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Sample records for albicans candida parapsilosis

  1. Postantifungal effect of caspofungin against the Candida albicans and Candida parapsilosis clades.

    PubMed

    Gil-Alonso, Sandra; Jauregizar, Nerea; Eraso, Elena; Quindós, Guillermo

    2016-10-01

    Killing and postantifungal effects could be relevant for the selection of optimal dosing schedules. This study aims to compare time-kill and postantifungal effects with caspofungin on Candida albicans (C. albicans, Candida dubliniensis, Candida africana) and Candida parapsilosis (C. parapsilosis, Candida metapsilosis, Candida orthopsilosis) clades. In the postantifungal effect experiments, strains were exposed to caspofungin for 1 h at concentrations 0.12-8 μg/mL. Time-kill experiments were conducted at the same concentrations. Caspofungin exhibited a significant and prolonged postantifungal effect (>37 h) with 2 μg/mL against the most strains of C. albicans clade. Against the C. parapsilosis clade, the postantifungal effect was <12 h at 8 μg/mL, except for two strains. Caspofungin was fungicidal against C. albicans, C. dubliniensis and C. metapsilosis.

  2. Candida parapsilosis Protects Premature Intestinal Epithelial Cells from Invasion and Damage by Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Gonia, Sara; Archambault, Linda; Shevik, Margaret; Altendahl, Marie; Fellows, Emily; Bliss, Joseph M.; Wheeler, Robert T.; Gale, Cheryl A.

    2017-01-01

    Candida is a leading cause of late-onset sepsis in premature infants and is thought to invade the host via immature or damaged epithelial barriers. We previously showed that the hyphal form of Candida albicans invades and causes damage to premature intestinal epithelial cells (pIECs), whereas the non-hyphal Candida parapsilosis, also a fungal pathogen of neonates, has less invasion and damage abilities. In this study, we investigated the potential for C. parapsilosis to modulate pathogenic interactions of C. albicans with the premature intestine. While a mixed infection with two fungal pathogens may be expected to result in additive or synergistic damage to pIECs, we instead found that C. parapsilosis was able to protect pIECs from invasion and damage by C. albicans. C. albicans-induced pIEC damage was reduced to a similar extent by multiple different C. parapsilosis strains, but strains differed in their ability to inhibit C. albicans invasion of pIECs, with the inhibitory activity correlating with their adhesiveness for C. albicans and epithelial cells. C. parapsilosis cell-free culture fractions were also able to significantly reduce C. albicans adhesion and damage to pIECs. Furthermore, coadministration of C. parapsilosis cell-free fractions with C. albicans was associated with decreased infection and mortality in zebrafish. These results indicate that C. parapsilosis is able to reduce invasion, damage, and virulence functions of C. albicans. Additionally, the results with cellular and cell-free fractions of yeast cultures suggest that inhibition of pathogenic interactions between C. albicans and host cells by C. parapsilosis occurs via secreted molecules as well as by physical contact with the C. parapsilosis cell surface. We propose that non-invasive commensals can be used to inhibit virulence features of pathogens and deserve further study as a non-pharmacological strategy to protect the fragile epithelial barriers of premature infants. PMID:28382297

  3. Postantifungal Effect of Micafungin against the Species Complexes of Candida albicans and Candida parapsilosis.

    PubMed

    Gil-Alonso, Sandra; Jauregizar, Nerea; Eraso, Elena; Quindós, Guillermo

    2015-01-01

    Micafungin is an effective antifungal agent useful for the therapy of invasive candidiasis. Candida albicans is the most common cause of invasive candidiasis; however, infections due to non-C. albicans species, such as Candida parapsilosis, are rising. Killing and postantifungal effects (PAFE) are important factors in both dose interval choice and infection outcome. The aim of this study was to determinate the micafungin PAFE against 7 C. albicans strains, 5 Candida dubliniensis, 2 Candida Africana, 3 C. parapsilosis, 2 Candida metapsilosis and 2 Candida orthopsilosis. For PAFE studies, cells were exposed to micafungin for 1 h at concentrations ranging from 0.12 to 8 μg/ml. Time-kill experiments (TK) were conducted at the same concentrations. Samples were removed at each time point (0-48 h) and viable counts determined. Micafungin (2 μg/ml) was fungicidal (≥ 3 log10 reduction) in TK against 5 out of 14 (36%) strains of C. albicans complex. In PAFE experiments, fungicidal endpoint was achieved against 2 out of 14 strains (14%). In TK against C. parapsilosis, 8 μg/ml of micafungin turned out to be fungicidal against 4 out 7 (57%) strains. Conversely, fungicidal endpoint was not achieved in PAFE studies. PAFE results for C. albicans complex (41.83 ± 2.18 h) differed from C. parapsilosis complex (8.07 ± 4.2 h) at the highest tested concentration of micafungin. In conclusion, micafungin showed significant differences in PAFE against C. albicans and C. parapsilosis complexes, being PAFE for the C. albicans complex longer than for the C. parapsilosis complex.

  4. Postantifungal Effect of Micafungin against the Species Complexes of Candida albicans and Candida parapsilosis

    PubMed Central

    Gil-Alonso, Sandra; Jauregizar, Nerea; Eraso, Elena; Quindós, Guillermo

    2015-01-01

    Micafungin is an effective antifungal agent useful for the therapy of invasive candidiasis. Candida albicans is the most common cause of invasive candidiasis; however, infections due to non-C. albicans species, such as Candida parapsilosis, are rising. Killing and postantifungal effects (PAFE) are important factors in both dose interval choice and infection outcome. The aim of this study was to determinate the micafungin PAFE against 7 C. albicans strains, 5 Candida dubliniensis, 2 Candida Africana, 3 C. parapsilosis, 2 Candida metapsilosis and 2 Candida orthopsilosis. For PAFE studies, cells were exposed to micafungin for 1 h at concentrations ranging from 0.12 to 8 μg/ml. Time-kill experiments (TK) were conducted at the same concentrations. Samples were removed at each time point (0-48 h) and viable counts determined. Micafungin (2 μg/ml) was fungicidal (≥ 3 log10 reduction) in TK against 5 out of 14 (36%) strains of C. albicans complex. In PAFE experiments, fungicidal endpoint was achieved against 2 out of 14 strains (14%). In TK against C. parapsilosis, 8 μg/ml of micafungin turned out to be fungicidal against 4 out 7 (57%) strains. Conversely, fungicidal endpoint was not achieved in PAFE studies. PAFE results for C. albicans complex (41.83 ± 2.18 h) differed from C. parapsilosis complex (8.07 ± 4.2 h) at the highest tested concentration of micafungin. In conclusion, micafungin showed significant differences in PAFE against C. albicans and C. parapsilosis complexes, being PAFE for the C. albicans complex longer than for the C. parapsilosis complex. PMID:26168269

  5. Comparative phenotypic analysis of the major fungal pathogens Candida parapsilosis and Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Holland, Linda M; Schröder, Markus S; Turner, Siobhán A; Taff, Heather; Andes, David; Grózer, Zsuzsanna; Gácser, Attila; Ames, Lauren; Haynes, Ken; Higgins, Desmond G; Butler, Geraldine

    2014-09-01

    Candida parapsilosis and Candida albicans are human fungal pathogens that belong to the CTG clade in the Saccharomycotina. In contrast to C. albicans, relatively little is known about the virulence properties of C. parapsilosis, a pathogen particularly associated with infections of premature neonates. We describe here the construction of C. parapsilosis strains carrying double allele deletions of 100 transcription factors, protein kinases and species-specific genes. Two independent deletions were constructed for each target gene. Growth in >40 conditions was tested, including carbon source, temperature, and the presence of antifungal drugs. The phenotypes were compared to C. albicans strains with deletions of orthologous transcription factors. We found that many phenotypes are shared between the two species, such as the role of Upc2 as a regulator of azole resistance, and of CAP1 in the oxidative stress response. Others are unique to one species. For example, Cph2 plays a role in the hypoxic response in C. parapsilosis but not in C. albicans. We found extensive divergence between the biofilm regulators of the two species. We identified seven transcription factors and one protein kinase that are required for biofilm development in C. parapsilosis. Only three (Efg1, Bcr1 and Ace2) have similar effects on C. albicans biofilms, whereas Cph2, Czf1, Gzf3 and Ume6 have major roles in C. parapsilosis only. Two transcription factors (Brg1 and Tec1) with well-characterized roles in biofilm formation in C. albicans do not have the same function in C. parapsilosis. We also compared the transcription profile of C. parapsilosis and C. albicans biofilms. Our analysis suggests the processes shared between the two species are predominantly metabolic, and that Cph2 and Bcr1 are major biofilm regulators in C. parapsilosis.

  6. Comparative Phenotypic Analysis of the Major Fungal Pathogens Candida parapsilosis and Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Linda M.; Schröder, Markus S.; Turner, Siobhán A.; Taff, Heather; Andes, David; Grózer, Zsuzsanna; Gácser, Attila; Ames, Lauren; Haynes, Ken; Higgins, Desmond G.; Butler, Geraldine

    2014-01-01

    Candida parapsilosis and Candida albicans are human fungal pathogens that belong to the CTG clade in the Saccharomycotina. In contrast to C. albicans, relatively little is known about the virulence properties of C. parapsilosis, a pathogen particularly associated with infections of premature neonates. We describe here the construction of C. parapsilosis strains carrying double allele deletions of 100 transcription factors, protein kinases and species-specific genes. Two independent deletions were constructed for each target gene. Growth in >40 conditions was tested, including carbon source, temperature, and the presence of antifungal drugs. The phenotypes were compared to C. albicans strains with deletions of orthologous transcription factors. We found that many phenotypes are shared between the two species, such as the role of Upc2 as a regulator of azole resistance, and of CAP1 in the oxidative stress response. Others are unique to one species. For example, Cph2 plays a role in the hypoxic response in C. parapsilosis but not in C. albicans. We found extensive divergence between the biofilm regulators of the two species. We identified seven transcription factors and one protein kinase that are required for biofilm development in C. parapsilosis. Only three (Efg1, Bcr1 and Ace2) have similar effects on C. albicans biofilms, whereas Cph2, Czf1, Gzf3 and Ume6 have major roles in C. parapsilosis only. Two transcription factors (Brg1 and Tec1) with well-characterized roles in biofilm formation in C. albicans do not have the same function in C. parapsilosis. We also compared the transcription profile of C. parapsilosis and C. albicans biofilms. Our analysis suggests the processes shared between the two species are predominantly metabolic, and that Cph2 and Bcr1 are major biofilm regulators in C. parapsilosis. PMID:25233198

  7. Conserved and Divergent Roles of Bcr1 and CFEM Proteins in Candida parapsilosis and Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Maguire, Sarah L.; Guida, Alessandro; Synnott, John M.; Andes, David R.; Butler, Geraldine

    2011-01-01

    Candida parapsilosis is a pathogenic fungus that is major cause of hospital-acquired infection, predominantly due to growth as biofilms on indwelling medical devices. It is related to Candida albicans, which remains the most common cause of candidiasis disease in humans. The transcription factor Bcr1 is an important regulator of biofilm formation in vitro in both C. parapsilosis and C. albicans. We show here that C. parapsilosis Bcr1 is required for in vivo biofilm development in a rat catheter model, like C. albicans. By comparing the transcription profiles of a bcr1 deletion in both species we found that regulation of expression of the CFEM family is conserved. In C. albicans, three of the five CFEM cell wall proteins (Rbt5, Pga7 and Csa1) are associated with both biofilm formation and acquisition of iron from heme, which is an important virulence characteristic. In C. parapsilosis, the CFEM family has undergone an expansion to 7 members. Expression of three genes (CFEM2, CFEM3, and CFEM6) is dependent on Bcr1, and is induced in low iron conditions. All three are involved in the acquisition of iron from heme. However, deletion of the three CFEM genes has no effect on biofilm formation in C. parapsilosis. Our data suggest that the role of the CFEM family in iron acquisition is conserved between C. albicans and C. parapsilosis, but their role in biofilm formation is not. PMID:22145027

  8. Adherence of Candida albicans and Candida parapsilosis to epithelial cells correlates with fungal cell surface carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Lima-Neto, Reginaldo G; Beltrão, Eduardo I C; Oliveira, Patrícia C; Neves, Rejane P

    2011-01-01

    Many studies have described the adherence of Candida albicans to epithelial cells but little is known about Candida parapsilosis adhesion and its role in host cell surface recognition. This study was designed to evaluate the correlation between the adherence of 20 C. albicans and 12 C. parapsilosis strains to human buccal epithelial cells and the expression of fungal cell surface carbohydrates using lectin histochemistry. Adherence assays were carried out by incubating epithelial cells in yeast suspensions (10(7) cells ml(-1) ) and peroxidase conjugated lectins (Con A, WGA, UEA I and PNA at 25 μg ml(-1) ) were used for lectin histochemistry. The results showed that adherence was overall greater for C. albicans than for C. parapsilosis (P < 0.01) and that the individual strain differences correlated with a high content of cell surface α-l-fucose residues as indicated by the UEA I staining pattern. Based on the saccharide specificity of the lectins used, these results suggest that l-fucose residues on cell surface glycoconjugates may represent recognition molecules for interactions between the yeast strain studied and the host (r = 0.6985, P = 0.0045). In addition, our results indicated the presence of α-d-glucose/α-d-mannose, N-acetyl-D-glucosamine/N-acetylneuraminic acid and D-galactose/N-acetyl-D-galactosamine in fungal cell wall.

  9. Members of the Candida parapsilosis Complex and Candida albicans are Differentially Recognized by Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Estrada-Mata, Eine; Navarro-Arias, María J.; Pérez-García, Luis A.; Mellado-Mojica, Erika; López, Mercedes G.; Csonka, Katalin; Gacser, Attila; Mora-Montes, Héctor M.

    2016-01-01

    The systemic infections caused by members of the Candida parapsilosis complex are currently associated to high morbility and mortality rates, and are considered as relevant as those caused by Candida albicans. Since the fungal cell wall is the first point of contact with the host cells, here we performed a comparison of this organelle in members of the C. parapsilosis complex, and its relevance during interaction with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). We found that the wall of the C. parapsilosis complex members is similar in composition, but differs to that from C. albicans, with less mannan content and more β-glucan and porosity levels. Furthermore, lectin-based analysis showed increased chitin and β1,3-glucan exposure at the surface of C. parapsilosis sensu lato when compared to C. albicans. Yeast cells of members of the C. parapsilosis complex stimulated more cytokine production by human PBMCs than C. albicans cells; and this significantly changed upon removal of O-linked mannans, indicating this wall component plays a significant role in cytokine stimulation by C. parapsilosis sensu lato. When inner wall components were exposed on the wall surface, C. parapsilosis sensu stricto and C. metapsilosis, but not C. orthopsilosis, stimulated higher cytokine production. Moreover, we found a strong dependency on β1,3-glucan recognition for the members of the C. parapsilosis complex, but not for live C. albicans cells; whereas TLR4 was required for TNFα production by the three members of the complex, and stimulation of IL-6 by C. orthopsilosis. Mannose receptor had a significant role during TNFα and IL-1β stimulation by members of the complex. Finally, we demonstrated that purified N- and O-mannans from either C. parapsilosis sensu lato or C. albicans are capable to block the recognition of these pathogens by human PBMCs. Together; our results suggest that the innate immune recognition of the members of the C. parapsilosis complex is differential

  10. Micafungin triggers caspase-dependent apoptosis in Candida albicans and Candida parapsilosis biofilms, including caspofungin non-susceptible isolates.

    PubMed

    Shirazi, F; Kontoyiannis, D P

    2015-01-01

    Candida biofilms play an important role in infections associated with medical devices and are resistant to antifungals. We hypothesized that the echinocandin micafungin (MICA) exerts an enhanced antifungal activity against caspofungin (CAS)-susceptible (CAS-S) and CAS-non-susceptible (CAS-NS) Candida albicans and Candida parapsilosis which is at least in part through apoptosis, even in the biofilm environment. Apoptosis was characterized by detecting reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), DNA fragmentation, lack of plasma membrane integrity, and metacaspase activation following exposure of Candida biofilm to MICA for 3h at 37°C in RPMI 1640 medium. The minimum inhibitory concentration was higher for CAS (2.0-16.0 μg/mL) than for MICA (1.0-8.0 μg/mL) for Candida biofilms. Elevated intracellular ROS levels and depolarization of MMP was evident in CAS-S C. albicans (3.0-4.2 fold) and C. parapsilosis (4.8-5.4 fold) biofilms compared with CAS-NS (1.2 fold) after exposure to MICA (0.25x-1xMIC). Elevated intracellular ROS levels and depolarization of MMP was evident in CAS-S C. albicans (3.0-4.2 fold) and C. parapsilosis (4.8-5.4 fold) biofilms compared with CAS-NS (1.2 fold) after exposure to MICA (0.25x-1xMIC). Finally higher ß-1, 3 glucan levels were seen in sessile cells compared to planktonic cells, especially in CAS-NS strains. MICA treatment might induce a metacaspase-dependent apoptotic process in biofilms of both CAS-S C. albicans and C. parapsilosis, and to some degree in CAS-NS strains.

  11. Clusters of patients with candidaemia due to genotypes of Candida albicans and Candida parapsilosis: differences in frequency between hospitals.

    PubMed

    Marcos-Zambrano, L J; Escribano, P; Sanguinetti, M; Gómez G de la Pedrosa, E; De Carolis, E; Vella, A; Cantón, R; Bouza, E; Guinea, J

    2015-07-01

    The presence of clusters (identical genotypes infecting different patients) suggests patient-to-patient transmission or a common source for strains. We report the results of a genotyping study based on microsatellite markers of Candida albicans (n = 179) and Candida parapsilosis (n = 76) causing candidaemia, to assess and compare the percentage of patients grouped in clusters during the study period (January 2010 to December 2012). The study was performed in two large tertiary hospitals in Madrid, Spain. We detected 145 C. albicans genotypes (21 in clusters) and 63 C. parapsilosis genotypes (seven in clusters). Clusters involved two to seven patients each. Most of the clusters in the two centres involved two patients for both species, but the number of patients included in each cluster differed between hospitals. Considering both species, the percentage of patients per cluster ranged from 19% to 38% (p < 0.05) in Hospital A and B respectively. Up to 2.9% of genotypes were present in both hospitals. Clusters of C. albicans and C. parapsilosis genotypes causing candidaemia differed between hospitals, suggesting differences in strain transmission. Occasionally, the same genotypes were found in patients admitted to different hospitals located in the same city.

  12. Demineralizing potential of dental biofilm added with Candida albicans and Candida parapsilosis isolated from preschool children with and without caries.

    PubMed

    Caroline de Abreu Brandi, Thayse; Portela, Maristela Barbosa; Lima, Paula Moraes; Castro, Gloria Fernanda Barbosa de Araújo; Maia, Lucianne Cople; Fonseca-Gonçalves, Andréa

    2016-11-01

    This study aimed to investigate the demineralizing potential of dental biofilm added of Candida albicans (CA) and Candida parapsilosis (CP), isolated from preschoolers with and without caries. Bovine enamel blocks (n = 48), with initial hardness = 341.50 ± 21,83 kg/mm(2) were fixed in 24 well plates containing culture media. A pool of children saliva (PHS) was the inoculum for biofilm formation in the presence or absence of isolated CA or CP in accordance with each group (G n = 8): G1 - PHS; G2 - PHS + CA isolated from children with caries; G3 - PHS + CP isolated from children with caries; G4 - PHS + CA isolated from children without caries; G5 - PHS + CP isolated from children without caries; and G6 - blank control. The plates were incubated at 37 °C for 5 days, with daily changes of culture media. The microhardness loss percentage (MHL%) of the blocks was calculated, taking in account the hardness values before and after the experiment. Dental biofilm became more cariogenic, independently of the isolated Candida species. The highest MHL% was observed in G4 (85.90 ± 8.72%) and G5 (86.13 ± 6.74%) compared to the others (p < 0.001): G1 (34.30 ± 14,30%) < G2 (59.40 ± 10.56%) and G3 (65.80 ± 6.36%) < G6 (13.68 ± 4.86%) (p < 0.001). C. albicans and C. parapsilosis isolates induced the demineralization of the dental enamel.

  13. High throughput multiplex-PCR for direct detection and diagnosis of dermatophyte species, Candida albicans and Candida parapsilosis in clinical specimen.

    PubMed

    Vahidnia, Ali; Bekers, Wouter; Bliekendaal, Harry; Spaargaren, Joke

    2015-06-01

    We have developed and validated a multiplex-PCR method for detection of dermatophyte spp., Candida albicans and parapsilosis for routine diagnostics. Our m-PCR showed excellent concordance with culture results in 475 clinical samples. Through the rapid diagnosis by our m-PCR, clinicians are able to initiate adequate antimycotic therapy much earlier.

  14. Pancreatic infection with Candida parapsilosis.

    PubMed

    Ibáñez, R; Serrano-Heranz, R

    1999-01-01

    Candida species other than C. albicans have been implicated as pathogens in intravascular (bloodstream, intravascular devices, endocarditis) and extravascular (arthritis, osteomielitis, endophtalmitis) infections. C. parapsilosis, however, is rarely implicated in intra-abdominal infections (peritonitis during peritoneal dialysis, complicating surgery or solid-organ transplantation). We describe a case of a 48-y-old male with acute pancreatitis who had a pancreatic abscess produced by primary C. parapsilosis infection. Although he received adequate treatment with antifungal medication and surgical drainage, the outcome was fatal. Because the clinical findings are indistinguishable from bacterial abscesses, Candida species should be considered in cases of complicated pancreatitis, in order to establish a prompt adequate treatment.

  15. Comparison of in vitro and vivo efficacy of caspofungin against Candida parapsilosis, C. orthopsilosis, C. metapsilosis and C. albicans.

    PubMed

    Földi, Richárd; Kovács, Renátó; Gesztelyi, Rudolf; Kardos, Gábor; Berényi, Réka; Juhász, Béla; Szilágyi, Judit; Mózes, Julianna; Majoros, László

    2012-10-01

    Caspofungin activity was determined in vitro and in vivo against three Candida orthopsilosis, three C. metapsilosis, two C. parapsilosis sensu stricto and two C. albicans isolates. MIC values and killing activity were determined in RPMI-1640 plus 50 % human serum. Neutropenic (cyclophosphamide-treated) mice were infected intravenously. Five-day intraperitoneal treatment with caspofungin was started after 24 h postinfection. Kidney burden was analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis test with Dunn's post-test. In killing studies, caspofungin was fungistatic and fungicidal against C. albicans at ≥0.25 and ≥2 μg/ml concentrations, respectively. Caspofungin was fungistatic at ≥8-16, ≥2-8 and at ≥2-8 μg/ml against C. parapsilosis, C. orthopsilosis and C. metapsilosis, respectively. In the murine model, C. albicans was inhibited by 1, 2 and 5 mg/kg of caspofungin (P < 0.001 compared to the controls). Against C. parapsilosis, only 5 mg/kg caspofungin was effective against both isolates (P < 0.05). Two and five mg/kg of caspofungin was effective against all C. orthopsilosis and C. metapsilosis isolates (P < 0.05 to <0.001). Serum-based killing tests proved to be useful in predicting in vivo efficacy of caspofungin against four Candida species. Caspofungin at clinically attainable concentrations proved to be effective against all four species.

  16. Genetic determinants of virulence - Candida parapsilosis.

    PubMed

    Singaravelu, Kumara; Gácser, Attila; Nosanchuk, Joshua D

    2014-01-01

    The global epidemiology of fungal infections is changing. While overall, Candida albicans remains the most common pathogen; several institutions in Europe, Asia and South America have reported the rapid emergence to predominance of Candida parapsilosis. This mini-review examines the impact of gene deletions achieved in C. parapsilosis that have been published to date. The molecular approaches to gene disruption in C. parapsilosis and the molecularly characterized genes to date are reviewed. Similar to C. albicans, factors influencing virulence in C. parapsilosis include adherence, biofilm formation, lipid metabolism, and secretion of hydrolytic enzymes such as lipases, phospholipases and secreted aspartyl proteinases. Development of a targeted gene deletion method has enabled the identification of several unique aspects of C. parapsilosis genes that play a role in host-pathogen interactions - CpLIP1, CpLIP2, SAPP1a, SAPP1b, BCR1, RBT1, CpFAS2, OLE1, FIT-2. This manuscript is part of the series of works presented at the "V International Workshop: Molecular genetic approaches to the study of human pathogenic fungi" (Oaxaca, Mexico, 2012).

  17. Candida Parapsilosis and Candida Guillermondii: Emerging Pathogens in Nail Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Fich, Felix; Abarzúa-Araya, Alvaro; Pérez, Mario; Nauhm, Yalile; León, Eugenia

    2014-01-01

    Background: Onychomycosis of the fingernails and toenails is generally caused by dermatophytes and yeasts. Toenail mycoses involve mainly dermatophytes but when Candida is also involved, the strain most commonly isolated worldwide is C. albicans. Aims: To determine Candida strains prevailing in onychomycosis. Materials and Methods: A retrospective, observational and descriptive study of fungal cultures retrieved from the registry of the microbiology laboratory of the Pontificia Universidad Católica was performed. Specimens obtained from patients attending the healthcare network between December 2007 and December 2010 was analyzed. Statistical Analysis: A descriptive statistical analysis was performed. Results: Candida was retrieved from 467 of 8443 specimens (52% fingernails and 48% toenails). Cultures were negative in 5320 specimens (63.6%). Among Candida-positive cultures, parapsilosis was the most commonly isolated strain with 202 cases (43.3%). While isolates of Candida guillermondii were 113 (24.2%), those of Candida albicans were 110 (23.6%), those of spp. were 20 (4.3%) and there were 22 cases of other isolates (4.71%). Among the 467 patients with positive cultures for Candida, 136 (29,1%) were men and 331 (70,9%) were women. All patients were older than 18 years old. Clinical files were available for only 169 of the 467 patients with positive cultures for Candida. For those, age, gender, underlying illnesses and use of immunossupresive agents during the trial was reviewed. Conclusions: The present study shows that both C. parapsilosis as well as C. guillermondii appear as emerging pathogens that would be in fact taking the place of C. albicans as the most commonly isolated pathogen in patients with Candida onychomycosis. The relative percentage of C parapsilosis increases every year. Identification of Candida strains as etiological agents of nail candidiasis becomes relevant to the management both nail as well as systemic candidiasis, in view of the

  18. Specific pathways mediating inflammasome activation by Candida parapsilosis

    PubMed Central

    Tóth, Adél; Zajta, Erik; Csonka, Katalin; Vágvölgyi, Csaba; Netea, Mihai G.; Gácser, Attila

    2017-01-01

    Candida albicans and C. parapsilosis are human pathogens causing severe infections. The NLRP3 inflammasome plays a crucial role in host defence against C. albicans, but it has been previously unknown whether C. parapsilosis activates this complex. Here we show that C. parapsilosis induces caspase-1 activation and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) secretion in THP-1, as well as primary, human macrophages. IL-1β secretion was dependent on NLRP3, K+-efflux, TLR4, IRAK, Syk, caspase-1, caspase-8 and NADPH-oxidase. Importantly, while C. albicans induced robust IL-1β release after 4 h, C. parapsilosis was not able to stimulate the production of IL-1β after this short incubation period. We also found that C. parapsilosis was phagocytosed to a lesser extent, and induced significantly lower ROS production and lysosomal cathepsin B release compared to C. albicans, suggesting that the low extent of inflammasome activation by C. parapsilosis may result from a delay in the so-called “signal 2”. In conclusion, this is the first study to examine the molecular pathways responsible for the IL-1β production in response to a non-albicans Candida species, and these results enhance our understanding about the immune response against C. parapsilosis. PMID:28225025

  19. Candida parapsilosis, an Emerging Fungal Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Trofa, David; Gácser, Attila; Nosanchuk, Joshua D.

    2008-01-01

    Summary: Candida parapsilosis is an emerging major human pathogen that has dramatically increased in significance and prevalence over the past 2 decades, such that C. parapsilosis is now one of the leading causes of invasive candidal disease. Individuals at the highest risk for severe infection include neonates and patients in intensive care units. C. parapsilosis infections are especially associated with hyperalimentation solutions, prosthetic devices, and indwelling catheters, as well as the nosocomial spread of disease through the hands of health care workers. Factors involved in disease pathogenesis include the secretion of hydrolytic enzymes, adhesion to prosthetics, and biofilm formation. New molecular genetic tools are providing additional and much-needed information regarding C. parapsilosis virulence. The emerging information will provide a deeper understanding of C. parapsilosis pathogenesis and facilitate the development of new therapeutic approaches for treating C. parapsilosis infections. PMID:18854483

  20. Killer behavior within the Candida parapsilosis complex.

    PubMed

    Robledo-Leal, Efrén; Elizondo-Zertuche, Mariana; Villarreal-Treviño, Licet; Treviño-Rangel, Rogelio de J; García-Maldonado, Nancy; Adame-Rodríguez, Juan M; González, Gloria M

    2014-11-01

    A group of 29 isolates of Candida parapsilosis sensu stricto, 29 of Candida orthopsilosis, and 4 of Candida metapsilosis were assayed for the presence of killer activity using Saccharomyces cerevisiae ATCC 26609 as a sensitive strain. All C. metapsilosis isolates showed killer activity at 25 °C while strains of C. parapsilosis sensu stricto or C. orthopsilosis did not exhibit this activity. Sensitivity to killer toxins was evaluated using a set of previously reported killer strains of clinical origin. Only 11 isolates of the C. parapsilosis complex were inhibited by at least one killer isolate without resulting in any clear pattern, except for C. parapsilosis sensu stricto ATCC 22019, which was inhibited by every killer strain with the exception of C. parapsilosis and Candida utilis. The lack of sensitivity to killer activity among isolates of the genus Candida suggests that their toxins belong to the same killer type. Differentiation of species within the C. parapsilosis complex using the killer system may be feasible if a more taxonomically diverse panel of killer strains is employed.

  1. Candida albicans isolates from a Malaysian hospital exhibit more potent phospholipase and haemolysin activities than non-albicans Candida isolates.

    PubMed

    Chin, V K; Foong, K J; Maha, A; Rusliza, B; Norhafizah, M; Ng, K P; Chong, P P

    2013-12-01

    This study was aimed at determining the phospholipase and haemolysin activity of Candida isolates in Malaysia. A total of 37 Candida clinical isolates representing seven species, Candida albicans (12), Candida tropicalis (8), Candida glabrata (4), Candida parapsilosis (1), Candida krusei (4), Candida orthopsilosis (1) and Candida rugosa (7) were tested. In vitro phospholipase activity was determined by using egg yolk plate assay whereas in vitro haemolysin activity was tested by using blood plate assay on sheep blood Sabouraud's dextrose agar (SDA) enriched with glucose. Phospholipase activity was detected in 75% (9 out of 12) of the C. albicans isolates. Among the 25 non- C. albicans Candida isolates, phospholipase activity was detected in only 24% of these isolates. The phospholipase activity of C. albicans was significantly higher than that of the non- C. albicans Candida isolates (P=0.002). Haemolysin activity was detected in 100% of the C. albicans, C. tropicalis, C. glabrata, C. krusei, C. parapsilosis, and C. orthopsilosis isolates while 75% of the C. krusei isolates and 12.3% of the C. rugosa isolates showed haemolysin activity. The haemolytic activity of C. albicans was significantly higher than that of the non- C. albicans Candida isolates (P=0.0001).The findings in this study indicate that C. albicans isolates in Malaysia may possess greater virulence potential than the non-albicans species.

  2. Candida/Candida biofilms. First description of dual-species Candida albicans/C. rugosa biofilm.

    PubMed

    Martins, Carlos Henrique Gomes; Pires, Regina Helena; Cunha, Aline Oliveira; Pereira, Cristiane Aparecida Martins; Singulani, Junya de Lacorte; Abrão, Fariza; Moraes, Thais de; Mendes-Giannini, Maria José Soares

    2016-04-01

    Denture liners have physical properties that favour plaque accumulation and colonization by Candida species, irritating oral tissues and causing denture stomatitis. To isolate and determine the incidence of oral Candida species in dental prostheses, oral swabs were collected from the dental prostheses of 66 patients. All the strains were screened for their ability to form biofilms; both monospecies and dual-species combinations were tested. Candida albicans (63 %) was the most frequently isolated microorganism; Candida tropicalis (14 %), Candida glabrata (13 %), Candida rugosa (5 %), Candida parapsilosis (3 %), and Candida krusei (2 %) were also detected. The XTT assay showed that C. albicans SC5314 possessed a biofilm-forming ability significantly higher (p < 0.001) than non-albicans Candida strains, after 6 h 37 °C. The total C. albicans CFU from a dual-species biofilm was less than the total CFU of a monospecies C. albicans biofilm. In contrast to the profuse hyphae verified in monospecies C. albicans biofilms, micrographies showed that the C. albicans/non-albicans Candida biofilms consisted of sparse yeast forms and profuse budding yeast cells that generated a network. These results suggested that C. albicans and the tested Candida species could co-exist in biofilms displaying apparent antagonism. The study provide the first description of C. albicans/C. rugosa mixed biofilm.

  3. [Prevalence of Candida albicans and Candida non-albicans in clinical samples during 1999-2001].

    PubMed

    Mujica, M T; Finquelievich, J L; Jewtuchowicz, V; Iovannitti, C A

    2004-01-01

    The importance of epidemiological monitoring of yeasts involved in pathologic processes is unquestionable due to the increase of these infections over the last decade, the changes observed in species causing candidiasis, and empirical antifungal treatment. At the Mycology Center, 1006 isolates from a wide range of clinical samples were studied during 1999-2001. Candida albicans (40.3%) was the most isolated species, although, the Candida no albicans species with 54.9% showed the major prevalence. In blood cultures Candida parapsilosis (34.9%), C. albicans (30.2%) and C. tropicalis (25.6%) were recovered most frequently while C. glabrata represented only 2.3%. C. albicans with 60%-80% was the predominant specie in mucosal surface. We also detected Candida mediastinistis, which alert us over the importance at this location. Urinary tract infections caused by yeasts were more frequent in hospitalized patients, being C. albicans (47.7%), the most commonly isolated, followed by C. glabrata (24.8%) and C. tropicalis (20.0%). In the candidal onychomycoses, C. parapsilosis (37.7%) outplaced C. albicans (22.0%). Fluconazole susceptibility studies of Candida species allowed us to conclude that the majority of C. albicans islolates are susceptible, and that the highest resistance averages were observed in C. glabrata (21.41%) and C. krusei (69.23%).

  4. Vaginal Candida parapsilosis: pathogen or bystander?

    PubMed Central

    Nyirjesy, Paul; Alexander, Alynn B; Weitz, M Velma

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Candida parapsilosis is an infrequent isolate on vaginal cultures; its role as a vaginal pathogen remains unstudied. This retrospective study of women with positive culture for C. parapsilosis sought to characterize the significance of this finding and its response to antifungal therapy. METHODS: From February 2001 to August 2002, we identified all individuals with positive fungal isolates among a population of women with chronic vulvovaginal symptoms. Charts of women with C. parapsilosis cultures were reviewed with regard to patient demographics, clinical presentation and therapeutic response. Mycological cure, defined as a negative fungal culture at the next office visit, and clinical cure, i.e. symptom resolution, were determined for each subject. RESULTS: A total of 582 women had positive vaginal cultures for 635 isolates, of which 54 (8.5%) were C. parapsilosis. The charts of 51 subjects with C. parapsilosis were available for review and follow-up cultures and clinical information were available for 39 (76.5%). Microscopy was positive in 9 (17.6%). Antifungal treatment resulted in mycological cure in 17/19 patients with fluconazole, 7/7 with butoconazole, 6/6 with boric acid, 1/1 with miconazole and occurred spontaneously in 6/7: 24/37 (64.9%) patients with a mycological cure experienced clinical cure. CONCLUSIONS: Although C. parapsilosis is often a cause of vaginal symptoms, it seems to respond to a variety of antifungal agents and may even be a transient vaginal colonizer. PMID:16040326

  5. Azole Antifungal Resistance in Candida albicans and Emerging Non-albicans Candida Species

    PubMed Central

    Whaley, Sarah G.; Berkow, Elizabeth L.; Rybak, Jeffrey M.; Nishimoto, Andrew T.; Barker, Katherine S.; Rogers, P. David

    2017-01-01

    Within the limited antifungal armamentarium, the azole antifungals are the most frequent class used to treat Candida infections. Azole antifungals such as fluconazole are often preferred treatment for many Candida infections as they are inexpensive, exhibit limited toxicity, and are available for oral administration. There is, however, extensive documentation of intrinsic and developed resistance to azole antifungals among several Candida species. As the frequency of azole resistant Candida isolates in the clinical setting increases, it is essential to elucidate the mechanisms of such resistance in order to both preserve and improve upon the azole class of antifungals for the treatment of Candida infections. This review examines azole resistance in infections caused by C. albicans as well as the emerging non-albicans Candida species C. parapsilosis, C. tropicalis, C. krusei, and C. glabrata and in particular, describes the current understanding of molecular basis of azole resistance in these fungal species. PMID:28127295

  6. Anticandidal efficacy of cinnamon oil against planktonic and biofilm cultures of Candida parapsilosis and Candida orthopsilosis.

    PubMed

    Pires, Regina Helena; Montanari, Lilian Bueno; Martins, Carlos Henrique G; Zaia, José Eduardo; Almeida, Ana Marisa Fusco; Matsumoto, Marcelo T; Mendes-Giannini, Maria José S

    2011-12-01

    Candida parapsilosis is yeast capable of forming biofilms on medical devices. Novel approaches for the prevention and eradication of the biofilms are desired. This study investigated the anticandidal activity of sixteen essential oils on planktonic and biofilm cultures of C. parapsilosis complex. We used molecular tools, enumeration of colony-forming units, the colourimetric MTT assay, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and a chequerboard assay coupled with software analyses to evaluate the growth kinetics, architecture, inhibition and reduction in biofilms formed from environmental isolates of the Candida parapsilosis complex; further, we also evaluated whether essential oils would interact synergistically with amphotericin B to increase their anticandidal activities. Of the environmental C. parapsilosis isolates examined, C. parapsilosis and C. orthopsilosis were identified. Biofilm growth on polystyrene substrates peaked within 48 h, after which growth remained relatively stable up to 72 h, when it began to decline. Details of the architectural analysis assessed by SEM showed that C. parapsilosis complex formed less complex biofilms compared with C. albicans biofilms. The most active essential oil was cinnamon oil (CO), which showed anticandidal activity against C. orthopsilosis and C. parapsilosis in both suspension (minimum inhibitory concentration-MIC-250 and 500 μg/ml) and biofilm (minimum biofilm reduction concentration-MBRC-1,000 and 2,000 μg/ml) cultures. CO also inhibited biofilm formation (MBIC) at concentrations above 250 μg/ml for both species tested. However, synergism with amphotericin B was not observed. Thus, CO is a natural anticandidal agent that can be effectively utilised for the control of the yeasts tested.

  7. Identification of Non-Coding RNAs in the Candida parapsilosis Species Group

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, Paul D.; Schröder, Markus S.; Higgins, Desmond G.

    2016-01-01

    The Candida CTG clade is a monophyletic group of fungal species that translates CTG as serine, and includes the pathogens Candida albicans and Candida parapsilosis. Research has typically focused on identifying protein-coding genes in these species. Here, we use bioinformatic and experimental approaches to annotate known classes of non-coding RNAs in three CTG-clade species, Candida parapsilosis, Candida orthopsilosis and Lodderomyces elongisporus. We also update the annotation of ncRNAs in the C. albicans genome. The majority of ncRNAs identified were snoRNAs. Approximately 50% of snoRNAs (including most of the C/D box class) are encoded in introns. Most are within mono- and polycistronic transcripts with no protein coding potential. Five polycistronic clusters of snoRNAs are highly conserved in fungi. In polycistronic regions, splicing occurs via the classical pathway, as well as by nested and recursive splicing. We identified spliceosomal small nuclear RNAs, the telomerase RNA component, signal recognition particle, RNase P RNA component and the related RNase MRP RNA component in all three genomes. Stem loop IV of the U2 spliceosomal RNA and the associated binding proteins were lost from the ancestor of C. parapsilosis and C. orthopsilosis, following the divergence from L. elongisporus. The RNA component of the MRP is longer in C. parapsilosis, C. orthopsilosis and L. elongisporus than in S. cerevisiae, but is substantially shorter than in C. albicans. PMID:27658249

  8. Candida albicans pathogenicity mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, François L.; Wilson, Duncan; Hube, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    The polymorphic fungus Candida albicans is a member of the normal human microbiome. In most individuals, C. albicans resides as a lifelong, harmless commensal. Under certain circumstances, however, C. albicans can cause infections that range from superficial infections of the skin to life-threatening systemic infections. Several factors and activities have been identified which contribute to the pathogenic potential of this fungus. Among them are molecules which mediate adhesion to and invasion into host cells, the secretion of hydrolases, the yeast-to-hypha transition, contact sensing and thigmotropism, biofilm formation, phenotypic switching and a range of fitness attributes. Our understanding of when and how these mechanisms and factors contribute to infection has significantly increased during the last years. In addition, novel virulence mechanisms have recently been discovered. In this review we present an update on our current understanding of the pathogenicity mechanisms of this important human pathogen. PMID:23302789

  9. Candida parapsilosis Biofilm Identification by Raman Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Samek, Ota; Mlynariková, Katarina; Bernatová, Silvie; Ježek, Jan; Krzyžánek, Vladislav; Šiler, Martin; Zemánek, Pavel; Růžička, Filip; Holá, Veronika; Mahelová, Martina

    2014-01-01

    Colonies of Candida parapsilosis on culture plates were probed directly in situ using Raman spectroscopy for rapid identification of specific strains separated by a given time intervals (up to months apart). To classify the Raman spectra, data analysis was performed using the approach of principal component analysis (PCA). The analysis of the data sets generated during the scans of individual colonies reveals that despite the inhomogeneity of the biological samples unambiguous associations to individual strains (two biofilm-positive and two biofilm-negative) could be made. PMID:25535081

  10. Candida parapsilosis biofilm identification by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Samek, Ota; Mlynariková, Katarina; Bernatová, Silvie; Ježek, Jan; Krzyžánek, Vladislav; Šiler, Martin; Zemánek, Pavel; Růžička, Filip; Holá, Veronika; Mahelová, Martina

    2014-12-22

    Colonies of Candida parapsilosis on culture plates were probed directly in situ using Raman spectroscopy for rapid identification of specific strains separated by a given time intervals (up to months apart). To classify the Raman spectra, data analysis was performed using the approach of principal component analysis (PCA). The analysis of the data sets generated during the scans of individual colonies reveals that despite the inhomogeneity of the biological samples unambiguous associations to individual strains (two biofilm-positive and two biofilm-negative) could be made.

  11. Lower sensitivity of serum (1,3)-β-d-glucan for the diagnosis of candidaemia due to Candida parapsilosis.

    PubMed

    Mikulska, M; Giacobbe, D R; Furfaro, E; Mesini, A; Marchese, A; Del Bono, V; Viscoli, C

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity and the levels of 1,3-β-d-glucan (BDG) among patients with candidaemia due to different Candida species. Retrospective study of all patients who had a single-species candidaemia and BDG testing performed within 48 h from the onset of candidaemia during 2009-2015 was performed. Factors influencing the sensitivity of BDG, including the presence of a central venous catheter, antifungal therapy and Candida species, were analysed in univariate and multivariate models. In all, 107 patients with the following Candida distribution were included: 46 (43%) Candida albicans, 37 (35%) Candida parapsilosis, and 24 (22%) other species. BDG sensitivity and levels were the highest in C. albicans candidaemia and lowest for C. parapsilosis (respectively, 72% and 410 pg/mL for C. albicans, 41% and 39 pg/mL for C. parapsilosis, and 63% and 149 pg/mL for other species; p 0.015 and p 0.003). In multivariate analysis, Candida species (parapsilosis versus others) was the only factor influencing the sensitivity of BDG (OR 0.3, 95% CI 0.1-0.7, p 0.006). The sensitivity of BDG in candidaemia seems highly dependent on the fungal species, with the lowest being for C. parapsilosis.

  12. Candida parapsilosis corneal graft infection from a single eye center: Histopathologic report of 2 cases

    PubMed Central

    Alkatan, Hind M.; Maktabi, Azza; Al-Harby, Mosa; Al-Rajhi, Ali A.

    2015-01-01

    Fungal keratitis accounts for 6–53% of all cases of ulcerative keratitis in variable studies. The majority of cases are due to septate fungi. The abnormal cornea in cases of dry eye syndrome, chronic ulceration, erythema multiform and possibly HIV infection is infected more commonly with Candida, most commonly Candida albicans. Candida parapsilosis affects neonates and intensive care unit (ICU) patients and it has been recently found with increasing frequency. In a previous study on mycotic keratitis in our tertiary eye hospital, filamentous fungi were more commonly isolated than yeasts. We are presenting 2 successive cases of corneal graft infection by Candida parapsilosis referred to us from another eye center to attract the attention of ophthalmologists and health workers to such an infection. PMID:26586985

  13. Unexpected Genomic Variability in Clinical and Environmental Strains of the Pathogenic Yeast Candida parapsilosis

    PubMed Central

    Pryszcz, Leszek P.; Németh, Tibor; Gácser, Attila; Gabaldón, Toni

    2013-01-01

    Invasive candidiasis is the most commonly reported invasive fungal infection worldwide. Although Candida albicans remains the main cause, the incidence of emerging Candida species, such as C. parapsilosis is increasing. It has been postulated that C. parapsilosis clinical isolates result from a recent global expansion of a virulent clone. However, the availability of a single genome for this species has so far prevented testing this hypothesis at genomic scales. We present here the sequence of three additional strains from clinical and environmental samples. Our analyses reveal unexpected patterns of genomic variation, shared among distant strains, that argue against the clonal expansion hypothesis. All strains carry independent expansions involving an arsenite transporter homolog, pointing to the existence of directional selection in the environment, and independent origins of the two clinical isolates. Furthermore, we report the first evidence for the existence of recombination in this species. Altogether, our results shed new light onto the dynamics of genome evolution in C. parapsilosis. PMID:24259314

  14. Role of Protein Glycosylation in Candida parapsilosis Cell Wall Integrity and Host Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-García, Luis A.; Csonka, Katalin; Flores-Carreón, Arturo; Estrada-Mata, Eine; Mellado-Mojica, Erika; Németh, Tibor; López-Ramírez, Luz A.; Toth, Renata; López, Mercedes G.; Vizler, Csaba; Marton, Annamaria; Tóth, Adél; Nosanchuk, Joshua D.; Gácser, Attila; Mora-Montes, Héctor M.

    2016-01-01

    Candida parapsilosis is an important, emerging opportunistic fungal pathogen. Highly mannosylated fungal cell wall proteins are initial contact points with host immune systems. In Candida albicans, Och1 is a Golgi α1,6-mannosyltransferase that plays a key role in the elaboration of the N-linked mannan outer chain. Here, we disrupted C. parapsilosis OCH1 to gain insights into the contribution of N-linked mannosylation to cell fitness and to interactions with immune cells. Loss of Och1 in C. parapsilosis resulted in cellular aggregation, failure of morphogenesis, enhanced susceptibility to cell wall perturbing agents and defects in wall composition. We removed the cell wall O-linked mannans by β-elimination, and assessed the relevance of mannans during interaction with human monocytes. Results indicated that O-linked mannans are important for IL-1β stimulation in a dectin-1 and TLR4-dependent pathway; whereas both, N- and O-linked mannans are equally important ligands for TNFα and IL-6 stimulation, but neither is involved in IL-10 production. Furthermore, mice infected with C. parapsilosis och1Δ null mutant cells had significantly lower fungal burdens compared to wild-type (WT)-challenged counterparts. Therefore, our data are the first to demonstrate that C. parapsilosis N- and O-linked mannans have different roles in host interactions than those reported for C. albicans. PMID:27014229

  15. Candida albicans and non-Candida albicans fungemia in an institutional hospital during a decade.

    PubMed

    Parmeland, Laurence; Gazon, Mathieu; Guerin, Claude; Argaud, Laurent; Lehot, Jean-Jacques; Bastien, Olivier; Allaouchiche, Bernard; Michallet, Mauricette; Picot, Stephane; Bienvenu, Anne-Lise

    2013-01-01

    Since the outcomes of patients with candidemia is poor and Candida spp. with increased resistance to antifungal therapy may be associated with these results, the emergence of these blood infections caused by non-C. albicans Candida spp. was explored prospectively over a two-year period (2009-2010). Candidemia was defined as the recovery of Candida spp. in culture from a patient's blood sample. The in vitro susceptibility of each isolate to amphotericin B, caspofungin, fluconazole and voriconazole was determined. In addition, characteristics of patients and outcomes were investigated in real-time. The Candida distribution was compared to that observed in a similar study 10 years earlier in the same hospital. A total of 182 patients with candidemia were included in the study. While C. albicans was the most frequently isolated species (n = 102), non-C. albicans Candida spp. included; C. glabrata (n = 32), C. parapsilosis (n = 21), C. tropicalis (n = 13), C. krusei (n = 8), C. kefyr (n = 3), C. lusitaniae (n = 2), C. lipolytica (n = 2), C. famata (n = 1), C. guilliermondii (n = 1), C. inconspicua (n = 1), C. dubliniensis (n = 1), C. sake (n = 1) and C. nivariensis (n = 1). In seven patients, C. albicans was associated with another Candida spp. Surprisingly, this prospective study demonstrated that regardless of the department (intensive care unit or hematological department), Candida spp. distribution was no different from that found in the 1998-2001 survey, except for C. krusei. A reduction in the proportion of C. krusei isolates was observed from 2000-2010 (P = 0.028) as a result of its decreased recovery in the hematological department.

  16. Comparison of the hemolytic activity between C. albicans and non-albicans Candida species.

    PubMed

    Rossoni, Rodnei Dennis; Barbosa, Júnia Oliveira; Vilela, Simone Furgeri Godinho; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso; Junqueira, Juliana Campos

    2013-01-01

    The ability to produce enzymes, such as hemolysins, is an important virulence factor for the genus Candida.The objective of this study was to compare the hemolytic activity between C. albicansand non-albicans Candida species. Fifty strains of Candida species, isolated from the oral cavity of patients infected with HIV were studied. The isolates included the following species: C. albicans, C. dubliniensis, C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, C. krusei, C. parapsilosis, C. dubliniensis, C. norvegensis, C. lusitaniae, and C. guilliermondii. Hemolysin production was evaluated on Sabouraud dextrose agar containing chloramphenicol, blood, and glucose. A loop-full of pure Candidaculture was spot-inoculated onto plates and incubated at 37 ºC for 24 h in a 5% CO2 atmosphere. Hemolytic activity was defined as the formation of a translucent halo around the colonies. All C. albicansstrains that were studied produced hemolysins. Among the non-albicans Candidaspecies, 86% exhibited hemolytic activity. Only C. guilliermondiiand some C. parapsilosis isolates were negative for this enzyme. In conclusion, most non-albicans Candidaspecies had a similar ability to produce hemolysins when compared to C. albicans.

  17. Candida albicans: adapting to succeed.

    PubMed

    Kadosh, David; Lopez-Ribot, Jose L

    2013-11-13

    In this issue of Cell Host & Microbe, Lu et al. (2013) report on the redundancy of signaling pathways controlling Candida albicans filamentation and pathogenicity. In the process, they provide important insight into how this normal commensal of humans adapts to different host microenvironments to become a highly successful opportunistic pathogen.

  18. Biofilms of non-Candida albicans Candida species: quantification, structure and matrix composition.

    PubMed

    Silva, Sónia; Henriques, Mariana; Martins, António; Oliveira, Rosário; Williams, David; Azeredo, Joana

    2009-11-01

    Most cases of candidiasis have been attributed to C. albicans, but recently, non- Candida albicans Candida (NCAC) species have been identified as common pathogens. The ability of Candida species to form biofilms has important clinical repercussions due to their increased resistance to antifungal therapy and the ability of yeast cells within the biofilms to withstand host immune defenses. Given this clinical importance of the biofilm growth form, the aim of this study was to characterize biofilms produced by three NCAC species, namely C. parapsilosis, C. tropicalis and C. glabrata. The biofilm forming ability of clinical isolates of C. parapsilosis, C. tropicalis and C. glabrata recovered from different sources, was evaluated by crystal violet staining. The structure and morphological characteristics of the biofilms were also assessed by scanning electron microscopy and the biofilm matrix composition analyzed for protein and carbohydrate content. All NCAC species were able to form biofilms although these were less extensive for C. glabrata compared with C. parapsilosis and C. tropicalis. It was evident that C. parapsilosis biofilm production was highly strain dependent, a feature not evident with C. glabrata and C. tropicalis. Scanning electron microscopy revealed structural differences for biofilms with respect to cell morphology and spatial arrangement. Candida parapsilosis biofilm matrices had large amounts of carbohydrate with less protein. Conversely, matrices extracted from C. tropicalis biofilms had low amounts of carbohydrate and protein. Interestingly, C. glabrata biofilm matrix was high in both protein and carbohydrate content. The present work demonstrates that biofilm forming ability, structure and matrix composition are highly species dependent with additional strain variability occurring with C. parapsilosis.

  19. Candida parapsilosis Resistance to Fluconazole: Molecular Mechanisms and In Vivo Impact in Infected Galleria mellonella Larvae.

    PubMed

    Souza, Ana Carolina R; Fuchs, Beth Burgwyn; Pinhati, Henrique M S; Siqueira, Ricardo A; Hagen, Ferry; Meis, Jacques F; Mylonakis, Eleftherios; Colombo, Arnaldo L

    2015-10-01

    Candida parapsilosis is the main non-albicans Candida species isolated from patients in Latin America. Mutations in the ERG11 gene and overexpression of membrane transporter proteins have been linked to fluconazole resistance. The aim of this study was to evaluate the molecular mechanisms in fluconazole-resistant strains of C. parapsilosis isolated from critically ill patients. The identities of the nine collected C. parapsilosis isolates at the species level were confirmed through molecular identification with a TaqMan qPCR assay. The clonal origin of the strains was checked by microsatellite typing. The Galleria mellonella infection model was used to confirm in vitro resistance. We assessed the presence of ERG11 mutations, as well as the expression of ERG11 and two additional genes that contribute to antifungal resistance (CDR1 and MDR1), by using real-time quantitative PCR. All of the C. parapsilosis (sensu stricto) isolates tested exhibited fluconazole MICs between 8 and 16 μg/ml. The in vitro data were confirmed by the failure of fluconazole in the treatment of G. mellonella infected with fluconazole-resistant strains of C. parapsilosis. Sequencing of the ERG11 gene revealed a common mutation leading to a Y132F amino acid substitution in all of the isolates, a finding consistent with their clonal origin. After fluconazole exposure, overexpression was noted for ERG11, CDR1, and MDR1 in 9/9, 9/9, and 2/9 strains, respectively. We demonstrated that a combination of molecular mechanisms, including the presence of point mutations in the ERG11 gene, overexpression of ERG11, and genes encoding efflux pumps, are involved in fluconazole resistance in C. parapsilosis.

  20. Candida parapsilosis Resistance to Fluconazole: Molecular Mechanisms and In Vivo Impact in Infected Galleria mellonella Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Ana Carolina R.; Fuchs, Beth Burgwyn; Pinhati, Henrique M. S.; Siqueira, Ricardo A.; Hagen, Ferry; Meis, Jacques F.

    2015-01-01

    Candida parapsilosis is the main non-albicans Candida species isolated from patients in Latin America. Mutations in the ERG11 gene and overexpression of membrane transporter proteins have been linked to fluconazole resistance. The aim of this study was to evaluate the molecular mechanisms in fluconazole-resistant strains of C. parapsilosis isolated from critically ill patients. The identities of the nine collected C. parapsilosis isolates at the species level were confirmed through molecular identification with a TaqMan qPCR assay. The clonal origin of the strains was checked by microsatellite typing. The Galleria mellonella infection model was used to confirm in vitro resistance. We assessed the presence of ERG11 mutations, as well as the expression of ERG11 and two additional genes that contribute to antifungal resistance (CDR1 and MDR1), by using real-time quantitative PCR. All of the C. parapsilosis (sensu stricto) isolates tested exhibited fluconazole MICs between 8 and 16 μg/ml. The in vitro data were confirmed by the failure of fluconazole in the treatment of G. mellonella infected with fluconazole-resistant strains of C. parapsilosis. Sequencing of the ERG11 gene revealed a common mutation leading to a Y132F amino acid substitution in all of the isolates, a finding consistent with their clonal origin. After fluconazole exposure, overexpression was noted for ERG11, CDR1, and MDR1 in 9/9, 9/9, and 2/9 strains, respectively. We demonstrated that a combination of molecular mechanisms, including the presence of point mutations in the ERG11 gene, overexpression of ERG11, and genes encoding efflux pumps, are involved in fluconazole resistance in C. parapsilosis. PMID:26259795

  1. Evidence of recent interkingdom horizontal gene transfer between bacteria and Candida parapsilosis

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background To date very few incidences of interdomain gene transfer into fungi have been identified. Here, we used the emerging genome sequences of Candida albicans WO-1, Candida tropicalis, Candida parapsilosis, Clavispora lusitaniae, Pichia guilliermondii, and Lodderomyces elongisporus to identify recent interdomain HGT events. We refer to these as CTG species because they translate the CTG codon as serine rather than leucine, and share a recent common ancestor. Results Phylogenetic and syntenic information infer that two C. parapsilosis genes originate from bacterial sources. One encodes a putative proline racemase (PR). Phylogenetic analysis also infers that there were independent transfers of bacterial PR enzymes into members of the Pezizomycotina, and protists. The second HGT gene in C. parapsilosis belongs to the phenazine F (PhzF) superfamily. Most CTG species also contain a fungal PhzF homolog. Our phylogeny suggests that the CTG homolog originated from an ancient HGT event, from a member of the proteobacteria. An analysis of synteny suggests that C. parapsilosis has lost the endogenous fungal form of PhzF, and subsequently reacquired it from a proteobacterial source. There is evidence that Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Basidiomycotina also obtained a PhzF homolog through HGT. Conclusion Our search revealed two instances of well-supported HGT from bacteria into the CTG clade, both specific to C. parapsilosis. Therefore, while recent interkingdom gene transfer has taken place in the CTG lineage, its occurrence is rare. However, our analysis will not detect ancient gene transfers, and we may have underestimated the global extent of HGT into CTG species. PMID:18577206

  2. Miltefosine inhibits Candida albicans and non-albicans Candida spp. biofilms and impairs the dispersion of infectious cells.

    PubMed

    Vila, Taissa; Ishida, Kelly; Seabra, Sergio Henrique; Rozental, Sonia

    2016-11-01

    Candida spp. can adhere to and form biofilms over different surfaces, becoming less susceptible to antifungal treatment. Resistance of biofilms to antifungal agents is multifactorial and the extracellular matrix (ECM) appears to play an important role. Among the few available antifungals for treatment of candidaemia, only the lipid formulations of amphotericin B (AmB) and the echinocandins are effective against biofilms. Our group has previously demonstrated that miltefosine has an important effect against Candida albicans biofilms. Thus, the aim of this work was to expand the analyses of the in vitro antibiofilm activity of miltefosine to non-albicans Candida spp. Miltefosine had significant antifungal activity against planktonic cells and the development of biofilms of C. albicans, Candida parapsilosis, Candida tropicalis and Candida glabrata. The activity profile in biofilms was superior to fluconazole and was similar to that of AmB and caspofungin. Biofilm-derived cells with their ECM extracted became as susceptible to miltefosine as planktonic cells, confirming the importance of the ECM in the biofilm resistant behaviour. Miltefosine also inhibited biofilm dispersion of cells at the same concentration needed to inhibit planktonic cell growth. The data obtained in this work reinforce the potent inhibitory activity of miltefosine on biofilms of the four most pathogenic Candida spp. and encourage further studies for the utilisation of this drug and/or structural analogues on biofilm-related infections.

  3. Azole resistance in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Smith, K J; Warnock, D W; Kennedy, C T; Johnson, E M; Hopwood, V; Van Cutsem, J; Vanden Bossche, H

    1986-04-01

    An isolate of Candida albicans from a patient with chronic mucocutaneous candidosis who relapsed during ketoconazole treatment was compared with a number of other azole-sensitive and azole-resistant isolates by tests in vitro and in three animal models of vaginal or disseminated infection. In-vitro tests indicated that the isolate was cross-resistant to all imidazole and triazole antifungals tested. In the animal models, treatment with miconazole, ketoconazole, itraconazole or fluconazole failed to influence the infection.

  4. Candida albicans commensalism in the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Neville, B Anne; d'Enfert, Christophe; Bougnoux, Marie-Elisabeth

    2015-11-01

    Candida albicans is a polymorphic yeast species that often forms part of the commensal gastrointestinal mycobiota of healthy humans. It is also an important opportunistic pathogen. A tripartite interaction involving C. albicans, the resident microbiota and host immunity maintains C. albicans in its commensal form. The influence of each of these factors on C. albicans carriage is considered herein, with particular focus on the mycobiota and the approaches used to study it, models of gastrointestinal colonization by C. albicans, the C. albicans genes and phenotypes that are necessary for commensalism and the host factors that influence C. albicans carriage.

  5. Urinary tract infections and Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Behzadi, Payam; Behzadi, Elham

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Urinary tract candidiasis is known as the most frequent nosocomial fungal infection worldwide. Candida albicans is the most common cause of nosocomial fungal urinary tract infections; however, a rapid change in the distribution of Candida species is undergoing. Simultaneously, the increase of urinary tract candidiasis has led to the appearance of antifungal resistant Candida species. In this review, we have an in depth look into Candida albicans uropathogenesis and distribution of the three most frequent Candida species contributing to urinary tract candidiasis in different countries around the world. Material and methods For writing this review, Google Scholar –a scholarly search engine– (http://scholar.google.com/) and PubMed database (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/) were used. The most recently published original articles and reviews of literature relating to the first three Candida species causing urinary tract infections in different countries and the pathogenicity of Candida albicans were selected and studied. Results Although some studies show rapid changes in the uropathogenesis of Candida species causing urinary tract infections in some countries, Candida albicans is still the most important cause of candidal urinary tract infections. Conclusions Despite the ranking of Candida albicans as the dominant species for urinary tract candidiasis, specific changes have occurred in some countries. At this time, it is important to continue the surveillance related to Candida species causing urinary tract infections to prevent, control and treat urinary tract candidiasis in future. PMID:25914847

  6. In vitro activity of xanthorrhizol against Candida glabrata, C. guilliermondii, and C. parapsilosis biofilms.

    PubMed

    Rukayadi, Yaya; Han, Sunghwa; Yong, Dongeun; Hwang, Jae-Kwan

    2011-01-01

    The formation of Candida biofilms has important clinical ramifications, because these biofilms exhibit increased resistance to conventional antifungal therapies. The aim of this study was to investigate the activity of xanthorrhizol on biofilms produced by non-C. albicans Candida (NCAC) species, including C. glabrata, C. guilliermondii, and C. parapsilosis. NCAC biofilms were generated in flat-bottom 96-well microtiter plates and quantified using the XTT (2, 3 - bis (2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-5-[(phenyl amino) carbonyl]-2H-tetrazolium hydroxide) reduction assay. The NCAC biofilms at adherent, intermediate, and mature growth phases were treated with 0.5-512 μg/ml of xanthorrhizol for 24 h. The ranges of sessile minimum inhibitory concentrations (SMICs) of xanthorrhizol against C. glabrata, C. guilliermondii, and C. parapsilosis biofilms were 8-32 μg/ml, 8-16 μg/ml, and 8-64 μg/ml, respectively. Xanthorrhizol affected cell density that had an indirect effect on the biofilm OD(490). The compound eradicated the viable cells of the C. glabrata and C. parapsilosis biofilms at the adherent growth phase at 16 μg/ml and that of C. guilliermondii at 8 μg/ml. Treatment with 128 μg/ml of xanthorrhizol reduced the OD(490) of C. glabrata, C. guilliermondii, and C. parapsilosis biofilms at the mature growth phase by 77.8%, 88.5%, and 64.5%, respectively. These results indicate that xanthorrhizol exhibits potent activity against NCAC biofilms in vitro. Therefore, xanthorrhizol has potential therapeutic value in treating biofilm-associated NCAC infections and should be further evaluated in vivo.

  7. Different Candida parapsilosis clinical isolates and lipase deficient strain trigger an altered cellular immune response

    PubMed Central

    Tóth, Renáta; Alonso, Maria F.; Bain, Judith M.; Vágvölgyi, Csaba; Erwig, Lars-Peter; Gácser, Attila

    2015-01-01

    Numerous human diseases can be associated with fungal infections either as potential causative agents or as a result of changed immune status due to a primary disease. Fungal infections caused by Candida species can vary from mild to severe dependent upon the site of infection, length of exposure, and past medical history. Patients with impaired immune status are at increased risk for chronic fungal infections. Recent epidemiologic studies have revealed the increasing incidence of candidiasis caused by non-albicans species such as Candida parapsilosis. Due to its increasing relevance we chose two distinct C. parapsilosis strains, to describe the cellular innate immune response toward this species. In the first section of our study we compared the interaction of CLIB 214 and GA1 cells with murine and human macrophages. Both strains are commonly used to investigate C. parapsilosis virulence properties. CLIB 214 is a rapidly pseudohyphae-forming strain and GA1 is an isolate that mainly exists in a yeast form. Our results showed, that the phagocyte response was similar in terms of overall uptake, however differences were observed in macrophage migration and engulfment of fungal cells. As C. parapsilosis releases extracellular lipases in order to promote host invasion we further investigated the role of these secreted components during the distinct stages of the phagocytic process. Using a secreted lipase deficient mutant strain and the parental strain GA1 individually and simultaneously, we confirmed that fungal secreted lipases influence the fungi's virulence by detecting altered innate cellular responses. In this study we report that two isolates of a single species can trigger markedly distinct host responses and that lipase secretion plays a role on the cellular level of host–pathogen interactions. PMID:26528256

  8. Ambroxol influences voriconazole resistance of Candida parapsilosis biofilm.

    PubMed

    Pulcrano, Giovanna; Panellis, Dimitrios; De Domenico, Giovanni; Rossano, Fabio; Catania, Maria Rosaria

    2012-06-01

    The ability to form biofilm on different surfaces is typical of most Candida species. Microscopic structure and genetic aspects of fungal biofilms have been the object of many studies because of very high resistance to antimycotic agents because of the scarce permeability of the external matrix and to the alterations in cell metabolism. In our study, 31 isolates of Candida parapsilosis, isolated from bloodstream infections, were tested for their ability to produce biofilm and were found to be good producers. The susceptibility to voriconazole, assayed by colorimetrical XTT assay, revealed a very elevated minimum inhibitory concentrations for sessile cells in comparison with planktonic ones. The addition of ambroxol, a mucolytic agent, increased the susceptibility of biofilm forming cells to voriconazole. Expression of the efflux pump genes CDR and MDR was analyzed in biofilms alone or treated with ambroxol, evidencing a role of ambroxol in the expression of genes involved in azole resistance mechanisms of C. parapsilosis biofilms. In conclusion, our data seem to encourage the use of different substances in combination with classical antimycotics, with the aim of finding a solution to the increasing problem of the resistance of biofilms formed on medical devices by nonalbicans Candida species.

  9. In vitro efficacy of liposomal amphotericin B, micafungin and fluconazole against non-albicans Candida species biofilms.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Akira; Yamagishi, Yuka; Mikamo, Hiroshige

    2015-09-01

    Non-albicans Candida species are being isolated with increasing frequency. In this study, biofilm formation by Candida tropicalis, Candida parapsilosis and Candida glabrata was evaluated and the activities of liposomal amphotericin B (LAB), micafungin (MFG) and fluconazole (FLC) against these biofilms were assessed using a clinically relevant in vitro model system. LAB exhibited strong activities against the three non-albicans Candida species and showed dose-dependent efficacy. MFG displayed a paradoxical growth effect against the C. tropicalis biofilm. FLC was ineffective for non-albicans biofilms. This study shows that Candida biofilms have unique susceptibility to LAB. The dose-dependent effects of LAB indicate that this drug may be a useful treatment for biofilm formation by non-albicans Candida species in cases in which the catheter cannot be removed for clinical reasons.

  10. The crystal structure of the secreted aspartic protease 1 from Candida parapsilosis in complex with pepstatin A

    SciTech Connect

    Dostál, Jiří; Brynda, Jiří; Hrušková-Heidingsfeldová, Olga; Sieglová, Irena; Pichová, Iva; Řezáčová, Pavlína

    2010-09-01

    Opportunistic pathogens of the genus Candida cause infections representing a major threat to long-term survival of immunocompromised patients. Virulence of the Candida pathogens is enhanced by production of extracellular proteolytic enzymes and secreted aspartic proteases (Saps) are therefore studied as potential virulence factors and possible targets for therapeutic drug design. Candida parapsilosis is less invasive than C. albicans, however, it is one of the leading causative agents of yeast infections. We report three-dimensional crystal structure of Sapp1p from C. parapsilosis in complex with pepstatin A, the classical inhibitor of aspartic proteases. The structure of Sapp1p was determined from protein isolated from its natural source and represents the first structure of Sap from C. parapsilosis. Overall fold and topology of Sapp1p is very similar to the archetypic fold of monomeric aspartic protease family and known structures of Sap isoenzymes from C. albicans and Sapt1p from C. tropicalis. Structural comparison revealed noticeable differences in the structure of loops surrounding the active site. This resulted in differential character, shape, and size of the substrate binding site explaining divergent substrate specificities and inhibitor affinities. Determination of structures of Sap isoenzymes from various species might contribute to the development of new Sap-specific inhibitors.

  11. Beyond Candida albicans: Mechanisms of immunity to non-albicans Candida species.

    PubMed

    Whibley, Natasha; Gaffen, Sarah L

    2015-11-01

    The fungal genus Candida encompasses numerous species that inhabit a variety of hosts, either as commensal microbes and/or pathogens. Candida species are a major cause of fungal infections, yet to date there are no vaccines against Candida or indeed any other fungal pathogen. Our knowledge of immunity to Candida mainly comes from studies on Candida albicans, the most frequent species associated with disease. However, non-albicans Candida (NAC) species also cause disease and their prevalence is increasing. Although research into immunity to NAC species is still at an early stage, it is becoming apparent that immunity to C. albicans differs in important ways from non-albicans species, with important implications for treatment, therapy and predicted demographic susceptibility. This review will discuss the current understanding of immunity to NAC species in the context of immunity to C. albicans, and highlight as-yet unanswered questions.

  12. Candidal urinary tract infections caused by non-albicans Candida species.

    PubMed

    Dorko, E; Pilipcinec, E; Tkáciková, L

    2002-01-01

    The incidence of non-albicans Candida and non-Candida species isolated from the urine of patients admitted to various departments of the Faculty Hospital of the Medical Faculty of Safárik University in Kosice was examined. From a total of 94 samples of analyzed urine 58 strains of C. albicans and 36 strains of yeasts belonging to 6 species of non-albicans Candida and non-Candida spp. were detected: C. parapsilosis (n = 23), C. tropicalis (6), C. krusei (3), C. robusta (2), C. catenulata (1) and Cryptococcus neoformans (1). In relation to the diagnosis, the yeasts were isolated from patients suffering from a kidneys disease, epididymitis, diabetes, neoplastic diseases, urogenital anomalies, obstructive uropathy, cystitis, prostatitis, hemolytic-uremic syndrome, and others.

  13. Rapid flow cytometric susceptibility testing of Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Ramani, R; Ramani, A; Wong, S J

    1997-01-01

    A rapid flow cytometric assay for in vitro antifungal drug susceptibility testing was developed by adapting the proposed reference method for broth macrodilution testing of yeasts. Membrane permeability changes caused by the antifungal agent were measured by flow cytometry using propidium iodide, a nucleic acid-binding fluorochrome largely excluded by the intact cell membrane. We determined the in vitro susceptibility of 31 Candida albicans isolates and two quality control strains (Candida parapsilosis ATCC 22019 and Candida krusei ATCC 6258) to amphotericin B and fluconazole. Amphotericin B MICs ranged from 0.03 to 2.0 microg/ml, while fluconazole MICs ranged from 0.125 to 128 microg/ml. This method results in clear-cut endpoints that were reproducible. Four-hour incubation was required for fluconazole, whereas a 2-h incubation was sufficient for amphotericin B to provide MICs comparable to the reference macrodilution method developed by the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards Subcommittee on Antifungal Susceptibility Tests. Results of these studies show that flow cytometry provides a rapid and sensitive in vitro method for antifungal susceptibility testing of C. albicans. PMID:9276410

  14. Replication intermediates of the linear mitochondrial DNA of Candida parapsilosis suggest a common recombination based mechanism for yeast mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Gerhold, Joachim M; Sedman, Tiina; Visacka, Katarina; Slezakova, Judita; Tomaska, Lubomir; Nosek, Jozef; Sedman, Juhan

    2014-08-15

    Variation in the topology of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in eukaryotes evokes the question if differently structured DNAs are replicated by a common mechanism. RNA-primed DNA synthesis has been established as a mechanism for replicating the circular animal/mammalian mtDNA. In yeasts, circular mtDNA molecules were assumed to be templates for rolling circle DNA-replication. We recently showed that in Candida albicans, which has circular mapping mtDNA, recombination driven replication is a major mechanism for replicating a complex branched mtDNA network. Careful analyses of C. albicans-mtDNA did not reveal detectable amounts of circular DNA molecules. In the present study we addressed the question of how the unit sized linear mtDNA of Candida parapsilosis terminating at both ends with arrays of tandem repeats (mitochondrial telomeres) is replicated. Originally, we expected to find replication intermediates diagnostic of canonical bi-directional replication initiation at the centrally located bi-directional promoter region. However, we found that the linear mtDNA of Candida parapsilosis also employs recombination for replication initiation. The most striking findings were that the mitochondrial telomeres appear to be hot spots for recombination driven replication, and that stable RNA:DNA hybrids, with a potential role in mtDNA replication, are also present in the mtDNA preparations.

  15. Adaptive immune responses to Candida albicans infection

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Jonathan P; Moyes, David L

    2015-01-01

    Fungal infections are becoming increasingly prevalent in the human population and contribute to morbidity and mortality in healthy and immunocompromised individuals respectively. Candida albicans is the most commonly encountered fungal pathogen of humans, and is frequently found on the mucosal surfaces of the body. Host defense against C. albicans is dependent upon a finely tuned implementation of innate and adaptive immune responses, enabling the host to neutralise the invading fungus. Central to this protection are the adaptive Th1 and Th17 cellular responses, which are considered paramount to successful immune defense against C. albicans infections, and enable tissue homeostasis to be maintained in the presence of colonising fungi. This review will highlight the recent advances in our understanding of adaptive immunity to Candida albicans infections. PMID:25607781

  16. Development of DNA probes for Candida albicans

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, L.L.; Hudson, J.B.

    1988-07-01

    An attempt was made to produce DNA probes that could be used as a rapid and efficient means of detecting candidiasis (invasive Candida infection) in immunocompromised patients. Whole DNA from Candida albicans was digested with restriction endonuclease, and the resulting fragments were randomly cloned into a plasmid vector. Several recombinant plasmids were evaluated for cross-hybridization to various other Candida species, other fungal DNAs, and to nonfungal DNAs. Cross reactions were observed between the probes and different yeasts, but none with unrelated DNAs. Some recombinants were genus-specific, and two of these were applied to the analysis of C. albicans growth curves. It became evident that, although both /sup 32/P- and biotin-labelled probes could be made quite sensitive, a possible limitation in their diagnostic potential was the poor liberation of Candida DNA from cells. Thus, better methods of treatment of clinical specimens will be required before such probes will be useful in routine diagnosis.

  17. Oral Candida albicans isolates from HIV-positive individuals have similar in vitro biofilm-forming ability and pathogenicity as invasive Candida isolates

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Candida can cause mucocutaneous and/or systemic infections in hospitalized and immunosuppressed patients. Most individuals are colonized by Candida spp. as part of the oral flora and the intestinal tract. We compared oral and systemic isolates for the capacity to form biofilm in an in vitro biofilm model and pathogenicity in the Galleria mellonella infection model. The oral Candida strains were isolated from the HIV patients and included species of C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis, C. krusei, C. norvegensis, and C. dubliniensis. The systemic strains were isolated from patients with invasive candidiasis and included species of C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis, C. lusitaniae, and C. kefyr. For each of the acquired strains, biofilm formation was evaluated on standardized samples of silicone pads and acrylic resin. We assessed the pathogenicity of the strains by infecting G. mellonella animals with Candida strains and observing survival. Results The biofilm formation and pathogenicity in Galleria was similar between oral and systemic isolates. The quantity of biofilm formed and the virulence in G. mellonella were different for each of the species studied. On silicone pads, C. albicans and C. dubliniensis produced more biofilm (1.12 to 6.61 mg) than the other species (0.25 to 3.66 mg). However, all Candida species produced a similar biofilm on acrylic resin, material used in dental prostheses. C. albicans, C. dubliniensis, C. tropicalis, and C. parapsilosis were the most virulent species in G. mellonella with 100% of mortality, followed by C. lusitaniae (87%), C. novergensis (37%), C. krusei (25%), C. glabrata (20%), and C. kefyr (12%). Conclusions We found that on silicone pads as well as in the Galleria model, biofilm formation and virulence depends on the Candida species. Importantly, for C. albicans the pathogenicity of oral Candida isolates was similar to systemic Candida isolates, suggesting that Candida

  18. Efficacy of micafungin in invasive candidiasis caused by common Candida species with special emphasis on non-albicans Candida species.

    PubMed

    Cornely, Oliver A; Vazquez, Jose; De Waele, Jan; Betts, Robert; Rotstein, Coleman; Nucci, Marcio; Pappas, Peter G; Ullmann, Andrew J

    2014-02-01

    The incidence of invasive candidiasis caused by non-albicans Candida (NAC) spp. is increasing. The aim of this analysis was to evaluate the efficacy of micafungin, caspofungin and liposomal amphotericin B in patients with invasive candidiasis and candidaemia caused by different Candida spp. This post hoc analysis used data obtained from two randomised phase III trials was conducted to evaluate the efficacy and safety of micafungin vs. caspofungin and micafungin vs. liposomal amphotericin B. Treatment success, clinical response, mycological response and mortality were evaluated in patients infected with C. albicans and NAC spp. Treatment success rates in patients with either C. albicans or NAC infections were similar. Outcomes were similar for micafungin, caspofungin and liposomal amphotericin B. Candida albicans was the most prevalent pathogen recovered (41.0%), followed by C. tropicalis (17.9%), C. parapsilosis (14.4%), C. glabrata (10.4%), multiple Candida spp. (7.3%) and C. krusei (3.2%). Age, primary diagnosis (i.e. candidaemia or invasive candidiasis), previous corticosteroid therapy and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score were identified as potential predictors of treatment success and mortality. Micafungin, caspofungin and liposomal amphotericin B exhibit favourable treatment response rates that are comparable for patients infected with different Candida spp.

  19. Mucosal biofilms of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Shantanu; Mitchell, Aaron P

    2011-08-01

    Biofilms are microbial communities that form on surfaces and are embedded in an extracellular matrix. C. albicans forms pathogenic mucosal biofilms that are evoked by changes in host immunity or mucosal ecology. Mucosal surfaces are inhabited by many microbial species; hence these biofilms are polymicrobial. Several recent studies have applied paradigms of biofilm analysis to study mucosal C. albicans infections. These studies reveal that the Bcr1 transcription factor is a master regulator of C. albicans biofilm formation under diverse conditions, though the most relevant Bcr1 target genes can vary with the biofilm niche. An important determinant of mucosal biofilm formation is the interaction with host defenses. Finally, studies of interactions between bacterial species and C. albicans provide insight into the communication mechanisms that endow polymicrobial biofilms with unique properties.

  20. Antifungal Susceptibility Analysis of Clinical Isolates of Candida parapsilosis in Iran

    PubMed Central

    LOTFALI, Ensieh; KORDBACHEH, Parivash; MIRHENDI, Hossein; ZAINI, Farideh; GHAJARI, Ali; MOHAMMADI, Rasoul; NOORBAKHSH, Fatemeh; MOAZENI, Maryam; FALLAHI, Aliakbar; REZAIE, Sassan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Candida parapsilosis is an emergent agent of invasive fungal infections. This yeast is one of the five most widespread yeasts concerned in invasive candidiasis. C. parapsilosis stands out as the second most common yeast species isolated from patients with bloodstream infections especially in neonates with catheter. Recently several reports suggested that its reduced susceptibility to azoles and polyene might become a cause for clinical concern, although C. parapsilosis is not believed to be intensely prone to the development of antifungal resistance. Methods: In the present report, One hundred and twenty clinical isolates of C. parapsilosis complex were identified and differentiated by using PCR-RFLP analysis. The isolates were then analyzed to determine their susceptibility profile to fluconazole (FLU), itraconazole (ITC) and amphotericin B. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) results were analyzed according to the standard CLSI guide. Results: All of isolates were identified as C. parapsilosis. No C. metapsilosis and C. orthopsilosis strains were found. Evaluation of the antifungal susceptibility profile showed that only three (2.5%) C. parapsilosis were resistant to fluconazole, three (2.5%) C. parapsilosis were resistant to itraconazole and two (1.7%) C. parapsilosis were amphotericin B resistant. Conclusion: Profiles in clinical isolates of C. parapsilosis can provide important information for the control of antifungal resistance as well as distribution and susceptibility profiles in populations. PMID:27141494

  1. Non-albicans Candida Infection: An Emerging Threat

    PubMed Central

    Deorukhkar, Sachin C.; Saini, Santosh

    2014-01-01

    The very nature of infectious diseases has undergone profound changes in the past few decades. Fungi once considered as nonpathogenic or less virulent are now recognized as a primary cause of morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised and severely ill patients. Candida spp. are among the most common fungal pathogens. Candida albicans was the predominant cause of candidiasis. However, a shift toward non-albicans Candida species has been recently observed. These non-albicans Candida species demonstrate reduced susceptibility to commonly used antifungal drugs. In the present study, we investigated the prevalence of non-albicans Candida spp. among Candida isolates from various clinical specimens and analysed their virulence factors and antifungal susceptibility profile. A total of 523 Candida spp. were isolated from various clinical specimens. Non-albicans Candida species were the predominant pathogens isolated. Non-albicans Candida species also demonstrated the production of virulence factors once attributed to Candida albicans. Non-albicans Candida demonstrated high resistance to azole group of antifungal agents. Therefore, it can be concluded that non-albicans Candida species have emerged as an important cause of infections. Their isolation from clinical specimen can no longer be ignored as a nonpathogenic isolate nor can it be dismissed as a contaminant. PMID:25404942

  2. Effect of Piper betle and Brucea javanica on the Differential Expression of Hyphal Wall Protein (HWP1) in Non-Candida albicans Candida (NCAC) Species.

    PubMed

    Wan Harun, Wan Himratul Aznita; Jamil, Nur Alyaa; Jamaludin, Nor Hazwani; Nordin, Mohd-Al-Faisal

    2013-01-01

    The study aimed to identify the HWP1 gene in non-Candida albicans Candida species and the differential expression of HWP1 following treatment with Piper betle and Brucea javanica aqueous extracts. All candidal suspensions were standardized to 1 × 10(6) cells/mL. The suspension was incubated overnight at 37 °C (C. parapsilosis, 35°C). Candidal cells were treated with each respective extract at 1, 3, and 6 mg/mL for 24 h. The total RNA was extracted and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was carried out with a specific primer of HWP1. HWP1 mRNAs were only detected in C. albicans, C. parapsilosis, and C. tropicalis. Exposing the cells to the aqueous extracts has affected the expression of HWP1 transcripts. C. albicans, C. parapsilosis, and C. tropicalis have demonstrated different intensity of mRNA. Compared to P. betle, B. javanica demonstrated a higher suppression on the transcript levels of HWP1 in all samples. HWP1 was not detected in C. albicans following the treatment of B. javanica at 1 mg/mL. In contrast, C. parapsilosis and C. tropicalis were shown to have HWP1 regulation. However, the expression levels were reduced upon the addition of higher concentration of B. javanica extract. P. betle and B. javanica have potential to be developed as oral health product.

  3. Effectiveness of disinfectants used in hemodialysis against both Candida orthopsilosis and C. parapsilosis sensu stricto biofilms.

    PubMed

    Pires, Regina Helena; da Silva, Julhiany de Fátima; Gomes Martins, Carlos Henrique; Fusco Almeida, Ana Marisa; Pienna Soares, Christiane; Soares Mendes-Giannini, Maria José

    2013-05-01

    Biofilms have been observed in the fluid pathways of hemodialysis machines. The impacts of four biocides used for the disinfection of hemodialysis systems were tested against Candida parapsilosis sensu stricto and Candida orthopsilosis biofilms generated by isolates obtained from a hydraulic circuit that were collected in a hemodialysis unit. Acetic acid was shown to be the most effective agent against Candida biofilms. Strategies for effective disinfection procedures used for hemodialysis systems should also seek to kill and inhibit biofilms.

  4. Molecular Epidemiology of Candida albicans and Its Closely Related Yeasts Candida dubliniensis and Candida africana▿

    PubMed Central

    Romeo, Orazio; Criseo, Giuseppe

    2009-01-01

    We performed a molecular study to determine the occurrence of Candida albicans, Candida africana, and Candida dubliniensis in different clinical samples. The study provides new insights into the epidemiology of candidiasis in hospitalized patients in three hospitals in southern Italy. It also reports the first detailed epidemiological data concerning the occurrence of C. africana in clinical samples. PMID:18987171

  5. Arachidonic acid affects biofilm formation and PGE2 level in Candida albicans and non-albicans species in presence of subinhibitory concentration of fluconazole and terbinafine.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Nripendra Nath; Ali, Shakir; Shukla, Praveen K

    2014-01-01

    Candida albicans utilizes arachidonic acid (AA) released during the course of infection (Candidiasis) from phospholipids of infected host cell membranes and synthesizes extracellular prostaglandin(s) which play an important role in hyphae formation and host cell damage. C. albicans biofilms secrete significantly more prostaglandin(s) and evidence suggests that Candida biofilms have dramatically reduced susceptibility to majority of antifungal drugs. AA influences the saturation level of lipids and fluidity of yeast cell membranes. Therefore the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of AA alone or in combination with antifungal agents on biofilm formation and production of prostaglandin (PGE2) in C. albicans, C. parapsilosis, C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, and C. albicans amphotericin B resistant strain (AmBR). Maximum biofilm formation was found to be in the case of C. albicans compared to C. non-albicans species. However, among the non-albicans species C. tropicalis exhibited highest biofilm formation. Treatment with AA in combination with subinhibitory concentrations of fluconazole and terbinafine separately exhibited significant (p<0.05) reduction in biofilm formation against C. glabrata, C. parapsilosis, C. tropicalis and AmBR as compared to their individual effect. Further, these two antifungal agents in combination with AA caused an increase in production of prostaglandin from fungal cell itself which was significant (p<0.05) in case of all the strains tested.

  6. Candida parapsilosis, Candida orthopsilosis, and Candida metapsilosis virulence in the non-conventional host Galleria mellonella.

    PubMed

    Gago, Sara; García-Rodas, Rocío; Cuesta, Isabel; Mellado, Emilia; Alastruey-Izquierdo, Ana

    2014-02-15

    The incidence of fungal infections due to C. parapsilosis and closely related cryptic species (-psilosis complex) has increased in the last few years, but differences in virulence among these species have not been widely studied. Fifteen clinical isolates of C. parapsilosis, C. orthopsilosis, and C. metapsilosis, including the type strains, were used to evaluate their virulence in Galleria mellonella larvae. Fluctuations in the hemocyte density and in the phagocytic activity were also tested. Differences in the median survival for these species were demonstrated at 37 °C (2.6 ± 1.02, 2.3 ± 0.92, and 4.53 ± 1.65 d for C. parapsilosis, C. orthopsilosis, and C. metapsilosis, respectively). Galleria mellonella hemocytes phagocytosed C. metapsilosis strains more effectively than did for C. orthopsilosis and C. parapsilosis (P<0.05). The phagocytosis rate was lower for C. parapsilosis than for C. orthopsilosis (P<0.05). The hemocyte density was increased in larvae infected with C. metapsilosis compared with those infected with C. parapsilosis or C. orthopsilosis (P<0.05). Moreover, in vitro studies of virulence factors such as pseudohyphae production and hydrolytic enzyme secretion showed that the capability of C. metapsilosis strains to produce those virulence factors was reduced. Infections due to -psilosis complex species produced tissue damage in G. mellonella and pseudohyphae could be also observed during infection with C. parapsilosis.

  7. Protection of Candida parapsilosis from neutrophil killing through internalization by human endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Glass, Kyle A; Longley, Sarah J; Bliss, Joseph M; Shaw, Sunil K

    2015-01-01

    Candida parapsilosis is a fungal pathogen that is associated with hematogenously disseminated disease in premature neonates, acutely ill or immunocompromised patients. In cell culture, C. parapsilosis cells are actively and avidly endocytosed by endothelial cells via actin polymerization mediated by N-WASP. Here we present evidence that C. parapsilosis that were internalized by endothelial cells remained alive, and avoided being acidified or otherwise damaged via the host cell. Internalized fungal cells reproduced intracellularly and eventually burst out of the host endothelial cell. When neutrophils were added to endothelium and C. parapsilosis, they patrolled the endothelial surface and efficiently killed most adherent fungal cells prior to endocytosis. But after endocytosis by endothelial cells, internalized fungal cells evaded neutrophil killing. Silencing endothelial N-WASP blocked endocytosis of C. parapsilosis and left fungal cells stranded on the cell surface, where they were susceptible to neutrophil killing. These observations suggest that for C. parapsilosis to escape from the bloodstream, fungi may adhere to and be internalized by endothelial cells before being confronted and phagocytosed by a patrolling leukocyte. Once internalized by endothelial cells, C. parapsilosis may safely replicate to cause further rounds of infection. Immunosurveillance of the intravascular lumen by leukocytes crawling on the endothelial surface and rapid killing of adherent yeast may play a major role in controlling C. parapsilosis dissemination and infected endothelial cells may be a significant reservoir for fungal persistence. PMID:26039751

  8. Candida albicans Biofilms and Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nobile, Clarissa J.; Johnson, Alexander D.

    2016-01-01

    In humans, microbial cells (including bacteria, archaea, and fungi) greatly outnumber host cells. Candida albicans is the most prevalent fungal species of the human microbiota; this species asymptomatically colonizes many areas of the body, particularly the gastrointestinal and genitourinary tracts of healthy individuals. Alterations in host immunity, stress, resident microbiota, and other factors can lead to C. albicans overgrowth, causing a wide range of infections, from superficial mucosal to hematogenously disseminated candidiasis. To date, most studies of C. albicans have been carried out in suspension cultures; however, the medical impact of C. albicans (like that of many other microorganisms) depends on its ability to thrive as a biofilm, a closely packed community of cells. Biofilms are notorious for forming on implanted medical devices, including catheters, pacemakers, dentures, and prosthetic joints, which provide a surface and sanctuary for biofilm growth. C. albicans biofilms are intrinsically resistant to conventional antifungal therapeutics, the host immune system, and other environmental perturbations, making biofilm-based infections a significant clinical challenge. Here, we review our current knowledge of biofilms formed by C. albicans and closely related fungal species. PMID:26488273

  9. Characterization of Mucosal Candida albicans Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Dongari-Bagtzoglou, Anna; Kashleva, Helena; Dwivedi, Prabhat; Diaz, Patricia; Vasilakos, John

    2009-01-01

    C. albicans triggers recurrent infections of the alimentary tract mucosa that result from biofilm growth. Although the ability of C. albicans to form a biofilm on abiotic surfaces has been well documented in recent years, no information exists on biofilms that form directly on mucosal surfaces. The objectives of this study were to characterize the structure and composition of Candida biofilms forming on the oral mucosa. We found that oral Candida biofilms consist of yeast, hyphae, and commensal bacteria, with keratin dispersed in the intercellular spaces. Neutrophils migrate through the oral mucosa and form nests within the biofilm mass. The cell wall polysaccharide β-glucan is exposed during mucosal biofilm growth and is more uniformly present on the surface of biofilm organisms invading the oral mucosa. We conclude that C. albicans forms complex mucosal biofilms consisting of both commensal bacterial flora and host components. These discoveries are important since they can prompt a shift of focus for current research in investigating the role of Candida-bacterial interactions in the pathogenesis of mucosal infections as well as the role of β-glucan mediated signaling in the host response. PMID:19956771

  10. Multi-species biofilm of Candida albicans and non-Candida albicans Candida species on acrylic substrate

    PubMed Central

    K PATHAK, Apurva; SHARMA, Sanjay; SHRIVASTVA, Pallavi

    2012-01-01

    Objective In polymicrobial biofilms bacteria extensively interact with Candida species, but the interaction among the different species of the Candida is yet to be completely evaluated. In the present study, the difference in biofilm formation ability of clinical isolates of four species of Candida in both single-species and multi-species combinations on the surface of dental acrylic resin strips was evaluated. Material and Methods The species of Candida, isolated from multiple species oral candidiasis of the neutropenic patients, were used for the experiment. Organisms were cultured on Sabouraud dextrose broth with 8% glucose (SDB). Biofilm production on the acrylic resins strips was determined by crystal violet assay. Student's t-test and ANOVA were used to compare in vitro biofilm formation for the individual species of Candida and its different multi-species combinations. Results In the present study, differences between the mean values of the biofilm-forming ability of individual species (C. glabrata>C. krusei>C. tropicalis>C. albicans) and in its multi-species' combinations (the highest for C. albicans with C. glabrata and the lowest for all the four species combination) were reported. Conclusions The findings of this study showed that biofilm-forming ability was found greater for non-Candida albicans Candida species (NCAC) than for C. albicans species with intra-species variation. Presence of C. albicans in multi-species biofilms increased, whereas; C. tropicalis decreased the biofilm production with all other NCAC species. PMID:22437681

  11. [Evaluation of a new chromogenic medium (Candida ID) for the isolation and presumptive identification of Candida albicans and other medically important yeasts].

    PubMed

    Quindós, G; Alonso-Vargas, R; Helou, S; Arechavala, A; Martín-Mazuelos, E; Negroni, R

    2001-03-01

    Candidiasis is a frequent human infection caused mainly by Candida albicans. However, other species are emerging as important pathogens, as Candida glabrata, Candida parapsilosis, Candida tropicalis, Candida krusei or Candida guilliermondii. Rapid identification of clinical isolates could facilitate diagnosis and treatment. Candida ID (bioMerieux, Spain) is a new medium for the isolation and presumptive identification of yeasts: C. albicans grows as blue colonies, and C. tropicalis, C. guilliermondii, Candida kefyr and Candida lusitaniae as pink ones. The utility of Candida ID was evaluated with more than 700 clinical isolates and type culture collection strains from different genera including Candida, Cryptococcus, Saccharomyces, and Rhodotorula. Presumptive identification was confirmed by germ tube test, microscopic morphology and chlamydoconidia production on corn meal agar and carbohydrate assimilation on API-ATB ID 32C or Vitek (bioMerieux). Growth on Candida ID was rapid (18-24 h) for most of the yeast strains tested. Sensitivity and specificity of identification of C. albicans was significantly high (>98%), since a very low number of isolates were found to be false negative or false positive. A better result was obtained for species growing as pink colonies (>99.5%). Detection of different species of medical important yeasts was easy with Candida ID, as perfectly distinct colors and textures of colonies were observed on this medium. Candida ID allowed the discrimination between C. glabrata (creamy and smooth) and C. krusei (rough and white) colonies. Other species showed different colony textures and colours, white being the predominant colour. Candida ID was very useful for the presumptive identification C. albicans isolates.

  12. Adherence and receptor relationships of Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Calderone, R A; Braun, P C

    1991-01-01

    The cell surface of Candida albicans is composed of a variety of polysaccharides such as glucan, chitin, and mannan. The first two components primarily provide structure, while the mannan, often covalently linked to protein, constitutes the major antigen of the organism. Mannoproteins also have enzymatic activity (acid protease) and ligand-receptor functions. The complement receptors of C. albicans appear to be mannoproteins that are required for the adherence of the organism to endothelial cells. This is certainly true of the CR3-like protein of C. albicans. Proof that the CR3 is the Candida receptor for endothelial cells is derived from two observations. First, mutants lacking CR3 activity are less adherent in vitro and, in fact, less virulent. Second, the ligand recognized by the CR3 receptor (C3bi) as well as anti-CR3 antibodies blocks adherence of the organism to endothelial cells. The CR2 of C. albicans appears to promote the adherence of the organism to plastic substrates. Unlike the CR2 of mammalian cells, the Candida CR2 recognizes ligands containing the RGD sequence of amino acids in addition to the C3d ligand, which does not contain the RGD sequence. There is uncertainty as to whether the Candida CR2 and CR3 are, in fact, different proteins. A mannoprotein has also been described as the adhesin for epithelial cells. In this case, the receptor has a lectinlike activity and recognizes fucose- or glucosamine-containing glycoproteins of epithelial cells, depending on the strain of C. albicans. The oligosaccharide component of the receptor is probably not involved in ligand recognition and may serve to stabilize the receptor. However, the oligosaccharide factor 6 epitope of mannan may also provide adhesin activity in the recognition of epithelial cells. Mannoproteins can be extracted from cells by a number of reagents. Zymolyase, for instance, tends to remove structural mannoproteins, which contain relatively little protein and are linked to glucan. Reagents

  13. Resveratrol lacks antifungal activity against Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Collado-González, Mar; Guirao-Abad, José P; Sánchez-Fresneda, Ruth; Belchí-Navarro, Sarai; Argüelles, Juan-Carlos

    2012-06-01

    The putative candicidal activity of resveratrol is currently a matter of controversy. Here, the antifungal activity as well as the antioxidant response of resveratrol against Candida albicans, have been tested in a set of strains with a well-established genetic background At the doses usually employed in antifungal tests (10-40 μg/ml), resveratrol has no effect on the exponential growth of the C. albicans CAI.4 strain, a tenfold increase (400 μg/ml) was required in order to record a certain degree of cell killing, which was negligible in comparison with the strong antifungal effect caused by the addition of amphotericin B (5 μg/ml). An identical pattern was recorded in the prototrophic strains of C. albicans SC5314 and RM-100, whereas the oxidative sensitive trehalose-deficient mutant (tps1/tps1 strain) was totally refractory to the presence of resveratrol. In turn, the serum-induced yeast-to-hypha transition remained unaffected upon addition of different concentrations of resveratrol. Determination of endogenous trehalose and catalase activity, two antioxidant markers in C. albicans; revealed no significant changes in their basal contents induced by resveratrol. Collectively, our results seem to dismiss a main antifungal role as well as the therapeutic application of resveratrol against the infections caused by C. albicans.

  14. Presumptive identification of Candida species other than C. albicans, C. krusei, and C. tropicalis with the chromogenic medium CHROMagar Candida

    PubMed Central

    Hospenthal, Duane R; Beckius, Miriam L; Floyd, Karon L; Horvath, Lynn L; Murray, Clinton K

    2006-01-01

    Background CHROMagar Candida (CaC) is increasingly being reported as a medium used to differentiate Candida albicans from non-albicans Candida (NAC) species. Rapid identification of NAC can assist the clinician in selecting appropriate antifungal therapy. CaC is a differential chromogenic medium designed to identify C. albicans, C. krusei, and C. tropicalis based on colony color and morphology. Some reports have proposed that CaC can also reliably identify C. dubliniensis and C. glabrata. Methods We evaluated the usefulness of CaC in the identification of C. dubliniensis, C. famata, C. firmetaria, C. glabrata, C. guilliermondii, C. inconspicua, C. kefyr, C. lipolytica, C. lusitaniae, C. norvegensis, C. parapsilosis, and C. rugosa. Results Most NAC produced colonies that were shades of pink, lavender, or ivory. Several isolates of C. firmetaria and all C. inconspicua produced colonies difficult to differentiate from C. krusei. Most C. rugosa isolates produced unique colonies with morphology like C. krusei except in a light blue-green color. C. glabrata isolates produced small dark violet colonies that could be differentiated from the pink and lavender colors produced by other species. All seventeen isolates of C. dubliniensis produced green colonies similar to those produced by C. albicans. Conclusion C. glabrata and C. rugosa appear distinguishable from other species using CaC. Some NAC, including C. firmetaria and C. inconspicua, could be confused with C. krusei using this medium. PMID:16390552

  15. Yeasts isolated from Algerian infants's feces revealed a burden of Candida albicans species, non-albicans Candida species and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Seddik, Hamza Ait; Ceugniez, Alexandre; Bendali, Farida; Cudennec, Benoit; Drider, Djamel

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at showing the yeast diversity in feces of Algerian infants, aged between 1 and 24 months, hospitalized at Bejaia hospital (northeast side of the country). Thus, 20 colonies with yeast characteristics were isolated and identified using biochemical (ID32C Api system) and molecular (sequencing of ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region) methods. Almost all colonies isolated (19 strains) were identified as Candida spp., with predominance of Candida albicans species, and one strain was identified as Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Screening of strains with inhibitory activities unveiled the potential of Candida parapsilosis P48L1 and Candida albicans P51L1 to inhibit the growth of Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923. Further studies performed with these two Candida strains revealed their susceptibility to clinically used antifungal compounds and were then characterized for their cytotoxicity and hemolytic properties. On the other hand, Saccharomyces cerevisiae P9L1 isolated as well in this study was shown to be devoid of antagonism but resulted safe and overall usable as probiotic.

  16. Ammonium assimilation by Candida albicans and other yeasts: evidence for activity of glutamate synthase.

    PubMed

    Holmes, A R; Collings, A; Farnden, K J; Shepherd, M G

    1989-06-01

    Activities and properties of the ammonium assimilation enzymes NADP+-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), glutamate synthase (GOGAT) and glutamine synthetase (GS) were determined in batch and continuous cultures of Candida albicans. NADP+-dependent GDH activity showed allosteric kinetics, with an S0.5 for 2-oxoglutarate of 7.5 mM and an apparent Km for ammonium of 5.0 mM. GOGAT activity was affected by the buffer used for extraction and assay, but in phosphate buffer, kinetics were hyperbolic, yielding Km values for glutamine of 750 microM and for 2-oxoglutarate of 65 microM. The enzymes GOGAT and NADP+-dependent GDH were also assayed in batch cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and three other pathogenic Candida spp.: Candida tropicalis, Candida pseudotropicalis and Candida parapsilosis. Evidence is presented that GS/GOGAT is a major pathway for ammonium assimilation in Candida albicans and that this pathway is also significant in other Candida species.

  17. Proteolytic activity and cytokine up-regulation by non-albicans Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Nawaz, Ali; Pärnänen, Pirjo; Kari, Kirsti; Meurman, Jukka H

    2015-05-01

    Mouth is an important source of infections and oral infections such as Candida infections increase the risk of mortality. Our purpose was to investigate differences in proteolytic activity of non-albicans Candida albicans (non-albicans Candida) between clinical isolates and laboratory samples. The second aim was to assess the concentration of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine levels IL-1β, IL-10, and TNF-α in saliva of patients with the non-albicans Candida and Candida-negative saliva samples. Clinical yeast samples from our laboratory were used for analyses. Candida strains were grown in YPG at 37 °C for 24 h in water bath with shaking. The activity of Candida proteinases of cell and cell-free fractions were analyzed by MDPF-gelatin zymography. The levels of IL-1β, IL-10, and TNF-α were measured from saliva with ELISA. The study showed differences in the proteolytic activity among the non-albicans Candida strains. C. tropicalis had higher proteolytic activity when compared to the other strains. Significant difference was found in salivary IL-1β levels between the non-albicans Candida and control strains (P < 0.002). The present findings showed differences in proteolytic activity among the non-albicans Candida strains. The increased IL-1β concentration may be one of the host response components associated with non-albicans Candida infection.

  18. Epithelial Cell Innate Response to Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Naglik, J.R.; Moyes, D.

    2011-01-01

    With the advent of treatments and diseases such as AIDS resulting in increasing numbers of patients with suppressed immune systems, fungal diseases are an escalating problem. Candida albicans is the most common of these fungal pathogens, causing infections in many of these patients. It is therefore important to understand how immunity to this fungus is regulated and how it might be manipulated. Although work has been done to identify the receptors, fungal moieties, and responses involved in anti-Candida immunity, most studies have investigated interactions with myeloid or lymphoid cells. Given that the first site of contact of C. albicans with its host is the mucosal epithelial surface, recent studies have begun to focus on interactions of C. albicans with this site. The results are startling yet in retrospect obvious, indicating that epithelial cells play an important role in these interactions, initiating responses and even providing a level of protection. These findings have obvious implications, not just for fungal pathogens, but also for identifying how host organisms can distinguish between commensal and pathogenic microbes. This review highlights some of these recent findings and discusses their importance in the wider context of infection and immunity. PMID:21441481

  19. Effect of Tetrandrine against Candida albicans Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lan-Xue; Li, De-Dong; Hu, Dan-Dan; Hu, Gan-Hai; Yan, Lan; Wang, Yan; Jiang, Yuan-Ying

    2013-01-01

    Candida albicans is the most common human fungal pathogen and has a high propensity to develop biofilms that are resistant to traditional antifungal agents. In this study, we investigated the effect of tetrandrine (TET) on growth, biofilm formation and yeast-to-hypha transition of C. albicans. We characterized the inhibitory effect of TET on hyphal growth and addressed its possible mechanism of action. Treatment of TET at a low concentration without affecting fungal growth inhibited hyphal growth in both liquid and solid Spider media. Real-time RT-PCR revealed that TET down-regulated the expression of hypha-specific genes ECE1, ALS3 and HWP1, and abrogated the induction of EFG1 and RAS1, regulators of hyphal growth. Addition of cAMP restored the normal phenotype of the SC5314 strain. These results indicate that TET may inhibit hyphal growth through the Ras1p-cAMP-PKA pathway. In vivo, at a range of concentrations from 4 mg/L to 32 mg/L, TET prolonged the survival of C. albicans-infected Caenorhabditis elegans significantly. This study provides useful information for the development of new strategies to reduce the incidence of C. albicans biofilm-associated infections. PMID:24260276

  20. Mucosal Immunity and Candida albicans Infection

    PubMed Central

    Moyes, David L.; Naglik, Julian R.

    2011-01-01

    Interactions between mucosal surfaces and microbial microbiota are key to host defense, health, and disease. These surfaces are exposed to high numbers of microbes and must be capable of distinguishing between those that are beneficial or avirulent and those that will invade and cause disease. Our understanding of the mechanisms involved in these discriminatory processes has recently begun to expand as new studies bring to light the importance of epithelial cells and novel immune cell subsets such as Th17 T cells in these processes. Elucidating how these mechanisms function will improve our understanding of many diverse diseases and improve our ability to treat patients suffering from these conditions. In our voyage to discover these mechanisms, mucosal interactions with opportunistic commensal organisms such as the fungus Candida albicans provide insights that are invaluable. Here, we review current knowledge of the interactions between C. albicans and epithelial surfaces and how this may shape our understanding of microbial-mucosal interactions. PMID:21776285

  1. Otite externe maligne à Candida Albicans

    PubMed Central

    Elayoubi, Fahd; Lachkar, Azeddine; Aabach, Ahmed; Chouai, Mohamed; Ghailan, Mohamed Rachid

    2016-01-01

    L’otite externe maligne est une ostéomyélite de la base du crane. Le Pseudomonas aeruginosa est le germe le plus incriminé. Cependant l’origine fongique n’est pas rare. Patiente âgée de 80 ans avait présenté une otalgie gauche persistante depuis deux mois malgré un traitement bien conduit. L’examen otologique mettait en évidence des signes inflammatoires au niveau du pavillon, une sténose du conduit avec des granulomes, et otorrhée d’allure purulente. Le scanner montrait un comblement otomastoïdien, un processus inflammatoire extensif des tissus pré et rétro-auriculaire et une lyse du tympanal. Vu l’absence d’amélioration un examen mycologique a été réalisé et qui a révélé la présence de Candida Albicans. Les cas d’otite externe maligne à Candida Albicans sont rarement rapportés. L’origine fongique doit être suspecté devant la négativité des prélèvements bactériologiques et la non amélioration malgré un traitement antibiotique bien conduit, et confirmée par des prélèvements mycologiques parfois multiples. L’otite externe maligne à Candida Albicans est une infection rare potentiellement mortelle. PMID:28154677

  2. Melittin induces apoptotic features in Candida albicans

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Cana; Lee, Dong Gun

    2010-03-26

    Melittin is a well-known antimicrobial peptide with membrane-active mechanisms. In this study, it was found that Melittin exerted its antifungal effect via apoptosis. Candida albicans exposed to Melittin showed the increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, measured by DHR-123 staining. Fluorescence microscopy staining with FITC-annexin V, TUNEL and DAPI further confirmed diagnostic markers of yeast apoptosis including phosphatidylserine externalization, and DNA and nuclear fragmentation. The current study suggests that Melittin possesses an antifungal effect with another mechanism promoting apoptosis.

  3. Electron Microscopy of Young Candida albicans Chlamydospores

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Sara E.; Spurlock, Ben O.; Michaels, G. E.

    1974-01-01

    One- to three-day-old cultures of Candida albicans bearing chlamydospores were grown and harvested by a special technique, free of agar, and prepared for ultramicrotomy and electron microscopy. These young chlamydospores exhibited a subcellular structure similar to that of the yeast phase, e.g., cytoplasmic membrane, ribosomes, and mitochondria. Other structural characteristics unique to chlamydospores were a very thick, layered cell wall, the outer layer of which was continuous with the outer layer of the suspensor cell wall and was covered by hair-like projections; membrane bound organelles; and large lipoid inclusions. Only young chlamydospores less than 3 to 4 days old exhibited these ultrastructural characteristics. Images PMID:4368664

  4. Characterization of biofilms formed by Candida parapsilosis, C. metapsilosis, and C. orthopsilosis.

    PubMed

    Lattif, Ali Abdul; Mukherjee, Pranab K; Chandra, Jyotsna; Swindell, Kim; Lockhart, Shawn R; Diekema, Daniel J; Pfaller, Michael A; Ghannoum, Mahmoud A

    2010-04-01

    Infections due to Candida parapsilosis have been associated with the ability of this fungus to form biofilms on indwelling medical devices. Recently, C. parapsilosis isolates were reclassified into 3 genetically non-identical classes: C. parapsilosis, C. orthopsilosis, and C. metapsilosis. Little information is available regarding the ability of these newly reclassified species to form biofilms on biomedical substrates. In this study, we characterized biofilm formation by 10 clinical isolates each of C. parapsilosis, C. orthopsilosis, and C. metapsilosis. Biofilms were allowed to form on silicone elastomer discs to early (6h) or mature (48 h) phases and quantified by tetrazolium (XTT) and dry weight assays. Surface topography and three-dimensional architecture of the biofilms were visualized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), respectively. Metabolic activity assay revealed strain-dependent biofilm forming ability of the 3 species tested, while biomass determination revealed that all 3 species formed equivalent biofilms (P>0.05 for all comparisons). SEM analyses of representative isolates of these species showed biofilms with clusters of yeast cells adherent to the catheter surface. Additionally, confocal microscopy analyses showed the presence of cells embedded in biofilms ranging in thickness between 62 and 85 microm. These results demonstrate that similar to C. parapsilosis, the 2 newly identified Candida species (C. orthopsilosis and C. metapsilosis) were able to form biofilms.

  5. Inhibition of Candida albicans by methanethiol produced by Brevibacterium linens.

    PubMed

    Lewis, B A

    1985-10-01

    Brevibacterium linens was screened for antifungal activity against Candida albicans using several antibiotic assay methods. The growth of C. albicans was inhibited only when the dual culture assay method was employed and using methionine-supplemented media. Results suggest that methanethiol which is produced by B. linens' utilization of methionine is the agent inhibitory to C. albicans' growth.

  6. Prospective Multicenter Study of the Epidemiology, Molecular Identification, and Antifungal Susceptibility of Candida parapsilosis, Candida orthopsilosis, and Candida metapsilosis Isolated from Patients with Candidemia ▿

    PubMed Central

    Cantón, Emilia; Pemán, Javier; Quindós, Guillermo; Eraso, Elena; Miranda-Zapico, Ilargi; Álvarez, María; Merino, Paloma; Campos-Herrero, Isolina; Marco, Francesc; de la Pedrosa, Elia Gomez G.; Yagüe, Genoveva; Guna, Remedios; Rubio, Carmen; Miranda, Consuelo; Pazos, Carmen; Velasco, David

    2011-01-01

    A 13-month prospective multicenter study including 44 hospitals was carried out to evaluate the epidemiology of Candida parapsilosis complex candidemia in Spain. Susceptibility to amphotericin B, flucytosine, fluconazole, itraconazole, voriconazole, posaconazole, anidulafungin, caspofungin, and micafungin was tested by the microdilution colorimetric method. A total of 364 C. parapsilosis complex isolates were identified by molecular methods: C. parapsilosis (90.7%), Candida orthopsilosis (8.2%), and Candida metapsilosis (1.1%). Most candidemias (C. parapsilosis, 76.4%; C. orthopsilosis, 70.0%; C. metapsilosis, 100%) were observed in adults. No C. orthopsilosis or C. metapsilosis candidemias occurred in neonates. C. parapsilosis was most frequent in adult intensive care unit (28.8%), surgery (20.9%), and internal medicine (19.7%) departments; and C. orthopsilosis was most frequent in hematology (28.6%), pediatrics (12.0%), and neonatology (11.5%) departments. The geographic distribution of C. orthopsilosis and C. metapsilosis was not uniform. According to CLSI clinical breakpoints, all C. orthopsilosis and C. metapsilosis isolates were susceptible to the nine agents tested. Resistance (MICs > 1 mg/liter) was observed only in C. parapsilosis: amphotericin B, posaconazole, itraconazole, and caspofungin (0.3% each), anidulafungin (1.9%), and micafungin (2.5%). Applying the new species-specific fluconazole and echinocandin breakpoints, the rates of resistance to fluconazole for C. parapsilosis and C. orthopsilosis increased to 4.8% and 0.3%, respectively; conversely, for C. parapsilosis they shifted from 1.9 to 0.6% (anidulafungin) and from 2.5 to 0.6% (micafungin). Our study confirms the different prevalence of C. parapsilosis complex candidemia among age groups: neither C. orthopsilosis nor C. metapsilosis was isolated from neonates; interestingly, C. metapsilosis was isolated only from adults and the elderly. The disparity in antifungal susceptibility among species

  7. Influence of glucose concentration on the structure and quantity of biofilms formed by Candida parapsilosis.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Leonel; Silva, Sónia; Ribeiro, Bruno; Henriques, Mariana; Azeredo, Joana

    2015-08-01

    Candida parapsilosis is nowadays an emerging opportunistic pathogen and its increasing incidence is part related to the capacity to produce biofilm. In addition, one of the most important C. parapsilosis pathogenic risk factors includes the organisms' selective growth capabilities in hyperalimentation solutions. Thus, in this study, we investigated the role of glucose in C. parapsilosis biofilm modulation, by studying biofilm formation, matrix composition, and structure. Moreover, the expression of biofilm-related genes (BCR1, FKS1 and OLE1) was analysed in the presence of different glucose percentages. The results demonstrated the importance of glucose in the modulation of C. parapsilosis biofilm. The concentration of glucose had direct implications on the C. parapsilosis transition of yeast cells to pseudohyphae. Additionally, it was demonstrated that biofilm-related genes BCR1, FKS1, and OLE1 are involved in biofilm modulation as a result of glucose. The mechanism by which glucose enhances biofilm formation is not fully understood; however, with this study we were able to demonstrate that C. parapsilosis responds to stress conditions caused by elevated levels of glucose by upregulating genes related to biofilm formation (BCR1, FKS1 and OLE1).

  8. Use of multilocus sequence typing for the investigation of colonisation by Candida albicans in intensive care unit patients.

    PubMed

    Cliff, P R; Sandoe, J A T; Heritage, J; Barton, R C

    2008-05-01

    A prospective study was performed to determine the prevalence of candidal colonisation on the general intensive care unit at a large teaching hospital. Colonisation with Candida spp. was found to be common, occurring in 79% of patients on the unit. C. albicans was the commonest species, colonising 64% of patients, followed by C. glabrata (18%) and C. parapsilosis (14%). Most of the members of staff tested carried Candida spp. at some point, although carriage appeared to be transient. C. parapsilosis was the most commonly isolated species from staff hands, whereas C. albicans was the most commonly isolated species from the mouth. The molecular epidemiology of C. albicans was investigated using Ca3 typing and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). MLST proved to be a reproducible typing method and a useful tool for the investigation of the molecular epidemiology of C. albicans. The results of the molecular typing provided evidence for the presence of an endemic strain on the unit, which was isolated repeatedly from patients and staff. This finding suggests horizontal transmission of C. albicans on the unit though it may also reflect the relative frequency of C. albicans strain types colonising patients on admission. This study has important implications for the epidemiology of systemic candidal infections.

  9. Looking into Candida albicans infection, host response, and antifungal strategies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans, a commonly encountered fungal pathogen, causes diseases varying from superficial mucosal complaints to life-threatening systemic disorders. Among the virulence traits of C. albicans, yeast-to-hypha transition is most widely acknowledged. Host innate immunity to C. albicans critically requires pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), and defence against C. albicans infection is provided by an exquisite interplay between the innate and adaptive arms of the host immune system. PMID:25590793

  10. Looking into Candida albicans infection, host response, and antifungal strategies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans, a commonly encountered fungal pathogen, causes diseases varying from superficial mucosal complaints to life-threatening systemic disorders. Among the virulence traits of C. albicans, yeast-to-hypha transition is most widely acknowledged. Host innate immunity to C. albicans critically requires pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), and defence against C. albicans infection is provided by an exquisite interplay between the innate and adaptive arms of the host immune system.

  11. The differences in the isoelectric points of biofilm-positive and biofilm-negative Candida parapsilosis strains.

    PubMed

    Ruzicka, Filip; Horka, Marie; Hola, Veronika; Kubesova, Anna; Pavlik, Tomas; Votava, Miroslav

    2010-03-01

    The isoelectric points of 39 Candida parapsilosis strains were determined by means of capillary isoelectric focusing. The value of the isoelectric point corresponded well with cell surface hydrophobicity, as well as with the ability to form biofilm in these yeasts.

  12. Comparison of four molecular approaches to identify Candida parapsilosis complex species

    PubMed Central

    Barbedo, Leonardo Silva; Figueiredo-Carvalho, Maria Helena Galdino; Muniz, Mauro de Medeiros; Zancopé-Oliveira, Rosely Maria

    2017-01-01

    Since the description of Candida orthopsilosis and C. metapsilosis in 2005, several methods have been proposed to identify and differentiate these species from C. parapsilosis sensu stricto. Species-specific uniplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed and compared with sequencing of the D1/D2 region of the LSU 28S rDNA gene, microsatellite typing of C. parapsilosis sensu stricto, and PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism patterns in the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region of the rDNA gene. There was agreement between results of testing of 98 clinical isolates with the four PCR-based methods, with 59 isolates identified as C. parapsilosis sensu stricto, 37 as C. orthopsilosis, and two as C. metapsilosis. PMID:28225905

  13. Comparison of four molecular approaches to identify Candida parapsilosis complex species.

    PubMed

    Barbedo, Leonardo Silva; Figueiredo-Carvalho, Maria Helena Galdino; Muniz, Mauro de Medeiros; Zancopé-Oliveira, Rosely Maria

    2017-03-01

    Since the description of Candida orthopsilosis and C. metapsilosis in 2005, several methods have been proposed to identify and differentiate these species from C. parapsilosis sensu stricto. Species-specific uniplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed and compared with sequencing of the D1/D2 region of the LSU 28S rDNA gene, microsatellite typing of C. parapsilosis sensu stricto, and PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism patterns in the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region of the rDNA gene. There was agreement between results of testing of 98 clinical isolates with the four PCR-based methods, with 59 isolates identified as C. parapsilosis sensu stricto, 37 as C. orthopsilosis, and two as C. metapsilosis.

  14. Comparison of four molecular approaches to identify Candida parapsilosis complex species.

    PubMed

    Barbedo, Leonardo Silva; Figueiredo-Carvalho, Maria Helena Galdino; Muniz, Mauro de Medeiros; Zancopé-Oliveira, Rosely Maria

    2017-02-16

    Since the description of Candida orthopsilosis and C. metapsilosis in 2005, several methods have been proposed to identify and differentiate these species from C. parapsilosis sensu stricto. Species-specific uniplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed and compared with sequencing of the D1/D2 region of the LSU 28S rDNA gene, microsatellite typing of C. parapsilosis sensu stricto, and PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism patterns in the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region of the rDNA gene. There was agreement between results of testing of 98 clinical isolates with the four PCR-based methods, with 59 isolates identified as C. parapsilosis sensu stricto, 37 as C. orthopsilosis, and two as C. metapsilosis.

  15. Direct electrochemical determination of Candida albicans activity.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Rabeay Y A; Bilitewski, Ursula

    2013-11-15

    Despite advances made in the field, rapid detection methods for the human pathogen Candida albicans are still missing. In this regard, bio-electrochemical systems including electrochemical sensors and biosensors satisfy the increasing demand for rapid, reliable, and direct microbial analyses. In this study, the bioelectrochemical characteristics of C. albicans were investigated for use in an analytical system that determines the viability of the organisms. The electrochemical responses of viable and non-viable cells of C. albicans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae were monitored. Cyclic voltammograms (CV) showed an irreversible oxidation peak at about 750 mV that accounts for viable cells. The peak current increased at viable cell numbers ranging from 3 × 10(5) to 1.6 × 10(7)cells/ml, indicating that the amount of viable cells can be accurately quantified. To elucidate the underlying electron transfer processes, the influence of electron transfer chain (ETC) - inhibitors on the electrochemical behavior of the two organisms were investigated. Inhibition of the function of classical respiratory chain (CRC) led to a decrease in the electrochemical response, whereas the oxidation current increased when the alternative oxidase (AOX) pathway was blocked by salicylhydroxamic acid (SHA). Blocking the AOX pathway improved the electrochemical performance, suggesting an involvement in the CRC, with cytochrome c oxidase (COX) as a relevant protein complex. Mutants, in which components of COX were deleted, showed a lower electro-activity than the wild-type strain. Particularly, deletion of subunit COX5a almost completely abolished the electrochemical signal. We believe that this work can be utilized for the development of early detection assays and opens the door for new technological developments in the field of C. albicans.

  16. Candida albicans and non-albicans species as etiological agent of vaginitis in pregnant and non-pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Babic, Mirela; Hukic, Mirsada

    2010-02-01

    Pregnancy represents a risk factor in the occurrence of vaginal candidosis. The objectives of our study were: to make determination of the microscopic findings of vaginal swab, frequency of Candida species in the culture of pregnant women and patients who are not pregnant, determine the Candida species in all cultures, and to determine the frequency and differences in the frequency of C. albicans and other non-albicans species. In one year study performed during 2006 year, we tested patients of Gynaecology and Obstetrics clinic of the Clinical Centre in Sarajevo and Gynaecology department of the General hospital in Sarajevo. 447 woman included in the study were separated in two groups: 203 pregnant (in the last trimester of pregnancy), and 244 non-pregnant woman in period of fertility. Each vaginal swab was examined microscopically. The yeast, number of colonies, and the species of Candida were determined on Sabouraud dextrose agar with presence of antibiotics. For determination of Candida species, we used germ tube test for detection of C. albicans, and cultivation on the selective medium and assimilation tests for detection of non-albicans species. The results indicated positive microscopic findings in the test group (40,9%), as well as greater number of positive cultures (46,8%). The most commonly detected species for both groups was C. albicans ( test group 40.9% and control group 23,0%). The most commonly detected non-albicans species for the test group were C. glabrata (4,2 %) and C. krusei (3,2%), and for the control group were C. glabrata (3,2%) and C. parapsilosis (3,2%). The microscopic findings correlated with the number of colonies in positive cultures. In the test group, we found an increased number of yeasts (64,3%), and the pseudopyphae and blastopores by microscopic examination as an indication of infection. In the control group, we found a small number of yeasts (64,6%) , in the form of blastopores, as an indication of the candida colonisation. Our

  17. Candida parapsilosis as a Potent Biocontrol Agent against Growth and Aflatoxin Production by Aspergillus Species

    PubMed Central

    Niknejad, F; Zaini, F; Faramarzi, MA; Amini, M; Kordbacheh, P; Mahmoudi, M; Safara, M

    2012-01-01

    Background: Aflatoxin contamination of food and feed stuff is a serious health problem and significant economic concerns. In the present study, the inhibitory effect of Candida parapsilosis IP1698 on mycelial growth and aflatoxin production in aflatoxigenic strains of Aspergillus species was investigated. Methods: Mycelial growth inhibitions of nine strains of aflatoxigenic and non-aflatoxigenic Aspergillus species in the presence of C. parapsilosis investigated by pour plate technique at different pH, temperature and time of incubation. Reduction of aflatoxin was evaluated in co-cultured fungi in yeast extract sucrose broth after seven days of incubation using HPLC method. The data were analyzed by SPSS 11.5. Results: The presence of the C. parapsilosis at different pH did not affect significantly the growth rate of Aspergillus isolates. On the other hand, temperature and time of incubation showed to be significantly effective when compared to controls without C. parapsilosis (P≤0.05). In aflatoxigenic strains, minimum percentage of reductions in total aflatoxin and B1, B2, G1, G2 fractions were 92.98, 92.54, 77.48, 54.54 and 72.22 and maximum percentage of reductions were 99.59, not detectable, 94.42, and not detectable in both G1 and G2, respectively. Conclusion: C. parapsilosis might employ as a good biocontrol agent against growth and aflatoxin production by aflatoxigenic Aspergillus species PMID:23308351

  18. Comparison of the clinical risk factors between Candida albicans and Candida non-albicans species for bloodstream infection.

    PubMed

    Shigemura, Katsumi; Osawa, Kayo; Jikimoto, Takumi; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Hayama, Brian; Ohji, Goh; Iwata, Kentaro; Fujisawa, Masato; Arakawa, Soichi

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the risk factors and susceptibilities to antifungal agents of Candida albicans and Candida non-albicans species (spp.) in candidemia cases in Kobe University Hospital. We investigated all consecutive patients with candida bloodstream infection (BSI) from 2008-2013 for whose full data were available for analyses, examining clinical factors such as gender, general complications, postoperative status or susceptibilities to antifungal agents. These factors were also compared between Candida albicans spp. and Candida non-albicans by univariate and multivariate analyses. Univariate analyses showed a significantly higher rate of Candida non-albicans species BSI patients cancer (odds ratio (OR) (95% confidence interval (CI))=2.29 (1.04-5.06) and P=0.040), chemotherapy (OR=4.35 (1.11-17.1) and P=0.035), fluconazole (FLCZ) resistance (OR=77.3 (4.51-1324) and P=0.003), and itraconazole (ITCZ) resistance (OR=15.6 (5.39-45.1) and P<0.001) and lower rate of underlying cardiovascular diseases (OR=0.27 (0.09-0.80) and P=0.018) and postoperative status (OR=0.35 (0.16-0.77) and P=0.035) in than Candida albicans. Multivariate analyses demonstrated that Candida non-albicans spp. had significantly higher rate of chemotherapy (OR=4.44 (1.04-19.0) and P=0.045), FLCZ resistance (OR=5.87 (2.01-17.1) and P=0.001), and ITCZ resistance (OR=18.7(5.77-60.4) and P<0.001) and lower rate of underlying cardiovascular diseases (OR=0.25 (0.08-0.82) and P=0.022) than Candida albicans. In conclusion, this study revealed several risk factors for BSI with Candida albicans (underlying cardiovascular diseases and postoperative status) and Candida non-albicans spp. (cancer and chemotherapy), and demonstrated that Candida non-albicans spp. were more resistant to FLCZ and ITCZ than Candida albicans.

  19. Atomic resolution crystal structure of Sapp2p, a secreted aspartic protease from Candida parapsilosis.

    PubMed

    Dostál, Jiří; Pecina, Adam; Hrušková-Heidingsfeldová, Olga; Marečková, Lucie; Pichová, Iva; Řezáčová, Pavlina; Lepšík, Martin; Brynda, Jiří

    2015-12-01

    The virulence of the Candida pathogens is enhanced by the production of secreted aspartic proteases, which therefore represent possible targets for drug design. Here, the crystal structure of the secreted aspartic protease Sapp2p from Candida parapsilosis was determined. Sapp2p was isolated from its natural source and crystallized in complex with pepstatin A, a classical aspartic protease inhibitor. The atomic resolution of 0.83 Å allowed the protonation states of the active-site residues to be inferred. A detailed comparison of the structure of Sapp2p with the structure of Sapp1p, the most abundant C. parapsilosis secreted aspartic protease, was performed. The analysis, which included advanced quantum-chemical interaction-energy calculations, uncovered molecular details that allowed the experimentally observed equipotent inhibition of both isoenzymes by pepstatin A to be rationalized.

  20. Candida parapsilosis (sensu lato) isolated from hospitals located in the Southeast of Brazil: Species distribution, antifungal susceptibility and virulence attributes.

    PubMed

    Ziccardi, Mariangela; Souza, Lucieri O P; Gandra, Rafael M; Galdino, Anna Clara M; Baptista, Andréa R S; Nunes, Ana Paula F; Ribeiro, Mariceli A; Branquinha, Marta H; Santos, André L S

    2015-12-01

    Candida parapsilosis (sensu lato), which represents a fungal complex composed of three genetically related species - Candida parapsilosis sensu stricto, Candida orthopsilosis and Candida metapsilosis, has emerged as an important yeast causing fungemia worldwide. The goal of the present work was to assess the prevalence, antifungal susceptibility and production of virulence traits in 53 clinical isolates previously identified as C. parapsilosis (sensu lato) obtained from hospitals located in the Southeast of Brazil. Species forming this fungal complex are physiologically/morphologically indistinguishable; however, polymerase chain reaction followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism of FKS1 gene has solved the identification inaccuracy, revealing that 43 (81.1%) isolates were identified as C. parapsilosis sensu stricto and 10 (18.9%) as C. orthopsilosis. No C. metapsilosis was found. The geographic distribution of these Candida species was uniform among the studied Brazilian States (São Paulo, Rio de Janeiro and Espírito Santo). All C. orthopsilosis and almost all C. parapsilosis sensu stricto (95.3%) isolates were susceptible to amphotericin B, fluconazole, itraconazole, voriconazole and caspofungin. Nevertheless, one C. parapsilosis sensu stricto isolate was resistant to fluconazole and another one was resistant to caspofungin. C. parapsilosis sensu stricto isolates exhibited higher MIC mean values to amphotericin B, fluconazole and caspofungin than those of C. orthopsilosis, while C. orthopsilosis isolates displayed higher MIC mean to itraconazole compared to C. parapsilosis sensu stricto. Identical MIC mean values to voriconazole were measured for these Candida species. All the isolates of both species were able to form biofilm on polystyrene surface. Impressively, biofilm-growing cells of C. parapsilosis sensu stricto and C. orthopsilosis exhibited a considerable resistance to all antifungal agents tested. Pseudohyphae were observed in 67.4% and 80

  1. Budding off: bringing functional genomics to Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Matthew Z; Bennett, Richard J

    2016-03-01

    Candida species are the most prevalent human fungal pathogens, with Candida albicans being the most clinically relevant species. Candida albicans resides as a commensal of the human gastrointestinal tract but is a frequent cause of opportunistic mucosal and systemic infections. Investigation of C. albicans virulence has traditionally relied on candidate gene approaches, but recent advances in functional genomics have now facilitated global, unbiased studies of gene function. Such studies include comparative genomics (both between and within Candida species), analysis of total RNA expression, and regulation and delineation of protein-DNA interactions. Additionally, large collections of mutant strains have begun to aid systematic screening of clinically relevant phenotypes. Here, we will highlight the development of functional genomics in C. albicans and discuss the use of these approaches to addressing both commensalism and pathogenesis in this species.

  2. Influence of Bacterial Presence on Biofilm Formation of Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Park, Su Jung; Han, Kyoung-Hee; Park, Joo Young; Choi, Sun Ju

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Candida albicans is an opportunistic pathogen that is commonly found in human microflora. Biofilm formation (BF) is known as a major virulence factor of C. albicans. The aim of this study was to examine the influence of bacterial presence on biofilm formation of C. albicans. Materials and Methods The BF of Candida was investigated when it was co-cultured with C. albicans (C. albicans 53, a yeast with a low BF ability, and C. albicans 163, a yeast with high BF ability) and bacteria. BF was assessed with XTT reduction assay. A scanning electron microscope was used to determine the structure of the biofilm, and real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction was used to amplify and quantify hyphae-associated genes. Results Co-culturing with two different types of bacteria increased the BF value. Co-culturing with C. albicans 53 and 163 also increased the BF value compared to the value that was obtained when the C. albicans was cultured individually. However, co-culturing with bacteria decreased the BF value of C. albicans, and the BF of C. albicans 163 was markedly inhibited. The expression of adherence and morphology transition related genes were significantly inhibited by co-culturing with live bacteria. Conclusion Bacteria have a negative effect on the formation of biofilm by C. albicans. This mechanism is the result of the suppression of genes associated with the hyphae transition of C. albicans, and bacteria particles physically affected the biofilm architecture and biofilm formation. PMID:24532517

  3. Killer system: a simple method for differentiating Candida albicans strains.

    PubMed Central

    Polonelli, L; Archibusacci, C; Sestito, M; Morace, G

    1983-01-01

    The killer effect of 37 species of Candida, Cryptococcus, Hansenula, Pichia, Rhodotorula, Saccharomyces, and Trichosporon on 100 Candida albicans isolates of human and animal origin was studied. All of the C. albicans cultures were sensitive to one or more killer yeasts. The factors affecting the killer phenomenon on C. albicans were investigated for realizing a simple system for the differentiation of the 100 C. albicans isolates. By using this system, it was possible to differentiate up to 512 isolates of C. albicans according to their susceptibility to the killer effect of nine selected killer yeasts. The use of this method as an epidemiological marker in the case of presumptive nosocomial infections due to C. albicans is also reported. Images PMID:6345575

  4. Prevalence and antifungal susceptibility of Candida parapsilosis complex isolates collected from oral cavities of HIV-infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Moris, D V; Melhem, M S C; Martins, M A; Souza, L R; Kacew, S; Szeszs, M W; Carvalho, L R; Pimenta-Rodrigues, M V; Berghs, H A M; Mendes, R P

    2012-12-01

    At present, few data are available on the prevalence and antifungal susceptibility of Candida parapsilosis complex isolates from HIV-infected individuals. The C. parapsilosis complex comprises three species, C. parapsilosis sensu stricto, C. metapsilosis and C. orthopsilosis. Fifteen of 318 Candida isolates were identified as members of the C. parapsilosis complex by PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). The prevalence of C. parapsilosis complex isolates was 4.7 %, 2.2 % being identified as C. parapsilosis sensu stricto and 2.5 % as C. metapsilosis, while no C. orthopsilosis was isolated. This is believed to be the first study that has identified isolates of C. metapsilosis obtained from the oral cavity of HIV-infected individuals. Antifungal susceptibility tests indicated that all the isolates were susceptible to amphotericin B (AMB), fluconazole (FLC), ketoconazole (KTC), itraconazole (ITC), voriconazole (VRC) and caspofungin (CASPO). Although isolates of C. parapsilosis sensu stricto and C. metapsilosis were susceptible to FLC, isolates of C. metapsilosis showed a tendency for higher MICs (≥1.0 µg ml(-1)). Based upon the frequency of candidiasis and the fact that certain isolates of the C. parapsilosis complex respond differently to FLC therapy, our data may be of therapeutic relevance with respect to susceptibility and potential resistance to specific antifungal agents. Our data suggest that C. metapsilosis can be a human commensal; its importance as a pathogen has yet to be confirmed.

  5. Micafungin induced apoptosis in Candida parapsilosis independent of its susceptibility to micafungin

    PubMed Central

    Shirazi, Fazal; Lewis, Russel E.; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P.

    2015-01-01

    We hypothesized that the cell wall inhibitor micafungin (MICA) induces apoptosis in both MICA-susceptible (MICA-S) and MICA-non-susceptible (MICA-NS) Candida parapsilosis. Antifungal activity and apoptosis were analyzed in MICA-S and MICA-NS C. parapsilosis strains following exposure to micafungin for 3 h at 37°C in RPMI 1640 medium. Apoptosis was characterized by detecting phosphatidylserine externalization (PS), plasma membrane integrity, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, mitochondrial membrane potential changes, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) release, and caspase-like activity. Apoptosis was detected in MICA exposed (0.25 to 1 mg/L) susceptible C. parapsilosis strains and was associated with apoptosis of 20-52% of analyzed cells versus only 5-30% of apoptosis in MICA-NS cells exposed to micafungin (0.5 to 2 mg/L; P = 0.001). The MICA antifungal activity was correlated with apoptotic cells showing increased dihydrorhodamine-123 staining (indicating ROS production), Rh-123 staining (decreased mitochondrial membrane potential), elevated ATP, and increased metacaspase activity. In conclusion, MICA is pro-apoptotic in MICA-S cells, but still exerts apoptotic effects in MICA -NS C. parapsilosis. PMID:28357269

  6. Assessment of two new molecular methods for identification of Candida parapsilosis sensu lato species.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Effron, Guillermo; Canton, Emilia; Pemán, Javier; Dilger, Amanda; Romá, Eva; Perlin, David S

    2011-09-01

    Candida parapsilosis sensu stricto, C. orthopsilosis, and C. metapsilosis replaced C. parapsilosis groups I, II, and III in 2005. Since then, an increased interest in studying their epidemiology has arisen based on the observed differences in antifungal susceptibilities and virulence the three species. A strict differentiation of these species cannot be achieved by phenotypic methods. We evaluate two new molecular methodologies to differentiate among these species by the use of a collection of 293 bloodstream infection isolates of C. parapsilosis sensu lato. For the first method, the isolates were studied using PCR amplification of a fragment of the C. parapsilosis sensu lato FKS1 gene and a universal primer pair followed by EcoRI enzyme digestion. The other method used the allele discrimination ability of molecular beacons in a multiplex real-time PCR format. Both methods of identification showed 100% concordance with internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1)/ITS2 sequencing and proved to be effective for clinical applications, even with mixed-species DNAs.

  7. Portrait of Candida Species Biofilm Regulatory Network Genes.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Daniela; Henriques, Mariana; Silva, Sónia

    2017-01-01

    Most cases of candidiasis have been attributed to Candida albicans, but Candida glabrata, Candida parapsilosis and Candida tropicalis, designated as non-C. albicans Candida (NCAC), have been identified as frequent human pathogens. Moreover, Candida biofilms are an escalating clinical problem associated with significant rates of mortality. Biofilms have distinct developmental phases, including adhesion/colonisation, maturation and dispersal, controlled by complex regulatory networks. This review discusses recent advances regarding Candida species biofilm regulatory network genes, which are key components for candidiasis.

  8. Phenotypic identification of Candida albicans by growth on chocolate agar.

    PubMed

    Sheth, Chirag C; Johnson, Elizabeth; Baker, Mark E; Haynes, Ken; Mühlschlegel, Fritz A

    2005-12-01

    In this study, we describe a simple method for the identification of Candida albicans in clinical samples. A total of 383 clinical isolates of Candida species were streaked onto chocolate agar and incubated for 48 h at 37 degrees C in the presence of an atmosphere of 6% CO2. All 208 of the C. albicans isolates tested, developed an easy to identify filamentous colony morphology. Of 175 other Candida species tested, 172 (98.3%) were distinguishable from C. albicans by their smooth colony morphology. Three isolates (1.7%) exhibited weak filamentation after prolonged incubation. Although not a routine medium in medical mycology a significant advantage of using chocolate agar lies in its use in clinical bacteriology laboratories for the isolation of fastidious bacteria. Implementation of the proposed method is applicable across a range of specimen types, thus allowing the direct identification of C. albicans in clinical samples. This simple method may allow a quicker entry into directed treatment.

  9. High-frequency switching in Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Soll, D R

    1992-01-01

    Most strains of Candida albicans are capable of switching frequently and reversibly between a number of phenotypes distinguishable by colony morphology. A number of different switching systems have been defined according to the limited set of phenotypes in each switching repertoire, and each strain appears to possess a single system. Switching can affect many aspects of cellular physiology and morphology and appears to be a second level of phenotypic variability superimposed upon the bud-hypha transition. The most dramatic switching system so far identified is the "white-opaque transition." This system dramatizes the extraordinary effects switching can have on the budding cell phenotype, including the synthesis of opaque-specific antigens, the expression of white-specific and opaque-specific genes, and the genesis of unique cell wall structures. Switching has been demonstrated to occur at sites of infection and between episodes of recurrent vaginitis, and it may function to generate variability in commensal and infecting populations for adaptive reasons. Although the molecular mechanisms involved in the switch event are not understood, recent approaches to its elucidation are discussed and an epigenetic mechanism is proposed. Images PMID:1576587

  10. Molecular epidemiology, phylogeny and evolution of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    McManus, Brenda A; Coleman, David C

    2014-01-01

    A small number of Candida species form part of the normal microbial flora of mucosal surfaces in humans and may give rise to opportunistic infections when host defences are impaired. Candida albicans is by far the most prevalent commensal and pathogenic Candida species. Several different molecular typing approaches including multilocus sequence typing, multilocus microsatellite typing and DNA fingerprinting using C. albicans-specific repetitive sequence-containing DNA probes have yielded a wealth of information regarding the epidemiology and population structure of this species. Such studies revealed that the C. albicans population structure consists of multiple major and minor clades, some of which exhibit geographical or phenotypic enrichment and that C. albicans reproduction is predominantly clonal. Despite this, losses of heterozygosity by recombination, the existence of a parasexual cycle, toleration of a wide range of aneuploidies and the recent description of viable haploid strains have all demonstrated the extensive plasticity of the C. albicans genome. Recombination and gross chromosomal rearrangements are more common under stressful environmental conditions, and have played a significant role in the evolution of this opportunistic pathogen. Surprisingly, Candida dubliniensis, the closest relative of C. albicans exhibits more karyotype variability than C. albicans, but is significantly less adaptable to unfavourable environments. This disparity most likely reflects the evolutionary processes that occurred during or soon after the divergence of both species from their common ancestor. Whilst C. dubliniensis underwent significant gene loss and pseudogenisation, C. albicans expanded gene families considered to be important in virulence. It is likely that technological developments in whole genome sequencing and data analysis in coming years will facilitate its routine use for population structure, epidemiological investigations, and phylogenetic analyses of

  11. Rapid detection and identification of Candida albicans and Torulopsis (Candida) glabrata in clinical specimens by species-specific nested PCR amplification of a cytochrome P-450 lanosterol-alpha-demethylase (L1A1) gene fragment.

    PubMed Central

    Burgener-Kairuz, P; Zuber, J P; Jaunin, P; Buchman, T G; Bille, J; Rossier, M

    1994-01-01

    PCR of a Candida albicans cytochrome P-450 lanosterol-alpha-demethylase (P450-L1A1) gene segment is a rapid and sensitive method of detection in clinical specimens. This enzyme is a target for azole antifungal action. In order to directly detect and identify the clinically most important species of Candida, we cloned and sequenced 1.3-kbp fragments of the cytochrome P450-L1A1 genes from Torulopsis (Candida) glabrata and from Candida krusei. These segments were compared with the published sequences from C. albicans and Candida tropicalis. Amplimers for gene sequences highly conserved throughout the fungal kingdom were first used; positive PCR results were obtained for C. albicans, T. glabrata, C. krusei, Candida parapsilosis, C. tropicalis, Cryptococcus neoformans, and Trichosporon beigelii DNA extracts. Primers were then selected for a highly variable region of the gene, allowing the species-specific detection from purified DNA of C. albicans, T. glabrata, C. krusei, and C. tropicalis. The assay sensitivity as tested for C. albicans in seeded clinical specimens such as blood, peritoneal fluid, or urine was 10 to 20 cells per 0.1 ml. Compared with results obtained by culture, the sensitivity, specificity, and efficiency of the species-specific nested PCR tested with 80 clinical specimens were 71, 95, and 83% for C. albicans and 100, 97, and 98% for T. glabrata, respectively. Images PMID:7989540

  12. In Candida parapsilosis the ATC1 Gene Encodes for an Acid Trehalase Involved in Trehalose Hydrolysis, Stress Resistance and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Fresneda, Ruth; Martínez-Esparza, María; Maicas, Sergi; Argüelles, Juan-Carlos; Valentín, Eulogio

    2014-01-01

    An ORF named CPAR2-208980 on contig 005809 was identified by screening a Candida parapsilosis genome data base. Its 67% identity with the acid trehalase sequence from C. albicans (ATC1) led us to designate it CpATC1. Homozygous mutants that lack acid trehalase activity were constructed by gene disruption at the two CpATC1 chromosomal alleles. Phenotypic characterization showed that atc1Δ null cells were unable to grow on exogenous trehalose as carbon source, and also displayed higher resistance to environmental challenges, such as saline exposure (1.2 M NaCl), heat shock (42°C) and both mild and severe oxidative stress (5 and 50 mM H2O2). Significant amounts of intracellular trehalose were specifically stored in response to the thermal upshift in both wild type and mutant strains. Analysis of their antioxidant activities revealed that catalase was only triggered in response to heat shock in atc1Δ cells, whereas glutathione reductase was activated upon mild oxidative stress in wild type and reintegrant strains, and in response to the whole set of stress treatments in the homozygous mutant. Furthermore, yeast cells with double CpATC1 deletion were significantly attenuated in non-mammalian infection models, suggesting that CpATC1 is required for the pathobiology of the fungus. Our results demonstrate the involvement of CpAtc1 protein in the physiological hydrolysis of external trehalose in C. parapsilosis, where it also plays a major role in stress resistance and virulence. PMID:24922533

  13. Synthetic arylquinuclidine derivatives exhibit antifungal activity against Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis and Candida parapsilopsis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Sterol biosynthesis is an essential pathway for fungal survival, and is the biochemical target of many antifungal agents. The antifungal drugs most widely used to treated fungal infections are compounds that inhibit cytochrome P450-dependent C14α-demethylase (CYP51), but other enzymes of this pathway, such as squalene synthase (SQS) which catalyses the first committed step in sterol biosynthesis, could be viable targets. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antifungal activity of SQS inhibitors on Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis and Candida parapsilopsis strains. Methods Ten arylquinuclidines that act as SQS inhibitors were tested as antiproliferative agents against three ATCC strains and 54 clinical isolates of Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis and Candida parapsilopsis. Also, the morphological alterations induced in the yeasts by the experimental compounds were evaluated by fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy. Results The most potent arylquinuclidine derivative (3-[1'-{4'-(benzyloxy)-phenyl}]-quinuclidine-2-ene) (WSP1267) had a MIC50 of 2 μg/ml for all species tested and MIC90 varying from 4 μg/ml to 8 μg/ml. Ultrathin sections of C. albicans treated with 1 μg/ml of WSP1267 showed several ultrastructural alterations, including (a) loss of cell wall integrity, (b) detachment of the plasma membrane from the fungal cell wall, (c) accumulation of small vesicles in the periplasmic region, (d) presence of large electron-dense vacuoles and (e) significantly increased cell size and cell wall thickness. In addition, fluorescence microscopy of cells labelled with Nile Red showed an accumulation of lipid droplets in the cytoplasm of treated yeasts. Nuclear staining with DAPI revealed the appearance of uncommon yeast buds without a nucleus or with two nuclei. Conclusion Taken together, our data demonstrate that arylquinuclidine derivatives could be useful as lead compounds for the rational synthesis of new antifungal drugs. PMID

  14. Rapid identification of Candida albicans by using Albicans ID and fluoroplate agar plates.

    PubMed Central

    Rousselle, P; Freydiere, A M; Couillerot, P J; de Montclos, H; Gille, Y

    1994-01-01

    Two commercially available agar media, Albicans ID and Fluoroplate, that use a chromogenic or a fluorogenic substrate for the detection and identification of Candida albicans were evaluated. From 1,006 clinical samples containing 723 yeast strains, 352 C. albicans strains were detected with either of the two media. The sensitivity of each of the two media was 93.8% and the specificity was 98.6%, with five false-positive reactions for Candida tropicalis and no false-negative reactions. PMID:7883894

  15. Candida albicans Secreted Aspartyl Proteinases in Virulence and Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Naglik, Julian R.; Challacombe, Stephen J.; Hube, Bernhard

    2003-01-01

    Candida albicans is the most common fungal pathogen of humans and has developed an extensive repertoire of putative virulence mechanisms that allows successful colonization and infection of the host under suitable predisposing conditions. Extracellular proteolytic activity plays a central role in Candida pathogenicity and is produced by a family of 10 secreted aspartyl proteinases (Sap proteins). Although the consequences of proteinase secretion during human infections is not precisely known, in vitro, animal, and human studies have implicated the proteinases in C. albicans virulence in one of the following seven ways: (i) correlation between Sap production in vitro and Candida virulence, (ii) degradation of human proteins and structural analysis in determining Sap substrate specificity, (iii) association of Sap production with other virulence processes of C. albicans, (iv) Sap protein production and Sap immune responses in animal and human infections, (v) SAP gene expression during Candida infections, (vi) modulation of C. albicans virulence by aspartyl proteinase inhibitors, and (vii) the use of SAP-disrupted mutants to analyze C. albicans virulence. Sap proteins fulfill a number of specialized functions during the infective process, which include the simple role of digesting molecules for nutrient acquisition, digesting or distorting host cell membranes to facilitate adhesion and tissue invasion, and digesting cells and molecules of the host immune system to avoid or resist antimicrobial attack by the host. We have critically discussed the data relevant to each of these seven criteria, with specific emphasis on how this proteinase family could contribute to Candida virulence and pathogenesis. PMID:12966142

  16. Global Identification of Biofilm-Specific Proteolysis in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Michael B.; Salcedo, Eugenia C.; Lohse, Matthew B.; Hartooni, Nairi; Gulati, Megha; Sanchez, Hiram; Takagi, Julie; Hube, Bernhard; Andes, David R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Candida albicans is a fungal species that is part of the normal human microbiota and also an opportunistic pathogen capable of causing mucosal and systemic infections. C. albicans cells proliferate in a planktonic (suspension) state, but they also form biofilms, organized and tightly packed communities of cells attached to a solid surface. Biofilms colonize many niches of the human body and persist on implanted medical devices, where they are a major source of new C. albicans infections. Here, we used an unbiased and global substrate-profiling approach to discover proteolytic activities produced specifically by C. albicans biofilms, compared to planktonic cells, with the goal of identifying potential biofilm-specific diagnostic markers and targets for therapeutic intervention. This activity-based profiling approach, coupled with proteomics, identified Sap5 (Candidapepsin-5) and Sap6 (Candidapepsin-6) as major biofilm-specific proteases secreted by C. albicans. Fluorogenic peptide substrates with selectivity for Sap5 or Sap6 confirmed that their activities are highly upregulated in C. albicans biofilms; we also show that these activities are upregulated in other Candida clade pathogens. Deletion of the SAP5 and SAP6 genes in C. albicans compromised biofilm development in vitro in standard biofilm assays and in vivo in a rat central venous catheter biofilm model. This work establishes secreted proteolysis as a promising enzymatic marker and potential therapeutic target for Candida biofilm formation. PMID:27624133

  17. Fungal arthritis of the wrist caused by Candida parapsilosis during infliximab therapy for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Hideaki; Miura, Toshiki; Morita, Euan; Morizaki, Yutaka; Uehara, Kosuke; Ohe, Takashi; Tanaka, Sakae

    2012-11-01

    A 60-year-old woman with rheumatoid arthritis, who had been treated with infliximab, presented with uncontrollable wrist arthritis. Fungal arthritis caused by Candida parapsilosis was confirmed by examining her aspirated joint fluid. Her infliximab therapy was interrupted, and antifungal therapy with fluconazole was started. After the fungal infection had been ameliorated, surgical debridement and arthrodesis of the wrist joint were conducted, and her symptoms completely resolved. Although fungal arthritis is rare, it should be considered as a differential diagnosis of exacerbated monoarthritis in patients treated with biological agents.

  18. Co-infection of Candida parapsilosis in a Patient of Pulmonary Actinomycosis-A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Purbasha; Kar, Mousumi; Nandi, Poulami; Naskar, Prosenjit

    2017-01-01

    The diagnosis of pulmonary actinomycosis is difficult and less than 10% of cases are diagnosed at the initial presentation. Actinomycosis is always poly-microbial flora infection in human. On the other hand, Candida parapsilosis is an emerging fungal pathogen especially in immuno-compromised patients. Combined bacterial-fungal infection increases frequency and severity of the disease. This report is a case of a Candida parapsilosis co-infection in a 23-year-old male patient having pulmonary actinomycosis. This thereby could guide the clinicians towards an appropriate therapy.

  19. Fatty Acid Synthase Impacts the Pathobiology of Candida parapsilosis In Vitro and during Mammalian Infection

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Long Nam; Trofa, David; Nosanchuk, Joshua D.

    2009-01-01

    Cytosolic fungal fatty acid synthase is composed of two subunits α and β, which are encoded by Fas1 and Fas2 genes. In this study, the Fas2 genes of the human pathogen Candida parapsilosis were deleted using a modified SAT1 flipper technique. CpFas2 was essential in media lacking exogenous fatty acids and the growth of Fas2 disruptants (Fas2 KO) was regulated by the supplementation of different long chain fatty acids, such as myristic acid (14∶0), palmitic acid (16∶0), and Tween 80, in a dose-specific manner. Lipidomic analysis revealed that Fas2 KO cells were severely restricted in production of unsaturated fatty acids. The Fas2 KO strains were unable to form normal biofilms and were more efficiently killed by murine-like macrophages, J774.16, than the wild type, heterozygous and reconstituted strains. Furthermore, Fas2 KO yeast were significantly less virulent in a systemic murine infection model. The Fas2 KO cells were also hypersensitive to human serum, and inhibition of CpFas2 in WT C. parapsilosis by cerulenin significantly decreased fungal growth in human serum. This study demonstrates that CpFas2 is essential for C. parapsilosis growth in the absence of exogenous fatty acids, is involved in unsaturated fatty acid production, influences fungal virulence, and represents a promising antifungal drug target. PMID:20027295

  20. An ectophosphatase activity in Candida parapsilosis influences the interaction of fungi with epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kiffer-Moreira, Tina; de Sá Pinheiro, Ana Acácia; Alviano, Wagner S; Barbosa, Fabiane M; Souto-Padrón, Thais; Nimrichter, Leonardo; Rodrigues, Marcio L; Alviano, Celuta S; Meyer-Fernandes, José Roberto

    2007-06-01

    This study describes the biochemical characterization of a phosphatase activity present on the cell surface of Candida parapsilosis, a common cause of candidemia. Intact yeasts hydrolyzed p-nitrophenylphosphate to p-nitrophenol at a rate of 24.30+/-2.63 nmol p-nitrophenol h(-1) 10(-7) cells. The cell wall distribution of the Ca. parapsilosis enzyme was demonstrated by transmission electron microscopy. The duration of incubation of the yeast cells with the substrate and cell density influenced enzyme activity linearly. Values of V(max) and apparent K(m) for p-nitrophenylphosphate hydrolysis were 26.80+/-1.13 nmol p-nitrophenol h(-1) 10(-7) cells and 0.47+/-0.05 mM p-nitrophenylphosphate, respectively. The ectophosphatase activity was strongly inhibited at high pH as well as by classical inhibitors of acid phosphatases, such as sodium orthovanadate, sodium molybdate, sodium fluoride, and inorganic phosphate, the final product of the reaction. Only the inhibition caused by sodium orthovanadate was irreversible. Different phophorylated amino acids were used as substrates for the Ca. parapsilosis ectoenzyme, and the highest rate of phosphate hydrolysis was achieved using phosphotyrosine. A direct relationship between ectophosphatase activity and adhesion to host cells was established. In these assays, irreversible inhibition of enzyme activity resulted in decreased levels of yeast adhesion to epithelial cells.

  1. Dynamics of in vitro acquisition of resistance by Candida parapsilosis to different azoles.

    PubMed

    Pinto e Silva, Ana Teresa; Costa-de-Oliveira, Sofia; Silva-Dias, Ana; Pina-Vaz, Cidália; Rodrigues, Acácio Gonçalves

    2009-06-01

    Candida parapsilosis is a common isolate from clinical fungal infectious episodes. Resistance of C. parapsilosis to azoles has been increasingly reported. To analyse the development of resistance in C. parapsilosis, four azole-susceptible clinical strains and one American Type Culture Collection type strain were cultured in the presence of fluconazole, voriconazole and posaconazole at different concentrations. The isolates developed variable degrees of azole resistance according to the antifungal used. Fluconazole was the fastest inducer while posaconazole was the slowest. Fluconazole and voriconazole induced resistance to themselves and each other, but not to posaconazole. Posaconazole induced resistance to all azoles. Developed resistance was stable; it could be confirmed after 30 days of subculture in drug-free medium. Azole-resistant isolates revealed a homogeneous population structure; the role of azole transporter efflux pumps was minor after evaluation by microdilution and cytometric assays with efflux pump blockers (verapamil, ibuprofen and carbonyl cyanide 3-chloro-phenylhydrazone). We conclude that the rapid development of azole resistance occurs by a mechanism that might involve mutation of genes responsible for ergosterol biosynthesis pathway, stressed by exposure to antifungals.

  2. Innate immune cell response upon Candida albicans infection.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yulin; Zhang, Lulu; Xu, Zheng; Zhang, Jinyu; Jiang, Yuan-Ying; Cao, Yongbing; Yan, Tianhua

    2016-07-03

    Candida albicans is a polymorphic fungus which is the predominant cause of superficial and deep tissue fungal infections. This microorganism has developed efficient strategies to invade the host and evade host defense systems. However, the host immune system will be prepared for defense against the microbe by recognition of receptors, activation of signal transduction pathways and cooperation of immune cells. As a consequence, C. albicans could either be eliminated by immune cells rapidly or disseminate hematogenously, leading to life-threatening systemic infections. The interplay between Candida albicans and the host is complex, requiring recognition of the invaded pathogens, activation of intricate pathways and collaboration of various immune cells. In this review, we will focus on the effects of innate immunity that emphasize the first line protection of host defense against invaded C. albicans including the basis of receptor-mediated recognition and the mechanisms of cell-mediated immunity.

  3. Molecular mechanisms of fluconazole resistance in Candida parapsilosis isolates from a U.S. surveillance system.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Nina T; Pham, Cau D; Cleveland, Angela A; Lockhart, Shawn R

    2015-02-01

    Candida parapsilosis is the second or third most common cause of candidemia in many countries. The Infectious Diseases Society of America recommends fluconazole as the primary therapy for C. parapsilosis candidemia. Although the rate of fluconazole resistance among C. parapsilosis isolates is low in most U.S. institutions, the resistance rate can be as high as 7.5%. This study was designed to assess the mechanisms of fluconazole resistance in 706 incident bloodstream isolates from U.S. hospitals. We sequenced the ERG11 and MRR1 genes of 122 C. parapsilosis isolates with resistant (30 isolates; 4.2%), susceptible dose-dependent (37 isolates; 5.2%), and susceptible (55 isolates) fluconazole MIC values and used real-time PCR of RNA from 17 isolates to investigate the regulation of MDR1. By comparing these isolates to fully fluconazole-susceptible isolates, we detected at least two mechanisms of fluconazole resistance: an amino acid substitution in the 14-α-demethylase gene ERG11 and overexpression of the efflux pump MDR1, possibly due to point mutations in the MRR1 transcription factor that regulates MDR1. The ERG11 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was found in 57% of the fluconazole-resistant isolates and in no susceptible isolates. The MRR1 SNPs were more difficult to characterize, as not all resulted in overexpression of MDR1 and not all MDR1 overexpression was associated with an SNP in MRR1. Further work to characterize the MRR1 SNPs and search for overexpression of other efflux pumps is needed.

  4. The pathogen Candida albicans hijacks pyroptosis for escape from macrophages.

    PubMed

    Uwamahoro, Nathalie; Verma-Gaur, Jiyoti; Shen, Hsin-Hui; Qu, Yue; Lewis, Rowena; Lu, Jingxiong; Bambery, Keith; Masters, Seth L; Vince, James E; Naderer, Thomas; Traven, Ana

    2014-03-25

    The fungal pathogen Candida albicans causes macrophage death and escapes, but the molecular mechanisms remained unknown. Here we used live-cell imaging to monitor the interaction of C. albicans with macrophages and show that C. albicans kills macrophages in two temporally and mechanistically distinct phases. Early upon phagocytosis, C. albicans triggers pyroptosis, a proinflammatory macrophage death. Pyroptosis is controlled by the developmental yeast-to-hypha transition of Candida. When pyroptosis is inactivated, wild-type C. albicans hyphae cause significantly less macrophage killing for up to 8 h postphagocytosis. After the first 8 h, a second macrophage-killing phase is initiated. This second phase depends on robust hyphal formation but is mechanistically distinct from pyroptosis. The transcriptional regulator Mediator is necessary for morphogenesis of C. albicans in macrophages and the establishment of the wild-type surface architecture of hyphae that together mediate activation of macrophage cell death. Our data suggest that the defects of the Mediator mutants in causing macrophage death are caused, at least in part, by reduced activation of pyroptosis. A Mediator mutant that forms hyphae of apparently wild-type morphology but is defective in triggering early macrophage death shows a breakdown of cell surface architecture and reduced exposed 1,3 β-glucan in hyphae. Our report shows how Candida uses host and pathogen pathways for macrophage killing. The current model of mechanical piercing of macrophages by C. albicans hyphae should be revised to include activation of pyroptosis by hyphae as an important mechanism mediating macrophage cell death upon C. albicans infection. IMPORTANCE Upon phagocytosis by macrophages, Candida albicans can transition to the hyphal form, which causes macrophage death and enables fungal escape. The current model is that the highly polarized growth of hyphae results in macrophage piercing. This model is challenged by recent

  5. Sensitization of Candida albicans to terbinafine by berberine and berberrubine

    PubMed Central

    LAM, PIKLING; KOK, STANTON HON LUNG; LEE, KENNETH KA HO; LAM, KIM HUNG; HAU, DESMOND KWOK PO; WONG, WAI YEUNG; BIAN, ZHAOXIANG; GAMBARI, ROBERTO; CHUI, CHUNG HIN

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans (C. albicans) is an opportunistic fungal pathogen, particularly observed in immunocompromised patients. C. albicans accounts for 50–70% of cases of invasive candidiasis in the majority of clinical settings. Terbinafine, an allylamine antifungal drug, has been used to treat fungal infections previously. It has fungistatic activity against C. albicans. Traditional Chinese medicines can be used as complementary medicines to conventional drugs to treat a variety of ailments and diseases. Berberine is a quaternary alkaloid isolated from the traditional Chinese herb, Coptidis Rhizoma, while berberrubine is isolated from the medicinal plant Berberis vulgaris, but is also readily derived from berberine by pyrolysis. The present study demonstrates the possible complementary use of berberine and berberrubine with terbinafine against C. albicans. The experimental findings assume that the potential application of these alkaloids together with reduced dosage of the standard drug would enhance the resulting antifungal potency. PMID:27073630

  6. Evaluation of Bichro-Dubli Fumouze to distinguish Candida dubliniensis from Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Sahand, Ismail H; Moragues, María D; Robert, Raymond; Quindós, Guillermo; Pontón, José

    2006-06-01

    We have evaluated the ability of the Bichro-Dubli Fumouze (Fumouze Diagnostics, Levallois-Perret, France) latex agglutination test to identify colonies of Candida dubliniensis grown on different media. The test was positive for 103 of 106 isolates of C. dubliniensis and negative for Candida albicans and other Candida species studied. The sensitivity and specificity of the test were 97.1% and 100%, respectively. The test is very rapid, simple, and reliable giving the same results independently of whether the colonies are grown previously on Sabouraud dextrose agar, CHROMagar Candida medium, Candida ID2 medium, or CHROMagar-Pal's medium.

  7. Ultrastructural and biochemical studies of two dynamically expressed cell surface determinants on Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Brawner, D L; Cutler, J E

    1986-01-01

    Variability in the expression of two different cell surface carbohydrate determinants was examined with two agglutinating immunoglobulin M monoclonal antibodies (H9 and C6) and immunoelectron microscopy during growth of three strains of Candida albicans. A single strain of Candida parapsilosis did not express either antigen at any time during growth. Antigens were detected on the surface of C. albicans by agglutination tests with either H9 or C6 over a 48-h growth period. The difference in specificities of the monoclonal antibodies was demonstrated by Ouchterlony double-diffusion tests with solubilized antigens and by variabilities in the reactivity of the agglutinins among yeast strains. The antigenic determinants were isolated by specific immunoprecipitation and protease digestion and characterized by methods including high-pressure liquid chromatography, gas-liquid chromatography, and mass spectroscopy with both chemical and electron ionization. These determinants both contain mannose and glucose. In the case of antigen H9, an additional carbohydrate was detected with gas chromatography and mass spectroscopy. The location of antigens on individual cells was determined by indirect labeling of the determinants, first reacting cells with H9 or C6 followed by goat anti-mouse antibody conjugated with 20-nm colloidal gold particles. Transmission electron microscopy was used to examine cells. The antigens that were reactive with the monoclonal antibodies were associated with a flocculent surface layer. Expression of this layer and expression of the antigens is a dynamic process which is growth phase and strain dependent. The antigens were not expressed on very young cells and disappeared from the cell surface of most C. albicans strains with age. The use of monoclonal antibody to cell surface determinants may allow characterization of cell surface antigens of C. albicans and be helpful in establishing receptors which mediate adherence. Images PMID:3510174

  8. Interspecies Interactions between Clostridium difficile and Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    van Leeuwen, Pim T.; van der Peet, Jasper M.; Bikker, Floris J.; Hoogenkamp, Michel A.; Oliveira Paiva, Ana M.; Kostidis, Sarantos; Mayboroda, Oleg A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The facultative anaerobic polymorphic fungus Candida albicans and the strictly anaerobic Gram-positive bacterium Clostridium difficile are two opportunistic pathogens residing in the human gut. While a few studies have focused on the prevalence of C. albicans in C. difficile-infected patients, the nature of the interactions between these two microbes has not been studied thus far. In the current study, both chemical and physical interactions between C. albicans and C. difficile were investigated. In the presence of C. albicans, C. difficile was able to grow under aerobic, normally toxic, conditions. This phenomenon was neither linked to adherence of bacteria to hyphae nor to biofilm formation by C. albicans. Conditioned medium of C. difficile inhibited hyphal growth of C. albicans, which is an important virulence factor of the fungus. In addition, it induced hypha-to-yeast conversion. p-Cresol, a fermentation product of tyrosine produced by C. difficile, also induced morphological effects and was identified as an active component of the conditioned medium. This study shows that in the presence of C. albicans, C. difficile can persist and grow under aerobic conditions. Furthermore, p-cresol, produced by C. difficile, is involved in inhibiting hypha formation of C. albicans, directly affecting the biofilm formation and virulence of C. albicans. This study is the first detailed characterization of the interactions between these two gut pathogens. IMPORTANCE Candida albicans and Clostridium difficile are two opportunistic pathogens that reside in the human gut. A few studies have focused on the prevalence of C. albicans in C. difficile-infected patients, but none have shown the interaction(s) that these two organisms may or may not have with each other. In this study, we used a wide range of different techniques to better understand this interaction at a macroscopic and microscopic level. We found that in the presence of C. albicans, C

  9. The Pathogen Candida albicans Hijacks Pyroptosis for Escape from Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Uwamahoro, Nathalie; Verma-Gaur, Jiyoti; Shen, Hsin-Hui; Qu, Yue; Lewis, Rowena; Lu, Jingxiong; Bambery, Keith; Masters, Seth L.; Vince, James E.; Naderer, Thomas; Traven, Ana

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The fungal pathogen Candida albicans causes macrophage death and escapes, but the molecular mechanisms remained unknown. Here we used live-cell imaging to monitor the interaction of C. albicans with macrophages and show that C. albicans kills macrophages in two temporally and mechanistically distinct phases. Early upon phagocytosis, C. albicans triggers pyroptosis, a proinflammatory macrophage death. Pyroptosis is controlled by the developmental yeast-to-hypha transition of Candida. When pyroptosis is inactivated, wild-type C. albicans hyphae cause significantly less macrophage killing for up to 8 h postphagocytosis. After the first 8 h, a second macrophage-killing phase is initiated. This second phase depends on robust hyphal formation but is mechanistically distinct from pyroptosis. The transcriptional regulator Mediator is necessary for morphogenesis of C. albicans in macrophages and the establishment of the wild-type surface architecture of hyphae that together mediate activation of macrophage cell death. Our data suggest that the defects of the Mediator mutants in causing macrophage death are caused, at least in part, by reduced activation of pyroptosis. A Mediator mutant that forms hyphae of apparently wild-type morphology but is defective in triggering early macrophage death shows a breakdown of cell surface architecture and reduced exposed 1,3 β-glucan in hyphae. Our report shows how Candida uses host and pathogen pathways for macrophage killing. The current model of mechanical piercing of macrophages by C. albicans hyphae should be revised to include activation of pyroptosis by hyphae as an important mechanism mediating macrophage cell death upon C. albicans infection. PMID:24667705

  10. Candida glabrata Binding to Candida albicans Hyphae Enables Its Development in Oropharyngeal Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Tati, Swetha; Davidow, Peter; McCall, Andrew; Hwang-Wong, Elizabeth; Rojas, Isolde G.; Cormack, Brendan; Edgerton, Mira

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic mechanisms of Candida glabrata in oral candidiasis, especially because of its inability to form hyphae, are understudied. Since both Candida albicans and C. glabrata are frequently co-isolated in oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC), we examined their co-adhesion in vitro and observed adhesion of C. glabrata only to C. albicans hyphae microscopically. Mice were infected sublingually with C. albicans or C. glabrata individually, or with both species concurrently, to study their ability to cause OPC. Infection with C. glabrata alone resulted in negligible infection of tongues; however, colonization by C. glabrata was increased by co-infection or a pre-established infection with C. albicans. Furthermore, C. glabrata required C. albicans for colonization of tongues, since decreasing C. albicans burden with fluconazole also reduced C. glabrata. C. albicans hyphal wall adhesins Als1 and Als3 were important for in vitro adhesion of C. glabrata and to establish OPC. C. glabrata cell wall protein coding genes EPA8, EPA19, AWP2, AWP7, and CAGL0F00181 were implicated in mediating adhesion to C. albicans hyphae and remarkably, their expression was induced by incubation with germinated C. albicans. Thus, we found a near essential requirement for the presence of C. albicans for both initial colonization and establishment of OPC infection by C. glabrata. PMID:27029023

  11. Candida glabrata Binding to Candida albicans Hyphae Enables Its Development in Oropharyngeal Candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Tati, Swetha; Davidow, Peter; McCall, Andrew; Hwang-Wong, Elizabeth; Rojas, Isolde G; Cormack, Brendan; Edgerton, Mira

    2016-03-01

    Pathogenic mechanisms of Candida glabrata in oral candidiasis, especially because of its inability to form hyphae, are understudied. Since both Candida albicans and C. glabrata are frequently co-isolated in oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC), we examined their co-adhesion in vitro and observed adhesion of C. glabrata only to C. albicans hyphae microscopically. Mice were infected sublingually with C. albicans or C. glabrata individually, or with both species concurrently, to study their ability to cause OPC. Infection with C. glabrata alone resulted in negligible infection of tongues; however, colonization by C. glabrata was increased by co-infection or a pre-established infection with C. albicans. Furthermore, C. glabrata required C. albicans for colonization of tongues, since decreasing C. albicans burden with fluconazole also reduced C. glabrata. C. albicans hyphal wall adhesins Als1 and Als3 were important for in vitro adhesion of C. glabrata and to establish OPC. C. glabrata cell wall protein coding genes EPA8, EPA19, AWP2, AWP7, and CAGL0F00181 were implicated in mediating adhesion to C. albicans hyphae and remarkably, their expression was induced by incubation with germinated C. albicans. Thus, we found a near essential requirement for the presence of C. albicans for both initial colonization and establishment of OPC infection by C. glabrata.

  12. [Suppression of activity of Candida albicans proteinases by cobalt chloride].

    PubMed

    Kutyreva, M P; Mukhametzianova, A R; Ulakhovich, N A

    2012-01-01

    Influence of cobalt (II) chloride on the system of Candida albicans proteinase (SAP C. alb.) (both in solution and immobilized on a surface of nitrocellulose membranes) has been investigated. In solution cobalt chloride inactivated inducible but not constitute enzyme. In the heterogenous sytem proteolitical effect of the cobalt ion on inductible proteinase was also observed.

  13. Evaluation of Candida Colonization and Specific Humoral Responses against Candida albicans in Patients with Atopic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Javad, Ghaffari; Taheri Sarvtin, Mehdi; Hedayati, Mohammad Taghi; Hajheydari, Zohreh; Yazdani, Jamshid; Shokohi, Tahereh

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the candidal colonization and specific humoral responses against Candida albicans in patients with atopic dermatitis. One hundred patients with atopic dermatitis and 50 healthy individuals were enrolled in the study. Skin and oral specimens from all participants were cultured on CHROMagar Candida medium. Isolated yeasts were identified by using the sequence of the D1/D2 domain of the 26S rRNA gene. ELISA was used for detection of IgM, IgA, and IgG antibodies against C. albicans in sera of participants. Candida species were isolated from the skin and oral cavity of 31% of the patients and 12% of the controls. There was no significant difference between Candida colonization in patients and controls (P>0.05). Candida albicans was isolated from the skin and oral cavity of 23% of the patients and 6% of the controls (P< 0.05). There were no significant differences between serum levels of IgM and IgA in patients and controls (P>0.05). Serum level of IgG was significantly lower in patients than in controls (P<0.05). Type of Candida colonization can change in patients with atopic dermatitis. In addition, these patients have abnormalities in the production of antibodies against Candida albicans that may have a role in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis. PMID:25945349

  14. Two unlike cousins: Candida albicans and C. glabrata infection strategies

    PubMed Central

    Brunke, Sascha; Hube, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    Candida albicans and C. glabrata are the two most common pathogenic yeasts of humans, yet they are phylogenetically, genetically and phenotypically very different. In this review, we compare and contrast the strategies of C. albicans and C. glabrata to attach to and invade into the host, obtain nutrients and evade the host immune response. Although their strategies share some basic concepts, they differ greatly in their outcome. While C. albicans follows an aggressive strategy to subvert the host response and to obtain nutrients for its survival, C. glabrata seems to have evolved a strategy which is based on stealth, evasion and persistence, without causing severe damage in murine models. However, both fungi are successful as commensals and as pathogens of humans. Understanding these strategies will help in finding novel ways to fight Candida, and fungal infections in general. PMID:23253282

  15. Mechanisms involved in the inhibition of glycolysis by cyanide and antimycin A in Candida albicans and its reversal by hydrogen peroxide. A common feature in Candida species.

    PubMed

    Peña, Antonio; Sánchez, Norma Silvia; González-López, Omar; Calahorra, Martha

    2015-12-01

    In Candida albicans, cyanide and antimycin A inhibited K(+) transport, not only with ethanol-O2 as the substrate, but also with glucose. The reason for this was that they inhibited not only respiration, but also fermentation, decreasing ATP production. Measurements of oxygen levels in cell suspensions allowed identification of the electron pathways involved. NADH fluorescence levels increased in the presence of the inhibitors, indirectly indicating lower levels of NAD(+) and so pointing to glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase as the limiting step responsible for the inhibition of glycolysis, which was confirmed by the levels of glycolytic intermediaries. The cyanide effect could be reversed by hydrogen peroxide, mainly due to an activity by which H2O2 can be reduced by electrons flowing from NADH through a pathway that can be inhibited by antimycin A, and appears to be a cytochrome c peroxidase. Therefore, the inhibition of glycolysis by the respiratory inhibitors seems to be due to the decreased availability of NAD(+), resulting in a decreased activity of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. Compartmentalization of pyridine nucleotides in favor of the mitochondria can contribute to explaining the low fermentation capacity of C. albicans. Similar results were obtained with three C. albicans strains, Candida dubliniensis and, to a lower degree, Candida parapsilosis.

  16. Gymnemic Acids Inhibit Hyphal Growth and Virulence in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Vediyappan, Govindsamy; Dumontet, Vincent; Pelissier, Franck; d’Enfert, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic and polymorphic fungal pathogen that causes mucosal, disseminated and invasive infections in humans. Transition from the yeast form to the hyphal form is one of the key virulence factors in C. albicans contributing to macrophage evasion, tissue invasion and biofilm formation. Nontoxic small molecules that inhibit C. albicans yeast-to-hypha conversion and hyphal growth could represent a valuable source for understanding pathogenic fungal morphogenesis, identifying drug targets and serving as templates for the development of novel antifungal agents. Here, we have identified the triterpenoid saponin family of gymnemic acids (GAs) as inhibitor of C. albicans morphogenesis. GAs were isolated and purified from Gymnema sylvestre leaves, the Ayurvedic traditional medicinal plant used to treat diabetes. Purified GAs had no effect on the growth and viability of C. albicans yeast cells but inhibited its yeast-to-hypha conversion under several hypha-inducing conditions, including the presence of serum. Moreover, GAs promoted the conversion of C. albicans hyphae into yeast cells under hypha inducing conditions. They also inhibited conidial germination and hyphal growth of Aspergillus sp. Finally, GAs inhibited the formation of invasive hyphae from C. albicans-infected Caenorhabditis elegans worms and rescued them from killing by C. albicans. Hence, GAs could be useful for various antifungal applications due to their traditional use in herbal medicine. PMID:24040201

  17. Gymnemic acids inhibit hyphal growth and virulence in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Vediyappan, Govindsamy; Dumontet, Vincent; Pelissier, Franck; d'Enfert, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic and polymorphic fungal pathogen that causes mucosal, disseminated and invasive infections in humans. Transition from the yeast form to the hyphal form is one of the key virulence factors in C. albicans contributing to macrophage evasion, tissue invasion and biofilm formation. Nontoxic small molecules that inhibit C. albicans yeast-to-hypha conversion and hyphal growth could represent a valuable source for understanding pathogenic fungal morphogenesis, identifying drug targets and serving as templates for the development of novel antifungal agents. Here, we have identified the triterpenoid saponin family of gymnemic acids (GAs) as inhibitor of C. albicans morphogenesis. GAs were isolated and purified from Gymnema sylvestre leaves, the Ayurvedic traditional medicinal plant used to treat diabetes. Purified GAs had no effect on the growth and viability of C. albicans yeast cells but inhibited its yeast-to-hypha conversion under several hypha-inducing conditions, including the presence of serum. Moreover, GAs promoted the conversion of C. albicans hyphae into yeast cells under hypha inducing conditions. They also inhibited conidial germination and hyphal growth of Aspergillus sp. Finally, GAs inhibited the formation of invasive hyphae from C. albicans-infected Caenorhabditis elegans worms and rescued them from killing by C. albicans. Hence, GAs could be useful for various antifungal applications due to their traditional use in herbal medicine.

  18. Pathogenicity and virulence of Candida dubliniensis: comparison with C. albicans.

    PubMed

    Vilela, M M S; Kamei, K; Sano, A; Tanaka, R; Uno, J; Takahashi, I; Ito, J; Yarita, K; Miyaji, M

    2002-06-01

    Candida dubliniensis is a newly described fungus that is frequently isolated from the oral cavities of HIV-positive patients. Although extensive studies have been performed on the phylogeny of C. dubliniensis, little is known about the pathogenic ecology of this yeast. Here we examined aspects related to C. dubliniensis in comparison with those of C. albicans. When injected intravenously into mice, C. dubliniensis had a higher survival rate than C. albicans. Histopathological analysis disclosed that C. dubliniensis remained mostly in the yeast form in the infected organs, whereas C. albicans changed into the mycelial form. The host inflammatory reaction was aggressive with C. dubliniensis infection and mild with C. albicans infection. Co-culture of the yeasts with human polymorphonuclear leukocytes disclosed that C. dubliniensis is more vulnerable to the fungicidal activity of leukocytes than C. albicans. C. dubliniensis was also more susceptible to the toxic effect of hydrogen peroxide. When cultured in vitro, C. dubliniensis grew more slowly than C. albicans, but the formation of germ tubes was faster. When the fungi were cultured in RPMI 1640, a fetal bovine serum supplement suppressed the growth of C. dubliniensis but enhanced that of C. albicans. These results clearly indicated that C. dubliniensis is less virulence than C. albicans.

  19. Host response to Candida albicans bloodstream infection and sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Duggan, Seána; Leonhardt, Ines; Hünniger, Kerstin; Kurzai, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is a major cause of bloodstream infection which may present as sepsis and septic shock - major causes of morbidity and mortality world-wide. After invasion of the pathogen, innate mechanisms govern the early response. Here, we outline the models used to study these mechanisms and summarize our current understanding of innate immune responses during Candida bloodstream infection. This includes protective immunity as well as harmful responses resulting in Candida induced sepsis. Neutrophilic granulocytes are considered principal effector cells conferring protection and recognize C. albicans mainly via complement receptor 3. They possess a range of effector mechanisms, contributing to elimination of the pathogen. Neutrophil activation is closely linked to complement and modulated by activated mononuclear cells. A thorough understanding of these mechanisms will help in creating an individualized approach to patients suffering from systemic candidiasis and aid in optimizing clinical management. PMID:25785541

  20. Terconazole cream for non-Candida albicans fungal vaginitis: results of a retrospective analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Sood, G; Nyirjesy, P; Weitz, M V; Chatwani, A

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Although it is FDA-approved for use in vulvovaginal candidiasis caused by non-Candida albicans species, terconazole cream has not been been studied in patients with these infections. We sought to assess the clinical and mycological efficacy of terconazole cream in women with non-C. albicans vaginitis. METHODS: The records of patients who had received a 7-day course of terconazole cream for culture-proved non-C. albicans vaginitis were reviewed. Data with regard to patient demographics, clinical and mycologic response to therapy within 1 month of treatment, and outcome with other antifungal therapies were analyzed. RESULTS: Twenty-eight patients received terconazole cream for non-C. albicans infections. Three patients did not return for follow-up. The median age was 45 years. Seven (28%) patients were nulliparous. The median duration of symptoms was 3 years. Nine patients (36%) had received terconazole within the 6 months prior to referral. Overall, there were 20 C. glabrata cases, 3 C. parapsilosis, and 2 C. lusitaniae. Fourteen (56%) patients achieved a mycologic cure; 11 (44%) noted a resolution of their symptoms. Prior terconazole use was not associated with treatment failure (P = 0.09). Ten failures received boric acid suppositories as subsequent treatment; a cure was effected in 4 (40%). Two of three patients (67%) were eventually cured with flucytosine cream. Five (20 %) patients remained uncured. CONCLUSIONS: Terconazole cream may be an appropriate first-line treatment for non C. albicans vaginitis, even in patients who have previously received the drug. PMID:11220485

  1. Baicalin prevents Candida albicans infections via increasing its apoptosis rate

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Shulong; Fu, Yingyuan Wu, Xiuzhen; Zhou, Zhixing; Xu, Jing; Zeng, Xiaoping; Kuang, Nanzhen; Zeng, Yurong

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • Baicalin increases the ratio of the G0/G1 stages and C. albicans apoptosis. • Baicalin decreases the proliferation index of C. albicans. • Baicalin inhibits the biosynthesis of DNA, RNA and protein in C. albicans. • Baicalin depresses Succinate Dehydrogenase and Ca{sup 2+}–Mg{sup 2+} ATPase in C. albicans. • Baicalin increases the endocytic free Ca{sup 2+} concentration in C. albicans. - Abstract: Background: These experiments were employed to explore the mechanisms underlying baicalin action on Candida albicans. Methodology and principal findings: We detected the baicalin inhibition effects on three isotope-labeled precursors of {sup 3}H-UdR, {sup 3}H-TdR and {sup 3}H-leucine incorporation into C. albicans using the isotope incorporation technology. The activities of Succinate Dehydrogenase (SDH), cytochrome oxidase (CCO) and Ca{sup 2+}–Mg{sup 2+} ATPase, cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} concentration, the cell cycle and apoptosis, as well as the ultrastructure of C.albicans were also tested. We found that baicalin inhibited {sup 3}H-UdR, {sup 3}H-TdR and {sup 3}H-leucine incorporation into C.albicans (P < 0.005). The activities of the SDH and Ca{sup 2+}–Mg{sup 2+} ATPase of C.albicans in baicalin groups were lower than those in control group (P < 0.05). Ca{sup 2+} concentrations of C. albicans in baicalin groups were much higher than those in control group (P < 0.05). The ratio of C.albicans at the G0/G1 stage increased in baicalin groups in dose dependent manner (P < 0.01). There were a significant differences in the apoptosis rate of C.albicans between baicalin and control groups (P < 0.01). After 12–48 h incubation with baicalin (1 mg/ml), C. albicans shown to be markedly damaged under transmission electron micrographs. Innovation and significance: Baicalin can increase the apoptosis rate of C. albicans. These effects of Baicalin may involved in its inhibiting the activities of the SDH and Ca{sup 2+}–Mg{sup 2+} ATPase, increasing

  2. Effect of caspofungin and micafungin in combination with farnesol against Candida parapsilosis biofilms.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Renátó; Bozó, Aliz; Gesztelyi, Rudolf; Domán, Marianna; Kardos, Gábor; Nagy, Fruzsina; Tóth, Zoltán; Majoros, László

    2016-04-01

    The in vitro activities of caspofungin and micafungin were determined with and without farnesol against Candida parapsilosis biofilms. Drug interactions were examined using the XTT colorimetric assay-based broth microdilution chequerboard method. Drug-drug interactions were assessed utilising the FICI, Bliss independence models and time-kill experiments. Median sessile MICs of five C. parapsilosis clinical isolates ranged between 32-256 mg/L, 16-512 mg/L and >300 μM for caspofungin, micafungin and farnesol, respectively. Median MICs for caspofungin and micafungin in combination with farnesol showed 8-64- and 4-64-fold decreases, respectively. Paradoxical growth noticed with both echinocandins was eliminated by farnesol. Based on FICIs for sessile clinical isolates, synergism was observed for caspofungin (range of median FICIs, 0.155-0.5) and micafungin (range of median FICIs, 0.093-0.5). Concordantly, MacSynergy analysis and global fitting of non-linear regression based on a Bliss independence models also showed synergism for caspofungin and micafungin. In line with FICI findings and the Bliss independence model, synergistic interactions were confirmed by time-kill experiments. The metabolic activity of fungal cells was significantly inhibited by caspofungin+farnesol at all three tested combinations (4 mg/L+75 μM, 8 mg/L+75 μM and 16 mg/L+75 μM) between 3 and 24 h compared with the control (P<0.05-0.001). Significant inhibition was observed for micafungin+farnesol between 3 and 12h (P<0.001) but not at 24 h. Despite the favourable effect of farnesol in combination with echinocandins, further in vivo studies are needed to confirm its therapeutic advantage in catheter-associated infections caused by C. parapsilosis.

  3. Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization with Peptide Nucleic Acid Probes for Rapid Identification of Candida albicans Directly from Blood Culture Bottles

    PubMed Central

    Rigby, Susan; Procop, Gary W.; Haase, Gerhard; Wilson, Deborah; Hall, Geraldine; Kurtzman, Cletus; Oliveira, Kenneth; Von Oy, Sabina; Hyldig-Nielsen, Jens J.; Coull, James; Stender, Henrik

    2002-01-01

    A new fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) method that uses peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes for identification of Candida albicans directly from positive-blood-culture bottles in which yeast was observed by Gram staining (herein referred to as yeast-positive blood culture bottles) is described. The test (the C. albicans PNA FISH method) is based on a fluorescein-labeled PNA probe that targets C. albicans 26S rRNA. The PNA probe is added to smears made directly from the contents of the blood culture bottle and hybridized for 90 min at 55°C. Unhybridized PNA probe is removed by washing of the mixture (30 min), and the smears are examined by fluorescence microscopy. The specificity of the method was confirmed with 23 reference strains representing phylogenetically related yeast species and 148 clinical isolates covering the clinically most significant yeast species, including C. albicans (n = 72), C. dubliniensis (n = 58), C. glabrata (n = 5), C. krusei (n = 2), C. parapsilosis (n = 4), and C. tropicalis (n = 3). The performance of the C. albicans PNA FISH method as a diagnostic test was evaluated with 33 routine and 25 simulated yeast-positive blood culture bottles and showed 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity. It is concluded that this 2.5-h method for the definitive identification of C. albicans directly from yeast-positive blood culture bottles provides important information for optimal antifungal therapy and patient management. PMID:12037084

  4. Non-Candida albicans Candida mediastinitis of odontogenic origin in a diabetic patient.

    PubMed

    Kofteridis, Diamantis P; Mantadakis, Elpis; Karatzanis, Alexander D; Bourolias, Constantinos A; Papazoglou, Georgios; Velegrakis, George A; Samonis, George

    2008-06-01

    Descending mediastinitis occurs as a complication of oropharyngeal or cervical infections and its delayed diagnosis and treatment are associated with high mortality. A rare case of an odontogenic infection in a diabetic patient, complicated by Candida parapsilosis and Candida krusei parapharyngeal space infection, descending mediastinitis and aspiration pneumonia is described. Isolate identification was based on colonial and microscopic morphological characteristics and carbohydrate assimilation test results. The patient was successfully treated with surgical drainage and debridement, broad spectrum antibacterials and liposomal amphotericin B followed by prolonged oral voriconazole therapy.

  5. Short peptides allowing preferential detection of Candida albicans hyphae.

    PubMed

    Kaba, Hani E J; Pölderl, Antonia; Bilitewski, Ursula

    2015-09-01

    Whereas the detection of pathogens via recognition of surface structures by specific antibodies and various types of antibody mimics is frequently described, the applicability of short linear peptides as sensor molecules or diagnostic tools is less well-known. We selected peptides which were previously reported to bind to recombinant S. cerevisiae cells, expressing members of the C. albicans Agglutinin-Like-Sequence (ALS) cell wall protein family. We slightly modified amino acid sequences to evaluate peptide sequence properties influencing binding to C. albicans cells. Among the selected peptides, decamer peptides with an "AP"-N-terminus were superior to shorter peptides. The new decamer peptide FBP4 stained viable C. albicans cells more efficiently in their mature hyphal form than in their yeast form. Moreover, it allowed distinction of C. albicans from other related Candida spp. and could thus be the basis for the development of a useful tool for the diagnosis of invasive candidiasis.

  6. Murine model of concurrent oral and vaginal Candida albicans colonisation.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Durdana; Mistry, Mukesh; Thavaraj, Selvam; Naglik, Julian R; Challacombe, Stephen J

    2012-01-01

    Investigations into the complex interaction between the fungal pathogen Candida albicans and its human host require the use of animals as in vivo models. A major advance is the creation of a low-oestrogen murine model of concurrent oral and vaginal C. albicans colonisation that resembles human candidal carriage at both mucosal sites. Weekly intramuscular (5 μg) and subcutaneous (5 μg) oestrogen administration was determined as optimal, enhancing oral colonisation but essential for vaginal colonisation. Using a clinical C. albicans oral isolate, persistent colonisation for up to 6 weeks can be achieved at both sites in two strains of mice (BALB/c and C57BL/6). This concurrent model of mucosal colonisation reduces the numbers of experimental mice by half, and opens up new avenues of research in assessing potential mucosal vaccine candidates and in studying delicate host-pathogen interactions during the most natural state of C. albicans epithelial colonisation.

  7. Inhibition of Candida albicans virulence factors by novel levofloxacin derivatives.

    PubMed

    Shafreen, Raja Mohamed Beema; Raja Mohamed, Beema Shafreen; Muthamil, Subramanian; Subramanian, Muthamil; Pandian, Shunmugiah Karutha; Shunmugiah, Karutha Pandian

    2014-08-01

    Candida albicans is an important opportunistic fungal pathogen, responsible for biofilm associated infections in immunocompromised patients. The aim of the present study was to investigate the antibiofilm properties of novel levofloxacin derivatives on C. albicans biofilms. The levofloxacin derivatives at their Biofilm Inhibitory Concentrations (BIC) were able to inhibit the biofilms of C. albicans, the yeast-to-hyphal transition and were also able to disrupt their mature biofilms. Furthermore, Real-time PCR analysis showed that the expression of ergosterol biosynthesis pathway gene (ERG11) and the efflux pump-encoding genes (CDR1 and MDR1) was decreased upon treatment with the levofloxacin derivatives. The total ergosterol content quantified using UV spectrophotomer showed decrease in ergosterol in the presence of levofloxacin derivatives. Overall, levofloxacin derivatives (6a, 6c and 7d) are capable of inhibiting C. albicans virulence factors. Therefore, these compounds with potential therapeutic implications can be used as new strategy to treat biofilm-related candidal infections.

  8. Co-isolation of Trichosporon inkin and Candida parapsilosis from a scalp white piedra case.

    PubMed

    Taj-Aldeen, Saad J; Al-Ansari, Hamda I; Boekhout, Teun; Theelen, Bart

    2004-02-01

    White piedra is a rare fungal infection of the hair shaft characterized by small, firm, irregular white-brown nodules. The infection is caused by basidiomycetous yeasts in the genus Trichosporon. We report a case of a 28-year-old female patient who acquired the infection in Qatar. In this case, the scalp was the only site affected, but infection at that site was extensive. The hair had a Saccharomyces-like yeast odor and appeared to be beaded, with light-brown nodules of varying sizes up to 2 mm long. Trichosporon sp. accompanied by Candida parapsilosis grew out along hair shafts planted in primary isolation media. Molecular identification of the Trichosporon carried out by analyzing the 26S ribosomal gene gave a 100% match with Trichosporon inkin, a major cause of pubic white piedra. The patient was treated with daily applications of ketoconazole shampoo followed by econazole shampoo and cream, and was considered clinically and mycologically cured after 2 months. Novel findings in the present case are the first identification of T. inkin as an agent of scalp white piedra, and the heavy outgrowth of C. parapsilosis from the concretions, although in the latter case it is not clear if the co-occurring yeast was etiologically contributory to the pathogenesis of the white piedra.

  9. Rat Indwelling Urinary Catheter Model of Candida albicans Biofilm Infection

    PubMed Central

    Nett, Jeniel E.; Brooks, Erin G.; Cabezas-Olcoz, Jonathan; Sanchez, Hiram; Zarnowski, Robert; Marchillo, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Indwelling urinary catheters are commonly used in the management of hospitalized patients. Candida can adhere to the device surface and propagate as a biofilm. These Candida biofilm communities differ from free-floating Candida, exhibiting high tolerance to antifungal therapy. The significance of catheter-associated candiduria is often unclear, and treatment may be problematic considering the biofilm drug-resistant phenotype. Here we describe a rodent model for the study of urinary catheter-associated Candida albicans biofilm infection that mimics this common process in patients. In the setting of a functioning, indwelling urinary catheter in a rat, Candida proliferated as a biofilm on the device surface. Characteristic biofilm architecture was observed, including adherent, filamentous cells embedded in an extracellular matrix. Similar to what occurs in human patients, animals with this infection developed candiduria and pyuria. Infection progressed to cystitis, and a biofilmlike covering was observed over the bladder surface. Furthermore, large numbers of C. albicans cells were dispersed into the urine from either the catheter or bladder wall biofilm over the infection period. We successfully utilized the model to test the efficacy of antifungals, analyze transcriptional patterns, and examine the phenotype of a genetic mutant. The model should be useful for future investigations involving the pathogenesis, diagnosis, therapy, prevention, and drug resistance of Candida biofilms in the urinary tract. PMID:25183731

  10. Defining pheromone-receptor signaling in Candida albicans and related asexual Candida species.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ching-Hsuan; Choi, Anthony; Bennett, Richard J

    2011-12-01

    Candida albicans is an important human fungal pathogen in which sexual reproduction is under the control of the novel white-opaque switch. Opaque cells are the mating-competent form, whereas white cells do not mate but can still respond to pheromones, resulting in biofilm formation. In this study, we first define the domains of the α-pheromone receptor Ste2 that are necessary for signaling in both white and opaque forms. Both cell states require the IC loop 3 (IC3) and the C-terminal tail of Ste2 for the cellular response, whereas the first IC loop (IC1) of Ste2 is dispensable for signaling. To also address pheromone-receptor interactions in related species, including apparently asexual Candida species, Ste2 orthologues were heterologously expressed in Candida albicans. Ste2 receptors from multiple Candida clade species were functional when expressed in C. albicans, whereas the Ste2 receptor of Candida lusitaniae was nonfunctional. Significantly, however, expression of a chimeric C. lusitaniae Ste2 receptor containing the C-terminal tail of Ste2 from C. albicans generated a productive response to C. lusitaniae pheromone. This system has allowed us to characterize pheromones from multiple Candida species and indicates that functional pheromone-receptor couples exist in fungal species that have yet to be shown to undergo sexual mating.

  11. Photoinactivation of single and mixed biofilms of Candida albicans and non-albicans Candida species using Phorodithazine(®).

    PubMed

    Carmello, Juliana Cabrini; Alves, Fernanda; Mima, Ewerton Garcia de Oliveira; Jorge, Janaina Habib; Bagnato, Vanderlei Salvador; Pavarina, Ana Cláudia

    2017-03-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) mediated by Photodithazine(®) (PDZ) formulated in hydrogel, in the inactivation of mono and duo-species biofilms of Candida albicans, Candida glabrata and Candida tropicalis. Standardized suspensions of each strain were prepared and after biofilm formation, mono-species were treated with 150 and 175mg/L of PDZ for 20min (pre-irradiation time), and exposed to LED light at a dose of 37.5J/cm(2) (660nm). The duo-species biofilms (C. albicans+C. glabrata and C. albicans+C. tropicalis) were treated with 150mg/L of PDZ and light. Additional samples were treated with PDZ or light only, and the control did not receive any treatment. Next, microbiological evaluation was performed by spreading the cells on Sabouraud Dextrose Agar and CHROMagar Candida for colony forming units (CFU/mL). Moreover, the total biomass of biofilm was verified using the crystal violet staining assay (CV). The data were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey post-hoc (α=0.05). The use of PDZ 150mg/L promoted a reduction of 1.0, 1.2, 1.5 log10 in the viability of C. glabrata, C. albicans and C. tropicalis, respectively. The same concentration reduced in 1.0 log10 the viability of each species grown as duo-species biofilms. The crystal violet assay showed that the use of 150mg/L reduced 24.4%, 39.2% and 43.7% of the total biomass of C. albicans, C. tropicalis and C. glabrata, respectively. aPDT did not reduce the total biomass to the duo-species biofilms. Thus, PDZ-mediated aPDT was more effective in the inactivation of mono-species biofilms of Candida spp. compared with duo-species biofilm.

  12. Olecranon Bursitis Caused by Candida parapsilosis in a Patient with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Rios, Grissel

    2016-01-01

    Septic bursitis is usually caused by bacterial organisms. However, infectious bursitis caused by fungi is very rare. Herein, we present a 68-year-old woman with long-standing rheumatoid arthritis who developed pain, erythema, and swelling of the right olecranon bursa. Aspiration of the olecranon bursa showed a white blood cell count of 3.1 × 103/μL (41% neutrophils, 30% lymphocytes, and 29% monocytes). Fluid culture was positive for Candida parapsilosis. She was treated with caspofungin 50 mg intravenously daily for 13 days followed by fluconazole 200 mg orally daily for one week. She responded well to this treatment but had recurrent swelling of the bursa. Bursectomy was recommended but she declined this option. This case, together with other reports, suggests that the awareness of uncommon pathogens, their presentation, and predisposing risk factors are important to establish an early diagnosis and prevent long-term complications. PMID:27595032

  13. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of (R)-carbonyl reductase from Candida parapsilosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shanshan; Nie, Yao; Yan, Xu; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Huang, Chun-Hsiang; Chan, Hsiu-Chien; Guo, Rey-Ting; Xiao, Rong

    2014-01-01

    The NADH-dependent (R)-carbonyl reductase from Candida parapsilosis (RCR) catalyzes the asymmetric reduction of 2-hydroxyacetophenone (HAP) to produce (R)-1-phenyl-1,2-ethanediol [(R)-PED], which is used as a versatile building block for the synthesis of pharmaceuticals and fine chemicals. To gain insight into the catalytic mechanism, the structures of complexes of RCR with ligands, including the coenzyme, are important. Here, the recombinant RCR protein was expressed and purified in Escherichia coli and was crystallized in the presence of NAD+. The crystals, which belonged to the orthorhombic space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 85.64, b = 106.11, c = 145.55 Å, were obtained by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method and diffracted to 2.15 Å resolution. Initial model building indicates that RCR forms a homotetramer, consistent with previous reports of medium-chain-type alcohol dehydrogenases. PMID:24915097

  14. Direct observation of redox reactions in Candida parapsilosis ATCC 7330 by Confocal microscopic studies

    PubMed Central

    Venkataraman, Sowmyalakshmi; Narayan, Shoba; Chadha, Anju

    2016-01-01

    Confocal microscopic studies with the resting cells of yeast, Candida parapsilosis ATCC 7330, a reportedly versatile biocatalyst for redox enzyme mediated preparation of optically pure secondary alcohols in high optical purities [enantiomeric excess (ee) up to >99%] and yields, revealed that the yeast cells had large vacuoles under the experimental conditions studied where the redox reaction takes place. A novel fluorescence method was developed using 1-(6-methoxynaphthalen-2-yl)ethanol to track the site of biotransformation within the cells. This alcohol, itself non-fluorescent, gets oxidized to produce a fluorescent ketone, 1-(6-methoxynaphthalen-2-yl)ethanone. Kinetic studies showed that the reaction occurs spontaneously and the products get released out of the cells in less time [5 mins]. The biotransformation was validated using HPLC. PMID:27739423

  15. AI-2 of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans inhibits Candida albicans biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Bachtiar, Endang W; Bachtiar, Boy M; Jarosz, Lucja M; Amir, Lisa R; Sunarto, Hari; Ganin, Hadas; Meijler, Michael M; Krom, Bastiaan P

    2014-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, a Gram-negative bacterium, and Candida albicans, a polymorphic fungus, are both commensals of the oral cavity but both are opportunistic pathogens that can cause oral diseases. A. actinomycetemcomitans produces a quorum-sensing molecule called autoinducer-2 (AI-2), synthesized by LuxS, that plays an important role in expression of virulence factors, in intra- but also in interspecies communication. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of AI-2 based signaling in the interactions between C. albicans and A. actinomycetemcomitans. A. actinomycetemcomitans adhered to C. albicans and inhibited biofilm formation by means of a molecule that was secreted during growth. C. albicans biofilm formation increased significantly when co-cultured with A. actinomycetemcomitans luxS, lacking AI-2 production. Addition of wild-type-derived spent medium or synthetic AI-2 to spent medium of the luxS strain, restored inhibition of C. albicans biofilm formation to wild-type levels. Addition of synthetic AI-2 significantly inhibited hypha formation of C. albicans possibly explaining the inhibition of biofilm formation. AI-2 of A. actinomycetemcomitans is synthesized by LuxS, accumulates during growth and inhibits C. albicans hypha- and biofilm formation. Identifying the molecular mechanisms underlying the interaction between bacteria and fungi may provide important insight into the balance within complex oral microbial communities.

  16. Survival of Candida albicans in tropical marine and fresh waters.

    PubMed Central

    Valdes-Collazo, L; Schultz, A J; Hazen, T C

    1987-01-01

    A survey of Candida albicans indicated that the organism was present at all sites sampled in a rain forest stream and in near-shore coastal waters of Puerto Rico. In the rain forest watershed no relationship existed between densities of fecal coliforms and densities of C. albicans. At two pristine sites in the rain forest watershed both C. albicans and Escherichia coli survived in diffusion chambers for extended periods of time. In near-shore coastal waters C. albicans and E. coli survival times in diffusion chambers were enhanced by effluent from a rum distillery. The rum distillery effluent had a greater effect on E. coli than on C. albicans survival in the diffusion chambers. These studies show that neither E. coli nor C. albicans organisms are good indicators of recent fecal contamination in tropical waters. It further demonstrates that pristine freshwater environments and marine waters receiving organic loading in the tropics can support densities of C. albicans which may be a health hazard. Images PMID:3310885

  17. Candida albicans-induced inflammatory response in human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Wollina, U; Künkel, W; Bulling, L; Fünfstück, C; Knöll, B; Vennewald, I; Hipler, U-C

    2004-06-01

    Candida albicans strains 3153a, ATCC 48867, CBS 2730, DSM 70014, and Vir 13 were cultivated and sterile C. albicans filtrates were produced. The interaction of soluble Candida factors of these infiltrates with human HaCaT keratinocytes was assayed in vitro. The following parameters were analyzed: cell proliferation, protein synthesis, nuclear matrix protein (NMP) 41 release, cytokine release (IL-1beta, soluble IL-2 receptor, IL-6, and IL-8), and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Cell counts at 1, 12, and 24 h were significantly lower for C. albicans strains CBS 2730 and VIR 13 (P < 0.05). There was no significant change for the remaining strains. Neither the protein synthesis nor the NMP-41 release was significantly affected. IL-6 and IL-8 were stimulated by C. albicans filtrates to different amounts with higher levels in strains of low virulence. There was no effect on the other cytokines. The production of ROS by HaCaT keratinocytes was suppressed. The induction of an inflammatory keratinocyte response by soluble C. albicans factors may play a role among the host-yeast interactions.

  18. Candida albicans and Candida tropicalis in oral candidosis: quantitative analysis, exoenzyme activity, and antifungal drug sensitivity.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Karen Regina Carim; Ferreira, Joseane Cristina; Komesu, Marilena Chinali; Candido, Regina Celia

    2009-02-01

    Candida albicans and C. tropicalis obtained from whole saliva of patients presenting signs of oral candidosis were assayed for quantification of colony forming units, exoenzyme activity (phospholipase and proteinase) and antifungal drug sensitivity (amphotericin B, fluconazole and itraconazole) by the reference method of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. The number of colony forming units per milliliter varied according to the Candida species involved and whether a single or mixed infection was present. Proteinase activity was observed in both C. albicans and C. tropicalis, but phospholipase activity was noted only in C. albicans. In vitro resistance to antifungals was verified in both species, but C. tropicalis appears to be more resistant to the tested antifungals than C. albicans.

  19. Molecular Tools for Cryptic "Candida" Species Identification with Applications in a Clinical Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamarra, Soledad; Dudiuk, Catiana; Mancilla, Estefania; Vera Garate, Maria Veronica; Guerrero, Sergio; Garcia-Effron, Guillermo

    2013-01-01

    "Candida" spp. includes more than 160 species but only 20 species pose clinical problems. "C. albicans" and "C. parapsilosis" account for more than 75% of all the fungemias worldwide. In 1995 and 2005, one "C. albicans" and two "C. parapsilosis"-related species were described, respectively. Using…

  20. Candida albicans specializations for iron homeostasis: from commensalism to virulence.

    PubMed

    Noble, Suzanne M

    2013-12-01

    Candida albicans is a fungal commensal-pathogen that persistently associates with its mammalian hosts. Between the commensal and pathogenic lifestyles, this microorganism inhabits host niches that differ markedly in the levels of bioavailable iron. A number of recent studies have exposed C. albicans specializations for acquiring iron from specific host molecules in regions where iron is scarce, while also defending against iron-related toxicity in regions where iron occurs in surfeit. Together, these results point to a central role for iron homeostasis in the evolution of this important human pathogen.

  1. Evaluation of in vivo pathogenicity of Candida parapsilosis, Candida orthopsilosis, and Candida metapsilosis with different enzymatic profiles in a murine model of disseminated candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Treviño-Rangel, Rogelio de J; Rodríguez-Sánchez, Irám P; Elizondo-Zertuche, M; Martínez-Fierro, Margarita L; Garza-Veloz, Idalia; Romero-Díaz, Víktor J; González, José G; González, Gloria M

    2014-04-01

    Six isolates of the Candida parapsilosis complex with different enzymatic profiles were used to induce systemic infection in immunocompetent BALB/c mice. Fungal tissue burden was determined on days 2, 5, 10, and 15 post challenge. The highest fungal load irrespective of post-infection day was detected in the kidney, followed by the spleen, lung, and liver, with a tendency for the fungal burden to decrease by day 15 in all groups. Significant differences among the strains were not detected, suggesting that the three species of the "psilosis" group possess a similar pathogenic potential in disseminated candidiasis regardless of their enzymatic profiles.

  2. Genotyping Candida albicans from Candida leukoplakia and non-Candida leukoplakia shows no enrichment of multilocus sequence typing clades but enrichment of ABC genotype C in Candida leukoplakia.

    PubMed

    Abdulrahim, Mohammed H; McManus, Brenda A; Flint, Stephen R; Coleman, David C

    2013-01-01

    Oral leukoplakias are histopathologically-diagnosed as Candida leukoplakia or non-Candida leukoplakia by the presence or absence of hyphae in the superficial epithelium. Candida leukoplakia lesions have significantly increased malignant potential. Candida albicans is the most prevalent fungal species associated with oral leukoplakia and may contribute to malignant transformation of Candida leukoplakia. To date, no detailed population analysis of C. albicans isolates from oral leukoplakia patients has been undertaken. This study investigated whether specific C. albicans genotypes were associated with Candida leukoplakia and non-Candida leukoplakia in a cohort of Irish patients. Patients with histopathologically-defined Candida leukoplakia (n = 31) or non-Candida leukoplakia (n = 47) were screened for Candida species by culture of oral rinse and lesional swab samples. Selected C. albicans isolates from Candida leukoplakia patients (n = 25), non-Candida leukoplakia patients (n = 19) and oral carriage isolates from age and sex matched healthy subjects without leukoplakia (n = 34) were subjected to multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and ABC genotyping. MLST revealed that the clade distribution of C. albicans from both Candida leukoplakia and non-Candida leukoplakia lesions overlapped with the corresponding clade distributions of oral carriage isolates and global reference isolates from the MLST database indicating no enrichment of leukoplakia-associated clones. Oral leukoplakia isolates were significantly enriched with ABC genotype C (12/44, 27.3%), particularly Candida leukoplakia isolates (9/25, 36%), relative to oral carriage isolates (3/34, 8.8%). Genotype C oral leukoplakia isolates were distributed in MLST clades 1,3,4,5,8,9 and 15, whereas genotype C oral carriage isolates were distributed in MLST clades 4 and 11.

  3. Accurate Identification of Candida parapsilosis (Sensu Lato) by Use of Mitochondrial DNA and Real-Time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Ana Carolina R.; Ferreira, Renata C.; Gonçalves, Sarah S.; Quindós, Guillermo; Eraso, Elena; Bizerra, Fernando C.; Briones, Marcelo R. S.

    2012-01-01

    Candida parapsilosis is the Candida species isolated the second most frequently from blood cultures in South America and some European countries, such as Spain. Since 2005, this species has been considered a complex of 3 closely related species: C. parapsilosis, Candida metapsilosis, and Candida orthopsilosis. Here, we describe a real-time TaqMan-MGB PCR assay, using mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) as the target, which readily distinguishes these 3 species. We first used comparative genomics to locate syntenic regions between these 3 mitochondrial genomes and then selected NADH5 as the target for the real-time PCR assay. Probes were designed to include a combination of different single-nucleotide polymorphisms that are able to differentiate each species within the C. parapsilosis complex. This new methodology was first tested using mtDNA and then genomic DNA from 4 reference and 5 clinical strains. For assay validation, a total of 96 clinical isolates and 4 American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) isolates previously identified by internal transcribed spacer (ITS) ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequencing were tested. Real-time PCR using genomic DNA was able to differentiate the 3 species with 100% accuracy. No amplification was observed when DNA from other species was used as the template. We observed 100% congruence with ITS rDNA sequencing identification, including for 30 strains used in blind testing. This novel method allows a quick and accurate intracomplex identification of C. parapsilosis and saves time compared with sequencing, which so far has been considered the “gold standard” for Candida yeast identification. In addition, this assay provides a useful tool for epidemiological and clinical studies of these emergent species. PMID:22535986

  4. Comparison of the susceptibilities of clinical isolates of Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis to essential oils.

    PubMed

    Pozzatti, Patrícia; Loreto, Erico Silva; Lopes, Paulo Guilherme Markus; Athayde, Margareth Linde; Santurio, Janio Morais; Alves, Sydney Hartz

    2010-01-01

    Here, a microdilution technique based on the M27-A2 protocol (NCCLS, 2002) was employed to compare the susceptibilities of Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis to essential oils extracted from plants used as spices. The chemical compositions of the essential oils were defined based on the analysis of retention indices obtained by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. Taken together, the results showed that the activity of the compounds against the two species was similar.

  5. Growing Candida albicans Biofilms on Paper Support and Dynamic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Selow, Marcela Lima Cardoso; Rymovicz, Alinne Ulbrich Mores; Ribas, Cristina Rauen; Saad, Renata Simão; Rosa, Rosimeire Takaki; Rosa, Edvaldo Antonio Ribeiro

    2015-08-01

    A stainless steel paper-embedded biofilm reactor (PEBR) was developed for Candida spp. growth, permitting confluent distribution of nutrients by capillary diffusion through ordinary laboratory filter paper. Antibiogram disks were distributed along the filter paper rim, and the PEBR received 0.1 or 0.01 % crystal violet (CV) at 200 μL min(-1) and at 37 °C, for 48 h. CV was recovered from the disks and measured at 540 nm. Candida albicans SC5314 cells were applied onto antibiogram disks. The bioreactor was assembled, and YEPD broth was admitted (200 μL min(-1)) at 37 °C, for 72 h. Biofilm growth was estimated via the MTT reduction test. Controls were disks that received the same treatments, except for the fungus. The PEBR was considered high-throughput table, low-cost, and feasible to grow C. albicans biofilms.

  6. Starvation survival of Candida albicans in various water microcosms.

    PubMed

    Chaieb, Kamel; Kouidhi, Bochra; Zmantar, Tarek; Mahdouani, Kacem; Bakhrouf, Amina

    2011-08-01

    Candida is a major Human pathogen causing a variety of infections and can survive for extended period of time in aquatic environment including marine and fresh water. In this study we compared a colorimetric XTT assay to colony forming units (CFU) count to evaluate the survival potential of Candida albicans incubated in water microcosms. Our results showed that cells maintain cultivability within a long period followed by a decline in cultivability and a drop of plate counts to less than 20 cell ml(-1) after 150 days in tap water, 190 days in rain water and 200 days in seawater. In addition we noted that 10% of cells viability was reached after 150 days in seawater, 180 days in rain water and 210 days in tap water. Molecular method confirms the persistence of C. albicans cells in water during long time starvation period.

  7. Mechanism underlying renal failure caused by pathogenic Candida albicans infection.

    PubMed

    Jae-Chen, Shin; Young-Joo, Jeon; Seon-Min, Park; Kang Seok, Seo; Jung-Hyun, Shim; Jung-Il, Chae

    2015-03-01

    Candida albicans (C. albicans) is an opportunistic fungal pathogen that commonly causes nosocomial infections. Systemic candidiasis is encountered with increasing frequency in immunocompromised hosts, leading to renal failure that results in severe morbidity and mortality. The present study investigated the mechanisms underlying kidney susceptibility following infection with several C. albicans strains, such as B311 and SC5314. Fungal growth of the highly virulent SC5314 strain was 10(3)-fold higher compared to the nonpathogenic B311 strain in the kidneys. An intravenous challenge of SC5314 in mice, elevated blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatine levels, which resulted in mortality at 8 or 35 days after infection in a dose- and time-dependent manner, whereas all the B311-infected mice had BUN and creatinine levels in the normal range and survived. Whether virulent C. albicans may escape clearance by activating signaling pathways that lead to the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-1β, was investigated. B311 infections significantly elevated TNF-α and IL-1β mRNA expression in the kidneys, whereas the expression in SC5314-infected mice remained unchanged. Furthermore, B311 infection significantly elevated the plasma levels of TNF-α and IL-1β. These results indicated that the less virulent strains of C. albicans induced pro-inflammatory cytokines in mice. These results determined that an impairment of the protective mechanisms occurred in the kidneys with virulent C. albicans infection.

  8. Effectiveness of magnetic fluid hyperthermia against Candida albicans cells.

    PubMed

    Chudzik, Barbara; Miaskowski, Arkadiusz; Surowiec, Zbigniew; Czernel, Grzegorz; Duluk, Tomasz; Marczuk, Andrzej; Gagoś, Mariusz

    2016-12-01

    Candida albicans is one of the most frequently isolated fungal pathogens causing opportunistic infections in humans. Targeted magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) is a promising method in thermal therapy facilitating selective heating of pathogen cells like C. albicans. In the paper, we used meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA)-coated magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and functionalised anti-C. albicans immunomagnetic nanoparticles (IMNPs) to investigate the potential of MFH in combating C. albicans cells in vitro. Using Mössbauer spectroscopy it was found that synthesised MNPs exhibited superparamagnetic phenomena. On the basis of calorimetric experiments, the maximum SAR (specific absorption rate) was found and a proper concentration of MNPs was established to control the temperature. MFH based on both DMSA-coated MNPs and functionalised anti-C. albicans IMNPs was more effective in combating C. albicans cells in vitro than thermostat hyperthermia. Especially promising results were obtained using functionalised IMNPs, which eradicated most of the pathogen colonies at the temperature of 43 °C.

  9. In vitro damage of Candida albicans biofilms by chitosan

    PubMed Central

    PU, YU; LIU, AIBO; ZHENG, YUQIANG; YE, BIN

    2014-01-01

    With the increasing usage of indwelling medical devices in clinical practice, the frequency of fungal infections has increased, such as that of Candida albicans (C. albicans). Biofilms, a protected niche for microorganisms, are resistant to a range of current antifungal agents. Chitosan is a polyatomic biopolymer with advantageous biocompatibility, biodegradation, nontoxicity and antibacterial properties. To investigate the inhibitory effect of chitosan on biofilms formed by C. albicans, cell viability, 2,3-bis(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-caboxanilide reduction, and morphological assays, including fluorescence microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), were employed. As assessed by cell viability assay, chitosan showed significant inhibitory effects on the planktonic cells and the biofilm of C. albicans in a dose-dependent manner. Fluorescence microscopy and SEM assays confirmed that the chitosan-treated group showed delayed C. albicans biofilm formation with defect morphological features, due to the inhibitory effects of the vast majority of fungal cell growth. In conclusion, C. albicans biofilms were compromised by the treatment with chitosan, providing an alternative therapeutic strategy against the fungal biofilms in the medical devices. PMID:25120626

  10. Anti-biofilm Properties of Peganum harmala against Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Aboualigalehdari, Elham; Sadeghifard, Nourkhoda; Taherikalani, Morovat; Zargoush, Zaynab; Tahmasebi, Zahra; Badakhsh, Behzad; Rostamzad, Arman; Ghafourian, Sobhan; Pakzad, Iraj

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Vaginitis still remains as a health issue in women. It is notable that Candida albicans producing biofilm is considered a microorganism responsible for vaginitis with hard to treat. Also, Peganum harmala was applied as an anti fungal in treatment for many infections in Iran. Therefore, this study goal to investigate the role of P. harmala in inhibition of biofilm formation in C. albicans. Methods So, 27 C. albicans collected from women with Vaginitis, then subjected for biofilm formation assay. P. harmala was applied as antibiofilm formation in C. albicans. Results Our results demonstrated that P. harmala in concentration of 12 μg/ml easily inhibited strong biofilm formation; while the concentrations of 10 and 6 μg/ml inhibited biofilm formation in moderate and weak biofilm formation C. albicans strains, respectively. Conclusion Hence, the current study presented P. harmala as antibiofilm herbal medicine for C. albicans; but in vivo study suggested to be performed to confirm its effectiveness. PMID:27169010

  11. Epidemiology and echinocandin susceptibility of Candida parapsilosis sensu lato species isolated from bloodstream infections at a Spanish university hospital

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Effron, Guillermo; Canton, Emilia; Pemán, Javier; Dilger, Amanda; Romá, Eva; Perlin, David S.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The aims of this work were to study the epidemiological profiles, differences in echinocandin susceptibilities and clinical relevance of the Candida parapsilosis sensu lato species isolated from proven fungaemia cases at La Fe University Hospital of Valencia (Spain) from 1995 to 2007. Results The prevalence of these species was: C. parapsilosis sensu stricto, 74.4%; Candida orthopsilosis, 23.54%; and Candida metapsilosis, 2.05%. The incidence of the species complex as agents of fungaemia remained stationary until 2005 and doubled in 2006. The incidence of C. orthopsilosis showed an increasing trend during the study period, while C. parapsilosis sensu stricto incidence diminished. Also, an important epidemiological change was observed starting in 2004, when 86.5% of the C. parapsilosis sensu lato strains were found in adult patients, while before that year only 13.5% of the isolates were found in this population. Conclusions Echinocandin drug susceptibility testing using the CLSI M27-A3 document showed a wide range of MIC values (0.015–4 mg/L), with micafungin being the most potent in vitro inhibitor followed by anidulafungin and caspofungin (MIC geometric mean of 0.68, 0.74 and 0.87 mg/L, respectively). C. metapsilosis was the most susceptible species of the complex to anidulafungin and micafungin in vitro (MIC50 for anidulafungin and micafungin: 0.06 mg/L), while there were no differences between C. parapsilosis sensu lato species when caspofungin MIC50s were compared (MIC50 1.00 mg/L). Differences in caspofungin in vitro susceptibility were observed between the different clinical service departments of La Fe Hospital. PMID:22868644

  12. Analysis of clinical and environmental Candida parapsilosis isolates by microsatellite genotyping--a tool for hospital infection surveillance.

    PubMed

    Sabino, R; Sampaio, P; Rosado, L; Videira, Z; Grenouillet, F; Pais, C

    2015-10-01

    Candida parapsilosis emerged as an important opportunistic pathogen, causing candidaemia worldwide. Nosocomial outbreaks triggered by this species have been frequently described, particularly in cancer patients. For a better understanding of its epidemiology, several typing methods are used and microsatellite analysis has been reported as highly discriminant. The main objective of this work was to study C. parapsilosis isolates by application of microsatellite genotyping to distinguish epidemiologically related strains, compare clinical and environmental isolates and determine possible routes of dispersion of the isolates in the hospital setting. A total of 129 C. parapsilosis isolates from different origins, including hospital environment and hands of healthcare workers, were genotyped using four microsatellite markers. The isolates were recovered from different health institutions. Analysis of C. parapsilosis isolates from hospital environment showed great genotypic diversity; however, the same or very similar genotypes were also found. The same multilocus genotype was shared by isolates recovered from the hand of a healthcare worker, from the hospital environment and from patients of the same healthcare institution, suggesting that these could be possible routes of transmission and that infections due to C. parapsilosis may be mainly related with exogenous transmission to the patient. Examination of sequential isolates from the same patients showed that colonizing and bloodstream isolates had the same multilocus genotype in the majority of cases. We demonstrate that this typing method is able to distinguish clonal clusters from genetically unrelated genotypes and can be a valuable tool to support epidemiologic investigations in the hospital setting.

  13. Genome-wide functional analysis in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Motaung, Thabiso E; Ells, Ruan; Pohl, Carolina H; Albertyn, Jacobus; Tsilo, Toi J

    2017-02-08

    Candida albicans is an important etiological agent of superficial and life-threatening infections in individuals with compromised immune systems. To date, we know of several overlapping genetic networks that govern virulence attributes in this fungal pathogen. Classical use of deletion mutants has led to the discovery of numerous virulence factors over the years, and genome-wide functional analysis has propelled gene discovery at an even faster pace. Indeed, a number of recent studies using large-scale genetic screens followed by genome-wide functional analysis has allowed for the unbiased discovery of many new genes involved in C. albicans biology. Here we share our perspectives on the role of these studies in analyzing fundamental aspects of C. albicans virulence properties.

  14. Rapid characterisation of Candida albicans by pyrolysis mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    White, G C; Sisson, P R; Freeman, R; Cookson, B D

    1994-08-01

    Clinical isolates (41) of Candida spp. from three possible outbreaks of nosocomially-acquired infection were compared by pyrolysis mass spectrometry (PMS) and by a combined morphotyping and resistotyping (M-R typing) method. Both systems characterised all the isolates and distinguished one isolate of C. tropicalis and another of C. glabrata from the 39 isolates of C. albicans. Results from both systems suggested that cross-infection with a single strain contributed to two of the outbreaks. In several instances, more than one strain of C. albicans was found amongst multiple isolates from the same patient. PMS is a simple, rapid and objective technique capable of characterising C. albicans isolates; discrimination was similar to M-R typing.

  15. Candida albicans and Enterococcus faecalis in the gut

    PubMed Central

    Garsin, Danielle A; Lorenz, Michael C

    2013-01-01

    The fungus Candida albicans and the gram-positive bacterium Enterococcus faecalis are both normal residents of the human gut microbiome and cause opportunistic disseminated infections in immunocompromised individuals. Using a nematode infection model, we recently showed that co-infection resulted in less pathology and less mortality than infection with either species alone and this was partly explained by an interkingdom signaling event in which a bacterial-derived product inhibits hyphal morphogenesis of C. albicans. In this addendum we discuss these findings in the contest of other described bacterial-fungal interactions and recent data suggesting a potentially synergistic relationship between these two species in the mouse gut as well. We suggest that E. faecalis and C. albicans promote a mutually beneficial association with the host, in effect choosing a commensal lifestyle over a pathogenic one. PMID:23941906

  16. Candida albicans in oral biofilms could prevent caries.

    PubMed

    Willems, Hubertine Marjoleine; Kos, Kevin; Jabra-Rizk, Mary Ann; Krom, Bastiaan P

    2016-07-01

    Streptococcus mutans is a Gram-positive bacterium involved in development to caries, the most common infectious disease of our time. Streptococcus mutans interacts with other microbes, like the fungus Candida albicans and both are commonly isolated from patients with caries. Since the role of C. albicans in caries remains unknown, our aim was to unravel this using an in vitro dual-species cariogenic oral biofilm model. Biofilms were grown for 24-72 h on glass cover slips or hydroxyapatite (HA) disks to mimic the surface of teeth. Medium pH, lactic acid production capacity and calcium release from HA disks were determined. All 24-h biofilms had external pH values below the critical pH of 5.5 where enamel dissolves. In contrast, 72-h dual-species biofilms had significantly higher pH (above the critical pH) and consequently decreased calcium release compared to single-species S. mutans biofilms. Counter intuitively, lactic acid production and growth of S. mutans were increased in 72-h dual-species biofilms. Candida albicans modulates the pH in dual-species biofilms to values above the critical pH where enamel dissolves. Our results suggest that C. albicans is not by definition a cariogenic microorganism; it could prevent caries by actively increasing pH preventing mineral loss.

  17. Interaction of Candida albicans with Human Leukocytes and Serum1

    PubMed Central

    Lehrer, Robert I.; Cline, Martin J.

    1969-01-01

    A quantitative assay of candidacidal activity based on differential staining of non-viable Candida albicans by methylene blue was developed and applied to studies of leukocytes from normal individuals and patients with fungal and other infections. Serum factors were necessary for optimal phagocytosis of C. albicans but lacked direct candidacidal activity. Normal human neutrophils (38 studies) killed 29.0 ± 7.4% of ingested C. albicans in 1 hr. Eosinophils and monocytes killed a smaller percentage. Neutrophil candidacidal activity did not require protein or ribonucleic acid synthesis by the leukocyte but was inhibited by anaerobic conditions, potassium cyanide, and colchicine. Leukocytes of a patient with hereditary myeloperoxidase deficiency and of three children with chronic granulomatous disease phagocytized C. albicans normally, yet failed to kill them. Our data suggest that the neutrophil can play an important role in resistance to Candida infection and that the lysosomal enzyme myeloperoxidase and its oxidant substrate hydrogen peroxide are the major participants in neutrophil candidacidal activity. Images PMID:4182532

  18. Ocimum sanctum essential oil inhibits virulence attributes in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Khan, Amber; Ahmad, Aijaz; Xess, Immaculata; Khan, Luqman A; Manzoor, Nikhat

    2014-03-15

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic human fungal pathogen which causes disease mainly in immunocompromised patients. Activity of hydrolytic enzymes is essential for virulence of C. albicans and so is the capacity of these cells to undergo transition from yeast to mycelial form of growth. Ocimum sanctum is cultivated worldwide for its essential oil which exhibits medicinal properties. This work evaluates the anti-virulence activity of O. sanctum essential oil (OSEO) on 22 strains of C. albicans (including a standard strain ATCC 90028) isolated from both HIV positive and HIV negative patients. Candida isolates were exposed to sub-MICs of OSEO. In vitro secretion of proteinases and phospholipases was evaluated by plate assay containing BSA and egg yolk respectively. Morphological transition from yeast to filamentous form was monitored microscopically in LSM. For genetic analysis, respective genes associated with morphological transition (HWP1), proteinase (SAP1) and phospholipase (PLB2) were also investigated by Real Time PCR (qRT-PCR). Results were analyzed using Student's t-test. OSEO inhibits morphological transition in C. albicans and had a significant inhibitory effect on extracellular secretion of proteinases and phospholipases. Expression profile of respective selected genes associated with C. albicans virulence by qRT-PCR showed a reduced expression of HWP1, SAP1 and PLB2 genes in cells treated with sub-inhibitory concentrations of OSEO. This work suggests that OSEO inhibits morphological transition in C. albicans and decreases the secretion of hydrolytic enzymes involved in the early stage of infection as well as down regulates the associated genes. Further studies will assess the clinical application of OSEO and its constituents in the treatment of fungal infections.

  19. Candida albicans susceptibility to lactoperoxidase-generated hypoiodite

    PubMed Central

    Ahariz, Mohamed; Courtois, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    In vivo, lactoperoxidase produces hypothiocyanite (OSCN−) from thiocyanate (SCN−) in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2); in vitro, iodide (I−) can be oxidized into hypoiodite (OI−) by this enzyme. The aim of this study was to compare in vitro the anti-Candida effect of iodide versus thiocyanate used as lactoperoxidase substrate to prevent Candida biofilms development. Candida albicans ATCC 10231 susceptibility upon both peroxidase systems was tested in three different experimental designs: (i) in a liquid culture medium, (ii) in an interface model between solid culture medium and gel containing the enzymic systems, (iii) in a biofilm model onto titanium and acrylic resin. Yeast growth in liquid medium was monitored by turbidimetry at 600 nm. Material-adherent yeast biomass was evaluated by the tetrazolium salt MTT method. The iodide-peroxidase system has been shown to inhibit Candida biofilm formation at lower substrate concentrations (~200 fold less H2O2 donor) and for longer incubation periods than the thiocyanate-peroxidase system. In conclusion, efficiency of lactoperoxidase-generated OI− to prevent C. albicans biofilm development allows refining iodine antifungal use in ex vivo conditions. PMID:23662084

  20. Molecular cloning and characterization of the Candida albicans enolase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Mason, A B; Buckley, H R; Gorman, J A

    1993-01-01

    A DNA clone containing the putative Candida albicans enolase gene (ENO1) was isolated from a genomic DNA library. The sequenced insert contained a continuous open reading frame of 1,320 bp. The predicted 440-amino-acid protein is 78 and 76% identical, respectively, to Saccharomyces cerevisiae enolase proteins 1 and 2. Only one enolase gene could be detected in C. albicans genomic DNA by Southern analysis with a homologous probe. Northern (RNA) analysis detected a single, abundant C. albicans ENO1 transcript of approximately 1,600 nucleotides. When cells were grown on glucose, levels of ENO1 mRNA were markedly increased by comparison with ENO1 mRNA levels in cells grown on ethanol, a gluconeogenic carbon source. In contrast to this glucose-mediated transcriptional induction, the carbon source had no dramatic effect on the levels of enolase protein or enzyme activity in the C. albicans strains tested. These results suggest that posttranscriptional mechanisms are responsible for modulating expression of the C. albicans enolase gene. Images PMID:8478328

  1. Nicotine Enhances Interspecies Relationship between Streptococcus mutans and Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shiyu; Qiu, Wei; Zhang, Keke; Zhou, Xuedong; Ren, Biao; He, Jinzhi; Xu, Xin; Cheng, Lei; Li, Mingyun

    2017-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans and Candida albicans are common microorganisms in the human oral cavity. The synergistic relationship between these two species has been deeply explored in many studies. In the present study, the effect of alkaloid nicotine on the interspecies between S. mutans and C. albicans is explored. We developed a dual-species biofilm model and studied biofilm biomass, biofilm structure, synthesis of extracellular polysaccharides (EPS), and expression of glucosyltransferases (Gtfs). Biofilm formation and bacterial and fungal cell numbers in dual-species biofilms increased in the presence of nicotine. More C. albicans cells were present in the dual-species biofilms in the nicotine-treated groups as determined by scanning electron microscopy. The synthesis of EPS was increased by 1 mg/ml of nicotine as detected by confocal laser scanning microscopy. The result of qRT-PCR showed gtfs expression was upregulated when 1 mg/ml of nicotine was used. We speculate that nicotine promoted the growth of S. mutans, and more S. mutans cells attracted more C. albicans cells due to the interaction between two species. Since S. mutans and C. albicans are putative pathogens for dental caries, the enhancement of the synergistic relationship by nicotine may contribute to caries development in smokers.

  2. Nicotine Enhances Interspecies Relationship between Streptococcus mutans and Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Wei; Zhang, Keke; Zhou, Xuedong; Ren, Biao; He, Jinzhi; Xu, Xin

    2017-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans and Candida albicans are common microorganisms in the human oral cavity. The synergistic relationship between these two species has been deeply explored in many studies. In the present study, the effect of alkaloid nicotine on the interspecies between S. mutans and C. albicans is explored. We developed a dual-species biofilm model and studied biofilm biomass, biofilm structure, synthesis of extracellular polysaccharides (EPS), and expression of glucosyltransferases (Gtfs). Biofilm formation and bacterial and fungal cell numbers in dual-species biofilms increased in the presence of nicotine. More C. albicans cells were present in the dual-species biofilms in the nicotine-treated groups as determined by scanning electron microscopy. The synthesis of EPS was increased by 1 mg/ml of nicotine as detected by confocal laser scanning microscopy. The result of qRT-PCR showed gtfs expression was upregulated when 1 mg/ml of nicotine was used. We speculate that nicotine promoted the growth of S. mutans, and more S. mutans cells attracted more C. albicans cells due to the interaction between two species. Since S. mutans and C. albicans are putative pathogens for dental caries, the enhancement of the synergistic relationship by nicotine may contribute to caries development in smokers. PMID:28280743

  3. A Photonic Crystal Protein Hydrogel Sensor for Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Cai, Zhongyu; Kwak, Daniel H; Punihaole, David; Hong, Zhenmin; Velankar, Sachin S; Liu, Xinyu; Asher, Sanford A

    2015-10-26

    We report two-dimensional (2D) photonic crystal (PC) sensing materials that selectively detect Candida albicans (C. albicans). These sensors utilize Concanavalin A (Con A) protein hydrogels with a 2D PC embedded on the Con A protein hydrogel surface, that multivalently and selectively bind to mannan on the C. albicans cell surface to form crosslinks. The resulting crosslinks shrink the Con A protein hydrogel, reduce the 2D PC particle spacing, and blue-shift the light diffracted from the PC. The diffraction shifts can be visually monitored, measured with a spectrometer, or determined from the Debye diffraction ring diameter. Our unoptimized hydrogel sensor has a detection limit of around 32 CFU/mL for C. albicans. This sensor distinguishes between C. albicans and those microbes devoid of cell-surface mannan such as the gram-negative bacterium E. coli. This sensor provides a proof-of-concept for utilizing recognition between lectins and microbial cell surface carbohydrates to detect microorganisms in aqueous environments.

  4. Candida albicans Is Resistant to Polyglutamine Aggregation and Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Leach, Michelle D.; Kim, TaeHyung; DiGregorio, Sonja E.; Collins, Cathy; Zhang, Zhaolei; Duennwald, Martin L.; Cowen, Leah E.

    2016-01-01

    Disruption of protein quality control can be detrimental, having toxic effects on single cell organisms and contributing to neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and Huntington’s in humans. Here, we examined the effects of polyglutamine (polyQ) aggregation in a major fungal pathogen of humans, Candida albicans, with the goal of identifying new approaches to disable this fungus. However, we discovered that expression of polyQ stretches up to 230Q had no effect on C. albicans ability to grow and withstand proteotoxic stress. Bioinformatics analysis demonstrates that C. albicans has a similarly glutamine-rich proteome to the unicellular fungus Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which exhibits polyQ toxicity with as few as 72Q. Surprisingly, global transcriptional profiles indicated no significant change upon induction of up to 230Q. Proteomic analysis highlighted two key interactors of 230Q, Sis1 and Sgt2; however, loss of either protein had no additional effect on C. albicans toxicity. Our data suggest that C. albicans has evolved powerful mechanisms to overcome the toxicity associated with aggregation-prone proteins, providing a unique model for studying polyQ-associated diseases. PMID:27807047

  5. Septin Function in Candida albicans MorphogenesisD⃞

    PubMed Central

    Warenda, Amy J.; Konopka, James B.

    2002-01-01

    The septin proteins function in the formation of septa, mating projections, and spores in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, as well as in cell division and other processes in animal cells. Candida albicans septins were examined in this study for their roles in morphogenesis of this multimorphic, opportunistically pathogenic fungus, which can range from round budding yeast to elongated hyphae. C. albicans green fluorescent protein labeled septin proteins localized to a tight ring at the bud and pseudohyphae necks and as a more diffuse array in emerging germ tubes of hyphae. Deletion analysis demonstrated that the C. albicans homologs of the S. cerevisiae CDC3 and CDC12 septins are essential for viability. In contrast, the C. albicans cdc10Δ and cdc11Δ mutants were viable but displayed conditional defects in cytokinesis, localization of cell wall chitin, and bud morphology. The mutant phenotypes were not identical, however, indicating that these septins carry out distinct functions. The viable septin mutants could be stimulated to undergo hyphal morphogenesis but formed hyphae with abnormal curvature, and they differed from wild type in the selection of sites for subsequent rounds of hyphal formation. The cdc11Δ mutants were also defective for invasive growth when embedded in agar. These results further extend the known roles of the septins by demonstrating that they are essential for the proper morphogenesis of C. albicans during both budding and filamentous growth. PMID:12181342

  6. In vitro activity of Caspofungin combined with Fluconazole on mixed Candida albicans and Candida glabrata biofilm.

    PubMed

    Pesee, Siripen; Angkananuwat, Chayanit; Tancharoensukjit, Sudarat; Muanmai, Somporn; Sirivan, Pattaraporn; Bubphawas, Manita; Tanarerkchai, Nissara

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the antifungal effect of caspofungin (CAS) combined with fluconazole (FLU) on the biofilm biomass and cultivable viability and microstructure of Candida albicans and Candida glabrata mixed biofilm in vitro.Biofilms were formed in a 96-well microtiter plate for crystal violet assay and colony forming unit (CFU) method and grown on plastic coverslip disks for scanning electron microscopy. MIC50 of CAS and FLU against single Candida spp.and mixed Candida spp.biofilms were evaluated using crystal violet assay. Additional,C. albicans and C. glabrata mixed biofilms were incubated with subinhibitory CAS concentration plus FLU and their percentages of Candida biofilm reduction were calculated. We found that percentages of biofilm reduction were significantly decreased when CAS at 0.25MIC and FLU (0.25 or 0.5MIC) were combined (P< .05) but not different when CAS at 0.5 MIC combined with FLU at 0.25 or 0.5MIC, compared to CAS treatment alone. Structural analyses revealed that CAS/FLU combination-treated biofilms showed less hyphae and blastospores with some aberrant cells compared to control group. Although it was evident that a greater CFU of Candida glabrata were demonstrated in every group, the total viable cells derived from CAS/FLU combination-treated biofilms at any ratio were not significantly different from positive control. Overall, CAS/FLU combinations appeared to affect the quantity and cell architecture, but number of viable cell, of Candida albicans and Candida glabrata mixed biofilm. This antifungal effect was CAS concentration dependent.

  7. Spaceflight enhances cell aggregation and random budding in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Crabbé, Aurélie; Nielsen-Preiss, Sheila M; Woolley, Christine M; Barrila, Jennifer; Buchanan, Kent; McCracken, James; Inglis, Diane O; Searles, Stephen C; Nelman-Gonzalez, Mayra A; Ott, C Mark; Wilson, James W; Pierson, Duane L; Stefanyshyn-Piper, Heidemarie M; Hyman, Linda E; Nickerson, Cheryl A

    2013-01-01

    This study presents the first global transcriptional profiling and phenotypic characterization of the major human opportunistic fungal pathogen, Candida albicans, grown in spaceflight conditions. Microarray analysis revealed that C. albicans subjected to short-term spaceflight culture differentially regulated 452 genes compared to synchronous ground controls, which represented 8.3% of the analyzed ORFs. Spaceflight-cultured C. albicans-induced genes involved in cell aggregation (similar to flocculation), which was validated by microscopic and flow cytometry analysis. We also observed enhanced random budding of spaceflight-cultured cells as opposed to bipolar budding patterns for ground samples, in accordance with the gene expression data. Furthermore, genes involved in antifungal agent and stress resistance were differentially regulated in spaceflight, including induction of ABC transporters and members of the major facilitator family, downregulation of ergosterol-encoding genes, and upregulation of genes involved in oxidative stress resistance. Finally, downregulation of genes involved in actin cytoskeleton was observed. Interestingly, the transcriptional regulator Cap1 and over 30% of the Cap1 regulon was differentially expressed in spaceflight-cultured C. albicans. A potential role for Cap1 in the spaceflight response of C. albicans is suggested, as this regulator is involved in random budding, cell aggregation, and oxidative stress resistance; all related to observed spaceflight-associated changes of C. albicans. While culture of C. albicans in microgravity potentiates a global change in gene expression that could induce a virulence-related phenotype, no increased virulence in a murine intraperitoneal (i.p.) infection model was observed under the conditions of this study. Collectively, our data represent an important basis for the assessment of the risk that commensal flora could play during human spaceflight missions. Furthermore, since the low fluid

  8. Cellular Components Mediating Coadherence of Candida albicans and Fusobacterium nucleatum

    PubMed Central

    Wu, T.; Cen, L.; Kaplan, C.; Zhou, X.; Lux, R.; Shi, W.; He, X.

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic fungal pathogen found as part of the normal oral flora. It can be coisolated with Fusobacterium nucleatum, an opportunistic bacterial pathogen, from oral disease sites, such as those involved in refractory periodontitis and pulp necrosis. The physical coadherence between these 2 clinically important microbes has been well documented and suggested to play a role in facilitating their oral colonization and colocalization and contributing to polymicrobial pathogenesis. Previous studies indicated that the physical interaction between C. albicans and F. nucleatum was mediated by the carbohydrate components on the surface of C. albicans and the protein components on the Fusobaterium cell surface. However, the identities of the components involved still remain elusive. This study was aimed at identifying the genetic determinants involved in coaggregation between the 2 species. By screening a C. albicans SN152 mutant library and a panel of F. nucleatum 23726 outer membrane protein mutants, we identified FLO9, which encodes a putative adhesin-like cell wall mannoprotein of C. albicans and radD, an arginine-inhibitable adhesin-encoding gene in F. nucleatum that is involved in interspecies coadherence. Consistent with these findings, we demonstrated that the strong coaggregation between wild-type F. nucleatum 23726 and C. albicans SN152 in an in vitro assay could be greatly inhibited by arginine and mannose. Our study also suggested a complex multifaceted mechanism underlying physical interaction between C. albicans and F. nucleatum and for the first time revealed the identity of major genetic components involved in mediating the coaggregation. These observations provide useful knowledge for developing new targeted treatments for disrupting interactions between these 2 clinically relevant pathogens. PMID:26152186

  9. Antifungal agent susceptibilities and interpretation of Malassezia pachydermatis and Candida parapsilosis isolated from dogs with and without seborrheic dermatitis skin.

    PubMed

    Yurayart, Chompoonek; Nuchnoul, Noppawan; Moolkum, Pornsawan; Jirasuksiri, Supitcha; Niyomtham, Waree; Chindamporn, Ariya; Kajiwara, Susumu; Prapasarakul, Nuvee

    2013-10-01

    Malassezia pachydermatis and Candida parapsilosis are recognized as commensal yeasts on the skin of healthy dogs but also causative agents of eborrheic dermatitis, especially in atopic dogs. We determined and compared the susceptibility levels of yeasts isolated from dogs with and without seborrheic dermatitis (SD) using the disk diffusion method (DD) for itraconazole (ITZ), ketoconazole (KTZ), nystatin (NYS), terbinafine (TERB) and 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) and the broth microdilution method (BMD) for ITZ and KTZ. The reliability between the methods was assessed using an agreement analysis and linear regression. Forty-five M. pachydermatis and 28 C. parapsilosis isolates were identified based on physiological characteristics and an approved molecular analysis. By DD, all tested M. pachydermatis isolates were susceptible to ITZ, KTZ, NYS and TERB but resistant to 5-FC. Only 46 - 60% of the tested C. parapsilosis isolates were susceptible to KTZ, TERB and 5-FC, but ITZ and NYS were effective against all. By BMD, over 95% of M. pachydermatis isolates were susceptible to KTZ and ITZ with an MIC90 < 0.03 and 0.12 μg/ml, respectively. The frequency of KTZ- and ITZ-resistant C. parapsilosis was 29% and 7%, and the MIC90 values were 1 μg/ml and 0.5-1 μg/ml, respectively. Regarding the agreement analysis, 2.2% of minor errors were observed in M. pachydermatis and 0.2-1% of very major errors occurred among C. parapsilosis. There were no significant differences in the yeast resistance rates between dogs with and without SD. KTZ and ITZ were still efficacious for M. pachydermatis but a high rate of KTZ resistant was reported in C. parapsilosis.

  10. Polymicrobial biofilm formation by Candida albicans, Actinomyces naeslundii, and Streptococcus mutans is Candida albicans strain and medium dependent.

    PubMed

    Arzmi, Mohd Hafiz; Alnuaimi, Ali D; Dashper, Stuart; Cirillo, Nicola; Reynolds, Eric C; McCullough, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Oral biofilms comprise of extracellular polysaccharides and polymicrobial microorganisms. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of polymicrobial interactions of Candida albicans, Actinomyces naeslundii, and Streptococcus mutans on biofilm formation with the hypotheses that biofilm biomass and metabolic activity are both C. albicans strain and growth medium dependent. To study monospecific biofilms, C. albicans, A. naeslundii, and S. mutans were inoculated into artificial saliva medium (ASM) and RPMI-1640 in separate vials, whereas to study polymicrobial biofilm formation, the inoculum containing microorganisms was prepared in the same vial prior inoculation into a 96-well plate followed by 72 hours incubation. Finally, biofilm biomass and metabolic activity were measured using crystal violet and XTT assays, respectively. Our results showed variability of monospecies and polymicrobial biofilm biomass between C. albicans strains and growth medium. Based on cut-offs, out of 32, seven RPMI-grown biofilms had high biofilm biomass (HBB), whereas, in ASM-grown biofilms, 14 out of 32 were HBB. Of the 32 biofilms grown in RPMI-1640, 21 were high metabolic activity (HMA), whereas in ASM, there was no biofilm had HMA. Significant differences were observed between ASM and RPMI-grown biofilms with respect to metabolic activity (P <01). In conclusion, biofilm biomass and metabolic activity were both C. albicans strain and growth medium dependent.

  11. Galleria mellonella lysozyme induces apoptotic changes in Candida albicans cells.

    PubMed

    Sowa-Jasiłek, Aneta; Zdybicka-Barabas, Agnieszka; Stączek, Sylwia; Wydrych, Jerzy; Skrzypiec, Krzysztof; Mak, Paweł; Deryło, Kamil; Tchórzewski, Marek; Cytryńska, Małgorzata

    2016-12-01

    The greater wax moth Galleria mellonella has been increasingly used as a model host to determine Candida albicans virulence and efficacy of antifungal treatment. The G. mellonella lysozyme, similarly to its human counterpart, is a member of the c-type family of lysozymes that exhibits antibacterial and antifungal activity. However, in contrast to the relatively well explained bactericidal action, the mechanism of fungistatic and/or fungicidal activity of lysozymes is still not clear. In the present study we provide the direct evidences that the G. mellonella lysozyme binds to the protoplasts as well as to the intact C. albicans cells and decreases the survival rate of both these forms in a time-dependent manner. No enzymatic activity of the lysozyme towards typical chitinase and β-glucanase substrates was detected, indicating that hydrolysis of main fungal cell wall components is not responsible for anti-Candida activity of the lysozyme. On the other hand, pre-treatment of cells with tetraethylammonium, a potassium channel blocker, prevented them from the lysozyme action, suggesting that lysozyme acts by induction of programmed cell death. In fact, the C. albicans cells treated with the lysozyme exhibited typical apoptotic features, i.e. loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, phosphatidylserine exposure in the outer leaflet of the cell membrane, as well as chromatin condensation and DNA fragmentation.

  12. Germ tube-specific antigens of Candida albicans cell walls

    SciTech Connect

    Sundstrom, P.R.

    1986-01-01

    Studies were performed to characterize the surface differences between blastospores and germ tubes of the pathogenic, dimorphic yeast, Candida albicans, and to identify components of yeast cells responsible for these differences. Investigation of surfaces differences of the two growth forms was facilitated by the production of rabbit antiserum prepared against Formalin-treated yeast possessing germ tubes. To prepare antiserum specific for germ tubes, this serum was adsorbed with stationary phase blastospores. Whereas the unadsorbed antiserum reacted with both blastospore and germ tube forms by immunofluorescence and Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay, the adsorbed antiserum did not react with blastospores but detected germ tube-specific antigens in hyphal forms. The differences between blastospores and germ tubes of Candida albicans, were further studied by comparing enzymatic digests of cell walls of both growth forms in radiolabeled organisms. Organisms were labeled either on the surface with /sup 125/I, or metabolically with (/sup 35/S) methionine or (/sup 3/H) mannose. Three-surface-located components (as shown by antibody adsorption and elution experiments) were precipitated from Zymolase digests. All three components were mannoproteins as shown by their ability to bind Concanavalin A, and to be labeled in protein labeling procedures, and two of these (200,000 and 155,000 molecular weight) were germ tube specific, as shown by their ability to be precipitated by germ tube-specific antiserum. Monoclonal antibodies were prepared to C. albicans, using blastospores bearing germ tubes as immunogen.

  13. Nanocapsules with glycerol monolaurate: Effects on Candida albicans biofilms.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Leonardo Quintana Soares; Santos, Cayane Genro; Vaucher, Rodrigo de Almeida; Raffin, Renata Platcheck; Santos, Roberto Christ Vianna

    2016-08-01

    Candida albicans does not only occur in the free living planktonic form but also grows in surface-attached biofilm communities. Moreover, these biofilms appear to be the most common lifestyle and are involved in the majority of human Candida infections. Nanoparticles can be used as an alternative to conventional antimicrobial agents and can also act as carriers for antibiotics and other drugs. In view of this, the aim of the study was develop, characterize and verify the anti-biofilm potential of GML Nanocapsules against C. albicans. The GML Nanocapsules showed mean diameter of 193.2 nm, polydispersion index of 0.044, zeta potential of -23.3 mV and pH 6.32. The microdilution assay showed MIC of 15.5 μg mL(-1) to GML Nanocapsules and 31.25 μg mL(-1) to GML. The anti-biofilm assay showed the significantly reduction of biomass of C. albicans biofilm treated with GML Nanocapsules while the GML does not exhibit effect. The kinetic assay demonstrated that at 48 h, the GML Nanocapsules reduce 94% of formed biofilm. The positive results suggest the promisor alternative for this public health problem that is biofilm infections.

  14. Candida albicans biofilm on titanium: effect of peroxidase precoating

    PubMed Central

    Ahariz, Mohamed; Courtois, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    The present study aimed to document Candida albicans biofilm development on titanium and its modulation by a peroxidase-precoated material which can generate antimicrobials, such as hypoiodite or hypothiocyanite, from hydrogen peroxide, iodide, or thiocyanate. For this purpose, titanium (powder or foil) was suspended in Sabouraud liquid medium inoculated with C. albicans ATCC10231. After continuous stirring for 2–21 days at room temperature, the supernatant was monitored by turbidimetry at 600 nm and titanium washed three times in sterile Sabouraud broth. Using the tetrazolium salt MTT-formazan assay, the titanium-adherent fungal biomass was measured as 7.50 ± 0.60 × 106 blastoconidia per gram of titanium powder (n = 30) and 0.50 ± 0.04 × 106 blastoconidia per cm2 of titanium foil (n = 12). The presence of yeast on the surface of titanium was confirmed by microscopy both on fresh preparations and after calcofluor white staining. However, in the presence of peroxidase systems (lactoperoxidase with substrates such as hydrogen peroxide donor, iodide, or thiocyanate), Candida growth in both planktonic and attached phases appeared to be inhibited. Moreover, this study demonstrates the possible partition of peroxidase systems between titanium material (peroxidase-precoated) and liquid environment (containing peroxidase substrates) to limit C. albicans biofilm formation. PMID:22915919

  15. Polyketide Glycosides from Bionectria ochroleuca Inhibit Candida albicans Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    One of the challenges presented by Candida infections is that many of the isolates encountered in the clinic produce biofilms, which can decrease these pathogens’ susceptibilities to standard-of-care antibiotic therapies. Inhibitors of fungal biofilm formation offer a potential solution to counteracting some of the problems associated with Candida infections. A screening campaign utilizing samples from our fungal extract library revealed that a Bionectria ochroleuca isolate cultured on Cheerios breakfast cereal produced metabolites that blocked the in vitro formation of Candida albicans biofilms. A scale-up culture of the fungus was undertaken using mycobags (also known as mushroom bags or spawn bags), which afforded four known [TMC-151s C–F (1–4)] and three new [bionectriols B–D (5–7)] polyketide glycosides. All seven metabolites exhibited potent biofilm inhibition against C. albicans SC5314, as well as exerted synergistic antifungal activities in combination with amphotericin B. In this report, we describe the structure determination of the new metabolites, as well as compare the secondary metabolome profiles of fungi grown in flasks and mycobags. These studies demonstrate that mycobags offer a useful alternative to flask-based cultures for the preparative production of fungal secondary metabolites. PMID:25302529

  16. Production of Mannitol from a High Concentration of Glucose by Candida parapsilosis SK26.001.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qing; Zhang, Tao; Wei, Wenting; Mu, Wanmeng; Miao, Ming

    2017-01-01

    A novel strain, SK26.001, which can produce mannitol from a high concentration of glucose without the addition of fructose, was isolated from sugarcane juice. This strain was identified as Candida parapsilosis based on 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequence analysis and the morphological and physiological-biochemical characteristics of the strain. Under optimized fermentation conditions, the mannitol concentration in shake flasks reached 68.5 g/L. When batch fermentation was performed, the fed glucose was completely consumed after 72 h, resulting in a final mannitol concentration of 80.3 g/L. Fed-batch fermentation was then performed with glucose feed. During the fed-batch process, ammonia water was added to maintain the pH at 4.0. The mannitol concentration in the fermenter reached 97.1 g/L after 120 h, with a total glucose consumption of 284 g/L.

  17. Novel anti-Prelog stereospecific carbonyl reductases from Candida parapsilosis for asymmetric reduction of prochiral ketones

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Yao; Xiao, Rong; Xu, Yan; Montelione, Gaetano T.

    2014-01-01

    Application of biocatalysis in the synthesis of chiral molecules is one of the greenest technologies for the replacement of chemical routes due to its environmentally benign reaction conditions and unparalleled chemo-, regio-and stereoselectivities. We have been interested in searching for carbonyl reductase enzymes and assessing their substrate specificity and stereoselectivity. We now report a gene cluster identified in Candida parapsilosis that consists of four open reading frames including three putative stereospecific carbonyl reductases (scr1, scr2, and scr3) and an alcohol dehydrogenase (cpadh). These newly identified three stereospecific carbonyl reductases (SCRs) showed high catalytic activities for producing (S)-1-phenyl-1,2-ethanediol from 2-hydroxyacetophenone with NADPH as the coenzyme. Together with CPADH, all four enzymes from this cluster are carbonyl reductases with novel anti-Prelog stereoselectivity. SCR1 and SCR3 exhibited distinct specificities to acetophenone derivatives and chloro-substituted 2-hydroxyacetophenones, and especially very high activities to ethyl 4-chloro-3-oxobutyrate, a β-ketoester with important pharmaceutical potentials. Our study also showed that genomic mining is a powerful tool for the discovery of new enzymes. PMID:21505708

  18. Novel anti-Prelog stereospecific carbonyl reductases from Candida parapsilosis for asymmetric reduction of prochiral ketones.

    PubMed

    Nie, Yao; Xiao, Rong; Xu, Yan; Montelione, Gaetano T

    2011-06-07

    The application of biocatalysis to the synthesis of chiral molecules is one of the greenest technologies for the replacement of chemical routes due to its environmentally benign reaction conditions and unparalleled chemo-, regio- and stereoselectivities. We have been interested in searching for carbonyl reductase enzymes and assessing their substrate specificity and stereoselectivity. We now report a gene cluster identified in Candida parapsilosis that consists of four open reading frames including three putative stereospecific carbonyl reductases (scr1, scr2, and scr3) and an alcohol dehydrogenase (cpadh). These newly identified three stereospecific carbonyl reductases (SCRs) showed high catalytic activities for producing (S)-1-phenyl-1,2-ethanediol from 2-hydroxyacetophenone with NADPH as the coenzyme. Together with CPADH, all four enzymes from this cluster are carbonyl reductases with novel anti-Prelog stereoselectivity. SCR1 and SCR3 exhibited distinct specificities to acetophenone derivatives and chloro-substituted 2-hydroxyacetophenones, and especially very high activities towards ethyl 4-chloro-3-oxobutyrate, a β-ketoester with important pharmaceutical potential. Our study also showed that genomic mining is a powerful tool for the discovery of new enzymes.

  19. Mitochondrial Carriers Link the Catabolism of Hydroxyaromatic Compounds to the Central Metabolism in Candida parapsilosis

    PubMed Central

    Zeman, Igor; Neboháčová, Martina; Gérecová, Gabriela; Katonová, Kornélia; Jánošíková, Eva; Jakúbková, Michaela; Centárová, Ivana; Dunčková, Ivana; Tomáška, L'ubomír; Pryszcz, Leszek P.; Gabaldón, Toni; Nosek, Jozef

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenic yeast Candida parapsilosis metabolizes hydroxyderivatives of benzene and benzoic acid to compounds channeled into central metabolism, including the mitochondrially localized tricarboxylic acid cycle, via the 3-oxoadipate and gentisate pathways. The orchestration of both catabolic pathways with mitochondrial metabolism as well as their evolutionary origin is not fully understood. Our results show that the enzymes involved in these two pathways operate in the cytoplasm with the exception of the mitochondrially targeted 3-oxoadipate CoA-transferase (Osc1p) and 3-oxoadipyl-CoA thiolase (Oct1p) catalyzing the last two reactions of the 3-oxoadipate pathway. The cellular localization of the enzymes indicates that degradation of hydroxyaromatic compounds requires a shuttling of intermediates, cofactors, and products of the corresponding biochemical reactions between cytosol and mitochondria. Indeed, we found that yeast cells assimilating hydroxybenzoates increase the expression of genes SFC1, LEU5, YHM2, and MPC1 coding for succinate/fumarate carrier, coenzyme A carrier, oxoglutarate/citrate carrier, and the subunit of pyruvate carrier, respectively. A phylogenetic analysis uncovered distinct evolutionary trajectories for sparsely distributed gene clusters coding for enzymes of both pathways. Whereas the 3-oxoadipate pathway appears to have evolved by vertical descent combined with multiple losses, the gentisate pathway shows a striking pattern suggestive of horizontal gene transfer to the evolutionarily distant Mucorales. PMID:27707801

  20. Acid production by oral strains of Candida albicans and lactobacilli.

    PubMed

    Klinke, T; Kneist, S; de Soet, J J; Kuhlisch, E; Mauersberger, S; Forster, A; Klimm, W

    2009-01-01

    Both Candida albicans and lactobacilli are common colonizers of carious lesions in children and adolescents. The purpose of this study is to compare the velocity of acid production between C. albicans and several Lactobacillus species at different pH levels and concentrations of glucose. Washed, pure resting-cell suspensions were obtained by culturing a total of 28 oral isolates comprising the species C. albicans, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Lactobacillus paracasei paracasei, Lactobacillus paracasei tolerans and Lactobacillus delbrueckii lactis. Acid production from glucose was determined at a constant pH of 7.0, 5.5, 5.0 and 4.0 by repeated titrations with NaOH in an automated pH-stat system. Acid formation rates of yeast and lactobacilli proved to be similar at both neutral and low pH, while in a moderately acidic environment C. albicans produced less acid than the lactobacilli. Ion chromatographic analysis of the cell-free medium after titration revealed pyruvate to be the predominant organic acid anion secreted by C. albicans. The proportion of organic acids to overall acid production by the yeast was below 10% at neutral conditions, in contrast to 42-66% at pH 4.0. Compared to lactobacilli, yeast required a concentration of glucose that was about 50 times higher to allow acid production at half the maximum speed. Considering the clinical data in the literature about the frequency and proportions of microorganisms present in early childhood caries lesions, the contribution of oral lactobacilli as well as C. albicans to overall microbial acid formation appears to be important.

  1. The mPEG-PCL Copolymer for Selective Fermentation of Staphylococcus lugdunensis Against Candida parapsilosis in the Human Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Ming-Shan; Wang, Yanhan; Marito, Shinta; Huang, Stephen; Lin, Wan-Zhen; Gangoiti, Jon A; Barshop, Bruce A; Hyun, Choi; Lee, Woan-Ruah; Sanford, James A; Gallo, Richard L; Ran, Yuping; Chen, Wan-Tzu; Huang, Chun-Jen; Hsieh, Ming-Fa; Huang, Chun-Ming

    2017-01-01

    Many human skin diseases, such as seborrheic dermatitis, potentially occur due to the over-growth of fungi. It remains a challenge to develop fungicides with a lower risk of generating resistant fungi and non-specifically killing commensal microbes. Our probiotic approaches using a selective fermentation initiator of skin commensal bacteria, fermentation metabolites or their derivatives provide novel therapeutics to rein in the over-growth of fungi. Staphylococcus lugdunensis (S. lugdunensis) bacteria and Candida parapsilosis (C. parapsilosis) fungi coexist in the scalp microbiome. S. lugdunensis interfered with the growth of C. parapsilosis via fermentation. A methoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(ε-caprolactone) (mPEG-PCL) copolymer functioned as a selective fermentation initiator of S. lugdunensis, selectively triggering the S. lugdunensis fermentation to produce acetic and isovaleric acids. The acetic acid and its pro-drug diethyleneglycol diacetate (Ac-DEG-Ac) effectively suppressed the growth of C. parapsilosis in vitro and impeded the fungal expansion in the human dandruff. We demonstrate for the first time that S. lugdunensis is a skin probiotic bacterium that can exploit mPEG-PCL to yield fungicidal short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs). The concept of bacterial fermentation as a part of skin immunity to re-balance the dysbiotic microbiome warrants a novel avenue for studying the probiotic function of the skin microbiome in promoting health. PMID:28111598

  2. The mPEG-PCL Copolymer for Selective Fermentation of Staphylococcus lugdunensis Against Candida parapsilosis in the Human Microbiome.

    PubMed

    Kao, Ming-Shan; Wang, Yanhan; Marito, Shinta; Huang, Stephen; Lin, Wan-Zhen; Gangoiti, Jon A; Barshop, Bruce A; Hyun, Choi; Lee, Woan-Ruah; Sanford, James A; Gallo, Richard L; Ran, Yuping; Chen, Wan-Tzu; Huang, Chun-Jen; Hsieh, Ming-Fa; Huang, Chun-Ming

    2016-08-01

    Many human skin diseases, such as seborrheic dermatitis, potentially occur due to the over-growth of fungi. It remains a challenge to develop fungicides with a lower risk of generating resistant fungi and non-specifically killing commensal microbes. Our probiotic approaches using a selective fermentation initiator of skin commensal bacteria, fermentation metabolites or their derivatives provide novel therapeutics to rein in the over-growth of fungi. Staphylococcus lugdunensis (S. lugdunensis) bacteria and Candida parapsilosis (C. parapsilosis) fungi coexist in the scalp microbiome. S. lugdunensis interfered with the growth of C. parapsilosis via fermentation. A methoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(ε-caprolactone) (mPEG-PCL) copolymer functioned as a selective fermentation initiator of S. lugdunensis, selectively triggering the S. lugdunensis fermentation to produce acetic and isovaleric acids. The acetic acid and its pro-drug diethyleneglycol diacetate (Ac-DEG-Ac) effectively suppressed the growth of C. parapsilosis in vitro and impeded the fungal expansion in the human dandruff. We demonstrate for the first time that S. lugdunensis is a skin probiotic bacterium that can exploit mPEG-PCL to yield fungicidal short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs). The concept of bacterial fermentation as a part of skin immunity to re-balance the dysbiotic microbiome warrants a novel avenue for studying the probiotic function of the skin microbiome in promoting health.

  3. Enterococcus faecium Mediastinitis Complicated by Disseminated Candida parapsilosis Infection after Congenital Heart Surgery in a 4-Week-Old Baby

    PubMed Central

    Renk, Hanna; Neunhoeffer, Felix; Hölzl, Florian; Hofbeck, Michael; Kumpf, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Background. Cardiac surgery offers multiple treatment options for children with congenital heart defects. However, infectious complications still remain a major cause of morbidity and mortality in these patients. Mediastinitis is a detrimental complication in children undergoing cardiac surgery. The risk of mediastinitis after delayed sternal closure is up to 10%. Case Presentation. We report a case of Enterococcus faecium mediastinitis in a 4-week-old female baby on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation after Norwood procedure. Although repeated antibiotic irrigation, debridement, and aggressive antibiotic treatment were started early, the pulmonary situation deteriorated. Candida parapsilosis was isolated from bronchoalveolar lavage after pulmonary hemorrhage. Disseminated C. parapsilosis infection with pulmonary involvement was treated with liposomal amphotericin B. Subsequently, inflammatory markers increased again and eventually C. parapsilosis was isolated from the central venous catheter. Conclusion. Children undergoing delayed sternal closure have a higher risk of mediastinitis. Therefore, antibiotic prophylaxis, for example, for soft tissue infection seems justified. However, long-term antibiotic treatment is a risk factor for fungal superinfection. Antifungal treatment of disseminated C. parapsilosis infection may fail in PICU patients with nonbiological material in place due to capacity of this species to form biofilms on medical devices. Immediate removal of central venous catheters and other nonbiological material is life-saving in these patients. PMID:26605096

  4. Candida species biofilm and Candida albicans ALS3 polymorphisms in clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Bruder-Nascimento, Ariane; Camargo, Carlos Henrique; Mondelli, Alessandro Lia; Sugizaki, Maria Fátima; Sadatsune, Terue; Bagagli, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decades, there have been important changes in the epidemiology of Candida infections. In recent years, Candida species have emerged as important causes of invasive infections mainly among immunocompromised patients. This study analyzed Candida spp. isolates and compared the frequency and biofilm production of different species among the different sources of isolation: blood, urine, vulvovaginal secretions and peritoneal dialysis fluid. Biofilm production was quantified in 327 Candida isolates obtained from patients attended at a Brazilian tertiary public hospital (Botucatu, Sao Paulo). C. albicans ALS3 gene polymorphism was also evaluated by determining the number of repeated motifs in the central domain. Of the 198 total biofilm-positive isolates, 72 and 126 were considered as low and high biofilm producers, respectively. Biofilm production by C. albicans was significantly lower than that by non-albicans isolates and was most frequently observed in C. tropicalis. Biofilm production was more frequent among bloodstream isolates than other clinical sources, in urine, the isolates displayed a peculiar distribution by presenting two distinct peaks, one containing biofilm-negative isolates and the other containing isolates with intense biofilm production. The numbers of tandem-repeat copies per allele were not associated with biofilm production, suggesting the evolvement of other genetic determinants.

  5. Culture media profoundly affect Candida albicans and Candida tropicalis growth, adhesion and biofilm development

    PubMed Central

    Weerasekera, Manjula M; Wijesinghe, Gayan K; Jayarathna, Thilini A; Gunasekara, Chinthika P; Fernando, Neluka; Kottegoda, Nilwala; Samaranayake, Lakshman P

    2016-01-01

    As there are sparse data on the impact of growth media on the phenomenon of biofilm development for Candida we evaluated the efficacy of three culture media on growth, adhesion and biofilm formation of two pathogenic yeasts, Candida albicans and Candida tropicalis. The planktonic phase yeast growth, either as monocultures or mixed cultures, in sabouraud dextrose broth (SDB), yeast nitrogen base (YNB), and RPMI 1640 was compared, and adhesion as well as biofilm formation were monitored using MTT and crystal violet (CV) assays and scanning electron microscopy. Planktonic cells of C. albicans, C. tropicalis and their 1:1 co-culture showed maximal growth in SDB. C. albicans/C. tropicalis adhesion was significantly facilitated in RPMI 1640 although the YNB elicited the maximum growth for C. tropicalis. Similarly, the biofilm growth was uniformly higher for both species in RPMI 1640, and C. tropicalis was the slower biofilm former in all three media. Scanning electron microscopy images tended to confirm the results of MTT and CV assay. Taken together, our data indicate that researchers should pay heed to the choice of laboratory culture media when comparing relative planktonic/biofilm growth of Candida. There is also a need for standardisation of biofilm development media so as to facilitate cross comparisons between laboratories. PMID:27706381

  6. Disruption of Sphingolipid Biosynthesis Blocks Phagocytosis of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Tafesse, Fikadu G; Rashidfarrokhi, Ali; Schmidt, Florian I; Freinkman, Elizaveta; Dougan, Stephanie; Dougan, Michael; Esteban, Alexandre; Maruyama, Takeshi; Strijbis, Karin; Ploegh, Hidde L

    2015-10-01

    The ability of phagocytes to clear pathogens is an essential attribute of the innate immune response. The role of signaling lipid molecules such as phosphoinositides is well established, but the role of membrane sphingolipids in phagocytosis is largely unknown. Using a genetic approach and small molecule inhibitors, we show that phagocytosis of Candida albicans requires an intact sphingolipid biosynthetic pathway. Blockade of serine-palmitoyltransferase (SPT) and ceramide synthase-enzymes involved in sphingolipid biosynthesis- by myriocin and fumonisin B1, respectively, impaired phagocytosis by phagocytes. We used CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing to generate Sptlc2-deficient DC2.4 dendritic cells, which lack serine palmitoyl transferase activity. Sptlc2-/- DC2.4 cells exhibited a stark defect in phagocytosis, were unable to bind fungal particles and failed to form a normal phagocytic cup to engulf C. albicans. Supplementing the growth media with GM1, the major ganglioside present at the cell surface, restored phagocytic activity of Sptlc2-/- DC2.4 cells. While overall membrane trafficking and endocytic pathways remained functional, Sptlc2-/- DC2.4 cells express reduced levels of the pattern recognition receptors Dectin-1 and TLR2 at the cell surface. Consistent with the in vitro data, compromised sphingolipid biosynthesis in mice sensitizes the animal to C. albicans infection. Sphingolipid biosynthesis is therefore critical for phagocytosis and in vivo clearance of C. albicans.

  7. Transformations of inorganic mercury by Candida albicans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Yannai, S.; Berdicevsky, I.; Duek, L. )

    1991-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans were incubated with 0.25, 0.5, or 0.75 {mu}g of Hg (as HgCl{sub 2}) per ml of Nelson's medium in the presence of trace amounts of oxygen at 28{degree}C for 12 days. Two control media were used, one without added Hg and one without yeast inoculum. Yeast cell growth was estimated after 1, 2, 3, and 8 days of incubation. The contents of organomercury in the system and of elemental mercury released from the media and collected in traps were determined at the end of the experiments. The results were as follows: (1) C. albicans was the more mercury-resistant species, but both yeast species failed to grown in the media containing 0.75 {mu}g of Hg per ml.; (2) The amounts of organomercury produced by the two species were proportional to the amount of HgCl{sub 2} added to the medium. In all cases C. albicans produced considerably larger amounts of methylmercury than S. cerevisiae; (3) The amounts of elemental Hg produced were inversely proportional to the HgCl{sub 2} level added in the case of S. cerevisiae but were all similar in the case of C. albicans;and (4) Neither organomercury nor elemental Hg was produced in any of the control media.

  8. Effects of ambroxol on Candida albicans growth and biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Rene, Hernandez-Delgadillo; José, Martínez-Sanmiguel Juan; Isela, Sánchez-Nájera Rosa; Claudio, Cabral-Romero

    2014-04-01

    Typically, the onset of candidiasis is characterised by the appearance of a biofilm of Candida albicans, which is associated with several diseases including oral candidiasis in young and elderly people. The objective of this work was to investigate the in vitro fungicidal activity as well as the antibiofilm activity of ambroxol (AMB) against C. albicans growth. In the present investigation, the fungicidal activity of AMB was established using the cell viability 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Also the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of AMB required to inhibit the fungal growth was determined. Simultaneously, the antibiofilm activity of AMB was evaluated using fluorescence microscopy. The study revealed that 2 mg ml(-1) of AMB exhibited higher fungicidal activity than 3.3 mg ml(-1) of terbinafine, one of most common commercial antifungals. A MIC of 1 mg ml(-1) was determined for AMB to interfere with C. albicans growth. Furthermore, AMB was found to be effective in inhibiting the biofilm formation of C. albicans and exerted its fungicidal activity against the fungal cells interspersed in the preformed biofilm. The study suggests a potential role of the mucolytic agent, AMB, as an interesting therapeutic alternative in the treatment of oral candidiasis.

  9. Lipidomics and in Vitro Azole Resistance in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ashutosh; Mahto, Kaushal Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Abstract We have shown earlier that fluconazole (FLC) stress induces global changes in the lipidome of Candida albicans in clinically adapted isolates. However, several laboratories have developed adapted in vitro FLC resistant strains of C. albicans to study azole resistance mechanisms. This study aimed to identify the lipid changes associated with FLC resistance in these in vitro adapted isolates. Using comparative lipidomics and principal component and discriminant analyses, we observed gradual changes in several lipid classes and molecular species upon FLC exposure of in vitro resistant C. albicans strains. Although the lipid imprint of FLC in vitro resistant isolates was very distinct from that of clinical isolates of C. albicans, the overall changes in lipid class compositions were similar in both cases. For example, an increased sterol content and depleted sphingolipid levels were the salient features of FLC resistance in both conditions. Taken together, it appears that the overall cellular lipid homeostasis is a critical factor in the observed FLC resistance and in handling FLC stress in both clinical and laboratory situations. The new observations reported herein have implications for more efficacious antifungal drug development as well as understanding host–infectious agent interactions in postgenomics microbiology practice. PMID:23374108

  10. Disruption of Sphingolipid Biosynthesis Blocks Phagocytosis of Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Florian I.; Freinkman, Elizaveta; Dougan, Stephanie; Dougan, Michael; Esteban, Alexandre; Maruyama, Takeshi; Strijbis, Karin; Ploegh, Hidde L.

    2015-01-01

    The ability of phagocytes to clear pathogens is an essential attribute of the innate immune response. The role of signaling lipid molecules such as phosphoinositides is well established, but the role of membrane sphingolipids in phagocytosis is largely unknown. Using a genetic approach and small molecule inhibitors, we show that phagocytosis of Candida albicans requires an intact sphingolipid biosynthetic pathway. Blockade of serine-palmitoyltransferase (SPT) and ceramide synthase-enzymes involved in sphingolipid biosynthesis- by myriocin and fumonisin B1, respectively, impaired phagocytosis by phagocytes. We used CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing to generate Sptlc2-deficient DC2.4 dendritic cells, which lack serine palmitoyl transferase activity. Sptlc2-/- DC2.4 cells exhibited a stark defect in phagocytosis, were unable to bind fungal particles and failed to form a normal phagocytic cup to engulf C. albicans. Supplementing the growth media with GM1, the major ganglioside present at the cell surface, restored phagocytic activity of Sptlc2-/- DC2.4 cells. While overall membrane trafficking and endocytic pathways remained functional, Sptlc2-/- DC2.4 cells express reduced levels of the pattern recognition receptors Dectin-1 and TLR2 at the cell surface. Consistent with the in vitro data, compromised sphingolipid biosynthesis in mice sensitizes the animal to C. albicans infection. Sphingolipid biosynthesis is therefore critical for phagocytosis and in vivo clearance of C. albicans. PMID:26431038

  11. Hydrophobic polyoxins are resistant to intracellular degradation in Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, H A; Shenbagamurthi, P; Naider, F; Kundu, B; Becker, J M

    1986-01-01

    Two novel polyoxins, N-epsilon-(octanoyl)-lysyl-uracil polyoxin C (Oct-Lys-UPOC) and N-gamma-(octyl)-glutaminyluracil polyoxin C (Oct-Gln-UPOC), were synthesized by reacting uracil polyoxin C with the appropriate amino acid p-nitrophenyl ester. Oct-Lys-UPOC and Oct-Gln-UPOC were strong inhibitors (Kis = 1.7 X 10(-6)M) of chitin synthetase from Candida albicans membrane preparations. In a permeabilized-cell assay, Oct-Gln-UPOC had a 10-fold-lower inhibitory activity toward chitin synthetase than did the Oct-Lys-UPOC analog. Both compounds were resistant to hydrolysis by a cell extract of C. albicans H317; however, Oct-Gln-UPOC was hydrolyzed with a half-life of 23 min by a permeabilized-cell preparation. Oct-Lys-UPOC was resistant to hydrolysis by permeabilized cells. Oct-Gln-UPOC and Oct-Lys-UPOC did not compete with the transport of peptides or uridine into the cell. At concentrations up to 2 mM these two new polyoxins were ineffective in the inhibition of cell growth or reduction of cell viability, but they induced aberrant morphologies in C. albicans at a concentration of 0.25 mM. These data suggest that polyoxins containing hydrophobic amino acids retain strong chitin synthetase inhibitory activity and are resistant to cellular hydrolysis. They provide the first example of effective synthetic chitin synthetase inhibitors which are stable inside C. albicans. PMID:3524423

  12. Molecular methods for strain typing of Candida albicans: a review.

    PubMed

    Saghrouni, F; Ben Abdeljelil, J; Boukadida, J; Ben Said, M

    2013-06-01

    Candida albicans is one of the most medically important fungi because of its high frequency as a commensal and pathogenic microorganism causing superficial as well as invasive infections. Strain typing and delineation of the species are essential for understanding its biology, epidemiology and population structure. A wide range of molecular techniques have been used for this purpose including non-DNA-based methods (multi-locus enzyme electrophoresis), conventional DNA-based methods (electrophoretic karyotyping, random amplified polymorphic DNA, amplified fragment length polymorphism, restriction enzyme analysis with and without hybridization, rep-PCR) and DNA-based methods called exact typing methods because they generate unambiguous and highly reproducible typing data (including microsatellite length polymorphism and multi-locus sequence typing). In this review, the main molecular methods used for C. albicans strain typing are summarized, and their advantages and limitations are discussed with regard to their discriminatory power, reproducibility, cost and ease of performance.

  13. Adaptation of Candida albicans to commensalism in the gut.

    PubMed

    Prieto, Daniel; Correia, Inês; Pla, Jesús; Román, Elvira

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans is a common resident of the oral cavity, GI tract and vagina in healthy humans where it establishes a commensal relationship with the host. Colonization of the gut, which is an important niche for the microbe, may lead to systemic dissemination and disease upon alteration of host defences. Understanding the mechanisms responsible for the adaptation of C. albicans to the gut is therefore important for the design of new ways of combating fungal diseases. In this review we discuss the available models to study commensalism of this yeast, the main mechanisms controlling the establishment of the fungus, such as microbiota, mucus layer and antimicrobial peptides, and the gene regulatory circuits that ensure its survival in this niche.

  14. An immunological link between Candida albicans colonization and Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Gerard, Romain; Sendid, Boualem; Colombel, Jean-Frederic; Poulain, Daniel; Jouault, Thierry

    2015-06-01

    The etiology of Crohn's disease (CD), an autoimmune, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) which affects approximately one million people in Europe, is still unclear. Nevertheless, it is widely accepted that CD could result from an inappropriate inflammatory response to intestinal microorganisms in a genetically susceptible host. Most studies to date have concerned the involvement of bacteria in disease progression. In addition to bacteria, there appears to be a possible link between the commensal yeast Candida albicans and disease development. In this review, in an attempt to link the gut colonization process and the development of CD, we describe the different pathways that are involved in the progression of CD and in the host response to C. albicans, making the yeast a possible initiator of the inflammatory process observed in this IBD.

  15. Recent advances on Candida albicans biology and virulence

    PubMed Central

    Sellam, Adnane; Whiteway, Malcolm

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans is an important human fungal pathogen, in terms of both its clinical significance and its use as an experimental model for scientific investigation. Although this opportunistic pathogen is a natural component of the human flora, it can cause life-threatening infections in immunosuppressed patients. There are currently a limited number of antifungal molecules and drug targets, and increasing resistance to the front-line therapeutics, demonstrating a clear need for new antifungal drugs. Understanding the biology of this pathogen is an important prerequisite for identifying new drug targets for antifungal therapeutics. In this review, we highlight some recent developments that help us to understand how virulence traits are regulated at the molecular level, in addition to technical advances that improve the ability of genome editing in C. albicans. PMID:27853524

  16. Quantitative relationships of Candida albicans infections and dressing patterns in Nigerian women.

    PubMed Central

    Elegbe, I A; Elegbe, I

    1983-01-01

    Candida albicans colony counts were far higher in patients with vaginitis wearing tight fitting clothing than in patients wearing loose fitting clothing. In Ile-Ife, Nigeria, tight fitting dresses, woolen and corduroy jeans, coupled with nylon underwear, appear to create an environment favorable to Candida albicans colonization. PMID:6338749

  17. Quantitative relationships of Candida albicans infections and dressing patterns in Nigerian women.

    PubMed

    Elegbe, I A; Elegbe, I

    1983-04-01

    Candida albicans colony counts were far higher in patients with vaginitis wearing tight fitting clothing than in patients wearing loose fitting clothing. In Ile-Ife, Nigeria, tight fitting dresses, woolen and corduroy jeans, coupled with nylon underwear, appear to create an environment favorable to Candida albicans colonization.

  18. Candida albicans biofilms: building a heterogeneous, drug-tolerant environment.

    PubMed

    Bonhomme, Julie; d'Enfert, Christophe

    2013-08-01

    Fungi are able to form biofilms on medical implants, causing serious infections. A better understanding of fungal biofilm formation is necessary to develop tools for detection or prevention and to identify new antifungal strategies. This review explores recent advances in the characterization at the molecular level of fungal biofilms, especially those formed by the yeast Candida albicans: the identification of complex transcriptional networks that control their formation; the pivotal role of the extracellular matrix in biofilm antifungal tolerance; and the knowledge gained on the physiology of biofilm cells and heterogeneity within these communities. These findings may help develop new, targeted therapeutic strategies.

  19. Targeted gene disruption in Candida parapsilosis demonstrates a role for CPAR2_404800 in adhesion to a biotic surface and in a murine model of ascending urinary tract infection

    PubMed Central

    Bertini, Alessia; Zoppo, Marina; Lombardi, Lisa; Rizzato, Cosmeri; De Carolis, Elena; Vella, Antonietta; Torelli, Riccardo; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Tavanti, Arianna

    2016-01-01

    Candida parapsilosis is an emerging opportunistic pathogen, second in frequency only to C. albicans and commonly associated with both mucosal and systemic infections. Adhesion to biotic surfaces is a key step for the development of mycoses. The C. parapsilosis genome encodes 5 predicted agglutinin-like sequence proteins and their precise role in the adhesion process still remains to be elucidated. In this study, we focused on the putative adhesin Cpar2_404800, in view of its high homology to the most important adhesion molecule in C. albicans. Two independent lineages of C. parapsilosis CPAR2_404800 heterozygous and null mutants were obtained by site-specific deletion. CPAR2_404800 mutants did not differ from wild-type strain in terms of in vitro growth or in their ability to undergo morphogenesis. However, when compared for adhesion to a biotic surface, CPAR2_404800 null mutants exhibited a marked reduction in their adhesion to buccal epithelial cells (>60% reduction of adhesion index). Reintroduction of one copy of CPAR2_404800 gene in the null background restored wild type phenotype. A murine model of urinary tract infection was used to elucidate the in vivo contribution of CPAR2_404800. A 0.5 and 1 log10 reduction in colony forming unit numbers (per gram) was observed respectively in bladder and kidneys obtained from mice infected with null mutant compared to wild-type infected ones. Taken together, these findings provide the first evidence for a direct role of CPAR2_404800 in C. parapsilosis adhesion to host surfaces and demonstrate its contribution to the pathogenesis of murine urinary candidiasis. PMID:26632333

  20. Synergistic Effects and Mechanisms of Budesonide in Combination with Fluconazole against Resistant Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiuyun; Yu, Cuixiang; Huang, Xin; Sun, Shujuan

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans is an important opportunistic pathogen, causing both superficial mucosal infections and life-threatening systemic diseases in the clinic. The emergence of drug resistance in Candida albicans has become a noteworthy phenomenon due to the extensive use of antifungal agents and the development of biofilms. This study showed that budesonide potentiates the antifungal effect of fluconazole against fluconazole-resistant Candida albicans strains both in vitro and in vivo. In addition, our results demonstrated, for the first time, that the combination of fluconazole and budesonide can reverse the resistance of Candida albicans by inhibiting the function of drug transporters, reducing the formation of biofilms, promoting apoptosis and inhibiting the activity of extracellular phospholipases. This is the first study implicating the effects and mechanisms of budesonide against Candida albicans alone or in combination with fluconazole, which may ultimately lead to the identification of new potential antifungal targets. PMID:28006028

  1. A Case Report of Penile Infection Caused by Fluconazole- and Terbinafine-Resistant Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yongxuan; Hu, Yanqing; Lu, Yan; Huang, Shiyun; Liu, Kangxing; Han, Xue; Mao, Zuhao; Wu, Zhong; Zhou, Xianyi

    2017-04-01

    Candida albicans is the most common pathogen that causes balanoposthitis. It often causes recurrence of symptoms probably due to its antifungal resistance. A significant number of balanitis Candida albicans isolates are resistant to azole and terbinafine antifungal agents in vitro. However, balanoposthitis caused by fluconazole- and terbinafine-resistant Candida albicans has rarely been reported. Here, we describe a case of a recurrent penile infection caused by fluconazole- and terbinafine-resistant Candida albicans, as well as the treatments administered to this patient. The isolate from the patient was tested for drug susceptibility in vitro. It was sensitive to itraconazole, voriconazole, clotrimazole and amphotericin B, but not to terbinafine and fluconazole. Thus, oral itraconazole was administrated to this patient with resistant Candida albicans penile infection. The symptoms were improved, and mycological examination result was negative. Follow-up treatment of this patient for 3 months showed no recurrence.

  2. Evaluation of the correlation of caspofungin MICs and treatment outcome in murine infections by wild type strains of Candida parapsilosis.

    PubMed

    Salas, Valentina; Pastor, F Javier; Capilla, Javier; Sutton, Deanna A; Mayayo, Emilio; Fothergill, Annette W; Rinaldi, Michael G; Guarro, Josep

    2013-09-01

    We have evaluated the in vitro activity of caspofungin against 36 wild-type strains of Candida parapsilosis sensu stricto using 3 techniques: broth microdilution, disk diffusion, and the determination of minimal fungicidal concentration (MFC). The first 2 methods showed a good in vitro activity of caspofungin, but the MFCs were ≥2 dilutions above their corresponding MICs. In a murine model of disseminated infection, we evaluated the efficacy of caspofungin at 5 mg/kg against 8 strains of C. parapsilosis representing different degrees of in vitro susceptibility (0.12-1 μg/mL). All the isolates responded to treatment and (1→3)-β-D-glucan levels were reduced in all the cases; however, the study revealed differences among isolates, since caspofungin reduced the tissue burden of mice infected with isolates with MICs ≤0.5 μg/mL but was less effective against those with MICs of 1 μg/mL.

  3. Glucose modulates antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation of Candida albicans in biofilms.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Luis Cláudio; Kato, Ilka Tiemy; Prates, Renato Araujo; Sabino, Caetano Padial; Yoshimura, Tania Mateus; Silva, Tamires Oliveira; Ribeiro, Martha Simões

    2017-03-01

    Candida albicans biofilm is a main cause of infections associated with medical devices such as catheters, contact lens and artificial joint prosthesis. The current treatment comprises antifungal chemotherapy that presents low success rates. Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) involves the combination of a photosensitizing compound (PS) and light to generate oxidative stress that has demonstrated effective antimicrobial activity against a broad-spectrum of pathogens, including C. albicans. This fungus senses glucose inducing an upregulation of membrane transporters that can facilitate PS uptake into the cell. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of glucose on methylene blue (MB) uptake and its influence on PDI efficiency when combined to a red LED with central wavelength at λ=660nm. C. albicans biofilms were grown on hydrogel disks. Prior to PDI assays, MB uptake tests were performed with and without glucose-sensitization. In this system, the optimum PS administration was determined as 500μM of MB in contact with the biofilm during 30min before irradiation. Irradiation was performed during 3, 6, 9, 12, 15 and 18min with irradiance of 127.3mW/cm(2). Our results showed that glucose was able to increase MB uptake in C. albicans cells. In addition, PDI without glucose showed a higher viability reduction until 6min; after 9min, glucose group demonstrated a significant decrease in cell viability when compared to glucose-free group. Taken together, our data suggest that glucose is capable to enhance MB uptake and modulate photodynamic inactivation of C. albicans biofilm.

  4. Susceptibility of Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis to Photodynamic Therapy Using Four Dyes as the Photosensitizer

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Nasim; Yazdanpanah, Samira; Saki, Maryam; Rezazadeh, Fahimeh; Ghapanchi, Janan; Zomorodian, Kamiar

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem: Oral candidiasis is the most common opportunistic infection affecting the human oral cavity. Photodynamic therapy, as one of its proposed treatment modalities, needs a distinct dye for achieving the best effect. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate photosensitization effects of four distinct dyes on standard suspension of Candida albicans (C. albicans) and Candida dubliniensis (C. dubliniensis) and biofilm of C. albicans considering the obtained optimum dye concentration and duration of laser irradiation. Materials and Method: In this in vitro study, colony forming units (CFU) of two sets of four groups of Laser plus Dye (L+D+), Dye (L-D+), Laser (L+D-) and No Laser, No Dye (L-D-) were assessed individually with different methylene blue concentrations and laser irradiation period. The photodynamic therapy effect on standard suspension of Candida species (using methylene blue, aniline blue, malachite green and crystal violet) were studied based on the obtained results. Similar investigation was performed on biofilm of C. albicans using the spectral absorbance. Data were imported to SPSS and assessed by statistical tests of analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey test (α= 0.05). Results: CFU among the different dye concentration and irradiation time decrease in dose- and time-dependent manner (p> 0.05), all of which were significantly lower than the control groups (p< 0.05). Among the examined photosensitizers, there was no statistically significant difference, (p> 0.05) though all of them were significantly decrease CFU compared with the control groups (p< 0.05). In L+D- and L+D+ groups, biofilm was significantly destroyed more than that of L-D- (p< 0.05). Conclusion: Photodynamic therapy might be used as an effective procedure to treat Candida associated mucocutaneous diseases and killing biofilm in the infected surfaces such as dentures. PMID:27942552

  5. Simple, Low-Cost Detection of Candida parapsilosis Complex Isolates and Molecular Fingerprinting of Candida orthopsilosis Strains in Kuwait by ITS Region Sequencing and Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism Analysis.

    PubMed

    Asadzadeh, Mohammad; Ahmad, Suhail; Hagen, Ferry; Meis, Jacques F; Al-Sweih, Noura; Khan, Ziauddin

    2015-01-01

    Candida parapsilosis has now emerged as the second or third most important cause of healthcare-associated Candida infections. Molecular studies have shown that phenotypically identified C. parapsilosis isolates represent a complex of three species, namely, C. parapsilosis, C. orthopsilosis and C. metapsilosis. Lodderomyces elongisporus is another species phenotypically closely related to the C. parapsilosis-complex. The aim of this study was to develop a simple, low cost multiplex (m) PCR assay for species-specific identification of C. parapsilosis complex isolates and to study genetic relatedness of C. orthopsilosis isolates in Kuwait. Species-specific amplicons from C. parapsilosis (171 bp), C. orthopsilosis (109 bp), C. metapsilosis (217 bp) and L. elongisporus (258 bp) were obtained in mPCR. Clinical isolates identified as C. parapsilosis (n = 380) by Vitek2 in Kuwait and an international collection of 27 C. parapsilosis complex and L. elongisporus isolates previously characterized by rDNA sequencing were analyzed to evaluate mPCR. Species-specific PCR and DNA sequencing of internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of rDNA were performed to validate the results of mPCR. Fingerprinting of 19 clinical C. orthopsilosis isolates (including 4 isolates from a previous study) was performed by amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis. Phenotypically identified C. parapsilosis isolates (n = 380) were identified as C. parapsilosis sensu stricto (n = 361), C. orthopsilosis (n = 15), C. metapsilosis (n = 1) and L. elongisporus (n = 3) by mPCR. The mPCR also accurately detected all epidemiologically unrelated C. parapsilosis complex and L. elongisporus isolates. The 19 C. orthopsilosis isolates obtained from 16 patients were divided into 3 haplotypes based on ITS region sequence data. Seven distinct genotypes were identified among the 19 C. orthopsilosis isolates by AFLP including a dominant genotype (AFLP1) comprising 11 isolates recovered from 10 patients. A

  6. Silver colloidal nanoparticles: antifungal effect against adhered cells and biofilms of Candida albicans and Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, D R; Gorup, L F; Silva, S; Negri, M; de Camargo, E R; Oliveira, R; Barbosa, D B; Henriques, M

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of silver nanoparticles (SN) against Candida albicans and Candida glabrata adhered cells and biofilms. SN (average diameter 5 nm) were synthesized by silver nitrate reduction with sodium citrate and stabilized with ammonia. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) tests were performed for C. albicans (n = 2) and C. glabrata (n = 2) grown in suspension following the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute microbroth dilution method. SN were applied to adhered cells (2 h) or biofilms (48 h) and after 24 h of contact their effect was assessed by enumeration of colony forming units (CFUs) and quantification of total biomass (by crystal violet staining). The MIC results showed that SN were fungicidal against all strains tested at very low concentrations (0.4-3.3 μg ml(-1)). Furthermore, SN were more effective in reducing biofilm biomass when applied to adhered cells (2 h) than to pre-formed biofilms (48 h), with the exception of C. glabrata ATCC, which in both cases showed a reduction ∼90%. Regarding cell viability, SN were highly effective on adhered C. glabrata and respective biofilms. On C. albicans the effect was not so evident but there was also a reduction in the number of viable biofilm cells. In summary, SN may have the potential to be an effective alternative to conventional antifungal agents for future therapies in Candida-associated denture stomatitis.

  7. Unusually large telomeric repeats in the yeast Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    McEachern, M J; Hicks, J B

    1993-01-01

    We have identified sequences at the telomeres of the yeast Candida albicans and have found that they are composed of tandem copies of a 23-bp sequence. Through the cloning of native telomeric ends and the characterization and cloning of a "healed" end, we demonstrate that these repeated sequences are sufficient to function as a telomere. All copies of the 23-bp repeat that have been sequenced from a number of C. albicans strains are identical. In contrast, adjacent subtelomeric sequences are variable both between strains and within the WO-1 strain. In the WO-1 strain, the lengths of the telomeres are dependent upon growth temperature and are substantially longer at higher temperatures. Telomere growth is accompanied by increases in the number of the 23-bp repeats present on the telomeric fragments. These results suggest that either telomerase-maintained telomeres can be more complex in structure than was previously imagined or that Candida telomeres are maintained via a telomerase-independent mechanism. Images PMID:8417351

  8. SOME CYTOLOGICAL AND PATHOGENIC PROPERTIES OF SPHEROPLASTS OF CANDIDA ALBICANS

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, George S.; Friedman, Lorraine; Kofroth, Judith F.

    1964-01-01

    Kobayashi, George S. (Tulane University, New Orleans, La.), Lorraine Friedman, and Judith F. Kofroth. Some cytological and pathogenic properties of spheroplasts of Candida albicans. J. Bacteriol. 88:795–801. 1964.—Spheroplasts of Candida albicans were prepared by use of an enzymatic mixture from the digestive tract of the snail Helix pomatia. Untreated cells exhibited well-defined cell walls, whereas such structures were absent from spheroplasts. The intravenous inoculation of either spheroplasts or intact cells into rabbits produced a fever which was apparent within 30 min, the “immediate” fever response characteristic of microbial endotoxin. Cell-wall fragments of enzyme-treated cells did not induce a convincing pyrogenic response. When the inoculum was viable, body temperatures did not return to normal but remained elevated until death of the animal 1 or more days later, exhibiting the “delayed” fever of infection. The gross pathological picture in animals succumbing to infection by viable spheroplasts was similar to that obtained with untreated yeast cells. Images PMID:14208520

  9. Ultrastructural analysis of Candida albicans when exposed to silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Vazquez-Muñoz, Roberto; Avalos-Borja, Miguel; Castro-Longoria, Ernestina

    2014-01-01

    Candida albicans is the most common fungal pathogen in humans, and recently some studies have reported the antifungal activity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) against some Candida species. However, ultrastructural analyses on the interaction of AgNPs with these microorganisms have not been reported. In this work we evaluated the effect of AgNPs on C. albicans, and the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was found to have a fungicidal effect. The IC50 was also determined, and the use of AgNPs with fluconazole (FLC), a fungistatic drug, reduced cell proliferation. In order to understand how AgNPs interact with living cells, the ultrastructural distribution of AgNPs in this fungus was determined. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis revealed a high accumulation of AgNPs outside the cells but also smaller nanoparticles (NPs) localized throughout the cytoplasm. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) analysis confirmed the presence of intracellular silver. From our results it is assumed that AgNPs used in this study do not penetrate the cell, but instead release silver ions that infiltrate into the cell leading to the formation of NPs through reduction by organic compounds present in the cell wall and cytoplasm.

  10. Ultrastructural Analysis of Candida albicans When Exposed to Silver Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez-Muñoz, Roberto; Avalos-Borja, Miguel; Castro-Longoria, Ernestina

    2014-01-01

    Candida albicans is the most common fungal pathogen in humans, and recently some studies have reported the antifungal activity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) against some Candida species. However, ultrastructural analyses on the interaction of AgNPs with these microorganisms have not been reported. In this work we evaluated the effect of AgNPs on C. albicans, and the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was found to have a fungicidal effect. The IC50 was also determined, and the use of AgNPs with fluconazole (FLC), a fungistatic drug, reduced cell proliferation. In order to understand how AgNPs interact with living cells, the ultrastructural distribution of AgNPs in this fungus was determined. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis revealed a high accumulation of AgNPs outside the cells but also smaller nanoparticles (NPs) localized throughout the cytoplasm. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) analysis confirmed the presence of intracellular silver. From our results it is assumed that AgNPs used in this study do not penetrate the cell, but instead release silver ions that infiltrate into the cell leading to the formation of NPs through reduction by organic compounds present in the cell wall and cytoplasm. PMID:25290909

  11. Antimicrobial effects of liquid anesthetic isoflurane on Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Barodka, Viachaslau M; Acheampong, Edward; Powell, Garry; Lobach, Ludmila; Logan, David A; Parveen, Zahida; Armstead, Valerie; Mukhtar, Muhammad

    2006-01-01

    Candida albicans is a dimorphic fungus that can grow in yeast morphology or hyphal form depending on the surrounding environment. This ubiquitous fungus is present in skin and mucus membranes as a potential pathogen that under opportunistic conditions causes a series of systemic and superficial infections known as candidiasis, moniliasis or simply candidiasis. There has been a steady increase in the prevalence of candidiasis that is expressed in more virulent forms of infection. Although candidiasis is commonly manifested as mucocutaneous disease, life-threatening systemic invasion by this fungus can occur in every part of the body. The severity of candidal infections is associated with its morphological shift such that the hyphal morphology of the fungus is most invasive. Of importance, aberrant multiplication of Candida yeast is also associated with the pathogenesis of certain mucosal diseases. In this study, we assessed the anti-candidal activity of the volatile anesthetic isoflurane in liquid form in comparison with the anti-fungal agent amphotericin B in an in vitro culture system. Exposure of C. albicans to isoflurane (0.3% volume/volume and above) inhibited multiplication of yeast as well as formation of hyphae. These data suggest development of potential topical application of isoflurane for controlling a series of cutaneous and genital infections associated with this fungus. Elucidiation of the mechanism by which isoflurane effects fungal growth could offer therapeutic potential for certain systemic fungal infections. PMID:17094810

  12. Chloroquine sensitizes biofilms of Candida albicans to antifungal azoles.

    PubMed

    Shinde, Ravikumar Bapurao; Raut, Jayant Shankar; Chauhan, Nitin Mahendra; Karuppayil, Sankunny Mohan

    2013-01-01

    Biofilms formed by Candida albicans, a human pathogen, are known to be resistant to different antifungal agents. Novel strategies to combat the biofilm associated Candida infections like multiple drug therapy are being explored. In this study, potential of chloroquine to be a partner drug in combination with four antifungal agents, namely fluconazole, voriconazole, amphotericin B, and caspofungin, was explored against biofilms of C. albicans. Activity of various concentrations of chloroquine in combination with a particular antifungal drug was analyzed in a checkerboard format. Growth of biofilm in presence of drugs was analyzed by XTT-assay, in terms of relative metabolic activity compared to that of drug free control. Results obtained by XTT-metabolic assay were confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. The interactions between chloroquine and four antifungal drugs were determined by calculating fractional inhibitory concentration indices. Azole resistance in biofilms was reverted significantly (p<0.05) in presence of 250μg/mL of chloroquine, which resulted in inhibition of biofilms at very low concentrations of antifungal drugs. No significant alteration in the sensitivity of biofilms to caspofungin and amphotericin B was evident in combination with chloroquine. This study for the first time indicates that chloroquine potentiates anti-biofilm activity of fluconazole and voriconazole.

  13. Candida albicans Ultrastructure: Colonization and Invasion of Oral Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Howlett, Julie A.; Squier, Christopher A.

    1980-01-01

    The colonization and invasion of various animal oral mucosae by Candida albicans were examined in an organ culture model. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy of the oral epithelium between 12 and 30 h after inoculation with the fungus revealed the morphological relationships between host and parasite. Examination of the fungi in thin sections showed five distinct layers in the cell wall of C. albicans within the epithelium, but changes were evident in the organization and definition of the outer cell wall layers in budding hyphae and in hyphae participating in colonization and invasion of the epithelial cells. Adherence of the fungus to the superficial cells of the oral mucosa appeared to involve intimate contact between the epithelial cell surface and the deeper layers of the fungal cell wall. During invasion a close seal was maintained between the invading hyphae and the surrounding epithelial cell envelope, there being no other evidence of damage to the host cell surface except at the site of entry. Within the epithelial cells there was only occasional loss of cytoplasmic components in the vicinity of the invading hyphae. These findings would suggest that enzymatic lysis associated with the invasive process is localized and that the mechanical support provided by surface adherence and the intimate association between the fungus and the epithelial cell envelope may permit growth of Candida on through the epithelium. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 PMID:6995338

  14. Differentiation of Candida dubliniensis from Candida albicans on rosemary extract agar and oregano extract agar.

    PubMed

    de Loreto, Erico Silva; Pozzatti, Patrícia; Alves Scheid, Liliane; Santurio, Deise; Morais Santurio, Janio; Alves, Sydney Hartz

    2008-01-01

    Candida dubliniensis is a recently described pathogenic species which shares many phenotypic features with Candida albicans and therefore, may be misidentified in microbiological laboratories. Because molecular methods can be onerous and unfeasible in routine mycological laboratories with restricted budgets such as those in developing countries, phenotypic techniques have been encouraged in the development of differential media for the presumptive identification of these species. We examined the colony morphology and chlamydospore production of 30 C. dubliniensis isolates and 100 C. albicans isolates on two new proposed media: rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) extract agar (REA) and oregano (Origanum vulgare) extract agar (OEA). These substrates are traditionally used as spices and medicinal herbs. In both of these media, all C. dubliniensis isolates (100%) showed rough colonies with peripheral hyphal fringes and abundant chlamydospores after 24 to 48 hr of incubation at 25 degrees C. In contrast, under the same conditions, all isolates of C. albicans (100%) showed smooth colonies without hyphal fringes or chlamydospores. In conclusion, REA and OEA offer a simple, rapid, and inexpensive screening media for the differentiation of C. albicans and C. dubliniensis.

  15. Candida albicans repetitive elements display epigenetic diversity and plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Freire-Benéitez, Verónica; Price, R. Jordan; Tarrant, Daniel; Berman, Judith; Buscaino, Alessia

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptionally silent heterochromatin is associated with repetitive DNA. It is poorly understood whether and how heterochromatin differs between different organisms and whether its structure can be remodelled in response to environmental signals. Here, we address this question by analysing the chromatin state associated with DNA repeats in the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans. Our analyses indicate that, contrary to model systems, each type of repetitive element is assembled into a distinct chromatin state. Classical Sir2-dependent hypoacetylated and hypomethylated chromatin is associated with the rDNA locus while telomeric regions are assembled into a weak heterochromatin that is only mildly hypoacetylated and hypomethylated. Major Repeat Sequences, a class of tandem repeats, are assembled into an intermediate chromatin state bearing features of both euchromatin and heterochromatin. Marker gene silencing assays and genome-wide RNA sequencing reveals that C. albicans heterochromatin represses expression of repeat-associated coding and non-coding RNAs. We find that telomeric heterochromatin is dynamic and remodelled upon an environmental change. Weak heterochromatin is associated with telomeres at 30 °C, while robust heterochromatin is assembled over these regions at 39 °C, a temperature mimicking moderate fever in the host. Thus in C. albicans, differential chromatin states controls gene expression and epigenetic plasticity is linked to adaptation. PMID:26971880

  16. Potent Synergy between Spirocyclic Pyrrolidinoindolinones and Fluconazole against Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Premachandra, Ilandari Dewage Udara Anulal; Scott, Kevin A; Shen, Chengtian; Wang, Fuqiang; Lane, Shelley; Liu, Haoping; Van Vranken, David L

    2015-10-01

    A spiroindolinone, (1S,3R,3aR,6aS)-1-benzyl-6'-chloro-5-(4-fluorophenyl)-7'-methylspiro[1,2,3a,6a-tetrahydropyrrolo[3,4-c]pyrrole-3,3'-1H-indole]-2',4,6-trione, was previously reported to enhance the antifungal effect of fluconazole against Candida albicans. A diastereomer of this compound was synthesized, along with various analogues. Many of the compounds were shown to enhance the antifungal effect of fluconazole against C. albicans, some with exquisite potency. One spirocyclic piperazine derivative, which we have named synazo-1, was found to enhance the effect of fluconazole with an EC50 value of 300 pM against a susceptible strain of C. albicans and going as low as 2 nM against some resistant strains. Synazo-1 exhibits true synergy with fluconazole, with an FIC index below 0.5 in the strains tested. Synazo-1 exhibited low toxicity in mammalian cells relative to the concentrations required for antifungal synergy.

  17. Genetic and phenotypic intra-species variation in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Hirakawa, Matthew P; Martinez, Diego A; Sakthikumar, Sharadha; Anderson, Matthew Z; Berlin, Aaron; Gujja, Sharvari; Zeng, Qiandong; Zisson, Ethan; Wang, Joshua M; Greenberg, Joshua M; Berman, Judith; Bennett, Richard J; Cuomo, Christina A

    2015-03-01

    Candida albicans is a commensal fungus of the human gastrointestinal tract and a prevalent opportunistic pathogen. To examine diversity within this species, extensive genomic and phenotypic analyses were performed on 21 clinical C. albicans isolates. Genomic variation was evident in the form of polymorphisms, copy number variations, chromosomal inversions, subtelomeric hypervariation, loss of heterozygosity (LOH), and whole or partial chromosome aneuploidies. All 21 strains were diploid, although karyotypic changes were present in eight of the 21 isolates, with multiple strains being trisomic for Chromosome 4 or Chromosome 7. Aneuploid strains exhibited a general fitness defect relative to euploid strains when grown under replete conditions. All strains were also heterozygous, yet multiple, distinct LOH tracts were present in each isolate. Higher overall levels of genome heterozygosity correlated with faster growth rates, consistent with increased overall fitness. Genes with the highest rates of amino acid substitutions included many cell wall proteins, implicating fast evolving changes in cell adhesion and host interactions. One clinical isolate, P94015, presented several striking properties including a novel cellular phenotype, an inability to filament, drug resistance, and decreased virulence. Several of these properties were shown to be due to a homozygous nonsense mutation in the EFG1 gene. Furthermore, loss of EFG1 function resulted in increased fitness of P94015 in a commensal model of infection. Our analysis therefore reveals intra-species genetic and phenotypic differences in C. albicans and delineates a natural mutation that alters the balance between commensalism and pathogenicity.

  18. Genetic and phenotypic intra-species variation in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Hirakawa, Matthew P.; Martinez, Diego A.; Sakthikumar, Sharadha; Anderson, Matthew Z.; Berlin, Aaron; Gujja, Sharvari; Zeng, Qiandong; Zisson, Ethan; Wang, Joshua M.; Greenberg, Joshua M.; Berman, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is a commensal fungus of the human gastrointestinal tract and a prevalent opportunistic pathogen. To examine diversity within this species, extensive genomic and phenotypic analyses were performed on 21 clinical C. albicans isolates. Genomic variation was evident in the form of polymorphisms, copy number variations, chromosomal inversions, subtelomeric hypervariation, loss of heterozygosity (LOH), and whole or partial chromosome aneuploidies. All 21 strains were diploid, although karyotypic changes were present in eight of the 21 isolates, with multiple strains being trisomic for Chromosome 4 or Chromosome 7. Aneuploid strains exhibited a general fitness defect relative to euploid strains when grown under replete conditions. All strains were also heterozygous, yet multiple, distinct LOH tracts were present in each isolate. Higher overall levels of genome heterozygosity correlated with faster growth rates, consistent with increased overall fitness. Genes with the highest rates of amino acid substitutions included many cell wall proteins, implicating fast evolving changes in cell adhesion and host interactions. One clinical isolate, P94015, presented several striking properties including a novel cellular phenotype, an inability to filament, drug resistance, and decreased virulence. Several of these properties were shown to be due to a homozygous nonsense mutation in the EFG1 gene. Furthermore, loss of EFG1 function resulted in increased fitness of P94015 in a commensal model of infection. Our analysis therefore reveals intra-species genetic and phenotypic differences in C. albicans and delineates a natural mutation that alters the balance between commensalism and pathogenicity. PMID:25504520

  19. Hypoxia and Temperature Regulated Morphogenesis in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Kurtz, Dagmar; Juchimiuk, Mateusz; Ernst, Joachim F.

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is a common commensal in the human gut but in predisposed patients it can become an important human fungal pathogen. As a commensal, C. albicans adapts to low-oxygen conditions and represses its hyphal development by the transcription factor Efg1, which under normoxia activates filamentation. The repressive hypoxic but not the normoxic function of Efg1 required its unmodified N-terminus, was prevented by phosphomimetic residues at normoxic phosphorylation sites T179 and T206 and occurred only at temperatures ≤35°C. Genome-wide binding sites for native Efg1 identified 300 hypoxia-specific target genes, which overlapped partially with hypoxic binding sites for Ace2, a known positive regulator of hypoxic filamentation. Transcriptional analyses revealed that EFG1, ACE2 and their identified targets BCR1 and BRG1 encode an interconnected regulatory hub, in which Efg1/Bcr1 act as negative and Ace2/Brg1 act as positive regulators of gene expression under hypoxia. In this circuit, the hypoxic function of Ace2 was stimulated by elevated CO2 levels. The hyperfilamentous phenotype of efg1 and bcr1 mutants depended on Ace2/Brg1 regulators and required increased expression of genes encoding Cek1 MAP kinase and its downstream target Cph1. The intricate temperature-dependent regulatory mechanisms under hypoxia suggest that C. albicans restricts hyphal morphogenesis in oxygen-poor body niches, possibly to persist as a commensal in the human host. PMID:26274602

  20. Distribution of Candida albicans genotypes among family members

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, S. K.; Stevens, D. A.; Mishra, S. K.; Feroze, F.; Pierson, D. L.

    1999-01-01

    Thirty-three families (71 subjects) were screened for the presence of Candida albicans in mouthwash or stool specimens; 12 families (28 subjects) were culture-positive for this yeast. An enrichment procedure provided a twofold increase in the recovery of C. albicans from mouthwash specimens. Nine of the twelve culture-positive families had two positive members each, two families had three positive members each, and one family had four positive members. Genetic profiles were obtained by three methods: pulsed-field gel electrophoresis; restriction endonuclease analysis, and random amplification of polymorphic DNA analysis. DNA fingerprinting of C. albicans isolated from one body site three consecutive times revealed that each of the 12 families carried a distinct genotype. No two families shared the same strain, and two or more members of a family commonly shared the same strain. Intrafamily genotypic identity (i.e., each member within the family harbored the same strain) was demonstrated in six families. Genotypes of isolates from husband and wife differed from one another in five families. All three methods were satisfactory in determining genotypes; however, we concluded that restriction endonuclease analysis provided adequate resolving power.

  1. Photodynamic therapy with Pc 4 induces apoptosis of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Lam, Minh; Jou, Paul C; Lattif, Ali A; Lee, Yoojin; Malbasa, Christi L; Mukherjee, Pranab K; Oleinick, Nancy L; Ghannoum, Mahmoud A; Cooper, Kevin D; Baron, Elma D

    2011-01-01

    The high prevalence of drug resistance necessitates the development of novel antifungal agents against infections caused by opportunistic fungal pathogens, such as Candida albicans. Elucidation of apoptosis in yeast-like fungi may provide a basis for future therapies. In mammalian cells, photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been demonstrated to generate reactive oxygen species, leading to immediate oxidative modifications of biological molecules and resulting in apoptotic cell death. In this report, we assess the in vitro cytotoxicity and mechanism of PDT, using the photosensitizer Pc 4, in planktonic C. albicans. Confocal image analysis confirmed that Pc 4 localizes to cytosolic organelles, including mitochondria. A colony formation assay showed that 1.0 μM Pc 4 followed by light at 2.0 J cm(-2) reduced cell survival by 4 logs. XTT (2,3-bis[2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl]-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxyanilide) assay revealed that Pc 4-PDT impaired fungal metabolic activity, which was confirmed using the FUN-1 (2-chloro-4-[2,3-dihydro-3-methyl-(benzo-1,3-thiazol-2-yl)-methylidene]-1-phenylquinolinium iodide) fluorescence probe. Furthermore, we observed changes in nuclear morphology characteristic of apoptosis, which were substantiated by increased externalization of phosphatidylserine and DNA fragmentation following Pc 4-PDT. These data indicate that Pc 4-PDT can induce apoptosis in C. albicans. Therefore, a better understanding of the process will be helpful, as PDT may become a useful treatment option for candidiasis.

  2. Antiarthritic effect of lonicerin on Candida albicans arthritis in mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jue-Hee; Han, Yongmoon

    2011-05-01

    Fungal arthritis is a potentially serious disease resulting in rapid destruction of the joint. Among the various Candida species, Candida albicans is the most commonly associated with fungal arthritis. In the present study, we examined the effect of lonicerin, a flavonoid isolated from Lonicerae Flos, on an arthritis caused by C. albicans cell wall (CACW) in mice. To examine the effect, an emulsified mixture of CACW and complete Freund's adjuvant (CACW/CFA) was injected into BALB/c mice via hind footpad route on days -3, -2, and -1. On Day 0, mice with the swollen footpad received lonicerin at 1 or 2 mg/dose/time intraperitoneally 3 times every other day. The footpad-swelling was measured for 20 days. Results showed that the lonicerin treatment reduced the edema at all dose levels, and, furthermore, there was app. 54% edema reduction in animals given the 2 mg-dose at the peak (day 10) of septic arthritis (p < 0.05). Since the peak, the edema was reduced in similar rates. This antiarthritic activity appeared to be mediated by lonicerin's ability to suppress T cell proliferation, nitric oxide production from macrophages, and shift of cellular immunity from Th1- toward Th2-type responses, all of which are beneficial to treat arthritis. In addition, the flavonoid had anticandidal activity (p < 0.01). These data suggest that lonicerin alone, which has both anti-arthritic and antifungal activities, can result in a combination therapy for the treatment of fungal arthritis due to C. albicans infection.

  3. Dose-dependent effect of lysozyme upon Candida albicans biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Sebaa, Sarra; Hizette, Nicolas; Boucherit-Otmani, Zahia; Courtois, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    The present study investigated the in vitro effect of lysozyme (0–1,000 µg/ml) on Candida albicans (C. albicans) biofilm development. Investigations were conducted on C. albicans ATCC 10231 and on 10 clinical isolates from dentures. Strains were cultured aerobically at 37°C in Sabouraud broth. Yeast growth was evaluated by turbidimetry. Biofilm biomass was quantified on a polystyrene support by crystal violet staining and on acrylic surfaces by counts of colony forming units. Lysozyme affected biofilm formation to a greater extent than it affected growth. For the ATCC 10231 reference strain, lysozyme acted as a biofilm promotor on polystyrene at the highest concentration tested (1,000 µg/ml, non-physiological). When the reference strain was investigated on acrylic resin support, lysozyme acted as a significant biofilm promotor on rough resin, but less on smooth resin. The attached biomass in the presence of physiological concentrations of lysozyme (10–30 µg/ml) was significantly decreased compared with the hypothetical value of 100% using a one-sample t-test, but a comparison between the different lysozyme conditions using analysis of variance and post hoc tests did not reveal significant differences. In 10 wild strains, different patterns of biofilm formation on polystyrene were observed in the presence of lysozyme. Some strains, characterized by large amounts of biofilm formation in the presence of 1,000 µg/ml lysozyme, were poor biofilm producers at low concentrations of lysozyme. In contrast, some strains that were poor biofilm producers with a high lysozyme concentration were more inhibited by low concentrations of lysozyme. The present study emphasizes the need to develop strategies for biofilm control based on in vitro experiments, and to implement these in clinical trials prior to approval of hygiene products enriched with exocrine proteins, such as lysozyme. Further studies will extend these investigations to other Candida species, and to fungi

  4. Gastrointestinal Colonization by Candida albicans Mutant Strains in Antibiotic-Treated Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wiesner, Stephen M.; Jechorek, Robert P.; Garni, Robb M.; Bendel, Catherine M.; Wells, Carol L.

    2001-01-01

    Antibiotic-treated mice orally inoculated with one of three Candida albicans strains (including two mutant strains) or indigenous Candida pelliculosa showed levels of candidal gastrointestinal colonization that were strain specific. However, regardless of strain, the numbers of viable candida were intermediate to high in the stomach, were consistently lowest in the upper small intestine, and increased progressively down the intestinal tract. PMID:11139219

  5. Combination of micropreparative solution isoelectric focusing and high-performance liquid chromatography for differentiation of biofilm-positive and biofilm-negative Candida parapsilosis group from vascular catheter.

    PubMed

    Vykydalová, Marie; Horká, Marie; Růžička, Filip; Duša, Filip; Moravcová, Dana; Kahle, Vladislav; Slais, Karel

    2014-02-17

    This study utilizes the high-performance liquid chromatography technique in combination with the new micropreparative solution isoelectric focusing fractionation on non-woven fabric strip for the characterization and differentiation of biofilm-positive and biofilm-negative forms of Candida parapsilosis sensu stricto on the basis of the changes in the composition of their cell-surface. Treatment of yeasts by boiling in distilled water relased surface substances from yeasts cells. Consequently, the optimized procedure has been used for fast identification of the highly pathogenic biofilm-positive Candida parapsilosis group in real clinical material - sonicate from vascular catheters. Moreover, the capillary isoelectric focusing was used as supporting and control technique. Obtained results suggest that this new method can be used to distinguish between biofilm-positive and negative forms of Candida parapsilosis sensu stricto.

  6. Hosting infection: experimental models to assay Candida virulence.

    PubMed

    Maccallum, Donna M

    2012-01-01

    Although normally commensals in humans, Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis, Candida parapsilosis, Candida glabrata, and Candida krusei are capable of causing opportunistic infections in individuals with altered physiological and/or immunological responses. These fungal species are linked with a variety of infections, including oral, vaginal, gastrointestinal, and systemic infections, with C. albicans the major cause of infection. To assess the ability of different Candida species and strains to cause infection and disease requires the use of experimental infection models. This paper discusses the mucosal and systemic models of infection available to assay Candida virulence and gives examples of some of the knowledge that has been gained to date from these models.

  7. The emergence of non-albicans Candida species as causes of invasive candidiasis and candidemia.

    PubMed

    Sobel, Jack D

    2006-11-01

    The last three decades have seen an expanding pool of high-risk patients susceptible to the opportunistic pathogen Candida. Accordingly, a dramatic increase in nosocomial blood stream infections (BSIs) due to Candida spp has been reported throughout the world, starting in tertiary care centers and spreading to community hospitals. This absolute increase in Candida BSIs was accompanied by both an absolute and then a proportional increase in invasive infection caused by reduced fluconazole-susceptible non-albicans Candida spp. Currently, the incidence trend of BSI has stabilized, and Candida albicans remains the most common species causing fungal BSI. Clinicians must be aware of the importance and implications of non-albicans Candida spp when selecting antifungal drugs, although most studies have not shown significant outcome differences with use of the various antifungal classes.

  8. Evaluation of latex reagents for rapid identification of Candida albicans and C. krusei colonies.

    PubMed Central

    Freydiere, A M; Buchaille, L; Guinet, R; Gille, Y

    1997-01-01

    A total of 322 yeast strains and yeastlike organisms belonging to the genera Candida, Cryptococcus, Geotrichum, Saccharomyces, and Trichosporon were tested with the new monoclonal antibody-based Bichro-latex albicans and Krusei color latex tests. Comparison of results with those obtained by conventional identification methods showed 100% sensitivity for both latex tests and 100% and 95% specificity for the Bichro-latex albicans and Krusei color tests, respectively. Because the test is easy to read and quick to perform, the Bichro-latex albicans test may be useful for rapid identification of Candida albicans colonies in the clinical laboratory. PMID:9157146

  9. Experimental hematogenous candidiasis caused by Candida krusei and Candida albicans: species differences in pathogenicity.

    PubMed Central

    Anaissie, E; Hachem, R; K-Tin-U, C; Stephens, L C; Bodey, G P

    1993-01-01

    Hematogenous infections caused by Candida krusei have been noted with increasing frequency, particularly in cancer patients receiving prophylaxis with antifungal triazoles. Progress in understanding the pathogenesis of this emerging infection has been limited by the lack of an animal model. We developed a CF1 mouse intravenous inoculation model of candidiasis to evaluate the pathogenicity of C. krusei in normal and immunosuppressed mice and to compare it with that of Candida albicans. Several inocula (10(6) to 10(8) CFU per animal) of two clinical strains of C. krusei and three American Type Culture Collection strains of C. albicans were tested. Groups of 20 mice each were injected with a single intravenous dose of one inoculum. Animals randomized to receive C. krusei were immunosuppressed by intraperitoneal injection of cyclophosphamide or the combination of cyclophosphamide plus cortisone acetate or they did not receive immunosuppressive agents (normal mice). One hundred percent mortality was observed in normal mice injected with 10(6) CFU of C. albicans per mouse compared with no mortality in normal mice that received 10(8) CFU of C. krusei per mouse (P < 0.01). Resistance to C. krusei infection was markedly lowered by immunosuppression, particularly by the combination of cyclophosphamide plus cortisone acetate, with a significantly shorter survival and a higher organ fungal burden in immunosuppressed than in normal animals (P < 0.01). Tissue infection was documented by culture and histopathologic findings in all examined organs. Images PMID:8454330

  10. Antifungal effect of lavender honey against Candida albicans , Candida krusei and Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Estevinho, Maria Leticia; Afonso, Sílvia Esteves; Feás, Xesús

    2011-10-01

    Monofloral lavender honey samples (n = 30), were analyzed to test antifungal effect against Candida albicans, Candida krusei, and Cryptococcus neoformans. The specific growth rates (μ) showed that all the yeast growths were reduced in the presence of honey. The honey concentration (% w/v) that inhibited 10% of the yeasts growth (X min) ranged from 31.0% (C. albicans), 16.8% (C. krusei) and 23.0% (C. neoformans). A synthetic honey solution was also tested to determine antifungal activity attributable to sugars. The presence of synthetic honey in the C. krusei culture medium at concentrations above 58.0% (w/v) was established as X min, while C. albicans and C. neoformans were more resistant, since X min values were not reached over the ranged tested (10-60%, w/v). What the data suggests is that the component in the lavender honey responsible for the observed antifungal in vitro properties is not sugar based. Honey might be tapped as a natural resource to look for new medicines for the treatment of mycotic infections. This could be very useful, onsidering the increasing resistance of antifungals. It should be noticed that this is the first study concerning the effect of lavender honey on the growth of pathogenic yeasts.

  11. Effect of tyrosol on adhesion of Candida albicans and Candida glabrata to acrylic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Douglas Roberto; Feresin, Leonardo Perina; Arias, Laís Salomão; Barão, Valentim Adelino Ricardo; Barbosa, Debora Barros; Delbem, Alberto Carlos Botazzo

    2015-09-01

    The prevention of adhesion of Candida cells to acrylic surfaces can be regarded as an alternative to prevent denture stomatitis. The use of quorum sensing molecules, such as tyrosol, could potentially interfere with the adhesion process. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the effect of tyrosol on adhesion of single and mixed cultures of Candida albicans and Candida glabrata to acrylic resin surfaces. Tyrosol was diluted in each yeast inoculum (10(7) cells/ml in artificial saliva) at 25, 50, 100, and 200 mM. Then, each dilution was added to wells of 24-well plates containing the acrylic specimens, and the plates were incubated at 37°C for 2 h. After, the effect of tyrosol was determined by total biomass quantification, metabolic activity of the cells and colony-forming unit counting. Chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG) was used as a positive control. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the Holm-Sidak post hoc test (α = 0.05). The results of total biomass quantification and metabolic activity revealed that the tyrosol promoted significant reductions (ranging from 22.32 to 86.16%) on single C. albicans and mixed cultures. Moreover, tyrosol at 200 mM and CHG significantly reduced (p < 0.05) the number of adhered cells to the acrylic surface for single and mixed cultures of both species, with reductions ranging from 1.74 to 3.64-log10. In conclusion, tyrosol has an inhibitory effect on Candida adhesion to acrylic resin, and further investigations are warranted to clarify its potential against Candida infections.

  12. Gastrointestinal granuloma due to Candida albicans in an immunocompetent cat

    PubMed Central

    Duchaussoy, Anne-Claire; Rose, Annie; Talbot, Jessica J.; Barrs, Vanessa R.

    2015-01-01

    A 3.5 year-old cat was admitted to the University of Melbourne Veterinary Teaching Hospital for chronic vomiting. Abdominal ultrasonography revealed a focal, circumferential thickening of the wall of the duodenum extending from the pylorus aborally for 3 cm, and an enlarged gastric lymph node. Cytology of fine-needle aspirates of the intestinal mass and lymph node revealed an eosinophilic inflammatory infiltrate and numerous extracellular septate acute angle branching fungal-type hyphae. Occasional hyphae had globose terminal ends, as well as round to oval blastospores and germ tubes. Candida albicans was cultured from a surgical biopsy of the duodenal mass. No underlying host immunodeficiencies were identified. Passage of an abrasive intestinal foreign body was suspected to have caused intestinal mucosal damage resulting in focal intestinal candidiasis. The cat was treated with a short course of oral itraconazole and all clinical signs resolved. PMID:26862475

  13. Isolation and characterization of yeast monomorphic mutants of Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Elorza, M V; Sentandreu, R; Ruiz-Herrera, J

    1994-01-01

    A method was devised for the isolation of yeast monomorphic (LEV) mutants of Candida albicans. By this procedure, about 20 stable yeast-like mutants were isolated after mutagenesis with ethyl methane sulfonate. The growth rate of the mutants in different carbon sources, both fermentable and not, was indistinguishable from that of the parental strain, but they were unable to grow as mycelial forms after application of any of the common effective inducers, i.e., heat shock, pH alterations, proline addition, or use of GlcNAc as the carbon source. Studies performed with one selected strain demonstrated that it had severe alterations in the chemical composition of the cell wall, mainly in the levels of chitin and glucans, and in specific mannoproteins, some of them recognizable by specific polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies. It is suggested that these structural alterations hinder the construction of a normal hyphal wall. Images PMID:8157600

  14. Essential Role for Vacuolar Acidification in Candida albicans Virulence*

    PubMed Central

    Patenaude, Cassandra; Zhang, Yongqiang; Cormack, Brendan; Köhler, Julia; Rao, Rajini

    2013-01-01

    Fungal infections are on the rise, with mortality above 30% in patients with septic Candida infections. Mutants lacking V-ATPase activity are avirulent and fail to acidify endomembrane compartments, exhibiting pleiotropic defects in secretory, endosomal, and vacuolar pathways. However, the individual contribution of organellar acidification to virulence and its associated traits is not known. To dissect their separate roles in Candida albicans pathogenicity we generated knock-out strains for the V0 subunit a genes VPH1 and STV1, which target the vacuole and secretory pathway, respectively. While the two subunits were redundant in many vma phenotypes, such as alkaline pH sensitivity, calcium homeostasis, respiratory defects, and cell wall integrity, we observed a unique contribution of VPH1. Specifically, vph1Δ was defective in acidification of the vacuole and its dependent functions, such as metal ion sequestration as evidenced by hypersensitivity to Zn2+ toxicity, whereas stv1Δ resembled wild type. In growth conditions that elicit morphogenic switching, vph1Δ was defective in forming hyphae whereas stv1Δ was normal or only modestly impaired. Host cell interactions were evaluated in vitro using the Caco-2 model of intestinal epithelial cells, and murine macrophages. Like wild type, stv1Δ was able to inflict cellular damage in Caco-2 and macrophage cells, as assayed by LDH release, and escape by filamentation. In contrast, vph1Δ resembled a vma7Δ mutant, with significant attenuation in host cell damage. Finally, we show that VPH1 is required for fungal virulence in a murine model of systemic infection. Our results suggest that vacuolar acidification has an essential function in the ability of C. albicans to form hyphae and establish infection. PMID:23884420

  15. An Expanded Regulatory Network Temporally Controls Candida albicans Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Emily P.; Bui, Catherine K.; Nett, Jeniel E.; Hartooni, Nairi; Mui, Michael M.; Andes, David R.; Nobile, Clarissa J.; Johnson, Alexander D.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Candida albicans biofilms are composed of highly adherent and densely arranged cells with properties distinct from those of free-floating (planktonic) cells. These biofilms are a significant medical problem because they commonly form on implanted medical devices, are drug resistant, and are difficult to remove. C. albicans biofilms are not static structures; rather they are dynamic and develop over time. Here we characterize gene expression in biofilms during their development, and by comparing them to multiple planktonic reference states, we identify patterns of gene expression relevant to biofilm formation. In particular, we document time-dependent changes in genes involved in adhesion and metabolism, both of which are at the core of biofilm development. Additionally, we identify three new regulators of biofilm formation, Flo8, Gal4, and Rfx2, which play distinct roles during biofilm development over time. Flo8 is required for biofilm formation at all timepoints, and Gal4 and Rfx2 are needed for proper biofilm formation at intermediate time points. PMID:25784162

  16. Phytosphingosine kills Candida albicans by disrupting its cell membrane.

    PubMed

    Veerman, Enno C I; Valentijn-Benz, Marianne; van't Hof, Wim; Nazmi, Kamran; van Marle, Jan; Amerongen, Arie V Nieuw

    2010-01-01

    The mechanism of action of phytosphingosine (PHS), a member of the sphingosine family which has candidacidal activity when added externally, was investigated. Previously, it has been reported that the fungicidal activity of PHS is based on the induction of caspase-independent apoptosis. In contrast, we found that addition of PHS causes a direct permeabilization of the plasma membrane of yeast, highlighted by the influx of the membrane probe propidium iodide, and the efflux of small molecules (i.e., adenine nucleotides) as well as large cellular constituents such as proteins. Freeze-fracture electron microscopy revealed that PHS treatment causes severe damage of the plasma membrane of the cell, which seems to have lost its integrity completely. We also found that PHS reverts the azide-induced insensitivity to histatin 5 (Hst5) of Candida albicans. In a previous study, we had found that the decreased sensitivity to Hst5 of energy-depleted cells is due to rigidification of the plasma membrane, which could be reverted by the membrane fluidizer benzyl alcohol. In line with the increased membrane permeabilization and ultrastructural damage, this reversal of the azide-induced insensitivity by PHS also points to a direct interaction between PHS and the cytoplasmic membrane of C. albicans.

  17. Candida albicans spondylodiscitis following an abdominal stab wound: forensic considerations.

    PubMed

    Savall, Frederic; Dedouit, Fabrice; Telmon, Norbert; Rougé, Daniel

    2014-03-01

    Candida albicans spondylodiscitis is a fungal infection of the spine which is still unusual in spite of the increasing frequency of predisposing factors. A 22-year-old man received an abdominal stab wound during a physical assault. Initial medical care included surgery, prolonged use of indwelling vascular catheters with administration of broad-spectrum antibiotics, and hospitalization in intensive care. Two months after the event, the victim experienced back pain in the right lumbar region and septic spondylodiscitis secondary to C. albicans was diagnosed three weeks later. This case is noteworthy because of its clinical forensic context. In France, the public prosecutor orders a medico-legal assessment after an assault for all living victims in order to establish a causal relationship between the assault and its complications. In our case, the patient presented numerous risk factors for candidemia and the forensic specialist reasonably accepted that the causal relationship was certain but indirect. We have only found one published case of spondylodiscitis after an abdominal penetrating injury and the pathogenic agent was not mentioned. We have found no case reported in a forensic context. This unusual observation shows that it may be genuinely difficult to prove the causal relationship between an abdominal penetrating injury and an unusual infectious complication such as fungal spondylodiscitis.

  18. Biofilm Matrix Regulation by Candida albicans Zap1

    PubMed Central

    Nobile, Clarissa J.; Nett, Jeniel E.; Hernday, Aaron D.; Homann, Oliver R.; Deneault, Jean-Sebastien; Nantel, Andre; Andes, David R.; Johnson, Alexander D.; Mitchell, Aaron P.

    2009-01-01

    A biofilm is a surface-associated population of microorganisms embedded in a matrix of extracellular polymeric substances. Biofilms are a major natural growth form of microorganisms and the cause of pervasive device-associated infection. This report focuses on the biofilm matrix of Candida albicans, the major fungal pathogen of humans. We report here that the C. albicans zinc-response transcription factor Zap1 is a negative regulator of a major matrix component, soluble β-1,3 glucan, in both in vitro and in vivo biofilm models. To understand the mechanistic relationship between Zap1 and matrix, we identified Zap1 target genes through expression profiling and full genome chromatin immunoprecipitation. On the basis of these results, we designed additional experiments showing that two glucoamylases, Gca1 and Gca2, have positive roles in matrix production and may function through hydrolysis of insoluble β-1,3 glucan chains. We also show that a group of alcohol dehydrogenases Adh5, Csh1, and Ifd6 have roles in matrix production: Adh5 acts positively, and Csh1 and Ifd6, negatively. We propose that these alcohol dehydrogenases generate quorum-sensing aryl and acyl alcohols that in turn govern multiple events in biofilm maturation. Our findings define a novel regulatory circuit and its mechanism of control of a process central to infection. PMID:19529758

  19. Candida albicans mannoprotein influences the biological function of dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Pietrella, Donatella; Bistoni, Giovanni; Corbucci, Cristina; Perito, Stefano; Vecchiarelli, Anna

    2006-04-01

    Cell wall components of fungi involved in induction of host immune response are predominantly proteins and glycoproteins, the latter being mainly mannoproteins (MP). In this study we analyse the interaction of the MP from Candida albicans (MP65) with dendritic cells (DC) and demonstrate that MP65 stimulates DC and induces the release of TNF-alpha, IL-6 and the activation of IL-12 gene, with maximal value 6 h post treatment. MP65 induces DC maturation by increasing costimulatory molecules and decreasing CD14 and FcgammaR molecule expression. The latter effect is partly mediated by toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) and TLR4, and the MyD88-dependent pathway is involved in the process. MP65 enables DC to activate T cell response, its protein core is essential for induction of T cell activation, while its glycosylated portion primarily promotes cytokine production. The mechanisms involved in induction of protective response against C. albicans could be mediated by the MP65 antigen, suggesting that MP65 may be a suitable candidate vaccine.

  20. Development of a high-throughput Candida albicans biofilm chip.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Anand; Uppuluri, Priya; Lopez-Ribot, Jose; Ramasubramanian, Anand K

    2011-04-22

    We have developed a high-density microarray platform consisting of nano-biofilms of Candida albicans. A robotic microarrayer was used to print yeast cells of C. albicans encapsulated in a collagen matrix at a volume as low as 50 nL onto surface-modified microscope slides. Upon incubation, the cells grow into fully formed "nano-biofilms". The morphological and architectural complexity of these biofilms were evaluated by scanning electron and confocal scanning laser microscopy. The extent of biofilm formation was determined using a microarray scanner from changes in fluorescence intensities due to FUN 1 metabolic processing. This staining technique was also adapted for antifungal susceptibility testing, which demonstrated that, similar to regular biofilms, cells within the on-chip biofilms displayed elevated levels of resistance against antifungal agents (fluconazole and amphotericin B). Thus, results from structural analyses and antifungal susceptibility testing indicated that despite miniaturization, these biofilms display the typical phenotypic properties associated with the biofilm mode of growth. In its final format, the C. albicans biofilm chip (CaBChip) is composed of 768 equivalent and spatially distinct nano-biofilms on a single slide; multiple chips can be printed and processed simultaneously. Compared to current methods for the formation of microbial biofilms, namely the 96-well microtiter plate model, this fungal biofilm chip has advantages in terms of miniaturization and automation, which combine to cut reagent use and analysis time, minimize labor intensive steps, and dramatically reduce assay costs. Such a chip should accelerate the antifungal drug discovery process by enabling rapid, convenient and inexpensive screening of hundreds-to-thousands of compounds simultaneously.

  1. Virulence attributes and genetic variability of oral Candida albicans and Candida tropicalis isolates.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Karen Regina Carim; Ferreira, Joseane Cristina; Lavrador, Marco Aurélio Sicchiroli; Baruffi, Marcelo Dias; Candido, Regina Celia

    2012-05-01

    The wide spectrum of candidiasis and its clinical importance encourage the research with the purpose of clarifying the mechanisms of pathogenicity and identification of virulence factors of Candida sp. Therefore, the aim of this study was to verify the adhesion capacity, protease activity and genotypic diversity of oral C. albicans and C. tropicalis isolates. The adhesion ability to the extracellular matrix glycoproteins laminin and fibronectin was evaluated using the ELISA technique. The research of proteases was carried out in agar plate containing bovine albumin and through a quantitative method in buffer solution containing haemoglobin. Intra and interspecies polymorphisms was verified through random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) technique. All C. albicans and C. tropicalis isolates binded to immobilised laminin and fibronectin. Ca33 and Ct13 isolates had relative adhesion index significantly higher than the other isolates for both glycoproteins (P < 0.001). Protease activity was observed in all isolates of C. albicans using either the semi-quantitative or quantitative assay. The protease activity of C. tropicalis was better detected through the quantitative assay. The genotypic diversity by RAPD revealed a heterogeneous population in both species. Nevertheless, C. tropicalis presented higher genetic variability than C. albicans strains.

  2. Comparison of the in vitro activity of echinocandins against Candida albicans, Candida dubliniensis, and Candida africana by time-kill curves.

    PubMed

    Gil-Alonso, Sandra; Jauregizar, Nerea; Cantón, Emilia; Eraso, Elena; Quindós, Guillermo

    2015-05-01

    Candida albicans remains the most common fungal pathogen. This species is closely related to 2 phenotypically similar cryptic species, Candida dubliniensis and Candida africana. This study aims to compare the antifungal activities of echinocandins against 7 C. albicans, 5 C. dubliniensis, and 2 C. africana strains by time-kill methodology. MIC values were similar for the 3 species; however, differences in killing activity were observed among species, isolates, and echinocandins. Echinocandins produced weak killing activity against the 3 species. In all drugs, the fungicidal endpoint (99.9% mortality) was reached at ≤31 h with ≥0.5 μg/mL for anidulafungin in 4 C. albicans and 1 C. dubliniensis, for caspofungin in 1 C. albicans and 2 C. dubliniensis, and for micafungin in 4 C. albicans and 1 C. dubliniensis. None of echinocandins showed lethality against C. africana. Identification of these new cryptic species and time-kill studies would be recommendable when echinocandin treatment fails.

  3. Metal ions may suppress or enhance cellular differentiation in Candida albicans and Candida tropicalis biofilms.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Joe J; Ceri, Howard; Yerly, Jerome; Rabiei, Maryam; Hu, Yaoping; Martinuzzi, Robert; Turner, Raymond J

    2007-08-01

    Candida albicans and Candida tropicalis are polymorphic fungi that develop antimicrobial-resistant biofilm communities that are characterized by multiple cell morphotypes. This study investigated cell type interconversion and drug and metal resistance as well as community organization in biofilms of these microorganisms that were exposed to metal ions. To study this, Candida biofilms were grown either in microtiter plates containing gradient arrays of metal ions or in the Calgary Biofilm Device for high-throughput susceptibility testing. Biofilm formation and antifungal resistance were evaluated by viable cell counts, tetrazolium salt reduction, light microscopy, and confocal laser scanning microscopy in conjunction with three-dimensional visualization. We discovered that subinhibitory concentrations of certain metal ions (CrO(4)(2-), Co(2+), Cu(2+), Ag(+), Zn(2+), Cd(2+), Hg(2+), Pb(2+), AsO(2)(-), and SeO(3)(2-)) caused changes in biofilm structure by blocking or eliciting the transition between yeast and hyphal cell types. Four distinct biofilm community structure types were discerned from these data, which were designated "domed," "layer cake," "flat," and "mycelial." This study suggests that Candida biofilm populations may respond to metal ions to form cell-cell and solid-surface-attached assemblages with distinct patterns of cellular differentiation.

  4. Investigation of minor species Candida africana, Candida stellatoidea and Candida dubliniensis in the Candida albicans complex among Yaoundé (Cameroon) HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Ngouana, Thierry K; Krasteva, Donika; Drakulovski, Pascal; Toghueo, Rufin K; Kouanfack, Charles; Ambe, Akaba; Reynes, Jacques; Delaporte, Eric; Boyom, Fabrice F; Mallié, Michèle; Bertout, Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    Minor species of the Candida albicans complex may cause overestimation of the epidemiology of C. albicans, and misidentifications could mask their implication in human pathology. Authors determined the occurrence of minor species of the C. albicans complex (C. africana, C. dubliniensis and C. stellatoidea) among Yaoundé HIV-infected patients, Cameroon. Stool, vaginal discharge, urine and oropharyngeal samples were analysed by mycological diagnosis. Isolates were identified by conventional methods and mass spectrometry (MS; carried out by the matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionisation time-of-flight MS protocol). Candida albicans isolates were thereafter submitted to the PCR amplification of the Hwp1 gene. The susceptibility of isolates to antifungal drugs was tested using the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute M27-A3 protocol. From 115 C. albicans obtained isolates, neither C. dubliniensis nor C. stellatoidea was observed; two strains of C. africana (422PV and 448PV) were identified by PCR electrophoretic profiles at 700 bp. These two C. africana strains were vaginal isolates. The isolate 448PV was resistant to ketoconazole at the minimal inhibitory concentration of 2 μg ml(-1), and showed reduced susceptibility to amphotericin B at 1 μg ml(-1). This first report on C. africana occurrence in Cameroon brings clues for the understanding of the global epidemiology of this yeast as well as that of minor species of the C. albicans complex.

  5. Manipulation of host diet to reduce gastrointestinal colonization by the opportunistic pathogen Candida albicans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Candida albicans, the most common human fungal pathogen, can cause systemic infections with a mortality rate of ~40%. Infections arise from colonization of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, where C. albicans is part of the normal microflora. Reducing colonization in at-risk patients using antifungal ...

  6. Synthesis of melanin pigment by Candida albicans in vitro and during infection.

    PubMed

    Morris-Jones, Rachael; Gomez, Beatriz L; Diez, Soraya; Uran, Martha; Morris-Jones, Stephen D; Casadevall, Arturo; Nosanchuk, Joshua D; Hamilton, Andrew J

    2005-09-01

    Melanins are implicated in the pathogenesis of several important human diseases. This study confirmed the presence of melanin particles in Candida albicans in vitro and during infection. Dark particles were isolated from the digestion of C. albicans cultures and from infected tissue, as established by electron microscopy and immunofluorescence techniques.

  7. Synthesis of Melanin Pigment by Candida albicans In Vitro and during Infection

    PubMed Central

    Morris-Jones, Rachael; Gomez, Beatriz L.; Diez, Soraya; Uran, Martha; Morris-Jones, Stephen D.; Casadevall, Arturo; Nosanchuk, Joshua D.; Hamilton, Andrew J.

    2005-01-01

    Melanins are implicated in the pathogenesis of several important human diseases. This study confirmed the presence of melanin particles in Candida albicans in vitro and during infection. Dark particles were isolated from the digestion of C. albicans cultures and from infected tissue, as established by electron microscopy and immunofluorescence techniques. PMID:16113337

  8. A piglet model for studying Candida albicans colonization of the human oro-gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Hoeflinger, Jennifer L; Coleman, David A; Oh, Soon-Hwan; Miller, Michael J; Hoyer, Lois L

    2014-08-01

    Pigs from a variety of sources were surveyed for oro-gastrointestinal (oro-GIT) carriage of Candida albicans. Candida albicans-positive animals were readily located, but we also identified C. albicans-free pigs. We hypothesized that pigs could be stably colonized with a C. albicans strain of choice, simply by feeding yeast cells. Piglets were farrowed routinely and remained with the sow for 4 days to acquire a normal microbiota. Piglets were then placed in an artificial rearing environment and fed sow milk replacer. Piglets were inoculated orally with one of three different C. albicans strains. Piglets were weighed daily, and culture swabs were collected to detect C. albicans orally, rectally and in the piglet's environment. Stable C. albicans colonization over the course of the study did not affect piglet growth. Necropsy revealed mucosally associated C. albicans throughout the oro-GIT with the highest abundance in the esophagus. Uninoculated control piglets remained C. albicans-negative. These data establish the piglet as a model to study C. albicans colonization of the human oro-GIT. Similarities between oro-GIT colonization in humans and pigs, as well as the ease of working with the piglet model, suggest its adaptability for use among investigators interested in understanding C. albicans-host commensal interactions.

  9. Application of CHROMagar Candida for rapid screening of clinical specimens for Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis, Candida krusei, and Candida (Torulopsis) glabrata.

    PubMed Central

    Pfaller, M A; Houston, A; Coffmann, S

    1996-01-01

    CHROMagar Candida is a new differential culture medium that allows selective isolation of yeasts and simultaneously identifies colonies of Candida albicans, C. tropicalis, and C. krusei. We evaluated the use of this medium with 316 yeast isolates including 247 isolated directly on CHROMagar from clinical material. Over 95% of stock and clinical isolates of C. albicans, C. tropicalis, and C. krusei were correctly identified on the basis of colony morphology and pigmentation on CHROMagar. Additionally, CHROMagar also allowed the identification of C. (Torulopsis) glabrata at a similar level of accuracy. The overall agreement between two observers in reading the CHROMagar plates was 95%. Growth of Candida sp. isolates on CHROMagar had no adverse effect on antifungal MICs or Vitek identification results. In parallel, cultures of 548 stool and rectal swab specimens set up on CHROMagar and Sabouraud glucose agar (SGA) were positive in 234 instances. CHROMagar was positive and SGA was negative for 11 specimens, and CHROMagar was negative and SGA was positive for 18 specimens. A single yeast species was isolated on both media from 162 specimens, and in 146 (90%) of these specimens the same species was detected on both CHROMagar and SGA. A total of 43 of the 234 positive cultures contained mixtures of yeast species. Twenty (47%) of these mixed cultures were detected only on CHROMagar. CHROMagar is extremely useful in making a rapid presumptive identification of common yeast species. This capability plus the ability to detect mixed cultures of Candida spp. promises to improve and streamline the work flow in the mycology and clinical microbiology laboratory. PMID:8748273

  10. Function and Regulation of Cph2 in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Shelley; Di Lena, Pietro; Tormanen, Kati; Baldi, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is associated with humans as both a harmless commensal organism and a pathogen. Cph2 is a transcription factor whose DNA binding domain is similar to that of mammalian sterol response element binding proteins (SREBPs). SREBPs are master regulators of cellular cholesterol levels and are highly conserved from fungi to mammals. However, ergosterol biosynthesis is regulated by the zinc finger transcription factor Upc2 in C. albicans and several other yeasts. Cph2 is not necessary for ergosterol biosynthesis but is important for colonization in the murine gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Here we demonstrate that Cph2 is a membrane-associated transcription factor that is processed to release the N-terminal DNA binding domain like SREBPs, but its cleavage is not regulated by cellular levels of ergosterol or oxygen. Chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq) shows that Cph2 binds to the promoters of HMS1 and other components of the regulatory circuit for GI tract colonization. In addition, 50% of Cph2 targets are also bound by Hms1 and other factors of the regulatory circuit. Several common targets function at the head of the glycolysis pathway. Thus, Cph2 is an integral part of the regulatory circuit for GI colonization that regulates glycolytic flux. Transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) shows a significant overlap in genes differentially regulated by Cph2 and hypoxia, and Cph2 is important for optimal expression of some hypoxia-responsive genes in glycolysis and the citric acid cycle. We suggest that Cph2 and Upc2 regulate hypoxia-responsive expression in different pathways, consistent with a synthetic lethal defect of the cph2 upc2 double mutant in hypoxia. PMID:26342020

  11. Susceptibility of Candida albicans to new synthetic sulfone derivatives.

    PubMed

    Staniszewska, Monika; Bondaryk, Małgorzata; Ochal, Zbigniew

    2015-02-01

    The influence of halogenated methyl sulfones, i.e. bromodichloromethyl-4-chloro-3-nitrophenyl sulfone (named halogenated methyl sulfone 1), dichloromethyl-4-chloro-3-nitrophenyl sulfone (halogenated methyl sulfone 2), and chlorodibromomethyl-4-hydrazino-3-nitrophenyl sulfone (halogenated methyl sulfone 3), on cell growth inhibition, aspartic protease gene (SAP4-6) expression, adhesion to epithelium, and filamentation was investigated. Antifungal susceptibility of the halogenated methyl sulfones was determined with the M27-A3 protocol in the range of 16-0.0313 µg/mL. Adherence to Caco-2 cells was performed in 24-well plates; relative quantification was normalized against ACT1 in cells after 18 h of growth in YEPD and on Caco-2 cells. SAP4-6 expression was analyzed using RT-PCR. Structure-activity relationship studies suggested that halogenated methyl sulfone 1 containing bromodichloromethyl or dichloromethyl function at C-4 (halogenated methyl sulfone 2) of the phenyl ring showed the best activity (100% cell inhibition at 0.5 µg/mL), while hydrazine at C-1 (halogenated methyl sulfone 3) reduced the sulfone potential (100% = 4 µg/mL). SAP4-6 were up- or down-regulated depending on the strains' genetic background and the substitutions on the phenyl ring. Halogenated methyl sulfone 2 repressed germination and affected adherence to epithelium (P ≤ 0.05). The tested halogenated methyl sulfones interfered with the adhesion of Candida albicans cells to the epithelial tissues, without affecting their viability after 90 min of incubation. The mode of action of the halogenated methyl sulfones was attributed to the reduced virulence of C. albicans. SAP5 and SAP6 contribute to halogenated methyl sulfones resistance. Thus, halogenated methyl sulfones can inhibit biofilm formation due to their interference with adherence and with the yeast-to-hyphae transition.

  12. A Phenotypic Profile of the Candida albicans Regulatory Network

    PubMed Central

    Homann, Oliver R.; Dea, Jeanselle; Noble, Suzanne M.; Johnson, Alexander D.

    2009-01-01

    Candida albicans is a normal resident of the gastrointestinal tract and also the most prevalent fungal pathogen of humans. It last shared a common ancestor with the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae over 300 million years ago. We describe a collection of 143 genetically matched strains of C. albicans, each of which has been deleted for a specific transcriptional regulator. This collection represents a large fraction of the non-essential transcription circuitry. A phenotypic profile for each mutant was developed using a screen of 55 growth conditions. The results identify the biological roles of many individual transcriptional regulators; for many, this work represents the first description of their functions. For example, a quarter of the strains showed altered colony formation, a phenotype reflecting transitions among yeast, pseudohyphal, and hyphal cell forms. These transitions, which have been closely linked to pathogenesis, have been extensively studied, yet our work nearly doubles the number of transcriptional regulators known to influence them. As a second example, nearly a quarter of the knockout strains affected sensitivity to commonly used antifungal drugs; although a few transcriptional regulators have previously been implicated in susceptibility to these drugs, our work indicates many additional mechanisms of sensitivity and resistance. Finally, our results inform how transcriptional networks evolve. Comparison with the existing S. cerevisiae data (supplemented by additional S. cerevisiae experiments reported here) allows the first systematic analysis of phenotypic conservation by orthologous transcriptional regulators over a large evolutionary distance. We find that, despite the many specific wiring changes documented between these species, the general phenotypes of orthologous transcriptional regulator knockouts are largely conserved. These observations support the idea that many wiring changes affect the detailed architecture of the circuit, but

  13. The Fungus Candida albicans Tolerates Ambiguity at Multiple Codons

    PubMed Central

    Simões, João; Bezerra, Ana R.; Moura, Gabriela R.; Araújo, Hugo; Gut, Ivo; Bayes, Mónica; Santos, Manuel A. S.

    2016-01-01

    The ascomycete Candida albicans is a normal resident of the gastrointestinal tract of humans and other warm-blooded animals. It occurs in a broad range of body sites and has high capacity to survive and proliferate in adverse environments with drastic changes in oxygen, carbon dioxide, pH, osmolarity, nutrients, and temperature. Its biology is unique due to flexible reassignment of the leucine CUG codon to serine and synthesis of statistical proteins. Under standard growth conditions, CUG sites incorporate leucine (3% of the times) and serine (97% of the times) on a proteome wide scale, but leucine incorporation fluctuates in response to environmental stressors and can be artificially increased up to 98%. In order to determine whether such flexibility also exists at other codons, we have constructed several serine tRNAs that decode various non-cognate codons. Expression of these tRNAs had minor effects on fitness, but growth of the mistranslating strains at different temperatures, in medium with different pH and nutrients composition was often enhanced relatively to the wild type (WT) strain, supporting our previous data on adaptive roles of CUG ambiguity in variable growth conditions. Parallel evolution of the recombinant strains (100 generations) followed by full genome resequencing identified various strain specific single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) and one SNP in the deneddylase (JAB1) gene in all strains. Since JAB1 is a subunit of the COP9 signalosome complex, which interacts with cullin (Cdc53p) to mediate degradation of a variety of cellular proteins, our data suggest that neddylation plays a key role in tolerance and adaptation to codon ambiguity in C. albicans. PMID:27065968

  14. Comparison of virulence factors of oral Candida dubliniensis and Candida albicans isolates in healthy people and patients with chronic candidosis.

    PubMed

    Hannula, J; Saarela, M; Dogan, B; Paatsama, J; Koukila-Kähkölä, P; Pirinen, S; Alakomi, H L; Perheentupa, J; Asikainen, S

    2000-08-01

    We determined differences in the expression of certain virulence factors between oral Candida dubliniensis and Candida albicans species. In addition, clonal differences were sought among C. albicans isolates recovered from patients with and without compromised immune system. The material comprised 93 clinical yeast isolates originated in 40 subjects (1-5 isolates per subject). All 26 C. dubliniensis isolates and 46 C. albicans isolates originated from healthy routine dental clinic patients. Additionally, 21 C. albicans isolates were collected from patients with autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidosis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED), who have chronic candidosis as one manifestation of their immunocompromising disease. Polymerase chain reaction amplification using the random sequence primer OPE-03 enabled grouping of the C. dubliniensis isolates in 2 genotypes (I and II) and C. albicans isolates in 15 genotypes (I-XV). No significant difference was found in the distribution of genotypes between the patients with APECED and the healthy subjects. C. dubliniensis isolates exhibited high-frequency phenotypic switching significantly more frequently than did C. albicans isolates, and vice versa regarding phospholipase and proteinase production. Proteinase production was significantly more frequent among C. albicans genotype V than genotype IX isolates. No significant difference was found in expression of virulence factors of C. albicans isolates between the patients with APECED and the healthy subjects.

  15. Geographic and temporal trends in isolation and antifungal susceptibility of Candida parapsilosis: a global assessment from the ARTEMIS DISK Antifungal Surveillance Program, 2001 to 2005.

    PubMed

    Pfaller, M A; Diekema, D J; Gibbs, D L; Newell, V A; Ng, K P; Colombo, A; Finquelievich, J; Barnes, R; Wadula, J

    2008-03-01

    We examined data from the ARTEMIS DISK Antifungal Surveillance Program to describe geographic and temporal trends in the isolation of Candida parapsilosis from clinical specimens and the in vitro susceptibilities of 9,371 isolates to fluconazole and voriconazole. We also report the in vitro susceptibility of bloodstream infection (BSI) isolates of C. parapsilosis to the echinocandins, anidulafungin, caspofungin, and micafungin. C. parapsilosis represented 6.6% of the 141,383 isolates of Candida collected from 2001 to 2005 and was most common among isolates from North America (14.3%) and Latin America (9.9%). High levels of susceptibility to both fluconazole (90.8 to 95.8%) and voriconazole (95.3 to 98.1%) were observed in all geographic regions with the exception of the Africa and Middle East region (79.3 and 85.8% susceptible to fluconazole and voriconazole, respectively). C. parapsilosis was most often isolated from blood and skin and/or soft tissue specimens and from patients hospitalized in the medical, surgical, intensive care unit (ICU) and dermatology services. Notably, isolates from the surgical ICU were the least susceptible to fluconazole (86.3%). There was no evidence of increasing azole resistance over time among C. parapsilosis isolates tested from 2001 to 2005. Of BSI isolates tested against the three echinocandins, 92, 99, and 100% were inhibited by concentrations of < or = 2 microg/ml of anidulafungin (621 isolates tested), caspofungin (1,447 isolates tested), and micafungin (539 isolates tested), respectively. C. parapsilosis is a ubiquitous pathogen that remains susceptible to the azoles and echinocandins; however, both the frequency of isolation and the resistance of C. parapsilosis to fluconazole and voriconazole may vary by geographic region and clinical service.

  16. Minocycline inhibits the Candida albicans budded-to-hyphal-form transition and biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Kurakado, Sanae; Takatori, Kazuhiko; Sugita, Takashi

    2017-03-28

    Candida albicans frequently causes bloodstream infections; the budded-to-hyphal-form transition (BHT) and biofilm formation are major contributors to virulence. In a survey of antibacterial compounds that inhibit C. albicans BHT, we found that the tetracycline derivative minocycline inhibited BHT and subsequent biofilm formation. Minocycline downregulates expression of the hypha-specific genes HWP1 and ECE1, and the adhesion factor gene ALS3 of C. albicans. In addition, minocycline decreases cell surface hydrophobicity and the extracellular β-glucan level in biofilms. Minocycline has been widely used for catheter antibiotic lock therapy in efforts to prevent bacterial infection; the compound might also be prophylactically effective against Candida infection.

  17. Epidemiology and outcomes of invasive candidiasis due to non-albicans species of Candida in 2,496 patients: data from the Prospective Antifungal Therapy (PATH) registry 2004-2008.

    PubMed

    Pfaller, Michael A; Andes, David R; Diekema, Daniel J; Horn, David L; Reboli, Annette C; Rotstein, Coleman; Franks, Billy; Azie, Nkechi E

    2014-01-01

    This analysis describes the epidemiology and outcomes of invasive candidiasis caused by non-albicans species of Candida in patients enrolled in the Prospective Antifungal Therapy Alliance (PATH Alliance) registry from 2004 to 2008. A total of 2,496 patients with non-albicans species of Candida isolates were identified. The identified species were C. glabrata (46.4%), C. parapsilosis (24.7%), C. tropicalis (13.9%), C. krusei (5.5%), C. lusitaniae (1.6%), C. dubliniensis (1.5%) and C. guilliermondii (0.4%); 111 infections involved two or more species of Candida (4.4%). Non-albicans species accounted for more than 50% of all cases of invasive candidiasis in 15 of the 24 sites (62.5%) that contributed more than one case to the survey. Among solid organ transplant recipients, patients with non-transplant surgery, and patients with solid tumors, the most prevalent non-albicans species was C. glabrata at 63.7%, 48.0%, and 53.8%, respectively. In 1,883 patients receiving antifungal therapy on day 3, fluconazole (30.5%) and echinocandins (47.5%) were the most frequently administered monotherapies. Among the 15 reported species, 90-day survival was highest for patients infected with either C. parapsilosis (70.7%) or C. lusitaniae (74.5%) and lowest for patients infected with an unknown species (46.7%) or two or more species (53.2%). In conclusion, this study expands the current knowledge of the epidemiology and outcomes of invasive candidiasis caused by non-albicans species of Candida in North America. The variability in species distribution in these centers underscores the importance of local epidemiology in guiding the selection of antifungal therapy.

  18. Biofilm production and antifungal susceptibility of co-cultured Malassezia pachydermatis and Candida parapsilosis isolated from canine seborrheic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Bumroongthai, K; Chetanachan, P; Niyomtham, W; Yurayart, C; Prapasarakul, N

    2016-07-01

    The yeasts Malassezia (M.) pachydermatis and Candida (C.) parapsilosis are often co-isolated in case of canine seborrhea dermatitis (SD) and also are emerging as opportunistic pathogens of immunocompromised human beings. Increased information about how their relationship results in biofilm production and an antifungal response would be useful to inform treatment and control. This study was designed to investigate biofilm production derived from co-culture of M. pachydermatis and C. parapsilosis from dog skin and to determine their in vitro antifungal susceptibility. We demonstrated that regardless of yeast strain or origin all single and dual cultures produced biofilms within 24 hours, and the greatest amount was present after 72 hours. Biofilm production from mixed cultures was greater than for single strains (P < .05). All sessile forms of the single and dual cultures were resistant to the tested antifungals itraconazole and ketoconazole, whereas planktonic forms were susceptible. The study suggests that dual cultures produce stronger biofilms that are likely to enhance persistence in skin lesions in dogs and result in greater resistance to antifungal treatment.

  19. Epidemiology and risk factors for nosocomial Non-Candida albicans candidemia in adult patients at a tertiary care hospital in North China.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xiurong; Yan, Donghui; Sun, Wei; Zeng, Zhaoyin; Su, Ruirui; Su, Jianrong

    2015-09-01

    Nosocomial candidemia extends the length of hospital stay, increases the costs of medical care, and is associated with a high mortality rate. Epidemiological data that assist in the choice of initial therapy may help to improve the prognosis. The present study was undertaken to investigate the epidemiology of nosocomial candidemia and identify risk factors for nosocomial candidemia caused by C. albicans and non-albicans Candida species (NAC). A retrospective chart review was undertaken to analyze cases of nosocomial candidemia treated at the Beijing Friendship Hospital between January 2008 and December 2012. All cases of candidemia were identified using the previously published criteria. Among 106 patients analyzed, 53.8% had nosocomial candidemia caused by NAC. Candida albicans was the most common causative agent, accounting for 46.2% of all cases, followed by C. glabrata (25.5%), C. tropicalis (15.1%), C. parapsilosis (10.4%) and C. Krusei (0.9%). Comparison of nosocomial C. albicans and NAC candidemia by multivariate logistic regression showed that factors independently associated with nosocomial NAC candidemia included exposure to azole agents (odds ratio [OR]: 3.359; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.136-10.154; P = .031) and artificial surgical implants (OR: 37.519; 95% CI: 2.5-562.998; P = .009). A significant risk factor for nosocomial C. albicans candidemia was cancer surgery (OR: 0.075; 95% CI: 0.013-0.437; P = .004). Clinical and epidemiological differences in the risk factors between nosocomial candidemia caused by C. albicans and NAC should be considered when selecting an initial antifungal regimen for the treatment of adult patients. This should be undertaken before the availability of species identification and/or antifungal susceptibility results.

  20. Evaluation of capacity to detect ability to form biofilm in Candida parapsilosis sensu stricto strains by MALDI-TOF MS.

    PubMed

    Mlynáriková, Katarína; Šedo, Ondrej; Růžička, Filip; Zdráhal, Zbyněk; Holá, Veronika; Mahelová, Martina

    2016-11-01

    Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is, currently, used as a rapid and reliable tool in microbial diagnostics. The discriminatory power of the method extends its applicability also beyond species level. This study examined the possibility to use MALDI-TOF MS to differentiate between Candida parapsilosis sensu stricto biofilm-positive (n = 12) and biofilm-negative (n = 9) strains. The results indicated a grouping trend within MALDI-TOF mass spectra belonging to each of the tested groups. However, these trends were eclipsed by mass spectral variations resulting from limited repeatability of the method, making its application for the selected purpose impossible. Improvement in the discriminatory power of the method was not obtained neither by using different matrices (α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid, ferulic acid, 5-chloro-2-mercaptobenzothionazole) for MALDI-TOF MS analysis nor by testing different culture conditions (cultivation length, culture media).

  1. Effect of Low-Level Laser therapy on the fungal proliferation of Candida albicans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carneiro, Vanda S. M.; Araújo, Natália C.; Menezes, Rebeca F. d.; Moreno, Lara M.; Santos-Neto, Alexandrino d. P.; Gerbi, Marleny Elizabeth M.

    2016-03-01

    Candida albicans plays an important role in triggering infections in HIV+ patients. The indiscriminate use of antifungals has led to resistance to Candida albicans, which requires new treatment alternatives for oral candidiasis. Low-level laser therapy promotes a considerable improvement in the healing of wounds and in curing illnesses caused by microorganisms. The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of laser radiation on the cell proliferation of Candida albicans in immunosuppressed patients. Six Candida albicans strains that had been isolated from immunosuppressed patients were divided into a control group and experimental groups, which received eight sessions of laser therapy (InGaAlP, λ685nm, P = 30mW, CW, Φ~6 mm and GaAlAs, λ830nm, P = 40mW, CW, Φ~6 mm) using dosimetries of 6J/cm2, 8J/cm2, 10J/cm2 and 12J/cm2 for each wavelength and power. The results were not statistically significant (Kruskal Wallis, p > 0.05), although the proliferation of Candida albicans was lower in some of the experimental groups. The dosimetry of 6J/cm2 (GaAlAs, λ830nm, P = 40mW) provided lower mean scores than the other groups for the growth of Candida. Further studies are required to confirm whetehr laser therapy is a viable option in the treatment of fungal infections.

  2. Effect of trace iron levels and iron withdrawal by chelation on the growth of Candida albicans and Candida vini.

    PubMed

    Holbein, Bruce E; Mira de Orduña, Ramón

    2010-06-01

    The iron requirements of the opportunistic pathogenic yeast, Candida albicans, and the related nonpathogenic spoilage yeast Candida vini were investigated along with their responses to various exogenous iron chelators. The influence of iron as well as the exogenous chelating agents lactoferrin, EDTA, deferiprone, desferrioxamine, bathophenanthroline sulphonate and a novel carried chelator with a hydroxypyridinone-like Fe-ligand functionality, DIBI, on fungal growth was studied in a chemically defined medium deferrated to trace iron levels (<1.2 microg L(-1) or 0.02 microM of Fe). Candida albicans competed better at low iron levels compared with C. vini, which was also more susceptible to most added chelators. Candida albicans was resistant to lactoferrin at physiologically relevant concentrations, but was inhibited by low concentrations of DIBI. Candida vini was sensitive to lactoferrin as well as to DIBI, whose inhibitory activity was shown to be Fe reversible. The pathogenic potential of C. albicans and the nonpathogenic nature of C. vini were consistent with their differing abilities to grow under iron-limiting conditions and in the presence of exogenous iron chelators. Both yeasts could be controlled by appropriately strong chelators. This work provides the first evidence of the iron requirements of the spoilage organism C. vini and its response to exogenous chelators. Efficient iron withdrawal has the potential to provide the basis for new fungal growth control strategies.

  3. Association of Oral Candida albicans with Severe Early Childhood Caries - A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Ann; Mhambrey, Sanjana; Chokshi, Achala; Jana, Sinjana; Thakur, Sneha; Jose, Deepak; Bajpai, Garima

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In early childhood, children are more susceptible to opportunistic microbial colonization in the oral cavity due to immature immune system and not fully established micro flora. The current literature proposes a probable role of Candida albicans, a fungus in the etiopathogenesis of dental caries. Aim This study was conducted to compare the Candida albicans count in children with severe early childhood caries and caries free children. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in 40 randomly selected healthy children between 12 to 71 months of age, who were divided into two groups based on the caries experience as Severe Early Childhood Caries (SECC) (dmfs ≥4) and caries free (dmfs = 0). The caries experiences (dmfs index) of the 40 children were recorded using visible light and diagnostic instruments. A 2ml sample of unstimulated whole saliva collected from the children was transported to the microbiology laboratory in universal containers and evaluated for Candida albicans count using the selective media. The data was statistically analyzed using SPSS software 17.0. Results Candida albicans was found in both the SECC group and caries free group. Median Candida albicans of the SECC group was numerically greater than the caries free group and this difference was highly statistically significant (p=0.012). Conclusion In this present cross-sectional study, we found a 100% prevalence of Candida albicans in the saliva of the study children. There was a highly significant increase in Candida albicans count in SECC children compared to the caries free children. PMID:27656551

  4. Integrating Candida albicans metabolism with biofilm heterogeneity by transcriptome mapping

    PubMed Central

    Rajendran, Ranjith; May, Ali; Sherry, Leighann; Kean, Ryan; Williams, Craig; Jones, Brian L.; Burgess, Karl V.; Heringa, Jaap; Abeln, Sanne; Brandt, Bernd W.; Munro, Carol A.; Ramage, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans biofilm formation is an important virulence factor in the pathogenesis of disease, a characteristic which has been shown to be heterogeneous in clinical isolates. Using an unbiased computational approach we investigated the central metabolic pathways driving biofilm heterogeneity. Transcripts from high (HBF) and low (LBF) biofilm forming isolates were analysed by RNA sequencing, with 6312 genes identified to be expressed in these two phenotypes. With a dedicated computational approach we identified and validated a significantly differentially expressed subnetwork of genes associated with these biofilm phenotypes. Our analysis revealed amino acid metabolism, such as arginine, proline, aspartate and glutamate metabolism, were predominantly upregulated in the HBF phenotype. On the contrary, purine, starch and sucrose metabolism was generally upregulated in the LBF phenotype. The aspartate aminotransferase gene AAT1 was found to be a common member of these amino acid pathways and significantly upregulated in the HBF phenotype. Pharmacological inhibition of AAT1 enzyme activity significantly reduced biofilm formation in a dose-dependent manner. Collectively, these findings provide evidence that biofilm phenotype is associated with differential regulation of metabolic pathways. Understanding and targeting such pathways, such as amino acid metabolism, is potentially useful for developing diagnostics and new antifungals to treat biofilm-based infections. PMID:27765942

  5. Comparison of molecular typing methods for Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Magee, P T; Bowdin, L; Staudinger, J

    1992-01-01

    Four molecular approaches to determining the types of Candida albicans strains were compared. The strains used were those whose repeated DNA (ribosomal and mitochondrial) EcoRI restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP) were determined by Stevens et al. (D. A. Stevens, F. C. Odds, and S. Scherer, Rev. Infect. Dis. 12:258-266, 1990). Scherer and Stevens (S. Scherer and D. A. Stevens, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 85:1452-1456, 1988) used the same strains to examine the Southern blots of genomic EcoRI digests probed with the repeated sequence 27A. The results of these investigators were compared with determinations of RFLPs generated from repeated DNA by the enzyme HinfI and examination of the karyotypes of strains under two sets of conditions, one for the smaller chromosomes and one for the larger ones. Analysis of RFLPs of repeated DNA is most convenient but shows the lowest degree of resolution. Use of the repeated sequence and use of karyotype have very high resolution, but the former method is more convenient than the latter. HinfI digestion is more sensitive than EcoRI digestion but equally convenient. By using all four methods, separate types were identified for 18 of the 20 strains examined. Images PMID:1356999

  6. Integrating Candida albicans metabolism with biofilm heterogeneity by transcriptome mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajendran, Ranjith; May, Ali; Sherry, Leighann; Kean, Ryan; Williams, Craig; Jones, Brian L.; Burgess, Karl V.; Heringa, Jaap; Abeln, Sanne; Brandt, Bernd W.; Munro, Carol A.; Ramage, Gordon

    2016-10-01

    Candida albicans biofilm formation is an important virulence factor in the pathogenesis of disease, a characteristic which has been shown to be heterogeneous in clinical isolates. Using an unbiased computational approach we investigated the central metabolic pathways driving biofilm heterogeneity. Transcripts from high (HBF) and low (LBF) biofilm forming isolates were analysed by RNA sequencing, with 6312 genes identified to be expressed in these two phenotypes. With a dedicated computational approach we identified and validated a significantly differentially expressed subnetwork of genes associated with these biofilm phenotypes. Our analysis revealed amino acid metabolism, such as arginine, proline, aspartate and glutamate metabolism, were predominantly upregulated in the HBF phenotype. On the contrary, purine, starch and sucrose metabolism was generally upregulated in the LBF phenotype. The aspartate aminotransferase gene AAT1 was found to be a common member of these amino acid pathways and significantly upregulated in the HBF phenotype. Pharmacological inhibition of AAT1 enzyme activity significantly reduced biofilm formation in a dose-dependent manner. Collectively, these findings provide evidence that biofilm phenotype is associated with differential regulation of metabolic pathways. Understanding and targeting such pathways, such as amino acid metabolism, is potentially useful for developing diagnostics and new antifungals to treat biofilm-based infections.

  7. Effects of histatin 5 and derived peptides on Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Ruissen, A L; Groenink, J; Helmerhorst, E J; Walgreen-Weterings, E; Van't Hof, W; Veerman, E C; Nieuw Amerongen, A V

    2001-01-01

    Three anti-microbial peptides were compared with respect to their killing activity against Candida albicans and their ability to disturb its cellular and internal membranes. Histatin 5 is an anti-fungal peptide occurring naturally in human saliva, while dhvar4 and dhvar5 are variants of its active domain, with increased anti-microbial activity. dhvar4 has increased amphipathicity compared with histatin 5, whereas dhvar5 has amphipathicity comparable with that of histatin 5. All three peptides caused depolarization of the cytoplasmic and/or mitochondrial membrane, indicating membranolytic activity. For the variant peptides both depolarization and killing occurred at a faster rate. With FITC-labelled peptides, no association with the cytoplasmic membrane was observed, contradicting the formation of permanent transmembrane multimeric peptide pores. Instead, the peptides were internalized and act on internal membranes, as demonstrated with mitochondrion- and vacuole-specific markers. In comparison with histatin 5, the variant peptides showed a more destructive effect on mitochondria. Entry of the peptides and subsequent killing were dependent on the metabolic state of the cells. Blocking of the mitochondrial activity led to complete protection against histatin 5 activity, whereas that of dhvar4 was hardly affected and that of dhvar5 was affected only intermediately. PMID:11368762

  8. Candida albicans survival, growth and biofilm formation are differently affected by mouthwashes: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Paulone, Simona; Malavasi, Giulia; Ardizzoni, Andrea; Orsi, Carlotta Francesca; Peppoloni, Samuele; Neglia, Rachele Giovanna; Blasi, Elisabetta

    2017-01-01

    Candida albicans is the most common cause of oral mycoses. The aim of the present study was to investigate in vitro the susceptibility of C. albicans to mouthwashes, in terms of growth, survival and biofilm formation. Candida albicans, laboratory strain SC5314, and 7 commercial mouthwashes were employed: 3 with 0.2% chlorhexidine digluconate; 1 with 0.06% chlorhexidine digluconate and 250 ppm F- sodium fluoride; 3 with fluorine-containing molecules. None of the mouthwashes contained ethanol in their formulations. The anti-Candida effects of the mouthwashes were assessed by disk diffusion, crystal violet and XTT assays. By using five protocols combining different dilutions and contact times the mouthwashes were tested against: 1) C. albicans growth; 2) biofilm formation; 3) survival of fungal cells in early, developing and mature Candida biofilm. Chlorhexidine digluconate-containing mouthwashes consistently exhibited the highest anti-Candida activity, irrespective of the protocols employed. Fungal growth, biofilm formation and survival of Candida cells within biofilm were impaired, the effects strictly depending on both the dilution employed and the time of contact. These in vitro studies provide evidence that mouthwashes exert anti-Candida activity against both planktonic and biofilm fungal structures, but to a different extent depending on their composition. This suggests special caution in the choice of mouthwashes for oral hygiene, whether aimed at prevention or treatment of oral candidiasis.

  9. Simple, Low-Cost Detection of Candida parapsilosis Complex Isolates and Molecular Fingerprinting of Candida orthopsilosis Strains in Kuwait by ITS Region Sequencing and Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Asadzadeh, Mohammad; Ahmad, Suhail; Hagen, Ferry; Meis, Jacques F.; Al-Sweih, Noura; Khan, Ziauddin

    2015-01-01

    Candida parapsilosis has now emerged as the second or third most important cause of healthcare-associated Candida infections. Molecular studies have shown that phenotypically identified C. parapsilosis isolates represent a complex of three species, namely, C. parapsilosis, C. orthopsilosis and C. metapsilosis. Lodderomyces elongisporus is another species phenotypically closely related to the C. parapsilosis-complex. The aim of this study was to develop a simple, low cost multiplex (m) PCR assay for species-specific identification of C. parapsilosis complex isolates and to study genetic relatedness of C. orthopsilosis isolates in Kuwait. Species-specific amplicons from C. parapsilosis (171 bp), C. orthopsilosis (109 bp), C. metapsilosis (217 bp) and L. elongisporus (258 bp) were obtained in mPCR. Clinical isolates identified as C. parapsilosis (n = 380) by Vitek2 in Kuwait and an international collection of 27 C. parapsilosis complex and L. elongisporus isolates previously characterized by rDNA sequencing were analyzed to evaluate mPCR. Species-specific PCR and DNA sequencing of internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of rDNA were performed to validate the results of mPCR. Fingerprinting of 19 clinical C. orthopsilosis isolates (including 4 isolates from a previous study) was performed by amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis. Phenotypically identified C. parapsilosis isolates (n = 380) were identified as C. parapsilosis sensu stricto (n = 361), C. orthopsilosis (n = 15), C. metapsilosis (n = 1) and L. elongisporus (n = 3) by mPCR. The mPCR also accurately detected all epidemiologically unrelated C. parapsilosis complex and L. elongisporus isolates. The 19 C. orthopsilosis isolates obtained from 16 patients were divided into 3 haplotypes based on ITS region sequence data. Seven distinct genotypes were identified among the 19 C. orthopsilosis isolates by AFLP including a dominant genotype (AFLP1) comprising 11 isolates recovered from 10 patients. A

  10. The role of pattern recognition receptors in the innate recognition of Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Nan-Xin; Wang, Yan; Hu, Dan-Dan; Yan, Lan; Jiang, Yuan-Ying

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is both a commensal microorganism in healthy individuals and a major fungal pathogen causing high mortality in immunocompromised patients. Yeast-hypha morphological transition is a well known virulence trait of C. albicans. Host innate immunity to C. albicans critically requires pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). In this review, we summarize the PRRs involved in the recognition of C. albicans in epithelial cells, endothelial cells, and phagocytic cells separately. We figure out the differential recognition of yeasts and hyphae, the findings on PRR-deficient mice, and the discoveries on human PRR-related single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). PMID:25714264

  11. Antifungal susceptibility and molecular typing of 115 Candida albicans isolates obtained from vulvovaginal candidiasis patients in 3 Shanghai maternity hospitals.

    PubMed

    Ying, Chunmei; Zhang, Hongju; Tang, Zhenhua; Chen, Huifen; Gao, Jing; Yue, Chaoyan

    2016-05-01

    In our multicenter study, we studied the distribution of Candida species in vulvovaginal candidiasis patients and investigated antifungal susceptibility profile and genotype of Candida albicans in vaginal swab. A total of 115 Candida albicans strains were detected in 135 clinical isolates. Minimum inhibitory concentration determinations showed that 83% and 81% of the 115 Candida albicans strains were susceptible to fluconazole and voriconazole. Randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis (RAPD) was applied to identify clonally related isolates from different patients at the local level. All tested strains were classified into genotype A (77.4%), genotype B (18.3%), and genotype C (4.3%). Genotype A was further classified into five subtypes and genotype B into two subtypes.Candida albicans was the dominant pathogen of vulvovaginal candidiasis, the majority belonging to genotype A in this study. Exposure to azoles is a risk factor for the emergence of azole resistance among Candida albicans isolated from VVC patients.

  12. The effect of ultraviolet radiation on the pathogenesis of Candida albicans in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Denkins, Y.M.

    1991-01-01

    This dissertation addresses questions concerning the effects of UV radiation on the pathogenesis of opportunistic fungal pathogens such as Candida albicans. UV radiation decreased the survival of Candida-infected mice; however, no correlation was found between suppression of the delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) response and the course of lethal infection. This suggested that DTH was not protective against lethal disease with this organism. UV radiation also changed the persistence of the organism in the internal organs. UV-irradiated, infected animals had increased numbers of Candida in their kidneys compared to non-irradiated mice. Sensitization prior to UV irradiation aided clearance of the organism from the kidneys of UV-irradiated mice. These data show that UV radiation suppresses cell-mediated immunity to Candida albicans in mice and increases mortality of Candida-infected mice. Moreover, the data suggest that an increase in environmental UV radiation could increase the severity of pathogenic infections.

  13. Person-to-person transfer of Candida albicans in the spacecraft environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, D. L.; Mehta, S. K.; Magee, B. B.; Mishra, S. K.

    1995-01-01

    We assessed the exchange of Candida albicans among crew members during 10 Space Shuttle missions. Throat, nasal, urine and faecal specimens were collected from 61 crew members twice before and once after space flights ranging from 7 to 10 days in duration; crews consisted of groups of five, six or seven men and women. Candida albicans was isolated at least once from 20 of the 61 subjects (33%). Candida strains were identified by restriction-fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) after digestion by the endonucleases EcoRI and HinfI; further discrimination was gained by Southern blot hybridization with the C. albicans repeat fragment 27A. Eighteen of the 20 Candida-positive crew members carried different strains of C. albicans in the specimens collected. Possible transfer of C. albicans between members of the same crew was demonstrated only once in the 10 missions studied. We conclude that the transfer of C. albicans among crew members during Space Shuttle flights is less frequent than had been predicted from earlier reports.

  14. Effects of carbapenems and their combination with amikacin on murine gut colonisation by Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Samonis, George; Galanakis, Emmanouil; Ntaoukakis, Markos; Sarchianaki, Emmanouela; Spathopoulou, Thomai; Dimopoulou, Dimitra; Kofteridis, Diamantis P; Maraki, Sofia

    2013-03-01

    Carbapenems are broad-spectrum antibiotics increasingly used for the treatment of severe infections. We evaluated the effects of four carbapenems given as monotherapies or in combination with amikacin on the level of gastrointestinal colonisation by Candida albicans in a previously established mouse model. Adult male Crl : CD1 (ICR) BR mice were fed chow containing C. albicans or regular chow. The mice fed with Candida chow had their gut colonised by the yeast. Both groups were subsequently given imipenem, meropenem, ertapenem, doripenem or their combination with amikacin or normal saline subcutaneously for 10 days. Stool cultures were performed immediately before, at the end and 1 week after discontinuation of treatment. Candida-colonised mice treated with the antibiotics had higher counts of the yeast in their stools than control C. albicans-colonised animals treated with saline. All four carbapenems and their combination with amikacin caused a significant increase in C. albicans concentration. Mice fed regular chow and treated with the study antibiotics or saline did not have any Candida in their stools. Dissemination of Candida was not detected in any animal. These data suggest that carbapenems and carbapenem plus amikacin induce substantial increases in the murine intestinal concentration of C. albicans.

  15. Nylon-3 polymers active against drug-resistant Candida albicans biofilms.

    PubMed

    Liu, Runhui; Chen, Xinyu; Falk, Shaun P; Masters, Kristyn S; Weisblum, Bernard; Gellman, Samuel H

    2015-02-18

    Candida albicans is the most common fungal pathogen in humans, and most diseases produced by C. albicans are associated with biofilms. We previously developed nylon-3 polymers with potent activity against planktonic C. albicans and excellent C. albicans versus mammalian cell selectivity. Here we show that these nylon-3 polymers have strong and selective activity against drug-resistant C. albicans in biofilms, as manifested by inhibition of biofilm formation and by killing of C. albicans in mature biofilms. The best nylon-3 polymer (poly-βNM) is superior to the antifungal drug fluconazole for all three strains examined. This polymer is slightly less effective than amphotericin B (AmpB) for two strains, but the polymer is superior against an AmpB-resistant strain.

  16. Imaging morphogenesis of Candida albicans during infection in a live animal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Soumya; Dolan, Kristy; Foster, Thomas H.; Wellington, Melanie

    2010-01-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic human fungal pathogen that requires an intact host immune response to prevent disease. Thus, studying host-pathogen interactions is critical to understanding and preventing this disease. We report a new model infection system in which ongoing C. albicans infections can be imaged at high spatial resolution in the ears of living mice. Intradermal inoculation into mouse ears with a C. albicans strain expressing green fluorescent protein results in systemic C. albicans infection that can be imaged in vivo using confocal microscopy. We observed filamentous growth of the organism in vivo as well as formation of microabscesses. This model system will allow us to gain significant new information about C. albicans pathogenesis through studies of host-C. albicans interactions in the native environment.

  17. Discrimination between Candida albicans and Other Pathogenic Species of the Genus Candida by Their Differential Sensitivities to Toxins of a Panel of Killer Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Buzzini, P.; Martini, A.

    2001-01-01

    The differential sensitivities to toxins produced by a short panel of four killer yeasts allowed discrimination between 91 strains of the yeast Candida albicans and 223 non-C. albicans Candida strains. One hundred percent of C. albicans isolates exhibited negative results to the toxin panel, while 100% of non-C. albicans cultures gave well-defined and reproducible positive results to at least one of the four killer toxins. Among C. albicans strains only 96 and 87% gave germ tube (GT)- and chlamydospore-positive results, respectively. In addition a few GT-false-positive strains were detected among non-C. albicans isolates. Susceptibility to the toxin panel is apparently expressed more consistently than either GT or chlamydospore production and may constitute a promising basis for a new simple and easy-to-use procedure for routine discrimination between the species C. albicans and other species of the genus Candida. PMID:11526179

  18. Endocarditis due to a co-infection of Candida albicans and Candida tropicalis in a drug abuser.

    PubMed

    Fesharaki, Shirinsadat Hashemi; Haghani, Iman; Mousavi, Bita; Kargar, Melika Laal; Boroumand, Mohammadali; Anvari, Maryam Sotoudeh; Abbasi, Kyomars; Meis, Jacques F; Badali, Hamid

    2013-11-01

    In recent decades the incidence of Candida endocarditis has increased dramatically. Despite the application of surgery and antifungal therapy, Candida endocarditis remains a life-threatening infection with significant morbidity and mortality. We report a 37-year-old male drug abuser presenting with high fever, chest pain, loss of appetite and cardiac failure. His echocardiography revealed mobile large tricuspid valve vegetations. Fungal endocarditis was confirmed by culturing of the resected vegetation showing mixed growth of Candida albicans and Candida tropicalis, although three consecutive blood cultures were negative for Candida species. Phenotypic identification was reconfirmed by sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS rDNA) region. The patient was initially treated with intravenous fluconazole (6 mg kg(-1) per day), followed by 2 weeks of intravenous amphotericin B deoxycholate (1 mg kg(-1) per day). Although MICs were low for both drugs, the patient's antifungal therapy combined with valve replacement failed, and he died due to respiratory failure.

  19. An Optimized Lock Solution Containing Micafungin, Ethanol and Doxycycline Inhibits Candida albicans and Mixed C. albicans – Staphyloccoccus aureus Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Lown, Livia; Peters, Brian M.; Walraven, Carla J.; Noverr, Mairi C.; Lee, Samuel A.

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans is a major cause of catheter-related bloodstream infections and is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Due to the propensity of C. albicans to form drug-resistant biofilms, the current standard of care includes catheter removal; however, reinsertion may be technically challenging or risky. Prolonged exposure of an antifungal lock solution within the catheter in conjunction with systemic therapy has been experimentally attempted for catheter salvage. Previously, we demonstrated excellent in vitro activity of micafungin, ethanol, and high-dose doxycycline as single agents for prevention and treatment of C. albicans biofilms. Thus, we sought to investigate optimal combinations of micafungin, ethanol, and/or doxycycline as a lock solution. We performed two- and three-drug checkerboard assays to determine the in vitro activity of pairwise or three agents in combination for prevention or treatment of C. albicans biofilms. Optimal lock solutions were tested for activity against C. albicans clinical isolates, reference strains and polymicrobial C. albicans-S. aureus biofilms. A solution containing 20% (v/v) ethanol, 0.01565 μg/mL micafungin, and 800 μg/mL doxycycline demonstrated a reduction of 98% metabolic activity and no fungal regrowth when used to prevent fungal biofilm formation; however there was no advantage over 20% ethanol alone. This solution was also successful in inhibiting the regrowth of C. albicans from mature polymicrobial biofilms, although it was not fully bactericidal. Solutions containing 5% ethanol with low concentrations of micafungin and doxycycline demonstrated synergistic activity when used to prevent monomicrobial C. albicans biofilm formation. A combined solution of micafungin, ethanol and doxycycline is highly effective for the prevention of C. albicans biofilm formation but did not demonstrate an advantage over 20% ethanol alone in these studies. PMID:27428310

  20. Inhibition of Candida albicans biofilm by pure selenium nanoparticles synthesized by pulsed laser ablation in liquids.

    PubMed

    Guisbiers, Grégory; Lara, Humberto H; Mendoza-Cruz, Ruben; Naranjo, Guillermo; Vincent, Brandy A; Peralta, Xomalin G; Nash, Kelly L

    2016-10-25

    Selenoproteins play an important role in the human body by accomplishing essential biological functions like oxido-reductions, antioxidant defense, thyroid hormone metabolism and immune response; therefore, the possibility to synthesize selenium nanoparticles free of any contaminants is exciting for future nano-medical applications. This paper reports the first synthesis of selenium nanoparticles by femtosecond pulsed laser ablation in de-ionized water. Those pure nanoparticles have been successfully used to inhibit the formation of Candida albicans biofilms. Advanced electron microscopy images showed that selenium nanoparticles easily adhere on the biofilm, then penetrate into the pathogen, and consequently damage the cell structure by substituting with sulfur. 50% inhibition of Candida albicans biofilm was obtained at only 25 ppm. Finally, the two physical parameters proved to affect strongly the viability of Candida albicans are the crystallinity and particle size.

  1. Relationship between Antifungal Activity against Candida albicans and Electron Parameters of Selected N-Heterocyclic Thioamides.

    PubMed

    Stachowicz, Jadwiga; Krajewska-Kułak, Elżbieta; Lukaszuk, Cecylia; Niewiadomy, A

    2014-07-01

    Due to the increasing demand for new pharmaceuticals showing biological activity against pathogenic microorganisms, there is increasing search for new compounds with predicted biological activity. Variously substituted thioamide derivatives with 1.3 and 1.2 ring of thiazole and 1,3,4-thiadiazole, as well as pyrazole were assessed for their activity against Candida albicans. Activity of majority of tested thioamides was larger as compared with that of the reference drugs. The electron parameters of obtained N-heterocyclic thioamides were determined and dependencies on their biological activity against Candida albicans were studied. The best electron compliance of produced bindings with the activity against Candida albicans was observed for the derivatives containing 1,3,4-thiadiazole ring.

  2. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, Bacillus cereus, and Candida parapsilosis from a multicontaminated soil alleviate metal toxicity in plants.

    PubMed

    Azcón, Rosario; Perálvarez, María del Carmen; Roldán, Antonio; Barea, José-Miguel

    2010-05-01

    We investigated if the limited development of Trifolium repens growing in a heavy metal (HM) multicontaminated soil was increased by selected native microorganisms, bacteria (Bacillus cereus (Bc)), yeast (Candida parapsilosis (Cp)), or arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), used either as single or dual inoculants. These microbial inoculants were assayed to ascertain whether the selection of HM-tolerant microorganisms can benefit plant growth and nutrient uptake and depress HM acquisition. The inoculated microorganisms, particularly in dual associations, increased plant biomass by 148% (Bc), 162%, (Cp), and 204% (AMF), concomitantly producing the highest symbiotic (AMF colonisation and nodulation) rates. The lack of AMF colonisation and nodulation in plants growing in this natural, polluted soil was compensated by adapted microbial inoculants. The metal bioaccumulation abilities of the inoculated microorganisms and particularly the microbial effect on decreasing metal concentrations in shoot biomass seem to be involved in such effects. Regarding microbial HM tolerance, the activities of antioxidant enzymes known to play an important role in cell protection by alleviating cellular oxidative damage, such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione reductase, and ascorbate peroxidase, were here considered as an index of microbial metal tolerance. Enzymatic mechanisms slightly changed in the HM-adapted B. cereus or C. parapsilosis in the presence of metals. Antioxidants seem to be directly involved in the adaptative microbial response and survival in HM-polluted sites. Microbial inoculations showed a bioremediation potential and helped plants to develop in the multicontaminated soil. Thus, they could be used as a biotechnological tool to improve plant development in HM-contaminated environments.

  3. In vitro adherence of Candida albicans isolated from patients with chronic periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    MACHADO, Adriana Gadotti; KOMIYAMA, Edson Yukio; dos SANTOS, Silvana Soléo Ferreira; JORGE, Antonio Olavo Cardoso; BRIGHENTI, Fernanda Lourenção; KOGA-ITO, Cristiane Yumi

    2011-01-01

    Adherence is considered an extremely important virulence factor in yeast. Objective The aim of this study was to analyze the adherence to epithelial cells of C. albicans isolated from patients with chronic periodontitis in comparison to healthy patients. Material and methods Candida albicans cells isolated from individuals with chronic periodontitis (n=25) and healthy controls (n=25) were included in this study. Suspensions of C. albicans (106 cells/mL) and epithelial cells (105 cells/mL) were mixed and incubated at 37ºC for 1 h. The number of yeasts adhered to 25 epithelial cells was counted. Results The number of C. albicans cells adhered to epithelial cells was statistically higher in the chronic periodontitis group than in the control group (Student's t-test, p=0.000). Conclusion The results of the present study suggest a higher Candida adherence of samples isolated from patients with chronic periodontitis. PMID:21710096

  4. Denture Stomatitis and Candida Albicans in Iranian Population: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Moosazadeh, Mahmood; Akbari, Maryam; Tabrizi, Reza; Ghorbani, Anahita; Golkari, Ali; Banakar, Morteza; Sekhavati, Eghbal; Kavari, Seyed Habibollah; Bagheri Lankarani, Kamran

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem: Denture stomatitis is the common form of oral candidiasis, which is seen in the form of diffused inflammation in the areas covered by dentures. Many primary studies report the prevalence of denture stomatitis and candida albicans among patients in the Iranian population; therefore, using meta-analysis is valuable for health policy makers. Purpose: The purpose of the present study is to determine the prevalence of denture stomatitis and candida albicans in Iran. Materials and Method: Using relevant keywords, national and international databases were searched. After limiting the search strategy and deleting the duplicates, the remaining papers were screened by examining the title and abstract. In order to increase the sensitivity of search reference lists of papers were examined. Finally the index of heterogeneity between studies was defined using Cochran test (Q) and I-squared (I2). According to heterogeneity, the random effects model was used to estimate the prevalence of denture stomatitis and candida albicans in Iran. Result: The prevalence of denture stomatitis in 12 studies, and the prevalence of candida albicans in patients with denture stomatitis have been reported in 6 studies. The number of sample under investigated and its age range among primary studies included meta- analysis was 2271 individuals and 32.7 till 87.5 years respectively. The prevalence of denture stomatitis in preliminary studies imported to a meta-analysis varied from 1.9% to 54.6%, and its rate in Iran using the meta-analysis was estimated 28.9 % (CI 95%: 18.2-39.6). Also the overall prevalence of candida albicans in patients with denture stomatitis in Iran was estimated 60.6% (CI 95%:50.1-71.2). Conclusion: This study showed that the prevalence of denture stomatitis and candida albicans among patient infected denture stomatitis is relatively significant in Iran. PMID:27840842

  5. Candida albicans and non-C. albicans Candida species: comparison of biofilm production and metabolic activity in biofilms, and putative virulence properties of isolates from hospital environments and infections.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, A V; Prado, C G; Carvalho, R R; Dias, K S T; Dias, A L T

    2013-04-01

    Candida albicans and, more recently, non-C. albicans Candida spp. are considered the most frequent fungi in hospitals. This study analyzed Candida spp. isolates and compared the frequency of different species, that is, C. albicans and non-C. albicans Candida spp., and the origins of isolates, that is, from hospital environments or infections. Yeast virulence factors were evaluated based on biofilm production and metabolic activity. Hemolysin production and the antifungal susceptibility profiles of isolates were also evaluated. Candida spp. were highly prevalent in samples collected from hospital environments, which may provide a reservoir for continuous infections with these yeasts. There were no differences in the biofilm productivity levels and metabolic activities of the environmental and clinical isolates, although the metabolic activities of non-C. albicans Candida spp. biofilms were greater than those of the C. albicans biofilms (p < 0.05). Clinical samples had higher hemolysin production (p < 0.05) and lower susceptibility to fluconazole (p < 0.05). Non-C. albicans Candida spp. predominated in samples collected from hospital environments and infections (p < 0.05). These species had a lower susceptibility to fluconazole and amphotericin B, and their biofilms had higher metabolic activities than those produced by C. albicans, which may explain the increased incidence of fungal infections with these yeasts during recent years.

  6. A Monoclonal Antibody Directed against a Candida albicans Cell Wall Mannoprotein Exerts Three Anti-C. albicans Activities

    PubMed Central

    Moragues, María D.; Omaetxebarria, Miren J.; Elguezabal, Natalia; Sevilla, María J.; Conti, Stefania; Polonelli, Luciano; Pontón, José

    2003-01-01

    Antibodies are believed to play a role in the protection against Candida albicans infections by a number of mechanisms, including the inhibition of adhesion or germ tube formation, opsonization, neutralization of virulence-related enzymes, and direct candidacidal activity. Although some of these biological activities have been demonstrated individually in monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), it is not clear if all these anti-C. albicans activities can be displayed by a single antibody. In this report, we characterized a monoclonal antibody raised against the main target of salivary secretory immunoglobulin A in the cell wall of C. albicans, which exerts three anti-C. albicans activities: (i) inhibition of adherence to HEp-2 cells, (ii) inhibition of germination, and (iii) direct candidacidal activity. MAb C7 reacted with a proteinic epitope from a mannoprotein with a molecular mass of >200 kDa predominantly expressed on the C. albicans germ tube cell wall surface as well as with a number of antigens from Candida lusitaniae, Cryptococcus neoformans, Aspergillus fumigatus, and Scedosporium prolificans. MAb C7 caused a 31.1% inhibition in the adhesion of C. albicans to HEp-2 monolayers and a 55.3% inhibition in the adhesion of C. albicans to buccal epithelial cells, produced a 38.5% decrease in the filamentation of C. albicans, and exhibited a potent fungicidal effect against C. albicans, C. lusitaniae, Cryptococcus neoformans, A. fumigatus, and S. prolificans, showing reductions in fungal growth ranging from 34.2 to 88.7%. The fungicidal activity showed by MAb C7 seems to be related to that reported by antibodies mimicking the activity of a killer toxin produced by the yeast Pichia anomala, since one of these MAbs also reacted with the C. albicans mannoprotein with a molecular mass of >200 kDa. Results presented in this study support the concept of a family of microbicidal antibodies that could be useful in the treatment of a wide range of microbial infections when used

  7. Comparison of the effect of honey and miconazole against Candida albicans in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Banaeian-Borujeni, Shayeste; Mobini, Gholam R.; Pourgheysari, Batoul; Validi, Majid

    2013-01-01

    Background: One of the most common causes of vaginitis is candidiasis. The aim of this study is to compare the effect of honey and miconazole against Candida albicans, in vitro. Materials and Methods: The different W/V concentrations of honey were prepared at 20, 40, 60, 80, and 95% and different dilutions of miconazole were prepared in 0.05, 5, and 50 μg/ml. A microdilution of 100/000 cells per ml of a two-day old culture of Candida albicans was prepared in normal saline, after culturing the strain of PTCC 5027 in RPMI 1640 medium. Ten microliters of this dilution was added to 1 ml of the RPMI 1640 medium containing different concentrations of honey and to 1 ml of the RPMI 1640 medium containing different dilutions of miconazole. The cultures were incubated at 35°C for 12, 24, and 48 hours. Results: The growth rate of Candida albicans was determined in the cultures. The results indicated that the honey prevented the growth of C. albicans greatly only at an 80% concentration, whereas, miconazole inhibited it completely. Conclusions: As Candida albicans is a normal vaginal flora, the inhibitory effect of honey without the fungicide effect is a very good trend in the treatment of vaginal candidiasis. PMID:24223372

  8. [High molecular weight chitosan and sodium alginate effect on secretory acid proteinase of Candida albicans].

    PubMed

    Calamari, Silvia; Bojanich, Alejandra; Barembaum, Silvina; Azcurra, Ana; Virga, Carolina; Dorronsoro, Susana

    2004-12-01

    The effect of high molecular weight chitosan (HMWCh) and sodium alginate (NaAL) on acid proteinase secretion of Candida albicans (one of culture collection and five isolates) was evaluated. The secretion of acid proteinase was induced in the presence and the absence of these polymers in different concentrations and their enzymatic activity was determined. HMWCh and NaAL significantly diminished the enzymatic activity (>76% for the collection strains and > 89% for the isolates, p < 0.05). HMWCh did not modify protein concentrations, but NaAL did. It can be concluded that both polymers can inhibit the proteinase activity of Candida albicans.

  9. In vitro pharmacodynamic modelling of anidulafungin against Candida spp.

    PubMed

    Gil-Alonso, Sandra; Jauregizar, Nerea; Ortega, Ignacio; Eraso, Elena; Suárez, Elena; Quindós, Guillermo

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to fit anidulafungin in vitro static time-kill data from nine strains of Candida with a pharmacodynamic (PD) model in order to describe the antifungal activity of this drug against Candida spp. Time-kill data from strains of Candida albicans, Candida glabrata and Candida parapsilosis clades were best fit using an adapted sigmoidal Emax model and resulted in a set of PD parameters (Emax, EC50 and Hill factor) for each fungal strain. The data were analysed with NONMEM 7. Anidulafungin was effective in a species- and concentration-dependent manner against the strains of C. glabrata and C. parapsilosis clades as observed with the EC50 estimates. Maximum killing rate constant (Emax) values were higher against C. glabrata and C. parapsilosis complex strains. In conclusion, we demonstrated that the activity of anidulafungin against Candida can be accurately described using an adapted sigmoidal Emax model.

  10. Cloning of the RHO1 gene from Candida albicans and its regulation of beta-1,3-glucan synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Kondoh, O; Tachibana, Y; Ohya, Y; Arisawa, M; Watanabe, T

    1997-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae RHO1 gene encodes a low-molecular-weight GTPase. One of its recently identified functions is the regulation of beta-1,3-glucan synthase, which synthesizes the main component of the fungal cell wall (J. Drgonova et al., Science 272:277-279, 1996; T. Mazur and W. Baginsky, J. Biol. Chem. 271:14604-14609, 1996; and H. Qadota et al., Science 272:279-281, 1996). From the opportunistic pathogenic fungus Candida albicans, we cloned the RHO1 gene by the PCR and cross-hybridization methods. Sequence analysis revealed that the Candida RHO1 gene has a 597-nucleotide region which encodes a putative 22.0-kDa peptide. The deduced amino acid sequence predicts that Candida albicans Rho1p is 82.9% identical to Saccharomyces Rho1p and contains all the domains conserved among Rho-type GTPases from other organisms. The Candida albicans RHO1 gene could rescue a S. cerevisiae strain containing a rho1 deletion. Furthermore, recombinant Candida albicans Rho1p could reactivate the beta-1,3-glucan synthesis activities of both C. albicans and S. cerevisiae membranes in which endogenous Rho1p had been depleted by Tergitol NP-40-NaCl treatment. Candida albicans Rho1p was copurified with the beta-1,3-glucan synthase putative catalytic subunit, Candida albicans Gsc1p, by product entrapment. Candida albicans Rho1p was shown to interact directly with Candida albicans Gsc1p in a ligand overlay assay and a cross-linking study. These results indicate that Candida albicans Rho1p acts in the same manner as Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rho1p to regulate beta-1,3-glucan synthesis. PMID:9401032

  11. Systemic Staphylococcus aureus infection mediated by Candida albicans hyphal invasion of mucosal tissue

    PubMed Central

    Schlecht, Lisa Marie; Peters, Brian M.; Krom, Bastiaan P.; Freiberg, Jeffrey A.; Hänsch, Gertrud M.; Filler, Scott G.

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans and Staphylococcus aureus are often co-isolated in cases of biofilm-associated infections. C. albicans can cause systemic disease through morphological switch from the rounded yeast to the invasive hyphal form. Alternatively, systemic S. aureus infections arise from seeding through breaks in host epithelial layers although many patients have no documented portal of entry. We describe a novel strategy by which S. aureus is able to invade host tissue and disseminate via adherence to the invasive hyphal elements of Candida albicans. In vitro and ex vivo findings demonstrate a specific binding of the staphylococci to the candida hyphal elements. The C. albicans cell wall adhesin Als3p binds to multiple staphylococcal adhesins. Furthermore, Als3p is required for C. albicans to transport S. aureus into the tissue and cause a disseminated infection in an oral co-colonization model. These findings suggest that C. albicans can facilitate the invasion of S. aureus across mucosal barriers, leading to systemic infection in co-colonized patients. PMID:25332378

  12. Comparative adherence of Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis to human buccal epithelial cells and extracellular matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Rachael P C; Williams, David W; Moran, Gary P; Coleman, David C; Sullivan, Derek J

    2014-04-01

    Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis are very closely related pathogenic yeast species. Despite their close relationship, C. albicans is a far more successful colonizer and pathogen of humans. The purpose of this study was to determine if the disparity in the virulence of the two species is attributed to differences in their ability to adhere to human buccal epithelial cells (BECs) and/or extracellular matrix proteins. When grown overnight at 30°C in yeast extract peptone dextrose, genotype 1 C. dubliniensis isolates were found to be significantly more adherent to human BECs than C. albicans or C. dubliniensis genotypes 2-4 (P < 0.001). However, when the yeast cells were grown at 37°C, no significant difference between the adhesion of C. dubliniensis genotype 1 and C. albicans to human BECs was observed, and C. dubliniensis genotype 1 and C. albicans adhered to BECs in significantly greater numbers than the other C. dubliniensis genotypes (P < 0.001). Using surface plasmon resonance analysis, C. dubliniensis isolates were found to adhere in significantly greater numbers than C. albicans to type I and IV collagen, fibronectin, laminin, vitronectin, and proline-rich peptides. These data suggest that C. albicans is not more adherent to epithelial cells or matrix proteins than C. dubliniensis and therefore other factors must contribute to the greater levels of virulence exhibited by C. albicans.

  13. Candida albicans stimulates cytokine production and leukocyte adhesion molecule expression by endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Filler, S G; Pfunder, A S; Spellberg, B J; Spellberg, J P; Edwards, J E

    1996-01-01

    Endothelial cells have the potential to influence significantly the host immune response to blood-borne microbial pathogens, such as Candida albicans. We investigated the ability (of this organism to stimulate endothelial cell responses relevant to host defense in vitro. Infection with C. albicans induced endothelial cells to express mRNAs encoding E-selectin, intercellular adhesion molecule 1, vascular cell adhesion molecule 1, interleukin 6, interleukin 8, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1, and inducible cyclooxygenase (cox2). All three leukocyte adhesion molecule proteins were expressed on the surfaces of the endothelial cells after 8 h of exposure to C. albicans. An increase in secretion of all three cytokines was found after 12 h of infection. Cytochalasin D inhibited accumulation of the endothelial cell cytokine and leukocyte adhesion molecule mRNAs in response to C. albicans, suggesting that endothelial cell phagocytosis of the organism is required to induce this response. Live Candida tropicalis, Candida glabrata, a nongerminating strain of C. albicans, and killed C. albicans did not stimulate the expression of any of the cytokine or leukocyte adhesion molecule mRNAs. These findings indicate that a factor associated with live, germinating C. albicans is required for induction of endothelial cell mRNA expression. Furthermore, since endothelial cells phagocytize killed C. albicans, phagocytosis is likely necessary but not sufficient for this organism to stimulate mRNA accumulation. In conclusion, the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines and expression of leukocyte adhesion molecules by endothelial cells in response to C. albicans could enhance the host defense against this organism by contributing to the recruitment of activated leukocytes to sites of intravascular infection. PMID:8698486

  14. Comparative Evaluation of Oral Candida albicans Carriage in Children with and without Dental Caries: A Microbiological in vivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Binita; Bhatia, Hind Pal; Aggarwal, Archana; Kumar Singh, Ashish; Gupta, Nidhi

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aim: The aim of this study was to examine the presence of Candida albicans in extensive carious lesions before and after treatment of the carious lesions and to evaluate the carriage of Candida albicans in children with and without caries. Materials and methods: The study was conducted on 60 childrens who were divided into two groups: Experimental group (group 1) and controlled group (group 2). Each group was further divided into 3 subgroups according to the dentition as: Group A (Deciduous), group B (Mixed) and group C (Permanent). Swab samples for mycological studies were collected from the dorsum of the tongue, vestibular sulcus and peak of the palatal vault. All samples were cultured directly on SDA plate (Sabouraud's dextrose agar). Number of Candida colonies was determined by counting colony forming unit on SDA plates. Further identification of Candida albicans was done by germ-tube test and corn-meal agar. Result: Overall prevalence of Candida albicans carriage was significantly higher and mean value of Candida albicans CFU (colony forming unit) was remarkably higher in group 1 (experimental group) as compare to group 2 (control group). Significant reduction in the frequency and mean value of Candida albicans CFU/plate was seen in children after treatment of carious lesions. Conclusion: This study supports the active role of Candida species in dental caries. Hence, Candida albicans may play an important role as a risk factor for dental caries. It was also seen that the oral environment stabilization procedures were able to reduce Candida albicans counts. Thus, these procedures can be considered efficient in the reduction of caries risk. How to cite this article: Srivastava B, Bhatia HP, Chaudhary V, Aggarwal A, Singh AK, Gupta N. Comparative Evaluation of Oral Candida albicans Carriage in Children with and without Dental Caries: A Microbiological in vivo Study. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2012;5(2):108-112. PMID:25206148

  15. External ecological niche for Candida albicans within reducing, oxygen-limited zones of wetlands.

    PubMed

    Stone, Wendy; Jones, Barbara-Lee; Wilsenach, Jac; Botha, Alfred

    2012-04-01

    Candida albicans within the human host is well studied; however, identifying environmental reservoirs of pathogens is epidemiologically valuable for disease management. Oxygen-limited, carbohydrate-rich zones of wetlands, to which sewage-borne C. albicans is often exposed, are characteristically similar to the gastrointestinal reservoir. Consequently, using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), we demonstrated that oxygen-limited zones in polluted wetlands may act as potential reservoirs of C. albicans.

  16. Influence of radiation therapy on oral Candida albicans colonization: a quantitative assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Rossie, K.M.; Taylor, J.; Beck, F.M.; Hodgson, S.E.; Blozis, G.G.

    1987-12-01

    An increase in quantity of oral Candida albicans was documented in patients receiving head and neck radiation therapy during and after therapy, as assessed by an oral-rinse culturing technique. The amount of the increase was greater in denture wearers and directly related to increasing radiation dose and increasing volume of parotid gland included in the radiation portal. A significant number of patients who did not carry C. albicans prior to radiation therapy developed positive cultures by 1 month after radiation therapy. The percentage of patients receiving head and neck radiation therapy who carried C. albicans prior to radiation therapy did not differ significantly from matched dental patient controls.

  17. Phospholipid biosynthesis in Candida albicans: Regulation by the precursors inositol and choline

    SciTech Connect

    Klig, L.S.; Friedli, L.; Schmid, E. )

    1990-08-01

    Phospholipid metabolism in the pathogenic fungus Candida albicans was examined. The phospholipid biosynthetic pathways of C. albicans were elucidated and were shown to be similar to those of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, marked differences were seen between these two fungi in the regulation of the pathways in response to exogenously provided precursors inositol and choline. In S. cerevisiae, the biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine via methylation of phosphatidylethanolamine appears to be regulated in response to inositol and choline; provision of choline alone does not repress the activity of this pathway. The same pathway in C. albicans responds to the exogenous provision of choline. Possible explanations for the observed differences in regulation are discussed.

  18. Virulence of Candida albicans isolated from HIV infected and non infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Wibawa, Tri; Praseno; Aman, Abu Tholib

    2015-01-01

    Candida sp contributes 33.1 % of fungal infections among HIV patients. Among the species of the genus Candida, Candida albicans is the most frequently isolated from HIV patients. This study aimed to analyze putative virulence factors of C. albicans isolated from oral cavities of HIV infected patients and healthy individuals. Twenty isolates from HIV infected patients and fourteen from healthy individuals were analyzed for phenotypic switching, cell growth rate, hyphae formation, hemolytic activity and biofilm formation characteristics. The frequency of phenotypic switching was low in both groups. The cell growth rate of C. albicans from HIV infected patients were significantly higher than those from healthy individuals (p < 0.001). After 48 h incubation, the concentration of C. albicans isolated from HIV infected patients was 8.6 × 10(6) cells/ml while the concentration of C. albicans isolated from healthy individuals was 7.8 × 10(6) cells/ml. After 72 h incubation, the concentration of C. albicans isolated from HIV infected patients was 9.5 × 10(6) cells/ml while the concentration of C. albicans isolated from healthy individuals was 8.2 × 10(6) cells/ml. In contrast, the hemolytic activity of C. albicans isolated from healthy individuals were significantly higher compared to those from HIV infected patients (p < 0.001) at both aerobic (6 vs. 3.5 mm) and anaerobic (3.8 vs. 1.3 mm) conditions. The percentages of hyphae forming cells were higher in C. albicans collected from HIV infected patients (27.5 %) compared to the healthy individual group (14.7 %). However, this trend was not statistically significant (p = 0.1). Candida albicans isolated from HIV infected patients have similar ability to develop biofilms compared to those from healthy individuals. (OR = 4.2; 95 % CI 0.724-26.559). The virulence factors of C. albicans isolated from HIV infected patients were not significantly different from those of healthy individuals. The results

  19. Potential Targets for Antifungal Drug Discovery Based on Growth and Virulence in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiuyun; Hou, Yinglong; Yue, Longtao; Liu, Shuyuan; Du, Juan; Sun, Shujuan

    2015-10-01

    Fungal infections, especially infections caused by Candida albicans, remain a challenging problem in clinical settings. Despite the development of more-effective antifungal drugs, their application is limited for various reasons. Thus, alternative treatments with drugs aimed at novel targets in C. albicans are needed. Knowledge of growth and virulence in fungal cells is essential not only to understand their pathogenic mechanisms but also to identify potential antifungal targets. This article reviews the current knowledge of the mechanisms of growth and virulence in C. albicans and examines potential targets for the development of new antifungal drugs.

  20. The effect of silver nanoparticles and nystatin on mixed biofilms of Candida glabrata and Candida albicans on acrylic.

    PubMed

    Silva, Sónia; Pires, Priscila; Monteiro, Douglas R; Negri, Melyssa; Gorup, Luiz F; Camargo, Emerson R; Barbosa, Débora B; Oliveira, Rosário; Williams, David W; Henriques, Mariana; Azeredo, Joana

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to compare biofilm formation by Candida glabrata and Candida albicans on acrylic, either individually or when combined (single and dual species) and then examine the antimicrobial effects of silver nanoparticles and nystatin on these biofilms. Candidal adhesion and biofilm assays were performed on acrylic surface in the presence of artificial saliva (AS) for 2 h and 48 h, respectively. Candida glabrata and C. albicans adherence was determined by the number of colony forming units (CFUs) recovered from the biofilms on CHROMagar(®) Candida. In addition, crystal violet (CV) staining was used as an indicator of biofilm biomass and to quantify biofilm formation ability. Pre-formed biofilms were treated either with silver nanoparticles or nystatin and the effect of these agents on the biofilms was evaluated after 24 h. Results showed that both species adhered to and formed biofilms on acrylic surfaces. A significantly (P < 0.05) higher number of CFUs was evident in C. glabrata biofilms compared with those formed by C. albicans. Comparing single and dual species biofilms, equivalent CFU numbers were evident for the individual species. Both silver nanoparticles and nystatin reduced biofilm biomass and the CFUs of single and dual species biofilms (P < 0.05). Silver nanoparticles had a significantly (P < 0.05) greater effect on reducing C. glabrata biofilm biomass compared with C. albicans. Similarly, nystatin was more effective in reducing the number of CFUs of dual species biofilms compared with those of single species (P < 0.05). In summary, C. glabrata and C. albicans can co-exist in biofilms without apparent antagonism, and both silver nanoparticles and nystatin exhibit inhibitory effects on biofilms of these species.

  1. Whole Saliva has a Dual Role on the Adherence of Candida albicans to Polymethylmetacrylate.

    PubMed

    Elguezabal, N; Maza, J L; Dorronsoro, S; Pontón, J

    2008-01-01

    Adhesion of Candida albicans to acrylic of dental prostheses or to salivary macromolecules adsorbed on their surface is believed to be a critical event in the development of denture stomatitis. In previous studies our group has shown that adhesion of C. albicans germ tubes to polystyrene is decreased by saliva whereas C. albicans yeast cells adhesion to the same material is enhanced. The results presented in this study confirm this dual role played by whole saliva, since it decreased the adhesion of germ tubes but increased the adhesion of yeast cells to polymethylmetacrylate (PMMA). These effects mediated by whole saliva do not seem to be related to an inhibition of the germination of C. albicans, since similar levels of filamentation were observed in presence and absence of saliva. These results may give new insights into the conflicting role of saliva in the adhesion of C. albicans to acrylic resins of dental prostheses.

  2. A viability assay for Candida albicans based on the electron transfer mediator 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Rabeay Y A; Bilitewski, Ursula

    2011-12-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic fungal pathogen with comparably high respiratory activity. Thus, we established a viability test based on 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol (DCIP), a membrane-permeable electron transfer agent. NADH dehydrogenases catalyze the reduction of DCIP by NADH, and the enzymatic activity can be determined either electrochemically via oxidation reactions of DCIP or photometrically. Among the specific respiratory chain inhibitors, only the complex I inhibitor rotenone decreased the DCIP signal from C. albicans, leaving residual activity of approximately 30%. Thus, the DCIP-reducing activity of C. albicans was largely dependent on complex I activity. C. albicans is closely related to the complex I-negative yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which had previously been used in DCIP viability assays. Via comparative studies, in which we included the pathogenic complex I-negative yeast Candida glabrata, we could define assay conditions that allow a distinction of complex I-negative and -positive organisms. Basal levels of DCIP turnover by S.cerevisiae and C. glabrata were only 30% of those obtained from C. albicans but could be increased to the C. albicans level by adding glucose. No significant increases were observed with galactose. DCIP reduction rates from C. albicans were not further increased by any carbon source.

  3. Antifungal mechanism of essential oil from Anethum graveolens seeds against Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuxin; Zeng, Hong; Tian, Jun; Ban, Xiaoquan; Ma, Bingxin; Wang, Youwei

    2013-08-01

    This work studied the antifungal mechanism of dill seed essential oil (DSEO) against Candida albicans. Flow cytometric analysis and inhibition of ergosterol synthesis were performed to clarify the mechanism of action of DSEO on C. albicans. Upon treatment of cells with DSEO, propidium iodide penetrated C. albicans through a lesion in its plasma membrane. DSEO also significantly reduced the amount of ergosterol. These findings indicate that the plasma membrane of C. albicans was damaged by DSEO. The effect of DSEO on the functions of the mitochondria in C. albicans was also studied. We assayed the mitochondrial membrane potential (mtΔψ) using rhodamine 123 and determined the production of mitochondrial dysfunction-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) via flow cytometry. The effects of the antioxidant l-cysteine (Cys) on DSEO-induced ROS production and the antifungal effect of DSEO on C. albicans were investigated. Exposure to DSEO increased mtΔψ. Dysfunctions in the mitochondria caused ROS accumulation in C. albicans. This increase in the level of ROS production and DSEO-induced decrease in cell viability were prevented by the addition of Cys, indicating that ROS are an important mediator of the antifungal action of DSEO. These findings indicate that the cytoplasmic membrane and mitochondria are the main anti-Candida targets of DSEO.

  4. Growth of Candida albicans in human saliva is supported by low-molecular-mass compounds.

    PubMed

    Valentijn-Benz, Marianne; Nazmi, Kamran; Brand, Henk S; van't Hof, Wim; Veerman, Enno C I

    2015-12-01

    Saliva plays a key role in the maintenance of a stable oral microflora. It contains antimicrobial compounds but also functions as a substrate for growth of bacteria under conditions of low external nutrient supply. Besides bacteria, yeasts, in particular Candida albicans, commonly inhabit the oral cavity. Under immunocompromised conditions, instantaneous outgrowth of this yeast occurs in oral carriers of C. albicans, suggesting that this yeast is able to survive in the oral cavity with saliva as sole source of growth substrate. The aim of the present study was to identify the salivary constituents that are used by C. albicans for growth and survival in saliva. In addition, we have explored the effect of growth in saliva on the susceptibility of C. albicans to histatin 5, a salivary antifungal peptide. It was found that C. albicans was able to grow in human saliva without addition of glucose, and in the stationary phase could survive for more than 400 h. Candida albicans grown in saliva was more than 10 times less susceptible for salivary histatin 5 than C. albicans cultured in Sabouraud medium.

  5. The APSES transcription factor Efg1 is a global regulator that controls morphogenesis and biofilm formation in Candida parapsilosis

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, Leona A; Riccombeni, Alessandro; Grózer, Zsuzsana; Holland, Linda M; Lynch, Denise B; Andes, David R; Gácser, Attila; Butler, Geraldine

    2013-01-01

    Efg1 (a member of the APSES family) is an important regulator of hyphal growth and of the white-to-opaque transition in Candida albicans and very closely related species. We show that in Candida parapsilosis Efg1 is a major regulator of a different morphological switch at the colony level, from a concentric to smooth morphology. The rate of switching is at least 20-fold increased in an efg1 knockout relative to wild type. Efg1 deletion strains also have reduced biofilm formation, attenuated virulence in an insect model, and increased sensitivity to SDS and caspofungin. Biofilm reduction is more dramatic in in vitro than in in vivo models. An Efg1 paralogue (Efh1) is restricted to Candida species, and does not regulate concentric-smooth phenotype switching, biofilm formation or stress response. We used ChIP-seq to identify the Efg1 regulon. A total of 931 promoter regions bound by Efg1 are highly enriched for transcription factors and regulatory proteins. Efg1 also binds to its own promoter, and negatively regulates its expression. Efg1 targets are enriched in binding sites for 93 additional transcription factors, including Ndt80. Our analysis suggests that Efg1 has an ancient role as regulator of development in fungi, and is central to several regulatory networks. PMID:23895281

  6. Differentiation of Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis by Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization with Peptide Nucleic Acid Probes

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Kenneth; Haase, Gerhard; Kurtzman, Cletus; Hyldig-Nielsen, Jens Jo/rgen; Stender, Henrik

    2001-01-01

    The recent discovery of Candida dubliniensis as a separate species that traditionally has been identified as Candida albicans has led to the development of a variety of biochemical and molecular methods for the differentiation of these two pathogenic yeasts. rRNA sequences are well-established phylogenetic markers, and probes targeting species-specific rRNA sequences have been used in diagnostic assays for the detection and identification of microorganisms. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) is a DNA mimic with improved hybridization characteristics, and the neutral backbone of PNA probes offers significant advantages in whole-cell in situ hybridization assays. In this study, we developed PNA probes targeting the rRNAs of C. albicans and C. dubliniensis and applied them to a fluorescence in situ hybridization method (PNA FISH) for differentiation between C. albicans and C. dubliniensis. Liquid cultures were smeared onto microscope slides, heat fixed, and then hybridized for 30 min. Unhybridized PNA probe was removed by washing, and smears were examined by fluorescence microscopy. Evaluation of the PNA FISH method using smears of 79 C. dubliniensis and 70 C. albicans strains showed 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity for both PNA probes. We concluded that PNA FISH is a powerful tool for the differentiation of C. albicans and C. dubliniensis. PMID:11682542

  7. Detailed comparison of Candida albicans and Candida glabrata biofilms under different conditions and their susceptibility to caspofungin and anidulafungin.

    PubMed

    Kucharíková, Sona; Tournu, Hélène; Lagrou, Katrien; Van Dijck, Patrick; Bujdáková, Helena

    2011-09-01

    Candida biofilm development can be influenced by diverse factors such as substrate, culture medium, carbohydrate source and pH. We have analysed biofilm formation of Candida albicans SC5314 and Candida glabrata ATCC 2001 wild-type strains in the presence of different media (RPMI 1640 versus YNB) and using different pH values (pH 5.6 or 7.0). We determined adhesion and biofilm formation on polystyrene, changes in the expression of adhesin genes during these processes and the susceptibility of mature biofilms to echinocandins. Biofilms formed on polystyrene by both Candida species proved to be influenced strongly by the composition of the medium rather than pH. C. albicans and C. glabrata formed thicker biofilms in RPMI 1640 medium, whereas in YNB medium, both species manifested adhesion rather than characteristic multilayer biofilm architecture. The stimulated biofilm formation in RPMI 1640 medium at pH 7.0 corroborated positively with increased expression of adhesin genes, essential to biofilm formation in vitro, including ALS3 and EAP1 in C. albicans and EPA6 in C. glabrata. The thicker biofilms grown in RPMI 1640 medium were more tolerant to caspofungin and anidulafungin than YNB-grown biofilms. We also observed that mature C. glabrata biofilms were less susceptible in RPMI 1640 medium to echinocandins than C. albicans biofilms. Environmental conditions, i.e. medium and pH, can significantly affect not only biofilm architecture, but also the expression profile of several genes involved during the different stages of biofilm development. In addition, growth conditions may also influence the antifungal-susceptibility profile of fungal populations within biofilm structures. Therefore, before designing any experimental biofilm set-up, it is important to consider the potential influence of external environmental factors on Candida biofilm development.

  8. Liposomal thymoquinone effectively combats fluconazole-resistant Candida albicans in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Khan, Masood Alam; Aljarbou, Ahmad N; Khan, Arif; Younus, Hina

    2015-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop a novel liposomal formulation of thymoquinone (TQ) to treat fluconazole-susceptible and -resistant Candida albicans (C. albicans) infections. The liposomal preparation of TQ (Lip-TQ) was used against a fluconazole-susceptible or -resistant isolate of C. albicans. Various doses of fluconazole (0, 5, 10, 20 and 40 mg/kg) or free TQ or Lip-TQ (0, 1, 2 and 5mg/kg) were used to treat C. albicans infected mice. Mice were observed for 40 days post C. albicans infection, and their kidneys were assessed for the fungal load. Fluconazole showed anti-fungal activity against the drug-susceptible, but not against the -resistant isolate of C. albicans. Free TQ showed its activity against both fluconazole-susceptible or -resistant C. albicans, however, Lip-TQ was found to be the most effective and imparted ∼ 100% and ∼ 90% survival of mice infected with fluconazole-susceptible and -resistant isolates of C. albicans, respectively. Mice treated with Lip-TQ showed highly reduced severity of infection in their tissue homogenates. Therefore, Lip-TQ may effectively be used in the treatment of C. albicans infections, including those which are not responding to fluconazole.

  9. Activation of HIF-1α and LL-37 by commensal bacteria inhibits Candida albicans colonization.

    PubMed

    Fan, Di; Coughlin, Laura A; Neubauer, Megan M; Kim, Jiwoong; Kim, Min Soo; Zhan, Xiaowei; Simms-Waldrip, Tiffany R; Xie, Yang; Hooper, Lora V; Koh, Andrew Y

    2015-07-01

    Candida albicans colonization is required for invasive disease. Unlike humans, adult mice with mature intact gut microbiota are resistant to C. albicans gastrointestinal (GI) colonization, but the factors that promote C. albicans colonization resistance are unknown. Here we demonstrate that commensal anaerobic bacteria-specifically clostridial Firmicutes (clusters IV and XIVa) and Bacteroidetes-are critical for maintaining C. albicans colonization resistance in mice. Using Bacteroides thetaiotamicron as a model organism, we find that hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), a transcription factor important for activating innate immune effectors, and the antimicrobial peptide LL-37 (CRAMP in mice) are key determinants of C. albicans colonization resistance. Although antibiotic treatment enables C. albicans colonization, pharmacologic activation of colonic Hif1a induces CRAMP expression and results in a significant reduction of C. albicans GI colonization and a 50% decrease in mortality from invasive disease. In the setting of antibiotics, Hif1a and Camp (which encodes CRAMP) are required for B. thetaiotamicron-induced protection against C. albicans colonization of the gut. Thus, modulating C. albicans GI colonization by activation of gut mucosal immune effectors may represent a novel therapeutic approach for preventing invasive fungal disease in humans.

  10. Antimicrobial blue light therapy for Candida albicans burn infection in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yunsong; Wang, Yucheng; Murray, Clinton K.; Hamblin, Michael R.; Gu, Ying; Dai, Tianhong

    2015-05-01

    In this preclinical study, we investigated the utility of antimicrobial blue light therapy for Candida albicans infection in acutely burned mice. A bioluminescent strain of C. albicans was used. The susceptibilities to blue light inactivation were compared between C. albicans and human keratinocyte. In vitro serial passaging of C. albicans on blue light exposure was performed to evaluate the potential development of resistance to blue light inactivation. A mouse model of acute thermal burn injury infected with the bioluminescent strain of C. albicans was developed. Blue light (415 nm) was delivered to mouse burns for decolonization of C. albicans. Bioluminescence imaging was used to monitor in real time the extent of fungal infection in mouse burns. Experimental results showed that C. albicans was approximately 42-fold more susceptible to blue light inactivation in vitro than human keratinocyte (P=0.0022). Serial passaging of C. albicans on blue light exposure implied a tendency for the fungal susceptibility to blue light inactivation to decrease with the numbers of passages. Blue light reduced fungal burden by over 4-log10 (99.99%) in acute mouse burns infected with C. albicans in comparison to infected mouse burns without blue light therapy (P=0.015).

  11. Association of KPC-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae colonization or infection with Candida isolation and selection of non-albicans species.

    PubMed

    Papadimitriou-Olivgeris, Matthaios; Spiliopoulou, Anastasia; Fligou, Fotini; Manolopoulou, Patroula; Spiliopoulou, Iris; Vrettos, Theofanis; Dodou, Vasiliki; Filos, Kriton S; Anastassiou, Evangelos D; Marangos, Markos; Christofidou, Myrto

    2014-11-01

    Clinical specimens from 565 patients hospitalized in 2 intensive care units (ICUs A and B) during a 28-month period were cultured on appropriate media for isolation of Candida. Forty-nine (9%) patients had at least a Candida spp.-positive sample. Candida albicans was the predominant species isolated from 26 (53%) patients. Seventeen patients (3%) developed candidemia. Multivariate analysis showed that obesity, female gender, hospitalization during summer months, admission at ICU B, parenteral nutrition, administration of metronidazole, transplantation, and KPC-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (KPC-Kp) infection were independently associated with Candida spp. isolation. Candidemia was associated with cortisone administration, KPC-Kp infection, and presence of colostomy or abdominal catheter. Administration of fluconazole was a protective factor for both Candida spp. isolation and infection, leading to selection of Candida non-albicans species. Among several risk factors, KPC-Kp infection and colonization are identified as statistically significant factors associated with Candida isolation, especially of non-albicans species.

  12. Enzyme immunoassays for invasive Candida infections: reactivity of somatic antigens of Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Zöller, L; Krämer, I; Kappe, R; Sonntag, H G

    1991-01-01

    The main problem encountered with serodiagnostic tests for Candida infections is their failure to differentiate between invasive and superficial candidosis. Recent immunoblotting studies suggested that the use of selective somatic proteins of Candida albicans as antigens might be a promising approach toward developing a new generation of serodiagnostic assays. In this study major cytoplasmic protein antigens with molecular weights of 47,000 (47K), 46,000 (46K), 45,000 (45K), and 29,000 (29K) were identified as potential marker antigens for antibody detection in invasive candidosis. Continuous-flow isoelectric focusing was employed to enrich the proteins in two fractions, one of them containing the 47K and 29K proteins and the other one containing predominantly the 47K and 45K major proteins. These antigens and a whole somatic antigen extract were used to establish enzyme immunoassays (EIAs) for antibody detection. Whereas all tests were able to discriminate between patients with invasive candidosis (n = 27) and normal healthy volunteers (n = 167), as proved by graphic marker analysis, the selective antigen EIAs were highly superior to the whole somatic antigen EIA and two serological standard assays (indirect immunofluorescence assay and indirect hemagglutination assay) when a panel of sera from patients with superficial candidosis (n = 34) was used as a negative control group. The use of the 47K-29K antigen fraction allowed the best differentiation between invasive and noninvasive candidosis. The corresponding immunoglobulin G class-specific EIA had a sensitivity of 81.5% and a specificity of 97% for both negative control groups as well. Images PMID:1774309

  13. Candida species: new insights into biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Cuéllar-Cruz, Mayra; López-Romero, Everardo; Villagómez-Castro, Julio C; Ruiz-Baca, Estela

    2012-06-01

    Biofilms of Candida albicans, Candida parapsilosis, Candida glabrata and Candida tropicalis are associated with high indices of hospital morbidity and mortality. Major factors involved in the formation and growth of Candida biofilms are the chemical composition of the medical implant and the cell wall adhesins responsible for mediating Candida-Candida, Candida-human host cell and Candida-medical device adhesion. Strategies for elucidating the mechanisms that regulate the formation of Candida biofilms combine tools from biology, chemistry, nanoscience, material science and physics. This review proposes the use of new technologies, such as synchrotron radiation, to study the mechanisms of biofilm formation. In the future, this information is expected to facilitate the design of new materials and antifungal compounds that can eradicate nosocomial Candida infections due to biofilm formation on medical implants. This will reduce dissemination of candidiasis and hopefully improve the quality of life of patients.

  14. Prospective evaluation of the chromogenic medium CandiSelect 4 for differentiation and presumptive identification of non-Candida albicans Candida species.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Liang; de Hoog, G Sybren; Cornelissen, Akke; Lyu, Qian; Mou, Lili; Liu, Taohua; Cao, Yu; Vatanshenassan, Mansoureh; Kang, Yingqian

    2016-02-01

    Rapid identification of pathogenic yeasts is a crucial step in timely and appropriate antifungal therapy. For diagnostics in the clinical laboratory, simplified alternatives to barcoding are needed. CandiSelect 4 (CS4) medium, a chromogenic medium for isolation of clinical yeasts, allows routine recognition of Candida albicans and presumptive identification of Candida tropicalis, Candida glabrata, and Candida krusei. We evaluated an extension of this method with 46 non-Candida albicans Candida (NCAC) and 7 Malassezia species. The medium supported growth of all species tested and a wide diversity of cultural types were observed. Colony colours were in violet, turquoise (including green and blue), or white tinges. Eight NCAC species produced violet pigmentation similar to that of C. albicans. Most NCAC species, including C. glabrata and C. tropicalis were distributed in the turquoise group. Malassezia species were invariably blue.

  15. Investigation of Structural Determinants for the Substrate Specificity in the Zinc-Dependent Alcohol Dehydrogenase CPCR2 from Candida parapsilosis.

    PubMed

    Loderer, Christoph; Dhoke, Gaurao V; Davari, Mehdi D; Kroutil, Wolfgang; Schwaneberg, Ulrich; Bocola, Marco; Ansorge-Schumacher, Marion B

    2015-07-06

    Zinc-dependent alcohol dehydrogenases (ADHs) are a class of enzymes applied in different biocatalytic processes ranging from lab to industrial scale. However, one drawback is the limited substrate range, necessitating a whole array of different ADHs for the relevant substrate classes. In this study, we investigated structural determinants of the substrate spectrum in the zinc-dependent ADH carbonyl reductase 2 from Candida parapsilosis (CPCR2), combining methods of mutational analysis with in silico substrate docking. Assigned active site residues were genetically randomized, and the resulting mutant libraries were screened with a selection of challenging carbonyl substrates. Three variants (C57A, W116K, and L119M) with improved activities toward different substrates were detected at neighboring positions in the active site. Thus, all possible combinations of the mutations were generated and characterized for their substrate specificity, yielding several improved variants. The most interesting were a C57A variant, with a 27-fold increase in specific activity for 4'-acetamidoacetophenone, and the double mutant CPCR2 B16-(C57A, L119M), with a 45-fold improvement in the kcat ⋅KM (-1) value. The obtained variants were further investigated by in silico docking experiments. The results indicate that the mentioned residues are structural determinants of the substrate specificity of CPCR2, being major players in the definition of the active site. Comparison of these results with closely related enzymes suggests that these might even be transferred to other ADHs.

  16. Biodiesel production from crude jatropha oil catalyzed by immobilized lipase/acyltransferase from Candida parapsilosis in aqueous medium.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Joana; Perrier, Véronique; Lecomte, Jérôme; Dubreucq, Eric; Ferreira-Dias, Suzana

    2016-10-01

    The lipase/acyltransferase from Candida parapsilosis (CpLIP2) immobilized on two synthetic resins (Accurel MP 1000 and Lewatit VP OC 1600) was used as catalyst for the production of biodiesel (fatty acid methyl esters, FAME) by transesterification of jatropha oil with methanol, in a lipid/aqueous system. The oil was dispersed in a buffer solution (pH 6.5) containing methanol in excess (2M in the biphasic system; molar ratio methanol/acyl chains 2:1). Transesterification was carried out at 30°C, under magnetic stirring, using 10% (w/w) of immobilized enzyme in relation to oil. The maximum FAME yields were attained after 8h reaction time: 80.5% and 93.8%, when CpLIP2 immobilized on Accurel MP 1000 or on Lewatit VP OC 1600 were used, respectively. CpLIP2 on both Accurel MP 1000 and Lewatit VP OC 1600 showed high operational stability along 5 consecutive 8h batches.

  17. Candida albicans Shaving to Profile Human Serum Proteins on Hyphal Surface

    PubMed Central

    Marín, Elvira; Parra-Giraldo, Claudia M.; Hernández-Haro, Carolina; Hernáez, María L.; Nombela, César; Monteoliva, Lucía; Gil, Concha

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is a human opportunistic fungus and it is responsible for a wide variety of infections, either superficial or systemic. C. albicans is a polymorphic fungus and its ability to switch between yeast and hyphae is essential for its virulence. Once C. albicans obtains access to the human body, the host serum constitutes a complex environment of interaction with C. albicans cell surface in bloodstream. To draw a comprehensive picture of this relevant step in host-pathogen interaction during invasive candidiasis, we have optimized a gel-free shaving proteomic strategy to identify both, human serum proteins coating C. albicans cells and fungi surface proteins simultaneously. This approach was carried out with normal serum (NS) and heat inactivated serum (HIS). We identified 214 human and 372 C. albicans unique proteins. Proteins identified in C. albicans included 147 which were described as located at the cell surface and 52 that were described as immunogenic. Interestingly, among these C. albicans proteins, we identified 23 GPI-anchored proteins, Gpd2 and Pra1, which are involved in complement system evasion and 7 other proteins that are able to attach plasminogen to C. albicans surface (Adh1, Eno1, Fba1, Pgk1, Tdh3, Tef1, and Tsa1). Furthermore, 12 proteins identified at the C. albicans hyphae surface induced with 10% human serum were not detected in other hypha-induced conditions. The most abundant human proteins identified are involved in complement and coagulation pathways. Remarkably, with this strategy, all main proteins belonging to complement cascades were identified on the C. albicans surface. Moreover, we identified immunoglobulins, cytoskeletal proteins, metabolic proteins such as apolipoproteins and others. Additionally, we identified more inhibitors of complement and coagulation pathways, some of them serpin proteins (serine protease inhibitors), in HIS vs. NS. On the other hand, we detected a higher amount of C3 at the C. albicans surface in

  18. Rapid and Accurate Identification of Candida albicans Isolates by Use of PNA FISHFlow▿

    PubMed Central

    Trnovsky, Jan; Merz, William; Della-Latta, Phyllis; Wu, Fann; Arendrup, Maiken Cavling; Stender, Henrik

    2008-01-01

    We developed the simple, rapid (1 h), and accurate PNA FISHFlow method for the identification of Candida albicans. The method exploits unique in solution in situ hybridization conditions under which the cells are simultaneously fixed and hybridized. This method facilitates the accurate identification of clinical yeast isolates using two scoring techniques: flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. PMID:18287325

  19. Isolation of Candida albicans and halophilic Vibrio spp. from aquatic birds in Connecticut and Florida.

    PubMed Central

    Buck, J D

    1990-01-01

    Halophilic vibrios were recovered from feces of six types of aquatic birds (gulls, pelicans, Canada geese, swans, egrets, cormorants) from Connecticut and/or Florida shorelines. Candida albicans was isolated from gulls and Canada geese in Connecticut and from gulls and cormorants in Florida. PMID:2180374

  20. The non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug niflumic acid inhibits Candida albicans growth.

    PubMed

    Baker, Andrew; Northrop, Frederick D; Miedema, Hendrik; Devine, Gary R; Davies, Julia M

    2002-01-01

    The non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug niflumic acid was found to inhibit growth of the yeast form of Candida albicans. Niflumic acid inhibited respiratory oxygen uptake and it is hypothesised that this was achieved by cytosolic acidification and block of glycolysis. Inhibitory concentrations are compatible with current practice of topical application.

  1. Multicenter collaborative study for standardization of Candida albicans genotyping using a polymorphic microsatellite marker.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Hermoso, Dea; MacCallum, Donna M; Lott, Timothy J; Sampaio, Paula; Serna, Maria-José Buitrago; Grenouillet, Fréderic; Klaassen, Corné H W; Bretagne, Stéphane

    2010-07-01

    Microsatellite-based genotyping for Candida albicans can give discrepant results between laboratories when expressed in fragment sizes, because their determination depends on electrophoretic conditions. The interlaboratory reproducibility was assessed in six laboratories provided with an allelic ladder. Despite variations in size determinations, alleles were correctly assigned, making data transportable between laboratories.

  2. Kinetic Patterns of Candida albicans Germ Tube Antibody in Critically Ill Patients: Influence on Mortality▿

    PubMed Central

    Zaragoza, Rafael; Pemán, Javier; Quindós, Guillermo; Iruretagoyena, Jose R.; Cuétara, María S.; Ramírez, Paula; Gómez, Maria D.; Camarena, Juan J.; Viudes, Angel; Pontón, José

    2009-01-01

    The influence of kinetic patterns of Candida albicans germ tube antibodies (CAGTA) on mortality was analyzed in six intensive care units. Statistically significant lower mortality rates were found in patients with patterns of increasing CAGTA titers who had been treated with antifungal agents. Thus, antifungal treatment should be considered when CAGTA titers are increasing in critically ill patients. PMID:19675223

  3. Multicenter Collaborative Study for Standardization of Candida albicans Genotyping Using a Polymorphic Microsatellite Marker▿

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Hermoso, Dea; MacCallum, Donna M.; Lott, Timothy J.; Sampaio, Paula; Serna, Maria-José Buitrago; Grenouillet, Fréderic; Klaassen, Corné H. W.; Bretagne, Stéphane

    2010-01-01

    Microsatellite-based genotyping for Candida albicans can give discrepant results between laboratories when expressed in fragment sizes, because their determination depends on electrophoretic conditions. The interlaboratory reproducibility was assessed in six laboratories provided with an allelic ladder. Despite variations in size determinations, alleles were correctly assigned, making data transportable between laboratories. PMID:20427694

  4. A Case Report of Candida albicans Costochondritis after a Complicated Esophagectomy

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Nicola R.; Watson, David I.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: We present an unusual case of Candida albicans costochondritis after a complicated Ivor Lewis esophagectomy. This case exhibits that pain, erythema, and swelling over the costal cartilages should alert the possibility of infective costochondritis, especially in a postoperative patient. If a fungal agent is identified, aggressive surgical debridement and early commencement of antifungal therapy are likely determinants for a satisfactory outcome. PMID:27104107

  5. Fournier Gangrene Caused by Candida albicans in an Infant After Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Jaworski, Radoslaw; Irga-Jaworska, Ninela; Naumiuk, Łukasz; Chojnicki, Maciej; Haponiuk, Ireneusz

    2017-04-01

    Fournier gangrene is a rare, rapidly progressive, life-threatening condition. We report a 23-day-old boy with pulmonary atresia and ventricular septal defect treated surgically, who developed Fournier gangrene. Emergency surgery was performed with tissue sampling for microbiological examination. Candida albicans was confirmed; caspofungin followed by fluconazole was administered with excellent results.

  6. Virulence and pathogenicity of Candida albicans is enhanced in biofilms containing oral bacteria.

    PubMed

    Cavalcanti, Yuri Wanderley; Morse, Daniel James; da Silva, Wander José; Del-Bel-Cury, Altair Antoninha; Wei, Xiaoqing; Wilson, Melanie; Milward, Paul; Lewis, Michael; Bradshaw, David; Williams, David Wynne

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the influence of bacteria on the virulence and pathogenicity of candidal biofilms. Mature biofilms (Candida albicans-only, bacteria-only, C. albicans with bacteria) were generated on acrylic and either analysed directly, or used to infect a reconstituted human oral epithelium (RHOE). Analyses included Candida hyphae enumeration and assessment of Candida virulence gene expression. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity and Candida tissue invasion following biofilm infection of the RHOE were also measured. Candida hyphae were more prevalent (p < 0.05) in acrylic biofilms also containing bacteria, with genes encoding secreted aspartyl-proteinases (SAP4/SAP6) and hyphal-wall protein (HWP1) up-regulated (p < 0.05). Candida adhesin genes (ALS3/EPA1), SAP6 and HWP1 were up-regulated in mixed-species biofilm infections of RHOE. Multi-species infections exhibited higher hyphal proportions (p < 0.05), up-regulation of IL-18, higher LDH activity and tissue invasion. As the presence of bacteria in acrylic biofilms promoted Candida virulence, consideration should be given to the bacterial component when managing denture biofilm associated candidoses.

  7. Antifungal activity of silver nanoparticles in combination with nystatin and chlorhexidine digluconate against Candida albicans and Candida glabrata biofilms.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Douglas R; Silva, Sónia; Negri, Melyssa; Gorup, Luiz F; de Camargo, Emerson R; Oliveira, Rosário; Barbosa, Debora B; Henriques, Mariana

    2013-11-01

    Although silver nanoparticles (SN) have been investigated as an alternative to conventional antifungal drugs in the control of Candida-associated denture stomatitis, the antifungal activity of SN in combination with antifungal drugs against Candida biofilms remains unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the antifungal efficacy of SN in combination with nystatin (NYT) or chlorhexidine digluconate (CHG) against Candida albicans and Candida glabrata biofilms. The drugs alone or combined with SN were applied on mature Candida biofilms (48 h), and after 24 h of treatment their antibiofilm activities were assessed by total biomass quantification (by crystal violet staining) and colony forming units enumeration. The structure of Candida biofilms was analysed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images. The data indicated that SN combined with either NYT or CHG demonstrated synergistic antibiofilm activity, and this activity was dependent on the species and on the drug concentrations used. SEM images showed that some drug combinations were able to disrupt Candida biofilms. The results of this study suggest that the combination of SN with NYT or CHG may have clinical implications in the treatment of denture stomatitis. However, further studies are needed before recommending the use of these drugs safely in clinical situations.

  8. [Detection of phospholipidolytic Candida albicans isolated from saliva of children with Down's syndrome].

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Evandro L; Campos, C De Castro; Crespo, A M Costa; Castro, Jovirês S; Rocha, Frederico P; Alves, Marcella; Goulart, Mariella S; Cardoso, Cléver; Ferreira, Wesley; Naves, Plínio Lázaro; Soares, A José; Miranda, Simone R; Pimenta, Fabiana C

    2002-01-01

    The childhood is one of the most propitious period of the life to the occurrence of infection by yeasts of the genus Candida. In children with Down's syndrome, besides the predispose factors to bucal candidiasis; macroglossia, bucal muscular incompetence, frequent respiratory diseases, motor difficulty and immunologic deficit are mentioned as additional elements for this fungus disease. It was verified that the children attacked by this syndrome have much more strains of Candida than other children. The aim of this study was to detect the prevalence of phospholipase producer, Candida on the saliva of children with Down's syndrome. Candida albicans was the only identified specie of Candida. The phospholipase production was found in isolated strains from both of study and control. However, the isolated strains of the group of children with Down's syndrome have strongly present phospholipidolitic.

  9. Antifungal susceptibility of Candida species isolated from patients with candidemia in southern Taiwan, 2007-2012: impact of new antifungal breakpoints.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Chun; Kuo, Shu-Fang; Chen, Fang-Ju; Lee, Chen-Hsiang

    2017-02-01

    The Clinical and Laboratory Standard Institute (CLSI) revised the clinical breakpoints (CBPs) for the azoles and echinocandins against Candida species in 2012. We aimed to report the epidemiology of candidemia and antifungal susceptibility of Candida species and evaluate the impact of new CBPs on antifungal susceptibility in our region. All blood isolates of Candida species were obtained from 2007 to 2012. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of fluconazole, voriconazole, echinocandins and flucytosine against Candida isolates were determined by Sensititre YeastOne system. Differences in susceptibility rates between the CBPs of previous and revised versions of CLSI were examined. Of 709 Candida isolates, the fluconazole-susceptible rate was 96.5% in Candida albicans, 85.8% in Candida tropicalis and 92.1% in Candida parapsilosis by the revised CBPs. Compared with the susceptibility results by previous CBPs, the marked reductions in susceptibility of C. albicans, C. tropicalis and C. parapsilosis to fluconazole, that of C. tropicalis and C. parapsilosis to voriconazole, that of C. tropicalis and Candida glabrata to anidulafungin and that of C. tropicalis, C. glabrata and Candida krusei to caspofungin by revised CBPs were found. In conclusion, Candida albicans and C. parapsilosis remain highly susceptible to fluconazole. The non-susceptible rates of Candida species to azoles and echinocandins increase with interpretation by the revised CBPs.

  10. Evaluation of the New Chromogenic Medium Candida ID 2 for Isolation and Identification of Candida albicans and Other Medically Important Candida Species

    PubMed Central

    Eraso, Elena; Moragues, María D.; Villar-Vidal, María; Sahand, Ismail H.; González-Gómez, Nagore; Pontón, José; Quindós, Guillermo

    2006-01-01

    The usefulness of Candida ID 2 (CAID2) reformulated medium (bioMérieux, France) has been compared with that of the former Candida ID (CAID; bioMérieux), Albicans ID 2 (ALB2; bioMérieux), and CHROMagar Candida (CAC; Chromagar, France) chromogenic media for the isolation and presumptive identification of clinically relevant yeasts. Three hundred forty-five stock strains from culture collections, and 103 fresh isolates from different clinical specimens were evaluated. CAID2 permitted differentiation based on colony color between Candida albicans (cobalt blue; sensitivity, 91.7%; specificity, 97.2%) and Candida dubliniensis (turquoise blue; sensitivity, 97.9%; specificity, 96.6%). Candida tropicalis gave distinguishable pink-bluish colonies in 97.4% of the strains in CAID2 (sensitivity, 97.4%; specificity, 100%); the same proportion was reached in CAC, where colonies were blue-gray (sensitivity, 97.4%; specificity, 98.7%). CAC and CAID2 showed 100% sensitivity values for the identification of Candida krusei. However, with CAID2, experience is required to differentiate the downy aspect of the white colonies of C. krusei from other white-colony-forming species. The new CAID2 medium is a good candidate to replace CAID and ALB2, and it compares well to CAC for culture and presumptive identification of clinically relevant Candida species. CAID2 showed better results than CAC in some aspects, such as quicker growth and color development of colonies from clinical specimens, detection of mixed cultures, and presumptive differentiation between C. albicans and C. dubliniensis. PMID:16954270

  11. Evaluation of the new chromogenic medium Candida ID 2 for isolation and identification of Candida albicans and other medically important Candida species.

    PubMed

    Eraso, Elena; Moragues, María D; Villar-Vidal, María; Sahand, Ismail H; González-Gómez, Nagore; Pontón, José; Quindós, Guillermo

    2006-09-01

    The usefulness of Candida ID 2 (CAID2) reformulated medium (bioMérieux, France) has been compared with that of the former Candida ID (CAID; bioMérieux), Albicans ID 2 (ALB2; bioMérieux), and CHROMagar Candida (CAC; Chromagar, France) chromogenic media for the isolation and presumptive identification of clinically relevant yeasts. Three hundred forty-five stock strains from culture collections, and 103 fresh isolates from different clinical specimens were evaluated. CAID2 permitted differentiation based on colony color between Candida albicans (cobalt blue; sensitivity, 91.7%; specificity, 97.2%) and Candida dubliniensis (turquoise blue; sensitivity, 97.9%; specificity, 96.6%). Candida tropicalis gave distinguishable pink-bluish colonies in 97.4% of the strains in CAID2 (sensitivity, 97.4%; specificity, 100%); the same proportion was reached in CAC, where colonies were blue-gray (sensitivity, 97.4%; specificity, 98.7%). CAC and CAID2 showed 100% sensitivity values for the identification of Candida krusei. However, with CAID2, experience is required to differentiate the downy aspect of the white colonies of C. krusei from other white-colony-forming species. The new CAID2 medium is a good candidate to replace CAID and ALB2, and it compares well to CAC for culture and presumptive identification of clinically relevant Candida species. CAID2 showed better results than CAC in some aspects, such as quicker growth and color development of colonies from clinical specimens, detection of mixed cultures, and presumptive differentiation between C. albicans and C. dubliniensis.

  12. Paeonia lactiflora Inhibits Cell Wall Synthesis and Triggers Membrane Depolarization in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Lee, Heung-Shick; Kim, Younhee

    2017-02-28

    Fungal cell walls and cell membranes are the main targets of antifungals. In this study, we report on the antifungal activity of an ethanol extract from Paeonia lactiflora against Candida albicans, showing that the antifungal activity is associated with the synergistic actions of preventing cell wall synthesis, enabling membrane depolarization, and compromising permeability. First, it was shown that the ethanol extract from P. lactiflora was involved in damaging the integrity of cell walls in C. albicans. In isotonic media, cell bursts of C. albicans by the P. lactiflora ethanol extract could be restored, and the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the P. lactiflora ethanol extract against C. albicans cells increased 4-fold. In addition, synthesis of (1,3)-β-D-glucan polymer was inhibited by 87% and 83% following treatment of C. albicans microsomes with the P. lactiflora ethanol extract at their 1× MIC and 2× MIC, respectively. Second, the ethanol extract from P. lactiflora influenced the function of C. albicans cell membranes. C. albicans cells treated with the P. lactiflora ethanol extract formed red aggregates by staining with a membrane-impermeable dye, propidium iodide. Membrane depolarization manifested as increased fluorescence intensity by staining P. lactiflora-treated C. albicans cells with a membrane-potential marker, DiBAC4(3) ((bis-1,3-dibutylbarbituric acid) trimethine oxonol). Membrane permeability was assessed by crystal violet assay, and C. albicans cells treated with the P. lactiflora ethanol extract exhibited significant uptake of crystal violet in a concentration-dependent manner. The findings suggest that P. lactiflora ethanol extract is a viable and effective candidate for the development of new antifungal agents to treat Candida-associated diseases.

  13. The correlation of virulence, pathogenicity, and itraconazole resistance with SAP activity in Candida albicans strains.

    PubMed

    Feng, Wenli; Yang, Jing; Pan, Yanwei; Xi, Zhiqin; Qiao, Zusha; Ma, Yan

    2016-02-01

    The relationship between SAP2 activity and drug resistance in Candida albicans was investigated by using itraconazole-resistant and itraconazole-sensitive C. albicans isolates. The precipitation zones were measured to analyze SAP2 activity. Mice were classified into itraconazole-resistant and -sensitive C. albicans isolate groups, and a control group, with their survival and mortality rate being observed over 30 days. The relative expression levels of CDR1, CDR2, MDR1, and SAP2 were measured using RT-PCR. It was found that the secreted aspartyl proteinase activity of itraconazole-resistant C. albicans strains was significantly higher than that of itraconazole-sensitive C. albicans strains (P < 0.001). A significantly higher mortality rate was recorded for mice treated with itraconazole-resistant C. albicans than for mice treated with itraconazole-sensitive C. albicans. In regards to the CDR1, CDR2, and MDR1 genes, there was no significant difference between the 2 groups of mice. Positive correlations between SAP2 and MDR1 and between CDR1 and CDR2 were found. The high expression level of SAP2 may relate to the virulence, pathogenicity, and resistance of C. albicans.

  14. Candida albicans chronic colonisation in cystic fibrosis may be associated with inhaled antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Noni, Maria; Katelari, Anna; Kaditis, Athanasios; Theochari, Ioanna; Lympari, Ioulia; Alexandrou-Athanassoulis, Helen; Doudounakis, Stavros-Eleftherios; Dimopoulos, George

    2015-07-01

    Candida albicans is increasingly recognised as a coloniser of the respiratory tract in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Yet, the potential role, if any, of the micro-organism in the progress of the disease remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the association between inhaled antibiotics and C. albicans chronic colonisation in patients with CF. A cohort of 121 CF patients born from 1988 to 1996 was, respectively, studied. The medical records of each patient were reviewed from the first time they attended the CF Centre until the occurrence of C. albicans chronic colonisation or their last visit for the year 2010. Chronic colonisation was defined as the presence of C. albicans in more than 50% of cultures in a given year. A number of possible confounders were included in the multivariate logistic regression analysis to identify an independent association between inhaled antibiotics and C. albicans chronic colonisation. Fifty-four (44.6%) of the 121 patients enrolled in the study developed chronic colonisation by the micro-organism. Multivariate logistic regression analysis determined the independent effect of inhaled antibiotic treatment on the odds of chronic colonisation (OR 1.112, 95% CI [1.007-1.229], P = 0.036). Candida albicans chronic colonisation may be associated with the duration of inhaled antibiotic treatment.

  15. Intestinal Colonization by Candida albicans Alters Inflammatory Responses in Bruton's Tyrosine Kinase-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Strijbis, Karin; Yilmaz, Ömer H.; Dougan, Stephanie K.; Esteban, Alexandre; Gröne, Andrea; Kumamoto, Carol A.; Ploegh, Hidde L.

    2014-01-01

    The commensal yeast Candida albicans is part of the human intestinal microflora and is considered a “pathobiont”, a resident microbe with pathogenic potential yet harmless under normal conditions. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of C. albicans on inflammation of the intestinal tract and the role of Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk). Btk is an enzyme that modulates downstream signaling of multiple receptors involved in innate and adaptive immunity, including the major anti-fungal receptor Dectin-1. Colitis was induced in wild type and Btk-/- mice by treatment with dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) and the gastrointestinal tract of selected treatment groups were then colonized with C. albicans. Colonization by C. albicans neither dampened nor exacerbated inflammation in wild type mice, but colon length and spleen weight were improved in Btk-deficient mice colonized with C. albicans. Neutrophil infiltration was comparable between wild type and Btk-/- mice, but the knockout mice displayed severely reduced numbers of macrophages in the colon during both DSS and DSS/Candida treatment. Smaller numbers and reduced responsiveness of Btk-/- macrophages might partially explain the improved colon length of Btk-/- mice as a result of Candida colonization. Surprisingly, DSS/Candida-treated Btk-/- animals had higher levels of certain pro-inflammatory cytokines and levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine TGF-β were reduced compared to wild type. A clustering and correlation analysis showed that for wild type animals, spleen TGF-β and colon IL-10 and for Btk-/- spleen and colon levels of IL-17A best correlated with the inflammatory parameters. We conclude that in Btk-/- immunocompromised animals, colonization of the gastrointestinal tract by the commensal yeast C. albicans alters inflammatory symptoms associated with colitis. PMID:25379804

  16. Antimicrobial blue light inactivation of Candida albicans: In vitro and in vivo studies

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yunsong; Zhu, Yingbo; Chen, Jia; Wang, Yucheng; Sherwood, Margaret E.; Murray, Clinton K.; Vrahas, Mark S.; Hooper, David C.; Hamblin, Michael R.; Dai, Tianhong

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Fungal infections are a common cause of morbidity, mortality and cost in critical care populations. The increasing emergence of antimicrobial resistance necessitates the development of new therapeutic approaches for fungal infections. In the present study, we investigated the effectiveness of an innovative approach, antimicrobial blue light (aBL), for inactivation of Candida albicans in vitro and in infected mouse burns. A bioluminescent strain of C. albicans was used. The susceptibilities to aBL (415 nm) were compared between C. albicans and human keratinocytes. The potential development of aBL resistance by C. albicans was investigated via 10 serial passages of C. albicans on aBL exposure. For the animal study, a mouse model of thermal burn infected with the bioluminescent C. albicans strain was used. aBL was delivered to mouse burns approximately 12 h after fungal inoculation. Bioluminescence imaging was performed to monitor in real time the extent of infection in mice. The results obtained from the studies demonstrated that C. albicans was approximately 42-fold more susceptible to aBL than human keratinocytes. Serial passaging of C. albicans on aBL exposure implied a tendency of reduced aBL susceptibility of C. albicans with increasing numbers of passages; however, no statistically significant difference was observed in the post-aBL survival rate of C. albicans between the first and the last passage (P>0.05). A single exposure of 432 J/cm2 aBL reduced the fungal burden in infected mouse burns by 1.75-log10 (P=0.015). Taken together, our findings suggest aBL is a potential therapeutic for C. albicans infections. PMID:26909654

  17. Elevated chitin content reduces the susceptibility of Candida species to caspofungin.

    PubMed

    Walker, Louise A; Gow, Neil A R; Munro, Carol A

    2013-01-01

    The echinocandin antifungal drugs inhibit synthesis of the major fungal cell wall polysaccharide β(1,3)-glucan. Echinocandins have good efficacy against Candida albicans but reduced activity against other Candida species, in particular Candida parapsilosis and Candida guilliermondii. Treatment of Candida albicans with a sub-MIC level of caspofungin has been reported to cause a compensatory increase in chitin content and to select for sporadic echinocandin-resistant FKS1 point mutants that also have elevated cell wall chitin. Here we show that elevated chitin in response to caspofungin is a common response in various Candida species. Activation of chitin synthesis was observed in isolates of C. albicans, Candida tropicalis, C. parapsilosis, and C. guilliermondii and in some isolates of Candida krusei in response to caspofungin treatment. However, Candida glabrata isolates demonstrated no exposure-induced change in chitin content. Furthermore, isolates of C. albicans, C. krusei, C. parapsilosis, and C. guilliermondii which were stimulated to have higher chitin levels via activation of the calcineurin and protein kinase C (PKC) signaling pathways had reduced susceptibility to caspofungin. Isolates containing point mutations in the FKS1 gene generally had higher chitin levels and did not demonstrate a further compensatory increase in chitin content in response to caspofungin treatment. These results highlight the potential of increased chitin synthesis as a potential mechanism of tolerance to caspofungin for the major pathogenic Candida species.

  18. Terpenoids inhibit Candida albicans growth by affecting membrane integrity and arrest of cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Zore, Gajanan B; Thakre, Archana D; Jadhav, Sitaram; Karuppayil, S Mohan

    2011-10-15

    Anti-Candida potential of six terpenoids were evaluated in this study against various isolates of Candida albicans (n=39) and non-C. albicans (n=9) that are differentially susceptible to fluconazole. All the six terpenoids tested, showed excellent activity and were equally effective against isolates of Candida sps., tested in this study. Linalool and citral were the most effective ones, inhibiting all the isolates at ≤0.064% (v/v). Five among the six terpenoids tested were fungicidal. Time dependent kill curve assay showed that MFCs of linalool and eugenol were highly toxic to C. albicans, killing 99.9% inoculum within seven min of exposure, while that of citronellal, linalyl acetate and citral required 15min, 1h and 2h, respectively. FIC index values (Linalool - 0.140, benzyl benzoate - 0.156, eugenol - 0.265, citral - 0.281 and 0.312 for linalyl acetate and citronellal) and isobologram obtained by checker board assay showed that all the six terpenoids tested exhibit excellent synergistic activity with fluconazole against a fluconazole resistant strain of C. albicans. Terpenoids tested arrested C. albicans cells at different phases of the cell cycle i.e. linalool and LA at G1, citral and citronellal at S phase and benzyl benzoate at G2-M phase and induced apoptosis. Linalool, citral, citronellal and benzyl benzoate caused more than 50% inhibition of germ tube induction at 0.008%, while eugenol and LA required 0.032 and 0.016% (v/v) concentrations, respectively. MICs of all the terpenoids for the C. albicans growth were non toxic to HeLa cells. Terpenoids tested exhibited excellent activity against C. albicans yeast and hyphal form growth at the concentrations that are non toxic to HeLa cells. Terpenoids tested in this study may find use in antifungal chemotherapy, not only as antifungal agents but also as synergistic agents along with conventional drugs like fluconazole.

  19. Comparison of Candida Albicans Adherence to Conventional Acrylic Denture Base Materials and Injection Molding Acrylic Materials

    PubMed Central

    Aslanimehr, Masoomeh; Rezvani, Shirin; Mahmoudi, Ali; Moosavi, Najmeh

    2017-01-01

    Statement of the Problem: Candida species are believed to play an important role in initiation and progression of denture stomatitis. The type of the denture material also influences the adhesion of candida and development of stomatitis. Purpose: The aim of this study was comparing the adherence of candida albicans to the conventional and injection molding acrylic denture base materials. Materials and Method: Twenty injection molding and 20 conventional pressure pack acrylic discs (10×10×2 mm) were prepared according to their manufacturer’s instructions. Immediately before the study, samples were placed in sterile water for 3 days to remove residual monomers. The samples were then sterilized using an ultraviolet light unit for 10 minutes. 1×108 Cfu/ml suspension of candida albicans ATCC-10231 was prepared from 48 h cultured organism on sabouraud dextrose agar plates incubated at 37oC. 100 μL of this suspension was placed on the surface of each disk. After being incubated at 37oC for 1 hour, the samples were washed with normal saline to remove non-adherent cells. Attached cells were counted using the colony count method after shaking at 3000 rmp for 20 seconds. Finally, each group was tested for 108 times and the data were statistically analyzed by t-test. Results: Quantitative analysis revealed that differences in colony count average of candida albicans adherence to conventional acrylic materials (8.3×103) comparing to injection molding acrylic resins (6×103) were statistically significant (p<0.001). Conclusion: Significant reduction of candida albicans adherence to the injection acrylic resin materials makes them valuable for patients with high risk of denture stomatitis. PMID:28280761

  20. Direct identification and recognition of yeast species from clinical material by using albicans ID and CHROMagar Candida plates.

    PubMed Central

    Baumgartner, C; Freydiere, A M; Gille, Y

    1996-01-01

    Two chromogenic media, Albicans ID and CHROMagar Candida agar plates, were compared with a reference medium, Sabouraud-chloramphenicol agar, and standard methods for the identification of yeast species. This study involved 951 clinical specimens. The detection rates for the two chromogenic media for polymicrobial specimens were 20% higher than that for the Sabouraud-chloramphenicol agar plates. The rates of identification of Candida albicans for Albicans ID and CHROMagar Candida agar plates were, respectively, 37.0 and 6.0% after 24 h of incubation and 93.6 and 92.2% after 72 h of incubation, with specificities of 99.8 and 100%. Furthermore, CHROMagar Candida plates identified 13 of 14 Candida tropicalis and 9 of 12 Candida krusei strains after 48 h of incubation. PMID:8789038

  1. Caspofungin MIC Distribution amongst Commonly Isolated Candida Species in a Tertiary Care Centre - An Indian Experience

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Rajarshi; Mehta, Preeti

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Emergence of Candida species resistant to Amphotericin B and triazole has led to use of echinocandins, mostly caspofungin in the management of invasive candidiasis. There are some published reports of caspofungin resistance in Candida species yet no studies on caspofungin susceptibility pattern of Candida species exist in Indian setup. Aim To carry out the antifungal susceptibility of Candida isolates against caspofungin. Materials and Methods In a retrospective study at a tertiary care teaching hospital, 60 preserved Candida isolates from inpatients of invasive candidiasis obtained over a period of 6 months from January 2015 to June 2015 were subjected to antifungal susceptibility to caspofungin and the Minimum Inhibitory Concentrations (MICs) of Candida species to caspofungin were determined by Epsilometer test (E-test). Results Thirty Candida albicans and 30 Non albicans Candida mainly Candida glabrata, Candida parapsilosis and Candida tropicalis were tested for caspofungin susceptibitity by E-test. Caspofungin resistance was detected in 6.67% Candida albicans isolates. Caspofungin resistance was not observed in Candida parapsilosis, Candida glabrata and Candida tropicalis. This shows that caspofungin resistance is still rare. Further elaborate studies with clinical correlation data are needed to detect prevalence of caspofungin resistance. Conclusion Emergence of resistance in our study warrants need of elaborate studies with clinical correlation data to detect prevalence of resistance to caspofungin. E-test method proved to be an easy and simple technique for testing susceptibility of Candida to caspofungin. PMID:28050365

  2. Pathogenicity mechanisms and host response during oral Candida albicans infections.

    PubMed

    Hebecker, Betty; Naglik, Julian R; Hube, Bernhard; Jacobsen, Ilse D

    2014-07-01

    Oral candidiasis remains one of the most common forms of Candida infections and occurs if the balance between host, Candida and microbiota is disturbed, e.g., by broad spectrum antibiotics or immunosuppression. In recent years, identification of fungal factors contributing to host cell damage and new insights into host defense mechanisms have significantly extended our understanding of the pathogenesis of oral candidiasis. In this review, we will provide an overview of the pathogenicity mechanisms during oral Candida infections and discuss some approaches by which this knowledge could be transferred into therapeutic approaches.

  3. DNA content, kinetic complexity, and the ploidy question in Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Riggsby, W S; Torres-Bauza, L J; Wills, J W; Townes, T M

    1982-01-01

    Candida albicans is a dimorphic fungus that is pathogenic for humans. No sexual cycle has been reported for this fungus, and earlier reports have differed on whether typical strains of C. albicans are haploid or diploid. Previous estimates of the DNA content of C. albicans varied by one order of magnitude. We used three independent methods to measure the kinetic complexity of the single-copy DNA from a typical strain of C. albicans (strain H317) to determine the DNA content per haploid genote; we obtained values of 15 and 20 fg per cell by using S1 nuclease and hydroxyapatite assays, respectively. Optical assays for DNA reassociation kinetics, although not definitive in themselves, yielded values in this range. Chemical measurements of the DNA content of several typical strains, including strain H317, yielded values clustered about a mean of 37 fg per cell. We concluded that these strains are diploid. PMID:6765567

  4. DNA content, kinetic complexity, and the ploidy question in Candida albicans

    SciTech Connect

    Riggsby, W.S.; Torres-Bauza, L.J.; Wills, J.W.; Townes, T.M.

    1982-07-01

    Candida albicans is a dimorphic fungus that is pathogenic for humans. No sexual cycle has been reported for this fungus, and earlier reports have differed on whether typical strains of C. albicans are haploid or diploid. Previous estimates of the DNA content of C. albicans varied by one order of magnitude. The authors used three independent methods to measure the kinetic complexity of the single-copy DNA from a typical strain of C. albicans (strain H317) to determine the DNA content per haploid genote; they obtained values of 15 and 20 fg per cell by using S1 nuclease and hydroxyapatite assays, respectively. Optical assays for DNA reassociation kinetics, although not definitive in themselves, yielded values in this range. Chemical measurements of the DNA content of several typical strains, including strain H317, yielded values clustered about a mean of 37 fg per cell. They concluded that these strains are diploid.

  5. Effect of salivary secretory IgA on the adhesion of Candida albicans to polystyrene.

    PubMed

    San Millán, R; Elguezabal, N; Regúlez, P; Moragues, M D; Quindós, G; Pontón, J

    2000-09-01

    Attachment of Candida albicans to plastic materials of dental prostheses or to salivary macromolecules adsorbed on their surface is believed to be a critical event in the development of denture stomatitis. In an earlier study, it was shown that adhesion of C. albicans to polystyrene, a model system to study the adhesion of C. albicans to plastic materials, can be partially inhibited with an mAb directed against cell wall polysaccharides of C. albicans. In the present study, the role of whole saliva in the adhesion of C. albicans to polystyrene has been investigated, and three mAbs directed against epitopes of cell wall mannoproteins have been used to mimic the inhibitory effect observed with salivary secretory IgA (sIgA) on the adhesion of C. albicans to polystyrene. In the absence of whole saliva, adherence of C. albicans 3153 increased with germination. However, the presence of whole saliva enhanced the adhesion to polystyrene of C. albicans 3153 yeast cells but decreased the adhesion of germinated cells. The enhancement of adhesion of yeast cells to polystyrene mediated by saliva was confirmed with an agerminative mutant of C. albicans 3153. The inhibition of the adhesion of C. albicans 3153 germ tubes to polystyrene was due to the salivary sIgA since sIgA-depleted saliva enhanced the adhesion of C. albicans 3153 to polystyrene. The inhibitory effect mediated by sIgA was not related to the inhibition of germination but to the blockage of adhesins expressed on the cell wall surface of the germ tubes. The three mAbs studied reduced the adhesion of C. albicans 3153 to polystyrene at levels equivalent to those for purified sIgA. The highest reduction in the adhesion was obtained with the IgA mAb N3B. The best results were obtained when the three mAbs were combined. The results suggest that whole saliva plays a different role in the adhesion of C. albicans to polystyrene depending on the morphological phase of C. albicans. These results may give new insights into the

  6. Streptococcus mutans Can Modulate Biofilm Formation and Attenuate the Virulence of Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Júnia Oliveira; Rossoni, Rodnei Dennis; Vilela, Simone Furgeri Godinho; de Alvarenga, Janaína Araújo; Velloso, Marisol dos Santos; Prata, Márcia Cristina de Azevedo; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso; Junqueira, Juliana Campos

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans and Candida albicans are found together in the oral biofilms on dental surfaces, but little is known about the ecological interactions between these species. Here, we studied the effects of S. mutans UA159 on the growth and pathogencity of C. albicans. Initially, the effects of S. mutans on the biofilm formation and morphogenesis of C. albicans were tested in vitro. Next, we investigate the influence of S. mutans on pathogenicity of C. albicans using in vivo host models, in which the experimental candidiasis was induced in G. mellonella larvae and analyzed by survival curves, C. albicans count in hemolymph, and quantification of hyphae in the host tissues. In all the tests, we evaluated the direct effects of S. mutans cells, as well as the indirect effects of the subproducts secreted by this microorganism using a bacterial culture filtrate. The in vitro analysis showed that S. mutans cells favored biofilm formation by C. albicans. However, a reduction in biofilm viable cells and inhibition of hyphal growth was observed when C. albicans was in contact with the S. mutans culture filtrate. In the in vivo study, injection of S. mutans cells or S. mutans culture filtrate into G. mellonella larvae infected with C. albicans increased the survival of these animals. Furthermore, a reduction in hyphal formation was observed in larval tissues when C. albicans was associated with S. mutans culture filtrate. These findings suggest that S. mutans can secrete subproducts capable to inhibit the biofilm formation, morphogenesis and pathogenicity of C. albicans, attenuating the experimental candidiasis in G. mellonella model. PMID:26934196

  7. Streptococcus mutans Can Modulate Biofilm Formation and Attenuate the Virulence of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Júnia Oliveira; Rossoni, Rodnei Dennis; Vilela, Simone Furgeri Godinho; de Alvarenga, Janaína Araújo; Velloso, Marisol dos Santos; Prata, Márcia Cristina de Azevedo; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso; Junqueira, Juliana Campos

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans and Candida albicans are found together in the oral biofilms on dental surfaces, but little is known about the ecological interactions between these species. Here, we studied the effects of S. mutans UA159 on the growth and pathogencity of C. albicans. Initially, the effects of S. mutans on the biofilm formation and morphogenesis of C. albicans were tested in vitro. Next, we investigate the influence of S. mutans on pathogenicity of C. albicans using in vivo host models, in which the experimental candidiasis was induced in G. mellonella larvae and analyzed by survival curves, C. albicans count in hemolymph, and quantification of hyphae in the host tissues. In all the tests, we evaluated the direct effects of S. mutans cells, as well as the indirect effects of the subproducts secreted by this microorganism using a bacterial culture filtrate. The in vitro analysis showed that S. mutans cells favored biofilm formation by C. albicans. However, a reduction in biofilm viable cells and inhibition of hyphal growth was observed when C. albicans was in contact with the S. mutans culture filtrate. In the in vivo study, injection of S. mutans cells or S. mutans culture filtrate into G. mellonella larvae infected with C. albicans increased the survival of these animals. Furthermore, a reduction in hyphal formation was observed in larval tissues when C. albicans was associated with S. mutans culture filtrate. These findings suggest that S. mutans can secrete subproducts capable to inhibit the biofilm formation, morphogenesis and pathogenicity of C. albicans, attenuating the experimental candidiasis in G. mellonella model.

  8. Diminished Antimicrobial Peptide and Antifungal Antibiotic Activities against Candida albicans in Denture Adhesive

    PubMed Central

    Bates, Amber M.; Garaicoa, Jorge L.; Fischer, Carol L.; Brogden, Kim A.

    2017-01-01

    The underlying causes of denture stomatitis may be related to the long-term use of adhesives, which may predispose individuals to oral candidiasis. In this study, we hypothesize that antimicrobial peptides and antifungal antibiotics have diminished anti-Candida activities in denture adhesive. To show this, nine antimicrobial peptides and five antifungal antibiotics with and without 1.0% denture adhesive were incubated with Candida albicans strains ATCC 64124 and HMV4C in radial diffusion assays. In gels with 1.0% adhesive, HNP-1, HBD2, HBD3, IP-10, LL37 (only one strain), histatin 5 (only one strain), lactoferricin B, and SMAP28 showed diminished activity against C. albicans. In gels with 1.0% adhesive, amphotericin B and chlorhexidine dihydrochloride were active against both strains of C. albicans. These results suggest that denture adhesive may inactivate innate immune mediators in the oral cavity increasing the risk of C. albicans infections, but inclusion of antifungal antibiotics to denture adhesive may aid in prevention or treatment of Candida infections and denture stomatitis. PMID:28178179

  9. Modulation of Candida albicans virulence by bacterial biofilms on titanium surfaces.

    PubMed

    Cavalcanti, Yuri Wanderley; Wilson, Melanie; Lewis, Michael; Del-Bel-Cury, Altair Antoninha; da Silva, Wander José; Williams, David W

    2016-01-01

    Whilst Candida albicans occurs in peri-implant biofilms, its role in peri-implantitis remains unclear. This study therefore examined the virulence of C. albicans in mixed-species biofilms on titanium surfaces. Biofilms of C. albicans (Ca), C. albicans with streptococci (Streptococcus sanguinis, S. mutans) (Ca-Ss-Sm) and those incorporating Porphyromonas gingivalis (Ca-Pg and Ca-Ss-Sm-Pg) were developed. Expression of C. albicans genes associated with adhesion (ALS1, ALS3, HWP1) and hydrolytic enzymes (SAP2, SAP4, SAP6, PLD1) was measured and hyphal production by C. albicans quantified. Compared with Ca biofilms, significant (p<0.05) up-regulation of ALS3, HWP1, SAP2 and SAP6, and hyphal production occurred in biofilms containing streptococci (Ca-Ss-Sm). In Ca-Pg biofilms, down-regulation of HWP1 and SAP4 expression, with reduced hyphal production occurred. Ca-Ss-Sm-Pg biofilms had increased hyphal proportions and up-regulation of ALS3, SAP2 and SAP6. In conclusion, C. albicans expressed virulence factors in biofilms that could contribute to peri-implantitis, but this was dependent on associated bacterial species.

  10. Candida albicans-induced agglutinin and immunoglobulin E responses in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Winterrowd, G E; Cutler, J E

    1983-01-01

    Mice varied in their ability to make detectable antibody responses to cell surface determinants of Candida albicans depending upon the antigen preparation and the immunization schedule used. Immunoglobulin M (IgM) appeared to be the major class of antibody responsible for the C. albicans-agglutinating activity of the immune sera. Various inbred strains of mice injected with a ribosomal fraction from C. albicans produced a low titer (average, 4 to 8) of yeast cell agglutinins and a higher titer (64 to 512) of IgE antibodies detected by passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) in rats. The two kinds of antibodies appeared to be specific for different antigens because the agglutinin, but not IgE, could be removed by absorbing the serum with a polysaccharide from the cell wall of C. albicans, but the polysaccharide did not provoke the PCA reaction. C. albicans-specific IgE antibodies showed cross-reactivity (PCA) with ribosomal antigens from a strain of C. albicans and C. tropicalis, but PCA reactions could not be elicited with similar antigen preparations from other yeast species. IgE responses were also detected in over 20% of the mice infected intravenously or intraperitoneally with live C. albicans. PMID:6190755

  11. Essential Functional Modules for Pathogenic and Defensive Mechanisms in Candida albicans Infections

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, I-Chun; Lin, Che; Chuang, Yung-Jen

    2014-01-01

    The clinical and biological significance of the study of fungal pathogen Candida albicans (C. albicans) has markedly increased. However, the explicit pathogenic and invasive mechanisms of such host-pathogen interactions have not yet been fully elucidated. Therefore, the essential functional modules involved in C. albicans-zebrafish interactions were investigated in this study. Adopting a systems biology approach, the early-stage and late-stage protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks for both C. albicans and zebrafish were constructed. By comparing PPI networks at the early and late stages of the infection process, several critical functional modules were identified in both pathogenic and defensive mechanisms. Functional modules in C. albicans, like those involved in hyphal morphogenesis, ion and small molecule transport, protein secretion, and shifts in carbon utilization, were seen to play important roles in pathogen invasion and damage caused to host cells. Moreover, the functional modules in zebrafish, such as those involved in immune response, apoptosis mechanisms, ion transport, protein secretion, and hemostasis-related processes, were found to be significant as defensive mechanisms during C. albicans infection. The essential functional modules thus determined could provide insights into the molecular mechanisms of host-pathogen interactions during the infection process and thereby devise potential therapeutic strategies to treat C. albicans infection. PMID:24757665

  12. Candida albicans Amphotericin B-Tolerant Persister Formation is Closely Related to Surface Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jing; Li, Zhigang; Chu, Haoyue; Guo, Jing; Jiang, Guangshui; Qi, Qingguo

    2016-02-01

    Candida albicans persisters have so far been observed only in biofilm environment; the biofilm element(s) that trigger(s) persister formation are still unknown. In this study, we tried to further elucidate the possible relationship between C. albicans persisters and the early phases of biofilm formation, especially the surface adhesion phase. Three C. albicans strains were surveyed for the formation of persisters. We tested C. albicans persister formation dynamically at different time points during the process of adhesion and biofilm formation. The number of persister cells was determined based on an assessment of cell viability after amphotericin B treatment and colony-forming unit assay. None of the planktonic cultures contained persisters. Immediately following adhesion of C. albicans cells to the surface, persister cells emerged and the proportion of persisters reached a peak of 0.2-0.69 % in approximately 2-h biofilm. As the biofilm matured, the proportion of persisters decreased and was only 0.01-0.02 % by 24 h, while the number of persisters remained stable with no significant change. Persisters were not detected in the absence of an attachment surface which was pre-coated. Persisters were also absent in biofilms that were scraped to disrupt surface adhesion prior to amphotericin B treatment. These results indicate that C. albicans antifungal-tolerant persisters are produced mainly in surface adhesion phase and surface adhesion is required for the emergence and maintenance of C. albicans persisters.

  13. Presence of extracellular DNA in the Candida albicans biofilm matrix and its contribution to biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Margarida; Uppuluri, Priya; Thomas, Derek P.; Cleary, Ian A.; Henriques, Mariana; Lopez-Ribot, José L.; Oliveira, Rosário

    2014-01-01

    DNA has been described as a structural component of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in bacterial biofilms. In Candida albicans there is a scarce knowledge concerning the contribution of extracellular DNA (eDNA) to biofilm matrix and overall structure. This work examined the presence and quantified the amount of eDNA in C.albicans biofilm ECM and the effect of DNase treatment and the addition of exogenous DNA on C. albicans biofilm development as indicators of a role for eDNA in biofilm development. We were able to detect the accumulation of eDNA in biofilm ECM extracted from C. albicans biofilms formed under conditions of flow, although the quantity of eDNA detected differed according to growth conditions, in particular with regards to the medium used to grow the biofilms. Experiments with C. albicans biofilms formed statically using a microtiter plate model indicated that the addition of exogenous DNA (>160 ng/ml) increases biofilm biomass and, conversely, DNase treatment (>0.03 mg/ml) decreases biofilm biomass at later time points of biofilm development. We present evidence for the role of eDNA in C. albicans biofilm structure and formation, consistent with eDNA being a key element of the ECM in mature C. albicans biofilms and playing a predominant role in biofilm structural integrity and maintenance. PMID:20012895

  14. Novel hydroxamates potentiated in vitro activity of fluconazole against Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Paul-Satyaseela, Maneesh; Hariharan, Periasamy; Bharani, Thirunavukkarasu; Franklyne, Jonathan S.; Selvakumar, Thangapazham; Bharathimohan, Kuppusamy; Kumar, Chenniappan Vinoth; Kachhadia, Virendra; Narayanan, Shridhar; Rajagopal, Sridharan; Balasubramanian, Gopalan

    2017-01-01

    A set of 12 novel hydroxamate compounds (NHCs), structurally designed as inhibitors of histone deacetylase (HDAC) enzyme, were synthesized at our facility. These were adamantane derivatives with N-hydroxyacetamide as pharmacophore, and each of these compounds was tested for potentiating activity on fluconazole. The concentration of fluconazole which completely inhibited (concentration of complete inhibition [CCI]) the growth of Candida albicans ATCC 90028 and C. albicans ATCC 64550 was determined by micro-dilution method in the absence and presence of NHCs. The CCI of fluconazole without the NHC combination was 64 μg/ml and 1024 μg/ml against C. albicans ATCC 90028 and C. albicans ATCC 64550, respectively. The majority of the NHCs potentiated the fluconazole activity markedly as CCI of fluconazole against C. albicans ATCC 90028 reduced to 0.25 μg/ml. Similarly, CCI of fluconazole against C. albicans ATCC 64550 reduced to 4–8 μg/ml in combination with majority of NHCs while the best activity was displayed by the compound 1 with a reduction of CCI to 0.5 μg/ml. The study results revealed the potential usage of hydroxamate derivatives, structurally designed as HDAC inhibitors to enhance the activity of fluconazole against C. albicans. PMID:28250687

  15. Barrier activity in Candida albicans mediates pheromone degradation and promotes mating.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Dana; Côte, Pierre; Whiteway, Malcolm; Bennett, Richard J

    2007-06-01

    Mating in Candida albicans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae is regulated by the secretion of peptide pheromones that initiate the mating process. An important regulator of pheromone activity in S. cerevisiae is barrier activity, involving an extracellular aspartyl protease encoded by the BAR1 gene that degrades the alpha pheromone. We have characterized an equivalent barrier activity in C. albicans and demonstrate that the loss of C. albicans BAR1 activity results in opaque a cells exhibiting hypersensitivity to alpha pheromone. Hypersensitivity to pheromone is clearly seen in halo assays; in response to alpha pheromone, a lawn of C. albicans Deltabar1 mutant cells produces a marked zone in which cell growth is inhibited, whereas wild-type strains fail to show halo formation. C. albicans mutants lacking BAR1 also exhibit a striking mating defect in a cells, but not in alpha cells, due to overstimulation of the response to alpha pheromone. The block to mating occurs prior to cell fusion, as very few mating zygotes were observed in mixes of Deltabar1 a and alpha cells. Finally, in a barrier assay using a highly pheromone-sensitive strain, we were able to demonstrate that barrier activity in C. albicans is dependent on Bar1p. These studies reveal that a barrier activity to alpha pheromone exists in C. albicans and that the activity is analogous to that caused by Bar1p in S. cerevisiae.

  16. Antifungal activity of Rubus chingii extract combined with fluconazole against fluconazole-resistant Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Han, Bing; Chen, Jia; Yu, Yi-qun; Cao, Yong-bing; Jiang, Yuan-ying

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to investigate the antifungal activity of Rubus chingii extract in combination with fluconazole (FLC) against FLC-resistant Candida albicans 100 in vitro. A R. chingii extract and FLC-resistant C. albicans fungus suspension were prepared. The minimum inhibitory concentration and fractional inhibitory concentration index of R. chingii extract combined with FLC against C. albicans were determined, after which growth curves for C. albicans treated with R. chingii extract, FLC alone and a combination of these preparations were constructed. Additionally, the mechanisms of drug combination against C. albicans were explored by flow cytometry, gas chromatographic mass spectrometry and drug efflux pump function detection. R. chingii extract combined with FLC showed significant synergy. Flow cytometry suggested that C. albicans cells mainly arrest in G1 and S phases when they have been treated with the drug combination. The drug combination resulted in a marked decrease in the ergosterol content of the cell membrane. Additionally, efflux of Rhodamine 6G decreased with increasing concentrations of R. chingii extract. R. chingii extract combined with FLC has antifungal activity against FLC-resistant C. albicans.

  17. Reduced PICD in Monocytes Mounts Altered Neonate Immune Response to Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Dreschers, Stephan; Saupp, Peter; Hornef, Mathias; Prehn, Andrea; Platen, Christopher; Morschhäuser, Joachim; Orlikowsky, Thorsten W.

    2016-01-01

    Background Invasive fungal infections with Candida albicans (C. albicans) occur frequently in extremely low birthweight (ELBW) infants and are associated with poor outcome. Phagocytosis of C.albicans initializes apoptosis in monocytes (phagocytosis induced cell death, PICD). PICD is reduced in neonatal cord blood monocytes (CBMO). Hypothesis Phagocytosis of C. albicans causes PICD which differs between neonatal monocytes (CBMO) and adult peripheral blood monocytes (PBMO) due to lower stimulation of TLR-mediated immune responses. Methods The ability to phagocytose C. albicans, expression of TLRs, the induction of apoptosis (assessment of sub-G1 and nick-strand breaks) were analyzed by FACS. TLR signalling was induced by agonists such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS), Pam3Cys, FSL-1 and Zymosan and blocked (neutralizing TLR2 antibodies and MYD88 inhibitor). Results Phagocytic indices of PBMO and CBMO were similar. Following stimulation with agonists and C. albicans induced up-regulation of TLR2 and consecutive phosphorylation of MAP kinase P38 and expression of TNF-α, which were stronger on PBMO compared to CBMO (p < 0.005). Downstream, TLR2 signalling initiated caspase-3-dependent PICD which was found reduced in CBMO (p < 0.05 vs PBMO). Conclusion Our data suggest direct involvement of TLR2-signalling in C. albicans-induced PICD in monocytes and an alteration of this pathway in CBMO. PMID:27870876

  18. Presence of extracellular DNA in the Candida albicans biofilm matrix and its contribution to biofilms.

    PubMed

    Martins, Margarida; Uppuluri, Priya; Thomas, Derek P; Cleary, Ian A; Henriques, Mariana; Lopez-Ribot, José L; Oliveira, Rosário

    2010-05-01

    DNA has been described as a structural component of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in bacterial biofilms. In Candida albicans, there is a scarce knowledge concerning the contribution of extracellular DNA (eDNA) to biofilm matrix and overall structure. This work examined the presence and quantified the amount of eDNA in C. albicans biofilm ECM and the effect of DNase treatment and the addition of exogenous DNA on C. albicans biofilm development as indicators of a role for eDNA in biofilm development. We were able to detect the accumulation of eDNA in biofilm ECM extracted from C. albicans biofilms formed under conditions of flow, although the quantity of eDNA detected differed according to growth conditions, in particular with regards to the medium used to grow the biofilms. Experiments with C. albicans biofilms formed statically using a microtiter plate model indicated that the addition of exogenous DNA (>160 ng/ml) increases biofilm biomass and, conversely, DNase treatment (>0.03 mg/ml) decreases biofilm biomass at later time points of biofilm development. We present evidence for the role of eDNA in C. albicans biofilm structure and formation, consistent with eDNA being a key element of the ECM in mature C. albicans biofilms and playing a predominant role in biofilm structural integrity and maintenance.

  19. [The effects of an aroma candy on oral Candida albicans colony-forming units (CFU) and oral hygiene states in healthy elderly carrying Candida albicans].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Motofumi; Hayama, Kazumi; Takahashi, Miki; Ezawa, Kunio; Yamazaki, Masatoshi; Matsukawa, Taiji; Kishi, Akinobu; Satou, Nobuya; Abe, Shigeru

    2015-01-01

    In a preceding paper, we showed that aroma candy containing oligonol, capric acid, and cinnamon (cassia) powder had potent inhibitory activity against mycelial growth of Candida albicans in vitro and protective activity against murine oral candidiasis. In order to assess the effects of this candy (the test candy) on oral C. albicans colony-forming units (CFU) and oral hygiene states, a placebo-controlled double-blind crossover comparative study was performed. Twenty subjects were divided into two groups. One group ingested the test candy in the first 7 days followed by 2 weeks washing-off period, then ingested the placebo candy (control candy) for 7 days. The other group was vice versa. C. albicans CFU in all oral rinse samples from the subjects before and after 7 days ingestion of candy was measured. The degree of oral malodor in all subjects was monitored using a portable measuring instrument. The results showed no statistically significant difference between test-candy group and placebo group for C. albicans CFU. However, C. albicans CFU in test-candy group with>4,000 CFUs was significantly decreased after 7 days ingestion of test-candy (p<0.05). Scores of oral malodor in the test-candy group was significantly decreased after 7 days ingestion of test-candy (p<0.05). A questionnaire survey of oral hygiene states indicated that in the test-candy group, oral malodor, glutinous feeling, and refreshing feeling significantly improved in comparison with control-candy group (p<0.05). Our study suggests that the aroma candy is effective in oral health care of elderly carrying C. albicans.

  20. Prevalence and antifungal susceptibility of Candida albicans and its related species Candida dubliniensis and Candida africana isolated from vulvovaginal samples in a hospital of Argentina.

    PubMed

    Theill, Laura; Dudiuk, Catiana; Morano, Susana; Gamarra, Soledad; Nardin, María Elena; Méndez, Emilce; Garcia-Effron, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Candida africana taxonomical status is controversial. It was proposed as a separate species within the Candida albicans species complex; however, phylogenetic analyses suggested that it is an unusual variety of C. albicans. The prevalence of C. albicans-related species (Candida dubliniensis and C. africana) as vulvovaginal pathogens is not known in Argentina. Moreover, data on antifungal susceptibility of isolates causing vulvovaginal candidiasis is scarce. The aims of this study were to establish the prevalence of C. dubliniensis and C. africana in vaginal samples and to evaluate the antifungal susceptibilities of vaginal C. albicans species complex strains. We used a molecular-based method coupled with a new pooled DNA extraction methodology to differentiate C. dubliniensis and C. africana in a collection of 287 strains originally identified as C. albicans isolated from an Argentinian hospital during 2013. Antifungal susceptibilities to fluconazole, clotrimazole, itraconazole, voriconazole, nystatin, amphotericin B and terbinafine were evaluated by using the CLSI M27-A3 and M27-S4 documents. Of the 287 isolates, 4 C. dubliniensis and one C. africana strains (1.39% and 0.35% prevalence, respectively) were identified. This is the first description of C. africana in Argentina and its identification was confirmed by sequencing the ITS2 region and the hwp1 gene. C. dubliniensis and C. africana strains showed very low MIC values for all the tested antifungals. Fluconazole-reduced-susceptibility and azole cross-resistance were observed in 3.55% and 1.41% of the C. albicans isolates, respectively. These results demonstrate that antifungal resistance is still a rare phenomenon in this kind of isolates.

  1. Use of CHROMagar Candida medium for isolation of yeasts from dental samples.

    PubMed Central

    Beighton, D; Ludford, R; Clark, D T; Brailsford, S R; Pankhurst, C L; Tinsley, G F; Fiske, J; Lewis, D; Daly, B; Khalifa, N

    1995-01-01

    A new differential medium, CHROMagar Candida, for the isolation of clinically important yeasts was investigated to determine its usefulness in facilitating the study of oral yeasts. The recovery of yeasts on the medium was not significantly different from the recovery on Sabouraud dextrose agar. The identities of 450 green colonies on CHROMagar Candida, presumptively identified as Candida albicans on the basis of the manufacturer's instructions, were confirmed by testing for beta-N-acetylgalactosaminidase. Candida tropicalis also formed distinctive colonies, and other yeasts including Candida (Torulopsis) glabrata, Candida Parapsilosis, Candida Magnoliae, Candida lusitaniae, Candida Famata, Candida kefir, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae were readily distinguished from C. albicans and C. tropicalis isolates. CHROMagar Candida is a very useful medium, and its use will facilitate the study of yeasts associated with dental diseases. PMID:8576366

  2. The Extracellular Matrix of Candida albicans Biofilms Impairs Formation of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps

    PubMed Central

    Cabezas-Olcoz, Jonathan; Wang, Steven X.; Huttenlocher, Anna; Ansari, Hamayail; Nett, Jeniel E.

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils release extracellular traps (NETs) in response to planktonic C. albicans. These complexes composed of DNA, histones, and proteins inhibit Candida growth and dissemination. Considering the resilience of Candida biofilms to host defenses, we examined the neutrophil response to C. albicans during biofilm growth. In contrast to planktonic C. albicans, biofilms triggered negligible release of NETs. Time lapse imaging confirmed the impairment in NET release and revealed neutrophils adhering to hyphae and migrating on the biofilm. NET inhibition depended on an intact extracellular biofilm matrix as physical or genetic disruption of this component resulted in NET release. Biofilm inhibition of NETosis could not be overcome by protein kinase C activation via phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and was associated with suppression of neutrophil reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. The degree of impaired NET release correlated with resistance to neutrophil attack. The clinical relevance of the role for extracellular matrix in diminishing NET production was corroborated in vivo using a rat catheter model. The C. albicans pmr1Δ/Δ, defective in production of matrix mannan, appeared to elicit a greater abundance of NETs by scanning electron microscopy imaging, which correlated with a decreased fungal burden. Together, these findings show that C. albicans biofilms impair neutrophil response through an inhibitory pathway induced by the extracellular matrix. PMID:27622514

  3. Antagonism of Fluconazole and a Proton Pump Inhibitor against Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ning-Ning; Köhler, Julia R

    2016-02-01

    Hospitalized ill patients, at risk for invasive candidiasis, often receive multiple medications, including proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). The antifungal fluconazole perturbs the vacuolar proton ATPase. The PPI omeprazole antagonized Candida albicans growth inhibition by fluconazole. A C. albicans codon-adapted pHluorin, Ca.pHluorin, was generated to measure cytosolic pH. The fungal cytosol was acidified by omeprazole and realkalinized by coexposure to fluconazole. Vacuolar pH was alkalinized by fluconazole. Off-target effects of any medication on fungal pathogens may occur.

  4. Comparative Analysis of Protein Glycosylation Pathways in Humans and the Fungal Pathogen Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Duncker, Iván; Díaz-Jímenez, Diana F.; Mora-Montes, Héctor M.

    2014-01-01

    Protein glycosylation pathways are present in all kingdoms of life and are metabolic pathways found in all the life kingdoms. Despite sharing commonalities in their synthesis, glycans attached to glycoproteins have species-specific structures generated by the presence of different sets of enzymes and acceptor substrates in each organism. In this review, we present a comparative analysis of the main glycosylation pathways shared by humans and the fungal pathogen Candida albicans: N-linked glycosylation, O-linked mannosylation and glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchorage. The knowledge of similarities and divergences between these metabolic pathways could help find new pharmacological targets for C. albicans infection. PMID:25104959

  5. Dissecting Candida albicans Infection from the Perspective of C. albicans Virulence and Omics Approaches on Host–Pathogen Interaction: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Voon Kin; Lee, Tze Yan; Rusliza, Basir; Chong, Pei Pei

    2016-01-01

    Candida bloodstream infections remain the most frequent life-threatening fungal disease, with Candida albicans accounting for 70% to 80% of the Candida isolates recovered from infected patients. In nature, Candida species are part of the normal commensal flora in mammalian hosts. However, they can transform into pathogens once the host immune system is weakened or breached. More recently, mortality attributed to Candida infections has continued to increase due to both inherent and acquired drug resistance in Candida, the inefficacy of the available antifungal drugs, tedious diagnostic procedures, and a rising number of immunocompromised patients. Adoption of animal models, viz. minihosts, mice, and zebrafish, has brought us closer to unraveling the pathogenesis and complexity of Candida infection in human hosts, leading towards the discovery of biomarkers and identification of potential therapeutic agents. In addition, the advancement of omics technologies offers a holistic view of the Candida-host interaction in a non-targeted and non-biased manner. Hence, in this review, we seek to summarize past and present milestone findings on C. albicans virulence, adoption of animal models in the study of C. albicans infection, and the application of omics technologies in the study of Candida–host interaction. A profound understanding of the interaction between host defense and pathogenesis is imperative for better design of novel immunotherapeutic strategies in future. PMID:27763544

  6. Prevalence of candida albicans in dental plaque and caries lesion of early childhood caries (ECC) according to sampling site

    PubMed Central

    Ghasempour, Maryam; Sefidgar, Seyed Ali Asghar; Eyzadian, Haniyeh; Gharakhani, Samaneh

    2011-01-01

    Background: Candida albicans may have cariogenic potential but its role in caries etiology has not been established. The aim of this study was to determine candida albicans in supragingival dental plaque and infected dentine of cervical and proximal in early childhood caries (ECC). Methods: This cross-sectional study was carried out on 6o children aged 2-5 years, which were divided into 3 groups: children with at least one cervical caries; children with at least one proximal caries and caries-free. The infected dentine was collected from cervical and proximal caries lesions and plaque samples were collected from the three groups in order to compare the frequency of candida albicans in the collected sites. All samples were cultured in Sabouraud and CHROMagar medium and the cases that were positive for candida albicans were cultured in germ tube. Data were collected and analyzed. Results: The mean age of the children was 3.9 years. From 100 samples, candida albicans samples were isolated in 55%, mold fungi were found in 29% cases and there was no fungal growth in 16% of the samples. In plaque samples, candida albicans were found in 15% of caries-free samples, 20% of the proximal and 80% of the cervical caries. In samples extracted from the caries, candida albicans were found in 60% of the proximal and 100% of the cervical caries. Mothers with university educational level had children with more cervical decays, caries free and proximal caries, respectively. Conclusion: The results showed that prevalence of Candida albicans in dental plaque and caries lesions of children with early childhood caries were relatively high and the prevalence was higher in cervical caries group. PMID:24551436

  7. Serum interleukin-6 levels in murine models of Candida albicans infection.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Renátó; Czudar, Anita; Horváth, László; Szakács, Levente; Majoros, László; Kónya, József

    2014-03-01

    Two Balb/C mouse models of Candida infection were used to detect serum interleukin-6 (IL-6) responses. The first model used systemic infection by Candida albicans ATCC 10231 strain infected through the lateral tail vein of mice without any specific pretreatment. The median Candida burdens of the kidneys were 1.5 × 106 CFU/ml 24 h postinoculation (p.i.) and 1.2 × 107 CFU/ml 72 h p.i., while median serum IL-6 levels were 479.3 pg/ml and 934.5 pg/ml, respectively. The Candida burden showed significant correlation with serum IL-6 24 h p.i. (R2 = 0.6358; P = 0.0082) but not 72 h p.i.The second model was a mouse vaginitis model applying intravaginal inoculation of mice pretreated with subcutaneous estradiol-valerate (10 mg/ml) 3 days before infection. Candida cell count in vaginal lavage fluid was 2.8 × 106 CFU/ml 24 h p.i. and 1.4 × 108 CFU/ml 72 h p.i. Serum IL-6 response was detected in 4 of 15 mice 24 h p.i. and 9 of 15 mice 72 h p.i. Even the responders had low IL-6 serum levels (mean values 29.9 pg/ml and 60.1 pg/ml, respectively) not correlating with Candida cell count in vaginal lavage fluid.In conclusion, serum IL-6 had strong relationship with systemic C. albicans infection while the local C. albicans infection of the vagina led to partial, prolonged and limited serum IL-6 response.

  8. Prevalence of Trichomonas vaginalis and Candida albicans among Brazilian Women of Reproductive Age

    PubMed Central

    Glehn, Mateus De Paula; Ferreira, Lana Cristina Evangelista Sá; Da Silva, Hian Delfino Ferreira; Machado, Eleuza Rodrigues

    2016-01-01

    Introduction There are no studies assessing the simultaneous occurrence of Candida albicans (C. albicans) and Trichomonas vaginalis (T. vaginalis) in the primary health care in Brazil. Despite different conditions to establishment of each one, the co-detection of both has been reported by some authors in previous studies from other regions. Aim To compare the prevalence of T. vaginalis and C. albicans in correlation with associated variables. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional study conducted in a family health clinic in the Federal District of Brazil, between November 2014 and March 2015. Vaginal swabs were collected from 201 women of the reproductive age selected from women registered at the family health clinic. Minors and pregnant women were excluded. The rates of T. vaginalis and Candida albicans prevalence were evaluated with vaginal pH, the whiff test, sexual practices and other social and demographic variables. Difference between proportions was assessed by Z-Test. Results C. albicans was present in 20% of the women, while 16% of them had T. vaginalis. The simultaneous occurrence of the agents was found in 1.5%. Significant differences were found between prevalence rates for the variables race/skin colour, practice of anilingus and lifetime number of sexual partners. Conclusion The prevalence of T. vaginalis exceeds C.albicans among women with higher numbers of sexual partners. The prevalence of C. albicans was higher than T. vaginalis among white women and those who practice active and receptive anilingus. The simultaneous occurrence of the two microorganisms was uncommon. PMID:28050410

  9. Activity of antimicrobial peptide mimetics in the oral cavity: I. Activity against biofilms of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Hua, J; Yamarthy, R; Felsenstein, S; Scott, R W; Markowitz, K; Diamond, G

    2010-12-01

    Naturally occurring antimicrobial peptides hold promise as therapeutic agents against oral pathogens such as Candida albicans but numerous difficulties have slowed their development. Synthetic, non-peptidic analogs that mimic the properties of these peptides have many advantages and exhibit potent, selective antimicrobial activity. Several series of mimetics (with molecular weight < 1000) were developed and screened against oral Candida strains as a proof-of-principle for their antifungal properties. One phenylalkyne and several arylamide compounds with reduced mammalian cytotoxicities were found to be active against C. albicans. These compounds demonstrated rapid fungicidal activity in liquid culture even in the presence of saliva, and demonstrated synergy with standard antifungal agents. When assayed against biofilms grown on denture acrylic, the compounds exhibited potent fungicidal activity as measured by metabolic and fluorescent viability assays. Repeated passages in sub-minimum inhibitory concentration levels did not lead to resistant Candida, in contrast to fluconazole. Our results demonstrate the proof-of principle for the use of these compounds as anti-Candida agents, and their further testing is warranted as novel anti-Candida therapies.

  10. Candida albicans biofilm inhibition by synergistic action of terpenes and fluconazole.

    PubMed

    Pemmaraju, Suma C; Pruthi, Parul A; Prasad, R; Pruthi, Vikas

    2013-11-01

    The current treatment options for Candida albicans biofilm-device related infections are very scarce due to their intrinsic increased tolerance to antimycotics. The aim of this work was to study synergistic action of terpenes (eugenol, menthol and thymol) with fluconazole (FLA) on C. albicans biofilm inhibition. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) assayed using CLSI M27-A3 broth micro-dilution method showed antifungal activity against C. albicans MTCC 227 at a concentration of 0.12 % (v/v) for both thymol and eugenol as compared to 0.25 % (v/v) for menthol. FLA was taken as positive control. The effect of these terpenes on metabolic activity of preformed C. albicans biofilm cells was evaluated using 2,3-bis (2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide (XTT) reduction assay in 96-well polystyrene microtiter plate. Thymol and eugenol were more effective at lower concentrations of > or = 1.0 % (v/v) than menthol. Synergistic studies using checkerboard micro-dilution assay showed fractional inhibitory concentration index (sigma FIC = 0.31) between thymol/FLA followed by eugenol/FLA (sigma FIC = 0.37) and menthol/FLA (sigma FIC < 0.5) against pre-formed C. albicans biofilms. Thymol with fluconazole showed highest synergy in reduction of biofilm formation than eugenol and menthol which was not observed when their activities were observed independently. Adherence assay showed 30% viability of C. albicans cells after 2 h of treatment with 0.05 % (v/v) thymol/FLA. Effect of thymol/FLA on C. albicans adhesion visualized by SEM micrographs showed disruption in number of candidal cells and alteration in structural design of C. albicans. Thus, the study demonstrated synergistic effect of terpenes with fluconazole on C. albicans biofilm, which could be future medications for biofilm infections.

  11. Function and subcellular localization of Gcn5, a histone acetyltransferase in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Chang, Peng; Fan, Xueyi; Chen, Jiangye

    2015-08-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic fungal pathogen commonly found in humans. It has the ability to switch reversibly between three growth forms: budding yeast, pseudohypha, and hypha. The transition between yeast and hyphal growth forms is critical for the pathogenesis of C. albicans. During the yeast-to-hypha morphologic transition, gene expression is regulated by transcriptional regulators including histone modifying complexes and chromatin remodeling complexes. We previously reported that Esa1, a catalytic subunit in the histone acetyltransferase complex NuA4, is essential for the hyphal development of C. albicans. In this study, we analyzed the functional roles of Gcn5, a catalytic subunit in the histone acetyltransferase complex SAGA, in C. albicans. Gcn5 is required for the invasive and filamentous growth of C. albicans. Deletion of GCN5 impaired hyphal elongation in sensing serum and attenuated the virulence of C. albicans in a mouse systemic infection model. The C. albicans gcn5/gcn5 mutant cells also exhibited sensitivity to cell wall stress. Functional analysis showed that the HAT domain and Bromodomain in Gcn5 play distinct roles in morphogenesis and cell wall stress response of C. albicans. Our results show that the conserved residue Glu188 is crucial for the Gcn5 HAT activity and for Gcn5 function during filamentous growth. In addition, the subcellular distribution of ectopically expressed GFP-Gcn5 correlates with the different growth states of C. albicans. In stationary phase, Gcn5 accumulated in the nucleus, while during vegetative growth it localized in the cytoplasm in a morpha-independent manner. Our results suggest that the nuclear localization of Gcn5 depends on the existence of its N-terminal NLS and HAT domains.

  12. Candida albicans alters the bacterial microbiome of early in vitro oral biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Janus, M. M.; Crielaard, W.; Volgenant, C. M. C.; van der Veen, M. H.; Brandt, B. W.; Krom, B. P.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The yeast Candida albicans is an oral commensal microorganism, occurring in the oral cavity of 50–70% of healthy individuals. Its effect on oral ecology has mostly been studied using dual-species models, which disregards the complex nature of oral biofilms. The aim of this study was to culture C. albicans in a complex model to study its effect on oral biofilms. Biofilms, inoculated using pooled stimulated saliva with or without addition of C. albicans, were grown under anaerobic, aerobic, or aerobic +5% CO2 conditions. Red autofluorescence was quantified using a spectrophotometer and visualized in fluorescence photographs. The microbiome of 5 h biofilms was determined using 16S rDNA sequencing. C. albicans was only able to proliferate in biofilms grown under aerobic conditions. After 48 h, C. albicans did not induce differences in total biofilm formation, lactic acid accumulation (cariogenic phenotype) or protease activity (periodontitis phenotype). In vitro, anaerobically grown biofilms developed red autofluorescence, irrespective of inoculum. However, under aerobic conditions, only C. albicans–containing biofilms showed red autofluorescence. Facultative or strict anaerobic Veillonella, Prevotella, Leptotrichia, and Fusobacterium genera were significantly more abundant in biofilms with C. albicans. Biofilms without C. albicans contained more of the aerobic and facultative anaerobic genera Neisseria, Rothia, and Streptococcus. The presence of C. albicans alters the bacterial microbiome in early in vitro oral biofilms, resulting in the presence of strictly anaerobic bacteria under oxygen-rich conditions. This in vitro study illustrates that C. albicans should not be disregarded in healthy oral ecosystems, as it has the potential to influence bacteria significantly. PMID:28326152

  13. Extensive chromosome rearrangements distinguish the karyotype of the hypovirulent species Candida dubliniensis from the virulent Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Magee, B B; Sanchez, Melissa D; Saunders, David; Harris, David; Berriman, M.; Magee, PT

    2008-01-01

    Candida dubliniensis and Candida albicans, the most common human fungal pathogen, have most of the same genes and high sequence similarity, but C. dubliniensis is less virulent. C. albicans causes both mucosal and hematogenously disseminated disease, C. dubliniensis mostly mucosal infections. Pulse-field electrophoresis, genomic restriction enzyme digests, Southern blotting, and the emerging sequence from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute were used to determine the karyotype of C. dubliniensis type strain CD36. Three chromosomes have two intact homologues. A translocation in the rDNA repeat on chromosome R exchanges telomere-proximal regions of R and chromosome 5. Translocations involving the remaining chromosomes occur at the Major Repeat Sequence. CD36 lacks an MRS on chromosome R but has one on 3. Of six other C. dubliniensis strains, no two had the same electrophoretic karyotype. Despite extensive chromosome rearrangements, karyotypic differences between C. dubliniensis and C. albicans are unlikely to affect gene expression. Karyotypic instability may account for the diminished pathogenicity of C. dubliniensis. PMID:17719250

  14. Comparison of Switching and Biofilm Formation between MTL-Homozygous Strains of Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis.

    PubMed

    Pujol, Claude; Daniels, Karla J; Soll, David R

    2015-12-01

    Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis are highly related species that share the same main developmental programs. In C. albicans, it has been demonstrated that the biofilms formed by strains heterozygous and homozygous at the mating type locus (MTL) differ functionally, but studies rarely identify the MTL configuration. This becomes a particular problem in studies of C. dubliniensis, given that one-third of natural strains are MTL homozygous. For that reason, we have analyzed MTL-homozygous strains of C. dubliniensis for their capacity to switch from white to opaque, the stability of the opaque phenotype, CO2 induction of switching, pheromone induction of adhesion, the effects of minority opaque cells on biofilm thickness and dry weight, and biofilm architecture in comparison with C. albicans. Our results reveal that C. dubliniensis strains switch to opaque at lower average frequencies, exhibit a far lower level of opaque phase stability, are not stimulated to switch by high CO2, exhibit more variability in biofilm architecture, and most notably, form mature biofilms composed predominately of pseudohyphae rather than true hyphae. Therefore, while several traits of MTL-homozygous strains of C. dubliniensis appear to be degenerating or have been lost, others, most notably several related to biofilm formation, have been conserved. Within this context, the possibility is considered that C. dubliniensis is transitioning from a hypha-dominated to a pseudohypha-dominated biofilm and that aspects of C. dubliniensis colonization may provide insights into the selective pressures that are involved.

  15. Fluconazole Susceptibility and Genotypic Heterogeneity of Oral Candida albicans Colonies from the Patients with Cancer Receiving Chemotherapy in China

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jing; Qi, Cheng; Lafleur, Micheal D; Qi, Qing-guo

    2009-01-01

    Aim To identify heterogeneity of Candida albicans (C. albicans) isolated from the population with cancer in China by using identification medium, subculture molecular typing, and antifungal susceptibility test. Methodology Oral cheek mucosal specimens from 52 cancer patients receiving chemotherapy were cultured on CHROMagar CandidaTM plates for Candida identification. All the C. albicans colonies on the plates were subcultured and reconfirmed by API20C, then submitted to the antifungal drug susceptibility test with fluconazole and molecular typing using randomly amplified polymorphic DNA-PCR (RAPD) with primers RSD6 and RSD12. Results 54% (28/52) patients were oral yeast carriage in which C. albicans predominated. More than 7 C. albicans colonies were isolated from each of 12 patients (Group A), while less than 5 colonies were isolated from each of 16 patients (Group B). RSD6 and RSD12 were successful in eliciting 17 (A1-A17) and 2 (B1-B2) genotypes, respectively from among the 205 isolates. The two primers were combined to generate 21 genotypes. The C. albicans isolates obtained from the same patient and episode showed a diversity for fluconazole revealed by MIC50 and MIC90. Conclusion The heterogeneity of the C. albicans colonies isolated from the same patients can be detected. C. albicans with varied fluconazole susceptibility and genotypic characteristics may coexist in the same oral Candida population. PMID:20695081

  16. Inhibition of human natural killer (NK) cytotoxicity by Candida albicans

    SciTech Connect

    Zunino, S.; Hudig, D.

    1986-03-01

    Experiments were initiated to determine whether human NK cells are cytotoxic to C. albicans with similar activity observed for mouse NK cells against the yeast Paracoccidiodes brasiliensis. In 48 hour assays using limiting dilutions of C. albicans, strain 3153A, mononuclear leukocytes with NK activity had only marginal effects on yeast outgrowth, whereas granulocytes killed most of the yeast. However, these yeast were able to block NK activity in 4 hr /sup 51/Cr release assays with K562 cells, at yeast to K562 ratios of 10:1 and 100:1. Yeast pretreated with the serum of the majority of donors blocked the NK activity more than untreated yeast. Two of the 7 donors did not enhance NK inhibition after pretreatment of the yeast with their serum. Serum antibody to C. albicans and complement consumption by the yeast correlated with the relative efficiency of NK inhibition for most donors. This report suggests that there may be in vivo interactions between NK cells of the immune system and opportunistic fungal pathogens, which may compromise NK cell function.

  17. Potent Synergy between Spirocyclic Pyrrolidinoindolinones and Fluconazole against Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Premachandra, Ilandari Dewage Udara Anulal; Scott, Kevin A.; Shen, Chengtian; Wang, Fuqiang; Lane, Shelley; Liu, Haoping

    2015-01-01

    A spiroindolinone (1S,3R,3aR,6aS)-1-benzyl-6′-chloro-5-(4-fluorophenyl)-7′-methylspiro[1,2,3a,6a-tetrahydropyrrolo[3,4-c]pyrrole-3,3′-1H-indole]-2′,4,6-trione was previously reported to enhance the antifungal effect of fluconazole against C. albicans. A diastereomer of that compound was synthesized, along with various analogues. Many of the compounds were shown to enhance the antifungal effect of fluconazole against C. albicans, some with exquisite potency. One spirocyclic piperazine derivative, which we have named synazo-1, enhanced the effect of fluconazole with EC50 of 300 pM against a susceptible strain of C. albicans and as low as 2 nM against some resistant strains. Synazo-1 exhibits true synergy with fluconazole with an FIC index below 0.5 in the strains tested. Synazo-1 exhibited low toxicity in mammalian cells relative to the concentrations required for the antifungal synergy. PMID:26263912

  18. The effect of cinnamaldehyde on the growth and the morphology of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Yuuki; Hasumi, Yayoi; Abe, Shigeru; Nishiyama, Yayoi

    2013-03-01

    We examined the viability and morphology of Candida albicans under experimental conditions after treatment with varying concentrations of cinnamaldehyde, the major component of cassia (Cinnamomum cassia), using XTT assay, fluorescent microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and thin-section electron microscopy. At 10 μg/ml level, cinnamaldehyde inhibited mycelial growth, but did not affect the growth of yeast cells, metabolic activity, cell shape, or the ultrastructure of the cells. At 40 μg/ml level, cinnamaldehyde showed fungicidal activity accompanied by alteration of the membrane and interior of Candida cells. These findings indicate that cinnamaldehyde has both fungistatic and fungicidal activities against C. albicans and affects the structure of the cells.

  19. A Candida albicans CRISPR system permits genetic engineering of essential genes and gene families.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Valmik K; Barrasa, M Inmaculada; Fink, Gerald R

    Candida albicans is a pathogenic yeast that causes mucosal and systematic infections with high mortality. The absence of facile molecular genetics has been a major impediment to analysis of pathogenesis. The lack of meiosis coupled with the absence of plasmids makes genetic engineering cumbersome, especially for essential functions and gene families. We describe a C. albicans CRISPR system that overcomes many of the obstacles to genetic engineering in this organism. The high frequency with which CRISPR-induced mutations can be directed to target genes enables easy isolation of homozygous gene knockouts, even without selection. Moreover, the system permits the creation of strains with mutations in multiple genes, gene families, and genes that encode essential functions. This CRISPR system is also effective in a fresh clinical isolate of undetermined ploidy. Our method transforms the ability to manipulate the genome of Candida and provides a new window into the biology of this pathogen.

  20. Antifungal Activity of Bee Venom and Sweet Bee Venom against Clinically Isolated Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Bae

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate the antifungal effect of bee venom (BV) and sweet bee venom (SBV) against Candida albicans (C. albicans) clinical isolates. Methods: In this study, BV and SBV were examined for antifungal activities against the Korean Collection for Type Cultures (KCTC) strain and 10 clinical isolates of C. albicans. The disk diffusion method was used to measure the antifungal activity and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) assays were performed by using a broth microdilution method. Also, a killing curve assay was conducted to investigate the kinetics of the anti- fungal action. Results: BV and SBV showed antifungal activity against 10 clinical isolates of C. albicans that were cultured from blood and the vagina by using disk diffusion method. The MIC values obtained for clinical isolates by using the broth microdilution method varied from 62.5 μg/ mL to 125 μg/mL for BV and from 15.63 μg/mL to 62.5 μg/mL for SBV. In the killing-curve assay, SBV behaved as amphotericin B, which was used as positive control, did. The antifungal efficacy of SBV was much higher than that of BV. Conclusion: BV and SBV showed antifungal activity against C. albicans clinical strains that were isolated from blood and the vagina. Especially, SBV might be a candidate for a new antifungal agent against C. albicans clinical isolates. PMID:27280049

  1. Nerol triggers mitochondrial dysfunction and disruption via elevation of Ca(2+) and ROS in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jun; Lu, Zhaoqun; Wang, Yanzhen; Zhang, Man; Wang, Xueyan; Tang, Xudong; Peng, Xue; Zeng, Hong

    2017-02-14

    The antifungal activity of Nerol (NEL) against Candida albicans, a pathogenic fungus, has a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 4.4mM that causes noteworthy candidacidal activity through an apoptosis-like mechanism. Calcium (Ca(2+)) levels and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, which are the major causes of apoptosis, were determined in C. albicans cells treated with NEL and were found to increase, which related to mitochondrial dysfunction and disruption. A series of characteristic changes of apoptosis caused by NEL, including mitochondrial membrane depolarization, cytochrome c (cyt c) release, and metacaspase activation were examined using a flow cytometer and Western blot. The results showed that an increase in intracellular Ca(2+) and ROS led to dramatically decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP); cyt c was also released from the mitochondria to the cytosol. Other early apoptotic features were also observed with the metacaspase activation. Finally, the morphological changes of the cells were observed, including phosphatidylserine (PS) externalization, nuclear condensation, and DNA fragmentation through Annexin V-FITC and PI double staining, TUNEL assay, and DAPI staining. The results supported the hypothesis that NEL was involved in the apoptosis of C. albicans cells not only at the early stages, but also at the late stages. In summary, NEL can trigger mitochondrial dysfunction and disruption via elevation of Ca(2+) and ROS leading to apoptosis in C. albicans. This research on the mechanism of cell death triggered by NEL against C. albicans has important significance for providing a novel treatment of C. albicans infections.

  2. Adaptations of Candida albicans for growth in the mammalian intestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Rosenbach, Ari; Dignard, Daniel; Pierce, Jessica V; Whiteway, Malcolm; Kumamoto, Carol A

    2010-07-01

    Although the fungus Candida albicans is a commensal colonizer of humans, the organism is also an important opportunistic pathogen. Most infections caused by C. albicans arise from organisms that were previously colonizing the host as commensals, and therefore successful establishment of colonization is a prerequisite for pathogenicity. To elucidate fungal activities that promote colonization, an analysis of the transcription profile of C. albicans cells recovered from the intestinal tracts of mice was performed. The results showed that within the C. albicans colonizing population, cells expressed genes characteristic of the laboratory-grown exponential phase and genes characteristic of post-exponential-phase cells. Thus, gene expression both promoted the ability to grow rapidly (a characteristic of exponential-phase cells) and enhanced the ability to resist stresses (a characteristic of post-exponential-phase cells). Similarities in gene expression in commensal colonizing cells and cells invading host tissue during disease were found, showing that C. albicans cells adopt a particular cell surface when growing within a host in both situations. In addition, transcription factors Cph2p and Tec1p were shown to regulate C. albicans gene expression during intestinal colonization.

  3. The CUG codon is decoded in vivo as serine and not leucine in Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Santos, M A; Tuite, M F

    1995-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the yeast Candida albicans encodes a unique seryl-tRNA(CAG) that should decode the leucine codon CUG as serine. However, in vitro translation of several different CUG-containing mRNAs in the presence of this unusual seryl-tRNA(CAG) result in an apparent increase in the molecular weight of the encoded polypeptides as judged by SDS-PAGE even though the molecular weight of serine is lower than that of leucine. A possible explanation for this altered electrophoretic mobility is that the CUG codon is decoded as modified serine in vitro. To elucidate the nature of CUG decoding in vivo, a reporter system based on the C. albicans gene (RBP1) encoding rapamycin-binding protein (RBP), coupled to the promoter of the C. albicans TEF3 gene, was utilized. Sequencing and mass-spectrometry analysis of the recombinant RBP expressed in C. albicans demonstrated that the CUG codon was decoded exclusively as serine while the related CUU codon was translated as leucine. A database search revealed that 32 out of the 65 C. albicans gene sequences available have CUG codons in their open reading frames. The CUG-containing genes do not belong to any particular gene family. Thus the amino acid specified by the CUG codon has been reassigned within the mRNAs of C. albicans. We argue here that this unique genetic code change in cellular mRNAs cannot be explained by the 'Codon Reassignment Theory'. Images PMID:7784200

  4. Hyphal formation of Candida albicans is controlled by electron transfer system

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Toshihiko . E-mail: twatanab@tohoku-pharm.ac.jp; Ogasawara, Ayako; Mikami, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Tatsuji

    2006-09-15

    Most Candida albicans cells cultured in RPMI1640 medium at 37 deg. C grow in hyphal form in aerobic conditions, but they grow in yeast form in anaerobic conditions. The hyphal growth of C. albicans was inhibited in glucose-deficient conditions. Malonic acid, an inhibitor of succinate dehydrogenase, enhanced the yeast proliferation of C. albicans, indicating that the hyphal-formation signal was derived from the glycolysis system and the signal was transmitted to the electron transfer system via the citric acid cycle. Thenoyl trifluoro acetone (TTFA), an inhibitor of the signal transmission between complex II and Co Q, significantly inhibited the hyphal growth of C. albicans. Antimycin, KCN, and oligomycin, inhibitors of complex III, IV, and V, respectively, did not inhibit the hyphal growth of C. albicans. The production of mRNAs for the hyphal formation signal was completely inhibited in anaerobic conditions. These results indicate that the electron transfer system functions upstream of the RAS1 signal pathway and activates the expression of the hyphal formation signal. Since the electron transfer system is inactivated in anaerobic conditions, C. albicans grew in yeast form in this condition.

  5. Opportunistic pathogen Candida albicans elicits a temporal response in primary human mast cells.

    PubMed

    Lopes, José Pedro; Stylianou, Marios; Nilsson, Gunnar; Urban, Constantin F

    2015-07-20

    Immunosuppressed patients are frequently afflicted with severe mycoses caused by opportunistic fungal pathogens. Besides being a commensal, colonizing predominantly skin and mucosal surfaces, Candida albicans is the most common human fungal pathogen. Mast cells are present in tissues prone to fungal colonization being expectedly among the first immune cells to get into contact with C. albicans. However, mast cell-fungus interaction remains a neglected area of study. Here we show that human mast cells mounted specific responses towards C. albicans. Collectively, mast cell responses included the launch of initial, intermediate and late phase components determined by the secretion of granular proteins and cytokines. Initially mast cells reduced fungal viability and occasionally internalized yeasts. C. albicans could evade ingestion by intracellular growth leading to cellular death. Furthermore, secreted factors in the supernatants of infected cells recruited neutrophils, but not monocytes. Late stages were marked by the release of cytokines that are known to be anti-inflammatory suggesting a modulation of initial responses. C. albicans-infected mast cells formed extracellular DNA traps, which ensnared but did not kill the fungus. Our results suggest that mast cells serve as tissue sentinels modulating antifungal immune responses during C. albicans infection. Consequently, these findings open new doors for understanding fungal pathogenicity.

  6. Commensal Protection of Staphylococcus aureus against Antimicrobials by Candida albicans Biofilm Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Eric F.; Tsui, Christina; Kucharíková, Sona; Andes, David

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Biofilm-associated polymicrobial infections, particularly those involving fungi and bacteria, are responsible for significant morbidity and mortality and tend to be challenging to treat. Candida albicans and Staphylococcus aureus specifically are considered leading opportunistic fungal and bacterial pathogens, respectively, mainly due to their ability to form biofilms on catheters and indwelling medical devices. However, the impact of mixed-species biofilm growth on therapy remains largely understudied. In this study, we investigated the influence of C. albicans secreted cell wall polysaccharides on the response of S. aureus to antibacterial agents in biofilm. Results demonstrated significantly enhanced tolerance for S. aureus to drugs in the presence of C. albicans or its secreted cell wall polysaccharide material. Fluorescence confocal time-lapse microscopy revealed impairment of drug diffusion through the mixed biofilm matrix. Using C. albicans mutant strains with modulated cell wall polysaccharide expression, exogenous supplementation, and enzymatic degradation, the C. albicans-secreted β-1,3-glucan cell wall component was identified as the key matrix constituent providing the bacteria with enhanced drug tolerance. Further, antibody labeling demonstrated rapid coating of the bacteria by the C. albicans matrix material. Importantly, via its effect on the fungal biofilm matrix, the antifungal caspofungin sensitized the bacteria to the drugs. Understanding such symbiotic interactions with clinical relevance between microbial species in biofilms will greatly aid in overcoming the limitations of current therapies and in defining potential new targets for treating polymicrobial infections. PMID:27729510

  7. Candida albicans VPS1 contributes to protease secretion, filamentation, and biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Bernardo, Stella M; Khalique, Zachary; Kot, John; Jones, Jason K; Lee, Samuel A

    2008-06-01

    To investigate the pre-vacuolar secretory pathway in Candida albicans, we cloned and analyzed the C. albicans homolog of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae vacuolar protein sorting gene VPS1. C. albicans VPS1 encodes a predicted 694-aa dynamin-like GTPase that is 73.3% similar to S. cerevisiae Vps1p. Plasmids bearing C. albicans VPS1 complemented the temperature-sensitive growth, abnormal class F vacuolar morphology, and carboxypeptidase missorting of a S. cerevisiae vps1 null mutant. To study VPS1 function in C. albicans, a conditional mutant strain (tetR-VPS1) was generated by deleting the first allele of VPS1 and placing the second allele under control of a tetracycline-regulatable promoter. With doxycycline, the tetR-VPS1 mutant was hyper-susceptible to sub-inhibitory concentrations of fluconazole, but not amphotericin B, 5-fluorocytosine, or non-specific osmotic stresses. The repressed tetR-VPS1 mutant was defective in filamentation and secreted less extracellular protease activity. Biofilm production and filamentation within the biofilm were markedly reduced. These results suggest that C. albicans VPS1 has a key role in several important virulence-related phenotypes.

  8. Genomic identification of potential targets unique to Candida albicans for the discovery of antifungal agents.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Himanshu; Luqman, Suaib; Meena, Abha; Khan, Feroz

    2014-01-01

    Despite of modern antifungal therapy, the mortality rates of invasive infection with human fungal pathogen Candida albicans are up to 40%. Studies suggest that drug resistance in the three most common species of human fungal pathogens viz., C. albicans, Aspergillus fumigatus (causing mortality rate up to 90%) and Cryptococcus neoformans (causing mortality rate up to 70%) is due to mutations in the target enzymes or high expression of drug transporter genes. Drug resistance in human fungal pathogens has led to an imperative need for the identification of new targets unique to fungal pathogens. In the present study, we have used a comparative genomics approach to find out potential target proteins unique to C. albicans, an opportunistic fungus responsible for severe infection in immune-compromised human. Interestingly, many target proteins of existing antifungal agents showed orthologs in human cells. To identify unique proteins, we have compared proteome of C. albicans [SC5314] i.e., 14,633 total proteins retrieved from the RefSeq database of NCBI, USA with proteome of human and non-pathogenic yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Results showed that 4,568 proteins were identified unique to C. albicans as compared to those of human and later when these unique proteins were compared with S. cerevisiae proteome, finally 2,161 proteins were identified as unique proteins and after removing repeats total 1,618 unique proteins (42 functionally known, 1,566 hypothetical and 10 unknown) were selected as potential antifungal drug targets unique to C. albicans.

  9. Anaerobic bacteria grow within Candida albicans biofilms and induce biofilm formation in suspension cultures.

    PubMed

    Fox, Emily P; Cowley, Elise S; Nobile, Clarissa J; Hartooni, Nairi; Newman, Dianne K; Johnson, Alexander D

    2014-10-20

    The human microbiome contains diverse microorganisms, which share and compete for the same environmental niches. A major microbial growth form in the human body is the biofilm state, where tightly packed bacterial, archaeal, and fungal cells must cooperate and/or compete for resources in order to survive. We examined mixed biofilms composed of the major fungal species of the gut microbiome, Candida albicans, and each of five prevalent bacterial gastrointestinal inhabitants: Bacteroides fragilis, Clostridium perfringens, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Enterococcus faecalis. We observed that biofilms formed by C. albicans provide a hypoxic microenvironment that supports the growth of two anaerobic bacteria, even when cultured in ambient oxic conditions that are normally toxic to the bacteria. We also found that coculture with bacteria in biofilms induces massive gene expression changes in C. albicans, including upregulation of WOR1, which encodes a transcription regulator that controls a phenotypic switch in C. albicans, from the "white" cell type to the "opaque" cell type. Finally, we observed that in suspension cultures, C. perfringens induces aggregation of C. albicans into "mini-biofilms," which allow C. perfringens cells to survive in a normally toxic environment. This work indicates that bacteria and C. albicans interactions modulate the local chemistry of their environment in multiple ways to create niches favorable to their growth and survival.

  10. Candida albicans peritonitis in a patient with Felty’s syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, D W; Munuswamy, P; Adu-Poku, K; Holgate, C S; Hickling, P; Lambert, A; Prentice, A G

    2005-01-01

    A 53 year old man with Felty’s syndrome presented with abdominal pain and fever. He underwent a laparotomy after starting broad spectrum antibiotics. An intestinal biopsy showed skip ulcers with fungal hyphae. Peritoneal exudates grew Candida albicans. He was started on intravenous fluconazole and then switched to liposomal amphotericin to which he showed a good clinical response. After one month at home he was readmitted with candidosis and died of a myocardial infarction. PMID:15790714

  11. Candida albicans-Derived β-1,2-Linked Mannooligosaccharides Induce Desensitization of Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Jouault, Thierry; Fradin, Chantal; Trinel, Pierre-André; Poulain, Daniel

    2000-01-01

    Candida albicans β-1,2-oligomannosides stimulate macrophage tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) but not NO release. This stimulation desensitized macrophages by altering β-1,2-oligomannoside-dependent TNF-α production and lipopolysaccharide-dependent TNF-α and NO secretion. Desensitization was not related to tyrosine phosphorylation signal transduction but was transferred by culture supernatants in which arachidonic acid derivatives were evidenced. PMID:10639473

  12. Isolation of a gene encoding a putative polyamine transporter from Candida albicans, GPT1.

    PubMed

    McNemar, M D; Gorman, J A; Buckley, H R

    2001-04-01

    A gene encoding a transport protein from the pathogenic yeast, Candida albicans, has been isolated during a complementation experiment utilizing an ornithine decarboxylase-negative (spe1 Delta) strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This gene restores gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transport to a GABA transport-negative mutant of S. cerevisiae and encodes a protein which putatively allows transport of one or more of the polyamines. We have assigned the name GPT1 (GABA/polyamine transporter) to this gene.

  13. Effect of Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol on mouse resistance to systemic Candida albicans infection.

    PubMed

    Blumstein, Gideon W; Parsa, Arya; Park, Anthony K; McDowell, Beverly L P; Arroyo-Mendoza, Melissa; Girguis, Marie; Adler-Moore, Jill P; Olson, Jon; Buckley, Nancy E

    2014-01-01

    Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC), the psychoactive component of marijuana, is known to suppress the immune responses to bacterial, viral and protozoan infections, but its effects on fungal infections have not been studied. Therefore, we investigated the effects of chronic Δ9-THC treatment on mouse resistance to systemic Candida albicans (C. albicans) infection. To determine the outcome of chronic Δ9-THC treatment on primary, acute systemic candidiasis, c57BL/6 mice were given vehicle or Δ9-THC (16 mg/kg) in vehicle on days 1-4, 8-11 and 15-18. On day 19, mice were infected with 5×10(5) C. albicans. We also determined the effect of chronic Δ9-THC (4-64 mg/kg) treatment on mice infected with a non-lethal dose of 7.5×10(4) C. albicans on day 2, followed by a higher challenge with 5×10(5) C. albicans on day 19. Mouse resistance to the infection was assessed by survival and tissue fungal load. Serum cytokine levels were determine to evaluate the immune responses. In the acute infection, chronic Δ9-THC treatment had no effect on mouse survival or tissue fungal load when compared to vehicle treated mice. However, Δ9-THC significantly suppressed IL-12p70 and IL-12p40 as well as marginally suppressed IL-17 versus vehicle treated mice. In comparison, when mice were given a secondary yeast infection, Δ9-THC significantly decreased survival, increased tissue fungal burden and suppressed serum IFN-γ and IL-12p40 levels compared to vehicle treated mice. The data showed that chronic Δ9-THC treatment decreased the efficacy of the memory immune response to candida infection, which correlated with a decrease in IFN-γ that was only observed after the secondary candida challenge.

  14. Manipulation of Host Diet To Reduce Gastrointestinal Colonization by the Opportunistic Pathogen Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Tornberg-Belanger, Stephanie N.; Matthan, Nirupa R.; Lichtenstein, Alice H.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Candida albicans, the most common human fungal pathogen, can cause systemic infections with a mortality rate of ~40%. Infections arise from colonization of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, where C. albicans is part of the normal microflora. Reducing colonization in at-risk patients using antifungal drugs prevents C. albicans-associated mortalities. C. albicans provides a clinically relevant system for studying the relationship between diet and the microbiota as it relates to commensalism and pathogenicity. As a first step toward a dietary intervention to reduce C. albicans GI colonization, we investigated the impact of dietary lipids on murine colonization by C. albicans. Coconut oil and its constituent fatty acids have antifungal activity in vitro; we hypothesized that dietary coconut oil would reduce GI colonization by C. albicans. Colonization was lower in mice fed a coconut oil-rich diet than in mice fed diets rich in beef tallow or soybean oil. Switching beef tallow-fed mice to a coconut oil diet reduced preexisting colonization. Coconut oil reduced colonization even when the diet also contained beef tallow. Dietary coconut oil also altered the metabolic program of colonizing C. albicans cells. Long-chain fatty acids were less abundant in the cecal contents of coconut oil-fed mice than in the cecal contents of beef tallow-fed mice; the expression of genes involved in fatty acid utilization was lower in C. albicans from coconut oil-fed mice than in C. albicans from beef tallow-fed mice. Extrapolating to humans, these findings suggest that coconut oil could become the first dietary intervention to reduce C. albicans GI colonization. IMPORTANCE Candida albicans, the most common human fungal pathogen, can cause infections with a mortality rate of ~40%. C. albicans is part of the normal gut flora, but when a patient’s immune system is compromised, it can leave the gut and cause infections. By reducing the amount of C. albicans in the gut of

  15. Manipulation of Host Diet To Reduce Gastrointestinal Colonization by the Opportunistic Pathogen Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Gunsalus, Kearney T W; Tornberg-Belanger, Stephanie N; Matthan, Nirupa R; Lichtenstein, Alice H; Kumamoto, Carol A

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans, the most common human fungal pathogen, can cause systemic infections with a mortality rate of ~40%. Infections arise from colonization of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, where C. albicans is part of the normal microflora. Reducing colonization in at-risk patients using antifungal drugs prevents C. albicans-associated mortalities. C. albicans provides a clinically relevant system for studying the relationship between diet and the microbiota as it relates to commensalism and pathogenicity. As a first step toward a dietary intervention to reduce C. albicans GI colonization, we investigated the impact of dietary lipids on murine colonization by C. albicans. Coconut oil and its constituent fatty acids have antifungal activity in vitro; we hypothesized that dietary coconut oil would reduce GI colonization by C. albicans. Colonization was lower in mice fed a coconut oil-rich diet than in mice fed diets rich in beef tallow or soybean oil. Switching beef tallow-fed mice to a coconut oil diet reduced preexisting colonization. Coconut oil reduced colonization even when the diet also contained beef tallow. Dietary coconut oil also altered the metabolic program of colonizing C. albicans cells. Long-chain fatty acids were less abundant in the cecal contents of coconut oil-fed mice than in the cecal contents of beef tallow-fed mice; the expression of genes involved in fatty acid utilization was lower in C. albicans from coconut oil-fed mice than in C. albicans from beef tallow-fed mice. Extrapolating to humans, these findings suggest that coconut oil could become the first dietary intervention to reduce C. albicans GI colonization. IMPORTANCE Candida albicans, the most common human fungal pathogen, can cause infections with a mortality rate of ~40%. C. albicans is part of the normal gut flora, but when a patient's immune system is compromised, it can leave the gut and cause infections. By reducing the amount of C. albicans in the gut of susceptible

  16. Investigation of an unrecognized large-scale outbreak of Candida parapsilosis sensu stricto fungaemia in a tertiary-care hospital in China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, He; Zhang, Li; Kudinha, Timothy; Kong, Fanrong; Ma, Xiao-Jun; Chu, Yun-Zhuo; Kang, Mei; Sun, Zi-Yong; Li, Ruo-Yu; Liao, Kang; Lu, Juan; Zou, Gui-Ling; Xiao, Meng; Fan, Xin; Xu, Ying-Chun

    2016-01-01

    A data analysis of yeast collections from the National China Hospital Invasive Fungal Surveillance Net (CHIF-NET) programme in 2013 revealed a sudden increase in the proportion of Candida parapsilosis complex isolates (n = 98) in one participating hospital (Hospital H). Out of 443 yeast isolates submitted to the CHIF-NET reference laboratory by Hospital H (2010–2014), 212 (47.9%) were identified as C. parapsilosis sensu stricto by sequencing analysis of the internal transcribed spacer region and D1/D2 domain of the 26S rRNA gene. Among the 212 C. parapsilosis sensu stricto isolates, 176 (83.0%) bloodstream-based isolates and 25 isolates from tip cultures of various vascular catheters from 25 patients with candidaemia, were subjected to microsatellite genotyping, and a phylogenetic relationship analysis was performed for 152 isolates. Among the 152 isolates, 45 genotypes (T01 to T45) were identified, and two prevalent genotypes (63.8%) were found: T15 (n = 74, 48.7%) and T16 (n = 23, 15.1%). These two main clones were confined mainly to three different wards of the hospital, and they persisted for 16–25 months and 12–13 months, respectively. The lack of proper coordination between the clinical microbiology laboratory and infection control staff as part of public health control resulted in the failure to timely identify an outbreak, which led to the wide and long-term dissemination of C. parapsilosis sensu stricto in Hospital H. PMID:27251023

  17. A genetic code alteration generates a proteome of high diversity in the human pathogen Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Ana C; Miranda, Isabel; Silva, Raquel M; Moura, Gabriela R; Thomas, Benjamin; Akoulitchev, Alexandre; Santos, Manuel AS

    2007-01-01

    Background Genetic code alterations have been reported in mitochondrial, prokaryotic, and eukaryotic cytoplasmic translation systems, but their evolution and how organisms cope and survive such dramatic genetic events are not understood. Results Here we used an unusual decoding of leucine CUG codons as serine in the main human fungal pathogen Candida albicans to elucidate the global impact of genetic code alterations on the proteome. We show that C. albicans decodes CUG codons ambiguously and tolerates partial reversion of their identity from serine back to leucine on a genome-wide scale. Conclusion Such codon ambiguity expands the proteome of this human pathogen exponentially and is used to generate important phenotypic diversity. This study highlights novel features of C. albicans biology and unanticipated roles for codon ambiguity in the evolution of the genetic code. PMID:17916231

  18. In vitro antifungal and antibiofilm activities of halogenated quinoline analogues against Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Ran; Garrison, Aaron T; Basak, Akash; Zhang, Peilan; Huigens, Robert W; Ding, Yousong

    2016-08-01

    With the increasing prevalence of fungal infections coupled with emerging drug resistance, there is an urgent need for new and effective antifungal agents. Here we report the antifungal activities of 19 diverse halogenated quinoline (HQ) small molecules against Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans. Four HQ analogues inhibited C. albicans growth with a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 100 nM, whilst 16 analogues effectively inhibited C. neoformans at MICs of 50-780 nM. Remarkably, two HQ analogues eradicated mature C. albicans and C. neoformans biofilms [minimum biofilm eradication concentration (MBEC) = 6.25-62.5 µM]. Several active HQs were found to penetrate into fungal cells, whilst one inactive analogue was unable to, suggesting that HQs elicit their antifungal activities through an intracellular mode of action. HQs are a promising class of small molecules that may be useful in future antifungal treatments.

  19. Artemisinins, New Miconazole Potentiators Resulting in Increased Activity against Candida albicans Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    De Cremer, Kaat; Lanckacker, Ellen; Cools, Tanne L.; Bax, Marijke; De Brucker, Katrijn; Cos, Paul; Thevissen, Karin

    2014-01-01

    Mucosal biofilm-related fungal infections are very common, and the incidence of recurrent oral and vulvovaginal candidiasis is significant. As resistance to azoles (the preferred treatment) is occurring, we aimed at identifying compounds that increase the activity of miconazole against Candida albicans biofilms. We screened 1,600 compounds of a drug-repositioning library in combination with a subinhibitory concentration of miconazole. Synergy between the best identified potentiators and miconazole was characterized by checkerboard analyses and fractional inhibitory concentration indices. Hexachlorophene, pyrvinium pamoate, and artesunate act synergistically with miconazole in affecting C. albicans biofilms. Synergy was most pronounced for artesunate and structural homologues thereof. No synergistic effect could be observed between artesunate and fluconazole, caspofungin, or amphotericin B. Our data reveal enhancement of the antibiofilm activity of miconazole by artesunate, pointing to potential combination therapy consisting of miconazole and artesunate to treat C. albicans biofilm-related infections. PMID:25367916

  20. Dectin-1 mediates in vitro phagocytosis of Candida albicans yeast cells by retinal microglia.

    PubMed

    Maneu, Victoria; Yáñez, Alberto; Murciano, Celia; Molina, Andrés; Gil, María Luisa; Gozalbo, Daniel

    2011-10-01

    We have investigated the expression of TLR2 and Dectin-1 in retinal microglia and their involvement in Candida albicans phagocytosis using a cytometric approach. The expression of both receptors has been demonstrated in CD11b(+) retinal cells. Phagocytosis of pHrodo-labelled C. albicans yeasts by microglial CD11b(+) cells of C57BL/6 mice was inhibited both by the Dectin-1 antagonist laminarin and anti-Dectin-1 antibodies, whereas phagocytosis of yeasts by retinal microglia of TLR2 KO mice was unaffected. These data indicate that phagocytosis of C. albicans yeasts by retinal microglia is mediated by Dectin-1, whereas TLR2 does not play a significant role in this process.

  1. The structure and retrotransposition mechanism of LTR-retrotransposons in the asexual yeast Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lulu; Yan, Lan; Jiang, Jingchen; Wang, Yan; Jiang, Yuanying; Yan, Tianhua; Cao, Yongbing

    2014-08-15

    Retrotransposons constitute a major part of the genome in a number of eukaryotes. Long-terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons are one type of the retrotransposons. Candida albicans have 34 distinct LTR-retrotransposon families. They respectively belong to the Ty1/copia and Ty3/gypsy groups which have been extensively studied in the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. LTR-retrotransposons carry two LTRs flanking a long internal protein-coding domain, open reading frames. LTR-retrotransposons use RNA as intermediate to synthesize double-stranded DNA copies. In this article, we describe the structure feature, retrotransposition mechanism and the influence on organism diversity of LTR retrotransposons in C. albicans. We also discuss the relationship between pathogenicity and LTR retrotransposons in C. albicans.

  2. Modulation of Candida albicans attachment to human epithelial cells by bacteria and carbohydrates.

    PubMed Central

    Centeno, A; Davis, C P; Cohen, M S; Warren, M M

    1983-01-01

    The effects of carbohydrates (mannose and dextrose). Escherichia coli 07KL. and Klebsiella pneumoniae on Candida albicans attachment to epithelial cells was studied. Dextrose had no effect on yeast attachment to epithelial cells. Conversely, mannose significantly decreased both yeast and piliated bacterial attachment (E. coli 07KL, heavily piliated K. pneumoniae) whereas having no effect on nonpiliated K. pneumoniae attachment to epithelial cells. The number of yeasts attaching to epithelial cells was enhanced by preincubation of epithelial cells with piliated strains of bacteria, whereas preincubation with nonpiliated strains of bacteria had no effect on yeast attachment. Scanning electron microscopy showed that piliated bacteria and yeasts were juxtaposed on the epithelial cell surface. These data suggest that certain piliated strains of bacteria can enhance C. albicans attachment to epithelial cells and that type 1 pili of bacteria can be a factor in the enhanced attachment of C. albicans to epithelial cells. Images PMID:6132878

  3. A sticky situation: untangling the transcriptional network controlling biofilm development in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Fox, Emily P; Nobile, Clarissa J

    2012-01-01

    Candida albicans is a commensal microorganism of the human microbiome; it is also the most prevalent fungal pathogen of humans. Many infections caused by C. albicans are a direct consequence of its proclivity to form biofilms--resilient, surface-associated communities of cells where individual cells acquire specialized properties that are distinct from those observed in suspension cultures. We recently identified the transcriptional network that orchestrates the formation of biofilms in C. albicans. These results set the stage for understanding how biofilms are formed and, once formed, how the specialized properties of biofilms are elaborated. This information will provide new insight for understanding biofilms in more detail and may lead to improvements in preventing and treating biofilm-based infections in the future.

  4. In vitro effects of Salvia officinalis L. essential oil on Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Sookto, Tularat; Srithavaj, Theerathavaj; Thaweboon, Sroisiri; Thaweboon, Boonyanit; Shrestha, Binit

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the anticandidal activities of Salvia officinalis L. (S. officinalis) essential oil against Candida albicans (C. albicans) and the inhibitory effects on the adhesion of C. albicans to polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) resin surface. Methods Disc diffusion method was first used to test the anticandidal activities of the S. officinalis L. essential oil against the reference strain (ATCC 90028) and 2 clinical strains of C. albicans. Then the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal lethal concentration (MLC) were determined by modified membrane method. The adhesion of C. albicans to PMMA resin surface was assessed after immersion with S. officinalis L. essential oil at various concentrations of 1×MIC, 0.5×MIC and 0.25×MIC at room temperature for 30 min. One-way ANOVA was used to compare the Candida cell adhesion with the pretreatment agents and Tukey's test was used for multiple comparisons. Results S. officinalis L. essential oil exhibited anticandidal activity against all strains of C. albicans with inhibition zone ranging from 40.5 mm to 19.5 mm. The MIC and MLC of the oil were determined as 2.780 g/L against all test strains. According to the effects on C. albicans adhesion to PMMA resin surface, it was found that immersion in the essential oil at concentrations of 1×MIC (2.780 g/L), 0.5×MIC (1.390 g/L) and 0.25×MIC (0.695 g/L) for 30 min significantly reduced the adhesion of all 3 test strains to PMMA resin surface in a dose dependent manner (P<0.05). Conclusions S. officinalis L. essential oil exhibited anticandidal activities against C. albicans and had inhibitory effects on the adhesion of the cells to PMMA resin surface. With further testing and development, S. officinalis essential oil may be used as an antifungal denture cleanser to prevent candidal adhesion and thus reduce the risk of candida-associated denture stomatitis. PMID:23646301

  5. Flexible camphor diamond-like carbon coating on polyurethane to prevent Candida albicans biofilm growth.

    PubMed

    Santos, Thaisa B; Vieira, Angela A; Paula, Luciana O; Santos, Everton D; Radi, Polyana A; Khouri, Sônia; Maciel, Homero S; Pessoa, Rodrigo S; Vieira, Lucia

    2017-04-01

    Camphor was incorporated in diamond-like carbon (DLC) films to prevent the Candida albicans yeasts fouling on polyurethane substrates, which is a material commonly used for catheter manufacturing. The camphor:DLC and DLC film for this investigation was produced by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD), using an apparatus based on the flash evaporation of organic liquid (hexane) containing diluted camphor for camphor:DLC and hexane/methane, mixture for DLC films. The film was deposited at a low temperature of less than 25°C. We obtained very adherent camphor:DLC and DLC films that accompanied the substrate flexibility without delamination. The adherence of camphor:DLC and DLC films on polyurethane segments were evaluated by scratching test and bending polyurethane segments at 180°. The polyurethane samples, with and without camphor:DLC and DLC films were characterized by Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and optical profilometry. Candida albicans biofilm formation on polyurethane, with and without camphor:DLC and DLC, was assessed. The camphor:DLC and DLC films reduced the biofilm growth by 99.0% and 91.0% of Candida albicans, respectively, compared to bare polyurethane. These results open the doors to studies of functionalized DLC coatings with biofilm inhibition properties used in the production of catheters or other biomedical applications.

  6. Analysis of the relationship between fluconazole consumption and non-C. albicans Candida infections.

    PubMed

    Tyczkowska-Sieron, E; Gaszynski, W; Tyczkowski, J; Glowacka, A

    2014-10-01

    The effect of fluconazole consumption on the incidence of nosocomial non-C. albicans Candida infections remains unclear. In this study we investigated such a relationship in an intensive care unit (Poland) over an 11-year period (2002-2012). Statistics relating to the number of candidiasis cases and the number of defined daily doses of fluconazole showed that only a very weak and not statistically significant linear correlation existed between these two variables (r(2) = 0.36, P = 0.052). However, the assumption of a 1-year delay in the infection response to changes in fluconazole concentrations resulted in a strong and statistically significant linear correlation (r(2) = 0.64, P = 0.0053). To more accurately determine the nature of this relationship, a simple epidemiological model was proposed that provided a better than linear correlation (r(2) = 0.78, P = 0.00077). We successfully used this approach to analyze results from the literature that were interpreted as evidence that fluconazole use is not a risk factor for development of non-C. albicans Candida infections. If a time delay in the infection response was assumed, a strong and statistically significant correlation was obtained. These findings suggest the need for a closer look at fluconazole therapy as a possible risk factor for development of non-C. albicans Candida infections.

  7. DLH1 is a functional Candida albicans homologue of the meiosis-specific gene DMC1

    SciTech Connect

    Diener, A.C.; Fink, G.R.

    1996-06-01

    DMC1/LIM15 homologue 1 (DLH1), a gene related to meiosis-specific genes, has been isolated from Candida albicans, a fungus thought not to undergo meiosis. The deduced protein sequence of DLH1 contains 74% amino acid identity with Dmc1p from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and 63% with Lim15p from the plant Lilium longiflorum, meiosis-specific homologous of Escherichia coli RecA. Candida DLH1 complements a dmc1/dmc1 null mutant in S. cerevisiae. High copy expression of DLH1 restores both sporulation and meiotic recombination to a Saccharomyces dmc1/{Delta}/dmc1{Delta} strain. Unlike the DMC1 gene, which is transcribed only in meiotic cells, the heterologous Candida DLH1 gene is transcribed in both vegetative and meiotic cells of S. cerevisiae. Transcription of DLH1 is not detected or induced in C. albicans under conditions that induce DMC1 and meiosis in S. cerevisiae. The presence of an intact homologue of a meiosis-specific gene in C. albicans raises the possibility that this organism has a cryptic meiotic pathway. 25 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Application of benzo[a]phenoxazinium chlorides in Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy of Candida albicans biofilms.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Marisa; Alves, Carlos Tiago; Rama Raju, B; Gonçalves, M Sameiro T; Coutinho, Paulo J G; Henriques, Mariana; Belo, Isabel

    2014-12-01

    The use of Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy (APDT) as a new approach to treat localized Candida infections is an emerging and promising field nowadays. The aim of this study was to verify the efficacy of photodynamic therapy using two new benzo[a]phenoxazinium photosensitizers against Candida albicans biofilms: N-(5-(3-hydroxypropylamino)-10-methyl-9H-benzo[a]phenoxazin-9-ylidene)ethanaminium chloride (FSc) and N-(5-(11-hydroxyundecylamino)-10-methyl-9H-benzo[a]phenoxazin-9-ylidene)ethanaminium chloride (FSd). The photodynamic activity of dyes against C. albicans biofilms was evaluated by incubating biofilms with dyes in the range of 100-300 μM for 3 or 18 h followed by illumination at 12 or 36 J cm(-2), using a xenon arc lamp (600 ± 2 nm). A total photoinactivation of C. albicans biofilm cells was achieved using 300 μM of FSc with 18 h of incubation, followed by illumination at 36 J cm(-2). Contrarily, FSd had insignificant effect on biofilms inactivation by APDT. The higher uptake of FSc than FSd dye by biofilms during the dark incubation may explain the greater photodynamic effectiveness achieved with FSc. The results obtained stresses out the FSc-mediated APDT potential use to treat C. albicans infections.

  9. Biofilm formation and Candida albicans morphology on the surface of denture base materials.

    PubMed

    Susewind, Sabine; Lang, Reinhold; Hahnel, Sebastian

    2015-12-01

    Fungal biofilms may contribute to the occurrence of denture stomatitis. The objective of the study was to investigate the biofilm formation and morphology of Candida albicans in biofilms on the surface of denture base materials. Specimens were prepared from different denture base materials. After determination of surface properties and salivary pellicle formation, mono- and multispecies biofilm formation including Candida albicans ATCC 10231 was initiated. Relative amounts of adherent cells were determined after 20, 44, 68 and 188 h; C. albicans morphology was analysed employing selective fluorescence microscopic analysis. Significant differences were identified in the relative amount of cells adherent to the denture base materials. Highest blastospore/hyphae index suggesting an increased percentage of hyphae was observed in mono- and multispecies biofilms on the soft denture liner, which did not necessarily respond to the highest relative amount of adherent cells. For both biofilm models, lowest relative amount of adherent cells was identified on the methacrylate-based denture base material, which did not necessarily relate to a significantly lower blastospore/hyphae index. The results indicate that there are significant differences in both biofilm formation as well as the morphology of C. albicans cells in biofilms on the surface of different denture base materials.

  10. Application of surface plasmon resonance biosensor for the detection of Candida albicans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yodmongkol, Sirasa; Thaweboon, Sroisiri; Thaweboon, Boonyanit; Puttharugsa, Chokchai; Sutapun, Boonsong; Amarit, Ratthasart; Somboonkaew, Armote; Srikhirin, Toemsak

    2016-02-01

    In this study, surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPR imaging) was developed for the detection of Candida albicans which is a causal agent of oral infection. The detection was based on the sandwich assay. The capture antibody was covalently immobilized on the mixed self assemble monolayers (SAMs). The ratio of mixed SAMs between 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid and 3-mercaptopropanol was varied to find the optimal ratio for use as a sensor surface. The results showed that the suitable surface for C. albicans detection was SAM of carboxylic (mixed SAMs 1:0), even though mixed SAMs 1:40 had a high detection signal in comparison to mixed SAMs 1:0, but the non-specific signal was higher. The detection limit was 107 cells/ml for direct detection, and was increased to 106 cells/ml with sandwich antibody. The use of polyclonal C. albicans antibody as capture and sandwich antibody showed good selectivity against the relevant oral bacteria including Escherichia coli, Streptococcus mutan, Staphylococcus aureus, β-streptococci, and Lactobacillus casei. SPR platform in this study could detect C. albicans from the mixed microbial suspension without requirement of skillful technician. This SPR imaging biosensor could be applied for Candida identification after cultivation.

  11. Nanoscopic cell-wall architecture of an immunogenic ligand in Candida albicans during antifungal drug treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jia; Wester, Michael J.; Graus, Matthew S.; Lidke, Keith A.; Neumann, Aaron K.

    2016-01-01

    The cell wall of Candida albicans is composed largely of polysaccharides. Here we focus on β-glucan, an immunogenic cell-wall polysaccharide whose surface exposure is often restricted, or “masked,” from immune recognition by Dectin-1 on dendritic cells (DCs) and other innate immune cells. Previous research suggested that the physical presentation geometry of β-glucan might determine whether it can be recognized by Dectin-1. We used direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy to explore the fine structure of β-glucan exposed on C. albicans cell walls before and after treatment with the antimycotic drug caspofungin, which alters glucan exposure. Most surface-accessible glucan on C. albicans yeast and hyphae is limited to isolated Dectin-1–binding sites. Caspofungin-induced unmasking caused approximately fourfold to sevenfold increase in total glucan exposure, accompanied by increased phagocytosis efficiency of DCs for unmasked yeasts. Nanoscopic imaging of caspofungin-unmasked C. albicans cell walls revealed that the increase in glucan exposure is due to increased density of glucan exposures and increased multiglucan exposure sizes. These findings reveal that glucan exhibits significant nanostructure, which is a previously unknown physical component of the host–Candida interaction that might change during antifungal chemotherapy and affect innate immune activation. PMID:26792838

  12. The effect of thyme and tea tree oils on morphology and metabolism of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Rajkowska, Katarzyna; Kunicka-Styczyńska, Alina; Maroszyńska, Marta; Dąbrowska, Mariola

    2014-01-01

    Members of Candida species cause significant problems in medicine and in many industrial branches also. In order to prevent from Candida sp. development, essential oils are more and more frequently applied as natural, non-toxic, non-pollutive and biodegradable agents with a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity. The aim of the research was to determine changes in morphology and metabolic properties of Candida albicans in the presence of thyme and tea tree oils. Changes of enzymatic activity of isolates were observed in the presence of both tested essential oils, and they were primarily associated with loss or decrease of activity of all enzymes detected for control. Furthermore, only for 3 out of 11 isolates additional activity of N-acetyl-β-glucosaminidase, α-mannosidase, α-fucosidase and trypsin was detected. Vivid changes in biochemical profiles were found after treatment with tea tree oil and they were related to loss of ability to assimilate D-xylose, D-sorbitol and D-trehalose. The main differences in morphology of isolates compared to the control strain concerned formation of pseudohyphae structures. Both examined essential oils caused changes in cell and colony morphology, as well as in the metabolism of Candida albicans. However, the extent of differences depends on the type and concentration of an essential oil. The most important finding is the broad spectrum of changes in yeast enzymatic profiles induced by thyme and tea tree oils. It can be supposed that these changes, together with loss of ability to assimilate saccharides could significantly impact Candida albicans pathogenicity.

  13. O-Mannosylation in Candida albicans Enables Development of Interkingdom Biofilm Communities

    PubMed Central

    Dutton, Lindsay C.; Nobbs, Angela H.; Jepson, Katy; Jepson, Mark A.; Vickerman, M. Margaret; Aqeel Alawfi, Sami; Munro, Carol A.; Lamont, Richard J.; Jenkinson, Howard F.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Candida albicans is a fungus that colonizes oral cavity surfaces, the gut, and the genital tract. Streptococcus gordonii is a ubiquitous oral bacterium that has been shown to form biofilm communities with C. albicans. Formation of dual-species S. gordonii-C. albicans biofilm communities involves interaction of the S. gordonii SspB protein with the Als3 protein on the hyphal filament surface of C. albicans. Mannoproteins comprise a major component of the C. albicans cell wall, and in this study we sought to determine if mannosylation in cell wall biogenesis of C. albicans was necessary for hyphal adhesin functions associated with interkingdom biofilm development. A C. albicans mnt1Δ mnt2Δ mutant, with deleted α-1,2-mannosyltransferase genes and thus defective in O-mannosylation, was abrogated in biofilm formation under various growth conditions and produced hyphal filaments that were not recognized by S. gordonii. Cell wall proteomes of hypha-forming mnt1Δ mnt2Δ mutant cells showed growth medium-dependent alterations, compared to findings for the wild type, in a range of protein components, including Als1, Als3, Rbt1, Scw1, and Sap9. Hyphal filaments formed by mnt1Δ mnt2Δ mutant cells, unlike wild-type hyphae, did not interact with C. albicans Als3 or Hwp1 partner cell wall proteins or with S. gordonii SspB partner adhesin, suggesting defective functionality of adhesins on the mnt1Δ mnt2Δ mutant. These observations imply that early stage O-mannosylation is critical for activation of hyphal adhesin functions required for biofilm formation, recognition by bacteria such as S. gordonii, and microbial community development. PMID:24736223

  14. Adding Biotin to Parenteral Nutrition Solutions Without Lipid Accelerates the Growth of Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Kuwahara, Takashi; Kaneda, Shinya; Shimono, Kazuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Background: We have previously demonstrated that Candida albicans requires multivitamins (MVs) or lipid to increase rapidly in parenteral nutrition (PN) solutions. In this study, in detail, the effects of vitamins on the growth of C. albicans in PN solutions without lipid were investigated. Methods: In the 1st experiment, a commercial PN solution without lipid was supplemented with water-soluble vitamins (SVs: vitamins B1, B2, B6, B12 and C, folic acid, nicotinamide, biotin and panthenol), water-insoluble vitamins (IVs: vitamins A, D, E and K) or both (MVs). In the 2nd experiment, the test solutions were prepared by supplementing the PN solution with one of each or all of the SVs. In the 3rd experiment, another commercial peripheral PN (PPN) solution without lipid was supplemented with SVs, nicotinic acid, biotin or both nicotinic acid and biotin. In each of the experiments, a specified number of C. albicans organisms was added to each test solution, and all of the test solutions were allowed to stand at room temperature (23-26ºC). The number of C. albicans was counted at 0, 24, 48 and 72 hours after the addition of the organism. Results: In the 1st experiment, the C. albicans increased rapidly in the PN solution supplemented with the SVs, but increased slowly without the SVs, regardless of the addition of the IVs. In the 2nd experiment, the C. albicans increased rapidly in the PN solution supplemented with the SVs or biotin, but increased slowly with each of the other water-soluble vitamins. In the 3rd experiment, the C. albicans increased rapidly in the PPN solution supplemented with the SVs or biotin, but increased slowly with the addition of nicotinic acid. Conclusions: These results suggested that adding MVs or SVs to PN solutions without lipid promotes the growth of C. albicans, and that this effect is mostly attributable to biotin. PMID:27648003

  15. Characterization of DNA topoisomerase I from Candida albicans as a target for drug discovery.

    PubMed Central

    Fostel, J M; Montgomery, D A; Shen, L L

    1992-01-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic pathogen responsible for life-threatening infections in persons with impaired immune systems. Topoisomerase I is a potential target for novel antifungal agents; however, in order for this enzyme to be a therapeutically useful target, it needs to be demonstrated that the fungal and human topoisomerases differ sufficiently as to allow the fungal topoisomerase to be selectively targeted. To address this question, we isolated the topoisomerase I from C. albicans and compared its biochemical properties with those of the mammalian enzyme. Similar to other eukaryotic type I topoisomerases, the C. albicans type I topoisomerase has an apparent molecular mass of 102 kDa and covalently links to the 3' end of DNA, as shown after the reaction is interrupted by sodium dodecyl sulfate. Topoisomerase poisons such as camptothecin act by stabilizing the cleavage complex formed by the topoisomerase I and DNA. We observed that the C. albicans and mammalian type I topoisomerases differ in that the C. albicans cleavage complex is approximately 10-fold less sensitive to camptothecin than the mammalian cleavage complex is. In addition, we found that the antifungal agent eupolauridine can stabilize the cleavage complex formed by both the C. albicans and human topoisomerases and that the response of the C. albicans topoisomerase I to this drug is greater than that of the human enzyme. Thus, the topoisomerase I from C. albicans is sufficiently distinct from the human enzyme as to allow differential chemical targeting and will therefore make a good target for antifungal drug discovery. Images PMID:1332588

  16. Sensitization of Candida albicans biofilms to fluconazole by terpenoids of plant origin.

    PubMed

    Doke, Sonali Kashinath; Raut, Jayant Shankar; Dhawale, Shashikant; Karuppayil, Sankunny Mohan

    2014-01-01

    Infections associated with the biofilms of Candida albicans are a challenge to antifungal treatment. Combinatorial therapy involving plant molecules with antifungal drugs would be an effective complementary approach against drug-resistant Candida biofilms. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of three bioactive terpenoids (carvacrol, eugenol and thymol) in combination with fluconazole against planktonic cells, biofilm development and mature biofilms of C. albicans. Activities of the selected molecules were tested using a microplate-based methodology, while their combinations with fluconazole were performed in a checkerboard format. Biofilms were quantitated by XTT-metabolic assay and confirmed by microscopic observations. Combinations of carvacrol and eugenol with fluconazole were found synergistic against planktonic growth of C. albicans, while that of thymol with fluconazole did not have any interaction. Biofilm development and mature biofilms were highly resistant to fluconazole, but susceptible to three terpenoids. Sensitization of cells by sub-inhibitory concentrations of carvacrol and eugenol resulted in prevention of biofilm formation at low fluconazole concentrations, i.e. 0.032 and 0.002 mg ml(-1), respectively. Addition of thymol could not potentiate activity of fluconazole against biofilm formation by C. albicans. Fractional inhibitory concentration indices (FICI) for carvacrol-fluconazole and eugenol-fluconazole combinations for biofilm formation were 0.311 and 0.25, respectively. The FICI value of 1.003 indicated a status of indifference for the combination of thymol and fluconazole against biofilm formation. Eugenol and thymol combinations with fluconazole did not have useful interaction against mature biofilms of C. albicans, but the presence of 0.5 mg ml(-1) of carvacrol caused inhibition of mature biofilms at a significantly low concentration (i.e. 0.032 mg ml(-1)) of fluconazole. The study indicated that carvacrol and eugenol

  17. The relationship between the acid and alkaline phosphatase activity and the adherence of clinical isolates of Candida parapsilosis to human buccal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Fernanado, P H; Panagoda, G J; Samaranayake, L P

    1999-11-01

    Candida parapsilosis is an emerging fungal pathogen implicated in many diseases, especially in compromised hosts. Candidal colonization and infection depends on the initial ability to adhere to host surfaces, which in turn depends upon the cell wall components and the allied structures of both the host and the fungus. Examination of a miscellaneous collection of 24 C. parapsilosis isolates, from both superficial and deep infections, for their potential pathogenic traits displayed a relationship between the phosphatase activity measured with p-nitrophenol phosphate and adhesion of the yeasts to human buccal epithelial cells (BECs). Significant intraspecies differences were seen in both the alkaline and acid phosphatase activity as well as in their adhesion to BECs (p<0.0001). The acid phosphatase activity of the superficial isolates was significantly greater (152%) than that of the systemic isolates (p = 0.0352). A highly significant positive correlation was also established between the yeast adhesion to BECs and both the acid (r = 0.88, p<0.0001) and alkaline (r = 0.9, p<0.0001) phosphatase activity. These relationships, described here for the first time, imply that phosphatases of Candida species may play a crucial role in potentiating their virulence.

  18. Impaired killing of Candida albicans by granulocytes mobilized for transfusion purposes: a role for granule components

    PubMed Central

    Gazendam, Roel P.; van de Geer, Annemarie; van Hamme, John L.; Tool, Anton T.J.; van Rees, Dieke J.; Aarts, Cathelijn E.M.; van den Biggelaar, Maartje; van Alphen, Floris; Verkuijlen, Paul; Meijer, Alexander B.; Janssen, Hans; Roos, Dirk; van den Berg, Timo K.; Kuijpers, Taco W.

    2016-01-01

    Granulocyte transfusions are used to treat neutropenic patients with life-threatening bacterial or fungal infections that do not respond to anti-microbial drugs. Donor neutrophils that have been mobilized with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) and dexamethasone are functional in terms of antibacterial activity, but less is known about their fungal killing capacity. We investigated the neutrophil-mediated cytotoxic response against C. albicans and A. fumigatus in detail. Whereas G-CSF/dexamethasone-mobilized neutrophils appeared less mature as compared to neutrophils from untreated controls, these cells exhibited normal ROS production by the NADPH oxidase system and an unaltered granule mobilization capacity upon stimulation. G-CSF/dexamethasone-mobilized neutrophils efficiently inhibited A. fumigatus germination and killed Aspergillus and Candida hyphae, but the killing of C. albicans yeasts was distinctly impaired. Following normal Candida phagocytosis, analysis by mass spectrometry of purified phagosomes after fusion with granules demonstrated that major constituents of the antimicrobial granule components, including major basic protein (MBP), were reduced. Purified MBP showed candidacidal activity, and neutrophil-like Crisp-Cas9 NB4-KO-MBP differentiated into phagocytes were impaired in Candida killing. Together, these findings indicate that G-CSF/dexamethasone-mobilized neutrophils for transfusion purposes have a selectively impaired capacity to kill Candida yeasts, as a consequence of an altered neutrophil granular content. PMID:26802050

  19. Impaired killing of Candida albicans by granulocytes mobilized for transfusion purposes: a role for granule components.

    PubMed

    Gazendam, Roel P; van de Geer, Annemarie; van Hamme, John L; Tool, Anton T J; van Rees, Dieke J; Aarts, Cathelijn E M; van den Biggelaar, Maartje; van Alphen, Floris; Verkuijlen, Paul; Meijer, Alexander B; Janssen, Hans; Roos, Dirk; van den Berg, Timo K; Kuijpers, Taco W

    2016-05-01

    Granulocyte transfusions are used to treat neutropenic patients with life-threatening bacterial or fungal infections that do not respond to anti-microbial drugs. Donor neutrophils that have been mobilized with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) and dexamethasone are functional in terms of antibacterial activity, but less is known about their fungal killing capacity. We investigated the neutrophil-mediated cytotoxic response against C. albicans and A. fumigatus in detail. Whereas G-CSF/dexamethasone-mobilized neutrophils appeared less mature as compared to neutrophils from untreated controls, these cells exhibited normal ROS production by the NADPH oxidase system and an unaltered granule mobilization capacity upon stimulation. G-CSF/dexamethasone-mobilized neutrophils efficiently inhibited A. fumigatus germination and killed Aspergillus and Candida hyphae, but the killing of C. albicans yeasts was distinctly impaired. Following normal Candida phagocytosis, analysis by mass spectrometry of purified phagosomes after fusion with granules demonstrated that major constituents of the antimicrobial granule components, including major basic protein (MBP), were reduced. Purified MBP showed candidacidal activity, and neutrophil-like Crisp-Cas9 NB4-KO-MBP differentiated into phagocytes were impaired in Candida killing. Together, these findings indicate that G-CSF/dexamethasone-mobilized neutrophils for transfusion purposes have a selectively impaired capacity to kill Candida yeasts, as a consequence of an altered neutrophil granular content.

  20. Mechanism of iron uptake by the pathogenic yeast, Candida albicans

    SciTech Connect

    Ismail, A.

    1986-01-01

    C. albicans requires iron for growth and phenotypic development. When deprived of iron, mycelium and bud formation was suppressed. Survival of the organism was also reduced under iron-limiting conditions. The combination of elevated temperature and iron-deprivation further reduced phenotypic development and survival of the yeast. The combination of elevated temperature and iron starvation resulted in a decrease in both the growth rate and siderophore production. However, with time, the cells were able to show partial recovery in the growth rate which occurred concomitantly with an increase in siderophore production. In order for siderophores to be utilized, ferri-siderophore receptors must be produced. The receptor was shown to be located in the plasma membrane of the yeast. Scatchard analysis of the binding of ferri-siderophores to plasma membrane receptors showed an increase in receptor affinity and number of binding sites in iron-starved cells when compared to control cells. Autoradiograms of the /sup 58/Fe-siderophore-protein complex following SDS-PAGE separation of candidal proteins revealed the presence of a ferri-siderophore receptor of approximately 10,000 daltons. C. albicans strains which lacked the ability to synthesize phenolate siderophore maintained a phenolate receptor and bound candidal phenolate siderophore better than non-candidal phenolate siderophores.

  1. Msb2 Shedding Protects Candida albicans against Antimicrobial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Szafranski-Schneider, Eva; Swidergall, Marc; Cottier, Fabien; Tielker, Denis; Román, Elvira; Pla, Jesus; Ernst, Joachim F.

    2012-01-01

    Msb2 is a sensor protein in the plasma membrane of fungi. In the human fungal pathogen C. albicans Msb2 signals via the Cek1 MAP kinase pathway to maintain cell wall integrity and allow filamentous growth. Msb2 doubly epitope-tagged in its large extracellular and small cytoplasmic domain was efficiently cleaved during liquid and surface growth and the extracellular domain was almost quantitatively released into the growth medium. Msb2 cleavage was independent of proteases Sap9, Sap10 and Kex2. Secreted Msb2 was highly O-glycosylated by protein mannosyltransferases including Pmt1 resulting in an apparent molecular mass of >400 kDa. Deletion analyses revealed that the transmembrane region is required for Msb2 function, while the large N-terminal and the small cytoplasmic region function to downregulate Msb2 signaling or, respectively, allow its induction by tunicamycin. Purified extracellular Msb2 domain protected fungal and bacterial cells effectively from antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) histatin-5 and LL-37. AMP inactivation was not due to degradation but depended on the quantity and length of the Msb2 glycofragment. C. albicans msb2 mutants were supersensitive to LL-37 but not histatin-5, suggesting that secreted rather than cell-associated Msb2 determines AMP protection. Thus, in addition to its sensor function Msb2 has a second activity because shedding of its glycofragment generates AMP quorum resistance. PMID:22319443

  2. Antagonistic effect of Candida albicans and IFNγ on E-cadherin expression and production by human primary gingival epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Rouabhia, Mahmoud; Semlali, Abdelhabib; Audoy, Julie; Chmielewski, Witold

    2012-11-01

    Caused mainly by Candida albicans, oropharyngeal candidiasis is the most common oral complication associated with HIV disease worldwide. Host defenses against C. albicans essentially fall into two categories: specific immune mechanisms and local oral mucosal epithelial cell defenses. Since oral mucosa is the first line of defense in the form of a physical barrier against C. albicans invasion, and since epithelial cells are involved in anti-Candida innate immunity through different cytokines, we wanted to determine whether C. albicans alters E-cadherin expression and production, and whether interferon-γ (INFγ), a TH1 cytokine, is involved in the anti-Candida defense. Using primary human gingival epithelial cells, we demonstrated that C. albicans significantly decreased E-cadherin mRNA expression and protein production. This effect was basically obtained at later infective periods (24 and 48h). Interestingly, when IFNγ was added to C. albicans infected epithelial cell cultures, it prevented the side effect of C. albicans on E-cadherin mRNA expression and protein production and deposition. All together, these results suggested concomitant interactions between oral epithelial cells and IFNγ against C. albicans infection.

  3. Transcriptomics Analysis of Candida albicans Treated with Huanglian Jiedu Decoction Using RNA-seq

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qianqian; Gao, Lei; Tao, Maocan; Chen, Zhe; Yang, Xiaohong; Cao, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans is the major invasive fungal pathogen of humans, causing diseases ranging from superficial mucosal infections to disseminated, systemic infections that are often life-threatening. Resistance of C. albicans to antifungal agents and limited antifungal agents has potentially serious implications for management of infections. As a famous multiherb prescription in China, Huanglian Jiedu Decoction (HLJJD, Orengedokuto in Japan) is efficient against Trichophyton mentagrophytes and C. albicans. But the antifungal mechanism of HLJDD remains unclear. In this study, by using RNA-seq technique, we performed a transcriptomics analysis of gene expression changes for C. albicans under the treatment of HLJDD. A total of 6057 predicted protein-encoding genes were identified. By gene expression analysis, we obtained a total of 735 differentially expressed genes (DEGs), including 700 upregulated genes and 35 downregulated genes. Genes encoding multidrug transporters such as ABC transporter and MFS transporter were identified to be significantly upregulated. Meanwhile, by pathway enrichment analysis, we identified 26 significant pathways, in which pathways of DNA replication and transporter activity were mainly involved. These results might provide insights for the inhibition mechanism of HLJDD against C. albicans. PMID:27143984

  4. The effects of rose bengal- and erythrosine-mediated photodynamic therapy on Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Costa, Anna Carolina Borges Pereira; Rasteiro, Vanessa Maria Campos; Pereira, Cristiane Aparecida; Rossoni, Rodnei Dennis; Junqueira, Juliana Campos; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of photodynamic therapy (PDT) using rose bengal or erythrosine with light emitting diode (LED) on Candida albicans planktonic cultures and biofilms. Seven C. albicans clinical strains and one standard strain (ATCC 18804) were used. Planktonic cultures and biofilms of each C. albicans strain were submitted to the following experimental conditions: (a) treatment with rose bengal and LED (RB+L+); (b) treatment with erythrosine and LED (E+L+); and (c) control group, without LED irradiation or photosensitiser treatment (P-L-). After irradiation of the planktonic cultures and biofilms, the cultures were seeded onto Sabouraud dextrose agar (37 °C at 48 h) for counting of colony-forming units (CFU ml(-1) ) followed by posterior anova and Tukey's test analyses (P < 0.05). The biofilms were analysed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results revealed a significant reduction of planktonic cultures (3.45 log(10) and 1.97 log(10) ) and of biofilms (<1 log(10) ) for cultures that were subjected to PDT mediated using either erythrosine or rose bengal, respectively. The SEM data revealed that the PDT was effective in reducing and destroying of C. albicans blastoconidia and hyphae. The results show that erythrosine- and rose bengal-mediated PDT with LED irradiation is effective in treating C. albicans.

  5. Inhibitory effect of verapamil on Candida albicans hyphal development, adhesion and gastrointestinal colonization.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qilin; Ding, Xiaohui; Zhang, Bing; Xu, Ning; Jia, Chang; Mao, Jiwei; Zhang, Biao; Xing, Laijun; Li, Mingchun

    2014-06-01

    Candida albicans morphogenesis and gastrointestinal colonization are closely associated with the pathogenicity of this pathogen. This study investigated the in vitro and in vivo effect of verapamil, a calcium channel blocker, on these processes. Exposure to ≥ 10 μg mL(-1) verapamil led to a significant decrease of C. albicans hyphal cells. The ability to adhere to a polystyrene surface and buccal epithelial cells was inhibited by exposure to ≥ 20 μg mL(-1) verapamil. Detection of the Hwp1-green fluorescent protein fusion protein showed that verapamil inhibited expression and transport of Hwp1, indicating its activity against both the regulation network of morphogenesis-associated proteins and the secretory pathway in C. albicans. Moreover, treatment with verapamil at 10 mg (kg day)(-1) led to a remarkable decrease in gastrointestinal-colonizing fungal cells. This study revealed the inhibitory effect of verapamil on C. albicans hyphal development, adhesion and gastrointestinal colonization, which is relevant to decreased expression and abnormal transport of the proteins required for morphogenesis. Therefore, verapamil may be taken into account when choosing an antifungal therapy against C. albicans colonization and infection.

  6. Adhesion of Candida albicans to various dental implant surfaces and the influence of salivary pellicle proteins.

    PubMed

    Bürgers, Ralf; Hahnel, Sebastian; Reichert, Torsten E; Rosentritt, Martin; Behr, Michael; Gerlach, Till; Handel, Gerhard; Gosau, Martin

    2010-06-01

    Dental implants may be considered a potential reservoir for (re)infection with oral Candida albicans. Our aim was to evaluate initial fungal adhesion to three differentially textured titanium and one zirconia implant surface, and to correlate these findings to differences in specific surface characteristics (surface roughness (R(a)) and surface free energy (SFE)). Additionally, we investigated the influence of salivary protein films and two pellicle proteins (mucin and albumin). Implant surfaces were characterized by perthometer (R(a)) and goniometer (SFE) measurements. Implant specimens were rinsed with human whole saliva, mucin, albumin, or phosphate buffered saline and incubated in C. albicans suspension for 2.5h. Adherent fungi were quantified by means of a bioluminometric assay. The lowest amount of fungal cells was found on sand-blasted titanium, whereas zirconia implants did not show any reduced potential to adhere C. albicans. The influence of the implant SFE on fungal biofilm formation appears to be more important than the influence of R(a). The protein mucin enhanced C. albicans accumulation. In contrast, albumin is unlikely to be involved in the adhesion process of C. albicans.

  7. Honokiol induces reactive oxygen species-mediated apoptosis in Candida albicans through mitochondrial dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Lingmei; Liao, Kai; Hang, Chengcheng; Wang, Dayong

    2017-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of honokiol on induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS), antioxidant defense systems, mitochondrial dysfunction, and apoptosis in Candida albicans. Methods To measure ROS accumulation, 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescein diacetate fluorescence was used. Lipid peroxidation was assessed using both fluorescence staining and a thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) assay. Protein oxidation was determined using dinitrophenylhydrazine derivatization. Antioxidant enzymatic activities were measured using commercially available detection kits. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) genes expression was measured using real time RT-PCR. To assess its antifungal abilities and effectiveness on ROS accumulation, honokiol and the SOD inhibitor N,N′-diethyldithiocarbamate (DDC) were used simultaneously. Mitochondrial dysfunction was assessed by measuring the mitochondrial membrane potential (mtΔψ). Honokiol-induced apoptosis was assessed using an Annexin V-FITC apoptosis detection kit. Results ROS, lipid peroxidation, and protein oxidation occurred in a dose-dependent manner in C. albicans after honokiol treatment. Honokiol caused an increase in antioxidant enzymatic activity. In addition, honokiol treatment induced SOD genes expression in C. albicans cells. Moreover, addition of DDC resulted in increased endogenous ROS levels and potentiated the antifungal activity of honokiol. Mitochondrial dysfunction was confirmed by measured changes to mtΔψ. The level of apoptosis increased in a dose-dependent manner after honokiol treatment. Conclusions Collectively, these results indicate that honokiol acts as a pro-oxidant in C. albicans. Furthermore, the SOD inhibitor DDC can be used to potentiate the activity of honokiol against C. albicans. PMID:28192489

  8. Inhibitory Effect of Sophorolipid on Candida albicans Biofilm Formation and Hyphal Growth

    PubMed Central

    Haque, Farazul; Alfatah, Md.; Ganesan, K.; Bhattacharyya, Mani Shankar

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans causes superficial and life-threatening systemic infections. These are difficult to treat often due to drug resistance, particularly because C. albicans biofilms are inherently resistant to most antifungals. Sophorolipid (SL), a glycolipid biosurfactant, has been shown to have antimicrobial and anticancer properties. In this study, we investigated the effect of SL on C. albicans biofilm formation and preformed biofilms. SL was found to inhibit C. albicans biofilm formation as well as reduce the viability of preformed biofilms. Moreover, SL, when used along with amphotericin B (AmB) or fluconazole (FLZ), was found to act synergistically against biofilm formation and preformed biofilms. Effect of SL on C. albicans biofilm formation was further visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), which revealed absence of hyphae, typical biofilm architecture and alteration in the morphology of biofilm cells. We also found that SL downregulates the expression of hypha specific genes HWP1, ALS1, ALS3, ECE1 and SAP4, which possibly explains the inhibitory effect of SL on hyphae and biofilm formation. PMID:27030404

  9. Calcium and oxidative stress mediate perillaldehyde-induced apoptosis in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Tian, Hui; Qu, Su; Wang, Yanzhen; Lu, Zhaoqun; Zhang, Man; Gan, Yeyun; Zhang, Peng; Tian, Jun

    2017-02-21

    New anti-Candida albicans drugs are needed due to the emergence of resistant cases in recent years. Perillaldehyde (PAE) is a natural monoterpenoid compound derived from Perilla frutescens. The minimum inhibitory concentration of PAE against C. albicans was 0.4 μL/mL. We aimed to elucidate the antifungal mode of action of PAE against C. albicans. The antifungal activity of PAE against C. albicans was found to correlate with an elevation in intracellular Ca(2+) and accumulation of ROS. Several downstream apoptosis events such as the disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential, phosphatidylserine externalization, cytochrome c release, and metacaspase activation were observed in PAE-treated cells. DNA damage and nuclear fragmentation assays also revealed apoptosis of C. albicans cells. In summary, by means of fluorescent microscopy, flow cytometer analysis, and Western blot, our data uncovered that PAE exerts its antifungal activity through Ca(2+) and oxidative stress-mediated apoptosis mechanisms. This study deciphered the mode of action of PAE, which will be useful in the design of improved antifungal therapies.

  10. Synthetic Organotellurium Compounds Sensitize Drug-Resistant Candida albicans Clinical Isolates to Fluconazole.

    PubMed

    Reis de Sá, L F; Toledo, F T; Gonçalves, A C; Sousa, B A; Dos Santos, A A; Brasil, P F; Duarte da Silva, V A; Tessis, A C; Ramos, J A; Carvalho, M A; Lamping, E; Ferreira-Pereira, A

    2017-01-01

    Invasive Candida albicans infections are a serious health threat for immunocompromised individuals. Fluconazole is most commonly used to treat these infections, but resistance due to the overexpression of multidrug efflux pumps is of grave concern. This study evaluated the ability of five synthetic organotellurium compounds to reverse the fluconazole resistance of C. albicans clinical isolates. Compounds 1 to 4, at <10 μg/ml, ameliorated the fluconazole resistance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains overexpressing the major C. albicans multidrug efflux pumps Cdr1p and Mdr1p, whereas compound 5 only sensitized Mdr1p-overexpressing strains to fluconazole. Compounds 1 to 4 also inhibited efflux of the fluorescent substrate rhodamine 6G and the ATPase activity of Cdr1p, whereas all five of compounds 1 to 5 inhibited Nile red efflux by Mdr1p. Interestingly, all five compounds demonstrated synergy with fluconazole against efflux pump-overexpressing fluconazole-resistant C. albicans clinical isolates, isolate 95-142 overexpressing CDR1 and CDR2, isolate 96-25 overexpressing MDR1 and ERG11, and isolate 12-99 overexpressing CDR1, CDR2, MDR1, and ERG11 Overall, organotellurium compounds 1 and 2 were the most promising fluconazole chemosensitizers of fl