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Sample records for albicans bloodstream infections

  1. Elimination of Bloodstream Infections Associated with Candida albicans Biofilm in Intravascular Catheters

    PubMed Central

    Akbari, Freshta; Kjellerup, Birthe Veno

    2015-01-01

    Intravascular catheters are among the most commonly inserted medical devices and they are known to cause a large number of catheter related bloodstream infections (BSIs). Biofilms are associated with many chronic infections due to the aggregation of microorganisms. One of these organisms is the fungus Candida albicans. It has shown to be one of the leading causes of catheter-related BSIs. The presence of biofilm on intravascular catheters provide increased tolerance against antimicrobial treatments, thus alternative treatment strategies are sought. Traditionally, many strategies, such as application of combined antimicrobials, addition of antifungals, and removal of catheters, have been practiced, but they were not successful in eradicating BSIs. Since these fungal infections can result in significant morbidity, mortality, and increased healthcare cost, other promising preventive strategies, including antimicrobial lock therapy, chelating agents, alcohol, and biofilm disruptors, have been applied. In this review, current success and failure of these new approaches, and a comparison with the previous strategies are discussed in order to understand which preventative treatment is the most effective in controlling the catheter-related BSIs. PMID:26131615

  2. Differential association of fluconazole dose and dose/MIC ratio with mortality in patients with Candida albicans and non-albicans bloodstream infection.

    PubMed

    Brosh-Nissimov, T; Ben-Ami, R

    2015-11-01

    Targeting fluconazole therapy to achieve predefined pharmacodynamic goals has been suggested as a means of optimizing the treatment of patients with candidaemia. However, data regarding species-specific dosing targets are inconclusive. We retrospectively analysed a cohort of 75 adult patients with Candida bloodstream infection (BSI) who received initial treatment with fluconazole for ≥48 h (36 Candida albicans and 39 non-albicans Candida (NAC)). Fluconazole dose, the dose/MIC ratio and the 24-h area under the concentration-time curve (AUC24)/MIC ratio were determined for each patient, and classification and regression tree analysis was used to determine breakpoints for significant interactions with 30-day survival. Both fluconazole exposure parameters and patient-related and disease-related variables were assessed in univariable and multivariable survival models. The crude 30-day mortality rate was 32% (44% and 21% for C. albicans and NAC, respectively). An average fluconazole dose of >200 mg/day, a dose/MIC ratio of >400 and an AUC24/MIC ratio of >400 were associated with a higher 30-day survival rate and better microbiological response in patients with C. albicans BSI but not in those with NAC BSI. Baseline chronic kidney disease was a risk factor for fluconazole underdosing and mortality. Severity of sepsis (Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score) was the only significant predictor of death in patients with NAC BSI. We conclude that, although pharmacodynamic target-directed fluconazole dosing may help to optimize outcomes for patients with C. albicans BSI, additional studies are needed to define the role of fluconazole in the treatment of NAC BSI.

  3. Differential association of fluconazole dose and dose/MIC ratio with mortality in patients with Candida albicans and non-albicans bloodstream infection.

    PubMed

    Brosh-Nissimov, T; Ben-Ami, R

    2015-11-01

    Targeting fluconazole therapy to achieve predefined pharmacodynamic goals has been suggested as a means of optimizing the treatment of patients with candidaemia. However, data regarding species-specific dosing targets are inconclusive. We retrospectively analysed a cohort of 75 adult patients with Candida bloodstream infection (BSI) who received initial treatment with fluconazole for ≥48 h (36 Candida albicans and 39 non-albicans Candida (NAC)). Fluconazole dose, the dose/MIC ratio and the 24-h area under the concentration-time curve (AUC24)/MIC ratio were determined for each patient, and classification and regression tree analysis was used to determine breakpoints for significant interactions with 30-day survival. Both fluconazole exposure parameters and patient-related and disease-related variables were assessed in univariable and multivariable survival models. The crude 30-day mortality rate was 32% (44% and 21% for C. albicans and NAC, respectively). An average fluconazole dose of >200 mg/day, a dose/MIC ratio of >400 and an AUC24/MIC ratio of >400 were associated with a higher 30-day survival rate and better microbiological response in patients with C. albicans BSI but not in those with NAC BSI. Baseline chronic kidney disease was a risk factor for fluconazole underdosing and mortality. Severity of sepsis (Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score) was the only significant predictor of death in patients with NAC BSI. We conclude that, although pharmacodynamic target-directed fluconazole dosing may help to optimize outcomes for patients with C. albicans BSI, additional studies are needed to define the role of fluconazole in the treatment of NAC BSI. PMID:26183300

  4. Clinical and molecular characteristics of bloodstream infections caused by Candida albicans in children from 2003 to 2011.

    PubMed

    Tsai, M-H; Wang, S-H; Hsu, J-F; Lin, L-C; Chu, S-M; Huang, H-R; Chiang, M-C; Fu, R-H; Lu, J-J; Huang, Y-C

    2015-11-01

    We investigated the clinical and molecular characteristics of Candida albicans bloodstream infection (BSI) in children from a tertiary-level medical centre in Taiwan over a 9-year period from January 2003 to December 2011. We performed multilocus sequence typing (MLST) to investigate the genetic relatedness of these C. albicans BSI isolates. A total of 79 episodes of C. albicans BSI in 76 paediatric patients were identified, including 41 (51.9%) from the paediatric intensive care unit, 24 (30.4%) from the neonatal intensive care unit and 14 (17.7%) from general wards. More than half (59.5%) of these patients had underlying chronic co-morbidities, and the majority (94.9%) had a catheter or some other artificial device. All the isolates were susceptible to the antifungal agents tested. Only 32.9% (26/79) received effective antifungal agents within 24 h of onset of candidaemia. Twenty-five (31.6%) patients had persistent candidaemia (>3 days after the start of antifungal treatment) and candidaemia-attributable mortality rate was 22.8% (18/79). The 72 isolates available for MLST yielded 53 unique diploid sequence types (DSTs). Forty-five DSTs were singletons and eight DSTs were shared by 27 (37.5%) isolates. Seventy-one (98.6%) isolates were clustered within previously known clades. Based on the definition of two or more strains with shared DST occurring within a period of 90 days, 10.1% of the infections were categorized as nosocomial clusters, most commonly identified in the intensive care units. Although cluster-associated candidaemia was not associated with a higher mortality rate, none of the clusters were identified by the hospital infection control team.

  5. Antifungal catheter lock therapy for the management of a persistent Candida albicans bloodstream infection in an adult receiving hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Paul DiMondi, V; Townsend, Mary L; Johnson, Melissa; Durkin, Michael

    2014-07-01

    Antifungal catheter lock therapy (AfLT) with liposomal amphotericin B has been used in the treatment of pediatric central line infections caused by Candida species; however, reports describing the use of liposomal amphotericin B lock therapy in the adult hemodialysis patient population are lacking. Management of central line-associated candidemia with systemic therapy alone is often challenging due to the propensity of Candida species to form biofilms on foreign bodies. We describe a 64-year-old woman who was receiving hemodialysis 3 times/week and was hospitalized with persistent fungemia. Despite receiving intravenous micafungin, she had multiple positive blood cultures for Candida albicans, which finally cleared after 7 days. Her double-lumen catheter was considered the most likely nidus of infection. Although catheter removal would have been preferred, this was not possible given her vasculopathy, history of multiple bloodstream infections, and lack of other available sites for vascular access. Catheter exchange was performed, and liposomal amphotericin B AfLT was administered in combination with intravenous micafungin for a total of 6 days. During this time, the patient experienced no discernible adverse effects secondary to AfLT. At discharge, AfLT was discontinued, and intravenous micafungin was changed to oral fluconazole. After 6 months of treatment, the patient remained culture negative and maintained her dialysis access. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of liposomal amphotericin B catheter lock therapy used to manage a persistent C. albicans bloodstream infection in an adult receiving hemodialysis. AfLT is a novel concept for treating catheter-associated fungal infections. Liposomal amphotericin B was chosen based on its favorable in vitro activity against Candida species biofilms in catheter lock environments. We identified several barriers to implementing AfLT, and these issues may prohibit the use of AfLT. This case report

  6. Klebsiella pneumoniae Bloodstream Infection

    PubMed Central

    Girometti, Nicolò; Lewis, Russell E.; Giannella, Maddalena; Ambretti, Simone; Bartoletti, Michele; Tedeschi, Sara; Tumietto, Fabio; Cristini, Francesco; Trapani, Filippo; Gaibani, Paolo; Viale, Pierluigi

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Multidrug resistance associated with extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) and Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC) among K. pneumoniae is endemic in southern Europe. We retrospectively analyzed the impact of resistance on the appropriateness of empirical therapy and treatment outcomes of K. pneumoniae bloodstream infections (BSIs) during a 2-year period at a 1420-bed tertiary-care teaching hospital in northern Italy. We identified 217 unique patient BSIs, including 92 (42%) KPC-positive, 49 (23%) ESBL-positive, and 1 (0.5%) metallo-beta-lactamase-positive isolates. Adequate empirical therapy was administered in 74% of infections caused by non-ESBL non-KPC strains, versus 33% of ESBL and 23% of KPC cases (p < 0.0001). To clarify the impact of resistance on BSI treatment outcomes, we compared several different models comprised of non-antibiotic treatment-related factors predictive of patients’ 30-day survival status. Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score determined at the time of positive blood culture was superior to other investigated models, correctly predicting survival status in 83% of the study cohort. In multivariate analysis accounting for APACHE II, receipt of inadequate empirical therapy was associated with nearly a twofold higher rate of death (adjusted hazard ratio 1.9, 95% confidence interval 1.1–3.4; p = 0.02). Multidrug-resistant K. pneumoniae accounted for two-thirds of all K. pneumoniae BSIs, high rates of inappropriate empirical therapy, and twofold higher rates of patient death irrespective of underlying illness. PMID:25398065

  7. Bloodstream infections in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Taramasso, Lucia; Tatarelli, Paola; Di Biagio, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    In the combined antiretroviral therapy era, HIV-infected patients remain a vulnerable population for the onset of bloodstream infections (BSI). Worldwide, nontyphoid salmonellae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase negative staphylococci are the most important pathogens. Intravenous catheter associated infection, skin-soft tissue infection and endocarditis are associated with Gram-positive bacteremia. Among the Gram-negative, nontyphoidal Salmonella have been previously correlated to sepsis. Other causes of BSI in HIV-infected patients are mycobacteria and fungi. Mycobacteria constitute a major cause of BSI in limited resource countries. Fungal BSI are not frequent and among them Cryptococcus neoformans is the most common life-threatening infection. The degree of immunosuppression remains the key prognostic factor leading to the development of BSI. PMID:26950194

  8. Pathogenesis of Staphylococcus aureus Bloodstream Infections

    PubMed Central

    Thomer, Lena; Schneewind, Olaf; Missiakas, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus , a Gram-positive bacterium colonizing nares, skin, and the gastrointestinal tract, frequently invades the skin, soft tissues, and bloodstreams of humans. Even with surgical and antibiotic therapy, bloodstream infections are associated with significant mortality. The secretion of coagulases, proteins that associate with and activate the host hemostatic factor prothrombin, and the bacterial surface display of agglutinins, proteins that bind polymerized fibrin, are key virulence strategies for the pathogenesis of S. aureus bloodstream infections, which culminate in the establishment of abscess lesions. Pathogen-controlled processes, involving a wide spectrum of secreted factors, are responsible for the recruitment and destruction of immune cells, transforming abscess lesions into purulent exudate, with which staphylococci disseminate to produce new infectious lesions or to infect new hosts. Research on S. aureus bloodstream infections is a frontier for the characterization of protective vaccine antigens and the development of immune therapeutics aiming to prevent disease or improve outcomes. PMID:26925499

  9. Candida bloodstream infection: a clinical microbiology laboratory perspective.

    PubMed

    Pongrácz, Júlia; Kristóf, Katalin

    2014-09-01

    The incidence of Candida bloodstream infection (BSI) has been on the rise in several countries worldwide. Species distribution is changing; an increase in the percentage of non-albicans species, mainly fluconazole non-susceptible C. glabrata was reported. Existing microbiology diagnostic methods lack sensitivity, and new methods need to be developed or further evaluation for routine application is necessary. Although reliable, standardized methods for antifungal susceptibility testing are available, the determination of clinical breakpoints remains challenging. Correct species identification is important and provides information on the intrinsic susceptibility profile of the isolate. Currently, acquired resistance in clinical Candida isolates is rare, but reports indicate that it could be an issue in the future. The role of the clinical microbiology laboratory is to isolate and correctly identify the infective agent and provide relevant and reliable susceptibility data as soon as possible to guide antifungal therapy.

  10. Biofilm formation is a risk factor for mortality in patients with Candida albicans bloodstream infection—Scotland, 2012–2013

    PubMed Central

    Rajendran, R.; Sherry, L.; Nile, C.J.; Sherriff, A.; Johnson, E.M.; Hanson, M.F.; Williams, C.; Munro, C.A.; Jones, B.J.; Ramage, G.

    2016-01-01

    Bloodstream infections caused by Candida species remain a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients. Biofilm formation by Candida species is an important virulence factor for disease pathogenesis. A prospective analysis of patients with Candida bloodstream infection (n = 217) in Scotland (2012–2013) was performed to assess the risk factors associated with patient mortality, in particular the impact of biofilm formation. Candida bloodstream isolates (n = 280) and clinical records for 157 patients were collected through 11 different health boards across Scotland. Biofilm formation by clinical isolates was assessed in vitro with standard biomass assays. The role of biofilm phenotype on treatment efficacy was also evaluated in vitro by treating preformed biofilms with fixed concentrations of different classes of antifungal. Available mortality data for 134 patients showed that the 30-day candidaemia case mortality rate was 41%, with predisposing factors including patient age and catheter removal. Multivariate Cox regression survival analysis for 42 patients showed a significantly higher mortality rate for Candida albicans infection than for Candida glabrata infection. Biofilm-forming ability was significantly associated with C. albicans mortality (34 patients). Finally, in vitro antifungal sensitivity testing showed that low biofilm formers and high biofilm formers were differentially affected by azoles and echinocandins, but not by polyenes. This study provides further evidence that the biofilm phenotype represents a significant clinical entity, and that isolates with this phenotype differentially respond to antifungal therapy in vitro. Collectively, these findings show that greater clinical understanding is required with respect to Candida biofilm infections, and the implications of isolate heterogeneity. PMID:26432192

  11. Candida utilis catheter-related bloodstream infection

    PubMed Central

    Scoppettuolo, Giancarlo; Donato, Concetta; De Carolis, Elena; Vella, Antonietta; Vaccaro, Luisa; La Greca, Antonio; Fantoni, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Central venous catheter-related fungemia are increasing in the last years, also due to rare fungi. We report the case of a Candida utilis catheter-related bloodstream infection in a patient with metastatic carcinoma of the bladder and a long term totally implanted venous catheter. The diagnosis was done by paired blood cultures and differential time to positivity. The Candida species was rapidly identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. The patient was successfully treated with anidulafungine. PMID:25473600

  12. Decrease in Candida bloodstream infections in veterans in Atlanta.

    PubMed

    Kabbani, Sarah; Jacob, Jesse T; Gaynes, Robert P; Rimland, David

    2016-04-01

    Despite the recent focus on prevention of health care-associated infections, rates of Candida bloodstream infections in adults have remained unchanged until recently. We report a decline of Candida bloodstream infections, not explained by changes in broad-spectrum antibiotic use, but coinciding with infection control policies aimed at central venous catheter maintenance.

  13. Bloodstream infections in patients with solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Gudiol, Carlota; Aguado, José María; Carratalà, Jordi

    2016-04-01

    Little information is currently available regarding bloodstream infection (BSI) in patients with solid tumors who, for a variety of reasons, are particularly predisposed to develop this condition. In this review we focus on the incidence, epidemiology, clinical features, etiology, antimicrobial resistance, and outcomes of BSI of adult cancer patients with solid tumors. Most episodes of BSI occur in non-neutropenic patients, in whom the site of primary or metastatic tumor often serves as the portal of entry. The urinary tract and the abdomen are the most frequent sources of infection, and cholangitis is the most common recurrent source of BSI. Gram-negative bacilli are becoming the leading cause of BSI in patients with solid tumors, and the rate of multidrug resistance is increasingly being recognized. The case-fatality rate in patients with solid tumors and BSI is high, especially among those with comorbidities, advanced neoplasms, corticosteroid therapy, and shock at presentation.

  14. Adaptive immune responses to Candida albicans infection.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Jonathan P; Moyes, David L

    2015-01-01

    Fungal infections are becoming increasingly prevalent in the human population and contribute to morbidity and mortality in healthy and immunocompromised individuals respectively. Candida albicans is the most commonly encountered fungal pathogen of humans, and is frequently found on the mucosal surfaces of the body. Host defense against C. albicans is dependent upon a finely tuned implementation of innate and adaptive immune responses, enabling the host to neutralise the invading fungus. Central to this protection are the adaptive Th1 and Th17 cellular responses, which are considered paramount to successful immune defense against C. albicans infections, and enable tissue homeostasis to be maintained in the presence of colonising fungi. This review will highlight the recent advances in our understanding of adaptive immunity to Candida albicans infections.

  15. Comparison of Total Hospital-Acquired Bloodstream Infections to Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infections and Implications for Outcome Measures in Infection Control

    PubMed Central

    Leekha, Surbhi; Li, Shanshan; Thom, Kerri A.; Anne Preas, Michael; Caffo, Brian S.; Morgan, Daniel J.; Harris, Anthony D.

    2014-01-01

    Validity of the central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) measure is compromised by subjectivity. We observed significant decreases in both CLABSI and total hospital-acquired bloodstream infection (BSI) following a CLABSI prevention intervention in adult intensive care units. Total hospital-acquired BSI could be explored as an adjunct, objective CLABSI measure. PMID:23917916

  16. Comparison of E,E-Farnesol Secretion and the Clinical Characteristics of Candida albicans Bloodstream Isolates from Different Multilocus Sequence Typing Clades.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sook-In; Shin, Jong Hee; Kim, Soo Hyun; Kim, Jin; Kim, Joo Hee; Choi, Min Ji; Chung, Eun-Kyung; Lee, Kyungwon; Koo, Sun Hoe; Chang, Hyun Ha; Bougnoux, Marie-Elisabeth; d'Enfert, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Using multilocus sequence typing (MLST), Candida albicans can be subdivided into 18 different clades. Farnesol, a quorum-sensing molecule secreted by C. albicans, is thought to play an important role in the development of C. albicans biofilms and is also a virulence factor. This study evaluated whether C. albicans bloodstream infection (BSI) strains belonging to different MLST clades secrete different levels of E,E-farnesol (FOH) and whether they have different clinical characteristics. In total, 149 C. albicans BSI isolates from ten Korean hospitals belonging to clades 18 (n = 28), 4 (n = 23), 1 (n = 22), 12 (n = 17), and other clades (n = 59) were assessed. For each isolate, the FOH level in 24-hour biofilms was determined in filtered (0.45 μm) culture supernatant using high-performance liquid chromatography. Marked differences in FOH secretion from biofilms (0.10-6.99 μM) were observed among the 149 BSI isolates. Clade 18 isolates secreted significantly more FOH than did non-clade 18 isolates (mean ± SEM; 2.66 ± 0.22 vs. 1.69 ± 0.10 μM; P < 0.001). Patients with isolates belonging to clade 18 had a lower mean severity of illness than other patients, as measured using the "acute physiology and chronic health evaluation" (APACHE) III score (14.4 ± 1.1 vs. 18.0 ± 0.7; P < 0.05). This study provides evidence that C. albicans BSI isolates belonging to the most prevalent MLST clade (clade 18) in Korea are characterized by increased levels of FOH secretion and less severe illness.

  17. Urinary tract infections and Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Behzadi, Payam; Behzadi, Elham

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Urinary tract candidiasis is known as the most frequent nosocomial fungal infection worldwide. Candida albicans is the most common cause of nosocomial fungal urinary tract infections; however, a rapid change in the distribution of Candida species is undergoing. Simultaneously, the increase of urinary tract candidiasis has led to the appearance of antifungal resistant Candida species. In this review, we have an in depth look into Candida albicans uropathogenesis and distribution of the three most frequent Candida species contributing to urinary tract candidiasis in different countries around the world. Material and methods For writing this review, Google Scholar –a scholarly search engine– (http://scholar.google.com/) and PubMed database (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/) were used. The most recently published original articles and reviews of literature relating to the first three Candida species causing urinary tract infections in different countries and the pathogenicity of Candida albicans were selected and studied. Results Although some studies show rapid changes in the uropathogenesis of Candida species causing urinary tract infections in some countries, Candida albicans is still the most important cause of candidal urinary tract infections. Conclusions Despite the ranking of Candida albicans as the dominant species for urinary tract candidiasis, specific changes have occurred in some countries. At this time, it is important to continue the surveillance related to Candida species causing urinary tract infections to prevent, control and treat urinary tract candidiasis in future. PMID:25914847

  18. Prosthetic valve endocarditis and bloodstream infection due to Mycobacterium chimaera.

    PubMed

    Achermann, Yvonne; Rössle, Matthias; Hoffmann, Matthias; Deggim, Vanessa; Kuster, Stefan; Zimmermann, Dieter R; Bloemberg, Guido; Hombach, Michael; Hasse, Barbara

    2013-06-01

    Prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) due to fast-growing nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) has been reported anecdotally. Reports of PVE with slowly growing NTM, however, are lacking. We present here one case of PVE and one case of bloodstream infection caused by Mycobacterium chimaera. Randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR indicated a relatedness of the two M. chimaera strains. Both patients had heart surgery 2 years apart from each other. A nosocomial link was not detected.

  19. Candida albicans bloodstream isolates in a German university hospital are genetically heterogenous and susceptible to commonly used antifungals.

    PubMed

    Huyke, Johanna; Martin, Ronny; Walther, Grit; Weber, Michael; Kaerger, Kerstin; Bougnoux, Marie-Elisabeth; Elias, Johannes; Kurzai, Oliver

    2015-10-01

    From an eight-year-span, 99 Candida bloodstream isolates were collected at the University Hospital Wuerzburg, Germany. In this study, all strains were analyzed using molecular and phenotypic typing methods. Confirmatory species identification revealed three isolates that were initially diagnosed as C. albicans to be actually C. dubliniensis. Two isolates contained a mixed culture of C. albicans and C. glabrata, in one of the specimens both species could be separated while it was not possible to recover C. albicans in the other sample. The remaining 95 C. albicans isolates were profiled by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Phylogenetic analyses showed a highly heterogenous collection of strains, associated with many different clades and constituting a set of new diploid sequence types (DST). For all strains with identical DST, patient data were reviewed for potential nosocomial transmission. In addition, all isolates were tested for their susceptibility to amphotericin B, caspofungin, fluconazole, itraconazole, posaconazole and voriconazole. No clinically relevant resistance could be detected. Furthermore, these data underline that correlation between minimal inhibitory concentrations for caspofungin and anidulafungin is low.

  20. Acinetobacter baumannii Genes Required for Bacterial Survival during Bloodstream Infection

    PubMed Central

    Subashchandrabose, Sargurunathan; Smith, Sara; DeOrnellas, Valerie; Crepin, Sebastien; Kole, Monica; Zahdeh, Carina

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Acinetobacter baumannii is emerging as a leading global multiple-antibiotic-resistant nosocomial pathogen. The identity of genes essential for pathogenesis in a mammalian host remains largely unknown. Using transposon-directed insertion-site sequencing (TraDIS), we identified A. baumannii genes involved in bacterial survival in a leukopenic mouse model of bloodstream infection. Mice were inoculated with a pooled transposon mutant library derived from 109,000 mutants, and TraDIS was used to map transposon insertion sites in the genomes of bacteria in the inoculum and of bacteria recovered from mouse spleens. Unique transposon insertion sites were mapped and used to calculate a fitness factor for every insertion site based on its relative abundance in the inoculum and postinfection libraries. Eighty-nine transposon insertion mutants that were underrepresented after experimental infection in mice compared to their presence in the inocula were delineated as candidates for further evaluation. Genetically defined mutants lacking feoB (ferrous iron import), ddc (d-ala-d-ala-carboxypeptidase), and pntB (pyridine nucleotide transhydrogenase subunit) exhibited a fitness defect during systemic infection resulting from bacteremia. In vitro, these mutants, as well as a fepA (ferric enterobactin receptor) mutant, are defective in survival in human serum and within macrophages and are hypersensitive to killing by antimicrobial peptides compared to the survival of the parental strain under these conditions. Our data demonstrate that FepA is involved in the uptake of exogenous enterobactin in A. baumannii. Genetic complementation rescues the phenotypes of mutants in assays that emulate conditions encountered during infection. In summary, we have determined novel A. baumannii fitness genes involved in the pathogenesis of mammalian infection. IMPORTANCE A. baumannii is a significant cause of bacterial bloodstream infection in humans. Since multiple antibiotic resistance

  1. Epidemiology of antimicrobial resistance in bloodstream infections.

    PubMed

    Akova, Murat

    2016-04-01

    Antimicrobial resistance in bacterial pathogens is a worldwide challenge leading high morbidity and mortality in clinical settings. Multidrug resistant patterns in gram-positive and -negative bacteria have resulted in difficult-to-treat or even untreatable infections with conventional antimicrobials. Since the early identification of causative microorganisms and their antimicrobial susceptibility patterns in patients with bacteremia and other serious infections is lacking in many healthcare institutions, broad spectrum antibiotics are liberally and mostly unnecessarily used. Such practice has, in turn, caused dramatic increases in emerging resistance and when coupled with poor practice of infection control, resistant bacteria can easily be disseminated to the other patients and the environment. Thus, availability of updated epidemiological data on antimicrobial resistance in frequently encountered bacterial pathogens will be useful not only for deciding on empirical treatment strategies, but also devising an effective antimicrobial stewardship program in hospitals. PMID:26984779

  2. Bloodstream infections in NNICU: Blight on ICU stay

    PubMed Central

    Mehndiratta, Man Mohan; Nayak, Rajeev; Ali, Sana; Sharma, Ajay

    2016-01-01

    Background: Bloodstream infections (BSIs) are among the serious hospital-acquired infections. Data regarding BSIs in intensive care units (ICUs) are available but there is limited information regarding these infections in neurology and neurosurgery intensive care units (NNICUs). Objectives: This study was conducted to find out the occurrence of BSI in NNICU patients of a tertiary care institute in India, along with the microbiological profile and risk factors associated with it. Materials and Methods: One hundred patients admitted in the NNICU of a tertiary care hospital for more than 24 h were included in the study. After detailed history, blood samples were collected from catheter hub and peripheral vein of all patients for culture, followed by identification and antibiotic sensitivity testing of the isolates. Results: Out of 100 patients, laboratory-confirmed bloodstream infection (LCBI) was detected in 16 patients. Five patients had secondary BSI, while 11 had central venous catheter (CVC)-related primary BSI. Gram-positive organisms constituted 64% of the isolates, especially coagulase-negative staphylococci and Staphylococcus aureus. Increased duration of CVC was a significant risk factor for catheter-related BSI (CR-BSI). Conclusion: BSIs pose a significant burden for NNICU patients, and increased duration of catheter insertion is a significant risk factor for CR-BSI. PMID:27570383

  3. Biofilm-based central line-associated bloodstream infections.

    PubMed

    Yousif, Ammar; Jamal, Mohamed A; Raad, Issam

    2015-01-01

    Different types of central venous catheters (CVCs) have been used in clinical practice to improve the quality of life of chronically and critically ill patients. Unfortunately, indwelling devices are usually associated with microbial biofilms and eventually lead to catheter-related bloodstream infections (CLABSIs).An estimated 250,000-400,000 CLABSIs occur every year in the United States, at a rate of 1.5 per 1,000 CVC days and a mortality rate of 12-25 %. The annual cost of caring for patients with CLABSIs ranges from 296 million to 2.3 billion dollars.Biofilm formation occurs on biotic and abiotic surfaces in the clinical setting. Extensive studies have been conducted to understand biofilm formation, including different biofilm developmental stages, biofilm matrix compositions, quorum-sensing regulated biofilm formation, biofilm dispersal (and its clinical implications), and multi-species biofilms that are relevant to polymicrobial infections.When microbes form a matured biofilm within human hosts through medical devices such as CVCs, the infection becomes resistant to antibiotic treatment and can develop into a chronic condition. For that reason, many techniques have been used to prevent the formation of biofilm by targeting different stages of biofilm maturation. Other methods have been used to diagnose and treat established cases of CLABSI.Catheter removal is the conventional management of catheter associated bacteremia; however, the procedure itself carries a relatively high risk of mechanical complications. Salvaging the catheter can help to minimize these complications.In this article, we provide an overview of microbial biofilm formation; describe the involvement of various genetic determinants, adhesion proteins, organelles, mechanism(s) of biofilm formation, polymicrobial infections, and biofilm-associated infections on indwelling intravascular catheters; and describe the diagnosis, management, and prevention of catheter-related bloodstream infections.

  4. Staphylococcus aureus Regulatory RNAs as Potential Biomarkers for Bloodstream Infections

    PubMed Central

    Bordeau, Valérie; Cady, Anne; Revest, Matthieu; Rostan, Octavie; Sassi, Mohamed; Tattevin, Pierre; Donnio, Pierre-Yves

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a commensal bacterium and pathogen. Identifying biomarkers for the transition from colonization to disease caused by this organism would be useful. Several S. aureus small RNAs (sRNAs) regulate virulence. We investigated presence and expression of 8 sRNAs in 83 S. aureus strains from 42 patients with sepsis or septic shock and 41 asymptomatic colonized carriers. Small pathogenicity island sRNAs sprB and sprC were clade specific. Six sRNAs had variable expression not correlated with clinical status. Expression of RNAIII was lower in strains from septic shock patients than in strains from colonized patients. When RNAIII was associated with expression of sprD, colonizing strains could be discriminated from strains in patients with bloodstream infections, including patients with sepsis and septic shock. Isolates associated with colonization might have sRNAs with target expression different from those of disease isolates. Monitoring expression of RNAIII and sprD could help determine severity of bloodstream infections. PMID:27224202

  5. Staphylococcus aureus Regulatory RNAs as Potential Biomarkers for Bloodstream Infections.

    PubMed

    Bordeau, Valérie; Cady, Anne; Revest, Matthieu; Rostan, Octavie; Sassi, Mohamed; Tattevin, Pierre; Donnio, Pierre-Yves; Felden, Brice

    2016-09-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a commensal bacterium and pathogen. Identifying biomarkers for the transition from colonization to disease caused by this organism would be useful. Several S. aureus small RNAs (sRNAs) regulate virulence. We investigated presence and expression of 8 sRNAs in 83 S. aureus strains from 42 patients with sepsis or septic shock and 41 asymptomatic colonized carriers. Small pathogenicity island sRNAs sprB and sprC were clade specific. Six sRNAs had variable expression not correlated with clinical status. Expression of RNAIII was lower in strains from septic shock patients than in strains from colonized patients. When RNAIII was associated with expression of sprD, colonizing strains could be discriminated from strains in patients with bloodstream infections, including patients with sepsis and septic shock. Isolates associated with colonization might have sRNAs with target expression different from those of disease isolates. Monitoring expression of RNAIII and sprD could help determine severity of bloodstream infections. PMID:27224202

  6. Bloodstream infections due to Peptoniphilus spp.: report of 15 cases

    PubMed Central

    Brown, K; Church, D; Lynch, T; Gregson, D

    2014-01-01

    Peptoniphilus spp. are Gram-positive anaerobic cocci (GPAC) that were formerly classified in the genus Peptostreptococcus. This study describes 15 cases of Peptoniphilus spp. bloodstream infection (BSI) diagnosed from 2007 to 2011 using 16S rDNA sequencing in patients with pneumonia, pre-term delivery, soft tissue infection or colon or bladder disease. Seven out of 15 (47%) of these cases had polymicrobial BSIs. One of the isolates was closely related to P. duerdenii (EU526290), while the other 14 isolates were most closely related to a Peptoniphilus sp. reference strain (ATCC 29743) and P. hareii (Y07839). Peptoniphilus is a rare but important cause of BSI. PMID:24773457

  7. Economic evaluation and catheter-related bloodstream infections.

    PubMed

    Halton, Kate; Graves, Nicholas

    2007-06-01

    Catheter-related bloodstream infections are a serious problem. Many interventions reduce risk, and some have been evaluated in cost-effectiveness studies. We review the usefulness and quality of these economic studies. Evidence is incomplete, and data required to inform a coherent policy are missing. The cost-effectiveness studies are characterized by a lack of transparency, short time-horizons, and narrow economic perspectives. Data quality is low for some important model parameters. Authors of future economic evaluations should aim to model the complete policy and not just single interventions. They should be rigorous in developing the structure of the economic model, include all relevant economic outcomes, use a systematic approach for selecting data sources for model parameters, and propagate the effect of uncertainty in model parameters on conclusions. This will inform future data collection and improve our understanding of the economics of preventing these infections.

  8. Cefotaxime resistance and outcome of Klebsiella spp bloodstream infection.

    PubMed

    Ortega, M; Marco, F; Soriano, A; Almela, M; Martínez, J A; López, J; Pitart, C; Mensa, J

    2011-12-01

    We attempt to describe the epidemiology and outcome associated with cefotaxime-resistant (CTX-R) Klebsiella spp bacteraemia. Klebsiella spp bloodstream infection episodes prospectively collected through a blood culture surveillance programme from January 1991 to December 2008 in a single institution were analysed. A total of 910 monomicrobial episodes of Klebsiella spp bacteraemia were identified during the study period. The most important sources were from urinary tract infection, unknown sources, billiary focus and catheter related infection. There were 112 (12%) CTX-R isolates. Out of 112 isolates, 98 were CTX-R by Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase production. Shock on presentation and mortality were significantly more frequent in CTX-R than in CTX susceptible isolates. Inappropriate empirical therapy was received in 50 (45%) cases in the CTX-R Klebsiella spp group (13 cases of death, 26%). Predictive factors associated with CTX-R Klebsiella spp isolate were: previous β-lactam therapy (OR = 4.16), nosocomial acquired bacteraemia (OR = 1.93), solid organ trasplantation (OR = 2.09) and shock (OR = 1.90). Independent risk factors associated with mortality in Klebsiella spp bacteraemia were: age (OR = 1.03), liver cirrhosis (OR = 2.63), ultimately or rapidly fatal prognosis of underlying disease (OR = 2.44), shock (OR = 8.60), pneumonia (OR = 4.96) or intraabdominal (OR = 3.85) source of bacteraemia and CTX-R isolate (OR = 4.63). Klebsiella spp is an important cause of bloodstream infection. CTX-R isolates have been increasing since 2000. CTX-R is an independent factor associated with mortality in Klebsiella spp bacteraemia.

  9. Diagnosis of Bacterial Bloodstream Infections: A 16S Metagenomics Approach

    PubMed Central

    Van Puyvelde, Sandra; De Block, Tessa; Maltha, Jessica; Palpouguini, Lompo; Tahita, Marc; Tinto, Halidou; Jacobs, Jan; Deborggraeve, Stijn

    2016-01-01

    Background Bacterial bloodstream infection (bBSI) is one of the leading causes of death in critically ill patients and accurate diagnosis is therefore crucial. We here report a 16S metagenomics approach for diagnosing and understanding bBSI. Methodology/Principal Findings The proof-of-concept was delivered in 75 children (median age 15 months) with severe febrile illness in Burkina Faso. Standard blood culture and malaria testing were conducted at the time of hospital admission. 16S metagenomics testing was done retrospectively and in duplicate on the blood of all patients. Total DNA was extracted from the blood and the V3–V4 regions of the bacterial 16S rRNA genes were amplified by PCR and deep sequenced on an Illumina MiSeq sequencer. Paired reads were curated, taxonomically labeled, and filtered. Blood culture diagnosed bBSI in 12 patients, but this number increased to 22 patients when combining blood culture and 16S metagenomics results. In addition to superior sensitivity compared to standard blood culture, 16S metagenomics revealed important novel insights into the nature of bBSI. Patients with acute malaria or recovering from malaria had a 7-fold higher risk of presenting polymicrobial bloodstream infections compared to patients with no recent malaria diagnosis (p-value = 0.046). Malaria is known to affect epithelial gut function and may thus facilitate bacterial translocation from the intestinal lumen to the blood. Importantly, patients with such polymicrobial blood infections showed a 9-fold higher risk factor for not surviving their febrile illness (p-value = 0.030). Conclusions/Significance Our data demonstrate that 16S metagenomics is a powerful approach for the diagnosis and understanding of bBSI. This proof-of-concept study also showed that appropriate control samples are crucial to detect background signals due to environmental contamination. PMID:26927306

  10. Epidemiology, surveillance, and prevention of bloodstream infections in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Patel, Priti R; Kallen, Alexander J; Arduino, Matthew J

    2010-09-01

    Infections cause significant morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing hemodialysis. Bloodstream infections (BSIs) are particularly problematic, accounting for a substantial number of hospitalizations in these patients. Hospitalizations for BSI and other vascular access infections appear to have increased dramatically in hemodialysis patients since 1993. These infections frequently are related to central venous catheter (CVC) use for dialysis access. Regional initiatives that have shown successful decreases in catheter-related BSIs in hospitalized patients have generated interest in replicating this success in outpatient hemodialysis populations. Several interventions have been effective in preventing BSIs in the hemodialysis setting. Avoiding the use of CVCs in favor of access types with lower associated BSI risk is among the most important. When CVCs are used, adherence to evidence-based catheter insertion and maintenance practices can positively influence BSI rates. In addition, facility-level surveillance to detect BSIs and stimulate examination of vascular access use and care practices is essential to a comprehensive approach to prevention. This article describes the current epidemiology of BSIs in hemodialysis patients and effective prevention strategies to decrease the incidence of these devastating infections.

  11. Sphingomonas paucimobilis bloodstream infections associated with contaminated intravenous fentanyl.

    PubMed

    Maragakis, Lisa L; Chaiwarith, Romanee; Srinivasan, Arjun; Torriani, Francesca J; Avdic, Edina; Lee, Andrew; Ross, Tracy R; Carroll, Karen C; Perl, Trish M

    2009-01-01

    Nationally distributed medications from compounding pharmacies, which typically adhere to less stringent quality-control standards than pharmaceutical manufacturers, can lead to multistate outbreaks. We investigated a cluster of 6 patients in a Maryland hospital who had Sphingomonas paucimobilis bloodstream infections in November 2007. Of the 6 case-patients, 5 (83%) had received intravenous fentanyl within 48 hours before bacteremia developed. Cultures of unopened samples of fentanyl grew S. paucimobilis; the pulsed-field gel electrophoresis pattern was indistinguishable from that of the isolates of 5 case-patients. The contaminated fentanyl lot had been prepared at a compounding pharmacy and distributed to 4 states. Subsequently, in California, S. paucimobilis bacteremia was diagnosed for 2 patients who had received intravenous fentanyl from the same compounding pharmacy. These pharmacies should adopt more stringent quality-control measures, including prerelease product testing, when compounding and distributing large quantities of sterile preparations.

  12. Molecular tracking of Candida albicans in a neonatal intensive care unit: long-term colonizations versus catheter-related infections.

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Diez, B; Martinez, V; Alvarez, M; Rodriguez-Tudela, J L; Martinez-Suarez, J V

    1997-01-01

    Nosocomial neonatal candidiasis is a major problem in infants requiring intensive therapy. The subjects of this retrospective study were nine preterm infants admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit of the Hospital Central de Asturias between March 1993 and August 1994. The infants were infected with or colonized by Candida albicans. Five patients developed C. albicans bloodstream infections. A total of 36 isolates (including isolates from catheters and parenteral nutrition) were examined for molecular relatedness by PCR fingerprinting and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. The core sequence of phage M13 was used as a single primer in the PCR-based fingerprinting procedure, and RFLP analysis was performed with C. albicans-specific DNA probe 27A. Both techniques were evaluated with a panel of eight C. albicans reference strains, and each technique showed eight different patterns. With the 36 isolates from neonates, each technique enabled us to identify by PCR and RFLP analysis seven and six different patterns, respectively. The combination of these two methods (composite DNA type) identified eight different profiles. A strain with one of these profiles was present in three patients and in their respective catheters. Patients infected with or colonized by this isolate profile were clustered in time. Among the other patients, each patient was infected over time and at multiple anatomic sites with a C. albicans strain with a distinct DNA type. We conclude that C. albicans was most commonly producing long-term colonizations, although horizontal transmission probably due to catheters also occurred. PMID:9399489

  13. Dissecting Candida albicans Infection from the Perspective of C. albicans Virulence and Omics Approaches on Host–Pathogen Interaction: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Voon Kin; Lee, Tze Yan; Rusliza, Basir; Chong, Pei Pei

    2016-01-01

    Candida bloodstream infections remain the most frequent life-threatening fungal disease, with Candida albicans accounting for 70% to 80% of the Candida isolates recovered from infected patients. In nature, Candida species are part of the normal commensal flora in mammalian hosts. However, they can transform into pathogens once the host immune system is weakened or breached. More recently, mortality attributed to Candida infections has continued to increase due to both inherent and acquired drug resistance in Candida, the inefficacy of the available antifungal drugs, tedious diagnostic procedures, and a rising number of immunocompromised patients. Adoption of animal models, viz. minihosts, mice, and zebrafish, has brought us closer to unraveling the pathogenesis and complexity of Candida infection in human hosts, leading towards the discovery of biomarkers and identification of potential therapeutic agents. In addition, the advancement of omics technologies offers a holistic view of the Candida-host interaction in a non-targeted and non-biased manner. Hence, in this review, we seek to summarize past and present milestone findings on C. albicans virulence, adoption of animal models in the study of C. albicans infection, and the application of omics technologies in the study of Candida–host interaction. A profound understanding of the interaction between host defense and pathogenesis is imperative for better design of novel immunotherapeutic strategies in future. PMID:27763544

  14. Infectious Complications and Morbidities After Neonatal Bloodstream Infections

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Ming-Horng; Lee, Chiang-Wen; Chu, Shih-Ming; Lee, I-Ta; Lien, Reyin; Huang, Hsuan-Rong; Chiang, Ming-Chou; Fu, Ren-Huei; Hsu, Jen-Fu; Huang, Yhu-Chering

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Few data are available on the clinical characteristics of complications and morbidities after neonatal bloodstream infections (BSIs), understood as any newly infectious focus or organ dysfunction directly related to BSIs but not occur concurrently. However, these bloodstream-associated infectious complications (BSICs) contribute significantly to increased hospital stay, cost, and final mortality. We performed an observational cohort study of unselected neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) patients based on records in a large clinical database. All neonates hospitalized in our NICU with BSI between 2006 and 2013 were reviewed, and those who developed BSICs were analyzed to identify the clinical characteristics and outcomes. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify independent risk factors for BSICs. Of 975 episodes of neonatal BSI, 101 (10.4%) BSICs occurred in 93 neonates with a median interval of 3 days (range, 0–17 days) after onset of BSI and included newly infectious focuses in 40 episodes (39.6%), major organ dysfunctions after septic shock in 36 episodes (35.6%), and neurological complications after meningitis or septic shock in 34 episodes (33.7%). All patients with BSICs encountered various morbidities, which subsequently resulted in in-hospital death in 30 (32.3%) neonates, critical discharge in 4 (4.3%), and persistent sequelae in 17 (18.3%). After multivariate logistic regression analysis, independent risk factors for BSICs included initial inappropriate antibiotics (odds ratio [OR], 5.54; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.40–9.01), BSI with septic shock (OR, 5.75; 95% CI, 3.51–9.40), and BSI concurrent with meningitis (OR, 9.20; 95% CI, 4.33–19.56). It is worth noting that a percentage of neonates with BSI encountered subsequent sequelae or died of infections complications, which were significantly associated with initial inappropriate antibiotic therapy, septic shock, and the occurrence of meningitis. Further investigation is

  15. Efficacy of an infection control programme in reducing nosocomial bloodstream infections in a Senegalese neonatal unit.

    PubMed

    Landre-Peigne, C; Ka, A S; Peigne, V; Bougere, J; Seye, M N; Imbert, P

    2011-10-01

    Neonatal nosocomial infections are public health threats in the developing world, and successful interventions are rarely reported. A before-and-after study was conducted in the neonatal unit of the Hôpital Principal de Dakar, Senegal to assess the efficacy of a multi-faceted hospital infection control programme implemented from March to May 2005. The interventions included clustering of nursing care, a simple algorithm for empirical therapy of suspected early-onset sepsis, minimal invasive care and promotion of early discharge of neonates. Data on nosocomial bloodstream infections, mortality, bacterial resistance and antibiotic use were collected before and after implementation of the infection control programme. One hundred and twenty-five infants were admitted immediately before the programme (Period 1, January-February 2005) and 148 infants were admitted immediately after the programme (Period 2, June-July 2005). The two groups of infants were comparable in terms of reason for admission and birth weight. After implementation of the infection control programme, the overall rate of nosocomial bloodstream infections decreased from 8.8% to 2.0% (P=0.01), and the rate of nosocomial bloodstream infections/patient-day decreased from 10.9 to 2.9/1000 patient-days (P=0.03). Overall mortality rates did not differ significantly. The proportion of neonates who received antimicrobial therapy for suspected early-onset sepsis decreased significantly from 100% to 51% of at-risk infants (P<0.001). The incidence of drug-resistant bacteria was significantly lower after implementation of the programme (79% vs 12%; P<0.001), and remained low one year later. In this neonatal unit, simple, low-cost and sustainable interventions led to the control of a high incidence of bacterial nosocomial bloodstream infections, and the efficacy of these interventions was long-lasting. Such interventions could be extended to other low-income countries.

  16. Genotypic diversity of anaerobic isolates from bloodstream infections.

    PubMed

    Simmon, Keith E; Mirrett, Stanley; Reller, L Barth; Petti, Cathy A

    2008-05-01

    Accurate species determination for anaerobes from blood culture bottles has become increasingly important with the reemergence of anaerobic bacteremia and prevalence of multiple-drug-resistant microorganisms. Our knowledge of the taxonomical diversity of anaerobes that cause bloodstream infections is extremely limited, because identification historically has relied on conventional methods. Over a 5-year period, we profiled anaerobic bacteremia at a large tertiary care hospital with 16S rRNA gene sequencing to gain a better understanding of the taxonomical diversity of the bacteria. Of 316 isolates, 16S rRNA gene sequencing and phylogenetic analysis identified 316 (100%) to the genus or taxonomical group level and 289 (91%) to the species level. Conventional methods identified 279 (88%) to the genus level and 208 (66%) to the species level; 75 (24%) were misidentified at the species level, and 33 (10%) results were inconclusive. High intragenus variability was observed for Bacteroides and Clostridium species, and high intraspecies variability was observed for Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron and Fusobacterium nucleatum. Sequence-based identification has potential benefits in comparison to conventional methods, because it more accurately characterizes anaerobes within taxonomically related clusters and thereby may enable better correlation with specific clinical syndromes and antibiotic resistance patterns.

  17. Surveillance of Candida spp Bloodstream Infections: Epidemiological Trends and Risk Factors of Death in Two Mexican Tertiary Care Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Corzo-Leon, Dora E.; Alvarado-Matute, Tito; Colombo, Arnaldo L.; Cornejo-Juarez, Patricia; Cortes, Jorge; Echevarria, Juan I.; Guzman-Blanco, Manuel; Macias, Alejandro E.; Nucci, Marcio; Ostrosky-Zeichner, Luis; Ponce-de-Leon, Alfredo; Queiroz-Telles, Flavio; Santolaya, Maria E.; Thompson-Moya, Luis; Tiraboschi, Iris N.; Zurita, Jeannete; Sifuentes-Osornio, Jose

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Larger populations at risk, broader use of antibiotics and longer hospital stays have impacted on the incidence of Candida sp. bloodstream infections (CBSI). Objective To determine clinical and epidemiologic characteristics of patients with CBSI in two tertiary care reference medical institutions in Mexico City. Design Prospective and observational laboratory-based surveillance study conducted from 07/2008 to 06/2010. Methods All patients with CBSI were included. Identification and antifungal susceptibility were performed using CLSI M27-A3 standard procedures. Frequencies, Mann-Whitney U test or T test were used as needed. Risk factors were determined with multivariable analysis and binary logistic regression analysis. Results CBSI represented 3.8% of nosocomial bloodstream infections. Cumulative incidence was 2.8 per 1000 discharges (incidence rate: 0.38 per 1000 patient-days). C. albicans was the predominant species (46%), followed by C. tropicalis (26%). C. glabrata was isolated from patients with diabetes (50%), and elderly patients. Sixty-four patients (86%) received antifungals. Amphotericin-B deoxycholate (AmBD) was the most commonly used agent (66%). Overall mortality rate reached 46%, and risk factors for death were APACHE II score ≥16 (OR = 6.94, CI95% = 2.34–20.58, p<0.0001), and liver disease (OR = 186.11, CI95% = 7.61–4550.20, p = 0.001). Full susceptibility to fluconazole, AmBD and echinocandins among C. albicans, C. tropicalis, and C. parapsilosis was observed. Conclusions The cumulative incidence rate in these centers was higher than other reports from tertiary care hospitals from Latin America. Knowledge of local epidemiologic patterns permits the design of more specific strategies for prevention and preemptive therapy of CBSI. PMID:24830654

  18. Selective photoinactivation of Candida albicans in the non-vertebrate host infection model Galleria mellonella

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Candida spp. are recognized as a primary agent of severe fungal infection in immunocompromised patients, and are the fourth most common cause of bloodstream infections. Our study explores treatment with photodynamic therapy (PDT) as an innovative antimicrobial technology that employs a nontoxic dye, termed a photosensitizer (PS), followed by irradiation with harmless visible light. After photoactivation, the PS produces either singlet oxygen or other reactive oxygen species (ROS) that primarily react with the pathogen cell wall, promoting permeabilization of the membrane and cell death. The emergence of antifungal-resistant Candida strains has motivated the study of antimicrobial PDT (aPDT) as an alternative treatment of these infections. We employed the invertebrate wax moth Galleria mellonella as an in vivo model to study the effects of aPDT against C. albicans infection. The effects of aPDT combined with conventional antifungal drugs were also evaluated in G. mellonella. Results We verified that methylene blue-mediated aPDT prolonged the survival of C. albicans infected G. mellonella larvae. The fungal burden of G. mellonella hemolymph was reduced after aPDT in infected larvae. A fluconazole-resistant C. albicans strain was used to test the combination of aPDT and fluconazole. Administration of fluconazole either before or after exposing the larvae to aPDT significantly prolonged the survival of the larvae compared to either treatment alone. Conclusions G. mellonella is a useful in vivo model to evaluate aPDT as a treatment regimen for Candida infections. The data suggests that combined aPDT and antifungal therapy could be an alternative approach to antifungal-resistant Candida strains. PMID:24083556

  19. Developments for improved diagnosis of bacterial bloodstream infections.

    PubMed

    Loonen, A J M; Wolffs, P F G; Bruggeman, C A; van den Brule, A J C

    2014-10-01

    Bloodstream infections (BSIs) are associated with high mortality and increased healthcare costs. Optimal management of BSI depends on several factors including recognition of the disease, laboratory tests and treatment. Rapid and accurate identification of the etiologic agent is crucial to be able to initiate pathogen specific antibiotic therapy and decrease mortality rates. Furthermore, appropriate treatment might slow down the emergence of antibiotic resistant strains. Culture-based methods are still considered to be the "gold standard" for the detection and identification of pathogens causing BSI. Positive blood cultures are used for Gram-staining. Subsequently, positive blood culture material is subcultured on solid media, and (semi-automated) biochemical testing is performed for species identification. Finally, a complete antibiotic susceptibility profile can be provided based on cultured colonies, which allows the start of pathogen-tailored antibiotic therapy. This conventional workflow is extremely time-consuming and can take up to several days. Furthermore, fastidious and slow-growing microorganisms, as well as antibiotic pre-treated samples can lead to false-negative results. The main aim of this review is to present different strategies to improve the conventional laboratory diagnostic steps for BSI. These approaches include protein-based (MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry) and nucleic acid-based (polymerase chain reaction [PCR]) identification from subculture, blood cultures, and whole blood to decrease time to results. Pathogen enrichment and DNA isolation methods, to enable optimal pathogen DNA recovery from whole blood, are described. In addition, the use of biomarkers as patient pre-selection tools for molecular assays are discussed. PMID:24848132

  20. Echinocandin to fluconazole step-down therapy in critically ill patients with invasive, susceptible Candida albicans infections.

    PubMed

    van der Geest, Patrick J; Rijnders, Bart J A; Vonk, Alieke G; Groeneveld, A B Johan

    2016-03-01

    Invasive Candida spp. infections are increasingly diagnosed in critically ill patients. For initial treatment, an echinocandin is recommended with a possible step-down to fluconazole when the patients' condition is improving and the isolate appears susceptible, but there are no data to support such policy. We studied the safety and efficacy of step-down therapy in critically ill patients with culture proven deep seated or bloodstream infections by C. albicans susceptible to fluconazole. All patients admitted into the intensive care unit from January 2010 to December 2014, who had a culture proven invasive C. albicans infection and received initial treatment with an echinocandin for at least 4 days were included. Data on patient characteristics, treatment and vital outcomes were assessed. Of the 56 patients, 32 received step-down fluconazole therapy, at median day 5, whereas the echinocandin was continued in the other 24. No differences where seen in baseline characteristics or risk factors for invasive C. albicans infection between the two groups. Response rates were similar and no difference where seen in 28-day or 90-day mortality between the groups. Step-down therapy to fluconazole may be safe and effective in critically ill patients with invasive infections by C. albicans, susceptible to fluconazole, who have clinically improved as early as 4 days after start of treatment with an echinocandin.

  1. Predictive value of superficial cultures to anticipate tunneled hemodialysis catheter-related bloodstream infection.

    PubMed

    Bouza, Emilio; Rojas, Loreto; Guembe, María; Marín, Mercedes; Anaya, Fernando; Luño, José; López, Juan M; Muñoz, Patricia

    2014-03-01

    We performed a prospective study in patients with tunneled catheters to assess the validity of Gram stain and superficial culture for anticipating catheter exit-site infection and hemodialysis catheter-related bloodstream infection. The sensitivity and negative predictive value were high, and we succeeded in identifying a subpopulation at low risk of infection.

  2. Biofilms formed by Candida albicans bloodstream isolates display phenotypic and transcriptional heterogeneity that are associated with resistance and pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Candida albicans infections have become increasingly recognised as being biofilm related. Recent studies have shown that there is a relationship between biofilm formation and poor clinical outcomes in patients infected with biofilm proficient strains. Here we have investigated a panel of clinical isolates in an attempt to evaluate their phenotypic and transcriptional properties in an attempt to differentiate and define levels of biofilm formation. Results Biofilm formation was shown to be heterogeneous; with isolates being defined as either high or low biofilm formers (LBF and HBF) based on different biomass quantification. These categories could also be differentiated using a cell surface hydrophobicity assay with 24 h biofilms. HBF isolates were more resistance to amphotericin B (AMB) treatment than LBF, but not voriconazole (VRZ). In a Galleria mellonella model of infection HBF mortality was significantly increased in comparison to LBF. Histological analysis of the HBF showed hyphal elements intertwined indicative of the biofilm phenotype. Transcriptional analysis of 23 genes implicated in biofilm formation showed no significant differential expression profiles between LBF and HBF, except for Cdr1 at 4 and 24 h. Cluster analysis showed similar patterns of expression for different functional classes of genes, though correlation analysis of the 4 h biofilms with overall biomass at 24 h showed that 7 genes were correlated with high levels of biofilm, including Als3, Eap1, Cph1, Sap5, Plb1, Cdr1 and Zap1. Conclusions Our findings show that biofilm formation is variable amongst C. albicans isolates, and categorising isolates depending on this can be used to predict how pathogenic the isolate will behave clinically. We have shown that looking at individual genes in less informative than looking at multiple genes when trying to categorise isolates at LBF or HBF. These findings are important when developing biofilm-specific diagnostics as these could be

  3. Prevention of bloodstream infections by photodynamic inactivation of multiresistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa in burn wounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, M. C. E.; Prates, R. A.; Toffoli, D. J.; Courrol, L. C.; Ribeiro, M. S.

    2010-02-01

    Bloodstream infections are potentially life-threatening diseases. They can cause serious secondary infections, and may result in endocarditis, severe sepsis or toxic-shock syndrome. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen and one of the most important etiological factors responsible for nosocomial infections, mainly in immuno-compromissed hosts, characteristic of patients with severe burns. Its multiresistance to antibiotics produces many therapeutic problems, and for this reason, the development of an alternative method to antibiotic therapy is needed. Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) may be an effective and alternative therapeutic option to prevent bloodstream infections in patients with severe burns. In this study we report the use of PDI to prevent bloodstream infections in mice with third-degree burns. Burns were produced on the back of the animals and they were infected with 109 cfu/mL of multi-resistant (MR) P. aeruginosa. Fifteen animals were divided into 3 groups: control, PDT blue and PDT red. PDT was performed thirty minutes after bacterial inoculation using 10μM HB:La+3 and a light-emitting diode (LED) emitting at λ=460nm+/-20nm and a LED emitting at λ=645 nm+/-10nm for 120s. Blood of mice were colected at 7h, 10h, 15h, 18h and 22h pos-infection (p.i.) for bacterial counting. Control group presented 1×104 cfu/mL in bloodstream at 7h p.i. increasing to 1×106 at 22h, while mice PDT-treated did not present any bacteria at 7h; only at 22h p.i. they presented 1×104cfu/mL. These results suggest that HB:La+3 associated to blue LED or red LED is effective to delay and diminish MR P.aeruginosa bloodstream invasion in third-degree-burned mice.

  4. Challenges in anti-infective development in the era of bad bugs, no drugs: a regulatory perspective using the example of bloodstream infection as an indication.

    PubMed

    Boucher, Helen W

    2010-01-01

    Bloodstream infections present many challenges to clinicians. The number of hospitalized patients with bloodstream infection continues to increase, and the number of newly available antimicrobial agents to treat these particularly lethal infections and many other serious infections continues to decrease. Drug-development programs for bloodstream infection that have adhered to existing regulatory guidelines have not been significantly successful. This article examines the regulatory history of the bloodstream infection indication as an example of the challenges faced by individuals and sponsors developing drugs for treatment of the current spectrum of antimicrobial-resistant infections, with the goal of providing insight into development pathways for agents targeting drug-resistant bacterial pathogens. Disease-specific and pathogen-specific indications are discussed, and recent regulatory approvals for bloodstream infection caused by vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus are reviewed. PMID:20067391

  5. Prevention of catheter-related bloodstream infections in patients on hemodialysis: challenges and management strategies

    PubMed Central

    Soi, Vivek; Moore, Carol L; Kumbar, Lalathakasha; Yee, Jerry

    2016-01-01

    Catheter-related bloodstream infections are a significant source of morbidity and mortality in the end-stage renal disease population. Although alternative accesses to undergoing renal replacement therapy exist, many patients begin hemodialysis with a dialysis catheter due to logistic and physiologic factors involved in arteriovenous fistula creation and maturation. Colonization of catheters via skin flora leads to the production of biofilm, which acts as a reservoir for virulent bacteria. Preventative therapies center on appropriate catheter maintenance, infection control measures, and early removal of devices as patients transition to other access. Despite best efforts, when conservative measures fail to prevent infections in a high-risk population, antimicrobial lock therapy should be considered as an option to combat catheter-related bloodstream infections. PMID:27143948

  6. Severe Community-Acquired Bloodstream Infection with Acinetobacter ursingii in Person who Injects Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Salzer, Helmut J.F.; Rolling, Thierry; Schmiedel, Stefan; Klupp, Eva-Maria; Lange, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    We report a community-acquired bloodstream infection with Acinteobacter ursingii in an HIV-negative woman who injected drugs. The infection was successfully treated with meropenem. Species identification was performed by using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Improved identification of Acinetobacter spp. by using this method will help identify clinical effects of this underdiagnosed pathogen. PMID:26689082

  7. Protective and pathologic immune responses against Candida albicans infection.

    PubMed

    Ashman, Robert B

    2008-05-01

    Candida albicans is an important opportunistic fungal pathogen. Clinical observations have indicated that both innate and adaptive immune responses are involved in recovery from initial infection, but analysis in murine models has shown that the contribution of the two arms of the cellular immune response differ in oral, vaginal, and systemic infections. The relative contributions of T cells and phagocytic cells, and the cytokines that mediate their interactions are discussed for each of the different manifestations of the disease, and the consequences of infection, in terms of protection and pathology, are evaluated.

  8. Th1-Th17 cells mediate protective adaptive immunity against Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lin; Ibrahim, Ashraf S; Xu, Xin; Farber, Joshua M; Avanesian, Valentina; Baquir, Beverlie; Fu, Yue; French, Samuel W; Edwards, John E; Spellberg, Brad

    2009-12-01

    We sought to define protective mechanisms of immunity to Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans bloodstream infections in mice immunized with the recombinant N-terminus of Als3p (rAls3p-N) vaccine plus aluminum hydroxide (Al(OH(3)) adjuvant, or adjuvant controls. Deficiency of IFN-gamma but not IL-17A enhanced susceptibility of control mice to both infections. However, vaccine-induced protective immunity against both infections required CD4+ T-cell-derived IFN-gamma and IL-17A, and functional phagocytic effectors. Vaccination primed Th1, Th17, and Th1/17 lymphocytes, which produced pro-inflammatory cytokines that enhanced phagocytic killing of both organisms. Vaccinated, infected mice had increased IFN-gamma, IL-17, and KC, increased neutrophil influx, and decreased organism burden in tissues. In summary, rAls3p-N vaccination induced a Th1/Th17 response, resulting in recruitment and activation of phagocytes at sites of infection, and more effective clearance of S. aureus and C. albicans from tissues. Thus, vaccine-mediated adaptive immunity can protect against both infections by targeting microbes for destruction by innate effectors.

  9. Assessing the necessity of the standardized infection ratio for reporting central line-associated bloodstream infections.

    PubMed

    Saman, Daniel M; Kavanagh, Kevin T

    2013-01-01

    This brief article presents results that support the contention that risk adjustment via the standardized infection ratio (SIR) for the reporting of central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) may be no more predictive than standard rate adjustments utilizing CLABSIs per central line days (i.e., CLABSI rates). Recent data posted on the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Hospital Compare website showed that nearly 70% of 1721 reporting hospitals with at least 1000 central line days had five or fewer infections during 2011. These hospitals had 39.3% of the total central line days and a significantly lower SIR than poorer performing hospitals with six or more CLABSIs (p<0.0001). In addition, 19 hospitals are presented which had central line days between 9000 to over 22,000 that also had zero to three CLABSIs. Some of these hospitals were university referral centers and inner city facilities. There was great variation of CLABSI cases among US hospitals. Evidence is mounting that all hospitals should be able to achieve a near zero incidence of CLABSIs and that these infections may in fact be near 'never events', which begs whether risk adjustment with the SIR is needed and whether it adds more information than does rate adjustment using CLABSI rates.

  10. Second-Generation central venous catheter in the prevention of bloodstream infection: a systematic review 1

    PubMed Central

    Stocco, Janislei Gislei Dorociaki; Hoers, Hellen; Pott, Franciele Soares; Crozeta, Karla; Barbosa, Dulce Aparecida; Meier, Marineli Joaquim

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to evaluate the effectiveness and safety in the use of second-generation central venous catheters impregnated in clorhexidine and silver sulfadiazine when compared with other catheters, being them impregnated or not, in order to prevent the bloodstream infection prevention. Method: systematic review with meta-analysis. Databases searched: MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, LILACS/SciELO, Cochrane CENTRAL; search in Congress Proceedings and records from Clinical Trials. Results: 1.235 studies were identified, 97 were pre-selected and 4 were included. In catheter-related bloodstream infection, there was no statistical significance between second-generation impregnated catheter compared with the non-impregnated ones, absolute relative risk 1,5% confidence interval 95% (3%-1%), relative risk 0,68 (confidence interval 95%, 0,40-1,15) and number needed to treat 66. In the sensitivity analysis, there was less bloodstream infection in impregnated catheters (relative risk 0,50, confidence interval 95%, 0,26-0,96). Lower colonization, absolute relative risk 9,6% (confidence interval 95%, 10% to 4%), relative risk 0,51 (confidence interval 95% from 0,38-0,85) and number needed to treat 5. Conclusion: the use of second-generation catheters was effective in reducing the catheter colonization and infection when a sensitivity analysis is performed. Future clinical trials are suggested to evaluate sepsis rates, mortality and adverse effects. PMID:27508901

  11. Activity of daptomycin against staphylococci collected from bloodstream infections in Spanish medical centers.

    PubMed

    Picazo, Juan J; Betriu, Carmen; Culebras, Esther; Rodríguez-Avial, Iciar; Gómez, María; López, Fátima

    2009-08-01

    We used the broth microdilution method to determine the MICs of daptomycin and 13 comparator agents against 319 methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus isolates, 201 methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) isolates, and 183 coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS). Isolates were consecutively collected from bloodstream infections in 39 Spanish medical centers during a 3-month period (March through May 2008). Among MRSA, 1 isolate with intermediate susceptibility to vancomycin and 6 isolates resistant to linezolid were found. Nonsusceptibility to teicoplanin was detected in 3.9% of CoNS. Daptomycin was highly active against the staphylococcal blood isolates tested-all were inhibited at the daptomycin susceptibility breakpoint of < or = 1 microg/mL. Daptomycin retained its activity against the isolates that were resistant to teicoplanin or linezolid, or that had reduced susceptibility to vancomycin. These data suggest that daptomycin could be useful for the treatment of bloodstream infections caused by staphylococci. PMID:19631100

  12. Rapid and Selective Detection of Pathogenic Bacteria in Bloodstream Infections with Aptamer-Based Recognition.

    PubMed

    Shen, Haijing; Wang, Jie; Liu, Haoyang; Li, Zhihao; Jiang, Fenglei; Wang, Fu-Bing; Yuan, Quan

    2016-08-01

    Sepsis and bacteremia are life-threatening clinical syndromes associated with significant patient morbidity and mortality. Rapid and sensitive detection of pathogenic bacteria is the key to improve patient survival rates. Herein, we have rationally constructed a simple aptamer-based capture platform to shorten the time needed for confirmation of bacterial bloodstream infection in clinical blood samples. This capture platform is made of a mesoporous TiO2-coated magnetic nanoparticle and is modified with target aptamer. It features excellent bacterial enrichment efficiency of about 80% even at low bacterial concentrations (10-2000 CFU mL(-1)). More importantly, the bacteria can be enriched within 2 h, and the time for bacterial identification is effectively shortened in comparison to the "gold standard" in clinical diagnosis of bloodstream infection. The aptamer-based capture platform may pave a way for the detection of biomarkers and find potential applications in disease diagnosis. PMID:27411775

  13. Persistent Bloodstream Infection with Kocuria rhizophila Related to a Damaged Central Catheter

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Karsten; Mérens, Audrey; Ferroni, Agnès; Dubern, Béatrice; Vu-Thien, Hoang

    2012-01-01

    A case of persistent bloodstream infection with Kocuria rhizophila related to a damaged central venous catheter in a 3-year-old girl with Hirschsprung's disease is reported. The strain was identified as K. rhizophila by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry. Arbitrarily primed PCR analysis showed a clonal strain. The repeated septic episodes were resolved with the catheter repair. PMID:22259211

  14. Cost-Effectiveness of Surveillance for Bloodstream Infections for Sepsis Management in Low-Resource Settings

    PubMed Central

    Penno, Erin C.; Baird, Sarah J.; Crump, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial sepsis is a leading cause of mortality among febrile patients in low- and middle-income countries, but blood culture services are not widely available. Consequently, empiric antimicrobial management of suspected bloodstream infection is based on generic guidelines that are rarely informed by local data on etiology and patterns of antimicrobial resistance. To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of surveillance for bloodstream infections to inform empiric management of suspected sepsis in low-resource areas, we compared costs and outcomes of generic antimicrobial management with management informed by local data on etiology and patterns of antimicrobial resistance. We applied a decision tree model to a hypothetical population of febrile patients presenting at the district hospital level in Africa. We found that the evidence-based regimen saved 534 more lives per 100,000 patients at an additional cost of $25.35 per patient, resulting in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $4,739. This ratio compares favorably to standard cost-effectiveness thresholds, but should ultimately be compared with other policy-relevant alternatives to determine whether routine surveillance for bloodstream infections is a cost-effective strategy in the African context. PMID:26175032

  15. Cost-Effectiveness of Surveillance for Bloodstream Infections for Sepsis Management in Low-Resource Settings.

    PubMed

    Penno, Erin C; Baird, Sarah J; Crump, John A

    2015-10-01

    Bacterial sepsis is a leading cause of mortality among febrile patients in low- and middle-income countries, but blood culture services are not widely available. Consequently, empiric antimicrobial management of suspected bloodstream infection is based on generic guidelines that are rarely informed by local data on etiology and patterns of antimicrobial resistance. To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of surveillance for bloodstream infections to inform empiric management of suspected sepsis in low-resource areas, we compared costs and outcomes of generic antimicrobial management with management informed by local data on etiology and patterns of antimicrobial resistance. We applied a decision tree model to a hypothetical population of febrile patients presenting at the district hospital level in Africa. We found that the evidence-based regimen saved 534 more lives per 100,000 patients at an additional cost of $25.35 per patient, resulting in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $4,739. This ratio compares favorably to standard cost-effectiveness thresholds, but should ultimately be compared with other policy-relevant alternatives to determine whether routine surveillance for bloodstream infections is a cost-effective strategy in the African context.

  16. Cost-Effectiveness of Surveillance for Bloodstream Infections for Sepsis Management in Low-Resource Settings.

    PubMed

    Penno, Erin C; Baird, Sarah J; Crump, John A

    2015-10-01

    Bacterial sepsis is a leading cause of mortality among febrile patients in low- and middle-income countries, but blood culture services are not widely available. Consequently, empiric antimicrobial management of suspected bloodstream infection is based on generic guidelines that are rarely informed by local data on etiology and patterns of antimicrobial resistance. To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of surveillance for bloodstream infections to inform empiric management of suspected sepsis in low-resource areas, we compared costs and outcomes of generic antimicrobial management with management informed by local data on etiology and patterns of antimicrobial resistance. We applied a decision tree model to a hypothetical population of febrile patients presenting at the district hospital level in Africa. We found that the evidence-based regimen saved 534 more lives per 100,000 patients at an additional cost of $25.35 per patient, resulting in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $4,739. This ratio compares favorably to standard cost-effectiveness thresholds, but should ultimately be compared with other policy-relevant alternatives to determine whether routine surveillance for bloodstream infections is a cost-effective strategy in the African context. PMID:26175032

  17. Impact of fluoroquinolone resistance in Gram-negative bloodstream infections on healthcare utilization.

    PubMed

    Brigmon, M M; Bookstaver, P Brandon; Kohn, J; Albrecht, H; Al-Hasan, M N

    2015-09-01

    There has been a concerning increase in fluoroquinolone resistance among Gram-negative bloodstream isolates. This retrospective cohort study examines the implications of fluoroquinolone resistance on use of healthcare resources in patients with Gram-negative bloodstream infections (BSI). Hospitalized adults with first episodes of community-onset Gram-negative BSI from 2010 to 2012 at Palmetto Health Hospitals in Columbia, SC, USA were identified. Multivariate linear regression was used to examine risk factors for prolonged hospital length of stay (HLOS) in survivors of Gram-negative BSI. Among 474 unique patients, 384 (81%) and 90 (19%) had BSI due to fluoroquinolone-susceptible (FQ-S) and fluoroquinolone non-susceptible (FQ-NS) Gram-negative bacilli, respectively. The FQ-NS bloodstream isolates, particularly Escherichia coli, were more likely than FQ-S isolates to be multi-drug resistant (56% versus 6%, p < 0.001). Compared with patients with BSI due to FQ-S bloodstream isolates, those with FQ-NS isolates were more likely to receive inappropriate empirical antimicrobial therapy (26% versus 3%, p < 0.001), have longer mean HLOS (11.6 versus 9.3 days, p 0.03) and treatment duration with intravenous antibiotics during hospitalization (9.1 versus 7.1 days, p 0.001), and use outpatient intravenous antibiotics at hospital discharge (15% versus 8%, p 0.05). After adjustments in the multivariate model, inappropriate empirical antimicrobial therapy was an independent risk factor for prolonged HLOS in survivors of Gram-negative BSI (parameter estimate 3.65 days, 95% CI 0.43-6.86). Multi-drug resistance among FQ-NS bloodstream isolates limits both empirical and definitive antimicrobial treatment options and poses excessive burdens on the healthcare system.

  18. Intra-amniotic Candida albicans infection induces mucosal injury and inflammation in the ovine fetal intestine

    PubMed Central

    Nikiforou, Maria; Jacobs, Esmee M.R.; Kemp, Matthew W.; Hornef, Mathias W.; Payne, Matthew S.; Saito, Masatoshi; Newnham, John P.; Janssen, Leon E.W.; Jobe, Alan H.; Kallapur, Suhas G.; Kramer, Boris W.; Wolfs, Tim G.A.M.

    2016-01-01

    Chorioamnionitis is caused by intrauterine infection with microorganisms including Candida albicans (C.albicans). Chorioamnionitis is associated with postnatal intestinal pathologies including necrotizing enterocolitis. The underlying mechanisms by which intra-amniotic C.albicans infection adversely affects the fetal gut remain unknown. Therefore, we assessed whether intra-amniotic C.albicans infection would cause intestinal inflammation and mucosal injury in an ovine model. Additionally, we tested whether treatment with the fungistatic fluconazole ameliorated the adverse intestinal outcome of intra-amniotic C.albicans infection. Pregnant sheep received intra-amniotic injections with 107 colony-forming units C.albicans or saline at 3 or 5 days before preterm delivery at 122 days of gestation. Fetuses were given intra-amniotic and intra-peritoneal fluconazole treatments 2 days after intra-amniotic administration of C.albicans. Intra-amniotic C.albicans caused intestinal colonization and invasive growth within the fetal gut with mucosal injury and intestinal inflammation, characterized by increased CD3+ lymphocytes, MPO+ cells and elevated TNF-α and IL-17 mRNA levels. Fluconazole treatment in utero decreased intestinal C.albicans colonization, mucosal injury but failed to attenuate intestinal inflammation. Intra-amniotic C.albicans caused intestinal infection, injury and inflammation. Fluconazole treatment decreased mucosal injury but failed to ameliorate C.albicans-mediated mucosal inflammation emphasizing the need to optimize the applied antifungal therapeutic strategy. PMID:27411776

  19. National Bloodstream Infection Surveillance in Switzerland 2008-2014: Different Patterns and Trends for University and Community Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Buetti, Niccolò; Marschall, Jonas; Atkinson, Andrew; Kronenberg, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE To characterize the epidemiology of bloodstream infections in Switzerland, comparing selected pathogens in community and university hospitals. DESIGN Observational, retrospective, multicenter laboratory surveillance study. METHODS Data on bloodstream infections from 2008 through 2014 were obtained from the Swiss infection surveillance system, which is part of the Swiss Centre for Antibiotic Resistance (ANRESIS). We compared pathogen prevalences across 26 acute care hospitals. A subanalysis for community-acquired and hospital-acquired bloodstream infections in community and university hospitals was performed. RESULTS A total of 42,802 bloodstream infection episodes were analyzed. The most common etiologies were Escherichia coli (28.3%), Staphylococcus aureus (12.4%), and polymicrobial bloodstream infections (11.4%). The proportion of E. coli increased from 27.5% in 2008 to 29.6% in 2014 (P = .04). E. coli and S. aureus were more commonly reported in community than university hospitals (34.3% vs 22.7%, P<.001 and 13.9% vs 11.1%, P<.001, respectively). Fifty percent of episodes were community-acquired, with E. coli again being more common in community hospitals (41.0% vs 32.4%, P<.001). The proportion of E. coli in community-acquired bloodstream infections increased in community hospitals only. Community-acquired polymicrobial infections (9.9% vs 5.6%, P<.001) and community-acquired coagulase-negative staphylococci (6.7% vs 3.4%, P<0.001) were more prevalent in university hospitals. CONCLUSIONS The role of E. coli as predominant pathogen in bloodstream infections has become more pronounced. There are distinct patterns in community and university hospitals, potentially influencing empirical antibiotic treatment. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;37:1060-1067.

  20. Rat indwelling urinary catheter model of Candida albicans biofilm infection.

    PubMed

    Nett, Jeniel E; Brooks, Erin G; Cabezas-Olcoz, Jonathan; Sanchez, Hiram; Zarnowski, Robert; Marchillo, Karen; Andes, David R

    2014-12-01

    Indwelling urinary catheters are commonly used in the management of hospitalized patients. Candida can adhere to the device surface and propagate as a biofilm. These Candida biofilm communities differ from free-floating Candida, exhibiting high tolerance to antifungal therapy. The significance of catheter-associated candiduria is often unclear, and treatment may be problematic considering the biofilm drug-resistant phenotype. Here we describe a rodent model for the study of urinary catheter-associated Candida albicans biofilm infection that mimics this common process in patients. In the setting of a functioning, indwelling urinary catheter in a rat, Candida proliferated as a biofilm on the device surface. Characteristic biofilm architecture was observed, including adherent, filamentous cells embedded in an extracellular matrix. Similar to what occurs in human patients, animals with this infection developed candiduria and pyuria. Infection progressed to cystitis, and a biofilmlike covering was observed over the bladder surface. Furthermore, large numbers of C. albicans cells were dispersed into the urine from either the catheter or bladder wall biofilm over the infection period. We successfully utilized the model to test the efficacy of antifungals, analyze transcriptional patterns, and examine the phenotype of a genetic mutant. The model should be useful for future investigations involving the pathogenesis, diagnosis, therapy, prevention, and drug resistance of Candida biofilms in the urinary tract.

  1. Risk Factors and Outcomes for Bloodstream Infections Secondary to Clostridium difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Alessandro; Iraci, Federica; Carfagna, Paolo; Goldoni, Paola; Vullo, Vincenzo; Venditti, Mario

    2015-01-01

    We determined the incidence, risk factors, and outcomes of bloodstream infections (BSI) subsequent to Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). We performed a retrospective study of all patients with definite diagnosis of CDI admitted from January 2014 to December 2014 in two large hospitals in Rome. Two groups of patients were analyzed: those with CDI and subsequent BSI (CDI/BSI+) and those with CDI and no evidence of primary BSI (CDI/BSI−). Data about clinical features, microbiology, treatments, and mortality were obtained. Overall, 393 cases of CDI were included in the final analysis: 72 developed a primary nosocomial BSI, while 321 had CDI without microbiological and clinical evidence of BSI. Etiologic agents of BSI were Candida species (47.3%), Enterobacteriaceae (19.4%), enterococci (13.9%), and mixed infections (19.4%). In multivariate analysis, ribotype 027 status (odds ratio [OR], 6.5), CDI recurrence (OR, 5.5), severe CDI infection (OR, 8.3), and oral vancomycin at >500 mg/day (OR, 3.1) were recognized as factors independently associated with the development of nosocomial BSI. Thirty-day mortality from CDI diagnosis was higher for patients of the CDI/BSI+ group than for the controls (38.9 versus 13.1%; P < 0.001). Among patients of the CDI/BSI+ group, mortality attributable to primary BSI was as high as 57%. Our findings suggest that severe CDI is complicated by the development of nosocomial BSI. Candida species and enteric bacteria appear to be the leading causative pathogens and are associated with poor outcomes. PMID:26482315

  2. Circulating inflammatory mediators in patients with fever: predicting bloodstream infection.

    PubMed

    Groeneveld, A B; Bossink, A W; van Mierlo, G J; Hack, C E

    2001-11-01

    The systemic host response to microbial infection involves clinical signs and symptoms of infection, including fever and elevated white blood cell (WBC) counts. In addition, inflammatory mediators are released, including activated complement product C3a, interleukin 6 (IL-6), and the acute-phase reactant secretory phospholipase A(2) (sPLA(2)). To compare the value of the latter with the former in predicting (the degree of) microbial infection at the bedside, we determined clinical variables and took blood samples daily for 3 consecutive days in 300 patients with a new fever (>38.0 degrees C rectally or >38.3 degrees C axillary). Microbiological culture results for 7 days after inclusion were collected. Patients were divided into clinical and microbial categories: those without and with a clinical focus of infection and those with negative cultures, with positive local cultures or specific stains for fungal (n = 13) or tuberculous infections (n = 1), and with positive blood cultures, including one patient with malaria parasitemia. The area under the curve (AUC) of the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) for prediction of positive cultures was 0.60 (P < 0.005) for peak temperature and 0.59 (P < 0.01) for peak WBC count, 0.60 (P < 0.005) for peak C3a, 0.63 (P < 0.001) for peak IL-6, and 0.61 (P < 0.001) for peak sPLA(2). The AUC under the ROC curve for prediction of positive blood cultures was 0.68 (P < 0.001) for peak temperature and 0.56 for peak WBC count (P < 0.05). The AUC for peak C3a was 0.69, that for peak IL-6 was 0.70, and that for sPLA(2) was 0.67 (for all, P < 0.001). The degree of microbial invasion is thus a major determinant of the clinical and inflammatory host response in patients with fever. Moreover, circulating inflammatory mediators such as C3a and IL-6 may help to predict positive blood cultures, together with clinical signs and symptoms of the host response to microbial infection, even before culture results are available. This may help in

  3. Implantable vascular access port-associated bloodstream infection caused by Rhizobium radiobacter: a case report.

    PubMed

    Karadağ-Öncel, Eda; Ozsürekci, Yasemin; Aytaç, Selin; Kara, Ateş; Cengiz, Ali Bülent; Ceyhan, Mehmet

    2013-01-01

    Rhizobium radiobacter is an uncommon opportunistic pathogen present in soil. It has been particularly associated with indwelling intravascular devices in immunocompromised patients. Reported herein is a case of R. radiobacter bloodstream infection associated with an implantable vascular access port, which was easily controlled with antimicrobial treatment and did not require removal of the intravascular device, in a child diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Also included is a review of the pertinent literature regarding the clinical presentation and management of R. radiobacter infections in the childhood period.

  4. The Value of Combining Blood Culture and SeptiFast Data for Predicting Complicated Bloodstream Infections Caused by Gram-Positive Bacteria or Candida Species

    PubMed Central

    Marín, Mercedes; Kestler, Martha; Alcalá, Luis; Rodriguez-Créixems, Marta; Bouza, Emilio

    2013-01-01

    Management of complicated bloodstream infections requires more aggressive treatment than uncomplicated bloodstream infections. We assessed the value of follow-up blood culture in bloodstream infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus spp., Streptococcus spp., and Candida spp. and studied the value of persistence of DNA in blood (using SeptiFast) for predicting complicated bloodstream infections. Patients with bloodstream infections caused by these microorganisms were enrolled prospectively. After the first positive blood culture, samples were obtained every third day to perform blood culture and SeptiFast analyses simultaneously. Patients were followed to detect complicated bloodstream infection. The study sample comprised 119 patients. One-third of the patients developed complicated bloodstream infections. The values of persistently positive tests to predict complicated bloodstream infections were as follows: SeptiFast positive samples (sensitivity, 56%; specificity, 79.5%; positive predictive value, 54%; negative predictive value, 80.5%; accuracy, 72.3%) and positive blood cultures (sensitivity, 30.5%; specificity, 92.8%; positive predictive value, 64%; negative predictive value, 75.5%; accuracy, 73.9%). Multivariate analysis showed that patients with a positive SeptiFast result between days 3 and 7 had an almost 8-fold-higher risk of developing a complicated bloodstream infection. In S. aureus, the combination of both techniques to exclude endovascular complications was significantly better than the use of blood culture alone. We obtained a score with variables selected by the multivariate model. With a cutoff of 7, the negative predictive value for complicated bloodstream infection was 96.6%. Patients with a positive SeptiFast result between days 3 and 7 after a positive blood culture have an almost 8-fold-higher risk of developing complicated bloodstream infections. A score combining clinical data with the SeptiFast result may improve the

  5. Imaging morphogenesis of Candida albicans during infection in a live animal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Soumya; Dolan, Kristy; Foster, Thomas H.; Wellington, Melanie

    2010-01-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic human fungal pathogen that requires an intact host immune response to prevent disease. Thus, studying host-pathogen interactions is critical to understanding and preventing this disease. We report a new model infection system in which ongoing C. albicans infections can be imaged at high spatial resolution in the ears of living mice. Intradermal inoculation into mouse ears with a C. albicans strain expressing green fluorescent protein results in systemic C. albicans infection that can be imaged in vivo using confocal microscopy. We observed filamentous growth of the organism in vivo as well as formation of microabscesses. This model system will allow us to gain significant new information about C. albicans pathogenesis through studies of host-C. albicans interactions in the native environment.

  6. Imaging morphogenesis of Candida albicans during infection in a live animal.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Soumya; Dolan, Kristy; Foster, Thomas H; Wellington, Melanie

    2010-01-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic human fungal pathogen that requires an intact host immune response to prevent disease. Thus, studying host-pathogen interactions is critical to understanding and preventing this disease. We report a new model infection system in which ongoing C. albicans infections can be imaged at high spatial resolution in the ears of living mice. Intradermal inoculation into mouse ears with a C. albicans strain expressing green fluorescent protein results in systemic C. albicans infection that can be imaged in vivo using confocal microscopy. We observed filamentous growth of the organism in vivo as well as formation of microabscesses. This model system will allow us to gain significant new information about C. albicans pathogenesis through studies of host-C. albicans interactions in the native environment.

  7. Epidemiological characteristics of bloodstream infections in patients with different degrees of liver disease.

    PubMed

    Brandolini, Micaela; Corbella, Marta; De Silvestri, Annalisa; Tinelli, Carmine; Albonico, Giulia; Albertini, Riccardo; Ludovisi, Serena; Bruno, Raffaele; Marone, Piero; Minoli, Lorenzo; Seminari, Elena

    2015-10-01

    Observational retrospective study to evaluate the etiology, the outcome and the risk factors of bloodstream infections (BSIs) in patients with liver disease. One hundred and forty-eight BSIs were diagnosed (infection rate: 0.60 per 100 days of hospital stay), 62 BSIs (41.9 %) were associated with Gram-positive bacteria (infection rate: 0.25 per 100 days of hospital stay) and 80 (54.4 %) with Gram-negative bacteria (infection rate: 0.32 per 100 days of hospital stay). Admission-associated mortality was higher in patients with BSI than in those without BSI (20.6 versus 5.0 %, p < 0.001). Patients with cirrhosis had an increased risk to develop a BSI compared with patients with chronic hepatitis, specifically for Gram-positive (and Staphylococcus spp)-related BSI.

  8. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry for the rapid identification of yeasts causing bloodstream infections.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, A K; Paul, S; Sood, P; Rudramurthy, S M; Rajbanshi, A; Jillwin, T J; Chakrabarti, A

    2015-04-01

    Few studies have systematically standardised and evaluated matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) for identification of yeasts from bloodstream infections. This is rapidly becoming pertinent for early identification of yeasts and appropriate antifungal therapy. We used 354 yeast strains identified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) sequencing for standardisation and 367 blind clinical strains for validation of our MALDI-TOF MS protocols. We also evaluated different sample preparation methods and found the on-plate formic acid extraction method as most cost- and time-efficient. The MALDI-TOF assay correctly identified 98.9% of PCR-sequenced yeasts. Novel main spectrum projections (MSP) were developed for Candida auris, C. viswanathii and Kodamaea ohmeri, which were missing from the Bruker MALDI-TOF MS database. Spectral cut-offs computed by receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis showed 99.4% to 100% accuracy at a log score of ≥ 1.70 for C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis, C. pelliculosa, C. orthopsilosis, C. albicans, C. rugosa, C. guilliermondii, C. lipolytica, C. metapsilosis, C. nivariensis. The differences in the species-specific scores of our standardisation and blind validation strains were not statistically significant, implying the optimal performance of our test protocol. The MSPs of the three new species also were validated. We conclude that MALDI-TOF MS is a rapid, accurate and reliable tool for identification of bloodstream yeasts. With proper standardisation, validation and regular database expansion, its efficiency can be further enhanced.

  9. Antimicrobial blue light therapy for Candida albicans burn infection in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yunsong; Wang, Yucheng; Murray, Clinton K.; Hamblin, Michael R.; Gu, Ying; Dai, Tianhong

    2015-05-01

    In this preclinical study, we investigated the utility of antimicrobial blue light therapy for Candida albicans infection in acutely burned mice. A bioluminescent strain of C. albicans was used. The susceptibilities to blue light inactivation were compared between C. albicans and human keratinocyte. In vitro serial passaging of C. albicans on blue light exposure was performed to evaluate the potential development of resistance to blue light inactivation. A mouse model of acute thermal burn injury infected with the bioluminescent strain of C. albicans was developed. Blue light (415 nm) was delivered to mouse burns for decolonization of C. albicans. Bioluminescence imaging was used to monitor in real time the extent of fungal infection in mouse burns. Experimental results showed that C. albicans was approximately 42-fold more susceptible to blue light inactivation in vitro than human keratinocyte (P=0.0022). Serial passaging of C. albicans on blue light exposure implied a tendency for the fungal susceptibility to blue light inactivation to decrease with the numbers of passages. Blue light reduced fungal burden by over 4-log10 (99.99%) in acute mouse burns infected with C. albicans in comparison to infected mouse burns without blue light therapy (P=0.015).

  10. Decreasing central line-associated bloodstream infections in the Non-ICU population.

    PubMed

    Medina, Alma; Serratt, Teresa; Pelter, Michele; Brancamp, Tami

    2014-01-01

    Central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) rates above the national average precipitated a quality improvement project aimed at reducing this trend. We implemented daily chlorhexidine bathing and used 4 strategies to promote a change in practice and culture in our medical/surgical units. These strategies include the following: (1) staff education, (2) leadership support, (3) resource availability, and (4) increased awareness and accountability. Since implementing these strategies, there has been a significant reduction in CLABSI rates in the medical/surgical units.

  11. Candida kefyr as a cause of bloodstream infection and adjunctive role of biomarkers in its diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Khan, Z; Ahmad, S; Al-Obaid, K; Joseph, L; Chandy, R

    2015-03-01

    A rare case of bloodstream infection caused by Candida kefyr is described. The diagnosis was established by repeatedly isolating the yeast in blood cultures and by detecting C. kefyr-specific DNA in serum samples. Demonstration of elevated serum levels of β-D-glucan and Candida mannan also provided additional diagnostic evidence. The identity of the isolates was confirmed by PCR sequencing of the ITS region of rDNA. This is the first report of C. kefyr candidemia from Kuwait and the Middle East. The report highlights emerging clinical significance of rare Candida spp. in etiology of candidemia and reinforces the adjunctive role of biomarkers in diagnosis.

  12. Risk and Prognosis of Bloodstream Infections among Patients on Chronic Hemodialysis: A Population-Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Skov Dalgaard, Lars; Nørgaard, Mette; Jespersen, Bente; Jensen-Fangel, Søren; Østergaard, Lars Jørgen; Schønheyder, Henrik Carl; Søgaard, Ole Schmeltz

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Infections are common complications among patients on chronic hemodialysis. This population-based cohort study aims to estimate risk and case fatality of bloodstream infection among chronic hemodialysis patients. Methods In this population-based cohort study we identified residents with end-stage renal disease in Central and North Jutland, Denmark who had hemodialysis as first renal replacement therapy (hemodialysis patients) during 1995–2010. For each hemodialysis patient, we sampled 19 persons from the general population matched on age, gender, and municipality. Information on positive blood cultures was obtained from regional microbiology databases. All persons were observed from cohort entry until first episode of bloodstream infection, emigration, death, or end of hemodialysis treatment, whichever came first. Incidence-rates and incidence-rate ratios were computed and risk factors for bloodstream infection assessed by Poisson regression. Case fatality was compared by Cox regression. Results Among 1792 hemodialysis patients and 33 618 matched population controls, we identified 461 and 1126 first episodes of bloodstream infection, respectively. Incidence rates of first episode of bloodstream infection were 13.7 (95% confidence interval (CI), 12.5–15.0) per 100 person-years among hemodialysis patients and 0.53 (95% CI, 0.50–0.56) per 100 person-years among population controls. In hemodialysis patients, the most common causative microorganisms were Staphylococcus aureus (43.8%) and Escherichia coli (12.6%). The 30-day case fatality was similar among hemodialysis patients and population controls 16% (95% CI, 13%–20%) vs. 18% (95% CI, 15%–20%). Conclusions Hemodialysis patients have extraordinary high risk of bloodstream infection while short-term case fatality following is similar to that of population controls. PMID:25910221

  13. Whole-Genome Sequencing to Determine Origin of Multinational Outbreak of Sarocladium kiliense Bloodstream Infections

    PubMed Central

    Roe, Chandler C.; Smith, Rachel M.; Vallabhaneni, Snigdha; Duarte, Carolina; Escandón, Patricia; Castañeda, Elizabeth; Gómez, Beatriz L.; de Bedout, Catalina; López, Luisa F.; Salas, Valentina; Hederra, Luz Maria; Fernández, Jorge; Pidal, Paola; Hormazabel, Juan Carlos; Otaíza-O’Ryan, Fernando; Vannberg, Fredrik O.; Gillece, John; Lemmer, Darrin; Driebe, Elizabeth M.; Engelthaler, David M.; Litvintseva, Anastasia P.

    2016-01-01

    We used whole-genome sequence typing (WGST) to investigate an outbreak of Sarocladium kiliense bloodstream infections (BSI) associated with receipt of contaminated antinausea medication among oncology patients in Colombia and Chile during 2013–2014. Twenty-five outbreak isolates (18 from patients and 7 from medication vials) and 11 control isolates unrelated to this outbreak were subjected to WGST to elucidate a source of infection. All outbreak isolates were nearly indistinguishable (<5 single-nucleotide polymorphisms), and >21,000 single-nucleotide polymorphisms were identified from unrelated control isolates, suggesting a point source for this outbreak. S. kiliense has been previously implicated in healthcare-related infections; however, the lack of available typing methods has precluded the ability to substantiate point sources. WGST for outbreak investigation caused by eukaryotic pathogens without reference genomes or existing genotyping methods enables accurate source identification to guide implementation of appropriate control and prevention measures. PMID:26891230

  14. Systemic Candida albicans infection in two alpacas (Lama pacos).

    PubMed

    Kramer, K; Haist, V; Roth, C; Schröder, C; Siesenhop, U; Baumgärtner, W; Wohlsein, P

    2008-01-01

    Systemic Candida albicans infection was diagnosed in two adult alpaca stallions originating from different herds. Case 1 had a history of chronic dermatitis with unknown aetiology that had been treated long-term with glucocorticoids. Case 2 had suffered from transient facial paralysis and psoroptic mange of the external ear. Both animals died suddenly after recovering from their initial disorders. Necropsy examination of case 1 revealed multifocal erosive dermatitis, thoracic and abdominal serofibrinous effusions, and multiple suppurative foci in lung, myocardium, kidney, pancreas and brain. Case 2 had multiple ulcers of the third gastric compartment and focal suppurative nephritis. Additionally, moderate depletion of lymphoid organs was observed in both animals. Histologically, suppurative to necrotizing inflammation with necrotizing vasculitis was present in the grossly affected organs of both animals. Yeast, pseudohyphae and branching hyphae were present within these lesions and C. albicans was isolated from lesional tissue of both animals. The primary site of Candida invasion was not determined in case 1, but the most likely portal of entry in case 2 was the gastric ulcers. Depletion of lymphoid tissue suggested a possible underlying immune suppression in both animals.

  15. Bloodstream-To-Eye Infections Are Facilitated by Outer Blood-Retinal Barrier Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Coburn, Phillip S.; Wiskur, Brandt J.; Miller, Frederick C.; LaGrow, Austin L.; Astley, Roger A.; Elliott, Michael H.; Callegan, Michelle C.

    2016-01-01

    The blood-retinal barrier (BRB) functions to maintain the immune privilege of the eye, which is necessary for normal vision. The outer BRB is formed by tightly-associated retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells which limit transport within the retinal environment, maintaining retinal function and viability. Retinal microvascular complications and RPE dysfunction resulting from diabetes and diabetic retinopathy cause permeability changes in the BRB that compromise barrier function. Diabetes is the major predisposing condition underlying endogenous bacterial endophthalmitis (EBE), a blinding intraocular infection resulting from bacterial invasion of the eye from the bloodstream. However, significant numbers of EBE cases occur in non-diabetics. In this work, we hypothesized that dysfunction of the outer BRB may be associated with EBE development. To disrupt the RPE component of the outer BRB in vivo, sodium iodate (NaIO3) was administered to C57BL/6J mice. NaIO3-treated and untreated mice were intravenously injected with 108 colony forming units (cfu) of Staphylococcus aureus or Klebsiella pneumoniae. At 4 and 6 days postinfection, EBE was observed in NaIO3-treated mice after infection with K. pneumoniae and S. aureus, although the incidence was higher following S. aureus infection. Invasion of the eye was observed in control mice following S. aureus infection, but not in control mice following K. pneumoniae infection. Immunohistochemistry and FITC-dextran conjugate transmigration assays of human RPE barriers after infection with an exoprotein-deficient agr/sar mutant of S. aureus suggested that S. aureus exoproteins may be required for the loss of the tight junction protein, ZO-1, and for permeability of this in vitro barrier. Our results support the clinical findings that for both pathogens, complications which result in BRB permeability increase the likelihood of bacterial transmigration from the bloodstream into the eye. For S. aureus, however, BRB permeability is

  16. Bloodstream Infections in Community Hospitals in the 21st Century: A Multicenter Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Deverick J.; Moehring, Rebekah W.; Sloane, Richard; Schmader, Kenneth E.; Weber, David J.; Fowler, Vance G.; Smathers, Emily; Sexton, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Background While the majority of healthcare in the US is provided in community hospitals, the epidemiology and treatment of bloodstream infections in this setting is unknown. Methods and Findings We undertook this multicenter, retrospective cohort study to 1) describe the epidemiology of bloodstream infections (BSI) in a network of community hospitals and 2) determine risk factors for inappropriate therapy for bloodstream infections in community hospitals. 1,470 patients were identified as having a BSI in 9 community hospitals in the southeastern US from 2003 through 2006. The majority of BSIs were community-onset, healthcare associated (n = 823, 56%); 432 (29%) patients had community-acquired BSI, and 215 (15%) had hospital-onset, healthcare-associated BSI. BSIs due to multidrug-resistant pathogens occurred in 340 patients (23%). Overall, the three most common pathogens were S. aureus (n = 428, 28%), E. coli (n = 359, 24%), coagulase-negative Staphylococci (n = 148, 10%), though type of infecting organism varied by location of acquisition (e.g., community-acquired). Inappropriate empiric antimicrobial therapy was given to 542 (38%) patients. Proportions of inappropriate therapy varied by hospital (median = 33%, range 21–71%). Multivariate logistic regression identified the following factors independently associated with failure to receive appropriate empiric antimicrobial therapy: hospital where the patient received care (p<0.001), assistance with ≥3 ADLs (p = 0.005), Charlson score (p = 0.05), community-onset, healthcare-associated infection (p = 0.01), and hospital-onset, healthcare-associated infection (p = 0.02). Important interaction was observed between Charlson score and location of acquisition. Conclusions Our large, multicenter study provides the most complete picture of BSIs in community hospitals in the US to date. The epidemiology of BSIs in community hospitals has changed: community-onset, healthcare

  17. Bacterial bloodstream infections in HIV-infected adults attending a Lagos teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Adeyemi, Adeleye I; Sulaiman, Akanmu A; Solomon, Bamiro B; Chinedu, Obosi A; Victor, Inem A

    2010-08-01

    An investigation was carried out during October 2005-September 2006 to determine the prevalence of bloodstream infections in patients attending the outpatient department of the HIV/AIDS clinic at the Lagos University Teaching Hospital in Nigeria. Two hundred and one patients--86 males and 115 females--aged 14-65 years were recruited for the study. Serological diagnosis was carried out on them to confirm their HIV status. Their CD4 counts were done using the micromagnetic bead method. Twenty mL of venous blood sample collected from each patient was inoculated into a pair of Oxoid Signal blood culture bottles for 2-14 days. Thereafter, 0.1 mL of the sample was plated in duplicates on MacConkey, blood and chocolate agar media and incubated at 37 degrees C for 18-24 hours. The CD4+ counts were generally low as 67% of 140 patients sampled had < 200 cells/microL of blood. Twenty-six bacterial isolates were obtained from the blood samples and comprised 15 (58%) coagulase-negative staphylococci as follows: Staphylococcus epidermidis (7), S. cohnii cohnii (1), S. cohnii urealyticum (2), S. chromogenes (1), S. warneri (2), S. scuri (1), and S. xylosus (1). Others were 6 (23%) Gram-negative non-typhoid Salmonella spp., S. Typhimurium (4), S. Enteritidis (2); Pseudomonas fluorescens (1), Escherichia coli (1), Ochrobactrum anthropi (1), Moraxella sp. (1), and Chryseobacterium meningosepticum. Results of antimicrobial susceptibility tests showed that coagulase-negative staphylococci had good sensitivities to vancomycin and most other antibiotics screened but were resistant mainly to ampicilin and tetracycline. The Gram-negative organisms isolated also showed resistance to ampicillin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, and septrin. This study demonstrates that coagulase-negative staphylococci and non-typhoidal Salmonellae are the most common aetiological agents of bacteraemia among HIV-infected adults attending the Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Nigeria. The organisms were

  18. Catheter-related Mycobacterium fortuitum bloodstream infection: rapid identification using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Artacho-Reinoso, M J; Olbrich, P; Solano-Paéz, P; Ybot-Gonzalez, P; Lepe, J A; Neth, O; Aznar, J

    2014-04-01

    We present the case of a 6-year-old boy diagnosed with stage III mediastinal Non Hodgkin Lymphoblastic T cell Lymphoma who suffered from catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBI) due to Mycobacterium fortuitum whilst receiving chemotherapy. Isolation of this rare pathogen was done directly from blood culture and identification was made rapidly within 48 h using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectro-metry as well as specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-reverse hybridization method. This allowed prompt directed antibiotic therapy apart from central venous catheter removal and resulted in an excellent clinical response. This case highlights the potential benefit of using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, a fast, cost-effective and precise methodology, in the diagnosis and subsequent management of invasive bacterial infection. PMID:24554588

  19. Protein A suppresses immune responses during Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection in guinea pigs

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, Hwan Keun; Falugi, Fabiana; Thomer, Lena; Missiakas, Dominique M.; Schneewind, Olaf

    2015-01-06

    Staphylococcus aureus infection is not associated with the development of protective immunity, and disease relapses occur frequently. We hypothesize that protein A, a factor that binds immunoglobulin Fcγ and cross-links VH3 clan B cell receptors (IgM), is the staphylococcal determinant for host immune suppression. To test this, vertebrate IgM was examined for protein A cross-linking. High VH3 binding activity occurred with human and guinea immunoglobulin, whereas mouse and rabbit immunoglobulins displayed little and no binding, respectively. Establishing a guinea pig model of S. aureus bloodstream infection, we show that protein A functions as a virulence determinant and suppresses host Bmore » cell responses. Immunization with SpAKKAA, which cannot bind immunoglobulin, elicits neutralizing antibodies that enable guinea pigs to develop protective immunity.« less

  20. Metagenomic analysis of bloodstream infections in patients with acute leukemia and therapy-induced neutropenia

    PubMed Central

    Gyarmati, P.; Kjellander, C.; Aust, C.; Song, Y.; Öhrmalm, L.; Giske, C. G.

    2016-01-01

    Leukemic patients are often immunocompromised due to underlying conditions, comorbidities and the effects of chemotherapy, and thus at risk for developing systemic infections. Bloodstream infection (BSI) is a severe complication in neutropenic patients, and is associated with increased mortality. BSI is routinely diagnosed with blood culture, which only detects culturable pathogens. We analyzed 27 blood samples from 9 patients with acute leukemia and suspected BSI at different time points of their antimicrobial treatment using shotgun metagenomics sequencing in order to detect unculturable and non-bacterial pathogens. Our findings confirm the presence of bacterial, fungal and viral pathogens alongside antimicrobial resistance genes. Decreased white blood cell (WBC) counts were associated with the presence of microbial DNA, and was inversely proportional to the number of sequencing reads. This study could indicate the use of high-throughput sequencing for personalized antimicrobial treatments in BSIs. PMID:26996149

  1. Evidence-based measures to prevent central line-associated bloodstream infections: a systematic review 1

    PubMed Central

    Perin, Daniele Cristina; Erdmann, Alacoque Lorenzini; Higashi, Giovana Dorneles Callegaro; Sasso, Grace Teresinha Marcon Dal

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to identify evidence-based care to prevent CLABSI among adult patients hospitalized in ICUs. Method: systematic review conducted in the following databases: PubMed, Scopus, Cinahl, Web of Science, Lilacs, Bdenf and Cochrane Studies addressing care and maintenance of central venous catheters, published from January 2011 to July 2014 were searched. The 34 studies identified were organized in an instrument and assessed by using the classification provided by the Joanna Briggs Institute. Results: the studies presented care bundles including elements such as hand hygiene and maximal barrier precautions; multidimensional programs and strategies such as impregnated catheters and bandages and the involvement of facilities in and commitment of staff to preventing infections. Conclusions: care bundles coupled with education and the commitment of both staff and institutions is a strategy that can contribute to decreased rates of central line-associated bloodstream infections among adult patients hospitalized in intensive care units. PMID:27598378

  2. Bacterial bloodstream infections and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern in pediatric hematology/oncology patients after anticancer chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mulla, Naima A; Taj-Aldeen, Saad J; El Shafie, Sittana; Janahi, Mohammed; Al-Nasser, Abdullah A; Chandra, Prem

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Bloodstream infections in pediatric hematology and oncology represent a major problem worldwide, but this has not been studied in Qatar. In this study, we investigated the burden of infection and the resistance pattern in the bacterial etiology, in the only tertiary pediatric hematology and oncology center in Qatar. Methods All pediatric cancer patients (n=185) were evaluated retrospectively during the period 2004–2011; a total of 70 (38%) patients were diagnosed with bloodstream infections. Bacterial etiology was determined, along with their susceptibility patterns. Neutropenia, duration of neutropenia, fever, duration of fever, and C-reactive protein (CRP) were evaluated throughout the study. Results A total of 70 patients (38%) were diagnosed with acute leukemias, lymphomas, solid tumors, or brain tumors; those patients experienced 111 episodes of bacteremia. The most common Gram-positive (n=64 [55%]) isolates were Staphylococcus epidermidis (n=26), Staphylococcus hominis (n=9), and Staphylococcus haemolyticus (n=7), and the common Gram-negative (n=52 [45%]) isolates were Klebsiella pneumoniae (n=14), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n=10), and Escherichia coli (n=7). There was a significant association observed between fever with positive blood culture and different types of cancer (P=0.035). The majority of bacteremia (n=68 [61.3%]) occurred in nonneutropenic episodes. Elevated values of CRP (≥5 mg/L) were detected in 82 (95.3%) episodes and were negatively correlated with absolute neutrophil count (ANC) (r=−0.18; P=0.248) among all cases. However, the infection-related fatality rate was 2.2% (n=4), with three caused by Gram-negative pathogens. Multidrug resistant organisms were implicated in 33 (28.4%) cases and caused three of the mortality cases. Conclusion Multidrug resistant organisms cause mortality in pediatric cancer patients. Investigation of antimicrobial susceptibility of these organisms may guide successful antimicrobial therapy and improve

  3. Sepsis From the Gut: The Enteric Habitat of Bacteria That Cause Late-Onset Neonatal Bloodstream Infections

    PubMed Central

    Carl, Mike A.; Ndao, I. Malick; Springman, A. Cody; Manning, Shannon D.; Johnson, James R.; Johnston, Brian D.; Burnham, Carey-Ann D.; Weinstock, Erica Sodergren; Weinstock, George M.; Wylie, Todd N.; Mitreva, Makedonka; Abubucker, Sahar; Zhou, Yanjiao; Stevens, Harold J.; Hall-Moore, Carla; Julian, Samuel; Shaikh, Nurmohammad; Warner, Barbara B.; Tarr, Phillip I.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Late-onset sepsis is a major problem in neonatology, but the habitat of the pathogens before bloodstream invasion occurs is not well established. Methods. We examined prospectively collected stools from premature infants with sepsis to find pathogens that subsequently invaded their bloodstreams, and sought the same organisms in stools of infants without sepsis. Culture-based techniques were used to isolate stool bacteria that provisionally matched the bloodstream organisms, which were then genome sequenced to confirm or refute commonality. Results. Of 11 children with late-onset neonatal bloodstream infections, 7 produced at least 1 stool that contained group B Streptococcus (GBS), Serratia marcescens, or Escherichia coli before their sepsis episode with provisionally matching organisms. Of 96 overlap comparison subjects without sepsis temporally associated with these cases, 4 were colonized with provisionally matching GBS or S. marcescens. Of 175 comparisons of stools from randomly selected infants without sepsis, 1 contained a GBS (this infant had also served as an overlap comparison subject and both specimens contained provisionally matching GBS). Genome sequencing confirmed common origin of provisionally matching fecal and blood isolates. The invasive E. coli were present in all presepticemic stools since birth, but gut colonization with GBS and S. marcescens occurred closer to time of bloodstream infection. Conclusions. The neonatal gut harbors sepsis-causing pathogens, but such organisms are not inevitable members of the normal microbiota. Surveillance microbiology, decolonization, and augmented hygiene might prevent dissemination of invasive bacteria between and within premature infants. PMID:24647013

  4. [Progress on the role of Toll-like receptors in Candida albicans infections].

    PubMed

    Yun, Zhou; Jianping, Pan

    2016-05-25

    Toll like receptors (TLRs) are expressed mainly on innate immunocytes such as dendritic cells and macrophages, and may have the potential to recognize and bind to pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) from Candida albicans, thereby triggering the downstream signals. The genetic polymorphism of TLRs is associated with susceptibility to Candida albicans. The activation of TLRs by PAMPs from Candida albicans can induce the production of proinflammatory cytokines that play key roles in the anti-infection of Candida albicans. However, in order to evade the immune response of host,Candida albicans can also change its bacterial phase. Understanding of the interaction between TLRs and Candida albicans will provide novel evidence to further clarify the mechanisms of anti-fungal immune response. PMID:27651197

  5. Taurolidine Lock Is Superior to Heparin Lock in the Prevention of Catheter Related Bloodstream Infections and Occlusions

    PubMed Central

    Olthof, Evelyn D.; Versleijen, Michelle W.; Huisman–de Waal, Getty; Feuth, Ton; Kievit, Wietske; Wanten, Geert J. A.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Patients on home parenteral nutrition (HPN) are at risk for catheter-related complications; mainly infections and occlusions. We have previously shown in HPN patients presenting with catheter sepsis that catheter locking with taurolidine dramatically reduced re-infections when compared with heparin. Our HPN population therefore switched from heparin to taurolidine in 2008. The aim of the present study was to compare long-term effects of this catheter lock strategy on the occurrence of catheter-related bloodstream infections and occlusions in HPN patients. Methods Data of catheter-related complications were retrospectively collected from 212 patients who received HPN between January 2000 and November 2011, comprising 545 and 200 catheters during catheter lock therapy with heparin and taurolidine, respectively. We evaluated catheter-related bloodstream infection and occlusion incidence rates using Poisson-normal regression analysis. Incidence rate ratios were calculated by dividing incidence rates of heparin by those of taurolidine, adjusting for underlying disease, use of anticoagulants or immune suppressives, frequency of HPN/fluid administration, composition of infusion fluids, and duration of HPN/fluid use before catheter creation. Results Bloodstream infection incidence rates were 1.1/year for heparin and 0.2/year for taurolidine locked catheters. Occlusion incidence rates were 0.2/year for heparin and 0.1/year for taurolidine locked catheters. Adjusted incidence ratios of heparin compared to taurolidine were 5.9 (95% confidence interval, 3.9–8.7) for bloodstream infections and 1.9 (95% confidence interval, 1.1–3.1) for occlusions. Conclusions Given that no other procedural changes than the catheter lock strategy were implemented during the observation period, these data strongly suggest that taurolidine decreases catheter-related bloodstream infections and occlusions in HPN patients compared with heparin. PMID:25379781

  6. Diagnostic Accuracy of Procalcitonin for Predicting Blood Culture Results in Patients With Suspected Bloodstream Infection

    PubMed Central

    Oussalah, Abderrahim; Ferrand, Janina; Filhine-Tresarrieu, Pierre; Aissa, Nejla; Aimone-Gastin, Isabelle; Namour, Fares; Garcia, Matthieu; Lozniewski, Alain; Guéant, Jean-Louis

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Previous studies have suggested that procalcitonin is a reliable marker for predicting bacteremia. However, these studies have had relatively small sample sizes or focused on a single clinical entity. The primary endpoint of this study was to investigate the diagnostic accuracy of procalcitonin for predicting or excluding clinically relevant pathogen categories in patients with suspected bloodstream infections. The secondary endpoint was to look for organisms significantly associated with internationally validated procalcitonin intervals. We performed a cross-sectional study that included 35,343 consecutive patients who underwent concomitant procalcitonin assays and blood cultures for suspected bloodstream infections. Biochemical and microbiological data were systematically collected in an electronic database and extracted for purposes of this study. Depending on blood culture results, patients were classified into 1 of the 5 following groups: negative blood culture, Gram-positive bacteremia, Gram-negative bacteremia, fungi, and potential contaminants found in blood cultures (PCBCs). The highest procalcitonin concentration was observed in patients with blood cultures growing Gram-negative bacteria (median 2.2 ng/mL [IQR 0.6–12.2]), and the lowest procalcitonin concentration was observed in patients with negative blood cultures (median 0.3 ng/mL [IQR 0.1–1.1]). With optimal thresholds ranging from ≤0.4 to ≤0.75 ng/mL, procalcitonin had a high diagnostic accuracy for excluding all pathogen categories with the following negative predictive values: Gram-negative bacteria (98.9%) (including enterobacteria [99.2%], nonfermenting Gram-negative bacilli [99.7%], and anaerobic bacteria [99.9%]), Gram-positive bacteria (98.4%), and fungi (99.6%). A procalcitonin concentration ≥10 ng/mL was associated with a high risk of Gram-negative (odds ratio 5.98; 95% CI, 5.20–6.88) or Gram-positive (odds ratio 3.64; 95% CI, 3.11–4.26) bacteremia but

  7. Avian pox infection with secondary Candida albicans encephalitis in a juvenile golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos).

    PubMed

    Shrubsole-Cockwill, Alana N; Millins, Caroline; Jardine, Claire; Kachur, Kelti; Parker, Dennilyn L

    2010-03-01

    Abstract: A juvenile golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos) was presented with proliferative epithelial lesions, consistent with avian poxvirus infection, around the eyes, on commissures of the beak, and on both feet. Despite treatment, the eagle declined clinically, and, 15 days after presentation, the eagle began seizuring and was euthanatized because of a poor prognosis. On postmortem examination, avian poxvirus infection was confirmed in the nodular skin lesions, and Candida albicans was cultured from the skin, lungs, and brain. Breaks in the skin barrier from poxvirus infection likely led to secondary infection with C albicans. Systemic vascular dissemination of C albicans to the brain resulted in thrombosis, hemorrhage, local hypoxia, and the clinically observed seizures. The combination of the breach in the primary immune system, immunosuppression, and a prolonged course of antibiotics were contributory factors to the opportunistic fungal infection in this eagle. Candida albicans should be considered as a differential diagnosis for encephalitis in an immunocompromised avian patient. PMID:20496607

  8. Humoral Immunity Links Candida albicans Infection and Celiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fradin, Chantal; Salleron, Julia; Damiens, Sébastien; Moragues, Maria Dolores; Souplet, Vianney; Jouault, Thierry; Robert, Raymond; Dubucquoi, Sylvain; Sendid, Boualem; Colombel, Jean Fréderic; Poulain, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Objective The protein Hwp1, expressed on the pathogenic phase of Candida albicans, presents sequence analogy with the gluten protein gliadin and is also a substrate for transglutaminase. This had led to the suggestion that C. albicans infection (CI) may be a triggering factor for Celiac disease (CeD) onset. We investigated cross-immune reactivity between CeD and CI. Methods Serum IgG levels against recombinant Hwp1 and serological markers of CeD were measured in 87 CeD patients, 41 CI patients, and 98 healthy controls (HC). IgA and IgG were also measured in 20 individuals from each of these groups using microchips sensitized with 38 peptides designed from the N-terminal of Hwp1. Results CI and CeD patients had higher levels of anti-Hwp1 (p=0.0005 and p=0.004) and anti-gliadin (p=0.002 and p=0.0009) antibodies than HC but there was no significant difference between CeD and CI patients. CeD and CI patients had higher levels of anti-transglutaminase IgA than HC (p=0.0001 and p=0.0039). During CI, the increase in anti-Hwp1 paralleled the increase in anti-gliadin antibodies. Microchip analysis showed that CeD patients were more reactive against some Hwp1 peptides than CI patients, and that some deamidated peptides were more reactive than their native analogs. Binding of IgG from CeD patients to Hwp1 peptides was inhibited by γIII gliadin peptides. Conclusions Humoral cross-reactivity between Hwp1 and gliadin was observed during CeD and CI. Increased reactivity to Hwp1 deamidated peptide suggests that transglutaminase is involved in this interplay. These results support the hypothesis that CI may trigger CeD onset in genetically-susceptible individuals. PMID:25793717

  9. CC9 livestock-associated Staphylococcus aureus emerges in bloodstream infections in French patients unconnected with animal farming.

    PubMed

    Lamamy, Cindy; Berthelot, Aline; Bertrand, Xavier; Valentin, Anne-Sophie; Dos Santos, Sandra; Thiais, Sophie; Morange, Virginie; Girard, Nicole; Donnio, Pierre-Yves; Quentin, Roland; Schrenzel, Jacques; François, Patrice; van der Mee-Marquet, Nathalie

    2013-04-01

    We report 4 bloodstream infections associated with CC9 agr type II Staphylococcus aureus in individuals without animal exposure. We demonstrate, by microarray analysis, the presence of egc cluster, fnbA, cap operon, lukS, set2, set12, splE, splD, sak, epiD, and can, genomic features associated with a high virulence potential in humans.

  10. Baicalin prevents Candida albicans infections via increasing its apoptosis rate

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Shulong; Fu, Yingyuan Wu, Xiuzhen; Zhou, Zhixing; Xu, Jing; Zeng, Xiaoping; Kuang, Nanzhen; Zeng, Yurong

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • Baicalin increases the ratio of the G0/G1 stages and C. albicans apoptosis. • Baicalin decreases the proliferation index of C. albicans. • Baicalin inhibits the biosynthesis of DNA, RNA and protein in C. albicans. • Baicalin depresses Succinate Dehydrogenase and Ca{sup 2+}–Mg{sup 2+} ATPase in C. albicans. • Baicalin increases the endocytic free Ca{sup 2+} concentration in C. albicans. - Abstract: Background: These experiments were employed to explore the mechanisms underlying baicalin action on Candida albicans. Methodology and principal findings: We detected the baicalin inhibition effects on three isotope-labeled precursors of {sup 3}H-UdR, {sup 3}H-TdR and {sup 3}H-leucine incorporation into C. albicans using the isotope incorporation technology. The activities of Succinate Dehydrogenase (SDH), cytochrome oxidase (CCO) and Ca{sup 2+}–Mg{sup 2+} ATPase, cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} concentration, the cell cycle and apoptosis, as well as the ultrastructure of C.albicans were also tested. We found that baicalin inhibited {sup 3}H-UdR, {sup 3}H-TdR and {sup 3}H-leucine incorporation into C.albicans (P < 0.005). The activities of the SDH and Ca{sup 2+}–Mg{sup 2+} ATPase of C.albicans in baicalin groups were lower than those in control group (P < 0.05). Ca{sup 2+} concentrations of C. albicans in baicalin groups were much higher than those in control group (P < 0.05). The ratio of C.albicans at the G0/G1 stage increased in baicalin groups in dose dependent manner (P < 0.01). There were a significant differences in the apoptosis rate of C.albicans between baicalin and control groups (P < 0.01). After 12–48 h incubation with baicalin (1 mg/ml), C. albicans shown to be markedly damaged under transmission electron micrographs. Innovation and significance: Baicalin can increase the apoptosis rate of C. albicans. These effects of Baicalin may involved in its inhibiting the activities of the SDH and Ca{sup 2+}–Mg{sup 2+} ATPase, increasing

  11. Rate of FKS Mutations among Consecutive Candida Isolates Causing Bloodstream Infection.

    PubMed

    Shields, Ryan K; Nguyen, M Hong; Press, Ellen G; Cumbie, Richard; Driscoll, Eileen; Pasculle, A William; Clancy, Cornelius J

    2015-12-01

    Precise FKS mutation rates among Candida species are undefined because studies have not systematically screened consecutive, disease-causing isolates. The Sensititre YeastOne (SYO) assay measures echinocandin MICs against Candida with less variability than reference broth microdilution methods. However, clinical breakpoint MICs may overstate caspofungin nonsusceptibility compared to other agents. Our objectives were to determine Candida FKS mutation rates by studying consecutive bloodstream isolates and to determine if discrepant susceptibility results were associated with FKS mutations. FKS hot spots were sequenced in echinocandin-intermediate and -resistant isolates and those from patients with breakthrough candidemia or ≥ 3 days of prior echinocandin exposure. Overall, 453 isolates from 384 patients underwent susceptibility testing; 16% were echinocandin intermediate or resistant. Intermediate susceptibility rates were higher for Candida glabrata than for other species (P < 0.0001) and higher for caspofungin than for other agents (P < 0.0001). Resistance rates were similar between agents. FKS mutations were detected in 5% of sequenced isolates and 2% of isolates overall. Corresponding rates among C. glabrata isolates were 8% and 4%, respectively. Among Candida albicans isolates, rates were 5% and <1%, respectively. Mutations occurred exclusively with prior echinocandin exposure and were not detected in other species. Isolates with discrepant susceptibility results did not harbor FKS mutations. Mutation rates among isolates resistant to ≥ 2, 1, and 0 agents were 75%, 13%, and 0%, respectively. In conclusion, FKS mutations were uncommon among non-C. glabrata species, even with prior echinocandin exposure. Discrepancies in echinocandin susceptibility by SYO testing were not driven by mutations and likely reflect imprecise caspofungin clinical breakpoints.

  12. Prosthetic joint infections with osteomyelitis due to Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Lerch, K; Kalteis, T; Schubert, T; Lehn, N; Grifka, J

    2003-12-01

    We report the case of a 78-year-old woman who suffered from a severe soft tissue and bone infection of her left knee 3 years after a total knee-joint replacement without loosening of her endoprosthesis. Cultures from joint aspiration and tissue specimen identified Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans. Direct microscopic examination of vital spongy bone and fibrous tissue revealed microabscesses and seeds of yeasts inside the fatty marrow and interface. After removal of the prosthesis several soft tissue and bone specimens were taken during planned re-operations. The histological examination showed no morphological changing, no reduction or extinction of the yeast cells under fluconazole therapy with a dosage of 6 mg kg(-1) body weight (400 mg daily). Curing of the fungal infection with eradication of the yeasts in the bony specimens was achieved with higher doses of 12 mg kg(-1) body weight (800 mg day(-1)) over a 2 month regimen in combination with repeated surgical debridements.

  13. Brachyspira pilosicoli bloodstream infections: Case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Bait-Merabet, Lilia; Thille, Arnaud; Legrand, Patrick; Brun-Buisson, Christian; Cattoir, Vincent

    2008-01-01

    Brachyspira pilosicoli is the etiologic agent of human and animal intestinal spirochetosis and is rarely implicated as a cause of bacteremia. Here, we describe the case of a B. pilosicoli spirochetemia in a 53-year-old male patient suffering from cardiogenic shock. This fastidious bacterium was isolated from blood, likely after translocation from the intestinal tract. Blood cultures were positive after 5 days of incubation (one day after the patient's death), highlighting the problem of the recovery of such type of fastidious bacterium. Identification was achieved by molecular methods (16S rRNA sequencing). A review of the English literature found only 8 cases of bacteremia caused by B. pilosicoli, mostly in immunocompromised or critically ill patients. Finally, difficulties in rapid and accurate diagnosis of B. pilosicoli bloodstream infections, in vitro antimicrobial susceptibility of human clinical isolates, and therapeutic options are discussed. PMID:18817558

  14. The Impact of Implementation of Bundle to Reduce Catheter-Related Bloodstream Infection Rates

    PubMed Central

    Menegueti, Mayra Goncalves; Ardison, Kym Marcel Martins; Bellissimo-Rodrigues, Fernando; Gaspar, Gilberto Gambero; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis; Puga, Marcelo Lourencini; Laus, Ana Maria; Basile-Filho, Anibal; Auxiliadora-Martins, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to investigate how control bundles reduce the rate of central venous catheter-associated bloodstream infections (CVC-BSIs) rates in critically ill patients. Methods This is a prospective before-and-after study designed to evaluate whether a set of control measures (bundle) can help prevent CVC-BSI. The bundles included a checklist that aimed to correct practices related to CVC insertion, manipulation, and maintenance based on guidelines of the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Results We examined 123 checklists before and 155 checklists after implementation of the training program. Compared with the pre-intervention period, CVC-BSI rates decreased. Hand hygiene techniques were used correctly. CVC-BSI incidence was 9.3 and 5.1 per 1,000 catheter-days before and after the training program, respectively. Conclusions The implementation of a bundle and training program effectively reduces CVC-BSI rates. PMID:26491498

  15. Predominance of Gram-negative bacilli among patients with catheter-related bloodstream infections.

    PubMed

    Braun, E; Hussein, K; Geffen, Y; Rabino, G; Bar-Lavie, Y; Paul, M

    2014-10-01

    We evaluated changes in the epidemiology of catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs) between 1996 and 2012 in a tertiary care centre in Israel. The cohort included 1754 episodes of CRBSI. The incidence of CRBSIs decreased throughout the study period, whereas 30-day mortality following bacteraemia increased. There was a linear shift toward predominance of Gram-negative bacilli throughout the study period (p for trend<0.001). In 1996, 68% (68/100) of CRBSIs were caused by Gram-positive cocci, whereas in 2012 77.8% (28/26) were caused by Gram-negative bacilli. The shift towards Gram-negative CRBSIs and the associated mortality mandates that empirical treatment for CRBSIs be directed by local epidemiology.

  16. What is new for the prevention of catheter-related bloodstream infections?

    PubMed

    Lorente, Leonardo

    2016-03-01

    After the publication in 2011 of latest guidelines of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for the prevention of catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI) some interesting findings have been published in that field. There has been published that skin disinfection with chlorhexidine alcohol reduced the risk of CRBSI compared to skin disinfection with povidone iodine alcohol, that the implementation of quality improvement interventions reduced the incidence of CRBSI, that the use of chlorhexidine impregnated dressing compared to standard dressings reduced the risk of CRBSI and catheter related cost in an health economic model, and that the use of antimicrobial/antiseptic impregnated catheters reduced the incidence of CRBSI and catheter related cost in clinical studies. PMID:27127772

  17. Population-Based Epidemiology and Microbiology of Community-Onset Bloodstream Infections

    PubMed Central

    Church, Deirdre L.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Bloodstream infection (BSI) is a major cause of infectious disease morbidity and mortality worldwide. While a positive blood culture is mandatory for establishment of the presence of a BSI, there are a number of determinants that must be considered for establishment of this entity. Community-onset BSIs are those that occur in outpatients or are first identified <48 h after admission to hospital, and they may be subclassified further as health care associated, when they occur in patients with significant prior health care exposure, or community associated, in other cases. The most common causes of community-onset BSI include Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus pneumoniae. Antimicrobial-resistant organisms, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and extended-spectrum β-lactamase/metallo-β-lactamase/carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae, have emerged as important etiologies of community-onset BSI. PMID:25278570

  18. Essential Functional Modules for Pathogenic and Defensive Mechanisms in Candida albicans Infections

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, I-Chun; Lin, Che; Chuang, Yung-Jen

    2014-01-01

    The clinical and biological significance of the study of fungal pathogen Candida albicans (C. albicans) has markedly increased. However, the explicit pathogenic and invasive mechanisms of such host-pathogen interactions have not yet been fully elucidated. Therefore, the essential functional modules involved in C. albicans-zebrafish interactions were investigated in this study. Adopting a systems biology approach, the early-stage and late-stage protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks for both C. albicans and zebrafish were constructed. By comparing PPI networks at the early and late stages of the infection process, several critical functional modules were identified in both pathogenic and defensive mechanisms. Functional modules in C. albicans, like those involved in hyphal morphogenesis, ion and small molecule transport, protein secretion, and shifts in carbon utilization, were seen to play important roles in pathogen invasion and damage caused to host cells. Moreover, the functional modules in zebrafish, such as those involved in immune response, apoptosis mechanisms, ion transport, protein secretion, and hemostasis-related processes, were found to be significant as defensive mechanisms during C. albicans infection. The essential functional modules thus determined could provide insights into the molecular mechanisms of host-pathogen interactions during the infection process and thereby devise potential therapeutic strategies to treat C. albicans infection. PMID:24757665

  19. Multiplex PCR To Diagnose Bloodstream Infections in Patients Admitted from the Emergency Department with Sepsis ▿

    PubMed Central

    Tsalik, Ephraim L.; Jones, Daphne; Nicholson, Bradly; Waring, Lynette; Liesenfeld, Oliver; Park, Lawrence P.; Glickman, Seth W.; Caram, Lauren B.; Langley, Raymond J.; van Velkinburgh, Jennifer C.; Cairns, Charles B.; Rivers, Emanuel P.; Otero, Ronny M.; Kingsmore, Stephen F.; Lalani, Tahaniyat; Fowler, Vance G.; Woods, Christopher W.

    2010-01-01

    Sepsis is caused by a heterogeneous group of infectious etiologies. Early diagnosis and the provision of appropriate antimicrobial therapy correlate with positive clinical outcomes. Current microbiological techniques are limited in their diagnostic capacities and timeliness. Multiplex PCR has the potential to rapidly identify bloodstream infections and fill this diagnostic gap. We identified patients from two large academic hospital emergency departments with suspected sepsis. The results of a multiplex PCR that could detect 25 bacterial and fungal pathogens were compared to those of blood culture. The results were analyzed with respect to the likelihood of infection, sepsis severity, the site of infection, and the effect of prior antibiotic therapy. We enrolled 306 subjects with suspected sepsis. Of these, 43 were later determined not to have infectious etiologies. Of the remaining 263 subjects, 70% had sepsis, 16% had severe sepsis, and 14% had septic shock. The majority had a definite infection (41.5%) or a probable infection (30.7%). Blood culture and PCR performed similarly with samples from patients with clinically defined infections (areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves, 0.64 and 0.60, respectively). However, blood culture identified more cases of septicemia than PCR among patients with an identified infectious etiology (66 and 46, respectively; P = 0.0004). The two tests performed similarly when the results were stratified by sepsis severity or infection site. Blood culture tended to detect infections more frequently among patients who had previously received antibiotics (P = 0.06). Conversely, PCR identified an additional 24 organisms that blood culture failed to detect. Real-time multiplex PCR has the potential to serve as an adjunct to conventional blood culture, adding diagnostic yield and shortening the time to pathogen identification. PMID:19846634

  20. Effect of UV irradiation on lethal infection of mice with Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Denkins, Y M; Kripke, M L

    1993-02-01

    Exposure of mice to UV radiation inhibits the induction and elicitation of the delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response to Candida albicans. To determine whether UV irradiation also affects the pathogenesis of systemic C. albicans infection, C3H mice were exposed to a single dose of 48 kJ/m2 UV-B radiation from FS40 sunlamps 5 days before or 5 days after sensitization with formalin-fixed C. albicans and challenged intravenously (i.v.) with a lethal dose of viable fungi 6 days after sensitization (11 or 1 days after UV irradiation). Exposing unsensitized mice to UV radiation 11 days before lethal challenge had no effect on survival, but the survival time of mice exposed to UV radiation 1 day before challenge was reduced by more than 50%. In the latter group, decreased survival time correlated with persistence of C. albicans in the brain and progressive growth of C. albicans in the kidneys. Sensitization of unirradiated mice with formalin-fixed C. albicans extended their survival time following lethal i.v. challenge with viable C. albicans. Exposing the mice to UV radiation 5 days before sensitization did not abrogate this beneficial effect of sensitization on survival, even though it significantly reduced the DTH response. Thus, immunity to systemic infection did not depend on the ability of the mice to exhibit a DTH response to C. albicans. The beneficial effect of sensitization on survival after lethal infection was abrogated, however, in mice exposed to UV radiation 1 day before lethal challenge with C. albicans. Furthermore, these mice were unable to contain the progressive growth of C. albicans in the kidneys, in contrast to sensitized, unirradiated mice. PMID:8451288

  1. Should we use closed or open infusion containers for prevention of bloodstream infections?

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Hospitalized patients in critical care settings are at risk for bloodstream infections (BSI). Most BSIs originate from a central line (CL), and they increase length of stay, cost, and mortality. Open infusion containers may increase the risk of contamination and administration-related (CLAB) because they allow the entry of air into the system, thereby also providing an opportunity for microbial entry. Closed infusion containers were designed to overcome this flaw. However, open infusion containers are still widely used throughout the world. The objective of the study was to determine the effect of switching from open (glass, burettes, and semi-rigid) infusion containers to closed, fully collapsible, plastic infusion containers (Viaflex®) on the rate and time to onset of central line-associated bloodstream infections CLABs. Methods An open label, prospective cohort, active healthcare-associated infection surveillance, sequential study was conducted in four ICUs in Mexico. Centers for Disease Control National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance Systems definitions were used to define device-associated infections. Results A total of 1,096 adult patients who had a central line in place for >24 hours were enrolled. The CLAB rate was significantly higher during the open versus the closed container period (16.1 versus 3.2 CLAB/1000 central line days; RR = 0.20, 95% CI = 0.11-0.36, P < 0.0001). The probability of developing CLAB remained relatively constant in the closed container period (1.4% Days 2-4 to 0.5% Days 8-10), but increased in the open container period (4.9% Days 2-4 to 5.4% Days 8-10). The chance of acquiring a CLAB was significantly decreased (81%) in the closed container period (Cox proportional hazard ratio 0.19, P < 0.0001). Mortality was statistically significantly lower during the closed versus the open container period (23.4% versus 16.1%; RR = 0.69, 95% CI = 0.54-0.88, P < 0.01). Conclusions Closed infusion containers significantly reduced

  2. Increase of mouse resistance to Candida albicans infection by thymosin alpha 1.

    PubMed Central

    Bistoni, F; Marconi, P; Frati, L; Bonmassar, E; Garaci, E

    1982-01-01

    Studies were carried out to assess the ability of thymosin alpha 1 to prolong the survival of mice challenged with Candida albicans. Two- to four-month-old mice were treated with graded doses of thymosin alpha 1 before, after, or before and after intravenous challenge with C. albicans. Significant resistance ot lethal infection was afforded by 100 micrograms of thymosin alpha 1 per kg given before or before and after challenge, whereas no protection was found in mice treated with thymosin alpha 1 administered at any dose level after inoculation. Pretreatment with thymosin alpha 1 also prevented the increased susceptibility to C. albicans infection of mice pretreated with cyclophosphamide on day -6. The results showed that thymosin alpha 1 was capable of protecting untreated or cyclophosphamide-pretreated mice from C. albicans infection at an optimal dose and schedule of administration. PMID:7085074

  3. Polymorphisms in Fibronectin Binding Proteins A and B among Staphylococcus aureus Bloodstream Isolates Are Not Associated with Arthroplasty Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sharma-Kuinkel, Batu; Park, Lawrence P.; Rude, Thomas H.; Ruffin, Felicia; Hos, Nina J.; Seifert, Harald; Rieg, Siegbert; Kern, Winfried V.; Lower, Steven K.; Fowler, Vance G.; Kaasch, Achim J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in fibronectin binding protein A (fnbA) of Staphylococcus aureus are associated with cardiac device infections. However, the role of fnbA SNPs in S. aureus arthroplasty infection is unknown. Methods Bloodstream S. aureus isolates from a derivation cohort of patients at a single U.S. medical center with S. aureus bacteremia (SAB) and prosthetic hip or knee arthroplasties that were infected (PJI, n = 27) or uninfected (PJU, n = 43) underwent sequencing of fnbA and fnbB. A validation cohort of S. aureus bloodstream PJI (n = 12) and PJU (n = 58) isolates from Germany also underwent fnbA and fnbB sequencing. Results Overall, none of the individual fnbA or fnbB SNPs were significantly associated with the PJI or PJU clinical groups within the derivation cohort. Similarly, none of the individual fnbA or fnbB SNPs were associated with PJI or PJU when the analysis was restricted to patients with either early SAB (i.e., bacteremia occurring <1 year after placement or manipulation of prostheses) or late SAB (i.e., bacteremia >1 year after placement or manipulation of prostheses). Conclusions In contrast to cardiac device infections, there is no association between nonsynonymous SNPs in fnbA or fnbB of bloodstream S. aureus isolates and arthroplasty infection. These results suggest that initial steps leading to S. aureus infection of cardiovascular and orthopedic prostheses may arise by distinct processes. PMID:26606522

  4. Bloodstream infections in intensive care unit patients: distribution and antibiotic resistance of bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Russotto, Vincenzo; Cortegiani, Andrea; Graziano, Giorgio; Saporito, Laura; Raineri, Santi Maurizio; Mammina, Caterina; Giarratano, Antonino

    2015-01-01

    Bloodstream infections (BSIs) are among the leading infections in critically ill patients. The case-fatality rate associated with BSIs in patients admitted to intensive care units (ICUs) reaches 35%–50%. The emergence and diffusion of bacteria with resistance to antibiotics is a global health problem. Multidrug-resistant bacteria were detected in 50.7% of patients with BSIs in a recently published international observational study, with methicillin resistance detected in 48% of Staphylococcus aureus strains, carbapenem resistance detected in 69% of Acinetobacter spp., in 38% of Klebsiella pneumoniae, and in 37% of Pseudomonas spp. Prior hospitalization and antibiotic exposure have been identified as risk factors for infections caused by resistant bacteria in different studies. Patients with BSIs caused by resistant strains showed an increased risk of mortality, which may be explained by a higher incidence of inappropriate empirical therapy in different studies. The molecular genetic characterization of resistant bacteria allows the understanding of the most common mechanisms underlying their resistance and the adoption of surveillance measures. Knowledge of epidemiology, risk factors, mechanisms of resistance, and outcomes of BSIs caused by resistant bacteria may have a major influence on global management of ICU patients. The aim of this review is to provide the clinician an update on BSIs caused by resistant bacteria in ICU patients. PMID:26300651

  5. The Validation of a Novel Surveillance System for Monitoring Bloodstream Infections in the Calgary Zone.

    PubMed

    Leal, Jenine R; Gregson, Daniel B; Church, Deirdre L; Henderson, Elizabeth A; Ross, Terry; Laupland, Kevin B

    2016-01-01

    Background. Electronic surveillance systems (ESSs) that utilize existing information in databases are more efficient than conventional infection surveillance methods. The objective was to assess an ESS for bloodstream infections (BSIs) in the Calgary Zone for its agreement with traditional medical record review. Methods. The ESS was developed by linking related data from regional laboratory and hospital administrative databases and using set definitions for excluding contaminants and duplicate isolates. Infections were classified as hospital-acquired (HA), healthcare-associated community-onset (HCA), or community-acquired (CA). A random sample of patients from the ESS was then compared with independent medical record review. Results. Among the 308 patients selected for comparative review, the ESS identified 318 episodes of BSI of which 130 (40.9%) were CA, 98 (30.8%) were HCA, and 90 (28.3%) were HA. Medical record review identified 313 episodes of which 136 (43.4%) were CA, 97 (30.9%) were HCA, and 80 (25.6%) were HA. Episodes of BSI were concordant in 304 (97%) cases. Overall, there was 85.5% agreement between ESS and medical record review for the classification of where BSIs were acquired (kappa = 0.78, 95% Confidence Interval: 0.75-0.80). Conclusion. This novel ESS identified and classified BSIs with a high degree of accuracy. This system requires additional linkages with other related databases. PMID:27375749

  6. Bloodstream infections in very low birth weight infants with intestinal failure

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Conrad R.; Hansen, Nellie I.; Higgins, Rosemary D.; Bell, Edward F.; Shankaran, Seetha; Laptook, Abbot R.; Walsh, Michele C.; Hale, Ellen C.; Newman, Nancy S.; Das, Abhik; Stoll, Barbara J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To examine pathogens and other characteristics associated with late-onset bloodstream infections (BSI) in infants with intestinal failure (IF) as a consequence of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). Study design Infants 401–1500 grams at birth who survived >72 hours and received care at NICHD Neonatal Research Network centers were studied. Frequency of culture positive BSI and pathogens were compared for infants with medical NEC, NEC managed surgically without IF, and surgical IF. Among infants with IF, duration of parenteral nutrition (PN) and other outcomes were evaluated. Results 932 infants were studied (IF, n=78; surgical NEC without IF, n=452; medical NEC, n=402). The proportion with BSI after NEC diagnosis was higher in infants with IF than with surgical NEC (p=0.007) or medical NEC (p<0.001). Gram positive pathogens were most frequent. Among infants with IF, increased number of infections was associated with longer hospitalization and duration on PN (0, 1, ≥2 infections; median stay (days): 172, 188, 260, p=0.06; median days on PN: 90, 112, 115, p=0.003), and the proportion who achieved full feeds during hospitalization decreased (87%, 67%, 50%, p=0.03). Conclusion Recurrent BSIs are common in VLBW infants with IF. Gram positive bacteria were most commonly identified in these infants. PMID:21840538

  7. Susceptibility to chlorhexidine amongst multidrug-resistant clinical isolates of Staphylococcus epidermidis from bloodstream infections.

    PubMed

    Hijazi, Karolin; Mukhopadhya, Indrani; Abbott, Felicity; Milne, Kathleen; Al-Jabri, Zaaima J; Oggioni, Marco R; Gould, Ian M

    2016-07-01

    The emergence of Staphylococcus isolates with reduced susceptibility to chlorhexidine is being increasingly reported. We present an update to a previous report showing the continuing efficacy of chlorhexidine-based infection control measures against Staphylococcus aureus over 6 years. In this study, qacA/B genes were screened in Staphylococcus isolates collected over another 6 years in the same intensive care unit in Scotland where chlorhexidine baths form an essential component of long-term control of nosocomial infections. Consistent with our previous study, we report minimal presence of qacA/B in S. aureus strains from screening samples and bacteraemia patients but the new finding of a high proportion of qacA/B carriage in Staphylococcus epidermidis associated with reduced susceptibility to chlorhexidine. S. epidermidis isolates positive for qacA/B were clonally diverse, although 65% of isolates belonged to the multidrug-resistant (MDR) clone ST2. These findings raise concerns in relation to the selection of MDR strains by chlorhexidine and are important in the context of recent evidence emphasising the benefits of targeting bloodstream infections associated with coagulase-negative staphylococci.

  8. Ribose 5-Phosphate Isomerase B Knockdown Compromises Trypanosoma brucei Bloodstream Form Infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Loureiro, Inês; Faria, Joana; Clayton, Christine; Macedo-Ribeiro, Sandra; Santarém, Nuno; Roy, Nilanjan; Cordeiro-da-Siva, Anabela; Tavares, Joana

    2015-01-01

    Ribose 5-phosphate isomerase is an enzyme involved in the non-oxidative branch of the pentose phosphate pathway, and catalyzes the inter-conversion of D-ribose 5-phosphate and D-ribulose 5-phosphate. Trypanosomatids, including the agent of African sleeping sickness namely Trypanosoma brucei, have a type B ribose-5-phosphate isomerase. This enzyme is absent from humans, which have a structurally unrelated ribose 5-phosphate isomerase type A, and therefore has been proposed as an attractive drug target waiting further characterization. In this study, Trypanosoma brucei ribose 5-phosphate isomerase B showed in vitro isomerase activity. RNAi against this enzyme reduced parasites' in vitro growth, and more importantly, bloodstream forms infectivity. Mice infected with induced RNAi clones exhibited lower parasitaemia and a prolonged survival compared to control mice. Phenotypic reversion was achieved by complementing induced RNAi clones with an ectopic copy of Trypanosoma cruzi gene. Our results present the first functional characterization of Trypanosoma brucei ribose 5-phosphate isomerase B, and show the relevance of an enzyme belonging to the non-oxidative branch of the pentose phosphate pathway in the context of Trypanosoma brucei infection. PMID:25568941

  9. Ribose 5-phosphate isomerase B knockdown compromises Trypanosoma brucei bloodstream form infectivity.

    PubMed

    Loureiro, Inês; Faria, Joana; Clayton, Christine; Macedo-Ribeiro, Sandra; Santarém, Nuno; Roy, Nilanjan; Cordeiro-da-Siva, Anabela; Tavares, Joana

    2015-01-01

    Ribose 5-phosphate isomerase is an enzyme involved in the non-oxidative branch of the pentose phosphate pathway, and catalyzes the inter-conversion of D-ribose 5-phosphate and D-ribulose 5-phosphate. Trypanosomatids, including the agent of African sleeping sickness namely Trypanosoma brucei, have a type B ribose-5-phosphate isomerase. This enzyme is absent from humans, which have a structurally unrelated ribose 5-phosphate isomerase type A, and therefore has been proposed as an attractive drug target waiting further characterization. In this study, Trypanosoma brucei ribose 5-phosphate isomerase B showed in vitro isomerase activity. RNAi against this enzyme reduced parasites' in vitro growth, and more importantly, bloodstream forms infectivity. Mice infected with induced RNAi clones exhibited lower parasitaemia and a prolonged survival compared to control mice. Phenotypic reversion was achieved by complementing induced RNAi clones with an ectopic copy of Trypanosoma cruzi gene. Our results present the first functional characterization of Trypanosoma brucei ribose 5-phosphate isomerase B, and show the relevance of an enzyme belonging to the non-oxidative branch of the pentose phosphate pathway in the context of Trypanosoma brucei infection. PMID:25568941

  10. Susceptibility to chlorhexidine amongst multidrug-resistant clinical isolates of Staphylococcus epidermidis from bloodstream infections.

    PubMed

    Hijazi, Karolin; Mukhopadhya, Indrani; Abbott, Felicity; Milne, Kathleen; Al-Jabri, Zaaima J; Oggioni, Marco R; Gould, Ian M

    2016-07-01

    The emergence of Staphylococcus isolates with reduced susceptibility to chlorhexidine is being increasingly reported. We present an update to a previous report showing the continuing efficacy of chlorhexidine-based infection control measures against Staphylococcus aureus over 6 years. In this study, qacA/B genes were screened in Staphylococcus isolates collected over another 6 years in the same intensive care unit in Scotland where chlorhexidine baths form an essential component of long-term control of nosocomial infections. Consistent with our previous study, we report minimal presence of qacA/B in S. aureus strains from screening samples and bacteraemia patients but the new finding of a high proportion of qacA/B carriage in Staphylococcus epidermidis associated with reduced susceptibility to chlorhexidine. S. epidermidis isolates positive for qacA/B were clonally diverse, although 65% of isolates belonged to the multidrug-resistant (MDR) clone ST2. These findings raise concerns in relation to the selection of MDR strains by chlorhexidine and are important in the context of recent evidence emphasising the benefits of targeting bloodstream infections associated with coagulase-negative staphylococci. PMID:27230473

  11. Ribose 5-phosphate isomerase B knockdown compromises Trypanosoma brucei bloodstream form infectivity.

    PubMed

    Loureiro, Inês; Faria, Joana; Clayton, Christine; Macedo-Ribeiro, Sandra; Santarém, Nuno; Roy, Nilanjan; Cordeiro-da-Siva, Anabela; Tavares, Joana

    2015-01-01

    Ribose 5-phosphate isomerase is an enzyme involved in the non-oxidative branch of the pentose phosphate pathway, and catalyzes the inter-conversion of D-ribose 5-phosphate and D-ribulose 5-phosphate. Trypanosomatids, including the agent of African sleeping sickness namely Trypanosoma brucei, have a type B ribose-5-phosphate isomerase. This enzyme is absent from humans, which have a structurally unrelated ribose 5-phosphate isomerase type A, and therefore has been proposed as an attractive drug target waiting further characterization. In this study, Trypanosoma brucei ribose 5-phosphate isomerase B showed in vitro isomerase activity. RNAi against this enzyme reduced parasites' in vitro growth, and more importantly, bloodstream forms infectivity. Mice infected with induced RNAi clones exhibited lower parasitaemia and a prolonged survival compared to control mice. Phenotypic reversion was achieved by complementing induced RNAi clones with an ectopic copy of Trypanosoma cruzi gene. Our results present the first functional characterization of Trypanosoma brucei ribose 5-phosphate isomerase B, and show the relevance of an enzyme belonging to the non-oxidative branch of the pentose phosphate pathway in the context of Trypanosoma brucei infection.

  12. Seasonal trend and clinical presentation of Bacillus cereus bloodstream infection: association with summer and indwelling catheter.

    PubMed

    Kato, K; Matsumura, Y; Yamamoto, M; Nagao, M; Ito, Y; Takakura, S; Ichiyama, S

    2014-08-01

    Bacillus cereus, an opportunistic pathogen, can cause fatal infection. However, B. cereus bloodstream infections (BSIs) have not been well characterised. From 2008 to 2013, B. cereus isolates from all of the specimens and patients with B. cereus BSIs were identified. Environmental samples were collected to detect B. cereus contamination. We also characterised the clinical presentation of B. cereus BSI through analyses of risk factors for BSI and mortality. A total of 217 clinical B. cereus isolates was detected. Fifty-one patients with nosocomial infections were diagnosed as B. cereus BSI, and 37 had contaminated blood cultures. The number of B. cereus isolates and BSI patients was significantly greater from June to September than from January to April (4.9 vs. 1.5 per month and 1.2 vs. 0.2, respectively). All BSIs were nosocomial and related to central or peripheral vascular catheter. Urinary catheter [odds ratio (OR) 6.93, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.40-20.0] was the independent risk factor associated with BSI patients when compared to patients regarded as contaminated. In-hospital mortality among BSI patients was 20% and was associated with urinary catheter (OR 34.7, 95 % CI 1.89-63.6) and higher Charlson index (OR 1.99, 95 % CI 1.26-3.12). The number of B. cereus isolates and BSI increased during summer. Inpatients with indwelling vascular or urinary catheters should be carefully monitored for potential B. cereus BSIs.

  13. Acetylcholine Protects against Candida albicans Infection by Inhibiting Biofilm Formation and Promoting Hemocyte Function in a Galleria mellonella Infection Model.

    PubMed

    Rajendran, Ranjith; Borghi, Elisa; Falleni, Monica; Perdoni, Federica; Tosi, Delfina; Lappin, David F; O'Donnell, Lindsay; Greetham, Darren; Ramage, Gordon; Nile, Christopher

    2015-08-01

    Both neuronal acetylcholine and nonneuronal acetylcholine have been demonstrated to modulate inflammatory responses. Studies investigating the role of acetylcholine in the pathogenesis of bacterial infections have revealed contradictory findings with regard to disease outcome. At present, the role of acetylcholine in the pathogenesis of fungal infections is unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine whether acetylcholine plays a role in fungal biofilm formation and the pathogenesis of Candida albicans infection. The effect of acetylcholine on C. albicans biofilm formation and metabolism in vitro was assessed using a crystal violet assay and phenotypic microarray analysis. Its effect on the outcome of a C. albicans infection, fungal burden, and biofilm formation were investigated in vivo using a Galleria mellonella infection model. In addition, its effect on modulation of host immunity to C. albicans infection was also determined in vivo using hemocyte counts, cytospin analysis, larval histology, lysozyme assays, hemolytic assays, and real-time PCR. Acetylcholine was shown to have the ability to inhibit C. albicans biofilm formation in vitro and in vivo. In addition, acetylcholine protected G. mellonella larvae from C. albicans infection mortality. The in vivo protection occurred through acetylcholine enhancing the function of hemocytes while at the same time inhibiting C. albicans biofilm formation. Furthermore, acetylcholine also inhibited inflammation-induced damage to internal organs. This is the first demonstration of a role for acetylcholine in protection against fungal infections, in addition to being the first report that this molecule can inhibit C. albicans biofilm formation. Therefore, acetylcholine has the capacity to modulate complex host-fungal interactions and plays a role in dictating the pathogenesis of fungal infections.

  14. Acetylcholine Protects against Candida albicans Infection by Inhibiting Biofilm Formation and Promoting Hemocyte Function in a Galleria mellonella Infection Model

    PubMed Central

    Rajendran, Ranjith; Borghi, Elisa; Falleni, Monica; Perdoni, Federica; Tosi, Delfina; Lappin, David F.; O'Donnell, Lindsay; Greetham, Darren; Ramage, Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Both neuronal acetylcholine and nonneuronal acetylcholine have been demonstrated to modulate inflammatory responses. Studies investigating the role of acetylcholine in the pathogenesis of bacterial infections have revealed contradictory findings with regard to disease outcome. At present, the role of acetylcholine in the pathogenesis of fungal infections is unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine whether acetylcholine plays a role in fungal biofilm formation and the pathogenesis of Candida albicans infection. The effect of acetylcholine on C. albicans biofilm formation and metabolism in vitro was assessed using a crystal violet assay and phenotypic microarray analysis. Its effect on the outcome of a C. albicans infection, fungal burden, and biofilm formation were investigated in vivo using a Galleria mellonella infection model. In addition, its effect on modulation of host immunity to C. albicans infection was also determined in vivo using hemocyte counts, cytospin analysis, larval histology, lysozyme assays, hemolytic assays, and real-time PCR. Acetylcholine was shown to have the ability to inhibit C. albicans biofilm formation in vitro and in vivo. In addition, acetylcholine protected G. mellonella larvae from C. albicans infection mortality. The in vivo protection occurred through acetylcholine enhancing the function of hemocytes while at the same time inhibiting C. albicans biofilm formation. Furthermore, acetylcholine also inhibited inflammation-induced damage to internal organs. This is the first demonstration of a role for acetylcholine in protection against fungal infections, in addition to being the first report that this molecule can inhibit C. albicans biofilm formation. Therefore, acetylcholine has the capacity to modulate complex host-fungal interactions and plays a role in dictating the pathogenesis of fungal infections. PMID:26092919

  15. Healthcare-associated Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection: length of stay, attributable mortality, and additional direct costs.

    PubMed

    Primo, Mariusa Gomes Borges; Guilarde, Adriana Oliveira; Martelli, Celina M Turchi; Batista, Lindon Johnson de Abreu; Turchi, Marília Dalva

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the excess length of stay, extra expenditures, and attributable mortality to healthcare-associated S. aureus bloodstream infection (BSI) at a teaching hospital in central Brazil. The study design was a matched (1:1) case-control. Cases were defined as patients >13 years old, with a healthcare-associated S. aureus BSI. Controls included patients without an S. aureus BSI, who were matched to cases by gender, age (± 7 years), morbidity, and underlying disease. Data were collected from medical records and from the Brazilian National Hospital Information System (Sistema de Informações Hospitalares do Sistema Único de Saúde - SIH/SUS). A Wilcoxon rank sum test was performed to compare length of stay and costs between cases and controls. Differences in mortality between cases and controls were compared using McNemar's tests. The Mantel-Haenzel stratified analysis was performed to compare invasive device utilization. Data analyses were conducted using Epi Info 6.0 and Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS 13.0). 84 case-control pairs matched by gender, age, admission period, morbidity, and underlying disease were analyzed. The mean lengths of hospital stay were 48.3 and 16.2 days for cases and controls, respectively (p<0.01), yielding an excess hospital stay among cases of 32.1 days. The excess mortality among cases compared to controls that was attributable to S. aureus bloodstream infection was 45.2%. Cases had a higher risk of dying compared to controls (OR 7.3, 95% CI 3.1-21.1). Overall costs of hospitalization (SIH/SUS) reached US$ 123,065 for cases versus US$ 40,247 for controls (p<0.01). The cost of antimicrobial therapy was 6.7 fold higher for cases compared to controls. Healthcare-associated S. aureus BSI was associated with statistically significant increases in length of hospitalization, attributable mortality, and economic burden. Implementation of measures to minimize the risk of healthcare-associated bacterial

  16. Systemic Staphylococcus aureus infection mediated by Candida albicans hyphal invasion of mucosal tissue

    PubMed Central

    Schlecht, Lisa Marie; Peters, Brian M.; Krom, Bastiaan P.; Freiberg, Jeffrey A.; Hänsch, Gertrud M.; Filler, Scott G.

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans and Staphylococcus aureus are often co-isolated in cases of biofilm-associated infections. C. albicans can cause systemic disease through morphological switch from the rounded yeast to the invasive hyphal form. Alternatively, systemic S. aureus infections arise from seeding through breaks in host epithelial layers although many patients have no documented portal of entry. We describe a novel strategy by which S. aureus is able to invade host tissue and disseminate via adherence to the invasive hyphal elements of Candida albicans. In vitro and ex vivo findings demonstrate a specific binding of the staphylococci to the candida hyphal elements. The C. albicans cell wall adhesin Als3p binds to multiple staphylococcal adhesins. Furthermore, Als3p is required for C. albicans to transport S. aureus into the tissue and cause a disseminated infection in an oral co-colonization model. These findings suggest that C. albicans can facilitate the invasion of S. aureus across mucosal barriers, leading to systemic infection in co-colonized patients. PMID:25332378

  17. Risk factors and outcomes of imipenem-resistant Acinetobacter bloodstream infection in North-eastern Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Deris, Zakuan Zainy; Shafei, Mohd Nazri; Harun, Azian

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine the risk factors and outcomes of imipenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (IRAB) bloodstream infection (BSI) cases, since there is very little publication on Acinetobacter baumannii infections from Malaysia. Methods A cross sectional study of 41 cases (73.2%) of imipenem-sensitive Acinetobacter baumanii (ISAB) and 15 cases (26.8%) of IRAB was conducted in a teaching hospital which was located at North-Eastern state of Malaysia. Results There was no independent risk factor for IRAB BSI identified but IRAB BSI was significantly associated with longer bacteraemic days [OR 1.23 (95% CI 1.01, 1.50)]. Although prior use of carbepenems and cephalosporin were higher among IRAB than ISAB group, statistically they were not significant. There was no significant difference in term of outcomes between the two groups. Conclusions Although statistically not significant, this analysis compliments previous publication highlighting the importance of appropriate empiric antibiotic usage in hospital especially carbepenems and need further evaluation with bigger subjects. PMID:23569782

  18. Magnet® Hospital Recognition Linked to Lower Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infection Rates.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Hilary; Rearden, Jessica; McHugh, Matthew D

    2016-04-01

    Central-line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSI) are among the deadliest heathcare-associated infections, with an estimated 12-25% mortality rate. In 2014, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) began to penalize hospitals for poor performance with respect to selected hospital-acquired conditions, including CLABSI. A structural factor associated with high-quality nursing care and better patient outcomes is The Magnet Recognition Program®. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between Magnet status and hospital CLABSI rates. We used propensity score matching to match Magnet and non-Magnet hospitals with similar hospital characteristics. In a matched sample of 291 Magnet hospitals and 291 non-Magnet hospitals, logistic regression models were used to examine whether there was a link between Magnet status and CLABSI rates. Both before and after matching, Magnet hospital status was associated with better (lower than the national average) CLABSI rates (OR = 1.60, 95%CI: 1.10, 2.33 after matching). While established programs such as Magnet recognition are consistently correlated with high-quality nursing work environments and positive patient outcomes, additional research is needed to determine whether Magnet designation produces positive patient outcomes or rewards existing excellence. PMID:26809115

  19. Magnet® Hospital Recognition Linked to Lower Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infection Rates.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Hilary; Rearden, Jessica; McHugh, Matthew D

    2016-04-01

    Central-line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSI) are among the deadliest heathcare-associated infections, with an estimated 12-25% mortality rate. In 2014, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) began to penalize hospitals for poor performance with respect to selected hospital-acquired conditions, including CLABSI. A structural factor associated with high-quality nursing care and better patient outcomes is The Magnet Recognition Program®. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between Magnet status and hospital CLABSI rates. We used propensity score matching to match Magnet and non-Magnet hospitals with similar hospital characteristics. In a matched sample of 291 Magnet hospitals and 291 non-Magnet hospitals, logistic regression models were used to examine whether there was a link between Magnet status and CLABSI rates. Both before and after matching, Magnet hospital status was associated with better (lower than the national average) CLABSI rates (OR = 1.60, 95%CI: 1.10, 2.33 after matching). While established programs such as Magnet recognition are consistently correlated with high-quality nursing work environments and positive patient outcomes, additional research is needed to determine whether Magnet designation produces positive patient outcomes or rewards existing excellence.

  20. Microdilution in vitro Antifungal Susceptibility Patterns of Candida Species, From Mild Cutaneous to Bloodstream Infections

    PubMed Central

    Rezazadeh, Elham; Sabokbar, Azar; Moazeni, Maryam; Rezai, Mohammad Sadegh; Badali, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Background Candida species, as opportunistic organisms, can cause various clinical manifestations, ranging from mild cutaneous infections to systemic candidiasis in otherwise healthy individuals. Remarkably, the incidence and mortality rates of candidemia have significantly increased worldwide, even after advances in medical interventions and the development of novel antifungal drugs. Objectives Given the possible resistance to antifungal agents, susceptibility testing can be useful in defining the activity spectrum of antifungals and determining the appropriate treatment regime. Materials and Methods The in vitro susceptibilities of molecularly identified Candida strains (n = 150) belonging to seven species recovered from clinical specimens, including vaginal, cutaneous, sputum, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), and blood samples, were determined for six antifungal drugs (amphotericin B, fluconazole, itraconazole, voriconazole, posaconazole, and caspofungin), based on the clinical and laboratory standards institute’s M27-A3 and M27-S4 documents. Results Candida albicans was the most frequently isolated species (44.66%), followed by non-albicans Candida, including C. glabrata (20%), C. parapsilosis (13.33%), C. krusei (8%), C. tropicalis (7.3%), C. dubliniensis (4%), and C. africana (3.33%). Posaconazole had the lowest geometric mean minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) (0.0122 µg/ml), followed by amphotericin B (0.0217 µg/mL), voriconazole (0.1022 µg/mL), itraconazole (0.1612 µg/mL), caspofungin (0.2525 µg/mL), and fluconazole (0.4874 µg/mL) against all isolated Candida species. Candida africana and C. parapsilosis were significantly more susceptible to fluconazole, compared to C. albicans and other Candida species (P < 0.001). However, their clinical effectiveness in the treatment of Candida infections remains to be determined. Conclusions These findings highlight the importance of precise and correct species identification of clinical yeast isolates via

  1. Incidence, Clinical Characteristics and Attributable Mortality of Persistent Bloodstream Infection in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Jen-Fu; Chu, Shih-Ming; Lee, Chiang-Wen; Yang, Pong-Hong; Lien, Reyin; Chiang, Ming-Chou; Fu, Ren-Huei; Huang, Hsuan-Rong; Tsai, Ming-Horng

    2015-01-01

    Background An atypical pattern of neonatal sepsis, characterized by persistent positive blood culture despite effective antimicrobial therapy, has been correlated with adverse outcomes. However, previous studies focused only on coagulate-negative staphylococcus infection. Methods All episodes of persistent bloodstream infection (BSI), defined as 3 or more consecutive positive blood cultures with the same bacterial species, at least two of them 48 hours apart, during a single sepsis episode, were enrolled over an 8-year period in a tertiary level neonatal intensive care unit. These cases were compared with all non-persistent BSI during the same period. Results We identified 81 episodes of persistent BSI (8.5% of all neonatal late-onset sepsis) in 74 infants, caused by gram-positive pathogens (n=38, 46.9%), gram-negative pathogens (n=21, 25.9%), fungus (n=20, 24.7%) and polymicrobial bacteremia (n=2, 2.5%). Persistent BSI does not differ from non-persistent BSI in most clinical characteristics and patient demographics, but tends to have a prolonged septic course, longer duration of feeding intolerance and more frequent requirement of blood transfusions. No difference was observed for death attributable to infection (9.8% vs. 6.5%), but neonates with persistent BSI had significantly higher rates of infectious complications (29.6% vs. 9.2%, P < 0.001), death from all causes (21.6% vs. 11.7%, P = 0.025), and duration of hospitalization among survivors [median (interquartile range): 80.0 (52.5-117.5) vs. 64.0 (40.0-96.0) days, P = 0.005] than those without persistent BSI. Conclusions Although persistent BSI does not contribute directly to increased mortality, the associated morbidities, infectious complications and prolonged septic courses highlight the importance of aggressive treatment to optimize outcomes. PMID:25875677

  2. Real-time PCR TaqMan assay for rapid screening of bloodstream infection

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Sepsis is one of the main causes of mortality and morbidity. The rapid detection of pathogens in blood of septic patients is essential for adequate antimicrobial therapy and better prognosis. This study aimed to accelerate the detection and discrimination of Gram-positive (GP) and Gram-negative (GN) bacteria and Candida species in blood culture samples by molecular methods. Methods The Real-GP®, -GN®, and -CAN® real-time PCR kit (M&D, Wonju, Republic of Korea) assays use the TaqMan probes for detecting pan-GP, pan-GN, and pan-Candida species, respectively. The diagnostic performances of the real-time PCR kits were evaluated with 115 clinical isolates, 256 positive and 200 negative blood culture bottle samples, and the data were compared to results obtained from conventional blood culture. Results Eighty-seven reference strains and 115 clinical isolates were correctly identified with specific probes corresponding to GP-bacteria, GN-bacteria and Candida, respectively. The overall sensitivity and specificity of the real-time PCR kit with blood culture samples were 99.6% and 89.5%, respectively. Conclusions The Real-GP®, -GN®, and -CAN® real-time PCR kits could be useful tools for the rapid and accurate screening of bloodstream infections (BSIs). PMID:24393579

  3. Rapid Diagnosis of Infection in the Critically Ill, a Multicenter Study of Molecular Detection in Bloodstream Infections, Pneumonia, and Sterile Site Infections*

    PubMed Central

    Brealey, David; Libert, Nicolas; Abidi, Nour Elhouda; O’Dwyer, Michael; Zacharowski, Kai; Mikaszewska-Sokolewicz, Malgorzata; Schrenzel, Jacques; Simon, François; Wilks, Mark; Picard-Maureau, Marcus; Chalfin, Donald B.; Ecker, David J.; Sampath, Rangarajan; Singer, Mervyn

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Early identification of causative microorganism(s) in patients with severe infection is crucial to optimize antimicrobial use and patient survival. However, current culture-based pathogen identification is slow and unreliable such that broad-spectrum antibiotics are often used to insure coverage of all potential organisms, carrying risks of overtreatment, toxicity, and selection of multidrug-resistant bacteria. We compared the results obtained using a novel, culture-independent polymerase chain reaction/electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry technology with those obtained by standard microbiological testing and evaluated the potential clinical implications of this technique. Design: Observational study. Setting: Nine ICUs in six European countries. Patients: Patients admitted between October 2013 and June 2014 with suspected or proven bloodstream infection, pneumonia, or sterile fluid and tissue infection were considered for inclusion. Interventions: None. Measurements and Main Results: We tested 616 bloodstream infection, 185 pneumonia, and 110 sterile fluid and tissue specimens from 529 patients. From the 616 bloodstream infection samples, polymerase chain reaction/electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry identified a pathogen in 228 cases (37%) and culture in just 68 (11%). Culture was positive and polymerase chain reaction/electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry negative in 13 cases, and both were negative in 384 cases, giving polymerase chain reaction/electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry a sensitivity of 81%, specificity of 69%, and negative predictive value of 97% at 6 hours from sample acquisition. The distribution of organisms was similar with both techniques. Similar observations were made for pneumonia and sterile fluid and tissue specimens. Independent clinical analysis of results suggested that polymerase chain reaction/electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry technology could potentially have resulted in altered treatment in up

  4. The Implementation of an Evidence-Based Bundle for Bloodstream Infections in Neonatal Intensive Care Units in Germany: A Controlled Intervention Study to Improve Patient Safety.

    PubMed

    Salm, Florian; Schwab, Frank; Geffers, Christine; Gastmeier, Petra; Piening, Brar

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE To improve the patient safety of very-low-birthweight infants in neonatal departments in Germany. DESIGN Multicenter cohort study with a baseline (24 months), an intervention (12 months), and a postinterventional follow-up period (12 months) and time series analysis. STUDY POPULATION Very-low-birthweight patients from 32 neonatal departments in Germany. METHODS Neonatal departments showing a standardized infection ratio of bloodstream infection 10% higher than the expected number (standardized infection ratio ≥1.1) were invited to participate in the study. To reduce the occurrence of primary bloodstream infections, evidence-based bundles to improve catheter maintenance routines, insertion practice, and hand-hygiene compliance were implemented in the participating infirmaries. RESULTS Thirty-four departments participated in the study and 32 reported data. In total, 6,222 very-low-birthweight infants with 231,868 patient-days and 1,405 cases of bloodstream infections were analyzed. In the baseline period the pooled mean bloodstream infection rate was 6.63 (95% CI, 6.17-7.12) per 1,000 patient-days. The bloodstream infection rate decreased in the intervention period to 5.68 (relative risk, 0.86 [95% CI, 0.76-0.97]) and in the 1-year follow-up period to 5.31 per 1,000 patient-days (relative risk, 0.80 [95% CI, 0.70-0.92]). The multivariable time series analysis of monthly aggregated data showed a significant change in the slope for the frequency of bloodstream infections from the start to the end of the intervention (change in slope incidence rate ratio, 0.97; P=.001). CONCLUSION The implementation of an intervention bundle is feasible and can reduce bloodstream infections in neonatal departments. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;37:798-804.

  5. Limitations of Murine Models for Assessment of Antibody-Mediated Therapies or Vaccine Candidates against Staphylococcus epidermidis Bloodstream Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jinrong; Kesselly, Augustus; Lam, Hubert; Kleanthous, Harry; Yethon, Jeremy A.

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis is normally a commensal colonizer of human skin and mucus membranes, but, due to its ability to form biofilms on indwelling medical devices, it has emerged as a leading cause of nosocomial infections. Bacteremia or bloodstream infection is a frequent and costly complication resulting from biofilm fouling of medical devices. Our goal was to develop a murine model of S. epidermidis infection to identify potential vaccine targets for the prevention of S. epidermidis bacteremia. However, assessing the contribution of adaptive immunity to protection against S. epidermidis challenge was complicated by a highly efficacious innate immune response in mice. Naive mice rapidly cleared S. epidermidis infections from blood and solid organs, even when the animals were immunocompromised. Cyclophosphamide-mediated leukopenia reduced the size of the bacterial challenge dose required to cause lethality but did not impair clearance after a nonlethal challenge. Nonspecific innate immune stimulation, such as treatment with a Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) agonist, enhanced bacterial clearance. TLR2 signaling was confirmed to accelerate the clearance of S. epidermidis bacteremia, but TLR2−/− mice could still resolve a bloodstream infection. Furthermore, TLR2 signaling played no role in the clearance of bacteria from the spleen. In conclusion, these data suggest that S. epidermidis bloodstream infection is cleared in a highly efficient manner that is mediated by both TLR2-dependent and -independent innate immune mechanisms. The inability to establish a persistent infection in mice, even in immunocompromised animals, rendered these murine models unsuitable for meaningful assessment of antibody-mediated therapies or vaccine candidates. PMID:26857577

  6. Limitations of Murine Models for Assessment of Antibody-Mediated Therapies or Vaccine Candidates against Staphylococcus epidermidis Bloodstream Infection.

    PubMed

    Cole, Leah E; Zhang, Jinrong; Kesselly, Augustus; Anosova, Natalie G; Lam, Hubert; Kleanthous, Harry; Yethon, Jeremy A

    2016-04-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis is normally a commensal colonizer of human skin and mucus membranes, but, due to its ability to form biofilms on indwelling medical devices, it has emerged as a leading cause of nosocomial infections. Bacteremia or bloodstream infection is a frequent and costly complication resulting from biofilm fouling of medical devices. Our goal was to develop a murine model of S. epidermidis infection to identify potential vaccine targets for the prevention of S. epidermidis bacteremia. However, assessing the contribution of adaptive immunity to protection against S. epidermidis challenge was complicated by a highly efficacious innate immune response in mice. Naive mice rapidly cleared S. epidermidis infections from blood and solid organs, even when the animals were immunocompromised. Cyclophosphamide-mediated leukopenia reduced the size of the bacterial challenge dose required to cause lethality but did not impair clearance after a nonlethal challenge. Nonspecific innate immune stimulation, such as treatment with a Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) agonist, enhanced bacterial clearance. TLR2 signaling was confirmed to accelerate the clearance of S. epidermidis bacteremia, but TLR2(-/-)mice could still resolve a bloodstream infection. Furthermore, TLR2 signaling played no role in the clearance of bacteria from the spleen. In conclusion, these data suggest that S. epidermidis bloodstream infection is cleared in a highly efficient manner that is mediated by both TLR2-dependent and -independent innate immune mechanisms. The inability to establish a persistent infection in mice, even in immunocompromised animals, rendered these murine models unsuitable for meaningful assessment of antibody-mediated therapies or vaccine candidates. PMID:26857577

  7. Limitations of Murine Models for Assessment of Antibody-Mediated Therapies or Vaccine Candidates against Staphylococcus epidermidis Bloodstream Infection.

    PubMed

    Cole, Leah E; Zhang, Jinrong; Kesselly, Augustus; Anosova, Natalie G; Lam, Hubert; Kleanthous, Harry; Yethon, Jeremy A

    2016-04-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis is normally a commensal colonizer of human skin and mucus membranes, but, due to its ability to form biofilms on indwelling medical devices, it has emerged as a leading cause of nosocomial infections. Bacteremia or bloodstream infection is a frequent and costly complication resulting from biofilm fouling of medical devices. Our goal was to develop a murine model of S. epidermidis infection to identify potential vaccine targets for the prevention of S. epidermidis bacteremia. However, assessing the contribution of adaptive immunity to protection against S. epidermidis challenge was complicated by a highly efficacious innate immune response in mice. Naive mice rapidly cleared S. epidermidis infections from blood and solid organs, even when the animals were immunocompromised. Cyclophosphamide-mediated leukopenia reduced the size of the bacterial challenge dose required to cause lethality but did not impair clearance after a nonlethal challenge. Nonspecific innate immune stimulation, such as treatment with a Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) agonist, enhanced bacterial clearance. TLR2 signaling was confirmed to accelerate the clearance of S. epidermidis bacteremia, but TLR2(-/-)mice could still resolve a bloodstream infection. Furthermore, TLR2 signaling played no role in the clearance of bacteria from the spleen. In conclusion, these data suggest that S. epidermidis bloodstream infection is cleared in a highly efficient manner that is mediated by both TLR2-dependent and -independent innate immune mechanisms. The inability to establish a persistent infection in mice, even in immunocompromised animals, rendered these murine models unsuitable for meaningful assessment of antibody-mediated therapies or vaccine candidates.

  8. Risk Factors and Outcomes for Patients with Bloodstream Infection Due to Acinetobacter baumannii-calcoaceticus Complex

    PubMed Central

    Marchaim, Dror; Johnson, Paul C.; Awali, Reda A.; Doshi, Hardik; Chalana, Indu; Davis, Naomi; Zhao, Jing J.; Pogue, Jason M.; Parmar, Sapna; Kaye, Keith S.

    2014-01-01

    Identifying patients at risk for bloodstream infection (BSI) due to Acinetobacter baumannii-Acinetobacter calcoaceticus complex (ABC) and providing early appropriate therapy are critical for improving patient outcomes. A retrospective matched case-control study was conducted to investigate the risk factors for BSI due to ABC in patients admitted to the Detroit Medical Center (DMC) between January 2006 and April 2009. The cases were patients with BSI due to ABC; the controls were patients not infected with ABC. Potential risk factors were collected 30 days prior to the ABC-positive culture date for the cases and 30 days prior to admission for the controls. A total of 245 case patients were matched with 245 control patients. Independent risk factors associated with BSI due to ABC included a Charlson's comorbidity score of ≥3 (odds ratio [OR], 2.34; P = 0.001), a direct admission from another health care facility (OR, 4.63; P < 0.0001), a prior hospitalization (OR, 3.11; P < 0.0001), the presence of an indwelling central venous line (OR, 2.75; P = 0.011), the receipt of total parenteral nutrition (OR, 21.2; P < 0.0001), the prior receipt of β-lactams (OR, 3.58; P < 0.0001), the prior receipt of carbapenems (OR, 3.18; P = 0.006), and the prior receipt of chemotherapy (OR, 15.42; P < 0.0001). The median time from the ABC-positive culture date to the initiation of the appropriate antimicrobial therapy was 2 days (interquartile range [IQR], 1 to 3 days). The in-hospital mortality rate was significantly higher among case patients than among control patients (OR, 3.40; P < 0.0001). BSIs due to ABC are more common among critically ill and debilitated institutionalized patients, who are heavily exposed to health care settings and invasive devices. PMID:24890594

  9. Acquired bloodstream infection in the intensive care unit: incidence and attributable mortality

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction To estimate the incidence of intensive care unit (ICU)-acquired bloodstream infection (BSI) and its independent effect on hospital mortality. Methods We retrospectively studied acquisition of BSI during admissions of >72 hours to adult ICUs from two university-affiliated hospitals. We obtained demographics, illness severity and co-morbidity data from ICU databases and microbiological diagnoses from departmental electronic records. We assessed survival at hospital discharge or at 90 days if still hospitalized. Results We identified 6339 ICU admissions, 330 of which were complicated by BSI (5.2%). Median time to first positive culture was 7 days (IQR 5-12). Overall mortality was 23.5%, 41.2% in patients with BSI and 22.5% in those without. Patients who developed BSI had higher illness severity at ICU admission (median APACHE III score: 79 vs. 68, P < 0.001). After controlling for illness severity and baseline demographics by Cox proportional-hazard model, BSI remained independently associated with risk of death (hazard ratio from diagnosis 2.89; 95% confidence interval 2.41-3.46; P < 0.001). However, only 5% of the deaths in this model could be attributed to acquired-BSI, equivalent to an absolute decrease in survival of 1% of the total population. When analyzed by microbiological classification, Candida, Staphylococcus aureus and gram-negative bacilli infections were independently associated with increased risk of death. In a sub-group analysis intravascular catheter associated BSI remained associated with significant risk of death (hazard ratio 2.64; 95% confidence interval 1.44-4.83; P = 0.002). Conclusions ICU-acquired BSI is associated with greater in-hospital mortality, but complicates only 5% of ICU admissions and its absolute effect on population mortality is limited. These findings have implications for the design and interpretation of clinical trials. PMID:21418635

  10. Systemic inflammatory response syndrome in adult patients with nosocomial bloodstream infections due to enterococci

    PubMed Central

    Bar, Katharine; Wisplinghoff, Hilmar; Wenzel, Richard P; Bearman, Gonzalo ML; Edmond, Michael B

    2006-01-01

    Background Enterococci are the third leading cause of nosocomial bloodstream infection (BSI). Vancomycin resistant enterococci are common and provide treatment challenges; however questions remain about VRE's pathogenicity and its direct clinical impact. This study analyzed the inflammatory response of Enterococcal BSI, contrasting infections from vancomycin-resistant and vancomycin-susceptible isolates. Methods We performed a historical cohort study on 50 adults with enterococcal BSI to evaluate the associated systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and mortality. We examined SIRS scores 2 days prior through 14 days after the first positive blood culture. Vancomycin resistant (n = 17) and susceptible infections (n = 33) were compared. Variables significant in univariate analysis were entered into a logistic regression model to determine the affect on mortality. Results 60% of BSI were caused by E. faecalis and 34% by E. faecium. 34% of the isolates were vancomycin resistant. Mean APACHE II (A2) score on the day of BSI was 16. Appropriate antimicrobials were begun within 24 hours in 52%. Septic shock occurred in 62% and severe sepsis in an additional 18%. Incidence of organ failure was as follows: respiratory 42%, renal 48%, hematologic 44%, hepatic 26%. Crude mortality was 48%. Progression to septic shock was associated with death (OR 14.9, p < .001). There was no difference in A2 scores on days -2, -1 and 0 between the VRE and VSE groups. Maximal SIR (severe sepsis, septic shock or death) was seen on day 2 for VSE BSI vs. day 8 for VRE. No significant difference was noted in the incidence of organ failure, 7-day or overall mortality between the two groups. Univariate analysis revealed that AP2>18 at BSI onset, and respiratory, cardiovascular, renal, hematologic and hepatic failure were associated with death, but time to appropriate therapy >24 hours, age, and infection due to VRE were not. Multivariate analysis revealed that hematologic (OR 8.4, p = .025

  11. Correlation of atherogenesis with an infection of Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Nurgeldiyeva, Maya J; Hojakuliyev, Bayram G; Muhammedov, Merdan B

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To study contents of atherosclerotic plaques for the presence of fungi of the genus Candida; and an analysis of some immunological and biochemical indices in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) that are positive for Candida albicans. Materials and methods: To test for the presence of fungi in an atherosclerotic plaque, we used a method developed by us (patent NO 531, a priority from 6/28/2010). A total of 47 atherosclerotic plaques were obtained during 20 autopsies. In addition, 80 individuals (58 male, 22 female; age range from 29 to 85) with acute coronary syndrome were subjected to a blood biochemical test, including quantification of TNF-α levels and IgG and IgM to Candida albicans was determined. Results: Fungi of the genus Candida were identified in 31.9% (15 out of 47) of atherosclerotic plaques. Particularly, Candida krusii and Candida grabrata were identified in overwhelming majority, although solitary colonies of Candida tropicalis and a single colony of Candida albicans were also detected. 80 (100%) patients were negative for IgM, but 30 (37.5%) were positive for IgG to Candida albicans. TNF-α was detected in a smaller quantity of IgG-negative patients (36.7%) relative to patients of IgG-positive group (70%), however its levels were considerably above in the first group (511.73±195.80 pg/ml) than in the second one (326.68±259.91 pg/ml, P < 0.05). Differences in the levels of ASAT and ALAT in patients positive to Candida albicans and negative for TNF-α were significantly higher than in the rest of patients. Conclusion: It is conceivable that fungi of the genus Candida are capable of inducing an inflammation of the vascular wall that in turn can lead to the development of atherosclerosis. PMID:25232398

  12. ID Learning Unit-Diagnostics Update: Current Laboratory Methods for Rapid Pathogen Identification in Patients With Bloodstream Infections.

    PubMed

    Rubach, Matthew P; Hanson, Kimberly E

    2015-12-01

    Diagnostic assays that rapidly identify bloodstream pathogens have the potential to improve patient outcomes and antibiotic stewardship efforts. Current tests are based on the detection of nucleic acids that are specific to a targeted pathogen or based on organism identification using mass spectrometry. Most rapid assays require a positive blood culture as their sample input and expedite pathogen identification by 24-72 hours. For those assays that also report detection of drug resistance markers, information on antimicrobial resistance is expedited by 48-96 hours. This learning unit reviews the basic principles of rapid microorganism identification assays for bloodstream infections with the aim of assisting clinicians in the interpretation and optimal utilization of test results. PMID:26719845

  13. ID Learning Unit—Diagnostics Update: Current Laboratory Methods for Rapid Pathogen Identification in Patients With Bloodstream Infections

    PubMed Central

    Rubach, Matthew P.; Hanson, Kimberly E.

    2015-01-01

    Diagnostic assays that rapidly identify bloodstream pathogens have the potential to improve patient outcomes and antibiotic stewardship efforts. Current tests are based on the detection of nucleic acids that are specific to a targeted pathogen or based on organism identification using mass spectrometry. Most rapid assays require a positive blood culture as their sample input and expedite pathogen identification by 24–72 hours. For those assays that also report detection of drug resistance markers, information on antimicrobial resistance is expedited by 48–96 hours. This learning unit reviews the basic principles of rapid microorganism identification assays for bloodstream infections with the aim of assisting clinicians in the interpretation and optimal utilization of test results. PMID:26719845

  14. Implementing a multifaceted intervention to decrease central line-associated bloodstream infections in SEHA (Abu Dhabi Health Services Company) intensive care units: the Abu Dhabi experience.

    PubMed

    Latif, Asad; Kelly, Bernadette; Edrees, Hanan; Kent, Paula S; Weaver, Sallie J; Jovanovic, Branislava; Attallah, Hadeel; de Grouchy, Kristin K; Al-Obaidli, Ali; Goeschel, Christine A; Berenholtz, Sean M

    2015-07-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine whether implementation of a multifaceted intervention would significantly reduce the incidence of central line-associated bloodstream infections. DESIGN Prospective cohort collaborative. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS Intensive care units of the Abu Dhabi Health Services Company hospitals in the Emirate of Abu Dhabi. INTERVENTIONS A bundled intervention consisting of 3 components was implemented as part of the program. It consisted of a multifaceted approach that targeted clinician use of evidence-based infection prevention recommendations, tools that supported the identification of local barriers to these practices, and implementation ideas to help ensure patients received the practices. Comprehensive unit-based safety teams were created to improve safety culture and teamwork. Finally, the measurement and feedback of monthly infection rate data to safety teams, senior leaders, and staff in participating intensive care units was encouraged. The main outcome measure was the quarterly rate of central line-associated bloodstream infections. RESULTS Eighteen intensive care units from 7 hospitals in Abu Dhabi implemented the program and achieved an overall 38% reduction in their central line-associated bloodstream infection rate, adjusted at the hospital and unit level. The number of units with a quarterly central line-associated bloodstream infection rate of less than 1 infection per 1,000 catheter-days increased by almost 40% between the baseline and postintervention periods. CONCLUSION A significant reduction in the global morbidity and mortality associated with central line-associated bloodstream infections is possible across intensive care units in disparate settings using a multifaceted intervention.

  15. Comparison of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome between monomicrobial and polymicrobial Pseudomonas aeruginosa nosocomial bloodstream infections

    PubMed Central

    Marra, Alexandre R; Bearman, Gonzalo ML; Wenzel, Richard P; Edmond, Michael B

    2005-01-01

    Background Some studies of nosocomial bloodstream infection (nBSI) have demonstrated a higher mortality for polymicrobial bacteremia when compared to monomicrobial nBSI. The purpose of this study was to compare differences in systemic inflammatory response and mortality between monomicrobial and polymicrobial nBSI with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Methods We performed a historical cohort study on 98 adults with P. aeruginosa (Pa) nBSI. SIRS scores were determined 2 days prior to the first positive blood culture through 14 days afterwards. Monomicrobial (n = 77) and polymicrobial BSIs (n = 21) were compared. Results 78.6% of BSIs were caused by monomicrobial P. aeruginosa infection (MPa) and 21.4% by polymicrobial P. aeruginosa infection (PPa). Median APACHE II score on the day of BSI was 22 for MPa and 23 for PPa BSIs. Septic shock occurred in 33.3% of PPa and in 39.0% of MPa (p = 0.64). Progression to septic shock was associated with death more frequently in PPa (OR 38.5, CI95 2.9–508.5) than MPa (OR 4.5, CI95 1.7–12.1). Maximal SIR (severe sepsis, septic shock or death) was seen on day 0 for PPa BSI vs. day 1 for MPa. No significant difference was noted in the incidence of organ failure, 7-day or overall mortality between the two groups. Univariate analysis revealed that APACHE II score ≥20 at BSI onset, Charlson weighted comorbidity index ≥3, burn injury and respiratory, cardiovascular, renal and hematologic failure were associated with death, while age, malignant disease, diabetes mellitus, hepatic failure, gastrointestinal complications, inappropriate antimicrobial therapy, infection with imipenem resistant P. aeruginosa and polymicrobial nBSI were not. Multivariate analysis revealed that hematologic failure (p < 0.001) and APACHE II score ≥20 at BSI onset (p = 0.005) independently predicted death. Conclusion In this historical cohort study of nBSI with P. aeruginosa, the incidence of septic shock and organ failure was high in both groups. Additionally

  16. Roles of IL-33 in Resistance and Tolerance to Systemic Candida albicans Infections

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang Jun; Cho, Hong Rae

    2016-01-01

    IL-33 is a multifunctional cytokine that is released in response to a variety of intrinsic and extrinsic stimuli. The role of IL-33 in Candida albicans infections is just beginning to be revealed. This cytokine has beneficial effects on host defense against systemic C. albicans infections, and it promotes resistance mechanisms by which the immune system eliminates the invading fungal pathogens; and it also elevates host tolerance by reducing the inflammatory response and thereby, potentially, tissue damage. Thus, IL-33 is classified as a cytokine that has evolved functionally to protect the host from damage by pathogens and immunopathology. PMID:27340384

  17. Bacterial and Clinical Characteristics of Health Care- and Community-Acquired Bloodstream Infections Due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Hattemer, Angela; Hauser, Alan; Diaz, Maureen; Scheetz, Marc; Shah, Nirav; Allen, Jonathan P.; Porhomayon, Jahan

    2013-01-01

    Health care-associated infections, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa bloodstream infection, have been linked to delays in appropriate antibiotic therapy and an increased mortality rate. The objective of this study was to evaluate intrinsic virulence, bacterial resistance, and clinical outcomes of health care-associated bloodstream infections (HCABSIs) in comparison with those of community-acquired bloodstream infections (CABSIs) caused by P. aeruginosa. We conducted a retrospective multicenter study of consecutive P. aeruginosa bacteremia patients at two university-affiliated hospitals. Demographic, clinical, and treatment data were collected. Microbiologic analyses included in vitro susceptibility profiles and type III secretory (TTS) phenotypes. Sixty CABSI and 90 HCABSI episodes were analyzed. Patients with HCABSIs had more organ dysfunction at the time of bacteremia (P = 0.05) and were more likely to have been exposed to antimicrobial therapy (P < 0.001) than those with CABSIs. Ninety-two percent of the carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa infections were characterized as HCABSIs. The 30-day mortality rate for CABSIs was 26% versus 36% for HCABSIs (P = 0.38). The sequential organ failure assessment score at the time of bacteremia (hazard ratio [HR], 1.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1 to 1.3) and the TTS phenotype (HR 2.1; 95% CI, 1.1 to 3.9) were found to be independent predictors of the 30-day mortality rate. No mortality rate difference was observed between CABSIs and HCABSIs caused by P. aeruginosa. Severity of illness and expression of TTS proteins were the strongest predictors of the 30-day mortality rate due to P. aeruginosa bacteremia. Future P. aeruginosa bacteremia trials designed to neutralize TTS proteins are warranted. PMID:23733476

  18. Molecular Detection of Culture-Confirmed Bacterial Bloodstream Infections with Limited Enrichment Time

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Miranda S.; McCann, Chase D.

    2013-01-01

    Conventional blood culturing using automated instrumentation with phenotypic identification requires a significant amount of time to generate results. This study investigated the speed and accuracy of results generated using PCR and pyrosequencing compared to the time required to obtain Gram stain results and final culture identification for cases of culture-confirmed bloodstream infections. Research and physician-ordered blood cultures were drawn concurrently. Aliquots of the incubating research blood culture fluid were removed hourly between 5 and 8 h, at 24 h, and again at 5 days. DNA was extracted from these 6 time point aliquots and analyzed by PCR and pyrosequencing for bacterial rRNA gene targets. These results were then compared to those of the physician-ordered blood culture. PCR and pyrosequencing accurately identified 92% of all culture-confirmed cases after a mean enrichment time of 5.8 ± 2.9 h. When the time needed to complete sample processing was included for PCR and pyrosequencing protocols, the molecular approach yielded results in 11.8 ± 2.9 h compared to means of 27.9 ± 13.6 h to obtain the Gram stain results and 81.6 ± 24.0 h to generate the final culture-based identification. The molecular approach enabled accurate detection of most bacteria present in incubating blood culture bottles on average about 16 h sooner than Gram stain results became available and approximately 3 days sooner than the phenotypic identification was entered in the Laboratory Information System. If implemented, this more rapid molecular approach could minimize the number of doses of unnecessary or ineffective antibiotics administered to patients. PMID:23985915

  19. Bloodstream infections among carriers of carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae: etiology, incidence and predictors.

    PubMed

    Amit, S; Mishali, H; Kotlovsky, T; Schwaber, M J; Carmeli, Y

    2015-01-01

    Carriers of carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae (CRKP) are increasingly recognised through active surveillance in much of the world. We studied incidence, aetiology and predictors of bloodstream infections (BSI) among such carriers. Via a retrospective cohort study conducted in a tertiary care teaching hospital, we examined occurrence of BSI within 45 days of CRKP carrier detection. Three nested case-control studies were conducted to analyse parameters associated with all-cause (ALL), Gram-negative rod (GNR) and CRKP BSI. Cases and controls were compared with respect to demographics, clinical parameters and recent receipt of antibiotics. A total of 431 patients were identified as CRKP carriers (28% by clinical culture, 72% by rectal surveillance), mean age was 75.2 years. Twenty percent of the patients (n = 85) developed BSI, of them 80% (n = 68) with GNR. Of 83 GNR isolates, 58 (70%) were Enterobacteriaceae, of which 19 were CRKP and 20 were extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) producers (23% and 24% of total GNR, respectively); 29% of the GNR isolates were nonfermenters (14.5% Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 14.5% Acinetobacter baumannii). Mechanical ventilation predicted ALL BSI (p = 0.04), whereas Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhoea predicted GNR BSI (p = 0.04). Receipt of broad-spectrum antibiotics (piperacillin-tazobactam, amikacin, imipenem) was significantly associated with ALL BSI or GNR BSI. No exposure independently predicted CRKP BSI. We conclude that patients detected as CRKP carriers are at high risk for BSI within 45 days of detection, primarily with multidrug-resistant GNR. Lack of predictive factors differentiating between pathogens and associated high mortality raises once more the dilemma regarding the appropriate empiric therapy for CRKP carriers who develop severe sepsis. PMID:25636924

  20. A multicentre analysis of epidemiology of the nosocomial bloodstream infections in Japanese university hospitals.

    PubMed

    Nagao, M

    2013-09-01

    Nosocomial bloodstream infections (BSIs) are an important cause of morbidity and mortality. The current study analysed data from a concurrent surveillance programme to examine the current epidemiological trends for nosocomial BSIs at 22 Japanese university hospitals from 1 April 2008 to 31 March 2012. The number of blood culture sets taken, the rate of multiple blood culture sets and the rates of antibiotic-resistant isolates among six major nosocomial BSI pathogens (Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus spp., Escherichia coli, Klebsiella spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Candida spp.) not including coagulase-negative staphylococci, were evaluated. The clinical characteristics of nosocomial BSIs caused by these pathogens were also collected for 2941 patients. The number of blood culture sets taken per bed increased during the 4-year study period (from 4.07 in 2008 to 5.37 in 2011), and the rates of multiple blood culture sets also increased (from 29.9% in 2008 to 50.0% in 2011). Methicillin resistance was detected in 50.2% of S. aureus isolates. The prevalence rates of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing E. coli and Klebsiella spp. isolates increased annually during the study period, and the average prevalence rates were 12.3% and 5.8%, respectively. The overall crude mortality of nosocomial BSIs due to the six pathogens evaluated was 24.5% (43.2% in ICU settings and 20.5% in non-ICU settings). Thus, our multicentre study evaluated the current epidemiological trends for nosocomial BSIs, and we found that further efforts are needed to increase the use of multiple blood culture sets and improve the prognosis of nosocomial BSIs in Japanese university hospitals.

  1. Epidemiologic Associations Between Short-Bowel Syndrome and Bloodstream Infection Among Hospitalized Children

    PubMed Central

    Miko, Benjamin A.; Kamath, Suma S.; Cohen, Bevin A.; Jeon, Christie; Jia, Haomiao; Larson, Elaine L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Children with short bowel syndrome (SBS) suffer from strikingly high rates of morbidity and mortality, due in part to their susceptibility to life-threatening infectious diseases. Few large, multisite studies have evaluated patient-specific factors associated with bacteremia in hospitalized children with and without SBS. Methods We conducted a case–control study to examine the epidemiological associations between SBS and bloodstream infections (BSI) in hospitalized children. Pediatric BSI cases and controls were selected from a prospective cohort study conducted at 3 New York City hospitals. Results Among 40 723 hospital admissions of 30 179 children, 1047 diagnoses of BSI were identified. A total of 64 children had a diagnosis of SBS. BSI was identified frequently among hospitalizations for children admitted with SBS (n = 207/450, 46%) compared to hospitalizations for children without the condition (n = 840/40 273, 2.1%, P < .001). While this population represented only 0.2% of our overall cohort, it accounted for nearly 20% of all hospital admissions with BSI. Multivariable analysis identified 8 factors significantly associated with pediatric hospitalizations with BSI. These included a diagnosis of SBS (odds ratio [OR] 19.0), ages 1–5 years (OR 1.33), presence of a non-Broviac-Hickman central venous catheter (OR 6.36), immunosuppression (OR 0.53), kidney injury (OR 6.67), organ transplantation (OR 4.44), admission from a skilled nursing facility (OR 2.66), and cirrhosis (OR 7.23). Conclusions While several clinical characteristics are contributory to the risk of BSI in children, SBS remains the single strongest predictor. Further research into the mediators of this risk will be essential for the development of prevention strategies for this vulnerable population. PMID:26336089

  2. DNA microarray analysis of Staphylococcus aureus causing bloodstream infection: bacterial genes associated with mortality?

    PubMed

    Blomfeldt, A; Aamot, H V; Eskesen, A N; Monecke, S; White, R A; Leegaard, T M; Bjørnholt, J V

    2016-08-01

    Providing evidence for microbial genetic determinants' impact on outcome in Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infections (SABSI) is challenging due to the complex and dynamic microbe-host interaction. Our recent population-based prospective study reported an association between the S. aureus clonal complex (CC) 30 genotype and mortality in SABSI patients. This follow-up investigation aimed to examine the genetic profiles of the SABSI isolates and test the hypothesis that specific genetic characteristics in S. aureus are associated with mortality. SABSI isolates (n = 305) and S. aureus CC30 isolates from asymptomatic nasal carriers (n = 38) were characterised by DNA microarray analysis and spa typing. Fisher's exact test, least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) and elastic net regressions were performed to discern within four groups defined by patient outcome and characteristics. No specific S. aureus genetic determinants were found to be associated with mortality in SABSI patients. By applying LASSO and elastic net regressions, we found evidence suggesting that agrIII and cna were positively and setC (=selX) and seh were negatively associated with S. aureus CC30 versus non-CC30 isolates. The genes chp and sak, encoding immune evasion molecules, were found in higher frequencies in CC30 SABSI isolates compared to CC30 carrier isolates, indicating a higher virulence potential. In conclusion, no specific S. aureus genes were found to be associated with mortality by DNA microarray analysis and state-of-the-art statistical analyses. The next natural step is to test the hypothesis in larger samples with higher resolution methods, like whole genome sequencing. PMID:27177754

  3. Rapid identification of major Escherichia coli sequence types causing urinary tract and bloodstream infections.

    PubMed

    Doumith, M; Day, M; Ciesielczuk, H; Hope, R; Underwood, A; Reynolds, R; Wain, J; Livermore, D M; Woodford, N

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli sequence types (STs) 69, 73, 95, and 131 are collectively responsible for a large proportion of E. coli urinary tract and bloodstream infections, and they differ markedly in their antibiotic susceptibilities. Here, we describe a novel PCR method to rapidly detect and distinguish these lineages. Three hundred eighteen published E. coli genomes were compared in order to identify signature sequences unique to each of the four major STs. The specificities of these sequences were assessed in silico by seeking them in an additional 98 genomes. A PCR assay was designed to amplify size-distinguishable fragments unique to the four lineages and was validated using 515 E. coli isolates of known STs. Genome comparisons identified 22 regions ranging in size from 335 bp to 26.5 kb that are unique to one or more of the four predominant E. coli STs, with two to 10 specific regions per ST. These regions predominantly harbor genes encoding hypothetical proteins and are within or adjacent to prophage sequences. Most (13/22) were highly conserved (>96.5% identity) in the genomes of their respective ST. The new assay correctly identified all 142 representatives of the four major STs in the validation set (n = 515), with only two ST12 isolates misidentified as ST95. Compared with MLST, the assay has 100% sensitivity and 99.5% specificity. The rapid identification of major extraintestinal E. coli STs will benefit future epidemiological studies and could be developed to tailor antibiotic therapy to the different susceptibilities of these dominant lineages. PMID:25355761

  4. DNA microarray analysis of Staphylococcus aureus causing bloodstream infection: bacterial genes associated with mortality?

    PubMed

    Blomfeldt, A; Aamot, H V; Eskesen, A N; Monecke, S; White, R A; Leegaard, T M; Bjørnholt, J V

    2016-08-01

    Providing evidence for microbial genetic determinants' impact on outcome in Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infections (SABSI) is challenging due to the complex and dynamic microbe-host interaction. Our recent population-based prospective study reported an association between the S. aureus clonal complex (CC) 30 genotype and mortality in SABSI patients. This follow-up investigation aimed to examine the genetic profiles of the SABSI isolates and test the hypothesis that specific genetic characteristics in S. aureus are associated with mortality. SABSI isolates (n = 305) and S. aureus CC30 isolates from asymptomatic nasal carriers (n = 38) were characterised by DNA microarray analysis and spa typing. Fisher's exact test, least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) and elastic net regressions were performed to discern within four groups defined by patient outcome and characteristics. No specific S. aureus genetic determinants were found to be associated with mortality in SABSI patients. By applying LASSO and elastic net regressions, we found evidence suggesting that agrIII and cna were positively and setC (=selX) and seh were negatively associated with S. aureus CC30 versus non-CC30 isolates. The genes chp and sak, encoding immune evasion molecules, were found in higher frequencies in CC30 SABSI isolates compared to CC30 carrier isolates, indicating a higher virulence potential. In conclusion, no specific S. aureus genes were found to be associated with mortality by DNA microarray analysis and state-of-the-art statistical analyses. The next natural step is to test the hypothesis in larger samples with higher resolution methods, like whole genome sequencing.

  5. Three Epidemics of Invasive Multidrug-Resistant Salmonella Bloodstream Infection in Blantyre, Malawi, 1998–2014

    PubMed Central

    Feasey, Nicholas A.; Masesa, Clemens; Jassi, Chikondi; Faragher, E. Brian; Mallewa, Jane; Mallewa, Macpherson; MacLennan, Calman A.; Msefula, Chisomo; Heyderman, Robert S.; Gordon, Melita A.

    2015-01-01

    Background. The Malawi Liverpool Wellcome Trust Clinical Research Programme (MLW) has routinely collected specimens for blood culture from febrile patients, and cerebrospinal fluid from patients with suspected meningitis, presenting to Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital (QECH), Blantyre, Malawi, since 1998. Methods. We present bloodstream infection (BSI) and meningitis surveillance data from 1998 to 2014. Automated blood culture, manual speciation, serotyping, and antimicrobial susceptibility testing were performed at MLW. Population data for minimum-incidence estimates in urban Blantyre were drawn from published estimates. Results. Between 1998 and 2014, 167 028 blood cultures were taken from adult and pediatric medical patients presenting to QECH; Salmonella Typhi was isolated on 2054 occasions (1.2%) and nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS) serovars were isolated 10 139 times (6.1%), of which 8017 (79.1%) were Salmonella Typhimurium and 1608 (15.8%) were Salmonella Enteritidis. There were 392 cases of NTS meningitis and 9 cases of Salmonella Typhi meningitis. There have been 3 epidemics of Salmonella BSI in Blantyre; Salmonella Enteritidis from 1999 to 2002, Salmonella Typhimurium from 2002 to 2008, and Salmonella Typhi, which began in 2011 and was ongoing in 2014. Multidrug resistance has emerged in all 3 serovars and is seen in the overwhelming majority of isolates, while resistance to third-generation cephalosporins and fluoroquinolones is currently uncommon but has been identified. Conclusions. Invasive Salmonella disease in Malawi is dynamic and not clearly attributable to a single risk factor, although all 3 epidemics were associated with multidrug resistance. To inform nonvaccine and vaccine interventions, reservoirs of disease and modes of transmission require further investigation. PMID:26449953

  6. Central venous catheter-related bloodstream infections in the intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Harsha V.; Patil, Virendra C.; Ramteerthkar, M. N.; Kulkarni, R. D.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Central venous catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients. Aims: This study was conducted to determine the incidence of central venous catheter-related infections (CRIs) and to identify the factors influencing it. So far, there are very few studies that have been conducted on CRBSI in the intensive care unit in India. Settings and Design: This was a prospective, observational study carried out in the medical intensive care unit (MICU) over a period of 1 year from January to December 2004. Materials and Methods: A total of 54 patients with indwelling central venous catheters of age group between 20 and 75 years were included. The catheters were cultured using the standard semiquantitative culture (SQC) method. Statistical analysis used SPSS-10 version statistical software. Results: A total of 54 CVC catheters with 319 catheter days were included in this study. Of 54 patients with CVCs studied for bacteriology, 39 (72.22%) catheters showed negative SQCs and also negative blood cultures. A total of 15 (27.77%) catheters were positive on SQC, of which 10 (18.52%) were with catheter-associated infection and four (7.41%) were with catheter-associated bacteremia; the remaining one was a probable catheter-associated bacteremia. CRIs were high among catheters that were kept in situ for more than 3 days and emergency procedures where two or more attempts were required for catheterization (P < 0.05). In multivariate analysis of covariance duration of catheter in situ for >3 days, inexperienced venupucturist, more number of attempts and emergency CVC were associated with more incidence of CVCBSIs, with P <0.02. The duration of catheter in situ was negatively correlated (-0.53) and number of attempts required to put CVC was positively correlated (+0.39) with incidence of CVCBSIs. Sixty-five percent of the isolates belonged to the CONS group (13/20). Staphylococcus epidermidis showed

  7. Prevention of Central Line–Associated Bloodstream Infections Through Quality Improvement Interventions: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Perl, Trish M.; Blot, Koen; Bergs, Jochen; Vogelaers, Dirk; Blot, Stijn; Vandijck, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    This systematic review and meta-analysis examines the impact of quality improvement interventions on central line–associated bloodstream infections in adult intensive care units. Studies were identified through Medline and manual searches (1995–June 2012). Random-effects meta-analysis obtained pooled odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Meta-regression assessed the impact of bundle/checklist interventions and high baseline rates on intervention effect. Forty-one before–after studies identified an infection rate decrease (OR, 0.39 [95% CI, .33–.46]; P < .001). This effect was more pronounced for trials implementing a bundle or checklist approach (P = .03). Furthermore, meta-analysis of 6 interrupted time series studies revealed an infection rate reduction 3 months postintervention (OR, 0.30 [95% CI, .10–.88]; P = .03). There was no difference in infection rates between studies with low or high baseline rates (P = .18). These results suggest that quality improvement interventions contribute to the prevention of central line–associated bloodstream infections. Implementation of care bundles and checklists appears to yield stronger risk reductions. PMID:24723276

  8. Acute labyrinthitis associated with systemic Candida albicans infection in ageing mice.

    PubMed

    Ashman, R B; Papadimitriou, J M; Fulurija, A

    1996-01-01

    The yeast Candida albicans is an important opportunistic pathogen that has been associated with disease of the inner ear. This study describes the histopathology of acute labyrinthitis caused by systemic infection with C. albicans in aging inbred mice. Within four days after infection, yeast and hyphal forms of C.albicans were found in the membranous labyrinth. The utricle and the adjacent parts of the ampullary regions of the semicircular canals were most severely affected, but damage was also seen in the scala media, the scala tympani, the saccule, and the scala vestibuli. In the utricle, the lining epithelium of the membranous labyrinth was disrupted, and the lining cells of the vestibular membrane showed foci in which the membrane was disrupted. The data suggest that age may represent a risk factor for fungal labyrinthitis.

  9. Classification of positive blood cultures: computer algorithms versus physicians' assessment - development of tools for surveillance of bloodstream infection prognosis using population-based laboratory databases

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Information from blood cultures is utilized for infection control, public health surveillance, and clinical outcome research. This information can be enriched by physicians’ assessments of positive blood cultures, which are, however, often available from selected patient groups or pathogens only. The aim of this work was to determine whether patients with positive blood cultures can be classified effectively for outcome research in epidemiological studies by the use of administrative data and computer algorithms, taking physicians’ assessments as reference. Methods Physicians’ assessments of positive blood cultures were routinely recorded at two Danish hospitals from 2006 through 2008. The physicians’ assessments classified positive blood cultures as: a) contamination or bloodstream infection; b) bloodstream infection as mono- or polymicrobial; c) bloodstream infection as community- or hospital-onset; d) community-onset bloodstream infection as healthcare-associated or not. We applied the computer algorithms to data from laboratory databases and the Danish National Patient Registry to classify the same groups and compared these with the physicians’ assessments as reference episodes. For each classification, we tabulated episodes derived by the physicians’ assessment and the computer algorithm and compared 30-day mortality between concordant and discrepant groups with adjustment for age, gender, and comorbidity. Results Physicians derived 9,482 reference episodes from 21,705 positive blood cultures. The agreement between computer algorithms and physicians’ assessments was high for contamination vs. bloodstream infection (8,966/9,482 reference episodes [96.6%], Kappa = 0.83) and mono- vs. polymicrobial bloodstream infection (6,932/7,288 reference episodes [95.2%], Kappa = 0.76), but lower for community- vs. hospital-onset bloodstream infection (6,056/7,288 reference episodes [83.1%], Kappa = 0.57) and healthcare-association (3

  10. Bloodstream Infections in Patients With Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Treated With Intravenous Prostanoids: Insights From the REVEAL REGISTRY®

    PubMed Central

    Kitterman, Natalie; Poms, Abby; Miller, Dave P.; Lombardi, Sandra; Farber, Harrison W.; Barst, Robyn J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the rate of and potential risk factors for bloodstream infections (BSIs) using data from the REVEAL (Registry to Evaluate Early and Long-term Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension [PAH] Disease Management) REGISTRY®, which provides current information about patients with PAH. Patients and Methods Patients were enrolled from March 30, 2006, through December 8, 2009, and data on reported BSIs were collected through the third quarter of 2010. Bloodstream infection rates were calculated per 1000 patient-days of risk. Results Of 3518 patients enrolled, 1146 patients received intravenous (IV) prostanoid therapy for more than 1 day (no BSI, n=1023; ≥1 BSI, n=123; total BSI episodes, n=166). Bloodstream infections rates were significantly increased in patients receiving IV treprostinil vs IV epoprostenol (0.36 vs 0.12 per 1000 treatment days; P<.001), primarily due to gram-negative organisms (0.20 vs 0.03 per 1000 treatment days; P<.001). Multivariate analysis adjusting for age, causes of PAH, and year of BSI found that treatment with IV treprostinil was associated with a 3.08-fold increase (95% confidence interval, 2.05-4.62; P<.001) in BSIs of any type and a 6.86-fold increase (95% confidence interval, 3.60-13.07; P<.001) in gram-negative BSIs compared with treatment with IV epoprostenol. Conclusion Compared with IV epoprostenol therapy, treatment with IV treprostinil is associated with a significantly higher rate of gram-negative BSIs; observed differences in BSI rate did not seem to be due to any other analyzed factors. Trial Registration clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00370214 PMID:22883740

  11. Lodderomyces elongisporus masquerading as Candida parapsilosis as a cause of bloodstream infections.

    PubMed

    Lockhart, Shawn R; Messer, Shawn A; Pfaller, Michael A; Diekema, Daniel J

    2008-01-01

    Ten yeast bloodstream isolates identified as Candida parapsilosis by conventional methods grew as turquoise blue colonies on Chromagar media. Subsequent sequence analysis showed that these isolates were the species Lodderomyces elongisporus. To our knowledge, this is the first published report of L. elongisporus as a cause of human disease.

  12. The rising tide of bloodstream infections with Actinomyces species: bimicrobial infection with Actinomyces odontolyticus and Escherichia coli in an intravenous drug user.

    PubMed

    Weiand, Daniel; Barlow, Gavin

    2014-12-01

    Clinicians of all specialties need to be aware of a recent, nationwide increase in the number of Actinomyces bloodstream infections. We report a case of bimicrobial bloodstream infection with Actinomyces odontolyticus and Escherichia coli in an intravenous drug user. A 36-year-old, male intravenous drug user was admitted with acute-onset pleuritic chest pain, back pain, pyrexia, tachycardia, tachypnoea and hypotension. Chest CT showed multiple, bilateral, cavitating lung lesions, most likely the result of septic emboli originating from an infected deep venous thrombosis (DVT). Blood cultures led to a mixed growth of A. odontolyticus, identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF), and E. coli. The rising tide of bloodstream infections with Actinomyces species is likely to continue with the increasing availability of sophisticated molecular identification techniques, including MALDI-TOF. In this case, the results of antimicrobial susceptibility tests were particularly important because the E. coli was susceptible to ciprofloxacin, whereas the A. odontolyticus was resistant.

  13. The rising tide of bloodstream infections with Actinomyces species: bimicrobial infection with Actinomyces odontolyticus and Escherichia coli in an intravenous drug user

    PubMed Central

    Weiand, Daniel; Barlow, Gavin

    2014-01-01

    Clinicians of all specialties need to be aware of a recent, nationwide increase in the number of Actinomyces bloodstream infections. We report a case of bimicrobial bloodstream infection with Actinomyces odontolyticus and Escherichia coli in an intravenous drug user. A 36-year-old, male intravenous drug user was admitted with acute-onset pleuritic chest pain, back pain, pyrexia, tachycardia, tachypnoea and hypotension. Chest CT showed multiple, bilateral, cavitating lung lesions, most likely the result of septic emboli originating from an infected deep venous thrombosis (DVT). Blood cultures led to a mixed growth of A. odontolyticus, identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF), and E. coli. The rising tide of bloodstream infections with Actinomyces species is likely to continue with the increasing availability of sophisticated molecular identification techniques, including MALDI-TOF. In this case, the results of antimicrobial susceptibility tests were particularly important because the E. coli was susceptible to ciprofloxacin, whereas the A. odontolyticus was resistant. PMID:25988064

  14. How to Optimize the Use of Blood Cultures for the Diagnosis of Bloodstream Infections? A State-of-the Art

    PubMed Central

    Lamy, Brigitte; Dargère, Sylvie; Arendrup, Maiken C.; Parienti, Jean-Jacques; Tattevin, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Bloodstream infection (BSI) is a major cause of death in developed countries and the detection of microorganisms is essential in managing patients. Despite major progress has been made to improve identification of microorganisms, blood culture (BC) remains the gold standard and the first line tool for detecting BSIs. Consensus guidelines are available to ensure optimal BSI procedures, but BC practices often deviate from the recommendations. This review provides an update on clinical and technical issues related to blood collection and to BC performance, with a special focus on the blood sample strategy to optimize the sensitivity and specificity of BCs. PMID:27242721

  15. Bench-to-bedside review: Challenges of diagnosis, care and prevention of central catheter-related bloodstream infections in children

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Central venous catheters (CVCs) are indispensable in modern pediatric medicine. CVCs provide secure vascular access, but are associated with a risk of severe complications, in particular bloodstream infection. We provide a review of the recent literature about the diagnostic and therapeutic challenges of catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) in children and its prevention. Variations in blood sampling and limitations in blood culturing interfere with accurate and timely diagnosis of CRBSI. Although novel molecular testing methods appear promising in overcoming some of the present diagnostic limitations of conventional blood sampling in children, they still need to solidly prove their accuracy and reliability in clinical practice. Standardized practices of catheter insertion and care remain the cornerstone of CRBSI prevention although their implementation in daily practice may be difficult. Technology such as CVC impregnation or catheter locking with antimicrobial substances has been shown less effective than anticipated. Despite encouraging results in CRBSI prevention among adults, the goal of zero infection in children is still not in range. More high-quality research is needed in the field of prevention, accurate and reliable diagnostic measures and effective treatment of CRBSI in children. PMID:24041298

  16. Recurrent Gram-Negative Bloodstream Infection: A 10-Year Population-Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hasan, Majdi N.; Eckel-Passow, Jeanette E.; Baddour, Larry M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Recurrent gram-negative bloodstream infection (BSI) has not been evaluated in a population-based setting; therefore, we performed a population-based retrospective cohort study to examine the incidence, recurrence, and mortality rates of gram-negative BSI. Methods We identified 944 episodes of gram-negative BSI, including 98 recurrent episodes, among Olmsted County, Minnesota, residents from 1/1/1998 to 12/31/2007. Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate the cumulative incidence rate of recurrence and 28-day all-cause mortality rate of gram-negative BSI. Cox proportional hazard regression was used to determine risk factors for recurrence. Results The overall age- and gender-adjusted incidence rate of gram-negative BSI per 100,000 person-years was 84.5 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 79.1–90.0), including 75.7 (95% CI: 70.6–80.8) for first episodes and 8.8 (95% CI: 7.1–10.6) for recurrent episodes. Among 846 patients with first episodes of gram-negative BSI, the cumulative incidence rates of recurrence after 1, 5, and 10 years of the initial episode were 5.6%, 9.2%, and 14.6%, respectively, with death treated as a competing risk. Patients with Klebsiella species were more likely than those with Escherichia coli BSI to develop recurrent gram-negative BSI (hazard ratio: 2.33 [95% CI: 1.34–3.92], p=0.003). The 28-day all-cause mortality rates following the initial and second episodes of gram-negative BSI were 10.0% (95% CI: 8.0–12.0) and 11.3% (95% CI: 4.4–18.2), respectively. Conclusions Even though recurrent gram-negative BSI was relatively uncommon in the general population, up to 15% of patients with gram-negative BSI developed a recurrent episode within 10 years of the initial episode. PMID:20378069

  17. Cytomegalovirus infection in patients with sepsis due to bloodstream infections: lower risk and better outcomes in new versus already hospitalised intensive care unit admissions.

    PubMed

    R, Osawa; M, Wagener; Ns, Singh

    2016-09-01

    Few studies have examined cytomegalovirus (CMV) reactivation exclusively in immunocompetent patients with sepsis due to bloodstream infections. In a cohort of CMV-seropositive critically ill otherwise non-immunosuppressed patients with sepsis due to bloodstream infection, weekly testing for CMV viraemia was performed. Outcomes were assessed at 30 days or until death/discharge from the intensive care unit (ICU). CMV viraemia developed in 20% (20/100) of the patients. Age (P=0.044) and blood transfusions (P=0.022) were significantly associated with CMV viraemia. There was no difference in the primary endpoint (mortality and/or multi-organ failure) between patients with and without CMV viraemia (P=0.49). However, CMV viraemia was associated with significantly fewer ICU-free days (P=0.023) and fewer ventilator-free days (P=0.031). Patients hospitalised in the ICU for more than 48 hours prior to the onset of bloodstream infection were more likely to develop CMV viraemia (P=0.006), have high-grade viraemia (P=0.010), and fewer ICU-free days (P=0.018) and ventilator-free days (P=0.029) than those admitted within 48 hours of bloodstream infection. Thus, CMV reactivation was associated with fewer ICU- and ventilator-free days, however overall mortality was not affected. Patients already in the ICU at the onset of sepsis had higher risk of CMV reactivation and worse outcomes than new ICU-bound patients suggesting that a targeted approach for interventions for CMV could conceivably be directed towards those with a more protracted course of illness. PMID:27608339

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of Extremely Drug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ST357) Strain CMC_VB_PA_B22862 Isolated from a Community-Acquired Bloodstream Infection

    PubMed Central

    Pragasam, Agila Kumari; Yesurajan, Francis; Doss C, George Priya; George, Biju; Devanga Ragupathi, Naveen Kumar; Walia, Kamini

    2016-01-01

    Extremely drug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains causing severe infections have become a serious concern across the world. Here, we report draft genome sequence of P. aeruginosa with an extremely drug-resistant profile isolated from a patient with community-acquired bloodstream infection in India. PMID:27795257

  19. Suppression of humoral response during the course of Candida albicans infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Valdez, J C; Meson, O E; de Valdez, G A; Sirena, A

    1984-10-30

    This paper aims at demonstrating the non-specific immunosuppression as regards thyme-dependent antigens sheep erythrocytes (SRBC) during the course of Candida albicans systemic infection. Three lots of syngeneic/BALB/c mice, 8-12 weeks of age, were used. The first normal lot was inoculated via the intraperitoneal route with a (SRBC) suspension (4 X 10(8) cells ml) in a Hank's balanced saline solution. The primary response of antibodies formed by splenic cells was measured from 4 to 8 days after inoculation using the direct plaque forming cells technique. The second lot was infected by the same route with a suspension of Candida albicans (1 X 10(7) cells). Positive retrocultures from the blood and kidneys of these infected mice were obtained. These yeasts cultivated in a Sabouraud medium were harvested after 20 h at 37 degrees C. Following the same methodology the immune response to SRBC was determined. The serum obtained from infected mice was transferred to a third lot of mice at different intervals during the course of the infection. The immune response to SRBC was done by the direct plaque-forming cells technique. Controls were carried out using normal donors and recipients. A suppression of the immune response was obtained as from the 2nd day of inoculation up to the 28th day. It was not possible to transfer such suppression passively by means of the serum. These results suggest that the systemic infection by Candida albicans induce a non-specific immunosuppression in the organism, already demonstrated in viral infections, bacteria, protozoaria and metazoaria in mammals. In some way, this will contribute to explain the mechanisms of immune response to Candida albicans.

  20. New signaling pathways govern the host response to C. albicans infection in various niches.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yaoping; Shetty, Amol C; Schwartz, Jennifer A; Bradford, L Latey; Xu, Wenjie; Phan, Qyunh T; Kumari, Priti; Mahurkar, Anup; Mitchell, Aaron P; Ravel, Jacques; Fraser, Claire M; Filler, Scott G; Bruno, Vincent M

    2015-05-01

    Candida albicans, the major invasive fungal pathogen of humans, can cause both debilitating mucosal infections and fatal invasive infections. Understanding the complex nature of the host-pathogen interaction in each of these contexts is essential to developing desperately needed therapies to treat fungal infections. RNA-seq enables a systems-level understanding of infection by facilitating comprehensive analysis of transcriptomes from multiple species (e.g., host and pathogen) simultaneously. We used RNA-seq to characterize the transcriptomes of both C. albicans and human endothelial cells or oral epithelial cells during in vitro infection. Network analysis of the differentially expressed genes identified the activation of several signaling pathways that have not previously been associated with the host response to fungal pathogens. Using an siRNA knockdown approach, we demonstrate that two of these pathways-platelet-derived growth factor BB (PDGF BB) and neural precursor-cell-expressed developmentally down-regulated protein 9 (NEDD9)-govern the host-pathogen interaction by regulating the uptake of C. albicans by host cells. Using RNA-seq analysis of a mouse model of hematogenously disseminated candidiasis (HDC) and episodes of vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) in humans, we found evidence that many of the same signaling pathways are activated during mucosal (VVC) and/or disseminated (HDC) infections in vivo. Our analyses have uncovered several signaling pathways at the interface between C. albicans and host cells in various contexts of infection, and suggest that PDGF BB and NEDD9 play important roles in this interaction. In addition, these data provide a valuable community resource for better understanding host-fungal pathogen interactions.

  1. Suppression of humoral response during the course of Candida albicans infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Valdez, J C; Meson, O E; de Valdez, G A; Sirena, A

    1984-10-30

    This paper aims at demonstrating the non-specific immunosuppression as regards thyme-dependent antigens sheep erythrocytes (SRBC) during the course of Candida albicans systemic infection. Three lots of syngeneic/BALB/c mice, 8-12 weeks of age, were used. The first normal lot was inoculated via the intraperitoneal route with a (SRBC) suspension (4 X 10(8) cells ml) in a Hank's balanced saline solution. The primary response of antibodies formed by splenic cells was measured from 4 to 8 days after inoculation using the direct plaque forming cells technique. The second lot was infected by the same route with a suspension of Candida albicans (1 X 10(7) cells). Positive retrocultures from the blood and kidneys of these infected mice were obtained. These yeasts cultivated in a Sabouraud medium were harvested after 20 h at 37 degrees C. Following the same methodology the immune response to SRBC was determined. The serum obtained from infected mice was transferred to a third lot of mice at different intervals during the course of the infection. The immune response to SRBC was done by the direct plaque-forming cells technique. Controls were carried out using normal donors and recipients. A suppression of the immune response was obtained as from the 2nd day of inoculation up to the 28th day. It was not possible to transfer such suppression passively by means of the serum. These results suggest that the systemic infection by Candida albicans induce a non-specific immunosuppression in the organism, already demonstrated in viral infections, bacteria, protozoaria and metazoaria in mammals. In some way, this will contribute to explain the mechanisms of immune response to Candida albicans. PMID:6392889

  2. High Prevalence of Tuberculosis and Serious Bloodstream Infections in Ambulatory Individuals Presenting for Antiretroviral Therapy in Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Bedell, Richard A.; Anderson, Suzanne T. B.; van Lettow, Monique; Åkesson, Ann; Corbett, Elizabeth L.; Kumwenda, Moses; Chan, Adrienne K.; Heyderman, Robert S.; Zachariah, Rony; Harries, Anthony D.; Ramsay, Andrew R.

    2012-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) and serious bloodstream infections (BSI) may contribute to the high early mortality observed among patients qualifying for antiretroviral therapy (ART) with unexplained weight loss, chronic fever or chronic diarrhea. Methods and Findings A prospective cohort study determined the prevalence of undiagnosed TB or BSI among ambulatory HIV-infected adults with unexplained weight loss and/or chronic fever, or diarrhea in two routine program settings in Malawi. Subjects with positive expectorated sputum smears for AFB were excluded. Investigations Bacterial and mycobacterial blood cultures, cryptococcal antigen test (CrAg), induced sputum (IS) for TB microscopy and solid culture, full blood count and CD4 lymphocyte count. Among 469 subjects, 52 (11%) had microbiological evidence of TB; 50 (11%) had a positive (non-TB) blood culture and/or positive CrAg. Sixty-five additional TB cases were diagnosed on clinical and radiological grounds. Nontyphoidal Salmonellae (NTS) were the most common blood culture pathogens (29 cases; 6% of participants and 52% of bloodstream isolates). Multivariate analysis of baseline clinical and hematological characteristics found significant independent associations between oral candidiasis or lymphadenopathy and TB, marked CD4 lymphopenia and NTS infection, and severe anemia and either infection, but low positive likelihood ratios (<2 for all combinations). Conclusions We observed a high prevalence of TB and serious BSI, particularly NTS, in a program cohort of chronically ill HIV-infected outpatients. Baseline clinical and hematological characteristics were inadequate predictors of infection. HIV clinics need better rapid screening tools for TB and BSI. Clinical trials to evaluate empiric TB or NTS treatment are required in similar populations. PMID:22761767

  3. Evaluation of Real-time PCR and Pyrosequencing for Screening Incubating Blood Culture Bottles from Adults with Suspected Bloodstream Infection

    PubMed Central

    McCann, Chase D.; Moore, Miranda S.; May, Larissa S.; McCarroll, Matthew; Jordan, Jeanne A.

    2015-01-01

    Several molecular platforms can identify bacteria associated with bloodstream infections, but require positive culture bottles as starting material. Here we describe results of screening 1140 blood cultures at 8 hours post-inoculation, from 918 eligible adults being evaluated for bloodstream infection. DNA was extracted and analyzed by 16S and/or 23S rRNA real-time PCR/Pyrosequencing. Compared to culture, PCR/Pyrosequencing displayed 90.9% sensitivity, 99.6% specificity, 95.7% PPV, and 99.1% NPV. Overall concordance rate was 98.9% (1127/1140). In four cases with molecular-positive/culture-negative results, medical chart reviews provided evidence of identical bacteria from subsequent blood or concomitant urine/sputum cultures. Nine culture-positive/molecular-negative cases were associated with either polymicrobial growth, grew only in the anaerobic bottle of the clinical pair, and/or were detected by PCR/Pyrosequencing after 8 hours. In summary, this approach accurately detected and identified bacteria in ~91% of culture-confirmed cases significantly sooner than the phenotypic identification was available, having the potential to improve antibiotic stewardship. PMID:25534615

  4. Evaluation of real-time PCR and pyrosequencing for screening incubating blood culture bottles from adults with suspected bloodstream infection.

    PubMed

    McCann, Chase D; Moore, Miranda S; May, Larissa S; McCarroll, Matthew G; Jordan, Jeanne A

    2015-03-01

    Several molecular platforms can identify bacteria associated with bloodstream infections but require positive culture bottles as starting material. Here, we describe results of screening 1140 blood cultures at 8h postinoculation, from 918 eligible adults being evaluated for bloodstream infection. DNA was extracted and analyzed by 16S and/or 23S rRNA real-time PCR/pyrosequencing. Compared to culture, PCR/pyrosequencing displayed 90.9% sensitivity, 99.6% specificity, 95.7% positive predictive value, and 99.1% negative predictive value. Overall concordance rate was 98.9% (1127/1140). In 4 cases with molecular-positive/culture-negative results, medical chart reviews provided evidence of identical bacteria from subsequent blood or concomitant urine/sputum cultures. Nine culture-positive/molecular-negative cases were associated with either polymicrobial growth, grew only in the anaerobic bottle of the clinical pair, and/or were detected by PCR/pyrosequencing after 8h. In summary, this approach accurately detected and identified bacteria in ~91% of culture-confirmed cases significantly sooner than the phenotypic identification was available, having the potential to improve antibiotic stewardship.

  5. Community-Onset Bloodstream and Other Infections, Caused by Carbapenemase-Producing Enterobacteriaceae: Epidemiological, Microbiological, and Clinical Features

    PubMed Central

    Paño-Pardo, José Ramón; López Quintana, Beatriz; Lázaro Perona, Fernando; Ruiz Carrascoso, Guillermo; Romero-Gómez, María Pilar; Loeches Yagüe, Belén; Díaz-Pollán, Beatriz; Martínez-Virto, Ana; Mingorance, Jesús; García Rodríguez, Julio; Arribas, José Ramón; Gómez-Gil, Rosa

    2016-01-01

    Background. Because most infections caused by carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE) begin during hospitalization, there are limited data about community-onset (CO) infections caused by CPE. Our aim is to describe the frequency of CO infections caused by CPE as well as the clinical features of CO bloodstream infections (CO-BSIs). Methods. This study includes retrospective case series of CO infections caused by CPE in a tertiary hospital from January 2010 to July 2014. Any clinical sample with a positive culture for CPE that had been ordered by primary care doctors or by doctors at the emergency room (ER) were classified as CO. Epidemiological and microbiological features of CO cases were assessed as were clinical features of CO-BSIs. Results. Of 780 clinical samples with CPE, 180 were requested at the ER or by primary care doctors (22.9%), 150 of which were produced by Klebsiella pneumoniae (83.3%). The blaOXA−48 gene was detected in 149 isolates (82.8%) followed by the blaVIM gene, 29 (16.1%). Sixty-one patients (33.9%) had a prior history of CPE infection/colonization. Thirty-four of the 119 (28.6%) patients without prior history of CPE infection/colonization did not fulfill Friedman criteria for healthcare-associated infections (HAIs). Considering previous hospitalization of up to 12 months as a criterion for defining HAI, only 16 (13.4%) cases were identified as community-acquired infections. The most frequent positive sample was urine (133 of 180; 73.9%). Twenty-one (11.7%) patients had a BSI, 9 of them secondary to urinary tract infections (42.9%). Thirty-day crude mortality among patients with BSI was 23.8% (5 of 21). Conclusions. Community-onset infections caused by CPE are an important subgroup of all CPE infections. The urinary tract is the main source. Bloodstream infections accounted for more than 10% of the cases. PMID:27703997

  6. Analysis of the relationship between fluconazole consumption and non-C. albicans Candida infections.

    PubMed

    Tyczkowska-Sieron, E; Gaszynski, W; Tyczkowski, J; Glowacka, A

    2014-10-01

    The effect of fluconazole consumption on the incidence of nosocomial non-C. albicans Candida infections remains unclear. In this study we investigated such a relationship in an intensive care unit (Poland) over an 11-year period (2002-2012). Statistics relating to the number of candidiasis cases and the number of defined daily doses of fluconazole showed that only a very weak and not statistically significant linear correlation existed between these two variables (r(2) = 0.36, P = 0.052). However, the assumption of a 1-year delay in the infection response to changes in fluconazole concentrations resulted in a strong and statistically significant linear correlation (r(2) = 0.64, P = 0.0053). To more accurately determine the nature of this relationship, a simple epidemiological model was proposed that provided a better than linear correlation (r(2) = 0.78, P = 0.00077). We successfully used this approach to analyze results from the literature that were interpreted as evidence that fluconazole use is not a risk factor for development of non-C. albicans Candida infections. If a time delay in the infection response was assumed, a strong and statistically significant correlation was obtained. These findings suggest the need for a closer look at fluconazole therapy as a possible risk factor for development of non-C. albicans Candida infections.

  7. Protein A suppresses immune responses during Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection in guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hwan Keun; Falugi, Fabiana; Thomer, Lena; Missiakas, Dominique M.; Schneewind, Olaf

    2015-01-06

    Staphylococcus aureus infection is not associated with the development of protective immunity, and disease relapses occur frequently. We hypothesize that protein A, a factor that binds immunoglobulin Fcγ and cross-links VH3 clan B cell receptors (IgM), is the staphylococcal determinant for host immune suppression. To test this, vertebrate IgM was examined for protein A cross-linking. High VH3 binding activity occurred with human and guinea immunoglobulin, whereas mouse and rabbit immunoglobulins displayed little and no binding, respectively. Establishing a guinea pig model of S. aureus bloodstream infection, we show that protein A functions as a virulence determinant and suppresses host B cell responses. Immunization with SpAKKAA, which cannot bind immunoglobulin, elicits neutralizing antibodies that enable guinea pigs to develop protective immunity.

  8. Incidence of colonization and bloodstream infection with carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae in children receiving antineoplastic chemotherapy in Italy.

    PubMed

    Caselli, Desiree; Cesaro, Simone; Fagioli, Franca; Carraro, Francesca; Ziino, Ottavio; Zanazzo, Giulio; Meazza, Cristina; Colombini, Antonella; Castagnola, Elio

    2016-02-01

    Few data are available on the incidence of carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE) infection or colonization in children receiving anticancer chemotherapy. We performed a nationwide survey among centers participating in the pediatric hematology-oncology cooperative study group (Associazione Italiana Ematologia Oncologia Pediatrica, AIEOP). During a 2-year observation period, we observed a threefold increase in the colonization rate, and a fourfold increase of bloodstream infection episodes, caused by CPE, with a 90-day mortality of 14%. This first nationwide Italian pediatric survey shows that the circulation of CPE strains in the pediatric hematology-oncology environment is increasing. Given the mortality rate, which is higher than for other bacterial strains, specific monitoring should be applied and the results should have implications for health-care practice in pediatric hematology-oncology.

  9. Recurrent candidaemia and pacemaker wire infection with Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Glöckner, A

    2011-12-01

    Recurrent candidaemia is both a cause and a symptom of deep organ candidiasis or infection of foreign bodies (e.g. central venous line, other indwelling catheter or pacemaker wire) and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. This case report demonstrates that in the event of pacemaker wire infection with Candida and when it is not possible to remove the infected pacemaker wire, treatment with an echinocandin, such as anidulafungin, can be safe and successful.

  10. Sequential Dysfunction and Progressive Depletion of Candida albicans-Specific CD4 T Cell Response in HIV-1 Infection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fengliang; Fan, Xiuzhen; Auclair, Sarah; Ferguson, Monique; Sun, Jiaren; Soong, Lynn; Hou, Wei; Redfield, Robert R; Birx, Deborah L; Ratto-Kim, Silvia; Robb, Merlin L; Kim, Jerome H; Michael, Nelson L; Hu, Haitao

    2016-06-01

    Loss of immune control over opportunistic infections can occur at different stages of HIV-1 (HIV) disease, among which mucosal candidiasis caused by the fungal pathogen Candida albicans (C. albicans) is one of the early and common manifestations in HIV-infected human subjects. The underlying immunological basis is not well defined. We have previously shown that compared to cytomegalovirus (CMV)-specific CD4 cells, C. albicans-specific CD4 T cells are highly permissive to HIV in vitro. Here, based on an antiretroviral treatment (ART) naïve HIV infection cohort (RV21), we investigated longitudinally the impact of HIV on C. albicans- and CMV-specific CD4 T-cell immunity in vivo. We found a sequential dysfunction and preferential depletion for C. albicans-specific CD4 T cell response during progressive HIV infection. Compared to Th1 (IFN-γ, MIP-1β) functional subsets, the Th17 functional subsets (IL-17, IL-22) of C. albicans-specific CD4 T cells were more permissive to HIV in vitro and impaired earlier in HIV-infected subjects. Infection history analysis showed that C. albicans-specific CD4 T cells were more susceptible to HIV in vivo, harboring modestly but significantly higher levels of HIV DNA, than CMV-specific CD4 T cells. Longitudinal analysis of HIV-infected individuals with ongoing CD4 depletion demonstrated that C. albicans-specific CD4 T-cell response was preferentially and progressively depleted. Taken together, these data suggest a potential mechanism for earlier loss of immune control over mucosal candidiasis in HIV-infected patients and provide new insights into pathogen-specific immune failure in AIDS pathogenesis. PMID:27280548

  11. Mixed Fungal Lung Infection with Aspergillus Fumigatus and Candida Albicans in a Immunocomprimised Patient: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Vipparti, Haritha

    2014-01-01

    The frequency of invasive, opportunistic mycoses has increased significantly over the past 2 decades. In the immune-compromised host, many fungi, including species of fungi typically considered non-pathogenic, have the potential to cause serious morbidity and mortality. Here we report a rare case of mixed fungal infection of the lung with Candida albicans and Aspergillus fumigatus in a patient on prolonged steroid therapy. PMID:24959447

  12. Ibuprofen potentiates the in vivo antifungal activity of fluconazole against Candida albicans murine infection.

    PubMed

    Costa-de-Oliveira, Sofia; Miranda, Isabel M; Silva-Dias, Ana; Silva, Ana P; Rodrigues, Acácio G; Pina-Vaz, Cidália

    2015-07-01

    Candida albicans is the most prevalent cause of fungemia worldwide. Its ability to develop resistance in patients receiving azole antifungal therapy is well documented. In a murine model of systemic infection, we show that ibuprofen potentiates fluconazole antifungal activity against a fluconazole-resistant strain, drastically reducing the fungal burden and morbidity. The therapeutic combination of fluconazole with ibuprofen may constitute a new approach for the management of antifungal therapeutics to reverse the resistance conferred by efflux pump overexpression.

  13. Ibuprofen Potentiates the In Vivo Antifungal Activity of Fluconazole against Candida albicans Murine Infection

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Isabel M.; Silva-Dias, Ana; Silva, Ana P.; Rodrigues, Acácio G.; Pina-Vaz, Cidália

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is the most prevalent cause of fungemia worldwide. Its ability to develop resistance in patients receiving azole antifungal therapy is well documented. In a murine model of systemic infection, we show that ibuprofen potentiates fluconazole antifungal activity against a fluconazole-resistant strain, drastically reducing the fungal burden and morbidity. The therapeutic combination of fluconazole with ibuprofen may constitute a new approach for the management of antifungal therapeutics to reverse the resistance conferred by efflux pump overexpression. PMID:25845879

  14. Modulation of macrophage cytokine profiles during solid tumor progression: susceptibility to Candida albicans infection

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background In order to attain a better understanding of the interactions between opportunist fungi and their hosts, we investigated the cytokine profile associated with the inflammatory response to Candida albicans infection in mice with solid Ehrlich tumors of different degrees. Methods Groups of eight animals were inoculated intraperitoneally with 5 × 106 C. albicans 7, 14 or 21 days after tumor implantation. After 24 or 72 hours, the animals were euthanized and intraperitoneal lavage fluid was collected. Peritoneal macrophages were cultivated and the levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-12, IL-10 and IL-4 released into the supernatants were measured by ELISA. Kidney, liver and spleen samples were evaluated for fungal dissemination. Tumor-free animals and animals that had only been subjected to C. albicans infection were used as control groups. Results Our results demonstrated that the mice produced more IFN-γ and TNF-α and less IL-10, and also exhibited fungal clearance, at the beginning of tumor evolution. With the tumor progression, this picture changed: IL-10 production increased and IFN-γ and TNF-α release decreased; furthermore, there was extensive fungal dissemination. Conclusion Our results indicate that solid tumors can affect the production of macrophage cytokines and, in consequence, affect host resistance to opportunistic infections. PMID:19534779

  15. Clinical and Laboratory Characteristics of Patients with Nontuberculous Mycobacterium Bloodstream Infection in a Tertiary Referral Hospital in Beijing, China

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Sai-Nan; Zhang, Li-Fan; Zhang, Yue-Qiu; Yang, Qi-Wen; Wang, Peng; Xu, Ying-Chun; Shi, Xiao-Chun; Liu, Xiao-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Background: Nontuberculous Mycobacterium (NTM) bloodstream infection (BSI) is relatively rare. We aimed in this study to evaluate the clinical characteristics, laboratory evaluation, and outcomes of patients with NTM BSI. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the clinical records of inpatients with NTM BSI at our institution between January 2008 and January 2015 and recorded clinical parameters including age, gender, underlying disease, clinical manifestation, organs involved with NTM disease, species of NTM, laboratory data, treatment and outcome of these patients. We also reviewed the reported cases and case series of NTM BSI by searching PubMed, EMBASE, and Wanfang databases. Data of normal distribution were expressed by mean ± standard deviation (SD). Data of nonnormal distribution were expressed by median and interquartile range (IQR). Results: Among the ten patients with NTM BSI, the median age was 51 years (IQR 29–57 years) and three patients were males. Eight patients were immunocompromised, with underlying diseases including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection (one patient), rheumatic diseases (two patients), breast cancer (one patient), myelodysplastic syndrome (two patients), and aplastic anemia (two patients). Other organ(s) involved were lung (two patients), endocardium (two patients), brain, spinal cord, and soft tissue (one each patient). The median lymphocyte was 0.66 × 109/L (IQR 0.24–1.93 × 109/L). The median cluster of differentiation 4 (CD4) cell count was 179/mm3 (IQR 82–619/mm3). Five patients died (three with hematological diseases, one with breast cancer, and one with rheumatic disease), three recovered, and two were lost to follow-up. Conclusions: We reported all cases in our hospital diagnosed with bloodstream NTM infection that was rarely reported. In this group of patients, patients usually had a high fever and could have multiple organ involvements. All patients with poor prognosis had underlying diseases. PMID:27625095

  16. Duplex DNA-Invading γ-Modified Peptide Nucleic Acids Enable Rapid Identification of Bloodstream Infections in Whole Blood

    PubMed Central

    Nölling, Jörk; Rapireddy, Srinivas; Amburg, Joel I.; Crawford, Elizabeth M.; Prakash, Ranjit A.; Rabson, Arthur R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bloodstream infections are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Early and targeted antimicrobial intervention is lifesaving, yet current diagnostic approaches fail to provide actionable information within a clinically viable time frame due to their reliance on blood culturing. Here, we present a novel pathogen identification (PID) platform that features the use of duplex DNA-invading γ-modified peptide nucleic acids (γPNAs) for the rapid identification of bacterial and fungal pathogens directly from blood, without culturing. The PID platform provides species-level information in under 2.5 hours while reaching single-CFU-per-milliliter sensitivity across the entire 21-pathogen panel. The clinical utility of the PID platform was demonstrated through assessment of 61 clinical specimens, which showed >95% sensitivity and >90% overall correlation to blood culture findings. This rapid γPNA-based platform promises to improve patient care by enabling the administration of a targeted first-line antimicrobial intervention. PMID:27094328

  17. Coordination of Candida albicans Invasion and Infection Functions by Phosphoglycerol Phosphatase Rhr2.

    PubMed

    Desai, Jigar V; Cheng, Shaoji; Ying, Tammy; Nguyen, M Hong; Clancy, Cornelius J; Lanni, Frederick; Mitchell, Aaron P

    2015-07-24

    The Candida albicans RHR2 gene, which specifies a glycerol biosynthetic enzyme, is required for biofilm formation in vitro and in vivo. Prior studies indicate that RHR2 is ultimately required for expression of adhesin genes, such as ALS1. In fact, RHR2 is unnecessary for biofilm formation when ALS1 is overexpressed from an RHR2-independent promoter. Here, we describe two additional biological processes that depend upon RHR2: invasion into an abiotic substrate and pathogenicity in an abdominal infection model. We report here that abiotic substrate invasion occurs concomitantly with biofilm formation, and a screen of transcription factor mutants indicates that biofilm and hyphal formation ability correlates with invasion ability. However, analysis presented here of the rhr2Δ/Δ mutant separates biofilm formation and invasion. We found that an rhr2Δ/Δ mutant forms a biofilm upon overexpression of the adhesin gene ALS1 or the transcription factor genes BRG1 or UME6. However, the biofilm-forming strains do not invade the substrate. These results indicate that RHR2 has an adhesin-independent role in substrate invasion, and mathematical modeling argues that RHR2 is required to generate turgor. Previous studies have shown that abdominal infection by C. albicans has two aspects: infection of abdominal organs and persistence in abscesses. We report here that an rhr2Δ/Δ mutant is defective in both of these infection phenotypes. We find here that overexpression of ALS1 in the mutant restores infection of organs, but does not improve persistence in abscesses. Therefore, RHR2 has an adhesin-independent role in abdominal infection, just as it does in substrate invasion. This report suggests that RHR2, through glycerol synthesis, coordinates adherence with host- or substrate-interaction activities that enable proliferation of the C. albicans population.

  18. Coordination of Candida albicans Invasion and Infection Functions by Phosphoglycerol Phosphatase Rhr2

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Jigar V.; Cheng, Shaoji; Ying, Tammy; Nguyen, M. Hong; Clancy, Cornelius J.; Lanni, Frederick; Mitchell, Aaron P.

    2015-01-01

    The Candida albicans RHR2 gene, which specifies a glycerol biosynthetic enzyme, is required for biofilm formation in vitro and in vivo. Prior studies indicate that RHR2 is ultimately required for expression of adhesin genes, such as ALS1. In fact, RHR2 is unnecessary for biofilm formation when ALS1 is overexpressed from an RHR2-independent promoter. Here, we describe two additional biological processes that depend upon RHR2: invasion into an abiotic substrate and pathogenicity in an abdominal infection model. We report here that abiotic substrate invasion occurs concomitantly with biofilm formation, and a screen of transcription factor mutants indicates that biofilm and hyphal formation ability correlates with invasion ability. However, analysis presented here of the rhr2Δ/Δ mutant separates biofilm formation and invasion. We found that an rhr2Δ/Δ mutant forms a biofilm upon overexpression of the adhesin gene ALS1 or the transcription factor genes BRG1 or UME6. However, the biofilm-forming strains do not invade the substrate. These results indicate that RHR2 has an adhesin-independent role in substrate invasion, and mathematical modeling argues that RHR2 is required to generate turgor. Previous studies have shown that abdominal infection by C. albicans has two aspects: infection of abdominal organs and persistence in abscesses. We report here that an rhr2Δ/Δ mutant is defective in both of these infection phenotypes. We find here that overexpression of ALS1 in the mutant restores infection of organs, but does not improve persistence in abscesses. Therefore, RHR2 has an adhesin-independent role in abdominal infection, just as it does in substrate invasion. This report suggests that RHR2, through glycerol synthesis, coordinates adherence with host- or substrate-interaction activities that enable proliferation of the C. albicans population. PMID:26213976

  19. Clinical and Microbiological Characteristics of Heteroresistant and Vancomycin-Intermediate Staphylococcus aureus from Bloodstream Infections in a Brazilian Teaching Hospital

    PubMed Central

    da Costa, Thaina Miranda; Morgado, Priscylla Guimarães Migueres; Cavalcante, Fernanda Sampaio; Damasco, Andreia Paredes; Nouér, Simone Aranha; dos Santos, Kátia Regina Netto

    2016-01-01

    This study analyzed clinical and microbiological characteristics of heteroresistant (hVISA) and vancomycin-intermediate Staphylococcus aureus (VISA) from bloodstream infections (BSI) in a Brazilian teaching hospital, between 2011 and 2013. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of antimicrobials were determined by broth microdilution method and SCCmec was detected by PCR. Isolates with a vancomycin MIC ≥ 2mg/L were cultured on BHI agar with 3, 4 or 6 mg/L (BHIa3, BHIa4 or BHIa6) of vancomycin and BHIa4 with casein (BHIa4ca). Macromethod Etest® and Etest® Glicopeptides Resistance Detection were also used. VISA and hVISA isolates were confirmed by the population analysis profile then typed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing. Medical data from the patients were obtained from their medical records. Among 110 consecutive isolates, 31 (28%) were MRSA and carried the SCCmec type II (15 isolates) or IV (16 isolates). Vancomycin MIC50 and MIC90 were 1 and 2 mg/L, respectively. MRSA isolates had increased non-susceptibility to daptomycin (p = 0.0003). Six (5%) isolates were VISA, four of which were MRSA, three SCCmec type II/USA100/ST5 and one type IV/USA800/ST3192. One MRSA SCCmec II isolate grew on agar BHIa3, BHIa4 and BHIa4ca, and it was confirmed as hVISA. Among the six VISA isolates, five (83%) grew on BHIa3 and three (50%) on BHI4ca. Four of the six VISA isolates and the one hVISA isolate were from patients who had undergone dialysis. Thus, a possible dissemination of the SCCmec II/USA100/ST5 lineage may have occurred in the hospital comprising the VISA, hVISA and daptomycin non-susceptible S. aureus Brazilian isolates from health care associated bloodstream infections. PMID:27575698

  20. Clinical and Microbiological Characteristics of Heteroresistant and Vancomycin-Intermediate Staphylococcus aureus from Bloodstream Infections in a Brazilian Teaching Hospital.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Thaina Miranda; Morgado, Priscylla Guimarães Migueres; Cavalcante, Fernanda Sampaio; Damasco, Andreia Paredes; Nouér, Simone Aranha; Dos Santos, Kátia Regina Netto

    2016-01-01

    This study analyzed clinical and microbiological characteristics of heteroresistant (hVISA) and vancomycin-intermediate Staphylococcus aureus (VISA) from bloodstream infections (BSI) in a Brazilian teaching hospital, between 2011 and 2013. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of antimicrobials were determined by broth microdilution method and SCCmec was detected by PCR. Isolates with a vancomycin MIC ≥ 2mg/L were cultured on BHI agar with 3, 4 or 6 mg/L (BHIa3, BHIa4 or BHIa6) of vancomycin and BHIa4 with casein (BHIa4ca). Macromethod Etest® and Etest® Glicopeptides Resistance Detection were also used. VISA and hVISA isolates were confirmed by the population analysis profile then typed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing. Medical data from the patients were obtained from their medical records. Among 110 consecutive isolates, 31 (28%) were MRSA and carried the SCCmec type II (15 isolates) or IV (16 isolates). Vancomycin MIC50 and MIC90 were 1 and 2 mg/L, respectively. MRSA isolates had increased non-susceptibility to daptomycin (p = 0.0003). Six (5%) isolates were VISA, four of which were MRSA, three SCCmec type II/USA100/ST5 and one type IV/USA800/ST3192. One MRSA SCCmec II isolate grew on agar BHIa3, BHIa4 and BHIa4ca, and it was confirmed as hVISA. Among the six VISA isolates, five (83%) grew on BHIa3 and three (50%) on BHI4ca. Four of the six VISA isolates and the one hVISA isolate were from patients who had undergone dialysis. Thus, a possible dissemination of the SCCmec II/USA100/ST5 lineage may have occurred in the hospital comprising the VISA, hVISA and daptomycin non-susceptible S. aureus Brazilian isolates from health care associated bloodstream infections.

  1. Clinical and Microbiological Characteristics of Heteroresistant and Vancomycin-Intermediate Staphylococcus aureus from Bloodstream Infections in a Brazilian Teaching Hospital.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Thaina Miranda; Morgado, Priscylla Guimarães Migueres; Cavalcante, Fernanda Sampaio; Damasco, Andreia Paredes; Nouér, Simone Aranha; Dos Santos, Kátia Regina Netto

    2016-01-01

    This study analyzed clinical and microbiological characteristics of heteroresistant (hVISA) and vancomycin-intermediate Staphylococcus aureus (VISA) from bloodstream infections (BSI) in a Brazilian teaching hospital, between 2011 and 2013. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of antimicrobials were determined by broth microdilution method and SCCmec was detected by PCR. Isolates with a vancomycin MIC ≥ 2mg/L were cultured on BHI agar with 3, 4 or 6 mg/L (BHIa3, BHIa4 or BHIa6) of vancomycin and BHIa4 with casein (BHIa4ca). Macromethod Etest® and Etest® Glicopeptides Resistance Detection were also used. VISA and hVISA isolates were confirmed by the population analysis profile then typed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing. Medical data from the patients were obtained from their medical records. Among 110 consecutive isolates, 31 (28%) were MRSA and carried the SCCmec type II (15 isolates) or IV (16 isolates). Vancomycin MIC50 and MIC90 were 1 and 2 mg/L, respectively. MRSA isolates had increased non-susceptibility to daptomycin (p = 0.0003). Six (5%) isolates were VISA, four of which were MRSA, three SCCmec type II/USA100/ST5 and one type IV/USA800/ST3192. One MRSA SCCmec II isolate grew on agar BHIa3, BHIa4 and BHIa4ca, and it was confirmed as hVISA. Among the six VISA isolates, five (83%) grew on BHIa3 and three (50%) on BHI4ca. Four of the six VISA isolates and the one hVISA isolate were from patients who had undergone dialysis. Thus, a possible dissemination of the SCCmec II/USA100/ST5 lineage may have occurred in the hospital comprising the VISA, hVISA and daptomycin non-susceptible S. aureus Brazilian isolates from health care associated bloodstream infections. PMID:27575698

  2. A cluster of central line-associated bloodstream infections due to rapidly growing nontuberculous mycobacteria in patients with hematologic disorders at a Japanese tertiary care center: an outbreak investigation and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Tagashira, Yasuaki; Kozai, Yasuji; Yamasa, Hitomi; Sakurada, Masako; Kashiyama, Tetsuya; Honda, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Rapidly growing nontuberculous mycobacteria (RGM) are considered rare pathogens, causing central line-associated bloodstream infection. We identified an outbreak of central line-associated bloodstream infection due to RGM at a hematology-oncology ward during a 5-month period. DESIGN Outbreak investigation and literature review. SETTING A Japanese tertiary care center. PATIENTS Adults who were hospitalized at the hematology-oncology ward from October 15, 2011, through February 17, 2012. RESULTS A total of 5 patients with a bloodstream infection due to RGM (4 cases of Mycobacterium mucogenicum and 1 case of Mycobacterium canariasense infection) were identified; of these, 3 patients had acute myeloid leukemia, 1 had acute lymphocytic leukemia, and 1 had aplastic anemia. Four of the 5 patients received cord blood transplantation prior to developing the bloodstream infection. All central venous catheters in patients with a bloodstream infection were removed. These patients promptly defervesced after catheter removal and their care was successfully managed without antimicrobial therapy. Surveillance cultures from the environment and water detected M. mucogenicum and M. canariasense in the water supply of the hematology-oncology ward. The isolates from the bloodstream infection and water sources were identical on the basis of 16S-rRNA gene sequencing. CONCLUSIONS The source of RGM in the outbreak of bloodstream infections likely was the ward tap water supply. Awareness of catheter-related bloodstream infections due to nontuberculous mycobacteria should be emphasized, especially where immunocompromised patients are at risk. Also, using antimicrobials after catheter removal to treat central line-associated bloodstream infection due to RGM may not be necessary. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2015;36(1): 76-80. PMID:25627764

  3. BAY 41-2272 activates host defence against local and disseminated Candida albicans infections

    PubMed Central

    Soeiro-Pereira, Paulo Vítor; Falcai, Angela; Kubo, Christina Arslanian; Antunes, Edson; Condino-Neto, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    In our previous study, we have found that 5-cyclopropyl-2-[1-(2-fluoro-benzyl)-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-b]pyridine-3-yl]-pyrimidin-4-ylamine (BAY 41-2272), a guanylate cyclase agonist, activates human monocytes and the THP-1 cell line to produce the superoxide anion, increasing in vitro microbicidal activity, suggesting that this drug can be used to modulate immune functioning in primary immunodeficiency patients. In the present work, we investigated the potential of the in vivo administration of BAY 41-2272 for the treatment of Candida albicans and Staphylococcus aureus infections introduced via intraperitoneal and subcutaneous inoculation. We found that intraperitoneal treatment with BAY 41-2272 markedly increased macrophage-dependent cell influx to the peritoneum in addition to macrophage functions, such as spreading, zymosan particle phagocytosis and nitric oxide and phorbol myristate acetate-stimulated hydrogen peroxide production. Treatment with BAY 41-2272 was highly effective in reducing the death rate due to intraperitoneal inoculation of C. albicans, but not S. aureus. However, we found that in vitro stimulation of peritoneal macrophages with BAY 41-2272 markedly increased microbicidal activities against both pathogens. Our results show that the prevention of death by the treatment of C. albicans-infected mice with BAY 41-2272 might occur primarily by the modulation of the host immune response through macrophage activation. PMID:25742266

  4. A Candida albicans Strain Expressing Mammalian Interleukin-17A Results in Early Control of Fungal Growth during Disseminated Infection

    PubMed Central

    Huppler, Anna R.; Whibley, Natasha; Woolford, Carol A.; Childs, Erin E.; He, Jie; Biswas, Partha S.; McGeachy, Mandy J.; Mitchell, Aaron P.

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is normally a commensal fungus of the human mucosae and skin, but it causes life-threatening systemic infections in hospital settings in the face of predisposing conditions, such as indwelling catheters, abdominal surgery, or antibiotic use. Immunity to C. albicans involves various immune parameters, but the cytokine interleukin-17A (IL-17A) (also known as IL-17) has emerged as a centrally important mediator of immune defense against both mucosal and systemic candidiasis. Conversely, IL-17A has been suggested to enhance the virulence of C. albicans, indicating that it may exert detrimental effects on pathogenesis. In this study, we hypothesized that a C. albicans strain expressing IL-17A would exhibit reduced virulence in vivo. To that end, we created a Candida-optimized expression cassette encoding murine IL-17A, which was transformed into the DAY286 strain of C. albicans. Candida-derived IL-17A was indistinguishable from murine IL-17A in terms of biological activity and detection in standard enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). Expression of IL-17A did not negatively impact the growth of these strains in vitro. Moreover, the IL-17A-expressing C. albicans strains showed significantly reduced pathogenicity in a systemic model of Candida infection, mainly evident during the early stages of disease. Collectively, these findings suggest that IL-17A mitigates the virulence of C. albicans. PMID:26150537

  5. A Web-Based, Hospital-Wide Health Care-Associated Bloodstream Infection Surveillance and Classification System: Development and Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Yi-Ju; Wu, Jung-Hsuan; Lin, Hui-Chi; Chen, Ming-Yuan; Ping, Xiao-Ou; Sun, Chun-Chuan; Shang, Rung-Ji; Sheng, Wang-Huei; Lai, Feipei; Chang, Shan-Chwen

    2015-01-01

    Background Surveillance of health care-associated infections is an essential component of infection prevention programs, but conventional systems are labor intensive and performance dependent. Objective To develop an automatic surveillance and classification system for health care-associated bloodstream infection (HABSI), and to evaluate its performance by comparing it with a conventional infection control personnel (ICP)-based surveillance system. Methods We developed a Web-based system that was integrated into the medical information system of a 2200-bed teaching hospital in Taiwan. The system automatically detects and classifies HABSIs. Results In this study, the number of computer-detected HABSIs correlated closely with the number of HABSIs detected by ICP by department (n=20; r=.999 P<.001) and by time (n=14; r=.941; P<.001). Compared with reference standards, this system performed excellently with regard to sensitivity (98.16%), specificity (99.96%), positive predictive value (95.81%), and negative predictive value (99.98%). The system enabled decreasing the delay in confirmation of HABSI cases, on average, by 29 days. Conclusions This system provides reliable and objective HABSI data for quality indicators, improving the delay caused by a conventional surveillance system. PMID:26392229

  6. Commensal enteric bacteria lipopolysaccharide impairs host defense against disseminated Candida albicans fungal infection.

    PubMed

    Jiang, T T; Chaturvedi, V; Ertelt, J M; Xin, L; Clark, D R; Kinder, J M; Way, S S

    2015-07-01

    Commensal enteric bacteria maintain systemic immune responsiveness that protects against disseminated or localized infection in extra-intestinal tissues caused by pathogenic microbes. However, as shifts in infection susceptibility after commensal bacteria eradication have primarily been probed using viruses, the broader applicability to other pathogen types remains undefined. In sharp contrast to diminished antiviral immunity, we show commensal bacteria eradication bolsters protection against disseminated Candida albicans fungal infection. Enhanced antifungal immunity reflects more robust systemic expansion of Ly6G(hi)Ly6C(int) neutrophils, and their mobilization into infected tissues among antibiotic-treated compared with commensal bacteria-replete control mice. Reciprocally, depletion of neutrophils from expanded levels or intestinal lipopolysaccharide reconstitution overrides the antifungal protective benefits conferred by commensal bacteria eradication. This discordance in antifungal compared with antiviral immunity highlights intrinsic differences in how commensal bacteria control responsiveness for specific immune cell subsets, because pathogen-specific CD8(+) T cells that protect against viruses were suppressed similarly after C. albicans and influenza A virus infection. Thus, positive calibration of antiviral immunity by commensal bacteria is counterbalanced by restrained activation of other immune components that confer antifungal immunity.

  7. Immune response in mice infected with Candida albicans in the mycelial form.

    PubMed

    Bibas Bonet de Jorrat, M E; de Valdez, G A; de Petrino, S F; Sirena, A; Perdigón, G

    1989-05-01

    The effect of the infection with the mycelial form of a Candida albicans strain (Mycology Dept.) upon the immune system in mice was studied. BALB/c mice were infected intraperitoneally in a single dose of a 3 x 10(6), 6 x 10(6) and 12 x 10(6) cell suspension of the strain. Macrophages's activity was studied the days 7, 14, 21, 28, 35, and 42 after inoculation, by the following assays: phagocytosis in vitro, mononucleated phagocytic system by the colloidal carbon clearance technique, the lymphocyte's activity by the direct plaque forming cells technique (PFC) and delayed hypersensitivity (DTH). Infection with the mycelial form did not affect the peritoneal macrophage's phagocytic ability, neither modified the delayed hypersensitivity to sheep red blood cells (SRBC). However, a slight and transient depression of the lymphocyte stimulation was found. Suppression of PFC to SRBC was high when a 12 x 10(6) cell suspension was used in contrast to the infection with blastospores. These results suggest that systemic infection by Candida albicans in its mycelial form do not induce a non specific immunosuppression.

  8. Immune response in mice infected with Candida albicans in the mycelial form.

    PubMed

    Bibas Bonet de Jorrat, M E; de Valdez, G A; de Petrino, S F; Sirena, A; Perdigón, G

    1989-05-01

    The effect of the infection with the mycelial form of a Candida albicans strain (Mycology Dept.) upon the immune system in mice was studied. BALB/c mice were infected intraperitoneally in a single dose of a 3 x 10(6), 6 x 10(6) and 12 x 10(6) cell suspension of the strain. Macrophages's activity was studied the days 7, 14, 21, 28, 35, and 42 after inoculation, by the following assays: phagocytosis in vitro, mononucleated phagocytic system by the colloidal carbon clearance technique, the lymphocyte's activity by the direct plaque forming cells technique (PFC) and delayed hypersensitivity (DTH). Infection with the mycelial form did not affect the peritoneal macrophage's phagocytic ability, neither modified the delayed hypersensitivity to sheep red blood cells (SRBC). However, a slight and transient depression of the lymphocyte stimulation was found. Suppression of PFC to SRBC was high when a 12 x 10(6) cell suspension was used in contrast to the infection with blastospores. These results suggest that systemic infection by Candida albicans in its mycelial form do not induce a non specific immunosuppression. PMID:2677735

  9. Effect of 2013 National Healthcare Safety Network definition changes on central line bloodstream infection rates: audit results from the New York State Department of Health.

    PubMed

    Hazamy, Peggy Ann; Haley, Valerie B; Tserenpuntsag, Boldtsetseg; Tsivitis, Marie; Giardina, Rosalie; Knab, Robin; Lutterloh, Emily

    2015-03-01

    Surveillance criteria for central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) are continually being refined to more accurately reflect infections related to central lines. An audit of 567 medical records from adult, pediatric, and neonatal intensive care unit patients with a central line and a positive blood culture showed a 16% decrease in CLABSI rates after the 2013 National Healthcare Safety Network definitions compared with the 2012 definitions.

  10. Antimicrobial Resistance and Molecular Epidemiology of Escherichia coli Causing Bloodstream Infections in Three Hospitals in Shanghai, China

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Shu-Zhen; Gu, Fei-Fei; Liu, Qing-Zhong; Tang, Jin; Guo, Xiao-Kui; Ni, Yu-Xing; Han, Li-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) is one of the most frequent and lethal causes of bloodstream infections (BSIs). We carried out a retrospective multicenter study on antimicrobial resistance and phylogenetic background of clinical E. coli isolates recovered from bloodstream in three hospitals in Shanghai. E. coli isolates causing BSIs were consecutively collected between Sept 2013 and Sept 2014. Ninety isolates randomly selected (30 from each hospital) were enrolled in the study. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed by disk diffusion. PCR was used to detect antimicrobial resistance genes coding for β-lactamases (TEM, CTX-M, OXA, etc.), carbapenemases (IMP, VIM, KPC, NDM-1 and OXA-48), and phylogenetic groups. eBURST was applied for analysis of multi-locus sequence typing (MLST). The resistance rates for penicillins, second-generation cephalosporins, fluoroquinolone and tetracyclines were high (>60%). Sixty-one of the 90 (67.8%) strains enrolled produced ESBLs and no carbapenemases were found. Molecular analysis showed that CTX-M-15 (25/61), CTX-M-14 (18/61) and CTX-M-55 (9/61) were the most common ESBLs. Phylogenetic group B2 predominated (43.3%) and exhibited the highest rates of ESBLs production. ST131 (20/90) was the most common sequence type and almost assigned to phylogenetic group B2 (19/20). The following sequence types were ST405 (8/90) and ST69 (5/90). Among 61 ESBL-producers isolates, B2 (26, 42.6%) and ST131 (18, 29.5%) were also the most common phylogenetic group and sequence type. Genetic diversity showed no evidence suggesting a spread of these antimicrobial resistant isolates in the three hospitals. In order to provide more comprehensive and reliable epidemiological information for preventing further dissemination, well-designed and continuous surveillance with more hospitals participating was important. PMID:26824702

  11. Antimicrobial Resistance and Molecular Epidemiology of Escherichia coli Causing Bloodstream Infections in Three Hospitals in Shanghai, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Su; Zhao, Sheng-Yuan; Xiao, Shu-Zhen; Gu, Fei-Fei; Liu, Qing-Zhong; Tang, Jin; Guo, Xiao-Kui; Ni, Yu-Xing; Han, Li-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) is one of the most frequent and lethal causes of bloodstream infections (BSIs). We carried out a retrospective multicenter study on antimicrobial resistance and phylogenetic background of clinical E. coli isolates recovered from bloodstream in three hospitals in Shanghai. E. coli isolates causing BSIs were consecutively collected between Sept 2013 and Sept 2014. Ninety isolates randomly selected (30 from each hospital) were enrolled in the study. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed by disk diffusion. PCR was used to detect antimicrobial resistance genes coding for β-lactamases (TEM, CTX-M, OXA, etc.), carbapenemases (IMP, VIM, KPC, NDM-1 and OXA-48), and phylogenetic groups. eBURST was applied for analysis of multi-locus sequence typing (MLST). The resistance rates for penicillins, second-generation cephalosporins, fluoroquinolone and tetracyclines were high (>60%). Sixty-one of the 90 (67.8%) strains enrolled produced ESBLs and no carbapenemases were found. Molecular analysis showed that CTX-M-15 (25/61), CTX-M-14 (18/61) and CTX-M-55 (9/61) were the most common ESBLs. Phylogenetic group B2 predominated (43.3%) and exhibited the highest rates of ESBLs production. ST131 (20/90) was the most common sequence type and almost assigned to phylogenetic group B2 (19/20). The following sequence types were ST405 (8/90) and ST69 (5/90). Among 61 ESBL-producers isolates, B2 (26, 42.6%) and ST131 (18, 29.5%) were also the most common phylogenetic group and sequence type. Genetic diversity showed no evidence suggesting a spread of these antimicrobial resistant isolates in the three hospitals. In order to provide more comprehensive and reliable epidemiological information for preventing further dissemination, well-designed and continuous surveillance with more hospitals participating was important.

  12. Aseptic non-touch technique and catheter-related bloodstream infection in children receiving parenteral nutrition at home

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Victoria; Hughes, Anna; Hill, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Parenteral nutrition (PN) at home is an acceptable form of delivering long-term PN for children with intestinal failure. Catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) is one of the serious complications of long-term PN and can lead to increasing morbidity and mortality. Using aseptic non-touch technique (ANTT) was proven to decrease the incidence of CRBSI in hospital patients. In this study we aimed to review the incidence of CRBSI in children receiving PN at home in our institution using the ANTT and a simplified training programme for parents and carers. Methods We retrospectively collected clinical and microbiological data on all children with intestinal failure (IF) who were on treatment with PN at home under our specialist IF rehabilitation service between November 2012 and November 2013. Results Thirty-five children were included, 16 of whom did not have any infection recorded during the study period. The overall CRBSI rate was 1.3 infections per 1000 line-days, with Staphylococcus being the commonest organism. Twenty-one children did not require catheter change and the overall catheter changes were 1.8 per 1000 line-days. Conclusion In this article, we report a low incidence of CRBSI in a single institution by using the principle of ANTT for accessing central venous catheters combined with a simplified, nurse-led, two-week standardised training programme for parents of children going home on PN. PMID:26279849

  13. CDC central-line bloodstream infection prevention efforts produced net benefits of at least $640 Million during 1990-2008.

    PubMed

    Scott, R Douglas; Sinkowitz-Cochran, Ronda; Wise, Matthew E; Baggs, James; Goates, Scott; Solomon, Steven L; McDonald, L Clifford; Jernigan, John A

    2014-06-01

    The prevention of central line-associated bloodstream infections in patients in hospital critical care units has been a target of efforts by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) since the 1960s. We developed a historical economic model to measure the net economic benefits of preventing these infections in Medicare and Medicaid patients in critical care units for the period 1990-2008-a time when reductions attributable to federal investment resulted primarily from CDC efforts-using the cost perspective of the federal government as a third-party payer. The estimated net economic benefits ranged from $640 million to $1.8 billion, with the corresponding net benefits per case averted ranging from $15,780 to $24,391. The per dollar rate of return on the CDC's investments ranged from $3.88 to $23.85. These findings suggest that investments in CDC programs targeting other health care-associated infections also have the potential to produce savings by lowering Medicare and Medicaid reimbursements.

  14. Erratum to: Seasonal trend and clinical presentation of Bacillus cereus bloodstream infection: association with summer and indwelling catheter.

    PubMed

    Kato, K; Matsumura, Y; Yamamoto, M; Nagao, M; Ito, Y; Takakura, S; Ichiyama, S

    2016-05-01

    Bacillus cereus, an opportunistic pathogen, can cause fatal infection. However, B. cereus bloodstream infections (BSIs) have not been well characterised. From 2008 to 2013, B. cereus isolates from all of the specimens and patients with B. cereus BSIs were identified. Environmental samples were collected to detect B. cereus contamination. We also characterised the clinical presentation of B. cereus BSI through analyses of risk factors for BSI and mortality. A total of 143 clinical B. cereus isolates was detected. Fifty-one patients with nosocomial infections were diagnosed as B. cereus BSI, and 37 had contaminated blood cultures. The number of B. cereus isolates and BSI patients was significantly greater from June to September than from January to April (3.4 vs. 1.0 per month and 1.4 vs. 0.2, respectively). All BSIs were nosocomial and related to central or peripheral vascular catheter. Urinary catheter [odds ratio (OR) 6.93, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 2.40-20.0] was the independent risk factor associated with BSI patients when compared to patients regarded as contaminated. In-hospital mortality among BSI patients was 20 % and was associated with urinary catheter (OR 12.3, 95 % CI 0.67-225, p=0.045) and higher Charlson index (OR 1.99, 95 % CI 1.26-3.12). The number of B. cereus isolates and BSI increased during summer. Inpatients with indwelling vascular or urinary catheters should be carefully monitored for potential B. cereus BSIs. PMID:27010814

  15. Tolerance to staphylococcal enterotoxin B initiated Th1 cell differentiation in mice infected with Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Romani, L; Puccetti, P; Mencacci, A; Spaccapelo, R; Cenci, E; Tonnetti, L; Bistoni, F

    1994-01-01

    Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) is a bacterial superantigen that specifically activates T cells bearing V beta 8 T-cell receptor domains, which eventually leads to a long-lasting state of clonal anergy accompanied by selective cell death in the targeted CD4+ subset. Because the superantigen is known to promote Th1 cell differentiation in vitro, we have investigated the effect of SEB treatment on the course of Th2-associated progressive disease in mice infected systemically with Candida albicans. On the basis of the kinetics of SEB-induced changes in CD4+ cells and production in sera of interleukin 4 (IL-4), IL-10, and gamma interferon, we obtained evidence that V beta 8+ cell anergy concomitant with infection abolished the early IL-4/IL-10 response of the host to the yeast, ultimately leading to a state of resistance characterized by gamma interferon secretion in vitro by antigen-specific CD4+ cells. In contrast, SEB administered near the time of challenge resulted in accelerated mortality. Significant resistance to infection was also afforded by exposure of mice to a retrovirally encoded endogenous superantigen. These data suggest that CD4+ V beta 8+ T cells play an important role in vivo in the initiation of a Th2 response to C. albicans and that suppression of their activity may alter the qualitative development of the T-cell response and the outcome of infection. PMID:7914883

  16. Inhibiting the immunoproteasome exacerbates the pathogenesis of systemic Candida albicans infection in mice

    PubMed Central

    Mundt, Sarah; Basler, Michael; Buerger, Stefanie; Engler, Harald; Groettrup, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    Apart from its role in MHC class I antigen processing, the immunoproteasome has recently been implicated in the modulation of T helper cell differentiation under polarizing conditions in vitro and in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases in vivo. In this study, we investigated the influence of LMP7 on T helper cell differentiation in response to the fungus Candida albicans. We observed a strong effect of ONX 0914, an LMP7-selective inhibitor of the immunoproteasome, on IFN-γ and IL-17A production by murine splenocytes and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) stimulated with C. albicans in vitro. Using a murine model of systemic candidiasis, we could confirm reduced generation of IFN-γ- and IL-17A-producing cells in ONX 0914 treated mice in vivo. Interestingly, ONX 0914 treatment resulted in increased susceptibility to systemic candidiasis, which manifested at very early stages of infection. Mice treated with ONX 0914 showed markedly increased kidney and brain fungal burden which resulted in enhanced neutrophil recruitment and immunopathology. Together, these results strongly suggest a role of the immunoproteasome in promoting proinflammatory T helper cells in response to C. albicans but also in affecting the innate antifungal immunity in a T helper cell-independent manner. PMID:26776888

  17. Association of KPC-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae colonization or infection with Candida isolation and selection of non-albicans species.

    PubMed

    Papadimitriou-Olivgeris, Matthaios; Spiliopoulou, Anastasia; Fligou, Fotini; Manolopoulou, Patroula; Spiliopoulou, Iris; Vrettos, Theofanis; Dodou, Vasiliki; Filos, Kriton S; Anastassiou, Evangelos D; Marangos, Markos; Christofidou, Myrto

    2014-11-01

    Clinical specimens from 565 patients hospitalized in 2 intensive care units (ICUs A and B) during a 28-month period were cultured on appropriate media for isolation of Candida. Forty-nine (9%) patients had at least a Candida spp.-positive sample. Candida albicans was the predominant species isolated from 26 (53%) patients. Seventeen patients (3%) developed candidemia. Multivariate analysis showed that obesity, female gender, hospitalization during summer months, admission at ICU B, parenteral nutrition, administration of metronidazole, transplantation, and KPC-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (KPC-Kp) infection were independently associated with Candida spp. isolation. Candidemia was associated with cortisone administration, KPC-Kp infection, and presence of colostomy or abdominal catheter. Administration of fluconazole was a protective factor for both Candida spp. isolation and infection, leading to selection of Candida non-albicans species. Among several risk factors, KPC-Kp infection and colonization are identified as statistically significant factors associated with Candida isolation, especially of non-albicans species.

  18. Epidemiology and Predictors of Mortality in Cases of Candida Bloodstream Infection: Results from Population-Based Surveillance, Barcelona, Spain, from 2002 to 2003

    PubMed Central

    Almirante, Benito; Rodríguez, Dolors; Park, Benjamin J.; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel; Planes, Ana M.; Almela, Manuel; Mensa, Jose; Sanchez, Ferran; Ayats, Josefina; Gimenez, Montserrat; Saballs, Pere; Fridkin, Scott K.; Morgan, Juliette; Rodriguez-Tudela, Juan L.; Warnock, David W.; Pahissa, Albert

    2005-01-01

    We conducted population-based surveillance for Candida bloodstream infections in Spain to determine its incidence, the extent of antifungal resistance, and risk factors for mortality. A case was defined as the first positive blood culture for any Candida spp. in a resident of Barcelona, from 1 January 2002 to 31 December 2003. We defined early mortality as occurring between days 3 to 7 after candidemia and late mortality as occurring between days 8 to 30. We detected 345 cases of candidemia, for an average annual incidence of 4.3 cases/100,000 population, 0.53 cases/1,000 hospital discharges, and 0.73 cases/10,000 patient-days. Outpatients comprised 11% of the cases, and 89% had a central venous catheter (CVC) at diagnosis. Overall mortality was 44%. Candida albicans was the most frequent species (51% of cases), followed by Candida parapsilosis (23%), Candida tropicalis (10%), Candida glabrata (8%), Candida krusei (4%), and other species (3%). Twenty-four isolates (7%) had decreased susceptibility to fluconazole (MIC ≥ 16 μg/ml). On multivariable analysis, early death was independently associated with hematological malignancy (odds ratio [OR], 3.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1 to 10.4). Treatment with antifungals (OR, 0.05; 95% CI, 0.01 to 0.2) and removal of CVCs (OR, 0.3; 95% CI, 0.1 to 0.9) were protective factors for early death. Receiving adequate treatment, defined as having CVCs removed and administration of an antifungal medication (OR, 0.2; 95% CI, 0.08 to 0.8), was associated with lower odds of late mortality; intubation (OR, 7.5; 95% CI, 2.6 to 21.1) was associated with higher odds. The incidence of candidemia and prevalence of fluconazole resistance are similar to other European countries, indicating that routine antifungal susceptibility testing is not warranted. Antifungal medication and catheter removal are critical in preventing mortality. PMID:15815004

  19. N-Acetylglucosaminylation of Serine-Aspartate Repeat Proteins Promotes Staphylococcus aureus Bloodstream Infection*

    PubMed Central

    Thomer, Lena; Becker, Samuel; Emolo, Carla; Quach, Austin; Kim, Hwan Keun; Rauch, Sabine; Anderson, Mark; LeBlanc, James F.; Schneewind, Olaf; Faull, Kym F.; Missiakas, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus secretes products that convert host fibrinogen to fibrin and promote its agglutination with fibrin fibrils, thereby shielding bacteria from immune defenses. The agglutination reaction involves ClfA (clumping factor A), a surface protein with serine-aspartate (SD) repeats that captures fibrin fibrils and fibrinogen. Pathogenic staphylococci express several different SD proteins that are modified by two glycosyltransferases, SdgA and SdgB. Here, we characterized three genes of S. aureus, aggA, aggB (sdgA), and aggC (sdgB), and show that aggA and aggC contribute to staphylococcal agglutination with fibrin fibrils in human plasma. We demonstrate that aggB (sdgA) and aggC (sdgB) are involved in GlcNAc modification of the ClfA SD repeats. However, only sdgB is essential for GlcNAc modification, and an sdgB mutant is defective in the pathogenesis of sepsis in mice. Thus, GlcNAc modification of proteins promotes S. aureus replication in the bloodstream of mammalian hosts. PMID:24344128

  20. Cost-effectiveness of employing a total parenteral nutrition surveillance nurse for the prevention of catheter-related bloodstream infections.

    PubMed

    Fraher, M H; Collins, C J; Bourke, J; Phelan, D; Lynch, M

    2009-10-01

    The cost of catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) is substantial in terms of morbidity, mortality and financial resources. Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is a recognised risk factor for CRBSI. In 1997, an intravenous nutrition nurse was promoted to TPN surveillance clinical nurse manager (CNM) and quarterly infection audit meetings were introduced to monitor trends in CRBSI. Data were prospectively collected over a 15-year period using specific TPN records in a 535-bed tertiary acute university hospital. A total of 20 439 CVC-days and 307 CRBSIs were recorded. Mean number of infections before, and after, the introduction of a dedicated TPN surveillance CNM were compared. Mean CRBSI per 1000 catheter-days+/-SD was 20.5+/-6.34 prior to 1997 and 14.64+/-7.81 after 1997, representing a mean reduction of 5.84 CRBSIs per 1000 catheter-days (95% CI: -4.92 to 16.60; P=0.05). Mean number of CRBSIs per year+/-SD was 28.3+/-4.93 prior to 1997 and 18.5+/-7.37 after 1997, representing a mean decrease of 9.8 infections per year (95% CI: 0.01 to 19.66; P<0.05). The savings made by preventing 9.8 infections per year were calculated from data on bed-days obtained from the hospital finance office. The cost in hospital days saved per annum was euro135,000. Introduction of a TPN surveillance CNM saved the hospital at least euro78,300 per annum and led to a significant decrease in CRBSIs in TPN patients.

  1. Case-Control Study of Telavancin as an Alternative Treatment for Gram-Positive Bloodstream Infections in Patients with Cancer.

    PubMed

    Chaftari, Anne-Marie; Hachem, Ray; Jordan, Mary; Garoge, Kumait; Al Hamal, Zainab; El Zakhem, Aline; Viola, George M; Granwehr, Bruno; Mulanovich, Victor; Gagel, Andrew; Reitzel, Ruth; Yousif, Ammar; Jiang, Ying; Raad, Issam

    2015-10-19

    Gram-positive bacterial infections are an important cause of morbidity and death among cancer patients, despite current therapy. In this case-control study, we evaluated the clinical outcomes and safety of telavancin in cancer patients with uncomplicated Gram-positive bloodstream infections (BSIs). Between March 2011 and May 2013, we enrolled cancer patients with uncomplicated Gram-positive BSIs to receive intravenous telavancin therapy for at least 14 days for Staphylococcus aureus and 7 days for other Gram-positive cocci. Patients with baseline creatinine clearance (CLCR) values of >50 ml/min received 10 mg/kg/day of telavancin, and those with CLCR values between 30 and 49 ml/min received 7.5 mg/kg/day. Patients were compared with a retrospective cohort of 39 historical patients with Gram-positive BSIs, matched for underlying malignancy, infecting organism, and neutropenia status, who had been treated with vancomycin. A total of 78 patients were analyzed, with 39 in each group. The most common pathogen causing BSIs was S. aureus (51%), followed by alpha-hemolytic streptococci (23%), Enterococcus spp. (15%), coagulase-negative staphylococci (8%), and beta-hemolytic streptococci (3%). Sixty-two percent of patients had hematological malignancies, and 38% had solid tumors; 51% of the patients were neutropenic. The overall response rate determined by clinical outcome and microbiological eradication at 72 h following the initiation of therapy, in the absence of relapse, deep-seated infections, and/or infection-related death, was better with telavancin than with vancomycin (86% versus 61%; P = 0.013). Rates of drug-related adverse events were similar in the two groups (telavancin, 31%; vancomycin, 23%; P = 0.79), with similar rates of renal adverse events. Telavancin may provide a useful alternative to standard vancomycin therapy for Gram-positive BSIs in cancer patients. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01321879.).

  2. Host-Imposed Copper Poisoning Impacts Fungal Micronutrient Acquisition during Systemic Candida albicans Infections

    PubMed Central

    Mackie, Joanna; Ballou, Elizabeth R.; Childers, Delma S.; MacCallum, Donna M.; Feldmann, Joerg; Brown, Alistair J. P.

    2016-01-01

    Nutritional immunity is a process whereby an infected host manipulates essential micronutrients to defend against an invading pathogen. We reveal a dynamic aspect of nutritional immunity during infection that involves copper assimilation. Using a combination of laser ablation inductively coupled mass spectrometry (LA-ICP MS) and metal mapping, immunohistochemistry, and gene expression profiling from infected tissues, we show that readjustments in hepatic, splenic and renal copper homeostasis accompany disseminated Candida albicans infections in the mouse model. Localized host-imposed copper poisoning manifests itself as a transient increase in copper early in the kidney infection. Changes in renal copper are detected by the fungus, as revealed by gene expression profiling and fungal virulence studies. The fungus responds by differentially regulating the Crp1 copper efflux pump (higher expression during early infection and down-regulation late in infection) and the Ctr1 copper importer (lower expression during early infection, and subsequent up-regulation late in infection) to maintain copper homeostasis during disease progression. Both Crp1 and Ctr1 are required for full fungal virulence. Importantly, copper homeostasis influences other virulence traits—metabolic flexibility and oxidative stress resistance. Our study highlights the importance of copper homeostasis for host defence and fungal virulence during systemic disease. PMID:27362522

  3. Host-Imposed Copper Poisoning Impacts Fungal Micronutrient Acquisition during Systemic Candida albicans Infections.

    PubMed

    Mackie, Joanna; Szabo, Edina K; Urgast, Dagmar S; Ballou, Elizabeth R; Childers, Delma S; MacCallum, Donna M; Feldmann, Joerg; Brown, Alistair J P

    2016-01-01

    Nutritional immunity is a process whereby an infected host manipulates essential micronutrients to defend against an invading pathogen. We reveal a dynamic aspect of nutritional immunity during infection that involves copper assimilation. Using a combination of laser ablation inductively coupled mass spectrometry (LA-ICP MS) and metal mapping, immunohistochemistry, and gene expression profiling from infected tissues, we show that readjustments in hepatic, splenic and renal copper homeostasis accompany disseminated Candida albicans infections in the mouse model. Localized host-imposed copper poisoning manifests itself as a transient increase in copper early in the kidney infection. Changes in renal copper are detected by the fungus, as revealed by gene expression profiling and fungal virulence studies. The fungus responds by differentially regulating the Crp1 copper efflux pump (higher expression during early infection and down-regulation late in infection) and the Ctr1 copper importer (lower expression during early infection, and subsequent up-regulation late in infection) to maintain copper homeostasis during disease progression. Both Crp1 and Ctr1 are required for full fungal virulence. Importantly, copper homeostasis influences other virulence traits-metabolic flexibility and oxidative stress resistance. Our study highlights the importance of copper homeostasis for host defence and fungal virulence during systemic disease. PMID:27362522

  4. Production and function of cytokines in natural and acquired immunity to Candida albicans infection.

    PubMed Central

    Ashman, R B; Papadimitriou, J M

    1995-01-01

    Host resistance against infections caused by the yeast Candida albicans is mediated predominantly by polymorphonuclear leukocytes and macrophages. Antigens of Candida stimulate lymphocyte proliferation and cytokine synthesis, and in both humans and mice, these cytokines enhance the candidacidal functions of the phagocytic cells. In systemic candidiasis in mice, cytokine production has been found to be a function of the CD4+ T helper (Th) cells. The Th1 subset of these cells, characterized by the production of gamma interferon and interleukin-2, is associated with macrophage activation and enhanced resistance against reinfection, whereas the Th2 subset, which produces interleukins-4, -6, and -10, is linked to the development of chronic disease. However, other models have generated divergent data. Mucosal infection generally elicits Th1-type cytokine responses and protection from systemic challenge, and identification of cytokine mRNA present in infected tissues of mice that develop mild or severe lesions does not show pure Th1- or Th2-type responses. Furthermore, antigens of C. albicans, mannan in particular, can induce suppressor cells that modulate both specific and nonspecific cellular and humoral immune responses, and there is an emerging body of evidence that molecular mimicry may affect the efficiency of anti-Candida responses within defined genetic contexts. PMID:8531890

  5. Surveillance of bloodstream infections in pediatric cancer centers – what have we learned and how do we move on?

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Arne; Furtwängler, Rhoikos; Graf, Norbert; Laws, Hans Jürgen; Voigt, Sebastian; Piening, Brar; Geffers, Christine; Agyeman, Philipp; Ammann, Roland A.

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric patients receiving conventional chemotherapy for malignant disease face an increased risk of bloodstream infection (BSI). Since BSI may represent an acute life-threatening event in patients with profound immunosuppression, and show further negative impact on quality of life and anticancer treatment, the prevention of BSI is of paramount importance to improve and guarantee patients’ safety during intensive treatment. The great majority of all pediatric cancer patients (about 85%) have a long-term central venous access catheter in use (type Broviac or Port; CVAD). Referring to the current surveillance definitions a significant proportion of all BSI in pediatric patients with febrile neutropenia is categorized as CVAD-associated BSI. This state of the art review summarizes the epidemiology and the distinct pathogen profile of BSI in pediatric cancer patients from the perspective of infection surveillance. Problems in executing the current surveillance definition in this patient population are discussed and a new concept for the surveillance of BSI in pediatric cancer patients is outlined. PMID:27274442

  6. Cefazolin versus Nafcillin for Methicillin-Sensitive Staphylococcus aureus Bloodstream Infection in a California Tertiary Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Pollett, S; Baxi, S M; Rutherford, G W; Doernberg, S B; Bacchetti, P; Chambers, H F

    2016-08-01

    Recent observational studies have suggested possible reductions in mortality in patients receiving cefazolin versus antistaphylococcal penicillins. We examined 90-day mortality in patients receiving cefazolin compared to nafcillin for methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) bloodstream infection (BSI). We identified persons with MSSA BSI admitted to San Francisco General Hospital from January 2008 to July 2013 through a hospital-wide infection surveillance system and confirmed 90-day mortality using U.S. national vital registries. We included persons receiving cefazolin or nafcillin as the predominant intravenous antimicrobial agent; all participants received inpatient Infectious Diseases service consultation. We estimated the association between receipt of cefazolin and 90-day risk of death by multivariate logistic regression, including a propensity score for receiving cefazolin as the second predictor. Of 230 MSSA BSI cases, 30 received nafcillin and 70 received cefazolin as the predominant antimicrobial; 10 died within 90 days, 5 from each group. Unadjusted analysis showed substantial but not statistically significant reduced odds of death in those receiving cefazolin (odds ratio, 0.38; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.10 to 1.44). Multivariate analysis with propensity scores found a similar adjusted odds ratio (0.40; 95% CI, 0.09 to 1.74; P = 0.22). We found a large reduction in 90-day mortality in those receiving cefazolin compared to nafcillin for MSSA BSI, but this finding was not statistically significant. The magnitude of effect seen in this and other studies justifies further study. PMID:27216053

  7. Outbreak of Multi-Drug Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Bloodstream Infection in the Haematology Unit of a South African Academic Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Mudau, Maanda; Jacobson, Rachael; Minenza, Nadia; Kuonza, Lazarus; Morris, Vida; Engelbrecht, Heather; Nicol, Mark P.; Bamford, Colleen

    2013-01-01

    Objective To describe an outbreak of multi-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa bloodstream infections (MRPA-BSI) that occurred in the haematology ward of a tertiary academic hospital in Cape Town, South Africa, and determine risk factors for acquisition of MRPA-BSI. Methods The outbreak investigation included a search for additional cases, review of patient records, environmental and staff screening, molecular typing using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and Multi-locus sequencing (MLST) and a retrospective case-control study. Results Ten MRPA-BSI cases occurred in the haematology ward between January 2010 and January 2011. The case fatality rate was 80%. Staff screening specimens were negative for MRPA and an environmental source was not identified. PFGE showed that 9/10 isolates were related. MLST showed that 3 of these 9 isolates belonged to Sequence type (ST) 233 while the unrelated isolate belonged to ST260. Conclusion We have described an outbreak of MRPA-BSI occurring over an extended period of time among neutropenic haematology patients. Molecular typing confirms that the outbreak was predominantly due to a single strain. The source of the outbreak was not identified, but the outbreak appears to have been controlled following intensive infection control measures. PMID:23516393

  8. Surveillance of bloodstream infections in pediatric cancer centers - what have we learned and how do we move on?

    PubMed

    Simon, Arne; Furtwängler, Rhoikos; Graf, Norbert; Laws, Hans Jürgen; Voigt, Sebastian; Piening, Brar; Geffers, Christine; Agyeman, Philipp; Ammann, Roland A

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric patients receiving conventional chemotherapy for malignant disease face an increased risk of bloodstream infection (BSI). Since BSI may represent an acute life-threatening event in patients with profound immunosuppression, and show further negative impact on quality of life and anticancer treatment, the prevention of BSI is of paramount importance to improve and guarantee patients' safety during intensive treatment. The great majority of all pediatric cancer patients (about 85%) have a long-term central venous access catheter in use (type Broviac or Port; CVAD). Referring to the current surveillance definitions a significant proportion of all BSI in pediatric patients with febrile neutropenia is categorized as CVAD-associated BSI. This state of the art review summarizes the epidemiology and the distinct pathogen profile of BSI in pediatric cancer patients from the perspective of infection surveillance. Problems in executing the current surveillance definition in this patient population are discussed and a new concept for the surveillance of BSI in pediatric cancer patients is outlined. PMID:27274442

  9. Protective effect of picolinic acid on mice intracerebrally infected with lethal doses of Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Blasi, E; Mazzolla, R; Pitzurra, L; Barluzzi, R; Bistoni, F

    1993-01-01

    We have studied the effects of picolinic acid (PLA), a product of tryptophan degradation, on mouse susceptibility to intracerebral infection with Candida albicans. We show that intraperitoneal administration of PLA significantly enhances the median survival time of mice inoculated with the lethal challenge. Furthermore, intracerebral administration of this agent induces a protective state against the local lethal infection, the phenomenon depending upon the administration schedule and doses of PLA employed. According to survival data, yeast growth in the brain as well as yeast colonization of the kidneys are drastically reduced in PLA-treated mice compared with those for untreated controls. Northern (RNA) blot analysis of brain tissues demonstrates that mRNA levels specific for tumor necrosis factor and interleukin 1 are augmented and induced, respectively, after inoculation of PLA. These results indicate that PLA has a protective effect likely involving elicitation of a cytokine response in vivo against fungal infections. Images PMID:7506894

  10. Solitary Candida albicans Infection Causing Fournier Gangrene and Review of Fungal Etiologies

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, Tiffany A; Bieniek, Jared M; Sumfest, Joel M

    2014-01-01

    Polymicrobial bacterial infections are commonly found in cases of Fournier gangrene (FG), although fungal growth may occur occasionally. Solitary fungal organisms causing FG have rarely been reported. The authors describe a case of an elderly man with a history of diabetes who presented with a necrotizing scrotal and perineal soft tissue infection. He underwent emergent surgical debridement with findings of diffuse urethral stricture disease and urinary extravasation requiring suprapubic tube placement. Candida albicans was found to be the single causative organism on culture, and the patient recovered well following antifungal treatment. Fungal infections should be considered as rare causes of necrotizing fasciitis and antifungal treatment considered in at-risk immunodeficient individuals. PMID:25009452

  11. Solitary Candida albicans Infection Causing Fournier Gangrene and Review of Fungal Etiologies.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Tiffany A; Bieniek, Jared M; Sumfest, Joel M

    2014-01-01

    Polymicrobial bacterial infections are commonly found in cases of Fournier gangrene (FG), although fungal growth may occur occasionally. Solitary fungal organisms causing FG have rarely been reported. The authors describe a case of an elderly man with a history of diabetes who presented with a necrotizing scrotal and perineal soft tissue infection. He underwent emergent surgical debridement with findings of diffuse urethral stricture disease and urinary extravasation requiring suprapubic tube placement. Candida albicans was found to be the single causative organism on culture, and the patient recovered well following antifungal treatment. Fungal infections should be considered as rare causes of necrotizing fasciitis and antifungal treatment considered in at-risk immunodeficient individuals. PMID:25009452

  12. Gold Nanoparticle-Photosensitizer Conjugate Based Photodynamic Inactivation of Biofilm Producing Cells: Potential for Treatment of C. albicans Infection in BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sherwani, Mohd. Asif; Tufail, Saba; Khan, Aijaz Ahmed; Owais, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been found to be effective in inhibiting biofilm producing organisms. We investigated the photodynamic effect of gold nanoparticle (GNP) conjugated photosensitizers against Candida albicans biofilm. We also examined the photodynamic efficacy of photosensitizer (PS) conjugated GNPs (GNP-PS) to treat skin and oral C. albicans infection in BALB/c mice. Methods The biomimetically synthesized GNPs were conjugated to photosensitizers viz. methylene blue (MB) or toluidine blue O (TB). The conjugation of PSs with GNPs was characterized by spectroscopic and microscopic techniques. The efficacy of gold nanoparticle conjugates against C. albicans biofilm was demonstrated by XTT assay and microscopic studies. The therapeutic efficacy of the combination of the GNP conjugates against cutaneous C. albicans infection was examined in mouse model by enumerating residual fungal burden and histopathological studies. Results The GNP-PS conjugate based PDT was found to effectively kill both C. albicans planktonic cells and biofilm populating hyphal forms. The mixture of GNPs conjugated to two different PSs significantly depleted the hyphal C. albicans burden against superficial skin and oral C. albicans infection in mice. Conclusion The GNP-PS conjugate combination exhibits synergism in photodynamic inactivation of C. albicans. The GNP conjugate based PDT can be employed effectively in treatment of cutaneous C. albicans infections in model animals. The antibiofilm potential of PDT therapy can also be exploited in depletion of C. albicans on medical appliances such as implants and catheters etc. PMID:26148012

  13. Closed Catheter Access System Implementation in Reducing the Bloodstream Infection Rate in Low Birth Weight Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Rundjan, Lily; Rohsiswatmo, Rinawati; Paramita, Tiara Nien; Oeswadi, Chrissela Anindita

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bloodstream infection (BSI) is one of the significant causes of morbidity and mortality encountered in a neonatal intensive care unit, especially in developing countries. Despite the implementation of infection control practices, such as strict hand hygiene, the BSI rate in our hospital is still high. The use of a closed catheter access system to reduce BSI related to intravascular catheter has hitherto never been evaluated in our hospital. Objective: To determine the effects of closed catheter access system implementation in reducing the BSI rate in preterm neonates with low birth weight. Methods: Randomized clinical trial was conducted on 60 low birth weight preterm infants hospitalized in the neonatal unit at Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, Jakarta, Indonesia from June to September 2013. Randomized subjects either received a closed or non-closed catheter access system. Subjects were monitored for 2 weeks for the development of BSI based on clinical signs, abnormal infection parameters, and blood culture. Results: Closed catheter access system implementation gave a protective effect toward the occurrence of culture-proven BSI (relative risk 0.095, 95% CI 0.011–0.85, p = 0.026). Risk of culture-proven BSI in the control group was 10.545 (95% CI 1.227–90.662, p = 0.026). BSI occurred in 75% of neonates without risk factors of infection in the control group compared to none in the study group. Conclusion: The use of a closed catheter access system reduced the BSI in low birth weight preterm infants. Choosing the right device design, proper disinfection of device, and appropriate frequency of connector change should be done simultaneously. PMID:25853110

  14. Antibodies against glucan, chitin, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae mannan as new biomarkers of Candida albicans infection that complement tests based on C. albicans mannan.

    PubMed

    Sendid, B; Dotan, N; Nseir, S; Savaux, C; Vandewalle, P; Standaert, A; Zerimech, F; Guery, B P; Dukler, A; Colombel, J F; Poulain, D

    2008-12-01

    Antibodies against Saccharomyces cerevisiae mannan (ASCA) and antibodies against synthetic disaccharide fragments of glucans (ALCA) and chitin (ACCA) are biomarkers of Crohn's disease (CD). We previously showed that Candida albicans infection generates ASCA. Here, we explored ALCA and ACCA as possible biomarkers of invasive C. albicans infection (ICI). ASCA, ALCA, ACCA, and Candida mannan antigen and antibody detection tests were performed on 69 sera obtained sequentially from 18 patients with ICIs proven by blood culture, 59 sera from CD patients, 47 sera from hospitalized subjects colonized by Candida species (CZ), and 131 sera from healthy controls (HC). ASCA, ALCA, and ACCA levels in CD and ICI patients were significantly different from those in CZ and HC subjects (P<0.0001). In ICI patients, these levels increased as infection developed. Using ASCA, ALCA, ACCA, and Platelia Candida tests, 100% of ICIs were detected, with the kinetics of the antibody response depending on the patient during the time course of infection. A large number of sera presented with more than three positive tests. This is the first evidence that the detection of antibodies against chitin and glucans has diagnostic value in fungal infections and that these tests can complement more specific tests. Future trials are necessary to assess the value of these tests in multiparametric analysis, as well as their pathophysiological relevance.

  15. Draft genome sequence of blaVeb-1, blaoxa-10producing multi-drug resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosastrain VRFPA09 recovered from bloodstream infection

    PubMed Central

    Murugan, Nandagopal; Malathi, Jambulingam; Umashankar, Vetrivel; Madhavan, Hajib NarahariRao

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) bacteremia causes significant mortality rate due to emergence of multidrug resistant (MDR) nosocomial infections. We report the draft genome sequence of P. aeruginosa strain VRFPA09, a human bloodstream isolate, phenotypically proven as MDR strain. Whole genome sequencing on VRFPA09, deciphered betalactamase encoding blaveb-1 and blaOXA-10genes and multiple drug resistance, virulence factor encoding genes. PMID:26413042

  16. Effect of N-acetylchitohexaose against Candida albicans infection of tumor-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, M; Watanabe, T; Suzuki, S; Suzuki, M

    1990-01-01

    A water-soluble oligosaccharide, N-acetylchitohexaose (NACOS-6), was able to enhance the protective effect against Candida albicans infection in mice during the early phase of tumor-bearing. A significant decrease in the number of C. albicans cells in the kidneys of NACOS-6-treated tumor-bearing mice was observed 8 days after the fungal infection, or 15 days after the tumor transplantation. The candidacidal activity of polymorphonuclear leukocytes from NACOS-6-treated tumor-bearing mice did not differ from that of NACOS-6-untreated tumor-bearing mice. On the other hand, the candidacidal activities of both macrophages and T lymphocytes increased following administration of NACOS-6 in the early phase of tumor-bearing. The culture supernatant of T lymphocytes from NACOS-6-treated tumor-bearing mice also potentiated the candidacidal activity of casein-induced macrophages. An enhancement of natural killer cell activity of splenic lymphocytes obtained from NACOS-6-treated tumor-bearing mice was also observed.

  17. Molecular and Clinical Characteristics of Hospital and Community Onset Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Strains Associated with Bloodstream Infections

    PubMed Central

    Hines, Lisa; van Balen, Joany; Mediavilla, José R.; Pan, Xueliang; Hoet, Armando E.; Kreiswirth, Barry N.; Pancholi, Preeti; Stevenson, Kurt B.

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bloodstream infections (BSI) are classified epidemiologically as health care-associated hospital onset (HAHO)-, health care-associated community onset (HACO)-, or community-associated (CA)-MRSA. Clinical and molecular differences between HAHO- and HACO-MRSA BSI are not well known. Thus, we evaluated clinical and molecular characteristics of MRSA BSI to determine if distinct features are associated with HAHO- or HACO-MRSA strains. Molecular genotyping and medical record reviews were conducted on 282 MRSA BSI isolates from January 2007 to December 2009. MRSA classifications were 38% HAHO-, 54% HACO-, and 8% CA-MRSA. Comparing patients with HAHO-MRSA to those with HACO-MRSA, HAHO-MRSA patients had significantly higher rates of malignancy, surgery, recent invasive devices, and mortality and longer hospital stays. Patients with HACO-MRSA were more likely to have a history of renal failure, hemodialysis, residence in a long-term-care facility, long-term invasive devices, and higher rate of MRSA relapse. Distinct MRSA molecular strain differences also were seen between HAHO-MRSA (60% staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec type II [SCCmec II], 30% SCCmec III, and 9% SCCmec IV) and HACO-MRSA (47% SCCmec II, 35% SCCmec III, and 16% SCCmec IV) (P < 0.001). In summary, our study reveals significant clinical and molecular differences between patients with HAHO- and HACO-MRSA BSI. In order to decrease rates of MRSA infection, preventive efforts need to be directed toward patients in the community with health care-associated risk factors in addition to inpatient infection control. PMID:25740776

  18. Carbapenemase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae bloodstream infections: lowering mortality by antibiotic combination schemes and the role of carbapenems.

    PubMed

    Daikos, George L; Tsaousi, Sophia; Tzouvelekis, Leonidas S; Anyfantis, Ioannis; Psichogiou, Mina; Argyropoulou, Athina; Stefanou, Ioanna; Sypsa, Vana; Miriagou, Vivi; Nepka, Martha; Georgiadou, Sarah; Markogiannakis, Antonis; Goukos, Dimitris; Skoutelis, Athanasios

    2014-01-01

    Carbapenemase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae strains (CP-Kps) are currently among the most important nosocomial pathogens. An observational study was conducted during 2009 to 2010 in two hospitals located in a high-prevalence area (Athens, Greece). The aims were (i) to evaluate the clinical outcome of patients with CP-Kp bloodstream infections (BSIs), (ii) to identify predictors of mortality, and (iii) to evaluate the various antibiotic schemes employed. A total of 205 patients with CP-Kp BSIs were identified: 163 (79.5%) were infected with KPC or KPC and VIM, and 42 were infected with VIM producers. For definitive treatment, 103 patients received combination therapy (two or more active drugs), 72 received monotherapy (one active drug), and 12 received therapy with no active drug. The remaining 18 patients died within 48 h after the onset of bacteremia. The all-cause 28-day mortality was 40%. A significantly higher mortality rate was observed in patients treated with monotherapy than in those treated with combination therapy (44.4% versus 27.2%; P=0.018). The lowest mortality rate (19.3%) was observed in patients treated with carbapenem-containing combinations. In the Cox proportion hazards model, ultimately fatal disease (hazards ratio [HR], 3.25; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.51 to 7.03; P=0.003), the presence of rapidly fatal underlying diseases (HR, 4.20; 95% CI, 2.19 to 8.08; P<0.001), and septic shock (HR, 2.15; 95% CI, 1.16 to 3.96; P=0.015) were independent predictors of death. Combination therapy was strongly associated with survival (HR of death for monotherapy versus combination, 2.08; 95% CI, 1.23 to 3.51; P=0.006), mostly due to the effectiveness of the carbapenem-containing regimens.

  19. Evaluating state-specific antibiotic resistance measures derived from central line-associated bloodstream infections, national healthcare safety network, 2011.

    PubMed

    Soe, Minn M; Edwards, Jonathan R; Sievert, Dawn M; Ricks, Philip M; Magill, Shelley S; Fridkin, Scott K

    2015-01-01

    DISCLOSURE The findings and conclusions in this report are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official position of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention or the Agency for Toxic Substances and Diseases Registry. OBJECTIVE Describe the impact of standardizing state-specific summary measures of antibiotic resistance that inform regional interventions to reduce transmission of resistant pathogens in healthcare settings. DESIGN Analysis of public health surveillance data. METHODS Central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) data from intensive care units (ICUs) of facilities reporting to the National Healthcare Safety Network in 2011 were analyzed. For CLABSI due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), extended-spectrum cephalosporin (ESC)-nonsusceptible Klebsiella species, and carbapenem-nonsusceptible Klebsiella species, we computed 3 state-level summary measures of nonsusceptibility: crude percent nonsusceptible, model-based adjusted percent nonsusceptible, and crude infection incidence rate. RESULTS Overall, 1,791 facilities reported CLABSIs from ICU patients. Of 1,618 S. aureus CLABSIs with methicillin-susceptibility test results, 791 (48.9%) were due to MRSA. Of 756 Klebsiella CLABSIs with ESC-susceptibility test results, 209 (27.7%) were due to ESC-nonsusceptible Klebsiella, and among 661 Klebsiella CLABSI with carbapenem susceptibility test results, 70 (10.6%) were due to carbapenem-nonsusceptible Klebsiella. All 3 state-specific measures demonstrated variability in magnitude by state. Adjusted measures, with few exceptions, were not appreciably different from crude values for any phenotypes. When linking values of crude and adjusted percent nonsusceptible by state, a state's absolute rank shifted slightly for MRSA in 5 instances and only once each for ESC-nonsusceptible and carbapenem-nonsusceptible Klebsiella species. Infection incidence measures correlated strongly with both percent nonsusceptibility

  20. National influences on catheter-associated bloodstream infection rates: practices among national surveillance networks participating in the European HELICS project.

    PubMed

    Hansen, S; Schwab, F; Behnke, M; Carsauw, H; Heczko, P; Klavs, I; Lyytikäinen, O; Palomar, M; Riesenfeld Orn, I; Savey, A; Szilagyi, E; Valinteliene, R; Fabry, J; Gastmeier, P

    2009-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate associations between organisational characteristics, routine practices and the incidence densities of central venous catheter-associated bloodstream infections (CVC-BSI rates) in European intensive care units (ICUs) as part of the HELICS project (Hospitals in Europe Link for Infection Control through Surveillance). Questionnaires were sent to ICUs participating in the national nosocomial infection surveillance networks in 2004. The national networks were asked for the CVC-BSI rates of the ICUs participating for the time period 2003--2004. Univariate and multivariate risk factor analyses were performed to identify which practices had the greatest impact on CVC-BSI rates. A total of 526 ICUs from 10 countries sent data on organisational characteristics and practices, demonstrating wide variation in care. CVC-BSI rates were also provided for 288 ICUs from five countries. This made it possible to include 1383444 patient days, 969897 CVC days and 1935 CVC-BSI cases in the analysis. Adjusted logistic regression analysis showed that the categorical variables of country [odds ratio (OR) varying per country from OR: 2.3; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.5-10.2; to OR: 12.8; 95% CI: 4.4-37.5; in reference to the country with the lowest CVC-BSI rates] and type of hospital 'university' (OR: 2.08; 95% CI: 1.02-4.25) were independent risk factors for high CVC-BSI rates. Substantial variation existed in CVC-BSI prevention activities, surveillance methods and estimated CVC-BSI rates among the European countries. Differences in cultural, social and legal perspectives as well as differences between healthcare systems are crucial in explaining these differences. PMID:18799236

  1. Evaluation of Bloodstream Infections During Chemotherapy-Induced Febrile Neutropenia in Patients with Malignant Hematological Diseases: Single Center Experience.

    PubMed

    Piukovics, Klára; Terhes, Gabriella; Lázár, Andrea; Tímár, Flóra; Borbényi, Zita; Urbán, Edit

    2015-09-01

    From year to year, it is important to get an overview of the occurrence of causative agents in febrile neutropenic patients to determine the empiric treatment. Thus our aims were to evaluate a four-year period regarding the prevalence of bloodstream infections and the most important causative agents. During this period, 1,361 patients were treated in our hematology ward because of various hematological disorders. 812 febrile episodes were recorded in 469 patients. At that time, 3,714 blood culture (BC) bottles were sent for microbiological investigations, 759 of them gave positive signal. From the majority of positive blood culture bottles (67.1%), Gram-positive bacteria, mainly coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS), were grown. Gram-negative bacteria were isolated from 32.9% of the positive blood culture bottles, in these cases the leading pathogen was Escherichia coli. The high prevalence of CNS was attributed to mainly contamination, while lower positivity rate for Gram-negative bacteria was associated with the use of broad-spectrum empiric antibiotic treatment. PMID:26495130

  2. High MICs for Vancomycin and Daptomycin and Complicated Catheter-Related Bloodstream Infections with Methicillin-Sensitive Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Viedma, Esther; Chaves, Fernando; Lalueza, Antonio; Fortún, Jesús; Loza, Elena; Pujol, Miquel; Ardanuy, Carmen; Morales, Isabel; de Cueto, Marina; Resino-Foz, Elena; Morales-Cartagena, Alejandra; Rico, Alicia; Romero, María P.; Orellana, María Ángeles; López-Medrano, Francisco; Fernández-Ruiz, Mario; Aguado, José María

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the prognostic role of high MICs for antistaphylococcal agents in patients with methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus catheter-related bloodstream infection (MSSA CRBSI). We prospectively reviewed 83 episodes from 5 centers in Spain during April 2011–June 2014 that had optimized clinical management and analyzed the relationship between E-test MICs for vancomycin, daptomycin, oxacillin, and linezolid and development of complicated bacteremia by using multivariate analysis. Complicated MSSA CRBSI occurred in 26 (31.3%) patients; MICs for vancomycin and daptomycin were higher in these patients (optimal cutoff values for predictive accuracy = 1.5 μg/mL and 0.5 μg/mL). High MICs for vancomycin (hazard ratio 2.4, 95% CI 1.2–5.5) and daptomycin (hazard ratio 2.4, 95% CI 1.1–5.9) were independent risk factors for development of complicated MSSA CRBSI. Our data suggest that patients with MSSA CRBSI caused by strains that have high MICs for vancomycin or daptomycin are at increased risk for complications. PMID:27192097

  3. Risk factors for mortality in patients with bloodstream infections during the pre-engraftment period after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Karpov, Igor; Milanovich, Natalia; Uss, Anatoly; Iskrov, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Background Bloodstream infections (BSI) remain a frequent complication during the pre-engraftment period after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), resulting in high mortality rates. This study evaluated risk factors for mortality in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients with BSI in the pre-engraftment period. Methods This prospective case control study was performed at the Center of Hematology and Bone Marrow Transplantation in Minsk, Republic of Belarus. Data relating to patient age and gender, date and type of transplantation, conditioning chemotherapy regimen, microorganisms isolated from blood, and antibacterial therapy were prospectively collected from all hematopoietic stem cell recipients with microbiologically proven cases of BSI in the pre-engraftment period. The primary outcome was all-cause 30-day mortality after onset of febrile neutropenia. Results A total of 135 adult patients with microbiologically proven BSI after HSCT were studied, with 65.2% of cases caused by gram-negative microorganisms and 21.5% by non-fermenting bacteria. Inadequate empiric antibacterial therapy and isolation of carbapenem-resistant non-fermenting gram-negative bacteria (Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) were independently associated with increased all-cause 30-day mortality in these patients. Conclusion The risk factors for mortality in adult patients with BSI in the pre-engraftment period after HSCT were inadequacy of empirical antibacterial therapy and isolation of carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii or P. aeruginosa. PMID:27382554

  4. The clinical diagnostic accuracy of rapid detection of healthcare-associated bloodstream infection in intensive care using multipathogen real-time PCR technology

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Graham; Chadwick, Paul; Young, Duncan; Bentley, Andrew; Carlson, Gordon; Warhurst, Geoffrey

    2011-01-01

    Background There is growing interest in the potential utility of real-time PCR in diagnosing bloodstream infection by detecting pathogen DNA in blood samples within a few hours. SeptiFast is a multipathogen probe-based real-time PCR system targeting ribosomal DNA sequences of bacteria and fungi. It detects and identifies the commonest pathogens causing bloodstream infection and has European regulatory approval. The SeptiFast pathogen panel is suited to identifying healthcare-associated bloodstream infection acquired during complex healthcare, and the authors report here the protocol for the first detailed health-technology assessment of multiplex real-time PCR in this setting. Methods/design A Phase III multicentre double-blinded diagnostic study will determine the clinical validity of SeptiFast for the rapid detection of healthcare-associated bloodstream infection, against the current service standard of microbiological culture, in an adequately sized population of critically ill adult patients. Results from SeptiFast and standard microbiological culture procedures in each patient will be compared at study conclusion and the metrics of clinical diagnostic accuracy of SeptiFast determined in this population setting. In addition, this study aims to assess further the preliminary evidence that the detection of pathogen DNA in the bloodstream using SeptiFast may have value in identifying the presence of infection elsewhere in the body. Furthermore, differences in circulating immune-inflammatory markers in patient groups differentiated by the presence/absence of culturable pathogens and pathogen DNA will help elucidate further the patho-physiology of infection developing in the critically ill. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval has been granted by the North West 6 Research Ethics Committee (09/H1003/109). Based on the results of this first non-commercial study, independent recommendations will be made to The Department of Health (open-access health technology

  5. Association of genotypes with infection types and antifungal susceptibilities in Candida albicans as revealed by recent molecular typing strategies

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Feng-Yan

    2014-01-01

    Candida albicans is a commensal microorganism in the mucosa of healthy individuals, but is also the most common opportunistic fungal pathogen of humans. It causes from benign infections such as oral and vaginal candidiasis to fatal, systematic diseases in immunocompromised or critically ill patients. In addition to improved therapy, the rapid and accurate identification of the disease-causing strains is crucial for diagnosis, clinical treatment and epidemiological studies of candidiasis. A variety of methods for strain typing of C. albicans have been developed. The most commonly used methods with the focus on recently developed molecular typing or DNA-fingerprinting strategies and the recent findings in the association of specific and genetically similar genotypes with certain infection types and the correlation between azole susceptibilities and certain genotypes of C. albicans from China are reviewed. PMID:24772369

  6. The effect of comprehensive infection control measures on the rate of late-onset bloodstream infections in very low-birth-weight infants.

    PubMed

    Wicker, Linda; Saslow, Judy; Shah, Sahil; Bhat, Vishwanath; Sannoh, Sulaiman; Brandon, Emma; Kemble, Nicole; Pyon, Kee; Stahl, Gary; Aghai, Zubair H

    2011-03-01

    Late-onset bloodstream infection (LOBI) is a significant problem in very low-birth-weight (VLBW) infants and can lead to increased mortality and morbidity. The incidence of LOBI in VLBW infants in our unit was >35% before 2004, much higher than 20% reported in other studies. A comprehensive infection control measure was introduced in our unit in 2005. Here we report the effects of comprehensive infection control measures on the rate of LOBI in VLBW infants. Infants in the preintervention group (born 2001 to 2004) were compared with the intervention group (born 2005 to 2008) for baseline demographics, risk factors for infection, and the rate of LOBI. LOBI was defined as a positive blood and/or cerebrospinal fluid culture after 3 days of life. Three hundred thirty-four VLBW infants were admitted to our unit during the preintervention period and 303 during the intervention period. There was no significant difference in baseline demographics and risk factors for LOBI between the two groups. The incidence of LOBI was significantly reduced from 38% before intervention to 23% after intervention ( P < 0.001). Comprehensive infection control measures significantly reduced the rate of LOBI in VLBW infants.

  7. Next-Generation Computational Genetic Analysis: Multiple Complement Alleles Control Survival after Candida albicans Infection ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Peltz, Gary; Zaas, Aimee K.; Zheng, Ming; Solis, Norma V.; Zhang, Mason X.; Liu, Hong-Hsing; Hu, Yajing; Boxx, Gayle M.; Phan, Quynh T.; Dill, David; Filler, Scott G.

    2011-01-01

    Candida albicans is a fungal pathogen that causes severe disseminated infections that can be lethal in immunocompromised patients. Genetic factors are known to alter the initial susceptibility to and severity of C. albicans infection. We developed a next-generation computational genetic mapping program with advanced features to identify genetic factors affecting survival in a murine genetic model of hematogenous C. albicans infection. This computational tool was used to analyze the median survival data after inbred mouse strains were infected with C. albicans, which provides a useful experimental model for identification of host susceptibility factors. The computational analysis indicated that genetic variation within early classical complement pathway components (C1q, C1r, and C1s) could affect survival. Consistent with the computational results, serum C1 binding to this pathogen was strongly affected by C1rs alleles, as was survival of chromosome substitution strains. These results led to a combinatorial, conditional genetic model, involving an interaction between C5 and C1r/s alleles, which accurately predicted survival after infection. Beyond applicability to infectious disease, this information could increase our understanding of the genetic factors affecting susceptibility to autoimmune and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:21875959

  8. Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection: A pooled analysis of five prospective, observational studies

    PubMed Central

    Kaasch, Achim J.; Barlow, Gavin; Edgeworth, Jonathan D.; Fowler, Vance G.; Hellmich, Martin; Hopkins, Susan; Kern, Winfried V.; Llewelyn, Martin J.; Rieg, Siegbert; Rodriguez-Baño, Jesús; Scarborough, Matthew; Seifert, Harald; Soriano, Alex; Tilley, Robert; Tőrők, M. Estée; Weiβ, Verena; Wilson, A. Peter R.; Thwaites, Guy E.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objectives Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia is a common, often fatal infection. Our aim was to describe how its clinical presentation varies between populations and to identify common determinants of outcome. Methods We conducted a pooled analysis on 3395 consecutive adult patients with S. aureus bacteraemia. Patients were enrolled between 2006 and 2011 in five prospective studies in 20 tertiary care centres in Germany, Spain, United Kingdom, and United States. Results The median age of participants was 64 years (interquartile range 50–75 years) and 63.8% were male. 25.4% of infections were associated with diabetes mellitus, 40.7% were nosocomial, 20.6% were caused by methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), although these proportions varied significantly across studies. Intravenous catheters were the commonest identified infective focus (27.7%); 8.3% had endocarditis. Crude 14 and 90-day mortality was 14.6% and 29.2%, respectively. Age, MRSA bacteraemia, nosocomial acquisition, endocarditis, and pneumonia were independently associated with death, but a strong association was with an unidentified infective focus (adjusted hazard ratio for 90-day mortality 2.92; 95% confidence interval 2.33 to 3.67, p < 0.0001). Conclusion The baseline demographic and clinical features of S. aureus bacteraemia vary significantly between populations. Mortality could be reduced by assiduous MRSA control and early identification of the infective focus. PMID:24247070

  9. Does antimicrobial use density at the ward level influence monthly central line-associated bloodstream infection rates?

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Junichi; Harada, Yukiko; Kikuchi, Tetsuya; Asano, Ikuyo; Ueno, Takako; Matsubara, Nobuo

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate risk factors, including ward antimicrobial use density (AUD), for central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) as defined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in a 430-bed community hospital using central venous lines with closed-hub systems. We calculated AUD as (total dose)/(defined daily dose × patient days) ×1,000 for a total of 20 drugs, nine wards, and 24 months. Into each line day data, we inputed AUD and device utilization ratios, number of central line days, and CLABSI. The ratio of susceptible strains in isolates were subjected to correlation analysis with AUD. Of a total of 9,997 line days over 24 months, CLABSI was present in 33 cases (3.3 ‰), 14 (42.4%) of which were on surgical wards out of nine wards. Of a total of 43 strains isolated, eight (18.6%) were methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA); none of the MRSA-positive patients had received cefotiam before the onset of infection. Receiver-operating characteristic analysis showed that central line day 7 had the highest accuracy. Logistic regression analysis showed the central line day showed an odds ratio of 5.511 with a 95% confidence interval of 1.936–15.690 as did AUD of cefotiam showing an odds ratio of 0.220 with 95% confidence interval of 0.00527–0.922 (P=0.038). Susceptible strains ratio and AUD showed a negative correlation (R2=0.1897). Thus, CLABSI could be prevented by making the number of central line days as short as possible. The preventative role of AUD remains to be investigated. PMID:25525373

  10. A project to reduce the rate of central line associated bloodstream infection in ICU patients to a target of zero

    PubMed Central

    Yaseen, Muhammad; Al-Hameed, Fahad; Osman, Khalid; Al-Janadi, Mansour; Al-Shamrani, Majid; Al-Saedi, Asim; Al-Thaqafi, Abdulhakeem

    2016-01-01

    Central venous catheters (CVCs) are life-saving and the majority of patients in intensive care units (ICUs) have them placed in order to receive medicine and fluids. However, the use of these catheters can result in serious bloodstream infections. The rate of Central Line Associated Blood Stream Infection (CLABSI) in Adult Intensive Care Units (ICUs) at King Abdulaziz Medical City Jeddah (KAMC-J) at the start of the project was 2.0/1000 line days in 2008. The Central Line (CL) Bundle by the Institute of Healthcare Improvement (IHI) was implemented at the same time with monitoring of compliance to the CL Bundle. The compliance to CL Bundle was very low at 37% in the same period. A multidisciplinary team was created to improve the compliance to the CL bundle which was expected to have an impact on the rate of CLABSI to achieve zero CLABSI events. The team continued to monitor and evaluate the progress on the compliance to the bundle as well as monitoring the CLABSI events using National Healthcare Safety Network diagnostic criteria. The real reduction in the rate of CLABSI was achieved in 2010 with 0.7/1,000 device days when the compliance to CL Bundle reached up to 98% in that year and 100% in the next two subsequent years. The project still continued and the rate continued to drop and the ultimate target of zero CLABSI was achieved in the year 2014 and maintained in the year 2015 with a sustained compliance of 100% to the CL Bundle. Successful implementation of CL Bundle can help in reducing the rates of CLABSI and achieving zero CLABSI events for a sustained period. PMID:27559470

  11. A project to reduce the rate of central line associated bloodstream infection in ICU patients to a target of zero.

    PubMed

    Yaseen, Muhammad; Al-Hameed, Fahad; Osman, Khalid; Al-Janadi, Mansour; Al-Shamrani, Majid; Al-Saedi, Asim; Al-Thaqafi, Abdulhakeem

    2016-01-01

    Central venous catheters (CVCs) are life-saving and the majority of patients in intensive care units (ICUs) have them placed in order to receive medicine and fluids. However, the use of these catheters can result in serious bloodstream infections. The rate of Central Line Associated Blood Stream Infection (CLABSI) in Adult Intensive Care Units (ICUs) at King Abdulaziz Medical City Jeddah (KAMC-J) at the start of the project was 2.0/1000 line days in 2008. The Central Line (CL) Bundle by the Institute of Healthcare Improvement (IHI) was implemented at the same time with monitoring of compliance to the CL Bundle. The compliance to CL Bundle was very low at 37% in the same period. A multidisciplinary team was created to improve the compliance to the CL bundle which was expected to have an impact on the rate of CLABSI to achieve zero CLABSI events. The team continued to monitor and evaluate the progress on the compliance to the bundle as well as monitoring the CLABSI events using National Healthcare Safety Network diagnostic criteria. The real reduction in the rate of CLABSI was achieved in 2010 with 0.7/1,000 device days when the compliance to CL Bundle reached up to 98% in that year and 100% in the next two subsequent years. The project still continued and the rate continued to drop and the ultimate target of zero CLABSI was achieved in the year 2014 and maintained in the year 2015 with a sustained compliance of 100% to the CL Bundle. Successful implementation of CL Bundle can help in reducing the rates of CLABSI and achieving zero CLABSI events for a sustained period. PMID:27559470

  12. Bringing Central Line–Associated Bloodstream Infection Prevention Home: CLABSI Definitions and Prevention Policies in Home Health Care Agencies

    PubMed Central

    Rinke, Michael L.; Bundy, David G.; Milstone, Aaron M.; Deuber, Kristin; Chen, Allen R.; Colantuoni, Elizabeth; Miller, Marlene R.

    2015-01-01

    Background A study was conducted to investigate home health care agency central line–associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) definitions and prevention policies and compare them to the Joint Commission National Patient Safety Goal (NPSG.07.04.01), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) CLABSI prevention recommendations, and a best-practice central line care bundle for inpatients. Methods A telephone-based survey was conducted in 2011 of a convenience sample of home health care agencies associated with children’s hematology/oncology centers. Results Of the 97 eligible home health care agencies, 57 (59%) completed the survey. No agency reported using all five aspects of the National Healthcare and Safety Network/Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology CLABSI definition and adjudication process, and of the 50 agencies that reported tracking CLABSI rates, 20 (40%) reported using none. Only 10 agencies (18%) had policies consistent with all elements of the inpatient-focused NPSG.07.04.01, 10 agencies (18%) were consistent with all elements of the home care targeted CDC CLABSI prevention recommendations, and no agencies were consistent with all elements of the central line care bundle. Only 14 agencies (25%) knew their overall CLABSI rate: mean 0.40 CLABSIs per 1,000 central line days (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.18 to 0.61). Six agencies (11%) knew their agency’s pediatric CLABSI rate: mean 0.54 CLABSIs per 1,000 central line days (95% CI, 0.06 to 1.01). Conclusions The policies of a national sample of home health care agencies varied significantly from national inpatient and home health care agency targeted standards for CLABSI definitions and prevention. Future research should assess strategies for standardizing home health care practices consistent with evidence-based recommendations. PMID:23991509

  13. Novel nanoscale bacteriophage-based single-domain antibodies for the therapy of systemic infection caused by Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Shuai; Shi, Hongxi; Cao, Donghui; Wang, Yicun; Zhang, Xintong; Li, Yan; Gao, Xiang; Wang, Li

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans (C. albicans) is an important human commensal and opportunistic fungal pathogen. Secreted aspartyl proteinases (Saps) are a major virulence trait of C. albicans, and among these proteases Sap2 has the highest expression levels. It is possible that antibodies against Sap2 could provide an antifungal effect. In this study, two phages displaying anti-rSap2 single chain variable fragments (scFvs) were screened from human single fold scFv libraries, and their potential therapeutic roles were evaluated using a murine model infected by C. albicans. The in vivo efficacies were assessed by mortality rates, fungal burden and histological examination. Overall survival rates were significantly increased while the colony counts and infectious foci were significantly decreased after treatment with the scFv-phages relative to the control groups. In order to investigate the immune response provoked by scFv-phages, three kinds of cytokines (Th1, Th2 and Th17 types) were measured and a clear immune response was observed. These findings suggest that anti-rSap2 scFv-phages have potential in the therapy of systemic infection caused by C. albicans. PMID:27558409

  14. Novel nanoscale bacteriophage-based single-domain antibodies for the therapy of systemic infection caused by Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shuai; Shi, Hongxi; Cao, Donghui; Wang, Yicun; Zhang, Xintong; Li, Yan; Gao, Xiang; Wang, Li

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans (C. albicans) is an important human commensal and opportunistic fungal pathogen. Secreted aspartyl proteinases (Saps) are a major virulence trait of C. albicans, and among these proteases Sap2 has the highest expression levels. It is possible that antibodies against Sap2 could provide an antifungal effect. In this study, two phages displaying anti-rSap2 single chain variable fragments (scFvs) were screened from human single fold scFv libraries, and their potential therapeutic roles were evaluated using a murine model infected by C. albicans. The in vivo efficacies were assessed by mortality rates, fungal burden and histological examination. Overall survival rates were significantly increased while the colony counts and infectious foci were significantly decreased after treatment with the scFv-phages relative to the control groups. In order to investigate the immune response provoked by scFv-phages, three kinds of cytokines (Th1, Th2 and Th17 types) were measured and a clear immune response was observed. These findings suggest that anti-rSap2 scFv-phages have potential in the therapy of systemic infection caused by C. albicans. PMID:27558409

  15. An Optimized Lock Solution Containing Micafungin, Ethanol and Doxycycline Inhibits Candida albicans and Mixed C. albicans – Staphyloccoccus aureus Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Lown, Livia; Peters, Brian M.; Walraven, Carla J.; Noverr, Mairi C.; Lee, Samuel A.

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans is a major cause of catheter-related bloodstream infections and is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Due to the propensity of C. albicans to form drug-resistant biofilms, the current standard of care includes catheter removal; however, reinsertion may be technically challenging or risky. Prolonged exposure of an antifungal lock solution within the catheter in conjunction with systemic therapy has been experimentally attempted for catheter salvage. Previously, we demonstrated excellent in vitro activity of micafungin, ethanol, and high-dose doxycycline as single agents for prevention and treatment of C. albicans biofilms. Thus, we sought to investigate optimal combinations of micafungin, ethanol, and/or doxycycline as a lock solution. We performed two- and three-drug checkerboard assays to determine the in vitro activity of pairwise or three agents in combination for prevention or treatment of C. albicans biofilms. Optimal lock solutions were tested for activity against C. albicans clinical isolates, reference strains and polymicrobial C. albicans-S. aureus biofilms. A solution containing 20% (v/v) ethanol, 0.01565 μg/mL micafungin, and 800 μg/mL doxycycline demonstrated a reduction of 98% metabolic activity and no fungal regrowth when used to prevent fungal biofilm formation; however there was no advantage over 20% ethanol alone. This solution was also successful in inhibiting the regrowth of C. albicans from mature polymicrobial biofilms, although it was not fully bactericidal. Solutions containing 5% ethanol with low concentrations of micafungin and doxycycline demonstrated synergistic activity when used to prevent monomicrobial C. albicans biofilm formation. A combined solution of micafungin, ethanol and doxycycline is highly effective for the prevention of C. albicans biofilm formation but did not demonstrate an advantage over 20% ethanol alone in these studies. PMID:27428310

  16. An Optimized Lock Solution Containing Micafungin, Ethanol and Doxycycline Inhibits Candida albicans and Mixed C. albicans - Staphyloccoccus aureus Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Lown, Livia; Peters, Brian M; Walraven, Carla J; Noverr, Mairi C; Lee, Samuel A

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans is a major cause of catheter-related bloodstream infections and is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Due to the propensity of C. albicans to form drug-resistant biofilms, the current standard of care includes catheter removal; however, reinsertion may be technically challenging or risky. Prolonged exposure of an antifungal lock solution within the catheter in conjunction with systemic therapy has been experimentally attempted for catheter salvage. Previously, we demonstrated excellent in vitro activity of micafungin, ethanol, and high-dose doxycycline as single agents for prevention and treatment of C. albicans biofilms. Thus, we sought to investigate optimal combinations of micafungin, ethanol, and/or doxycycline as a lock solution. We performed two- and three-drug checkerboard assays to determine the in vitro activity of pairwise or three agents in combination for prevention or treatment of C. albicans biofilms. Optimal lock solutions were tested for activity against C. albicans clinical isolates, reference strains and polymicrobial C. albicans-S. aureus biofilms. A solution containing 20% (v/v) ethanol, 0.01565 μg/mL micafungin, and 800 μg/mL doxycycline demonstrated a reduction of 98% metabolic activity and no fungal regrowth when used to prevent fungal biofilm formation; however there was no advantage over 20% ethanol alone. This solution was also successful in inhibiting the regrowth of C. albicans from mature polymicrobial biofilms, although it was not fully bactericidal. Solutions containing 5% ethanol with low concentrations of micafungin and doxycycline demonstrated synergistic activity when used to prevent monomicrobial C. albicans biofilm formation. A combined solution of micafungin, ethanol and doxycycline is highly effective for the prevention of C. albicans biofilm formation but did not demonstrate an advantage over 20% ethanol alone in these studies. PMID:27428310

  17. Outbreak of bloodstream infections associated with multiuse dialyzers containing O-rings.

    PubMed

    Oyong, Kelsey; Marquez, Patricia; Terashita, Dawn; English, L'Tanya; Rivas, Hector; Deak, Eszter; Mascola, Laurene

    2014-01-01

    This report details an outbreak investigation conducted by the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health of 3 cases of bacterial infection among patients receiving hemodialysis who were treated at the same dialysis center in 2011. Improper disinfection of reusable dialyzers was hypothesized as the source of transmission. PMID:24334805

  18. Rare infection of implantable cardioverter-defibrillator lead with Candida albicans: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Nina Thakkar; Bray, Natasha; Wang, Hong; Zelnick, Kenneth; Osman, Ahmed; Vicuña, Ricardo

    2014-10-01

    Infection of implanted cardiac devices has a low rate of occurrence. Fungal infections of such devices represent an atypical phenomenon, associated with high mortality. Both medical and surgical therapies are recommended for a successful outcome. A 60-year-old woman with past medical history of heart failure with reduced ejection fraction, implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) placement, sarcoidosis and diabetes presented with fevers and atypical pleuritic chest pain. Transthoracic echocardiogram revealed a highly mobile 2.09 cm by 4.49 cm mass associated with the ICD wire. Blood cultures were positive for Candida albicans. The patient underwent sternotomy for removal. The vegetation was 4 cm by 2 cm by 2 cm in size, attached to the right ventricle without interference with the tricuspid valve. The patient was treated with micafungin for 2 weeks and then fluconazole for 6 weeks. In this case report, we describe the rare infection of an ICD lead with C. albicans, in the form of a fungal ball. This is the 18th reported case of Candida device-related endocarditis and the first reported in a woman. Prior case reports have occurred primarily in pacemaker rather than ICD leads. The vegetation size is also one of the largest that has been reported, measuring 4 cm at its greatest length. As Candida device-related endocarditis is so rare, and as fatality occurs in half of cases, clinical management can only be derived from sporadic case reports. Therefore, the course of this patient's disease care will be a useful adjunct to the current literature for determining treatment and prognosis in similar cases.

  19. A collaborative, systems-level approach to eliminating healthcare-associated MRSA, central-line-associated bloodstream infections, ventilator-associated pneumonia, and respiratory virus infections.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Donna M; Staiger, Thomas O; Peterson, Gene N; Sinanan, Mika N; Angiulo, Cindy L; Makarewicz, Vanessa A; Wild, Lorie M; Whimbey, Estella E

    2012-01-01

    To achieve sustainable reductions in healthcare-associated infections (HAIs), the University of Washington Medical Center (UWMC) deployed a collaborative, systems-level initiative. With the sponsorship of senior leadership, multidisciplinary teams were established to address healthcare-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), central-line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSI), ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), and respiratory virus infections. The goal of the initiative was to eliminate these four HAIs among medical center inpatients by 2012. In the first 24 months of the project, the number of healthcare-associated MRSA cases decreased 58%; CLABSI cases decreased 54%. Staff and provider compliance with infection prevention measures improved and remained strong, for example, 96% compliance with hand hygiene, 98% compliance with the recommended influenza vaccination program, and 100% compliance with the VAP bundle. Achieving these results required an array of coordinated, systems-level interventions. Critical project success factors were believed to include creating organizational alignment by declaring eliminating HAIs as an organizational breakthrough goal, having the organization's executive leadership highly engaged in the project, coordination by an experienced and effective project leader and manager, collaboration by multidisciplinary project teams, and promoting transparency of results across the organization.

  20. Antifungal susceptibility of invasive Candida bloodstream isolates from the Asia-Pacific region.

    PubMed

    Tan, Thean Yen; Hsu, Li Yang; Alejandria, Marissa M; Chaiwarith, Romanee; Chinniah, Terrence; Chayakulkeeree, Methee; Choudhury, Saugata; Chen, Yen Hsu; Shin, Jong Hee; Kiratisin, Pattarachai; Mendoza, Myrna; Prabhu, Kavitha; Supparatpinyo, Khuanchai; Tan, Ai Ling; Phan, Xuan Thi; Tran, Thi Thanh Nga; Nguyen, Gia Binh; Doan, Mai Phuong; Huynh, Van An; Nguyen, Su Minh Tuyet; Tran, Thanh Binh; Van Pham, Hung

    2016-07-01

    Bloodstream infections caused by Candida species are of increasing importance and associated with significant mortality. We performed a multi-centre prospective observational study to identify the species and antifungal susceptibilities of invasive bloodstream isolates of Candida species in the Asia-Pacific region. The study was carried out over a two year period, involving 13 centers from Brunei, Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan, Thailand, and Vietnam. Identification of Candida species was performed at each study center, and reconfirmed at a central laboratory. Susceptibility testing was performed using a commercial broth dilution panel (Sensititre YeastOne YST-010, Thermofisher, United Kingdom) with susceptibility categorisation (S = susceptible, S-DD = susceptible dose-dependent) applied using breakpoints from the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute. Eight hundred and sixty-one Candida isolates were included in the study. The most common species were C. albicans (35.9%), C. tropicalis (30.7%), C. parapsilosis (15.7%), and C. glabrata (13.6%). Non-albicans species exceeded C. albicans species in centers from all countries except Taiwan. Fluconazole susceptibility was almost universal for C. albicans (S = 99.7%) but lower for C. tropicalis (S = 75.8%, S-DD = 6.1%), C. glabrata (S-DD = 94.9%), and C. parapsilosis (S = 94.8%). Echinocandins demonstrated high rates of in vitro susceptibility (S>99%) against C. albicans, C. tropicalis, and C. parapsilosis This study demonstrates that non-albicans species are the most common isolates from bloodstream infections in most countries in the Asia-Pacific region, with C. tropicalis as the predominant species. Because of the prevalence of reduced susceptibility to fluconazole in non-albicans species, the study indicates that echinocandins should be the antifungal of choice in clinically unstable or high-risk patients with documented candidemia.

  1. Candida albicans Shaving to Profile Human Serum Proteins on Hyphal Surface

    PubMed Central

    Marín, Elvira; Parra-Giraldo, Claudia M.; Hernández-Haro, Carolina; Hernáez, María L.; Nombela, César; Monteoliva, Lucía; Gil, Concha

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is a human opportunistic fungus and it is responsible for a wide variety of infections, either superficial or systemic. C. albicans is a polymorphic fungus and its ability to switch between yeast and hyphae is essential for its virulence. Once C. albicans obtains access to the human body, the host serum constitutes a complex environment of interaction with C. albicans cell surface in bloodstream. To draw a comprehensive picture of this relevant step in host-pathogen interaction during invasive candidiasis, we have optimized a gel-free shaving proteomic strategy to identify both, human serum proteins coating C. albicans cells and fungi surface proteins simultaneously. This approach was carried out with normal serum (NS) and heat inactivated serum (HIS). We identified 214 human and 372 C. albicans unique proteins. Proteins identified in C. albicans included 147 which were described as located at the cell surface and 52 that were described as immunogenic. Interestingly, among these C. albicans proteins, we identified 23 GPI-anchored proteins, Gpd2 and Pra1, which are involved in complement system evasion and 7 other proteins that are able to attach plasminogen to C. albicans surface (Adh1, Eno1, Fba1, Pgk1, Tdh3, Tef1, and Tsa1). Furthermore, 12 proteins identified at the C. albicans hyphae surface induced with 10% human serum were not detected in other hypha-induced conditions. The most abundant human proteins identified are involved in complement and coagulation pathways. Remarkably, with this strategy, all main proteins belonging to complement cascades were identified on the C. albicans surface. Moreover, we identified immunoglobulins, cytoskeletal proteins, metabolic proteins such as apolipoproteins and others. Additionally, we identified more inhibitors of complement and coagulation pathways, some of them serpin proteins (serine protease inhibitors), in HIS vs. NS. On the other hand, we detected a higher amount of C3 at the C. albicans surface in

  2. Detection of Different Bovine Papillomavirus Types and Co-infection in Bloodstream of Cattle.

    PubMed

    Santos, E U D; Silva, M A R; Pontes, N E; Coutinho, L C A; Paiva, S S L; Castro, R S; Freitas, A C

    2016-02-01

    Bovine papillomavirus (BPV) is a diverse group of double-stranded DNA oncogenic viruses. BPVs are classically described as epitheliotropic, however, they have been detected in body fluids, such as blood and semen. The presence of BPV in these sites can have implications for the dissemination of BPV. The aim of this study was to verify the prevalence of BPV types in cattle blood. A total of 57 blood samples were analyzed by PCR using BPV type-specific primers to BPVs 1-6 and 8-10, and subsequent sequencing. Sequencing quality was determined using Staden package with Phred 20. Similarity analysis was performed with BioEdit and BLAST programs to assess the identity with known BPV types. Statistical analysis was performed by Fisher's exact test. The results showed seven different types of BPVs in the blood, with the exception of BPV 5 and 9. This is the first study that demonstrates BPVs 3, 6, 8 and 10 DNA in cattle blood. BPVs 1 and 2 were the viral types most frequent in blood, while BPVs 4 and 10 were the least frequent types. All the samples showed co-infection by at least two BPV types. These data suggest that several BPV types may infect blood cells at the same time and demonstrate the possibility that the BPV infection in non-epithelial tissue can occur without restriction to one or two viral types. These results can contribute to future studies aimed at the control and prevention of papillomaviruses.

  3. Central venous catheter-associated bloodstream infections occurring in Canadian intensive care units: A six-month cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Holton, Donna; Paton, Shirley; Conly, John; Embree, Joanne; Taylor, Geoffrey; Thompson, William

    2006-01-01

    Objective To determine the rate and risk factors associated with central venous catheter (CVC)-associated bloodstream infections (BSIs) in Canadian intensive care units (ICUs). Design A prospective, active six-month cohort with a nested case-control study. Setting Forty-one ICUs located in 19 Canadian hospitals. Methods Data were collected using a standardized format on all CVCs and patients when a CVC was inserted for more than 48 h. Results of microbiological studies and therapeutic interventions were recorded when a BSI occurred. Results There were 182 BSIs from 3696 CVC insertions in 2531 patients. Coagulase-negative staphylococci were responsible for 73% of the BSIs. Mean rates of CVC-associated BSIs per 1000 CVC days were 6.9, 6.8 and 5.0 in adult, neonatal and pediatric ICUs, respectively. Significant factors associated with BSI included duration of CVC insertion (OR=1.2, 95% CI 1.1 to 1.3), receiving total parenteral nutrition (OR=4.1, 95% CI 1.2 to 14.3) and having one or more CVCs (OR=3.1, 95% CI 1.5 to 6.5). In the case-control study, 80% of the variance in a backward elimination logistic regression analysis was explained by duration of CVC insertion (OR=1.2 per day), receiving chemotherapy (OR=6.1), more than one CVC insertion during the study (OR=3.5), insertion of a CVC with two or more lumens (OR=2.3), using the CVC to administer total parenteral nutrition (OR=1.6) and having a surgical wound other than a clean wound (OR=1.6). Conclusion The present study identified risk factors explaining 80% of the variance associated with BSIs and is one of the largest reports on the rate of CVC-associated BSIs occurring in the ICU setting. PMID:18418495

  4. Controlled clinical comparison of Isolator and BACTEC 9240 Aerobic/F resin bottle for detection of bloodstream infections.

    PubMed Central

    Pohlman, J K; Kirkley, B A; Easley, K A; Washington, J A

    1995-01-01

    A controlled clinical comparison was carried out with the BACTEC 9240 Aerobic/F resin bottle and the Isolator system with adult patients suspected of having bloodstream infections. A total of 10,500 paired specimens were collected, of which 1,122 from 520 patients were positive. There were 68 false-positive BACTEC bottles; 259 positive cultures that were excluded from analysis because the bottle, the Isolator, or both failed to meet the minimum volume criterion of 8 ml of blood; and 207 positive cultures that were excluded because the isolates were found to be clinically insignificant or of indeterminate clinical significance on the basis of patient assessment. A total of 656 positive cultures from 258 patients formed the basis of the analysis. Significantly more Staphylococcus aureus isolates (P = 0.03), Staphylococcus epidermidis isolates (P = 0.03), members of the family Enterobacteriaceae (P = 0.03), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates (P = 0.04) were recovered from the resin bottle, and there was no category of organism that was recovered significantly more frequently from the Isolator system. With patients receiving antibiotics at the time of blood culture, S. aureus, S. epidermidis, and gram-negative bacilli were recovered significantly more frequently from the resin bottle. No significant differences between systems were found with cultures from patients not receiving antibiotics at the time of blood culture. Only 12 clinically significant organisms were recovered from the bottle on terminal subcultures, and only 1 of these had not been previously isolated from another blood culture set (10 of the 12) or from the companion Isolator (1 of 12).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8567877

  5. The Likelihood of Hospital Readmission among Patients with Hospital-Onset Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infections

    PubMed Central

    Khong, Carolyn; Baggs, James; Kleinbaum, David; Cochran, Ronda; Jernigan, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective We sought to determine whether central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSI) increase the likelihood of readmission. Design Retrospective matched cohort study for the years 2008–2009. Setting Acute care hospitals. Participants Medicare recipients. CLABSI and readmission status were determined by linking National Healthcare Safety Network surveillance data to the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services’ Medical Provider and Analysis Review in eight states. Frequency matching was used on ICD-9-CM procedure code category and intensive care unit status. Methods We compared the rate of readmission among patients with and without CLABSI during an index hospitalization. Cox proportional hazard analysis was used to assess rate of readmission (the first hospitalization within 30 days post-index discharge). Multivariate models included the following covariates: race, sex, length of index hospitalization stay central line procedure code, GAGNE co-morbidity score, and individual chronic conditions. Results Of the 8,097 patients, 2,260 were readmitted within 30 days (27.9%). The rate of first readmission was 7.1 events/person-year (PY) for CLABSI patients and 4.3 events/PY for non-CLABSI patients (p <0.001). The final model revealed a small but significant increase in the rate of 30 day readmissions for patients with a CLABSI compared to similar non-CLABSI patients. In the first readmission for CLABSI patients, we also observed an increase in diagnostic categories consistent with CLABSI including septicemia and complications of a device. Conclusions Our analysis found a statistically significant association between CLABSI status and readmission, suggesting that CLABSI may have adverse health impact that extends beyond hospital discharge. PMID:25990620

  6. Nosocomial bloodstream infections in Brazilian hospitals: analysis of 2,563 cases from a prospective nationwide surveillance study.

    PubMed

    Marra, Alexandre R; Camargo, Luis Fernando Aranha; Pignatari, Antonio Carlos Campos; Sukiennik, Teresa; Behar, Paulo Renato Petersen; Medeiros, Eduardo Alexandrino Servolo; Ribeiro, Julival; Girão, Evelyne; Correa, Luci; Guerra, Carla; Brites, Carlos; Pereira, Carlos Alberto Pires; Carneiro, Irna; Reis, Marise; de Souza, Marta Antunes; Tranchesi, Regina; Barata, Cristina U; Edmond, Michael B

    2011-05-01

    Nosocomial bloodstream infections (nBSIs) are an important cause of morbidity and mortality. Data from a nationwide, concurrent surveillance study, Brazilian SCOPE (Surveillance and Control of Pathogens of Epidemiological Importance), were used to examine the epidemiology and microbiology of nBSIs at 16 Brazilian hospitals. In our study 2,563 patients with nBSIs were included from 12 June 2007 to 31 March 2010. Ninety-five percent of BSIs were monomicrobial. Gram-negative organisms caused 58.5% of these BSIs, Gram-positive organisms caused 35.4%, and fungi caused 6.1%. The most common pathogens (monomicrobial) were Staphylococcus aureus (14.0%), coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) (12.6%), Klebsiella spp. (12.0%), and Acinetobacter spp. (11.4%). The crude mortality was 40.0%. Forty-nine percent of nBSIs occurred in the intensive-care unit (ICU). The most frequent underlying conditions were malignancy, in 622 patients (24.3%). Among the potential factors predisposing patients to BSI, central venous catheters were the most frequent (70.3%). Methicillin resistance was detected in 157 S. aureus isolates (43.7%). Of the Klebsiella sp. isolates, 54.9% were resistant to third-generation cephalosporins. Of the Acinetobacter spp. and Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates, 55.9% and 36.8%, respectively, were resistant to imipenem. In our multicenter study, we found high crude mortality and a high proportion of nBSIs due to antibiotic-resistant organisms. PMID:21411591

  7. Risk factors for late-onset health care-associated bloodstream infections in patients in neonatal intensive care units

    PubMed Central

    Perlman, Sharon E.; Saiman, Lisa; Larson, Elaine L.

    2007-01-01

    Background There are few data comparing risk factors for catheter-related (CR) versus non-CR bloodstream infection (BSI) or for BSI caused by gram-positive versus gram-negative organisms. The aims of this study were to compare risk factors for CR versus non-CR BSI and to compare risk factors for BSI associated with gram-negative versus gram-positive organisms among infants hospitalized in two neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). Methods Data were collected prospectively over a 2-year period to assess risk factors among 2,935 neonates from two NICUs. Results Among all neonates, in addition to low birth weight and presence of a central venous catheter, hospitalization in NICU 1 (relative risk [RR]: 1.60, 95% confidence intervals [CI]: 1.14, 2.24) was a significant predictor of BSI. In neonates with a central catheter total parenteral nutrition (TPN) was a significant risk factor for BSI (RR: 4.69, 95% CI: 2.22, 9.87). Ventilator use was a significant risk factor for CR versus non-CR BSI (RR: 3.74, 95% CI: 1.87, 7.48), and significantly more CR BSI were caused by gram-positive (77.1%) than by gram-negative organisms (61.4%), P = .03. Conclusions This study confirmed that central venous catheters and low birth weight were risk factors for neonates with late-onset healthcare-associated BSI and further elucidated the potential risks associated with TPN and ventilator use in subgroups of neonates with BSI. Additional studies are needed to examine the incremental risk of TPN among infants with central venous catheters and to understand the link between CR BSI and ventilator use. Preventive strategies for BSI in neonates in NICUs should continue to focus on limiting the use of invasive devices. PMID:17433941

  8. Impact of Inadequate Empirical Therapy on the Mortality of Patients with Bloodstream Infections: a Propensity Score-Based Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Retamar, Pilar; Portillo, María M.; López-Prieto, María Dolores; Rodríguez-López, Fernando; de Cueto, Marina; García, María V.; Gómez, María J.; del Arco, Alfonso; Muñoz, Angel; Sánchez-Porto, Antonio; Torres-Tortosa, Manuel; Martín-Aspas, Andrés; Arroyo, Ascensión; García-Figueras, Carolina; Acosta, Federico; Corzo, Juan E.; León-Ruiz, Laura; Escobar-Lara, Trinidad

    2012-01-01

    The impact of the adequacy of empirical therapy on outcome for patients with bloodstream infections (BSI) is key for determining whether adequate empirical coverage should be prioritized over other, more conservative approaches. Recent systematic reviews outlined the need for new studies in the field, using improved methodologies. We assessed the impact of inadequate empirical treatment on the mortality of patients with BSI in the present-day context, incorporating recent methodological recommendations. A prospective multicenter cohort including all BSI episodes in adult patients was performed in 15 hospitals in Andalucía, Spain, over a 2-month period in 2006 to 2007. The main outcome variables were 14- and 30-day mortality. Adjusted analyses were performed by multivariate analysis and propensity score-based matching. Eight hundred one episodes were included. Inadequate empirical therapy was administered in 199 (24.8%) episodes; mortality at days 14 and 30 was 18.55% and 22.6%, respectively. After controlling for age, Charlson index, Pitt score, neutropenia, source, etiology, and presentation with severe sepsis or shock, inadequate empirical treatment was associated with increased mortality at days 14 and 30 (odds ratios [ORs], 2.12 and 1.56; 95% confidence intervals [95% CI], 1.34 to 3.34 and 1.01 to 2.40, respectively). The adjusted ORs after a propensity score-based matched analysis were 3.03 and 1.70 (95% CI, 1.60 to 5.74 and 0.98 to 2.98, respectively). In conclusion, inadequate empirical therapy is independently associated with increased mortality in patients with BSI. Programs to improve the quality of empirical therapy in patients with suspicion of BSI and optimization of definitive therapy should be implemented. PMID:22005999

  9. A Central Line Care Maintenance Bundle for the Prevention of Catheter-Associated Bloodstream Infection in Non-ICU Settings

    PubMed Central

    O'Neil, Caroline; Ball, Kelly; Wood, Helen; McMullen, Kathleen; Kremer, Pamala; Jafarzadeh, S. Reza; Fraser, Victoria; Warren, David

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate a central line care maintenance bundle to reduce central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) in non-ICU settings. Design Before-after trial with 12 month follow-up period. Setting 1250-bed teaching hospital. Participants Patients with central lines on eight general medicine wards. Four wards received the intervention and four served as controls. Intervention A multifaceted catheter care maintenance bundle consisting of educational programs for nurses, update of hospital policies, visual aids, a competency assessment, process monitoring, regular progress reports, and consolidation of supplies necessary for catheter maintenance. Results Data were collected for 25,542 catheter-days including 43 CLABSI (rate = 1.68 per 1,000 CL-days) and 4,012 catheter dressing observations. Following the intervention, a 2.5% monthly decrease in the CLABSI incidence density was observed on intervention floors, but this was not statistically significant (95% confidence interval (CI); −5.3 – 0.4). On control floors, there was a smaller, but marginally significant decrease in CLABSI incidence during the study (change in monthly rate = −1.1%; 95% CI, −2.1 - −0.1). Implementation of the bundle was associated with improvement in catheter dressing compliance on intervention wards (78.8% compliance pre-intervention vs. 87.9% during intervention/follow-up; p<0.001) but improvement was also observed on control wards (84.9% compliance pre-intervention vs. 90.9% during intervention/follow-up; P = .001). Conclusions A multi-faceted program to improve catheter care was associated with improvement in catheter dressing care, but no change in CLABSI rates. Additional study is needed to determine strategies to prevent CLABSI in non-ICU patients. PMID:26999746

  10. Evaluating State-Specific Antibiotic Resistance Measures Derived from Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infections, National Healthcare Safety Network, 2011

    PubMed Central

    Soe, Minn M.; Edwards, Jonathan R.; Sievert, Dawn M.; Ricks, Philip M.; Magill, Shelley S.; Fridkin, Scott K.

    2015-01-01

    DISCLOSURE The findings and conclusions in this report are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official position of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention or the Agency for Toxic Substances and Diseases Registry. OBJECTIVE Describe the impact of standardizing state-specific summary measures of antibiotic resistance that inform regional interventions to reduce transmission of resistant pathogens in healthcare settings. DESIGN Analysis of public health surveillance data. METHODS Central line–associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) data from intensive care units (ICUs) of facilities reporting to the National Healthcare Safety Network in 2011 were analyzed. For CLABSI due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), extended-spectrum cephalosporin (ESC)-nonsusceptible Klebsiella species, and carbapenem-nonsusceptible Klebsiella species, we computed 3 state-level summary measures of nonsusceptibility: crude percent nonsusceptible, model-based adjusted percent nonsusceptible, and crude infection incidence rate. RESULTS Overall, 1,791 facilities reported CLABSIs from ICU patients. Of 1,618 S. aureus CLABSIs with methicillin-susceptibility test results, 791 (48.9%) were due to MRSA. Of 756 Klebsiella CLABSIs with ESC-susceptibility test results, 209 (27.7%) were due to ESC-nonsusceptible Klebsiella, and among 661 Klebsiella CLABSI with carbapenem susceptibility test results, 70 (10.6%) were due to carbapenem-nonsusceptible Klebsiella. All 3 state-specific measures demonstrated variability in magnitude by state. Adjusted measures, with few exceptions, were not appreciably different from crude values for any phenotypes. When linking values of crude and adjusted percent nonsusceptible by state, a state’s absolute rank shifted slightly for MRSA in 5 instances and only once each for ESC-nonsusceptible and carbapenem-nonsusceptible Klebsiella species. Infection incidence measures correlated strongly with both percent

  11. Characterization and Clinical Impact of Bloodstream Infection Caused by Carbapenemase-Producing Enterobacteriaceae in Seven Latin American Countries

    PubMed Central

    Villegas, Maria Virginia; Pallares, Christian J.; Hernández-Gómez, Cristhian; Correa, Adriana; Álvarez, Carlos; Rosso, Fernando; Matta, Lorena; Luna, Carlos; Zurita, Jeannete; Mejía-Villatoro, Carlos; Rodríguez-Noriega, Eduardo; Seas, Carlos; Cortesía, Manuel; Guzmán-Suárez, Alfonso; Guzmán-Blanco, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Infections caused by carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae are a public health problem associated with higher mortality rates, longer hospitalization and increased healthcare costs. We carried out a study to describe the characteristics of patients with carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE) and non-CPE bloodstream infection (BSI) from Latin American hospitals and to determine the clinical impact in terms of mortality and antibiotic therapy. Methods Between July 2013 and November 2014, we conducted a multicenter observational study in 11 hospitals from 7 Latin American countries (Argentina, Colombia, Ecuador, Guatemala, Mexico, Peru, Venezuela). Patients with BSI caused by Enterobacteriaceae were included and classified either as CPE or non-CPE based on detection of blaKPC, blaVIM, blaIMP, blaNDM and blaOXA-48 by polymerase chain reaction. Enrolled subjects were followed until discharge or death. Demographic, microbiological and clinical characteristics were collected from medical records. Both descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyze the information. Results A total of 255 patients with Enterobacteriaceae BSI were included; CPE were identified in 53 of them. In vitro non-susceptibility to all screened antibiotics was higher in the patients with CPE BSI, remaining colistin, tigecycline and amikacin as the most active drugs. Combination therapy was significantly more frequent in the CPE BSI group (p < 0.001). The most common regimen was carbapenem + colistin or polymyxin B. The overall mortality was 37% (94/255). Overall and attributable mortality were significantly higher in patients with CPE BSI (p < 0.001); however, we found that patients with CPE BSI who received combination therapy and those who received monotherapy had similar mortality. After multivariate adjustment, CPE BSI (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 4; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.7–9.5; p = 0.002) and critical illness (aOR 6.5; 95% CI 3.1–13.7; p < 0

  12. Evaluation of clinical outcomes in patients with Gram-negative bloodstream infections according to cefepime MIC.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Nathaniel J; Liu, Jiajun; McLaughlin, Milena M; Qi, Chao; Scheetz, Marc H

    2015-06-01

    Predicted and observed failures at higher cefepime MICs have prompted the Clinical and Laboratories Standards Institute (CLSI) to lower the susceptible breakpoint for Enterobacteriaceae to ≤2mg/L, with dose-dependent susceptibility at 4-8mg/L, while the susceptibility breakpoint for nonfermentative organisms remain unchanged at ≥8mg/L. The contribution of increasing cefepime MIC to mortality risk in the setting of aggressive cefepime dosing is not well defined. Patients who were treated with cefepime for Gram-negative blood stream infections (GNBSIs), including both Enterobacteriaceae and nonfermentative organisms, were screened for inclusion in this retrospective cohort study. Demographic and microbiologic variables were collected, including pathogen, cefepime MIC, dosage, and interval. The objective was to define a risk-adjusted mortality breakpoint for cefepime MICs. Secondarily, we looked at time to death and length of stay (LOS) postculture. Ninety-one patients were included in the analysis. Overall, 19 patients died and 72 survived. Classification and Regression Tree analysis identified an inhospital mortality breakpoint at a cefepime MIC between 2 and 4mg/L for patients with a modified Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score ≤16.5 (4.2% versus 25%, respectively). Multivariate logistic regression revealed increased odds of mortality at a cefepime MIC of 4mg/L (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 6.47; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.25-33.4) and 64mg/L (aOR 6.54, 95% CI 1.03-41.4). Those with cefepime MICs ≥4mg/L experienced a greater median intensive care unit LOS for survivors (16 versus 2days; P=0.026). Increasing cefepime MIC appears to predict inhospital mortality among patients who received aggressive doses of cefepime for GNBSIs, supporting a clinical breakpoint MIC of 2mg/L.

  13. Multiplex PCR Allows Rapid and Accurate Diagnosis of Bloodstream Infections in Newborns and Children with Suspected Sepsis▿†§

    PubMed Central

    Lucignano, Barbara; Ranno, Stefania; Liesenfeld, Oliver; Pizzorno, Beatrice; Putignani, Lorenza; Bernaschi, Paola; Menichella, Donato

    2011-01-01

    Sepsis is a major health problem in newborns and children. Early detection of pathogens allows initiation of appropriate antimicrobial therapy that strongly correlates with positive outcomes. Multiplex PCR has the potential to rapidly identify bloodstream infections, compensating for the loss of blood culture sensitivity. In an Italian pediatric hospital, multiplex PCR (the LightCycler SeptiFast test) was compared to routine blood culture with 1,673 samples obtained from 803 children with suspected sepsis; clinical and laboratory information was used to determine the patient infection status. Excluding results attributable to contaminants, SeptiFast showed a sensitivity of 85.0% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 78.7 to 89.7%) and a specificity of 93.5% (95% CI = 92.1 to 94.7%) compared to blood culture. The rate of positive results was significantly higher with SeptiFast (14.6%) than blood culture (10.3%) (P < 0.0001), and the overall positivity rate was 16.1% when the results of both tests were combined. Staphylococcus aureus (11.6%), coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) (29.6%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (16.5%), and Klebsiella spp. (10.1%) were the most frequently detected. SeptiFast identified 97 additional isolates that blood culture failed to detect (24.7% P. aeruginosa, 23.7% CoNS, 14.4% Klebsiella spp., 14.4% Candida spp.). Among specimens taken from patients receiving antibiotic therapy, we also observed a significantly higher rate of positivity of SeptiFast than blood culture (14.1% versus 6.5%, respectively; P < 0.0001). On the contrary, contaminants were significantly more frequent among blood cultures than SeptiFast (n = 97 [5.8%] versus n = 26 [1.6%]), respectively; P < 0.0001). SeptiFast served as a highly valuable adjunct to conventional blood culture in children, adding diagnostic value and shortening the time to result (TTR) to 6 h. PMID:21471340

  14. Prevalence of Resistant Gram-Negative Bacilli in Bloodstream Infection in Febrile Neutropenia Patients Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ling; Wang, Ying; Fan, Xing; Tang, Wei; Hu, Jiong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Bloodstream infection (BSI) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). To evaluate the causative bacteria and identify risk factors for BSI associated mortality in febrile neutropenia patients undergoing HSCT, we collected the clinical and microbiological data from patients underwent HSCT between 2008 and 2014 and performed a retrospective analysis. Throughout the study period, among 348 episodes of neutropenic fever in patients underwent HSCT, 89 episodes in 85 patients had microbiological defined BSI with a total of 108 isolates. Gram-negative bacteria (GNB) were the most common isolates (76, 70.3%) followed by gram-positive bacteria (GPB, 29, 26.9%) and fungus (3, 2.8%). As to the drug resistance, 26 multiple drug resistance (MDR) isolates were identified. Resistant isolates (n = 23) were more common documented in GNB, mostly Escherichia coli (9/36, 25%) and Klebsiella pneumonia (6/24, 25%). A total of 12 isolated were resistant to carbapenem including 4 K pneumoniae (4/24, 16.7%), 3 Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, and 1 Pseudomonas aeruginosa and other 4 GNB isolates (Citrobacter freumdii, Pseudomonas stutzeri, Acinetobacter baumanii, and Chryseobacterium indologenes). As to the GPB, only 3 resistant isolates were documented including 2 methicillin-resistant isolates (Staphylococcus hominis and Arcanobacterium hemolysis) and 1 vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium. Among these 85 patients with documented BSI, 11 patients died of BSI as primary or associated cause with a BSI-related mortality of 13.1 ± 3.7% and 90-day overall survival after transplantation at 80.0 ± 4.3%. Patients with high-risk disease undergoing allo-HSCT, prolonged neutropenia (≥15 days) and infection with carbapenem-resistant GNB were associated with BSI associated mortality in univariate and multivariate analyses. Our report revealed a prevalence of GNB in BSI of neutropenic patients

  15. Defining Clinical Exposures of Cefepime for Gram-Negative Bloodstream Infections That Are Associated with Improved Survival.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Nathaniel J; Kuti, Joseph L; Nicolau, David P; Van Wart, Scott; Nicasio, Anthony M; Liu, Jiajun; Lee, Benjamin J; Neely, Michael N; Scheetz, Marc H

    2016-03-01

    The percentage of time that free drug concentrations remain above the MIC (fT>MIC) that is necessary to prevent mortality among cefepime-treated patients with Gram-negative bloodstream infections (GNBSI) is poorly defined. We conducted a retrospective study of adult patients with GNBSI. Eligible cases were frequency matched to ensure categorical representation from all MICs. Organism, MIC, infection source, gender, age, serum creatinine, weight, antibiotic history, and modified APACHE II score were collected from hospital records. Two population pharmacokinetic models (models 1 and 2) were used to impute exposures over the first 24 h in each patient from mean model parameters, covariates, and dosing history. From the imputed exposures, survival thresholds for fT>MIC were identified using classification and regression tree (CART) analysis and analyzed as nominal variables for univariate and multivariate regressions. A total of 180 patients were included in the analysis, of whom 13.9% died and 86.1% survived. Many patients (46.7% [n = 84/180]) received combination therapy with cefepime. Survivors had higher mean (standard deviation [SD]) fT>MIC than those who died (model 1, 74.2% [29.6%] versus 52.1% [33.8%], P < 0.001; model 2, 85.9% [24.0%] versus 64.4% [31.4%], P < 0.001). CART identified fT>MIC threshold values for greater survival according to models 1 and 2 at >68% and >74%, respectively. Survival was improved for those with fT>MIC of >68% (model 1 adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 7.12; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.90 to 26.7; P = 0.004) and >74% (model 2 aOR, 6.48; 95% CI, 1.90 to 22.1) after controlling for clinical covariates. Similarly, each 1% increase in cefepime fT>MIC resulted in a 2% improvement in multivariate survival probability (P = 0.015). Achieving a cefepime fT>MIC of 68 to 74% was associated with a higher odds of survival for patients with GNBSI. Regimens targeting this exposure should be aggressively pursued. PMID:26666929

  16. Contribution of the BacT/Alert MB Mycobacterium Bottle to Bloodstream Infection Surveillance in Thailand: Added Yield for Burkholderia pseudomallei

    PubMed Central

    Higdon, Melissa; Kaewpan, Anek; Makprasert, Sirirat; Yuenprakhon, Somkhit; Tawisaid, Kittisak; Dejsirilert, Surang; Whistler, Toni; Baggett, Henry C.

    2015-01-01

    Community-acquired bloodstream infections cause substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide, but microbiology capacity and surveillance limitations have challenged good descriptions of pathogen distribution in many regions, including Southeast Asia. Active surveillance for bloodstream infections has been conducted in two rural Thailand provinces for >7 years. Blood specimens were divided into two culture bottles, one optimized for aerobic growth (F bottle) and a second for enhanced growth of mycobacteria (MB bottle), and processed with the BactT/Alert 3D system. Because the routine use of MB culture bottles is resource intensive (expensive and requires prolonged incubation), we assessed the added yield of MB bottles by comparing the proportion of pathogens detected by MB versus that by F bottles from 2005 to 2012. Of 63,066 blood cultures, 7,296 (12%) were positive for at least one pathogen; the most common pathogens were Escherichia coli (28%), Burkholderia pseudomallei (11%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (9%), and Staphylococcus aureus (6%). Two bottles improved the yield overall, but the added yield attributable to the MB bottles was limited to a few pathogens. In addition to the detection of mycobacteria and some fungi, MB bottles improved the detection of B. pseudomallei (27% [MB] versus 8% [F]; P < 0.0001), with added benefit if therapy was initiated prior to the blood culture. The targeted use of MB bottles is warranted for patients at risk for mycobacterial and fungal infections and for infection with B. pseudomallei, a common cause of septicemia in Thailand. PMID:25588650

  17. Biomarkers and Molecular Analysis to Improve Bloodstream Infection Diagnostics in an Emergency Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Loonen, Anne J. M.; de Jager, Cornelis P. C.; Tosserams, Janna; Kusters, Ron; Hilbink, Mirrian; Wever, Peter C.; van den Brule, Adriaan J. C.

    2014-01-01

    Molecular pathogen detection from blood is still expensive and the exact clinical value remains to be determined. The use of biomarkers may assist in preselecting patients for immediate molecular testing besides blood culture. In this study, 140 patients with ≥ 2 SIRS criteria and clinical signs of infection presenting at the emergency department of our hospital were included. C-reactive protein (CRP), neutrophil-lymphocyte count ratio (NLCR), procalcitonin (PCT) and soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) levels were determined. One ml EDTA blood was obtained and selective pathogen DNA isolation was performed with MolYsis (Molzym). DNA samples were analysed for the presence of pathogens, using both the MagicPlex Sepsis Test (Seegene) and SepsiTest (Molzym), and results were compared to blood cultures. Fifteen patients had to be excluded from the study, leaving 125 patients for further analysis. Of the 125 patient samples analysed, 27 presented with positive blood cultures of which 7 were considered to be contaminants. suPAR, PCT, and NLCR values were significantly higher in patients with positive blood cultures compared to patients without (p < 0.001). Receiver operating characteristic curves of the 4 biomarkers for differentiating bacteremia from non-bacteremia showed the highest area under the curve (AUC) for PCT (0.806 (95% confidence interval 0.699–0.913)). NLCR, suPAR and CRP resulted in an AUC of 0.770, 0.793, and 0.485, respectively. When compared to blood cultures, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) for SepsiTest and MagicPlex Sepsis Test were 11%, 96%, 43%, 80%, and 37%, 77%, 30%, 82%, respectively. In conclusion, both molecular assays perform poorly when one ml whole blood is used from emergency care unit patients. NLCR is a cheap, fast, easy to determine, and rapidly available biomarker, and therefore seems most promising in differentiating BSI from non-BSI patients for

  18. Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infections among patients undergoing electroconvulsive therapy traced to breaks in infection control and possible extrinsic contamination by propofol.

    PubMed

    Kuehnert, M J; Webb, R M; Jochimsen, E M; Hancock, G A; Arduino, M J; Hand, S; Currier, M; Jarvis, W R

    1997-08-01

    Infectious complications associated with electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) are extremely unusual. When five of nine patients undergoing ECT at one facility on June 20, 1996 developed Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection (BSI), an investigation was initiated. A retrospective cohort study, a procedure review, and observational and microbiologic studies were performed. A case was defined as any patient who had ECT at Facility A from June 1, 1995 through June 20, 1996 and developed S. aureus BSI <30 days after ECT. The post-ECT S. aureus BSI rate was significantly greater on the epidemic day than the pre-epidemic period, (i.e., June 1, 1995 through June 19, 1996) (5 of 9 vs 0 of 54 patients, P < 0.001). All patients during the study period received propofol before ECT. Case patients were more likely than noncase patients to have higher maximum temperature after ECT (median 103.9 degrees F vs 100.0 degrees F, P < 0.03) and a greater time from preparation of intravenous medications to infusion (median 2.1 vs 1.1 h, P = 0.01). All case-patient S. aureus isolates were indistinguishable by pulsed field gel electrophoresis. Our investigation suggests that the ECT-associated S. aureus BSIs were associated with infection control breaks, which possibly led to the extrinsic contamination of propofol. Prevention of propofol-associated infectious complications requires aseptic preparation and use immediately before infusion.

  19. Antifungal Susceptibility in Serum and Virulence Determinants of Candida Bloodstream Isolates from Hong Kong

    PubMed Central

    Seneviratne, Chaminda J.; Rajan, Suhasini; Wong, Sarah S. W.; Tsang, Dominic N. C.; Lai, Christopher K. C.; Samaranayake, Lakshman P.; Jin, Lijian

    2016-01-01

    Candida bloodstream infections (CBI) are one of the most common nosocomial infections globally, and they account for a high mortality rate. The increasing global prevalence of drug-resistant Candida strains has also been posing a challenge to clinicians. In this study, we comprehensively evaluated the biofilm formation and production of hemolysin and proteinase of 63 CBI isolates derived from a hospital setting in Hong Kong as well as their antifungal susceptibility both in the presence and in the absence of human serum, using standard methodology. Candida albicans was the predominant species among the 63 CBI isolates collected, and non-albicans Candida species accounted for approximately one third of the isolates (36.5%). Of them, Candida tropicalis was the most common non-albicans Candida species. A high proportion (31.7%) of the CBI isolates (40% of C. albicans isolates, 10% of C. tropicalis isolates, 11% of C. parapsilosis isolates, and 100% of C. glabrata isolates) were found to be resistant to fluconazole. One of the isolates (C. tropicalis) was resistant to amphotericin B. A rising prevalence of drug-resistance CBI isolates in Hong Kong was observed with reference to a previous study. Notably, all non-albicans Candida species, showed increased hemolytic activity relative to C. albicans, whilst C. albicans, C. tropicalis, and C. parapsilosis exhibited proteinase activities. Majority of the isolates were capable of forming mature biofilms. Interestingly, the presence of serum distorted the yeast sensitivity to fluconazole, but not amphotericin B. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that CBI isolates of Candida have the potential to express to varying extent their virulence attributes (e.g., biofilm formation, hemolysin production, and proteinase activity) and these, together with perturbations in their antifungal sensitivity in the presence of serum, may contribute to treatment complication in candidemia. The effect of serum on antifungal activity

  20. Robustness analysis on interspecies interaction network for iron and glucose competition between Candida albicans and zebrafish during infection

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Candida albicans has emerged as an important model organism for the study of infectious disease. Using high-throughput simultaneously quantified time-course transcriptomics, this study constructed host-pathogen interspecies interaction networks between C. albicans and zebrafish during the adhesion, invasion, and damage stages. Given that iron and glucose have been identified as crucial resources required during the infection process between C. albicans and zebrafish, we focused on the construction of the interspecies networks associated with them. Furthermore, a randomization technique was proposed to identify differentially regulated proteins that are statistically eminent for the three infection stages. The behaviors of the highly connected or differentially regulated proteins identified from the resulting networks were further investigated. "Robustness" is an important system property that measures the ability of the system tolerating the intrinsic perturbations in a dynamic network. This characteristic provides a systematic and quantitative view to elucidate the dynamics of iron and glucose competition in terms of the interspecies interaction networks. Here, we further estimated the robustness of our constructed interspecies interaction networks for the three infection stages. The constructed networks and robustness analysis provided significant insight into dynamic interactions related to iron and glucose competition during infection and enabled us to quantify the system's intrinsic perturbation tolerance ability during iron and glucose competition throughout the three infection stages. Moreover, the networks also assist in elucidating the offensive and defensive mechanisms of C. albicans and zebrafish during their competition for iron and glucose. Our proposed method can be easily extended to identify other such networks involved in the competition for essential resources during infection. PMID:25603810

  1. Use of Six Sigma strategies to pull the line on central line-associated bloodstream infections in a neurotrauma intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Loftus, Kelli; Tilley, Terry; Hoffman, Jason; Bradburn, Eric; Harvey, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    The creation of a consistent culture of safety and quality in an intensive care unit is challenging. We applied the Six Sigma Define-Measure-Analyze-Improve-Control (DMAIC) model for quality improvement (QI) to develop a long-term solution to improve outcomes in a high-risk neurotrauma intensive care unit. We sought to reduce central line utilization as a cornerstone in preventing central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs). This study describes the successful application of the DMAIC model in the creation and implementation of evidence-based quality improvement designed to reduce CLABSIs to below national benchmarks. PMID:25768963

  2. Evidence for macrophage-mediated protection against lethal Candida albicans infection.

    PubMed Central

    Bistoni, F; Vecchiarelli, A; Cenci, E; Puccetti, P; Marconi, P; Cassone, A

    1986-01-01

    Systemic infection of mice with a Candida albicans strain (PCA-2) incapable of yeast-mycelial conversion conferred protection against a subsequent intravenous challenge with the pathogenic strain of the parent organism, strain CA-6. Protection was nonspecific since it was also detected upon challenge of mice with Staphylococcus aureus. Moreover, the PCA-2 organisms had to be viable, their effects being most evident when they were given intravenously at a dose of 10(6) cells 7 to 14 days prior to microbial challenge. Thus, all mice pretreated with PCA-2 and challenged 14 days later with viable CA-6 cells lived through a 60-day observation period, whereas all control mice not treated with PCA-2 died within 3 days. In an attempt to correlate the immunostimulatory effects observed in vivo with possible modifications in in vitro functions, it was found that administration of PCA-2 was accompanied by an increase in the number of peripheral blood polymorphonuclear cells and by the activation in the spleen of cells with highly candidacidal activity in vitro. Moreover, the adoptive transfer of plastic-adherent cells from PCA-2-infected mice into histocompatible recipients conferred considerable protection against subsequent CA-6 challenge. PMID:3943907

  3. Thymol has antifungal activity against Candida albicans during infection and maintains the innate immune response required for function of the p38 MAPK signaling pathway in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Shu, Chengjie; Sun, Lingmei; Zhang, Weiming

    2016-08-01

    The Caenorhabditis elegans model can be used to study Candida albicans virulence and host immunity, as well as to identify plant-derived natural products to use against C. albicans. Thymol is a hydrophobic phenol compound from the aromatic plant thyme. In this study, the in vitro data demonstrated concentration-dependent thymol inhibition of both C. albicans growth and biofilm formation during different developmental phases. With the aid of the C. elegans system, we performed in vivo assays, and our results further showed the ability of thymol to increase C. elegans life span during infection, inhibit C. albicans colony formation in the C. elegans intestine, and increase the expression levels of host antimicrobial genes. Moreover, among the genes that encode the p38 MAPK signaling pathway, mutation of the pmk-1 or sek-1 gene decreased the beneficial effects of thymol's antifungal activity against C. albicans and thymol's maintenance of the innate immune response in nematodes. Western blot data showed the level of phosphorylation of pmk-1 was dramatically decreased against C. albicans. In nematodes, treatment with thymol recovered the dysregulation of pmk-1 and sek-1 gene expressions, the phosphorylation level of PMK-1 caused by C. albicans infection. Therefore, thymol may act, at least in part, through the function of the p38 MAPK signaling pathway to protect against C. albicans infection and maintain the host innate immune response to C. albicans. Our results indicate that the p38 MAPK signaling pathway plays a crucial role in regulating the beneficial effects observed after nematodes infected with C. albicans were treated with thymol. PMID:26783030

  4. Comparison of Phenotypic with Genotypic Procedures for Confirmation of Coagulase-Negative Staphylococcus Catheter-Related Bloodstream Infections

    PubMed Central

    Aldea-Mansilla, Carmen; García de Viedma, Darío; Cercenado, Emilia; Martín-Rabadán, Pablo; Marín, Mercedes; Bouza, Emilio

    2006-01-01

    We sought here to review the present definition of catheter-related bloodstream infections (CR-BSI) due to coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) by comparing the routine phenotypic methods with a genotypic procedure that considers different morphotypes. Our phenotypic characterization of CNS isolates included routine identification with biotype and antibiotype. The genotypic diagnosis was based on longer incubation periods with the consideration of all morphotypes and molecular typing by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis techniques. We prospectively selected 61 episodes of suspected CR-BSI by CNS occurring during 1 year, based on the presence of a compatible clinical setting and the isolation of one or more CNS from blood and catheter tip. Of these episodes, 47 (77%) were identified as true episodes of CR-BSI based on the presence of microorganisms of the same genotype in the blood and on the catheter tip. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive, negative predictive, accuracy, positive likelihood ratio, and negative likelihood ratio values obtained by different phenotypic microbiological approaches to establish the diagnosis of CR-BSI were as follows: identity at species level (78.7%, 85.7%, 94.9%, 54.5%, 80.3%, 5.51, and 0.25, respectively); identity of species and biotype (59.6%, 92.9%, 96.6%, 40.6%, 67.2%, 8.34, and 0.44, respectively); identity of species and antibiotype (61.7%, 92.9%, 96.7%, 41.9%, 68.8%, 8.64, and 0.41, respectively); and identity of species, biotype, and antibiotype (48.9%, 92.9%, 95.8%, 35.1%, 59%, 6.85, and 0.55, respectively). Our study demonstrates the inaccuracy of the diagnosis of CNS CR-BSI when the current definition based on conventional routine microbiological practice is followed. A new definition of CNS CR-BSI is necessary, at least as an epidemiological and research tool. PMID:17021078

  5. Phenotypic characterization of mononuclear cells and class II antigen expression in angular cheilitis infected by Candida albicans or Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Ohman, S C; Jontell, M; Jonsson, R

    1989-04-01

    In the present study we characterized the phenotypes of infiltrating mononuclear cells in angular cheilitis lesions to further explore the pathogenesis of this disorder. Frozen sections from lesions infected by Candida albicans and/or Staphylococcus aureus were subjected to immunohistochemical analysis utilizing monoclonal antibodies directed to subsets of T-lymphocytes, B-lymphocytes, and macrophages. In addition, the expression of Class II antigens (HLA-DP, -DQ, -DR), the interleukin 2- and transferrin-receptors was studied on resident and infiltrating cells. An intense infiltration of T-lymphocytes was accompanied by expression of Class II antigens on the epidermal keratinocytes in lesion infected by Candida albicans. The Staphylococcus aureus infected lesions displayed a diffuse infiltration of T-lymphocytes but virtually no expression of Class II antigen by epidermal keratinocytes. These observations suggest that the cell-mediated arm of the immune system is involved in the inflammatory reaction of lesions infected by Candida albicans. In addition, the present study confirms that epidermal expression of Class II antigens is closely related to the type and magnitude of the infiltrating T-lymphocyte. Finally, these findings indicate that the type of inflammatory reaction in angular cheilitis is primarily dependent on the isolated microorganism, although the clinical pictures of the disorder are virtually identical. PMID:2468179

  6. Effect of Er,Cr:YSGG Laser Irradiation with Radial Firing Tips on Candida albicans in Experimentally Infected Root Canals

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Aim. To compare the disinfection effect of Er,Cr:YSGG laser using radial firing tips with NaOCI in root canals infected with C. albicans and to evaluate the irradiation effect on the dentinal surfaces. Material and Methods. In total seventy-six mandibular premolar teeth were used. In order to standardize the incubation and sterilization procedure, eight teeth were used. Sixty-eight of the root canals were incubated with C. albicans suspension for 72 hours. The specimens were divided into 5 experimental groups. Two groups were constituted as Group 1 was irradiated with 1.5 W laser (n = 8) and group 2, which was irradiated with 2 W laser (n = 8). Two more groups were formed as Group 3 (2 W laser (n = 25) and Group 4 NaOCI (5%) (n = 25). Group 5 (n = 2) did not receive any treatment. Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal-Wallis H tests were used to compare the different laser output powers. Wilcoxon Signed Ranks Test was used in order to compare the Candida cfu/ml levels according to treatment protocols (P < 0.05). Results. Both 1.5 W and 2 W laser resulted in a major reduction of C. albicans without a significant difference. The comparison of the dentin surfaces irradiated with Er,Cr:YSGG laser at two power settings resulted in similar morphological changes. However, NaOCI was found to be more effective in reduction of C. albicans than 2 W laser application. Conclusion. According to the results of the present study, the Er,Cr:YSGG laser with radial firing tips presented less antifungal effects on C. albicans in root canals of infected teeth than NaOCl solution. PMID:24955367

  7. The Adaptor CARD9 Is Required for Adaptive but Not Innate Immunity to Oral Mucosal Candida albicans Infections

    PubMed Central

    Bishu, Shrinivas; Hernández-Santos, Nydiaris; Simpson-Abelson, Michelle R.; Huppler, Anna R.; Conti, Heather R.; Ghilardi, Nico; Mamo, Anna J.

    2014-01-01

    Oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC [thrush]) is an opportunistic infection caused by the commensal fungus Candida albicans. OPC is common in individuals with HIV/AIDS, infants, patients on chemotherapy, and individuals with congenital immune defects. Immunity to OPC is strongly dependent on the interleukin-23 (IL-23)/IL-17R axis, as mice and humans with defects in IL-17R signaling (IL17F, ACT1, IL-17RA) or in genes that direct Th17 differentiation (STAT3, STAT1, CARD9) are prone to mucocutaneous candidiasis. Conventional Th17 cells are induced in response to C. albicans infection via signals from C-type lectin receptors, which signal through the adaptor CARD9, leading to production of Th17-inducing cytokines such as IL-6, IL-1β, and IL-23. Recent data indicate that IL-17 can also be made by numerous innate cell subsets. These innate “type 17” cells resemble conventional Th17 cells, but they can be activated without need for prior antigen exposure. Because C. albicans is not a commensal organism in rodents and mice are thus naive to this fungus, we had the opportunity to assess the role of CARD9 in innate versus adaptive responses using an OPC infection model. As expected, CARD9−/− mice failed to mount an adaptive Th17 response following oral Candida infection. Surprisingly, however, CARD9−/− mice had preserved innate IL-17-dependent responses to Candida and were almost fully resistant to OPC. Thus, CARD9 is important primarily for adaptive immunity to C. albicans, whereas alternate recognition systems appear to be needed for effective innate responses. PMID:24379290

  8. Globally dispersed mobile drug-resistance genes in Gram-negative bacterial isolates from patients with bloodstream infections in a US urban general hospital

    PubMed Central

    Adams-Sapper, S.; Sergeevna-Selezneva, J.; Tartof, S.; Raphael, E.; Diep, B. An; Perdreau-Remington, F.

    2012-01-01

    Mobile drug-resistance genes with identical nucleic acid sequences carried by multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli strains that cause community-acquired infections are becomingly increasingly dispersed worldwide. Over a 2-year period, we analysed Gram-negative bacterial (GNB) pathogens from the blood of inpatients at an urban public hospital to determine what proportion of these isolates carried such globally dispersed drug-resistance genes. Of 376 GNB isolates, 167 (44 %) were Escherichia coli, 50 (13 %) were Klebsiella pneumoniae, 25 (7 %) were Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 25 (7 %) were Proteus mirabilis and 20 (5 %) were Enterobacter cloacae; the remainder (24 %) comprised 26 different GNB species. Among E. coli isolates, class 1 integrons were detected in 64 (38 %). The most common integron gene cassette configuration was dfrA17-aadA5, found in 30 (25 %) of 119 drug-resistant E. coli isolates and in one isolate of Moraxella morganii. Extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) genes were found in 16 E. coli isolates (10 %). These genes with identical sequences were found in nearly 40 % of bloodstream E. coli isolates in the study hospital, as well as in a variety of bacterial species from clinical and non-clinical sources worldwide. Thus, a substantial proportion of bloodstream infections among hospitalized patients were caused by E. coli strains carrying drug-resistance genes that are dispersed globally in a wide variety of bacterial species. PMID:22493279

  9. Bst1 is required for Candida albicans infecting host via facilitating cell wall anchorage of Glycosylphosphatidyl inositol anchored proteins

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Zou, Zui; Huang, Xin; Shen, Hui; He, Li Juan; Chen, Si Min; Li, Li Ping; Yan, Lan; Zhang, Shi Qun; Zhang, Jun Dong; Xu, Zheng; Xu, Guo Tong; An, Mao Mao; Jiang, Yuan Ying

    2016-01-01

    Glycosylphosphatidyl inositol anchored proteins (GPI-APs) on fungal cell wall are essential for invasive infections. While the function of inositol deacylation of GPI-APs in mammalian cells has been previously characterized the impact of inositol deacylation in fungi and implications to host infection remains largely unexplored. Herein we describe our identification of BST1, an inositol deacylase of GPI-Aps in Candida albicans, was critical for GPI-APs cell wall attachment and host infection. BST1-deficient C. albicans (bst1Δ/Δ) was associated with severely impaired cell wall anchorage of GPI-APs and subsequen unmasked β-(1,3)-glucan. Consistent with the aberrant cell wall structures, bst1Δ/Δ strain did not display an invasive ability and could be recognized more efficiently by host immune systems. Moreover, BST1 null mutants or those expressing Bst1 variants did not display inositol deacylation activity and exhibited severely attenuated virulence and reduced organic colonization in a murine systemic candidiasis model. Thus, Bst1 can facilitate cell wall anchorage of GPI-APs in C. albicans by inositol deacylation, and is critical for host invasion and immune escape. PMID:27708385

  10. Bloodstream infections in patients with solid tumors: epidemiology, antibiotic therapy, and outcomes in 528 episodes in a single cancer center.

    PubMed

    Marín, Mar; Gudiol, Carlota; Garcia-Vidal, Carol; Ardanuy, Carmen; Carratalà, Jordi

    2014-05-01

    Current information regarding bloodstream infection (BSI) in patients with solid tumors is scarce. We assessed the epidemiology, antibiotic therapy, and outcomes of BSI in these patients. We also compared patients who died with those who survived to identify risk factors associated with mortality. From January 2006 to July 2012 all episodes of BSI in patients with solid tumors at a cancer center were prospectively recorded and analyzed. A total of 528 episodes of BSI were documented in 489 patients. The most frequent neoplasms were hepatobiliary tumors (19%), followed by lung cancer (18%) and lower gastrointestinal malignancies (16%). Many patients had received corticosteroid therapy (41%), and 15% had neutropenia (<500 neutrophils/μL) at the time of BSI. The most common source of BSI was cholangitis (21%), followed by other abdominal (19.5%) and urinary tract infections (17%). Gram-negative BSI occurred in 55% of cases, mainly due to Escherichia coli (55%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (18%), and Klebsiella pneumoniae (16%). Among gram-positive BSI (35%), viridans group streptococci were the most frequent causative organisms (22%), followed by Staphylococcus aureus (21%) and Enterococcus species (18%). We identified 61 multidrug-resistant (MDR) organisms (13%), mainly extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (n = 20) and AmpC-producing Enterobacteriaceae (n = 13). The majority of patients with BSI caused by MDR organisms had received antibiotics (70%), and they had been previously hospitalized (61.4%) more frequently than patients with BSI caused by susceptible strains. Inadequate empirical antibiotic therapy was given to 23% of patients, with a higher proportion in those with BSI due to a MDR strain (69%). Early (<48 h) and overall (30 d) case-fatality rates were 7% and 32%, respectively. The overall case-fatality rate was higher among cases caused by MDR organisms (39.3%). The only independent risk factors for the early case-fatality rate were the

  11. Impact of hospital care on incidence of bloodstream infection: the evaluation of processes and indicators in infection control study.

    PubMed Central

    Kritchevsky, S. B.; Braun, B. I.; Wong, E. S.; Solomon, S. L.; Steele, L.; Richards, C.; Simmons, B. P.

    2001-01-01

    The Evaluation of Processes and Indicators in Infection Control (EPIC) study assesses the relationship between hospital care and rates of central venous catheter-associated primary bacteremia in 54 intensive-care units (ICUs) in the United States and 14 other countries. Using ICU rather than the patient as the primary unit of statistical analysis permits evaluation of factors that vary at the ICU level. The design of EPIC can serve as a template for studies investigating the relationship between process and event rates across health-care institutions. PMID:11294704

  12. Editorial on low-dose acetylsalicylic acid treatment and impact on short-term mortality in Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection: a propensity score-matched cohort study.

    PubMed

    Schoergenhofer, Christian; Schwameis, Michael; Lagler, Heimo; Jilma, Bernd

    2016-05-01

    The manuscript "Low-Dose Acetylsalicylic Acid Treatment and Impact on Short-Term Mortality in Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) Bloodstream Infection: A propensity Score-Matched Cohort Study" published in Critical Care Medicine by Osthoff et al. reported an association of aspirin intake with a reduced short-term mortality. Direct anti-microbial effects of aspirin and its metabolite salicylate were suggested in preclinical studies. Especially intriguing is the inclusion of a control group with Escherichia coli (E. coli) blood stream infections in this study, in which aspirin was not associated with an improved outcome. However, as other observational studies also reported benefits of aspirin in critically ill patients, randomized trials are needed to confirm the effects of low-dose aspirin. PMID:27294095

  13. Editorial on low-dose acetylsalicylic acid treatment and impact on short-term mortality in Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection: a propensity score-matched cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Schoergenhofer, Christian; Schwameis, Michael; Lagler, Heimo

    2016-01-01

    The manuscript “Low-Dose Acetylsalicylic Acid Treatment and Impact on Short-Term Mortality in Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) Bloodstream Infection: A propensity Score-Matched Cohort Study” published in Critical Care Medicine by Osthoff et al. reported an association of aspirin intake with a reduced short-term mortality. Direct anti-microbial effects of aspirin and its metabolite salicylate were suggested in preclinical studies. Especially intriguing is the inclusion of a control group with Escherichia coli (E. coli) blood stream infections in this study, in which aspirin was not associated with an improved outcome. However, as other observational studies also reported benefits of aspirin in critically ill patients, randomized trials are needed to confirm the effects of low-dose aspirin. PMID:27294095

  14. Characterization of the extra-intestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli ST131 clone among isolates recovered from urinary and bloodstream infections in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Ciesielczuk, H; Doumith, M; Hope, R; Woodford, N; Wareham, D W

    2015-12-01

    The multidrug-resistant ST131-O25b clone of Escherichia coli is well established as a significant cause of extra-intestinal infections worldwide. However, there have been only two small regional studies comparing ST131 isolates from the UK. Therefore, we characterized 143 ST131 E. coli (38 urinary, 105 bloodstream) collected between January 2011 and March 2012 from 38 centres located across the UK and Republic of Ireland. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of clonal isolates revealed high rates of resistance to amoxicillin-clavulanate (56 %), cefotaxime (32 %), ciprofloxacin (79 %), temocillin (69 %, bloodstream isolates only), gentamicin (67 %) and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (59 %). The most frequently detected extended-spectrum beta-lactamase was CTX-M-15 (87 %), predominantly encoded on IncF plasmids, although it was also associated with IncU plasmids in two isolates. The majority of UK ST131 clonal isolates possessed the O25b antigen (97 %) and the H30 fimH allele (92 %), but three serogroups (O19a, O136 and O153) novel to ST131 were identified among our strains. Contrary to previous reports, UK ST131-O16 isolates were typically susceptible to ciprofloxacin and lacked beta-lactamase genes (n = 12/12). In summary, ST131 strains of E. coli circulating in the UK possess characteristic clonal features, but are becoming more diverse than other international ST131 populations. PMID:26445772

  15. Rapid real-time nucleic Acid sequence-based amplification-molecular beacon platform to detect fungal and bacterial bloodstream infections.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanan; Park, Steven; Kreiswirth, Barry N; Ginocchio, Christine C; Veyret, Raphaël; Laayoun, Ali; Troesch, Alain; Perlin, David S

    2009-07-01

    Bloodstream infections (BSIs) are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. Successful patient outcomes are diminished by a failure to rapidly diagnose these infections and initiate appropriate therapy. A rapid and reliable diagnostic platform of high sensitivity is needed for the management of patients with BSIs. The combination of an RNA-dependent nucleic acid sequence-based amplification and molecular beacon (NASBA-MB) detection system in multiplex format was developed to rapidly detect medically important BSI organisms. Probes and primers representing pan-gram-negative, pan-gram-positive, pan-fungal, pan-Candida, and pan-Aspergillus organisms were established utilizing 16S and 28S rRNA targets for bacteria and fungi, respectively. Two multiplex panels were developed to rapidly discriminate bacterial or fungal infections at the subkingdom/genus level with a sensitivity of 1 to 50 genomes. A clinical study was performed to evaluate the accuracy of this platform by evaluating 570 clinical samples from a tertiary-care hospital group using blood bottle samples. The sensitivity, specificity, and Youden's index values for pan-gram-positive detection and pan-gram-negative detection were 99.7%, 100%, 0.997 and 98.6%, 95.9%, 0.945, respectively. The positive predictive values (PPV) and the negative predictive values (NPV) for these two probes were 100, 90.7, and 99.4, 99.4, respectively. Pan-fungal and pan-Candida probes showed 100% sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV, and the pan-Aspergillus probe showed 100% NPV. Robust signals were observed for all probes in the multiplex panels, with signal detection in <15 min. The multiplex real-time NASBA-MB assay provides a valuable platform for the rapid and specific diagnosis of bloodstream pathogens, and reliable pathogen identification and characterization can be obtained in under 3 h.

  16. Integrin αXβ₂ is a leukocyte receptor for Candida albicans and is essential for protection against fungal infections.

    PubMed

    Jawhara, Samir; Pluskota, Elzbieta; Verbovetskiy, Dmitriy; Skomorovska-Prokvolit, Olena; Plow, Edward F; Soloviev, Dmitry A

    2012-09-01

    The opportunistic fungus Candida albicans is one of the leading causes of infections in immunocompromised patients, and innate immunity provides a principal mechanism for protection from the pathogen. In the present work, the role of integrin α(X)β₂ in the pathogenesis of fungal infection was assessed. Both purified α(X)β₂ and α(X)β₂-expressing human epithelial kidney 293 cells recognized and bound to the fungal hyphae of SC5314 strain of C. albicans but not to the yeast form or to hyphae of a strain deficient in the fungal mannoprotein, Pra1. The binding of the integrin to the fungus was inhibited by β-glucans but not by mannans, implicating a lectin-like activity in recognition but distinct in specificity from that of α(M)β₂. Mice deficient in α(X)β₂ were more prone to systemic infection with the LD₅₀ fungal inoculum decreasing 3-fold in α(X)β₂-deficient mice compared with wild-type mice. After challenging i.v. with 1.5 × 10⁴ cell/g, 60% of control C57BL/6 mice died within 14 d compared with 100% mortality of α(X)β₂-deficient mice within 9 d. Organs taken from α(X)β₂-deficient mice 16 h postinfection revealed a 10-fold increase in fungal invasion into the brain and a 2-fold increase into the liver. These data indicate that α(X)β₂ is important for protection against systemic C. albicans infections and macrophage subsets in the liver, Kupffer cells, and in the brain, microglial cells use α(X)β₂ to control fungal invasion.

  17. Rapid detection of health-care-associated bloodstream infection in critical care using multipathogen real-time polymerase chain reaction technology: a diagnostic accuracy study and systematic review.

    PubMed Central

    Warhurst, Geoffrey; Dunn, Graham; Chadwick, Paul; Blackwood, Bronagh; McAuley, Daniel; Perkins, Gavin D; McMullan, Ronan; Gates, Simon; Bentley, Andrew; Young, Duncan; Carlson, Gordon L; Dark, Paul

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND There is growing interest in the potential utility of real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in diagnosing bloodstream infection by detecting pathogen deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in blood samples within a few hours. SeptiFast (Roche Diagnostics GmBH, Mannheim, Germany) is a multipathogen probe-based system targeting ribosomal DNA sequences of bacteria and fungi. It detects and identifies the commonest pathogens causing bloodstream infection. As background to this study, we report a systematic review of Phase III diagnostic accuracy studies of SeptiFast, which reveals uncertainty about its likely clinical utility based on widespread evidence of deficiencies in study design and reporting with a high risk of bias. OBJECTIVE Determine the accuracy of SeptiFast real-time PCR for the detection of health-care-associated bloodstream infection, against standard microbiological culture. DESIGN Prospective multicentre Phase III clinical diagnostic accuracy study using the standards for the reporting of diagnostic accuracy studies criteria. SETTING Critical care departments within NHS hospitals in the north-west of England. PARTICIPANTS Adult patients requiring blood culture (BC) when developing new signs of systemic inflammation. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES SeptiFast real-time PCR results at species/genus level compared with microbiological culture in association with independent adjudication of infection. Metrics of diagnostic accuracy were derived including sensitivity, specificity, likelihood ratios and predictive values, with their 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Latent class analysis was used to explore the diagnostic performance of culture as a reference standard. RESULTS Of 1006 new patient episodes of systemic inflammation in 853 patients, 922 (92%) met the inclusion criteria and provided sufficient information for analysis. Index test assay failure occurred on 69 (7%) occasions. Adult patients had been exposed to a median of 8 days (interquartile range 4

  18. CX3CR1 Is Dispensable for Control of Mucosal Candida albicans Infections in Mice and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Break, Timothy J.; Jaeger, Martin; Solis, Norma V.; Filler, Scott G.; Rodriguez, Carlos A.; Lim, Jean K.; Lee, Chyi-Chia Richard; Sobel, Jack D.; Netea, Mihai G.

    2014-01-01

    Candida albicans is part of the normal commensal microbiota of mucosal surfaces in a large percentage of the human population. However, perturbations of the host's immune response or bacterial microbiota have been shown to predispose individuals to the development of opportunistic Candida infections. It was recently discovered that a defect in the chemokine receptor CX3CR1 increases susceptibility of mice and humans to systemic candidiasis. However, whether CX3CR1 confers protection against mucosal C. albicans infection has not been investigated. Using two different mouse models, we found that Cx3cr1 is dispensable for the induction of interleukin 17A (IL-17A), IL-22, and IL-23 in the tongue after infection, as well as for the clearance of mucosal candidiasis from the tongue or lower gastrointestinal (GI) tract colonization. Furthermore, the dysfunctional human CX3CR1 allele CX3CR1-M280 was not associated with development of recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis (RVVC) in women. Taken together, these data indicate that CX3CR1 is not essential for protection of the host against mucosal candidiasis, underscoring the dependence on different mammalian immune factors for control of mucosal versus systemic Candida infections. PMID:25547797

  19. Thiamine antivitamins--an opportunity of therapy of fungal infections caused by Malassezia pachydermatis and Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Siemieniuk, Magdalena; Czyzewska, Urszula; Strumilo, Slawomir; Tylicki, Adam

    2016-02-01

    Severe skin diseases and systemic fungaemia are caused by Malassezia pachydermatis and Candida albicans respectively. Antifungal therapies are less effective because of chronic character of infections and high percentage of relapses. Therefore, there is a great need to develop new strategies of antifungal therapies. We previously found that oxythiamine decreases proliferation of yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), therefore we suggest that thiamine antivitamins can be considered as antifungal agents. The aim of this study was the comparison of thiamine antivitamins (oxythiamine, amprolium, thiochrome, tetrahydrothiamine and tetrahydrooxythiamine) inhibitory effect on the growth rate and energetic metabolism efficiency in non-pathogenic S. cerevisiae and two potentially pathogenic species M. pachydermatis and C. albicans. Investigated species were cultured on a Sabouraud medium supplemented with trace elements in the presence (40 mg l(-1)) or absence of each tested antivitamins to estimate their influence on growth rate, enzyme activity and kinetic parameters of pyruvate decarboxylase and malate dehydrogenase of each tested species. Oxythiamine was the only antivitamin with antifungal potential. M. pachydermatis and S. cerevisiae were the most sensitive, whereas C. albicans was the least sensitive to oxythiamine action. Oxythiamine can be considered as supportive agent in superficial mycoses treatment, especially those caused by species from the genus Malassezia.

  20. A 5-year survey of antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolated from patients with bloodstream infections in Northeast Italy.

    PubMed

    Cojutti, Piergiorgio; Scarparo, Claudio; Sartor, Assunta; Coato, Paola; Rigoli, Roberto; Pea, Federico

    2015-01-01

    A 5-year survey (2009-2013) of antimicrobial susceptibility of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolated from patients with bloodstream infections was carried out in Northeast Italy. No upward creep of glycopeptides MICs was documented among 582 nonduplicate MRSA blood isolates, which were tested in accordance with broth microdilution and interpreted in accordance with EUCAST recommendations. Teicoplanin showed stably a lower MIC50 in comparison with vancomycin (0.25-0.5 versus 1 mg/L). The activities of newer anti-MRSA antibacterials stratified by glycopeptides MICs showed similar trends in MICs of either vancomycin or teicoplanin with those of daptomycin, linezolid, and tigecycline. We hypothesize that in centers with different distribution of glycopeptides MICs, downward for teicoplanin and upward for vancomycin, teicoplanin could be a more effective alternative to vancomycin for empirical treatment of MRSA-related bacteremia.

  1. Innovative Use of Existing Public and Private Data Sources for Postmarketing Surveillance of Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infections Associated With Intravenous Needleless Connectors

    PubMed Central

    Tabak, Ying P.; Johannes, Richard S.; Sun, Xiaowu; Crosby, Cynthia T.

    2016-01-01

    The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Hospital Compare central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) data and private databases containing new-generation intravenous needleless connector (study NC) use at the hospital level were linked. The relative risk (RR) of CLABSI associated with the study NCs was estimated, adjusting for hospital characteristics. Among 3074 eligible hospitals in the 2013 CMS database, 758 (25%) hospitals used the study NCs. The study NC hospitals had a lower unadjusted CLABSI rate (1.03 vs 1.13 CLABSIs per 1000 central line days, P < .0001) compared with comparator hospitals. The adjusted RR for CLABSI was 0.94 (95% confidence interval: 0.86, 1.02; P = .11). PMID:27598072

  2. Carbapenems Versus Piperacillin-Tazobactam for Bloodstream Infections of Nonurinary Source Caused by Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamase-Producing Enterobacteriaceae.

    PubMed

    Ofer-Friedman, Hadas; Shefler, Coral; Sharma, Sarit; Tirosh, Amit; Tal-Jasper, Ruthy; Kandipalli, Deepthi; Sharma, Shruti; Bathina, Pradeep; Kaplansky, Tamir; Maskit, Moran; Azouri, Tal; Lazarovitch, Tsilia; Zaidenstein, Ronit; Kaye, Keith S; Marchaim, Dror

    2015-08-01

    A recent, frequently quoted study has suggested that for bloodstream infections (BSIs) due to extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL) Escherichia coli, treatment with β-lactam/β-lactamase inhibitors (BLBLIs) might be equivalent to treatment with carbapenems. However, the majority of BSIs originate from the urinary tract. A multicenter, multinational efficacy analysis was conducted from 2010 to 2012 to compare outcomes of patients with non-urinary ESBL BSIs who received a carbapenem (69 patients) vs those treated with piperacillin-tazobactam (10 patients). In multivariate analysis, therapy with piperacillin-tazobactam was associated with increased 90-day mortality (adjusted odds ratio, 7.9, P=.03). For ESBL BSIs of a non-urinary origin, carbapenems should be considered a superior treatment to BLBLIs.

  3. Innovative Use of Existing Public and Private Data Sources for Postmarketing Surveillance of Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infections Associated With Intravenous Needleless Connectors.

    PubMed

    Tabak, Ying P; Johannes, Richard S; Sun, Xiaowu; Crosby, Cynthia T; Jarvis, William R

    2016-01-01

    The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Hospital Compare central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) data and private databases containing new-generation intravenous needleless connector (study NC) use at the hospital level were linked. The relative risk (RR) of CLABSI associated with the study NCs was estimated, adjusting for hospital characteristics. Among 3074 eligible hospitals in the 2013 CMS database, 758 (25%) hospitals used the study NCs. The study NC hospitals had a lower unadjusted CLABSI rate (1.03 vs 1.13 CLABSIs per 1000 central line days, P < .0001) compared with comparator hospitals. The adjusted RR for CLABSI was 0.94 (95% confidence interval: 0.86, 1.02; P = .11). PMID:27598072

  4. Bloodstream infections, antibiotic resistance and the practice of blood culture sampling in Germany: study design of a Thuringia-wide prospective population-based study (AlertsNet)

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, Roland P; Rißner, Florian; Castell, Stefanie; Töpel, Sandra; Jakob, Matthias; Brunkhorst, Frank M; Mikolajczyk, Rafael T

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Bloodstream infections are a major cause of death worldwide; blood culture (BC) sampling remains the most important tool for their diagnosis. Current data suggest that BC rates in German hospitals are considerably lower than recommended; this points to shortfalls in the application of microbiological analyses. Since early and appropriate BC diagnostics are associated with reduced case fatality rates and a shorter duration of antimicrobial therapy, a multicomponent study for the improvement of BC diagnostics was developed. Methods and analysis An electronic BC registry established for the German Federal state of Thuringia is the structural basis of this study. The registry includes individual patient data (microbiological results and clinical data) and institutional information for all clinically relevant positive BCs at the participating centres. First, classic result quality indicators for bloodstream infections (eg, sepsis rates) will be studied using Poisson regression models (adjusted for institutional characteristics) in order to derive relative ranks for feedback to clinical institutions. Second, a target value will be established for the process indicator BC rate. On the basis of this target value, recommendations will be made for a given combination of institutional characteristics as a reference for future use in quality control. An interventional study aiming at the improvement of BC rates will be conducted thereafter. On the basis of the results of a survey in the participating institutions, a targeted educational intervention will be developed. The success of the educational intervention will be measured by changes in the process indicator and the result indicators over time using a pre–post design. Ethics and dissemination Ethics approval was obtained from the Ethics committee of the University Hospital Jena and from the Ethics committee of the State Chamber of Physicians of Thuringia. Findings of AlertsNet will be disseminated through

  5. The Role of Autophagy-Related Proteins in Candida albicans Infections

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Jenny M.; Mansour, Michael K.; Acharya, Mridu; Sokolovska, Anna; Timmons, Allison K.; Lacy-Hulbert, Adam; Vyas, Jatin M.

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy plays an important role in maintaining cell homeostasis by providing nutrients during periods of starvation and removing damaged organelles from the cytoplasm. A marker in the autophagic process is the reversible conjugation of LC3, a membrane scaffolding protein, to double membrane autophagosomes. Recently, a role for LC3 in the elimination of pathogenic bacteria and fungi, including Candida albicans (C. albicans), was demonstrated, but these organisms reside in single membrane phagosomes. This process is distinct from autophagy and is termed LC3-associated phagocytosis (LAP). This review will detail the hallmarks of LAP that distinguish it from classical autophagy and review the role of autophagy proteins in host response to C. albicans and other pathogenic fungi. PMID:27043636

  6. Epithelial invasion outcompetes hypha development during Candida albicans infection as revealed by an image-based systems biology approach.

    PubMed

    Mech, Franziska; Wilson, Duncan; Lehnert, Teresa; Hube, Bernhard; Thilo Figge, Marc

    2014-02-01

    Candida albicans is the most common opportunistic fungal pathogen of the human mucosal flora, frequently causing infections. The fungus is responsible for invasive infections in immunocompromised patients that can lead to sepsis. The yeast to hypha transition and invasion of host-tissue represent major determinants in the switch from benign colonizer to invasive pathogen. A comprehensive understanding of the infection process requires analyses at the quantitative level. Utilizing fluorescence microscopy with differential staining, we obtained images of C. albicans undergoing epithelial invasion during a time course of 6 h. An image-based systems biology approach, combining image analysis and mathematical modeling, was applied to quantify the kinetics of hyphae development, hyphal elongation, and epithelial invasion. The automated image analysis facilitates high-throughput screening and provided quantities that allow for the time-resolved characterization of the morphological and invasive state of fungal cells. The interpretation of these data was supported by two mathematical models, a kinetic growth model and a kinetic transition model, that were developed using differential equations. The kinetic growth model describes the increase in hyphal length and revealed that hyphae undergo mass invasion of epithelial cells following primary hypha formation. We also provide evidence that epithelial cells stimulate the production of secondary hyphae by C. albicans. Based on the kinetic transition model, the route of invasion was quantified in the state space of non-invasive and invasive fungal cells depending on their number of hyphae. This analysis revealed that the initiation of hyphae formation represents an ultimate commitment to invasive growth and suggests that in vivo, the yeast to hypha transition must be under exquisitely tight negative regulation to avoid the transition from commensal to pathogen invading the epithelium.

  7. Predictors of mortality in patients with bloodstream infections caused by KPC-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae and impact of appropriate antimicrobial treatment.

    PubMed

    Zarkotou, O; Pournaras, S; Tselioti, P; Dragoumanos, V; Pitiriga, V; Ranellou, K; Prekates, A; Themeli-Digalaki, K; Tsakris, A

    2011-12-01

    Bloodstream infections (BSIs) caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemases (KPC)-producing K. pneumoniae (KPC-KP) are associated with high mortality rates. We investigated outcomes, risk factors for mortality and impact of appropriate antimicrobial treatment in patients with BSIs caused by molecularly confirmed KPC-KP. All consecutive patients with KPC-KP BSIs between May 2008 and May 2010 were included in the study and followed-up until their discharge or death. Potential risk factors for infection mortality were examined by a case-control study. Case-patients were those who died from the BSI and control-patients those who survived. Appropriate antimicrobial therapy was defined as treatment with in vitro active antimicrobials for at least 48 h. A total of 53 patients were identified. Overall mortality was 52.8% and infection mortality was 34%. Appropriate antimicrobial therapy was administered to 35 patients; mortality due to infection occurred in 20%. All 20 patients that received combination schemes had favourable infection outcome; in contrast, seven of 15 patients given appropriate monotherapy died (p 0.001). In univariate analysis, risk factors for mortality were age (p <0.001), APACHE II score at admission and infection onset (p <0.001) and severe sepsis (p <0.001), while appropriate antimicrobial treatment (p 0.003), combinations of active antimicrobials (p 0.001), catheter-related bacteraemia (p 0.04), prior surgery (p 0.014) and other therapeutic interventions (p 0.015) were significantly associated with survival. Independent predictors of mortality were age, APACHE II score at infection onset and inappropriate antimicrobial treatment. Among them, appropriate treatment is the only modifiable independent predictor of infection outcome.

  8. Bloodstream infection caused by extensively drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in cancer patients: high mortality associated with delayed treatment rather than with the degree of neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Freire, M P; de Oliveira Garcia, D; Garcia, C P; Campagnari Bueno, M F; Camargo, C H; Kono Magri, A S G; Francisco, G R; Reghini, R; Vieira, M F; Ibrahim, K Y; Rossi, F; Hajjar, L; Levin, A S; Hoff, P M; Pierrotti, L C; Abdala, E

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to describe severe infections with extensively drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii-calcoaceticus complex (XDR-ABC), as well as to investigate risk factors for mortality, in cancer patients. It was a retrospective study including all patients diagnosed with XDR-ABC bacteraemia during hospitalization in the intensive care unit of a cancer hospital between July 2009 and July 2013. Surveillance cultures were collected weekly during the study period, and clonality was analysed using pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). We analysed underlying diseases, oncology therapy, neutrophil counts, infection site and management of infection, in terms of their correlation with 30-day mortality. During the study period, 92 patients with XDR-ABC bacteraemia were identified, of whom 35 (38.0%) were patients with haematological malignancy. We identified XDR-ABC strains with four different profile patterns, 91.3% of patients harbouring the predominant PFGE type. Of the 92 patients with XDR-ABC bacteraemia, 66 (71.7%) had central line-associated bloodstream infections; infection occurred during neutropenia in 22 (23.9%); and 58 (63.0%) died before receiving the appropriate therapy. All patients were treated with polymyxin, which was used in combination therapy in 30 of them (32.4%). The 30-day mortality rate was 83.7%. Multivariate analysis revealed that septic shock at diagnosis of XDR-ABC infection was a risk factor for 30-day mortality; protective factors were receiving appropriate therapy and invasive device removal within the first 48 h. Among cancer patients, ineffective management of such infection increases the risk of death, more so than do features such as neutropenia and infection at the tumour site.

  9. [In vitro antifungal resistance in Candida albicans from HIV-infected patients with and without oral candidosis.].

    PubMed

    Ceballos Salobreña, A; Gaitán Cepeda, L A; Orihuela Cañada, F; Olea Barrionuevo, D; Ceballos García, L; Quindós, G

    1999-12-01

    The main purpose of this study has been to determine the in vitro antifungal susceptibility of clinical isolates from HIV-infected or AIDS patients, depending on the presence of oral candidosis. The oral cavity of 307 HIV-infected or AIDS patients was examined and an oral swab was cultured on Sabouraud glucose agar and studied by conventional mycological methods. In vitro antifungal susceptibility to amphotericin B, nystatin, fluconazole, itraconazole and ketoconazole was tested by disk diffusion with Neo-Sensitabs tablets (Rosco Diagnostica, Dinamarca). One hundred and thirty five Candida albicans isolates (91 serotype A, 38 serotype B, three C. albicans variety stellatoidea and three untyped isolates), three Candida krusei and two Candida glabrata were obtained. All the isolates were susceptible to nystatin and amphotericin B. However, 7.9% isolates were resistant to fluconazole and 2.9% isolates were resistant to ketoconazole or itraconazole. Nearly all C. krusei and C. glabrata isolates, 31% patients with candidosis and 20% Candida-colonized patients showed decreased susceptibility to azoles. This study shows that polyenes had a great in vitro efficacy against clinical isolates from HIV-infected patients and that in vitro resistance to azoles is not as high as observed in other countries.

  10. Study of the prevalence and association of ocular chlamydial conjunctivitis in women with genital infection by Chlamydia trachomatis, Mycoplasma genitalium and Candida albicans attending outpatient clinic

    PubMed Central

    Khattab, Rania Abdelmonem; Abdelfattah, Maha Mohssen

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine the association between chlamydial conjunctivitis and genital infection by Chlamydia trachomatis, Mycoplasma genitalium and Candida albicans, in addition to the possible relationship between cultured bacterial pathogens and oculogenital chlamydial infection. METHODS This study was performed on 100 (50 symptomatic and 50 asymptomatic) women attending the Gynecological and Obstetric outpatient clinic of Alzahra hospital, Alazhar University. Simultaneously a conjunctival swab was taken from these patients. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was done on DNA extracted from both vaginal and conjunctival swab samples. Culture for both vaginal and conjunctival swabs was also done. RESULTS Candida albicans was the predominant organism isolated by culture in 20% and 40% of conjunctival and vaginal swabs respectively. By the PCR method, ocular Chlamydia trachomatis was present in 60% of symptomatic women, while genital Chlamydia trachomatis infection was present in 30% of symptomatic women. The results of this method also indicated that 25/50 (50%) vaginal swabs were positive with PCR for Candida albicans versus 15/50 (30%) were PCR positive in conjunctival swab. Mycoplasma genitalium was present in only 10% of vaginal swabs. Concomitant oculogenital PCR positive results for Chlamydia trachomatis and Candida albicans were 30% and 28% respectively. CONCLUSION Ocular Chlamydia trachomatis was associated with genital Chlamydia trachomatis in a high percentage of women followed by Candida albicans. Cultured bacterial organisms do not play a role in enhancement of Chlamydia trachomatis infection. PMID:27588273

  11. Epidemiology of Candida infection. II. Application of biochemical methods for typing of Candida albicans strains.

    PubMed

    Budak, A

    1990-01-01

    Biochemical profiles of 350 C. albicans isolates from five towns in Poland and from Freiburg in Germany were determined on the basis of nine biochemical tests of Odds and Abbott method. API 20 C AUX system and additionally a resistogram. The analysis of the strains according to Odds' and Abbotts's system showed that investigated strains can be typed into 9 profile codes of common biochemical patterns. There were some differences among the profiles according to their geographical origin and anatomical sources of the isolation. On the basis of the ability C. albicans strains to assimilate of carbon sources, 350 isolates were categorised into 13 separate auxotrophic profiles with the major one: 2,576,174 accounting for 81% of the total. The majority of the investigated isolates were susceptible to antifungal agents (83%). A disproportionate distribution of auxotrophic profiles limited the use of resistogram method and API 20 C AUX as systems for typing C. albicans strains. On the other hand, the method of Odds and Abbott provides valuable criteria for typing of C. albicans. PMID:2130802

  12. Comparative efficacies of Zataria multiflora essential oil and itraconazole against disseminated Candida albicans infection in BALB/c mice

    PubMed Central

    Khosravi, A.R.; Shokri, H.; Tootian, Z.; Alizadeh, M.; Yahyaraeyat, R.

    2009-01-01

    Disseminated candidiasis is a serious problem in public health that results from the invasion of Candida species, in particular Candida albicans. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacies of Zataria multiflora essential oil and itraconazole in clearing C. albicans from the visceral organs of BALB/c mice suffered from disseminated candidiasis. Zataria multiflora essential oil was extracted using Clevenger-type apparatus and analyzed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). For clearance experiment, mice (20-25 g, N=8 per group) received essential oil at doses of 30, 48 and 64 mg/kg and itraconazole at dose of 200 mg/kg intraperitoneally (IP) 2 days before and after intravenous inoculation of 0.5 × 106 C. albicans blastospores. The treated animals were sacrificed on day 20, and 0.1 g of the tissue homogenates was plated onto specific media. In GC-Mass, the main components of the essential oil were carvacrol (61.29%) and thymol (25.18%). The results demonstrated that IP administration of 64 mg/kg of the essential oil had the highest efficacy in reducing C. albicans and produced 39.5, 21.8, 141.5, 174 and 501-fold reductions in mean CFUs per 0.1 gram in Candida infections of the liver, spleen, lungs, brain and kidneys, respectively, compared to positive control. Itraconazole showed significantly more responsiveness than the essential oil at dose of 30 mg/kg in clearing C. albicans from the kidneys (P<0.02), brain (P<0.02) and spleen (P<0.04), and less responsiveness than that of 64 mg/kg in clearing the organism from the brain (P<0.01), lungs (P<0.0005) and kidneys (P<0.0005), whereas no significant difference was observed between this drug and Z. multiflora at dose of 48 mg/kg. These data explain the increased rate of yeast clearance and reduced dissemination to the viscera of Z. multiflora treated mice. PMID:24031384

  13. On the CUSP: Stop BSI: Evaluating the relationship between central line–associated bloodstream infection rate and patient safety climate profile

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Sallie J.; Weeks, Kristina; Pham, Julius Cuong

    2015-01-01

    Background Central line–associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) remains one of the most common and deadly hospital acquired infections in the United States. Creating a culture of safety is an important part of healthcare–associated infection improvement efforts; however, few studies have robustly examined the role of safety climate in patient safety outcomes. We applied a pattern-based approach to measuring safety climate to investigate the relationship between intensive care unit (ICU) patient safety climate profiles and CLABSI rates. Methods Secondary analyses of data collected from 237 adult ICUs participating in the On the CUSP: Stop BSI project. Unit-level baseline scores on the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety, a survey designed to assess patient safety climate, and CLABSI rates, were investigated. Three climate profile characteristics were examined: profile elevation, variability, and shape. Results Zero-inflated Poisson analyses suggested an association between the relative incidence of CLABSI and safety climate profile shape. K-means cluster analysis revealed 5 climate profile shapes. ICUs with conflicting climates and nonpunitive climates had a significantly higher CLABSI risk compared with ICUs with generative leadership climates. Conclusions Relative CLABSI risk was related to safety climate profile shape. None of the climate profile shapes was related to the odds of reporting zero CLABSI. Our findings support using pattern-based methods for examining safety climate rather than examining the relationships between each narrow dimension of safety climate and broader safety outcomes like CLABSI. PMID:25239711

  14. Production of an Attenuated Phenol-Soluble Modulin Variant Unique to the MRSA Clonal Complex 30 Increases Severity of Bloodstream Infection

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Gordon Y. C.; Kretschmer, Dorothee; Duong, Anthony C.; Yeh, Anthony J.; Ho, Trung V.; Chen, Yan; Joo, Hwang-Soo; Kreiswirth, Barry N.; Peschel, Andreas; Otto, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a leading cause of morbidity and death. Phenol-soluble modulins (PSMs) are recently-discovered toxins with a key impact on the development of Staphylococcus aureus infections. Allelic variants of PSMs and their potential impact on pathogen success during infection have not yet been described. Here we show that the clonal complex (CC) 30 lineage, a major cause of hospital-associated sepsis and hematogenous complications, expresses an allelic variant of the PSMα3 peptide. We found that this variant, PSMα3N22Y, is characteristic of CC30 strains and has significantly reduced cytolytic and pro-inflammatory potential. Notably, CC30 strains showed reduced cytolytic and chemotactic potential toward human neutrophils, and increased hematogenous seeding in a bacteremia model, compared to strains in which the genome was altered to express non-CC30 PSMα3. Our findings describe a molecular mechanism contributing to attenuated pro-inflammatory potential in a main MRSA lineage. They suggest that reduced pathogen recognition via PSMs allows the bacteria to evade elimination by innate host defenses during bloodstream infections. Furthermore, they underscore the role of point mutations in key S. aureus toxin genes in that adaptation and the pivotal importance PSMs have in defining key S. aureus immune evasion and virulence mechanisms. PMID:25144687

  15. Risk factors and treatment outcomes of bloodstream infection caused by extended-spectrum cephalosporin-resistant Enterobacter species in adults with cancer.

    PubMed

    Huh, Kyungmin; Kang, Cheol-In; Kim, Jungok; Cho, Sun Young; Ha, Young Eun; Joo, Eun-Jeong; Chung, Doo Ryeon; Lee, Nam Yong; Peck, Kyong Ran; Song, Jae-Hoon

    2014-02-01

    Treatment of Enterobacter infection is complicated due to its intrinsic resistance to cephalosporins. Medical records of 192 adults with cancer who had Enterobacter bacteremia were analyzed retrospectively to evaluate the risk factors for and the treatment outcomes in extended-spectrum cephalosporin (ESC)-resistant Enterobacter bacteremia in adults with cancer. The main outcome measure was 30-day mortality. Of the 192 patients, 53 (27.6%) had bloodstream infections caused by ESC-resistant Enterobacter species. Recent use of a third-generation cephalosporin, older age, tumor progression at last evaluation, recent surgery, and nosocomial acquisition were associated with ESC-resistant Enterobacter bacteremia. The 30-day mortality rate was significantly higher in the resistant group. Multivariate analysis showed that respiratory tract infection, tumor progression, septic shock at presentation, Enterobacter aerogenes as the culprit pathogen, and diabetes mellitus were independent risk factors for mortality. ESC resistance was significantly associated with mortality in patients with E. aerogenes bacteremia, although not in the overall patient population.

  16. Investigation of minor species Candida africana, Candida stellatoidea and Candida dubliniensis in the Candida albicans complex among Yaoundé (Cameroon) HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Ngouana, Thierry K; Krasteva, Donika; Drakulovski, Pascal; Toghueo, Rufin K; Kouanfack, Charles; Ambe, Akaba; Reynes, Jacques; Delaporte, Eric; Boyom, Fabrice F; Mallié, Michèle; Bertout, Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    Minor species of the Candida albicans complex may cause overestimation of the epidemiology of C. albicans, and misidentifications could mask their implication in human pathology. Authors determined the occurrence of minor species of the C. albicans complex (C. africana, C. dubliniensis and C. stellatoidea) among Yaoundé HIV-infected patients, Cameroon. Stool, vaginal discharge, urine and oropharyngeal samples were analysed by mycological diagnosis. Isolates were identified by conventional methods and mass spectrometry (MS; carried out by the matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionisation time-of-flight MS protocol). Candida albicans isolates were thereafter submitted to the PCR amplification of the Hwp1 gene. The susceptibility of isolates to antifungal drugs was tested using the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute M27-A3 protocol. From 115 C. albicans obtained isolates, neither C. dubliniensis nor C. stellatoidea was observed; two strains of C. africana (422PV and 448PV) were identified by PCR electrophoretic profiles at 700 bp. These two C. africana strains were vaginal isolates. The isolate 448PV was resistant to ketoconazole at the minimal inhibitory concentration of 2 μg ml(-1), and showed reduced susceptibility to amphotericin B at 1 μg ml(-1). This first report on C. africana occurrence in Cameroon brings clues for the understanding of the global epidemiology of this yeast as well as that of minor species of the C. albicans complex.

  17. Characteristics of DTH suppressor cells in mice infected with Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Valdez, J C; Mesón, O E; Sirena, A; de Alderete, N G

    1987-05-01

    Inoculation of 10(8) C. albicans intraperitoneally into Balb/c mice at given dosage was reported to induce suppression of antigen-specific delayed-type hypersensitivity. Adoptive transfer of spleen cells into normal syngeneic mice pre-treated with Cyclophosphamide confirmed the existence of suppressor cells in mice. Such cells were sensitive to treatment with anti-theta serum and complement, non-adherent to Sephadex G-10. A pretreatment of the mice with Cyclophosphamide eliminated DTH suppression. Treatment with antimacrophage agents via intraperitoneal abrogated suppression only if being effected before inoculation of alive 10(8) Candida albicans. It is concluded that the spleen suppressor cell is a T-lymphocyte whose precursor is Cyclophosphamide-sensitive, requiring the macrophage to be induced.

  18. Characteristics of DTH suppressor cells in mice infected with Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Valdez, J C; Mesón, O E; Sirena, A; de Alderete, N G

    1987-05-01

    Inoculation of 10(8) C. albicans intraperitoneally into Balb/c mice at given dosage was reported to induce suppression of antigen-specific delayed-type hypersensitivity. Adoptive transfer of spleen cells into normal syngeneic mice pre-treated with Cyclophosphamide confirmed the existence of suppressor cells in mice. Such cells were sensitive to treatment with anti-theta serum and complement, non-adherent to Sephadex G-10. A pretreatment of the mice with Cyclophosphamide eliminated DTH suppression. Treatment with antimacrophage agents via intraperitoneal abrogated suppression only if being effected before inoculation of alive 10(8) Candida albicans. It is concluded that the spleen suppressor cell is a T-lymphocyte whose precursor is Cyclophosphamide-sensitive, requiring the macrophage to be induced. PMID:2439911

  19. High positive predictive value of Gram stain on catheter-drawn blood samples for the diagnosis of catheter-related bloodstream infection in intensive care neonates.

    PubMed

    Deleers, M; Dodémont, M; Van Overmeire, B; Hennequin, Y; Vermeylen, D; Roisin, S; Denis, O

    2016-04-01

    Catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs) remain a leading cause of healthcare-associated infections in preterm infants. Rapid and accurate methods for the diagnosis of CRBSIs are needed in order to implement timely and appropriate treatment. A retrospective study was conducted during a 7-year period (2005-2012) in the neonatal intensive care unit of the University Hospital Erasme to assess the value of Gram stain on catheter-drawn blood samples (CDBS) to predict CRBSIs. Both peripheral samples and CDBS were obtained from neonates with clinically suspected CRBSI. Gram stain, automated culture and quantitative cultures on blood agar plates were performed for each sample. The paired quantitative blood culture was used as the standard to define CRBSI. Out of 397 episodes of suspected CRBSIs, 35 were confirmed by a positive ratio of quantitative culture (>5) or a colony count of CDBS culture >100 colony-forming units (CFU)/mL. All but two of the 30 patients who had a CDBS with a positive Gram stain were confirmed as having a CRBSI. Seven patients who had a CDBS with a negative Gram stain were diagnosed as CRBSI. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of Gram stain on CDBS were 80, 99.4, 93.3 and 98.1 %, respectively. Gram staining on CDBS is a viable method for rapidly (<1 h) detecting CRBSI without catheter withdrawal. PMID:26864043

  20. High positive predictive value of Gram stain on catheter-drawn blood samples for the diagnosis of catheter-related bloodstream infection in intensive care neonates.

    PubMed

    Deleers, M; Dodémont, M; Van Overmeire, B; Hennequin, Y; Vermeylen, D; Roisin, S; Denis, O

    2016-04-01

    Catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs) remain a leading cause of healthcare-associated infections in preterm infants. Rapid and accurate methods for the diagnosis of CRBSIs are needed in order to implement timely and appropriate treatment. A retrospective study was conducted during a 7-year period (2005-2012) in the neonatal intensive care unit of the University Hospital Erasme to assess the value of Gram stain on catheter-drawn blood samples (CDBS) to predict CRBSIs. Both peripheral samples and CDBS were obtained from neonates with clinically suspected CRBSI. Gram stain, automated culture and quantitative cultures on blood agar plates were performed for each sample. The paired quantitative blood culture was used as the standard to define CRBSI. Out of 397 episodes of suspected CRBSIs, 35 were confirmed by a positive ratio of quantitative culture (>5) or a colony count of CDBS culture >100 colony-forming units (CFU)/mL. All but two of the 30 patients who had a CDBS with a positive Gram stain were confirmed as having a CRBSI. Seven patients who had a CDBS with a negative Gram stain were diagnosed as CRBSI. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of Gram stain on CDBS were 80, 99.4, 93.3 and 98.1 %, respectively. Gram staining on CDBS is a viable method for rapidly (<1 h) detecting CRBSI without catheter withdrawal.

  1. Clinical impact of antimicrobial resistance in European hospitals: excess mortality and length of hospital stay related to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infections.

    PubMed

    de Kraker, Marlieke E A; Wolkewitz, Martin; Davey, Peter G; Koller, Walter; Berger, Jutta; Nagler, Jan; Icket, Claudine; Kalenic, Smilja; Horvatic, Jasminka; Seifert, Harald; Kaasch, Achim J; Paniara, Olga; Argyropoulou, Athina; Bompola, Maria; Smyth, Edmond; Skally, Mairead; Raglio, Annibale; Dumpis, Uga; Kelmere, Agita Melbarde; Borg, Michael; Xuereb, Deborah; Ghita, Mihaela C; Noble, Michelle; Kolman, Jana; Grabljevec, Stanko; Turner, David; Lansbury, Louise; Grundmann, Hajo

    2011-04-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is threatening the successful management of nosocomial infections worldwide. Despite the therapeutic limitations imposed by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), its clinical impact is still debated. The objective of this study was to estimate the excess mortality and length of hospital stay (LOS) associated with MRSA bloodstream infections (BSI) in European hospitals. Between July 2007 and June 2008, a multicenter, prospective, parallel matched-cohort study was carried out in 13 tertiary care hospitals in as many European countries. Cohort I consisted of patients with MRSA BSI and cohort II of patients with methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) BSI. The patients in both cohorts were matched for LOS prior to the onset of BSI with patients free of the respective BSI. Cohort I consisted of 248 MRSA patients and 453 controls and cohort II of 618 MSSA patients and 1,170 controls. Compared to the controls, MRSA patients had higher 30-day mortality (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 4.4) and higher hospital mortality (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] = 3.5). Their excess LOS was 9.2 days. MSSA patients also had higher 30-day (aOR = 2.4) and hospital (aHR = 3.1) mortality and an excess LOS of 8.6 days. When the outcomes from the two cohorts were compared, an effect attributable to methicillin resistance was found for 30-day mortality (OR = 1.8; P = 0.04), but not for hospital mortality (HR = 1.1; P = 0.63) or LOS (difference = 0.6 days; P = 0.96). Irrespective of methicillin susceptibility, S. aureus BSI has a significant impact on morbidity and mortality. In addition, MRSA BSI leads to a fatal outcome more frequently than MSSA BSI. Infection control efforts in hospitals should aim to contain infections caused by both resistant and susceptible S. aureus.

  2. Effectiveness of Practices To Increase Timeliness of Providing Targeted Therapy for Inpatients with Bloodstream Infections: a Laboratory Medicine Best Practices Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Buehler, Stephanie S.; Madison, Bereneice; Snyder, Susan R.; Derzon, James H.; Saubolle, Michael A.; Weissfeld, Alice S.; Weinstein, Melvin P.; Liebow, Edward B.; Wolk, Donna M.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Background. Bloodstream infection (BSI) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality throughout the world. Rapid identification of bloodstream pathogens is a laboratory practice that supports strategies for rapid transition to direct targeted therapy by providing for timely and effective patient care. In fact, the more rapidly that appropriate antimicrobials are prescribed, the lower the mortality for patients with sepsis. Rapid identification methods may have multiple positive impacts on patient outcomes, including reductions in mortality, morbidity, hospital lengths of stay, and antibiotic use. In addition, the strategy can reduce the cost of care for patients with BSIs. Objectives. The purpose of this review is to evaluate the evidence for the effectiveness of three rapid diagnostic practices in decreasing the time to targeted therapy for hospitalized patients with BSIs. The review was performed by applying the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC's) Laboratory Medicine Best Practices Initiative (LMBP) systematic review methods for quality improvement (QI) practices and translating the results into evidence-based guidance (R. H. Christenson et al., Clin Chem 57:816–825, 2011, http://dx.doi.org/10.1373/clinchem.2010.157131). Search strategy. A comprehensive literature search was conducted to identify studies with measurable outcomes. A search of three electronic bibliographic databases (PubMed, Embase, and CINAHL), databases containing “gray” literature (unpublished academic, government, or industry evidence not governed by commercial publishing) (CIHI, NIHR, SIGN, and other databases), and the Cochrane database for English-language articles published between 1990 and 2011 was conducted in July 2011. Dates of search. The dates of our search were from 1990 to July 2011. Selection criteria. Animal studies and non-English publications were excluded. The search contained the following medical subject headings: bacteremia; bloodstream

  3. Effectiveness of Practices To Increase Timeliness of Providing Targeted Therapy for Inpatients with Bloodstream Infections: a Laboratory Medicine Best Practices Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Buehler, Stephanie S.; Madison, Bereneice; Snyder, Susan R.; Derzon, James H.; Saubolle, Michael A.; Weissfeld, Alice S.; Weinstein, Melvin P.; Liebow, Edward B.; Wolk, Donna M.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Background. Bloodstream infection (BSI) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality throughout the world. Rapid identification of bloodstream pathogens is a laboratory practice that supports strategies for rapid transition to direct targeted therapy by providing for timely and effective patient care. In fact, the more rapidly that appropriate antimicrobials are prescribed, the lower the mortality for patients with sepsis. Rapid identification methods may have multiple positive impacts on patient outcomes, including reductions in mortality, morbidity, hospital lengths of stay, and antibiotic use. In addition, the strategy can reduce the cost of care for patients with BSIs. Objectives. The purpose of this review is to evaluate the evidence for the effectiveness of three rapid diagnostic practices in decreasing the time to targeted therapy for hospitalized patients with BSIs. The review was performed by applying the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC's) Laboratory Medicine Best Practices Initiative (LMBP) systematic review methods for quality improvement (QI) practices and translating the results into evidence-based guidance (R. H. Christenson et al., Clin Chem 57:816–825, 2011, http://dx.doi.org/10.1373/clinchem.2010.157131). Search strategy. A comprehensive literature search was conducted to identify studies with measurable outcomes. A search of three electronic bibliographic databases (PubMed, Embase, and CINAHL), databases containing “gray” literature (unpublished academic, government, or industry evidence not governed by commercial publishing) (CIHI, NIHR, SIGN, and other databases), and the Cochrane database for English-language articles published between 1990 and 2011 was conducted in July 2011. Dates of search. The dates of our search were from 1990 to July 2011. Selection criteria. Animal studies and non-English publications were excluded. The search contained the following medical subject headings: bacteremia; bloodstream

  4. Immunoadjuvant activity of amphotericin B as displayed in mice infected with Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Bistoni, F; Vecchiarelli, A; Mazzolla, R; Puccetti, P; Marconi, P; Garaci, E

    1985-01-01

    Mice receiving a single intraperitoneal injection of amphotericin B showed increased resistance to subsequent challenge with either Candida albicans or Staphylococcus aureus. This enhancement of resistance was obvious in terms of both survival criteria and clearance of the intravenously injected organism from different organs. The protective effect of amphotericin B was conditioned by dose, time of drug administration, and size of yeast or bacterial inoculum and was reversed by cyclophosphamide. Effector cells from mice treated with amphotericin B displayed enhanced fungicidal activity in vitro as measured in a short-term 51Cr release assay. Macrophages from intact animals exposed in vitro to amphotericin B also acquired strong candidacidal reactivity. PMID:3890731

  5. Azole resistance in oropharyngeal Candida albicans strains isolated from patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    He, X; Tiballi, R N; Zarins, L T; Bradley, S F; Sangeorzan, J A; Kauffman, C A

    1994-01-01

    For 212 oropharyngeal isolates of Candida albicans, the fluconazole MICs for 50 and 90% of strains tested were 0.5 and 16 micrograms/ml, respectively, and those of itraconazole were 0.05 and 0.2 micrograms/ml, respectively. Of 16 isolates for which fluconazole MICs were > 64 micrograms/ml, itraconazole MICs for 14 were < or = 0.8 micrograms/ml and for 2 were > 6.4 micrograms/ml. Most fluconazole-resistant strains remained susceptible to itraconazole; whether itraconazole will prove effective for refractory thrush remains to be shown. PMID:7840596

  6. Implementation of central venous catheter bundle in an intensive care unit in Kuwait: Effect on central line-associated bloodstream infections.

    PubMed

    Salama, Mona F; Jamal, Wafaa; Al Mousa, Haifa; Rotimi, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSIs) is an important healthcare-associated infection in the critical care units. It causes substantial morbidity, mortality and incurs high costs. The use of central venous line (CVL) insertion bundle has been shown to decrease the incidence of CLABSIs. Our aim was to study the impact of CVL insertion bundle on incidence of CLABSI and study the causative microbial agents in an intensive care unit in Kuwait. Surveillance for CLABSI was conducted by trained infection control team using National Health Safety Network (NHSN) case definitions and device days measurement methods. During the intervention period, nursing staff used central line care bundle consisting of (1) hand hygiene by inserter (2) maximal barrier precautions upon insertion by the physician inserting the catheter and sterile drape from head to toe to the patient (3) use of a 2% chlorohexidine gluconate (CHG) in 70% ethanol scrub for the insertion site (4) optimum catheter site selection. (5) Examination of the daily necessity of the central line. During the pre-intervention period, there were 5367 documented catheter-days and 80 CLABSIs, for an incidence density of 14.9 CLABSIs per 1000 catheter-days. After implementation of the interventions, there were 5052 catheter-days and 56 CLABSIs, for an incidence density of 11.08 per 1000 catheter-days. The reduction in the CLABSI/1000 catheter days was not statistically significant (P=0.0859). This study demonstrates that implementation of a central venous catheter post-insertion care bundle was associated with a reduction in CLABSI in an intensive care area setting.

  7. Clinical Features and Treatment Outcomes of Bloodstream Infections Caused by Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase-Producing Escherichia coli Sequence Type 131.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sun Young; Kang, Cheol-In; Cha, Min Kyeong; Wi, Yu Mi; Ha, Young Eun; Chung, Doo Ryeon; Lee, Nam Yong; Peck, Kyong Ran; Song, Jae-Hoon

    2015-08-01

    Despite the remarkable emergence of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli sequence type 131 (ST131), the clinical features and outcomes of infections caused by ST131 remain poorly described. From 2011 to 2012, we collected ESBL-producing E. coli isolates from patients with bloodstream infections in 13 hospitals in Korea and compared clinical characteristics and outcomes between ST131 and non-ST131 clones. Of the 110 ESBL-producing isolates, the most common ST was ST131 (30.9%). Multivariate analysis showed that recent operation was the only variable associated with the ST131 clone; other comorbid conditions and clinical features were similar between ST131 and non-ST131 clones. CTX-M-14 and CTX-M-15 were the predominant types of ESBLs, and CTX-M-15 was significantly associated with ST131. The rate of nonsusceptibility to ciprofloxacin was higher in ST131 than in non-ST131 clones (94.1% vs. 75.0%). No significant differences in 30-day mortality rates were found between ST131 and non-ST131 clones. Multivariate analysis revealed that older age (odds ratio [OR]=5.39, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.22-23.89; p=0.027), nosocomial infection (OR=4.81, 95% CI 1.15-20.15; p=0.032), and higher Pitt bacteremia score (OR=7.26, 95% CI 1.41-37.42; p=0.018) were independent risk factors for 30-day mortality. The ESBL-producing E. coli ST131 clone has emerged and disseminated in Korea. Our findings reveal similarities in clinical and demographic characteristics between ST131 and non-ST131 clones. Although a more resistant profile has been detected in ST131, patients with the ST131 clone did not exhibit a higher mortality rate.

  8. Risk factors for bloodstream infections due to colistin-resistant KPC-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae: results from a multicenter case-control-control study.

    PubMed

    Giacobbe, D R; Del Bono, V; Trecarichi, E M; De Rosa, F G; Giannella, M; Bassetti, M; Bartoloni, A; Losito, A R; Corcione, S; Bartoletti, M; Mantengoli, E; Saffioti, C; Pagani, N; Tedeschi, S; Spanu, T; Rossolini, G M; Marchese, A; Ambretti, S; Cauda, R; Viale, P; Viscoli, C; Tumbarello, M

    2015-12-01

    The increasing prevalence of colistin resistance (ColR) Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC)-producing K. pneumoniae (Kp) is a matter of concern because of its unfavourable impact on mortality of KPC-Kp bloodstream infections (BSI) and the shortage of alternative therapeutic options. A matched case-control-control analysis was conducted. The primary study end point was to assess risk factors for ColR KPC-Kp BSI. The secondary end point was to describe mortality and clinical characteristics of these infections. To assess risk factors for ColR, 142 patients with ColR KPC-Kp BSI were compared to two controls groups: 284 controls without infections caused by KPC-Kp (control group A) and 284 controls with colistin-susceptible (ColS) KPC-Kp BSI (control group B). In the first multivariate analysis (cases vs. group A), previous colistin therapy, previous KPC-Kp colonization, ≥3 previous hospitalizations, Charlson score ≥3 and neutropenia were found to be associated with the development of ColR KPC-Kp BSI. In the second multivariate analysis (cases vs. group B), only previous colistin therapy, previous KPC-Kp colonization and Charlson score ≥3 were associated with ColR. Overall, ColR among KPC-Kp blood isolates increased more than threefold during the 4.5-year study period, and 30-day mortality of ColR KPC-Kp BSI was as high as 51%. Strict rules for the use of colistin are mandatory to staunch the dissemination of ColR in KPC-Kp-endemic hospitals.

  9. Imbalanced Macrophage and Dendritic Cell Activations in Response to Candida albicans in a Murine Model of Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Venturini, James; Fraga-Silva, Thais Fernanda Campos; Marchetti, Camila Martins; Mimura, Luiza Ayumi Nishiyama; Conti, Bruno José; Golim, Márjorie de Assis; Mendes, Rinaldo Poncio; de Arruda, Maria Sueli Parreira

    2016-07-01

    Bloodstream infections caused by Candida species are responsible for high morbidity and mortality, and diabetes mellitus (DM) is an important underlying disease in candidemia episodes. Although DM patients show an enhanced proinflammatory profile, they are highly susceptible to mycobacterial and mycotic infections. Attempting to understand this paradox, we investigated if imbalanced macrophage and dendritic cell (DC) activations could be associated to high incidence and/or severity of Candida albicans infection in the hypoinsulinemia-hyperglycemia (HH) milieu. HH alloxan-induced mice were infected with C. albicans and peritoneal aderent phagocytes were co-cultured with or without lipopolyssaccharide or heat-killed C. albicans, and the production of cytotoxic metabolites, cytokines, and chemokines was evaluated. We also evaluated the surface expression of MHC-II and CD86 in splenic DCs. Our findings showed that both uninfected and C. albicans-infected HH mice showed less production of CCL2 and reduced expression of CD86 by peritoneal phagocytes and splenic DCs, respectively.

  10. Impact of Prophylactic Levofloxacin on Rates of Bloodstream Infection and Fever in Neutropenic Patients with Multiple Myeloma Undergoing Autologous Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Satlin, Michael J.; Vardhana, Santosh; Soave, Rosemary; Shore, Tsiporah B.; Mark, Tomer M.; Jacobs, Samantha E.; Walsh, Thomas J.; Gergis, Usama

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have evaluated the role of antibacterial prophylaxis during neutropenia in patients with multiple myeloma undergoing autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). At our center, levofloxacin prophylaxis was initiated in June 2006 in patients with myeloma who were undergoing autologous HSCT. We compared the incidence of bloodstream infection (BSI) and fever and neutropenia (FN) within 30 days of transplantation before (January 2003 - May 2006) and after (June 2006 - April 2010) the initiation of levofloxacin prophylaxis in patients undergoing autologous HSCT for myeloma. We also compared rates of BSI and FN during the same time periods in autologous HSCT recipients with lymphoma who did not receive antibacterial prophylaxis during either time period. After the initiation of levofloxacin prophylaxis, the BSI rate decreased from 41.2% (49/119) to 14.7% (23/156) and the rate of FN decreased from 91.6% to 60.9% in patients with myeloma (P < 0.001, for each). In contrast, rates of BSI (43.1% vs. 47.3%; P = 0.50) and FN (98.8% vs. 97.1%; P = 0.63) did not change in patients with lymphoma. Levofloxacin prophylaxis was independently associated with decreased odds of BSI (odds ratio [OR] 0.27; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.14–0.51; P < 0.001) and FN (OR 0.18, 95% CI 0.09–0.36; P < 0.001) in multivariate analysis. Patients with myeloma had a non-significant increase in the risk of BSI due to levofloxacin-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (5% vs. 1%, P = 0.08) and Clostridium difficile infection (7% vs. 3%, P = 0.12) after the initiation of levofloxacin prophylaxis, but did not have higher rates of BSI due to other resistant bacteria. Levofloxacin prophylaxis is associated with decreased risk of BSI and FN in patients with myeloma undergoing autologous HSCT. PMID:26150022

  11. Case-case-control study of patients with carbapenem-resistant and third-generation-cephalosporin-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae bloodstream infections.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Jason C; Kuriakose, Safia; Haynes, Kevin; Axelrod, Peter

    2014-10-01

    Strains of third-generation-cephalosporin-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae (3GCRKP) and carbapenem-resistant K. pneumoniae (CRKP) are rapidly spreading. Evidence is needed to establish whether differences exist between patients at risk for 3GCRKP and those at risk for CRKP bloodstream infections (BSIs); thus, this retrospective case-case-control study was conducted to determine if the risk factors for these two infections differ. The inclusion criteria for cases were positive blood cultures for K. pneumoniae, first episode of BSI, age of ≥18 years, and susceptibility results indicating resistance to either third-generation cephalosporins (3GCRKP group) or carbapenems and cephalosporins (CRKP group). Controls were patients admitted for ≥72 h and were matched to cases by month/year and medical unit. Variables of interest were analyzed by univariate analysis, and those of significance were analyzed by logistic regression. In total, 111 patients with 3GCRKP BSIs and 43 patients with CRKP BSIs were matched to 154 controls. Multivariate analyses of 3GCRKP case and control groups demonstrated that a length of stay (LOS) of >40 days (odds ratio [OR], 17.7; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.7 to 84.3), the use of antibiotics in the past 90 days (OR, 4.3; 95% CI, 1.5 to 11.9), and the presence of a central venous catheter (OR, 4.1; 95% CI, 1.3 to 13.4) were independent risk factors. Multivariate analyses of the CRKP case and control groups demonstrated that a LOS of >40 days (OR, 13.5; 95% CI, 2.9 to 62.8) and the use of antibiotics in the past 90 days (OR, 5.9; 95% CI, 1.3 to 26.5) were independent risk factors. Similar factors put patients at risk for these two types of K. pneumoniae BSIs.

  12. Prior statin use and 90-day mortality in Gram-negative and Gram-positive bloodstream infection: a prospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Mehl, A; Harthug, S; Lydersen, S; Paulsen, J; Åsvold, B O; Solligård, E; Damås, J K; Edna, T-H

    2015-03-01

    In several studies on patients with bloodstream infection (BSI), prior use of statins has been associated with improved survival. Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria alert the innate immune system in different ways. We, therefore, studied whether the relation between prior statin use and 90-day total mortality differed between Gram-positive and Gram-negative BSI. We conducted a prospective observational cohort study of 1,408 adults with BSI admitted to Levanger Hospital between January 1, 2002, and December 31, 2011. Data on the use of statins and other medications at admission, comorbidities, functional status, treatment, and outcome were obtained from the patients' hospital records. The relation of statin use with 90-day mortality differed between Gram-negative and Gram-positive BSI (p-value for interaction 0.01). Among patients with Gram-negative BSI, statin users had significantly lower 90-day total mortality [odds ratio (OR) 0.42, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.23-0.75, p = 0.003]. The association remained essentially unchanged after adjusting for the effect of sex, age, functional status before the infection, and underlying diseases that were considered confounders (adjusted OR 0.38, 95 % CI 0.20-0.72, p = 0.003). A similar analysis of patients with Gram-positive BSI showed no association of statin use with mortality (adjusted OR 1.22, 95 % CI 0.69-2.17, p = 0.49). The present study suggests that prior statin use is associated with a lower 90-day total mortality in Gram-negative BSI, but not in Gram-positive BSI.

  13. Emergence of Resistance of Candida albicans to Clotrimazole in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Children: In Vitro and Clinical Correlations

    PubMed Central

    Pelletier, René; Peter, Joanne; Antin, Cynthia; Gonzalez, Corina; Wood, Lauren; Walsh, Thomas J.

    2000-01-01

    Oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC) is a common opportunistic infection in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients and other immunocompromised hosts. Clotrimazole troches are widely used in the treatment of mucosal candidiasis. However, little is known about the potential contribution of clotrimazole resistance to the development of refractory mucosal candidiasis. We therefore investigated the potential emergence of resistance to clotrimazole in a prospectively monitored HIV-infected pediatric population receiving this azole. Adapting the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards M27-A reference method for broth antifungal susceptibility testing of yeasts to clotrimazole, we compared MICs in macrodilution and microdilution assays. We further analyzed the correlation between these in vitro findings and the clinical response to antifungal therapy. One isolate from each of 87 HIV-infected children was studied by the macrodilution and microdilution methods. Two inoculum sizes were tested by the macrodilution method (103 and 104 CFU/ml) in order to assess the effect of inoculum size on clotrimazole MICs. The same isolates also were tested using a noncolorimetric microdilution method. Clotrimazole concentrations ranged from 0.03 to 16 μg/ml. Readings were performed after incubation for 24 and 48 h at 35°C. For 62 (71.2%) of 87 clinical isolates, the MICs were low (≤0.06 μg/ml). The MIC for 90% of the strains tested was 0.5 μg/ml, and the highest MIC was 8 μg/ml. There was no significant difference between MICs at the two inoculum sizes. There was 89% agreement (±1 tube) between the microdilution method at 24 h and the macrodilution method at 48 h. If the MIC of clotrimazole for an isolate of C. albicans was ≥0.5 μg/ml, there was a significant risk (P < 0.001) of cross-resistance to other azoles: fluconazole, ≥64 μg/ml (relative risk [RR] = 8.9); itraconazole, ≥1 μg/ml (RR = 10). Resistance to clotrimazole was highly associated with

  14. Successful Treatment of Bloodstream Infection Due to Metallo-β-Lactamase-Producing Stenotrophomonas maltophilia in a Renal Transplant Patient.

    PubMed

    Mojica, Maria F; Ouellette, Christopher P; Leber, Amy; Becknell, M Brian; Ardura, Monica I; Perez, Federico; Shimamura, Masako; Bonomo, Robert A; Aitken, Samuel L; Shelburne, Samuel A

    2016-09-01

    Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is an emerging multidrug-resistant (MDR) opportunistic pathogen for which new antibiotic options are urgently needed. We report our clinical experience treating a 19-year-old renal transplant recipient who developed prolonged bacteremia due to metallo-β-lactamase-producing S. maltophilia refractory to conventional treatment. The infection recurred despite a prolonged course of colistimethate sodium (colistin) but resolved with the use of a novel drug combination with clinical efficacy against the patient's S. maltophilia isolate. PMID:27551008

  15. Driving forces of vancomycin-resistant E. faecium and E. faecalis blood-stream infections in children

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Rates of invasive vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) in the USA remains on the rise. Efforts to control vancomycin use and nosocomial transmission have had limited success in halting the spread of this pathogen. The role of antibiotic exposure remains a topic of controversy. We evaluated the association between emergence of VRE-blood-stream infections (BSI), aggregate and individual-patient vancomycin- exposure, and clonal transmission of VRE at an academic pediatric tertiary care hospital. Methods E. faecium and E. faecalis isolates recovered from blood specimens from hospitalized children from 2003–2010 were retrieved from the microbiology database. Aggregate vancomycin use and individual-patient vancomycin exposure 6 months preceding each event of bacteremia were recorded. Pulse-field electrophoresis was performed on selected VRE isolates. Results Of 151 episodes of E. faecium and E. faecalis BSI among hospitalized children <18 years of age, 9% (14) were due to VRE. Of these, 5 (36%) were due to nosocomial transmission. Aggregate (r .19, P = 0.3) and individual-patient vancomycin-exposure (X 2  = .26; P = .87) were not associated with VRE-BSI. On bivariate analysis, OR for developing VRE-BSI among patients infected with clonal isolates was 36 (P < .0001). Infection control interventions, rather than antimicrobial stewardship interventions to decrease vancomycin use, proved to be effective in reducing the rates of VRE-BSI. Conclusions In our experience, VRE-BSI was associated with nosocomial transmission and was independent of aggregate and individual-patient vancomycin-exposure. Molecular epidemiology is a crucial tool to differentiate the role of nosocomial transmission and antibiotic exposure in the emergence of invasive VRE infections among hospitalized children. PMID:25206975

  16. Evaluation of the Broad-Range PCR/ESI-MS Technology in Blood Specimens for the Molecular Diagnosis of Bloodstream Infections

    PubMed Central

    Jordana-Lluch, Elena; Giménez, Montserrat; Quesada, Mª Dolores; Rivaya, Belén; Marcó, Clara; Domínguez, Mª Jesús; Arméstar, Fernando; Martró, Elisa; Ausina, Vicente

    2015-01-01

    Background Rapid identification of the etiological agent in bloodstream infections is of vital importance for the early administration of the most appropriate antibiotic therapy. Molecular methods may offer an advantage to current culture-based microbiological diagnosis. The goal of this study was to evaluate the performance of IRIDICA, a platform based on universal genetic amplification followed by mass spectrometry (PCR/ESI-MS) for the molecular diagnosis of sepsis-related pathogens directly from the patient’s blood. Methods A total of 410 whole blood specimens from patients admitted to Emergency Room (ER) and Intensive Care Unit (ICU) with clinical suspicion of sepsis were tested with the IRIDICA BAC BSI Assay (broad identification of bacteria and Candida spp.). Microorganisms grown in culture and detected by IRIDICA were compared considering blood culture as gold standard. When discrepancies were found, clinical records and results from other cultures were taken into consideration (clinical infection criterion). Results The overall positive and negative agreement of IRIDICA with blood culture in the analysis by specimen was 74.8% and 78.6%, respectively, rising to 76.9% and 87.2% respectively, when compared with the clinical infection criterion. Interestingly, IRIDICA detected 41 clinically significant microorganisms missed by culture, most of them from patients under antimicrobial treatment. Of special interest were the detections of one Mycoplasma hominis and two Mycobacterium simiae in immunocompromised patients. When ICU patients were analyzed separately, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values compared with blood culture were 83.3%, 78.6%, 33.9% and 97.3% respectively, and 90.5%, 87.2%, 64.4% and 97.3% respectively, in comparison with the clinical infection criterion. Conclusions IRIDICA is a promising technology that offers an early and reliable identification of a wide variety of pathogens directly from the patient’s blood

  17. Epidemiology and Burden of Bloodstream Infections Caused by Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamase Producing Enterobacteriaceae in a Pediatric Hospital in Senegal

    PubMed Central

    Ndir, Awa; Diop, Amadou; Faye, Pape Makhtar; Cissé, Moussa Fafa; Ndoye, Babacar; Astagneau, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Context Severe bacterial infections are not considered as a leading cause of death in young children in sub-Saharan Africa. The worldwide emergence of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-E) could change the paradigm, especially in neonates who are at high risk of developing healthcare-associated infections. Objective To evaluate the epidemiology and the burden of ESBL-E bloodstream infections (BSI). Methods A case-case-control study was conducted in patients admitted in a pediatric hospital during two consecutive years. Cases were patients with Enterobacteriaceae BSI and included ESBL-positive (cases 1) and ESBL-negative BSI (cases 2). Controls were patients with no BSI. Multivariate analysis using a stepwise logistic regression was performed to identify risk factors for ESBL acquisition and for fatal outcomes. A multistate model was used to estimate the excess length of hospital stay (LOS) attributable to ESBL production while accounting for time of infection. Cox proportional hazards models were performed to assess the independent effect of ESBL-positive and negative BSI on LOS. Results The incidence rate of ESBL-E BSI was of 1.52 cases/1000 patient-days (95% CI: 1.2–5.6 cases per 1000 patient-days). Multivariate analysis showed that independent risk factors for ESBL-BSI acquisition were related to underlying comorbidities (sickle cell disease OR = 3.1 (95%CI: 2.3–4.9), malnutrition OR = 2.0 (95%CI: 1.7–2.6)) and invasive procedures (mechanical ventilation OR = 3.5 (95%CI: 2.7–5.3)). Neonates were also identified to be at risk for ESBL-E BSI. Inadequate initial antibiotic therapy was more frequent in ESBL-positive BSI than ESBL-negative BSI (94.2% versus 5.7%, p<0.0001). ESBL-positive BSI was associated with higher case-fatality rate than ESBL-negative BSI (54.8% versus 15.4%, p<0.001). Multistate modelling indicated an excess LOS attributable to ESBL production of 4.3 days. The adjusted end-of-LOS hazard ratio for ESBL

  18. Correlation between in vivo and in vitro studies of modulation of resistance to experimental Candida albicans infection by cyclophosphamide in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Bistoni, F; Baccarini, M; Blasi, E; Marconi, P; Puccetti, P; Garaci, E

    1983-01-01

    Mice receiving a single injection of cyclophosphamide (150 mg/kg) 1 to 6 days before inoculation with viable Candida albicans showed an increased susceptibility to the challenge accompanied by a reduction in peripheral blood polymorphonuclear leukocytes and lymphocytes as well as in spleen cellularity. Several immunological in vitro functions also appeared to be dramatically depressed. Most of these hematological and functional parameters returned to control values by day 9 after cyclophosphamide administration, at a time when resistance to C. albicans infection appeared to be unchanged. However, when exposure to cyclophosphamide occurred 12 to 21 days before inoculation with the live yeast, enhanced resistance was observed with the majority of the animals surviving challenge. To gain some insight into the mechanisms underlying this late increase in resistance to C. albicans infection after cyclophosphamide administration, we analyzed a series of immunological functions, including the in vitro candidacidal activity of polymorphonuclear neutrophils and plastic-adherent and nonadherent spleen cells as well as the activity of natural killer cells and alloreactive T lymphocytes. The results show that a numerical rebound of blood polymorphonuclear neutrophils and the appearance of a highly candidacidal cell population in the spleen may be among the factors underlying the late increase in resistance to C. albicans after administration of cyclophosphamide. PMID:6339410

  19. Use of Disinfection Cap to Reduce Central-Line–Associated Bloodstream Infection and Blood Culture Contamination Among Hematology–Oncology Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kamboj, Mini; Blair, Rachel; Bell, Natalie; Son, Crystal; Huang, Yao-Ting; Dowling, Mary; Lipitz-Snyderman, Allison; Eagan, Janet; Sepkowitz, Kent

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE In this study, we examined the impact of routine use of a passive disinfection cap for catheter hub decontamination in hematology–oncology patients. SETTING A tertiary care cancer center in New York City METHODS In this multiphase prospective study, we used 2 preintervention phases (P1 and P2) to establish surveillance and baseline rates followed by sequential introduction of disinfection caps on high-risk units (HRUs: hematologic malignancy wards, hematopoietic stem cell transplant units and intensive care units) (P3) and general oncology units (P4). Unit-specific and hospital-wide hospital-acquired central-line–associated bloodstream infection (HA-CLABSI) rates and blood culture contamination (BCC) with coagulase negative staphylococci (CONS) were measured. RESULTS Implementation of a passive disinfection cap resulted in a 34% decrease in hospital-wide HA-CLABSI rates (combined P1 and P2 baseline rate of 2.66–1.75 per 1,000 catheter days at the end of the study period). This reduction occurred only among high-risk patients and not among general oncology patients. In addition, the use of the passive disinfection cap resulted in decreases of 63% (HRUs) and 51% (general oncology units) in blood culture contamination, with an estimated reduction of 242 BCCs with CONS. The reductions in HA-CLABSI and BCC correspond to an estimated annual savings of $3.2 million in direct medical costs. CONCLUSION Routine use of disinfection caps is associated with decreased HA-CLABSI rates among high-risk hematology oncology patients and a reduction in blood culture contamination among all oncology patients. PMID:26394849

  20. Genetic characteristics and antimicrobial resistance of Staphylococcus epidermidis isolates from patients with catheter-related bloodstream infections and from colonized healthcare workers in a Belgian hospital

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Staphylococcus epidermidis is a pathogen that is frequently encountered in the hospital environment. Healthcare workers (HCWs) can serve as a reservoir for the transmission of S. epidermidis to patients. Methods The aim of this study was to compare and identify differences between S. epidermidis isolated from 20 patients with catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs) and from the hands of 42 HCWs in the same hospital in terms of antimicrobial resistance, biofilm production, presence of the intercellular adhesion (ica) operon and genetic diversity (pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and staphylococcal cassette chromosome (SCC) mec typing). Results S. epidermidis isolates that caused CRBSI were resistant to significantly more non-betalactam drugs than were isolates collected from HCWs. Among the 43 mecA positive isolates (26 from HCWs), the most frequent SCCmec type was type IV (44%). The ica operon was significantly more prevalent in CRBSI isolates than in HCWs (P < 0.05). Weak in vitro biofilm production seemed to correlate with the absence of the ica operon regardless of the commensal or pathogenic origin of the isolate. The 62 isolates showed high diversity in their PFGE patterns divided into 37 different types: 19 harbored only by the CRBSI isolates and 6 shared by the clinical and HCW isolates. MLST revealed a total of ten different sequence types (ST). ST2 was limited to CRBSI-specific PFGE types while the “mixed” PFGE types were ST5, ST16, ST88 and ST153. Conclusion One third of CRBSI episodes were due to isolates belonging to PFGE types that were also found on the hands of HCWs, suggesting that HCW serve as a reservoir for oxacillin resistance and transmission to patients. However, S. epidermidis ST2, mecA-positive and icaA-positive isolates, which caused the majority of clinically severe CRBSI, were not recovered from the HCW’s hands. PMID:24899534

  1. Are ciprofloxacin dosage regimens adequate for antimicrobial efficacy and prevention of resistance? Pseudomonas aeruginosa bloodstream infection in elderly patients as a simulation case study.

    PubMed

    Cazaubon, Yoann; Bourguignon, Laurent; Goutelle, Sylvain; Martin, Olivier; Maire, Pascal; Ducher, Michel

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this work was to define the optimal dosage (OD) of ciprofloxacin in order to prevent the emergence of bacterial resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a geriatric population with a bloodstream infection. A thousand pharmacokinetic profiles were simulated with a ciprofloxacin pharmacokinetic model from the literature. Three dosing regimens were tested for five days: once daily (QD), twice daily (BID), and thrice daily (TID). First of all, effective dosages (ED) of ciprofloxacin were defined as those achieving a target AUC24 /MIC ≥ 125. Then, these ED were simulated in order to calculate the percentage of time spent within the mutant selection window (TMSW ) and to select optimal dosage (OD) defined as those achieving TMSW ≤ 20%. Based on the AUC24 /MIC, for low MICs (0.125 μg/mL), all dosing regimens recommended by French guidelines were effective. For intermediate MICs (0.25 and 0.5 μg/mL), simulated doses higher than those recommended were needed to achieve the efficacy target. About prevention of resistance for low MICs, dosages recommended were only effective in patients with creatinine clearance (CLCR ) ≥ 60 mL/min. For intermediate MICs, dosages higher than recommended were needed to achieve the optimality target. This study shows that current ciprofloxacin dosing guidelines have not been optimized to prevent the emergence of bacterial resistance, especially in geriatric patients with mild to severe renal impairment. To achieve both efficacy and prevention of resistance, ciprofloxacin dosages greater than those recommended would be needed. Tolerance of such higher doses needs to be evaluated in clinical studies.

  2. Five-Lumen Antibiotic-Impregnated Femoral Central Venous Catheters in Severely Burned Patients: An Investigation of Device Utility and Catheter-Related Bloodstream Infection Rates.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Bruce C; Mian, Mohammad A H; Mullins, Robert F; Hassan, Zaheed; Shaver, Joseph R; Johnston, Krystal K

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) rate in a severely burned patient population, many of whom required prolonged use of central venous catheters (CVCs). Between January 2008 and June 2012, 151 patients underwent placement of 455 five-lumen minocycline/rifampin-impregnated CVCs. CRBSI was defined as at least one blood culture (>100,000 colonies) and one simultaneous roll-plate CVC tip culture (>15 colony forming units) positive for the same organism. Most patients had accidental burns (81.5%) with a mean TBSA of 50%. A mean of three catheters were inserted per patient (range, 1-25). CVCs were inserted in the femoral vein (91.2%), subclavian vein (5.3%), and internal jugular vein (3.3%). Mean overall catheter indwell time was 8 days (range, 0-39 days). The overall rate of CRBSI per 1000 catheter days was 11.2; patients with a TBSA >60% experienced significantly higher rates of CRBSI than patients with a TBSA ≤60% (16.2 vs 7.3, P = .01). CVCs placed through burned skin were four times more likely to be associated with CRBSI than CVCs placed through intact skin. The most common infectious organism was Acinetobacter baumannii. Deep venous thrombosis developed in eleven patients (7%). The overall rate of CRBSI was 11.2, consistent with published rates of CRBSI in burn patients. Thus, femoral placement of 5-lumen CVCs did not result in increased CRBSI rates. These data support the safety of femoral CVC placement in burn patients, contrary to the Centers for Disease Control recommendation to avoid femoral CVC insertion.

  3. Utility of Electronic Medical Records to Assess the Relationship Between Parenteral Nutrition and Central Line–Associated Bloodstream Infections in Adult Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ippolito, Paul; Larson, Elaine L.; Furuya, E. Yoko; Liu, Jianfang; Seres, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Parenteral nutrition is associated with increased central line–associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs). Electronic databases are important for identifying independent risk factors for prevention strategies. Our aims were to evaluate the utility of using electronic data sources to identify risk factors for CLABSIs, including parenteral nutrition (PN), and to assess the association between CLABSI and PN administration. Methods Data were obtained for all discharges of adult patients in whom a central line was inserted between September 1, 2007, and December 31, 2008, in a large, academically affiliated hospital in New York City. CLABSI was defined electronically using a modified definition from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. A manual chart review was also undertaken to assess validity/reliability of the electronic database and gather additional information. Risk factors for CLABSI were examined using logistic regression. Results Among 4840 patients, there were 220 CLABSIs, an incidence of 5.4 CLABSIs per 1000 central line days. Risk factors included PN (odds ratio [OR], 4.33; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.50–7.48), intensive care unit stay (OR, 2.26; 95% CI, 1.58–3.23), renal disease (OR, 2.79; 95% CI, 2.00–3.88), and immunodeficiency (OR, 2.26; 95% CI, 1.70–3.00). Diabetes mellitus was associated with reduced CLABSI rates (OR, 0.63; 95% CI, 0.45–0.88). Conclusions The utility of electronic medical records for determining risk factors is limited by such things as free-text data entry. Using a hybrid between fully electronic and manual chart review, reliable data were obtained. PN is associated with a high risk for CLABSI in a population highly selected for indications for PN. PMID:24898208

  4. Similar efficacy and safety of daptomycin versus linezolid for treatment of vancomycin-resistant enterococcal bloodstream infections: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ming; Liang, Liang; Ji, Liwei; Chen, Di; Zhang, Yatong; Zhu, Yuanchao; Patel, Khilna

    2016-09-01

    Daptomycin and linezolid are the most commonly used antibiotics for bloodstream infection caused by vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE-BSI). However, the best therapeutic agent to treat VRE-BSI remains to be established. In order to provide evidence for an optimal treatment decision, a systematic review and meta-analysis was performed comparing the efficacy and safety of daptomycin and linezolid for the treatment of VRE-BSI. After thorough searching of relevant studies from MEDLINE, EMBASE, Clinicaltrials.gov and international meetings up to November 2015, 11 retrospective cohort studies were finally included with a sample size of 1339 patients. Among these 11 included studies, all patients in the daptomycin group received standard or high-dose daptomycin treatment (≥6 mg/kg/day). Data were extracted and pooled risk ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated using a random-effects model. The meta-analysis indicated similar crude overall mortality between patients receiving daptomycin and those treated with linezolid (RR = 1.07, 95% CI 0.83-1.37). Moreover, no difference regarding clinical cure (RR = 1.11, 95% CI 0.88-1.42), microbiological cure (RR = 0.99, 95% CI 0.90-1.09) or relapse rate of VRE-BSI (RR = 1.08, 95% CI 0.76-1.52) was found between daptomycin and linezolid. Adverse event rates were not significantly different between the two groups. Currently available evidence indicates similar efficacy and safety of daptomycin and linezolid for the treatment of VRE-BSI. However, the findings in the meta-analysis are limited by heterogeneity between relatively small-scale retrospective studies and should be interpreted cautiously. PMID:27475877

  5. Central Venous Catheter Repair is Associated with an Increased Risk of Bacteremia and Central Line Associated Bloodstream Infection in Pediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    LUNDGREN, INGRID S.; ZHOU, CHUAN; MALONE, FRANCES R.; MCAFEE, NANCY G.; GANTT, SOREN; ZERR, DANIELLE M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Repair of broken central venous catheters (CVCs) is common in pediatric patients. We hypothesized that this practice predisposes to bacteremia and CVC-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSI). Methods We conducted a retrospective case-crossover study of pediatric patients aged 1 month to 21 years with CVC breakages who underwent a first-time repair at our institution, using repair kits provided by CVC manufacturers. We compared rates of bacteremia and CLABSI (defined by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention criteria) in the 30 days pre-repair (control period) and the 30 days post-repair (exposure period), with adjustment for within-patient correlation using conditional Poisson regression. Results The mean pre-repair rate of bacteremia was 9.9 per 1000 catheter days, which increased to 24.5 post-repair, resulting in an adjusted incidence rate ratio (IRR) of 1.87 (95% CI 1.05 – 3.33, p = 0.034). Risk of CLABSI demonstrated a greater than two-fold increase (IRR 2.15, 95% CI 1.02 – 4.53, p = 0.045) when all catheter days were included, and a four-fold increase when days on antibiotics were excluded (IRR 4.07, 95% CI 1.43 – 11.57, p = 0.008). Conclusions We found that repair of a broken CVC was associated with a two to four-fold higher risk of developing CLABSI within 30 days of repair in pediatric patients. Further studies are needed to determine interventions to reduce this risk and to better define the relative merits of CVC repair compared with replacement in selected patient populations. PMID:22146741

  6. Significance of Mannose-Binding Lectin Deficiency and Nucleotide-Binding Oligomerization Domain 2 Polymorphisms in Staphylococcus aureus Bloodstream Infections: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Osthoff, Michael; Au Yong, Hue Mun; Dean, Melinda M.; Eisen, Damon P.

    2013-01-01

    Background Pathways coordinated by innate pattern recognition receptors like mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 2 (NOD2) are among the first immune responses to Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) bloodstream infections (BSI) in animal models, but human data are limited. Here, we investigated the role of MBL deficiency and NOD2 mutations in the predisposition to and severity of S. aureus BSI. Patients and Methods A matched case-control study was undertaken involving 70 patients with S. aureus BSI and 70 age- and sex-matched hospitalized controls. MBL levels, MBL2 and NOD2 polymorphisms were analyzed. Results After adjusting for potential confounders, MBL deficiency (<0.5 µg/ml) was found less frequently in cases than controls (26 vs. 41%, OR 0.4, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.20-0.95, p=0.04) as were low producing MBL genotypes (11 vs. 23%, OR 0.2, 95% CI 0.08-0.75, p=0.01), whereas NOD2 polymorphisms were similarly distributed. Cases with NOD2 polymorphisms had less organ dysfunction as shown by a lower SOFA score (median 2.5 vs. 4.5, p=0.02), whereas only severe MBL deficiency (<0.1 µg/ml) was associated with life-threatening S. aureus BSI (OR 5.6, 95% CI 1.25-24.85, p=0.02). Conclusions Contrary to animal model data, our study suggests MBL deficiency may confer protection against acquiring S. aureus BSI. NOD2 mutations were less frequently associated with multi-organ dysfunction. Further human studies of the innate immune response in S. aureus BSI are needed to identify suitable host targets in sepsis treatment. PMID:24086711

  7. The Effect of Inadequate Initial Empiric Antimicrobial Treatment on Mortality in Critically Ill Patients with Bloodstream Infections: A Multi-Centre Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Savage, Rachel D; Fowler, Robert A; Rishu, Asgar H; Bagshaw, Sean M; Cook, Deborah; Dodek, Peter; Hall, Richard; Kumar, Anand; Lamontagne, François; Lauzier, François; Marshall, John; Martin, Claudio M; McIntyre, Lauralyn; Muscedere, John; Reynolds, Steven; Stelfox, Henry T; Daneman, Nick

    2016-01-01

    Hospital mortality rates are elevated in critically ill patients with bloodstream infections. Given that mortality may be even higher if appropriate treatment is delayed, we sought to determine the effect of inadequate initial empiric treatment on mortality in these patients. A retrospective cohort study was conducted across 13 intensive care units in Canada. We defined inadequate initial empiric treatment as not receiving at least one dose of an antimicrobial to which the causative pathogen(s) was susceptible within one day of initial blood culture. We evaluated the association between inadequate initial treatment and hospital mortality using a random effects multivariable logistic regression model. Among 1,190 patients (1,097 had bacteremia and 93 had candidemia), 476 (40%) died and 266 (22%) received inadequate initial treatment. Candidemic patients more often had inadequate initial empiric therapy (64.5% versus 18.8%), as well as longer delays to final culture results (4 vs 3 days) and appropriate therapy (2 vs 0 days). After adjustment, there was no detectable association between inadequate initial treatment and mortality among bacteremic patients (Odds Ratio (OR): 1.02, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 0.70-1.48); however, candidemic patients receiving inadequate treatment had nearly three times the odds of death (OR: 2.89, 95% CI: 1.05-7.99). Inadequate initial empiric antimicrobial treatment was not associated with increased mortality in bacteremic patients, but was an important risk factor in the subgroup of candidemic patients. Further research is warranted to improve early diagnostic and risk prediction methods in candidemic patients. PMID:27152615

  8. Use of Universal 16S rRNA Gene PCR as a Diagnostic Tool for Venous Access Port-Related Bloodstream Infections

    PubMed Central

    Marín, M.; Martín-Rabadán, P.; Echenagusia, A.; Camúñez, F.; Rodríguez-Rosales, G.; Simó, G.; Echenagusia, M.; Bouza, E.

    2013-01-01

    Amplification of the universal 16S rRNA gene using PCR has improved the diagnostic yield of microbiological samples. However, no data have been reported on the reliability of this technique with venous access ports (VAPs). We assessed the utility of 16S rRNA PCR for the prediction of VAP-related bloodstream infection (VAP-RBSI). During a 2-year period, we prospectively received all VAPs removed by interventional radiologists. PCR and conventional cultures were performed using samples from the different VAP sites. We compared the results of PCR with those of conventional culture for patients with confirmed VAP-RBSI. We collected 219 VAPs from 219 patients. Conventional VAP culture revealed 15 episodes of VAP-RBSI. PCR revealed a further 4 episodes in patients undergoing antibiotic therapy which would have gone undetected using conventional culture. Moreover, it had a negative predictive value of 97.8% for the prediction of VAP-RBSI when it was performed using biofilm from the internal surface of the port. In conclusion, universal 16S rRNA PCR performed with samples from the inside of VAPs proved to be a useful tool for the diagnosis of VAP-RBSI. It increased detection of VAP-RBSI episodes by 21.1% in patients undergoing antibiotic therapy whose episodes would have gone undetected using conventional culture. Therefore, we propose a new application of 16S rRNA PCR as a useful tool for the diagnosis of VAP-RBSI in patients receiving antibiotic therapy. PMID:23254136

  9. The Effect of Inadequate Initial Empiric Antimicrobial Treatment on Mortality in Critically Ill Patients with Bloodstream Infections: A Multi-Centre Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Savage, Rachel D.; Fowler, Robert A.; Rishu, Asgar H.; Bagshaw, Sean M.; Cook, Deborah; Dodek, Peter; Hall, Richard; Kumar, Anand; Lamontagne, François; Lauzier, François; Marshall, John; Martin, Claudio M.; McIntyre, Lauralyn; Muscedere, John; Reynolds, Steven; Stelfox, Henry T.; Daneman, Nick

    2016-01-01

    Hospital mortality rates are elevated in critically ill patients with bloodstream infections. Given that mortality may be even higher if appropriate treatment is delayed, we sought to determine the effect of inadequate initial empiric treatment on mortality in these patients. A retrospective cohort study was conducted across 13 intensive care units in Canada. We defined inadequate initial empiric treatment as not receiving at least one dose of an antimicrobial to which the causative pathogen(s) was susceptible within one day of initial blood culture. We evaluated the association between inadequate initial treatment and hospital mortality using a random effects multivariable logistic regression model. Among 1,190 patients (1,097 had bacteremia and 93 had candidemia), 476 (40%) died and 266 (22%) received inadequate initial treatment. Candidemic patients more often had inadequate initial empiric therapy (64.5% versus 18.8%), as well as longer delays to final culture results (4 vs 3 days) and appropriate therapy (2 vs 0 days). After adjustment, there was no detectable association between inadequate initial treatment and mortality among bacteremic patients (Odds Ratio (OR): 1.02, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 0.70–1.48); however, candidemic patients receiving inadequate treatment had nearly three times the odds of death (OR: 2.89, 95% CI: 1.05–7.99). Inadequate initial empiric antimicrobial treatment was not associated with increased mortality in bacteremic patients, but was an important risk factor in the subgroup of candidemic patients. Further research is warranted to improve early diagnostic and risk prediction methods in candidemic patients. PMID:27152615

  10. Geographical Variability in the Likelihood of Bloodstream Infections Due to Gram-Negative Bacteria: Correlation with Proximity to the Equator and Health Care Expenditure

    PubMed Central

    Carmeli, Yehuda; Perencevich, Eli; Tuite, Ashleigh R.; Mermel, Leonard A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Infections due to Gram-negative bacteria exhibit seasonal trends, with peak infection rates during warmer months. We hypothesized that the likelihood of a bloodstream infection due to Gram-negative bacteria increases with proximity to the equator. We tested this hypothesis and identified geographical, climatic and social factors associated with this variability. Design We established a network of 23 international centers in 22 cities. Setting: De-identified results of positive blood cultures from 2007–2011 and data sources for geographic, climatic and socioeconomic factors were assembled for each center. Participants Patients at the 23 centers with positive blood cultures. Main outcome Due to variability in the availability of total culture volumes across sites, our primary outcome measure was the fraction of positive blood cultures that yielded Gram-negative bacteria; sources of variability in this outcome measure were explored using meta-regression techniques. Results The mean fraction of bacteremia associated with Gram-negative bacteria was 48.4% (range 26.4% to 61.8%). Although not all sites displayed significant seasonality, the overall P-value for seasonal oscillation was significant (P<0.001). In univariate meta-regression models, temperature, latitude, latitude squared, longitude, per capita gross domestic product and percent of gross domestic product spent on healthcare were all associated with the fraction of bacteremia due to Gram-negative bacteria. In multivariable models, only percent of gross domestic product spent on healthcare and distance from the equator (ie. latitude squared) were significantly associated with the fraction of bacteremia due to Gram-negative bacteria. Conclusions The likelihood of bacteremia due to Gram-negative bacteria varies markedly between cities, in a manner that appears to have both geographic (latitude) and socioeconomic (proportion gross domestic product devoted to health spending) determinants. Thus, the

  11. Klebsiella variicola is a frequent cause of bloodstream infection in the stockholm area, and associated with higher mortality compared to K. pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Maatallah, Makaoui; Vading, Malin; Kabir, Muhammad Humaun; Bakhrouf, Amina; Kalin, Mats; Nauclér, Pontus; Brisse, Sylvain; Giske, Christian G

    2014-01-01

    Clinical isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae are divided into three phylogroups and differ in their virulence factor contents. The aim of this study was to determine an association between phylogroup, virulence factors and mortality following bloodstream infection (BSI) caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae. Isolates from all adult patients with BSI caused by K. pneumoniae admitted to Karolinska University Hospital, Solna between 2007 and 2009 (n = 139) were included in the study. Phylogenetic analysis was performed based on multilocus sequence typing (MLST) data. Testing for mucoid phenotype, multiplex PCR determining serotypes K1, K2, K5, K20, K54 and K57, and testing for virulence factors connected to more severe disease in previous studies, was also performed. Data was retrieved from medical records including age, sex, comorbidity, central and urinary catheters, time to adequate treatment, hospital-acquired infection, and mortality, to identify risk factors. The primary end-point was 30- day mortality. The three K. pneumoniae phylogroups were represented: KpI (n = 96), KpII (corresponding to K. quasipneumoniae, n = 9) and KpIII (corresponding to K. variicola, n = 34). Phylogroups were not significantly different in baseline characteristics. Overall, the 30-day mortality was 24/139 (17.3%). Isolates belonging to KpIII were associated with the highest 30-day mortality (10/34 cases, 29.4%), whereas KpI isolates were associated with mortality in 13/96 cases (13.5%). This difference was significant both in univariate statistical analysis (P = 0.037) and in multivariate analysis adjusting for age and comorbidity (OR 3.03 (95% CI: 1.10-8.36). Only three of the isolates causing mortality within 30 days belonged to any of the virulent serotypes (K54, n = 1), had a mucoid phenotype (n = 1) and/or contained virulence genes (wcaG n = 1 and wcaG/allS n = 1). In conclusion, the results indicate higher mortality among patients infected with

  12. Laboratory-based surveillance of hospital-acquired catheter-related bloodstream infections in Catalonia. Results of the VINCat Program (2007-2010).

    PubMed

    Almirante, Benito; Limón, Enric; Freixas, Núria; Gudiol, F

    2012-06-01

    The VINCat Program is an institutional surveillance program for hospital-acquired infections developed in the healthcare institutions of Catalonia, Spain. The program includes the monitoring of various components of hospital-acquired infection, among which is catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI). The aim of this study was to describe the frequency of CRBSI in hospitals participating in the VINCat Program over a period of 4 years (2007-2010). The monitoring of the CRBSI component is carried out continuously in all inpatient units by performing a daily assessment of all blood culture results issued by the Microbiology Laboratories. Precise definitions are used for CRBSI, and adjusted rates are expressed per 1,000 days of hospitalization, hospital size and type of catheter. The rates of CRBSI in catheters used for parenteral nutrition are adjusted and expressed per 1,000 days of device use. The aggregate data of the total period are shown in percentiles (10%, 25%, 50% or median, 75%, and 90%). From 2007 to 2010, a total of 2977 episodes of CRBSI were reported in 40 hospitals participating in the VINCat Program. The cumulative incidence of CRBSI has been 0.26 episodes per 1,000 days of hospitalization (CI95% 0.2 to 0.3). The overall incidence varied depending on hospital size: 0.36 ‰ for hospitals in Group I (>500 beds), 0.17 ‰ for Group II (200-500 beds), and 0.09 ‰ for Group III (<200 beds). 76% of the episodes were associated with central venous catheters (CVC), 19% of the episodes with peripheral venous catheters (PVC), and the remaining 5% with peripherally inserted CVCs (PICC). The most common organisms causing CRBSI were staphylococci, the group Klebsiella, Serratia and Enterobacter, Candida spp., and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. There are important differences in the etiology of CRBSI in relation to these variables. During the reporting period, a significant reduction (38.1%, CI95%, 29.0-46.0%) of CRBSI rates have been observed in Group I hospitals

  13. Bringing Central Line–Associated Bloodstream Infection Prevention Home: Catheter Maintenance Practices and Beliefs of Pediatric Oncology Patients and Families

    PubMed Central

    Rinke, Michael L.; Chen, Allen R.; Milstone, Aaron M.; Hebert, Lindsay C.; Bundy, David G.; Colantuoni, Elizabeth; Fratino, Lisa; Herpst, Cynthia; Kokoszka, Michelle; Miller, Marlene R.

    2015-01-01

    Background A study was conducted to investigate (1) the extent to which best-practice central line maintenance practices were employed in the homes of pediatric oncology patients and by whom, (2) caregiver beliefs about central line care and central line–associated blood stream infection (CLABSI) risk, (3) barriers to optimal central line care by families, and (4) educational experiences and preferences regarding central line care. Methods Researchers administered a survey to patients and families in a tertiary care pediatric oncology clinic that engaged in rigorous ambulatory and inpatient CLABSI prevention efforts. Results Of 110 invited patients and caregivers, 105 participated (95% response rate) in the survey (March–May 2012). Of the 50 respondents reporting that they or another caregiver change central line dressings, 48% changed a dressing whenever it was soiled as per protocol (many who did not change dressings per protocol also never personally changed dressings); 67% reported the oncology clinic primarily cares for their child’s central line, while 29% reported that an adult caregiver or the patient primarily cares for the central line. Eight patients performed their own line care “always” or “most of the time.” Some 13% of respondents believed that it was “slightly likely” or “not at all likely” that their child will get an infection if caregivers do not perform line care practices perfectly every time. Dressing change practices were the most difficult to comply with at home. Some 18% of respondents wished they learned more about line care, and 12% received contradictory training. Respondents cited a variety of preferences regarding line care teaching, although the majority looked to clinic nurses for modeling line care. Conclusions Interventions aimed at reducing ambulatory CLABSIs should target appropriate educational experiences for adult caregivers and patients and identify ways to improve compliance with best-practice care

  14. Characterization of carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-baumannii complex isolates from nosocomial bloodstream infections in southern Iran.

    PubMed

    Pourabbas, Bahman; Firouzi, Roya; Pouladfar, Gholamreza

    2016-03-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an important opportunistic bacterial pathogen responsible for serious infections in hospitalized patients. From a total of 78 consecutive non-repetitive Acinetobacter spp. isolates from patients with blood infections, 61 were carbapenem resistant, which were positive for blaOXA-51-like (96.7%), blaOXA-23-like (77 %), blaOXA-58-like (8.1%) and blaOXA-40-like genes (32.8%) by multiplex PCR. The isolates were identified as A. baumannii (n = 59) and Acinetobacter nosocomialis (n = 2). Also, we found a case of Acinetobacter junii, causing bacteraemia, that possessed the IMP gene. High levels of resistance were observed to fluoroquinolones, aminoglycosides, tigecycline and to the beta-lactam antibiotics, including piperacillin/tazobactam and ampicillin/sulbactam. ISAba1 was present in 96.7% of all Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-baumannii complex (Acb) isolates. Also, 33 (54.1%) and 23 (37.7%) isolates harboured ISAba1 upstream of blaOXA-23-like and blaOXA-51-like genes, respectively, though this was not observed in A. nosocomialis isolates. No relationship was observed between the presence of ISAba1 upstream of oxacillinase genes and the level of carbapenem resistance in all Acb isolates. Only two genes encoding metallo-beta-lactamase (VIM, SPM) were detected in all Acb isolates. This suggests that carbapenem resistance in blood-isolate Acb is mostly due to the presence of acquired carbapenemases. This is the first report from Iran on the identification of A. nosocomialis isolates that possess multiple oxacillinase genes and lack upstream ISAba1. PMID:26747061

  15. A Competitive Infection Model of Hematogenously Disseminated Candidiasis in Mice Redefines the Role of Candida albicans IRS4 in Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Suresh B.; Nguyen, M. Hong; Cheng, Shaoji; Badrane, Hassan; Iczkowski, Kenneth A.; Wegener, Marilyn; Gaffen, Sarah L.; Mitchell, Aaron P.

    2013-01-01

    Candida albicans IRS4 encodes a protein that regulates phosphatidylinositol-(4,5)-bisphosphate, which was shown to contribute to hematogenously disseminated candidiasis (DC) after several days in the standard mouse model. Our objective was to more accurately define the temporal contributions of IRS4 to pathogenesis. During competition assays in vitro, an irs4-null (Δirs4) mutant exhibited wild-type fitness. In DC experiments, mice were infected intravenously with the Δirs4 mutant, strain CAI-12 (1 × 105 CFU), or a mixture of the strains (0.5 × 105 CFU each). In single-strain infections, quantitative PCR revealed reduced Δirs4 mutant burdens within kidneys at days 1, 4, and 7 but not 6 h. In competitive infections, the Δirs4 mutant was outcompeted by CAI-12 in each mouse at ≥6 h (competitive indices, P ≤ 0.0001). At 4 and 7 days, the Δirs4 mutant burdens during competitive infections were significantly lower than those during single-strain infections (P = 0.01 and P < 0.001, respectively), suggesting increased susceptibility to inflammatory responses. Phagocytic infiltration of kidneys in response to CAI-12 or competitive infections was significantly greater than that in response to Δirs4 mutant infection at days 1 and 4 (P < 0.001), and the Δirs4 mutant was more susceptible to phagocytosis and killing by human polymorphonuclear cells (P = 0.01 and P = 0.006, respectively) and mouse macrophages in vitro (P = 0.04 and P = 0.01, respectively). Therefore, IRS4 contributes to tissue invasion at early stages of DC and mediates resistance to phagocytosis as DC progresses. Microarray analysis revealed remarkably similar gene expression by the Δirs4 mutant and reference strain CAI-12 within blood, suggesting that IRS4 is not significantly involved in the hematogenous stage of disease. A competitive DC model detects attenuated virulence that is not evident with the standard model. PMID:23429534

  16. Protective effect of Artin M from extract of Artocarpus integrifolia seeds by Th1 and Th17 immune response on the course of infection by Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Custodio, Luiz Antonio; Loyola, Wagner; Conchon-Costa, Ivete; da Silva Quirino, Gustavo Fernando; Felipe, Ionice

    2011-10-01

    The immunoregulatory effect of Artin M and jacalin from extract of Artocarpus integrifolia seeds (jack extract) against infection with Candida albicans was investigated. Swiss mice received jack extract containing 500 μg protein/ml PBS intraperitoneally (i.p.) or PBS alone and after 72 h were infected i.p. with C. albicans CR15 (10(7)) and sacrificed after 30 min, 2, 6, 24, and 72 h. ELISA analysis revealed that in jack extract-treated mice IFN-γ was predominantly produced versus IL-10 in control mice. These results suggest that jack extract induced a protective immune response, since C. albicans clearance was complete at 72 h postinfection. Jack extract presents two lectins (Artin M and jacalin) with distinct biological properties. Artin M was able to induce IL-12 production by macrophages. Also, Artin M in different concentrations, associated with jacalin or in jack extract induced both IFN-γ and IL-17 production. As a consequence, phagocytic and candidacidal activity increased significantly. Alanine aminotransferase activity (ALT) was used as parameter for damage of the liver. The activity of ALT correlated with inoculum size that increased significantly in control group, however, mice pretreated with jack extract 3 days before infection presented normal ALT. Mice pretreated with jack extract that received a lethal inoculum of Candida presented 90% survival versus 20% among controls or mice pretreated with jacalin. Thus, the results suggest that Artin M by itself, associated with jacalin or present in jack extract is able to induce protective Th1 and Th17 immune responses against Candida albicans infection.

  17. Hospital costs of central line-associated bloodstream infections and cost-effectiveness of closed vs. open infusion containers. The case of Intensive Care Units in Italy

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The aim was to evaluate direct health care costs of central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSI) and to calculate the cost-effectiveness ratio of closed fully collapsible plastic intravenous infusion containers vs. open (glass) infusion containers. Methods A two-year, prospective case-control study was undertaken in four intensive care units in an Italian teaching hospital. Patients with CLABSI (cases) and patients without CLABSI (controls) were matched for admission departments, gender, age, and average severity of illness score. Costs were estimated according to micro-costing approach. In the cost effectiveness analysis, the cost component was assessed as the difference between production costs while effectiveness was measured by CLABSI rate (number of CLABSI per 1000 central line days) associated with the two infusion containers. Results A total of 43 cases of CLABSI were compared with 97 matched controls. The mean age of cases and controls was 62.1 and 66.6 years, respectively (p = 0.143); 56% of the cases and 57% of the controls were females (p = 0.922). The mean length of stay of cases and controls was 17.41 and 8.55 days, respectively (p < 0.001). Overall, the mean total costs of patients with and without CLABSI were € 18,241 and € 9,087, respectively (p < 0.001). On average, the extra cost for drugs was € 843 (p < 0.001), for supplies € 133 (p = 0.116), for lab tests € 171 (p < 0.001), and for specialist visits € 15 (p = 0.019). The mean extra cost for hospital stay (overhead) was € 7,180 (p < 0.001). The closed infusion container was a dominant strategy. It resulted in lower CLABSI rates (3.5 vs. 8.2 CLABSIs per 1000 central line days for closed vs. open infusion container) without any significant difference in total production costs. The higher acquisition cost of the closed infusion container was offset by savings incurred in other phases of production, especially waste management. Conclusions CLABSI results in

  18. Prevalence of Resistant Gram-Negative Bacilli in Bloodstream Infection in Febrile Neutropenia Patients Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: A Single Center Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ling; Wang, Ying; Fan, Xing; Tang, Wei; Hu, Jiong

    2015-11-01

    Bloodstream infection (BSI) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). To evaluate the causative bacteria and identify risk factors for BSI associated mortality in febrile neutropenia patients undergoing HSCT, we collected the clinical and microbiological data from patients underwent HSCT between 2008 and 2014 and performed a retrospective analysis. Throughout the study period, among 348 episodes of neutropenic fever in patients underwent HSCT, 89 episodes in 85 patients had microbiological defined BSI with a total of 108 isolates. Gram-negative bacteria (GNB) were the most common isolates (76, 70.3%) followed by gram-positive bacteria (GPB, 29, 26.9%) and fungus (3, 2.8%). As to the drug resistance, 26 multiple drug resistance (MDR) isolates were identified. Resistant isolates (n = 23) were more common documented in GNB, mostly Escherichia coli (9/36, 25%) and Klebsiella pneumonia (6/24, 25%). A total of 12 isolated were resistant to carbapenem including 4 K pneumoniae (4/24, 16.7%), 3 Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, and 1 Pseudomonas aeruginosa and other 4 GNB isolates (Citrobacter freumdii, Pseudomonas stutzeri, Acinetobacter baumanii, and Chryseobacterium indologenes). As to the GPB, only 3 resistant isolates were documented including 2 methicillin-resistant isolates (Staphylococcus hominis and Arcanobacterium hemolysis) and 1 vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium. Among these 85 patients with documented BSI, 11 patients died of BSI as primary or associated cause with a BSI-related mortality of 13.1 ± 3.7% and 90-day overall survival after transplantation at 80.0 ± 4.3%. Patients with high-risk disease undergoing allo-HSCT, prolonged neutropenia (≥15 days) and infection with carbapenem-resistant GNB were associated with BSI associated mortality in univariate and multivariate analyses. Our report revealed a prevalence of GNB in BSI of neutropenic patients undergoing

  19. Bloodstream infections in febrile neutropenic patients at a tertiary cancer institute in South India: A timeline of clinical and microbial trends through the years

    PubMed Central

    Babu, K Govind; Lokanatha, D.; Lakshmaiah, K. C.; Suresh Babu, M. C.; Jacob, Linu A.; Bhat, Gita R.; Vardhana, Harsha; Sinha, Mahua; Vijaykumar, B. R.; Sumati, B. G.; Jayshree, R. S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Febrile neutropenia (FN) is an oncological emergency. The choice of empiric therapy depends on the locally prevalent pathogens and their sensitivities, the sites of infection, and cost. The Infectious Diseases Society of America guidelines are being followed for the management of FN in India. Methods: This is a prospective observational study conducted at a tertiary care cancer centre from September 2012 to September 2014. Objectives: The objectives of this study were as follows: (1) To review the pattern of microbial flora, susceptibility pattern, and important clinical variables among bloodstream infections in febrile neutropenic patients with solid tumors and hematological malignancies. (2) As per the institutional protocol to periodically review the antibiotic policy and susceptibility pattern, and compare the findings with an earlier study done in our institute in 2010. This was a prospective study conducted from September 2012 to September 2014. Results: About 379 episodes of FN were documented among 300 patients. About 887 blood cultures were drawn. Of these, 137 (15%) isolates were cultured. Isolates having identical antibiograms obtained from a single patient during the same hospitalization were considered as one. Hence, 128 isolates were analyzed. About 74 (58%) cultures yielded Gram-negative bacilli, 51 (40%) were positive for Gram-positive cocci, and 3 (2%) grew fungi. Among Gram-negative organisms, Escherichia coli followed by Acinetobacter baumannii and Klebsiella pneumoniae accounted for 78% of the isolates. Among Gram-positive cocci, Staphylococcus species accounted for 84% of the isolates. We have noted a changing trend in the antibiotic sensitivity pattern over the years. Following the switch in empirical antibiotics, based on the results of the study done in 2010 (when the empirical antibiotics were ceftazidime + amikacin), the sensitivity to cefoperazone-sulbactam has plunged from about 80% to 60%%. Similar reduction in

  20. Reduction of central line-associated bloodstream infection rates in a neonatal intensive care unit after implementation of a multidisciplinary evidence-based quality improvement collaborative: A four-year surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Ting, Joseph Y; Goh, Vicki SK; Osiovich, Horacio

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The use of central venous catheters has permitted lifesaving treatment for critically ill neonates; however, the attributable mortality rate for central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) has been estimated to be between 4% and 20%. In 2006/2007, the authors’ neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) had a CLABSI rate that was nearly twofold higher than that reported by other Canadian NICUs. OBJECTIVE: To implement a quality improvement collaborative to reduce the incidence of neonatal CLABSI. METHODS: A retrospective observational study was performed to compare CLABSI in neonates admitted to the authors’ level III NICU between August 2007 and March 2011. The entire study period was divided into four time periods to evaluate secular trends. A comprehensive catheter-related bloodstream infection prevention initiative was implemented in August 2007. The initiatives included staff education, standardization of skin preparation protocol, introduction of new antiseptic agents, implementation of central catheter insertion and maintenance checklists, reinforcement of the use of maximal sterile barrier precautions, and revision of the central catheter configuration and maintenance protocols. RESULTS: The median CLABSI rate of 7.9 per 1000 catheter days at the beginning of the study (period 1 [August 2007 to June 2008]) gradually decreased over the entire study period (P=0.034): period 2 (July 2008 to May 2009), 3.3 per 1000 catheter days; period 3 (June 2009 to April 2010), 2.6 per 1000 catheter days; and period 4 (May 2010 to March 2011), 2.2 per 1000 catheter days. CONCLUSION: A multidisciplinary evidence-based quality improvement collaborative resulted in a significant reduction in the CLABSI rate. Continuous quality improvement measures are required to reduce catheter-related bloodstream infections among low-birth-weight infants. PMID:24489559

  1. Prostaglandins from Cytosolic Phospholipase A2α/Cyclooxygenase-1 Pathway and Mitogen-activated Protein Kinases Regulate Gene Expression in Candida albicans-infected Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Yun, Bogeon; Lee, HeeJung; Jayaraja, Sabarirajan; Suram, Saritha; Murphy, Robert C; Leslie, Christina C

    2016-03-25

    In Candida albicans-infected resident peritoneal macrophages, activation of group IVA cytosolic phospholipase A2(cPLA2α) by calcium- and mitogen-activated protein kinases triggers the rapid production of prostaglandins I2 and E2 through cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 and regulates gene expression by increasing cAMP. InC. albicans-infected cPLA2α(-/-)or COX-1(-/-)macrophages, expression ofI l10,Nr4a2, and Ptgs2 was lower, and expression ofTnfα was higher, than in wild type macrophages. Expression was reconstituted with 8-bromo-cAMP, the PKA activator 6-benzoyl-cAMP, and agonists for prostaglandin receptors IP, EP2, and EP4 in infected but not uninfected cPLA2α(-/-)or COX-1(-/-)macrophages. InC. albicans-infected cPLA2α(+/+)macrophages, COX-2 expression was blocked by IP, EP2, and EP4 receptor antagonists, indicating a role for both prostaglandin I2 and E2 Activation of ERKs and p38, but not JNKs, by C. albicansacted synergistically with prostaglandins to induce expression of Il10,Nr4a2, and Ptgs2. Tnfα expression required activation of ERKs and p38 but was suppressed by cAMP. Results using cAMP analogues that activate PKA or Epacs suggested that cAMP regulates gene expression through PKA. However, phosphorylation of cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB), the cAMP-regulated transcription factor involved inIl10,Nr4a2,Ptgs2, andTnfα expression, was not mediated by cAMP/PKA because it was similar inC. albicans-infected wild type and cPLA2α(-/-)or COX-1(-/-)macrophages. CREB phosphorylation was blocked by p38 inhibitors and induced by the p38 activator anisomycin but not by the PKA activator 6-benzoyl-cAMP. Therefore, MAPK activation inC. albicans-infected macrophages plays a dual role by promoting the cPLA2α/prostaglandin/cAMP/PKA pathway and CREB phosphorylation that coordinately regulate immediate early gene expression.

  2. Evaluation of the MALDI-TOF VITEK MS™ system for the identification of Candida parapsilosis, C. orthopsilosis and C. metapsilosis from bloodstream infections.

    PubMed

    Nobrega de Almeida Júnior, João; de Souza, Letícia Bonato; Motta, Adriana Lopes; Rossi, Flávia; Romano Di Gioia, Thais Sabato; Benard, Gil; Del Negro, Gilda Maria Barbaro

    2014-10-01

    Twenty-nine Candida parapsilosis, seventeen Candida orthopsilosis and two Candida metapsilosis bloodstream isolates were submitted for identification by VITEK-MS™ mass spectrometer. Four isolates, two C. orthopsilosis and two C. metapsilosis, were not identified. Inclusion of Superspectra of both species in this database is required to improve its discrimination power.

  3. Disruption of the Candida albicans TPS1 gene encoding trehalose-6-phosphate synthase impairs formation of hyphae and decreases infectivity.

    PubMed

    Zaragoza, O; Blazquez, M A; Gancedo, C

    1998-08-01

    The TPS1 gene from Candida albicans, which encodes trehalose-6-phosphate synthase, has been cloned by functional complementation of a tps1 mutant from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In contrast with the wild-type strain, the double tps1/tps1 disruptant did not accumulate trehalose at stationary phase or after heat shock. Growth of the tps1/tps1 disruptant at 30 degreesC was indistinguishable from that of the wild type. However, at 42 degreesC it did not grow on glucose or fructose but grew normally on galactose or glycerol. At 37 degreesC, the yeast-hypha transition in the mutant in glucose-calf serum medium did not occur. During growth at 42 degreesC, the mutant did not form hyphae in galactose or in glycerol. Some of the growth defects observed may be traced to an unbalanced sugar metabolism that reduces the cellular content of ATP. Mice inoculated with 10(6) CFU of the tps1/tps1 mutant did not show visible symptoms of infection 16 days after inoculation, while those similarly inoculated with wild-type cells were dead 12 days after inoculation.

  4. Oral-resident natural Th17 cells and γδ T cells control opportunistic Candida albicans infections.

    PubMed

    Conti, Heather R; Peterson, Alanna C; Brane, Lucas; Huppler, Anna R; Hernández-Santos, Nydiaris; Whibley, Natasha; Garg, Abhishek V; Simpson-Abelson, Michelle R; Gibson, Gregory A; Mamo, Anna J; Osborne, Lisa C; Bishu, Shrinivas; Ghilardi, Nico; Siebenlist, Ulrich; Watkins, Simon C; Artis, David; McGeachy, Mandy J; Gaffen, Sarah L

    2014-09-22

    Oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC) is an opportunistic fungal infection caused by Candida albicans. OPC is frequent in HIV/AIDS, implicating adaptive immunity. Mice are naive to Candida, yet IL-17 is induced within 24 h of infection, and susceptibility is strongly dependent on IL-17R signaling. We sought to identify the source of IL-17 during the early innate response to candidiasis. We show that innate responses to Candida require an intact TCR, as SCID, IL-7Rα(-/-), and Rag1(-/-) mice were susceptible to OPC, and blockade of TCR signaling by cyclosporine induced susceptibility. Using fate-tracking IL-17 reporter mice, we found that IL-17 is produced within 1-2 d by tongue-resident populations of γδ T cells and CD3(+)CD4(+)CD44(hi)TCRβ(+)CCR6(+) natural Th17 (nTh17) cells, but not by TCR-deficient innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) or NK cells. These cells function redundantly, as TCR-β(-/-) and TCR-δ(-/-) mice were both resistant to OPC. Whereas γδ T cells were previously shown to produce IL-17 during dermal candidiasis and are known to mediate host defense at mucosal surfaces, nTh17 cells are poorly understood. The oral nTh17 population expanded rapidly after OPC, exhibited high TCR-β clonal diversity, and was absent in Rag1(-/-), IL-7Rα(-/-), and germ-free mice. These findings indicate that nTh17 and γδ T cells, but not ILCs, are key mucosal sentinels that control oral pathogens.

  5. Prevalence and distribution of beta-lactamase coding genes in third-generation cephalosporin-resistant Enterobacteriaceae from bloodstream infections in Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Vlieghe, E R; Huang, T-D; Phe, T; Bogaerts, P; Berhin, C; De Smet, B; Peetermans, W E; Jacobs, J A; Glupczynski, Y

    2015-06-01

    Resistance to third-generation cephalosporins in Gram-negative bacteria is emerging in Asia. We report the prevalence and distribution of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL), AmpC beta-lactamase and carbapenemase-coding genes in cefotaxime-resistant Enterobacteriaceae isolates from bloodstream infections (BSI) in Cambodia. All Enterobacteriaceae isolated from BSI in adult patients at Sihanouk Hospital Centre of HOPE, Phnom Penh, Cambodia (2007-2010) were assessed. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was carried out by disc diffusion and MicroScan according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) guidelines. Screening for ESBL, plasmidic AmpC and carbapenemase-coding genes was performed by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) sequencing assays. Identification of the ST131 clone was performed in all CTX-M-positive Escherichia coli, using PCR targeting the papB gene. Out of 183 Enterobacteriaceae, 91 (49.7 %) isolates (84 BSI episodes) were cefotaxime-resistant: E. coli (n = 68), Klebsiella pneumoniae (n = 17) and Enterobacter spp. (n = 6). Most episodes were community-acquired (66/84; 78.3 %). ESBLs were present in 89/91 (97.8 %) cefotaxime-resistant isolates: 86 (96.6 %) were CTX-M, mainly CTX-M-15 (n = 41) and CTX-M-14 (n = 21). CTX-M of group 1 were frequently associated with TEM and/or OXA-1/30 coding genes and with phenotypic combined resistance to ciprofloxacin, sulphamethoxazole-trimethoprim and gentamicin (39/50, 78.0 %). Plasmidic AmpC (CMY-2 and DHA-1 types) were found alone (n = 2) or in combination with ESBL (n = 4). Eighteen E. coli isolates were identified as B2-ST131-O25B: 11 (61.1 %) carried CTX-M-14. No carbapenemase-coding genes were detected. ESBL among Enterobacteriaceae from BSI in Cambodia is common, mainly associated with CTX-M-15 and CTX-M-14. These findings warrant urgent action for the containment of antibiotic resistance in Cambodia.

  6. A Multinational, Preregistered Cohort Study of β-Lactam/β-Lactamase Inhibitor Combinations for Treatment of Bloodstream Infections Due to Extended-Spectrum-β-Lactamase-Producing Enterobacteriaceae.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Gutiérrez, Belén; Pérez-Galera, Salvador; Salamanca, Elena; de Cueto, Marina; Calbo, Esther; Almirante, Benito; Viale, Pierluigi; Oliver, Antonio; Pintado, Vicente; Gasch, Oriol; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Pitout, Johann; Akova, Murat; Peña, Carmen; Molina, José; Hernández, Alicia; Venditti, Mario; Prim, Nuria; Origüen, Julia; Bou, German; Tacconelli, Evelina; Tumbarello, Mario; Hamprecht, Axel; Giamarellou, Helen; Almela, Manel; Pérez, Federico; Schwaber, Mitchell J; Bermejo, Joaquín; Lowman, Warren; Hsueh, Po-Ren; Mora-Rillo, Marta; Natera, Clara; Souli, Maria; Bonomo, Robert A; Carmeli, Yehuda; Paterson, David L; Pascual, Alvaro; Rodríguez-Baño, Jesús

    2016-07-01

    The spread of extended-spectrum-β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-E) is leading to increased carbapenem consumption. Alternatives to carbapenems need to be investigated. We investigated whether β-lactam/β-lactamase inhibitor (BLBLI) combinations are as effective as carbapenems in the treatment of bloodstream infections (BSI) due to ESBL-E. A multinational, retrospective cohort study was performed. Patients with monomicrobial BSI due to ESBL-E were studied; specific criteria were applied for inclusion of patients in the empirical-therapy (ET) cohort (ETC; 365 patients), targeted-therapy (TT) cohort (TTC; 601 patients), and global cohort (GC; 627 patients). The main outcome variables were cure/improvement rate at day 14 and all-cause 30-day mortality. Multivariate analysis, propensity scores (PS), and sensitivity analyses were used to control for confounding. The cure/improvement rates with BLBLIs and carbapenems were 80.0% and 78.9% in the ETC and 90.2% and 85.5% in the TTC, respectively. The 30-day mortality rates were 17.6% and 20% in the ETC and 9.8% and 13.9% in the TTC, respectively. The adjusted odds ratio (OR) (95% confidence interval [CI]) values for cure/improvement rate with ET with BLBLIs were 1.37 (0.69 to 2.76); for TT, they were 1.61 (0.58 to 4.86). Regarding 30-day mortality, the adjusted OR (95% CI) values were 0.55 (0.25 to 1.18) for ET and 0.59 (0.19 to 1.71) for TT. The results were consistent in all subgroups studied, in a stratified analysis according to quartiles of PS, in PS-matched cases, and in the GC. BLBLIs, if active in vitro, appear to be as effective as carbapenems for ET and TT of BSI due to ESLB-E regardless of the source and specific species. These data may help to avoid the overuse of carbapenems. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01764490.). PMID:27139473

  7. Candida albicans is able to use M cells as a portal of entry across the intestinal barrier in vitro.

    PubMed

    Albac, Sandrine; Schmitz, Antonin; Lopez-Alayon, Carolina; d'Enfert, Christophe; Sautour, Marc; Ducreux, Amandine; Labruère-Chazal, Catherine; Laue, Michael; Holland, Gudrun; Bonnin, Alain; Dalle, Frederic

    2016-02-01

    Candida albicans is the most frequent yeast responsible for systemic infections in humans. These infections mainly originate from the gastrointestinal tract where C. albicans can invade the gut epithelial barrier to gain access to the bloodstream. Along the gut, pathogens can use Microfold (M) cells as a portal of entry to cross the epithelial barrier. M cells are specialized cells mainly located in the follicule-associated epithelium of Peyer patches. In this study, we used scanning electron and fluorescence microscopy, adhesion and invasion assays and fungal mutants to investigate the interactions of C. albicans with M cells obtained in an established in vitro model whereby enterocyte-like Caco-2 cells co-cultured with the Raji B cell line undergo a phenotypic switch to morphologically and functionally resembling M cells. Our data demonstrate that C. albicans co-localizes with and invades preferentially M cells, providing evidence that the fungus can use M cells as a portal of entry into the intestinal barrier. In addition to active penetration, F-actin dependent endocytosis contributes to internalization of the fungus into M cells through a mechanism involving hypha-associated invasins including Ssa1 and Als3. PMID:26242223

  8. Examination of the pathogenic potential of Candida albicans filamentous cells in an animal model of haematogenously disseminated candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Cleary, Ian A; Reinhard, Sara M; Lazzell, Anna L; Monteagudo, Carlos; Thomas, Derek P; Lopez-Ribot, Jose L; Saville, Stephen P

    2016-03-01

    The opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida albicans is an increasingly common threat to human health. Candida albicans grows in several morphologies and mutant strains locked in yeast or filamentous forms have attenuated virulence in the murine model of disseminated candidiasis. Thus, the ability to change shape is important for virulence. The transcriptional repressors Nrg1p and Tup1p are required for normal regulation of C. albicans morphology. Strains lacking either NRG1 or TUP1 are constitutively pseudohyphal under yeast growth conditions, and display attenuated virulence in the disseminated model. To dissect the relative importance of hyphae and pseudohyphae during an infection, we used strains in which the morphological transition could be externally manipulated through controlled expression of NRG1 or TUP1. Remarkably, hyphal form inocula retain the capacity to cause disease. Whilst induction of a pseudohyphal morphology through depletion of TUP1 did result in attenuated virulence, this was not due to a defect in the ability to escape the bloodstream. Instead, we observed that pseudohyphal cells are cleared from tissues much more efficiently than either hyphal (virulent) or yeast form (avirulent) cells, indicating that different C. albicans morphologies have distinct interactions with host cells during an infection.

  9. Improving central line infection rates in the neonatal intensive care unit: Effect of hospital location, site of insertion, and implementation of catheter-associated bloodstream infection protocols

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Jennifer J.; Gadepalli, Samir K.; Siddiqui, Sabina M.; Jarboe, Marcus D.; Hirschl, Ronald B.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Catheter associated blood stream infections (CABSI) are morbid and expensive for all ages, including neonates. Thus far, the impact of CABSI prevention protocols, such as insertion and maintenance bundles, in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) is largely unknown. We hypothesized that lines placed in the operating room (OR) would have a lower infection rate due to established insertion protocols and a more sterile environment. Methods Retrospective chart review of NICU patients who received a percutaneous or tunneled central venous catheter between 2005 and 2012. ECMO cannulas, PICC and umbilical catheters were excluded. Variables of interest included demographics, anatomical site, hospital location, line days, and line infection. Line infection was defined as a positive blood culture drawn through the catheter. Results A total of 368 catheters were placed in 285 NICU patients. Majority of catheters (65.5%) were placed in OR. Saphenous and femoral veins were most common anatomical sites (50.8%). Twenty-eight catheters were infected (7.6%). After adjusting for pre-operative antibiotics, anatomical site, and SNAPPE-II scores, lines placed in OR were three times less likely to become infected (Odds Ratio=0.32, p=0.038). Although implementation of CABSI prevention protocols resulted in statistically significant reductions in infection (Odds Ratio=0.4, p=0.043), lines placed in the OR remained less likely to become infected. Conclusions NICU line infection rates decreased with implementation of CABSI prevention protocols. Despite this implementation, catheters placed in the NICU continued to have higher infection rates. As a result, when patient status allows it, we recommend that central lines in newborns be placed in the operating room. PMID:25783394

  10. Candida species biofilm and Candida albicans ALS3 polymorphisms in clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Bruder-Nascimento, Ariane; Camargo, Carlos Henrique; Mondelli, Alessandro Lia; Sugizaki, Maria Fátima; Sadatsune, Terue; Bagagli, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decades, there have been important changes in the epidemiology of Candida infections. In recent years, Candida species have emerged as important causes of invasive infections mainly among immunocompromised patients. This study analyzed Candida spp. isolates and compared the frequency and biofilm production of different species among the different sources of isolation: blood, urine, vulvovaginal secretions and peritoneal dialysis fluid. Biofilm production was quantified in 327 Candida isolates obtained from patients attended at a Brazilian tertiary public hospital (Botucatu, Sao Paulo). C. albicans ALS3 gene polymorphism was also evaluated by determining the number of repeated motifs in the central domain. Of the 198 total biofilm-positive isolates, 72 and 126 were considered as low and high biofilm producers, respectively. Biofilm production by C. albicans was significantly lower than that by non-albicans isolates and was most frequently observed in C. tropicalis. Biofilm production was more frequent among bloodstream isolates than other clinical sources, in urine, the isolates displayed a peculiar distribution by presenting two distinct peaks, one containing biofilm-negative isolates and the other containing isolates with intense biofilm production. The numbers of tandem-repeat copies per allele were not associated with biofilm production, suggesting the evolvement of other genetic determinants.

  11. Impact of cefepime therapy on mortality among patients with bloodstream infections caused by extended-spectrum-β-lactamase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Teena; Marchaim, Dror; Veltman, Jennifer; Johnson, Paul; Zhao, Jing J; Tansek, Ryan; Hatahet, Dania; Chaudhry, Khawar; Pogue, Jason M; Rahbar, Hiro; Chen, Ting-Yi; Truong, Thientu; Rodriguez, Victor; Ellsworth, Joseph; Bernabela, Luigino; Bhargava, Ashish; Yousuf, Adnan; Alangaden, George; Kaye, Keith S

    2012-07-01

    Extended-spectrum-β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing pathogens are associated with extensive morbidity and mortality and rising health care costs. Scant data exist on the impact of antimicrobial therapy on clinical outcomes in patients with ESBL bloodstream infections (BSI), and no large studies have examined the impact of cefepime therapy. A retrospective 3-year study was performed at the Detroit Medical Center on adult patients with BSI due to ESBL-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae or Escherichia coli. Data were collected from the medical records of study patients at five hospitals between January 2005 and December 2007. Multivariate analysis was performed using logistic regression. One hundred forty-five patients with BSI due to ESBL-producing pathogens, including K. pneumoniae (83%) and E. coli (16.5%), were studied. The mean age of the patients was 66 years. Fifty-one percent of the patients were female, and 79.3% were African-American. Fifty-three patients (37%) died in the hospital, and 92 survived to discharge. In bivariate analysis, the variables associated with mortality (P < 0.05) were presence of a rapidly fatal condition at the time of admission, use of gentamicin as a consolidative therapeutic agent, and presence of one or more of the following prior to culture date: mechanical ventilation, stay in the intensive care unit (ICU), and presence of a central venous catheter. In multivariate analysis, the predictors of in-hospital mortality included stay in the intensive care unit (odds ratio [OR], 2.17; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.98 to 4.78), presence of a central-line catheter prior to positive culture (OR, 2.33; 95% CI, 0.77 to 7.03), presence of a rapidly fatal condition at the time of admission (OR, 5.13; 95% CI, 2.13 to 12.39), and recent prior hospitalization (OR, 1.92; 95% CI, 0.83 to 4.09). When carbapenems were added as empirical therapy to the predictor model, there was a trend between empirical carbapenem therapy and decreased mortality (OR, 0

  12. Quinacrine inhibits Candida albicans growth and filamentation at neutral pH.

    PubMed

    Kulkarny, Vibhati V; Chavez-Dozal, Alba; Rane, Hallie S; Jahng, Maximillian; Bernardo, Stella M; Parra, Karlett J; Lee, Samuel A

    2014-12-01

    Candida albicans is a common cause of catheter-related bloodstream infections (CR-BSI), in part due to its strong propensity to form biofilms. Drug repurposing is an approach that might identify agents that are able to overcome antifungal drug resistance within biofilms. Quinacrine (QNC) is clinically active against the eukaryotic protozoan parasites Plasmodium and Giardia. We sought to investigate the antifungal activity of QNC against C. albicans biofilms. C. albicans biofilms were incubated with QNC at serially increasing concentrations (4 to 2,048 μg/ml) and assessed using a 2,3-bis-(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide (XTT) assay in a static microplate model. Combinations of QNC and standard antifungals were assayed using biofilm checkerboard analyses. To define a mechanism of action, QNC was assessed for the inhibition of filamentation, effects on endocytosis, and pH-dependent activity. High-dose QNC was effective for the prevention and treatment of C. albicans biofilms in vitro. QNC with fluconazole had no interaction, while the combination of QNC and either caspofungin or amphotericin B demonstrated synergy. QNC was most active against planktonic growth at alkaline pH. QNC dramatically inhibited filamentation. QNC accumulated within vacuoles as expected and caused defects in endocytosis. A tetracycline-regulated VMA3 mutant lacking vacuolar ATPase (V-ATPase) function demonstrated increased susceptibility to QNC. These experiments indicate that QNC is active against C. albicans growth in a pH-dependent manner. Although QNC activity is not biofilm specific, QNC is effective in the prevention and treatment of biofilms. QNC antibiofilm activity likely occurs via several independent mechanisms: vacuolar alkalinization, inhibition of endocytosis, and impaired filamentation. Further investigation of QNC for the treatment and prevention of biofilm-related Candida CR-BSI is warranted. PMID:25288082

  13. Epidemiology and antifungal susceptibility of bloodstream Candida isolates in Quebec: Report on 453 cases between 2003 and 2005

    PubMed Central

    St-Germain, Guy; Laverdière, Michel; Pelletier, René; René, Pierre; Bourgault, Anne-Marie; Lemieux, Claude; Libman, Michael

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND Between May 2003 and April 2005, a population-based surveillance of Candida bloodstream infections was conducted in Quebec. A total of 453 episodes of candidemia (464 yeast isolates) from 54 participating hospitals were studied. RESULTS The annual incidence rate was three per 100,000 population. Global hospital mortality was 38%. The most common predisposing factors were the presence of an intravascular catheter (80%), use of antibacterial therapy (67%), stay in an intensive care unit (49%), use of parenteral nutrition (32%) and intra-abdominal surgery (31%). Fluconazole alone or in association with other antifungals was used for treatment in over 80% of cases. Candida albicans comprised 62% of isolates, followed by Candida glabrata (17%), Candida parapsilosis (9%), Candida tropicalis (5%), Candida lusitaniae (3%) and Candida krusei (3%). Of the 288 C albicans isolates, seven (2%) were resistant to flucytosine, one to fluconazole and none to itraconazole or voriconazole. Of the 75 non-C albicans species isolates with reduced susceptibility to fluconazole (minimum inhibitory concentration [MIC] 16 μg/mL or greater), none were susceptible to itraconazole (MIC 0.12 mg/L or lower), whereas 71 (95%) were susceptible to voriconazole (MIC 1 μg/mL or lower). However, only five of 12 (42%) fluconazole-resistant isolates were susceptible to voriconazole. Posaconazole, ravuconazole and caspofungin displayed a broad spectrum of activity against these isolates, with MICs of 1 mg/L or lower in 56%, 92% and 100% of isolates, respectively. Overall, a correlation (r2>0.87) was observed among increasing fluconazole MICs and the geometric mean MICs of itraconazole, voriconazole, posaconazole and ravuconazole. CONCLUSIONS These surveillance results when compared with those of the 1993 to 1995 survey confirm little variation in the distribution of species causing invasive Candida infection over a 10-year period in Quebec, as well as the continuous excellent overall in

  14. Mixed biofilms formed by C. albicans and non-albicans species: a study of microbial interactions.

    PubMed

    Santos, Jéssica Diane dos; Piva, Elisabete; Vilela, Simone Furgeri Godinho; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso; Junqueira, Juliana Campos

    2016-01-01

    Most Candida infections are related to microbial biofilms often formed by the association of different species. The objective of this study was to evaluate the interactions between Candida albicans and non-albicans species in biofilms formed in vitro. The non-albicans species studied were:Candida tropicalis, Candida glabrata and Candida krusei. Single and mixed biofilms (formed by clinical isolates of C. albicans and non-albicans species) were developed from standardized suspensions of each strain (10(7) cells/mL), on flat-bottom 96-well microtiter plates for 48 hour. These biofilms were analyzed by counting colony-forming units (CFU/mL) in Candida HiChrome agar and by determining cell viability, using the XTT 2,3-bis (2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulphophenyl)-5-[(phenylamino) carbonyl]-2H-tetrazolium hydroxide colorimetric assay. The results for both the CFU/mL count and the XTT colorimetric assay showed that all the species studied were capable of forming high levels of in vitro biofilm. The number of CFU/mL and the metabolic activity of C. albicans were reduced in mixed biofilms with non-albicans species, as compared with a single C. albicans biofilm. Among the species tested, C. krusei exerted the highest inhibitory action against C. albicans. In conclusion, C. albicans established antagonistic interactions with non-albicans Candida species in mixed biofilms.

  15. Meningococcal Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... are a type of bacteria that cause serious infections. The most common infection is meningitis, which is an inflammation of the ... also cause other problems, including a serious bloodstream infection called sepsis. Meningococcal infections can spread from person ...

  16. Molecular epidemiology of invasive Candida albicans at a tertiary hospital in northern Taiwan from 2003 to 2011.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shao-Hung; Shen, Mandy; Lin, Hsin-Chieh; Sun, Pei-Lun; Lo, Hsiu-Jung; Lu, Jang-Jih

    2015-11-01

    Candida albicans is a common cause of bloodstream fungal infections in hospitalized patients. To investigate its epidemiology, multilocus sequence typing (MLST) was performed on 285 C. albicans bloodstream isolates from patients in Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Linkou (CGMHL), Taiwan from 2003 to 2011. Among these isolates, the three major diploid sequence types (DSTs) were 693, 659, and 443 with 19, 16, and 13 isolates, respectively. The 179 DSTs were classified into 16 clades by unweighted pair-group method using arithmetic averages (UPGMA). The major ones were clades 1, 4, 3, and 17 (54, 49, 31, and 31 isolates, respectively). Further analyses with eBURST clustered the 285 isolates into 28 clonal complexes (CC). The most common complexes were CC8, CC20, and CC9. DST 693 that had the highest number of isolates was determined to be the cluster founder of CC20, which belonged to clade 3. So far, 33 isolates worldwide including 29 from Taiwan and 4 from Korea, are CC20, suggesting that CC20 is an Asian cluster. Two fluconazole-resistant isolates belonging to CC12 and CC19 were detected. All other CGMHL isolates were susceptible to 5-flucytosine, amphotericin B, anidulfungin, caspofungin, fluconazole, itraconazole, micafungin, posaconazole, and voriconazole. However, CC20 isolates exhibited significantly lower susceptibility to fluconazole. In conclusion, the 285 CGMHL C. albicans isolates displayed geographically clustering with Asian isolates, and most of them are susceptible to common antifungal drugs. Isolates of DST 693, a Taiwanese major genotype belonging to MLST clade 3, were more resistant to fluconazole than other isolates.

  17. Proteolytic activity and cytokine up-regulation by non-albicans Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Nawaz, Ali; Pärnänen, Pirjo; Kari, Kirsti; Meurman, Jukka H

    2015-05-01

    Mouth is an important source of infections and oral infections such as Candida infections increase the risk of mortality. Our purpose was to investigate differences in proteolytic activity of non-albicans Candida albicans (non-albicans Candida) between clinical isolates and laboratory samples. The second aim was to assess the concentration of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine levels IL-1β, IL-10, and TNF-α in saliva of patients with the non-albicans Candida and Candida-negative saliva samples. Clinical yeast samples from our laboratory were used for analyses. Candida strains were grown in YPG at 37 °C for 24 h in water bath with shaking. The activity of Candida proteinases of cell and cell-free fractions were analyzed by MDPF-gelatin zymography. The levels of IL-1β, IL-10, and TNF-α were measured from saliva with ELISA. The study showed differences in the proteolytic activity among the non-albicans Candida strains. C. tropicalis had higher proteolytic activity when compared to the other strains. Significant difference was found in salivary IL-1β levels between the non-albicans Candida and control strains (P < 0.002). The present findings showed differences in proteolytic activity among the non-albicans Candida strains. The increased IL-1β concentration may be one of the host response components associated with non-albicans Candida infection.

  18. Trends in Susceptibility Rates and Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase Production of Klebsiella pneumoniae in Bloodstream Infections Across the United States Veterans Affairs Healthcare System.

    PubMed

    Gentry, Chris A; Williams, Riley J

    2015-12-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is an important pathogen, increasingly notorious for its ability to become resistant to antimicrobial agents. This study sought to characterize trends in antimicrobial susceptibility rates for K. pneumoniae causing bacteremias across the United States (U.S.) Veterans Healthcare Administration (VHA) from 2007 through 2013 utilizing a national clinical database. K. pneumoniae grew in 9,235 blood cultures from 8,414 patients. Nationally, ampicillin-sulbactam, ceftazidime, cefepime, ertapenem, fluoroquinolones, and amikacin demonstrated statistically significant susceptibility rate increases against K. pneumoniae in the 2010-2013 period versus the 2007-2009 period. No antimicrobial agent had a statistically significant nationwide susceptibility rate decrease. Of the 126 antibiotic-organism pairs tested among 9 U.S. regions, 18 demonstrated statistically significant susceptibility rate increases while 6 demonstrated statistically significant susceptibility rate decreases. The East North Central (eight agents), Mid-Atlantic (five agents), and South Atlantic (four agents) regions demonstrated statistically significant susceptibility rate increases for multiple antimicrobial agents. Of the 70 antibiotic-organism pairs tested among 5 different medical center complexity levels, 11 antibiotics demonstrated statistically significant susceptibility rate increases and 1 demonstrated a statistically significant rate decrease. Extended-spectrum β-lactamase production did not significantly change over the study period across an available nationwide representation of 31 facilities (10.6% in 2007-2009 vs. 9.21% in 2010-2013, p=0.17). The South Atlantic and Mid-Atlantic regions had the highest prevalence of extended-spectrum ß-lactamase production in the two periods, respectively. The recent trend of generally increasing susceptibility rates for K. pneumoniae bloodstream isolates in this nationwide U.S. VHA study contrasts from other U.S. health system reports

  19. Trends in Susceptibility Rates and Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase Production of Klebsiella pneumoniae in Bloodstream Infections Across the United States Veterans Affairs Healthcare System.

    PubMed

    Gentry, Chris A; Williams, Riley J

    2015-12-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is an important pathogen, increasingly notorious for its ability to become resistant to antimicrobial agents. This study sought to characterize trends in antimicrobial susceptibility rates for K. pneumoniae causing bacteremias across the United States (U.S.) Veterans Healthcare Administration (VHA) from 2007 through 2013 utilizing a national clinical database. K. pneumoniae grew in 9,235 blood cultures from 8,414 patients. Nationally, ampicillin-sulbactam, ceftazidime, cefepime, ertapenem, fluoroquinolones, and amikacin demonstrated statistically significant susceptibility rate increases against K. pneumoniae in the 2010-2013 period versus the 2007-2009 period. No antimicrobial agent had a statistically significant nationwide susceptibility rate decrease. Of the 126 antibiotic-organism pairs tested among 9 U.S. regions, 18 demonstrated statistically significant susceptibility rate increases while 6 demonstrated statistically significant susceptibility rate decreases. The East North Central (eight agents), Mid-Atlantic (five agents), and South Atlantic (four agents) regions demonstrated statistically significant susceptibility rate increases for multiple antimicrobial agents. Of the 70 antibiotic-organism pairs tested among 5 different medical center complexity levels, 11 antibiotics demonstrated statistically significant susceptibility rate increases and 1 demonstrated a statistically significant rate decrease. Extended-spectrum β-lactamase production did not significantly change over the study period across an available nationwide representation of 31 facilities (10.6% in 2007-2009 vs. 9.21% in 2010-2013, p=0.17). The South Atlantic and Mid-Atlantic regions had the highest prevalence of extended-spectrum ß-lactamase production in the two periods, respectively. The recent trend of generally increasing susceptibility rates for K. pneumoniae bloodstream isolates in this nationwide U.S. VHA study contrasts from other U.S. health system reports

  20. Multicenter surveillance of species distribution and antifungal susceptibilities of Candida bloodstream isolates in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sook-In; Shin, Jong Hee; Song, Jae-Hoon; Peck, Kyong Ran; Lee, Kyungwon; Kim, Mi-Na; Chang, Hyun Ha; Moon, Chi Sook

    2010-06-01

    Multicenter data on in vitro susceptibility of Candida bloodstream isolates to echinocandin antifungal agents is still lacking in South Korea. We performed a prospective multicenter study to determine the species distribution of Candida bloodstream isolates and their susceptibility to five antifungal agents, including caspofungin and micafungin. A total of 639 isolates were collected from 20 tertiary hospitals between September 2006 and August 2007. Antifungal susceptibilities were determined through the use of the CLSI broth microdilution method M27-A3. The overall species distribution was as follows; Candida albicans (38%), Candida parapsilosis (26%), Candia tropicalis (20%), Candida glabrata (11%), and miscellaneous Candida species (5%). Although C. parapsilosis and miscellaneous Candida species were less susceptible to both echinocandins, all 639 isolates were susceptible to both caspofungin and micafungin (MIC, albicans Candida species, including C. parapsilosis, constitutes over 60% of all Candida species isolates recovered from the bloodstream. In addition, the rates of resistance to all five antifungals, including two echinocandins, are still low among bloodstream isolates in South Korea.

  1. Flagellin-induced expression of CXCL10 mediates direct fungal killing and recruitment of NK cells to the cornea in response to Candida albicans infection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaowei; Gao, Nan; Dong, Chen; Zhou, Li; Mi, Qing-Sheng; Standiford, Theodore J; Yu, Fu-Shin X

    2014-09-01

    We previously showed that topical flagellin induces profound mucosal innate protection in the cornea against microbial infection, a response involving multiple genes and cell types. In this study, we used a Candida albicans (CA)-C57BL/6 mouse keratitis model to delineate the contribution of CXCL10- and CXCR3-expressing cells in flagellin-induced protection. Flagellin pretreatment markedly enhanced CXCL10 expression at 6 h post CA infection (hpi), but significantly dampened CXCL10 expression at 24 hpi. At the cellular level, CXCL10 was expressed in the epithelia at 6 hpi in flagellin-pretreated corneas, and concentrated at lesion sites 24 hpi. CXCR3-expressing cells were detected in great numbers at 24 hpi, organized within clusters at the lesion sites in CA-infected corneas. CXCL10 or CXCR3 neutralization increased keratitis severity and dampened flagellin-induced protection. CXCR3-positive cells were identified as NK cells, the depletion of which resulted in severe CA keratitis. Contributions from NK T-cells were excluded by finding no change in flagellin-induced protection in Rag1 KO mice. Recombinant CXCL10 inhibited CA growth in vitro and accelerated fungal clearance and inflammation resolution in vivo. Taken together, our data indicate that epithelium-expressed CXCL10 plays a critical role in fungal clearance and that CXCR3-expressing NK cells contribute to CA eradication in mouse corneas.

  2. Bone Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the body, bones can get infected. The infections are usually bacterial, but can also be fungal. ... bloodstream. People who are at risk for bone infections include those with diabetes, poor circulation, or recent ...

  3. Tigecycline Lock Therapy for Catheter-Related Bloodstream Infection Caused by KPC-Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae in Two Pediatric Hematological Patients.

    PubMed

    Foresti, Sergio; Di Bella, Stefano; Rovelli, Attilio; Sala, Alessandra; Verna, Marta; Bisi, Luca; Nisii, Carla; Gori, Andrea

    2015-12-01

    Catheter-related bacteremias carry high mortality rates in hematological patients. When a multidrug-resistant microorganism is involved, the catheter should ideally be removed; however, this approach is not always possible. Tigecycline lock therapy was used in two pediatric oncohematological patients with intravascular catheter-related infection due to KPC-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae. The catheter was salvaged in both cases, and the patients were later discharged. Our experience suggests the usefulness of this approach in treating this type of infection.

  4. Disruption in Candida albicans of the TPS2 gene encoding trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase affects cell integrity and decreases infectivity.

    PubMed

    Zaragoza, Oscar; de Virgilio, Claudio; Pontón, José; Gancedo, Carlos

    2002-05-01

    The gene CaTPS2 encoding trehalose-6-phosphate (T6P) phosphatase from Candida albicans has been cloned and disrupted in this organism. The Catps2/Catps2 mutant did not accumulate trehalose but accumulated high levels of T6P. Disruption of the two copies of the CaTPS2 gene did not abolish growth even at 42 degrees C, but decreased the growth rate. In the stationary phase, the Catps2/Catps2 mutant aggregated, more than 50% of its cells became permeable to propidium iodide and a large amount of protein was found in the culture medium. Aggregation occurred only at pH values higher than 7 and was avoided by osmoprotectants; it was never observed during the exponential phase of growth. The mutant formed colonies with a smooth border on Spider medium. Mice inoculated with 1.5 x 10(6) c.f.u. of wild-type cells died after 8 days, while 80% of those inoculated with the same number of c.f.u. of the Catps2/Catps2 mutant survived for at least 1 month. Reintroduction of the wild-type CaTPS2 gene in the Catps2/Catps2 mutant abolished the phenotypes described. It is hypothesized that the accumulation of T6P interferes with the assembly of a normal cell wall.

  5. Healthcare-Associated Infections (HAIs) Data and Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... and 2014 13 percent decrease in hospital-onset methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteremia (bloodstream infections) between 2011 ... Clostridium difficile infections ( C. difficile ), and hospital-onset ... Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteremia (bloodstream infections). To read ...

  6. GENETIC CONTROL OF CANDIDA ALBICANS BIOFILM DEVELOPMENT

    PubMed Central

    Finkel, Jonathan S.; Mitchell, Aaron P.

    2014-01-01

    Preface Candida species cause frequent infections due to their ability to form biofilms – surface-associated microbial communities – primarily on implanted medical devices. Increasingly, mechanistic studies have identified the gene products that participate directly in Candida albicans biofilm formation, as well as the regulatory circuitry and networks that control their expression and activity. These studies have revealed new mechanisms and signals that govern C. albicans biofilm formation and associated drug resistance, thus providing biological insight and therapeutic foresight. PMID:21189476

  7. The health and economic burden of bloodstream infections caused by antimicrobial-susceptible and non-susceptible Enterobacteriaceae and Staphylococcus aureus in European hospitals, 2010 and 2011: a multicentre retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Stewardson, Andrew J; Allignol, Arthur; Beyersmann, Jan; Graves, Nicholas; Schumacher, Martin; Meyer, Rodolphe; Tacconelli, Evelina; De Angelis, Giulia; Farina, Claudio; Pezzoli, Fabio; Bertrand, Xavier; Gbaguidi-Haore, Houssein; Edgeworth, Jonathan; Tosas, Olga; Martinez, Jose A; Ayala-Blanco, M Pilar; Pan, Angelo; Zoncada, Alessia; Marwick, Charis A; Nathwani, Dilip; Seifert, Harald; Hos, Nina; Hagel, Stefan; Pletz, Mathias; Harbarth, Stephan

    2016-08-18

    We performed a multicentre retrospective cohort study including 606,649 acute inpatient episodes at 10 European hospitals in 2010 and 2011 to estimate the impact of antimicrobial resistance on hospital mortality, excess length of stay (LOS) and cost. Bloodstream infections (BSI) caused by third-generation cephalosporin-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (3GCRE), meticillin-susceptible (MSSA) and -resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) increased the daily risk of hospital death (adjusted hazard ratio (HR) = 1.80; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.34-2.42, HR = 1.81; 95% CI: 1.49-2.20 and HR = 2.42; 95% CI: 1.66-3.51, respectively) and prolonged LOS (9.3 days; 95% CI: 9.2-9.4, 11.5 days; 95% CI: 11.5-11.6 and 13.3 days; 95% CI: 13.2-13.4, respectively). BSI with third-generation cephalosporin-susceptible Enterobacteriaceae (3GCSE) significantly increased LOS (5.9 days; 95% CI: 5.8-5.9) but not hazard of death (1.16; 95% CI: 0.98-1.36). 3GCRE significantly increased the hazard of death (1.63; 95% CI: 1.13-2.35), excess LOS (4.9 days; 95% CI: 1.1-8.7) and cost compared with susceptible strains, whereas meticillin resistance did not. The annual cost of 3GCRE BSI was higher than of MRSA BSI. While BSI with S. aureus had greater impact on mortality, excess LOS and cost than Enterobacteriaceae per infection, the impact of antimicrobial resistance was greater for Enterobacteriaceae. PMID:27562950

  8. The health and economic burden of bloodstream infections caused by antimicrobial-susceptible and non-susceptible Enterobacteriaceae and Staphylococcus aureus in European hospitals, 2010 and 2011: a multicentre retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Stewardson, Andrew J; Allignol, Arthur; Beyersmann, Jan; Graves, Nicholas; Schumacher, Martin; Meyer, Rodolphe; Tacconelli, Evelina; De Angelis, Giulia; Farina, Claudio; Pezzoli, Fabio; Bertrand, Xavier; Gbaguidi-Haore, Houssein; Edgeworth, Jonathan; Tosas, Olga; Martinez, Jose A; Ayala-Blanco, M Pilar; Pan, Angelo; Zoncada, Alessia; Marwick, Charis A; Nathwani, Dilip; Seifert, Harald; Hos, Nina; Hagel, Stefan; Pletz, Mathias; Harbarth, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    We performed a multicentre retrospective cohort study including 606,649 acute inpatient episodes at 10 European hospitals in 2010 and 2011 to estimate the impact of antimicrobial resistance on hospital mortality, excess length of stay (LOS) and cost. Bloodstream infections (BSI) caused by third-generation cephalosporin-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (3GCRE), meticillin-susceptible (MSSA) and -resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) increased the daily risk of hospital death (adjusted hazard ratio (HR) = 1.80; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.34–2.42, HR = 1.81; 95% CI: 1.49–2.20 and HR = 2.42; 95% CI: 1.66–3.51, respectively) and prolonged LOS (9.3 days; 95% CI: 9.2–9.4, 11.5 days; 95% CI: 11.5–11.6 and 13.3 days; 95% CI: 13.2–13.4, respectively). BSI with third-generation cephalosporin-susceptible Enterobacteriaceae (3GCSE) significantly increased LOS (5.9 days; 95% CI: 5.8–5.9) but not hazard of death (1.16; 95% CI: 0.98–1.36). 3GCRE significantly increased the hazard of death (1.63; 95% CI: 1.13–2.35), excess LOS (4.9 days; 95% CI: 1.1–8.7) and cost compared with susceptible strains, whereas meticillin resistance did not. The annual cost of 3GCRE BSI was higher than of MRSA BSI. While BSI with S. aureus had greater impact on mortality, excess LOS and cost than Enterobacteriaceae per infection, the impact of antimicrobial resistance was greater for Enterobacteriaceae. PMID:27562950

  9. Antifungal Susceptibility Profiles of Bloodstream Yeast Isolates by Sensititre YeastOne over Nine Years at a Large Italian Teaching Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Posteraro, Brunella; Spanu, Teresa; Fiori, Barbara; De Maio, Flavio; De Carolis, Elena; Giaquinto, Alessia; Prete, Valentina; De Angelis, Giulia; Torelli, Riccardo; D'Inzeo, Tiziana; Vella, Antonietta; De Luca, Alessio; Tumbarello, Mario; Ricciardi, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Sensititre YeastOne (SYO) is an affordable alternative to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) reference method for antifungal susceptibility testing. In this study, the MICs of yeast isolates from 1,214 bloodstream infection episodes, generated by SYO during hospital laboratory activity (January 2005 to December 2013), were reanalyzed using current CLSI clinical breakpoints/epidemiological cutoff values to assign susceptibility (or the wild-type [WT] phenotype) to systemic antifungal agents. Excluding Candida albicans (57.4% of all isolates [n = 1,250]), the most predominant species were Candida parapsilosis complex (20.9%), Candida tropicalis (8.2%), Candida glabrata (6.4%), Candida guilliermondii (1.6%), and Candida krusei (1.3%). Among the non-Candida species (1.9%), 7 were Cryptococcus neoformans and 17 were other species, mainly Rhodotorula species. Over 97% of Candida isolates were susceptible (WT phenotype) to amphotericin B and flucytosine. Rates of susceptibility (WT phenotype) to fluconazole, itraconazole, and voriconazole were 98.7% in C. albicans, 92.3% in the C. parapsilosis complex, 96.1% in C. tropicalis, 92.5% in C. glabrata, 100% in C. guilliermondii, and 100% (excluding fluconazole) in C. krusei. The fluconazole-resistant isolates consisted of 6 C. parapsilosis complex isolates, 3 C. glabrata isolates, 2 C. albicans isolates, 2 C. tropicalis isolates, and 1 Candida lusitaniae isolate. Of the non-Candida isolates, 2 C. neoformans isolates had the non-WT phenotype for susceptibility to fluconazole, whereas Rhodotorula isolates had elevated azole MICs. Overall, 99.7% to 99.8% of Candida isolates were susceptible (WT phenotype) to echinocandins, but 3 isolates were nonsusceptible (either intermediate or resistant) to caspofungin (C. albicans, C. guilliermondii, and C. krusei), anidulafungin (C. albicans and C. guilliermondii), and micafungin (C. albicans). However, when the intrinsically resistant non-Candida isolates were included

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of Colistin-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Strain VB22595 Isolated from a Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infection

    PubMed Central

    Veeraraghavan, Balaji; Anandan, Shalini; Ragupathi, Naveen Kumar Devanga; Vijayakumar, Saranya; Sethuvel, Dhiviya Prabaa Muthuirulandi

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an important emerging pathogen that causes health care-associated infections. In this study, we determined the genome of a multidrug-resistant clinical strain, VB22595, isolated from a hospital in Southern India. The draft genome indicates that strain VB22595 encodes a genome of ~3.92 Mb in size and does not contain plasmid derived MCR-1 for colistin resistance. PMID:27516521

  11. Beyond Candida albicans: Mechanisms of immunity to non-albicans Candida species.

    PubMed

    Whibley, Natasha; Gaffen, Sarah L

    2015-11-01

    The fungal genus Candida encompasses numerous species that inhabit a variety of hosts, either as commensal microbes and/or pathogens. Candida species are a major cause of fungal infections, yet to date there are no vaccines against Candida or indeed any other fungal pathogen. Our knowledge of immunity to Candida mainly comes from studies on Candida albicans, the most frequent species associated with disease. However, non-albicans Candida (NAC) species also cause disease and their prevalence is increasing. Although research into immunity to NAC species is still at an early stage, it is becoming apparent that immunity to C. albicans differs in important ways from non-albicans species, with important implications for treatment, therapy and predicted demographic susceptibility. This review will discuss the current understanding of immunity to NAC species in the context of immunity to C. albicans, and highlight as-yet unanswered questions.

  12. Candida albicans Biofilms and Human Disease.

    PubMed

    Nobile, Clarissa J; Johnson, Alexander D

    2015-01-01

    In humans, microbial cells (including bacteria, archaea, and fungi) greatly outnumber host cells. Candida albicans is the most prevalent fungal species of the human microbiota; this species asymptomatically colonizes many areas of the body, particularly the gastrointestinal and genitourinary tracts of healthy individuals. Alterations in host immunity, stress, resident microbiota, and other factors can lead to C. albicans overgrowth, causing a wide range of infections, from superficial mucosal to hematogenously disseminated candidiasis. To date, most studies of C. albicans have been carried out in suspension cultures; however, the medical impact of C. albicans (like that of many other microorganisms) depends on its ability to thrive as a biofilm, a closely packed community of cells. Biofilms are notorious for forming on implanted medical devices, including catheters, pacemakers, dentures, and prosthetic joints, which provide a surface and sanctuary for biofilm growth. C. albicans biofilms are intrinsically resistant to conventional antifungal therapeutics, the host immune system, and other environmental perturbations, making biofilm-based infections a significant clinical challenge. Here, we review our current knowledge of biofilms formed by C. albicans and closely related fungal species. PMID:26488273

  13. In vitro modification of Candida albicans invasiveness.

    PubMed

    Fontenla de Petrino, S E; de Jorrat, M E; Sirena, A; Valdez, J C; Mesón, O

    1986-05-01

    Candida albicans produces germ-tubes (GT) when it is incubated in animal or human serum. This dimorphism is responsible for its invasive ability. The purpose of the present paper is (1) to evaluate the ability of rat peritoneal macrophages to inhibit GT production of ingested Candida albicans, obtained from immunized rats and then activated in vitro with Candida-induced lymphokines; (2) to determinate any possible alteration of phagocytic and candidacidal activities. The phagocytes were obtained from rats immunized with viable C. albicans. Some of them were exposed to Candida-induced lymphokines in order to activate the macrophages in vitro. The monolayers of activated, immune and normal macrophages were infected with a C. albicans suspension during 4 hr. Activated macrophages presented not only the highest phagocytic and candidacidal activities but a noticeable inhibition of GT formation and incremented candidacidal activity.

  14. Milestones in Candida albicans Gene Manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Samaranayake, Dhanushki P.; Hanes, Steven D.

    2011-01-01

    In the United States, candidemia is one of the most common hospital-acquired infections and is estimated to cause 10,000 deaths per year. The species Candida albicans is responsible for the majority of these cases. As C. albicans is capable of developing resistance against the currently available drugs, understanding the molecular basis of drug resistance, finding new cellular targets, and further understanding the overall mechanism of C. albicans pathogenesis are important goals. To study this pathogen it is advantageous to manipulate its genome. Numerous strategies of C. albicans gene manipulation have been introduced. This review evaluates a majority of these strategies and should be a helpful guide for researchers to identify gene targeting strategies to suit their requirements. PMID:21511047

  15. In vitro modification of Candida albicans invasiveness.

    PubMed

    Fontenla de Petrino, S E; de Jorrat, M E; Sirena, A; Valdez, J C; Mesón, O

    1986-05-01

    Candida albicans produces germ-tubes (GT) when it is incubated in animal or human serum. This dimorphism is responsible for its invasive ability. The purpose of the present paper is (1) to evaluate the ability of rat peritoneal macrophages to inhibit GT production of ingested Candida albicans, obtained from immunized rats and then activated in vitro with Candida-induced lymphokines; (2) to determinate any possible alteration of phagocytic and candidacidal activities. The phagocytes were obtained from rats immunized with viable C. albicans. Some of them were exposed to Candida-induced lymphokines in order to activate the macrophages in vitro. The monolayers of activated, immune and normal macrophages were infected with a C. albicans suspension during 4 hr. Activated macrophages presented not only the highest phagocytic and candidacidal activities but a noticeable inhibition of GT formation and incremented candidacidal activity. PMID:3523254

  16. Risk factors for mortality in patients with bloodstream infections caused by carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa: clinical impact of bacterial virulence and strains on outcome.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Su Jin; Yoon, Sang Sun; Bae, Il Kwon; Jeong, Seok Hoon; Kim, June Myung; Lee, Kyungwon

    2014-10-01

    The incidence of carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (CRPA) bacteremia has increased in recent years, and infections caused by CRPA result in higher mortality than those caused by susceptible strains. This study was performed to evaluate the risk factors for mortality and to study the impact of virulence factors and bacterial strains on clinical outcomes in patients with CRPA bacteremia. Data on 63 episodes of CRPA bacteremia that have occurred between January 1, 2007, and December 31, 2009, in a teaching hospital (2000 beds) in Seoul, Korea, were analyzed. The Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) score at the time of CRPA bacteremia and the capacity of CRPA to form biofilm were independent predictive factors for mortality in patients with CRPA bacteremia. In addition, the biofilm-forming ability and elastase activity of strains were correlated with APACHE II scores to measure the severity of disease and estimate predicted mortality in the patients.

  17. In Vitro Activity of Caspofungin against Candida albicans Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Bachmann, Stefano P.; VandeWalle, Kacy; Ramage, Gordon; Patterson, Thomas F.; Wickes, Brian L.; Graybill, John R.; López-Ribot, José L.

    2002-01-01

    Most manifestations of candidiasis are associated with biofilm formation on biological or inanimate surfaces. Candida albicans biofilms are recalcitrant to treatment with conventional antifungal therapies. Here we report on the activity of caspofungin, a new semisynthetic echinocandin, against C. albicans biofilms. Caspofungin displayed potent in vitro activity against sessile C. albicans cells within biofilms, with MICs at which 50% of the sessile cells were inhibited well within the drug's therapeutic range. Scanning electron microscopy and confocal scanning laser microscopy were used to visualize the effects of caspofungin on preformed C. albicans biofilms, and the results indicated that caspofungin affected the cellular morphology and the metabolic status of cells within the biofilms. The coating of biomaterials with caspofungin had an inhibitory effect on subsequent biofilm development by C. albicans. Together these findings indicate that caspofungin displays potent activity against C. albicans biofilms in vitro and merits further investigation for the treatment of biofilm-associated infections. PMID:12384370

  18. [Investigation of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes in quinolone-resistant Escherichia coli and Klebsiella spp. isolates from bloodstream infections].

    PubMed

    Buruk, Celal Kurtuluş; Öztel Ocak, Hikmet; Bayramoğlu, Gülçin; Aydın, Faruk

    2016-04-01

    One of the treatment options of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella spp. infections which are the most common opportunistic pathogens of gram-negative sepsis is quinolones. Resistance to quinolones which act by disrupting DNA synthesis has been increasing. Horizontal transfer of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes play an important role in the spread of resistance. The data about the prevalence of PMQR genes in our country is quite limited. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of known PMQR genes namely qnrA, qnrB, qnrC, qnrS, qnrD, aac(6')-Ib-cr, qepA and oqxAB amongst quinolone-resistant E. coli and Klebsiella spp. strains isolated from blood cultures. One hundred twenty seven E.coli and 66 Klebsiella isolates detected as nalidixic acid- and/or ciprofloxacin-resistant by phenotypical methods, from 193 blood samples of 187 patients admitted to Karadeniz Technical University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Microbiology, Bacteriology Unit of Patient Service Laboratory between January 2012 to August 2013 were included in the study. The presence of PMQR genes were investigated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and for the detection of aac(6')-Ib-cr variants PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method was used. The positive bands were sequenced using the same primers, and aligned with formerly defined resistance gene sequences, and confirmed. In the study, 56.7% (72/127) of E.coli and 19.7% (13/66) of Klebsiella spp. isolates, with a total of 44% (85/193) of all the isolates were found to be phenotypically resistant to quinolones. Of the 13 resistant Klebsiella isolates, 11 were K.pneumoniae, and two were K.oxytoca. Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing isolates showed higher resistance (50/80, 62.5%) to quinolones than the negative ones (35/113, 30.9%). The prevalence of quinolone resistance genes among resistant E. coli and Klebsiella spp. isolates was determined as qnrA, 1.4% and 15.4%; qnrB, 4

  19. Candida albicans escapes from mouse neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Ermert, David; Niemiec, Maria J; Röhm, Marc; Glenthøj, Andreas; Borregaard, Niels; Urban, Constantin F

    2013-08-01

    Candida albicans, the most commonly isolated human fungal pathogen, is able to grow as budding yeasts or filamentous forms, such as hyphae. The ability to switch morphology has been attributed a crucial role for the pathogenesis of C. albicans. To mimic disseminated candidiasis in humans, the mouse is the most widely used model organism. Neutrophils are essential immune cells to prevent opportunistic mycoses. To explore potential differences between the rodent infection model and the human host, we compared the interactions of C. albicans with neutrophil granulocytes from mice and humans. We revealed that murine neutrophils exhibited a significantly lower ability to kill C. albicans than their human counterparts. Strikingly, C. albicans yeast cells formed germ tubes upon internalization by murine neutrophils, eventually rupturing the neutrophil membrane and thereby, killing the phagocyte. On the contrary, growth and subsequent escape of C. albicans are blocked inside human neutrophils. According to our findings, this blockage in human neutrophils might be a result of higher levels of MPO activity and the presence of α-defensins. We therefore outline differences in antifungal immune defense between humans and mouse strains, which facilitates a more accurate interpretation of in vivo results.

  20. Comparison of albicans vs. non-albicans candidemia in French intensive care units

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Candidemia raises numerous therapeutic issues for intensive care physicians. Epidemiological data that could guide the choice of initial therapy are still required. This analysis sought to compare the characteristics of intensive care unit (ICU) patients with candidemia due to non-albicans Candida species with those of ICU patients with candidemia due to Candida albicans. Methods A prospective, observational, multicenter, French study was conducted from October 2005 to May 2006. Patients exhibiting candidemia developed during ICU stay and exclusively due either to one or more non-albicans Candida species or to C. albicans were selected. The data collected included patient characteristics on ICU admission and at the onset of candidemia. Results Among the 136 patients analyzed, 78 (57.4%) had candidemia caused by C. albicans. These patients had earlier onset of infection (11.1 ± 14.2 days after ICU admission vs. 17.4 ± 17.7, p = 0.02), higher severity scores on ICU admission (SOFA: 10.4 ± 4.7 vs. 8.6 ± 4.6, p = 0.03; SAPS II: 57.4 ± 22.8 vs. 48.7 ± 15.5, P = 0.015), and were less often neutropenic (2.6% vs. 12%, p = 0.04) than patients with candidemia due to non-albicans Candida species. Conclusions Although patients infected with Candida albicans differed from patients infected with non-albicans Candida species for a few characteristics, no clinical factor appeared pertinent enough to guide the choice of empirical antifungal therapy in ICU. PMID:20507569

  1. Competitive Interactions between C. albicans, C. glabrata and C. krusei during Biofilm Formation and Development of Experimental Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Rossoni, Rodnei Dennis; Barbosa, Júnia Oliveira; Vilela, Simone Furgeri Godinho; dos Santos, Jéssica Diane; de Barros, Patrícia Pimentel; Prata, Márcia Cristina de Azevedo; Anbinder, Ana Lia; Fuchs, Beth Burgwyn; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso; Mylonakis, Eleftherios; Junqueira, Juliana Campos

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the interactions between Candida albicans, Candida krusei and Candida glabrata in mixed infections. Initially, these interactions were studied in biofilms formed in vitro. CFU/mL values of C. albicans were lower in mixed biofilms when compared to the single biofilms, verifying 77% and 89% of C. albicans reduction when this species was associated with C. glabrata and C. krusei, respectively. After that, we expanded this study for in vivo host models of experimental candidiasis. G. mellonella larvae were inoculated with monotypic and heterotypic Candida suspensions for analysis of survival rate and quantification of fungal cells in the haemolymph. In the groups with single infections, 100% of the larvae died within 18 h after infection with C. albicans. However, interaction groups achieved 100% mortality after 72 h of infection by C. albicans-C. glabrata and 96 h of infection by C. albicans-C. krusei. C. albicans CFU/mL values from larvae hemolymph were lower in the interacting groups compared with the monoespecies group after 12 h of infection. In addition, immunosuppressed mice were also inoculated with monotypic and heterotypic microbial suspensions to induce oral candidiasis. C. albicans CFU/mL values recovered from oral cavity of mice were higher in the group with single infection by C. albicans than the groups with mixed infections by C. albicans-C. glabrata and C. albicans-C. krusei. Moreover, the group with single infection by C. albicans had a higher degree of hyphae and epithelial changes in the tongue dorsum than the groups with mixed infections. We concluded that single infections by C. albicans were more harmful for animal models than mixed infections with non-albicans species, suggesting that C. albicans establish competitive interactions with C. krusei and C. glabrata during biofilm formation and development of experimental candidiasis. PMID:26146832

  2. Competitive Interactions between C. albicans, C. glabrata and C. krusei during Biofilm Formation and Development of Experimental Candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Rossoni, Rodnei Dennis; Barbosa, Júnia Oliveira; Vilela, Simone Furgeri Godinho; dos Santos, Jéssica Diane; de Barros, Patrícia Pimentel; Prata, Márcia Cristina de Azevedo; Anbinder, Ana Lia; Fuchs, Beth Burgwyn; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso; Mylonakis, Eleftherios; Junqueira, Juliana Campos

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the interactions between Candida albicans, Candida krusei and Candida glabrata in mixed infections. Initially, these interactions were studied in biofilms formed in vitro. CFU/mL values of C. albicans were lower in mixed biofilms when compared to the single biofilms, verifying 77% and 89% of C. albicans reduction when this species was associated with C. glabrata and C. krusei, respectively. After that, we expanded this study for in vivo host models of experimental candidiasis. G. mellonella larvae were inoculated with monotypic and heterotypic Candida suspensions for analysis of survival rate and quantification of fungal cells in the haemolymph. In the groups with single infections, 100% of the larvae died within 18 h after infection with C. albicans. However, interaction groups achieved 100% mortality after 72 h of infection by C. albicans-C. glabrata and 96 h of infection by C. albicans-C. krusei. C. albicans CFU/mL values from larvae hemolymph were lower in the interacting groups compared with the monoespecies group after 12 h of infection. In addition, immunosuppressed mice were also inoculated with monotypic and heterotypic microbial suspensions to induce oral candidiasis. C. albicans CFU/mL values recovered from oral cavity of mice were higher in the group with single infection by C. albicans than the groups with mixed infections by C. albicans-C. glabrata and C. albicans-C. krusei. Moreover, the group with single infection by C. albicans had a higher degree of hyphae and epithelial changes in the tongue dorsum than the groups with mixed infections. We concluded that single infections by C. albicans were more harmful for animal models than mixed infections with non-albicans species, suggesting that C. albicans establish competitive interactions with C. krusei and C. glabrata during biofilm formation and development of experimental candidiasis.

  3. Uncommon opportunistic yeast bloodstream infections from Qatar.

    PubMed

    Taj-Aldeen, Saad J; AbdulWahab, Atqah; Kolecka, Anna; Deshmukh, Anand; Meis, Jacques F; Boekhout, Teun

    2014-07-01

    Eleven uncommon yeast species that are associated with high mortality rates irrespective of antifungal therapy were isolated from 17/187 (201 episodes) pediatric and elderly patients with fungemia from Qatar. The samples were taken over a 6-year period (January 2004-December 2010). Isolated species included Kluyveromyces marxianus, Lodderomyces elongisporus, Lindnera fabianii, Candida dubliniensis, Meyerozyma guilliermondii, Candida intermedia, Pichia kudriavzevii, Yarrowia lipolytica, Clavispora lusitaniae, Candida pararugosa, and Wickerhamomyces anomalus. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry provided correct identifications compared with molecular analysis testing of the same isolates. Low minimal inhibitory concentrations were found when isavuconazole and voriconazole were used for all uncommon yeast species evaluated in this study. Resistance to antifungal drugs was low and remained restricted to a few species. PMID:24934803

  4. Utility of the oestrogen-dependent vaginal candidosis murine model in evaluating the efficacy of various therapies against vaginal Candida albicans infection.

    PubMed

    Hamad, Mawieh; Muta'eb, Enas; Abu-Shaqra, Qasem; Fraij, Abeer; Abu-Elteen, Khaled; Yasin, Salem R

    2006-03-01

    The efficacy of yogurt treatment against vaginal candidosis (VC) was examined using an oestrogen-dependent vaginal candidosis (EDVC) murine model. The EDVC mouse model was constructed by inoculating mice with viable Candida albicans cells under pseudo-oestrus conditions. Vaginal fungal burden in the various mouse groups was evaluated at several time points following the induction of VC. Untreated and yogurt-treated naïve mice exhibited background levels of VC (<6000 CFU per mouse). Candida albicans colonisation in untreated EDVC mice was significantly higher (P < 0.05) than that in yogurt-treated EDVC mice at days 20-30. Metronidazole-treated naïve mice developed persistent C. albicans vaginal colonisation at significantly lower levels (P < 0.05) than that in untreated or metronidazole-treated EDVC mice. Lactobacillus was only detected in the reproductive tracts of yogurt-treated naïve and EDVC mice. These findings suggest that the presence of Lactobacillus in the reproductive tract can suppress C. albicans growth and the antibiotics may predispose to VC. PMID:16466442

  5. Candida glabrata Binding to Candida albicans Hyphae Enables Its Development in Oropharyngeal Candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Tati, Swetha; Davidow, Peter; McCall, Andrew; Hwang-Wong, Elizabeth; Rojas, Isolde G; Cormack, Brendan; Edgerton, Mira

    2016-03-01

    Pathogenic mechanisms of Candida glabrata in oral candidiasis, especially because of its inability to form hyphae, are understudied. Since both Candida albicans and C. glabrata are frequently co-isolated in oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC), we examined their co-adhesion in vitro and observed adhesion of C. glabrata only to C. albicans hyphae microscopically. Mice were infected sublingually with C. albicans or C. glabrata individually, or with both species concurrently, to study their ability to cause OPC. Infection with C. glabrata alone resulted in negligible infection of tongues; however, colonization by C. glabrata was increased by co-infection or a pre-established infection with C. albicans. Furthermore, C. glabrata required C. albicans for colonization of tongues, since decreasing C. albicans burden with fluconazole also reduced C. glabrata. C. albicans hyphal wall adhesins Als1 and Als3 were important for in vitro adhesion of C. glabrata and to establish OPC. C. glabrata cell wall protein coding genes EPA8, EPA19, AWP2, AWP7, and CAGL0F00181 were implicated in mediating adhesion to C. albicans hyphae and remarkably, their expression was induced by incubation with germinated C. albicans. Thus, we found a near essential requirement for the presence of C. albicans for both initial colonization and establishment of OPC infection by C. glabrata.

  6. Candida glabrata Binding to Candida albicans Hyphae Enables Its Development in Oropharyngeal Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Tati, Swetha; Davidow, Peter; McCall, Andrew; Hwang-Wong, Elizabeth; Rojas, Isolde G.; Cormack, Brendan; Edgerton, Mira

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic mechanisms of Candida glabrata in oral candidiasis, especially because of its inability to form hyphae, are understudied. Since both Candida albicans and C. glabrata are frequently co-isolated in oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC), we examined their co-adhesion in vitro and observed adhesion of C. glabrata only to C. albicans hyphae microscopically. Mice were infected sublingually with C. albicans or C. glabrata individually, or with both species concurrently, to study their ability to cause OPC. Infection with C. glabrata alone resulted in negligible infection of tongues; however, colonization by C. glabrata was increased by co-infection or a pre-established infection with C. albicans. Furthermore, C. glabrata required C. albicans for colonization of tongues, since decreasing C. albicans burden with fluconazole also reduced C. glabrata. C. albicans hyphal wall adhesins Als1 and Als3 were important for in vitro adhesion of C. glabrata and to establish OPC. C. glabrata cell wall protein coding genes EPA8, EPA19, AWP2, AWP7, and CAGL0F00181 were implicated in mediating adhesion to C. albicans hyphae and remarkably, their expression was induced by incubation with germinated C. albicans. Thus, we found a near essential requirement for the presence of C. albicans for both initial colonization and establishment of OPC infection by C. glabrata. PMID:27029023

  7. Types of Haemophilus influenzae Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... many different kinds of infections. These infections can range from mild ear infections to severe diseases, like bloodstream infections. When the bacteria invade parts of the body that are normally free from germs, like spinal fluid or blood, this ...

  8. Sensitization of Candida albicans to terbinafine by berberine and berberrubine

    PubMed Central

    LAM, PIKLING; KOK, STANTON HON LUNG; LEE, KENNETH KA HO; LAM, KIM HUNG; HAU, DESMOND KWOK PO; WONG, WAI YEUNG; BIAN, ZHAOXIANG; GAMBARI, ROBERTO; CHUI, CHUNG HIN

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans (C. albicans) is an opportunistic fungal pathogen, particularly observed in immunocompromised patients. C. albicans accounts for 50–70% of cases of invasive candidiasis in the majority of clinical settings. Terbinafine, an allylamine antifungal drug, has been used to treat fungal infections previously. It has fungistatic activity against C. albicans. Traditional Chinese medicines can be used as complementary medicines to conventional drugs to treat a variety of ailments and diseases. Berberine is a quaternary alkaloid isolated from the traditional Chinese herb, Coptidis Rhizoma, while berberrubine is isolated from the medicinal plant Berberis vulgaris, but is also readily derived from berberine by pyrolysis. The present study demonstrates the possible complementary use of berberine and berberrubine with terbinafine against C. albicans. The experimental findings assume that the potential application of these alkaloids together with reduced dosage of the standard drug would enhance the resulting antifungal potency. PMID:27073630

  9. [Meningitis to Candida albicans at the adult, use of the new diagnosis methods].

    PubMed

    Duclos, G; Dumont, J-C; Ranque, S; Zieleskiewicz, L; Bruder, N

    2014-01-01

    Candida albicans or non-albicans are a frequent source of infection but seldom displayed in cerebrospinal fluid although responsible of an important number of nosocomial meningitis. Diagnosis is difficult which often delays treatment, which in turn hinders prognostic. This clinical case shows a patient afflicted with a deadly C. albicans meningitis and allows us to focus on new diagnostic tools and advice against this infection. PMID:25127852

  10. Effect of Tetrandrine against Candida albicans Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lan-Xue; Li, De-Dong; Hu, Dan-Dan; Hu, Gan-Hai; Yan, Lan; Wang, Yan; Jiang, Yuan-Ying

    2013-01-01

    Candida albicans is the most common human fungal pathogen and has a high propensity to develop biofilms that are resistant to traditional antifungal agents. In this study, we investigated the effect of tetrandrine (TET) on growth, biofilm formation and yeast-to-hypha transition of C. albicans. We characterized the inhibitory effect of TET on hyphal growth and addressed its possible mechanism of action. Treatment of TET at a low concentration without affecting fungal growth inhibited hyphal growth in both liquid and solid Spider media. Real-time RT-PCR revealed that TET down-regulated the expression of hypha-specific genes ECE1, ALS3 and HWP1, and abrogated the induction of EFG1 and RAS1, regulators of hyphal growth. Addition of cAMP restored the normal phenotype of the SC5314 strain. These results indicate that TET may inhibit hyphal growth through the Ras1p-cAMP-PKA pathway. In vivo, at a range of concentrations from 4 mg/L to 32 mg/L, TET prolonged the survival of C. albicans-infected Caenorhabditis elegans significantly. This study provides useful information for the development of new strategies to reduce the incidence of C. albicans biofilm-associated infections. PMID:24260276

  11. Liposomal thymoquinone effectively combats fluconazole-resistant Candida albicans in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Khan, Masood Alam; Aljarbou, Ahmad N; Khan, Arif; Younus, Hina

    2015-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop a novel liposomal formulation of thymoquinone (TQ) to treat fluconazole-susceptible and -resistant Candida albicans (C. albicans) infections. The liposomal preparation of TQ (Lip-TQ) was used against a fluconazole-susceptible or -resistant isolate of C. albicans. Various doses of fluconazole (0, 5, 10, 20 and 40 mg/kg) or free TQ or Lip-TQ (0, 1, 2 and 5mg/kg) were used to treat C. albicans infected mice. Mice were observed for 40 days post C. albicans infection, and their kidneys were assessed for the fungal load. Fluconazole showed anti-fungal activity against the drug-susceptible, but not against the -resistant isolate of C. albicans. Free TQ showed its activity against both fluconazole-susceptible or -resistant C. albicans, however, Lip-TQ was found to be the most effective and imparted ∼ 100% and ∼ 90% survival of mice infected with fluconazole-susceptible and -resistant isolates of C. albicans, respectively. Mice treated with Lip-TQ showed highly reduced severity of infection in their tissue homogenates. Therefore, Lip-TQ may effectively be used in the treatment of C. albicans infections, including those which are not responding to fluconazole.

  12. Global Identification of Biofilm-Specific Proteolysis in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Michael B.; Salcedo, Eugenia C.; Lohse, Matthew B.; Hartooni, Nairi; Gulati, Megha; Sanchez, Hiram; Takagi, Julie; Hube, Bernhard; Andes, David R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Candida albicans is a fungal species that is part of the normal human microbiota and also an opportunistic pathogen capable of causing mucosal and systemic infections. C. albicans cells proliferate in a planktonic (suspension) state, but they also form biofilms, organized and tightly packed communities of cells attached to a solid surface. Biofilms colonize many niches of the human body and persist on implanted medical devices, where they are a major source of new C. albicans infections. Here, we used an unbiased and global substrate-profiling approach to discover proteolytic activities produced specifically by C. albicans biofilms, compared to planktonic cells, with the goal of identifying potential biofilm-specific diagnostic markers and targets for therapeutic intervention. This activity-based profiling approach, coupled with proteomics, identified Sap5 (Candidapepsin-5) and Sap6 (Candidapepsin-6) as major biofilm-specific proteases secreted by C. albicans. Fluorogenic peptide substrates with selectivity for Sap5 or Sap6 confirmed that their activities are highly upregulated in C. albicans biofilms; we also show that these activities are upregulated in other Candida clade pathogens. Deletion of the SAP5 and SAP6 genes in C. albicans compromised biofilm development in vitro in standard biofilm assays and in vivo in a rat central venous catheter biofilm model. This work establishes secreted proteolysis as a promising enzymatic marker and potential therapeutic target for Candida biofilm formation. PMID:27624133

  13. Initiation of phospholipomannan β-1,2 mannosylation involves Bmts with redundant activity, influences its cell wall location and regulates β-glucans homeostasis but is dispensable for Candida albicans systemic infection.

    PubMed

    Courjol, F; Mille, C; Hall, R A; Masset, A; Aijjou, R; Gow, N A R; Poulain, D; Jouault, T; Fradin, C

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic and non-pathogenic fungi synthesize glycosphingolipids, which have a crucial role in growth and viability. Glycosphingolipids also contribute to fungal-associated pathogenesis. The opportunistic yeast pathogen Candida albicans synthesizes phospholipomannan (PLM), which is a glycosphingolipid of the mannosylinositol phosphorylceramide family. Through its lipid and glycan moieties, PLM contributes to the initial recognition of the yeast, causing immune system disorder and persistent fungal disease through activation of host signaling pathways. The lipid moiety of PLM activates the deregulation signaling pathway involved in yeast phagocytosis whereas its glycan moiety, composed of β-1,2 mannosides (β-Mans), participates to inflammatory processes through a mechanism involving Galectin-3. Biosynthesis of PLM β-Mans involves two β-1,2 mannosyltransferases (Bmts) that initiate (Bmt5) and elongate (Bmt6) the glycan chains. After generation of double bmtsΔ mutants, we show that Bmt5 has redundant activity with Bmt2, which can replace Bmt5 in bmt5Δ mutant. We also report that PLM is located in the inner layer of the yeast cell wall. PLM seems to be not essential for systemic infection of the yeast. However, defect of PLM β-mannosylation increases resistance of C. albicans to inhibitors of β-glucans and chitin synthesis, highlighting a role of PLM in cell wall homeostasis.

  14. Manipulation of host diet to reduce gastrointestinal colonization by the opportunistic pathogen Candida albicans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Candida albicans, the most common human fungal pathogen, can cause systemic infections with a mortality rate of ~40%. Infections arise from colonization of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, where C. albicans is part of the normal microflora. Reducing colonization in at-risk patients using antifungal ...

  15. Characterization of extracellular nucleotide metabolism in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Lisa; Russo-Abrahão, Thais; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Gonçalves, Teresa; Meyer-Fernandes, José Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans is the most frequent agent of human disseminated fungal infection. Ectophosphatase and ectonucleotidase activities are known to influence the infectious potential of several microbes, including other non-albicans species of Candida. With the present work we aim to characterize these ecto-enzymatic activities in C. albicans. We found that C. albicans does not have a classical ecto-5'-nucleotidase enzyme and 5'AMP is cleaved by a phosphatase instead of exclusively by a nucleotidase that also can use 3'AMP as a substrate. Moreover, these enzymatic activities are not dependent on secreted soluble enzymes and change when the yeast cells are under infection conditions, including low pH, and higher temperature and CO2 content.

  16. Oxidative stress of photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy inhibits Candida albicans virulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Ilka Tiemy; Prates, Renato Araujo; Tegos, George P.; Hamblin, Michael R.; Simões Ribeiro, Martha

    2011-03-01

    Photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT) is based on the principal that microorganisms will be inactivated using a light source combined to a photosensitizing agent in the presence of oxygen. Oxidative damage of cell components occurs by the action of reactive oxygen species leading to cell death for microbial species. It has been demonstrated that PACT is highly efficient in vitro against a wide range of pathogens, however, there is limited information for its in vivo potential. In addition, it has been demonstrated that sublethal photodynamic inactivation may alter the virulence determinants of microorganisms. In this study, we explored the effect of sublethal photodynamic inactivation to the virulence factors of Candida albicans. Methylene Blue (MB) was used as photosensitizer for sublethal photodynamic challenge on C. albicans associated with a diode laser irradiation (λ=660nm). The parameters of irradiation were selected in causing no reduction of viable cells. The potential effects of PACT on virulence determinants of C. albicans cells were investigated by analysis of germ tube formation and in vivo pathogenicity assays. Systemic infection was induced in mice by the injection of fungal suspension in the lateral caudal vein. C. albicans exposed to sublethal photodynamic inactivation formed significantly less germ tube than untreated cells. In addition, mice infected with C. albicans submitted to sublethal PACT survived for a longer period of time than mice infected with untreated cells. The oxidative damage promoted by sublethal photodynamic inactivation inhibited virulence determinants and reduced in vivo pathogenicity of C. albicans.

  17. Symbiotic Plant Peptides Eliminate Candida albicans Both In Vitro and in an Epithelial Infection Model and Inhibit the Proliferation of Immortalized Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ördögh, Lilla; Vörös, Andrea; Nagy, István; Kondorosi, Éva

    2014-01-01

    The increasing number of multidrug-resistant microbes now emerging necessitates the identification of novel antimicrobial agents. Plants produce a great variety of antimicrobial peptides including hundreds of small, nodule-specific cysteine-rich NCR peptides that, in the legume Medicago truncatula, govern the differentiation of endosymbiotic nitrogen fixing bacteria and, in vitro, can display potent antibacterial activities. In this study, the potential candidacidal activity of 19 NCR peptides was investigated. Cationic NCR peptides having an isoelectric point above 9 were efficient in killing Candida albicans, one of the most common fungal pathogens of humans. None of the tested NCR peptides were toxic for immortalized human epithelial cells at concentrations that effectively killed the fungus; however, at higher concentrations, some of them inhibited the division of the cells. Furthermore, the cationic peptides successfully inhibited C. albicans induced human epithelial cell death in an in vitro coculture model. These results highlight the therapeutic potential of cationic NCR peptides in the treatment of candidiasis. PMID:25243129

  18. Comparison of the hemolytic activity between C. albicans and non-albicans Candida species.

    PubMed

    Rossoni, Rodnei Dennis; Barbosa, Júnia Oliveira; Vilela, Simone Furgeri Godinho; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso; Junqueira, Juliana Campos

    2013-01-01

    The ability to produce enzymes, such as hemolysins, is an important virulence factor for the genus Candida.The objective of this study was to compare the hemolytic activity between C. albicansand non-albicans Candida species. Fifty strains of Candida species, isolated from the oral cavity of patients infected with HIV were studied. The isolates included the following species: C. albicans, C. dubliniensis, C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, C. krusei, C. parapsilosis, C. dubliniensis, C. norvegensis, C. lusitaniae, and C. guilliermondii. Hemolysin production was evaluated on Sabouraud dextrose agar containing chloramphenicol, blood, and glucose. A loop-full of pure Candidaculture was spot-inoculated onto plates and incubated at 37 ºC for 24 h in a 5% CO2 atmosphere. Hemolytic activity was defined as the formation of a translucent halo around the colonies. All C. albicansstrains that were studied produced hemolysins. Among the non-albicans Candidaspecies, 86% exhibited hemolytic activity. Only C. guilliermondiiand some C. parapsilosis isolates were negative for this enzyme. In conclusion, most non-albicans Candidaspecies had a similar ability to produce hemolysins when compared to C. albicans.

  19. Candida albicans and Enterococcus faecalis in the gut

    PubMed Central

    Garsin, Danielle A; Lorenz, Michael C

    2013-01-01

    The fungus Candida albicans and the gram-positive bacterium Enterococcus faecalis are both normal residents of the human gut microbiome and cause opportunistic disseminated infections in immunocompromised individuals. Using a nematode infection model, we recently showed that co-infection resulted in less pathology and less mortality than infection with either species alone and this was partly explained by an interkingdom signaling event in which a bacterial-derived product inhibits hyphal morphogenesis of C. albicans. In this addendum we discuss these findings in the contest of other described bacterial-fungal interactions and recent data suggesting a potentially synergistic relationship between these two species in the mouse gut as well. We suggest that E. faecalis and C. albicans promote a mutually beneficial association with the host, in effect choosing a commensal lifestyle over a pathogenic one. PMID:23941906

  20. In vitro activity of eugenol against Candida albicans biofilms.

    PubMed

    He, Miao; Du, Minquan; Fan, Mingwen; Bian, Zhuan

    2007-03-01

    Most manifestations of candidiasis are associated with biofilm formation occurring on the surfaces of host tissues and medical devices. Candida albicans is the most frequently isolated causative pathogen of candidiasis, and the biofilms display significantly increased levels of resistance to the conventional antifungal agents. Eugenol, the major phenolic component of clove essential oil, possesses potent antifungal activity. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of eugenol on preformed biofilms, adherent cells, subsequent biofilm formation and cell morphogenesis of C. albicans. Eugenol displayed in vitro activity against C. albicans cells within biofilms, when MIC(50) for sessile cells was 500 mg/L. C. albicans adherent cell populations (after 0, 1, 2 and 4 h of adherence) were treated with various concentrations of eugenol (0, 20, 200 and 2,000 mg/L). The extent of subsequent biofilm formation were then assessed with the tetrazolium salt reduction assay. Effect of eugenol on morphogenesis of C. albicans cells was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results indicated that the effect of eugenol on adherent cells and subsequent biofilm formation was dependent on the initial adherence time and the concentration of this compound, and that eugenol can inhibit filamentous growth of C. albicans cells. In addition, using human erythrocytes, eugenol showed low hemolytic activity. These results indicated that eugenol displayed potent activity against C. albicans biofilms in vitro with low cytotoxicity and therefore has potential therapeutic implication for biofilm-associated candidal infections. PMID:17356790

  1. Chlorhexidine Gluconate Cleansing in Preventing Central Line Associated Bloodstream Infection and Acquisition of Multi-drug Resistant Organisms in Younger Patients With Cancer or Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-27

    Bacterial Infection; Benign Neoplasm; Malignant Neoplasm; Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Infection; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Myeloid Neoplasm

  2. Effect of tunicamycin on Candida albicans biofilm formation and maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Christopher G.; Thomas, Derek P.; López-Ribot, José L.

    2009-01-01

    Background Candida albicans is a common opportunistic pathogen of the human body and is the frequent causative agent of candidiasis. Typically, these infections are associated with the formation of biofilms on both host tissues and implanted biomaterials. As a result of the intrinsic resistance of C. albicans biofilms to most antifungal agents, new strategies are needed to combat these infections. Methods Here we have used a 96-well microtitre plate model of C. albicans biofilm formation to study the inhibitory effect of tunicamycin, a nucleoside antibiotic that inhibits N-linked glycosylation affecting cell wall and secreted proteins, on C. albicans biofilm formation. A proteomic approach was used to study the effect of tunicamycin on levels of glycosylation of key secreted mannoproteins in the biofilm matrix. Results Our results revealed that physiological concentrations of tunicamycin displayed significant inhibitory effects on biofilm development and maintenance, while not affecting overall cell growth or morphology. However, tunicamycin exerted a minimal effect on fully mature, pre-formed C. albicans biofilms. Conclusions The effect of tunicamycin on the C. albicans biofilm mode of growth demonstrates the importance of N-linked glycosylation in the developmental stages of biofilm formation. In addition, our results indicate that N-linked glycosylation represents an attractive target for the development of alternative strategies for the prevention of biofilm formation by this important pathogenic fungus. PMID:19098294

  3. Molecular Insights into the Fungus-Specific Serine/Threonine Protein Phosphatase Z1 in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Emily; Choy, Meng S.; Petrényi, Katalin; Kónya, Zoltán; Erdődi, Ferenc; Dombrádi, Viktor; Peti, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The opportunistic pathogen Candida is one of the most common causes of nosocomial bloodstream infections. Because candidemia is associated with high mortality rates and because the incidences of multidrug-resistant Candida are increasing, efforts to identify novel targets for the development of potent antifungals are warranted. Here, we describe the structure and function of the first member of a family of protein phosphatases that is specific to fungi, protein phosphatase Z1 (PPZ1) from Candida albicans. We show that PPZ1 not only is active but also is as susceptible to inhibition by the cyclic peptide inhibitor microcystin-LR as its most similar human homolog, protein phosphatase 1α (PP1α [GLC7 in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae]). Unexpectedly, we also discovered that, despite its 66% sequence identity to PP1α, the catalytic domain of PPZ1 contains novel structural elements that are not present in PP1α. We then used activity and pulldown assays to show that these structural differences block a large subset of PP1/GLC7 regulatory proteins from effectively binding PPZ1, demonstrating that PPZ1 does not compete with GLC7 for its regulatory proteins. Equally important, these unique structural elements provide new pockets suitable for the development of PPZ1-specific inhibitors. Together, these studies not only reveal why PPZ1 does not negatively impact GLC7 activity in vivo but also demonstrate that the family of fungus-specific phosphatases—especially PPZ1 from C. albicans—are highly suitable targets for the development of novel drugs that specifically target C. albicans without cross-reacting with human phosphatases. PMID:27578752

  4. Development of DNA probes for Candida albicans

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, L.L.; Hudson, J.B.

    1988-07-01

    An attempt was made to produce DNA probes that could be used as a rapid and efficient means of detecting candidiasis (invasive Candida infection) in immunocompromised patients. Whole DNA from Candida albicans was digested with restriction endonuclease, and the resulting fragments were randomly cloned into a plasmid vector. Several recombinant plasmids were evaluated for cross-hybridization to various other Candida species, other fungal DNAs, and to nonfungal DNAs. Cross reactions were observed between the probes and different yeasts, but none with unrelated DNAs. Some recombinants were genus-specific, and two of these were applied to the analysis of C. albicans growth curves. It became evident that, although both /sup 32/P- and biotin-labelled probes could be made quite sensitive, a possible limitation in their diagnostic potential was the poor liberation of Candida DNA from cells. Thus, better methods of treatment of clinical specimens will be required before such probes will be useful in routine diagnosis.

  5. Candida albicans Fungaemia following Traumatic Urethral Catheterisation in a Paraplegic Patient with Diabetes Mellitus and Candiduria Treated by Caspofungin.

    PubMed

    Vaidyanathan, Subramanian; Soni, Bakul; Hughes, Peter; Ramage, Gordon; Sherry, Leighann; Singh, Gurpreet; Mansour, Paul

    2013-01-01

    A 58-year-old paraplegic male, with long-term indwelling urethral catheter, developed catheter block. The catheter was changed, but blood-stained urine was drained intermittently. A long segment of the catheter was seen lying outside his penis, which indicated that the balloon of Foley catheter had been inflated in urethra. The misplaced catheter was removed and a new catheter was inserted correctly. Gentamicin 160 mg was given intravenously; meropenem 1 gram every eight hours was prescribed; antifungals were not given. Twenty hours later, this patient developed distension of abdomen, tachycardia, and hypotension; he was not arousable. Computed tomography of abdomen revealed inflamed uroepithelium of right renal pelvis and ureter, 4 mm lower ureteric calculus with gas in right ureter proximally, and vesical calculus containing gas in its matrix. Urine and blood culture yielded Candida albicans. Identical sensitivity pattern of both isolates suggested that the source of the bloodstream infection was most likely urine. Both isolates formed consistently high levels of biofilm formation in vitro as assessed using a biofilm biomass stain, and high levels of resistance to voriconazole were observed. Both amphotericin B and caspofungin showed good activity against the biofilms. HbA1c was 111 mmol/mol. This patient was prescribed human soluble insulin and caspofungin 70 mg followed by 50 mg daily intravenously. He recovered fully from candidemia.

  6. Human Epithelial Cells Discriminate between Commensal and Pathogenic Interactions with Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Rast, Timothy J; Kullas, Amy L; Southern, Peter J; Davis, Dana A

    2016-01-01

    The commensal fungus, Candida albicans, can cause life-threatening infections in at risk individuals. C. albicans colonizes mucosal surfaces of most people, adhering to and interacting with epithelial cells. At low concentrations, C. albicans is not pathogenic nor does it cause epithelial cell damage in vitro; at high concentrations, C. albicans causes mucosal infections and kills epithelial cells in vitro. Here we show that while there are quantitative dose-dependent differences in exposed epithelial cell populations, these reflect a fundamental qualitative difference in host cell response to C. albicans. Using transcriptional profiling experiments and real time PCR, we found that wild-type C. albicans induce dose-dependent responses from a FaDu epithelial cell line. However, real time PCR and Western blot analysis using a high dose of various C. albicans strains demonstrated that these dose-dependent responses are associated with ability to promote host cell damage. Our studies support the idea that epithelial cells play a key role in the immune system by monitoring the microbial community at mucosal surfaces and initiating defensive responses when this community is dysfunctional. This places epithelial cells at a pivotal position in the interaction with C. albicans as epithelial cells themselves promote C. albicans stimulated damage.

  7. Human Epithelial Cells Discriminate between Commensal and Pathogenic Interactions with Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Rast, Timothy J.; Kullas, Amy L.; Southern, Peter J.; Davis, Dana A.

    2016-01-01

    The commensal fungus, Candida albicans, can cause life-threatening infections in at risk individuals. C. albicans colonizes mucosal surfaces of most people, adhering to and interacting with epithelial cells. At low concentrations, C. albicans is not pathogenic nor does it cause epithelial cell damage in vitro; at high concentrations, C. albicans causes mucosal infections and kills epithelial cells in vitro. Here we show that while there are quantitative dose-dependent differences in exposed epithelial cell populations, these reflect a fundamental qualitative difference in host cell response to C. albicans. Using transcriptional profiling experiments and real time PCR, we found that wild-type C. albicans induce dose-dependent responses from a FaDu epithelial cell line. However, real time PCR and Western blot analysis using a high dose of various C. albicans strains demonstrated that these dose-dependent responses are associated with ability to promote host cell damage. Our studies support the idea that epithelial cells play a key role in the immune system by monitoring the microbial community at mucosal surfaces and initiating defensive responses when this community is dysfunctional. This places epithelial cells at a pivotal position in the interaction with C. albicans as epithelial cells themselves promote C. albicans stimulated damage. PMID:27088599

  8. Human Epithelial Cells Discriminate between Commensal and Pathogenic Interactions with Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Rast, Timothy J; Kullas, Amy L; Southern, Peter J; Davis, Dana A

    2016-01-01

    The commensal fungus, Candida albicans, can cause life-threatening infections in at risk individuals. C. albicans colonizes mucosal surfaces of most people, adhering to and interacting with epithelial cells. At low concentrations, C. albicans is not pathogenic nor does it cause epithelial cell damage in vitro; at high concentrations, C. albicans causes mucosal infections and kills epithelial cells in vitro. Here we show that while there are quantitative dose-dependent differences in exposed epithelial cell populations, these reflect a fundamental qualitative difference in host cell response to C. albicans. Using transcriptional profiling experiments and real time PCR, we found that wild-type C. albicans induce dose-dependent responses from a FaDu epithelial cell line. However, real time PCR and Western blot analysis using a high dose of various C. albicans strains demonstrated that these dose-dependent responses are associated with ability to promote host cell damage. Our studies support the idea that epithelial cells play a key role in the immune system by monitoring the microbial community at mucosal surfaces and initiating defensive responses when this community is dysfunctional. This places epithelial cells at a pivotal position in the interaction with C. albicans as epithelial cells themselves promote C. albicans stimulated damage. PMID:27088599

  9. Anti-biofilm Properties of Peganum harmala against Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Aboualigalehdari, Elham; Sadeghifard, Nourkhoda; Taherikalani, Morovat; Zargoush, Zaynab; Tahmasebi, Zahra; Badakhsh, Behzad; Rostamzad, Arman; Ghafourian, Sobhan; Pakzad, Iraj

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Vaginitis still remains as a health issue in women. It is notable that Candida albicans producing biofilm is considered a microorganism responsible for vaginitis with hard to treat. Also, Peganum harmala was applied as an anti fungal in treatment for many infections in Iran. Therefore, this study goal to investigate the role of P. harmala in inhibition of biofilm formation in C. albicans. Methods So, 27 C. albicans collected from women with Vaginitis, then subjected for biofilm formation assay. P. harmala was applied as antibiofilm formation in C. albicans. Results Our results demonstrated that P. harmala in concentration of 12 μg/ml easily inhibited strong biofilm formation; while the concentrations of 10 and 6 μg/ml inhibited biofilm formation in moderate and weak biofilm formation C. albicans strains, respectively. Conclusion Hence, the current study presented P. harmala as antibiofilm herbal medicine for C. albicans; but in vivo study suggested to be performed to confirm its effectiveness. PMID:27169010

  10. Dental caries in rats associated with Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Klinke, T; Guggenheim, B; Klimm, W; Thurnheer, T

    2011-01-01

    In addition to occasional opportunistic colonization of the oral mucosa, Candida albicans is frequently found in carious dentin. The yeast's potential to induce dental caries as a consequence of its pronounced ability to produce and tolerate acids was investigated. Eighty caries-active Osborne-Mendel rats were raised on an ampicillin-supplemented diet and exposed to C. albicans and/or Streptococcus mutans, except for controls. Throughout the 28-day test period, the animals were offered the modified cariogenic diet 2000a, containing 40% various sugars. Subsequently, maxillary molars were scored for plaque extent. After dissection, the mandibular molars were evaluated for smooth surface and fissure caries. Test animals exposed to C. albicans displayed considerably more advanced fissure lesions (p < 0.001) than non-exposed controls. While S. mutans yielded similar results, a combined association of C. albicans and S. mutans had no effect on occlusal caries incidence. Substituting dietary sucrose by glucose did not modify caries induction by C. albicans. However, animals fed a diet containing 20% of both sugars showed no differences to non-infected controls. Smooth surface caries was not generated by the yeast. This study provides experimental evidence that C. albicans is capable of causing occlusal caries in rats at a high rate.

  11. In Vitro Assessment of the Antimicrobial Efficacy of Optimized Nitroglycerin-Citrate-Ethanol as a Nonantibiotic, Antimicrobial Catheter Lock Solution for Prevention of Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infections.

    PubMed

    Reitzel, Ruth A; Rosenblatt, Joel; Hirsh-Ginsberg, Cheryl; Murray, Kimberly; Chaftari, Anne-Marie; Hachem, Ray; Raad, Issam

    2016-09-01

    The rapid, broad-spectrum, biofilm-eradicating activity of the combination of 0.01% nitroglycerin, 7% citrate, and 20% ethanol and its potential as a nonantibiotic, antimicrobial catheter lock solution (ACLS) were previously reported. Here, a nitroglycerin-citrate-ethanol (NiCE) ACLS optimized for clinical assessment was developed by reducing the nitroglycerin and citrate concentrations and increasing the ethanol concentration. Biofilm-eradicating activity was sustained when the ethanol concentration was increased from 20 to 22% which fully compensated for reducing the citrate concentration from 7% to 4% as well as the nitroglycerin concentration from 0.01% to 0.0015% or 0.003%. The optimized formulations demonstrated complete and rapid (2 h) eradication of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-intermediate Staphylococcus aureus (VISA), methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis (MRSE), vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE), multidrug-resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa, MDR Klebsiella pneumoniae, MDR Enterobacter cloacae, MDR Acinetobacter baumannii, MDR Escherichia coli, MDR Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Candida albicans, and Candida glabrata biofilms. The optimized NiCE lock solutions demonstrated anticoagulant activities comparable to those of heparin lock solutions. NiCE lock solution was significantly more effective than taurolidine-citrate-heparin lock solution in eradicating biofilms of Staphylococcus aureus and Candida glabrata The optimized, nonantibiotic, heparin-free NiCE lock solution demonstrates rapid broad-spectrum biofilm eradication as well as effective anticoagulant activity, making NiCE a high-quality ACLS candidate for clinical assessment.

  12. In Vitro Assessment of the Antimicrobial Efficacy of Optimized Nitroglycerin-Citrate-Ethanol as a Nonantibiotic, Antimicrobial Catheter Lock Solution for Prevention of Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infections.

    PubMed

    Reitzel, Ruth A; Rosenblatt, Joel; Hirsh-Ginsberg, Cheryl; Murray, Kimberly; Chaftari, Anne-Marie; Hachem, Ray; Raad, Issam

    2016-09-01

    The rapid, broad-spectrum, biofilm-eradicating activity of the combination of 0.01% nitroglycerin, 7% citrate, and 20% ethanol and its potential as a nonantibiotic, antimicrobial catheter lock solution (ACLS) were previously reported. Here, a nitroglycerin-citrate-ethanol (NiCE) ACLS optimized for clinical assessment was developed by reducing the nitroglycerin and citrate concentrations and increasing the ethanol concentration. Biofilm-eradicating activity was sustained when the ethanol concentration was increased from 20 to 22% which fully compensated for reducing the citrate concentration from 7% to 4% as well as the nitroglycerin concentration from 0.01% to 0.0015% or 0.003%. The optimized formulations demonstrated complete and rapid (2 h) eradication of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-intermediate Staphylococcus aureus (VISA), methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis (MRSE), vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE), multidrug-resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa, MDR Klebsiella pneumoniae, MDR Enterobacter cloacae, MDR Acinetobacter baumannii, MDR Escherichia coli, MDR Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Candida albicans, and Candida glabrata biofilms. The optimized NiCE lock solutions demonstrated anticoagulant activities comparable to those of heparin lock solutions. NiCE lock solution was significantly more effective than taurolidine-citrate-heparin lock solution in eradicating biofilms of Staphylococcus aureus and Candida glabrata The optimized, nonantibiotic, heparin-free NiCE lock solution demonstrates rapid broad-spectrum biofilm eradication as well as effective anticoagulant activity, making NiCE a high-quality ACLS candidate for clinical assessment. PMID:27297475

  13. Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 4356 inhibits biofilm formation by C. albicans and attenuates the experimental candidiasis in Galleria mellonella.

    PubMed

    Vilela, Simone F G; Barbosa, Júnia O; Rossoni, Rodnei D; Santos, Jéssica D; Prata, Marcia C A; Anbinder, Ana Lia; Jorge, Antonio O C; Junqueira, Juliana C

    2015-01-01

    Probiotic strains of Lactobacillus have been studied for their inhibitory effects on Candida albicans. However, few studies have investigated the effect of these strains on biofilm formation, filamentation and C. albicans infection. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 4356 on C. albicans ATCC 18804 using in vitro and in vivo models. In vitro analysis evaluated the effects of L. acidophilus on the biofilm formation and on the capacity of C. albicans filamentation. For in vivo study, Galleria mellonella was used as an infection model to evaluate the effects of L. acidophilus on candidiasis by survival analysis, quantification of C. albicans CFU/mL, and histological analysis. The direct effects of L. acidophilus cells on C. albicans, as well as the indirect effects using only a Lactobacillus culture filtrate, were evaluated in both tests. The in vitro results showed that both L. acidophilus cells and filtrate were able to inhibit C. albicans biofilm formation and filamentation. In the in vivo study, injection of L. acidophilus into G. mellonella larvae infected with C. albicans increased the survival of these animals. Furthermore, the number of C. albicans CFU/mL recovered from the larval hemolymph was lower in the group inoculated with L. acidophilus compared to the control group. In conclusion, L. acidophilus ATCC 4356 inhibited in vitro biofilm formation by C. albicans and protected G. mellonella against experimental candidiasis in vivo.

  14. Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 4356 inhibits biofilm formation by C. albicans and attenuates the experimental candidiasis in Galleria mellonella

    PubMed Central

    Vilela, Simone FG; Barbosa, Júnia O; Rossoni, Rodnei D; Santos, Jéssica D; Prata, Marcia CA; Anbinder, Ana Lia; Jorge, Antonio OC; Junqueira, Juliana C

    2015-01-01

    Probiotic strains of Lactobacillus have been studied for their inhibitory effects on Candida albicans. However, few studies have investigated the effect of these strains on biofilm formation, filamentation and C. albicans infection. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 4356 on C. albicans ATCC 18804 using in vitro and in vivo models. In vitro analysis evaluated the effects of L. acidophilus on the biofilm formation and on the capacity of C. albicans filamentation. For in vivo study, Galleria mellonella was used as an infection model to evaluate the effects of L. acidophilus on candidiasis by survival analysis, quantification of C. albicans CFU/mL, and histological analysis. The direct effects of L. acidophilus cells on C. albicans, as well as the indirect effects using only a Lactobacillus culture filtrate, were evaluated in both tests. The in vitro results showed that both L. acidophilus cells and filtrate were able to inhibit C. albicans biofilm formation and filamentation. In the in vivo study, injection of L. acidophilus into G. mellonella larvae infected with C. albicans increased the survival of these animals. Furthermore, the number of C. albicans CFU/mL recovered from the larval hemolymph was lower in the group inoculated with L. acidophilus compared to the control group. In conclusion, L. acidophilus ATCC 4356 inhibited in vitro biofilm formation by C. albicans and protected G. mellonella against experimental candidiasis in vivo. PMID:25654408

  15. Spaceflight enhances cell aggregation and random budding in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Crabbé, Aurélie; Nielsen-Preiss, Sheila M; Woolley, Christine M; Barrila, Jennifer; Buchanan, Kent; McCracken, James; Inglis, Diane O; Searles, Stephen C; Nelman-Gonzalez, Mayra A; Ott, C Mark; Wilson, James W; Pierson, Duane L; Stefanyshyn-Piper, Heidemarie M; Hyman, Linda E; Nickerson, Cheryl A

    2013-01-01

    This study presents the first global transcriptional profiling and phenotypic characterization of the major human opportunistic fungal pathogen, Candida albicans, grown in spaceflight conditions. Microarray analysis revealed that C. albicans subjected to short-term spaceflight culture differentially regulated 452 genes compared to synchronous ground controls, which represented 8.3% of the analyzed ORFs. Spaceflight-cultured C. albicans-induced genes involved in cell aggregation (similar to flocculation), which was validated by microscopic and flow cytometry analysis. We also observed enhanced random budding of spaceflight-cultured cells as opposed to bipolar budding patterns for ground samples, in accordance with the gene expression data. Furthermore, genes involved in antifungal agent and stress resistance were differentially regulated in spaceflight, including induction of ABC transporters and members of the major facilitator family, downregulation of ergosterol-encoding genes, and upregulation of genes involved in oxidative stress resistance. Finally, downregulation of genes involved in actin cytoskeleton was observed. Interestingly, the transcriptional regulator Cap1 and over 30% of the Cap1 regulon was differentially expressed in spaceflight-cultured C. albicans. A potential role for Cap1 in the spaceflight response of C. albicans is suggested, as this regulator is involved in random budding, cell aggregation, and oxidative stress resistance; all related to observed spaceflight-associated changes of C. albicans. While culture of C. albicans in microgravity potentiates a global change in gene expression that could induce a virulence-related phenotype, no increased virulence in a murine intraperitoneal (i.p.) infection model was observed under the conditions of this study. Collectively, our data represent an important basis for the assessment of the risk that commensal flora could play during human spaceflight missions. Furthermore, since the low fluid

  16. Candida albicans Transcriptional Profiling Within Biliary Fluid From a Patient With Cholangitis, Before and After Antifungal Treatment and Surgical Drainage

    PubMed Central

    Clancy, Cornelius J.; Meslin, Camille; Badrane, Hassan; Cheng, Shaoji; Losada, Liliana C.; Nierman, William C.; Vergidis, Pascalis; Clark, Nathan L.; Nguyen, M. Hong

    2016-01-01

    We used ribonucleic acid sequencing to profile Candida albicans transcription within biliary fluid from a patient with cholangitis; samples were collected before and after treatment with fluconazole and drainage. Candida albicans transcriptomes at the infection site distinguished treated from untreated cholangitis. After treatment, 1131 C. albicans genes were differentially expressed in biliary fluid. Up-regulated genes were enriched in hyphal growth, cell wall organization, adhesion, oxidation reduction, biofilm, and fatty acid and ergosterol biosynthesis. This is the first study to define Candida global gene expression during deep-seated human infection. Successful treatment of cholangitis induced C. albicans genes involved in fluconazole responses and pathogenesis.

  17. Candida albicans commensalism in the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Neville, B Anne; d'Enfert, Christophe; Bougnoux, Marie-Elisabeth

    2015-11-01

    Candida albicans is a polymorphic yeast species that often forms part of the commensal gastrointestinal mycobiota of healthy humans. It is also an important opportunistic pathogen. A tripartite interaction involving C. albicans, the resident microbiota and host immunity maintains C. albicans in its commensal form. The influence of each of these factors on C. albicans carriage is considered herein, with particular focus on the mycobiota and the approaches used to study it, models of gastrointestinal colonization by C. albicans, the C. albicans genes and phenotypes that are necessary for commensalism and the host factors that influence C. albicans carriage.

  18. Potential Targets for Antifungal Drug Discovery Based on Growth and Virulence in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiuyun; Hou, Yinglong; Yue, Longtao; Liu, Shuyuan; Du, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Fungal infections, especially infections caused by Candida albicans, remain a challenging problem in clinical settings. Despite the development of more-effective antifungal drugs, their application is limited for various reasons. Thus, alternative treatments with drugs aimed at novel targets in C. albicans are needed. Knowledge of growth and virulence in fungal cells is essential not only to understand their pathogenic mechanisms but also to identify potential antifungal targets. This article reviews the current knowledge of the mechanisms of growth and virulence in C. albicans and examines potential targets for the development of new antifungal drugs. PMID:26195510

  19. Betamethasone augments the antifungal effect of menadione--towards a novel anti-Candida albicans combination therapy.

    PubMed

    Jakab, Ágnes; Emri, Tamás; Sipos, Lilla; Kiss, Ágnes; Kovács, Renátó; Dombrádi, Viktor; Kemény-Beke, Ádám; Balla, József; Majoros, László; Pócsi, István

    2015-08-01

    The fluorinated glucocorticoid betamethasone stimulated both the extracellular phospholipase production and hypha formation of the opportunistic human pathogen Candida albicans and also decreased the efficiency of the polyene antimycotics amphotericin B and nystatin against C. albicans in a dose-dependent manner. Importantly, betamethasone increased synergistically the anti-Candida activity of the oxidative stress generating agent menadione, which may be exploited in future combination therapies to prevent or cure C. albicans infections, in the field of dermatology.

  20. Effect of Candida albicans on Intestinal Ischemia-reperfusion Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Lei; Wu, Chun-Rong; Wang, Chen; Yang, Chun-Hui; Tong, Guang-Zhi; Tang, Jian-Guo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Inflammation is supposed to play a key role in the pathophysiological processes of intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury (IIRI), and Candida albicans in human gut commonly elevates inflammatory cytokines in intestinal mucosa. This study aimed to explore the effect of C. albicans on IIRI. Methods: Fifty female Wistar rats were divided into five groups according to the status of C. albicans infection and IIRI operation: group blank and sham; group blank and IIRI; group cefoperazone plus IIRI; group C. albicans plus cefoperazone and IIRI (CCI); and group C. albicans plus cefoperazone and sham. The levels of inflammatory factors tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1β, and diamine oxidase (DAO) measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were used to evaluate the inflammation reactivity as well as the integrity of small intestine. Histological scores were used to assess the mucosal damage, and the C. albicans blood translocation was detected to judge the permeability of intestinal mucosal barrier. Results: The levels of inflammatory factors TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β in serum and intestine were higher in rats undergone both C. albicans infection and IIRI operation compared with rats in other groups. The levels of DAO (serum: 44.13 ± 4.30 pg/ml, intestine: 346.21 ± 37.03 pg/g) and Chiu scores (3.41 ± 1.09) which reflected intestinal mucosal disruption were highest in group CCI after the operation. The number of C. albicans translocated into blood was most in group CCI ([33.80 ± 6.60] ×102 colony forming unit (CFU)/ml). Conclusion: Intestinal C. albicans infection worsened the IIRI-induced disruption of intestinal mucosal barrier and facilitated the subsequent C. albicans translocation and dissemination. PMID:27411459

  1. Candida albicans mutant construction and characterization of selected virulence determinants.

    PubMed

    Motaung, T E; Albertyn, J; Pohl, C H; Köhler, Gerwald

    2015-08-01

    Candida albicans is a diploid, polymorphic yeast, associated with humans, where it mostly causes no harm. However, under certain conditions it can cause infections ranging from superficial to life threatening. This ability to become pathogenic is often linked to the immune status of the host as well as the expression of certain virulence factors by the yeast. Due to the importance of C. albicans as a pathogen, determination of the molecular mechanisms that allow this yeast to cause disease is important. These studies rely on the ability of researchers to create deletion mutants of specific genes in order to study their function. This article provides a critical review of the important techniques used to create deletion mutants in C. albicans and highlights how these deletion mutants can be used to determine the role of genes in the expression of virulence factors in vitro.

  2. Severe Bloodstream Infection due to KPC-Producer E coli in a Renal Transplant Recipient Treated With the Double-Carbapenem Regimen and Analysis of In Vitro Synergy Testing: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Oliva, Alessandra; Cipolla, Alessia; Gizzi, Francesca; D'Abramo, Alessandra; Favaro, Marco; De Angelis, Massimiliano; Ferretti, Giancarlo; Russo, Gianluca; Iannetta, Marco; Mastroianni, Claudio M; Mascellino, Maria T; Vullo, Vincenzo

    2016-02-01

    Transplant recipients are at high risk of infections caused by multidrug resistant microorganisms. Due to the limited therapeutic options, innovative antimicrobial combinations against carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae causing severe infections are necessary.A 61-year-old woman with a history of congenital solitary kidney underwent renal transplantation. The postoperative course was complicated by nosocomial pneumonia due to Stenotrophomonas maltophilia and pan-sensitive Escherichia coli, successfully treated with antimicrobial therapy. On postoperative day 22, diagnosis of surgical site infection and nosocomial pneumonia with concomitant bacteremia due to a Klebisella pneumoniae carbapenemase-producer E coli was made. The patient was treated with the double-carbapenem regimen (high dose of meropenem plus ertapenem) and a potent synergistic and bactericidal activity of this un-conventional therapeutic strategy was observed in vitro. Despite a microbiological response with prompt negativity of blood cultures, the patient faced a worse outcome because of severe hemorrhagic shock.The double-carbapenem regimen might be considered as a rescue therapy in those subjects, including transplant recipients, in whom previous antimicrobial combinations failed or when colistin use might be discouraged. Performing in vitro synergy testing should be strongly encouraged in cases of infections caused by pan-drug resistant strains, especially in high-risk patients. PMID:26886594

  3. Severe Bloodstream Infection due to KPC-Producer E coli in a Renal Transplant Recipient Treated With the Double-Carbapenem Regimen and Analysis of In Vitro Synergy Testing

    PubMed Central

    Oliva, Alessandra; Cipolla, Alessia; Gizzi, Francesca; D’Abramo, Alessandra; Favaro, Marco; De Angelis, Massimiliano; Ferretti, Giancarlo; Russo, Gianluca; Iannetta, Marco; Mastroianni, Claudio M.; Mascellino, Maria T.; Vullo, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Transplant recipients are at high risk of infections caused by multidrug resistant microorganisms. Due to the limited therapeutic options, innovative antimicrobial combinations against carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae causing severe infections are necessary. A 61-year-old woman with a history of congenital solitary kidney underwent renal transplantation. The postoperative course was complicated by nosocomial pneumonia due to Stenotrophomonas maltophilia and pan-sensitive Escherichia coli, successfully treated with antimicrobial therapy. On postoperative day 22, diagnosis of surgical site infection and nosocomial pneumonia with concomitant bacteremia due to a Klebisella pneumoniae carbapenemase-producer E coli was made. The patient was treated with the double-carbapenem regimen (high dose of meropenem plus ertapenem) and a potent synergistic and bactericidal activity of this un-conventional therapeutic strategy was observed in vitro. Despite a microbiological response with prompt negativity of blood cultures, the patient faced a worse outcome because of severe hemorrhagic shock. The double-carbapenem regimen might be considered as a rescue therapy in those subjects, including transplant recipients, in whom previous antimicrobial combinations failed or when colistin use might be discouraged. Performing in vitro synergy testing should be strongly encouraged in cases of infections caused by pan-drug resistant strains, especially in high-risk patients. PMID:26886594

  4. Oxidative stress responses in the human fungal pathogen, Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Dantas, Alessandra da Silva; Day, Alison; Ikeh, Mélanie; Kos, Iaroslava; Achan, Beatrice; Quinn, Janet

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is a major fungal pathogen of humans, causing approximately 400,000 life-threatening systemic infections world-wide each year in severely immunocompromised patients. An important fungicidal mechanism employed by innate immune cells involves the generation of toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as superoxide and hydrogen peroxide. Consequently, there is much interest in the strategies employed by C. albicans to evade the oxidative killing by macrophages and neutrophils. Our understanding of how C. albicans senses and responds to ROS has significantly increased in recent years. Key findings include the observations that hydrogen peroxide triggers the filamentation of this polymorphic fungus and that a superoxide dismutase enzyme with a novel mode of action is expressed at the cell surface of C. albicans. Furthermore, recent studies have indicated that combinations of the chemical stresses generated by phagocytes can actively prevent C. albicans oxidative stress responses through a mechanism termed the stress pathway interference. In this review, we present an up-date of our current understanding of the role and regulation of oxidative stress responses in this important human fungal pathogen. PMID:25723552

  5. Oxidative Stress Responses in the Human Fungal Pathogen, Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    da Silva Dantas, Alessandra; Day, Alison; Ikeh, Mélanie; Kos, Iaroslava; Achan, Beatrice; Quinn, Janet

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is a major fungal pathogen of humans, causing approximately 400,000 life-threatening systemic infections world-wide each year in severely immunocompromised patients. An important fungicidal mechanism employed by innate immune cells involves the generation of toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as superoxide and hydrogen peroxide. Consequently, there is much interest in the strategies employed by C. albicans to evade the oxidative killing by macrophages and neutrophils. Our understanding of how C. albicans senses and responds to ROS has significantly increased in recent years. Key findings include the observations that hydrogen peroxide triggers the filamentation of this polymorphic fungus and that a superoxide dismutase enzyme with a novel mode of action is expressed at the cell surface of C. albicans. Furthermore, recent studies have indicated that combinations of the chemical stresses generated by phagocytes can actively prevent C. albicans oxidative stress responses through a mechanism termed the stress pathway interference. In this review, we present an up-date of our current understanding of the role and regulation of oxidative stress responses in this important human fungal pathogen. PMID:25723552

  6. The genetic basis of fluconazole resistance development in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Morschhäuser, Joachim

    2002-07-18

    Infections by the opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida albicans are widely treated with the antifungal agent fluconazole that inhibits the biosynthesis of ergosterol, the major sterol in the fungal plasma membrane. The emergence of fluconazole-resistant C. albicans strains is a significant problem after long-term treatment of recurrent oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC) in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients. Resistance can be caused by alterations in sterol biosynthesis, by mutations in the drug target enzyme, sterol 14alpha-demethylase (14DM), which lower its affinity for fluconazole, by increased expression of the ERG11 gene encoding 14DM, or by overexpression of genes coding for membrane transport proteins of the ABC transporter (CDR1/CDR2) or the major facilitator (MDR1) superfamilies. Different mechanisms are frequently combined to result in a stepwise development of fluconazole resistance over time. The MDR1 gene is not or barely transcribed during growth in vitro in fluconazole-susceptible C. albicans strains, but overexpressed in many fluconazole-resistant clinical isolates, resulting in reduced intracellular fluconazole accumulation. The activation of the gene in resistant isolates is caused by mutations in as yet unknown trans-regulatory factors, and the resulting constitutive high level of MDR1 expression causes resistance to other toxic compounds in addition to fluconazole. Disruption of both alleles of the MDR1 gene in resistant C. albicans isolates abolishes their resistance to these drugs, providing genetic evidence that MDR1 mediates multidrug resistance in C. albicans. PMID:12084466

  7. Karyotyping of Candida albicans and Candida glabrata from patients with Candida sepsis.

    PubMed

    Klempp-Selb, B; Rimek, D; Kappe, R

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the relatedness of Candida strains from patients suffering from Candida septicaemia by typing of Candida isolates from blood cultures and different body sites by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE using a contour-clamped homogenous electric field, CHEF). We studied 17 isolates of Candida albicans and 10 isolates of Candida glabrata from six patients. Four patients suffered from a C. albicans septicaemia, one patient from a C. glabrata septicaemia, and one patient had a mixed septicaemia with C. albicans and C. glabrata. Eight isolates from blood cultures were compared with 19 isolates of other sites (stool six, urine four, genital swab four, tip of central venous catheter three, tracheal secretion one, sputum one). PFGE typing resulted in 10 different patterns, four with C. albicans and six with C. glabrata. Five of the six patients had strains of identical PFGE patterns in the blood and at other sites. Seven isolates of a 58-year-old female with a C. glabrata septicaemia fell into five different PFGE patterns. However, they showed minor differences only, which may be due to chromosomal rearrangements within a single strain. Thus it appears, that the colonizing Candida strains were identical to the circulating strains in the bloodstream in at least five of six patients.

  8. Ocimum sanctum essential oil inhibits virulence attributes in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Khan, Amber; Ahmad, Aijaz; Xess, Immaculata; Khan, Luqman A; Manzoor, Nikhat

    2014-03-15

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic human fungal pathogen which causes disease mainly in immunocompromised patients. Activity of hydrolytic enzymes is essential for virulence of C. albicans and so is the capacity of these cells to undergo transition from yeast to mycelial form of growth. Ocimum sanctum is cultivated worldwide for its essential oil which exhibits medicinal properties. This work evaluates the anti-virulence activity of O. sanctum essential oil (OSEO) on 22 strains of C. albicans (including a standard strain ATCC 90028) isolated from both HIV positive and HIV negative patients. Candida isolates were exposed to sub-MICs of OSEO. In vitro secretion of proteinases and phospholipases was evaluated by plate assay containing BSA and egg yolk respectively. Morphological transition from yeast to filamentous form was monitored microscopically in LSM. For genetic analysis, respective genes associated with morphological transition (HWP1), proteinase (SAP1) and phospholipase (PLB2) were also investigated by Real Time PCR (qRT-PCR). Results were analyzed using Student's t-test. OSEO inhibits morphological transition in C. albicans and had a significant inhibitory effect on extracellular secretion of proteinases and phospholipases. Expression profile of respective selected genes associated with C. albicans virulence by qRT-PCR showed a reduced expression of HWP1, SAP1 and PLB2 genes in cells treated with sub-inhibitory concentrations of OSEO. This work suggests that OSEO inhibits morphological transition in C. albicans and decreases the secretion of hydrolytic enzymes involved in the early stage of infection as well as down regulates the associated genes. Further studies will assess the clinical application of OSEO and its constituents in the treatment of fungal infections. PMID:24252340

  9. Spaceflight Enhances Cell Aggregation and Random Budding in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Woolley, Christine M.; Barrila, Jennifer; Buchanan, Kent; McCracken, James; Inglis, Diane O.; Searles, Stephen C.; Nelman-Gonzalez, Mayra A.; Ott, C. Mark; Wilson, James W.; Pierson, Duane L.; Stefanyshyn-Piper, Heidemarie M.; Hyman, Linda E.; Nickerson, Cheryl A.

    2013-01-01

    This study presents the first global transcriptional profiling and phenotypic characterization of the major human opportunistic fungal pathogen, Candida albicans, grown in spaceflight conditions. Microarray analysis revealed that C. albicans subjected to short-term spaceflight culture differentially regulated 452 genes compared to synchronous ground controls, which represented 8.3% of the analyzed ORFs. Spaceflight-cultured C. albicans–induced genes involved in cell aggregation (similar to flocculation), which was validated by microscopic and flow cytometry analysis. We also observed enhanced random budding of spaceflight-cultured cells as opposed to bipolar budding patterns for ground samples, in accordance with the gene expression data. Furthermore, genes involved in antifungal agent and stress resistance were differentially regulated in spaceflight, including induction of ABC transporters and members of the major facilitator family, downregulation of ergosterol-encoding genes, and upregulation of genes involved in oxidative stress resistance. Finally, downregulation of genes involved in actin cytoskeleton was observed. Interestingly, the transcriptional regulator Cap1 and over 30% of the Cap1 regulon was differentially expressed in spaceflight-cultured C. albicans. A potential role for Cap1 in the spaceflight response of C. albicans is suggested, as this regulator is involved in random budding, cell aggregation, and oxidative stress resistance; all related to observed spaceflight-associated changes of C. albicans. While culture of C. albicans in microgravity potentiates a global change in gene expression that could induce a virulence-related phenotype, no increased virulence in a murine intraperitoneal (i.p.) infection model was observed under the conditions of this study. Collectively, our data represent an important basis for the assessment of the risk that commensal flora could play during human spaceflight missions. Furthermore, since the low fluid

  10. Inhibitors of the Glyoxylate Cycle Enzyme ICL1 in Candida albicans for Potential Use as Antifungal Agents

    PubMed Central

    Cheah, Hong-Leong; Lim, Vuanghao; Sandai, Doblin

    2014-01-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic pathogen that causes candidiasis in humans. In recent years, metabolic pathways in C. albicans have been explored as potential antifungal targets to treat candidiasis. The glyoxylate cycle, which enables C. albicans to survive in nutrient-limited host niches and its. Key enzymes (e.g., isocitrate lyase (ICL1), are particularly attractive antifungal targets for C. albicans. In this study, we used a new screening approach that better reflects the physiological environment that C. albicans cells experience during infection to identify potential inhibitors of ICL. Three compounds (caffeic acid (CAFF), rosmarinic acid (ROS), and apigenin (API)) were found to have antifungal activity against C. albicans when tested under glucose-depleted conditions. We further confirmed the inhibitory potential of these compounds against ICL using the ICL enzyme assay. Lastly, we assessed the bioavailability and toxicity of these compounds using Lipinski's rule-of-five and ADMET analysis. PMID:24781056

  11. Neutrophil activation by Candida glabrata but not Candida albicans promotes fungal uptake by monocytes.

    PubMed

    Duggan, Seána; Essig, Fabian; Hünniger, Kerstin; Mokhtari, Zeinab; Bauer, Laura; Lehnert, Teresa; Brandes, Susanne; Häder, Antje; Jacobsen, Ilse D; Martin, Ronny; Figge, Marc Thilo; Kurzai, Oliver

    2015-09-01

    Candida albicans and Candida glabrata account for the majority of candidiasis cases worldwide. Although both species are in the same genus, they differ in key virulence attributes. Within this work, live cell imaging was used to examine the dynamics of neutrophil activation after confrontation with either C. albicans or C. glabrata. Analyses revealed higher phagocytosis rates of C. albicans than C. glabrata that resulted in stronger PMN (polymorphonuclear cells) activation by C. albicans. Furthermore, we observed differences in the secretion of chemokines, indicating chemotactic differences in PMN signalling towards recruitment of further immune cells upon confrontation with Candida spp. Supernatants from co-incubations of neutrophils with C. glabrata primarily attracted monocytes and increased the phagocytosis of C. glabrata by monocytes. In contrast, PMN activation by C. albicans resulted in recruitment of more neutrophils. Two complex infection models confirmed distinct targeting of immune cell populations by the two Candida spp.: In a human whole blood infection model, C. glabrata was more effectively taken up by monocytes than C. albicans and histopathological analyses of murine model infections confirmed primarily monocytic infiltrates in C. glabrata kidney infection in contrast to PMN-dominated infiltrates in C. albicans infection. Taken together, our data demonstrate that the human opportunistic fungi C. albicans and C. glabrata are differentially recognized by neutrophils and one outcome of this differential recognition is the preferential uptake of C. glabrata by monocytes.

  12. Factors supporting cysteine tolerance and sulfite production in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Hennicke, Florian; Grumbt, Maria; Lermann, Ulrich; Ueberschaar, Nico; Palige, Katja; Böttcher, Bettina; Jacobsen, Ilse D; Staib, Claudia; Morschhäuser, Joachim; Monod, Michel; Hube, Bernhard; Hertweck, Christian; Staib, Peter

    2013-04-01

    The amino acid cysteine has long been known to be toxic at elevated levels for bacteria, fungi, and humans. However, mechanisms of cysteine tolerance in microbes remain largely obscure. Here we show that the human pathogenic yeast Candida albicans excretes sulfite when confronted with increasing cysteine concentrations. Mutant construction and phenotypic analysis revealed that sulfite formation from cysteine in C. albicans relies on cysteine dioxygenase Cdg1, an enzyme with similar functions in humans. Environmental cysteine induced not only the expression of the CDG1 gene in C. albicans, but also the expression of SSU1, encoding a putative sulfite efflux pump. Accordingly, the deletion of SSU1 resulted in enhanced sensitivity of the fungal cells to both cysteine and sulfite. To study the regulation of sulfite/cysteine tolerance in more detail, we screened a C. albicans library of transcription factor mutants in the presence of sulfite. This approach and subsequent independent mutant analysis identified the zinc cluster transcription factor Zcf2 to govern sulfite/cysteine tolerance, as well as cysteine-inducible SSU1 and CDG1 gene expression. cdg1Δ and ssu1Δ mutants displayed reduced hypha formation in the presence of cysteine, indicating a possible role of the newly proposed mechanisms of cysteine tolerance and sulfite secretion in the pathogenicity of C. albicans. Moreover, cdg1Δ mutants induced delayed mortality in a mouse model of disseminated infection. Since sulfite is toxic and a potent reducing agent, its production by C. albicans suggests diverse roles during host adaptation and pathogenicity.

  13. Prospective intervention study with a microarray-based, multiplexed, automated molecular diagnosis instrument (Verigene system) for the rapid diagnosis of bloodstream infections, and its impact on the clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hiromichi; Hitomi, Shigemi; Yaguchi, Yuji; Tamai, Kiyoko; Ueda, Atsuo; Kamata, Kazuhiro; Tokuda, Yasuharu; Koganemaru, Hiroshi; Kurihara, Yoko; Ishikawa, Hiroichi; Yanagisawa, Hideji; Yanagihara, Katsunori

    2015-12-01

    The Verigene Gram-positive blood culture test (BC-GP) and the Verigene Gram-negative blood culture test (BC-GN) identify representative Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative bacteria and their antimicrobial resistance by detecting resistance genes within 3 h. Significant benefits are anticipated due to their rapidity and accuracy, however, their clinical utility is unproven in clinical studies. We performed a clinical trial between July 2014 and December 2014 for hospitalized bacteremia patients. During the intervention period (N = 88), Verigene BC-GP and BC-GN was used along with conventional microbiological diagnostic methods, while comparing the clinical data and outcomes with those during the control period (N = 147) (UMIN registration ID: UMIN000014399). The median duration between the initiation of blood culture incubation and the reporting time of the Verigene system results was 21.7 h (IQR 18.2-26.8) and the results were found in 88% of the cases by the next day after blood cultures were obtained without discordance. The hospital-onset infection rate was higher in the control period (24% vs. 44%, p = 0.002), however, no differences were seen in co-morbidities and severity between the control and intervention periods. During the intervention period, the time of appropriate antimicrobial agents' initiation was significantly earlier than that in the control period (p = 0.001) and most cases (90%; 79/88) were treated with antimicrobial agents with in-vitro susceptibility for causative bacteria the day after the blood culture was obtained. The costs for antimicrobial agents were lower in the intervention period (3618 yen vs. 8505 yen, p = 0.001). The 30-day mortality was lower in the intervention period (3% vs. 13%, p = 0.019). PMID:26433422

  14. Candida albicans exposures, sex specificity and cognitive deficits in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Severance, Emily G; Gressitt, Kristin L; Stallings, Catherine R; Katsafanas, Emily; Schweinfurth, Lucy A; Savage, Christina L; Adamos, Maria B; Sweeney, Kevin M; Origoni, Andrea E; Khushalani, Sunil; Leweke, F Markus; Dickerson, Faith B; Yolken, Robert H

    2016-01-01

    Immune aberrations in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder have led to the hypotheses that infectious agents or corresponding immune responses might contribute to psychiatric etiopathogeneses. We investigated case–control differences in exposure to the opportunistic fungal pathogen, Candida albicans, and examined associations with cognition, medication, lifestyle, and somatic conditions. We quantified C. albicans IgG antibodies in two cohorts totaling 947 individuals and evaluated odds ratios (OR) of exposure with psychiatric disorder using multivariate regressions. The case–control cohort included 261 with schizophrenia, 270 with bipolar disorder, and 277 non-psychiatric controls; the second included 139 with first-episode schizophrenia, 78 of whom were antipsychotic naive. No differences in C. albicans exposures were found until diagnostic groups were stratified by sex. In males, C. albicans seropositivity conferred increased odds for a schizophrenia diagnosis (OR 2.04–9.53, P⩽0.0001). In females, C. albicans seropositivity conferred increased odds for lower cognitive scores on Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS) in schizophrenia (OR 1.12, P⩽0.004), with significant decreases on memory modules for both disorders (P⩽0.0007–0.03). C. albicans IgG levels were not impacted by antipsychotic medications. Gastrointestinal (GI) disturbances were associated with elevated C. albicans in males with schizophrenia and females with bipolar disorder (P⩽0.009–0.02). C. albicans exposure was associated with homelessness in bipolar males (P⩽0.0015). In conclusion, sex-specific C. albicans immune responses were evident in psychiatric disorder subsets. Inquiry regarding C. albicans infection or symptoms may expedite amelioration of this treatable comorbid condition. Yeast exposure as a risk factor for schizophrenia and its associated cognitive and GI effects require further investigation including the possible contribution of

  15. Streptococcus mutans Can Modulate Biofilm Formation and Attenuate the Virulence of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Júnia Oliveira; Rossoni, Rodnei Dennis; Vilela, Simone Furgeri Godinho; de Alvarenga, Janaína Araújo; Velloso, Marisol dos Santos; Prata, Márcia Cristina de Azevedo; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso; Junqueira, Juliana Campos

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans and Candida albicans are found together in the oral biofilms on dental surfaces, but little is known about the ecological interactions between these species. Here, we studied the effects of S. mutans UA159 on the growth and pathogencity of C. albicans. Initially, the effects of S. mutans on the biofilm formation and morphogenesis of C. albicans were tested in vitro. Next, we investigate the influence of S. mutans on pathogenicity of C. albicans using in vivo host models, in which the experimental candidiasis was induced in G. mellonella larvae and analyzed by survival curves, C. albicans count in hemolymph, and quantification of hyphae in the host tissues. In all the tests, we evaluated the direct effects of S. mutans cells, as well as the indirect effects of the subproducts secreted by this microorganism using a bacterial culture filtrate. The in vitro analysis showed that S. mutans cells favored biofilm formation by C. albicans. However, a reduction in biofilm viable cells and inhibition of hyphal growth was observed when C. albicans was in contact with the S. mutans culture filtrate. In the in vivo study, injection of S. mutans cells or S. mutans culture filtrate into G. mellonella larvae infected with C. albicans increased the survival of these animals. Furthermore, a reduction in hyphal formation was observed in larval tissues when C. albicans was associated with S. mutans culture filtrate. These findings suggest that S. mutans can secrete subproducts capable to inhibit the biofilm formation, morphogenesis and pathogenicity of C. albicans, attenuating the experimental candidiasis in G. mellonella model.

  16. Streptococcus mutans Can Modulate Biofilm Formation and Attenuate the Virulence of Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Júnia Oliveira; Rossoni, Rodnei Dennis; Vilela, Simone Furgeri Godinho; de Alvarenga, Janaína Araújo; Velloso, Marisol dos Santos; Prata, Márcia Cristina de Azevedo; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso; Junqueira, Juliana Campos

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans and Candida albicans are found together in the oral biofilms on dental surfaces, but little is known about the ecological interactions between these species. Here, we studied the effects of S. mutans UA159 on the growth and pathogencity of C. albicans. Initially, the effects of S. mutans on the biofilm formation and morphogenesis of C. albicans were tested in vitro. Next, we investigate the influence of S. mutans on pathogenicity of C. albicans using in vivo host models, in which the experimental candidiasis was induced in G. mellonella larvae and analyzed by survival curves, C. albicans count in hemolymph, and quantification of hyphae in the host tissues. In all the tests, we evaluated the direct effects of S. mutans cells, as well as the indirect effects of the subproducts secreted by this microorganism using a bacterial culture filtrate. The in vitro analysis showed that S. mutans cells favored biofilm formation by C. albicans. However, a reduction in biofilm viable cells and inhibition of hyphal growth was observed when C. albicans was in contact with the S. mutans culture filtrate. In the in vivo study, injection of S. mutans cells or S. mutans culture filtrate into G. mellonella larvae infected with C. albicans increased the survival of these animals. Furthermore, a reduction in hyphal formation was observed in larval tissues when C. albicans was associated with S. mutans culture filtrate. These findings suggest that S. mutans can secrete subproducts capable to inhibit the biofilm formation, morphogenesis and pathogenicity of C. albicans, attenuating the experimental candidiasis in G. mellonella model. PMID:26934196

  17. Candida albicans exposures, sex specificity and cognitive deficits in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Severance, Emily G; Gressitt, Kristin L; Stallings, Catherine R; Katsafanas, Emily; Schweinfurth, Lucy A; Savage, Christina L; Adamos, Maria B; Sweeney, Kevin M; Origoni, Andrea E; Khushalani, Sunil; Leweke, F Markus; Dickerson, Faith B; Yolken, Robert H

    2016-01-01

    Immune aberrations in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder have led to the hypotheses that infectious agents or corresponding immune responses might contribute to psychiatric etiopathogeneses. We investigated case-control differences in exposure to the opportunistic fungal pathogen, Candida albicans, and examined associations with cognition, medication, lifestyle, and somatic conditions. We quantified C. albicans IgG antibodies in two cohorts totaling 947 individuals and evaluated odds ratios (OR) of exposure with psychiatric disorder using multivariate regressions. The case-control cohort included 261 with schizophrenia, 270 with bipolar disorder, and 277 non-psychiatric controls; the second included 139 with first-episode schizophrenia, 78 of whom were antipsychotic naive. No differences in C. albicans exposures were found until diagnostic groups were stratified by sex. In males, C. albicans seropositivity conferred increased odds for a schizophrenia diagnosis (OR 2.04-9.53, P⩽0.0001). In females, C. albicans seropositivity conferred increased odds for lower cognitive scores on Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS) in schizophrenia (OR 1.12, P⩽0.004), with significant decreases on memory modules for both disorders (P⩽0.0007-0.03). C. albicans IgG levels were not impacted by antipsychotic medications. Gastrointestinal (GI) disturbances were associated with elevated C. albicans in males with schizophrenia and females with bipolar disorder (P⩽0.009-0.02). C. albicans exposure was associated with homelessness in bipolar males (P⩽0.0015). In conclusion, sex-specific C. albicans immune responses were evident in psychiatric disorder subsets. Inquiry regarding C. albicans infection or symptoms may expedite amelioration of this treatable comorbid condition. Yeast exposure as a risk factor for schizophrenia and its associated cognitive and GI effects require further investigation including the possible contribution of gut

  18. Anti-infective catheters: novel strategies to prevent nosocomial infections in oncology.

    PubMed

    Schierholz, J M; Rump, A F; Pulverer, G; Beuth, J

    1998-01-01

    Intravenous access contributes significantly to the therapeutical success and to the comfort of oncologic patients. The highest risk for bloodstream infections, however, is vascular catheter-mediated. In oncology high mortality is associated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Candida albicans and Staphylococcus aureus sepsis. Besides established hygienic measures, the coupling or incorporation of antimicrobial substances to or into catheter materials may be a suitable way to prevent the development of catheter-associated infections. Here we present a risk- benefit evaluation of different models of antimicrobial catheter coated with silver, antiseptics or antibiotics. The controversial reports on clinical efficacy and the potential of adverse reactions due to silver and antiseptic coated catheters are discussed. The microbiological, pharmaceutical and physicochemical backgrounds of different types of coating are discussed in detail. Incorporation of antimicrobial agents into long-term silicon catheters providing a slow release of those substances through the external and internal surfaces of catheters may be the most effective technological innovation for reducing biomaterial-mediated nosocomial infections. PMID:9854469

  19. Microsatellite-based genotyping of Candida albicans isolated from patients with superficial candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Kazue; Hattori, Hisao; Adachi, Hidesada; Oshima, Ryosuke; Horii, Toshinobu; Tanaka, Reiko; Yaguchi, Takashi; Tomita, Yasushi; Akiyama, Masashi; Kawamoto, Fumihiko; Kanbe, Toshio

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the genotype distribution of Candida albicans and the major genotypes involved in superficial candidiasis. The genotypes of C. albicans isolated from the infection sites of patients with superficial candidiasis (referred to as infection isolates) were analyzed by fragment analysis using 4 microsatellite markers (HIS3, CDC3, CAI and CAIII). Genotypes of the infection isolates were compared with those of C. albicans isolated from oral mucosa of non-candidiasis patients (referred to as oral isolates). Isolates of C. albicans showed 4 major genotypes for HIS3/CAI (" a " for 148 : 148 / 23 : 23," b " for 148 : 160 / 33 : 41," c " for 148 : 164 / 32 : 41 and " d " for 152 : 152 / 18 : 27). The genotypes " a "," b " and " d " were commonly found in oral (4.7, 8.8 and 7.6%, respectively) and infection (6.6, 9.2 and 15.4%, respectively) isolates. No isolates of genotype " c " were isolated from infection sites. The genotype " a " was found in the isolates from patients with genitalia candidiasis. Genotyping of multiple isolates from an individual patient showed that C. albicans from infection sites was genetically homogenous as compared with that of oral isolates, even in the same patient with candidiasis.

  20. Direct Screening of Blood by PCR and Pyrosequencing for a 16S rRNA Gene Target from Emergency Department and Intensive Care Unit Patients Being Evaluated for Bloodstream Infection

    PubMed Central

    Moore, M. S.; McCarroll, M. G.; McCann, C. D.; May, L.; Younes, N.

    2015-01-01

    three-quarters of all culture-confirmed cases of bacteremia directly from blood in significantly less time than standard culture but cannot be used to rule out infection. PMID:26511737