marketing mix must be addressed to the consumers as well as to the employees of the providing firm. Furthermore, it must be interpreted as employees ability to satisfy customers (interactive marketing). PMID:26093140

  13. Strategic service quality management for health care.

    PubMed

    Anderson, E A; Zwelling, L A

    1996-01-01

    Quality management has become one of the most important and most debated topics within the service sector. This is especially true for health care, as the controversy rages on how the existing American system should be restructured. Health care reform aimed at reducing costs and ensuring access to all Americans cannot be allowed to jeopardize the quality of care. As such, total quality management (TQM) has become a vital ingredient to strategic planning within the health care domain. At the heart of any such quality improvement effort is the issue of measurement. TQM cannot be effectively utilized as a competitive weapon unless quality can be accurately defined, measured, evaluated, and monitored over time. Through such analysis a hospital can elect how to expend its limited resources toward those quality improvement projects which will impact customer perceptions of service quality the most. Thus, the purpose of this report is to establish a framework by which to approach the issue of quality measurement, delineate the various components of quality that exist in health care, and explore how these elements affect one another. We propose that the issue of quality measurement in health care be approached as an integration of service quality attributes common to other service organizations and technical quality attributes unique to health care. We hope that this research will serve as a first step toward the synthesis of the various quality attributes inherent in the health care domain and encourage other researchers to address the interactions of the various quality attributes. PMID:8763215

  14. Gender and health services use for a mental health problem

    PubMed Central

    Albizu-Garcia, Carmen E.; Alegría, Margarita; Freeman, Daniel; Vera, Mildred

    2013-01-01

    This study addresses whether the predictors of seeking help for a mental health problem differ by gender. An adaptation of Andersen’s Socio-Behavioral Model is used to identify factors associated with seeking care for a mental health problem. Data are derived from two waves of a community survey undertaken in 1992–1993 and in 1993–1994 among a probability sample of adults (18–69 years), residing in poor areas of Puerto Rico. Paired data was used from those individuals who responded to both waves of the survey for a total of 3221 community respondents. Responses from wave 1 were used to predict mental health service use in wave 2. The dependent variable is any use of outpatient mental health services in the year preceding the second interview. Logistic regression was used to model the effects of the independent variables on use. Males and females were found to use mental health services in nearly equal proportions. Gender did not have a main effect on use when other covariates were controlled. Significant interactions with gender were found for several predictors of use. The largest intervention effects were encountered in our need for care indicators. Having a definite need for mental health care and poor self-rated mental health had a larger effect on predicting use of services for men than they do for women. It is concluded that strategies designed to improve access to mental health services for minority disadvantaged populations ought to take into account gender differences in the predictors of use. Studies addressing factors influencing health services utilization for a mental health problem should consider stratifying their sample by gender. Future research should establish whether or not these findings are sustained with other population groups. PMID:11522134

  15. School Mental Health Resources and Adolescent Mental Health Service Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Jennifer Greif; McLaughlin, Katie A.; Alegria, Margarita; Costello, E. Jane; Gruber, Michael J.; Hoagwood, Kimberly; Leaf, Philip J.; Olin, Serene; Sampson, Nancy A.; Kessler, Ronald C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Although schools are identified as critical for detecting youth mental disorders, little is known about whether the number of mental health providers and types of resources that they offer influence student mental health service use. Such information could inform the development and allocation of appropriate school-based resources to…

  16. Evaluation of occupational exposure to free silica in Alberta foundries.

    PubMed

    Ayalp, A; Myroniuk, D

    1982-11-01

    The Occupational Hygiene Branch of Alberta Workers' Health, Safety and Compensation conducted a comprehensive study of the foundry industry in Alberta. The surveys assessed both the degree of health hazards present and the effectiveness of existing control systems for airborne contaminants. All nine of Alberta's ferrous foundries were surveyed in the course of the project. The foundries varied from those which were small with limited mechanization to those which were large and highly automated. The concentrations of free silica in the work environment are correlated to the different attempts to control silica using substitution and various ventilation systems. The particular foundry processes evaluated for airborne free silica were sand preparation, shakeout, dry sand transport and sand molding. Workers' exposure to free airborne silica was evaluated by personal and area samples. The free silica content of the samples was determined by infra-red spectrophotometry. The results indicated most control systems were inadequate. Effective control methods are described to reduce the health hazard.

  17. Climate services to improve public health.

    PubMed

    Jancloes, Michel; Thomson, Madeleine; Costa, María Mánez; Hewitt, Chris; Corvalan, Carlos; Dinku, Tufa; Lowe, Rachel; Hayden, Mary

    2014-04-25

    A high level expert panel discussed how climate and health services could best collaborate to improve public health. This was on the agenda of the recent Third International Climate Services Conference, held in Montego Bay, Jamaica, 4-6 December 2013. Issues and challenges concerning a demand led approach to serve the health sector needs, were identified and analysed. Important recommendations emerged to ensure that innovative collaboration between climate and health services assist decision-making processes and the management of climate-sensitive health risk. Key recommendations included: a move from risk assessment towards risk management; the engagement of the public health community with both the climate sector and development sectors, whose decisions impact on health, particularly the most vulnerable; to increase operational research on the use of policy-relevant climate information to manage climate- sensitive health risks; and to develop in-country capacities to improve local knowledge (including collection of epidemiological, climate and socio-economic data), along with institutional interaction with policy makers.

  18. 42 CFR 424.22 - Requirements for home health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Requirements for home health services. 424.22 Section 424.22 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... § 424.22 Requirements for home health services. Medicare Part A or Part B pays for home health...

  19. Industrial health services in large plants.

    PubMed

    BURGER, G C

    1955-01-01

    An industrial area or a large industry can be most usefully served by setting up an occupational health centre in close co-operation with other health services. This centre should strive to achieve not only the adaptation of the worker to the machine and to the work, but also-and even more important-the adaptation of the machine and the working methods to the physical and mental capacities of men.The industrial medical service has to work in close co-operation with the social services of the plant, but should not be considered as a part of these services, because the programme of the medical department is based on different principles and has different aims. The medical department should be directly under the supervision of the top management. But an industrial health service should not be the exponent of either the management or the worker; it should be based on general medical principles and knowledge. It is very important that the workers should fully support the activities of the medical department, and this can best be achieved by encouraging representatives of the workers to take a special interest in the work and keeping them fully informed about it.The preventive work of an industrial health centre includes pre-employment and periodical medical examinations, job analysis and placement, supervision of environmental conditions, health guidance, health statistics, and co-operation with other health agencies. The therapeutic work includes first aid and accident treatment and, under certain conditions, full medical care of the workers and their families. Experience has shown that the activity of such a centre is of great value to the health of the workers; it is also of great importance to the industry itself, even from the financial point of view. PMID:13276819

  20. MEDICAL CARE AND PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICES

    PubMed Central

    Emerson, Haven

    1952-01-01

    Medical care applies to the individual, and public health to the community. One is the concentrated application of diagnosis and treatment for the life, the comfort of a patient, and includes guidance in health as for motherhood, infancy, childhood and old age. Public health services, provided by the community through its local government and the local department of health, are concerned with the prevention of diseases of all kinds. Some are controlled by sanitary authority, but the majority of preventable diseases are dealt with by public health education. It is not the function of the health department to treat the sick. The family physicians, the hospitals and dispensaries provide for medical care. Medical care of the sick and public health protection are two parallel activities to make use of medical science, one for treatment, the other for prevention of disease. PMID:13009462

  1. Human resource issues in university health services.

    PubMed

    Meilman, P W

    2001-07-01

    To provide first-rate services to students, college health services need the best possible staff. Managers and supervisors play a critical role in guiding the work of their employees so as to enhance performance. Reference checks for new employees and regular performance appraisal dialogues for ongoing employees are important tools in this process. The author discusses these issues and suggests formats for reference checks and performance appraisals.

  2. Program management of telemental health care services.

    PubMed

    Darkins, A

    2001-01-01

    Telemedicine is a new adjunct to the delivery of health care services that has been applied to a range of health care specialties, including mental health. When prospective telemedicine programs are planned, telemedicine is often envisaged as simply a question of introducing new technology. The development of a robust, sustainable telemental health program involves clinical, technical, and managerial considerations. The major barriers to making this happen are usually how practitioners and patients adapt successfully to the technology and not in the physical installation of telecommunications bandwidth and the associated hardware necessary for teleconsultation. This article outlines the requirements for establishing a viable telemental health service, one that is based on clinical need, practitioner acceptance, technical reliability, and revenue generation. It concludes that the major challenge associated with the implementation of telemental health does not lie in having the idea or in taking the idea to the project stage needed for proof of concept. The major challenge to the widespread adoption of telemental health is paying sufficient attention to the myriad of details needed to integrate models of remote health care delivery into the wider health care system.

  3. 77 FR 62243 - Health Resources and Services Administration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration National Advisory Council on the National...., November 2, 2012--8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m. Place: Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), Parklawn..., Bureau of Clinician Recruitment and Service, Health Resources and Services Administration,...

  4. Caring for older people. Community services: health.

    PubMed

    Pushpangadan, M; Burns, E

    1996-09-28

    Many frail or disabled elderly people are now being maintained in the community, partially at least as a consequence of the Community Care Act 1993. This paper details the work of the major health professionals who are involved in caring for older people in the community and describes how to access nursing, palliative care, continence, mental health, Hospital at Home, physiotherapy, occupational therapy, equipment, and optical, dental, and dietetic services. In many areas, services are evolving to meet needs and some examples of innovative practice are included.

  5. 41 CFR 101-5.307 - Public Health Service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Public Health Service... AND COMPLEXES 5.3-Federal Employee Health Services § 101-5.307 Public Health Service. (a) The only authorized contact point for assistance of and consultation with the Public Health Service is the...

  6. 41 CFR 101-5.307 - Public Health Service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2011-07-01 2007-07-01 true Public Health Service... AND COMPLEXES 5.3-Federal Employee Health Services § 101-5.307 Public Health Service. (a) The only authorized contact point for assistance of and consultation with the Public Health Service is the...

  7. 41 CFR 101-5.307 - Public Health Service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2014-07-01 2012-07-01 true Public Health Service... AND COMPLEXES 5.3-Federal Employee Health Services § 101-5.307 Public Health Service. (a) The only authorized contact point for assistance of and consultation with the Public Health Service is the...

  8. 41 CFR 101-5.307 - Public Health Service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Public Health Service... AND COMPLEXES 5.3-Federal Employee Health Services § 101-5.307 Public Health Service. (a) The only authorized contact point for assistance of and consultation with the Public Health Service is the...

  9. 41 CFR 101-5.307 - Public Health Service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Public Health Service... AND COMPLEXES 5.3-Federal Employee Health Services § 101-5.307 Public Health Service. (a) The only authorized contact point for assistance of and consultation with the Public Health Service is the...

  10. Challenging heterosexism in college health service delivery.

    PubMed

    McKee, M B; Hayes, S F; Axiotis, I R

    1994-03-01

    The empowerment and affirmation of lesbian, bisexual, and gay students is long overdue. This article explores how human immunodeficiency virus and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS), substance abuse, violence and hate-related crimes, suicide, and heterosexism all adversely affect the physical and emotional health of nonheterosexual college students. College health services must expand their current scope and practice and assume a leadership role in combating all forms of oppression by actively incorporating and addressing the unique health issues and needs of the lesbian, bisexual, and gay population. This article provides a brief overview of the relevant healthcare issues for lesbians, bisexuals, and gays; examples of heterosexism in college health services; and recommendations for institutional and personal and professional change.

  11. Strategic market positions for mental health services.

    PubMed

    Ambrose, D M; Lennox, L

    1988-01-01

    Faced with a rapidly changing market, increased legislation and intense competition, mental health service providers must be sophisticated planners and position themselves advantageously in the marketplace. They can effectively position themselves to be profitable and sustaining through market segmentation and sensitivity. The following article will address one concept of marketing that has received less attention but is of critical importance: positioning. As the market environment becomes increasingly competitive, positioning will be the key to success for mental health programs and institutions.

  12. Mental health services in the Arab world.

    PubMed

    Okasha, Ahmed; Karam, Elie; Okasha, Tarek

    2012-02-01

    This paper summarizes the current situation of mental health services in the Arab world. Out of 20 countries for which information is available, six do not have a mental health legislation and two do not have a mental health policy. Three countries (Lebanon, Kuwait and Bahrain) had in 2007 more than 30 psychiatric beds per 100,000 population, while two (Sudan and Somalia) had less than 5 per 100,000. The highest number of psychiatrists is found in Qatar, Bahrain and Kuwait, while seven countries (Iraq, Libya, Morocco, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen) have less than 0.5 psychiatrists for 100,000 population. The budget allowed for mental health as a percentage from the total health budget, in the few countries where information is available, is far below the range to promote mental health services. Some improvement has occurred in the last decade, but the mental health human resources and the attention devoted to mental health issues are still insufficient.

  13. Health services reforms in revolutionary Nicaragua.

    PubMed Central

    Garfield, R M; Taboada, E

    1984-01-01

    Before the Nicaraguan revolution of 1979, access to health services was largely limited to the affluent sectors of the urban population and the minority of workers with social security coverage. Repeated attempts at reform by organized medicine were ineffective. Since the revolution, a tremendous expansion in health services has occurred. The national health system receives approximately one-third of its funds from the social security system. Steadily increasing equity in access is a result of the promotion of primary care, health campaigns involving up to 10 per cent of the general population as volunteers, the use of paramedical aides, and foreign assistance. Private practice nevertheless remains strong. In the coming years, several complex issues must be examined, including: a balance in the number of nurses and doctors trained, the role of private practice, and the relationship of the Ministry of Health to the social security system. Further progress in health reforms may be delayed by the defensive war which Nicaragua is fighting on its northern and southern borders. Despite emergent health problems in the war zones, most of the innovative aspects of the health system remain intact as of this writing. PMID:6476169

  14. Essential Concepts in Modern Health Services

    PubMed Central

    El Taguri, A

    2008-01-01

    Health services have the functions to define community health problems, to identify unmet needs and survey the resources to meet them, to establish SMART objectives, and to project administrative actions to accomplish the purpose of proposed action programs. For maximum efficacy, health systems should rely on newer approaches of management as management-by-objectives, risk-management, and performance management with full and equal participation from professionals and consumers. The public should be well informed about their needs and what is expected from them to improve their health. Inefficient use of budget allocated to health services should be prevented by tools like performance management and clinical governance. Data processed to information and intelligence is needed to deal with changing disease patterns and to encourage policies that could manage with the complex feedback system of health. e-health solutions should be instituted to increase effectiveness and improve efficiency and informing human resources and populations. Suitable legislations should be introduced including those that ensure coordination between different sectors. Competent workforce should be given the opportunity to receive lifetime appropriate adequate training. External continuous evaluation using appropriate indicators is vital. Actions should be done both inside and outside the health sector to monitor changes and overcome constraints. PMID:21499457

  15. Mental health services in the Arab world

    PubMed Central

    OKASHA, AHMED; KARAM, ELIE; OKASHA, TAREK

    2012-01-01

    This paper summarizes the current situation of mental health services in the Arab world. Out of 20 countries for which information is available, six do not have a mental health legislation and two do not have a mental health policy. Three countries (Lebanon, Kuwait and Bahrain) had in 2007 more than 30 psychiatric beds per 100,000 population, while two (Sudan and Somalia) had less than 5 per 100,000. The highest number of psychiatrists is found in Qatar, Bahrain and Kuwait, while seven countries (Iraq, Libya, Morocco, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen) have less than 0.5 psychiatrists for 100,000 population. The budget allowed for mental health as a percentage from the total health budget, in the few countries where information is available, is far below the range to promote mental health services. Some improvement has occurred in the last decade, but the mental health human resources and the attention devoted to mental health issues are still insufficient. PMID:22295010

  16. Hispanic access to health/mental health services.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Pedro

    2002-01-01

    Currently, the Hispanic population of the United States is growing very rapidly. Despite the significance of this growth and the fact that it is expected that Hispanics will be soon the largest ethnic minority group in this country, the access to health/mental health care for the Hispanic population is rather limited. Many factors are currently affecting the Hispanics' access to health/mental health care services. Among them, cultural and language barriers, insufficient numbers of Hispanic manpower in the health care professions, low educational and socioeconomic levels, the high number of uninsured Hispanics, and ethnic and racial prejudices and discrimination. In this commentary, I address the factors that interfere with the Hispanics' access to health/mental health care, and advance recommendations geared to alleviate and/or resolve this critical problem. PMID:12025724

  17. 42 CFR 417.104 - Payment for basic health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Payment for basic health services. 417.104 Section 417.104 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) HEALTH MAINTENANCE ORGANIZATIONS, COMPETITIVE...

  18. 42 CFR 417.104 - Payment for basic health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Payment for basic health services. 417.104 Section 417.104 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM HEALTH MAINTENANCE ORGANIZATIONS, COMPETITIVE MEDICAL PLANS,...

  19. 42 CFR 417.105 - Payment for supplemental health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Payment for supplemental health services. 417.105 Section 417.105 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) HEALTH MAINTENANCE ORGANIZATIONS, COMPETITIVE...

  20. 42 CFR 417.104 - Payment for basic health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Payment for basic health services. 417.104 Section 417.104 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) HEALTH MAINTENANCE ORGANIZATIONS, COMPETITIVE...

  1. 42 CFR 424.22 - Requirements for home health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Requirements for home health services. 424.22 Section 424.22 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Requirements § 424.22 Requirements for home health services. Medicare Part A or Part B pays for home...

  2. 42 CFR 417.105 - Payment for supplemental health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Payment for supplemental health services. 417.105 Section 417.105 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM HEALTH MAINTENANCE ORGANIZATIONS, COMPETITIVE MEDICAL PLANS,...

  3. 42 CFR 417.105 - Payment for supplemental health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Payment for supplemental health services. 417.105 Section 417.105 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) HEALTH MAINTENANCE ORGANIZATIONS, COMPETITIVE...

  4. 42 CFR 417.105 - Payment for supplemental health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... for a supplemental health service provided an enrollee who is a full-time student at an accredited... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Payment for supplemental health services. 417.105 Section 417.105 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND...

  5. Patient satisfaction with transgender health services.

    PubMed

    Bockting, W; Robinson, B; Benner, A; Scheltema, K

    2004-01-01

    Measuring patient satisfaction (i.e., patients' subjective evaluation of health care services received) is increasingly important in assessing health care outcomes because of the current emphasis on greater partnership between providers (therapist, doctor, staff) and consumers (patients) in health care. In care of transgender persons, achieving good patient satisfaction is particularly challenging given the primary role mental health professionals play as arbiters of who has access to sex reassignment and when such candidates are ready. Dependence on a mental health professional in this "gate-keeping" role is perceived by some members of the transgender community as unnecessarily pathologizing. This study compared satisfaction ratings of 180 transgender and 837 other sexual health patients with psychotherapeutic, psychiatric, and sexual medicine services provided at a university-based sexual health clinic. Five consecutive surveys conducted during 1993-2002 showed high patient satisfaction. We found few significant differences between transgender and other sexual health patients, except that in 1995, transgender patients had higher satisfaction on their perceived ability to handle the problems that originally had led them to therapy. Survey results helped target areas in need of improvement (e.g., friendliness and courtesy of staff, handling of phone calls), and efforts by the providers to improve services resulted in significant increases in patient satisfaction. These findings put individual complaints in perspective and showed that despite the challenges inherent in providing transgender care good satisfaction can be achieved. We encourage providers to implement quality assurance and improvement procedures to give patients the opportunity to provide feedback and have a voice in shaping their own health care. PMID:15205065

  6. Patient satisfaction with transgender health services.

    PubMed

    Bockting, W; Robinson, B; Benner, A; Scheltema, K

    2004-01-01

    Measuring patient satisfaction (i.e., patients' subjective evaluation of health care services received) is increasingly important in assessing health care outcomes because of the current emphasis on greater partnership between providers (therapist, doctor, staff) and consumers (patients) in health care. In care of transgender persons, achieving good patient satisfaction is particularly challenging given the primary role mental health professionals play as arbiters of who has access to sex reassignment and when such candidates are ready. Dependence on a mental health professional in this "gate-keeping" role is perceived by some members of the transgender community as unnecessarily pathologizing. This study compared satisfaction ratings of 180 transgender and 837 other sexual health patients with psychotherapeutic, psychiatric, and sexual medicine services provided at a university-based sexual health clinic. Five consecutive surveys conducted during 1993-2002 showed high patient satisfaction. We found few significant differences between transgender and other sexual health patients, except that in 1995, transgender patients had higher satisfaction on their perceived ability to handle the problems that originally had led them to therapy. Survey results helped target areas in need of improvement (e.g., friendliness and courtesy of staff, handling of phone calls), and efforts by the providers to improve services resulted in significant increases in patient satisfaction. These findings put individual complaints in perspective and showed that despite the challenges inherent in providing transgender care good satisfaction can be achieved. We encourage providers to implement quality assurance and improvement procedures to give patients the opportunity to provide feedback and have a voice in shaping their own health care.

  7. 42 CFR 410.170 - Payment for home health services, for medical and other health services furnished by a provider...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Payment for home health services, for medical and other health services furnished by a provider or an approved ESRD facility, and for comprehensive... services, for medical and other health services furnished by a provider or an approved ESRD facility,...

  8. 42 CFR 410.170 - Payment for home health services, for medical and other health services furnished by a provider...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Payment for home health services, for medical and other health services furnished by a provider or an approved ESRD facility, and for comprehensive... services, for medical and other health services furnished by a provider or an approved ESRD facility,...

  9. 42 CFR 410.170 - Payment for home health services, for medical and other health services furnished by a provider...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Payment for home health services, for medical and other health services furnished by a provider or an approved ESRD facility, and for comprehensive... services, for medical and other health services furnished by a provider or an approved ESRD facility,...

  10. 42 CFR 410.170 - Payment for home health services, for medical and other health services furnished by a provider...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Payment for home health services, for medical and other health services furnished by a provider or an approved ESRD facility, and for comprehensive... services, for medical and other health services furnished by a provider or an approved ESRD facility,...

  11. 42 CFR 410.170 - Payment for home health services, for medical and other health services furnished by a provider...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Payment for home health services, for medical and other health services furnished by a provider or an approved ESRD facility, and for comprehensive... services, for medical and other health services furnished by a provider or an approved ESRD facility,...

  12. Robots and service innovation in health care.

    PubMed

    Oborn, Eivor; Barrett, Michael; Darzi, Ara

    2011-01-01

    Robots have long captured our imagination and are being used increasingly in health care. In this paper we summarize, organize and criticize the health care robotics literature and highlight how the social and technical elements of robots iteratively influence and redefine each other. We suggest the need for increased emphasis on sociological dimensions of using robots, recognizing how social and work relations are restructured during changes in practice. Further, we propose the usefulness of a 'service logic' in providing insight as to how robots can influence health care innovation.

  13. Who killed the English National Health Service?

    PubMed

    Powell, Martin

    2015-05-01

    The death of the English National Health Service (NHS) has been pronounced many times over the years, but the time and cause of death and the murder weapon remains to be fully established. This article reviews some of these claims, and asks for clearer criteria and evidence to be presented.

  14. Who killed the English National Health Service?

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The death of the English National Health Service (NHS) has been pronounced many times over the years, but the time and cause of death and the murder weapon remains to be fully established. This article reviews some of these claims, and asks for clearer criteria and evidence to be presented. PMID:25905477

  15. Department of Health and Human Services

    MedlinePlus

    ... flu vaccine. What You Need to Know about Zika Virus Find the most up-to-date information on the Zika virus and how you can protect yourself and your loved ones. Coverage to Care Understand your health coverage and connect to primary care and preventive services, so you ... Blog Zika and Pregnancy: My Professional and Personal Fight As ...

  16. School-Based Health Services: Administrative Rules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Dept. of Human Resources, Salem.

    This manual outlines the State of Oregon's program to reimburse medical providers furnishing health services to students with medical disabilities in special education settings. The program was established to comply with federal provisions of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act of 1990. The guide will assist school personnel in…

  17. Electronic Health Record Application Support Service Enablers.

    PubMed

    Neofytou, M S; Neokleous, K; Aristodemou, A; Constantinou, I; Antoniou, Z; Schiza, E C; Pattichis, C S; Schizas, C N

    2015-08-01

    There is a huge need for open source software solutions in the healthcare domain, given the flexibility, interoperability and resource savings characteristics they offer. In this context, this paper presents the development of three open source libraries - Specific Enablers (SEs) for eHealth applications that were developed under the European project titled "Future Internet Social and Technological Alignment Research" (FI-STAR) funded under the "Future Internet Public Private Partnership" (FI-PPP) program. The three SEs developed under the Electronic Health Record Application Support Service Enablers (EHR-EN) correspond to: a) an Electronic Health Record enabler (EHR SE), b) a patient summary enabler based on the EU project "European patient Summary Open Source services" (epSOS SE) supporting patient mobility and the offering of interoperable services, and c) a Picture Archiving and Communications System (PACS) enabler (PACS SE) based on the dcm4che open source system for the support of medical imaging functionality. The EHR SE follows the HL7 Clinical Document Architecture (CDA) V2.0 and supports the Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise (IHE) profiles (recently awarded in Connectathon 2015). These three FI-STAR platform enablers are designed to facilitate the deployment of innovative applications and value added services in the health care sector. They can be downloaded from the FI-STAR cataloque website. Work in progress focuses in the validation and evaluation scenarios for the proving and demonstration of the usability, applicability and adaptability of the proposed enablers. PMID:26736531

  18. Health Service Areas (HSAs) - Small Area Estimates

    Cancer.gov

    Health Service Areas (HSAs) are a compromise between the 3000 counties and the 50 states. An HSA may be thought of as an area that is relatively self-contained with respect to hospital care and may cross over state boundries.

  19. Health Services Mobility Study, Plan of Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    City Univ. of New York Research Foundation, NY.

    To determine ways and means of facilitating horizontal and vertical mobility within New York City's Health Services Administration and selected private hospitals, a systems approach was adopted. Methodology for manpower development and training in an organizational setting related to the educational system and other accrediting institutions will…

  20. Marketing service guarantees for health care.

    PubMed

    Levy, J S

    1999-01-01

    The author introduces the concept of service guarantees for application in health care and differentiates between explicit, implicit, and conditional vs. unconditional types of guarantees. An example of an unconditional guarantee of satisfaction is provided by the hospitality industry. Firms conveying an implicit guarantee are those with outstanding reputations for products such as luxury automobiles, or ultimate customer service, like Nordstrom. Federal Express and Domino's Pizza offer explicit guarantees of on-time delivery. Taking this concept into efforts to improve health care delivery involves a number of caveats. Customers invited to use exceptional service cards may use these to record either satisfaction or dissatisfaction. The cards need to provide enough specific information about issues so that "immediate action could be taken to improve processes." Front-line employees should be empowered to respond to complaints in a meaningful way to resolve the problem before the client leaves the premises.

  1. Women's health centers and specialized services.

    PubMed

    LaFleur, E K; Taylor, S L

    1996-01-01

    More than 75% of the female respondents in this study would choose a women's health center (WHC) over a standard health facility. Women who worked outside the home perceived a greater WHC need. And almost all respondents were interested in communications from the center via a quarterly newsletter. Significant test results related to age, income, education, and work status as segmentation variables, offering WHC's an opportunity to target their patients with specialized services such as cosmetic surgery, infertility treatment, breast imaging, etc. If enough resources are allocated, a WHC can design itself to attract highly lucrative patients. Little difference was found in the opinions of women regarding the need for a WHC or the core services desired, but the specific service mix decision must be carefully considered when designing a WHC.

  2. Women's health centers and specialized services.

    PubMed

    LaFleur, E K; Taylor, S L

    1996-01-01

    More than 75% of the female respondents in this study would choose a women's health center (WHC) over a standard health facility. Women who worked outside the home perceived a greater WHC need. And almost all respondents were interested in communications from the center via a quarterly newsletter. Significant test results related to age, income, education, and work status as segmentation variables, offering WHC's an opportunity to target their patients with specialized services such as cosmetic surgery, infertility treatment, breast imaging, etc. If enough resources are allocated, a WHC can design itself to attract highly lucrative patients. Little difference was found in the opinions of women regarding the need for a WHC or the core services desired, but the specific service mix decision must be carefully considered when designing a WHC. PMID:10163055

  3. Marketing service guarantees for health care.

    PubMed

    Levy, J S

    1999-01-01

    The author introduces the concept of service guarantees for application in health care and differentiates between explicit, implicit, and conditional vs. unconditional types of guarantees. An example of an unconditional guarantee of satisfaction is provided by the hospitality industry. Firms conveying an implicit guarantee are those with outstanding reputations for products such as luxury automobiles, or ultimate customer service, like Nordstrom. Federal Express and Domino's Pizza offer explicit guarantees of on-time delivery. Taking this concept into efforts to improve health care delivery involves a number of caveats. Customers invited to use exceptional service cards may use these to record either satisfaction or dissatisfaction. The cards need to provide enough specific information about issues so that "immediate action could be taken to improve processes." Front-line employees should be empowered to respond to complaints in a meaningful way to resolve the problem before the client leaves the premises. PMID:10711165

  4. Financing rural health and medical services.

    PubMed

    Straub, L A

    1990-10-01

    The provision and utilization of health care services in rural areas are tied directly to the structure of financing. The model of rural health care shaped by federal policies over three decades was significantly altered by changes during the 1980s. With reactions of third-party payers to health care costs rising faster than inflation, the difficulty of accommodating access to care and cost efficiency in provision became evident. This review begins with the literature on patient services and capital financing of rural hospitals, then continues with the financing of clinics, community centers, and other supply forms. Research during the 1980s provides insight into the effects of various financing policies on the supply of services. The demand for health care in rural areas is characterized by less generous third-party coverage, leaving residents paying a larger share of their incomes for care than do urban residents. As a consequence, access to care is especially difficult for low-income and elderly people, heavily dependent upon government financing. Third-party payers have severely reduced cost shifting as a mechanism for taking care of the health care needs of a sizable share of the population, thereby placing providers in an uncomfortable position. Several potential and more formalized financing options for replacing cost shifting are discussed. Several important changes will take place with rural-focused legislation enacted in the late 1980s. These are used to present a rural financing research agenda for the 1990s.

  5. Salmonella enteritidis infections associated with foods purchased from mobile lunch trucks--Alberta, Canada, October 2010-February 2011.

    PubMed

    2013-07-19

    During October 2010-February 2011, an outbreak of 91 Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) infections in Alberta, Canada, was investigated by a local public health department (Alberta Health Services, Calgary Zone). Index cases initially were linked through a common history of consumption of food purchased from mobile food-vending vehicles (lunch trucks) operating at worksites in Alberta. Further investigation implicated one catering company that supplied items for the lunch trucks and other vendors. In 85 cases, patients reported consumption of food prepared by the catering company in the 7 days before illness. Six patients were employees of the catering company, and two food samples collected from the catering company were positive for SE. Foods likely were contaminated directly or indirectly through the use of illegally sourced, SE-contaminated eggs at the implicated catering facility and by catering employees who were infected with SE. Public health interventions put into place to control the outbreak included screening employees for Salmonella, excluding those infected from food-handling duties, and training employees in safe food-handling procedures. No further outbreak cases were identified after full implementation of the interventions. This investigation highlights the potential for lunch trucks to be a source of foodborne illness and the need for robust regulatory compliance monitoring of lunch trucks and their food suppliers.

  6. Salmonella enteritidis infections associated with foods purchased from mobile lunch trucks--Alberta, Canada, October 2010-February 2011.

    PubMed

    2013-07-19

    During October 2010-February 2011, an outbreak of 91 Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) infections in Alberta, Canada, was investigated by a local public health department (Alberta Health Services, Calgary Zone). Index cases initially were linked through a common history of consumption of food purchased from mobile food-vending vehicles (lunch trucks) operating at worksites in Alberta. Further investigation implicated one catering company that supplied items for the lunch trucks and other vendors. In 85 cases, patients reported consumption of food prepared by the catering company in the 7 days before illness. Six patients were employees of the catering company, and two food samples collected from the catering company were positive for SE. Foods likely were contaminated directly or indirectly through the use of illegally sourced, SE-contaminated eggs at the implicated catering facility and by catering employees who were infected with SE. Public health interventions put into place to control the outbreak included screening employees for Salmonella, excluding those infected from food-handling duties, and training employees in safe food-handling procedures. No further outbreak cases were identified after full implementation of the interventions. This investigation highlights the potential for lunch trucks to be a source of foodborne illness and the need for robust regulatory compliance monitoring of lunch trucks and their food suppliers. PMID:23863703

  7. Radiation Safety among Workers in Health Services.

    PubMed

    Jones, Eric; Mathieson, Kathleen

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to survey health service workers regarding their radiation safety knowledge and practice. Participants were health service workers (n = 721) who received an anonymous online survey by email to test their radiation safety knowledge. A knowledge test of 15 questions was completed by 412 respondents. The overall average percent correct was 77.9%. Health physicists/medical physicists had the highest average percent score (93.5%), while physician assistants scored the lowest (60.0%). Of all the respondents, only 64.0% reported they participated in periodic radiation safety training at their place of employment. The most common topic selected where participants wanted additional training was in biological effects of radiation (41.0%). In conclusion, radiation safety training and education needs to be developed and planned effectively. Areas or specialties with poor radiation safety knowledge need to be addressed with corresponding safety measures. PMID:27023151

  8. 42 CFR 405.2462 - Payment for rural health clinic and Federally qualified health center services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Payment for rural health clinic and Federally qualified health center services. 405.2462 Section 405.2462 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM FEDERAL HEALTH INSURANCE FOR THE AGED AND DISABLED Rural Health Clinic...

  9. Explaining Alberta's rising mesothelioma rates.

    PubMed

    Cree, M; Lalji, M; Jiang, B; Carriere, K C; Beach, J; Kamruzzaman, A

    2009-01-01

    Although mesothelioma rates have been rising worldwide, little is known about mesothelioma trends in Alberta. This population-based descriptive study used Alberta Cancer Board Registry data from 1980 to 2004 to develop an age-period-cohort model of male pleural mesothelioma incidence rates over time. Both age and cohort effects are associated with incidence rates. The highest-risk cohort comprised men born between 1930 and 1939, reflecting widespread asbestos use and exposure beginning in the 1940s in Canada. We predict that 1393 Albertan men 40 years and older will die of pleural mesothelioma between 1980 and 2024; 783 (56.2%) of these deaths will occur between 2010 and 2024. The total number of mesothelioma deaths in Alberta will be higher when all age groups, both sexes, and all disease sites are included, with numbers likely peaking sometime between 2015 and 2019. In addition to the ongoing efforts that focus on eliminating asbestos-related disease in Alberta, the challenge is to implement surveillance systems to prevent future epidemics of preventable occupational cancers in Alberta.

  10. Organisation for Change: The British National Health Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chester, T. E.

    Begun in 1948, The National Health Service was organized in a "functional" pattern of three main groups: hospital service, primary health care, and community health services and personal social services. Dissatisfaction led to a reorganization in 1974 along geographical divisions for region, area, and district levels, necessitating a managing…

  11. Service delivery for e-Health applications.

    PubMed

    Staemmler, Martin

    2011-01-01

    E-Health applications have to take the business perspective into account. This is achieved by adding a fourth layer reflecting organizational and business processes to an existing three layer model for IT-system functionality and management. This approach is used for designing a state-wide e-Health service delivery allowing for distributed responsibilities: clinical organizations act on the fourth layer and have established mutual cooperation in this state-wide approach based on collectively outsourced IT-system services. As a result, no clinical organization can take a dominant role based on operating the IT-system infrastructure. The implementation relies on a central infrastructure with extended means to guarantee service delivery: (i) established redundancy within the system architecture, (ii) actively controlled network and application availability, (iii) automated routine performance tests fulfilling regulatory requirements and (iv) hub-to-spoke and end-to-end authentication. As a result, about half of the hospitals and some practices of the state have signed-up to the services and guarantee long-term sustainability by sharing the infrastructural costs. Collaboration takes place for more than 1000 patients per month based on second opinion, online consultation and proxy services for weekend and night shifts.

  12. Health services at the Kennedy Space Center.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, E B; Humbert, P; Long, I D; Tipton, D A

    1992-08-01

    Comprehensive occupational health services are provided to approximately 17,000 workers at the Kennedy Space Center and an additional 6000 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. These areas cover about 120,000 acres encompassing part of the Merritt Island Wild Life Refuge and wetlands which are the habitat of numerous endangered and protected species of wildlife. The services provided at the Kennedy Space Center optimally assure a safe and healthy working environment for the employees engaged in the preparation and launching of this country's Space Shuttle and other important space exploration programs.

  13. Health services at the Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, E. B.; Humbert, P.; Long, I. D.; Tipton, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    Comprehensive occupational health services are provided to approximately 17,000 workers at the Kennedy Space Center and an additional 6000 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. These areas cover about 120,000 acres encompassing part of the Merritt Island Wild Life Refuge and wetlands which are the habitat of numerous endangered and protected species of wildlife. The services provided at the Kennedy Space Center optimally assure a safe and healthy working environment for the employees engaged in the preparation and launching of this country's Space Shuttle and other important space exploration programs.

  14. The Effect of Maternal Health Beliefs on Utilization of Childhood Preventive Health Services and Child Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tinsley, Barbara J.

    Relationships among mothers' beliefs and values concerning their children's health, utilization of childhood preventive health services, and children's health status were examined. Mothers' health beliefs were measured with Parental Health Belief scales developed to explore three factors: (1) mothers' degree of perceived control or internality…

  15. Understanding privacy in occupational health services.

    PubMed

    Heikkinen, Anne; Wickström, Gustav; Leino-Kilpi, Helena

    2006-09-01

    The aim of this study was to gain a deeper understanding of privacy in occupational health services. Data were collected through in-depth theme interviews with occupational health professionals (n = 15), employees (n = 15) and employers (n = 14). Our findings indicate that privacy, in this context, is a complex and multilayered concept, and that companies as well as individual employees have their own core secrets. Co-operation between the three groups proved challenging: occupational health professionals have to consider carefully in which situations and how much they are entitled to release private information on individual employees for the benefit of the whole company. Privacy is thus not an absolute right of an individual, but involves the idea of sharing responsibility. The findings open up useful new perspectives on ethical questions of privacy and on the development of occupational health practices.

  16. Causal Model of a Health Services System

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, James G.

    1972-01-01

    Path analysis is used to construct a causal model of the health services system serving the state of New Mexico. The model includes a network specifying the causal relationships among a set of social, demographic, and economic variables hypothesized to be related to the health status of the population; a set of mathematical equations that permit prediction of the effects of changes in the values of any one variable on all other variables in the model; and estimates of path coefficients based on U.S. Census data and vital statistics. The model is used to predict both direct and indirect effects on health status of changes in population structure resulting from natural causes or from the intervention of health programs. PMID:5025955

  17. [Health services waste management: a biosafety issue].

    PubMed

    Garcia, Leila Posenato; Zanetti-Ramos, Betina Giehl

    2004-01-01

    The subject of "health services waste" is controversial and widely discussed. Biosafety, the principles of which include safeguarding occupational health, community health, and environmental safety, is directly involved in the issue of medical waste management. There are controversies as to the risks posed by medical waste, as evidenced by diverging opinions among authors: some advocate severe approaches on the basis that medical waste is hazardous, while others contend that the potential for infection from medical waste is nonexistent. The Brazilian National Health Surveillance Agency (ANVISA) has published resolution RDC 33/2003 to standardize medical waste management nationwide. There is an evident need to implement biosafety procedures in this area, including heath care workers' training and provision of information to the general population.

  18. 43 CFR 17.250 - Health, welfare, and social services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Health, welfare, and social services. 17... § 17.250 Health, welfare, and social services. This subpart applies to health, welfare, and other...) General. In providing health, welfare, or other social services or benefits, a recipient may not, on...

  19. 43 CFR 17.250 - Health, welfare, and social services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Health, welfare, and social services. 17... § 17.250 Health, welfare, and social services. This subpart applies to health, welfare, and other...) General. In providing health, welfare, or other social services or benefits, a recipient may not, on...

  20. 43 CFR 17.250 - Health, welfare, and social services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Health, welfare, and social services. 17... § 17.250 Health, welfare, and social services. This subpart applies to health, welfare, and other...) General. In providing health, welfare, or other social services or benefits, a recipient may not, on...

  1. 43 CFR 17.250 - Health, welfare, and social services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Health, welfare, and social services. 17... § 17.250 Health, welfare, and social services. This subpart applies to health, welfare, and other...) General. In providing health, welfare, or other social services or benefits, a recipient may not, on...

  2. HIV-Related Illnesses: Topics for Health Services Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Health Services Research and Health Care Technology Assessment (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD.

    Topics addressed in this report were suggested at a meeting of staff from the National Center for Health Services Research and Health Care Technology Assessment (NCHSR) and other Public Health Service representatives held in 1988 to update the Public Health Service's plan for the prevention and control of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).…

  3. The organization of health services for Indian people.

    PubMed Central

    Rhoades, E R; Reyes, L L; Buzzard, G D

    1987-01-01

    The Indian Health Service (IHS) is a bureau of the Health Resources and Services Administration, an agency of the Public Health Service. It was formed in 1955 by a transfer of health services from the Bureau of Indian Affairs, Department of the Interior. Since that time, IHS has grown larger and more complicated and has become a truly complex national organization that is responsible for direct and contract health care services to approximately 1 million Indian people. The historical background of the Service, its present organization, and the services that it provides through a variety of organizational structures are outlined in this report. PMID:3112842

  4. International Medical Graduates: Learning for Practice in Alberta, Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockyer, Jocelyn; Hofmeister, Marianna; Crutcher, Rodney; Klein, Douglas; Fidler, Herta

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: There is little known about the learning that is undertaken by physicians who graduate from a World Health Organization-listed medical school outside Canada and who migrate to Canada to practice. What do physicians learn and what resources do they access in adapting to practice in Alberta, a province of Canada? Methods: Telephone…

  5. Alberta Learning Results Report, 1999/2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Learning, Edmonton.

    Alberta Learning was created in May 1999 to enhance the focus of the government of Alberta, Canada, on lifelong learning and equipping all Albertans with the information and skills needed to live and work in the information age. During its first year of operation, Alberta Learning focused on its core businesses of basic learning, adult learning,…

  6. [Universal coverage of health services in Mexico].

    PubMed

    2013-01-01

    The reforms made in recent years to the Mexican Health System have reduced inequities in the health care of the population, but have been insufficient to solve all the problems of the MHS. In order to make the right to health protection established in the Constitution a reality for every citizen, Mexico must warrant effective universal access to health services. This paper outlines a long-term reform for the consolidation of a health system that is akin to international standards and which may establish the structural conditions to reduce coverage inequity. This reform is based on a "structured pluralism" intended to avoid both a monopoly exercised within the public sector and fragmentation in the private sector, and to prevent falling into the extremes of authoritarian procedures or an absence of regulation. This involves the replacement of the present vertical integration and segregation of social groups by a horizontal organization with separation of duties. This also entails legal and fiscal reforms, the reinforcement of the MHS, the reorganization of health institutions, and the formulation of regulatory, technical and financial instruments to operationalize the proposed scheme with the objective of rendering the human right to health fully effective for the Mexican people.

  7. [Universal coverage of health services in Mexico].

    PubMed

    2013-01-01

    The reforms made in recent years to the Mexican Health System have reduced inequities in the health care of the population, but have been insufficient to solve all the problems of the MHS. In order to make the right to health protection established in the Constitution a reality for every citizen, Mexico must warrant effective universal access to health services. This paper outlines a long-term reform for the consolidation of a health system that is akin to international standards and which may establish the structural conditions to reduce coverage inequity. This reform is based on a "structured pluralism" intended to avoid both a monopoly exercised within the public sector and fragmentation in the private sector, and to prevent falling into the extremes of authoritarian procedures or an absence of regulation. This involves the replacement of the present vertical integration and segregation of social groups by a horizontal organization with separation of duties. This also entails legal and fiscal reforms, the reinforcement of the MHS, the reorganization of health institutions, and the formulation of regulatory, technical and financial instruments to operationalize the proposed scheme with the objective of rendering the human right to health fully effective for the Mexican people. PMID:24570037

  8. [Solidarity relationships in health services -- utopia?].

    PubMed

    Bettinelli, L A; Erdmann, A L

    2000-07-01

    The article approaches some aspects considered relevant to rethink relations on the care offered by health services, especially, hospital organizations. It presents some reflection upon the possibilities of constructing human civility, centered on solidarity relations and on the exercise of citizenship, on an ethical condition of a dignified and healthier life. Mutual comprehension between human beings is vital to restore life, nature and conviviality values.

  9. 42 CFR 417.102 - Health benefits plan: Supplemental health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Health benefits plan: Supplemental health services. 417.102 Section 417.102 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) HEALTH MAINTENANCE...

  10. 42 CFR 417.101 - Health benefits plan: Basic health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Health benefits plan: Basic health services. 417.101 Section 417.101 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM HEALTH MAINTENANCE ORGANIZATIONS, COMPETITIVE MEDICAL...

  11. 42 CFR 417.101 - Health benefits plan: Basic health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Health benefits plan: Basic health services. 417.101 Section 417.101 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) HEALTH MAINTENANCE ORGANIZATIONS,...

  12. 42 CFR 417.102 - Health benefits plan: Supplemental health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Health benefits plan: Supplemental health services. 417.102 Section 417.102 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) HEALTH MAINTENANCE...

  13. 42 CFR 417.101 - Health benefits plan: Basic health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Health benefits plan: Basic health services. 417.101 Section 417.101 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) HEALTH MAINTENANCE ORGANIZATIONS,...

  14. 42 CFR 417.101 - Health benefits plan: Basic health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Health benefits plan: Basic health services. 417.101 Section 417.101 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM HEALTH MAINTENANCE ORGANIZATIONS, COMPETITIVE MEDICAL...

  15. 42 CFR 417.102 - Health benefits plan: Supplemental health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Health benefits plan: Supplemental health services. 417.102 Section 417.102 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM HEALTH MAINTENANCE ORGANIZATIONS, COMPETITIVE...

  16. 42 CFR 417.102 - Health benefits plan: Supplemental health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Health benefits plan: Supplemental health services. 417.102 Section 417.102 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM HEALTH MAINTENANCE ORGANIZATIONS, COMPETITIVE...

  17. 42 CFR 417.101 - Health benefits plan: Basic health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Health benefits plan: Basic health services. 417.101 Section 417.101 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) HEALTH MAINTENANCE ORGANIZATIONS,...

  18. 42 CFR 417.102 - Health benefits plan: Supplemental health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Health benefits plan: Supplemental health services. 417.102 Section 417.102 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) HEALTH MAINTENANCE...

  19. Women workers in the health service industry.

    PubMed

    Brown, C A

    1975-01-01

    The health service industry is unusual in that most of the skilled as well as unskilled workers are women, although the industry is largely controlled by men. Women are hired because they constitute an inexpensive, available, and seemingly powerless work force. Women enter health service because they have few alternatives to the low-paying, dead-end jobs found there. Health service occupations are organized like craft unions, with rigid hierarchical separations and control by the top occupation. Conflicts between men and women-between management and workers-are often played out as conflicts between occupations. Challenges to physicians come from various nursing specialties as well as from technical professions. Physicians in turn create lower-level occupations which challenge the nurses' status. Increasing industrialization alters the pattern of conflict, creating opportunities for individual bureaucratic mobility as well as favorable conditions for unionization drives. Unionism is often held back by sex, race, and professional conflicts, which must be overcome if the status of women is to be changed in the industry.

  20. Information Technology in Complex Health Services

    PubMed Central

    Southon, Frank Charles Gray; Sauer, Chris; Dampney, Christopher Noel Grant (Kit)

    1997-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To identify impediments to the successful transfer and implementation of packaged information systems through large, divisionalized health services. Design: A case analysis of the failure of an implementation of a critical application in the Public Health System of the State of New South Wales, Australia, was carried out. This application had been proven in the United States environment. Measurements: Interviews involving over 60 staff at all levels of the service were undertaken by a team of three. The interviews were recorded and analyzed for key themes, and the results were shared and compared to enable a continuing critical assessment. Results: Two components of the transfer of the system were considered: the transfer from a different environment, and the diffusion throughout a large, divisionalized organization. The analyses were based on the Scott-Morton organizational fit framework. In relation to the first, it was found that there was a lack of fit in the business environments and strategies, organizational structures and strategy-structure pairing as well as the management process-roles pairing. The diffusion process experienced problems because of the lack of fit in the strategy-structure, strategy-structure-management processes, and strategy-structure-role relationships. Conclusion: The large-scale developments of integrated health services present great challenges to the efficient and reliable implementation of information technology, especially in large, divisionalized organizations. There is a need to take a more sophisticated approach to understanding the complexities of organizational factors than has traditionally been the case. PMID:9067877

  1. Home health services in New Hampshire.

    PubMed

    Hale, F A; Jacobs, A R

    1976-01-01

    While home health services have traditionally been an underused component of the health care system, current trends suggest the desirability of expanding these services. These trends include an increase in the number of elderly who need the benefits of home care, the recognition that long-term chronic illnesses require appropriate management at home, and concern that patients have access to care at the level most appropriate to their illnesses. In New Hampshire, 41 certified home health agencies offer services. Little systematic research has been conducted on the kinds of services they provide and the patients seen by their staffs. Patient encounter data were collected from a sample of eight agencies for a 4-week period. Staff of the agencies used the patient contact record developed by the National Functional Task Analysis Cooperative Study to collect data. The data reflected differences among the agencies in the size of the populations they serve, organizational characteristics, reasons for patients' visits, expected sources of the revenue that supported them, and the diagnosis of the patients they cared for. The agencies served areas with populations ranging from 1,000 to 40,000. The staffs ranged from 1 to 14 full-time persons. Two were public agencies; the others had voluntary sponsorship. When data on reasons for visits were averaged for the eight agencies, it was shown that 72% of the visits were made for disease control activities such as care for a chronic or acute condition or for treatment or a laboratory test. Disease prevention activities such as a checkup for adults, children, prenatal or postnatal care, or health education accounted for only 24% of the visits. This result may indicate that, in areas short of physician manpower, the community health nurse is taking on increasing responsibility for medical care as well as health and education. Reimbursement for the visits came from Medicare, 25%; Medicaid-welfare, 14%; the patients, 18%; and health

  2. Home health services in New Hampshire.

    PubMed

    Hale, F A; Jacobs, A R

    1976-01-01

    While home health services have traditionally been an underused component of the health care system, current trends suggest the desirability of expanding these services. These trends include an increase in the number of elderly who need the benefits of home care, the recognition that long-term chronic illnesses require appropriate management at home, and concern that patients have access to care at the level most appropriate to their illnesses. In New Hampshire, 41 certified home health agencies offer services. Little systematic research has been conducted on the kinds of services they provide and the patients seen by their staffs. Patient encounter data were collected from a sample of eight agencies for a 4-week period. Staff of the agencies used the patient contact record developed by the National Functional Task Analysis Cooperative Study to collect data. The data reflected differences among the agencies in the size of the populations they serve, organizational characteristics, reasons for patients' visits, expected sources of the revenue that supported them, and the diagnosis of the patients they cared for. The agencies served areas with populations ranging from 1,000 to 40,000. The staffs ranged from 1 to 14 full-time persons. Two were public agencies; the others had voluntary sponsorship. When data on reasons for visits were averaged for the eight agencies, it was shown that 72% of the visits were made for disease control activities such as care for a chronic or acute condition or for treatment or a laboratory test. Disease prevention activities such as a checkup for adults, children, prenatal or postnatal care, or health education accounted for only 24% of the visits. This result may indicate that, in areas short of physician manpower, the community health nurse is taking on increasing responsibility for medical care as well as health and education. Reimbursement for the visits came from Medicare, 25%; Medicaid-welfare, 14%; the patients, 18%; and health

  3. 77 FR 8330 - Health Services Research and Development Service Scientific Merit Review Board; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-14

    ... AFFAIRS Health Services Research and Development Service Scientific Merit Review Board; Notice of Meeting... Committee Act) that various subcommittees of the Health Services Research and Development Service Scientific... health care delivery and management, and nursing research. Applications are reviewed for scientific...

  4. 42 CFR 93.220 - Public Health Service or PHS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... HEALTH EFFECTS STUDIES OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES RELEASES AND FACILITIES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE POLICIES ON... and Science and the following Operating Divisions: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality,...

  5. 78 FR 12422 - Health Services Research and Development Service Scientific Merit Review Board, Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-22

    ... AFFAIRS Health Services Research and Development Service Scientific Merit Review Board, Notice of Meeting... States Code Appendix 2, that the Health Services Research and Development Service Scientific Merit Review... Services Research (HSR) subcommittees and its Nursing Research Initiative (NRI) subcommittee. The...

  6. Access to Rural Mental Health Services: Service Use and Out-of-Pocket Costs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziller, Erika C.; Anderson, Nathaniel J.; Coburn, Andrew F.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To examine rural-urban differences in the use of mental health services (mental health and substance abuse office visits, and mental health prescriptions) and in the out-of-pocket costs paid for these services. Methods: The pooled 2003 and 2004 Medical Expenditure Panel Surveys were used to assess differences in mental health service use…

  7. Area health education centers and health science library services.

    PubMed Central

    West, R T; Howard, F H

    1977-01-01

    A study to determine the impact that the Area Health Education Center type of programs may have on health science libraries was conducted by the Extramural Programs, National Library of Medicine, in conjunction with a contract awarded by the Bureau of Health Manpower, Health Resources Administration, to develop an inventory of the AHEC type of projects in the United States. Specific study tasks included a review of these programs as they relate to library and information activities, on-site surveys on the programs to define their needs for library services and information, and a categorization of library activities. A major finding was that health science libraries and information services are generally not included in AHEC program planning and development, although information and information exchange is a fundamental part of the AHEC type of programs. This study suggests that library inadequacies are basically the result of this planning failure and of a lack of financial resources; however, many other factors may be contributory. The design and value of library activities for these programs needs explication. PMID:884349

  8. Area health education centers and health science library services.

    PubMed

    West, R T; Howard, F H

    1977-07-01

    A study to determine the impact that the Area Health Education Center type of programs may have on health science libraries was conducted by the Extramural Programs, National Library of Medicine, in conjunction with a contract awarded by the Bureau of Health Manpower, Health Resources Administration, to develop an inventory of the AHEC type of projects in the United States. Specific study tasks included a review of these programs as they relate to library and information activities, on-site surveys on the programs to define their needs for library services and information, and a categorization of library activities. A major finding was that health science libraries and information services are generally not included in AHEC program planning and development, although information and information exchange is a fundamental part of the AHEC type of programs. This study suggests that library inadequacies are basically the result of this planning failure and of a lack of financial resources; however, many other factors may be contributory. The design and value of library activities for these programs needs explication.

  9. Health Service Utilization and Poor Health Reporting in Asthma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Behr, Joshua G.; Diaz, Rafael; Akpinar-Elci, Muge

    2016-01-01

    The management and treatment of adult asthma has been associated with utilization of health services. Objectives: First, to investigate the likelihood of health service utilization, including primary care, emergency department, and hospital stays, among persons diagnosed with an asthma condition relative to those that do not have an asthma condition. Second, to examine the likelihood of poor physical health among asthma respondents relative to those that do not have an asthma condition. Third, to demonstrate that these relationships vary with frequency of utilization. Fourth, to discuss the magnitude of differences in frequent utilization between asthma and non-asthma respondents. Data Source: Data is derived from a random, stratified sampling of Hampton Roads adults, 18 years and older (n = 1678). Study Design: Study participants are interviewed to identify asthma diagnosis, access to primary care, frequency of emergency department utilization, hospital admissions, and days of poor physical health. Odds-ratios establish relationships with the covariates on the outcome variable. Findings: Those with asthma are found more likely (OR 1.50, 95% CI 1.05–2.15) to report poor physical health relative to non-asthma study participants. Further, asthma respondents are found more likely (OR 4.23, 95% CI 1.56–11.69) to frequently utilize primary care that may be associated with the management of the condition and are also more likely to utilize treatment services, such as the emergency department (OR 1.87, 95% CI 1.32–2.65) and hospitalization (OR 2.21, 95% CI 1.39–3.50), associated with acute and episodic care. Further, it is a novel finding that these likelihoods increase with frequency of utilization for emergency department visits and hospital stays. Conclusion: Continuity in care and better management of the diseases may result in less demand for emergency department services and hospitalization. Health care systems need to recognize that asthma patients are

  10. The impact of health insurance on health services utilization and health outcomes in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Guindon, G Emmanuel

    2014-10-01

    In recent years, a number of low- and middle-income country governments have introduced health insurance schemes. Yet not a great deal is known about the impact of such policy shifts. Vietnam's recent health insurance experience including a health insurance scheme for the poor in 2003 and a compulsory scheme that provides health insurance to all children under six years of age combined with Vietnam's commitment to universal coverage calls for research that examines the impact of health insurance. Taking advantage of Vietnam's unique policy environment, data from the 2002, 2004 and 2006 waves of the Vietnam Household Living Standard Survey and single-difference and difference-in-differences approaches are used to assess whether access to health insurance--for the poor, for children and for students--impacts on health services utilization and health outcomes in Vietnam. For the poor and for students, results suggest health insurance increased the use of inpatient services but not of outpatient services or health outcomes. For young children, results suggest health insurance increased the use of outpatient services (including the use of preventive health services such as vaccination and check-up) but not of inpatient services.

  11. 1981 Alberta Social Studies Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Dept. of Education, Edmonton.

    Designed for teachers of students in grades 1-12, this document provides an overview of program content and objectives for the 1981 Alberta social studies curriculum. Minimum expectations regarding core and elective components, evaluation, and time allocations are briefly described and the status and availability of various learning resources are…

  12. Alberta. Reference Series No. 26.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of External Affairs, Ottawa (Ontario).

    This booklet, one of a series featuring the Canadian provinces, presents a brief overview of Alberta and is suitable for teacher reference or student reading. Separate sections discuss the history and population, the provincial government, the economy, transportation, communications, mineral resources, agriculture, manufacturing, forest products,…

  13. Satisfaction with Education in Alberta.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEwen, Nelly

    1998-01-01

    Annual Alberta surveys of parents, high school students, and the public are part of accountability processes and provide public consultation on policy issues and reform efforts. Selected results of the 1995 and 1996 surveys are presented, related to provincial educational objectives, and compared to similar U.S. and Ontario surveys and established…

  14. [Financing the public health services. 1967].

    PubMed

    Mascarenhas, Rodolfo Dos Santos

    2006-08-01

    Federal statistic figures show that the Brazilian States altogether have, in their respective territories, a collection of taxes which is higher than the Union one. The highest collection of the Central Government which is shown at the official statistics is due to the excess of collection of the federal taxes over the ones of the States; this usually happens in five or six states, of which, in 1964 Guanabara and São Paulo were responsible for 91% of this difference. One can not change the present system of competence in Public Health Services in the three levels--central, regional and local--without modifying at the same time the present Brazilian tributary system, where the municipal governments received back in 1962 only 5.6 of the general collection of taxes. Figures from 1955 show that the per capita cost of Public Health Services in Brazil, comprising the three levels, was Cr 123 Cr dollars dollars ( 1.82 US dollars), and in 1962, Cr 827 (US 2.30 US dollars). These three levels of government reserved in 1955, 5.6% of the money spent in its total expenditure for Public Health activities; this percentage declined to 4.5% in 1962. In relation to the sum invested on Public Health government activities, the Union spent in 1962, 36.4% of the total expenses, the States 59.3% and the counties only 5.5%. There is a great disproportion in the distribution of Public Health expenditure among the various Brazilian States, ranging from a minimal percentage over the total public expenses such as the case of Goiás (1.6% in 1964) up to a maximum of 17.2% in Pará in the same year. There is also a considerable variation from one state to another and in 1964 it ranged from the lowest limit of 70 Cr dollars in Maranhão up to 5.217 in Guanabara. If we analyze the per capita expenses of each state with Public Health activities, using 1964 and 1954 figures represented in 1964 monetary values, we can verify that the expenditure of 20 states dropped of 17.2%. One can not know

  15. CORBA security services for health information systems.

    PubMed

    Blobel, B; Holena, M

    1998-01-01

    The structure of healthcare systems in developed countries is changing to 'shared care', enforced by economic constraints and caused by a change in the basic conditions of care. That development results in co-operative health information systems across the boundaries of organisational, technological, and policy domains. Increasingly, these distributed and, as far as their domains are concerned, heterogeneous systems are based on middleware approaches, such as CORBA. Regarding the sensitivity of personal and medical data, such open, distributed, and heterogeneous health information systems require a high level of data protection and data security, both with respect to patient information and with respect to users. This paper, relying on experience gained through our activities in CORBAmed, describes the possibilities the CORBA middleware provides to achieve application and communication security. On the background of the overall CORBA architecture, it outlines the different security services previewed in the adopted CORBA specifications which are discussed in the context of the security requirements of healthcare information systems. Security services required in the healthcare domain but not available at the moment are mentioned. A solution is proposed, which on the one hand allows to make use of the available CORBA security services and additional ones, on the other hand remains open to other middleware approaches, such as DHE or HL7. PMID:9848400

  16. CORBA security services for health information systems.

    PubMed

    Blobel, B; Holena, M

    1998-01-01

    The structure of healthcare systems in developed countries is changing to 'shared care', enforced by economic constraints and caused by a change in the basic conditions of care. That development results in co-operative health information systems across the boundaries of organisational, technological, and policy domains. Increasingly, these distributed and, as far as their domains are concerned, heterogeneous systems are based on middleware approaches, such as CORBA. Regarding the sensitivity of personal and medical data, such open, distributed, and heterogeneous health information systems require a high level of data protection and data security, both with respect to patient information and with respect to users. This paper, relying on experience gained through our activities in CORBAmed, describes the possibilities the CORBA middleware provides to achieve application and communication security. On the background of the overall CORBA architecture, it outlines the different security services previewed in the adopted CORBA specifications which are discussed in the context of the security requirements of healthcare information systems. Security services required in the healthcare domain but not available at the moment are mentioned. A solution is proposed, which on the one hand allows to make use of the available CORBA security services and additional ones, on the other hand remains open to other middleware approaches, such as DHE or HL7.

  17. 75 FR 21508 - Health and Human Services Acquisition Regulation; Corrections

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES 48 CFR Chapter 3 Health and Human Services Acquisition Regulation; Corrections AGENCY: Department of Health and Human Services. ACTION: Correcting amendments. SUMMARY: This action corrects minor errors, inconsistencies and omissions in the final rule, which revised the Health and Human...

  18. 38 CFR 3.753 - Public Health Service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Public Health Service. 3... Pension, Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation Retirement § 3.753 Public Health Service... of the Public Health Service, who was receiving disability compensation on December 31, 1956,...

  19. 19 CFR 4.70 - Public Health Service requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Public Health Service requirements. 4.70 Section 4... THE TREASURY VESSELS IN FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC TRADES Foreign Clearances § 4.70 Public Health Service... Public Health Service....

  20. 38 CFR 3.753 - Public Health Service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Public Health Service. 3... Pension, Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation Retirement § 3.753 Public Health Service... of the Public Health Service, who was receiving disability compensation on December 31, 1956,...

  1. 38 CFR 3.753 - Public Health Service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Public Health Service. 3... Pension, Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation Retirement § 3.753 Public Health Service... of the Public Health Service, who was receiving disability compensation on December 31, 1956,...

  2. 38 CFR 3.753 - Public Health Service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Public Health Service. 3... Pension, Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation Retirement § 3.753 Public Health Service... of the Public Health Service, who was receiving disability compensation on December 31, 1956,...

  3. 19 CFR 4.70 - Public Health Service requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Public Health Service requirements. 4.70 Section 4... THE TREASURY VESSELS IN FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC TRADES Foreign Clearances § 4.70 Public Health Service... Public Health Service....

  4. 19 CFR 4.70 - Public Health Service requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Public Health Service requirements. 4.70 Section 4... THE TREASURY VESSELS IN FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC TRADES Foreign Clearances § 4.70 Public Health Service... Public Health Service....

  5. 38 CFR 3.753 - Public Health Service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Public Health Service. 3... Pension, Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation Retirement § 3.753 Public Health Service... of the Public Health Service, who was receiving disability compensation on December 31, 1956,...

  6. 19 CFR 4.70 - Public Health Service requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Public Health Service requirements. 4.70 Section 4... THE TREASURY VESSELS IN FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC TRADES Foreign Clearances § 4.70 Public Health Service... Public Health Service....

  7. 19 CFR 4.70 - Public Health Service requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Public Health Service requirements. 4.70 Section 4... THE TREASURY VESSELS IN FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC TRADES Foreign Clearances § 4.70 Public Health Service... Public Health Service....

  8. 38 CFR 18.452 - Health and other social services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Health and other social... Social Services § 18.452 Health and other social services. (a) General. In providing health, or other social services or benefits, a recipient may not, on the basis of handicap: (1) Deny a...

  9. 45 CFR 1304.20 - Child health and developmental services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN, YOUTH AND... GRANTEE AND DELEGATE AGENCIES Early Childhood Development and Health Services § 1304.20 Child health and... this section) from the child's entry into the program (for the purposes of 45 CFR 1304.20(a)(1), 45...

  10. 45 CFR 1304.20 - Child health and developmental services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN, YOUTH AND... GRANTEE AND DELEGATE AGENCIES Early Childhood Development and Health Services § 1304.20 Child health and... this section) from the child's entry into the program (for the purposes of 45 CFR 1304.20(a)(1), 45...

  11. 45 CFR 1304.20 - Child health and developmental services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN, YOUTH AND... GRANTEE AND DELEGATE AGENCIES Early Childhood Development and Health Services § 1304.20 Child health and... this section) from the child's entry into the program (for the purposes of 45 CFR 1304.20(a)(1), 45...

  12. 38 CFR 18.452 - Health and other social services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Social Services § 18.452 Health and other social services. (a) General. In providing health, or other social services or benefits, a recipient may not, on the basis of handicap: (1) Deny a qualified... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Health and other...

  13. 38 CFR 18.452 - Health and other social services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Social Services § 18.452 Health and other social services. (a) General. In providing health, or other social services or benefits, a recipient may not, on the basis of handicap: (1) Deny a qualified... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Health and other...

  14. The Unmet Need for Mental Health Services among Probationers' Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Susan D.; Venema, Rachel; Roque, Lorena

    2010-01-01

    This study explores the unmet need for mental health services among children with parents on probation. A group of 77 probationers provided information on 170 children. Information about children's need for mental health services was based on the Child Behavior Checklist and information about children's receipt of mental health services was based…

  15. Immunization Services for Adolescents within Comprehensive School Health Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vernon, Mary E.; Bryan, Gloria; Hunt, Pete; Allensworth, Diane; Bradley, Beverly

    1997-01-01

    Discusses school health services, adolescent immunization, current school immunization practices, and support for school-based immunization programs. Children and adolescents can receive preventive health services, including immunizations and monitoring of immunization levels. Expanding school health services could improve the immunization levels…

  16. Psychosocial Dynamics of College Students' Use of Mental Health Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenthal, Beth Spenciner; Wilson, William Cody

    2016-01-01

    The authors present and empirically test a multivariate model of the use of mental health counseling services. Use of such services by 1st-year college students is directly a result of need for these services and willingness to use them. Beliefs about mental health services and demographic characteristics are not directly related to use, but…

  17. Dysfunctional health service conflict: causes and accelerants.

    PubMed

    Nelson, H Wayne

    2012-01-01

    This article examines the causes and accelerants of dysfunctional health service conflict and how it emerges from the health system's core hierarchical structures, specialized roles, participant psychodynamics, culture, and values. This article sets out to answer whether health care conflict is more widespread and intense than in other settings and if it is, why? To this end, health care power, gender, and educational status gaps are examined with an eye to how they undermine open communication, teamwork, and collaborative forms of conflict and spark a range of dysfunctions, including a pervasive culture of fear; the deny-and-defend lawsuit response; widespread patterns of hierarchical, generational, and lateral bullying; overly avoidant conflict styles among non-elite groups; and a range of other behaviors that lead to numerous human resource problems, including burnout, higher staff turnover, increased errors, poor employee citizenship behavior, patient dissatisfaction, increased patient complaints, and lawsuits. Bad patient outcomes include decreased compliance and increased morbidity and mortality. Health care managers must understand the root causes of these problems to treat them at the source and implement solutions that avoid negative conflict spirals that undermine organizational morale and efficiency. PMID:22534973

  18. Medical pluralism and health services in India.

    PubMed

    Minocha, A A

    1980-11-01

    Lack of understanding of the pluralistic medical system has impeded programs to improve community health status in India. Assumptions and misconceptions about the pluralistic Indian medical system are examined and their implications for health service are assessed. When alternative therapists are taken into account, the maldistribution of health practitioners is not as serious as usually believed. Preference for practitioners from their own cultural milieu is less important to patients than the availability, accessibility and quality of medical care provided by different systems. Laymen respond to problems of health and disease using concepts from various systems of medicine. Practitioners also incorporate elements from other systems, sometimes without knowledge of the underlying theoretical principles and with consequent danger to the patient. Despite arguments to the contrary, people rely on traditional practitioners when they lack easy and adequate access to modern medicine. The preference of most physicians for urban areas is more complex than usually credited and is due in large part to the lack of even simple facilities and drugs in rural areas. Medical interventions should be distinguished from non-medical health interventions and persons with medical training should be allowed to concentrate on specifically medical concerns. PMID:7053036

  19. Mystery shopping in health service evaluation.

    PubMed Central

    Moriarty, Helen; McLeod, Deborah; Dowell, Anthony

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Over the last 5 years, primary care telephone triage systems have been introduced in the United Kingdom, United States, Australia, and most recently in New Zealand. Evaluation of the clinical safety of such systems poses a challenge for health planners and researchers. AIM: To evaluate the use of simulated patients in the assessment of aspects of clinical safety in a pilot New Zealand primary care telephone triage service. DESIGN OF STUDY: 'Mystery shopping', an evaluation strategy commonly used in market research, was adapted by using simulated patients for telephone triage service evaluation. SETTING: New Zealand. METHODS: Four scripted clinical scenarios were developed by academic general practitioners, validated in student teaching situations, and then used by simulated patients to make 101 telephone calls. The scenarios were designed to necessitate a referral to a medical practitioner for further investigation. The documentation kept by the callers was compared with the call records from the telephone triage company, and both were analysed for capture and handling of the clinical safety features of each scenario. In cases where the endpoint was not a medical assessment, possible reasons for this were explored. RESULTS: Records were retrieved for 85 telephone calls. Considerable triage variability was discovered. There were discrepancies between expected and actual triage outcomes with 51% of analysed calls resulting in a self-care recommendation. A number of reasons were identified both for the triage variability and the unpredicted outcomes. Audiotaping of consultations would have enhanced the credibility of the evaluation but it would have carried ethical constraints. CONCLUSION: Simulated patients can be used to evaluate the limitations of health services and to identify areas that could be addressed to improve patient safety. Evaluation of patient satisfaction with services is not sufficient alone to evaluate safety. PMID:14960218

  20. Progressive segmented health insurance: Colombian health reform and access to health services.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Fernando; Amaya, Liliana; Venegas, Stella

    2007-01-01

    Equal access for poor populations to health services is a comprehensive objective for any health reform. The Colombian health reform addressed this issue through a segmented progressive social health insurance approach. The strategy was to assure universal coverage expanding the population covered through payroll linked insurance, and implementing a subsidized insurance program for the poorest populations, those not affiliated through formal employment. A prospective study was performed to follow-up health service utilization and out-of-pocket expenses using a cohort design. It was representative of four Colombian cities (Cendex Health Services Use and Expenditure Study, 2001). A four part econometric model was applied. The model related medical service utilization and medication with different socioeconomic, geographic, and risk associated variables. Results showed that subsidized health insurance improves health service utilization and reduces the financial burden for the poorest, as compared to those non-insured. Other social health insurance schemes preserved high utilization with variable out-of-pocket expenditures. Family and age conditions have significant effect on medical service utilization. Geographic variables play a significant role in hospital inpatient service utilization. Both, geographic and income variables also have significant impact on out-of-pocket expenses. Projected utilization rates and a simulation favor a dual policy for two-stage income segmented insurance to progress towards the universal insurance goal. PMID:16929487

  1. Function Model for Community Health Service Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Peng; Pan, Feng; Liu, Danhong; Xu, Yongyong

    In order to construct a function model of community health service (CHS) information for development of CHS information management system, Integration Definition for Function Modeling (IDEF0), an IEEE standard which is extended from Structured Analysis and Design(SADT) and now is a widely used function modeling method, was used to classifying its information from top to bottom. The contents of every level of the model were described and coded. Then function model for CHS information, which includes 4 super-classes, 15 classes and 28 sub-classed of business function, 43 business processes and 168 business activities, was established. This model can facilitate information management system development and workflow refinement.

  2. Integrating complementary and alternative medicine into mainstream healthcare services: the perspectives of health service managers

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is increasingly included within mainstream integrative healthcare (IHC) services. Health service managers are key stakeholders central to ensuring effective integrative health care services. Yet, little research has specifically investigated the role or perspective of health service managers with regards to integrative health care services under their management. In response, this paper reports findings from an exploratory study focusing exclusively on the perspectives of health service managers of integrative health care services in Australia regarding the role of CAM within their service and the health service managers rational for incorporating CAM into clinical care. Methods Health service managers from seven services were recruited using purposive and snowball sampling. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with the health service managers. The services addressed trauma and chronic conditions and comprised: five community-based programs including drug and alcohol rehabilitation, refugee mental health and women’s health; and two hospital-based specialist services. The CAM practices included in the services investigated included acupuncture, naturopathy, Western herbal medicine and massage. Results Findings reveal that the health service managers in this study understand CAM to enhance the holistic capacity of their service by: filling therapeutic gaps in existing healthcare practices; by treating the whole person; and by increasing healthcare choices. Health service managers also identified CAM as addressing therapeutic gaps through the provision of a mind-body approach in psychological trauma and in chronic disease management treatment. Health service managers describe the addition of CAM in their service as enabling patients who would otherwise not be able to afford CAM to gain access to these treatments thereby increasing healthcare choices. Some health service managers expressly align the notion

  3. 38 CFR 18.452 - Health and other social services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Health and other social...-EFFECTUATION OF TITLE VI OF THE CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1964 Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Handicap Health and Social Services § 18.452 Health and other social services. (a) General. In providing health, or...

  4. 38 CFR 18.452 - Health and other social services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Health and other social...-EFFECTUATION OF TITLE VI OF THE CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1964 Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Handicap Health and Social Services § 18.452 Health and other social services. (a) General. In providing health, or...

  5. A School Health Service for Children? A Commentary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polnay, Leon

    1998-01-01

    Notes that findings presented by Mayall and Storey raise important concerns about school health services: (1) expanding scope of program and declining workforce to deliver services: (2) lack of marketing about school health; (3) loss of infrastructure for school health; (4) need to improve relationship between school health and other staff; and…

  6. Redesignation of Contract Health Service Delivery Area--Indian Health Service, HHS. Final notice.

    PubMed

    1993-04-01

    This notice advises the public that the Indian Health Service (IHS) is redesignating the geographic boundaries of the Contract Health Service Delivery Area (CHSDA) for the Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians ("The Band"). The Grand Traverse CHSDA was comprised of Leelanau County in Michigan. This county was designated as the Band's CHSDA when the IHS published its updated list of CHSDAs in the Federal Register of January 10, 1984 (49 FR 1291). The redesignated CHSDA is comprised of six counties in the State of Michigan, i.e., Leelanau, Antrim, Benzie, Grand Traverse, Manistee, and Charlevoix. This notice is issued under authority of 43 FR 34654, August 4, 1978.

  7. 20 CFR 1002.58 - Is service in the commissioned corps of the Public Health Service considered “service in the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Public Health Service considered âservice in the uniformed services?â 1002.58 Section 1002.58 Employees... commissioned corps of the Public Health Service considered “service in the uniformed services?” Yes. Service in the commissioned corps of the Public Health Service (PHS) is “service in the uniformed services”...

  8. 20 CFR 1002.58 - Is service in the commissioned corps of the Public Health Service considered “service in the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Public Health Service considered âservice in the uniformed services?â 1002.58 Section 1002.58 Employees... commissioned corps of the Public Health Service considered “service in the uniformed services?” Yes. Service in the commissioned corps of the Public Health Service (PHS) is “service in the uniformed services”...

  9. 42 CFR 440.20 - Outpatient hospital services and rural health clinic services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Outpatient hospital services and rural health... Definitions § 440.20 Outpatient hospital services and rural health clinic services. (a) Outpatient hospital... furnished by an institution that— (i) Is licensed or formally approved as a hospital by an...

  10. 76 FR 6197 - Health Services Research and Development Service Merit Review Board; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-03

    ... from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.; and Career Development will convene from 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. On March 3, Career... AFFAIRS Health Services Research and Development Service Merit Review Board; Notice of Meeting The...) that a meeting of the Health Services Research and Development Service Merit Review Board will be...

  11. 78 FR 50144 - Health Services Research and Development Service, Scientific Merit Review Board; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-16

    ... AFFAIRS Health Services Research and Development Service, Scientific Merit Review Board; Notice of Meeting.... App. 2, that the Health Services Research and Development Service (HSR&D) Scientific Merit Review... research. Applications are reviewed for scientific and technical merit, mission relevance, and...

  12. Specialization and competition in dental health services.

    PubMed

    Grytten, Jostein; Skau, Irene

    2009-04-01

    The number of specialists within dental health services has increased over the last few years. This raises the issue of how the services should be organized and funded. We describe the effect of one way of organizing the services, which is by relying on competition. In Norway, some oral specialists face real competition with general dental practitioners for the same patients (prosthetists, periodontists and endodontists), while other specialists do not (orthodontists and oral surgeons). The latter specialists have skills that give them exclusive possibilities to practice their profession. We find that competition can be effective for the specialists who experience real competition with general dental practitioners for patients. In situations where real competition does not exist, specialists can obtain market power and raise their fees. Our results are based on an analysis of a representative set of data from general dental practitioners and specialists in Norway. The specialities in which practitioners can exercise market power raise challenges related to the type of public policy that can reduce this market power in an appropriate way, and without involving too large costs for the authorities.

  13. [Supply services at health facilities: measuring performance].

    PubMed

    Dacosta Claro, I

    2001-01-01

    Performance measurement, in their different meanings--either balance scorecard or outputs measurement--have become an essential tool in today's organizations (World-Class organizations) to improve service quality and reduce costs. This paper presents a performance measurement system for the hospital supply chain. The system is organized in different levels and groups of indicators in order to show a hierarchical, coherent and integrated vision of the processes. Thus, supply services performance is measured according to (1) financial aspects, (2) customers satisfaction aspects and (3) internal aspects of the processes performed. Since the informational needs of the managers vary within the administrative structure, the performance measurement system is defined in three hierarchical levels. Firstly, the whole supply chain, with the different interrelation of activities. Secondly, the three main processes of the chain--physical management of products, purchasing and negotiation processes and the local storage units. And finally, the performance measurement of each activity involved. The system and the indicators have been evaluated with the participation of 17 health services of Quebec (Canada), however, and due to the similarities of the operation, could be equally implemented in Spanish hospitals.

  14. Public health nutrition services: issues today and tomorrow.

    PubMed

    Egan, M C

    1980-10-01

    The accomplishments of the past are reviewed in this paper to give public health nutritionists perspective in dealing with the problems of the present and of the future. Positive and negative observations on the current scene in nutrition services follow. Issues and concerns for the future that are discussed are: Defining and planning for public health nutrition services, paying for nutrition services, training for public health nutrition, and advocacy for nutrition services. PMID:6999067

  15. Sexual reproductive health service provision to young people in Kenya; health service providers’ experiences

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Addressing the sexual and reproductive health (SRH) needs of young people remains a challenge for most developing countries. This study explored the perceptions and experiences of Health Service Providers (HSP) in providing SRH services to young people in Kenya. Methods Qualitative study conducted in eight health facilities; five from Nairobi and three rural district hospitals in Laikipia, Meru Central, and Kirinyaga. Nineteen in-depth interviews (IDI) and two focus group discussions (FGD) were conducted with HSPs. Interviews were tape recorded and transcribed. Data was coded and analysed using the thematic framework approach. Results The majority of HSPs were aware of the youth friendly service (YFS) concept but not of the supporting national policies and guidelines. HSP felt they lacked competency in providing SRH services to young people especially regarding counselling and interpersonal communication. HSPs were conservative with regards to providing SRH services to young people particularly contraception. HSP reported being torn between personal feelings, cultural and religious values and beliefs and their wish to respect young people’s rights to accessing and obtaining SRH services. Conclusion Supporting youth friendly policies and competency based training of HSP are two common approaches used to improve SRH services for adolescents. However, these may not be sufficient to change HSPs’ attitude to adolescents seeking help. There is need to address the cultural, religious and traditional value systems that prevent HSPs from providing good quality and comprehensive SRH services to young people. Training updates should include sessions that enable HSPs to evaluate how their personal and cultural values and beliefs influence practice. PMID:24229365

  16. Coordination between Child Welfare Agencies and Mental Health Service Providers, Children's Service Use, and Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bai, Yu; Wells, Rebecca; Hillemeier, Marianne M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Interorganizational relationships (IORs) between child welfare agencies and mental health service providers may facilitate mental health treatment access for vulnerable children. This study investigates whether IORs are associated with greater use of mental health services and improvement in mental health status for children served by…

  17. The occupational health service. Staffing, facilities, and equipment.

    PubMed

    Rieth, L K

    2000-08-01

    An occupational health service can be an integral part of any company. It is incumbent on the industry to conduct a thorough assessment of the need for such a service and then support the service from a financial and resource perspective. Consequently, staffing and equipping an occupational health service adequately are dependent on the services to be delivered and the type of professional staff hired. All occupational health programs can be conducted in a cost effective manner when the goals and mission are in alignment with company goals, management supports appropriate funding, and space supports the delivery of quality health care.

  18. Innovations in Mental Health Services to Disaster Victims.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lystad, Mary, Ed.

    This monograph was developed to provide mental health and other service delivery workers with an overview of conceptual, programmatic, and educational developments in mental health services to disaster victims over the past 10 years. It was written primarily for national policymakers, administrators, and service providers of disaster relief…

  19. Mental Health Service Providers: College Student Perceptions of Helper Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ackerman, Ashley M.; Wantz, Richard A.; Firmin, Michael W; Poindexter, Dawn C.; Pujara, Amita L.

    2014-01-01

    Undergraduate perceptions of the overall effectiveness of six types of mental health service providers (MHSPs) were obtained with a survey. Although many mental health services are available to consumers in the United States, research has indicated that these services are underutilized. Perceptions have been linked to therapeutic outcomes and may…

  20. Telephone survey of service-user experiences of a telephone-based mental health triage service.

    PubMed

    Elsom, Stephen; Sands, Natisha; Roper, Cath; Hoppner, Cayte; Gerdtz, Marie

    2013-10-01

    The participation of service users in all aspects of mental health service delivery including policy development, service planning and evaluation is increasingly an expectation of contemporary mental health care. Although there are a growing number of publications reporting service-user perspectives in the evaluation of mental health services, little attention has been paid to the views of service users about mental health triage services. The purpose of the study reported here was to examine service-users' (consumers and informal carers) experiences of a telephone-based mental health triage service. Using a framework developed from the World Health Organisation's elements of responsiveness, we conducted structured telephone interviews with service users who had contacted a telephone-based mental health triage service in regional Victoria, Australia. The main findings of the study were that consumers experienced more difficulty than carers in accessing the service and that, although most participants were satisfied, only a minority reported being involved in decision-making. Further work is needed to improve accessibility of mental health triage services and to investigate barriers to consumer self-referral. Professional development and practice support systems should be established to support mental health triage nurses in the development of collaborative, consumer-focused care.

  1. [Health services research in urology: basis and examples].

    PubMed

    Glaeske, G

    2014-12-01

    Health services research investigates the supply of individuals and the population with health-relevant products and services under routine daily conditions. It must be understood as a cyclic process whereby an image of the current situation should always be the starting point but which can, for example generate hypotheses for new approaches in clinical research. Health services research cannot be reduced to a specific method but is primarily defined by the question to be answered. The use of health insurance data in particular play a major role in health services research.

  2. Health services implications of DNA testing.

    PubMed

    Struse, H M; Montoya, I D

    2001-01-01

    This review article summarizes the state of the art in genetic testing and discusses the many issues that new technologies have raised. A health services perspective is offered to aid in providing laboratorians with an understanding of the dilemma that society faces with the exponential advances in knowledge. Unmistakably, these new technologies are a mixed blessing: on the one hand, diagnoses can be made with greater accuracy and preventive measures implemented more fruitfully and individuals may be more conclusively identified and/or exonerated for forensic purposes. On the other hand, however, are the very real concerns that discrimination under a medical guise will be encouraged and that privacy rights may be compromised. Another important issue is how the laboratory profession will serve in moving these new technologies from research to practice. We examine the role of the CLS in moving forward to a role of patient counselor and advocate in the emerging complex world of DNA-related biotechnology.

  3. Data Collection Methods in Health Services Research

    PubMed Central

    Bowles, K.-A.; Skinner, E.H.; Mitchell, D.; Haas, R.; Ho, M.; Salter, K.; May, K.; Markham, D.; O’Brien, L.; Plumb, S.; Haines, T.P.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Hospital length of stay and discharge destination are important outcome measures in evaluating effectiveness and efficiency of health services. Although hospital administrative data are readily used as a data collection source in health services research, no research has assessed this data collection method against other commonly used methods. Objective Determine if administrative data from electronic patient management programs are an effective data collection method for key hospital outcome measures when compared with alternative hospital data collection methods. Method Prospective observational study comparing the completeness of data capture and level of agreement between three data collection methods; manual data collection from ward-based sources, administrative data from an electronic patient management program (i.PM), and inpatient medical record review (gold standard) for hospital length of stay and discharge destination. Results Manual data collection from ward-based sources captured only 376 (69%) of the 542 inpatient episodes captured from the hospital administrative electronic patient management program. Administrative data from the electronic patient management program had the highest levels of agreement with inpatient medical record review for both length of stay (93.4%) and discharge destination (91%) data. Conclusion This is the first paper to demonstrate differences between data collection methods for hospital length of stay and discharge destination. Administrative data from an electronic patient management program showed the highest level of completeness of capture and level of agreement with the gold standard of inpatient medical record review for both length of stay and discharge destination, and therefore may be an acceptable data collection method for these measures. PMID:25848416

  4. School Health Services in Wisconsin. Staff Brief 94-7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin State Legislative Council, Madison.

    This Staff Brief was prepared for the Joint Legislative Council's Special Committee on School Health Services, which was established to study pupil health services within the public school system. Part 1 provides background information on selected federal initiatives and programs, including a joint statement on school health, and a discussion of…

  5. 20 CFR 638.510 - Health care and services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Health care and services. 638.510 Section 638... UNDER TITLE IV-B OF THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT Center Operations § 638.510 Health care and services. The center operator shall provide a health program, including basic medical, dental, and...

  6. 20 CFR 638.510 - Health care and services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Health care and services. 638.510 Section 638... UNDER TITLE IV-B OF THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT Center Operations § 638.510 Health care and services. The center operator shall provide a health program, including basic medical, dental, and...

  7. 20 CFR 638.510 - Health care and services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Health care and services. 638.510 Section 638... UNDER TITLE IV-B OF THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT Center Operations § 638.510 Health care and services. The center operator shall provide a health program, including basic medical, dental, and...

  8. 77 FR 76052 - Health Resources and Services Administration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Agency Information Collection Activities... States Code, as amended by the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, Public Law 104-13), the Health...

  9. Federal Program Encourages Health Service Innovations on Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nix, Mary P.

    2009-01-01

    There is always room for improvement in the delivery of health services. This article discusses the U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality's (AHRQ) Health Care Innovations Exchange (www.innovations.ahrq.gov), a comprehensive program that aims to increase awareness of innovative strategies to meet health service delivery challenges and…

  10. Sex, Kids, and Politics. Health Services in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emihovich, Catherine; Herrington, Carolyn D.

    This book examines practical, cultural, and political implications of placing health service programs in public schools, detailing three cases of Florida school districts, where a controversial statewide initiative for health services in schools recently went into effect. The plan supports programs to promote the health of medically underserved…

  11. 75 FR 27348 - Public Health Services Act; Delegation of Authority

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Public Health Services Act; Delegation of Authority Notice is hereby given that I have delegated to the Director, Office of Public Health...

  12. Dementia in Ontario: Prevalence and Health Services Utilization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tranmer, J. E.; Croxford, R.; Coyte, P. C.

    2003-01-01

    To understand the impact of ongoing reform of mental health and dementia care in Ontario, an examination of prevalence and health services utilization rates is needed. However, there exists a gap in current prevalence and health services research specific to dementia care in Ontario. The objective of this study was to address these concerns using…

  13. National School Health Service Program. Special Report. Number 1, 1985.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, New Brunswick, NJ.

    A five-year School Health Service demonstration program, sponsored by The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, tested whether School Nurse Practitioners (SNP's) supported by community physicians could improve children's access to health care by expanding the health services in schools. The program was conducted in 18 school districts in medically…

  14. Health service planning in a British new town.

    PubMed

    Reid, J J; Gooding, D G

    1975-01-01

    The initial postwar development of new towns in Britain took place at a time when the present British National Health Service was in its infancy, and few attempts were made to integrate health service planning into the overall planning process. The more recent new towns have been the object of better social planning and, at the same time, the National Health Service has been substantially unified, at first functionally and, in 1974, administratively. In consequence, attempts have been made to use the opportunities which such towns present for planning health services in a comprehensive and integrated manner. The evolution of a planning and implementation structure for health services in Milton Keynes, a new town with a target population of 250,000, is described, together with some of the implications for the administratively unified National Health Service which came into being in 1974.

  15. Challenges facing occupational health services in the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Westerholm, P

    1999-12-01

    The mission and tasks of occupational health services are reviewed in the context of the global megatrends of productivity increase, population overgrowth, and the implications of changes in the technology of information and communication. Current trends in attempts to achieve harmonization with respect to the concept and tasks of occupational health services in the European Union are described, along with the basic features of occupational health services as a human service organization with implications for the setting of objectives and criteria for assessing quality and performance and ethics. The need to adopt a quality-focused approach to occupational health service programs is emphasized, and some of the inhibitions and obstacles to quality work are mentioned. The need for professional commitment to develop and implement quality concepts is outlined. Evidence-based health care in the setting of occupational health services and some salient aspects of professional ethics in the 21st century are commented on.

  16. Rhetoric and Reality in the English National Health Service

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Rudolf

    2015-01-01

    Despite fiscal stress, public confidence in the National Health Service (NHS) remains strong; privatisation has not hollowed out the service. But if long term challenges are to be overcome, pragmatism not rhetoric should be the guide PMID:26340494

  17. Photochemical model evaluation of the ground-level ozone impacts on ambient air quality and vegetation health in the Alberta oil sands region: Using present and future emission scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayaraghavan, Krish; Cho, Sunny; Morris, Ralph; Spink, David; Jung, Jaegun; Pauls, Ron; Duffett, Katherine

    2016-09-01

    One of the potential environmental issues associated with oil sands development is increased ozone formation resulting from NOX and volatile organic compound emissions from bitumen extraction, processing and upgrading. To manage this issue in the Athabasca Oil Sands Region (AOSR) in northeast Alberta, a regional multi-stakeholder group, the Cumulative Environmental Management Association (CEMA), developed an Ozone Management Framework that includes a modelling based assessment component. In this paper, we describe how the Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ) model was applied to assess potential ground-level ozone formation and impacts on ambient air quality and vegetation health for three different ozone precursor cases in the AOSR. Statistical analysis methods were applied, and the CMAQ performance results met the U.S. EPA model performance goal at all sites. The modelled 4th highest daily maximum 8-h average ozone concentrations in the base and two future year scenarios did not exceed the Canada-wide standard of 65 ppb or the newer Canadian Ambient Air Quality Standards of 63 ppb in 2015 and 62 ppb in 2020. Modelled maximum 1-h ozone concentrations in the study were well below the Alberta Ambient Air Quality Objective of 82 ppb in all three cases. Several ozone vegetation exposure metrics were also evaluated to investigate the potential impact of ground-level ozone on vegetation. The chronic 3-months SUM60 exposure metric is within the CEMA baseline range (0-2000 ppb-hr) everywhere in the AOSR. The AOT40 ozone exposure metric predicted by CMAQ did not exceed the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UN/ECE) threshold of concern of 3000 ppb-hr in any of the cases but is just below the threshold in high-end future emissions scenario. In all three emission scenarios, the CMAQ predicted W126 ozone exposure metric is within the CEMA baseline threshold of 4000 ppb-hr. This study outlines the use of photochemical modelling of the impact of an industry (oil

  18. Health policy dilemmas related to high technology infertility services.

    PubMed

    Gennaro, S; Klein, A; Miranda, L

    1992-01-01

    As cost containment in health care becomes an important concern, the costs and benefits of specific health care services will be more closely examined. The costs and benefits of one type of health care, high technology infertility services, are explored in this paper. These services may be particularly susceptible to cost containment since they are costly, raise ethical issues, and because they currently are provided to healthy individuals not experiencing life-threatening illness who can afford them. PMID:1521846

  19. Integration of mental health into priority health service delivery platforms: maternal and child health services.

    PubMed

    Rahman, A

    2015-09-28

    Maternal and child health (MCH) programmes are the most logical and appropriate platforms for integration of mental health care in an equitable, accessible and holistic manner. Such integration has the potential to improve both mental and physical health synergistically. Key steps to successful integration include a) recognition, at the highest international and national policy forums, that mental health and well-being is a generic component of MCH that does not compete with MCH programmes but instead complements them; b) tailoring the training and supervision of MCH and primary care personnel so they can recognize and assist in the management of common maternal and child mental health problems, recognizing that this, in turn, will enable them to be more effective health-care workers; c) adapting effective interventions to local contexts; and d) investing in implementation research so that these approaches are refined and scaled-up, leading to improved outcomes for all MCH programmes.

  20. 77 FR 54783 - Improving Access to Mental Health Services for Veterans, Service Members, and Military Families

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-05

    ... Veterans, Service Members, and Military Families By the authority vested in me as President by the... network of support capable of providing effective mental health services for veterans, service members... health care systems of the Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs and in local communities....

  1. Community mental health services and the elderly: retrenchment or expansion?

    PubMed

    Swan, J H; Fox, P J; Estes, C L

    1986-01-01

    Data gathered from a recent survey of CMHC's suggest that the elderly are increasing their utilization of CMHC services. As more responsibility for mental health services is shifted to the states, a commitment to mental health services for the elderly increasingly becomes an issue of state discretion, and of state finances. This makes it probable that accessibility to mental health services for the elderly will become more variable and problematic on a national basis. This is especially important in light of data that indicates an increasing awareness by CMHC's of the mental health needs of the elderly.

  2. Factors influencing the utilisation of health services by rural men.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Dermot; Lower, Tony

    2002-01-01

    This research identified the barriers and enablers that influence the utilisation of health services by rural men in the Midwest region of Western Australia. The methodology was based on participatory action research, including qualitative assessments to determine the issues for a larger quantitative study. Four variables were identified as predictors for the use of health services: those who attended for preventive reasons; those not affected by seasonal work; men who thought a medical telephone line was not important; and those who did not consider privacy an important issue. Modification of health service delivery to men could potentially enhance appropriate utilisation of health services in rural areas.

  3. Developing a strategic plan for school health services in Massachusetts.

    PubMed

    Sheetz, Anne H

    2002-09-01

    School health service programs underwent rapid changes to meet the health needs of today's students. These needs stem largely from: a) increased number of students with special health care needs attending school, b) increased stress and time pressure on families, c) rapid restructuring of the health care system serving children, and d) recognition that schools provide opportunities to identify students with health risks. This paper describes seven components of a statewide Massachusetts plan to develop school health services by: a) setting standards, b) reviewing and revising statutes and regulations, c) promoting credentialing of school health personnel, d) providing continuing education on subjects pertinent to school health, e) exploring reimbursement systems and new funding sources, including funds from the tobacco settlement, f) exploring new models of care, and g) implementing data systems. The plan focuses on developing school nurse-managed school health services within a public health model.

  4. Telemental Health Technology in Deaf and General Mental-Health Services: Access and Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austen, Sally; McGrath, Melissa

    2006-01-01

    Long-distance travel to provide mental health services for deaf people has implications for efficiency, safety, and equality of service. However, uptake of Telemental Health (TMH) has been slow in both deaf and general mental health services. A quantitative study was used to investigate access to TMH and whether staff confidence, experience, or…

  5. Marriage, Cohabitation, and Men's Use of Preventive Health Care Services

    MedlinePlus

    ... NCHS Marriage, Cohabitation, and Men's Use of Preventive Health Care Services Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir NCHS ... other not-married men to have had a health care visit in the past 12 months. Figure 1. ...

  6. Rhetoric and Reality in the English National Health Service Comment on "Who Killed the English National Health Service?".

    PubMed

    Klein, Rudolf

    2015-09-01

    Despite fiscal stress, public confidence in the National Health Service (NHS) remains strong; privatisation has not hollowed out the service. But if long term challenges are to be overcome, pragmatism not rhetoric should be the guide. PMID:26340494

  7. Rhetoric and Reality in the English National Health Service Comment on "Who Killed the English National Health Service?".

    PubMed

    Klein, Rudolf

    2015-09-01

    Despite fiscal stress, public confidence in the National Health Service (NHS) remains strong; privatisation has not hollowed out the service. But if long term challenges are to be overcome, pragmatism not rhetoric should be the guide.

  8. A classification of service types and glossary of terminology for non-government mental health services.

    PubMed

    Wood, Christie; Pennebaker, Duane

    2004-01-01

    This article presents a defined classification of non-government community mental health services designed for reporting by the non-government sector. Initial classification involved review of the relevant literature, advisory committee consultation and content analysis of the Department of Health, Western Australia's service specifications and service contracts. A proposed classification was evaluated by a sample of 50 non-government service providers via focus groups and telephone interviews for internal validity and applicability. The revised classification was validated by Victorian government and non-government providers. The final validated classification contained one service class, seven service types and seven service sub-types, accompanied by a glossary of terms.

  9. Physical health nurse consultant role to improve physical health in mental health services: A carer's perspective.

    PubMed

    Happell, Brenda; Wilson, Karen; Platania-Phung, Chris; Stanton, Robert

    2016-06-01

    The physical health of people diagnosed with a mental illness is significantly poorer in comparison with the general population. Awareness of this health disparity is increasing; however, strategies to address the problem are limited. Carers play an important role in the physical health care of people with mental illness, particularly in facilitating navigation of and advocating in the health care system. A specialist physical health nurse consultant position has been suggested as a way to address the physical health care disparity and limited research available suggests that positive outcomes are possible. In the present study, a qualitative exploratory research project was undertaken, involving in-depth interviews with people identifying as mental health carers. Two focus groups and one individual interview were conducted involving a total of 13 carers. The resulting data were analyzed thematically. Views and opinions about the proposed physical health nurse consultant (PHNC) position were sought during these interviews and are reported in this paper. Two main sub-themes were evident relating to characteristics of this role: reliability and consistency; and communication and support. Essentially carers expressed a need for support for themselves and consumers in addressing physical health concerns. Successful implementation of this position would require a consistent and reliable approach. Carers are significant stakeholders in the physical health of consumers of mental health services and their active involvement in identifying and tailoring services, including development of the physical health nurse consultant must be seen as a priority.

  10. Alberta Associations for Bright Children Members' Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Association for Bright Children, Edmonton.

    This handbook is designed to provide information to parents of gifted children in Alberta, Canada. The handbook outlines the mission and objectives of the Alberta Associations for Bright Children and describes the structure of the non-profit organization. The booklet then addresses: (1) the characteristics of gifted children; (2) the rights of…

  11. The American Imprint on Alberta Politics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiseman, Nelson

    2011-01-01

    Characteristics assigned to America's classical liberal ideology--rugged individualism, market capitalism, egalitarianism in the sense of equality of opportunity, and fierce hostility toward centralized federalism and socialism--are particularly appropriate for fathoming Alberta's political culture. The author contends that Alberta's early…

  12. Inclusion's Confusion in Alberta

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilham, Chris; Williamson, W. John

    2014-01-01

    This hermeneutic paper interprets a recent series of reforms to inclusive education policy undertaken by the ministry of education in the province of Alberta, Canada. A 2007 Alberta Education review of the 16,000 student files in the province that school boards had claimed met the criteria for severe disability codification status -- the level of…

  13. Barriers to mental health services utilization in the Niger Delta region of Nigeria: service users’ perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Jack-Ide, Izibeloko Omi; Uys, Leana

    2013-01-01

    Introduction There is only one neuro-psychiatric hospital for over four million people in the Niger Delta region of Nigeria. Low-income groups in urban and rural areas who access care through public mental health clinics are at greater risk of not accessing the needed mental health care. This study aimed to explored barriers that prevent people from utilizing mental health services, and to identifies key factors to increase access and improved service delivery. Methods A qualitative study was conducted among 20 service users attending the outpatient clinic of Rumuigbo neuropsychiatric hospital. Ten participants were caregivers and 10 were clients, both having accessed services for at least one year. Results The mean age was 37.7 years, 60% were males, 40% were unemployed and only 15% had a regular monthly income, while 65% live in rural areas. Barriers observed in mental health services use were physical, financial and cultural. These include absence of service in rural communities, poor knowledge of mental health services, stigma, transportation problems, waiting time at the facility and cost of service. Conclusion Stigma remains a strong barrier to accessing mental health services, and extensive efforts need to be made to overcome ignorance and discrimination. Mental health services need to be provided throughout the health care system to enable people to access them locally and affordably, preventing the need to travel and promoting service uptake and treatment continuation. PMID:23785564

  14. Lichen biomonitoring networks in alberta.

    PubMed

    Case, J W

    1984-09-01

    Lichen biomonitoring of air pollution has developed over a period of about 150 yr. Several valuable techniques now exist which could complement physical/chemical air quality monitoring programmes. The affects of air pollution and acid rain, in areas such as Alberta, where lichens and bryophytes make up a significant portion of the forest vegetation, must be considered important. In addition, bioaccumulation studies can be used to map the areas of 'heavy metal' deposition, estimate actual depositional rates, and check the accuracy of pollutant dispersion models. Lichen biomonitoring techniques must now be calibrated with more 'glamorous' effects on plant physiology, ecosystem processes, cancer incidence, etc.

  15. Developing an Employee Counselling Service within the British National Health Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whelan, Linda; Robson, Maggie; Cook, Peter

    1999-01-01

    Evaluation of an employee counseling service in Britain's National Health Service by 26 staff participants found the service was valued by employees. Designed to meet the objectives of a "healthy workplace" initiative, the service appeared to be addressing staff support needs. (SK)

  16. Critical issues in reforming rural mental health service delivery.

    PubMed

    Blank, M B; Fox, J C; Hargrove, D S; Turner, J T

    1995-12-01

    Critical issues in reforming rural mental health service delivery systems under health care reform are outlined. It is argued that the exclusive focus on health care financing reform fails to include obstacles to effective mental health service delivery in rural area, which should focus on issues of availability, accessibility, and acceptability, as well as financing and accountability. Characteristics of rural areas are delineated and three assumptions about the structure of rural communities which are shaping the dialogue on rural health and mental health service delivery are examined. These assumptions include the notion that rural communities are more closely knit than urban ones, that rural services can be effectively delivered through urban hubs, and that rural dwellers represent a low risk population which can be effectively served through existing facilities and by extending existing services. PMID:8608697

  17. [Counseling and Guidance in Health Care and Psychological Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubble, Kenneth O.

    A health aide is defined as an individual living in one of the organized living units on campus, employed by the University Health Center, who assists in extending preventive and therapeutic health services to house members. Three major objectives are enumerated: 1) early identification of health problems; 2) environmental control of factors which…

  18. Tuberculosis diagnosis: primary health care or emergency medical services?

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Rubia Laine de Paula; Scatolin, Beatriz Estuque; Wysocki, Anneliese Domingues; Beraldo, Aline Ale; Monroe, Aline Aparecida; Scatena, Lúcia Marina; Villa, Tereza Cristina Scatena

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess primary health care and emergency medical services performance for tuberculosis diagnosis. METHODS Cross-sectional study were conducted with 90 health professionals from primary health care and 68 from emergency medical services, in Ribeirao Preto, SP, Southeastern Brazil, in 2009. A structured questionnaire based on an instrument of tuberculosis care assessment was used. The association between health service and the variables of structure and process for tuberculosis diagnosis was assessed by Chi-square test, Fisher's exact test (both with 5% of statistical significance) and multiple correspondence analysis. RESULTS Primary health care was associated with the adequate provision of inputs and human resources, as well as with the sputum test request. Emergencial medical services were associated with the availability of X-ray equipment, work overload, human resources turnover, insufficient availability of health professionals, unavailability of sputum collection pots and do not request sputum test. In both services, tuberculosis diagnosis remained as a physician's responsibility. CONCLUSIONS Emergencial medical services presented weaknesses in its structure to identify tuberculosis suspects. Gaps on the process were identified in both primary health care and emergencial medical services. This situation highlights the need for qualification of health services that are the main gateway to health system to meet sector reforms that prioritize the timely diagnosis of tuberculosis and its control. PMID:24626553

  19. Determinants of Mental Health Service Use Among Depressed Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Breland, David J.; McCarty, Carolyn A.; Zhou, Chuan; McCauley, Elizabeth; Rockhill, Carol; Katon, Wayne; Richardson, Laura P.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Evaluate determinants of mental health service use among depressed adolescents. Method We assessed mental health services use over the 12 months following screening among 113 adolescents (34 males, 79 females) from an integrated healthcare system who screened positive for depression (Patient Health Questionnaire-9 score > 11). Youth characteristics (demographics, depression severity, and co-morbidity) and parent characteristics (parent history of depression, parent-report of youth externalizing and internalizing problems) were compared among youth who had received mental health services and those who had not. Multivariate regression was used to evaluate the strongest factors associated with mental health service use. Results Overall, 52% of adolescents who screened positive for depression received mental health service in the year following screening. Higher parent-reported youth internalizing problems (OR 5.37 CI 1.77–16.35), parental history of depression/anxiety (OR 4.12 CI 1.36–12.48) were significant factors associated with mental health service use. Suicidality and functional impairment were not associated with increased mental health services use. Conclusion Parental factors including recognition of the adolescent’s internalizing symptoms and parental experience with depression/anxiety are strongly associated with mental health service use for depressed adolescents. This highlights the importance of educating parents about depression and developing systems to actively screen and engage youth in treatment for depression. PMID:24417955

  20. The use of information and communications technology for health service delivery in Namibia: perspectives of the health service providers.

    PubMed

    Shivute, Meke I; Maumbe, Blessing M; Owei, Vesper T

    2008-01-01

    We surveyed health service providers in Namibia to find out how they used information and communication technologies (ICTs) to deliver health services to their patients. A structured questionnaire was administered to 21 health service providers in two regions of the country (one urban, one rural). There was overwhelming consensus among the health service providers that ICTs were very important, especially for medical services (100%). Ninety-one percent of health service providers viewed ICT as helping them to interact with other providers in other health institutions. The most commonly used ICT was the telephone, which was used in the admission areas of most health institutions (36%); the next most commonly used ICT was the PC (23%). The most commonly used channels for communication with patients were the telephone followed by TV. Some of the problems common to all health institutions in Namibia were poor budgetary resources and lack of basic infrastructure such as electricity or telephone lines. There is a need to promote ICT use for health service delivery and also to stimulate patients to use ICT to access health services and relevant information.

  1. The Indian Health Program of the U.S. Public Health Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Public Health Service (DHEW), Arlington, VA.

    As reported in this publication, about 410,000 Alaskan Indians, Eskimos, and Aleuts receive a full range of curative, preventive, and rehabilitative health services--including hospitalization, outpatient medical care, public health nursing, maternal and child health care, dental and nutrition services, and health education. The U.S. Public Health…

  2. Mental Health Services in School-Based Health Centers: Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bains, Ranbir Mangat; Diallo, Ana F.

    2016-01-01

    Mental health issues affect 20-25% of children and adolescents, of which few receive services. School-based health centers (SBHCs) provide access to mental health services to children and adolescents within their schools. A systematic review of literature was undertaken to review evidence on the effectiveness of delivery of mental health services…

  3. School Health Services for Children with Special Health Care Needs in California

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Dian L.; Hebbeler, Kathleen; Davis-Alldritt, Linda; Anderson, Lori S.; Knauer, Heather

    2015-01-01

    Children with special health care needs (CSHCN) are at risk for school failure when their health needs are not met. Current studies have identified a strong connection between school success and health. This study attempted to determine (a) how schools meet the direct service health needs of children and (b) who provides those services. The study…

  4. Health Services: Results from the School Health Policies and Programs Study 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brener, Nancy D.; Burstein, Gale R.; DuShaw, Martha L.; Vernon, Mary E.; Wheeler, Lani; Robinson, Judy

    2001-01-01

    Describes School Health Policies and Programs Study 2000 findings about state- and district-level school health services policies and practices regarding: organization, staffing, and facilities; required services; school based health clinics and other sites; immunizations; screening; medication administration; HIV; student health records; special…

  5. Indian Health Service: A Comprehensive Health Care Program for American Indians and Alaska Natives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indian Health Service (PHS/HSA), Rockville, MD.

    Comprehensive health care (preventive, curative, rehabilitative, and environmental) for more than 930,000 eligible American Indians and Alaska Natives is the responsibility of the Indian Health Service (IHS). Since 1955, this agency of the U.S. Public Health Service has made notable progress in raising the health status of Indians and Alaska…

  6. Mexican immigrant mothers' expectations for children's health services.

    PubMed

    Clark, Lauren; Redman, Richard W

    2007-10-01

    Women of Mexican descent living in the United States raise children who use health care services. What do immigrant Mexican mothers expect from children's health care services? And how do their expectations for children's health services compare to acculturated Mexican American mothers' expectations? This focused ethnographic study, based on repeated interviews with 28 mothers of varying acculturation levels, describes their expectations and experiences with children's health care services in the United States. Findings support a shared core of expectations for both Mexican immigrant and Mexican American mothers, and differences in health care access and financing, time spent in health care encounters, and cultural and linguistic expectations for care. Health care providers can use this information to approach Mexican-descent mothers and children with their expectations in mind, and craft a negotiated plan of care congruent with their expectations.

  7. Establishing a people-centered health service in Gwent, Wales.

    PubMed

    Wilson, B

    1992-01-01

    The Welsh Health Planning Forum has developed a "Strategic Intent and Direction for the NHS in Wales." The aim is "to take the people of Wales into the 21st Century with a level of health on course to compare with the best in Europe" (Welsh Office NHS Directorate, The Welsh Health Planning Forum, 1989). Gwent Health, one of the nine health authorities in Wales, provides a comprehensive health service to its population of 445,000 and was chosen to develop a prototype for the provision of cancer services. Gwent residents were invited to seminars to express their opinions of the health service that was provided and describe the type of service they would like to have in the future. The response was encouraging enough to engender the planning of future seminars. PMID:10119895

  8. 38 CFR 17.98 - Mental health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., 1713, or 1717, or 38 CFR 17.84 of this part, prior to the veteran's death, but may only be furnished in... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Mental health services... Outpatient Treatment § 17.98 Mental health services. (a) Following the death of a veteran,...

  9. 38 CFR 17.98 - Mental health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., 1713, or 1717, or 38 CFR 17.84 of this part, prior to the veteran's death, but may only be furnished in... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Mental health services... Outpatient Treatment § 17.98 Mental health services. (a) Following the death of a veteran,...

  10. 38 CFR 17.98 - Mental health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., 1713, or 1717, or 38 CFR 17.84 of this part, prior to the veteran's death, but may only be furnished in... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Mental health services... Outpatient Treatment § 17.98 Mental health services. (a) Following the death of a veteran,...

  11. 38 CFR 17.98 - Mental health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., 1713, or 1717, or 38 CFR 17.84 of this part, prior to the veteran's death, but may only be furnished in... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mental health services... Outpatient Treatment § 17.98 Mental health services. (a) Following the death of a veteran,...

  12. 38 CFR 17.98 - Mental health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., 1713, or 1717, or 38 CFR 17.84 of this part, prior to the veteran's death, but may only be furnished in... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Mental health services... Outpatient Treatment § 17.98 Mental health services. (a) Following the death of a veteran,...

  13. Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services Among Rural Minorities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamm, Larry D.

    2004-01-01

    This paper provides a brief overview of current conditions and prospects for increased access to mental health and substance abuse services among rural minorities. First, it addresses challenges in ensuring rural minorities access to needed services. Second, it considers steps to increase rural minority participation in the mental health and…

  14. Services Shared by Health Care Organizations: An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hospital Research and Educational Trust, Chicago, IL.

    This bibliography is designed to assist planners in the field of institutional health and health support services in gaining access to knowledge that will enhance their efforts to achieve new or expanded arrangements of service sharing. Entries are cross-referenced to as many categories as the material warrants. Case studies that are not annotated…

  15. Guidelines for Health Services for Migrant Students. 1984 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento. Bureau of Community Services and Migrant Education.

    To promote uniformity and continuity, standards have been established for planning, implementing, and evaluating student health programs provided by grade K-12 migrant education programs throughout California. State mandated health requirements, the rationale for supplemental services, methods of providing supplemental services, and community…

  16. Correlates of Home Health Care Services Use among the Elderly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starrett, Richard A.; And Others

    The use of health and social services is influenced by economic, community, geographic, organizational, societal, and environmental factors. A study was conducted to examine predisposing, enabling, and need-for-care factors related to the use of home health care services by a stratified random sample of 400 older adults. Predisposing factors…

  17. Inpatient Mental Health Services in Rural Areas: An Interregional Comparison.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagenfeld, Morton O.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    A classification of nonmetropolitan counties based on type of economy, socioeconomic level, and land use was applied to inpatient psychiatric services data of the National Institute of Mental Health. The scarce inpatient mental health services in nonmetropolitan areas were located mostly in nonfederal general hospitals in specialized-government…

  18. Parental Cultural Affiliation and Youth Mental Health Service Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ho, Judy; Yeh, May; McCabe, Kristen; Hough, Richard L.

    2007-01-01

    Studies indicate that African American, Asian/Pacific Islander, and Latino youth have higher rates of unmet mental health needs and lower rates of mental health service utilization compared to non-Hispanic White youth, suggesting that obstacles may exist in the help-seeking and service utilization pathway for minority youth. Parental cultural…

  19. Mental Health Services in School-Based Health Centers: Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Bains, Ranbir Mangat; Diallo, Ana F

    2016-02-01

    Mental health issues affect 20-25% of children and adolescents, of which few receive services. School-based health centers (SBHCs) provide access to mental health services to children and adolescents within their schools. A systematic review of literature was undertaken to review evidence on the effectiveness of delivery of mental health services in SBHCs. Databases were searched extensively for research studies published between January 1990 and March 2014. Data analysis was based on the method proposed by the Centre for Reviews and Dissemination. Twenty-three studies were selected for review. Each study was explored for accessibility and content of mental health services in SBHCs. SBHCs provide access and eliminate barriers to mental health services. Students who exhibited high-risk behaviors were more likely to have sought services at the SBHC. However, there is a lack of high-quality research evaluating mental health services in the SBHCs and their effect on children and adolescents.

  20. The Technological Growth in eHealth Services.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Shilpa; Pant, Millie; Abraham, Ajith; Agrawal, Namrata

    2015-01-01

    The infusion of information communication technology (ICT) into health services is emerging as an active area of research. It has several advantages but perhaps the most important one is providing medical benefits to one and all irrespective of geographic boundaries in a cost effective manner, providing global expertise and holistic services, in a time bound manner. This paper provides a systematic review of technological growth in eHealth services. The present study reviews and analyzes the role of four important technologies, namely, satellite, internet, mobile, and cloud for providing health services. PMID:26146515

  1. Integration of mother and child health services in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Walley, J D; McDonald, M

    1991-01-01

    In Wollo region of Ethiopia, various non-governmental officers have been working closely with each other and with the Regional Health Department to implement the policy of daily integrated mother and child health services. The record cards, registers, procedures and training courses of the separate 'vertically' organized services were brought together to enable the development of a model integrated service. There were improvements in accessibility, acceptability and output of the services. The system was evaluated by a joint Ministry of Health and UNICEF team, and was adopted for use in the rest of Ethiopia.

  2. The Technological Growth in eHealth Services

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Shilpa; Pant, Millie; Abraham, Ajith; Agrawal, Namrata

    2015-01-01

    The infusion of information communication technology (ICT) into health services is emerging as an active area of research. It has several advantages but perhaps the most important one is providing medical benefits to one and all irrespective of geographic boundaries in a cost effective manner, providing global expertise and holistic services, in a time bound manner. This paper provides a systematic review of technological growth in eHealth services. The present study reviews and analyzes the role of four important technologies, namely, satellite, internet, mobile, and cloud for providing health services. PMID:26146515

  3. The Technological Growth in eHealth Services.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Shilpa; Pant, Millie; Abraham, Ajith; Agrawal, Namrata

    2015-01-01

    The infusion of information communication technology (ICT) into health services is emerging as an active area of research. It has several advantages but perhaps the most important one is providing medical benefits to one and all irrespective of geographic boundaries in a cost effective manner, providing global expertise and holistic services, in a time bound manner. This paper provides a systematic review of technological growth in eHealth services. The present study reviews and analyzes the role of four important technologies, namely, satellite, internet, mobile, and cloud for providing health services.

  4. 75 FR 3906 - Request for Public Comment: 30-Day Proposed Information Collection: Indian Health Service...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-25

    ...: Indian Health Service Customer Satisfaction Survey AGENCY: Indian Health Service, HHS. ACTION: Notice... Service Customer Satisfaction Survey.'' Type of Information Collection Request: Three year approval of this new information collection, 0917-NEW, ``Indian Health Service Customer Satisfaction Survey.''...

  5. [Proposals for the reform of public health services in Catalonia].

    PubMed

    Villalbí, Joan R; Antó, Josep M; Pané, Olga; de Peray, Josep L

    2006-01-01

    In the year 2004 the government of Catalonia undertook a process to reform its public health services. In this context, it created a working groupinvolving experts from diverse backgrounds to analyse the reforms to be undertaken, the Scientific Committee for the Reform of Public Health in Catalonia. Its members produced eight documents on specific aspects of public health, from which a global report of the Committee was compiled by the end of 2005. This paper makes a synthesis of their production, and includes as an annex their recommendations and proposals. Public health policies should be structured around three main goal: the reduction of health inequalities, the control and removal of social and environmental risks, and effective improvements in quality of life. To reach them, common criteria are defined as main directions. These are based in favouring decentralization of public health services and their administration, linking public health activities with health care services, designing interventions with a population perspective, and reinforcing cross-sectional implications of public health. The work of this Committee is produced in the context of an international debate on the future of public health services and the disproportion between its contribution to health and well being and its resources and visibility. The Committee produced proposals and recommendations which can he grouped in five facets: consolidating a solid and coherent system, developing an organizational reform, defining a port-folio of services, adopting improvements in management, and taking into account cross sectional aspects relating to public health.

  6. Trade in health services in the ASEAN region.

    PubMed

    Arunanondchai, Jutamas; Fink, Carsten

    2006-12-01

    Promoting quality health services to large population segments is a key ingredient to human and economic development. At its core, healthcare policymaking involves complex trade-offs between promoting equitable and affordable access to a basic set of health services, creating incentives for efficiencies in the healthcare system and managing constraints in government budgets. International trade in health services influences these trade-offs. It presents opportunities for cost savings and access to better quality care, but it also raises challenges in promoting equitable and affordable access. This paper offers a discussion of trade policy in health services for the ASEAN region. It reviews the existing patterns of trade and identifies policy measures that could further harness the benefits from trade in health services and address potential pitfalls that deeper integration may bring about. PMID:17307958

  7. Consumption of Mental Health Services by People with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spiller, Mary Jane; Costello, Helen; Bramley, Agnieszka; Bouras, Nick; Martin, Graham; Tsakanikos, Elias; Holt, Geraldine

    2007-01-01

    Background: Although research is starting to identify those factors that predict contact with mental health services in individuals with intellectual disabilities, very little is known about the patterns of service use following referral. Yet, this information is vital for effective service planning and development. We therefore examined the…

  8. An Evaluation of an Occupational Health Advice Service

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shearn, P.; Ford, Norma J.; Murphy, R. G.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this article is to identify the profile of service users of an occupational health (OH) support service and establish areas of need, and to gather client feedback on the experience of participating in the support service and perceived outcomes and the impact of the advice received. Design and Setting: We carried out…

  9. Understanding Expanded School Mental Health Services in Baltimore City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walrath, Christine M.; Bruns, Eric J.; Anderson, Karyn L.; Glass-Siegal, Marcia; Weist, Mark D.

    2004-01-01

    This article explores the nature of expanded school mental health (ESMH) services in Baltimore City, which at the time of the study were incorporated into 40% of the citys public schools. A provider survey was distributed to ESMH clinicians to gather information on the characteristics of service providers and recipients, types of services being…

  10. Mental Health and Mental Retardation Services in Nevada. Executive Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kakalik, J. S.; And Others

    Summarized are the findings and recommendations of a 2-year study of all major services and service delivery systems in Nevada for persons with mental health disorders, mentally retarded persons, and abusers of alcohol and other drugs. Considered are the following areas of basic service needs: prevention of the mentally handicapping conditions,…

  11. The ethics of advertising for health care services.

    PubMed

    Schenker, Yael; Arnold, Robert M; London, Alex John

    2014-01-01

    Advertising by health care institutions has increased steadily in recent years. While direct-to-consumer prescription drug advertising is subject to unique oversight by the Federal Drug Administration, advertisements for health care services are regulated by the Federal Trade Commission and treated no differently from advertisements for consumer goods. In this article, we argue that decisions about pursuing health care services are distinguished by informational asymmetries, high stakes, and patient vulnerabilities, grounding fiduciary responsibilities on the part of health care providers and health care institutions. Using examples, we illustrate how common advertising techniques may mislead patients and compromise fiduciary relationships, thereby posing ethical risks to patients, providers, health care institutions, and society. We conclude by proposing that these risks justify new standards for advertising when considered as part of the moral obligation of health care institutions and suggest that mechanisms currently in place to regulate advertising for prescription pharmaceuticals should be applied to advertising for health care services more broadly.

  12. International survey of occupational health nurses' roles in multidisciplinary teamwork in occupational health services.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Bonnie; Kono, Keiko; Marziale, Maria Helena Palucci; Peurala, Marjatta; Radford, Jennifer; Staun, Julie

    2014-07-01

    Access to occupational health services for primary prevention and control of work-related injuries and illnesses by the global workforce is limited (World Health Organization [WHO], 2013). From the WHO survey of 121 (61%) participating countries, only one-third of the responding countries provided occupational health services to more than 30% of their workers (2013). How services are provided in these countries is dependent on legal requirements and regulations, population, workforce characteristics, and culture, as well as an understanding of the impact of workplace hazards and worker health needs. Around the world, many occupational health services are provided by occupational health nurses independently or in collaboration with other disciplines' professionals. These services may be health protection, health promotion, or both, and are designed to reduce health risks, support productivity, improve workers' quality of life, and be cost-effective. Rantanen (2004) stated that basic occupational health services must increase rather than decline, especially as work becomes more complex; workforces become more dynamic and mobile, creating new models of work-places; and jobs become more precarious and temporary. To better understand occupational health services provided by occupational health nurses globally and how decisions are made to provide these services, this study examined the scope of services provided by a sample of participating occupational health nurses from various countries. PMID:25000546

  13. International survey of occupational health nurses' roles in multidisciplinary teamwork in occupational health services.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Bonnie; Kono, Keiko; Marziale, Maria Helena Palucci; Peurala, Marjatta; Radford, Jennifer; Staun, Julie

    2014-07-01

    Access to occupational health services for primary prevention and control of work-related injuries and illnesses by the global workforce is limited (World Health Organization [WHO], 2013). From the WHO survey of 121 (61%) participating countries, only one-third of the responding countries provided occupational health services to more than 30% of their workers (2013). How services are provided in these countries is dependent on legal requirements and regulations, population, workforce characteristics, and culture, as well as an understanding of the impact of workplace hazards and worker health needs. Around the world, many occupational health services are provided by occupational health nurses independently or in collaboration with other disciplines' professionals. These services may be health protection, health promotion, or both, and are designed to reduce health risks, support productivity, improve workers' quality of life, and be cost-effective. Rantanen (2004) stated that basic occupational health services must increase rather than decline, especially as work becomes more complex; workforces become more dynamic and mobile, creating new models of work-places; and jobs become more precarious and temporary. To better understand occupational health services provided by occupational health nurses globally and how decisions are made to provide these services, this study examined the scope of services provided by a sample of participating occupational health nurses from various countries.

  14. Assessing uncertainty in outsourcing clinical services at tertiary health centers.

    PubMed

    Billi, John E; Pai, Chih-Wen; Spahlinger, David A

    2007-01-01

    When tertiary health centers face capacity constraint, one feasible strategy to meet service demand is outsourcing clinical services to qualified community providers. Clinical outsourcing enables tertiary health centers to meet the expectations of service timeliness and provides good opportunities to collaborate with other health care providers. However, outsourcing may result in dependence and loss of control for the tertiary health centers. Other parties involved in clinical outsourcing such as local partners, patients, and payers may also encounter potential risks as well as enjoy benefits in an outsourcing arrangement. Recommendations on selecting potential outsourcing partners are given to minimize the risks associated with an outsourcing contract.

  15. Health literacy: applying current concepts to improve health services and reduce health inequalities.

    PubMed

    Batterham, R W; Hawkins, M; Collins, P A; Buchbinder, R; Osborne, R H

    2016-03-01

    The concept of 'health literacy' refers to the personal and relational factors that affect a person's ability to acquire, understand and use information about health and health services. For many years, efforts in the development of the concept of health literacy exceeded the development of measurement tools and interventions. Furthermore, the discourse about and development of health literacy in public health and in clinical settings were often substantially different. This paper provides an update about recently developed approaches to measurement that assess health literacy strengths and limitations of individuals and of groups across multiple aspects of health literacy. This advancement in measurement now allows diagnostic and problem-solving approaches to developing responses to identified strengths and limitations. In this paper, we consider how such an approach can be applied across the diverse range of settings in which health literacy has been applied. In particular, we consider some approaches to applying health literacy in the daily practice of health-service providers in many settings, and how new insights and tools--including approaches based on an understanding of diversity of health literacy needs in a target community--can contribute to improvements in practice. Finally, we present a model that attempts to integrate the concept of health literacy with concepts that are often considered to overlap with it. With careful consideration of the distinctions between prevailing concepts, health literacy can be used to complement many fields from individual patient care to community-level development, and from improving compliance to empowering individuals and communities. PMID:26872738

  16. Digital reference service: trends in academic health science libraries.

    PubMed

    Dee, Cheryl R

    2005-01-01

    Two years after the initial 2002 study, a greater number of academic health science libraries are offering digital reference chat services, and this number appears poised to grow in the coming years. This 2004 follow-up study found that 36 (27%) of the academic health science libraries examined provide digital chat reference services; this was an approximately 6% increase over the 25 libraries (21%) located in 2002. Trends in digital reference services in academic health science libraries were derived from the exploration of academic health science library Web sites and from digital correspondence with academic health science library personnel using e-mail and chat. This article presents an overview of the current state of digital reference service in academic health science libraries.

  17. Increasing the Delivery of Preventive Health Services in Public Education.

    PubMed

    Cruden, Gracelyn; Kelleher, Kelly; Kellam, Sheppard; Brown, C Hendricks

    2016-10-01

    The delivery of prevention services to children and adolescents through traditional healthcare settings is challenging for a variety of reasons. Parent- and community-focused services are typically not reimbursable in traditional medical settings, and personal healthcare services are often designed for acute and chronic medical treatment rather than prevention. To provide preventive services in a setting that reaches the widest population, those interested in public health and prevention often turn to school settings. This paper proposes that an equitable, efficient manner in which to promote health across the life course is to integrate efforts from public health, primary care, and public education through the delivery of preventive healthcare services, in particular, in the education system. Such an integration of systems will require a concerted effort on the part of various stakeholders, as well as a shared vision to promote child health via community and institutional stakeholder partnerships. This paper includes (1) examination of some key system features necessary for delivery of preventive services that improve child outcomes; (2) a review of the features of some common models of school health services for their relevance to prevention services; and (3) policy and implementation strategy recommendations to further the delivery of preventive services in schools. These recommendations include the development of common metrics for health outcomes reporting, facilitated data sharing of these metrics, shared organization incentives for integration, and improved reimbursement and funding opportunities. PMID:27542653

  18. Increasing the Delivery of Preventive Health Services in Public Education.

    PubMed

    Cruden, Gracelyn; Kelleher, Kelly; Kellam, Sheppard; Brown, C Hendricks

    2016-10-01

    The delivery of prevention services to children and adolescents through traditional healthcare settings is challenging for a variety of reasons. Parent- and community-focused services are typically not reimbursable in traditional medical settings, and personal healthcare services are often designed for acute and chronic medical treatment rather than prevention. To provide preventive services in a setting that reaches the widest population, those interested in public health and prevention often turn to school settings. This paper proposes that an equitable, efficient manner in which to promote health across the life course is to integrate efforts from public health, primary care, and public education through the delivery of preventive healthcare services, in particular, in the education system. Such an integration of systems will require a concerted effort on the part of various stakeholders, as well as a shared vision to promote child health via community and institutional stakeholder partnerships. This paper includes (1) examination of some key system features necessary for delivery of preventive services that improve child outcomes; (2) a review of the features of some common models of school health services for their relevance to prevention services; and (3) policy and implementation strategy recommendations to further the delivery of preventive services in schools. These recommendations include the development of common metrics for health outcomes reporting, facilitated data sharing of these metrics, shared organization incentives for integration, and improved reimbursement and funding opportunities.

  19. Comparing Health and Mental Health Needs, Service Use, and Barriers to Services among Sexual Minority Youths and Their Peers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Kelly A.; Chapman, Mimi V.

    2011-01-01

    Using a representative national sample (N = 20,745), this article explores health and mental health needs, service use, and barriers to services among sexual minority youths (SMYs) and heterosexual peers. SMYs were defined by ever having a same-sex romantic attraction or having a recent same-sex romantic relationship or sexual partner. SMYs…

  20. Privatisation in reproductive health services in Pakistan: three case studies.

    PubMed

    Ravindran, T K Sundari

    2010-11-01

    Privatisation in Pakistan's health sector was part of the Structural Adjustment Programme that started in 1998 following the country's acute foreign exchange crisis. This paper examines three examples of privatisation which have taken place in service delivery, management and capacity-building functions in the health sector: 1) large-scale contracting out of publicly-funded health services to private, not-for-profit organisations; 2) social marketing/franchising networks providing reproductive health services; and 3) a public-private partnership involving a consortium of private players and the government of Pakistan. It assesses the extent to which these initiatives have contributed to promoting equitable access to good quality, comprehensive reproductive health services. The paper concludes that these forms of privatisation in Pakistan's health sector have at best made available a limited range of fragmented reproductive health services, often of sub-optimal quality, to a fraction of the population, with poor returns in terms of health and survival, especially for women. This analysis has exposed a deep-rooted malaise within the health system as an important contributor to this situation. Sustained investment in health system strengthening is called for, where resources from both public and private sectors are channelled towards achieving health equity, under the stewardship of the state and with active participation by and accountability to members of civil society. PMID:21111347

  1. Diversification strategy and performance: implications for health services research.

    PubMed

    Rivers, P A; Glover, S H; Munchus, G

    1999-01-01

    Health care represents a promising area of research due to its uniqueness. In recent years, considerable progress has been made in diversification strategy and performance research but not the study of health services strategy research. This article reviews diversification strategy and performance in health services domains. Adopting Datta, Rajagopalan, and Rasheed's (1991) framework, the authors evaluate the theoretical and empirical contributions of this research. The limitations and theoretical implications of these efforts are also explored.

  2. 42 CFR 136.22 - Establishment of contract health service delivery areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... areas. 136.22 Section 136.22 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH Contract Health... area after consultation with the tribal governing body or bodies on those reservations included...

  3. Integrating Ecosystem Services Into Health Impact Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Health Impact Assessment (HIA) provides a methodology for incorporating considerations of public health into planning and decision-making processes. HIA promotes interdisciplinary action, stakeholder participation, and timeliness and takes into account equity, sustainability, and...

  4. Health Services: Results from the School Health Policies and Programs Study 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brener, Nancy D.; Wheeler, Lani; Wolfe, Linda C.; Vernon-Smiley, Mary; Caldart-Olson, Linda

    2007-01-01

    Background: The specific health services provided to students at school and the model for delivering these services vary across districts and schools. This article describes the characteristics of school health services in the United States, including state- and district-level policies and school practices. Methods: The Centers for Disease Control…

  5. [The right to health care services under Quebec law].

    PubMed

    Sprumont, D

    1998-01-01

    The main goal of the Canada Health Act is to guarantee that Canadian residents have reasonable access to a comprehensive and universal health care plan. However, reduced federal funding for health care and increases in health care costs due to technical and scientific developments have created unprecedented financial pressures on provincial health care systems. The right to health care, once perceived as one of the pillars of Canadian society, may be imperiled. This article will provide a detailed analysis of the nature and scope of the right to health care from mainly a legal, but also from a political, perspective. Based on the premises that the Canada Health Act is basically a financial agreement between the Federal and provincial governments and that it does not enshrine a substantive right on which individuals may claim services, the author explores the nature and scope of this right under Québec legislation. Indeed, the Québec Health and Social Services Act has, since the 1960s, included various provisions that establish a right of access to health care services. This right, however, is fraught with regulatory, organizational and financial limits. The first part of this paper examines relevant regulation from an historical perspective, highlighting the relationships between federal and Québec provincial legislation. In the second part, the author explores exhaustively the principal provisions relevant to the right to health care. This entails the analysis of administrative regulations as well as of the responsibilities of the various provincial, regional, institutional and professional authorities involved. Ultimately, as this study will demonstrate, the availability of health care services depends more on a vague process than on a legal right to health care. This conclusion is further confirmed by the analysis of the adjudication process of patient complaints provided under the Québec Health and Social Services Act and by the limited case law on the

  6. Infusing Early Childhood Mental Health into Early Intervention Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grabert, John C.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the process of enhancing early childhood mental health awareness and skills in non-mental health staff. The author describes a pilot training model, conducted the U.S. Army's Early Intervention Services, that involved: (a) increasing early childhood mental health knowledge through reflective readings, (b) enhancing…

  7. Behavioral Systems Analysis in Health and Human Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGee, Heather M.; Diener, Lori H.

    2010-01-01

    This article provides a behavioral systems approach to improve operational performance in health and human service organizations. This article provides six performance truths that are relevant to any organization and a case study from a community mental health network of agencies. A comprehensive analysis, as described here, will help health and…

  8. 42 CFR 417.104 - Payment for basic health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... program (other than the health benefits program authorized by chapter 89 (“Health Insurance”) of title 5... Budget under control number 0915-0051) (Sec. 215 of the Public Health Service Act, as amended, 58 Stat. 690, 67 Stat. 631 (42 U.S.C. 216); secs. 1301-1318, as amended, Pub. L. 97-35, 95 Stat. 572-578 (42...

  9. Transition Services for Youth Receiving Child Mental Health Services. Data Trends #119

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Research and Training Center on Family Support and Children's Mental Health, 2005

    2005-01-01

    "Data Trends" reports present summaries of research on mental health services for children and adolescents and their families. The article summarized in this "Data Trends" discusses national data on transition services available for children served within the state child mental health systems. These data are derived from information provided by…

  10. 75 FR 39734 - Health Services Research and Development Service Merit Review Board; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-12

    ... convene from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. and Career Development Award will convene from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. On September 1, the Career Development Award will continue from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. and six subcommittees on Health... AFFAIRS Health Services Research and Development Service Merit Review Board; Notice of Meeting...

  11. Palestinian mothers' perceptions of child mental health problems and services.

    PubMed

    Thabet, Abdel Aziz; El Gammal, Hossam; Vostanis, Panos

    2006-06-01

    The aim of this study was to explore Palestinian mothers' perceptions of child mental health problems and their understanding of their causes; to determine Palestinian mothers' awareness of existing services and sources of help and support; to identify professionals in the community whom Palestinian mothers would consult if their child had mental health problems; and to establish their views on ways of increasing awareness of child mental health issues and services. Checklists exploring the above issues were completed by 249 Palestinian mothers living in refugee camps in the Gaza Strip. Palestinian mothers equally perceived emotional, behavioural and psychotic symptoms as suggestive of mental ill health in childhood. Mothers perceived multiple causes of child mental health problems, including family problems, parental psychiatric illness and social adversity. A substantial proportion (42.6%) had knowledge of local child mental health care services. Overall, mothers preferred Western over traditional types of treatment, and were keen to increase mental health awareness within their society. Despite a different cultural tradition, Palestinian mothers appear open to a range of services and interventions for child mental health problems. As in other non-Western societies, child mental health service provision should be integrated with existing primary health care, schools, and community structures. PMID:16946953

  12. Aggregating Case Study Data in Customer Service Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrington, Gail V.

    An evaluation was conducted to determine the outcomes and impacts of participation in the ALBERTA BEST training program in terms of participant attitudes toward service excellence and business profitability. ALBERTA BEST is a customer service program offered by the Alberta (Canada) government. The evaluation involved a series of case studies…

  13. Service user involvement in mental health practitioner education in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Higgins, A; Maguire, G; Watts, M; Creaner, M; McCann, E; Rani, S; Alexander, J

    2011-08-01

    In recent years, there is an ever increasing call to involve people who use mental health services in the development, delivery and evaluation of education programmes. Within Ireland, there is very little evidence of the degree of service user involvement in the educational preparation of mental health practitioners. This paper presents the findings on service user involvement in the education and training of professionals working in mental health services in Ireland. Findings from this study indicate that in the vast majority of courses curricula are planned and delivered without consultation or input from service users. Currently the scope of service user involvement is on teaching, with little involvement in curriculum development, student assessment and student selection. However, there is evidence that this is changing, with many respondents indicating an eagerness to move this agenda forward.

  14. Planning, design, and building for health services.

    PubMed

    Douglass, R

    1988-01-01

    Robert Douglass discusses why and how this issue was compiled and notes that, regardless of the state of the health care industry (i.e., in a mode of expansion or retrenchment), health facilities will always change, and construction will be a fact of life. Educating health care executives about the health facilities development process (with all its individual but interrelated components and phases) is important in order to assist these executives in minimizing risk and achieving success in their own projects. He also gives the reader an "executive overview" of the health facilities development process, outlines several key factors for administrative control in virtually every health facility project, and offers specific suggestions for executive leaders seeking excellence in health facility development.

  15. The Stigma of Reproductive Health Services Utilization by Unmarried Women

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Fatemeh; Kohan, Shahnaz; Mostafavi, Firoozeh; Gholami, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background: Fear of the stigma associated with reproductive health services has always been one of the reasons why youth and unmarried individuals avoid making use of such services. This stigma imposes a great deal of mental stress, fear, and depression on patients and causes delays in the diagnosis and treatment of their conditions. Objectives: This paper explores the concept of stigma in the context of the utilization of reproductive health services by unmarried women. Patients and Methods: This study is qualitative in nature. Purposive sampling was employed, and semi-structured interviews were conducted with 16 unmarried women, five midwives, and two physicians. The data were analyzed using the conventional content analysis method. Results: Four main categories constituted the general concept concerning the stigma suffered by unmarried women for using reproductive health services, i.e., prevalent stereotypical thinking patterns in society, the fear of being judged and labeled by others, discrimination, and feeling ashamed of seeking reproductive health services. Conclusions: The findings indicated that society associates reproductive health issues with sexual relations, which in turn shapes the stigma and places limitations on unmarried women for using reproductive health services. Thus, while reproductive health services are planned and provided to unmarried women, strategies are demanded for overcoming this stigma. PMID:27247794

  16. ADHD and Health Services Utilization in the National Health Interview Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuffe, Steven P.; Moore, Charity G.; McKeown, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Describe the general health, comorbidities and health service use among U.S. children with ADHD. Method: The 2001 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) contained the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ; used to determine probable ADHD), data on medical problems, overall health, and health care utilization. Results: Asthma…

  17. Promoting Teen Health and Reducing Risks: A Look at Adolescent Health Services in New York City.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Citizens' Committee for Children of New York, NY.

    This study examined data from focus groups with New York City adolescents and interviews with health care providers serving New York City adolescents (hospital based clinics, school based health centers, child health clinics, community health centers, and a multi-service adolescent center) in order to determine how to promote health and reduce…

  18. The cost of rural health services in Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, M; Thomason, J; Donaldson, D; Garner, P

    1991-12-01

    In 1988 a countrywide study was conducted on the costs of rural health services in Papua New Guinea. 16% of all health centres and subcentres were surveyed. Information was collected on physical facilities, recurrent costs, staff time allocation, service outputs and quality of services. Wide variation was found in the costs of rural health facilities overall, and significant differences were found between the costs and outputs of health centres and subcentres. Average levels of service output were found to be similar at church and government facilities but average levels of utilization by the population were higher at church facilities. Despite government policy on extension of preventive health care, a strong emphasis was found on curative care. Many facilities were found to have significant excess bed capacity. Recurrent financing for transportation and maintenance was found to be inadequate. PMID:1799090

  19. Clinical issues in mental health service delivery to refugees.

    PubMed

    Gong-Guy, E; Cravens, R B; Patterson, T E

    1991-06-01

    Serious limitations exist in the delivery of mental health services to refugees throughout the resettlement process. Having survived harrowing physical and psychological traumas prior to reaching refugee camps, many refugees encounter mental health services in overseas camps that are characterized by fragmentation, instability, language barriers, and severe staff shortages. Refugees requiring mental health intervention after resettlement in the United States confront additional barriers, including frequent misdiagnosis, inappropriate use of interpreters and paraprofessionals, and culturally inappropriate treatment methods. Suggestions for improving mental health services for refugee populations emphasize modifying diagnostic assumptions and treatment approaches, recognizing potential problems associated with using interpreters and paraprofessionals, and examining the role of consultation, prevention, and outreach services in addressing refugee mental health concerns.

  20. Elder Care for the 1980s: Health and Social Service in One Prepaid Health Maintenance System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diamond, Larry M.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Discusses the feasibility of delivering combined health and social services to an elderly population. The social/health maintenance organization (S/HMO), incorporating features of health maintenance organizations with community social services, will be financed on a prepaid, capitated basis through premium contributions from Medicare, Medicaid,…

  1. Equity in Access to Health Promotion and Risk Reduction Services: Implications for Elder Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Nancy H.; Howze, Elizabeth Harper

    Although there is a national emphasis on health promotion and preventive practices, questions remain regarding the equity of access to these services by low income and minority groups, and the implications of inequities for elder health. Data from a systematic survey of 500 public and private providers of health promotion services in northern…

  2. Adolescents with Mental Health Problems: What Do They Say about Health Services?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buston, Katie

    2002-01-01

    Explores the health-related views and experiences of adolescent users of mental health services through interviews with adolescents who had been diagnosed with a mental illness. The majority of respondents had both negative and positive things to say about their contact with health services. These relate to: the doctor-patient relationship,…

  3. Honoring their service: behavioral health services in North Carolina for military service members, veterans, and their families.

    PubMed

    Alexander-Bratcher, Kimberly M; Martin, Grier; Purcell, William R; Watson, Michael; Silberman, Pam

    2011-01-01

    The North Carolina Institute of Medicine Task Force on Behavioral Health Services for the Military and Their Families examined the adequacy of Medicaid- and state-funded services for mental health conditions, developmental disabilities (including traumatic brain injury), and substance abuse that are currently available in North Carolina to military service members, veterans, and their families. The task force determined that there are several gaps in services and made 13 recommendations related to federal, state, and local community resources. This article reviews the work of the task force and current efforts to improve services in North Carolina.

  4. [Satisfaction with health services in the North Bohemia Region].

    PubMed

    Masopust, V; Rajman, K

    1989-04-01

    In May 1988 in the North Bohemian region an anonymous survey was made in which 3,767 respondents participated, i.e. 0.42% of the population living in the region. The survey was focused on the satisfaction with and attitudes of patients to the health services. 73.64% of the respondents evaluated the provided services positively, 24.39% had an ambivalent attitude and 1.97% evaluated them negatively. Material shortcomings in the health services were criticized by 54.05% of the respondents, 37.75% criticized long waiting periods and 23.17% shortage of health personnel. The greatest advantage of our health services is that they are free of charge (49.91% respondents); availability (48.23%) and good interpersonal relations (21.56%). The satisfaction with the health services was expressed by 85.72% respondents verbally, 5.57% by criticism, 1.57% by a bribe and 1.43% by complaints. The most pretentious group are young patients working in industry. A positive attitude to the health services correlates with a positive evaluation of health workers. Thus the necessity arises to guard the ethical and professional standard of the health workers. PMID:2736659

  5. Principles of youth participation in mental health services.

    PubMed

    James, Anthony M

    2007-10-01

    Young people with mental illness face many barriers in accessing care and often have different needs to those of adult consumers. Young people's participation in mental health services is one way of addressing quality and access issues, through receiving feedback and implementing youth-driven and youth-friendly strategies. headspace, the National Youth Mental Health Foundation, established in July 2006, highlights the mental health care sector's commitment to young people. Existing youth participation programs provide examples of what can be achieved at national and local levels and with varying levels of financial and other support. These include: Ybblue, the youth program of beyondblue; Reach Out!, a web-based service; Headroom, providing health promotion and a website; and Platform Team (ORYGEN Youth Health), comprising current and past clients who advise the service and provide peer support. Current practice in youth participation in mental health services involves a variety of methods, such as ensuring information and education is appropriate for a youth audience, and participating in peer-support programs and staff selection panels. Challenges in the future development of youth participation in mental health services include avoiding tokenism, acknowledging that young people are not a uniform group, translating national strategies into local improvements in services, and gaining the support and cooperation of health care workers in genuine participation.

  6. Afghanistan's basic package of health services: its development and effects on rebuilding the health system.

    PubMed

    Newbrander, William; Ickx, Paul; Feroz, Ferozuddin; Stanekzai, Hedayatullah

    2014-01-01

    In 2001, Afghanistan's Ministry of Public Health inherited a devastated health system and some of the worst health statistics in the world. The health system was rebuilt based on the Basic Package of Health Services (BPHS). This paper examines why the BPHS was needed, how it was developed, its content and the changes resulting from the rebuilding. The methods used for assessing change were to review health outcome and health system indicator changes from 2004 to 2011 structured along World Health Organisation's six building blocks of health system strengthening. BPHS implementation contributed to success in improving health status by translating policy and strategy into practical interventions, focusing health services on priority health problems, clearly defining the services to be delivered at different service levels and helped the Ministry to exert its stewardship role. BPHS was expanded nationwide by contracting out its provision of services to non-governmental organisations. As a result, access to and utilisation of primary health care services in rural areas increased dramatically because the number of BPHS facilities more than doubled; access for women to basic health care improved; more deliveries were attended by skilled personnel; supply of essential medicines increased; and the health information system became more functional. PMID:24865404

  7. Afghanistan's Basic Package of Health Services: Its development and effects on rebuilding the health system

    PubMed Central

    Newbrander, William; Ickx, Paul; Feroz, Ferozuddin; Stanekzai, Hedayatullah

    2014-01-01

    In 2001, Afghanistan's Ministry of Public Health inherited a devastated health system and some of the worst health statistics in the world. The health system was rebuilt based on the Basic Package of Health Services (BPHS). This paper examines why the BPHS was needed, how it was developed, its content and the changes resulting from the rebuilding. The methods used for assessing change were to review health outcome and health system indicator changes from 2004 to 2011 structured along World Health Organisation's six building blocks of health system strengthening. BPHS implementation contributed to success in improving health status by translating policy and strategy into practical interventions, focusing health services on priority health problems, clearly defining the services to be delivered at different service levels and helped the Ministry to exert its stewardship role. BPHS was expanded nationwide by contracting out its provision of services to non-governmental organisations. As a result, access to and utilisation of primary health care services in rural areas increased dramatically because the number of BPHS facilities more than doubled; access for women to basic health care improved; more deliveries were attended by skilled personnel; supply of essential medicines increased; and the health information system became more functional. PMID:24865404

  8. Using geographic information systems to match local health needs with public health services and programs.

    PubMed

    Dubowitz, Tamara; Williams, Malcolm; Steiner, Elizabeth D; Weden, Margaret M; Miyashiro, Lisa; Jacobson, Dawn; Lurie, Nicole

    2011-09-01

    Local health departments (LHDs) play an important role in ensuring essential public health services. Geographic information system (GIS) technology offers a promising means for LHDs to identify geographic gaps between areas of need and the reach of public health services. We examined how large LHDs could better inform planning and investments by using GIS-based methodologies to align community needs and health outcomes with public health programs. We present a framework to drive LHDs in identifying and addressing gaps or mismatches in services or health outcomes.

  9. Child and adolescent mental health emergency services in Macedonia.

    PubMed

    Releva, M; Boskovska, M; Apceva, A; Polazarevska, M; Novotni, A; Bonevski, D; Sargent, J

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the development of child and adolescent mental health emergency services in Macedonia since 1993. The evolution of services through the Mental Crisis Centre for Children and Adolescents, funded by the Open Society Institute, and located in six cities is outlined. The paper also defines traditional services, the nature of child mental health emergencies, the evaluation process, follow-up care and training and supervision. It concludes with concern that the mental health emergency system is not sufficient to meet the needs of the child and adolescent population, particularly in the face of the Kosovar refugee crisis. Recommendations for the future are made. PMID:11508566

  10. Making customer-service a priority in health care organizations.

    PubMed

    O'Hagan, Joshua; Persaud, David

    2008-01-01

    Improving customer-service in health care organizations has been linked to better patient care, satisfied staff, a reduction in preventable medical errors, fewer malpractice lawsuits and improved revenue. However, it has been observed that there is sometimes a gap between the level of customer-service provided by health care organizations and their clients' expectations. This paper integrates, synthesizes and extends theory and practice from existing literature to provide health care organizations with strategies for closing this gap. Methods are also outlined for creating, implementing and evaluating an organizational plan for improving customer-service.

  11. Integrating emergency services in an urban health system.

    PubMed

    Radloff, D; Blouin, A S; Larsen, L; Kripp, M E

    2000-03-01

    When planning for growth and management efficiency across urban health systems, economic and market factors present significant service line challenges and opportunities. This article describes the evolutionary integration of emergency services in St John Health System, a large, religious-sponsored health care system located in Detroit, Michigan. Critical business elements, including the System's vision, mission, and economic context, are defined as the framework for site-specific and System-wide planning. The impact of managed care and market changes prompted St John's clinicians and executives to explore how integrating emergency services could create a competitive market advantage.

  12. Experiences in the health services network and in the street: Captures and detours in psychology training for public health services.

    PubMed

    Severo, Ana Kalliny de Sousa; Amorim, Ana Karenina de Melo Arraes; Romagnoli, Roberta Carvalho

    2016-03-01

    This article discusses the internships at the psychosocial health system of Natal, Northeast region of Brazil, as part of training in psychology. The objective of these internships is to offer students work experiences in public health both inside and outside health services. Based on Institutional Analysis and Schizoanalysis, these experiences were examined through two analysers: (1) the power of knowledge and (2) the need for by-passes. We conclude that health provokes tensions between instituted practices in health services and those instituted in psychology training.

  13. Telemental health technology in deaf and general mental-health services: access and use.

    PubMed

    Austen, Sally; McGrath, Melissa

    2006-01-01

    Long-distance travel to provide mental health services for deaf people has implications for efficiency, safety, and equality of service. However, uptake of Telemental Health (TMH) has been slow in both deaf and general mental health services. A quantitative study was used to investigate access to TMH and whether staff confidence, experience, or demographics affect TMH use. It was concluded that staff in neither deaf mental health services nor general mental health services had adequate knowledge of or access to TMH. Staff expressed concerns over TMH's appropriateness in their work. Previous use of videoconferencing was assosciated significantly with confidence, but previous use of videophones was not. Neither staff in deaf services nor deaf staff were more experienced with or more confident about videoconferencing, whereas, within deaf services, deaf staff were significantly more confident about videophone use. Training implications are discussed.

  14. School Health Services: A Facility Planning and Design Guide for School Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryland State Dept. of Education, Baltimore.

    This guide for Maryland schools outlines the role of school health services and proper facility design for these services. Chapter 1 provides an overview, describing coordinated school health programs, school health services programs, school health services programs in Maryland, how school health services are delivered, trends, the number of…

  15. 78 FR 45543 - Center for Mental Health Services; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Center for Mental Health... and Mental Health Services Administration's (SAMHSA) Center for Mental Health Services (CMHS) National...). Committee Name: SAMHSA's Center for Mental Health Services National Advisory Council. Date/Time/Type:...

  16. Health services research: the gradual encroachment of ideas.

    PubMed

    Black, Nick

    2009-04-01

    There is increasing pressure on researchers and research funding bodies to demonstrate the value of research. Simple approaches, consistent with the biomedical paradigm, based on relating the cost of research to its supposed impact are being investigated and adopted in laboratory and clinical research. While this may be appropriate in such research areas, it should not be applied to health services research which aims to alter the ways policy-makers and managers think about health, disease and health care or, as John Maynard Keynes put it, 'the gradual encroachment of ideas'. By considering six fundamental assumptions about health care that have been successfully challenged and overturned over the past few decades, the profound and sustained impact of health services research can be demonstrated. The application of economic models of 'payback' would fail to recognize such contributions which, in turn, could threaten future funding of health services research.

  17. Rating maternal and neonatal health services in developing countries.

    PubMed Central

    Bulatao, Rodolfo A.; Ross, John A.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess maternal and neonatal health services in 49 developing countries. METHODS: The services were rated on a scale of 0 to 100 by 10 - 25 experts in each country. The ratings covered emergency and routine services, including family planning, at health centres and district hospitals, access to these services for both rural and urban women, the likelihood that women would receive particular forms of antenatal and delivery care, and supporting elements of programmes such as policy, resources, monitoring, health promotion and training. FINDINGS: The average rating was only 56, but countries varied widely, especially in access to services in rural areas. Comparatively good ratings were reported for immunization services, aspects of antenatal care and counselling on breast feeding. Ratings were particularly weak for emergency obstetric care in rural areas, safe abortion and HIV counselling. CONCLUSION: Maternal health programme effort in developing countries is seriously deficient, particularly in rural areas. Rural women are disadvantaged in many respects, but especially regarding the treatment of emergency obstetric conditions. Both rural and urban women receive inadequate HIV counselling and testing and have quite limited access to safe abortion. Improving services requires moving beyond policy reform to strengthening implementation of services and to better staff training and health promotion. Increased financing is only part of the solution. PMID:12378290

  18. Equity and efficiency in health status and health services utilization: a household perspective.

    PubMed

    Sirageldin, I; Diop, F

    1991-01-01

    Health economists examine the existing pattern of disease, the initial distributional structure of public policies, and the behavioral response of households in allocating resources towards health promoting activities to understand the health consequences of public fiscal and income policies. They hope that this analysis will guide health policymakers to minimize differentials in health service utilization and health outcomes. The household production of health serves as the general framework. The analysis reveals that the demand for health and the demand for health services depend on the organization of government fiscal and distribution policies. Further the demand for health services hinges on its own price as well as on the prices of other inputs including nutrition and environmental sanitation. The government basically subsidizes these inputs, but it does not equally distribute the subsidies. For people with the lower subsidy on other health inputs, the health benefit from using health services tend to be lower. Thus the fact that these households have a low demand for health and low use of health services may indicate a rational decision which reveals low perceived productivity of these inputs. Therefore policymakers should include the effect of public subsidies when examining the effect of public policies on health status. These policies may include structural adjustment or cost recovery schemes. In fact, as evidenced in a case study in the Ivory Coast, structural adjustments did not affect the rural poor and urban poor, but instead adversely affected middle class urban households. Hence policymakers should not limit their examinations to traditional income groups. PMID:12285361

  19. The state of the psychology health service provider workforce.

    PubMed

    Michalski, Daniel S; Kohout, Jessica L

    2011-12-01

    Numerous efforts to describe the health service provider or clinical workforce in psychology have been conducted during the past 30 years. The American Psychological Association (APA) has studied trends in the doctoral education pathway and the resultant effects on the broader psychology workforce. During this period, the creation and growth of the PsyD degree and the formalization of the predoctoral internship placement system (the APPIC Match) have been well noted, but efforts to gain a complete understanding of professional practice are lacking. Specifically, piecemeal research on the provider workforce has led to the study of specific subpopulations using varying approaches and definitions of those providing direct clinical service. Consequently, estimates of the supply and need for health service providers are distinctly divergent and generate protracted debate in organized psychology. The APA membership directory and the APA Doctorate Employment Surveys have traditionally been relied on for workforce analyses. Yet, these data have become characterized by limited generalizability in recent years because of declining survey response rates and the fact that APA member data may not be as representative of the entire psychology health service provider population as they were previously. The 2008 APA Survey of Psychology Health Service Providers targeted these limitations by including nonmember psychologists in the sampling frame. Results revealed emerging themes in the demographics, work settings, and delivery of health services of the psychology health service provider workforce. Future areas of research for APA and organized psychology to undertake in addressing need and demand are suggested.

  20. The management of health care service quality. A physician perspective

    PubMed Central

    Bobocea, L; Gheorghe, IR; Spiridon, St; Gheorghe, CM; Purcarea, VL

    2016-01-01

    Applying marketing in health care services is presently an essential element for every manager or policy maker. In order to be successful, a health care organization has to identify an accurate measurement scale for defining service quality due to competitive pressure and cost values. The most widely employed scale in the services sector is SERVQUAL scale. In spite of being successfully adopted in fields such as brokerage and banking, experts concluded that the SERVQUAL scale should be modified depending on the specific context. Moreover, the SERVQUAL scale focused on the consumer’s perspective regarding service quality. While service quality was measured with the help of SERVQUAL scale, other experts identified a structure-process-outcome design, which, they thought, would be more suitable for health care services. This approach highlights a different perspective on investigating the service quality, namely, the physician’s perspective. Further, we believe that the Seven Prong Model for Improving Service Quality has been adopted in order to effectively measure the health care service in a Romanian context from a physician’s perspective. PMID:27453745

  1. The management of health care service quality. A physician perspective.

    PubMed

    Bobocea, L; Gheorghe, I R; Spiridon, St; Gheorghe, C M; Purcarea, V L

    2016-01-01

    Applying marketing in health care services is presently an essential element for every manager or policy maker. In order to be successful, a health care organization has to identify an accurate measurement scale for defining service quality due to competitive pressure and cost values. The most widely employed scale in the services sector is SERVQUAL scale. In spite of being successfully adopted in fields such as brokerage and banking, experts concluded that the SERVQUAL scale should be modified depending on the specific context. Moreover, the SERVQUAL scale focused on the consumer's perspective regarding service quality. While service quality was measured with the help of SERVQUAL scale, other experts identified a structure-process-outcome design, which, they thought, would be more suitable for health care services. This approach highlights a different perspective on investigating the service quality, namely, the physician's perspective. Further, we believe that the Seven Prong Model for Improving Service Quality has been adopted in order to effectively measure the health care service in a Romanian context from a physician's perspective.

  2. The management of health care service quality. A physician perspective.

    PubMed

    Bobocea, L; Gheorghe, I R; Spiridon, St; Gheorghe, C M; Purcarea, V L

    2016-01-01

    Applying marketing in health care services is presently an essential element for every manager or policy maker. In order to be successful, a health care organization has to identify an accurate measurement scale for defining service quality due to competitive pressure and cost values. The most widely employed scale in the services sector is SERVQUAL scale. In spite of being successfully adopted in fields such as brokerage and banking, experts concluded that the SERVQUAL scale should be modified depending on the specific context. Moreover, the SERVQUAL scale focused on the consumer's perspective regarding service quality. While service quality was measured with the help of SERVQUAL scale, other experts identified a structure-process-outcome design, which, they thought, would be more suitable for health care services. This approach highlights a different perspective on investigating the service quality, namely, the physician's perspective. Further, we believe that the Seven Prong Model for Improving Service Quality has been adopted in order to effectively measure the health care service in a Romanian context from a physician's perspective. PMID:27453745

  3. Mental Health Services at Selected Private Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Hoof, Thomas J.; Sherwin, Tierney E.; Baggish, Rosemary C.; Tacy, Peter B.; Meehan, Thomas P.

    2004-01-01

    Private schools educate a significant percentage of US children and adolescents. Private schools, particularly where students reside during the academic year, assume responsibility for the health and well-being of their students. Children and adolescents experience mental health problems at a predictable rate, and private schools need a mechanism…

  4. Mental health services and R&D in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Roh, Sungwon; Lee, Sang-Uk; Soh, Minah; Ryu, Vin; Kim, Hyunjin; Jang, Jung Won; Lim, Hee Young; Jeon, Mina; Park, Jong-Ik; Choi, SungKu; Ha, Kyooseob

    2016-01-01

    World Health Organization has asserted that mental illness is the greatest overriding burden of disease in the majority of developed countries, and that the socioeconomic burden of mental disease will exceed that of cancer and cardiovascular disorders in the future. The life-time prevalence rate for mental disorders in Korea is reported at 27.6 %, which means three out of 10 adults experience mental disorders more than once throughout their lifetime. Korea's suicide rate has remained the highest among Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) nations for 10 consecutive years, with 29.1 people out of every 100,000 having committed suicide. Nevertheless, a comprehensive study on the mental health services and the Research and Development (R&D) status in Korea is hard to find. Against this backdrop, this paper examines the mental health services and the R&D status in Korea, and examines their shortcomings and future direction. The paper discusses the mental health service system, budget and human resources, followed by the mental health R&D system and budget. And, by a comparison with other OECD countries, the areas for improvement are discussed and based on that, a future direction is suggested. This paper proposes three measures to realize mid and long-term mental health promotion services and to realize improvements in mental health R&D at the national level: first, establish a national mental health system; second, forecast demand for mental health; and third, secure and develop mental health professionals.

  5. Mental health services and R&D in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Roh, Sungwon; Lee, Sang-Uk; Soh, Minah; Ryu, Vin; Kim, Hyunjin; Jang, Jung Won; Lim, Hee Young; Jeon, Mina; Park, Jong-Ik; Choi, SungKu; Ha, Kyooseob

    2016-01-01

    World Health Organization has asserted that mental illness is the greatest overriding burden of disease in the majority of developed countries, and that the socioeconomic burden of mental disease will exceed that of cancer and cardiovascular disorders in the future. The life-time prevalence rate for mental disorders in Korea is reported at 27.6 %, which means three out of 10 adults experience mental disorders more than once throughout their lifetime. Korea's suicide rate has remained the highest among Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) nations for 10 consecutive years, with 29.1 people out of every 100,000 having committed suicide. Nevertheless, a comprehensive study on the mental health services and the Research and Development (R&D) status in Korea is hard to find. Against this backdrop, this paper examines the mental health services and the R&D status in Korea, and examines their shortcomings and future direction. The paper discusses the mental health service system, budget and human resources, followed by the mental health R&D system and budget. And, by a comparison with other OECD countries, the areas for improvement are discussed and based on that, a future direction is suggested. This paper proposes three measures to realize mid and long-term mental health promotion services and to realize improvements in mental health R&D at the national level: first, establish a national mental health system; second, forecast demand for mental health; and third, secure and develop mental health professionals. PMID:27257434

  6. Organizing care across the continuum: primary care, specialty services, acute and long-term care.

    PubMed

    Oelke, Nelly D; Cunning, Leslie; Andrews, Kaye; Martin, Dorothy; MacKay, Anne; Kuschminder, Katie; Congdon, Val

    2009-01-01

    Primary care networks (PCNs) facilitate integration of healthcare across the continuum. The Calgary Rural PCN implemented a community-based model where physicians and Alberta Health Services work together to deliver primary care addressing local population needs. This model is highly valued by physicians, decision-makers and providers, with early impacts on outcomes.

  7. Health services system for seafarers and fishermen in Iran.

    PubMed

    Ali Hasanzadeh, Mohammad; Azizabadi, Ebrahim; Allah Alipour, Nosrat

    2005-01-01

    The maritime health services system is presented in this review article. The national Iranian shipping line IRISL owns the largest commercial fleet in the Middle East and it operates 137 ships. This company and several other national shipping companies employ over 5900 seafarers. There are 11,000 fishing ships and boats and the number of Iranian fishermen reaches 124,000. Seafarers and fishermen are regularly medically examined and issued health certificates, according to the national regulations. The health services system for them is linked to the port authorities throughout the country. Observations, data and relevant statistics on the health problems of the national maritime workers have been regularly collected. PMID:16532596

  8. [Tuberculosis screening in school health services in Geneva, Switzerland].

    PubMed

    Meynard, Anne; Pfarrwaller, Eva; Lazarevic, Claire-Anne Wyler

    2016-06-01

    Recent immigrantyouth have multiple health needs that need to be adapted to the context of migration. School health services provide a systematic health check to allyoung immigrants starting school in Geneva, including a tuberculin skin test if coming from a middle or high incidence country. Positive tests are confirmed with Interferon Gamma Release Assay (IGRA) and if indicated, offered treatment of latent tuberculosis even in the absence of clear guidelines. Collective and individual benefits outweigh the difficult logistics: reducing risk of reactivation of latent tuberculosis for populations living in promiscuity, effective collaboration between primary care and school health services to answer the needs of these underserved youth. PMID:27451510

  9. Mental health services by and for Austrailian aborigines.

    PubMed

    Kahn, M W; Henry, J; Cawte, J

    1976-09-01

    Based on a program developed for the Papago Indians of Arizona, five Australian Aborigines were trained as Behavioral Health workers, to deliver mental health services to their group. The problems of the Aborigines are very similar to those of the Indians. The training consisted of developing basic skills in interviewing, case indentification and several methods of intervention, including crisis intervention, family and alcoholism counselling. A mental health clinic was developed for the Aboriginal community for health services and training. Community projects and field trips were part of the training, as was report writing, record keeping and presentations to professional groups.

  10. Mental Health Services for Children and Youth: Strengthening the Promise of the Future. Human Services Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craig, Rebecca T.

    1988-01-01

    Many mentally ill children, especially those who are seriously disturbed, are not receiving the mental health care they need. Although the federal government offers financing to the states for child and adolescent mental health programming, the primary responsibility for financing mental health services has been assumed by state governments. At…

  11. Emergency department mental health triage consultancy service: a qualitative evaluation.

    PubMed

    Wynaden, Dianne; Chapman, Rose; McGowan, Sunita; McDonough, Stuart; Finn, Michael; Hood, Sean

    2003-07-01

    This study evaluated staff perception of a three-month clinical trial of an emergency mental health triage and consultancy service. Eleven night duty emergency department (ED) staff were interviewed on the last night of the trial. Data was analysed according to the standards of qualitative research and through content analysis major themes were identified. Staff-perceived value of the emergency mental health triage and consultancy service to the emergency department was identified under three major themes: "enhancing the quality of service for people requiring psychiatric/psychosocial intervention", "the impact on the ED environment" and "providing education and support". The findings of this study show that ED staff perceived that the emergency mental health triage and consultancy service made a valuable contribution to the overall functioning of the ED. The findings also highlight the advanced practice role undertaken by mental health nurses in the ED.

  12. Some Recent Data on Community College Health Service Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Donald Dean

    1973-01-01

    This article discusses the conclusions drawn from descriptive and tabular data collected from 482 public community colleges in an attempt to analyze the content and extent of student health services. (JA)

  13. Department of Health and Human Services, Office for Civil Rights

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resize A A A Print Share Office for Civil Rights (OCR) I would like info on. . . Contact ... enter your contact information below. Email Office for Civil Rights Headquarters U.S. Department of Health & Human Services ...

  14. Streptococcal Infections, Rheumatic Fever and School Health Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markowitz, Milton

    1979-01-01

    Because rheumatic fever is a potentially serious complication of a streptococcal sore throat which can lead to permanent heart disease, this article advocates the expansion of school health services in medically underserved areas. (JMF)

  15. Achieving Quality Health Services for Adolescents.

    PubMed

    2016-08-01

    This update of the 2008 statement from the American Academy of Pediatrics redirects the discussion of quality health care from the theoretical to the practical within the medical home. This statement reviews the evolution of the medical home concept and challenges the provision of quality adolescent health care within the patient-centered medical home. Areas of attention for quality adolescent health care are reviewed, including developmentally appropriate care, confidentiality, location of adolescent care, providers who offer such care, the role of research in advancing care, and the transition to adult care. PMID:27432849

  16. Measuring service quality at a university health clinic.

    PubMed

    Anderson, E A

    1995-01-01

    Describes research undertaken to assess the quality of service provided by a public university health clinic. The SERVQUAL instrument was administered to patients of the University of Houston Health Center in order to evaluate customer perceptions of service quality. The results of this study are currently being incorporated into the clinic's strategic planning process, specifically with respect to future resource allocation towards quality improvement projects. PMID:10142015

  17. Measuring service quality at a university health clinic.

    PubMed

    Anderson, E A

    1995-01-01

    Describes research undertaken to assess the quality of service provided by a public university health clinic. The SERVQUAL instrument was administered to patients of the University of Houston Health Center in order to evaluate customer perceptions of service quality. The results of this study are currently being incorporated into the clinic's strategic planning process, specifically with respect to future resource allocation towards quality improvement projects.

  18. Involvement of users and relatives in mental health service evaluation.

    PubMed

    Barbato, Angelo; D'Avanzo, Barbara; D'Anza, Vito; Montorfano, Emanuele; Savio, Monica; Corbascio, Caterina G

    2014-06-01

    Although Italian mental health (MH) services are community based, user and relative participation in service evaluation lagged behind until lately. We here review three recent studies involving stakeholder participation in service evaluation: two were quantitative studies, one on 204 users in an MH service in Pistoia (Central Italy) and the other on 2259 relatives, conducted with the National Union of Associations for Mental Health. The third (supported by The Centro per il Controllo delle Malattie, the ministerial Center for Disease Control) was a qualitative study in seven MH services, involving users, relatives, and professionals together, which collected interviews from 136 users, 119 relatives, and 79 professionals. In the quantitative studies, positive evaluations outnumbered negative ones. The qualitative study explored negative aspects in greater depth. Common findings were insufficient information, underinvolvement of users-relatives in planning, no choice of clinician, psychiatrist domination, and limited helpfulness of interventions. With stakeholder participation in service evaluation, the present medical framework will need reshaping.

  19. Charging for health services in the Third World.

    PubMed

    1992-08-22

    In developing countries the increasing tendency to charge for the use of health services is the result of the collapse of government funding for health programs and the general trend toward privatization. Restraints on government spending, especially on social programs, have been reinforced by loan conditions imposed by the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank. On the other hand, governments have committed themselves to the objectives of Health for All, and they have to maximize access to essential services for prevention and treatment of diseases. Charges are sometimes advocated as a means of reducing frivolous use of services. Studies have suggested that in Peru and rural Ivory Coast a modest rise in charges is likely to reduce use of services substantially for those on very low incomes, while those whose needs are the lest will continue to use services. Scarce facilities, skilled professionals, and other services provided at public expense are involved in the provision of basic health care. It is particularly difficult to recover the cost of training of doctors and nurses. Provision of technically advanced services for a minority who can afford to pay is almost always subsidized by governments and may deprive the rest of the population of key resources. The trend to introduce charges for family planning services and services for the treatment and prevention of communicable disease may have serious consequences. However, the collapse of government funding for health services in many developing countries requires alternative sources of funding for basic primary care. Some user charges may be justified, especially if these revenues result insubstantial improvements in the quality and availability of services. Development of feasible mechanisms for greater risk sharing in the longer term remains a priority if the most regressive effects of charges are to be avoided.

  20. Health visitors' awareness and perception of clinical genetic services.

    PubMed Central

    Guilbert, P; Cheater, F

    1990-01-01

    A questionnaire was sent to 84 health visitors to assess their awareness and perception of genetic services and how they perceived their role in the referral of patients. The study showed that while health visitors had a reasonable knowledge of the more obvious aspects of genetic services, there were a number of areas in which they were unsure. The respondents did not identify themselves as prime initiators in the process of referring patients to a genetic service, although they appeared able to identify families on their caseloads for whom this service may be relevant. Health visitors viewed their own knowledge of genetics as poor, a factor which may account for the low referral rate initiated by this group of professionals. The respondents attached importance to genetic issues and 76 (95%) wished to be better informed about the subject. It is suggested that the inclusion of genetics as part of an in-service training programme might fulfil this need and lead to greater advocacy of genetic services among the families in their care. These findings are of interest in view of the proposals within the recent Royal College of Physicians report (Prenatal screening and genetic counselling) suggesting that community genetic services should make use of primary health care workers such as health visitors. PMID:2213844

  1. Conceptualizing and Categorizing Race and Ethnicity in Health Services Research

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Marvella E; Kelly, P Adam

    2005-01-01

    Objectives Veterans Affairs (VA) patient populations are becoming increasingly diverse in race and ethnicity. The purpose of this paper is to (1) document the importance of using consistent standards of conceptualizing and categorizing race and ethnicity in health services research, (2) provide an overview of different methods currently used to assess race and ethnicity in health services research, and (3) suggest assessment methods that could be incorporated into health services research to ensure accurate assessment of disease prevalence and incidence, as well as accounts of appropriate health services use, in patients with different racial and ethnic backgrounds. Design A critical review of published literature was used. Principal Findings Race is a complex, multidimensional construct. For some individuals, institutionalized racism and internalized racism are intertwined in the effects of race on health outcomes and health services use. Ethnicity is most commonly used as a social–political construct and includes shared origin, shared language, and shared cultural traditions. Acculturation appears to affect the strength of the relationships among ethnicity, health outcomes, and health services use. Conclusions Improved and consistent methods of data collection need to be developed for use by VA researchers across the country. VA research sites with patients representing specific population groups could use a core set of demographic items in addition to expanded modules designed to assess the ethnic diversity within these population groups. Improved and consistent methods of data collection could result in the collection of higher-quality data, which could lead to the identification of race- and ethnic-specific health services needs. These investigations could in turn lead to the development of interventions designed to reduce or eliminate these disparities. PMID:16179001

  2. Access of Rural AFDC Medicaid Beneficiaries to Mental Health Services

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, David; Agger, Marc S.

    1995-01-01

    This article examines geographic differences in the use of mental health services among Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC)-eligible Medicaid beneficiaries in Maine. Findings indicate that rural AFDC beneficiaries have significantly lower utilization of mental health services than urban beneficiaries. Specialty mental health providers account for the majority of ambulatory visits for both rural and urban beneficiaries. However, rural beneficiaries rely more on primary-care providers than do urban beneficiaries. Differences in use are largely explained by variations in the supply of specialty mental health providers. This finding supports the long-held assumption that lower supply is a barrier to access to mental health services in rural areas. PMID:10153467

  3. The use of videoconferencing for mental health services in Finland.

    PubMed

    Ohinmaa, Arto; Roine, Risto; Hailey, David; Kuusimäki, Marja-Leena; Winblad, Ilkka

    2008-01-01

    The utilization of telemental health (TMH) services in Finland was surveyed in 2006. In total, 135 health-care units provided responses. Eighty-four responses were received from primary care units (health-care centres and clinics) and eight from other clinics, in all hospital districts. The overall rate of TMH consultations was 4 per 100,000 population. The highest TMH consultation per population ratio, 22 per 100,000, was in northern Finland. Most of the sites used telepsychiatry services for less than 10% of clinical outpatient services. The sites with over 20% utilization of clinical TMH services from all psychiatric consultations were all rural health centres. Compared with Finland, the utilization rates of TMH were higher in Canada; that might be due to differences between the countries in the organization of mental health services in primary and specialized care. In Finland TMH consultations made up only a very small proportion of all mental health services. The use of TMH was particularly common in remote areas; however, there were many rural centres that did not utilize clinical TMH. TMH was widely utilized for continuing and medical education.

  4. Advancing health policy in nursing education through service learning.

    PubMed

    Cohen, S S; Milone-Nuzzo, P

    2001-03-01

    Knowledge of health policy is an increasingly important aspect of nursing practice and education, especially as nurses strive to improve the rapidly changing health care delivery system. At the same time, many educators, researchers, foundations, and government officials are touting the benefits of service learning. In particular, service learning offers ways to enhance partnerships between academia and community agencies and to extend learning beyond the traditional classroom. We present a model for educating nurses as advanced practice nurses in health policy that links service learning with a framework for the political development of nurses. Under the rubric of service learning, the curriculum is based on the overlap among health policy, the role of the nurse as consultant, and community-based care. After discussing the importance of health policy for graduate nursing education and reviewing the essentials of service learning, we describe a three-semester graduate sequence in health policy service learning. The focus is on the clinical and classroom components of both individual and group practica and their relationship to stages of nursing's political development. The article concludes with evaluation considerations and the implications of our work for nursing theory, research, practice, and education.

  5. Southeast Asian Mental Health: Treatment, Prevention, Services, Training and Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owan, Tom Choken, Ed.

    This sourcebook contains 19 papers which discuss the mental health service needs of Southeast Asian refugees in the United States. The volume is divided into five sections: Treatment; Prevention; Services; Training; and Research. The papers (and their authors) are: (1) "Psychiatric Care for Southeast Asians: How Different Is Different?" (Tran Minh…

  6. Using the cooperative extension service in agricultural health education.

    PubMed

    James, P A; Langley, R L

    1991-01-01

    In summary, the North Carolina experience of cooperation and health education using the Cooperative Extension Service has been very successful. Agriculture and medicine have found a common ground where responsibilities can be shared. By discovering the special capabilities and contributions of the Cooperative Extension Service, medical professionals may more closely address preventive medicine in an agricultural setting.

  7. Developments in Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilliland, David; Gallagher, Peter; Growcott, John

    2005-01-01

    This paper highlights the main issues that are present in the field of child and adolescent mental health services with regard to strategic development. It identifies the major themes that have emerged concerning the commissioning and delivery of services, and also highlights the difficulties faced by particular groups of children. The authors…

  8. Recentralization of Mental Health Services: Closing an Outpatient Clinic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weirich, Thomas W.; Sheinfeld-Gorin, Sherri N.

    1982-01-01

    Evaluated the process and consequences of recentralizing services by surveying staff (N=24) and clients (N=15) of a community mental health clinic. Analyzes the planning, decision-making, implication, and effects of the change and illustrates the complexity of the adiministrator's role in restructuring services. (Author/JAC)

  9. Health workforce governance: Processes, tools and actors towards a competent workforce for integrated health services delivery.

    PubMed

    Barbazza, Erica; Langins, Margrieta; Kluge, Hans; Tello, Juan

    2015-12-01

    A competent health workforce is a vital resource for health services delivery, dictating the extent to which services are capable of responding to health needs. In the context of the changing health landscape, an integrated approach to service provision has taken precedence. For this, strengthening health workforce competencies is an imperative, and doing so in practice hinges on the oversight and steering function of governance. To aid health system stewards in their governing role, this review seeks to provide an overview of processes, tools and actors for strengthening health workforce competencies. It draws from a purposive and multidisciplinary review of literature, expert opinion and country initiatives across the WHO European Region's 53 Member States. Through our analysis, we observe distinct yet complementary roles can be differentiated between health services delivery and the health system. This understanding is a necessary prerequisite to gain deeper insight into the specificities for strengthening health workforce competencies in order for governance to rightly create the institutional environment called for to foster alignment. Differentiating between the contribution of health services and the health system in the strengthening of health workforce competencies is an important distinction for achieving and sustaining health improvement goals.

  10. 32 CFR 728.54 - U.S. Public Health Service (USPHS), other than members of the uniformed services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false U.S. Public Health Service (USPHS), other than... FACILITIES Beneficiaries of Other Federal Agencies § 728.54 U.S. Public Health Service (USPHS), other than... 43 (Contract Health Service Purchase Order for Hospital Services Rendered) or HRSA form 64...

  11. [Youth mental health at the cross roads of service organization].

    PubMed

    Rousseau, Cécile; Nadeau, Lucie; Pontbriand, Annie; Johnson-Lafleur, Janique; Measham, Toby; Broadhurst, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    The importance of children and youth mental health is increasingly recognized. This rapidly developing field cannot be conceptualized as an extension of adult services to a younger age group and its developmental and organizational specificities are the object of debate. Reviewing recent literature in this domain and some preliminary information about the Quebec Mental Health Plan implementation, this paper addresses some of the questions which structure this debate in Quebec.Quebec mental health plan has put at the forefront collaboration among disciplines and partnership among institutions. In spite of having produced significant improvement in the field, discontinuities in services, which interfere with an ecosystemic model of care, persist. Recent studies suggest that the organisational climate which surrounds youth mental health services has a direct impact on the quality of services and on youth health outcomes. A flexible management structure, which engages clinicians and health workers, favors empowerment, minimizes work stress and facilitates partnership, is needed to foster successful interdisciplinary and intersectorial collaboration. This collaboration is the cornerstone of youth mental health services.

  12. Health service quality scale: Brazilian Portuguese translation, reliability and validity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Health Service Quality Scale is a multidimensional hierarchical scale that is based on interdisciplinary approach. This instrument was specifically created for measuring health service quality based on marketing and health care concepts. The aim of this study was to translate and culturally adapt the Health Service Quality Scale into Brazilian Portuguese and to assess the validity and reliability of the Brazilian Portuguese version of the instrument. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional, observational study, with public health system patients in a Brazilian university hospital. Validity was assessed using Pearson’s correlation coefficient to measure the strength of the association between the Brazilian Portuguese version of the instrument and the SERVQUAL scale. Internal consistency was evaluated using Cronbach’s alpha coefficient; the intraclass (ICC) and Pearson’s correlation coefficients were used for test-retest reliability. Results One hundred and sixteen consecutive postoperative patients completed the questionnaire. Pearson’s correlation coefficient for validity was 0.20. Cronbach's alpha for the first and second administrations of the final version of the instrument were 0.982 and 0.986, respectively. For test-retest reliability, Pearson’s correlation coefficient was 0.89 and ICC was 0.90. Conclusions The culturally adapted, Brazilian Portuguese version of the Health Service Quality Scale is a valid and reliable instrument to measure health service quality. PMID:23327598

  13. Building the national health information infrastructure for personal health, health care services, public health, and research

    PubMed Central

    Detmer, Don E

    2003-01-01

    Background Improving health in our nation requires strengthening four major domains of the health care system: personal health management, health care delivery, public health, and health-related research. Many avoidable shortcomings in the health sector that result in poor quality are due to inaccessible data, information, and knowledge. A national health information infrastructure (NHII) offers the connectivity and knowledge management essential to correct these shortcomings. Better health and a better health system are within our reach. Discussion A national health information infrastructure for the United States should address the needs of personal health management, health care delivery, public health, and research. It should also address relevant global dimensions (e.g., standards for sharing data and knowledge across national boundaries). The public and private sectors will need to collaborate to build a robust national health information infrastructure, essentially a 'paperless' health care system, for the United States. The federal government should assume leadership for assuring a national health information infrastructure as recommended by the National Committee on Vital and Health Statistics and the President's Information Technology Advisory Committee. Progress is needed in the areas of funding, incentives, standards, and continued refinement of a privacy (i.e., confidentiality and security) framework to facilitate personal identification for health purposes. Particular attention should be paid to NHII leadership and change management challenges. Summary A national health information infrastructure is a necessary step for improved health in the U.S. It will require a concerted, collaborative effort by both public and private sectors. If you cannot measure it, you cannot improve it. Lord Kelvin PMID:12525262

  14. Evaluation of community mental health services: comparison of a primary care mental health team and an extended day hospital service.

    PubMed

    Secker, J; Gulliver, P; Peck, E; Robinson, J; Bell, R; Hughes, J

    2001-11-01

    Alongside mental health policies emphasising the need to focus on people experiencing serious, long-term problems, recent general healthcare policy is leading to the development in the UK of a primary care-led National Health Service. While most primary care-led mental health initiatives have focused on supporting general practitioners (GPs) in managing milder depression and anxiety, this article describes an evaluation comparing primary care-based and secondary care-based services for people with serious long-term problems. A survey of service users was carried out at three points in time using three measures: the Camberwell Assessment of Need, the Verona Satisfaction with Services Scales and the Lancashire Quality of Life Profile. Staff views were sought at two time intervals and carers' views were obtained towards the end of the 2-year study period. The results indicate that both services reduced overall needs and the users' need for information. The primary care service also reduced the need for help with psychotic symptoms whereas the secondary care service reduced users' need for help with benefits and occupation. There were no major differences in terms of satisfaction or quality of life. Primary care-based services therefore appear to have the potential to be as effective as more traditional secondary care services. However, a more comprehensive range of services is required to address the whole spectrum of needs, a conclusion supported by the views of staff and carers.

  15. Transitions between child and adult mental health services: service design, philosophy and meaning at uncertain times.

    PubMed

    Murcott, W J

    2014-09-01

    A young person's transition of care from child and adolescent mental health services to adult mental health services can be an uncertain and distressing event that can have serious ramifications for their recovery. Recognition of this across many countries and recent UK media interest in the dangers of mental health services failing young people has led practitioners to question the existing processes. This paper reviews the current theories and research into potential failings of services and encourages exploration for a deeper understanding of when and how care should be managed in the transition process for young people. Mental health nurses can play a vital role in this process and, by adopting the assumptions of this paradigm, look at transition from this unique perspective. By reviewing the current ideas related to age boundaries, service thresholds, service philosophy and service design, it is argued that the importance of the therapeutic relationship, the understanding of the cultural context of the young person and the placing of the young person in a position of autonomy and control should be central to any decision and process of transfer between two mental health services.

  16. Equity in Access to Health Care Services in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Glorioso, Valeria; Subramanian, S V

    2014-01-01

    Objective To provide new evidence on whether and how patterns of health care utilization deviate from horizontal equity in a country with a universal and egalitarian public health care system: Italy. Data Sources Secondary analysis of data from the Health Conditions and Health Care Utilization Survey 2005, conducted by the Italian National Institute of Statistics on a probability sample of the noninstitutionalized Italian population. Study Design Using multilevel logistic regression, we investigated how the probability of utilizing five health care services varies among individuals with equal health status but different SES. Data Collection/Extraction Respondents aged 18 or older at the interview time (n = 103,651). Principal Findings Overall, we found that use of primary care is inequitable in favor of the less well-off, hospitalization is equitable, and use of outpatient specialist care, basic medical tests, and diagnostic services is inequitable in favor of the well-off. Stratifying the analysis by health status, however, we found that the degree of inequity varies according to health status. Conclusions Despite its universal and egalitarian public health care system, Italy exhibits a significant degree of SES-related horizontal inequity in health services utilization. PMID:24949515

  17. The Significant Contribution of Student Health Services to Student Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broderick, Susan

    This document, put together by the Director of Santa Barbara City College Student Health Service, discusses how in the 108 community colleges in California the student health centers are in danger as administrators ponder budget cuts. To clarify the gravity of the situation, the report focuses on the Santa Barbara City College (SBCC) Student…

  18. Incorporating Integrative Health Services in Social Work Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gant, Larry; Benn, Rita; Gioia, Deborah; Seabury, Brett

    2009-01-01

    More than one third of Americans practice complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Social workers continue to provide most first-line health, mental health, and psychological referral and direct practice services in the United States, despite a lack of systematic education and training opportunities in CAM. Schools of social work are…

  19. A Principal Calling: Professionalism and Health Care Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornett, Becky Sutherland

    2006-01-01

    As health care professionals, our ''product'' is clinical service. We demonstrate professionalism by attitudes, knowledge, and behaviors that reflect a multi-faceted approach to the standards, regulations, and principles underlying successful clinical practices. The issues facing practitioners who work in health care environments are complex,…

  20. The Impact of Economic Stress on Community Mental Health Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagan, Brian J.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Warns that community mental health services are threatened by reductions in federal support and increased numbers of clients. Reviews literature on the effect of adverse economic events on mental health. Identifies issues and answers for managing this dilemma including planning, financial diversification, and inter-agency cooperation. (Author/JAC)

  1. A health analytics semantic ETL service for obesity surveillance.

    PubMed

    Poulymenopoulou, M; Papakonstantinou, D; Malamateniou, F; Vassilacopoulos, G

    2015-01-01

    The increasingly large amount of data produced in healthcare (e.g. collected through health information systems such as electronic medical records - EMRs or collected through novel data sources such as personal health records - PHRs, social media, web resources) enable the creation of detailed records about people's health, sentiments and activities (e.g. physical activity, diet, sleep quality) that can be used in the public health area among others. However, despite the transformative potential of big data in public health surveillance there are several challenges in integrating big data. In this paper, the interoperability challenge is tackled and a semantic Extract Transform Load (ETL) service is proposed that seeks to semantically annotate big data to result into valuable data for analysis. This service is considered as part of a health analytics engine on the cloud that interacts with existing healthcare information exchange networks, like the Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise (IHE), PHRs, sensors, mobile applications, and other web resources to retrieve patient health, behavioral and daily activity data. The semantic ETL service aims at semantically integrating big data for use by analytic mechanisms. An illustrative implementation of the service on big data which is potentially relevant to human obesity, enables using appropriate analytic techniques (e.g. machine learning, text mining) that are expected to assist in identifying patterns and contributing factors (e.g. genetic background, social, environmental) for this social phenomenon and, hence, drive health policy changes and promote healthy behaviors where residents live, work, learn, shop and play.

  2. 78 FR 61367 - Health Resources and Services Administration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-03

    ... comprehensive primary health care in outpatient settings for people living with HIV disease. Part D grantees...-xxxx--New. Abstract: The HRSA's HIV/AIDS Bureau (HAB) administers the Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program (RWHAP) authorized under Title XXVI of the Public Health Service Act as amended by the Ryan White...

  3. The Future of Mental Health Services for Deaf People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Luther, Ed.; Trybus, Raymond J., Ed.

    1977-01-01

    The proceedings of the 1976 Orthopsychiatric Workshop on Deafness contains 33 papers on mental health for the deaf. Papers address the following five major topics (sample subtopics in parentheses): current status of mental health services for the deaf (hospital, clinic, and school based programs); federal perspectives (the impact of P. L. 94-142,…

  4. Service Learning and Community Health Nursing: A Natural Fit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Marilyn P.; Swanson, Elizabeth

    2002-01-01

    Community health nursing students performed community assessments and proposed and implemented service learning projects that addressed adolescent smoking in middle schools, home safety for elderly persons, industrial worker health, and sexual abuse of teenaged girls. Students learned to apply epidemiological research methods, mobilize resources,…

  5. Ethical Issues in Health Services: A Report and Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carmody, James

    This publication identifies, discusses, and lists areas for further research for five ethical issues related to health services: 1) the right to health care; 2) death and euthanasia; 3) human experimentation; 4) genetic engineering; and, 5) abortion. Following a discussion of each issue is a selected annotated bibliography covering the years 1967…

  6. Transforming Student Health Services through Purpose-Driven Assessment Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knoll, Dorothy; Meiers, Chris; Honeck, Sara

    2006-01-01

    The University of Kansas Medical Center did a comprehensive review of the services provided in the Student Health Center (SHC). Using purpose-driven assessment techniques, areas needing improvement were identified. The results of the survey were presented to students and, with student support, student health fees were increased to fund desired…

  7. Sexual Health Services and Education: Young People's Experiences and Preferences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeves, C.; Whitaker, R.; Parsonage, R. K.; Robinson, C. A.; Swale, K.; Bayley, L.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To examine young people's requirements and perceptions of sexual health services and education in the context of their experience of sexual relationships and knowledge of sexual health. Design: A questionnaire based cohort study. Setting: Three hundred and sixty Year 11 students (aged 15-16 years) surveyed in three Secondary Schools.…

  8. Health sciences libraries and information services in Bangladesh.

    PubMed Central

    Khan, M S; Ahmed, Z; Akhter, N

    1990-01-01

    Basic problems relating to the status of health sciences libraries and information centers in Bangladesh are highlighted and discussed; strategies for improving the country's health sciences information services are suggested. A survey of libraries is reported, the country's national science and technology information policy is defined, and recommendations for action are proposed. PMID:2224300

  9. A Proposal for Financing the Purchase of Health Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baird, Charles W.

    1970-01-01

    A proposal to grant tax credits against the personal income tax for most health care expenditures. The premium or amount that the tax bill would increase to offset the decrease in tax revenues would depend on income. The plan would require more government participation in health services and would benefit the poor more than the wealthy. (BC)

  10. Cultural Competence and Children's Mental Health Service Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mancoske, Ronald J.; Lewis, Marva L.; Bowers-Stephens, Cheryll; Ford, Almarie

    2012-01-01

    This study describes the relationships between clients' perception of cultural competency of mental health providers and service outcomes. A study was conducted of a public children's mental health program that used a community-based, systems of care approach. Data from a subsample (N = 111) of families with youths (average age 12.3) and primarily…

  11. California Health Services/Educational Activities. Consortium Network.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Charles H.

    Profiles are presented of each of the 10 consortia that make up the California Health Services/Education Activities (HS/EA) network (new relationships between educational facilities where health care manpower is trained in the community settings where they practice). The first part of the booklet is a comparative analysis of (1) Area Health…

  12. A Qualitative Study Exploring Facilitators for Improved Health Behaviors and Health Behavior Programs: Mental Health Service Users' Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Candida; de Leeuw, Sarah; Griffiths, Brenda

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Mental health service users experience high rates of cardiometabolic disorders and have a 20–25% shorter life expectancy than the general population from such disorders. Clinician-led health behavior programs have shown moderate improvements, for mental health service users, in managing aspects of cardiometabolic disorders. This study sought to potentially enhance health initiatives by exploring (1) facilitators that help mental health service users engage in better health behaviors and (2) the types of health programs mental health service users want to develop. Methods. A qualitative study utilizing focus groups was conducted with 37 mental health service users attending a psychosocial rehabilitation center, in Northern British Columbia, Canada. Results. Four major facilitator themes were identified: (1) factors of empowerment, self-value, and personal growth; (2) the need for social support; (3) pragmatic aspects of motivation and planning; and (4) access. Participants believed that engaging with programs of physical activity, nutrition, creativity, and illness support would motivate them to live more healthily. Conclusions and Implications for Practice. Being able to contribute to health behavior programs, feeling valued and able to experience personal growth are vital factors to engage mental health service users in health programs. Clinicians and health care policy makers need to account for these considerations to improve success of health improvement initiatives for this population. PMID:24895667

  13. Complementary health care services: a survey of general practitioners' views.

    PubMed Central

    Goldszmidt, M; Levitt, C; Duarte-Franco, E; Kaczorowski, J

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the referral practices, perceived usefulness, knowledge, prior training and desire for training of general practitioners (GPs) in Quebec with regard to complementary health care services such as acupuncture, chiropractic and hypnosis. DESIGN: Cross-sectional mail survey. SETTING: Province of Quebec. PARTICIPANTS: Random sample of 200 GPs. Of the 146 who responded, 25 were excluded because they were no longer in practice; this left 121 (83%). OUTCOME MEASURES: Self-reported referral practices for complementary health care services, perceived usefulness and self-assessed knowledge of such services, and prior training and desire for training in these services. RESULTS: Sixty percent (72/121) of the GPs knew at least one practitioner of a complementary health care service for referral; 59% (70/119) reported referring patients to physicians who practise such services and 68% (80/118) to nonmedical practitioners. At least one of the three services studied were regarded as having some use by 83% (101/121). Overall, self-reported knowledge was poor: the proportions of GPs who reported knowing a lot about acupuncture, chiropractic and hypnosis were 11% (13/121), 10% (12/121) and 8% (10/121) respectively. Prior training was also lacking: only 8% (9/118) of the GPs had received previous training in acupuncture, 2% (2/111) in chiropractic and 3% (3/103) in hypnosis. In all, 48% (57/118) indicated that they would like further training in at least one of the services studied, and 13% (16/121) indicated that they currently provided one service. CONCLUSIONS: Referral of patients by GPs to practitioners of complementary health care services is common in Quebec. Although self-assessed knowledge about such services is relatively poor, interest in learning more about them is high. These findings identify a demand for future educational initiatives. PMID:7796373

  14. Portraying Reflexivity in Health Services Research.

    PubMed

    Rae, John; Green, Bill

    2016-09-01

    A model is proposed for supporting reflexivity in qualitative health research, informed by arguments from Bourdieu and Finlay. Bourdieu refers to mastering the subjective relation to the object at three levels-the overall social space, the field of specialists, and the scholastic universe. The model overlays Bourdieu's levels of objectivation with Finlay's three stages of research (pre-research, data collection, and data analysis). The intersections of these two ways of considering reflexivity, displayed as cells of a matrix, pose questions and offer prompts to productively challenge health researchers' reflexivity. Portraiture is used to show how these challenges and prompts can facilitate such reflexivity, as illustrated in a research project.

  15. Portraying Reflexivity in Health Services Research.

    PubMed

    Rae, John; Green, Bill

    2016-09-01

    A model is proposed for supporting reflexivity in qualitative health research, informed by arguments from Bourdieu and Finlay. Bourdieu refers to mastering the subjective relation to the object at three levels-the overall social space, the field of specialists, and the scholastic universe. The model overlays Bourdieu's levels of objectivation with Finlay's three stages of research (pre-research, data collection, and data analysis). The intersections of these two ways of considering reflexivity, displayed as cells of a matrix, pose questions and offer prompts to productively challenge health researchers' reflexivity. Portraiture is used to show how these challenges and prompts can facilitate such reflexivity, as illustrated in a research project. PMID:26935721

  16. 42 CFR 447.371 - Services furnished by rural health clinics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Services furnished by rural health clinics. 447.371 Section 447.371 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS PAYMENTS FOR SERVICES Payment Methods for Other Institutional and Noninstitutional Services...

  17. 42 CFR 447.371 - Services furnished by rural health clinics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Services furnished by rural health clinics. 447.371 Section 447.371 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS PAYMENTS FOR SERVICES Payment Methods for Other Institutional and Noninstitutional Services...

  18. Developing leaders vs training administrators in the health services.

    PubMed Central

    Legnini, M W

    1994-01-01

    In these difficult times, health care institutions need leaders, not simply managers. Leaders' breadth of skills and perspective come from understanding the values involved in health care delivery; managers know the right way to do things, but leaders know which are the right things to do. Schools of public health are moving away from their potential contribution to leadership development in health services administration. The result is a lack of accountability to the community. Leadership skills and an examination of values should be part of health services administration programs in schools of public health, which should see their mission as helping to identify and train leaders, not simply technical specialists in management. PMID:7943472

  19. Cognitive Appraisals of Specialty Mental Health Services and Their Relation to Mental Health Service Utilization in the Rural Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deen, Tisha L.; Bridges, Ana J.; McGahan, Tara C.; Andrews, Arthur R., III

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Rural individuals utilize specialty mental health services (eg, psychiatrists, psychologists, counselors, and social workers) at lower rates than their urban counterparts. This study explores whether cognitive appraisals (ie, individual perceptions of need for services, outcome expectancies, and value of a positive therapeutic outcome) of…

  20. Health workers' attitudes toward sexual and reproductive health services for unmarried adolescents in Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Adolescents in developing countries face a range of sexual and reproductive health problems. Lack of health care service for reproductive health or difficulty in accessing them are among them. In this study we aimed to examine health care workers' attitudes toward sexual and reproductive health services to unmarried adolescents in Ethiopia. Methods We conducted a descriptive cross-sectional survey among 423 health care service providers working in eastern Ethiopia in 2010. A pre-tested structured questionnaire was used to collect data. Descriptive statistics, chi-square tests and logistic regression were performed to drive proportions and associations. Results The majority of health workers had positive attitudes. However, nearly one third (30%) of health care workers had negative attitudes toward providing RH services to unmarried adolescents. Close to half (46.5%) of the respondents had unfavorable responses toward providing family planning to unmarried adolescents. About 13% of health workers agreed to setting up penal rules and regulations against adolescents that practice pre-marital sexual intercourse. The multivariate analysis indicated that being married (OR 2.15; 95% CI 1.44 - 3.06), lower education level (OR 1.45; 95% CI 1.04 - 1.99), being a health extension worker (OR 2.49; 95% CI 1.43 - 4.35), lack of training on reproductive health services (OR 5.27; 95% CI 1.51 - 5.89) to be significantly associated with negative attitudes toward provision of sexual and reproductive services to adolescents. Conclusions The majority of the health workers had generally positive attitudes toward sexual and reproductive health to adolescents. However, a minority has displayed negatives attitudes. Such negative attitudes will be barriers to service utilization by adolescents and hampers the efforts to reduce sexually transmitted infections and unwanted pregnancies among unmarried adolescents. We therefore call for a targeted effort toward alleviating negative