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Sample records for albicans clinical isolate

  1. Antifungal Activity of Bee Venom and Sweet Bee Venom against Clinically Isolated Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Bae

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate the antifungal effect of bee venom (BV) and sweet bee venom (SBV) against Candida albicans (C. albicans) clinical isolates. Methods: In this study, BV and SBV were examined for antifungal activities against the Korean Collection for Type Cultures (KCTC) strain and 10 clinical isolates of C. albicans. The disk diffusion method was used to measure the antifungal activity and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) assays were performed by using a broth microdilution method. Also, a killing curve assay was conducted to investigate the kinetics of the anti- fungal action. Results: BV and SBV showed antifungal activity against 10 clinical isolates of C. albicans that were cultured from blood and the vagina by using disk diffusion method. The MIC values obtained for clinical isolates by using the broth microdilution method varied from 62.5 μg/ mL to 125 μg/mL for BV and from 15.63 μg/mL to 62.5 μg/mL for SBV. In the killing-curve assay, SBV behaved as amphotericin B, which was used as positive control, did. The antifungal efficacy of SBV was much higher than that of BV. Conclusion: BV and SBV showed antifungal activity against C. albicans clinical strains that were isolated from blood and the vagina. Especially, SBV might be a candidate for a new antifungal agent against C. albicans clinical isolates. PMID:27280049

  2. Synthetic Organotellurium Compounds Sensitize Drug-Resistant Candida albicans Clinical Isolates to Fluconazole.

    PubMed

    Reis de Sá, L F; Toledo, F T; Gonçalves, A C; Sousa, B A; Dos Santos, A A; Brasil, P F; Duarte da Silva, V A; Tessis, A C; Ramos, J A; Carvalho, M A; Lamping, E; Ferreira-Pereira, A

    2017-01-01

    Invasive Candida albicans infections are a serious health threat for immunocompromised individuals. Fluconazole is most commonly used to treat these infections, but resistance due to the overexpression of multidrug efflux pumps is of grave concern. This study evaluated the ability of five synthetic organotellurium compounds to reverse the fluconazole resistance of C. albicans clinical isolates. Compounds 1 to 4, at <10 μg/ml, ameliorated the fluconazole resistance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains overexpressing the major C. albicans multidrug efflux pumps Cdr1p and Mdr1p, whereas compound 5 only sensitized Mdr1p-overexpressing strains to fluconazole. Compounds 1 to 4 also inhibited efflux of the fluorescent substrate rhodamine 6G and the ATPase activity of Cdr1p, whereas all five of compounds 1 to 5 inhibited Nile red efflux by Mdr1p. Interestingly, all five compounds demonstrated synergy with fluconazole against efflux pump-overexpressing fluconazole-resistant C. albicans clinical isolates, isolate 95-142 overexpressing CDR1 and CDR2, isolate 96-25 overexpressing MDR1 and ERG11, and isolate 12-99 overexpressing CDR1, CDR2, MDR1, and ERG11 Overall, organotellurium compounds 1 and 2 were the most promising fluconazole chemosensitizers of fluconazole-resistant C. albicans isolates. Our data suggest that these novel organotellurium compounds inhibit pump efflux by two very important and distinct families of fungal multidrug efflux pumps: the ATP-binding cassette transporter Cdr1p and the major facilitator superfamily transporter Mdr1p.

  3. Candida species biofilm and Candida albicans ALS3 polymorphisms in clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Bruder-Nascimento, Ariane; Camargo, Carlos Henrique; Mondelli, Alessandro Lia; Sugizaki, Maria Fátima; Sadatsune, Terue; Bagagli, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decades, there have been important changes in the epidemiology of Candida infections. In recent years, Candida species have emerged as important causes of invasive infections mainly among immunocompromised patients. This study analyzed Candida spp. isolates and compared the frequency and biofilm production of different species among the different sources of isolation: blood, urine, vulvovaginal secretions and peritoneal dialysis fluid. Biofilm production was quantified in 327 Candida isolates obtained from patients attended at a Brazilian tertiary public hospital (Botucatu, Sao Paulo). C. albicans ALS3 gene polymorphism was also evaluated by determining the number of repeated motifs in the central domain. Of the 198 total biofilm-positive isolates, 72 and 126 were considered as low and high biofilm producers, respectively. Biofilm production by C. albicans was significantly lower than that by non-albicans isolates and was most frequently observed in C. tropicalis. Biofilm production was more frequent among bloodstream isolates than other clinical sources, in urine, the isolates displayed a peculiar distribution by presenting two distinct peaks, one containing biofilm-negative isolates and the other containing isolates with intense biofilm production. The numbers of tandem-repeat copies per allele were not associated with biofilm production, suggesting the evolvement of other genetic determinants.

  4. Cyclosporine A decreases the fluconazole minimum inhibitory concentration of Candida albicans clinical isolates but not biofilm formation and cell growth.

    PubMed

    Wibawa, T; Nurrokhman; Baly, I; Daeli, P R; Kartasasmita, G; Wijayanti, N

    2015-03-01

    Among the genus Candida, Candida albicans is the most abundant species in humans. One of the virulent factors of C. albicans is its ability to develop biofilm. Biofilm forming microbes are characterized by decreasing of its susceptibility to antibiotics and antifungal. The fungicidal effect of fluconazole may be enhanced by cyclosporine A in laboratory engineered C. albicans strains. The aim of this work is to analyze the synergistic effect of cyclosporine A with fluconazole in C. albicans clinical isolates and the effect of cycolsporine A alone in the biofilm formation. Six fluconazole resistant and six sensitive C. albicans clinical isolates were analyzed for its minimum inhibitory concentration (MICs), biofilm formation, and cell growths. A semi-quantitative XTT [2,3-bis(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5- sulfo-phenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide] reduction assay was conducted to measure the biofilm formation. Cyclosporine A has synergistic effect with fluconazole that was shown by decreasing MICs of both fluconazole resistant and sensitive C. albicans clinical isolates. However, cyclosporine A alone did not influence the biofilm formation and cell growth of both fluconazole resistant and sensitive C. albicans clinical isolates. These results indicated that cyclosporine A might be a promising candidate of adjuvant therapy for fluconazole against both fluconazole resistant and sensitive C. albicans clinical isolates.

  5. Molecular mechanisms associated with Fluconazole resistance in clinical Candida albicans isolates from India.

    PubMed

    Mane, Arati; Vidhate, Pallavi; Kusro, Chanchal; Waman, Vaishali; Saxena, Vandana; Kulkarni-Kale, Urmila; Risbud, Arun

    2016-02-01

    Resistance to azole antifungals is a significant problem in Candida albicans. An understanding of resistance at molecular level is essential for the development of strategies to tackle resistance and rationale design of newer antifungals and target-based molecular approaches. This study presents the first evaluation of molecular mechanisms associated with fluconazole resistance in clinical C.albicans isolates from India. Target site (ERG11) alterations were determined by DNA sequencing, whereas real-time PCRs were performed to quantify target and efflux pump genes (CDR1, CDR2, MDR1) in 87 [Fluconazole susceptible (n = 30), susceptible-dose dependent (n = 30) and resistant (n = 27)] C.albicans isolates. Cross-resistance to fluconazole, ketoconazole and itraconazole was observed in 74.1% isolates. Six amino acid substitutions were identified, including 4 (E116D, F145L, E226D, I437V) previously reported ones and 2 (P406L, Q474H) new ones. CDR1 over-expression was seen in 77.7% resistant isolates. CDR2 was exclusively expressed with CDR1 and their concomitant over-expression was associated with azole cross-resistance. MDR1 and ERG11 over-expression did not seem to be associated with resistance. Our results show that drug efflux mediated by Adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette transporters, especially CDR1 is the predominant mechanism of fluconazole resistance and azole cross-resistance in C. albicans and indicate the need for research directed towards developing strategies to tackle efflux mediated resistance to salvage azoles.

  6. Expression of the CDR1 efflux pump in clinical Candida albicans isolates is controlled by a negative regulatory element

    SciTech Connect

    Gaur, Naseem Akhtar; Manoharlal, Raman; Saini, Preeti; Prasad, Tulika; Mukhopadhyay, Gauranga; Hoefer, Milan; Morschhaeuser, Joachim; Prasad, Rajendra . E-mail: rp47@hotmail.com

    2005-06-24

    Resistance to azole antifungal drugs in clinical isolates of the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans is often caused by constitutive overexpression of the CDR1 gene, which encodes a multidrug efflux pump of the ABC transporter superfamily. To understand the relevance of a recently identified negative regulatory element (NRE) in the CDR1 promoter for the control of CDR1 expression in the clinical scenario, we investigated the effect of mutation or deletion of the NRE on CDR1 expression in two matched pairs of azole-sensitive and resistant clinical isolates of C. albicans. Expression of GFP or lacZ reporter genes from the wild type CDR1 promoter was much higher in the azole-resistant C. albicans isolates than in the azole-susceptible isolates, reflecting the known differences in CDR1 expression in these strains. Deletion or mutation of the NRE resulted in enhanced reporter gene expression in azole-sensitive strains, but did not further increase the already high CDR1 promoter activity in the azole-resistant strains. In agreement with these findings, electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed a reduced binding to the NRE of nuclear extracts from the resistant C. albicans isolates as compared with extracts from the sensitive isolates. These results demonstrate that the NRE is involved in maintaining CDR1 expression at basal levels and that this repression is overcome in azole-resistant clinical C. albicans isolates, resulting in constitutive CDR1 overexpression and concomitant drug resistance.

  7. Effect of edible sesame oil on growth of clinical isolates of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Toshiko; Nishio, Junko; Okada, Shinobu

    2014-07-01

    Elderly individuals are at increased risk of oral thrush (oral candidiasis) due to decreased saliva secretion. Due to their antimicrobial properties, edible oils can be effective natural agents for oral care. The objective of the present study was to compare the effects of sesame oil, which is widely used for cooking in Asian countries, and two other edible oils on the growth of both mycelial and yeast forms of five clinical isolates of Candida albicans, a causative microorganism of oral thrush. We assessed the effect of each oil in concentrations of 0.078%, 0.156%, and 0.313% on growth of the mycelial forms of the clinical isolates over 24 hr using the crystal violet method. We also evaluated the effect of each oil on growth of the yeast forms by counting the number of viable yeast cells after culturing in the oils for 24 hr. Sesame oil inhibited the growth of both mycelial and yeast forms. Safflower and olive oil also inhibited the growth of both forms of C. albicans but to a lesser extent than sesame oil. The ability to inhibit the growth of the mycelial form correlated with sesame oil concentration. Roasting influenced growth inhibition ability and high-roasted sesame oil most effectively inhibited the yeast form. The growth inhibitory effect differed among the five isolates. We hypothesize that the sesamin and fatty acid components of sesame oil are involved in its antifungal activity.

  8. Mutations in transcription factor Mrr2p contribute to fluconazole resistance in clinical isolates of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Liu, Jin-Yan; Shi, Ce; Li, Wen-Jing; Zhao, Yue; Yan, Lan; Xiang, Ming-Jie

    2015-11-01

    The Candida albicans zinc cluster proteins are a family of transcription factors (TFs) that play essential roles in the development of antifungal drug resistance. Gain-of-function mutations in several TFs, such as Tac1p, Mrr1p and Upc2p, have been previously well documented in azole-resistant clinical C. albicans isolates. Mrr2p (multidrug resistance regulator 2) is a novel TF controlling expression of the ABC transporter gene CDR1 and mediating fluconazole resistance. In this study, the relationship between naturally occurring mutations in MRR2 and fluconazole resistance in clinical C. albicans isolates was investigated. Among a group of 20 fluconazole-resistant clinical C. albicans and 10 fluconazole-susceptible C. albicans, 12 fluconazole-resistant isolates overexpressed CDR1 by at least two-fold compared with the fluconazole-susceptible isolates. Of these 12 resistant isolates, three (C7, C9, C15) contained 11 identical missense mutations, 6 of which occurred only in the azole-resistant isolates. The contribution of these mutations to CDR1 overexpression and therefore to fluconazole resistance was further verified by generating recombinant strains containing the mutated MRR2 gene. The mutated MRR2 alleles from isolate C9 contributed to an almost six-fold increase in CDR1 expression and an eight-fold increase in fluconazole resistance; the missense mutations S466L and T470N resulted in an increase in CDR1 expression of more than two-fold and a four-fold increase in fluconazole resistance. In contrast, the other four missense mutations conferred only two- to four-fold increases in fluconazole resistance, with no significant increase in CDR1 expression. These findings provide some insight into the mechanism by which MRR2 regulates C. albicans multidrug resistance.

  9. White-opaque Switching in Different Mating Type-like Locus Gene Types of Clinical Candida albicans Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hou-Min; Shimizu-Imanishi, Yumi; Tanaka, Reiko; Li, Ruo-Yu; Yaguchi, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Candida albicans (C. albicans) can become a pathogen causing superficial as well as life-threatening systemic infections, especially in immunocompromised patients. Many phenotypic attributes contribute to its capacity to colonize human organs. In our study, 93 C. albicans isolates from patients of various candidiasis in a hospital of China were surveyed. We aimed to investigate the white-opaque (WO) switching competence, drug sensitivity, and virulence of mating type-like (MTL) a/α isolates. Methods: Internal transcribed spacer (ITS) gene and the MTL configuration were detected in all the isolates by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. White/opaque phenotype and doubling time of cell growth were determined. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of antifungal agent were measured using broth microdilution method. Results: Sixty-four isolates (69.6%) were classified to serotype A, 19 (20.6%) to serotype B, and 9 (9.8%) to serotype C. Moreover, phylogenetic analysis showed that these isolates were divided into four different subgroups of ITS genotypes. Most of our clinical isolates were MTLa/α type, while 6.8% remained MTLa or MTLα type. The frequency of opaque phenotype was 71.0% (66 isolates). Following the guidelines of Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute M27-A3, all isolates were susceptible to caspofungin and a few (0.6–3.2%) of them showed resistance against amphotericin B, flucytosine, fluconazole, itraconazole, and voriconazole. Conclusions: From these analyses, there were comparatively more C. albicans strains classified into serotype B, and the frequency of opaque phase strains was significant in the clinical isolates from China. Genetic, phenotypic, or drug susceptibility patterns were not significantly different from previous studies. MTLa/α isolates could also undergo WO switching which facilitates their survival. PMID:27824006

  10. Assessment of antifungal activity of herbal and conventional toothpastes against clinical isolates of Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Adwan, Ghaleb; Salameh, Yousef; Adwan, Kamel; Barakat, Ali

    2012-01-01

    Objective To detect the anticandidal activity of nine toothpastes containing sodium fluoride, sodium monofluorophosphate and herbal extracts as an active ingredients against 45 oral and non oral Candida albicans (C. albicans) isolates. Methods The antifungal activity of these toothpaste formulations was determined using a standard agar well diffusion method. Statistical analysis was performed using a statistical package, SPSS windows version 15, by applying mean values using one-way ANOVA with post-hoc least square differences (LSD) method. A P value of less than 0.05 was considered significant. Results All toothpastes studied in our experiments were effective in inhibiting the growth of all C. albicans isolates. The highest anticandidal activity was obtained from toothpaste that containing both herbal extracts and sodium fluoride as active ingredients, while the lowest activity was obtained from toothpaste containing sodium monofluorophosphate as an active ingredient. Antifungal activity of Parodontax toothpaste showed a significant difference (P< 0.001) against C. albicans isolates compared to toothpastes containing sodium fluoride or herbal products. Conclusions In the present study, it has been demonstrated that toothpaste containing both herbal extracts and sodium fluoride as active ingredients are more effective in control of C. albicans, while toothpaste that containing monofluorophosphate as an active ingredient is less effective against C. albicans. Some herbal toothpaste formulations studied in our experiments, appear to be equally effective as the fluoride dental formulations and it can be used as an alternative to conventional formulations for individuals who have an interest in naturally-based products. Our results may provide invaluable information for dental professionals. PMID:23569933

  11. Candida albicans isolates from a Malaysian hospital exhibit more potent phospholipase and haemolysin activities than non-albicans Candida isolates.

    PubMed

    Chin, V K; Foong, K J; Maha, A; Rusliza, B; Norhafizah, M; Ng, K P; Chong, P P

    2013-12-01

    This study was aimed at determining the phospholipase and haemolysin activity of Candida isolates in Malaysia. A total of 37 Candida clinical isolates representing seven species, Candida albicans (12), Candida tropicalis (8), Candida glabrata (4), Candida parapsilosis (1), Candida krusei (4), Candida orthopsilosis (1) and Candida rugosa (7) were tested. In vitro phospholipase activity was determined by using egg yolk plate assay whereas in vitro haemolysin activity was tested by using blood plate assay on sheep blood Sabouraud's dextrose agar (SDA) enriched with glucose. Phospholipase activity was detected in 75% (9 out of 12) of the C. albicans isolates. Among the 25 non- C. albicans Candida isolates, phospholipase activity was detected in only 24% of these isolates. The phospholipase activity of C. albicans was significantly higher than that of the non- C. albicans Candida isolates (P=0.002). Haemolysin activity was detected in 100% of the C. albicans, C. tropicalis, C. glabrata, C. krusei, C. parapsilosis, and C. orthopsilosis isolates while 75% of the C. krusei isolates and 12.3% of the C. rugosa isolates showed haemolysin activity. The haemolytic activity of C. albicans was significantly higher than that of the non- C. albicans Candida isolates (P=0.0001).The findings in this study indicate that C. albicans isolates in Malaysia may possess greater virulence potential than the non-albicans species.

  12. Paradoxical antifungal activity and structural observations in biofilms formed by echinocandin-resistant Candida albicans clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Walraven, Carla J; Bernardo, Stella M; Wiederhold, Nathan P; Lee, Samuel A

    2014-02-01

    Echinocandin-resistant clinical isolates of Candida albicans have been reported, and key-hot spot mutations in the FKS1 gene, which encodes a major glucan synthase subunit, have been identified in these (caspofungin-resistant [CAS-R]) strains. Although these mutations result in phenotypic resistance to echinocandins in planktonic cells, there is little data on antifungal susceptibilities of CAS-R C. albicans strains within biofilms. Thus, we analyzed biofilms formed by 12 C. albicans CAS-R clinical strains in which we previously identified FKS1 hot-spot mutations and compared the sessile antifungal and paradoxical activity of anidulafungin (ANID), caspofungin (CAS), and micafungin (MICA). Biofilms were formed in a 96-well static microplate model and assayed using both tetrazolium-salt reduction and crystal violet assays, as well as examination by scanning electron microscopy. We first sought to assess biofilm formation and structure in these fks1 mutants and found that the biofilm mass and metabolic activities were reduced in most of the fks1 mutants as compared with reference strain SC5314. Structural analyses revealed that the fks1 mutant biofilms were generally less dense and had a clear predominance of yeast and pseudohyphae, with unusual "pit"-like cell surface structures. We also noted that sessile minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) to ANID, CAS, and MICA were higher than planktonic MICs of all but one strain. The majority of strains demonstrated a paradoxical effect (PE) to particular echinocandins, in either planktonic or sessile forms. Overall, biofilms formed by echinocandin-resistant clinical isolates demonstrated varied PEs to echinocandins and were structurally characterized by a preponderance of yeast, pseudohyphae, and pit-like structures.

  13. An MDR1 promoter allele with higher promoter activity is common in clinically isolated strains of Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Bruzual, Igor

    2013-01-01

    In the opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida albicans, up-regulation of MDR1, encoding an efflux transporter, leads to increased resistance to the antifungal drug fluconazole. Antifungal resistance has been linked to several types of genetic change in C. albicans, including changes in genome structure, genetic alteration of the drug target, and overexpression of transporters. High-level over-expression of MDR1 is commonly mediated by mutation in a trans-acting factor, Mrr1p. This report describes a second mechanism that contributes to up-regulation of MDR1 expression. By analyzing the sequence of the MDR1 promoter region in fluconazole-resistant and fluconazole-susceptible strains, we identified sequence polymorphisms that defined two linkage groups, corresponding to the two alleles in the diploid genome. One of the alleles conferred higher MDR1 expression compared with the other allele. Strains in which both alleles were of the higher activity type were common in collections of clinically isolated strains while strains carrying only the less active allele were rare. As increased expression of MDR1 confers higher resistance to drugs, strains with the more active MDR1 promoter allele may grow or survive longer when exposed to drugs or other selective pressures, providing greater opportunity for mutations that confer high-level drug resistance to arise. Through this mechanism, higher activity alleles of the MDR1 promoter could promote the development of drug resistance. PMID:21972105

  14. Comparison of multilocus sequence typing and Ca3 fingerprinting for molecular subtyping epidemiologically-related clinical isolates of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Chowdhary, Anuradha; Lee-Yang, Wendy; Lasker, Brent A; Brandt, Mary E; Warnock, David W; Arthington-Skaggs, Beth A

    2006-08-01

    Southern hybridization with the complex probe Ca3 is a well established tool for molecular subtyping of Candida albicans. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) is a DNA sequence-based subtyping method recently applied to C. albicans and shown to have a high degree of intraspecies discriminatory power. However, its utility for studying the molecular epidemiology of sequential isolates from recurrent disease has not been established. We compared Ca3 Southern hybridization and MLST using seven housekeeping genes (CaAAT1a, CaACC1, CaADP1, CaPMI, CaSYA1, CaVPS13, CaZWF1b) for their ability to discriminate among 37 C. albicans isolates from recurrent cases of oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC) in ten HIV-positive patients from India and the US. Among the 37 isolates, MLST identified 23 distinct genotypes (index of diversity = 97%); Ca3 Southern hybridization identified 21 distinct genotypes (index of diversity = 95%). Both methods clustered isolates into seven genetically-related groups and, with one exception, isolates that were indistinguishable by MLST were indistinguishable or highly related by Ca3 Southern hybridization. These results demonstrate that MLST performs equally well or better compared to Ca3 Southern hybridization for defining genetic-relatedness of sequential C. albicans isolates from recurrent cases of OPC in HIV-positive patients.

  15. Comparison of the susceptibilities of clinical isolates of Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis to essential oils.

    PubMed

    Pozzatti, Patrícia; Loreto, Erico Silva; Lopes, Paulo Guilherme Markus; Athayde, Margareth Linde; Santurio, Janio Morais; Alves, Sydney Hartz

    2010-01-01

    Here, a microdilution technique based on the M27-A2 protocol (NCCLS, 2002) was employed to compare the susceptibilities of Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis to essential oils extracted from plants used as spices. The chemical compositions of the essential oils were defined based on the analysis of retention indices obtained by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. Taken together, the results showed that the activity of the compounds against the two species was similar.

  16. In vitro synergistic efficacy of combination of amphotericin B with Myrtus communis essential oil against clinical isolates of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Mahboubi, M; Ghazian Bidgoli, F

    2010-08-01

    In this study, we evaluated the antifungal activity of the essential oil from Myrtus communis (myrtle) leaves against Candida albicans (eight clinical isolates and one ATCC type strains) and different species of Aspergillus sp (A. niger, A. parasiticus, six isolates of Aspergillus flavus) using broth micro dilution assay. In addition, we evaluated the synergistic effect between the essential oil and the antifungal compound amphotericin B by checkboard micro titer assay. The essential oil was obtained from myrtle leaves by hydrodistillation method and the oil was analyzed by GC and GC-MS methods. Chemical analysis of oil revealed the presence of 70 components, representing 99.23% of the total oil. 1,8-cineole (36.1%), alpha-pinene (22.5%), linalool (8.4%), bornyl acetate (5.2%), alpha-terpineol (4.4%), linalyl acetate (4.2%) and limonene (3.8%) were found to be the major components of the oil. The antifungal evaluating showed that myrtle oil exhibited good antifungal activity against fungi. Myrtle oil showed significant antifungal activity when combined with amphotericin B.

  17. Reliability of the agar based method to assess the production of degradative enzymes in clinical isolates of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Arantes, Paula Tamião; Sanitá, Paula Volpato; Santezi, Carolina; Barbeiro, Camila de Oliveira; Reina, Bárbara Donadon; Vergani, Carlos Eduardo; Dovigo, Lívia Nordi

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to establish a reproducible protocol using the methodology of hyaline zones around the colonies on specific agar plates for phospholipase and proteinase production. This was an in vitro double-blind experiment, in which the dependent variables were the enzymatic activity measurements (Pz) for the production of phospholipase (Pz-ph) and the production of secreted aspartyl proteinases (Pz-sap). Three independent variables give rise to different measurement protocols. All measurements were carried out at two different moments by four examiners (E1, E2, E3, and E4). The minimum sample size was 30 Candida albicans clinical isolates. Specific agar plates for phospholipase and SAPs production were prepared according the literature. The intra-and inter-examiner reproducibility for each protocol was estimated using the Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC) and its confidence interval (95% CI). Based on the results obtained for both phospholipase and SAPs, there appears to be no consensus on the protocol chosen for each particular examiner. Measuring the colonies in triplicate may be the main factor associated with the increase in measurement accuracy and should therefore take precedence over measuring only one colony. When only one examiner is responsible for taking measurements, a standard protocol should be put in place and the statistical calibration of this researcher should be done prior to data collection. However, if two or more researchers are involved in the assessment of agar plates, our results suggest that the protocols using software to undertake plate reading is preferred.

  18. [Prevalence of Candida albicans and Candida non-albicans in clinical samples during 1999-2001].

    PubMed

    Mujica, M T; Finquelievich, J L; Jewtuchowicz, V; Iovannitti, C A

    2004-01-01

    The importance of epidemiological monitoring of yeasts involved in pathologic processes is unquestionable due to the increase of these infections over the last decade, the changes observed in species causing candidiasis, and empirical antifungal treatment. At the Mycology Center, 1006 isolates from a wide range of clinical samples were studied during 1999-2001. Candida albicans (40.3%) was the most isolated species, although, the Candida no albicans species with 54.9% showed the major prevalence. In blood cultures Candida parapsilosis (34.9%), C. albicans (30.2%) and C. tropicalis (25.6%) were recovered most frequently while C. glabrata represented only 2.3%. C. albicans with 60%-80% was the predominant specie in mucosal surface. We also detected Candida mediastinistis, which alert us over the importance at this location. Urinary tract infections caused by yeasts were more frequent in hospitalized patients, being C. albicans (47.7%), the most commonly isolated, followed by C. glabrata (24.8%) and C. tropicalis (20.0%). In the candidal onychomycoses, C. parapsilosis (37.7%) outplaced C. albicans (22.0%). Fluconazole susceptibility studies of Candida species allowed us to conclude that the majority of C. albicans islolates are susceptible, and that the highest resistance averages were observed in C. glabrata (21.41%) and C. krusei (69.23%).

  19. Comparison of virulence factors of oral Candida dubliniensis and Candida albicans isolates in healthy people and patients with chronic candidosis.

    PubMed

    Hannula, J; Saarela, M; Dogan, B; Paatsama, J; Koukila-Kähkölä, P; Pirinen, S; Alakomi, H L; Perheentupa, J; Asikainen, S

    2000-08-01

    We determined differences in the expression of certain virulence factors between oral Candida dubliniensis and Candida albicans species. In addition, clonal differences were sought among C. albicans isolates recovered from patients with and without compromised immune system. The material comprised 93 clinical yeast isolates originated in 40 subjects (1-5 isolates per subject). All 26 C. dubliniensis isolates and 46 C. albicans isolates originated from healthy routine dental clinic patients. Additionally, 21 C. albicans isolates were collected from patients with autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidosis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED), who have chronic candidosis as one manifestation of their immunocompromising disease. Polymerase chain reaction amplification using the random sequence primer OPE-03 enabled grouping of the C. dubliniensis isolates in 2 genotypes (I and II) and C. albicans isolates in 15 genotypes (I-XV). No significant difference was found in the distribution of genotypes between the patients with APECED and the healthy subjects. C. dubliniensis isolates exhibited high-frequency phenotypic switching significantly more frequently than did C. albicans isolates, and vice versa regarding phospholipase and proteinase production. Proteinase production was significantly more frequent among C. albicans genotype V than genotype IX isolates. No significant difference was found in expression of virulence factors of C. albicans isolates between the patients with APECED and the healthy subjects.

  20. Antifungal susceptibility and molecular typing of 115 Candida albicans isolates obtained from vulvovaginal candidiasis patients in 3 Shanghai maternity hospitals.

    PubMed

    Ying, Chunmei; Zhang, Hongju; Tang, Zhenhua; Chen, Huifen; Gao, Jing; Yue, Chaoyan

    2016-05-01

    In our multicenter study, we studied the distribution of Candida species in vulvovaginal candidiasis patients and investigated antifungal susceptibility profile and genotype of Candida albicans in vaginal swab. A total of 115 Candida albicans strains were detected in 135 clinical isolates. Minimum inhibitory concentration determinations showed that 83% and 81% of the 115 Candida albicans strains were susceptible to fluconazole and voriconazole. Randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis (RAPD) was applied to identify clonally related isolates from different patients at the local level. All tested strains were classified into genotype A (77.4%), genotype B (18.3%), and genotype C (4.3%). Genotype A was further classified into five subtypes and genotype B into two subtypes.Candida albicans was the dominant pathogen of vulvovaginal candidiasis, the majority belonging to genotype A in this study. Exposure to azoles is a risk factor for the emergence of azole resistance among Candida albicans isolated from VVC patients.

  1. Amino Acid Substitutions in the Cytochrome P-450 Lanosterol 14α-Demethylase (CYP51A1) from Azole-Resistant Candida albicans Clinical Isolates Contribute to Resistance to Azole Antifungal Agents

    PubMed Central

    Sanglard, Dominique; Ischer, Françoise; Koymans, Luc; Bille, Jacques

    1998-01-01

    The cytochrome P-450 lanosterol 14α-demethylase (CYP51A1) of yeasts is involved in an important step in the biosynthesis of ergosterol. Since CYP51A1 is the target of azole antifungal agents, this enzyme is potentially prone to alterations leading to resistance to these agents. Among them, a decrease in the affinity of CYP51A1 for these agents is possible. We showed in a group of Candida albicans isolates from AIDS patients that multidrug efflux transporters were playing an important role in the resistance of C. albicans to azole antifungal agents, but without excluding the involvement of other factors (D. Sanglard, K. Kuchler, F. Ischer, J.-L. Pagani, M. Monod, and J. Bille, Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 39:2378–2386, 1995). We therefore analyzed in closer detail changes in the affinity of CYP51A1 for azole antifungal agents. A strategy consisting of functional expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae of the C. albicans CYP51A1 genes of sequential clinical isolates from patients was designed. This selection, which was coupled with a test of susceptibility to the azole derivatives fluconazole, ketoconazole, and itraconazole, enabled the detection of mutations in different cloned CYP51A1 genes, whose products are potentially affected in their affinity for azole derivatives. This selection enabled the detection of five different mutations in the cloned CYP51A1 genes which correlated with the occurrence of azole resistance in clinical C. albicans isolates. These mutations were as follows: replacement of the glycine at position 129 with alanine (G129A), Y132H, S405F, G464S, and R467K. While the S405F mutation was found as a single amino acid substitution in a CYP51A1 gene from an azole-resistant yeast, other mutations were found simultaneously in individual CYP51A1 genes, i.e., R467K with G464S, S405F with Y132H, G129A with G464S, and R467K with G464S and Y132H. Site-directed mutagenesis of a wild-type CYP51A1 gene was performed to estimate the effect of each of these

  2. Rapid and Accurate Identification of Candida albicans Isolates by Use of PNA FISHFlow▿

    PubMed Central

    Trnovsky, Jan; Merz, William; Della-Latta, Phyllis; Wu, Fann; Arendrup, Maiken Cavling; Stender, Henrik

    2008-01-01

    We developed the simple, rapid (1 h), and accurate PNA FISHFlow method for the identification of Candida albicans. The method exploits unique in solution in situ hybridization conditions under which the cells are simultaneously fixed and hybridized. This method facilitates the accurate identification of clinical yeast isolates using two scoring techniques: flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. PMID:18287325

  3. Pathogenicity of Candida albicans isolates from bloodstream and mucosal candidiasis assessed in mice and Galleria mellonella.

    PubMed

    Frenkel, M; Mandelblat, M; Alastruey-Izquierdo, A; Mendlovic, S; Semis, R; Segal, E

    2016-03-01

    The working hypothesis of this study was to elucidate a possible association between the pathogenic potential of Candida albicans strains with a clinical entity, systemic versus superficial candidiasis. Specifically, we assessed the pathogenicity of two groups of clinical C. albicans isolates: isolates from bloodstream infection (S) versus isolates from vaginitis patients (M), in two experimental in vivo systems - mice and Galleria melonella, in comparison to a control strain (CBS 562). Mice and G. mellonella larvae were inoculated with CBS 562 and the different S and M isolates, and followed up for survival rate and survival time during 30 and 7 days, respectively. Candida kidney colonization of mice was assessed by histopathology and colony-forming units' enumeration. The results revealed: (1) S and M isolates had different behavior patterns in the two models and varied in different parameters; (2) no statistically significant difference in pathogenicity between S and M isolates as whole groups was noted; (3) S14 was the most virulent isolate and close to the standard strain CBS 562 in both models. This study is distinctive in its outline combining two different groups of C. albicans clinical isolates originating from two different clinical entities that were assessed in vivo concurrently in two models.

  4. Virulence attributes and genetic variability of oral Candida albicans and Candida tropicalis isolates.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Karen Regina Carim; Ferreira, Joseane Cristina; Lavrador, Marco Aurélio Sicchiroli; Baruffi, Marcelo Dias; Candido, Regina Celia

    2012-05-01

    The wide spectrum of candidiasis and its clinical importance encourage the research with the purpose of clarifying the mechanisms of pathogenicity and identification of virulence factors of Candida sp. Therefore, the aim of this study was to verify the adhesion capacity, protease activity and genotypic diversity of oral C. albicans and C. tropicalis isolates. The adhesion ability to the extracellular matrix glycoproteins laminin and fibronectin was evaluated using the ELISA technique. The research of proteases was carried out in agar plate containing bovine albumin and through a quantitative method in buffer solution containing haemoglobin. Intra and interspecies polymorphisms was verified through random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) technique. All C. albicans and C. tropicalis isolates binded to immobilised laminin and fibronectin. Ca33 and Ct13 isolates had relative adhesion index significantly higher than the other isolates for both glycoproteins (P < 0.001). Protease activity was observed in all isolates of C. albicans using either the semi-quantitative or quantitative assay. The protease activity of C. tropicalis was better detected through the quantitative assay. The genotypic diversity by RAPD revealed a heterogeneous population in both species. Nevertheless, C. tropicalis presented higher genetic variability than C. albicans strains.

  5. Increased expression of Candida albicans secretory proteinase, a putative virulence factor, in isolates from human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients.

    PubMed Central

    Ollert, M W; Wende, C; Görlich, M; McMullan-Vogel, C G; Borg-von Zepelin, M; Vogel, C W; Korting, H C

    1995-01-01

    The increased prevalence and the severity of oropharyngeal candidiasis in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients are attributed exclusively to the virus-induced immune deficiency of the host. The present study was aimed at answering the question of whether Candida albicans secretory proteinase, a putative virulence factor of the opportunistic C. albicans yeast, has any potential influence on the clinical manifestation of oropharyngeal candidiasis in HIV-positive patients. We measured the secretory proteinase activities of clinical C. albicans isolates from the oropharynges of either HIV-positive individuals (n = 100) or a control group (n = 122). The mean secretory proteinase activity of C. albicans isolates from the HIV-positive group (4,255 +/- 2,372 U/liter) was significantly higher compared with that of isolates from the control group (2,324 +/- 1,487 U/liter) (P < 0.05). The higher level of secretory proteinase activity in the culture supernatants of individual C. albicans isolates correlated with the increased level of proteinase expression on the cell surface, as revealed by cytofluorometry, and with higher levels of secretion of the immunodetectable protein, as shown by Western blotting (immunoblotting). Proteinase activity within the population of C. albicans isolates from HIV-positive individuals was independent of the patient's clinical disease stage and the CD4+/CD8+ cell numbers. Furthermore, no correlation of the proteinase activities with the C. albicans serotype was found, although C. albicans serotype B was significantly more frequent in the HIV-positive group (40%) compared with that in the control group (12%). However, a positive correlation of proteinase activity to antifungal susceptibility was evident.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8567880

  6. Candida albicans and non-C. albicans Candida species: comparison of biofilm production and metabolic activity in biofilms, and putative virulence properties of isolates from hospital environments and infections.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, A V; Prado, C G; Carvalho, R R; Dias, K S T; Dias, A L T

    2013-04-01

    Candida albicans and, more recently, non-C. albicans Candida spp. are considered the most frequent fungi in hospitals. This study analyzed Candida spp. isolates and compared the frequency of different species, that is, C. albicans and non-C. albicans Candida spp., and the origins of isolates, that is, from hospital environments or infections. Yeast virulence factors were evaluated based on biofilm production and metabolic activity. Hemolysin production and the antifungal susceptibility profiles of isolates were also evaluated. Candida spp. were highly prevalent in samples collected from hospital environments, which may provide a reservoir for continuous infections with these yeasts. There were no differences in the biofilm productivity levels and metabolic activities of the environmental and clinical isolates, although the metabolic activities of non-C. albicans Candida spp. biofilms were greater than those of the C. albicans biofilms (p < 0.05). Clinical samples had higher hemolysin production (p < 0.05) and lower susceptibility to fluconazole (p < 0.05). Non-C. albicans Candida spp. predominated in samples collected from hospital environments and infections (p < 0.05). These species had a lower susceptibility to fluconazole and amphotericin B, and their biofilms had higher metabolic activities than those produced by C. albicans, which may explain the increased incidence of fungal infections with these yeasts during recent years.

  7. Association of KPC-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae colonization or infection with Candida isolation and selection of non-albicans species.

    PubMed

    Papadimitriou-Olivgeris, Matthaios; Spiliopoulou, Anastasia; Fligou, Fotini; Manolopoulou, Patroula; Spiliopoulou, Iris; Vrettos, Theofanis; Dodou, Vasiliki; Filos, Kriton S; Anastassiou, Evangelos D; Marangos, Markos; Christofidou, Myrto

    2014-11-01

    Clinical specimens from 565 patients hospitalized in 2 intensive care units (ICUs A and B) during a 28-month period were cultured on appropriate media for isolation of Candida. Forty-nine (9%) patients had at least a Candida spp.-positive sample. Candida albicans was the predominant species isolated from 26 (53%) patients. Seventeen patients (3%) developed candidemia. Multivariate analysis showed that obesity, female gender, hospitalization during summer months, admission at ICU B, parenteral nutrition, administration of metronidazole, transplantation, and KPC-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (KPC-Kp) infection were independently associated with Candida spp. isolation. Candidemia was associated with cortisone administration, KPC-Kp infection, and presence of colostomy or abdominal catheter. Administration of fluconazole was a protective factor for both Candida spp. isolation and infection, leading to selection of Candida non-albicans species. Among several risk factors, KPC-Kp infection and colonization are identified as statistically significant factors associated with Candida isolation, especially of non-albicans species.

  8. Biotypes of oral Candida albicans isolated from AIDS patients and HIV-free subjects in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Teanpaisan, R; Nittayananta, W; Chongsuvivatwong, V

    2000-05-01

    This study was conducted to examine biotypes and antifungal susceptibility patterns of oral Candida albicans isolated from HIV-infected patients, HIV-free patients with candidiasis and healthy subjects. All isolates were biotyped using a typing system based on enzyme profiles, carbohydrate assimilation patterns and boric acid resistance. Thirty-eight biotypes were found amongst 218 oral C. albicans isolates. The major biotype found was A1S, which accounted for 32.6% of all isolates, and this biotype was the most common in all groups. There was a greater variety of biotypes of C. albicans in the HIV-infected group than in the other groups; however, there was no statistically significant difference between the groups. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of a total of 118 isolates were determined for amphotericin B and for ketoconazole using the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS) broth macrodilution method and the E-test. When the antifungal susceptibility patterns among the groups were compared, a statistically significant difference was found only with amphotericin B. The median MIC of amphotericin B in the HIV-infected group was higher than in the healthy group (P=0.013, NCCLS method; P=0.002, E-test). However, this difference in sensitivity was not restricted to any sub-type investigated. Our results showed that the biotype patterns of C. albicans isolates that colonize HIV-infected patients are similar to those of HIV-free subjects, and there is no relationship between antifungal susceptibility patterns and the biotypes.

  9. Susceptibility profile of vaginal isolates of Candida albicans prior to and following fluconazole introduction - impact of two decades.

    PubMed

    Bulik, C C; Sobel, J D; Nailor, M D

    2011-01-01

    Current treatment options for vulvovaginal candidiasis due to Candida albicans include over-the-counter and prescription antifungal agents. Fluconazole has been used extensively with an unknown impact on susceptibility. To investigate antifungal susceptibility trends in clinical vaginal isolates of C. albicans from 1986 to 2008, microdilution susceptibility was performed on randomly selected single isolates. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined for: fluconazole, clotrimazole, miconazole, ketoconazole, itraconazole, voriconazole, flucytosine and amphotericin B. The MIC(90) for each drug was then calculated for the time periods: 1986-1989, 1992-1996 and 2005-2007. A total of 250 C. albicans vaginal isolates were included. The MIC(90) (mcg ml(-1) ) for fluconazole was 0.25, 0.5 and 0.5 mcg ml(-1) for each grouping, respectively. The corresponding MIC(90) for flucytosine was 1, 2 and 8 mcg ml(-1) , respectively. The MIC(90) for the remaining agents remained unchanged across time periods mentioned. Of note, the percentage of isolates with MIC ≥1 and ≥2 mcg ml(-1) for fluconazole increased from 3% to 9% over the study period. Although the C. albicans MIC(90) to fluconazole in vaginal isolates has not shown a clinically significant increase since 1986, there is an increasing number of isolates with elevated MICs. The implications of this increase are unknown, but given the achievable vaginal concentrations of fluconazole, reduced susceptibility may have clinical relevance.

  10. Isolation and characterization of yeast monomorphic mutants of Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Elorza, M V; Sentandreu, R; Ruiz-Herrera, J

    1994-01-01

    A method was devised for the isolation of yeast monomorphic (LEV) mutants of Candida albicans. By this procedure, about 20 stable yeast-like mutants were isolated after mutagenesis with ethyl methane sulfonate. The growth rate of the mutants in different carbon sources, both fermentable and not, was indistinguishable from that of the parental strain, but they were unable to grow as mycelial forms after application of any of the common effective inducers, i.e., heat shock, pH alterations, proline addition, or use of GlcNAc as the carbon source. Studies performed with one selected strain demonstrated that it had severe alterations in the chemical composition of the cell wall, mainly in the levels of chitin and glucans, and in specific mannoproteins, some of them recognizable by specific polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies. It is suggested that these structural alterations hinder the construction of a normal hyphal wall. Images PMID:8157600

  11. Molecular Phylogenetic Analysis of a Geographically and Temporally Matched Set of Candida albicans Isolates from Humans and Nonmigratory Wildlife in Central Illinois ▿

    PubMed Central

    Wrobel, Lauren; Whittington, Julia K.; Pujol, Claude; Oh, Soon-Hwan; Ruiz, Marilyn O.; Pfaller, Michael A.; Diekema, Daniel J.; Soll, David R.; Hoyer, Lois L.

    2008-01-01

    This study explored whether wildlife species serve as the reservoir for human Candida albicans strains in a given geographic area. C. albicans isolates were collected from nonmigratory wildlife admitted to the University of Illinois Wildlife Medical Clinic. A geographically and temporally matched set of C. albicans oral isolates was collected from healthy human volunteers. Multilocus sequence typing was used to assign strains to genetic clades. Clade 1 isolates, particularly diploid sequence type 69 (DST 69), were most common in humans. Clade 1 strains were less frequently recovered from wildlife, while clade 8 strains, particularly DST 90, were overrepresented in the wildlife collection. All instances where a wildlife and human isolate shared the same DST occurred within clade 1. Clade distributions between human and wildlife isolates were significantly different, demonstrating population isolation between the groups. These differences may indicate limited strain transfer between groups or differential selection of C. albicans isolates in humans and wildlife. Wildlife strains had an amphotericin B MIC significantly lower than that of human isolates; strains with increased susceptibility were from several clades. C. albicans isolates were collected from domestic animals to provide comparisons with human and wildlife data sets. C. albicans isolation from canine and feline oral and anal swabs was infrequent; companion animal isolates were closely related to clade 1 human isolates. Collectively, the data suggest a greater likelihood of C. albicans transfer from humans to animals than from animals to humans. The nontransient human population may maintain the connection between geography and the C. albicans genetic groups recovered from humans. PMID:18621922

  12. Candida albicans bloodstream isolates in a German university hospital are genetically heterogenous and susceptible to commonly used antifungals.

    PubMed

    Huyke, Johanna; Martin, Ronny; Walther, Grit; Weber, Michael; Kaerger, Kerstin; Bougnoux, Marie-Elisabeth; Elias, Johannes; Kurzai, Oliver

    2015-10-01

    From an eight-year-span, 99 Candida bloodstream isolates were collected at the University Hospital Wuerzburg, Germany. In this study, all strains were analyzed using molecular and phenotypic typing methods. Confirmatory species identification revealed three isolates that were initially diagnosed as C. albicans to be actually C. dubliniensis. Two isolates contained a mixed culture of C. albicans and C. glabrata, in one of the specimens both species could be separated while it was not possible to recover C. albicans in the other sample. The remaining 95 C. albicans isolates were profiled by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Phylogenetic analyses showed a highly heterogenous collection of strains, associated with many different clades and constituting a set of new diploid sequence types (DST). For all strains with identical DST, patient data were reviewed for potential nosocomial transmission. In addition, all isolates were tested for their susceptibility to amphotericin B, caspofungin, fluconazole, itraconazole, posaconazole and voriconazole. No clinically relevant resistance could be detected. Furthermore, these data underline that correlation between minimal inhibitory concentrations for caspofungin and anidulafungin is low.

  13. Candida species distribution, genotyping and virulence factors of Candida albicans isolated from the oral cavity of kidney transplant recipients of two geographic regions of Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Candida albicans is a diploid yeast that in some circumstances may cause oral or oropharyngeal infections. This investigation aimed to study the prevalence of Candida spp. and to analyze the ABC genotypes of 76 clinical isolates of C. albicans obtained from the oral cavity of kidney transplant patients from two distinct geographic regions of Brazil. Methods We typed 48 strains with ABC genotyping and Microsatelitte using primer M13 and tested three virulence factors in vitro: phospholipase activity, morphogenesis and the ability to evade from polymorphonuclear neutrophils phagocytosis. Results C. albicans was the most prevalent species (86.4%), followed by C. tropicalis (4.5%). C. albicans genotype A was the most prevalent (58 isolates; 76.4%), followed by genotype C (15 isolates; 19.7%) and genotype B (3 isolates; 3.9%). When Microsatellite technique with primer M13 was applied, 80% of the isolates from the South were placed within the same cluster. The majority of Genotype C strains were grouped together within two different clusters. Genotype C was considered more resistant to PMNs attack than genotypes A and B. Strains isolated from the South of Brazil showed also better ability to combat PMNs phagocytosis. Conclusions We found a high rate of C. albicans genotype C strains isolated from the oral cavity of this group of patients. This study characterized oral C. albicans strains isolated from kidney transplant recipients and will contribute to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of oral candidiasis. PMID:24628850

  14. Virulence of Candida albicans isolated from HIV infected and non infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Wibawa, Tri; Praseno; Aman, Abu Tholib

    2015-01-01

    Candida sp contributes 33.1 % of fungal infections among HIV patients. Among the species of the genus Candida, Candida albicans is the most frequently isolated from HIV patients. This study aimed to analyze putative virulence factors of C. albicans isolated from oral cavities of HIV infected patients and healthy individuals. Twenty isolates from HIV infected patients and fourteen from healthy individuals were analyzed for phenotypic switching, cell growth rate, hyphae formation, hemolytic activity and biofilm formation characteristics. The frequency of phenotypic switching was low in both groups. The cell growth rate of C. albicans from HIV infected patients were significantly higher than those from healthy individuals (p < 0.001). After 48 h incubation, the concentration of C. albicans isolated from HIV infected patients was 8.6 × 10(6) cells/ml while the concentration of C. albicans isolated from healthy individuals was 7.8 × 10(6) cells/ml. After 72 h incubation, the concentration of C. albicans isolated from HIV infected patients was 9.5 × 10(6) cells/ml while the concentration of C. albicans isolated from healthy individuals was 8.2 × 10(6) cells/ml. In contrast, the hemolytic activity of C. albicans isolated from healthy individuals were significantly higher compared to those from HIV infected patients (p < 0.001) at both aerobic (6 vs. 3.5 mm) and anaerobic (3.8 vs. 1.3 mm) conditions. The percentages of hyphae forming cells were higher in C. albicans collected from HIV infected patients (27.5 %) compared to the healthy individual group (14.7 %). However, this trend was not statistically significant (p = 0.1). Candida albicans isolated from HIV infected patients have similar ability to develop biofilms compared to those from healthy individuals. (OR = 4.2; 95 % CI 0.724-26.559). The virulence factors of C. albicans isolated from HIV infected patients were not significantly different from those of healthy individuals. The results

  15. Susceptibilities of Candida albicans mouth isolates to antifungal agents, essentials oils and mouth rinses.

    PubMed

    Carvalhinho, Sara; Costa, Ana Margarida; Coelho, Ana Cláudia; Martins, Eugénio; Sampaio, Ana

    2012-07-01

    Forty Candida albicans strains isolated from patient's mouth with fixed orthodontic appliances were analyzed to their susceptibilities to antifungal agents, mouth rinses and essential oils. Susceptibility to fluconazole, econazole, miconazole and ketoconazole, amphotericin B and nystatin was assessed by the disk diffusion (DD) method based on the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute M44-A protocol, and by Etest (fluconazole and amphotericin B). The susceptibilities to mouth rinses and essential oils were also determined by the DD technique. All isolates tested were susceptible (S) to amphotericin B, nystatin and fluconazole. The overall concordance between the DD and the Etest was 100% for amphotericin and fluconazole. One isolate was resistant to econazole (2.5%) and the other to ketoconazole (2.5%). Econazole and ketoconazole had the highest percentages of susceptible dose dependent (SDD), 55 and 95%, respectively. Regarding to the susceptibility isolates profile, seven phenotypes were detected, and the 3 more represented (90% of the isolates) of them were SDD to one, two or three azoles. The study of mouth rinses showed a high variability of efficacy against C. albicans. The results showed that the isolates susceptibility to essential oils differed (P < 0.05). The profile activity was: cinnamon > laurel > mint > eucalyptus > rosemary > lemon > myrrh > tangerine. The main finding was that the susceptibility to cinnamon and laurel varied among the three more representative antifungal phenotypes (P < 0.05). The susceptibility of econazole-SDD isolates to cinnamon and lemon was higher than those of the econazole-S yeasts (P < 0.05). In contrast, econazole-SDD isolates were less affected by laurel than econazole-S counterparts (P < 0.05).

  16. Microsatellite-based genotyping of Candida albicans isolated from patients with superficial candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Kazue; Hattori, Hisao; Adachi, Hidesada; Oshima, Ryosuke; Horii, Toshinobu; Tanaka, Reiko; Yaguchi, Takashi; Tomita, Yasushi; Akiyama, Masashi; Kawamoto, Fumihiko; Kanbe, Toshio

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the genotype distribution of Candida albicans and the major genotypes involved in superficial candidiasis. The genotypes of C. albicans isolated from the infection sites of patients with superficial candidiasis (referred to as infection isolates) were analyzed by fragment analysis using 4 microsatellite markers (HIS3, CDC3, CAI and CAIII). Genotypes of the infection isolates were compared with those of C. albicans isolated from oral mucosa of non-candidiasis patients (referred to as oral isolates). Isolates of C. albicans showed 4 major genotypes for HIS3/CAI (" a " for 148 : 148 / 23 : 23," b " for 148 : 160 / 33 : 41," c " for 148 : 164 / 32 : 41 and " d " for 152 : 152 / 18 : 27). The genotypes " a "," b " and " d " were commonly found in oral (4.7, 8.8 and 7.6%, respectively) and infection (6.6, 9.2 and 15.4%, respectively) isolates. No isolates of genotype " c " were isolated from infection sites. The genotype " a " was found in the isolates from patients with genitalia candidiasis. Genotyping of multiple isolates from an individual patient showed that C. albicans from infection sites was genetically homogenous as compared with that of oral isolates, even in the same patient with candidiasis.

  17. Cluster of oral atypical Candida albicans isolates in a group of human immunodeficiency virus-positive drug users.

    PubMed Central

    Boerlin, P; Boerlin-Petzold, F; Durussel, C; Addo, M; Pagani, J L; Chave, J P; Bille, J

    1995-01-01

    Twenty-one chlamydospore-forming and germ tube-positive Candida albicans clinical isolates from 15 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive and 3 HIV-negative patients were examined by two different genetic methods. Multilocus enzyme electrophoresis and hybridization with the C. albicans-specific Ca3 probe showed that such isolates can be split into two genetically distinct groups that can be clearly distinguished. One group mainly contained strains with atypical sugar assimilation patterns and could be distinguished from the other group by the absence of intracellular beta-glucosidase activity. All 13 strains belonging to this group were isolated from the oral cavities of asymptomatic HIV-positive drug users and may be less pathogenic than the eight strains from the other group isolated either from HIV-positive patients with oropharyngeal candidiasis or from HIV-negative patients with invasive candidiasis. PMID:7615716

  18. Comparison of the clinical risk factors between Candida albicans and Candida non-albicans species for bloodstream infection.

    PubMed

    Shigemura, Katsumi; Osawa, Kayo; Jikimoto, Takumi; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Hayama, Brian; Ohji, Goh; Iwata, Kentaro; Fujisawa, Masato; Arakawa, Soichi

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the risk factors and susceptibilities to antifungal agents of Candida albicans and Candida non-albicans species (spp.) in candidemia cases in Kobe University Hospital. We investigated all consecutive patients with candida bloodstream infection (BSI) from 2008-2013 for whose full data were available for analyses, examining clinical factors such as gender, general complications, postoperative status or susceptibilities to antifungal agents. These factors were also compared between Candida albicans spp. and Candida non-albicans by univariate and multivariate analyses. Univariate analyses showed a significantly higher rate of Candida non-albicans species BSI patients cancer (odds ratio (OR) (95% confidence interval (CI))=2.29 (1.04-5.06) and P=0.040), chemotherapy (OR=4.35 (1.11-17.1) and P=0.035), fluconazole (FLCZ) resistance (OR=77.3 (4.51-1324) and P=0.003), and itraconazole (ITCZ) resistance (OR=15.6 (5.39-45.1) and P<0.001) and lower rate of underlying cardiovascular diseases (OR=0.27 (0.09-0.80) and P=0.018) and postoperative status (OR=0.35 (0.16-0.77) and P=0.035) in than Candida albicans. Multivariate analyses demonstrated that Candida non-albicans spp. had significantly higher rate of chemotherapy (OR=4.44 (1.04-19.0) and P=0.045), FLCZ resistance (OR=5.87 (2.01-17.1) and P=0.001), and ITCZ resistance (OR=18.7(5.77-60.4) and P<0.001) and lower rate of underlying cardiovascular diseases (OR=0.25 (0.08-0.82) and P=0.022) than Candida albicans. In conclusion, this study revealed several risk factors for BSI with Candida albicans (underlying cardiovascular diseases and postoperative status) and Candida non-albicans spp. (cancer and chemotherapy), and demonstrated that Candida non-albicans spp. were more resistant to FLCZ and ITCZ than Candida albicans.

  19. A Combination Fluorescence Assay Demonstrates Increased Efflux Pump Activity as a Resistance Mechanism in Azole-Resistant Vaginal Candida albicans Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Somanon; Sobel, Jack D.

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans is a pathogenic fungus causing vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC). Azole drugs, such as fluconazole, are the most common treatment for these infections. Recently, azole-resistant vaginal C. albicans isolates have been detected in patients with recurring and refractory vaginal infections. However, the mechanisms of resistance in vaginal C. albicans isolates have not been studied in detail. In oral and systemic resistant isolates, overexpression of the ABC transporters Cdr1p and Cdr2p and the major facilitator transporter Mdr1p is associated with resistance. Sixteen fluconazole-susceptible and 22 fluconazole-resistant vaginal C. albicans isolates were obtained, including six matched sets containing a susceptible and a resistant isolate, from individual patients. Using quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR), 16 of 22 resistant isolates showed overexpression of at least one efflux pump gene, while only 1 of 16 susceptible isolates showed such overexpression. To evaluate the pump activity associated with overexpression, an assay that combined data from two separate fluorescent assays using rhodamine 6G and alanine β-naphthylamide was developed. The qRT-PCR results and activity assay results were in good agreement. This combination of two fluorescent assays can be used to study efflux pumps as resistance mechanisms in clinical isolates. These results demonstrate that efflux pumps are a significant resistance mechanism in vaginal C. albicans isolates. PMID:27431223

  20. Biotypes of Candida albicans isolated from cardiovascular system and skin surveillance cultures of hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Vazić-Babić, Verica; Mlinarić-Missoni, Emilija; Kalenić, Smilja

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the study was to biotype 59 isolates of Candida (C.) albicans from cardiovascular system samples (blood and intravenous catheter) and 123 isolates of the same species from skin surveillance cultures (swabs of the armpit, groins and intravenous catheter insertion sites) of hospitalized patients using the Odds and Abbott biotyping method. Biotyping of 59 isolates of C. albicans taken from the cardiovascular system samples revealed the presence of 16 biotypes. Biotype 355 was the most common biotype, accounting for 35.6% of all biotype isolates from this system. Biotyping of 123 C. albicans isolates from skin surveillance cultures detected 21 biotypes. Biotype 355 was most common, accounting for 17.9% of all biotype isolates from these samples. The two systems had 10 biotypes in common: 355, 155, 257, 305, 105, 315, 300, 015, 157, and 345. These biotypes accounted for 88.3% and 81.4% of all C. albicans biotypes isolated from the cardiovascular system and skin surveillance cultures, respectively. Biotypes 355, 155, and 257 were the biotypes most frequently shared in isolates from the two systems. These biotypes accounted for 57.7% and 43.1% of all C. albicans biotypes isolated from the cardiovascular system and skin surveillance cultures, respectively.

  1. In vitro adherence of Candida albicans isolated from patients with chronic periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    MACHADO, Adriana Gadotti; KOMIYAMA, Edson Yukio; dos SANTOS, Silvana Soléo Ferreira; JORGE, Antonio Olavo Cardoso; BRIGHENTI, Fernanda Lourenção; KOGA-ITO, Cristiane Yumi

    2011-01-01

    Adherence is considered an extremely important virulence factor in yeast. Objective The aim of this study was to analyze the adherence to epithelial cells of C. albicans isolated from patients with chronic periodontitis in comparison to healthy patients. Material and methods Candida albicans cells isolated from individuals with chronic periodontitis (n=25) and healthy controls (n=25) were included in this study. Suspensions of C. albicans (106 cells/mL) and epithelial cells (105 cells/mL) were mixed and incubated at 37ºC for 1 h. The number of yeasts adhered to 25 epithelial cells was counted. Results The number of C. albicans cells adhered to epithelial cells was statistically higher in the chronic periodontitis group than in the control group (Student's t-test, p=0.000). Conclusion The results of the present study suggest a higher Candida adherence of samples isolated from patients with chronic periodontitis. PMID:21710096

  2. High Virulence and Antifungal Resistance in Clinical Strains of Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Monroy-Pérez, Eric; Paniagua-Contreras, Gloria Luz; Rodríguez-Purata, Pamela; Vaca-Paniagua, Felipe; Vázquez-Villaseñor, Marco; Díaz-Velásquez, Clara; Uribe-García, Alina

    2016-01-01

    Antifungal resistance and virulence properties of Candida albicans are a growing health problem worldwide. To study the expression of virulence and azole resistance genes in 39 clinical strains of C. albicans, we used a model of infection of human vaginal epithelial cells with C. albicans strains isolated from Mexican women with vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC). The strains were identified by PCR amplification of the ITS1 and ITS2 regions of rRNA. The detection and expression of virulence genes and azole resistance genes MDR1 and CDR1 were performed using PCR and RT-PCR, respectively. All strains were sensitive to nystatin and 38 (97.4%) and 37 (94.9%) were resistant to ketoconazole and fluconazole, respectively. ALS1, SAP4–SAP6, LIP1, LIP2, LIP4, LIP6, LIP7, LIP9, LIP10, and PLB1-PLB2 were present in all strains; SAP1 was identified in 37 (94.8%) isolates, HWP1 in 35 (89.7%), ALS3 in 14 (35.8%), and CDR1 in 26 (66.6%). In nearly all of the strains, ALS1, HWP1, SAP4–SAP6, LIP1–LIP10, PLB1, and PLB2 were expressed, whereas CDR1 was expressed in 20 (51.3%) and ALS3 in 14 (35.8%). In our in vitro model of infection with C. albicans, the clinical strains showed different expression profiles of virulence genes in association with the azole resistance gene CDR1. The results indicate that the strains that infect Mexican patients suffering from VVC are highly virulent and virtually all are insensitive to azoles. PMID:28058052

  3. Yeasts isolated from Algerian infants's feces revealed a burden of Candida albicans species, non-albicans Candida species and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Seddik, Hamza Ait; Ceugniez, Alexandre; Bendali, Farida; Cudennec, Benoit; Drider, Djamel

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at showing the yeast diversity in feces of Algerian infants, aged between 1 and 24 months, hospitalized at Bejaia hospital (northeast side of the country). Thus, 20 colonies with yeast characteristics were isolated and identified using biochemical (ID32C Api system) and molecular (sequencing of ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region) methods. Almost all colonies isolated (19 strains) were identified as Candida spp., with predominance of Candida albicans species, and one strain was identified as Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Screening of strains with inhibitory activities unveiled the potential of Candida parapsilosis P48L1 and Candida albicans P51L1 to inhibit the growth of Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923. Further studies performed with these two Candida strains revealed their susceptibility to clinically used antifungal compounds and were then characterized for their cytotoxicity and hemolytic properties. On the other hand, Saccharomyces cerevisiae P9L1 isolated as well in this study was shown to be devoid of antagonism but resulted safe and overall usable as probiotic.

  4. Expression of SAP5 and SAP9 in Candida albicans biofilms: comparison of bloodstream isolates with isolates from other sources.

    PubMed

    Joo, Min Young; Shin, Jong Hee; Jang, Hee-Chang; Song, Eun Song; Kee, Seung Jung; Shin, Myung Geun; Suh, Soon Pal; Ryang, Dong Wook

    2013-11-01

    Secreted aspartic proteases (Sap), encoded by a family of 10 SAP genes, are key virulence determinants in Candida albicans. Although biofilm-associated bloodstream infections (BSIs) are frequently caused by C. albicans, SAP gene expression in C. albicans biofilms formed by BSI isolates has not been evaluated. We compared the expression of two SAP genes, SAP5 and SAP9, in C. albicans biofilms formed by BSI isolates with those formed by isolates from other body sites. Sixty-three C. albicans isolates were analyzed, comprising 35 BSI isolates and 28 from other sites. A denture-strip biofilm model was used, and expression of the two SAP genes was quantified by real-time RT-PCR during planktonic or biofilm growth. Mean SAP5 expression levels of the BSI isolates were 3.59-fold and 3.86-fold higher in 24-h and 48-h biofilms, respectively, than in planktonic cells. These results did not differ from those for isolates from other sites (2.71-fold and 2.8-fold for 24-h and 48-h biofilms, respectively). By contrast, mean SAP9 expression during biofilm formation was higher in BSI isolates (2.89-fold and 3.29-fold at 24 and 48 h, respectively) than in isolates from other sites (1.27-fold and 1.32-fold at 24 and 48 h, respectively; both, P < 0.001). These results show, for the first time, that both SAP5 and SAP9 are upregulated in C. albicans biofilms formed by BSI isolates, and that BSI isolates may have a greater capacity to express SAP9 under biofilm conditions than isolates from other sites.

  5. FK520 interacts with the discrete intrahelical amino acids of multidrug transporter Cdr1 protein and acts as antagonist to selectively chemosensitize azole-resistant clinical isolates of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Nim, Shweta; Rawal, Manpreet K; Prasad, Rajendra

    2014-06-01

    FK520, a homolog of antifungal FK506, displays fungicidal synergism with azoles in Candida albicans and inhibits drug efflux mediated by ABC multidrug transporter. This study establishes the molecular basis of interaction of FK520 with Cdr1 protein, which is one of the major ABC multidrug transporters of C. albicans. For this, we have exploited an in-house library of Cdr1 protein consisting of 252 mutant variants where the entire primary structure of the two transmembrane domains comprising of 12 transmembrane helices was subjected to alanine scanning. With these mutant variants of Cdr1 protein, we could identify the critical amino acids of the transporter protein, which if replaced with alanine, not only abrogated FK520-dependent competitive inhibition of drug efflux but simultaneously decreased susceptibility to azoles. Notably, the replacement of most of the residues with alanine was inconsequential; however, there were close to 13% mutant variants, which showed abrogation of drug efflux and reversal of fungicidal synergy with azoles. Of note, all the intrahelical residues of Cdr1 protein, which abrogated inhibitor's ability to block the efflux and reversed fungicidal synergy, were common. Taken together, our results provide evidence of cross-talk of FK520 with Cdr1 by interacting with the select intrahelical residues of the protein to chemosensitize isolates of Candida.

  6. Increased expression of virulence attributes in oral Candida albicans isolates from human immunodeficiency virus-positive individuals.

    PubMed

    Mane, Arati; Gaikwad, Shraddha; Bembalkar, Shilpa; Risbud, Arun

    2012-02-01

    Oral candidiasis caused by Candida albicans is recognized as one of the most frequent opportunistic infections in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals. The overall severity and chronicity of oral candidiasis has been attributed exclusively to the HIV-induced immune deficiency of the affected individuals but not to the virulence factors of the pathogen, i.e. C. albicans. However, genotypic and phenotypic studies have suggested that HIV infection might be associated with preferential selection of C. albicans strains with altered virulence determinants, leading to colonization with Candida populations that are better able to cause disease in these immunologically compromised hosts. If this process of selection is indeed related to pathogenicity, it may be possible to measure alterations in different virulence factors produced by C. albicans in HIV-infected patients. To evaluate this hypothesis, the present work was undertaken to determine simultaneously the expression of five virulence factors in oral C. albicans isolates colonizing and infecting HIV-positive and -negative individuals. The significance of genotypes in the pathogenesis of oral candidiasis was also elucidated. Oral swabs were collected from 335 consecutive individuals (210 HIV-positive and 125 HIV-negative). Virulence factors and genotypes were determined for all the C. albicans strains isolated. The results showed significantly increased expression of proteinase, phospholipase and haemolytic activities, as well as a greater ability to adhere, in isolates from HIV-positive compared with HIV-negative individuals (P<0.05). However, no significant differences in virulence factor expression in isolates colonizing or infecting HIV-positive individuals were seen. Genotype A was the predominant type (71.3 %); however, a relationship could not be established between the genotypes and the virulence factors, or with clinical infection. These data support the concept of preferential C. albicans

  7. Biotypes and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) profiles of subgingival Candida albicans isolates in HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Pizzo, Giuseppe; Giammanco, Giovanni M; Pecorella, Sonia; Campisi, Giuseppina; Mammina, Caterina; D'Angelo, Matteo

    2005-01-01

    A group of subgingival isolates of C. albicans recovered from Italian HIV-positive (HIV+) subjects were characterized both phenotypically and genotypically. Phenotyping of the isolates was carried out by a biotyping method based on the enzyme profiles, carbohydrate assimilation patterns and boric acid resistance of the yeasts. Genotyping was performed through randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis. Five biotypes were found among the 29 subgingival C. albicans strains examined. The predominant biotypes were A1R (55.17%), A1S (24.14%), and A2R (13.79%), while the biotypes A11R and A13R were represented by a single isolate each. RAPD profiles identified 15 genotypes among the 29 isolates. Almost every individual harboured his/her own specific isolate and in three out of the six subjects with multiple isolates (two to six each) more than one genotype (two to six) was found. The biotype distribution we found is consistent with previous reports on C. albicans isolates from other oral sources, whereas the resistance to boric acid was highly frequent in subgingival strains. RAPD analysis showed high genetic heterogeneity within subgingival isolates, also when isolates were phenotypically identical. These findings, obtained from HIV+ subjects living in Southern Italy, may be useful as baseline information on subgingival C. albicans colonization in the Mediterranean area.

  8. Molecular typing of Candida albicans strains isolated from denture wearers by repetitive sequence-based PCR.

    PubMed

    Abaci, O; Haliki-Uztan, A; Ozturk, B; Toksavul, S; Ulusoy, M; Boyacioglu, H

    2011-02-01

    Long-term use of prosthesis is the most important risk factor for the colonization of Candida species on the mucosal surfaces, which can lead to the development of denture-related stomatitis (DRS). Some individuals wearing prosthesis develop DRS and others do not. C. albicans strains isolated from both groups were genotypically compared. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the strain causing prosthesis stomatitis was different from the other strains genotypically. The study included 90 individuals wearing different prostheses and 20 control individuals with natural teeth. In the study 109 C. albicans strains were used which were isolated from the saliva samples and the mucosal surfaces of the tongues and palates of 51 individuals and then defined phenotypically. Phenotypic diagnosis of the isolates was genotypically verified by using species-specific PCR. For molecular typing, repetitive extragenic palindromic sequence polymerase chain reaction (REP-PCR) was employed. The results of the study revealed that REP-PCR had the capability to separate 109 C. albicans strains and six reference strains into 44 genotypes. Whereas C. albicans strains showed heterogenic distribution, C. albicans strains isolated from the individuals suffering from prosthesis stomatitis showed no specific genotypes. REP-PCR is a simple, fast and low-cost method and helped work on a great number of samples.

  9. Candida biotypes isolated from clinical specimens in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Ng, K P; Madasamy, M; Saw, T L; Baki, A; He, J; Soo-Hoo, T S

    The distribution of Candida species was examined using 1114 yeasts isolated from various clinical specimens. The isolates were identified by germ tube test, hyphal/pseudohyphae and chlamydoconidia production and carbohydrate assimilation test using ten carbohydrates (glucose, sucrose, trehalose, cellobiose, arabinose, galactose, mannitol, raffinose, lactose and maltose). Among the 1114 isolates studied, 9 species of Candida were identified and the relative frequency of isolation was C. albicans (44.2%), C. parapsilosis (26.0%), C. tropicalis (17.7%), C. glabrata (9.6%), C. krusei (1.2%), C. rugosa (0.6%), C. guilliermondii (0.2%), C. lusitaniae (0.08%) and C. kefyr (0.08%). Non-C. albicans was the most common Candida species isolated from blood, respiratory system, urine and skin. The isolate from vaginal swabs was predominantly C. albicans. 82.2% of C. glabrata and 64.2% of C. krusei isolated in this study were from vaginal swabs.

  10. Isolation of Candida albicans and halophilic Vibrio spp. from aquatic birds in Connecticut and Florida.

    PubMed Central

    Buck, J D

    1990-01-01

    Halophilic vibrios were recovered from feces of six types of aquatic birds (gulls, pelicans, Canada geese, swans, egrets, cormorants) from Connecticut and/or Florida shorelines. Candida albicans was isolated from gulls and Canada geese in Connecticut and from gulls and cormorants in Florida. PMID:2180374

  11. Biotypes of oral Candida albicans isolates in a Tanzanian child population.

    PubMed

    Matee, M I; Samaranayake, L P; Scheutz, F; Simon, E; Lyamuya, E F; Mwinula, J

    1996-09-01

    Although biotypes of Candida albicans from adult populations, especially in the West, have been described, there are no data either from a child population, or from the African continent. Hence a total of 200 oral C. albicans isolates from Tanzanian children aged 6-24 months were biotyped using two commercially available API micromethod kit systems and a boric acid resistance test. The predominant biotypes, which comprised two thirds of the organisms isolated, were J1S (19.5%), A1S (16.0%), J1R (14.5%), A1R (9.5%) and P1R (7.5%). In total, 16 new biotypes comprising 44 (22%) isolates which have not hitherto been described were found in this Tanzanian population and, of these, the P1R biotype predominated with 15 (7.5%) isolates. There was no significant association between predominant biotypes (with clusters > or = 15 isolates) and age, gender, breast feeding and malnutrition. These data indicate that the biotype profile of C. albicans isolates may differ in paediatric and adult populations, and/or global distribution of various subtypes of this common opportunistic pathogen.

  12. Genotypes of Candida albicans isolated from healthy individuals and their distribution in patients with oral candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Yuki; Fukano, Hideo; Shimozato, Kazuo; Tanaka, Reiko; Horii, Toshinobu; Kawamoto, Fumihiko; Kanbe, Toshio

    2013-12-01

    For the study of Candida albicans genotypes involved in development of candidiasis, Candida albicans isolates were collected from healthy volunteers and patients with oral candidiasis and genotyped on the basis of 25S rDNA and microsatellite polymorphisms. In the microsatellite analysis using two microsatellite markers (CDC3 and CAI), 63 healthy volunteer isolates were classified into 35 genotypes (allelic relations to CDC3 alleles 1:2/CAI alleles 1:2), among which genotypes II (115:119/23:23), III (115:123/18:27), and V (123:127/32:41) were found at frequencies of 12.7%, 7.9%, and 7.9%, respectively. In 68 oral candidiasis isolates classified into 39 genotypes, genotypes II and III were identified in 4.4% and 20.6% of the isolates, respectively. The frequency of genotype III was higher in the candidiasis isolates than in the healthy isolates (p < 0.05). These results suggest that genotype III C. albicans assigned by CDC3/CAI is related to the development of oral candidiasis.

  13. Effects of antifungal agents in sap activity of Candida albicans isolates.

    PubMed

    Costa, Carolina Rodrigues; Jesuíno, Rosália Santos Amorim; de Aquino Lemos, Janine; de Fátima Lisboa Fernandes, Orionalda; Hasimoto e Souza, Lúcia Kioko; Passos, Xisto Sena; do Rosário Rodrigues Silva, Maria

    2010-02-01

    Some antifungal agents have shown to exert effects on expression of virulent factors of Candida as the production of secretory aspartyl proteinase (Sap). In this study, we sought to determine and to compare the influence of fluconazole and voriconazole in proteinase activity of this microorganism. Thirty-one isolates obtained from oral mucosa of human immunodeficiency virus positive (HIV) patients were used in this study. The minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of fluconazole and voriconazole were determined using the broth microdilution method with RPMI 1640 medium and with yeast carbon base-bovine serum albumin (YCB-BSA) medium. The Sap activity following by digestion of BSA as substrate was determined for four Candida albicans strains arbitrarily chosen according to susceptibility (susceptible or resistant) to fluconazole or voriconazole. Besides, the SAP1 to SAP7 genes were screened by PCR for the same isolates that were determined by the Sap activity. In vitro susceptibility testing using the two media presented similar MIC values. Increased Sap activity was observed in resistant isolates on presence of drugs, but the Sap activity by susceptible isolates to azoles showed different behavior on the presence of drug. We detected the presence of SAP1 to SAP7 genes from all susceptible or resistant C. albicans isolates. The present study provides important data about the proteinase activity and the presence of genes of SAP family in fluconazole and voriconazole susceptible or resistant C. albicans isolates.

  14. Enhanced extracellular production of aspartyl proteinase, a virulence factor, by Candida albicans isolates following growth in subinhibitory concentrations of fluconazole.

    PubMed

    Wu, T; Wright, K; Hurst, S F; Morrison, C J

    2000-05-01

    We examined the production of secreted aspartyl proteinase (Sap), a putative virulence factor of Candida albicans, by a series of 17 isolates representing a single strain obtained from the oral cavity of an AIDS patient before and after the development of clinical and in vitro resistance to fluconazole. Isolates were grown in Sap-inducing yeast carbon base-bovine serum albumin medium containing 0, 0.25, 0.5, or 1 MIC of fluconazole, and cultures were sampled daily for 14 days to determine extracellular Sap activity by enzymatic degradation of bovine serum albumin. Extracellular Sap activity was significantly decreased in a dose-dependent manner for the most fluconazole-susceptible isolate (MIC, 1.0 microg/ml) and significantly increased in a dose-dependent manner for the most fluconazole-resistant isolate (MIC, >64 microg/ml). Enhanced extracellular Sap production could not be attributed to cell death or nonspecific release of Sap, because there was no reduction in the number of CFU and no significant release of enolase, a constitutive enzyme of the glycolytic pathway. Conversely, intracellular Sap concentrations were significantly increased in a dose-dependent manner in the most fluconazole-susceptible isolate and decreased in the most fluconazole-resistant isolate. Enhanced Sap production correlated with the overexpression of a gene encoding a multidrug resistance (MDR1) efflux pump occurring in these isolates. These data indicate that exposure to subinhibitory concentrations of fluconazole can result in enhanced extracellular production of Sap by isolates with the capacity to overexpress MDR1 and imply that patients infected with these isolates and subsequently treated with suboptimal doses of fluconazole may experience enhanced C. albicans virulence in vivo.

  15. Systemic neonatal candidosis: the karyotyping of Candida albicans strains isolated from neonates and health-workers.

    PubMed

    Ben Abdeljelil, J; Ben Saida, N; Saghrouni, F; Fathallah, A; Boukadida, J; Sboui, H; Ben Said, M

    2010-01-01

    Candida albicans has become an important cause of nosocomial infections in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). The aim of the present study was to compare C. albicans strains isolated from neonates (NN) suffering from systemic candidosis and from nurses in order to determine the relatedness between NN and health workers' strains. Thirty-one C. albicans strains were isolated from 18 NN admitted to the NICU of the neonatology service of Farhat Hached Hospital of Sousse, Tunisia and suffering from systemic candidosis, together with five strains recovered from nurses suffering from C. albicans onychomycosis. Two additional strains were tested, one from an adult patient who developed a systemic candidosis and the second from an adult with inguinal intertrigo. All strains were karyotyped by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) with a CHEF-DR II system. Analysis of PFGE patterns yielded by the 38 strains tested led to the identification of three pulsotypes that were designated I, II and III, and consisted of six chromosomal bands with a size ranging from 700 to >2500 kbp. The most widespread was the pulsotype I, which was shared by 17 NN and the five nurses' strains. The identity between NN and nurses' strains is very suggestive of a nosocomial acquisition from health-workers.

  16. Biofilms formed by Candida albicans bloodstream isolates display phenotypic and transcriptional heterogeneity that are associated with resistance and pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Candida albicans infections have become increasingly recognised as being biofilm related. Recent studies have shown that there is a relationship between biofilm formation and poor clinical outcomes in patients infected with biofilm proficient strains. Here we have investigated a panel of clinical isolates in an attempt to evaluate their phenotypic and transcriptional properties in an attempt to differentiate and define levels of biofilm formation. Results Biofilm formation was shown to be heterogeneous; with isolates being defined as either high or low biofilm formers (LBF and HBF) based on different biomass quantification. These categories could also be differentiated using a cell surface hydrophobicity assay with 24 h biofilms. HBF isolates were more resistance to amphotericin B (AMB) treatment than LBF, but not voriconazole (VRZ). In a Galleria mellonella model of infection HBF mortality was significantly increased in comparison to LBF. Histological analysis of the HBF showed hyphal elements intertwined indicative of the biofilm phenotype. Transcriptional analysis of 23 genes implicated in biofilm formation showed no significant differential expression profiles between LBF and HBF, except for Cdr1 at 4 and 24 h. Cluster analysis showed similar patterns of expression for different functional classes of genes, though correlation analysis of the 4 h biofilms with overall biomass at 24 h showed that 7 genes were correlated with high levels of biofilm, including Als3, Eap1, Cph1, Sap5, Plb1, Cdr1 and Zap1. Conclusions Our findings show that biofilm formation is variable amongst C. albicans isolates, and categorising isolates depending on this can be used to predict how pathogenic the isolate will behave clinically. We have shown that looking at individual genes in less informative than looking at multiple genes when trying to categorise isolates at LBF or HBF. These findings are important when developing biofilm-specific diagnostics as these could be

  17. Biotypes of oral Candida albicans isolates in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients from diverse geographic locations.

    PubMed

    Tsang, P C; Samaranayake, L P; Philipsen, H P; McCulloug, M; Reichart, P A; Schmidt-Westhausen, A; Scully, C; Porter, S R

    1995-01-01

    Oral Candida albicans isolates from HIV-infected individuals in Hong Kong, Australia, Germany and England were characterised using a biotyping system based on enzyme profiles, carbohydrate assimilation patterns and boric acid resistance of the yeasts. A total of 44 biotypes were found amongst the 117 oral C. albicans isolates examined. The major biotype A1R accounted for 17.9% of all isolates while the second commonest biotype was A1S (11.1% of isolates). Whereas these two biotypes were isolated from all the regions studied, there were a number of other biotypes unique to individual countries. The data indicate that there are many different sub-strains of oral C. albicans in HIV-infected patients, some of which are globally prevalent. However, further work is required to ascertain the diversity of oral C. albicans biotypes, if any, in health and disease.

  18. Isolation of a gene encoding a putative polyamine transporter from Candida albicans, GPT1.

    PubMed

    McNemar, M D; Gorman, J A; Buckley, H R

    2001-04-01

    A gene encoding a transport protein from the pathogenic yeast, Candida albicans, has been isolated during a complementation experiment utilizing an ornithine decarboxylase-negative (spe1 Delta) strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This gene restores gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transport to a GABA transport-negative mutant of S. cerevisiae and encodes a protein which putatively allows transport of one or more of the polyamines. We have assigned the name GPT1 (GABA/polyamine transporter) to this gene.

  19. Virulence factors of Candida albicans isolates from the oral cavities of HIV-1-positive patients.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Tatiany O A; Gillet, Luciana C S; Menezes, Sílvio A F; Feitosa, Rosimar N M; Ishak, Marluísa O G; Ishak, Ricardo; Marques-da-Silva, Sílvia H; Vallinoto, Antonio C R

    2013-06-01

    The present study assessed the phenotypic aspects of oral-cavity Candida albicans isolates from 300 HIV-1- positive patients, relating the most commonly investigated virulence factors (enzyme typing and germ-tube formation) to the most common morphotypes. The samples were seeded into specific media for isolation and subsequent identification using the automated Vitek 2 system. The following assays were performed for phenotypic characterization: morphotyping, germ-tube formation and enzyme typing. Out of 300 collected samples, 144 tested positive for yeasts of the Candida genus, 98 (32.7 %) of which were identified as C. albicans. The latter samples were attributed to seven different morphotypes; the three most common morphotypes were 7208 (49 %), 7308 (14.3 %) and 3208 (13.3 %). All of the C. albicans isolate samples formed germ tubes and produced the enzymes proteinase and phospholipase, with an activity classified as intermediate to high. Due to the identification of virulence factors among the analyzed samples, monitoring of HIV-1-positive patients colonized by different morphotypes must be established because these morphotypes are extremely pathogenic and can trigger severe fungal infections.

  20. Evaluation of virulence factors of Candida albicans isolated from HIV-positive individuals using HAART.

    PubMed

    de Paula Menezes, Ralciane; de Melo Riceto, Érika Bezerra; Borges, Aércio Sebastião; de Brito Röder, Denise Von Dolingër; dos Santos Pedroso, Reginaldo

    2016-06-01

    The colonization by Candida species is one of the most important factors related to the development of oral candidiasis in HIV-infected individuals. The aim of the study was to evaluate and discuss the phospholipase, proteinase, DNAse and haemolytic activities of Candida albicans isolated from the oral cavity of HIV individuals with high efficiency antiretroviral therapy. Seventy-five isolates of C. albicans obtained from saliva samples of patients with HIV and 41 isolates from HIV-negative individuals were studied. Haemolytic activity was determined in Sabouraud dextrose agar plates containing 3% glucose and 7% sheep red cells. Culture medium containing DNA base-agar, egg yolk, and bovine albumin were used to determine DNase, phospholipase and proteinase activities, respectively. All isolates from the HIV patients group had haemolytic activity, 98% showed phospholipase activity, 92% were positive for proteinase and 32% DNAse activity. Regarding the group of indivídios HIV negative, all 41 isolates presented hemolytic activity, 90.2% showed phospholipase and proteinase activity and 12.2% were positive for DNAse. The phospholipase activity was more intense for the group of HIV positive individuals. DNase production was more frequently observed in the group of HIV-positive individuals. The percentage of isolates having DNAse activity was also significantly different between the groups of patients not using any antiretroviral therapy, those using transcriptase inhibitors and those using transcriptase inhibitor and protease inhibitor in combination.

  1. Clinical and molecular characteristics of bloodstream infections caused by Candida albicans in children from 2003 to 2011.

    PubMed

    Tsai, M-H; Wang, S-H; Hsu, J-F; Lin, L-C; Chu, S-M; Huang, H-R; Chiang, M-C; Fu, R-H; Lu, J-J; Huang, Y-C

    2015-11-01

    We investigated the clinical and molecular characteristics of Candida albicans bloodstream infection (BSI) in children from a tertiary-level medical centre in Taiwan over a 9-year period from January 2003 to December 2011. We performed multilocus sequence typing (MLST) to investigate the genetic relatedness of these C. albicans BSI isolates. A total of 79 episodes of C. albicans BSI in 76 paediatric patients were identified, including 41 (51.9%) from the paediatric intensive care unit, 24 (30.4%) from the neonatal intensive care unit and 14 (17.7%) from general wards. More than half (59.5%) of these patients had underlying chronic co-morbidities, and the majority (94.9%) had a catheter or some other artificial device. All the isolates were susceptible to the antifungal agents tested. Only 32.9% (26/79) received effective antifungal agents within 24 h of onset of candidaemia. Twenty-five (31.6%) patients had persistent candidaemia (>3 days after the start of antifungal treatment) and candidaemia-attributable mortality rate was 22.8% (18/79). The 72 isolates available for MLST yielded 53 unique diploid sequence types (DSTs). Forty-five DSTs were singletons and eight DSTs were shared by 27 (37.5%) isolates. Seventy-one (98.6%) isolates were clustered within previously known clades. Based on the definition of two or more strains with shared DST occurring within a period of 90 days, 10.1% of the infections were categorized as nosocomial clusters, most commonly identified in the intensive care units. Although cluster-associated candidaemia was not associated with a higher mortality rate, none of the clusters were identified by the hospital infection control team.

  2. Clonal Strain Persistence of Candida albicans Isolates from Chronic Mucocutaneous Candidiasis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Moorhouse, Alexander J.; Rennison, Claire; Raza, Muhammad; Lilic, Desa; Gow, Neil A. R.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (CMC) is a primary immunodeficiency disorder characterised by susceptibility to chronic Candida and fungal dermatophyte infections of the skin, nails and mucous membranes. Molecular epidemiology studies of CMC infection are limited in number and scope and it is not clear whether single or multiple strains inducing CMC persist stably or are exchanged and replaced. We subjected 42 C. albicans individual single colony isolates from 6 unrelated CMC patients to multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Multiple colonies were typed from swabs taken from multiple body sites across multiple time points over a 17-month period. Among isolates from each individual patient, our data show clonal and persistent diploid sequence types (DSTs) that were stable over time, identical between multiple infection sites and exhibit azole resistant phenotypes. No shared origin or common source of infection was identified among isolates from these patients. Additionally, we performed C. albicans MLST SNP genotype frequency analysis to identify signatures of past loss of heterozygosity (LOH) events among persistent and azole resistant isolates retrieved from patients with autoimmune disorders including CMC. PMID:26849050

  3. [Evaluation of a new chromogenic medium (Candida ID) for the isolation and presumptive identification of Candida albicans and other medically important yeasts].

    PubMed

    Quindós, G; Alonso-Vargas, R; Helou, S; Arechavala, A; Martín-Mazuelos, E; Negroni, R

    2001-03-01

    Candidiasis is a frequent human infection caused mainly by Candida albicans. However, other species are emerging as important pathogens, as Candida glabrata, Candida parapsilosis, Candida tropicalis, Candida krusei or Candida guilliermondii. Rapid identification of clinical isolates could facilitate diagnosis and treatment. Candida ID (bioMerieux, Spain) is a new medium for the isolation and presumptive identification of yeasts: C. albicans grows as blue colonies, and C. tropicalis, C. guilliermondii, Candida kefyr and Candida lusitaniae as pink ones. The utility of Candida ID was evaluated with more than 700 clinical isolates and type culture collection strains from different genera including Candida, Cryptococcus, Saccharomyces, and Rhodotorula. Presumptive identification was confirmed by germ tube test, microscopic morphology and chlamydoconidia production on corn meal agar and carbohydrate assimilation on API-ATB ID 32C or Vitek (bioMerieux). Growth on Candida ID was rapid (18-24 h) for most of the yeast strains tested. Sensitivity and specificity of identification of C. albicans was significantly high (>98%), since a very low number of isolates were found to be false negative or false positive. A better result was obtained for species growing as pink colonies (>99.5%). Detection of different species of medical important yeasts was easy with Candida ID, as perfectly distinct colors and textures of colonies were observed on this medium. Candida ID allowed the discrimination between C. glabrata (creamy and smooth) and C. krusei (rough and white) colonies. Other species showed different colony textures and colours, white being the predominant colour. Candida ID was very useful for the presumptive identification C. albicans isolates.

  4. Decolorization of textile dye by Candida albicans isolated from industrial effluents.

    PubMed

    Vitor, Vivian; Corso, Carlos Renato

    2008-11-01

    The aim of the present work was to observe microbial decolorization and biodegradation of the Direct Violet 51 azo dye by Candida albicans isolated from industrial effluents and study the metabolites formed after degradation. C. albicans was used in the removal of the dye in order to further biosorption and biodegradation at different pH values in aqueous solutions. A comparative study of biodegradation analysis was carried out using UV-vis and FTIR spectroscopy, which revealed significant changes in peak positions when compared to the dye spectrum. Theses changes in dye structure appeared after 72 h at pH 2.50; after 240 h at pH 4.50; and after 280 h at pH 6.50, indicating the different by-products formed during the biodegradation process. Hence, the yeast C. albicans was able to remove the color substance, demonstrating a potential enzymatic capacity to modify the chemical structure of pigments found in industrial effluents.

  5. Rapid Detection of Candida albicans by Polymerase Spiral Reaction Assay in Clinical Blood Samples

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xiaoqun; Dong, Derong; Bian, Lihong; Zou, Dayang; He, Xiaoming; Ao, Da; Yang, Zhan; Huang, Simo; Liu, Ningwei; Liu, Wei; Huang, Liuyu

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans is the most common human yeast pathogen which causes mucosal infections and invasive fungal diseases. Early detection of this pathogen is needed to guide preventative and therapeutic treatment. The aim of this study was to establish a polymerase spiral reaction (PSR) assay that rapidly and accurately detects C. albicans and to assess the clinical applicability of PSR-based diagnostic testing. Internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2), a region between 5.8S and 28S fungal ribosomal DNA, was used as the target sequence. Four primers were designed for amplification of ITS2 with the PSR method, which was evaluated using real time turbidity monitoring and visual detection using a pH indicator. Fourteen non-C. albicans yeast strains were negative for detection, which indicated the specificity of PSR assay was 100%. A 10-fold serial dilution of C. albicans genomic DNA was subjected to PSR and conventional polimerase chain reaction (PCR) to compare their sensitivities. The detection limit of PSR was 6.9 pg/μl within 1 h, 10-fold higher than that of PCR (69.0 pg/μl). Blood samples (n = 122) were collected from intensive care unit and hematological patients with proven or suspected C. albicans infection at two hospitals in Beijing, China. Both PSR assay and the culture method were used to analyze the samples. Of the 122 clinical samples, 34 were identified as positive by PSR. The result was consistent with those obtained by the culture method. In conclusion, a novel and effective C. albicans detection assay was developed that has a great potential for clinical screening and point-of-care testing. PMID:27379048

  6. The efficacy of disinfectants on abattoirs’ Candida albicans isolates in Niger Delta region

    PubMed Central

    Olorode, Oluwayemisi A

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the antimicrobial activities of common disinfectants- these are (parachlorometaxylenol) dettol, savlon purit and jik (sodium hypochlorite) on  Candida albicans isolated from displaying and cutting tables in five different abattoirs in Port Harcourt (Niger Delta region); the abattoirs include Trans Amadi, Agip, Woji, Rumuokoro, and Rumuodara. This research was carried out between January 2005 and June 2006. Swab samples were collected from abattoirs cutting tables with sterile swab sticks and immediately transferred and cultured in the laboratory on a selective medium Sabouraud Dextrose Agar (SDA). The disinfectants’ concentrations were prepared at 10%, 20%, 40%, and 70%, in triplicates and the mean values calculated. 0.5 Mc Farland turbidity method of standardization and Agar diffusion method were used for disinfectants testing of the isolates. Statistical analysis of the data showed no significant difference in the effectiveness of these disinfectants at (p<0.05). In conclusion, this study has shown that savlon and dettol were the most potent antimicrobial agents at 10% concentration on  Candida albicans isolates when compared with purit and jik in this study, hence they are good sanitizing agents to be applied on the abattoirs cutting tables, before meat products can be displayed for sale. PMID:24358834

  7. Oral Candida albicans isolates from nonhospitalized normal carriers, immunocompetent hospitalized patients, and immunocompromised patients with or without acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Brawner, D L; Cutler, J E

    1989-01-01

    A total of 128 human oral isolates of Candida albicans were collected from asymptomatic healthy carriers (64 isolates); asymptomatic, nonimmunosuppressed, hospitalized patients (25 isolates); immunosuppressed transplant patients (19 isolates); and human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients with symptoms of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and oral candidiasis (20 isolates). Isolates were serotyped as A or B and tested for reactivity with an agglutinating immunoglobulin M monoclonal antibody (H9). Immunocompetent individuals colonized by oral C. albicans were almost equally likely to carry serotype A as serotype B cells, while immunocompromised individuals were at least twice as likely to be infected by serotype B than serotype A strains. The reactivity of isolates with H9 antibody followed a similar but more distinctive pattern. Approximately half of the strains from immunocompetent individuals reacted strongly with H9, and the remainder reacted weakly. However, up to 75% of the isolates from immunocompromised patients reacted weakly with H9, while the remainder reacted strongly. A correlation between H9 reactivity and the serotypes of these isolates existed (P = 0.16). The correlation between H9 reactivity and immune status was even stronger (P = 0.025). The monoclonal antibody activities described above were determined by agglutination tests during defined phases of C. albicans growth. Expression of antigen at various times during growth of several isolates was confirmed at the cellular level by analysis using fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Despite the correlation between serotype A and H9 reactivity, H9 antigen was not identical to the serotype A antigen because four serotype A strains reacted only weakly with H9 antibody, and one strain reacted strongly with H9 but was serotype B. These data indicate that oral strains of C. albicans from immunocompetent individuals differ as a group from C. albicans isolated from those who are immunosuppressed. PMID

  8. Study of the prevalence and association of ocular chlamydial conjunctivitis in women with genital infection by Chlamydia trachomatis, Mycoplasma genitalium and Candida albicans attending outpatient clinic

    PubMed Central

    Khattab, Rania Abdelmonem; Abdelfattah, Maha Mohssen

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine the association between chlamydial conjunctivitis and genital infection by Chlamydia trachomatis, Mycoplasma genitalium and Candida albicans, in addition to the possible relationship between cultured bacterial pathogens and oculogenital chlamydial infection. METHODS This study was performed on 100 (50 symptomatic and 50 asymptomatic) women attending the Gynecological and Obstetric outpatient clinic of Alzahra hospital, Alazhar University. Simultaneously a conjunctival swab was taken from these patients. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was done on DNA extracted from both vaginal and conjunctival swab samples. Culture for both vaginal and conjunctival swabs was also done. RESULTS Candida albicans was the predominant organism isolated by culture in 20% and 40% of conjunctival and vaginal swabs respectively. By the PCR method, ocular Chlamydia trachomatis was present in 60% of symptomatic women, while genital Chlamydia trachomatis infection was present in 30% of symptomatic women. The results of this method also indicated that 25/50 (50%) vaginal swabs were positive with PCR for Candida albicans versus 15/50 (30%) were PCR positive in conjunctival swab. Mycoplasma genitalium was present in only 10% of vaginal swabs. Concomitant oculogenital PCR positive results for Chlamydia trachomatis and Candida albicans were 30% and 28% respectively. CONCLUSION Ocular Chlamydia trachomatis was associated with genital Chlamydia trachomatis in a high percentage of women followed by Candida albicans. Cultured bacterial organisms do not play a role in enhancement of Chlamydia trachomatis infection. PMID:27588273

  9. Mixed biofilms formed by C. albicans and non-albicans species: a study of microbial interactions.

    PubMed

    Santos, Jéssica Diane dos; Piva, Elisabete; Vilela, Simone Furgeri Godinho; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso; Junqueira, Juliana Campos

    2016-01-01

    Most Candida infections are related to microbial biofilms often formed by the association of different species. The objective of this study was to evaluate the interactions between Candida albicans and non-albicans species in biofilms formed in vitro. The non-albicans species studied were:Candida tropicalis, Candida glabrata and Candida krusei. Single and mixed biofilms (formed by clinical isolates of C. albicans and non-albicans species) were developed from standardized suspensions of each strain (10(7) cells/mL), on flat-bottom 96-well microtiter plates for 48 hour. These biofilms were analyzed by counting colony-forming units (CFU/mL) in Candida HiChrome agar and by determining cell viability, using the XTT 2,3-bis (2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulphophenyl)-5-[(phenylamino) carbonyl]-2H-tetrazolium hydroxide colorimetric assay. The results for both the CFU/mL count and the XTT colorimetric assay showed that all the species studied were capable of forming high levels of in vitro biofilm. The number of CFU/mL and the metabolic activity of C. albicans were reduced in mixed biofilms with non-albicans species, as compared with a single C. albicans biofilm. Among the species tested, C. krusei exerted the highest inhibitory action against C. albicans. In conclusion, C. albicans established antagonistic interactions with non-albicans Candida species in mixed biofilms.

  10. Susceptibility testing of Candida albicans isolated from oropharyngeal mucosa of HIV+ patients to fluconazole, amphotericin B and Caspofungin. killing kinetics of caspofungin and amphotericin B against fluconazole resistant and susceptible isolates

    PubMed Central

    de Aquino Lemos, Janine; Costa, Carolina Rodrigues; de Araújo, Crystiane Rodrigues; Souza, Lúcia Kioko Hasimoto e; Silva, Maria do Rosário Rodrigues

    2009-01-01

    A clear understanding of the pharmacodynamic properties of antifungal agents is important for the adequate treatment of fungal infections like candidiasis. For certain antifungal agents, the determination of Minimal Fungicidal Concentration (MFC) and time kill curve could be clinically more relevant than the determination of the Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC). In this study, MIC and MFC to fluconazole, amphotericin B and caspofungin against C. albicans isolates and the killing patterns obtained with caspofungin and amphotericin B against susceptible and resistant strains to fluconazole were determined. The results of MICs showed that all C. albicans isolates were highly susceptible to amphotericin B, but two isolates were fluconazole resistant. The comparative analysis between MIC and MFC showed that MFC of fluconazole was fourfold higher than MIC in 41.9% of the C. albicans isolates. Same values of MFC and MIC of amphotericin B and caspofungin were found for 71% of the isolates. Correlation between time kill curves and MFC of amphotericin B and caspofungin against all 4 isolates tested was observed. The caspofungin killing effect was more evident at MFC in 6 hours of incubation than at MIC in this time, suggesting dependence of concentration. The similarity of results of time-kill curve and MFC values indicate that determination of MFC is an alternative for the detection of the fungicidal activity of these drugs. PMID:24031337

  11. [Detection of phospholipidolytic Candida albicans isolated from saliva of children with Down's syndrome].

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Evandro L; Campos, C De Castro; Crespo, A M Costa; Castro, Jovirês S; Rocha, Frederico P; Alves, Marcella; Goulart, Mariella S; Cardoso, Cléver; Ferreira, Wesley; Naves, Plínio Lázaro; Soares, A José; Miranda, Simone R; Pimenta, Fabiana C

    2002-01-01

    The childhood is one of the most propitious period of the life to the occurrence of infection by yeasts of the genus Candida. In children with Down's syndrome, besides the predispose factors to bucal candidiasis; macroglossia, bucal muscular incompetence, frequent respiratory diseases, motor difficulty and immunologic deficit are mentioned as additional elements for this fungus disease. It was verified that the children attacked by this syndrome have much more strains of Candida than other children. The aim of this study was to detect the prevalence of phospholipase producer, Candida on the saliva of children with Down's syndrome. Candida albicans was the only identified specie of Candida. The phospholipase production was found in isolated strains from both of study and control. However, the isolated strains of the group of children with Down's syndrome have strongly present phospholipidolitic.

  12. Comparison of four molecular typing methods for evaluating genetic diversity among Candida albicans isolates from human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients with oral candidiasis.

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Guerra, T M; Martínez-Suárez, J V; Laguna, F; Rodríguez-Tudela, J L

    1997-01-01

    Candida albicans strain delineation by karyotyping. NotI restriction pattern analysis, hybridization with specific probe 27A, and PCR fingerprinting with the phage M13 core sequence were performed with 30 isolates from the oral cavities of 30 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients and 8 reference strains. Within the panel of clinical isolates, 20 were geographically related, although 10 isolates were susceptible to fluconazole and 10 isolates were resistant to fluconazole. The remaining isolates used in this study were fluconazole resistant and geographically unrelated. A composite DNA type was defined for each of the strains as the combination of types obtained by the four molecular methods. By this procedure, a great diversity of DNA types was found among isolates from the oropharynges of HIV-infected individuals with oral candidiasis. This diversity was not reduced when isolates were evaluated on the basis of whether they came from the same geographical locale and whether they were fluconazole resistant. These data refute the idea of a clonal origin for fluconazole-resistant strains among HIV-positive patients. Karyotyping was the least discriminatory method, yielding 19 DNA types among the 38 strains analyzed. Conversely, hybridization with the 27A probe showed a unique DNA pattern for each of the strains examined in this study. Our results demonstrate that at least two different molecular methods are needed for Candida albicans typing and that there is a great deal of strain variation within the species, irrespective of place of origin or antifungal resistance patterns. PMID:9157142

  13. In vitro activity of xanthorrhizol isolated from the rhizome of Javanese turmeric (Curcuma xanthorrhiza Roxb.) against Candida albicans biofilms.

    PubMed

    Rukayadi, Yaya; Hwang, Jae-Kwan

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the activity of xanthorrhizol isolated from Curcuma xanthorrhiza Roxb. on Candida albicans biofilms at adherent, intermediate, and mature phase of growth. C. albicans biofilms were formed in flat-bottom 96-well microtiter plates. The biofilms of C. albicans at different phases of development were exposed to xanthorrhizol at different concentrations (0.5 µg/mL-256 µg/mL) for 24 h. The metabolic activity of cells within the biofilms was quantified using the XTT reduction assay. Sessile minimum inhibitory concentrations (SMICs) were determined at 50% and 80% reduction in the biofilm OD₄₉₀ compared to the control wells. The SMIC₅₀ and SMIC₈₀ of xanthorrhizol against 18 C. albicans biofilms were 4--16 µg/mL and 8--32 µg/mL, respectively. The results demonstrated that the activity of xanthorrhizol in reducing C. albicans biofilms OD₄₉₀ was dependent on the concentration and the phase of growth of biofilm. Xanthorrhizol at concentration of 8 µg/mL completely reduced in biofilm referring to XTT-colorimetric readings at adherent phase, whereas 32 µg/mL of xanthorrhizol reduced 87.95% and 67.48 % of biofilm referring to XTT-colorimetric readings at intermediate and mature phases, respectively. Xanthorrhizol displayed potent activity against C. albicans biofilms in vitro and therefore might have potential therapeutic implication for biofilm-associated candidal infections.

  14. Non-albicans Candida Infection: An Emerging Threat

    PubMed Central

    Deorukhkar, Sachin C.; Saini, Santosh

    2014-01-01

    The very nature of infectious diseases has undergone profound changes in the past few decades. Fungi once considered as nonpathogenic or less virulent are now recognized as a primary cause of morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised and severely ill patients. Candida spp. are among the most common fungal pathogens. Candida albicans was the predominant cause of candidiasis. However, a shift toward non-albicans Candida species has been recently observed. These non-albicans Candida species demonstrate reduced susceptibility to commonly used antifungal drugs. In the present study, we investigated the prevalence of non-albicans Candida spp. among Candida isolates from various clinical specimens and analysed their virulence factors and antifungal susceptibility profile. A total of 523 Candida spp. were isolated from various clinical specimens. Non-albicans Candida species were the predominant pathogens isolated. Non-albicans Candida species also demonstrated the production of virulence factors once attributed to Candida albicans. Non-albicans Candida demonstrated high resistance to azole group of antifungal agents. Therefore, it can be concluded that non-albicans Candida species have emerged as an important cause of infections. Their isolation from clinical specimen can no longer be ignored as a nonpathogenic isolate nor can it be dismissed as a contaminant. PMID:25404942

  15. Prevalence and exoenzyme secretion by Candida albicans isolates from oral and vaginal mucosas of HIV-infected women.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Mariceli Araujo; Miranda, Angelica Espinosa; Gambale, Walderez; Paula, Claudete Rodrigues

    2004-04-01

    A cross-sectional study was performed to evaluate the prevalence and the aetiology of forms of mucosal fungal infections of HIV-negative and HIV-positive women. Candida albicans was the predominate specie isolated from both groups of patients, with remarkable proportion of isolation from symptomatic women. All 239 C. albicans isolates, regardless of their source, showed activity of proteinase and phospholipase. It was verified that isolates with particularly higher levels of exoenzymes production were significantly more common in HIV-positive patients. However, isolates obtained from the HIV-positive patients in use of HAART, with protease inhibitor, presented lower levels of these exoenzymes, similar to the levels observed in the isolates from HIV-negative patients.

  16. Effect of lectins on hepatic clearance and killing of Candida albicans by the isolated perfused mouse liver.

    PubMed Central

    Sawyer, R T; Garner, R E; Hudson, J A

    1992-01-01

    The isolated perfused mouse liver model was used to study the effects of various lectins on hepatic trapping and killing of Candida albicans. After mouse livers were washed with 20 to 30 ml of perfusion buffer, 10(6) C. albicans CFU were infused into the livers. At the time of recovery, 63% +/- 2% (mean +/- standard error of the mean) of the infused C. albicans CFU were recovered from the liver and 14% +/- 1% were recovered from the effluent for a total recovery of 77% +/- 2%. This indicated that 86% +/- 9% of the original inoculum was trapped by the liver and that 23% +/- 2% was killed within the liver. When included in both preperfusion and postperfusion buffers (0.2 mg of lectin per ml), Ulex europeaus lectin (binding specificity for fucose) decreased hepatic trapping of C. albicans by 37% and eluted trapped C. albicans from the liver only when included in postperfusion buffer. By comparison, treatment of C. albicans with U. europeaus lectin before infusion had no effect on the trapping or killing of yeast cells. When Lens culinaris lectin (binding specificity for mannose) was included in the perfusion buffers, hepatic killing of C. albicans increased by 16% with no significant effect on hepatic killing when yeast cells were treated with L. culinaris lectin before infusion. Forty to 55% of the infused C. albicans were killed when concanavalin A (binding specificities for mannose and glucose), Glycine max (binding specificity for N-acetylgalactosamine), or Arachis hypogea (binding specificity for galactose) lectin was included in the perfusion buffer or when yeast cells were treated with these lectins before their infusion. When C. albicans was treated with concanavalin A at a concentration of less than 0.02 mg/ml, hepatic killing of yeast cells was not significantly increased. The data suggest that a fucose-containing receptor on the surface of either sinusoidal endothelial cells or Kupffer cells is involved in the trapping of C. albicans by the perfused mouse

  17. The in vitro and in vivo efficacy of fluconazole in combination with farnesol against Candida albicans isolates using a murine vulvovaginitis model.

    PubMed

    Bozó, Aliz; Domán, Marianna; Majoros, László; Kardos, Gábor; Varga, István; Kovács, Renátó

    2016-11-01

    Farnesol is a quorum-sensing molecule that inhibits biofilm formation in Candida albicans. Previous in vitro data suggest that, in combination with certain antifungals, farnesol may have an adjuvant anti-biofilm agent. However, the in vivo efficacy of farnesol is very questionable. Therefore, the in vitro and in vivo activity of fluconazole combined with farnesol was evaluated against C. albicans biofilms using fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI) determination, time-kill experiments and a murine vulvovaginitis model. The median biofilm MICs of fluconazole-sensitive C. albicans isolates ranged between 4 -> 512 mg/L and 150-300 μM for fluconazole and farnesol, respectively. These values were 512 -> 512 mg/L and > 300 μM for fluconazole-resistant clinical isolates. Farnesol decreased the median MICs of fluconazole by 2-64-fold for biofilms. Based on FICI, synergistic interaction was observed only in the case of the sessile SC5314 reference strain (FICIs: 0.16-0.27). In time-kill studies, only the 512 mg/L fluconazole and 512 mg/L fluconazole + 75 μM farnesol reduced biofilm mass significantly at each time point in the case of all isolates. The combination reduced the metabolic activity of biofilms for all isolates in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Our findings revealed that farnesol alone was not protective in a murine vulvovaginitis model. Farnesol was not beneficial in combination with fluconazole for fluconazole-susceptible isolates, but partially increased fluconazole activity against one fluconazole-resistant isolate, but not the other one.

  18. Effect of pH on In Vitro Susceptibility of Candida glabrata and Candida albicans to 11 Antifungal Agents and Implications for Clinical Use

    PubMed Central

    Danby, Claire S.; Boikov, Dina; Rautemaa-Richardson, Rina

    2012-01-01

    The treatment of vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) due to Candida glabrata is challenging, with limited therapeutic options. Unexplained disappointing clinical efficacy has been reported with systemic and topical azole antifungal agents in spite of in vitro susceptibility. Given that the vaginal pH of patients with VVC is unchanged at 4 to 4.5, we studied the effect of pH on the in vitro activity of 11 antifungal agents against 40 C. glabrata isolates and compared activity against 15 fluconazole-sensitive and 10 reduced-fluconazole-susceptibility C. albicans strains. In vitro susceptibility to flucytosine, fluconazole, voriconazole, posaconazole, itraconazole, ketoconazole, clotrimazole, miconazole, ciclopirox olamine, amphotericin B, and caspofungin was determined using the CLSI method for yeast susceptibility testing. Test media were buffered to pHs of 7, 6, 5, and 4. Under conditions of reduced pH, C. glabrata isolates remained susceptible to caspofungin and flucytosine; however, there was a dramatic increase in the MIC90 for amphotericin B and every azole drug tested. Although susceptible to other azole drugs tested at pH 7, C. albicans strains with reduced fluconazole susceptibility also demonstrated reduced susceptibility to amphotericin B and all azoles at pH 4. In contrast, fluconazole-sensitive C. albicans isolates remained susceptible at low pH to azoles, in keeping with clinical observations. In selecting agents for treatment of recurrent C. glabrata vaginitis, clinicians should recognize the limitations of in vitro susceptibility testing utilizing pH 7.0. PMID:22232293

  19. [Comparative study of the Candida albicans genotypes isolated from immunocompromised patients and health carriers].

    PubMed

    Carnovale, S; Elias Costa, M R; Relloso, S; Negroni, R; Negroni, M B; Iovannitti, C

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study is to compare Candida albicans strain genotype isolates from oral cavity of immunocompromised patients due to different immunologic impairments with apparently normal carriers. Four populations were studied: 1) HIV positive hospitalized patients, 2) HIV negative immunocompromised patients (leukemia, lymphoma, organ transplant recipients), 3) drug addicts prior to AIDS pandemia in Argentina, 4) apparently normal carriers. DNA extracted was digested with the enzyme Eco RI, electrophoresed, transferred to nitrocellulose membrane and hybridized with the 27A probe labelled with 32P. The comparison between the profiles obtained permitted the differentiation of 16 genotypes. The distribution of the strains led to the conclusion that: a) all the isolated strains from AIDS patients were closely related and distributed in only three genotypes (1, 3, 11); b) a major genetic relationship between the isolates from AIDS patients and HIV negative immunocompromised patients was observed; c) strains from carriers showed a minor genetic similarity with those obtained from AIDS patients; d) characteristic profiles belonging to any of the studied groups were not found; e) significant genomic changes have not been observed during the last twenty years.

  20. Oral Candida albicans isolates from HIV-positive individuals have similar in vitro biofilm-forming ability and pathogenicity as invasive Candida isolates

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Candida can cause mucocutaneous and/or systemic infections in hospitalized and immunosuppressed patients. Most individuals are colonized by Candida spp. as part of the oral flora and the intestinal tract. We compared oral and systemic isolates for the capacity to form biofilm in an in vitro biofilm model and pathogenicity in the Galleria mellonella infection model. The oral Candida strains were isolated from the HIV patients and included species of C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis, C. krusei, C. norvegensis, and C. dubliniensis. The systemic strains were isolated from patients with invasive candidiasis and included species of C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis, C. lusitaniae, and C. kefyr. For each of the acquired strains, biofilm formation was evaluated on standardized samples of silicone pads and acrylic resin. We assessed the pathogenicity of the strains by infecting G. mellonella animals with Candida strains and observing survival. Results The biofilm formation and pathogenicity in Galleria was similar between oral and systemic isolates. The quantity of biofilm formed and the virulence in G. mellonella were different for each of the species studied. On silicone pads, C. albicans and C. dubliniensis produced more biofilm (1.12 to 6.61 mg) than the other species (0.25 to 3.66 mg). However, all Candida species produced a similar biofilm on acrylic resin, material used in dental prostheses. C. albicans, C. dubliniensis, C. tropicalis, and C. parapsilosis were the most virulent species in G. mellonella with 100% of mortality, followed by C. lusitaniae (87%), C. novergensis (37%), C. krusei (25%), C. glabrata (20%), and C. kefyr (12%). Conclusions We found that on silicone pads as well as in the Galleria model, biofilm formation and virulence depends on the Candida species. Importantly, for C. albicans the pathogenicity of oral Candida isolates was similar to systemic Candida isolates, suggesting that Candida

  1. Quick Detection of FKS1 Mutations Responsible for Clinical Echinocandin Resistance in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Dudiuk, Catiana; Gamarra, Soledad; Jimenez-Ortigosa, Cristina; Leonardelli, Florencia; Macedo, Daiana; Perlin, David S.

    2015-01-01

    A rapid molecular-based assay for the detection of the Candida albicans FKS1 gene mutations responsible for resistance to echinocandin drugs was designed and evaluated. The assay consisted of a multiplexed PCR set of 5 tubes able to detect the most commonly described resistance mechanism, including FKS1 hot spot 1 and hot spot 2 mutations. The performance and specificity of the assay was evaluated using a double-blinded panel of 50 C. albicans strains. The assay showed a sensitivity of 96% and was able to detect all homozygous mutants included in the collection of strains, demonstrating that it is a robust, quick, and labor-saving method that is suitable for a routine clinical diagnostic laboratory. PMID:25878347

  2. Evaluation of the New Chromogenic Medium Candida ID 2 for Isolation and Identification of Candida albicans and Other Medically Important Candida Species

    PubMed Central

    Eraso, Elena; Moragues, María D.; Villar-Vidal, María; Sahand, Ismail H.; González-Gómez, Nagore; Pontón, José; Quindós, Guillermo

    2006-01-01

    The usefulness of Candida ID 2 (CAID2) reformulated medium (bioMérieux, France) has been compared with that of the former Candida ID (CAID; bioMérieux), Albicans ID 2 (ALB2; bioMérieux), and CHROMagar Candida (CAC; Chromagar, France) chromogenic media for the isolation and presumptive identification of clinically relevant yeasts. Three hundred forty-five stock strains from culture collections, and 103 fresh isolates from different clinical specimens were evaluated. CAID2 permitted differentiation based on colony color between Candida albicans (cobalt blue; sensitivity, 91.7%; specificity, 97.2%) and Candida dubliniensis (turquoise blue; sensitivity, 97.9%; specificity, 96.6%). Candida tropicalis gave distinguishable pink-bluish colonies in 97.4% of the strains in CAID2 (sensitivity, 97.4%; specificity, 100%); the same proportion was reached in CAC, where colonies were blue-gray (sensitivity, 97.4%; specificity, 98.7%). CAC and CAID2 showed 100% sensitivity values for the identification of Candida krusei. However, with CAID2, experience is required to differentiate the downy aspect of the white colonies of C. krusei from other white-colony-forming species. The new CAID2 medium is a good candidate to replace CAID and ALB2, and it compares well to CAC for culture and presumptive identification of clinically relevant Candida species. CAID2 showed better results than CAC in some aspects, such as quicker growth and color development of colonies from clinical specimens, detection of mixed cultures, and presumptive differentiation between C. albicans and C. dubliniensis. PMID:16954270

  3. Evaluation of the new chromogenic medium Candida ID 2 for isolation and identification of Candida albicans and other medically important Candida species.

    PubMed

    Eraso, Elena; Moragues, María D; Villar-Vidal, María; Sahand, Ismail H; González-Gómez, Nagore; Pontón, José; Quindós, Guillermo

    2006-09-01

    The usefulness of Candida ID 2 (CAID2) reformulated medium (bioMérieux, France) has been compared with that of the former Candida ID (CAID; bioMérieux), Albicans ID 2 (ALB2; bioMérieux), and CHROMagar Candida (CAC; Chromagar, France) chromogenic media for the isolation and presumptive identification of clinically relevant yeasts. Three hundred forty-five stock strains from culture collections, and 103 fresh isolates from different clinical specimens were evaluated. CAID2 permitted differentiation based on colony color between Candida albicans (cobalt blue; sensitivity, 91.7%; specificity, 97.2%) and Candida dubliniensis (turquoise blue; sensitivity, 97.9%; specificity, 96.6%). Candida tropicalis gave distinguishable pink-bluish colonies in 97.4% of the strains in CAID2 (sensitivity, 97.4%; specificity, 100%); the same proportion was reached in CAC, where colonies were blue-gray (sensitivity, 97.4%; specificity, 98.7%). CAC and CAID2 showed 100% sensitivity values for the identification of Candida krusei. However, with CAID2, experience is required to differentiate the downy aspect of the white colonies of C. krusei from other white-colony-forming species. The new CAID2 medium is a good candidate to replace CAID and ALB2, and it compares well to CAC for culture and presumptive identification of clinically relevant Candida species. CAID2 showed better results than CAC in some aspects, such as quicker growth and color development of colonies from clinical specimens, detection of mixed cultures, and presumptive differentiation between C. albicans and C. dubliniensis.

  4. Identification and characterization of nine atypical Candida dubliniensis clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Albaina, Olatz; Sahand, Ismail H; Brusca, María I; Sullivan, Derek J; Fernández de Larrinoa, Iñigo; Moragues, María D

    2015-02-01

    Candida dubliniensis is a pathogenic yeast of the genus Candida closely related to Candida albicans. The phenotypic similarity of these two species often leads to misidentification of C. dubliniensis isolates in clinical samples. DNA-based methods continue to be the most effective means of discriminating accurately between the two species. Here, we report on the identification of nine unusual Candida isolates that showed ambiguous identification patterns on the basis of their phenotypic and immunological traits. The isolates were categorized into two groups. Group I isolates were unable to produce germ tubes and chlamydospores, and to agglutinate commercial latex particles coated with a mAb highly specific for C. dubliniensis. Group II isolates grew as pink and white colonies on CHROMagar Candida and ChromID Candida, respectively. Carbohydrate assimilation profiles obtained with API/ID32C together with PCR amplification with specific primers and DNA sequencing allowed reliable identification of the nine unusual clinical isolates as C. dubliniensis.

  5. Phenotypic identification of Candida albicans by growth on chocolate agar.

    PubMed

    Sheth, Chirag C; Johnson, Elizabeth; Baker, Mark E; Haynes, Ken; Mühlschlegel, Fritz A

    2005-12-01

    In this study, we describe a simple method for the identification of Candida albicans in clinical samples. A total of 383 clinical isolates of Candida species were streaked onto chocolate agar and incubated for 48 h at 37 degrees C in the presence of an atmosphere of 6% CO2. All 208 of the C. albicans isolates tested, developed an easy to identify filamentous colony morphology. Of 175 other Candida species tested, 172 (98.3%) were distinguishable from C. albicans by their smooth colony morphology. Three isolates (1.7%) exhibited weak filamentation after prolonged incubation. Although not a routine medium in medical mycology a significant advantage of using chocolate agar lies in its use in clinical bacteriology laboratories for the isolation of fastidious bacteria. Implementation of the proposed method is applicable across a range of specimen types, thus allowing the direct identification of C. albicans in clinical samples. This simple method may allow a quicker entry into directed treatment.

  6. Emergence of Resistance of Candida albicans to Clotrimazole in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Children: In Vitro and Clinical Correlations

    PubMed Central

    Pelletier, René; Peter, Joanne; Antin, Cynthia; Gonzalez, Corina; Wood, Lauren; Walsh, Thomas J.

    2000-01-01

    Oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC) is a common opportunistic infection in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients and other immunocompromised hosts. Clotrimazole troches are widely used in the treatment of mucosal candidiasis. However, little is known about the potential contribution of clotrimazole resistance to the development of refractory mucosal candidiasis. We therefore investigated the potential emergence of resistance to clotrimazole in a prospectively monitored HIV-infected pediatric population receiving this azole. Adapting the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards M27-A reference method for broth antifungal susceptibility testing of yeasts to clotrimazole, we compared MICs in macrodilution and microdilution assays. We further analyzed the correlation between these in vitro findings and the clinical response to antifungal therapy. One isolate from each of 87 HIV-infected children was studied by the macrodilution and microdilution methods. Two inoculum sizes were tested by the macrodilution method (103 and 104 CFU/ml) in order to assess the effect of inoculum size on clotrimazole MICs. The same isolates also were tested using a noncolorimetric microdilution method. Clotrimazole concentrations ranged from 0.03 to 16 μg/ml. Readings were performed after incubation for 24 and 48 h at 35°C. For 62 (71.2%) of 87 clinical isolates, the MICs were low (≤0.06 μg/ml). The MIC for 90% of the strains tested was 0.5 μg/ml, and the highest MIC was 8 μg/ml. There was no significant difference between MICs at the two inoculum sizes. There was 89% agreement (±1 tube) between the microdilution method at 24 h and the macrodilution method at 48 h. If the MIC of clotrimazole for an isolate of C. albicans was ≥0.5 μg/ml, there was a significant risk (P < 0.001) of cross-resistance to other azoles: fluconazole, ≥64 μg/ml (relative risk [RR] = 8.9); itraconazole, ≥1 μg/ml (RR = 10). Resistance to clotrimazole was highly associated with

  7. Isolation and sequence of the gene encoding ornithine decarboxylase, SPE1, from Candida albicans by complementation of a spe1 delta strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    McNemar, M D; Gorman, J A; Buckley, H R

    1997-11-01

    The gene encoding ornithine decarboxylase, SPE1, from the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans has been isolated by complementation of an ornithine decarboxylase-negative (spe1 delta) strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Four transformants, three of which contain plasmids with the SPE1 gene, were isolated by selection on polyamine-free medium. The C. albicans ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) showed high homology with other eukaryotic ODCs at both the amino acid and nucleic acid levels.

  8. Isolation and partial characterisation of a new antiproliferative substance from human leucocytes inhibiting growth of Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Naess-Andresen, C F; Ekeberg, D; Fagerhol, M K; Sandvik, K; Staahl, L

    2003-01-01

    Aim: To purify and partially characterise a fraction from human leucocytes containing a substance cytotoxic to Candida albicans. Methods: Leucocytes were isolated from the buffy coats of healthy blood donors. The cytotoxic factor (CF) was isolated from the soluble fraction of the cells. A cell lysate was passed through a filter with a cut off value of 3 kDa, and the filtrate was processed by anionic exchange chromatography and gel filtration. The purified CF was analysed for its chemical and biological properties. The cytotoxicity of CF was tested on C albicans grown on agar plates. Results: Mass spectrometry showed a molecular mass of 2.148 kDa. CF was found in polymorphonuclear neutrophilic cells only. No amino acids were detected, and a low ultraviolet absorbance at 260 nm and resistance to nuclease indicate the absence of nucleic acids. An anthrone test was positive for carbohydrate. The substance was soluble in water. CF showed a dose related cytotoxicity in the range of 0.1–1 mg/ml. The cytotoxic effect was abrogated by zinc ions. Preliminary testing indicated that CF also had cytotoxic effects against some bacteria. Conclusions: This report describes a factor from isolated human leucocytes that is cytotoxic to C albicans. The substance contains a carbohydrate moiety, whereas no amino acids were detected. The cytotoxicity can be abrogated by zinc ions in vitro. This substance is probably part of the repertoire by which leucocytes prevent infections. PMID:12890745

  9. In vitro biofilm production of Candida bloodstream isolates: any association with clinical characteristics?

    PubMed

    Pongrácz, Júlia; Benedek, Kálmán; Juhász, Emese; Iván, Miklós; Kristóf, Katalin

    2016-04-01

    Candida spp. are a leading cause of bloodstream infection (BSI) and are associated with high mortality rates. Biofilm production is a virulence factor of Candida spp., and has been linked with poor clinical outcome. The aim of our study was to assess biofilm production of Candida bloodstream isolates at our institute, and to determine whether in vitro biofilm production is associated with any clinical characteristics of infection. During the four-year study period, 93 cases of Candida BSI were analysed. The most frequently isolated species was C. albicans (66.7 %), followed by C. glabrata (9.7 %), C. parapsilosis (9.7 %), C. tropicalis (9.7 %) and C. krusei (4.3 %). Biofilm production was more prevalent among non-albicans Candida spp. (77.4 %) than C. albicans (30.6 %) (P = 0.02). Abdominal surgery was identified as a risk factor of BSI caused by biofilm producing non-albicans Candida isolates. No risk factors predisposing to bloodstream infection caused by a biofilm producing C. albicans isolate were identified. Biofilm production was not verified as a risk factor of mortality.

  10. Susceptibility of clinical isolates of Candida spp. to terconazole and other azole antifungal agents.

    PubMed

    Pfaller, M A; Gerarden, T

    1989-01-01

    Terconazole is a triazole ketal derivative with potent, broad-spectrum antifungal activity. We investigated the in vitro activity of terconazole, miconazole, and clotrimazole, against 94 clinical isolates of Candida spp.: C. albicans (n = 68), C. tropicalis (n = 18), and C. parapsilosis (n = 8). In vitro susceptibility testing was performed using a broth microdilution method. The minimal inhibitory concentrations of terconazole were less than those of miconazole against C. albicans and C. parapsilosis but higher against C. tropicalis. Terconazole was more active than clotrimazole against C. parapsilosis and less active against C. albicans and C. tropicalis. Terconazole inhibited the uptake of 14C-labeled glucose, leucine, and hypoxanthine into C. albicans and caused the rapid release of intracellular K+. Based on these studies, terconazole has promising anticandidal activity and warrants further in vitro and in vivo investigation.

  11. Proteolytic activity and cytokine up-regulation by non-albicans Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Nawaz, Ali; Pärnänen, Pirjo; Kari, Kirsti; Meurman, Jukka H

    2015-05-01

    Mouth is an important source of infections and oral infections such as Candida infections increase the risk of mortality. Our purpose was to investigate differences in proteolytic activity of non-albicans Candida albicans (non-albicans Candida) between clinical isolates and laboratory samples. The second aim was to assess the concentration of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine levels IL-1β, IL-10, and TNF-α in saliva of patients with the non-albicans Candida and Candida-negative saliva samples. Clinical yeast samples from our laboratory were used for analyses. Candida strains were grown in YPG at 37 °C for 24 h in water bath with shaking. The activity of Candida proteinases of cell and cell-free fractions were analyzed by MDPF-gelatin zymography. The levels of IL-1β, IL-10, and TNF-α were measured from saliva with ELISA. The study showed differences in the proteolytic activity among the non-albicans Candida strains. C. tropicalis had higher proteolytic activity when compared to the other strains. Significant difference was found in salivary IL-1β levels between the non-albicans Candida and control strains (P < 0.002). The present findings showed differences in proteolytic activity among the non-albicans Candida strains. The increased IL-1β concentration may be one of the host response components associated with non-albicans Candida infection.

  12. Genetic-relatedness of peri-implants and buccal Candida albicans isolates determined by RAPD-PCR.

    PubMed

    Bertone, Adriana M; Rosa, Alcira C; Nastri, Natalia; Santillán, Hector D; Ariza, Yamila; Iovannitti, Cristina A; Jewtuchowicz, Virginia M

    2016-12-01

    Molecular techniques have been used in recent studies to identify a wide range of potential bacterial pathogens in periimplant pockets of the oral cavity. However, the prevalence and molecular epidemiology of yeasts and species distribution related to periimplantitis are as yet unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and distribution of yeasts in periimplant biofilm and to study genetic relatedness of Candida albicans. Yeasts recovered from periimplant biofilm samples (n=89) and buccal samples (n=120) were studied in 40 immunocompetent nonsmoking patients who visited the dental clinic of the Asociación Implantodontológica Argentina, Buenos Aires, Argentina, and had received oral rehabilitation with implants for more than five years. Yeasts recovered from samples were studied by typing assays using RAPDPCR. The prevalence of yeasts in the periimplant sulcus was 73% (n=29). C. albicans was the most prevalent species identified in this study population. The RAPD analysis showed identical genotypes in most C. albicans spp. from the two different sampling sites: buccal and periimplant. These findings suggest that periimplant biofilm is an ecological niche that favors the growth of yeast species. Most C. albicans found in periimplant biofilm originate from the endogenous infection caused by commensal strains.

  13. Fluconazole susceptibility and strain variation of Candida albicans isolates from HIV-infected patients with oropharyngeal candidosis.

    PubMed

    Barchiesi, F; Arzeni, D; Del Prete, M S; Sinicco, A; Falconi Di Francesco, L; Pasticci, M B; Lamura, L; Nuzzo, M M; Burzacchini, F; Coppola, S; Chiodo, F; Scalise, G

    1998-05-01

    Over a 16 month period we conducted a prospective study in a cohort of 45 HIV-positive patients to detect the development of resistance to fluconazole and to analyse the epidemiology of oropharyngeal candidosis (OPC). Each episode was treated with fluconazole 100 mg/day po for 10 days. All yeast isolates were tested for their in-vitro susceptibility to fluconazole. Multiple strains of Candida albicans simultaneously isolated from a given patient were typed by electrophoretic karyotyping. Overall, 106 episodes of OPC were diagnosed among the 45 patients: 18/45 patients (40%) had only one episode, 11/45 (24%) had two episodes, and the remaining 16/45 (36%) had three or more episodes (range 3-7). Cure (complete resolution of signs and symptoms and negative post-treatment cultures) and improvement (complete resolution of signs and symptoms but positive post-treatment cultures) were observed in 30/106 (28%) and 69/106 (65%) episodes of OPC, respectively. Failure (absence of improvement or exacerbation of signs and symptoms) was observed in seven episodes (7%) from four patients. In two of these four patients a significant and progressive increase in fluconazole MICs was observed: from 0.25 to 16 mg/L in one patient, and from < or = 0.125 to 32 mg/L in the second one. Tests on multiple colonies from individual isolation plates showed that it was not unusual to obtain different fluconazole MICs, indicating that, in order to avoid misleading results, one should perform in-vitro susceptibility testing by using a multiple colony inoculum rather than an inoculum made from a single colony. A total of 213 strains of C. albicans isolated from seven patients who suffered from four or more episodes of OPC through the course of the study were typed by electrophoretic karyotyping. Five individuals (71%) were infected with yeasts with only one DNA type, while the other two patients showed the presence of two or three different DNA types. The simultaneous presence of multiple types

  14. Typing Candida albicans oral isolates from healthy brazilian schoolchildren using multilocus enzyme electrophoresis reveals two highly polymorphic taxa

    PubMed Central

    Boriollo, Marcelo Fabiano Gomes; Spolidorio, Denise Madalena Palomari; Barros, Letizia Monteiro; Bassi, Rodrigo Carlos; Garcia, José Antonio Dias; Costa, Ana Maria Duarte Dias; Rosa, Edvaldo Antonio Ribeiro; Höfling, José Francisco

    2011-01-01

    The genetic diversity of C. albicans oral isolates from 75 healthy schoolchildren from eight schools located in different geographic areas of Piracicaba city, São Paulo state, Brazil, was established using isoenzymes marker (Multilocus Enzyme Electrophoresis – MLEE) and cluster analysis. Patterns of monoclonal and polyclonal oral colonization by C. albicans within and between groups of schoolchildren were identified. However, significant divergence between the observed and the expected genotypic frequencies (Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium test) was not detected in the geographically adjacent groups, suggesting the hypothesis that populations of healthy schoolchildren do not correspond to the selection factor (differential survival) of strains. Two highly polymorphic and distantly genetically related taxa (A and B) were identified within the total population of yeasts, each contained subgroups (A1, A2, A3, A4, B1 and B2) and clusters of moderately related strains (from I to X), suggesting the existence of strains restricted or not to certain groups of geographically limited, healthy students. However, the coexistence of identical strains in healthy schoolchildren from the same school (geographically related) reinforces the hypothesis of oral transmission, where the sources of propagation could be explored. Furthermore, this could also be used in current and retrospective analyses of C. albicans isolated from immunocompetent and immunocompromised people, in order to detect commensal or potentially pathogenic yeast groups, predominantly in candidiasis, and in the development of strategies to prevent transmission or human propagation. PMID:24031720

  15. Biotype stability of Candida albicans isolates after culture storage determined by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA and phenotypical methods.

    PubMed

    Bacelo, Katia Leston; da Costa, Karen Regina Carim; Ferreira, Joseane Cristina; Candido, Regina Celia

    2010-11-01

    Typing methods to evaluate isolates in relation to their phenotypical and molecular characteristics are essential in epidemiological studies. In this study, Candida albicans biotypes were determined before and after storage in order to verify their stability. Twenty C. albicans isolates were typed by Randomly Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD), production of phospholipase and proteinase exoenzymes (enzymotyping) and morphotyping before and after 180 days of storage in Sabouraud dextrose agar (SDA) and sterilised distilled water. Before the storage, 19 RAPD patterns, two enzymotypes and eight morphotypes were identified. The fragment patterns obtained by RAPD, on the one hand, were not significantly altered after storage. On the other hand, the majority of the isolates changed their enzymotype and morphotype after storage. RAPD typing provided the better discriminatory index (DI) among isolates (DI = 0.995) and maintained the profile identified, thereby confirming its utility in epidemiological surveys. Based on the low reproducibility observed after storage in SDA and distilled water by morphotyping (DI = 0.853) and enzymotyping (DI = 0.521), the use of these techniques is not recommended on stored isolates.

  16. Application of CHROMagar Candida for rapid screening of clinical specimens for Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis, Candida krusei, and Candida (Torulopsis) glabrata.

    PubMed Central

    Pfaller, M A; Houston, A; Coffmann, S

    1996-01-01

    CHROMagar Candida is a new differential culture medium that allows selective isolation of yeasts and simultaneously identifies colonies of Candida albicans, C. tropicalis, and C. krusei. We evaluated the use of this medium with 316 yeast isolates including 247 isolated directly on CHROMagar from clinical material. Over 95% of stock and clinical isolates of C. albicans, C. tropicalis, and C. krusei were correctly identified on the basis of colony morphology and pigmentation on CHROMagar. Additionally, CHROMagar also allowed the identification of C. (Torulopsis) glabrata at a similar level of accuracy. The overall agreement between two observers in reading the CHROMagar plates was 95%. Growth of Candida sp. isolates on CHROMagar had no adverse effect on antifungal MICs or Vitek identification results. In parallel, cultures of 548 stool and rectal swab specimens set up on CHROMagar and Sabouraud glucose agar (SGA) were positive in 234 instances. CHROMagar was positive and SGA was negative for 11 specimens, and CHROMagar was negative and SGA was positive for 18 specimens. A single yeast species was isolated on both media from 162 specimens, and in 146 (90%) of these specimens the same species was detected on both CHROMagar and SGA. A total of 43 of the 234 positive cultures contained mixtures of yeast species. Twenty (47%) of these mixed cultures were detected only on CHROMagar. CHROMagar is extremely useful in making a rapid presumptive identification of common yeast species. This capability plus the ability to detect mixed cultures of Candida spp. promises to improve and streamline the work flow in the mycology and clinical microbiology laboratory. PMID:8748273

  17. Hibiscus sabdariffa extract inhibits in vitro biofilm formation capacity of Candida albicans isolated from recurrent urinary tract infections

    PubMed Central

    Alshami, Issam; Alharbi, Ahmed E

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the prevention of recurrent candiduria using natural based approaches and to study the antimicrobial effect of Hibiscus sabdariffa (H. sabdariffa) extract and the biofilm forming capacity of Candida albicans strains in the present of the H. sabdariffa extract. Methods In this particular study, six strains of fluconazole resistant Candida albicans isolated from recurrent candiduria were used. The susceptibility of fungal isolates, time-kill curves and biofilm forming capacity in the present of the H. sabdariffa extract were determined. Results Various levels minimum inhibitory concentration of the extract were observed against all the isolates. Minimum inhibitory concentration values ranged from 0.5 to 2.0 mg/mL. Time-kill experiment demonstrated that the effect was fungistatic. The biofilm inhibition assay results showed that H. sabdariffa extract inhibited biofilm production of all the isolates. Conclusions The results of the study support the potential effect of H. sabdariffa extract for preventing recurrent candiduria and emphasize the significance of the plant extract approach as a potential antifungal agent. PMID:25182280

  18. Sensitization of Candida albicans to terbinafine by berberine and berberrubine

    PubMed Central

    LAM, PIKLING; KOK, STANTON HON LUNG; LEE, KENNETH KA HO; LAM, KIM HUNG; HAU, DESMOND KWOK PO; WONG, WAI YEUNG; BIAN, ZHAOXIANG; GAMBARI, ROBERTO; CHUI, CHUNG HIN

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans (C. albicans) is an opportunistic fungal pathogen, particularly observed in immunocompromised patients. C. albicans accounts for 50–70% of cases of invasive candidiasis in the majority of clinical settings. Terbinafine, an allylamine antifungal drug, has been used to treat fungal infections previously. It has fungistatic activity against C. albicans. Traditional Chinese medicines can be used as complementary medicines to conventional drugs to treat a variety of ailments and diseases. Berberine is a quaternary alkaloid isolated from the traditional Chinese herb, Coptidis Rhizoma, while berberrubine is isolated from the medicinal plant Berberis vulgaris, but is also readily derived from berberine by pyrolysis. The present study demonstrates the possible complementary use of berberine and berberrubine with terbinafine against C. albicans. The experimental findings assume that the potential application of these alkaloids together with reduced dosage of the standard drug would enhance the resulting antifungal potency. PMID:27073630

  19. Demineralizing potential of dental biofilm added with Candida albicans and Candida parapsilosis isolated from preschool children with and without caries.

    PubMed

    Caroline de Abreu Brandi, Thayse; Portela, Maristela Barbosa; Lima, Paula Moraes; Castro, Gloria Fernanda Barbosa de Araújo; Maia, Lucianne Cople; Fonseca-Gonçalves, Andréa

    2016-11-01

    This study aimed to investigate the demineralizing potential of dental biofilm added of Candida albicans (CA) and Candida parapsilosis (CP), isolated from preschoolers with and without caries. Bovine enamel blocks (n = 48), with initial hardness = 341.50 ± 21,83 kg/mm(2) were fixed in 24 well plates containing culture media. A pool of children saliva (PHS) was the inoculum for biofilm formation in the presence or absence of isolated CA or CP in accordance with each group (G n = 8): G1 - PHS; G2 - PHS + CA isolated from children with caries; G3 - PHS + CP isolated from children with caries; G4 - PHS + CA isolated from children without caries; G5 - PHS + CP isolated from children without caries; and G6 - blank control. The plates were incubated at 37 °C for 5 days, with daily changes of culture media. The microhardness loss percentage (MHL%) of the blocks was calculated, taking in account the hardness values before and after the experiment. Dental biofilm became more cariogenic, independently of the isolated Candida species. The highest MHL% was observed in G4 (85.90 ± 8.72%) and G5 (86.13 ± 6.74%) compared to the others (p < 0.001): G1 (34.30 ± 14,30%) < G2 (59.40 ± 10.56%) and G3 (65.80 ± 6.36%) < G6 (13.68 ± 4.86%) (p < 0.001). C. albicans and C. parapsilosis isolates induced the demineralization of the dental enamel.

  20. C. albicans Colonization of Human Mucosal Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Southern, Peter; Horbul, Julie; Maher, Diane; Davis, Dana A.

    2008-01-01

    Background Candida albicans is a low level commensal organism in normal human populations with the continuous potential to expand and cause a spectrum of clinical conditions. Methodology/Principal Findings Using ex vivo human organ cultures and populations of primary human cells, we have developed several related experimental systems to examine early-stage interactions between C. albicans and mucosal surfaces. Experiments have been conducted both with exogenously added C. albicans and with overtly normal human mucosal surfaces supporting pre-existing infections with natural isolates of Candida. Under different culture conditions, we have demonstrated the formation of C. albicans colonies on human target cells and filament formation, equivalent to tissue invasion. Conclusions/Significance These organ culture systems provide a valuable new resource to examine the molecular and cellular basis for Candida colonization of human mucosal surfaces. PMID:18446191

  1. Isolation, characterization and mechanism of action of an antimicrobial peptide from Lecythis pisonis seeds with inhibitory activity against Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Maria Eliza Brambila; Vasconcelos, Ilka Maria; Machado, Olga Lima Tavares; Gomes, Valdirene Moreira; Carvalho, André de Oliveira

    2015-09-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are produced by a range of organisms as a first line of defense against invaders or competitors. Owing to their broad antimicrobial activity, AMPs have attracted attention as a potential source of chemotherapeutic drugs. The increasing prevalence of infections caused by Candida species as opportunistic pathogens in immunocompromised patients requires new drugs. Lecythis pisonis is a Lecythydaceae tree that grows in Brazil. The AMPs produced by this tree have not been described previously. We describe the isolation of 12 fractions enriched in peptides from L. pisonis seeds. Of the 12 fractions, at 10 μg/ml, the F4 fraction had the strongest growth inhibitory effect (53.7%) in Candida albicans, in addition to a loss of viability of 94.9%. The F4 fraction was separated into seven sub-fractions by reversed-phase chromatography. The F4.7' fraction had the strongest activity at 10 μg/ml, inhibiting C. albicans growth by 38.5% and a 69.3% loss of viability. The peptide in F4.7' was sequenced and was found to be similar to plant defensins. For this reason, the peptide was named L. pisonis defensin 1 (Lp-Def1). The mechanism of action that is responsible for C. albicans inhibition by Lp-Def1 includes a slight increase of reactive oxygen species induction and a significant loss of mitochondrial function. The results described here support the future development of plant defensins, specifically Lp-Def1, as new therapeutic substances against fungi, especially C. albicans.

  2. Direct identification and recognition of yeast species from clinical material by using albicans ID and CHROMagar Candida plates.

    PubMed Central

    Baumgartner, C; Freydiere, A M; Gille, Y

    1996-01-01

    Two chromogenic media, Albicans ID and CHROMagar Candida agar plates, were compared with a reference medium, Sabouraud-chloramphenicol agar, and standard methods for the identification of yeast species. This study involved 951 clinical specimens. The detection rates for the two chromogenic media for polymicrobial specimens were 20% higher than that for the Sabouraud-chloramphenicol agar plates. The rates of identification of Candida albicans for Albicans ID and CHROMagar Candida agar plates were, respectively, 37.0 and 6.0% after 24 h of incubation and 93.6 and 92.2% after 72 h of incubation, with specificities of 99.8 and 100%. Furthermore, CHROMagar Candida plates identified 13 of 14 Candida tropicalis and 9 of 12 Candida krusei strains after 48 h of incubation. PMID:8789038

  3. Overexpression and mutation as a genetic mechanism of fluconazole resistance in Candida albicans isolated from human immunodeficiency virus patients in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Rosana, Yeva; Yasmon, Andi; Lestari, Delly Chipta

    2015-09-01

    Fluconazole is the standard treatment for oropharyngeal candidiasis, which is the third most common opportunistic infection in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS patients in Indonesia. Overuse of this drug could lead to the emergence of resistance. The objective of this study was to analyse the role of ERG11, CDR1, CDR2 and MDR1 gene overexpression and mutations in the ERG11 gene as a genetic mechanism of fluconazole resistance in Candida albicans isolated from HIV patients in Indonesia. Overexpression of ERG11, CDR1, CDR2 and MDR1 was analysed by real-time reverse transcription PCR, while ERG11 gene mutation analysis was performed using sequencing methods. Seventeen isolates out of 92 strains of C. albicans isolated from 108 HIV patients were found to be resistant to azole antifungals. The highest gene overexpression of ERG11 was found in C. albicans resistant to single fluconazole, while the highest gene overexpression of CDR2 was detected in all isolates of C. albicans resistant to multiple azoles. Amino acid substitutions were observed at six positions, i.e. D116E, D153E, I261V, E266D, V437I and V488I. The amino acid substitution I261V was identified in this study and was probably associated with fluconazole resistance. The combination of overexpression of CDR2 and ERG11 and mutation in the ERG11 gene was found to be a genetic mechanism of fluconazole resistance in C. albicans isolated from HIV patients in Indonesia.

  4. Evaluation of Albicans ID2 and Biggy agar for the isolation and direct identification of vaginal yeast isolates.

    PubMed

    Ilkit, Macit; Hilmioglu, Suleyha; Tasbakan, Meltem; Aydemir, Sohret

    2007-06-01

    In this study, 250 vaginal samples from patients with vulvovaginal candidosis were inoculated onto two chromogenic media, Albicans ID(2) and Biggy agar, as well as onto Sabouraud chloramphenicol agar, yielding a total of 63 yeast (25.2 %) on all three media. These strains were identified as Candida glabrata in 20 (31.8 %) samples, Candida albicans in 15 samples (23.8 %), Candida tropicalis in 10 samples (15.9 %), Candida krusei in five samples (7.9 %), Candida kefyr in five samples (7.9 %), Candida dubliniensis in four samples (6.3 %), Candida parapsilosis in two samples (3.2 %) and Candida guilliermondii in two samples (3.2 %). Mixed fungal cultures and bacterial growth or filamentous fungi were not detected on any of the selected media. The sensitivity and specificity of the Albicans ID(2) and Biggy agar with regard to the identification of C. albicans were 80.0 and 64.6 %, and 86.7 and 56.3 %, respectively. This study showed these two chromogenic media to be as effective as Sabouraud chloramphenicol agar with respect to fungal detection. However, neither Albicans ID(2) nor Biggy agar was sufficient for reliable differentiation of yeasts to the species level.

  5. [Isolation, identification and serotyping of yeasts obtained from the vaginal fluid in patients with clinical vaginitis].

    PubMed

    Mendoza, M; González, I; Bellorin, E J; Salazar, W; Mendoza, L; Zambrano, E A; de Albornoz, M C

    1999-03-01

    A study was carried out to determine the presence of Candida in 105 patients with clinical vaginitis who consulted in the Infectious Disease Unit of the Vargas Hospital after referral from Gynecology Service. Yeasts were detected in 23 cases (24%), and identified as C. albicans (12), C. tropicalis (5), C. guilliermondii (3), C. glabrata (2) and C. parapsilosis (1). The presence of hyphae was observed in 50% of the direct examinations, in which the isolated species was C. albicans. These structures were not observed in infections with other species of Candida. In this study, there was relatively little difference between the percentages of serotypes A and B, 58 % and 42, respectively. This is in contrast with previous studies reported in clinical material from Venezuela and other countries, in which serotype A presented a greater incidence than serotype B. Our observations suggest an increase in serotype B C. albicans in vaginal candidiasis.

  6. Comparing FTIR and RAPD techniques in the typing of C. albicans in a clinical set-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandt, Christophe L.; Sockalingum, Ganesh D.; Toubas, Dominique; Aubert, Dominique; Lepan, Herve; Lepouse, Claire; Jaussaud, Maryse; Leon, Alain; Pinon, Jean-Michel; Manfait, Michel

    2002-03-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic pathogen, generally though to be of endogenous origin, with however reported outbreaks. Epidemilogy of C. albicans has been studied so far by genotypic methods mainly, including the classical RAPD analysis. Albeit powerful, genotypic techniques are expensive, time consuming and complex to implement. FTIR spectroscopy is simple, rapid, inexpensive and an increasingly used technique for the identification of microorganisms. As a phenotypic method, it provides rapid whole cells 'fingerprinting' using few consumables and can detect very subtle differences between strains of the same species. In this study, C. albicans strains isolated from 50 patients from six hospital units were collected and studied by FTIR spectroscopy and RAPD-PCR. Discrimination of strains was computed using classification algorithms on selected features of the spectral data. Results from 10 patients, for whom iterative sampling was possible, are presented and discussed. Emphasis was laid on the reproducibility of dat for strain-level identification. FTIR analysis shows that (a) the C. albicans spectra were different from one patient to another, (b) seven patients exhibit each a homogeneous group while three patients display each two groups of strains. RAPD-PCR and FTIR analyses correlate quite well showing that FTIR spectroscopy could be a potential epidemiological tool in the control of nosocomial fungal infections.

  7. Directed mutagenesis in Candida albicans: one-step gene disruption to isolate ura3 mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, R.; Miller, S.M.; Kurtz, M.B.; Kirsch, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    A method for introducing specific mutations into the diploid Candida albicans by one-step gene disruption and subsequent UV-induced recombination was developed. The cloned C. albicans URA3 gene was disrupted with the C. albicans ADE2 gene, and the linearized DNA was used for transformation of two ade2 mutants, SGY-129 and A81-Pu. Both an insertional inactivation of the URA3 gene and a disruption which results in a 4.0-kilobase deletion were made. Southern hybridization analyses demonstrated that the URA3 gene was disrupted on one of the chromosomal homologs in 15 of the 18 transformants analyzed. These analyses also revealed restriction site dimorphism of EcoRI at the URA3 locus which provides a unique marker to distinguish between chromosomal homologs. This enabled us to show that either homolog could be disrupted and that disrupted transformants of SGY-129 contained more than two copies of the URA3 locus. The A81-Pu transformants heterozygous for the ura3 mutations were rendered homozygous and Ura- by UV-induced recombination. The homozygosity of a deletion mutant and an insertion mutant was confirmed by Southern hybridization. Both mutants were transformed to Ura+ with plasmids containing the URA3 gene and in addition, were resistant to 5-fluoro-orotic acid, a characteristic of Saccharomyces cerevisiae ura3 mutants as well as of orotidine-5'-phosphate decarboxylase mutants of other organisms.

  8. Prevalence and antifungal susceptibility of Candida albicans and its related species Candida dubliniensis and Candida africana isolated from vulvovaginal samples in a hospital of Argentina.

    PubMed

    Theill, Laura; Dudiuk, Catiana; Morano, Susana; Gamarra, Soledad; Nardin, María Elena; Méndez, Emilce; Garcia-Effron, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Candida africana taxonomical status is controversial. It was proposed as a separate species within the Candida albicans species complex; however, phylogenetic analyses suggested that it is an unusual variety of C. albicans. The prevalence of C. albicans-related species (Candida dubliniensis and C. africana) as vulvovaginal pathogens is not known in Argentina. Moreover, data on antifungal susceptibility of isolates causing vulvovaginal candidiasis is scarce. The aims of this study were to establish the prevalence of C. dubliniensis and C. africana in vaginal samples and to evaluate the antifungal susceptibilities of vaginal C. albicans species complex strains. We used a molecular-based method coupled with a new pooled DNA extraction methodology to differentiate C. dubliniensis and C. africana in a collection of 287 strains originally identified as C. albicans isolated from an Argentinian hospital during 2013. Antifungal susceptibilities to fluconazole, clotrimazole, itraconazole, voriconazole, nystatin, amphotericin B and terbinafine were evaluated by using the CLSI M27-A3 and M27-S4 documents. Of the 287 isolates, 4 C. dubliniensis and one C. africana strains (1.39% and 0.35% prevalence, respectively) were identified. This is the first description of C. africana in Argentina and its identification was confirmed by sequencing the ITS2 region and the hwp1 gene. C. dubliniensis and C. africana strains showed very low MIC values for all the tested antifungals. Fluconazole-reduced-susceptibility and azole cross-resistance were observed in 3.55% and 1.41% of the C. albicans isolates, respectively. These results demonstrate that antifungal resistance is still a rare phenomenon in this kind of isolates.

  9. Candida albicans Isolates from the Gut of Critically Ill Patients Respond to Phosphate Limitation by Expressing Filaments and a Lethal Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Valuckaite, Vesta; Rolfes, Ronda J.; Babrowski, Trissa; Bethel, Cindy; Olivas, Andrea; Zaborina, Olga; Alverdy, John C.

    2012-01-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic pathogen that proliferates in the intestinal tract of critically ill patients where it continues to be a major cause of infectious-related mortality. The precise cues that shift intestinal C. albicans from its ubiquitous indolent colonizing yeast form to an invasive and lethal filamentous form remain unknown. We have previously shown that severe phosphate depletion develops in the intestinal tract during extreme physiologic stress and plays a major role in shifting intestinal Pseudomonas aeruginosa to express a lethal phenotype via conserved phosphosensory-phosphoregulatory systems. Here we studied whether phosphate dependent virulence expression could be similarly demonstrated for C. albicans. C. albicans isolates from the stool of critically ill patients and laboratory prototype strains (SC5314, BWP17, SN152) were evaluated for morphotype transformation and lethality against C. elegans and mice during exposure to phosphate limitation. Isolates ICU1 and ICU12 were able to filament and kill C. elegans in a phosphate dependent manner. In a mouse model of intestinal phosphate depletion (30% hepatectomy), direct intestinal inoculation of C. albicans caused mortality that was prevented by oral phosphate supplementation. Prototype strains displayed limited responses to phosphate limitation; however, the pho4Δ mutant displayed extensive filamentation during low phosphate conditions compared to its isogenic parent strain SN152, suggesting that mutation in the transcriptional factor Pho4p may sensitize C. albicans to phosphate limitation. Extensive filamentation was also observed in strain ICU12 suggesting that this strain is also sensitized to phosphate limitation. Analysis of the sequence of PHO4 in strain ICU12, its transcriptional response to phosphate limitation, and phosphatase assays confirmed that ICU12 demonstrates a profound response to phosphate limitation. The emergence of strains of C. albicans with marked responsiveness

  10. Rapid characterisation of Candida albicans by pyrolysis mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    White, G C; Sisson, P R; Freeman, R; Cookson, B D

    1994-08-01

    Clinical isolates (41) of Candida spp. from three possible outbreaks of nosocomially-acquired infection were compared by pyrolysis mass spectrometry (PMS) and by a combined morphotyping and resistotyping (M-R typing) method. Both systems characterised all the isolates and distinguished one isolate of C. tropicalis and another of C. glabrata from the 39 isolates of C. albicans. Results from both systems suggested that cross-infection with a single strain contributed to two of the outbreaks. In several instances, more than one strain of C. albicans was found amongst multiple isolates from the same patient. PMS is a simple, rapid and objective technique capable of characterising C. albicans isolates; discrimination was similar to M-R typing.

  11. Effect of Tyrosol and Farnesol on Virulence and Antibiotic Resistance of Clinical Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Rhman, Shaymaa Hassan; El-Mahdy, Areej Mostafa; El-Mowafy, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Mixed-species biofilms could create a protected environment that allows for survival to external antimicrobials and allows different bacterial-fungal interactions. Pseudomonas aeruginosa-Candida albicans coexistence is an example for such mixed-species community. Numerous reports demonstrated how P. aeruginosa or its metabolites could influence the growth, morphogenesis, and virulence of C. albicans. In this study, we investigated how the C. albicans quorum sensing compounds, tyrosol and farnesol, might affect Egyptian clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa regarding growth, antibiotic sensitivity, and virulence. We could demonstrate that tyrosol possesses an antibacterial activity against P. aeruginosa (10 µM inhibited more than 50% of growth after 16 h cultivation). Moreover, we could show for the first time that tyrosol strongly inhibits the production of the virulence factors hemolysin and protease in P. aeruginosa, whereas farnesol inhibits, to lower extent, hemolysin production in this bacterial pathogen. Cumulatively, tyrosol is expected to strongly affect P. aeruginosa in mixed microbial biofilm.

  12. Candida glabrata: Review of Epidemiology, Pathogenesis, and Clinical Disease with Comparison to C. albicans

    PubMed Central

    Fidel, Paul L.; Vazquez, Jose A.; Sobel, Jack D.

    1999-01-01

    Until recently, Candida glabrata was considered a relatively nonpathogenic commensal fungal organism of human mucosal tissues. However, with the increased use of immunosuppressive agents, mucosal and systemic infections caused by C. glabrata have increased significantly, especially in the human immunodeficiency virus-infected population. A major obstacle in C. glabrata infections is their innate resistance to azole antimycotic therapy, which is very effective in treating infections caused by other Candida species. Candida glabrata, formerly known as Torulopsis glabrata, contrasts with other Candida species in its nondimorphic blastoconidial morphology and haploid genome. C. glabrata currently ranks second or third as the causative agent of superficial (oral, esophageal, vaginal, or urinary) or systemic candidal infections, which are often nosocomial. Currently, however, there are few recognized virulence factors of C. glabrata and little is known about the host defense mechanisms that protect against infection. Two established animal models (systemic and vaginal) have been established to study treatment, pathogenesis, and immunity. Treatment of C. glabrata infections can include azoles but often requires amphotericin B or flucytosine. This review summarizes all known clinical and experimental information about C. glabrata infections with comparisons to C. albicans as a means of contrasting the two species commonly observed and emphasizing the many recognized differences. PMID:9880475

  13. In vitro susceptibility of e.faecalis and c.albicans isolates from apical periodontitis to common antimicrobial agents, antibiotics and antifungal medicaments

    PubMed Central

    Yoldas, Oguz; Yilmaz, Sehnaz; Akcimen, Beril; Seydaoglu, Gulsah; Kipalev, Arzu; Koksal, Fatih

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro antimicrobial activity of 4 antibiotic agents (for E.faecalis) and 4 antifungal agents (for C.albicans) by agar dilution method. Additionally, modified strip diffusion method was used for detection of in vitro antimicrobial activities of 5% NaOCl, 2.5% NaOCl, 17% EDTA and 2% CHX and agar diffusion method for detection of in vitro susceptibilities of three intracanal medicaments for 18 E.faecalis and 18 C.albicans isolates from primary and secondary root canal infection. Isolates were recovered from 231 endodontic samples of patients, with the need of root canal treatment and retreatment. All tested E.faecalis isolates showed resistance to antibiotics. For irrigation solutions, 2% CHX was more effective in eliminating E.faecalis but 5% NaOCl showed larger inhibition zone than 2.5% NaOCl, 17% EDTA and 2% CHX. For intracanal medication, Ca(OH)2-CHX worked efficiently in killing E.faecalis isolates compared to Ca(OH)2-Steril saline solution, Ca(OH)2-Glycerin. For C.albicans, 18 isolates were susceptible to amphotericin B, nistatin, fluconazole but showed resistance to ketoconazole. 5% NaOCl was more effective in eliminating and produced larger inhibition zone compared to 2.5% NaOCl, 17% EDTA and 2% CHX. Ca(OH)2-Glycerin intracanal medication was better in eliminating C.albicans isolates and produced larger inhibition zone compared to other Ca(OH)2 medicaments. Key words:E.faecalis, C.albicans, antimicrobial, antibiotic, antifungal. PMID:24558517

  14. Rapid Identification of Yeast Isolates from Clinical Specimens in Critically Ill Trauma ICU Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Neetu; Mathur, Purva; Misra, Mahesh Chandra; Behera, Bijayini; Xess, Immaculata; Sharma, Satya Priya

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose was to evaluate the performance of a commercially available chromogenic Candida speciation media and the Vitek 2 ID system for the identification of medically important yeasts and yeast-like organisms in a routine clinical microbiology laboratory. Materials and Methods: A total of 429 non duplicate, consecutive yeast strains were included during the 3.5-year study period. The performance of the Vitek 2 ID system and a chromogenic agar medium was evaluated against the gold standard conventional phenotypic and biochemical identification method for speciation of yeast isolates from trauma patients. Results: Candida tropicalis (64%) was the most common Candida species, followed by Candida albicans (14%), Candida rugosa (7%), and Candida parapsilosis (6.5%). Of the 429 isolates, 183 could be identified to species level by all the three methods. Agreement between the chromogenic agar method and conventional methods was 80% for Candida tropicalis, 100% for Candida rugosa, 89% for Candida albicans, and 77% for Candida parapsilosis. Vitek 2 had lower sensitivity, with agreement of 49% for Candida tropicalis, 100% for Candida rugosa, 39% for Candida albicans, and 31% for Candida parapsilosis. Conclusion: Thus, in long-term ICU patients, an increasing trend of isolating nonalbicans Candida spp. continues. The chromogenic agar medium is a convenient and economic method to identify commonly isolated species in busy clinical microbiology laboratories. PMID:22923919

  15. Antimicrobial Efficacy of Probiotic and Herbal Oral Rinses against Candida albicans in Children: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, Shobha; Rathore, Monika; Banerjee, Molay

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: A growing number of dentists are embracing the philosophy that natural agents are better for children’s oral health. Knowledge of probiotics on host immune system has entered a new phase of research, and progression in this field is likely to offer novel means by modulating host immunity for prevention and treatment of a wide variety of oral diseases. Aim: To compare the antimicrobial efficacy of probiotics in reducing salivary Candida albicans counts with commonly used antimicrobial agents like 0.2% chlorhexidine and herbal rinse. Materials and methods: A randomized clinical trial was conducted on 60 subjects aged between 6 and 14 years, for a period of 9 months. The subjects were randomly divided into three groups comprising 20 subjects in each group. Three oral agents were administered twice daily for a maximum period of 1 week. Candida albicans counts were recorded before and after intervention and the results were submitted for statistical analysis using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 15.0 software. Results: The change in mean log10 colony-forming unit (CFU)/ ml of C. albicans in groups A to C was 0.43 ± 0.72, 0.68 ± 1.05 and 0.22 ± 0.66 CFU/ml respectively. Conclusion: Data obtained from the study demonstrated that probiotic rinse was equally effective as 0.2% chlorhexidine digluconate rinse in reducing C. albicans counts after 1 week of intervention. Herbal oral rinse was least effective. Probiotic oral rinses have opened new horizons in improvement of oral health by maintaining healthy ecosystem. However, a longitudinal study with larger sample size needs to be undertaken to evaluate the therapeutic effects of probiotics and herbal agents. How to cite this article: Mishra R, Tandon S, Rathore M, Banerjee M. Antimicrobial Efficacy of Probiotic and Herbal Oral Rinses against Candida albicans in Children: A Randomized Clinical Trial. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(1):25-30. PMID:27274151

  16. Murine model of concurrent oral and vaginal Candida albicans colonisation.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Durdana; Mistry, Mukesh; Thavaraj, Selvam; Naglik, Julian R; Challacombe, Stephen J

    2012-01-01

    Investigations into the complex interaction between the fungal pathogen Candida albicans and its human host require the use of animals as in vivo models. A major advance is the creation of a low-oestrogen murine model of concurrent oral and vaginal C. albicans colonisation that resembles human candidal carriage at both mucosal sites. Weekly intramuscular (5 μg) and subcutaneous (5 μg) oestrogen administration was determined as optimal, enhancing oral colonisation but essential for vaginal colonisation. Using a clinical C. albicans oral isolate, persistent colonisation for up to 6 weeks can be achieved at both sites in two strains of mice (BALB/c and C57BL/6). This concurrent model of mucosal colonisation reduces the numbers of experimental mice by half, and opens up new avenues of research in assessing potential mucosal vaccine candidates and in studying delicate host-pathogen interactions during the most natural state of C. albicans epithelial colonisation.

  17. Antifungal potential of eugenyl acetate against clinical isolates of Candida species.

    PubMed

    Musthafa, Khadar Syed; Hmoteh, Jutharat; Thamjarungwong, Benjamas; Voravuthikunchai, Supayang Piyawan

    2016-10-01

    The study evaluated the efficiency of eugenyl acetate (EA), a phytochemical in clove essential oil, against clinical isolates of Candida albicans, Candida parapsilosis, Candida tropicalis, and Candida glabrata. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of EA against Candida isolates were in the range between 0.1% and 0.4% (v/v). Spot assay further confirmed the susceptibility of Candida isolates to the compound upon treatment with respective 1 × MIC. Growth profile measured in time kill study evidence that the compound at 1 × MIC and 1/2 × MIC retarded the growth of Candida cells, divulging the fungicidal activity. Light microscopic observation demonstrated that upon treated with EA, rough cell morphology, cell damage, and fragmented patterns were observed in C. albicans, C. parapsilosis, C. tropicalis, and C. glabrata. Furthermore, unusual morphological changes of the organism were observed in scanning electron microscopic study. Therefore, it is validated that the compound could cause cell damage resulting in the cell death of Candida clinical isolates. Eventually, the compound at sub-MIC (0.0125% v/v) significantly inhibited serum-induced germ tube formation by C. albicans. Eugenyl acetate inhibited biofilm forming ability of the organisms as well as reduced the adherence of Candida cells to HaCaT keratinocytes cells. In addition, upon treatment with EA, the phagocytic activity of macrophages was increased significantly against C. albicans (P < 0.05). The results demonstrated the potential of EA as a valuable phytochemical to fight against emerging Candida infections.

  18. Clinical significance of the isolation of Candida species from hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Magalhães, Yankee C; Bomfim, Maria Rosa Q; Melônio, Luciane C; Ribeiro, Patrícia C S; Cosme, Lécia M; Rhoden, Cristianne R; Marques, Sirlei G

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we isolated and phenotypically identified 108 yeast strains from various clinical specimens collected from 100 hospitalized patients at three tertiary hospitals in São Luís-Maranhão, Brazil, from July to December 2010. The isolates were analyzed for their susceptibility to four of the most widely used antifungal agents in the surveyed hospitals, amphotericin B, fluconazole, 5-flucytosine and voriconazole. The species identified were Candida albicans (41.4%), Candida tropicalis (30.1%), C. glabrata (7.4%), Candida parapsilosis (5.5%), Candida krusei (4.6%), Cryptococcus neoformans (4.6%), Trichosporon spp . (3.7%), Candida norvegensis (0.9%), Rhodotorula glutinis (0.9%) and Pichia farinosa (0.9%). A higher isolation rate was observed in the following clinical specimens: urine (54 isolates; 50%), respiratory tract samples (21 isolates; 19.4%) and blood (20 isolates; 18.6%). Candida albicans isolates were 100% sensitive to all antifungal agents tested, whereas Candida krusei and Crytococcus neoformans displayed intermediate resistance to 5-flucytosine, with Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) values of 8 mg/mL and 16 mg/mL, respectively. Both strains were also S-DD to fluconazole with an MIC of 16 mg/mL. C. tropicalis was resistant to 5-flucytosine with an MIC of 32 μg/mL. This study demonstrates the importance of identifying the yeast species involved in community and nosocomial infections.

  19. Clinical isolates and laboratory reference Candida species and strains have varying abilities to form biofilms.

    PubMed

    Alnuaimi, Ali D; O'Brien-Simpson, Neil M; Reynolds, Eric C; McCullough, Michael J

    2013-11-01

    Candida biofilms are a major virulence trait for this yeast. In this study, the biofilm-forming ability of the major medically important clinical and laboratory reference strains was compared. Biofilms were quantified using traditional methods, that is, crystal violet (CV), tetrazolium (XTT) reduction and colony-forming unit assays (CFU), and two new methods: an automated cell counter (ACC) and biofilm suspension turbidity (BST) method. Biofilms could be categorized based on biofilm biomass (high, medium and low) and growth state (high and low). Candida albicans genotypes, A, B and C, showed medium biofilm mass and low growth rate, and only one C. albicans laboratory strain, ATCC MYA-2719, matched this biofilm category. Of all non-albicans Candida species tested, only Candida dubliniensis and Candida glabrata laboratory and clinical isolates had similar biofilm development. The ACC and BST methods for measuring biofilm significantly correlated with CV and CFU biofilm mass measurements. Thus, biofilm mass can be rapidly assessed using biofilm disruptive/cellular nondestructive methods allowing yeast biofilm cells to be used for further analysis. In conclusion, Candida laboratory reference strains and clinical isolates have been shown to form biofilms at different rates; hence for validity, the selection of laboratory reference strains in biofilm studies may be critical for virulence assessment.

  20. Misidentification of clinical yeast isolates by using the updated Vitek Yeast Biochemical Card.

    PubMed Central

    Dooley, D P; Beckius, M L; Jeffrey, B S

    1994-01-01

    The Vitek Yeast Biochemical Card (YBC) is widely used as a rapid identification (RI) (within 48 h) system for clinical yeast isolates. We compared the RI results obtained by the YBC technique with matched results obtained with the API 20C system. The RI of germ tube-negative yeasts isolated from 222 clinical specimens was performed with the YBC system, and the results were compared with those of standard identifications obtained by using the API 20C system and morphology, with additional biochemical reactions performed as required. Commonly isolated yeasts (Candida albicans [n = 29], Candida tropicalis [n = 40], Torulopsis [Candida] glabrata [n = 28], Candida parapsilosis [n = 12], and Cryptococcus neoformans [n = 14]) were generally well identified (115 of 123 [93%] identified correctly, with only C. albicans, C. tropicalis, and C. neoformans mis- or unidentified more than once). The RI of less commonly isolated yeasts included in the YBC database, however, was less successful (54 of 99 [55%] correct). The YBC card failed to identify 42% (10 of 24) of Candida krusei isolates, 80% (4 of 5) of Candida lambica isolates, 88% (7 of 8) of Trichosporon beigelii isolates, and 83% (10 of 12) of Cryptococcus isolates (non-C. neoformans species). For most identification failures (79%; 42 of 53) there was no identification by the end of 48 h; the other identification failures (21%; 11 of 53) gave definite but incorrect identifications. Of eight rare clinical yeast isolates not included in the Vitek database, six were correctly, not identified, while two (25%) were falsely assigned a definite RI (one Hansenula fabianii isolate was identified as Rhodotorula glutinis, and one Hansenula isolate [non-Hansenula anomala] was identified as Hansenula anomala). While the Vitek YBC rapidly and adequately identifies common yeast isolates, it fails in the RI of more unusual organisms. PMID:7883873

  1. CHROMagar Candida, a new differential isolation medium for presumptive identification of clinically important Candida species.

    PubMed Central

    Odds, F C; Bernaerts, R

    1994-01-01

    CHROMagar Candida is a novel, differential culture medium that is claimed to facilitate the isolation and presumptive identification of some clinically important yeast species. We evaluated the use of this medium with 726 yeast isolates, including 82 isolated directly on the medium from clinical material. After 2 days of incubation at 37 degrees C, 285 C. albicans isolates gave distinctive green colonies that were not seen with any of 441 other yeast isolates representing 21 different species. A total of 54 C. tropicalis isolates also developed distinctive dark blue-gray colonies with a halo of dark brownish purple in the surrounding agar. C. krusei isolates (n = 43) also formed highly characteristic rough, spreading colonies with pale pink centers and a white edge that was otherwise encountered only rarely with isolates of C. norvegensis. Trichosporon spp. (n = 34) formed small, pale colonies that became larger and characteristically rough with prolonged incubation. Most of the other 310 yeasts studied formed colonies with a color that ranged from white to pink to purple with a brownish tint. The only exceptions were found among isolates identified as Geotrichum sp. or Pichia sp., some of which formed colonies with a gray to blue color and which in two instances formed a green pigment or a dark halo in the agar. The specificity and sensitivity of the new medium for the presumptive identification of C. albicans, C. krusei, and C. tropicalis exceeded 99% for all three species. A blinded reading test involving four personnel and 57 yeast isolates representing nine clinically important species confirmed that colonial appearance after 48 h of incubation on CHROMagar Candida afforded the correct presumptive recognition of C. albicans, C. tropicalis, C, krusei, and Trichosporon spp. None of nine bacterial isolates grew on CHROMagar Candida within 72 h, and bacteria (Escherichia coli) grew from only 4 of 104 vaginal, 100 oral, and 99 anorectal swabs. The new medium

  2. Efficacy of the clinical agent VT-1161 against fluconazole-sensitive and -resistant Candida albicans in a murine model of vaginal candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Garvey, E P; Hoekstra, W J; Schotzinger, R J; Sobel, J D; Lilly, E A; Fidel, P L

    2015-09-01

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) and recurrent VVC (RVVC) remain major health problems for women. VT-1161, a novel fungal CYP51 inhibitor which has potent antifungal activity against fluconazole-sensitive Candida albicans, retained its in vitro potency (MIC50 of ≤0.015 and MIC90 of 0.12 μg/ml) against 10 clinical isolates from VVC or RVVC patients resistant to fluconazole (MIC50 of 8 and MIC90 of 64 μg/ml). VT-1161 pharmacokinetics in mice displayed a high volume of distribution (1.4 liters/kg), high oral absorption (73%), and a long half-life (>48 h) and showed rapid penetration into vaginal tissue. In a murine model of vaginal candidiasis using fluconazole-sensitive yeast, oral doses as low as 4 mg/kg VT-1161 significantly reduced the fungal burden 1 and 4 days posttreatment (P < 0.0001). Similar VT-1161 efficacy was measured when an isolate highly resistant to fluconazole (MIC of 64 μg/ml) but fully sensitive in vitro to VT-1161 was used. When an isolate partially sensitive to VT-1161 (MIC of 0.12 μg/ml) and moderately resistant to fluconazole (MIC of 8 μg/ml) was used, VT-1161 remained efficacious, whereas fluconazole was efficacious on day 1 but did not sustain efficacy 4 days posttreatment. Both agents were inactive in treating an infection with an isolate that demonstrated weaker potency (MICs of 2 and 64 μg/ml for VT-1161 and fluconazole, respectively). Finally, the plasma concentrations of free VT-1161 were predictive of efficacy when in excess of the in vitro MIC values. These data support the clinical development of VT-1161 as a potentially more efficacious treatment for VVC and RVVC.

  3. Photodynamic inactivation of clinical isolates of Candida using Photodithazine®.

    PubMed

    Dovigo, L N; Carmello, J C; Carvalho, M T; Mima, E G; Vergani, C E; Bagnato, V S; Pavarina, A C

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the photodynamic inactivation (PDI) mediated by Photodithazine(®) (PDZ) against 15 clinical isolates of Candida albicans, Candida glabrata and Candida tropicalis. Each isolate, in planktonic and biofilm form, was exposed to PDI by assessing a range of PDZ concentrations and light emitting diode fluences. Cell survival of the planktonic suspensions was determined by colony forming units (CFU ml(-1)). The antifungal effects of PDI against biofilms were evaluated by CFU ml(-1) and metabolic assay. Data were analyzed by non-parametric tests (α = 0.05). Regardless of the species, PDI promoted a significant viability reduction of planktonic yeasts. The highest reduction in cell viability of the biofilms was equivalent to 0.9 log10 (CFU ml(-1)) for C. albicans, while 1.4 and 1.5 log10 reductions were obtained for C. tropicalis and C. glabrata, respectively. PDI reduced the metabolic activity of biofilms by 62.1, 76.0, and 76.9% for C. albicans, C. tropicalis, and C. glabrata, respectively. PDZ-mediated PDI promoted significant reduction in the viability of Candida isolates.

  4. Synergistic Effects of Honey and Propolis toward Drug Multi-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus, Escherichia Coli and Candida Albicans Isolates in Single and Polymicrobial Cultures

    PubMed Central

    AL-Waili, Noori; Al-Ghamdi, Ahmad; Ansari, Mohammad Javed; Al-Attal, Y.; Salom, Khelod

    2012-01-01

    Background: Propolis and honey are natural bee products with wide range of biological and medicinal properties. The study investigated antimicrobial activity of ethyl alcohol extraction of propolis collected from Saudi Arabia (EEPS) and from Egypt (EEPE), and their synergistic effect when used with honey. Single and polymicrobial cultures of antibiotic resistant human pathogens were tested. Material and methods; Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus),), Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Candida albicans (C.albicans) were cultured in 10-100% (v/v) honey diluted in broth, or 0.08-1.0% (weight/volume) EEPS and EEPE diluted in broth. Four types of polymicrobial cultures were prepared by culturing the isolates with each other in broth (control) and broth containing various concentrations of honey or propolis. Microbial growth was assessed on solid plate media after 24 h incubation. Results; EEPS and EEPE inhibited antibiotic resistant E.coli, and S.aureus, and C.albicans in single and polymicrobial cultures. S.aureus became more susceptible when it was cultured with E.coli or C.albicans or when all cultured together. C.albicans became more susceptible when it was cultured with S.aureus or with E.coli and S. aureus together. The presence of ethyl alcohol or honey potentiated antimicrobial effect of propolis toward entire microbes tested in single or polymicrobial cultures. EEPS had lower MIC toward E.coli and C.albicans than EEPE. When propolis was mixed with honey, EEPS showed lower MIC than EEPE. In addition, honey showed lower MIC toward entire microbes when mixed with EEPS than when it was mixed with EEPE. Conclusion; 1) propolis prevents the growth of the microorganisms in single and mixed microbial cultures, and has synergistic effect when used with honey or ethyl alcohol, 2) the antimicrobial property of propolis varies with geographical origin, and 3) this study will pave the way to isolate active ingredients from honey and propolis to be further tested individually or

  5. An Optimized Lock Solution Containing Micafungin, Ethanol and Doxycycline Inhibits Candida albicans and Mixed C. albicans – Staphyloccoccus aureus Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Lown, Livia; Peters, Brian M.; Walraven, Carla J.; Noverr, Mairi C.; Lee, Samuel A.

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans is a major cause of catheter-related bloodstream infections and is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Due to the propensity of C. albicans to form drug-resistant biofilms, the current standard of care includes catheter removal; however, reinsertion may be technically challenging or risky. Prolonged exposure of an antifungal lock solution within the catheter in conjunction with systemic therapy has been experimentally attempted for catheter salvage. Previously, we demonstrated excellent in vitro activity of micafungin, ethanol, and high-dose doxycycline as single agents for prevention and treatment of C. albicans biofilms. Thus, we sought to investigate optimal combinations of micafungin, ethanol, and/or doxycycline as a lock solution. We performed two- and three-drug checkerboard assays to determine the in vitro activity of pairwise or three agents in combination for prevention or treatment of C. albicans biofilms. Optimal lock solutions were tested for activity against C. albicans clinical isolates, reference strains and polymicrobial C. albicans-S. aureus biofilms. A solution containing 20% (v/v) ethanol, 0.01565 μg/mL micafungin, and 800 μg/mL doxycycline demonstrated a reduction of 98% metabolic activity and no fungal regrowth when used to prevent fungal biofilm formation; however there was no advantage over 20% ethanol alone. This solution was also successful in inhibiting the regrowth of C. albicans from mature polymicrobial biofilms, although it was not fully bactericidal. Solutions containing 5% ethanol with low concentrations of micafungin and doxycycline demonstrated synergistic activity when used to prevent monomicrobial C. albicans biofilm formation. A combined solution of micafungin, ethanol and doxycycline is highly effective for the prevention of C. albicans biofilm formation but did not demonstrate an advantage over 20% ethanol alone in these studies. PMID:27428310

  6. Effectiveness of Hexetidine 0.1% in Eliminating Candida albicans Colonizing Dentures: A Randomized Clinical In Vivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Aoun, Georges; Nasseh, Ibrahim; Saadeh, Maria; Cassia, Antoine; Berberi, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    Background: Effective cleaning of dentures is important to maintain a good oral hygiene for patients suffering from denture stomatitis (DS). This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of hexetidine 0.1% in eliminating C. albicans colonizing dentures. Materials and Methods: A total of 40 denture wearers (18 men, 22 women; age range 40-80 years) with clinical evidence of DS were randomly divided into 2 groups, 1 test, and 1 control. The dentures of the test group were treated by immersion in hexetidine 0.1% while those of the control group were immersed in distilled water. Swab samples from the palatal surfaces of the upper dentures were collected before and after of cleaner use and examined mycologically. Results: Reduction in the number of colony-forming units (CFU) of C. albicans after immersion of the dentures with hexetidine 0.1% was evaluated compared to those of the control group. Conclusion: Hexetidine 0.1% solution tested for the first time as a product of disinfection of the acrylic dentures showed average results after immersion of 8 night hours for 4 days. PMID:26225095

  7. Microbiological screening of Irish patients with autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy reveals persistence of Candida albicans strains, gradual reduction in susceptibility to azoles, and incidences of clinical signs of oral candidiasis without culture evidence.

    PubMed

    McManus, Brenda A; McGovern, Eleanor; Moran, Gary P; Healy, Claire M; Nunn, June; Fleming, Pádraig; Costigan, Colm; Sullivan, Derek J; Coleman, David C

    2011-05-01

    Patients with autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED) are prone to chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis, which is often treated with azoles. The purpose of this study was to characterize the oral Candida populations from 16 Irish APECED patients, who comprise approximately half the total number identified in Ireland, and to examine the effect of intermittent antifungal therapy on the azole susceptibility patterns of Candida isolates. Patients attended between one and four clinical evaluations over a 5-year period, providing oral rinses and/or oral swab samples each time. Candida was recovered from 14/16 patients, and Candida albicans was the only Candida species identified. Interestingly, clinical diagnosis of candidiasis did not correlate with microbiological evidence of Candida infection at 7/22 (32%) clinical assessments. Multilocus sequence typing analysis of C. albicans isolates recovered from the same patients on separate occasions identified the same sequence type each time. Fluconazole resistance was detected in isolates from one patient, and isolates exhibiting a progressive reduction in itraconazole and/or fluconazole susceptibility were identified in a further 3/16 patients, in each case correlating with the upregulation of CDR- and MDR-encoded efflux pumps. Mutations were also identified in the ERG11 and the TAC1 genes of isolates from these four patients; some of these mutations have previously been associated with azole resistance. The findings suggest that alternative Candida treatment options, other than azoles such as chlorhexidine, should be considered in APECED patients and that clinical diagnosis of oral candidiasis should be confirmed by culture prior to the commencement of anti-Candida therapy.

  8. Lipidomics and in Vitro Azole Resistance in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ashutosh; Mahto, Kaushal Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Abstract We have shown earlier that fluconazole (FLC) stress induces global changes in the lipidome of Candida albicans in clinically adapted isolates. However, several laboratories have developed adapted in vitro FLC resistant strains of C. albicans to study azole resistance mechanisms. This study aimed to identify the lipid changes associated with FLC resistance in these in vitro adapted isolates. Using comparative lipidomics and principal component and discriminant analyses, we observed gradual changes in several lipid classes and molecular species upon FLC exposure of in vitro resistant C. albicans strains. Although the lipid imprint of FLC in vitro resistant isolates was very distinct from that of clinical isolates of C. albicans, the overall changes in lipid class compositions were similar in both cases. For example, an increased sterol content and depleted sphingolipid levels were the salient features of FLC resistance in both conditions. Taken together, it appears that the overall cellular lipid homeostasis is a critical factor in the observed FLC resistance and in handling FLC stress in both clinical and laboratory situations. The new observations reported herein have implications for more efficacious antifungal drug development as well as understanding host–infectious agent interactions in postgenomics microbiology practice. PMID:23374108

  9. High throughput multiplex-PCR for direct detection and diagnosis of dermatophyte species, Candida albicans and Candida parapsilosis in clinical specimen.

    PubMed

    Vahidnia, Ali; Bekers, Wouter; Bliekendaal, Harry; Spaargaren, Joke

    2015-06-01

    We have developed and validated a multiplex-PCR method for detection of dermatophyte spp., Candida albicans and parapsilosis for routine diagnostics. Our m-PCR showed excellent concordance with culture results in 475 clinical samples. Through the rapid diagnosis by our m-PCR, clinicians are able to initiate adequate antimycotic therapy much earlier.

  10. In vitro photodynamic inactivation effects of cationic benzylidene cyclopentanone photosensitizers on clinical fluconazole-resistant Candida albicans planktonic cells and biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shaona; Fang, Yanyan; Ye, Zulin; Wang, Ying; Zhao, Yuxia; Gu, Ying

    2016-10-01

    Background: An increasing prevalence of Candida infections has emerged with the wide use of immune-suppressants and antibiotics. Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) as a new approach to treat localized Candida infections is an emerging and promising field nowadays. This study evaluated the efficacy of photodynamic therapy using two new Cationic benzylidene cyclopentanone photosensitizers(P1 and P2) against strains of clinical fluconazole-resistant Candida albicans. Methods: Suspensions and biofilms of Candida species were incubated with P1 and P2 concentrations (0.25 50 μM) for 30 min followed by 532nm laser irradiation. For planktonic suspensions, viability of cells was assayed by CFU counting. For biofilms, the metabolic activity was evaluated by XTT. Results: In PDI of a planktonic culture of clinical fluconazole-resistant Candida albicans, P2 showed the higher efficacy. After incubation with 25 μM of P2 for 30 min and irradiation with 532nm laser (36 J cm-2), the viability of C. albicans planktonic cells decreased by 3.84 log10. For biofilm cells, a higher light dose of 75 mW cm-2 was necessary to achieve 97.71% metabolic activity reduction. Conclusions: The results of this investigation demonstrated that benzylidene cyclopentanone photosensitizer, P2, is an efficient photosensitizer to kill C. albicans. Moreover, single-species biofilms were less susceptible to PDT than their planktonic counterparts.

  11. Multi-species biofilm of Candida albicans and non-Candida albicans Candida species on acrylic substrate

    PubMed Central

    K PATHAK, Apurva; SHARMA, Sanjay; SHRIVASTVA, Pallavi

    2012-01-01

    Objective In polymicrobial biofilms bacteria extensively interact with Candida species, but the interaction among the different species of the Candida is yet to be completely evaluated. In the present study, the difference in biofilm formation ability of clinical isolates of four species of Candida in both single-species and multi-species combinations on the surface of dental acrylic resin strips was evaluated. Material and Methods The species of Candida, isolated from multiple species oral candidiasis of the neutropenic patients, were used for the experiment. Organisms were cultured on Sabouraud dextrose broth with 8% glucose (SDB). Biofilm production on the acrylic resins strips was determined by crystal violet assay. Student's t-test and ANOVA were used to compare in vitro biofilm formation for the individual species of Candida and its different multi-species combinations. Results In the present study, differences between the mean values of the biofilm-forming ability of individual species (C. glabrata>C. krusei>C. tropicalis>C. albicans) and in its multi-species' combinations (the highest for C. albicans with C. glabrata and the lowest for all the four species combination) were reported. Conclusions The findings of this study showed that biofilm-forming ability was found greater for non-Candida albicans Candida species (NCAC) than for C. albicans species with intra-species variation. Presence of C. albicans in multi-species biofilms increased, whereas; C. tropicalis decreased the biofilm production with all other NCAC species. PMID:22437681

  12. Comparison of Antimicrobial Activity of Chlorhexidine, Coconut Oil, Probiotics, and Ketoconazole on Candida albicans Isolated in Children with Early Childhood Caries: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed Bijapur, Gufran; Kottayi, Soni; Jose, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Background. Early childhood caries (ECC) is associated with early colonisation and high levels of cariogenic microorganisms. With C. albicans being one of those, there is a need to determine the effectiveness of various chemotherapeutic agents against it. The study is aimed at isolating Candida species in children with ECC and at studying the antifungal effect of coconut oil, probiotics, Lactobacillus, and 0.2% chlorhexidine on C. albicans in comparison with ketoconazole. Materials and Methods. Samples were collected using sterile cotton swabs, swabbed on the tooth surfaces from children with ECC of 3 to 6 yrs and streaked on Sabouraud dextrose agar (HI Media) plates and incubated in a 5% CO2 enriched atmosphere at 37°C for 24 hours. Candida was isolated and its susceptibility to probiotics, chlorhexidine, ketoconazole, and coconut oil was determined using Disc Diffusion method. Results. The mean zone of inhibition for chlorhexidine was 21.8 mm, whereas for coconut oil it was 16.8 mm, for probiotics it was 13.5 mm, and for ketoconazole it was 22.3 mm. The difference between the groups was not statistically significant (Chi-square value 7.42, P value 0.06). Conclusion. Chlorhexidine and coconut oil have shown significant antifungal activity which is comparable with ketoconazole. PMID:27051559

  13. Comparison of Antimicrobial Activity of Chlorhexidine, Coconut Oil, Probiotics, and Ketoconazole on Candida albicans Isolated in Children with Early Childhood Caries: An In Vitro Study.

    PubMed

    Shino, Beena; Peedikayil, Faizal C; Jaiprakash, Shyamala R; Ahmed Bijapur, Gufran; Kottayi, Soni; Jose, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Background. Early childhood caries (ECC) is associated with early colonisation and high levels of cariogenic microorganisms. With C. albicans being one of those, there is a need to determine the effectiveness of various chemotherapeutic agents against it. The study is aimed at isolating Candida species in children with ECC and at studying the antifungal effect of coconut oil, probiotics, Lactobacillus, and 0.2% chlorhexidine on C. albicans in comparison with ketoconazole. Materials and Methods. Samples were collected using sterile cotton swabs, swabbed on the tooth surfaces from children with ECC of 3 to 6 yrs and streaked on Sabouraud dextrose agar (HI Media) plates and incubated in a 5% CO2 enriched atmosphere at 37°C for 24 hours. Candida was isolated and its susceptibility to probiotics, chlorhexidine, ketoconazole, and coconut oil was determined using Disc Diffusion method. Results. The mean zone of inhibition for chlorhexidine was 21.8 mm, whereas for coconut oil it was 16.8 mm, for probiotics it was 13.5 mm, and for ketoconazole it was 22.3 mm. The difference between the groups was not statistically significant (Chi-square value 7.42, P value 0.06). Conclusion. Chlorhexidine and coconut oil have shown significant antifungal activity which is comparable with ketoconazole.

  14. Effect of Tyrosol and Farnesol on Virulence and Antibiotic Resistance of Clinical Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Hassan Abdel-Rhman, Shaymaa; Mostafa El-Mahdy, Areej; El-Mowafy, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Mixed-species biofilms could create a protected environment that allows for survival to external antimicrobials and allows different bacterial-fungal interactions. Pseudomonas aeruginosa-Candida albicans coexistence is an example for such mixed-species community. Numerous reports demonstrated how P. aeruginosa or its metabolites could influence the growth, morphogenesis, and virulence of C. albicans. In this study, we investigated how the C. albicans quorum sensing compounds, tyrosol and farnesol, might affect Egyptian clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa regarding growth, antibiotic sensitivity, and virulence. We could demonstrate that tyrosol possesses an antibacterial activity against P. aeruginosa (10 µM inhibited more than 50% of growth after 16 h cultivation). Moreover, we could show for the first time that tyrosol strongly inhibits the production of the virulence factors hemolysin and protease in P. aeruginosa, whereas farnesol inhibits, to lower extent, hemolysin production in this bacterial pathogen. Cumulatively, tyrosol is expected to strongly affect P. aeruginosa in mixed microbial biofilm. PMID:26844228

  15. Micafungin triggers caspase-dependent apoptosis in Candida albicans and Candida parapsilosis biofilms, including caspofungin non-susceptible isolates.

    PubMed

    Shirazi, F; Kontoyiannis, D P

    2015-01-01

    Candida biofilms play an important role in infections associated with medical devices and are resistant to antifungals. We hypothesized that the echinocandin micafungin (MICA) exerts an enhanced antifungal activity against caspofungin (CAS)-susceptible (CAS-S) and CAS-non-susceptible (CAS-NS) Candida albicans and Candida parapsilosis which is at least in part through apoptosis, even in the biofilm environment. Apoptosis was characterized by detecting reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), DNA fragmentation, lack of plasma membrane integrity, and metacaspase activation following exposure of Candida biofilm to MICA for 3h at 37°C in RPMI 1640 medium. The minimum inhibitory concentration was higher for CAS (2.0-16.0 μg/mL) than for MICA (1.0-8.0 μg/mL) for Candida biofilms. Elevated intracellular ROS levels and depolarization of MMP was evident in CAS-S C. albicans (3.0-4.2 fold) and C. parapsilosis (4.8-5.4 fold) biofilms compared with CAS-NS (1.2 fold) after exposure to MICA (0.25x-1xMIC). Elevated intracellular ROS levels and depolarization of MMP was evident in CAS-S C. albicans (3.0-4.2 fold) and C. parapsilosis (4.8-5.4 fold) biofilms compared with CAS-NS (1.2 fold) after exposure to MICA (0.25x-1xMIC). Finally higher ß-1, 3 glucan levels were seen in sessile cells compared to planktonic cells, especially in CAS-NS strains. MICA treatment might induce a metacaspase-dependent apoptotic process in biofilms of both CAS-S C. albicans and C. parapsilosis, and to some degree in CAS-NS strains.

  16. Isolation and characterization of Candida albicans morphological mutants derepressed for the formation of filamentous hypha-type structures

    SciTech Connect

    Gil, C.; Pomes, R.; Nombela, C. )

    1990-05-01

    Several Candida albicans morphological mutants were obtained by a procedure based on a combined treatment with nitrous acid plus UV irradiation and a double-enrichment step to increase the proportion of mutants growing as long filamentous structures. Altered cell morphogenesis in these mutants correlated with an altered colonial phenotype. Two of these mutants, C. albicans NEL102 and NEL103, were selected and characterized. Mutant blastoconidia initiated budding but eventually gave rise to filamentous hypha-type formations. These filaments were long and septate, and they branched very regularly at positions near septa. Calcofluor white (which is known to bind chitin-rich areas) stained septa, branching zones, and filament tips very intensely, as observed under the fluorescence microscope. Wild-type hybrids were obtained by fusing protoplasts of strain NEL102 with B14, another morphological mutant previously described as being permanently pseudomycelial, indicating that genetic determinants responsible for the two altered phenotypes are different. The mutants characterized in this work seemed to sequentially express the morphogenic characteristics of C. albicans, from blastoconidia to hyphae, in the absence of any inducer. Further characterization of these strains could be relevant to gain understanding of the genetic control of dimorphism in this species.

  17. Activity of Isavuconazole and Other Azoles against Candida Clinical Isolates and Yeast Model Systems with Known Azole Resistance Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Coste, Alix T.

    2015-01-01

    Isavuconazole is a novel, broad-spectrum, antifungal azole. In order to evaluate its interactions with known azole resistance mechanisms, isavuconazole susceptibility among different yeast models and clinical isolates expressing characterized azole resistance mechanisms was tested and compared to those of fluconazole, itraconazole, posaconazole, and voriconazole. Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing the Candida albicans and C. glabrata ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters (CDR1, CDR2, and CgCDR1), major facilitator (MDR1), and lanosterol 14-α-sterol-demethylase (ERG11) alleles with mutations were used. In addition, pairs of C. albicans and C. glabrata strains from matched clinical isolates with known azole resistance mechanisms were investigated. The expression of ABC transporters increased all azole MICs, suggesting that all azoles tested were substrates of ABC transporters. The expression of MDR1 did not increase posaconazole, itraconazole, and isavuconazole MICs. Relative increases of azole MICs (from 4- to 32-fold) were observed for fluconazole, voriconazole, and isavuconazole when at least two mutations were present in the same ERG11 allele. Upon MIC testing of azoles with clinical C. albicans and C. glabrata isolates with known resistance mechanisms, the MIC90s of C. albicans for fluconazole, voriconazole, itraconazole, posaconazole, and isavuconazole were 128, 2, 1, 0.5, and 2 μg/ml, respectively, while in C. glabrata they were 128, 2, 4, 4, and 16 μg/ml, respectively. In conclusion, the effects of azole resistance mechanisms on isavuconazole did not differ significantly from those of other azoles. Resistance mechanisms in yeasts involving ABC transporters and ERG11 decreased the activity of isavuconazole, while MDR1 had limited effect. PMID:26482310

  18. Comparison of a spectrophotometric microdilution method with RPMI-2% glucose with the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards reference macrodilution method M27-P for in vitro susceptibility testing of amphotericin B, flucytosine, and fluconazole against Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Tudela, J L; Berenguer, J; Martínez-Suárez, J V; Sanchez, R

    1996-01-01

    The National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards has proposed a reference broth macrodilution method for in vitro antifungal susceptibility testing of yeasts (the M27-P method). This method is cumbersome and time-consuming and includes MIC endpoint determination by visual and subjective inspection of growth inhibition after 48 h of incubation. An alternative microdilution procedure was compared with the M27-P method for determination of the amphotericin B, flucytosine, and fluconazole susceptibilities of 8 American Type Culture Collection strains (6 of them were quality control or reference strains) and 50 clinical isolates of candida albicans. This microdilution method uses as culture medium RPMI 1640 supplemented with 18 g of glucose per liter (RPMI-2% glucose). Preparation of drugs, basal medium, and inocula was done by following the recommendations of the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards. The MIC endpoint was calculated objectively from the turbidimetric data read at 24 h. Increased growth of C. albicans in RPMI-2% glucose and its spectrophotometric reading allowed for the rapid (24 h) and objective calculation of MIC endpoints compared with previous microdilution methods with standard RPMI 1640. Nevertheless, good agreement was shown between the M27-P method and this microdilution test. The MICs obtained for the quality control or reference strains by the microdilution method were in the ranges published for those strains. For clinical isolates, the percentages of agreement were 100% for amphotericin B and fluconazole and 98.1% for flucytosine. These data suggest that this microdilution method may serve as a less subjective and more rapid alternative to the M27-P method for antifungal susceptibility testing of yeasts. PMID:8878570

  19. Clinical factors associated with a Candida albicans Germ Tube Antibody positive test in Intensive Care Unit patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Poor outcomes of invasive candidiasis (IC) are associated with the difficulty in establishing the microbiological diagnosis at an early stage. New scores and laboratory tests have been developed in order to make an early therapeutic intervention in an attempt to reduce the high mortality associated with invasive fungal infections. Candida albicans IFA IgG has been recently commercialized for germ tube antibody detection (CAGTA). This test provides a rapid and simple diagnosis of IC (84.4% sensitivity and 94.7% specificity). The aim of this study is to identify the patients who could be benefited by the use of CAGTA test in critical care setting. Methods A prospective, cohort, observational multicentre study was carried out in six medical/surgical Intensive care units (ICU) of tertiary-care Spanish hospitals. Candida albicans Germ Tube Antibody test was performed twice a week if predetermined risk factors were present, and serologically demonstrated candidiasis was considered if the testing serum dilution was ≥ 1:160 in at least one sample and no other microbiological evidence of invasive candidiasis was found. Results Fifty-three critically ill non-neutropenic patients (37.7% post surgery) were included. Twenty-two patients (41.5%) had CAGTA-positive results, none of them with positive blood culture for Candida. Neither corrected colonization index nor antifungal treatment had influence on CAGTA results. This finding could corroborate that the CAGTA may be an important biomarker to distinguish between colonization and infection in these patients. The presence of acute renal failure at the beginning of the study was more frequent in CAGTA-negative patients. Previous surgery was statistically more frequent in CAGTA-positive patients. Conclusions This study identified previous surgery as the principal clinical factor associated with CAGTA-positive results and emphasises the utility of this promising technique, which was not influenced by high Candida

  20. Azole Antifungal Resistance in Candida albicans and Emerging Non-albicans Candida Species

    PubMed Central

    Whaley, Sarah G.; Berkow, Elizabeth L.; Rybak, Jeffrey M.; Nishimoto, Andrew T.; Barker, Katherine S.; Rogers, P. David

    2017-01-01

    Within the limited antifungal armamentarium, the azole antifungals are the most frequent class used to treat Candida infections. Azole antifungals such as fluconazole are often preferred treatment for many Candida infections as they are inexpensive, exhibit limited toxicity, and are available for oral administration. There is, however, extensive documentation of intrinsic and developed resistance to azole antifungals among several Candida species. As the frequency of azole resistant Candida isolates in the clinical setting increases, it is essential to elucidate the mechanisms of such resistance in order to both preserve and improve upon the azole class of antifungals for the treatment of Candida infections. This review examines azole resistance in infections caused by C. albicans as well as the emerging non-albicans Candida species C. parapsilosis, C. tropicalis, C. krusei, and C. glabrata and in particular, describes the current understanding of molecular basis of azole resistance in these fungal species. PMID:28127295

  1. Codetection of Trichomonas vaginalis and Candida albicans by PCR in Urine Samples in a Low-Risk Population Attended in a Clinic First Level in Central Veracruz, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    López-Monteon, A.; Gómez-Figueroa, F. S.; Ramos-Poceros, G.; Guzmán-Gómez, D.; Ramos-Ligonio, A.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to estimate the prevalence of Trichomonas vaginalis and Candida albicans in low-risk patients treated at a first level clinic (primary health care represents the first level of contact of individuals, families, and the community with the system national health). Using a cross-sectional study in patients treated in clinical laboratory of the Sanitary District no. 7 of the city of Orizaba during the months June-July, 252 urine samples were collected for the identification of T. vaginalis and C. albicans by PCR. Furthermore, we analyzed the sociodemographic characteristics of the studied population. We observed an overall prevalence of 23.41% (95% CI 22.10–24.72) for T. vaginalis and 38.88% (95% CI 37.73–40.03) for C. albicans. There was also presence of coinfection in 14.28% (95% CI 13.10–15.46), which was associated with the presence of pain. Most of the positive cases were observed in women house-maker (80%, 95% CI 50.36–48.98). The results of this study provide evidence that the majority of positive cases observed in the studied population are presented in an asymptomatic form and usually are not associated with any risk factor. PMID:24069593

  2. Ocimum sanctum essential oil inhibits virulence attributes in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Khan, Amber; Ahmad, Aijaz; Xess, Immaculata; Khan, Luqman A; Manzoor, Nikhat

    2014-03-15

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic human fungal pathogen which causes disease mainly in immunocompromised patients. Activity of hydrolytic enzymes is essential for virulence of C. albicans and so is the capacity of these cells to undergo transition from yeast to mycelial form of growth. Ocimum sanctum is cultivated worldwide for its essential oil which exhibits medicinal properties. This work evaluates the anti-virulence activity of O. sanctum essential oil (OSEO) on 22 strains of C. albicans (including a standard strain ATCC 90028) isolated from both HIV positive and HIV negative patients. Candida isolates were exposed to sub-MICs of OSEO. In vitro secretion of proteinases and phospholipases was evaluated by plate assay containing BSA and egg yolk respectively. Morphological transition from yeast to filamentous form was monitored microscopically in LSM. For genetic analysis, respective genes associated with morphological transition (HWP1), proteinase (SAP1) and phospholipase (PLB2) were also investigated by Real Time PCR (qRT-PCR). Results were analyzed using Student's t-test. OSEO inhibits morphological transition in C. albicans and had a significant inhibitory effect on extracellular secretion of proteinases and phospholipases. Expression profile of respective selected genes associated with C. albicans virulence by qRT-PCR showed a reduced expression of HWP1, SAP1 and PLB2 genes in cells treated with sub-inhibitory concentrations of OSEO. This work suggests that OSEO inhibits morphological transition in C. albicans and decreases the secretion of hydrolytic enzymes involved in the early stage of infection as well as down regulates the associated genes. Further studies will assess the clinical application of OSEO and its constituents in the treatment of fungal infections.

  3. Activity of 2,4-Di-tert-butylphenol produced by a strain of Streptomyces mutabilis isolated from a Saharan soil against Candida albicans and other pathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Belghit, S; Driche, E H; Bijani, C; Zitouni, A; Sabaou, N; Badji, B; Mathieu, F

    2016-06-01

    In a search for new antifungal antibiotics active against Candida albicans and others pathogenic fungi, a strain of actinobacteria, designated G61, was isolated from a Saharan soil and tested for its activity against these microorganisms. The analysis of its 16S rDNA sequence showed a similarity level of 100% with Streptomyces mutabilis NBRC 12800(T). The highest anticandidal activities produced by the strain G61 were obtained on Bennett medium in the fourth day of incubation. The active product, extracted by n-butanol, contained one bioactive spot detected on thin layer chromatography plates. It was purified by HPLC and its chemical structure was determined by spectroscopic analyses as 2,4-Di-tert-butylphenol. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of this product against several strains of pathogenic microorganisms are interesting.

  4. Azole resistance in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Smith, K J; Warnock, D W; Kennedy, C T; Johnson, E M; Hopwood, V; Van Cutsem, J; Vanden Bossche, H

    1986-04-01

    An isolate of Candida albicans from a patient with chronic mucocutaneous candidosis who relapsed during ketoconazole treatment was compared with a number of other azole-sensitive and azole-resistant isolates by tests in vitro and in three animal models of vaginal or disseminated infection. In-vitro tests indicated that the isolate was cross-resistant to all imidazole and triazole antifungals tested. In the animal models, treatment with miconazole, ketoconazole, itraconazole or fluconazole failed to influence the infection.

  5. Rapid detection and identification of Candida albicans and Torulopsis (Candida) glabrata in clinical specimens by species-specific nested PCR amplification of a cytochrome P-450 lanosterol-alpha-demethylase (L1A1) gene fragment.

    PubMed Central

    Burgener-Kairuz, P; Zuber, J P; Jaunin, P; Buchman, T G; Bille, J; Rossier, M

    1994-01-01

    PCR of a Candida albicans cytochrome P-450 lanosterol-alpha-demethylase (P450-L1A1) gene segment is a rapid and sensitive method of detection in clinical specimens. This enzyme is a target for azole antifungal action. In order to directly detect and identify the clinically most important species of Candida, we cloned and sequenced 1.3-kbp fragments of the cytochrome P450-L1A1 genes from Torulopsis (Candida) glabrata and from Candida krusei. These segments were compared with the published sequences from C. albicans and Candida tropicalis. Amplimers for gene sequences highly conserved throughout the fungal kingdom were first used; positive PCR results were obtained for C. albicans, T. glabrata, C. krusei, Candida parapsilosis, C. tropicalis, Cryptococcus neoformans, and Trichosporon beigelii DNA extracts. Primers were then selected for a highly variable region of the gene, allowing the species-specific detection from purified DNA of C. albicans, T. glabrata, C. krusei, and C. tropicalis. The assay sensitivity as tested for C. albicans in seeded clinical specimens such as blood, peritoneal fluid, or urine was 10 to 20 cells per 0.1 ml. Compared with results obtained by culture, the sensitivity, specificity, and efficiency of the species-specific nested PCR tested with 80 clinical specimens were 71, 95, and 83% for C. albicans and 100, 97, and 98% for T. glabrata, respectively. Images PMID:7989540

  6. Assessing the potential of four cathelicidins for the management of mouse candidiasis and Candida albicans biofilms.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haining; Liu, Xuelian; Wang, Chen; Qiao, Xue; Wu, Sijin; Wang, Hui; Feng, Lan; Wang, Yipeng

    2016-02-01

    As the most common fungal pathogen of humans, severe drug resistance has emerged in the clinically isolated Candida albicans, which lead to the urgency to develop novel antifungal agents. Here, four our previously characterized cathelicidins (cathelicidin-BF, Pc-CATH1, Cc-CATH2, Cc-CATH3) were selected and their antifungal activities against C. albicans were evaluated in vitro and in vivo using amphotericin B and LL-37 as control. Results showed that all four cathelicidins could eradicate standard and clinically isolated C. albicans strains with most MIC values ranging from 1 to 16 μg/ml, in less than 0.5 h revealed by time-kill kinetic assay. Four peptides only exhibited slight hemolytic activity with most HC50 > 200 μg/ml, and retained potent anti-C. albicans activity at salt concentrations below and beyond physiological level. In animal experiment, 50 mg/kg administration of the four cathelicidins could significantly reduce the fungal counts in a murine oral candidiasis model induced by clinically isolated C. albicans. The antibiofilm activity of cathelicidin-BF, the most potent among the five peptides was evaluated, and result showed that cathelicidin-BF strongly inhibited C. albicans biofilm formation at 20 μg/ml. Furthermore, cathelicidin-BF also exhibited potent anti-C. albicans activity in established biofilms as measured by metabolic and fluorescent viability assays. Structure-function analyses suggest that they mainly adopt an α-helical conformations, which enable them to act as a membrane-active molecule. Altogether, the four cathelicidins display great potential for antifungal agent development against candidiasis.

  7. Genetic and phenotypic intra-species variation in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Hirakawa, Matthew P; Martinez, Diego A; Sakthikumar, Sharadha; Anderson, Matthew Z; Berlin, Aaron; Gujja, Sharvari; Zeng, Qiandong; Zisson, Ethan; Wang, Joshua M; Greenberg, Joshua M; Berman, Judith; Bennett, Richard J; Cuomo, Christina A

    2015-03-01

    Candida albicans is a commensal fungus of the human gastrointestinal tract and a prevalent opportunistic pathogen. To examine diversity within this species, extensive genomic and phenotypic analyses were performed on 21 clinical C. albicans isolates. Genomic variation was evident in the form of polymorphisms, copy number variations, chromosomal inversions, subtelomeric hypervariation, loss of heterozygosity (LOH), and whole or partial chromosome aneuploidies. All 21 strains were diploid, although karyotypic changes were present in eight of the 21 isolates, with multiple strains being trisomic for Chromosome 4 or Chromosome 7. Aneuploid strains exhibited a general fitness defect relative to euploid strains when grown under replete conditions. All strains were also heterozygous, yet multiple, distinct LOH tracts were present in each isolate. Higher overall levels of genome heterozygosity correlated with faster growth rates, consistent with increased overall fitness. Genes with the highest rates of amino acid substitutions included many cell wall proteins, implicating fast evolving changes in cell adhesion and host interactions. One clinical isolate, P94015, presented several striking properties including a novel cellular phenotype, an inability to filament, drug resistance, and decreased virulence. Several of these properties were shown to be due to a homozygous nonsense mutation in the EFG1 gene. Furthermore, loss of EFG1 function resulted in increased fitness of P94015 in a commensal model of infection. Our analysis therefore reveals intra-species genetic and phenotypic differences in C. albicans and delineates a natural mutation that alters the balance between commensalism and pathogenicity.

  8. Genetic and phenotypic intra-species variation in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Hirakawa, Matthew P.; Martinez, Diego A.; Sakthikumar, Sharadha; Anderson, Matthew Z.; Berlin, Aaron; Gujja, Sharvari; Zeng, Qiandong; Zisson, Ethan; Wang, Joshua M.; Greenberg, Joshua M.; Berman, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is a commensal fungus of the human gastrointestinal tract and a prevalent opportunistic pathogen. To examine diversity within this species, extensive genomic and phenotypic analyses were performed on 21 clinical C. albicans isolates. Genomic variation was evident in the form of polymorphisms, copy number variations, chromosomal inversions, subtelomeric hypervariation, loss of heterozygosity (LOH), and whole or partial chromosome aneuploidies. All 21 strains were diploid, although karyotypic changes were present in eight of the 21 isolates, with multiple strains being trisomic for Chromosome 4 or Chromosome 7. Aneuploid strains exhibited a general fitness defect relative to euploid strains when grown under replete conditions. All strains were also heterozygous, yet multiple, distinct LOH tracts were present in each isolate. Higher overall levels of genome heterozygosity correlated with faster growth rates, consistent with increased overall fitness. Genes with the highest rates of amino acid substitutions included many cell wall proteins, implicating fast evolving changes in cell adhesion and host interactions. One clinical isolate, P94015, presented several striking properties including a novel cellular phenotype, an inability to filament, drug resistance, and decreased virulence. Several of these properties were shown to be due to a homozygous nonsense mutation in the EFG1 gene. Furthermore, loss of EFG1 function resulted in increased fitness of P94015 in a commensal model of infection. Our analysis therefore reveals intra-species genetic and phenotypic differences in C. albicans and delineates a natural mutation that alters the balance between commensalism and pathogenicity. PMID:25504520

  9. Characterization of Micrococcaceae Isolated from Clinical Sources

    PubMed Central

    Person, Donald A.; Yu, Pauline K. W.; Washington, John A.

    1969-01-01

    The characterization of 556 Micrococcaceae isolates from various clinical sources has been presented. The incidence of coagulase-negative mannitol-positive staphylococci was 3.2% and that of coagulase-positive mannitol-negative staphylococci was 1.6%. There appears to be insufficient justification for the routine reporting of staphylococcal variants from a general bacteriology laboratory, and biotyping should be reserved for special circumstances. PMID:5803634

  10. In vitro efficacy of liposomal amphotericin B, micafungin and fluconazole against non-albicans Candida species biofilms.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Akira; Yamagishi, Yuka; Mikamo, Hiroshige

    2015-09-01

    Non-albicans Candida species are being isolated with increasing frequency. In this study, biofilm formation by Candida tropicalis, Candida parapsilosis and Candida glabrata was evaluated and the activities of liposomal amphotericin B (LAB), micafungin (MFG) and fluconazole (FLC) against these biofilms were assessed using a clinically relevant in vitro model system. LAB exhibited strong activities against the three non-albicans Candida species and showed dose-dependent efficacy. MFG displayed a paradoxical growth effect against the C. tropicalis biofilm. FLC was ineffective for non-albicans biofilms. This study shows that Candida biofilms have unique susceptibility to LAB. The dose-dependent effects of LAB indicate that this drug may be a useful treatment for biofilm formation by non-albicans Candida species in cases in which the catheter cannot be removed for clinical reasons.

  11. Acid production by oral strains of Candida albicans and lactobacilli.

    PubMed

    Klinke, T; Kneist, S; de Soet, J J; Kuhlisch, E; Mauersberger, S; Forster, A; Klimm, W

    2009-01-01

    Both Candida albicans and lactobacilli are common colonizers of carious lesions in children and adolescents. The purpose of this study is to compare the velocity of acid production between C. albicans and several Lactobacillus species at different pH levels and concentrations of glucose. Washed, pure resting-cell suspensions were obtained by culturing a total of 28 oral isolates comprising the species C. albicans, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Lactobacillus paracasei paracasei, Lactobacillus paracasei tolerans and Lactobacillus delbrueckii lactis. Acid production from glucose was determined at a constant pH of 7.0, 5.5, 5.0 and 4.0 by repeated titrations with NaOH in an automated pH-stat system. Acid formation rates of yeast and lactobacilli proved to be similar at both neutral and low pH, while in a moderately acidic environment C. albicans produced less acid than the lactobacilli. Ion chromatographic analysis of the cell-free medium after titration revealed pyruvate to be the predominant organic acid anion secreted by C. albicans. The proportion of organic acids to overall acid production by the yeast was below 10% at neutral conditions, in contrast to 42-66% at pH 4.0. Compared to lactobacilli, yeast required a concentration of glucose that was about 50 times higher to allow acid production at half the maximum speed. Considering the clinical data in the literature about the frequency and proportions of microorganisms present in early childhood caries lesions, the contribution of oral lactobacilli as well as C. albicans to overall microbial acid formation appears to be important.

  12. The formation of germtubes by Candida albicans, when grown with Staphylococcus pyogene, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Lactobacilius acidophilus and Proteus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Purohit, B C; Joshi, K R; Ramdeo, I N; Bharadwaj, T P

    1977-12-31

    The formation of germtubes by twelve clinical isolates of C. albicans was studied in human serum containing per millilitre 10(3) to 10(9) organisms as: Staphylococcus pyegene, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Lactobacillus acidophilus and Proteus vulgaris. All the five bacteria inhibited formation of germtubes by C. albicans at all concentrations and the percent germtube formed diminished with increasing concentration of the bacteria. Lactobacillus acidophilus inhibited the formation of germtubes maximally followed by Staphylococcus pyogene, Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Proteus vulgaris in the concentrations of 10(3) to 10(7) bacteria per millilitre produced only insignificant inhibition of formation of germtubes by C. albicans. Since germtubes of C. albicans are invasive, it is suggested that inhibition of "blastospore-germtube transformation" may be significantly responsible for prevention of infection by C. albicans by coexisting bacterial flora.

  13. Investigation of minor species Candida africana, Candida stellatoidea and Candida dubliniensis in the Candida albicans complex among Yaoundé (Cameroon) HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Ngouana, Thierry K; Krasteva, Donika; Drakulovski, Pascal; Toghueo, Rufin K; Kouanfack, Charles; Ambe, Akaba; Reynes, Jacques; Delaporte, Eric; Boyom, Fabrice F; Mallié, Michèle; Bertout, Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    Minor species of the Candida albicans complex may cause overestimation of the epidemiology of C. albicans, and misidentifications could mask their implication in human pathology. Authors determined the occurrence of minor species of the C. albicans complex (C. africana, C. dubliniensis and C. stellatoidea) among Yaoundé HIV-infected patients, Cameroon. Stool, vaginal discharge, urine and oropharyngeal samples were analysed by mycological diagnosis. Isolates were identified by conventional methods and mass spectrometry (MS; carried out by the matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionisation time-of-flight MS protocol). Candida albicans isolates were thereafter submitted to the PCR amplification of the Hwp1 gene. The susceptibility of isolates to antifungal drugs was tested using the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute M27-A3 protocol. From 115 C. albicans obtained isolates, neither C. dubliniensis nor C. stellatoidea was observed; two strains of C. africana (422PV and 448PV) were identified by PCR electrophoretic profiles at 700 bp. These two C. africana strains were vaginal isolates. The isolate 448PV was resistant to ketoconazole at the minimal inhibitory concentration of 2 μg ml(-1), and showed reduced susceptibility to amphotericin B at 1 μg ml(-1). This first report on C. africana occurrence in Cameroon brings clues for the understanding of the global epidemiology of this yeast as well as that of minor species of the C. albicans complex.

  14. The isolation of Candida rugosa and Candida mesorugosa from clinical samples in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Adjapong, Gloria; Bartlett, Michael; Hale, Marie; Garrill, Ashley

    2016-03-01

    Members of the Candida rugosa species complex have been described as emerging fungal pathogens and are responsible for a growing number of Candida infections. In this communication we report the isolation of Candida rugosa and Candida mesorugosa in Ghana. To the best of our knowledge this is the first description of this species complex from a clinical setting in Africa.The isolates were identified on the basis of their rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences. For one isolate, obtained from sputum, the sequence grouped well with that of C. rugosa. Two other isolates from urine had sequences that grouped with Candida mesorugosa. Morphologically, C. rugosa formed white, wrinkled, and flat colonies on Sabouraud Dextrose Agar (SDA), whereas C. mesorugosa formed white, smooth colonies. On chromogenic medium, the isolates formed small, dry greenish-blue colonies with a pale or white border, similar to C. albicans. The C. rugosa isolate produced pseudohyphae in human serum and on CMA-Tween 80 agar. In contrast, the C. mesorugosa isolates did not generate pseudohyphae in human serum, but generated a few pseudohyphae with abundant blastoconidia on CMA-Tween 80 agar. Growth was observed at 37 °C and 42 °C but not at 45 °C.The two C. mesorugosa isolates had Minimum Inhibitory Concentrations (MICs) of 6 and 48 μg ml(-1) for fluconazole and are thus resistant. The C. rugosa isolate had an MIC of 24 μg ml(-1), indicative of resistance. All three isolates were susceptible to itraconazole and voriconazole (with respective MICs of < 0.125 μg ml(-1)).

  15. Comparison of a randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis and ATB ID 32C system for identification of clinical isolates of different Candida species.

    PubMed

    Baires-Varguez, Laura; Cruz-García, Alejandro; Villa-Tanaka, Lourdes; Sánchez-García, Sergio; Gaitán-Cepeda, Luis Alberto; Sánchez-Vargas, Luis Octavio; Quindós, Guillermo; Hernández-Rodríguez, César

    2007-06-01

    The objective of this work was to compare the usefulness of a randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) assay to that of the ATB ID32C kit (bioMérieux, France) for identification of different species of Candida isolated from clinical specimens. The RAPD-PCR patterns obtained with OPE-18 primer for identification of clinical isolates were consistent, and the different independent assays revealed reproduction of the band patterns. RAPD with the OPE-18 primer is a very specific and sensitive method for identification of Candida glabrata, Candida guilliermondii, Candida tropicalis, Candida pelliculosa, Candida albicans, Candida krusei, and Candida lusitaniae.

  16. Clinically isolated neurosarcoidosis: a recommended diagnostic path.

    PubMed

    Wegener, Susanne; Linnebank, Michael; Martin, Roland; Valavanis, Anton; Weller, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The involvement of the central nervous system in sarcoidosis can manifest with a variety of neurological symptoms, most of them nonspecific. We identified 13 patients with neurosarcoidosis diagnosed at our clinic. Six of 13 patients presented with clinically isolated neurosarcoidosis (CINS) without signs or symptoms of systemic disease. CINS patients were not different with respect to age, as well as imaging and spinal fluid findings, or disease course. However, we found spinal cord involvement in neurosarcoidosis patients much more common than previously described (in 8 out of 13 patients). Spinal cord affection was associated with older age at diagnosis and a less favorable response to therapy. Based on our findings, we propose a diagnostic path for neurosarcoidosis, including spinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a mandatory and early step during diagnostic workup.

  17. Clinically Isolated Syndromes: Clinical Characteristics, Differential Diagnosis, and Management

    PubMed Central

    EFENDİ, Hüsnü

    2015-01-01

    Clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) is a term that describes the first clinical onset of potential multiple sclerosis (MS). The term CIS is typically applied to young adults with episodes of acute or subacute onset, which reaches a peak quite rapidly within 2–3 weeks. In 85% of young adults who develop MS, onset occurs with an acute, CIS of the optic nerves, brainstem, or spinal cord. When clinically silent brain lesions are seen on MRI, the likelihood of developing MS is high. Because no single clinical feature or diagnostic test is sufficient for the diagnosis of CIS, diagnostic criteria have included a combination of both clinical and paraclinical studies. Diagnostic criteria from the International Panel of McDonald and colleagues incorporate MRI evidence of dissemination in time and space to allow a diagnosis of definite MS in patients with CIS. As CIS is typically the earliest clinical expression of MS, research on patients with CIS may provide new insights into early pathological changes and pathogenetic mechanisms that might affect the course of the disorder. With recent improvements in diagnosis and the advent of disease-modifying treatments for MS, there has been growing interest and research in patients with CIS.

  18. Phenotypic diversity and correlation between white-opaque switching and the CAI microsatellite locus in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jian; Guan, Guobo; Dai, Yu; Tao, Li; Zhang, Jianzhong; Li, Houmin; Huang, Guanghua

    2016-08-01

    Candida albicans is a commensal fungal pathogen that is often found as part of the human microbial flora. The aim of the present study was to establish a relationship between diverse genotypes and phenotypes of clinical isolates of C. albicans. Totally 231 clinical isolates were collected and used for genotyping and phenotypic switching analysis. Based on the microsatellite locus (CAI) genotyping assay, 65 different genotypes were identified, and some dominant types were found in certain human niches. For example, the genotypes of 30-44 and 30-45 were enriched in vaginal infection samples. C. albicans has a number of morphological forms including the single-celled yeasts, multicellular filaments, white, and opaque cell types. The relationship between the CAI genotype and the ability to undergo phenotypic switching was examined in the clinical isolates. We found that the strains with longer CAA/G repeats in both alleles of the CAI locus were more opaque competent. We also discovered that some MTL heterozygous (a/alpha) isolates could undergo white-opaque switching when grown on regular culture medium (containing glucose as the sole carbon source). Our study establishes a link between phenotypic switching and genotypes of the CAI microsatellite locus in clinical isolates of C. albicans.

  19. Killer system: a simple method for differentiating Candida albicans strains.

    PubMed Central

    Polonelli, L; Archibusacci, C; Sestito, M; Morace, G

    1983-01-01

    The killer effect of 37 species of Candida, Cryptococcus, Hansenula, Pichia, Rhodotorula, Saccharomyces, and Trichosporon on 100 Candida albicans isolates of human and animal origin was studied. All of the C. albicans cultures were sensitive to one or more killer yeasts. The factors affecting the killer phenomenon on C. albicans were investigated for realizing a simple system for the differentiation of the 100 C. albicans isolates. By using this system, it was possible to differentiate up to 512 isolates of C. albicans according to their susceptibility to the killer effect of nine selected killer yeasts. The use of this method as an epidemiological marker in the case of presumptive nosocomial infections due to C. albicans is also reported. Images PMID:6345575

  20. Candidiasis in Pediatrics; Identification and In vitro Antifungal Susceptibility of the Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, R; Ataei, B

    2016-01-01

    Background Candida species are normal microflora of oral cavity, vagina, and gastrointestinal tract. They are the third most prevalent cause of pediatric health care–associated bloodstream fungal infection. This study aimed to provide an epidemiological feature of candidiasis and also presents an antifungal susceptibility profile of clinical Candida isolates among children. Materials and Methods During July 2013 to February 2015, 105 patients from different hospitals of Isfahan, Iran, were examined for candidiasis by phenotypic tests. Samples were obtained from nail clippings, blood, thrush, BAL, urine, oropharynx, skin, and eye discharge. The age range of patients was between 18 days to 16 years. Genomic DNA of isolates was extracted and ITS1-5.8SrDNA-ITS2 region was amplified by ITS1 and ITS2 primers. The PCR products were digested using the restriction enzyme MspI. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MICs) was determined using microdilution broth method according to the clinical and laboratory standards institute (CLSI) M27-A3 and M27-S4 documents. Results Forty-three patients (40.9%) had Candida infection.The most clinical strains were isolated from nail infections (39.5%), and candidemia (13.9%). Candida albicans was the most prevalent species (46.5%). MICs ranges for amphotericin B, fluconazole, and itraconazole were (0.025-0.75 µg/ml), (0.125-16 µg/ml), and (0.094-2 µg/ml), respectively. Conclusion Due to high incidence of Candida infections among children, increasing of fatal infection like candidemia, and emersion of antifungal resistance Candida isolates, early and precise identification of the Candida species and determination of antifungal susceptibility patterns of clinical isolates may lead to better management of the infection. PMID:27222702

  1. Effectiveness of Hexetidine 0.1% Compared to Chlorhexidine Digluconate 0.12% in Eliminating Candida Albicans Colonizing Dentures: A Randomized Clinical In Vivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Aoun, Georges; Saadeh, Maria; Berberi, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    Background: Denture hygiene is an important factor in the prevention and treatment of denture stomatitis (DS). This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of two different mouthwashes (chlorhexidine digluconate 0.12% and hexetidine 0.1%) in eliminating Candida albicans on dentures. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 denture wearers (20 men, 40 women; age range 40-80 years) with clinical evidence of DS were randomly divided into 2 test groups and 1 control group. The dentures of each test group were treated by immersion in one of the two mouthwashes while those of the control group were immersed in distilled water. Swab samples from the palatal surfaces of the upper dentures were collected before and after of cleaner use and examined mycologically. Results: Reduction in the number of colony-forming units of Candida albicans after immersion of the dentures with chlorhexidine digluconate 0.12% was significantly greater than that of the group using hexetidine 0.1% and those of the control group. Conclusion: Hexetidine 0.1% solution tested for the first time as a product of disinfection of the acrylic dentures showed average results after immersion of 8 night hours for 4 days and was less effective than chlorhexidine digluconate 0.12%. PMID:26464531

  2. Nuclear fusion occurs during mating in Candida albicans and is dependent on the KAR3 gene.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Richard J; Miller, Mathew G; Chua, Penelope R; Maxon, Mary E; Johnson, Alexander D

    2005-02-01

    It is now well established that mating can occur between diploid a and alpha cells of Candida albicans. There is, however, controversy over when, and with what efficiency, nuclear fusion follows cell fusion to create stable tetraploid a/alpha cells. In this study, we have analysed the mating process between C. albicans strains using both cytological and genetic approaches. Using strains derived from SC5314, we used a number of techniques, including time-lapse microscopy, to demonstrate that efficient nuclear fusion occurs in the zygote before formation of the first daughter cell. Consistent with these observations, zygotes micromanipulated from mating mixes gave rise to mononuclear tetraploid cells, even when no selection for successful mating was applied to them. Mating between different clinical isolates of C. albicans revealed that while all isolates could undergo nuclear fusion, the efficiency of nuclear fusion varied in different crosses. We also show that nuclear fusion in C. albicans requires the Kar3 microtubule motor protein. Deletion of the CaKAR3 gene from both mating partners had little or no effect on zygote formation but reduced the formation of stable tetraploids more than 600-fold, as determined by quantitative mating assays. These findings demonstrate that nuclear fusion is an active process that can occur in C. albicans at high frequency to produce stable, mononucleate mating products.

  3. Candida albicans biofilm heterogeneity does not influence denture stomatitis but strongly influences denture cleansing capacity.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Lindsay E; Alalwan, Hasanain K A; Kean, Ryan; Calvert, Gareth; Nile, Christopher J; Lappin, David F; Robertson, Douglas; Williams, Craig; Ramage, Gordon; Sherry, Leighann

    2017-01-01

    Approximately 20  % of the UK population wear some form of denture prosthesis, resulting in denture stomatitis in half of these individuals. Candida albicans is primarily attributed as the causative agent, due to its biofilm -forming ability. Recently, there has been increasing evidence of C. albicans biofilm heterogeneity and the negative impact it can have clinically; however, this phenomenon has yet to be studied in relation to denture isolates. The aims of this study were to evaluate C. albicans biofilm formation of clinical denture isolates in a denture environment and to assess antimicrobial activity of common denture cleansers against these tenacious communities. C. albicans isolated from dentures of healthy and diseased individuals was quantified using real-time PCR and biofilm biomass assessed using crystal violet. Biofilm development on the denture substratum poly(methyl methacrylate), Molloplast B and Ufi-gel was determined. Biofilm formation was assessed using metabolic and biomass stains, following treatment with denture hygiene products. Although C. albicans was detected in greater quantities in diseased individuals, it was not associated with increased biofilm biomass. Denture substrata were shown to influence biofilm biomass, with poly(methyl methacrylate) providing the most suitable environment for C. albicans to reside. Of all denture hygiene products tested, Milton had the most effective antimicrobial activity, reducing biofilm biomass and viability the greatest. Overall, our results highlight the complex nature of denture- related disease, and disease development cannot always be attributed to a sole cause. It is the distinct combination of various factors that ultimately determines the pathogenic outcome.

  4. Differential Gene Expression of Heat Shock Protein 90 (Hsp90) of Candida albicans obtained from Malaysian and Iranian Patients

    PubMed Central

    Khalili, Vajihe; Shokri, Hojjatollah; Md Akim, Abdah; Khosravi, Ali Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background Candida albicans (C. albicans) has several virulence factors, in particular heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90), which is expressed by Hsp90 gene. The purposes of this study were to assess the expression of Hsp90 gene in clinical and control isolates of C. albicans obtained from different geographical regions (Malaysia and Iran), different temperatures (25°C, 37°C and 42°C) and mice with candidiasis. Methods C. albicans isolates were cultured onto sabouraud dextrose agar (SDA). The assessment of the expression of Hsp90 gene was performed using real time-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results The results showed a significant increase in the expression of C. albicans Hsp90 gene under high thermal shock (42°C) when compared to other temperatures tested (P-value = 0.001). The mean differences in the expression of Hsp90 gene at 37°C were 0.20 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.13–0.29) between Malaysian and Iranian controls (P-value = 0.040) and 0.47 (95% CI 0.27–0.60) between Malaysian and Iranian patients (P-value = 0.040). Conclusion The results demonstrated that the expression of C. albicans Hsp90 gene varied between Malaysian and Iranian subjects, representing the efficacy of geographical and thermal conditions on virulence gene expression. PMID:27418871

  5. Molecular Fingerprinting Studies Do Not Support Intrahospital Transmission of Candida albicans among Candidemia Patients in Kuwait

    PubMed Central

    Asadzadeh, Mohammad; Ahmad, Suhail; Al-Sweih, Noura; Khan, Ziauddin

    2017-01-01

    Candida albicans, a constituent of normal microbial flora of human mucosal surfaces, is a major cause of candidemia in immunocompromised individuals and hospitalized patients with other debilitating diseases. Molecular fingerprinting studies have suggested nosocomial transmission of C. albicans based on the presence of clusters or endemic genotypes in some hospitals. However, intrahospital strain transmission or a common source of infection has not been firmly established. We performed multilocus sequence typing (MLST) on 102 C. albicans bloodstream isolates (representing 92% of all culture-confirmed candidemia patients over a 31-month period at seven major hospitals) to identify patient-to-patient transmission or infection from a common source in Kuwait, a small country in the Middle East where consanguineous marriages are common. Repeat bloodstream isolates from six patients and nine surveillance cultures from other anatomic sites from six patients were also analyzed. Fifty-five isolates belonged to unique genotypes. Forty-seven isolates from 47 patients formed 16 clusters, with each cluster containing 2–9 isolates. Multiple isolates from the same patient from bloodstream or other anatomical sites yielded identical genotypes. We identified four cases of potential patient-to-patient transmission or infection from a common source based on association analysis between patients' clinical/epidemiological data and the corresponding MLST genotypes of eight C. albicans isolates. However, further fingerprinting by whole genome-based amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis yielded 8 different genotypes, ruling out intrahospital transmission of infection. The findings suggest that related strains of C. albicans exist in the community and fingerprinting by MLST alone may complicate hospital infection control measures during outbreak investigations. PMID:28270801

  6. Molecular Fingerprinting Studies Do Not Support Intrahospital Transmission of Candida albicans among Candidemia Patients in Kuwait.

    PubMed

    Asadzadeh, Mohammad; Ahmad, Suhail; Al-Sweih, Noura; Khan, Ziauddin

    2017-01-01

    Candida albicans, a constituent of normal microbial flora of human mucosal surfaces, is a major cause of candidemia in immunocompromised individuals and hospitalized patients with other debilitating diseases. Molecular fingerprinting studies have suggested nosocomial transmission of C. albicans based on the presence of clusters or endemic genotypes in some hospitals. However, intrahospital strain transmission or a common source of infection has not been firmly established. We performed multilocus sequence typing (MLST) on 102 C. albicans bloodstream isolates (representing 92% of all culture-confirmed candidemia patients over a 31-month period at seven major hospitals) to identify patient-to-patient transmission or infection from a common source in Kuwait, a small country in the Middle East where consanguineous marriages are common. Repeat bloodstream isolates from six patients and nine surveillance cultures from other anatomic sites from six patients were also analyzed. Fifty-five isolates belonged to unique genotypes. Forty-seven isolates from 47 patients formed 16 clusters, with each cluster containing 2-9 isolates. Multiple isolates from the same patient from bloodstream or other anatomical sites yielded identical genotypes. We identified four cases of potential patient-to-patient transmission or infection from a common source based on association analysis between patients' clinical/epidemiological data and the corresponding MLST genotypes of eight C. albicans isolates. However, further fingerprinting by whole genome-based amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis yielded 8 different genotypes, ruling out intrahospital transmission of infection. The findings suggest that related strains of C. albicans exist in the community and fingerprinting by MLST alone may complicate hospital infection control measures during outbreak investigations.

  7. Epidemiology, Antifungal Susceptibility, and Pathogenicity of Candida africana Isolates from the United Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Szekely, Adrien; Linton, Chistopher J.; Palmer, Michael D.; Brown, Phillipa; Johnson, Elizabeth M.

    2013-01-01

    Candida africana was previously proposed as a new species within the Candida albicans species complex, together with C. albicans and C. dubliniensis, although further phylogenetic analyses better support its status as an unusual variant within C. albicans. Here we show that C. africana can be distinguished from C. albicans and C. dubliniensis by pyrosequencing of a short region of ITS2, and we have evaluated its occurrence in clinical samples by pyrosequencing all presumptive isolates of C. albicans submitted to the Mycology Reference Laboratory over a 9-month period. The C. albicans complex constituted 826/1,839 (44.9%) of yeast isolates received over the study period and included 783 isolates of C. albicans, 28 isolates of C. dubliniensis, and 15 isolates of C. africana. In agreement with previous reports, C. africana was isolated exclusively from genital specimens, in women in the 18-to-35-year age group. Indeed, C. africana constituted 15/251 (6%) of “C. albicans” isolates from female genital specimens during the study period. C. africana isolates were germ tube positive, grew significantly more slowly than C. albicans and C. dubliniensis on conventional mycological media, could be distinguished from the other members of the C. albicans complex by appearance on chromogenic agar, and were incapable of forming chlamydospores. Here we present the detailed evaluation of epidemiological, phenotypic, and clinical features and antifungal susceptibility profiles of United Kingdom isolates of C. africana. Furthermore, we demonstrate that C. africana is significantly less pathogenic than C. albicans and C. dubliniensis in the Galleria mellonella insect systemic infection model. PMID:23303503

  8. Evaluation of Mueller-Hinton-agar as a simple medium for the germ tube production of Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis.

    PubMed

    Rimek, Dagmar; Fehse, Brigitte; Göpel, Petra

    2008-05-01

    Candida albicans is the most frequently isolated yeast species from clinical specimens. A classical rapid presumptive differentiation from non-albicans species is based on its ability to produce germ tubes after incubation in human serum. The only non-albicans Candida species producing germ tubes is Candida dubliniensis. In this study, we evaluated Mueller-Hinton-agar (MH-agar) as a medium for germ tube formation of C. albicans and C. dubliniensis. A total of 859 yeast isolates from stool samples, including 632 strains of C. albicans, 10 C. dubliniensis and 217 other yeast strains from 20 different species, were grown on Sabouraud glucose (2%) agar at 37 degrees C for 24-72 h. Species were identified by standard methods. For the germ tube test (GTT), an inoculum from a single colony was streaked onto a MH-agar plate and covered by a sterile coverslip. After incubation at 37 degrees C for 2 h, the MH plates were examined using a light microscope at x200. The GTT was positive in 578 of 632 C. albicans strains (sensitivity 91.5%), in six of 10 C. dubliniensis strains (sensitivity 60.0%), and in none of the other yeast strains. MH-agar is a suitable medium for the GTT and the presumptive identification of C. albicans. It is safer to use than human serum and is widely available in microbiology laboratories.

  9. Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization with Peptide Nucleic Acid Probes for Rapid Identification of Candida albicans Directly from Blood Culture Bottles

    PubMed Central

    Rigby, Susan; Procop, Gary W.; Haase, Gerhard; Wilson, Deborah; Hall, Geraldine; Kurtzman, Cletus; Oliveira, Kenneth; Von Oy, Sabina; Hyldig-Nielsen, Jens J.; Coull, James; Stender, Henrik

    2002-01-01

    A new fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) method that uses peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes for identification of Candida albicans directly from positive-blood-culture bottles in which yeast was observed by Gram staining (herein referred to as yeast-positive blood culture bottles) is described. The test (the C. albicans PNA FISH method) is based on a fluorescein-labeled PNA probe that targets C. albicans 26S rRNA. The PNA probe is added to smears made directly from the contents of the blood culture bottle and hybridized for 90 min at 55°C. Unhybridized PNA probe is removed by washing of the mixture (30 min), and the smears are examined by fluorescence microscopy. The specificity of the method was confirmed with 23 reference strains representing phylogenetically related yeast species and 148 clinical isolates covering the clinically most significant yeast species, including C. albicans (n = 72), C. dubliniensis (n = 58), C. glabrata (n = 5), C. krusei (n = 2), C. parapsilosis (n = 4), and C. tropicalis (n = 3). The performance of the C. albicans PNA FISH method as a diagnostic test was evaluated with 33 routine and 25 simulated yeast-positive blood culture bottles and showed 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity. It is concluded that this 2.5-h method for the definitive identification of C. albicans directly from yeast-positive blood culture bottles provides important information for optimal antifungal therapy and patient management. PMID:12037084

  10. Kinetic and thermodynamic characterization of the interactions between the components of human plasma kinin-forming system and isolated and purified cell wall proteins of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Seweryn, Karolina; Karkowska-Kuleta, Justyna; Wolak, Natalia; Bochenska, Oliwia; Kedracka-Krok, Sylwia; Kozik, Andrzej; Rapala-Kozik, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Cell wall proteins of Candida albicans, besides their best known role in the adhesion of this fungal pathogen to host's tissues, also bind some soluble proteins, present in body fluids and involved in maintaining the biochemical homeostasis of the human organism. In particular, three plasma factors - high-molecular-mass kininogen (HK), factor XII (FXII) and prekallikrein (PPK) - have been shown to adhere to candidal cells. These proteins are involved in the surface-contact-catalyzed production of bradykinin-related peptides (kinins) that contribute to inflammatory states associated with microbial infections. We recently identified several proteins, associated with the candidal cell walls, and probably involved in the binding of HK. In our present study, a list of potential FXII- and PPK-binding proteins was proposed, using an affinity selection (on agarose-coupled FXII or PPK) from a whole mixture of β-1,3-glucanase-extrated cell wall-associated proteins and the mass-spectrometry protein identification. Five of these fungal proteins, including agglutinin-like sequence protein 3 (Als3), triosephosphate isomerase 1 (Tpi1), enolase 1 (Eno1), phosphoglycerate mutase 1 (Gpm1) and glucose-6-phosphate isomerase 1 (Gpi1), were purified and characterized in terms of affinities to the human contact factors, using the surface plasmon resonance measurements. Except Gpm1 that bound only PPK, and Als3 that exhibited an affinity to HK and FXII, the other isolated proteins interacted with all three contact factors. The determined dissociation constants for the identified protein complexes were of 10(-7) M order, and the association rate constants were in a range of 10(4)-10(5) M(-1)s(-1). The identified fungal pathogen-host protein interactions are potential targets for novel anticandidal therapeutic approaches.

  11. Population Structure of Candida albicans from Three Teaching Hospitals in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Adjapong, Gloria; Hale, Marie; Garrill, Ashley

    2016-02-01

    Previous studies on Candida species in a clinical setting in Ghana have shown a prevalence of Candida albicans. Despite this, very little is known about the various strain types and their population genetic structure. In this study three microsatellite loci, CAI, CAIII and CAVI, were used to investigate the population genetic structure of C. albicans from clinical isolates in Ghana. In all, 240 clinically unrelated C. albicans isolates were recovered from patients reporting at three teaching hospitals. All the isolates were heterozygous for at least one of the three loci, except for one isolate, which was homozygous for all three loci. Sixty-seven unique alleles and 240 different genotypes were generated by the three polymorphic microsatellite loci, resulting in a very high discriminatory potential of approximately 0.98. There was no significant difference in allele frequencies from the small number of anatomical sites sampled, regardless of the host conditions although high genotypic diversities were observed among the isolates. There was evidence for clonal reproduction, including over-expression of observed heterozygotes across the populations. The populations deviated significantly from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and pair-wise genotypic linkage disequilibria comparisons across the three loci were significant, also suggesting a clonal population. The overall Wright FIS for the three loci was negative, and the overall FST value was not significantly different from zero for the three loci analyzed, indicating a clonal and homogeneous population across the three sampling locations from Ghana.

  12. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and Bayesian phylogenetic analysis to characterize Candida clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Angeletti, Silvia; Lo Presti, Alessandra; Cella, Eleonora; Dicuonzo, Giordano; Crea, Francesca; Palazzotti, Bernardetta; Dedej, Etleva; Ciccozzi, Massimo; De Florio, Lucia

    2015-12-01

    Clinical Candida isolates from two different hospitals in Rome were identified and clustered by MALDI-TOF MS system and their origin and evolution estimated by Bayesian phylogenetic analysis. The different species of Candida were correctly identified and clustered separately, confirming the ability of these techniques to discriminate between different Candida species. Focusing MALDI-TOF analysis on a single Candida species, Candida albicans and Candida parapsilosis strains clustered differently for hospital setting as well as for period of isolation than Candida glabrata and Candida tropicalis isolates. The evolutionary rates of C. albicans and C. parapsilosis (1.93×10(-2) and 1.17×10(-2)substitutions/site/year, respectively) were in agreement with a higher rate of mutation of these species, even in a narrow period, than what was observed in C. glabrata and C. tropicalis strains (6.99×10(-4) and 7.52×10(-3)substitutions/site/year, respectively). C. albicans resulted as the species with the highest between and within clades genetic distance values in agreement with the temporal-related clustering found by MALDI-TOF and the high evolutionary rate 1.93×10(-2)substitutions/site/year.

  13. Antifungal Activity of Hydroalcoholic Extract of Chrysobalanus icaco Against Oral Clinical Isolates of Candida Species

    PubMed Central

    Silva, João Paulo Bastos; Peres, Ana Regina Maués Noronha; Paixão, Thiago Portal; Silva, Andressa Santa Brígida; Baetas, Ana Cristina; Barbosa, Wagner Luiz Ramos; Monteiro, Marta Chagas; Andrade, Marcieni Ataíde

    2017-01-01

    Background: Chrysobalanus icaco is a medicinal plant commonly used to treat fungal infections in Brazilian Amazonian region. Objective: This work aimed to evaluate the antifungal activity of the hydroalcoholic extract of C. icaco (HECi) against oral clinical isolates of Candida spp. and to determine the pharmacognostic parameters of the herbal drug and the phytochemical characteristics of HECi. Materials and Methods: The pharmacognostic characterization was performed using pharmacopoeial techniques. Phytochemical screening, total flavonoid content, and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis were used to investigate the chemical composition of the HECi. A broth microdilution method was used to determine the antifungal activity of the extract against 11 oral clinical isolates of Candida spp. Results: Herbal drug presented parameters which were within the limits set forth in current Brazilian legislation. A high amount of flavonoid content (132,959.33 ± 12,598.23 μg quercetin equivalent/g of extract) was found in HECi. Flavonoids such as myricetin and rutin were detected in the extract by HPLC analyses. HECi showed antifungal activity against oral isolates of Candida albicans and Candida parapsilosis (minimum inhibitory concentrations [MIC] 3.12 and 6.25 mg/mL, respectively), and C. albicans American American Type Culture Collection (MIC <1.56 mg/mL). Conclusion: HECi was shown to possess antifungal activity against Candida species with clinical importance in the development of oral candidiasis, and these activities may be related to its chemical composition. The antifungal activity detected for C. icaco against Candida species with clinical importance in the development of oral candidiasis can be attributed to the presence of flavonoids in HECi, characterized by chromatographic and spectroscopic techniques. SUMMARY Chrysobalanus icaco presents a high amount of flavonoids in its constitutionLC analysis was able to identify the flavonoids myricetin

  14. Comparison of the rapid yeast plus panel with the API20C yeast system for identification of clinically significant isolates of Candida species.

    PubMed

    Heelan, J S; Sotomayor, E; Coon, K; D'Arezzo, J B

    1998-05-01

    The RapID Yeast Plus system (Innovative Diagnostic Systems, Norcross, Ga.) is a qualitative micromethod employing conventional tests and single-substrate chromogenic tests and having a 4-h incubation period. This system was compared with the API20C (bioMerieux Vitek, Hazelwood, Mo.) system, a 24- to 72-h carbohydrate assimilation method. One hundred thirty-three clinical yeast isolates, including 57 of Candida albicans, 26 of Candida tropicalis, 23 of Candida glabrata, and 27 of other yeasts, were tested by both methods. When discrepancies occurred, isolates were further tested by the Automated Yeast Biochemical Card (bioMerieux Vitek). Germ tube production and microscopic morphology were used as needed to definitively identify yeast isolates. The RapID Yeast Plus system correctly identified 125 yeast isolates, with an overall accuracy of 94% (125 of 133). Excellent correlation was found in the recognition of the three yeasts most commonly isolated from human sources. The test was 99% (105 of 106 isolates) accurate with C. albicans, C. tropicalis, and C. glabrata. The RapID Yeast Plus system compares favorably with the API20C system and provides a simple, accurate alternative to conventional assimilation methods for the rapid identification of the most commonly encountered isolates of Candida species.

  15. Comparison of the Rapid Yeast Plus Panel with the API20C Yeast System for Identification of Clinically Significant Isolates of Candida Species

    PubMed Central

    Heelan, Judith S.; Sotomayor, Edgar; Coon, Kimberly; D’Arezzo, Julia B.

    1998-01-01

    The RapID Yeast Plus system (Innovative Diagnostic Systems, Norcross, Ga.) is a qualitative micromethod employing conventional tests and single-substrate chromogenic tests and having a 4-h incubation period. This system was compared with the API20C (bioMerieux Vitek, Hazelwood, Mo.) system, a 24- to 72-h carbohydrate assimilation method. One hundred thirty-three clinical yeast isolates, including 57 of Candida albicans, 26 of Candida tropicalis, 23 of Candida glabrata, and 27 of other yeasts, were tested by both methods. When discrepancies occurred, isolates were further tested by the Automated Yeast Biochemical Card (bioMerieux Vitek). Germ tube production and microscopic morphology were used as needed to definitively identify yeast isolates. The RapID Yeast Plus system correctly identified 125 yeast isolates, with an overall accuracy of 94% (125 of 133). Excellent correlation was found in the recognition of the three yeasts most commonly isolated from human sources. The test was 99% (105 of 106 isolates) accurate with C. albicans, C. tropicalis, and C. glabrata. The RapID Yeast Plus system compares favorably with the API20C system and provides a simple, accurate alternative to conventional assimilation methods for the rapid identification of the most commonly encountered isolates of Candida species. PMID:9574727

  16. Expression of firefly luciferase in Candida albicans and its use in the selection of stable transformants.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Timothy C; Nawotka, Kevin A; Purchio, Anthony F; Akin, Ali R; Francis, Kevin P; Contag, Pamela R

    2006-02-01

    The infectious yeast Candida albicans is a model organism for understanding the mechanisms of fungal pathogenicity. We describe the functional expression of the firefly luciferase gene, a reporter commonly used to tag genes in many other cellular systems. Due to a non-standard codon usage by this yeast, the CUG codons were first mutated to UUG to allow functional expression. When integrated into the chromosome of C. albicans with a strong constitutive promoter, cells bioluminesce when provided with luciferin substrate in their media. When fused to the inducible promoter from the HWP1 gene, expression and bioluminescence was only detected in cultures conditioning hyphal growth. We further used the luciferase gene as a selection to isolate transformed cell lines from clinical isolates of C. albicans, using a high-density screening strategy that purifies transformed colonies by virtue of light emission. This strategy requires no drug or auxotrophic selectable marker, and we were thus able to generate stable transformants of clinical isolates that are identical to the parental strain in all aspects tested, other than their bioluminescence. The firefly luciferase gene can, therefore, be used as a sensitive reporter to analyze gene function both in laboratory and clinical isolates of this medically important yeast.

  17. Detection of azole susceptibility patterns in clinical yeast strains isolated from 1998 to 2008.

    PubMed

    Czaika, Viktor; Nenoff, Pietro; Glöckner, Andreas; Becker, Karsten; Fegeler, Wolfgang; Schmalreck, Arno F

    2014-10-01

    4,860 clinical yeast isolates (25 genera, 47 species) were tested in parallel to fluconazole, itraconazole, ketoconazole, and voriconazole. After re-evaluation of all species according to their current valid taxonomic denominations, the range of the top four of the dermatology, gynaecology and paediatrics associated species from superficial infections was similar to those isolated from other wards with mainly systemic/invasive infections. Candida albicans (44.7%) was the most frequent pathogen followed by C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, and C. parapsilosis. The MIC-assessment revealed for the ten-year test period an overall azole-susceptibility of about 75%, and ~80% for their associated ICUs. The overall susceptibility of the isolates from systemic and superficial infections to the four azoles was 79% and 80% respectively, and demonstrates a high in vitro activity. When two test periods (1998-2001 and 2002-2008) were compared by characteristic MIC values and multi-azole resistance, no significant increase could be detected in azole susceptibility/resistance over the two periods, respectively, over the total investigation period of ten years. This holds true when the characteristic MIC values were compared with those from different azole susceptibility studies from similar time periods and from different investigators around the world (1991 to 2010). With a new method, susceptibility pattern analysis for fungi, detailed information of multi-resistant microorganism populations could be obtained, and different characteristic resistance patterns in clinical yeast species detected. Although at a relatively low level, multi-resistance was seen in individual species populations demonstrating resistance to two (6.7%), three (4.4%), or all four (4%) azoles tested. A level of 4% and 2% fourfold parallel resistance was also determined in Candia spp. and non-Candida spp. derived of blood culture isolates.

  18. Oral Candida albicans biotypes in Chinese patients with and without oral candidosis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Y Y; Samaranayake, L P

    1995-06-01

    A total of 53 oral Candida albicans isolates from Chinese patients with clinically diagnosed oral candidosis (27 patients) or without overt signs and mycological manifestations of infection (26) were biotyped using two commercially available API micromethod kits and a boric acid-resistance test. There were no significant differences in the biotypes in health and disease, although the biotype A1R was present only in diseased individuals. The biotype A1S accounted for 21% of the total isolates, as in a number of other previous studies from the West. However, 14 of the 27 biotypes characterized were new biotypes that have not been described before. These preliminary data indicate that biotypic profile of C. albicans may bear no relation to the virulence of the isolates, and that diverse subtypes of the fungus are globally prevalent.

  19. Single-strand conformation polymorphism of microsatellite for rapid strain typing of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Bai, Feng-Yan

    2007-11-01

    Single-strand conformation polymorphisms (SSCP) of Candida albicans' microsatellite CAI were characterized. Among the 76 clinical isolates recovered from different patients (independent strains), 60 distinct CAI SSCP patterns were recognized, resulting in a discriminatory power of 0.993. The multiple isolates recovered sequentially from the same or different body locations of the same patient showed exactly the same CAI SSCP pattern. The reliability of the SSCP analysis was confirmed by GeneScan and sequence analyses. From the same set of independent strains, 59 distinct CAI genotypes were identified by GeneScan analysis. Sequence comparison showed the advantage of SSCP over GeneSan analysis in the detection of point mutations in the microsatellite. The results indicated that PCR SSCP analysis of CAI microsatellite is a powerful and economical approach for rapid strain typing of C. albicans in clinical laboratories, especially in the detection of microevolutionary changes in microsatellites and in large-scale epidemiological investigation.

  20. Specific Gene Loci of Clinical Pseudomonas putida Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Lázaro; Udaondo, Zulema; Duque, Estrella; Fernández, Matilde; Bernal, Patricia; Roca, Amalia; de la Torre, Jesús; Ramos, Juan Luis

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida are ubiquitous inhabitants of soils and clinical isolates of this species have been seldom described. Clinical isolates show significant variability in their ability to cause damage to hosts because some of them are able to modulate the host’s immune response. In the current study, comparisons between the genomes of different clinical and environmental strains of P. putida were done to identify genetic clusters shared by clinical isolates that are not present in environmental isolates. We show that in clinical strains specific genes are mostly present on transposons, and that this set of genes exhibit high identity with genes found in pathogens and opportunistic pathogens. The set of genes prevalent in P. putida clinical isolates, and absent in environmental isolates, are related with survival under oxidative stress conditions, resistance against biocides, amino acid metabolism and toxin/antitoxin (TA) systems. This set of functions have influence in colonization and survival within human tissues, since they avoid host immune response or enhance stress resistance. An in depth bioinformatic analysis was also carried out to identify genetic clusters that are exclusive to each of the clinical isolates and that correlate with phenotypical differences between them, a secretion system type III-like was found in one of these clinical strains, a determinant of pathogenicity in Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:26820467

  1. Clinical significance of Bacillus species isolated from blood cultures.

    PubMed

    Weber, D J; Saviteer, S M; Rutala, W A; Thomann, C A

    1989-06-01

    To determine the clinical significance of blood isolates of Bacillus, we reviewed all blood cultures obtained at North Carolina Memorial Hospital between 1981 and 1985. Over the five-year study period the number of patients (incidence per 10,000 hospital admissions) from whom Bacillus was isolated increased from 4.97 in 1981 to 12.5 in 1985. The incidence per 1,000 blood cultures also increased from 1.12 in 1981 to 2.33 in 1985. Review of the medical records of 78 of the 95 patients (82%) with positive cultures allowed retrospective classification of five isolates (6.4%) as clinically significant, 33 isolates (42.3%) as possibly significant, and 40 isolates (51.3%) as nonsignificant. Underlying diseases in patients with clinically significant Bacillus bacteremia included burn trauma in two, leukemia in one, carcinoma in one, and gastrointestinal hemorrhage in one. All isolates judged to be clinically significant and the majority of possibly significant isolates were B cereus. We conclude that the isolation of Bacillus species from blood cultures is clinically significant in 5% to 10% of cases, that the incidence of Bacillus bacteremia is increasing, and that burn trauma should be added to the list of conditions known to predispose to clinically significant Bacillus bacteremia.

  2. Rapid identification of Candida albicans by using Albicans ID and fluoroplate agar plates.

    PubMed Central

    Rousselle, P; Freydiere, A M; Couillerot, P J; de Montclos, H; Gille, Y

    1994-01-01

    Two commercially available agar media, Albicans ID and Fluoroplate, that use a chromogenic or a fluorogenic substrate for the detection and identification of Candida albicans were evaluated. From 1,006 clinical samples containing 723 yeast strains, 352 C. albicans strains were detected with either of the two media. The sensitivity of each of the two media was 93.8% and the specificity was 98.6%, with five false-positive reactions for Candida tropicalis and no false-negative reactions. PMID:7883894

  3. Candida albicans Biofilms and Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nobile, Clarissa J.; Johnson, Alexander D.

    2016-01-01

    In humans, microbial cells (including bacteria, archaea, and fungi) greatly outnumber host cells. Candida albicans is the most prevalent fungal species of the human microbiota; this species asymptomatically colonizes many areas of the body, particularly the gastrointestinal and genitourinary tracts of healthy individuals. Alterations in host immunity, stress, resident microbiota, and other factors can lead to C. albicans overgrowth, causing a wide range of infections, from superficial mucosal to hematogenously disseminated candidiasis. To date, most studies of C. albicans have been carried out in suspension cultures; however, the medical impact of C. albicans (like that of many other microorganisms) depends on its ability to thrive as a biofilm, a closely packed community of cells. Biofilms are notorious for forming on implanted medical devices, including catheters, pacemakers, dentures, and prosthetic joints, which provide a surface and sanctuary for biofilm growth. C. albicans biofilms are intrinsically resistant to conventional antifungal therapeutics, the host immune system, and other environmental perturbations, making biofilm-based infections a significant clinical challenge. Here, we review our current knowledge of biofilms formed by C. albicans and closely related fungal species. PMID:26488273

  4. In vitro activities of amphotericin B deoxycholate and liposomal amphotericin B against 604 clinical yeast isolates.

    PubMed

    Montagna, Maria Teresa; Lovero, Grazia; Coretti, Caterina; De Giglio, Osvalda; Martinelli, Domenico; Bedini, Andrea; Delia, Mario; Rosato, Antonio; Codeluppi, Mauro; Caggiano, Giuseppina

    2014-12-01

    We determined the in vitro antifungal activity of liposomal amphotericin B (L-AmB) against 604 clinical yeast isolates. Amphotericin B deoxycholate (D-AmB) was tested in parallel against all the isolates. Susceptibility testing was performed according to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) M27-A3 method. Overall, L-AmB was highly active against the isolates (mean MIC, 0.42 µg ml(-1); MIC90, 1 µg ml(-1); 97.2 % of MICs were ≤1 µg ml(-1)) and comparable to D-AmB (mean MIC, 0.48 µg ml(-1); MIC90, 1 µg ml(-1); 97.3 % of MICs were ≤1 µg ml(-1)). The in vitro activity of D-AmB and L-AmB was correlated (R(2) = 0.61; exp(b), 2.3; 95 % CI, 2.19-2.44, P<0.001). Candida albicans (mean MICs of D-AmB and L-AmB, 0.39 µg ml(-1) and 0.31 µg ml(-1), respectively) and Candida parapsilosis (mean MICs of D-AmB and L-AmB, 0.38 µg ml(-1) and 0.35 µg ml(-1), respectively) were the species most susceptible to the agents tested, while Candida krusei (currently named Issatchenkia orientalis) (mean MICs of D-AmB and L-AmB, 1.27 µg ml(-1) and 1.13 µg ml(-1), respectively) was the least susceptible. The excellent in vitro activity of L-AmB may have important implications for empirical treatment approaches and support its role in treatment of a wide range of invasive infections due to yeasts.

  5. Comparison of MALDI-TOF mass spectra with microsatellite length polymorphisms in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Dhieb, C; Normand, A C; L'Ollivier, C; Gautier, M; Vranckx, K; El Euch, D; Chaker, E; Hendrickx, M; Dalle, F; Sadfi, N; Piarroux, R; Ranque, S

    2015-02-01

    Candida albicans is the most frequent yeast involved in human infections. Its population structure can be divided into several genetic clades, some of which have been associated with antifungal susceptibility. Therefore, detecting and monitoring fungal clones in a routine laboratory setting would be a major epidemiological advance. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectra results are now widely used as bar codes to identify microorganisms in clinical microbiology laboratories. This study aimed at testing MALDI-TOF mass spectra bar codes to identify clades among a set of C. albicans isolates. Accordingly, 102 clinical strains were genotyped using 10 microsatellite markers and analyzed via MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. The mass spectra were compared with a reference spectral library including 33 well-characterized collection strains, using a Microflex(TM) system and Biotyper(TM) software, to test the capacity of the spectrum of a given isolate to match with the reference mass spectrum of an isolate from the same genetic clade. Despite high confidence species identification, the spectra failed to significantly match with the corresponding clade (p = 0.74). This was confirmed with the MALDI-TOF spectra similarity dendrogram, in which the strains were dispersed irrespective of their genetic clade. Various attempts to improve intra-clade spectra recognition were unsuccessful. In conclusion, MALDI-TOF mass spectra bar code analysis failed to reliably recognize genetically related C. albicans isolates. Further studies are warranted to develop alternative MALDI-TOF mass spectra analytical approaches to identify and monitor C. albicans clades in the routine clinical laboratory.

  6. The influence of tea tree oil (Melaleuca alternifolia) on fluconazole activity against fluconazole-resistant Candida albicans strains.

    PubMed

    Mertas, Anna; Garbusińska, Aleksandra; Szliszka, Ewelina; Jureczko, Andrzej; Kowalska, Magdalena; Król, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the activity of fluconazole against 32 clinical strains of fluconazole-resistant Candida albicans, and C. albicans ATCC 10231 reference strain, after their exposure to sublethal concentrations of tea tree oil (TTO) or its main bioactive component terpinen-4-ol. For all tested fluconazole-resistant C. albicans strains TTO and terpinen-4-ol minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were low, ranging from 0.06% to 0.5%. The 24-hour exposure of fluconazole-resistant C. albicans strains to fluconazole with sublethal dose of TTO enhanced fluconazole activity against these strains. Overall, 62.5% of isolates were classified as susceptible, 25.0% exhibited intermediate susceptibility, and 12.5% were resistant. For all of the tested clinical strains the fluconazole MIC decreased from an average of 244.0 μg/mL to an average of 38.46 μg/mL, and the fluconazole minimal fungicidal concentrations (MFC) decreased from an average of 254.67 μg/mL to an average of 66.62 μg/mL. Terpinen-4-ol was found to be more active than TTO, and strongly enhanced fluconazole activity against fluconazole-resistant C. albicans strains. The results of this study demonstrate that combining natural substances such as TTO and conventional drug such as fluconazole, may help treat difficult yeast infections.

  7. Reverse Genetics in Candida albicans Predicts ARF Cycling Is Essential for Drug Resistance and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Epp, Elias; Vanier, Ghyslaine; Harcus, Doreen; Lee, Anna Y.; Jansen, Gregor; Hallett, Michael; Sheppard, Don C.; Thomas, David Y.; Munro, Carol A.; Mullick, Alaka; Whiteway, Malcolm

    2010-01-01

    Candida albicans, the major fungal pathogen of humans, causes life-threatening infections in immunocompromised individuals. Due to limited available therapy options, this can frequently lead to therapy failure and emergence of drug resistance. To improve current treatment strategies, we have combined comprehensive chemical-genomic screening in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and validation in C. albicans with the goal of identifying compounds that can couple with the fungistatic drug fluconazole to make it fungicidal. Among the genes identified in the yeast screen, we found that only AGE3, which codes for an ADP-ribosylation factor GTPase activating effector protein, abrogates fluconazole tolerance in C. albicans. The age3 mutant was more sensitive to other sterols and cell wall inhibitors, including caspofungin. The deletion of AGE3 in drug resistant clinical isolates and in constitutively active calcineurin signaling mutants restored fluconazole sensitivity. We confirmed chemically the AGE3-dependent drug sensitivity by showing a potent fungicidal synergy between fluconazole and brefeldin A (an inhibitor of the guanine nucleotide exchange factor for ADP ribosylation factors) in wild type C. albicans as well as in drug resistant clinical isolates. Addition of calcineurin inhibitors to the fluconazole/brefeldin A combination only initially improved pathogen killing. Brefeldin A synergized with different drugs in non-albicans Candida species as well as Aspergillus fumigatus. Microarray studies showed that core transcriptional responses to two different drug classes are not significantly altered in age3 mutants. The therapeutic potential of inhibiting ARF activities was demonstrated by in vivo studies that showed age3 mutants are avirulent in wild type mice, attenuated in virulence in immunocompromised mice and that fluconazole treatment was significantly more efficacious when ARF signaling was genetically compromised. This work describes a new, widely conserved, broad

  8. A Candida albicans CRISPR system permits genetic engineering of essential genes and gene families.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Valmik K; Barrasa, M Inmaculada; Fink, Gerald R

    Candida albicans is a pathogenic yeast that causes mucosal and systematic infections with high mortality. The absence of facile molecular genetics has been a major impediment to analysis of pathogenesis. The lack of meiosis coupled with the absence of plasmids makes genetic engineering cumbersome, especially for essential functions and gene families. We describe a C. albicans CRISPR system that overcomes many of the obstacles to genetic engineering in this organism. The high frequency with which CRISPR-induced mutations can be directed to target genes enables easy isolation of homozygous gene knockouts, even without selection. Moreover, the system permits the creation of strains with mutations in multiple genes, gene families, and genes that encode essential functions. This CRISPR system is also effective in a fresh clinical isolate of undetermined ploidy. Our method transforms the ability to manipulate the genome of Candida and provides a new window into the biology of this pathogen.

  9. Chitinase 3-like 1: prognostic biomarker in clinically isolated syndromes.

    PubMed

    Cantó, Ester; Tintoré, Mar; Villar, Luisa M; Costa, Carme; Nurtdinov, Ramil; Álvarez-Cermeño, José C; Arrambide, Georgina; Reverter, Ferran; Deisenhammer, Florian; Hegen, Harald; Khademi, Mohsen; Olsson, Tomas; Tumani, Hayrettin; Rodríguez-Martín, Eulalia; Piehl, Fredrik; Bartos, Ales; Zimova, Denisa; Kotoucova, Jolana; Kuhle, Jens; Kappos, Ludwig; García-Merino, Juan Antonio; Sánchez, Antonio José; Saiz, Albert; Blanco, Yolanda; Hintzen, Rogier; Jafari, Naghmeh; Brassat, David; Lauda, Florian; Roesler, Romy; Rejdak, Konrad; Papuc, Ewa; de Andrés, Clara; Rauch, Stefan; Khalil, Michael; Enzinger, Christian; Galimberti, Daniela; Scarpini, Elio; Teunissen, Charlotte; Sánchez, Alex; Rovira, Alex; Montalban, Xavier; Comabella, Manuel

    2015-04-01

    Chitinase 3-like 1 (CHI3L1) has been proposed as a biomarker associated with the conversion to clinically definite multiple sclerosis in patients with clinically isolated syndromes, based on the finding of increased cerebrospinal fluid CHI3L1 levels in clinically isolated syndrome patients who later converted to multiple sclerosis compared to those who remained as clinically isolated syndrome. Here, we aimed to validate CHI3L1 as a prognostic biomarker in a large cohort of patients with clinically isolated syndrome. This is a longitudinal cohort study of clinically isolated syndrome patients with clinical, magnetic resonance imaging, and cerebrospinal fluid data prospectively acquired. A total of 813 cerebrospinal fluid samples from patients with clinically isolated syndrome were recruited from 15 European multiple sclerosis centres. Cerebrospinal fluid CHI3L1 levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Multivariable Cox regression models were used to investigate the association between cerebrospinal fluid CHI3L1 levels and time to conversion to multiple sclerosis and time to reach Expanded Disability Status Scale 3.0. CHI3L1 levels were higher in patients who converted to clinically definite multiple sclerosis compared to patients who continued as clinically isolated syndrome (P = 8.1 × 10(-11)). In the Cox regression analysis, CHI3L1 levels were a risk factor for conversion to multiple sclerosis (hazard ratio = 1.7; P = 1.1 × 10(-5) using Poser criteria; hazard ratio = 1.6; P = 3.7 × 10(-6) for McDonald criteria) independent of other covariates such as brain magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities and presence of cerebrospinal fluid oligoclonal bands, and were the only significant independent risk factor associated with the development of disability (hazard ratio = 3.8; P = 2.5 × 10(-8)). High CHI3L1 levels were associated with shorter time to multiple sclerosis (P = 3.2 × 10(-9) using Poser criteria; P = 5.6 × 10(-11) for McDonald criteria

  10. Comparison of the hemolytic activity between C. albicans and non-albicans Candida species.

    PubMed

    Rossoni, Rodnei Dennis; Barbosa, Júnia Oliveira; Vilela, Simone Furgeri Godinho; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso; Junqueira, Juliana Campos

    2013-01-01

    The ability to produce enzymes, such as hemolysins, is an important virulence factor for the genus Candida.The objective of this study was to compare the hemolytic activity between C. albicansand non-albicans Candida species. Fifty strains of Candida species, isolated from the oral cavity of patients infected with HIV were studied. The isolates included the following species: C. albicans, C. dubliniensis, C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, C. krusei, C. parapsilosis, C. dubliniensis, C. norvegensis, C. lusitaniae, and C. guilliermondii. Hemolysin production was evaluated on Sabouraud dextrose agar containing chloramphenicol, blood, and glucose. A loop-full of pure Candidaculture was spot-inoculated onto plates and incubated at 37 ºC for 24 h in a 5% CO2 atmosphere. Hemolytic activity was defined as the formation of a translucent halo around the colonies. All C. albicansstrains that were studied produced hemolysins. Among the non-albicans Candidaspecies, 86% exhibited hemolytic activity. Only C. guilliermondiiand some C. parapsilosis isolates were negative for this enzyme. In conclusion, most non-albicans Candidaspecies had a similar ability to produce hemolysins when compared to C. albicans.

  11. In vitro activities of terbinafine in combination with fluconazole and itraconazole against isolates of Candida albicans with reduced susceptibility to azoles.

    PubMed Central

    Barchiesi, F; Falconi Di Francesco, L; Scalise, G

    1997-01-01

    A checkerboard microdilution method was applied to study the in vitro interaction of terbinafine with either fluconazole and itraconazole against 30 strains of Candida albicans. Synergy was observed in 40% of the terbinafine-fluconazole interactions and in 43% of the terbinafine-itraconazole interactions, while antagonism was not observed. Even when only additivity was achieved, the combinations still showed beneficial effects since at least twofold reductions in the MICs of both drugs were found in 100% of the terbinafine-fluconazole interactions and in 76% of the terbinafine-itraconazole interactions. PMID:9257768

  12. Cranberry-derived proanthocyanidins prevent formation of Candida albicans biofilms in artificial urine through biofilm- and adherence-specific mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Rane, Hallie S.; Bernardo, Stella M.; Howell, Amy B.; Lee, Samuel A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Candida albicans is a common cause of nosocomial urinary tract infections (UTIs) and is responsible for increased morbidity and healthcare costs. Moreover, the US Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services no longer reimburse for hospital-acquired catheter-associated UTIs. Thus, development of specific approaches for the prevention of Candida urinary infections is needed. Cranberry juice-derived proanthocyanidins (PACs) have efficacy in the prevention of bacterial UTIs, partially due to anti-adherence properties, but there are limited data on their use for the prevention and/or treatment of Candida UTIs. Therefore, we sought to systematically assess the in vitro effect of cranberry-derived PACs on C. albicans biofilm formation in artificial urine. Methods C. albicans biofilms in artificial urine were coincubated with cranberry PACs at serially increasing concentrations and biofilm metabolic activity was assessed using the XTT assay in static microplate and silicone disc models. Results Cranberry PAC concentrations of ≥16 mg/L significantly reduced biofilm formation in all C. albicans strains tested, with a paradoxical effect observed at high concentrations in two clinical isolates. Further, cranberry PACs were additive in combination with traditional antifungals. Cranberry PACs reduced C. albicans adherence to both polystyrene and silicone. Supplementation of the medium with iron reduced the efficacy of cranberry PACs against biofilms. Conclusions These findings indicate that cranberry PACs have excellent in vitro activity against C. albicans biofilm formation in artificial urine. We present preliminary evidence that cranberry PAC activity against C. albicans biofilm formation is due to anti-adherence properties and/or iron chelation. PMID:24114570

  13. In vitro antimicrobial activity of ten medicinal plants against clinical isolates of oral cancer cases

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Suppression of immune system in treated cancer patients may lead to secondary infections that obviate the need of antibiotics. In the present study, an attempt was made to understand the occurrence of secondary infections in immuno-suppressed patients along with herbal control of these infections with the following objectives to: (a) isolate the microbial species from the treated oral cancer patients along with the estimation of absolute neutrophile counts of patients (b) assess the in vitro antimicrobial activity medicinal plants against the above clinical isolates. Methods Blood and oral swab cultures were taken from 40 oral cancer patients undergoing treatment in the radiotherapy unit of Regional Cancer Institute, Pt. B.D.S. Health University, Rohtak, Haryana. Clinical isolates were identified by following general microbiological, staining and biochemical methods. The absolute neutrophile counts were done by following the standard methods. The medicinal plants selected for antimicrobial activity analysis were Asphodelus tenuifolius Cav., Asparagus racemosus Willd., Balanites aegyptiaca L., Cestrum diurnum L., Cordia dichotoma G. Forst, Eclipta alba L., Murraya koenigii (L.) Spreng. , Pedalium murex L., Ricinus communis L. and Trigonella foenum graecum L. The antimicrobial efficacy of medicinal plants was evaluated by modified Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. MIC and MFC were investigated by serial two fold microbroth dilution method. Results Prevalent bacterial pathogens isolated were Staphylococcus aureus (23.2%), Escherichia coli (15.62%), Staphylococcus epidermidis (12.5%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (9.37%), Klebsiella pneumonia (7.81%), Proteus mirabilis (3.6%), Proteus vulgaris (4.2%) and the fungal pathogens were Candida albicans (14.6%), Aspergillus fumigatus (9.37%). Out of 40 cases, 35 (87.5%) were observed as neutropenic. Eight medicinal plants (A. tenuifolius, A. racemosus, B. aegyptiaca, E. alba, M. koenigii, P. murex R. communis and T

  14. Emergence of fluconazole-resistant strains of Candida albicans in patients with recurrent oropharyngeal candidosis and human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Ruhnke, M; Eigler, A; Tennagen, I; Geiseler, B; Engelmann, E; Trautmann, M

    1994-01-01

    After repeated use of fluconazole for therapy of oropharyngeal candidosis, the emergence of in vitro fluconazole-resistant Candida albicans isolates (MIC, > or = 25 micrograms/ml) together with oral candidosis unresponsive to oral dosages of up to 400 mg of fluconazole were observed in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Antifungal susceptibility testing was done by broth microdilution and agar dilution techniques on C. albicans isolates recovered from a cohort of patients with symptomatic HIV infection who were treated repeatedly with fluconazole for oropharyngeal candidosis. In vitro findings did show a gradual increase in the MICs for C. albicans isolates recovered from selected patients with repeated episodes of oropharyngeal candidosis. Primary resistance of C. albicans to fluconazole was not seen. Cross-resistance in vitro occurred between fluconazole and other azoles (ketoconazole, itraconazole), but to a lesser extent. The results of the study suggest that the development of clinical resistance to fluconazole could be clearly correlated to in vitro resistance to fluconazole. Itraconazole may still serve as an effective antifungal agent in patients with HIV infection and oropharyngeal candidosis nonresponsive to fluconazole. PMID:7814530

  15. Antifungal Action of Methylene Blue Involves Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Disruption of Redox and Membrane Homeostasis in C. albicans

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Moiz A.; Fatima, Zeeshan; Hameed, Saif

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans is known to cause infections ranging from superficial and systemic in immunocompromised person. In this study, we explored that the antifungal action of Methylene blue (MB) is mediated through mitochondrial dysfunction and disruption of redox and membrane homeostasis against C. albicans. We demonstrated that MB displayed its antifungal potential against C. albicans and two clinical isolates tested. We also showed that MB is effective against two non- albicans species as well. Notably, the antifungal effect of MB seems to be independent of the major drug efflux pumps transporter activity. We explored that MB treated Candida cells were sensitive on non-fermentable carbon source leading us to propose that MB inhibits mitochondria. This sensitive phenotype was reinforced with the fact that sensitivity of Candida cells to MB could be rescued upon the supplementation of ascorbic acid, an antioxidant. This clearly suggests that disturbances in redox status are linked with MB action. We further demonstrated that Candida cells were susceptible to membrane perturbing agent viz. SDS which was additionally confirmed by transmission electron micrographs showing disruption of membrane integrity. Moreover, the ergosterol levels were significantly decreased by 66% suggesting lipid compositional changes due to MB. Furthermore, we could demonstrate that MB inhibits the yeast to hyphal transition in C. albicans which is one of the major virulence attribute in most of the hyphal inducing conditions. Taken together, the data generated from present study clearly establishes MB as promising antifungal agent that could be efficiently employed in strategies to treat Candida infections. PMID:27006725

  16. Analysis of Repair Mechanisms following an Induced Double-Strand Break Uncovers Recessive Deleterious Alleles in the Candida albicans Diploid Genome.

    PubMed

    Feri, Adeline; Loll-Krippleber, Raphaël; Commere, Pierre-Henri; Maufrais, Corinne; Sertour, Natacha; Schwartz, Katja; Sherlock, Gavin; Bougnoux, Marie-Elisabeth; d'Enfert, Christophe; Legrand, Mélanie

    2016-10-11

    The diploid genome of the yeast Candida albicans is highly plastic, exhibiting frequent loss-of-heterozygosity (LOH) events. To provide a deeper understanding of the mechanisms leading to LOH, we investigated the repair of a unique DNA double-strand break (DSB) in the laboratory C. albicans SC5314 strain using the I-SceI meganuclease. Upon I-SceI induction, we detected a strong increase in the frequency of LOH events at an I-SceI target locus positioned on chromosome 4 (Chr4), including events spreading from this locus to the proximal telomere. Characterization of the repair events by single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) typing and whole-genome sequencing revealed a predominance of gene conversions, but we also observed mitotic crossover or break-induced replication events, as well as combinations of independent events. Importantly, progeny that had undergone homozygosis of part or all of Chr4 haplotype B (Chr4B) were inviable. Mining of genome sequencing data for 155 C. albicans isolates allowed the identification of a recessive lethal allele in the GPI16 gene on Chr4B unique to C. albicans strain SC5314 which is responsible for this inviability. Additional recessive lethal or deleterious alleles were identified in the genomes of strain SC5314 and two clinical isolates. Our results demonstrate that recessive lethal alleles in the genomes of C. albicans isolates prevent the occurrence of specific extended LOH events. While these and other recessive lethal and deleterious alleles are likely to accumulate in C. albicans due to clonal reproduction, their occurrence may in turn promote the maintenance of corresponding nondeleterious alleles and, consequently, heterozygosity in the C. albicans species.

  17. Analysis of Repair Mechanisms following an Induced Double-Strand Break Uncovers Recessive Deleterious Alleles in the Candida albicans Diploid Genome

    PubMed Central

    Feri, Adeline; Loll-Krippleber, Raphaël; Commere, Pierre-Henri; Maufrais, Corinne; Sertour, Natacha; Schwartz, Katja; Sherlock, Gavin; Bougnoux, Marie-Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The diploid genome of the yeast Candida albicans is highly plastic, exhibiting frequent loss-of-heterozygosity (LOH) events. To provide a deeper understanding of the mechanisms leading to LOH, we investigated the repair of a unique DNA double-strand break (DSB) in the laboratory C. albicans SC5314 strain using the I-SceI meganuclease. Upon I-SceI induction, we detected a strong increase in the frequency of LOH events at an I-SceI target locus positioned on chromosome 4 (Chr4), including events spreading from this locus to the proximal telomere. Characterization of the repair events by single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) typing and whole-genome sequencing revealed a predominance of gene conversions, but we also observed mitotic crossover or break-induced replication events, as well as combinations of independent events. Importantly, progeny that had undergone homozygosis of part or all of Chr4 haplotype B (Chr4B) were inviable. Mining of genome sequencing data for 155 C. albicans isolates allowed the identification of a recessive lethal allele in the GPI16 gene on Chr4B unique to C. albicans strain SC5314 which is responsible for this inviability. Additional recessive lethal or deleterious alleles were identified in the genomes of strain SC5314 and two clinical isolates. Our results demonstrate that recessive lethal alleles in the genomes of C. albicans isolates prevent the occurrence of specific extended LOH events. While these and other recessive lethal and deleterious alleles are likely to accumulate in C. albicans due to clonal reproduction, their occurrence may in turn promote the maintenance of corresponding nondeleterious alleles and, consequently, heterozygosity in the C. albicans species. PMID:27729506

  18. Gymnemic Acids Inhibit Hyphal Growth and Virulence in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Vediyappan, Govindsamy; Dumontet, Vincent; Pelissier, Franck; d’Enfert, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic and polymorphic fungal pathogen that causes mucosal, disseminated and invasive infections in humans. Transition from the yeast form to the hyphal form is one of the key virulence factors in C. albicans contributing to macrophage evasion, tissue invasion and biofilm formation. Nontoxic small molecules that inhibit C. albicans yeast-to-hypha conversion and hyphal growth could represent a valuable source for understanding pathogenic fungal morphogenesis, identifying drug targets and serving as templates for the development of novel antifungal agents. Here, we have identified the triterpenoid saponin family of gymnemic acids (GAs) as inhibitor of C. albicans morphogenesis. GAs were isolated and purified from Gymnema sylvestre leaves, the Ayurvedic traditional medicinal plant used to treat diabetes. Purified GAs had no effect on the growth and viability of C. albicans yeast cells but inhibited its yeast-to-hypha conversion under several hypha-inducing conditions, including the presence of serum. Moreover, GAs promoted the conversion of C. albicans hyphae into yeast cells under hypha inducing conditions. They also inhibited conidial germination and hyphal growth of Aspergillus sp. Finally, GAs inhibited the formation of invasive hyphae from C. albicans-infected Caenorhabditis elegans worms and rescued them from killing by C. albicans. Hence, GAs could be useful for various antifungal applications due to their traditional use in herbal medicine. PMID:24040201

  19. Gymnemic acids inhibit hyphal growth and virulence in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Vediyappan, Govindsamy; Dumontet, Vincent; Pelissier, Franck; d'Enfert, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic and polymorphic fungal pathogen that causes mucosal, disseminated and invasive infections in humans. Transition from the yeast form to the hyphal form is one of the key virulence factors in C. albicans contributing to macrophage evasion, tissue invasion and biofilm formation. Nontoxic small molecules that inhibit C. albicans yeast-to-hypha conversion and hyphal growth could represent a valuable source for understanding pathogenic fungal morphogenesis, identifying drug targets and serving as templates for the development of novel antifungal agents. Here, we have identified the triterpenoid saponin family of gymnemic acids (GAs) as inhibitor of C. albicans morphogenesis. GAs were isolated and purified from Gymnema sylvestre leaves, the Ayurvedic traditional medicinal plant used to treat diabetes. Purified GAs had no effect on the growth and viability of C. albicans yeast cells but inhibited its yeast-to-hypha conversion under several hypha-inducing conditions, including the presence of serum. Moreover, GAs promoted the conversion of C. albicans hyphae into yeast cells under hypha inducing conditions. They also inhibited conidial germination and hyphal growth of Aspergillus sp. Finally, GAs inhibited the formation of invasive hyphae from C. albicans-infected Caenorhabditis elegans worms and rescued them from killing by C. albicans. Hence, GAs could be useful for various antifungal applications due to their traditional use in herbal medicine.

  20. Pathogenicity and virulence of Candida dubliniensis: comparison with C. albicans.

    PubMed

    Vilela, M M S; Kamei, K; Sano, A; Tanaka, R; Uno, J; Takahashi, I; Ito, J; Yarita, K; Miyaji, M

    2002-06-01

    Candida dubliniensis is a newly described fungus that is frequently isolated from the oral cavities of HIV-positive patients. Although extensive studies have been performed on the phylogeny of C. dubliniensis, little is known about the pathogenic ecology of this yeast. Here we examined aspects related to C. dubliniensis in comparison with those of C. albicans. When injected intravenously into mice, C. dubliniensis had a higher survival rate than C. albicans. Histopathological analysis disclosed that C. dubliniensis remained mostly in the yeast form in the infected organs, whereas C. albicans changed into the mycelial form. The host inflammatory reaction was aggressive with C. dubliniensis infection and mild with C. albicans infection. Co-culture of the yeasts with human polymorphonuclear leukocytes disclosed that C. dubliniensis is more vulnerable to the fungicidal activity of leukocytes than C. albicans. C. dubliniensis was also more susceptible to the toxic effect of hydrogen peroxide. When cultured in vitro, C. dubliniensis grew more slowly than C. albicans, but the formation of germ tubes was faster. When the fungi were cultured in RPMI 1640, a fetal bovine serum supplement suppressed the growth of C. dubliniensis but enhanced that of C. albicans. These results clearly indicated that C. dubliniensis is less virulence than C. albicans.

  1. Polyketide Glycosides from Bionectria ochroleuca Inhibit Candida albicans Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    One of the challenges presented by Candida infections is that many of the isolates encountered in the clinic produce biofilms, which can decrease these pathogens’ susceptibilities to standard-of-care antibiotic therapies. Inhibitors of fungal biofilm formation offer a potential solution to counteracting some of the problems associated with Candida infections. A screening campaign utilizing samples from our fungal extract library revealed that a Bionectria ochroleuca isolate cultured on Cheerios breakfast cereal produced metabolites that blocked the in vitro formation of Candida albicans biofilms. A scale-up culture of the fungus was undertaken using mycobags (also known as mushroom bags or spawn bags), which afforded four known [TMC-151s C–F (1–4)] and three new [bionectriols B–D (5–7)] polyketide glycosides. All seven metabolites exhibited potent biofilm inhibition against C. albicans SC5314, as well as exerted synergistic antifungal activities in combination with amphotericin B. In this report, we describe the structure determination of the new metabolites, as well as compare the secondary metabolome profiles of fungi grown in flasks and mycobags. These studies demonstrate that mycobags offer a useful alternative to flask-based cultures for the preparative production of fungal secondary metabolites. PMID:25302529

  2. Antibiotic resistance among Helicobacter pylori clinical isolates in Lima, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Boehnke, Kevin F; Valdivieso, Manuel; Bussalleu, Alejandro; Sexton, Rachael; Thompson, Kathryn C; Osorio, Soledad; Reyes, Italo Novoa; Crowley, John J; Baker, Laurence H; Xi, Chuanwu

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Gastric carcinoma is the most common cancer and cause of cancer mortality in Peru. Helicobacter pylori, a bacterium that colonizes the human stomach, is a Group 1 carcinogen due to its causal relationship to gastric carcinoma. While eradication of H. pylori can help prevent gastric cancer, characterizing regional antibiotic resistance patterns is necessary to determine targeted treatment for each region. Thus, we examined primary antibiotic resistance in clinical isolates of H. pylori in Lima, Peru. Materials and methods H. pylori strains were isolated from gastric biopsies of patients with histologically proven H. pylori infection. Primary antibiotic resistance among isolates was examined using E-test strips. Isolates were examined for the presence of the cagA pathogenicity island and the vacA m1/m2 alleles via polymerase chain reaction. Results Seventy-six isolates were recovered from gastric biopsies. Clinical isolates showed evidence of antibiotic resistance to 1 (27.6%, n=21/76), 2 (28.9%, n=22/76), or ≥3 antibiotics (40.8%). Of 76 isolates, eight (10.5%) were resistant to amoxicillin and clarithromycin, which are part of the standard triple therapy for H. pylori infection. No trends were seen between the presence of cagA, vacA m1, or vacA m2 and antibiotic resistance. Conclusion The rate of antibiotic resistance among H. pylori isolates in Lima, Peru, is higher than expected and presents cause for concern. To develop more targeted eradication therapies for H. pylori in Peru, more research is needed to better characterize antibiotic resistance among a larger number of clinical isolates prospectively. PMID:28331349

  3. Dose-dependent effect of lysozyme upon Candida albicans biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Sebaa, Sarra; Hizette, Nicolas; Boucherit-Otmani, Zahia; Courtois, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    The present study investigated the in vitro effect of lysozyme (0–1,000 µg/ml) on Candida albicans (C. albicans) biofilm development. Investigations were conducted on C. albicans ATCC 10231 and on 10 clinical isolates from dentures. Strains were cultured aerobically at 37°C in Sabouraud broth. Yeast growth was evaluated by turbidimetry. Biofilm biomass was quantified on a polystyrene support by crystal violet staining and on acrylic surfaces by counts of colony forming units. Lysozyme affected biofilm formation to a greater extent than it affected growth. For the ATCC 10231 reference strain, lysozyme acted as a biofilm promotor on polystyrene at the highest concentration tested (1,000 µg/ml, non-physiological). When the reference strain was investigated on acrylic resin support, lysozyme acted as a significant biofilm promotor on rough resin, but less on smooth resin. The attached biomass in the presence of physiological concentrations of lysozyme (10–30 µg/ml) was significantly decreased compared with the hypothetical value of 100% using a one-sample t-test, but a comparison between the different lysozyme conditions using analysis of variance and post hoc tests did not reveal significant differences. In 10 wild strains, different patterns of biofilm formation on polystyrene were observed in the presence of lysozyme. Some strains, characterized by large amounts of biofilm formation in the presence of 1,000 µg/ml lysozyme, were poor biofilm producers at low concentrations of lysozyme. In contrast, some strains that were poor biofilm producers with a high lysozyme concentration were more inhibited by low concentrations of lysozyme. The present study emphasizes the need to develop strategies for biofilm control based on in vitro experiments, and to implement these in clinical trials prior to approval of hygiene products enriched with exocrine proteins, such as lysozyme. Further studies will extend these investigations to other Candida species, and to fungi

  4. Molecular mechanism of fluoroquinolones resistance in Mycoplasma hominis clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Meng, Dong-Ya; Sun, Chang-Jian; Yu, Jing-Bo; Ma, Jun; Xue, Wen-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the molecular mechanism of fluoroquinolones resistance in Mycoplasma hominis (MH) clinical strains isolated from urogenital specimens. 15 MH clinical isolates with different phenotypes of resistance to fluoroquinolones antibiotics were screened for mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDRs) of DNA gyrase (gyrA and gyrB) and topoisomerase IV (parC and parE) in comparison with the reference strain PG21, which is susceptible to fluoroquinolones antibiotics. 15 MH isolates with three kinds of quinolone resistance phenotypes were obtained. Thirteen out of these quinolone-resistant isolates were found to carry nucleotide substitutions in either gyrA or parC. There were no alterations in gyrB and no mutations were found in the isolates with a phenotype of resistance to Ofloxacin (OFX), intermediate resistant to Levofloxacin (LVX) and Sparfloxacin (SFX), and those susceptible to all three tested antibiotics. The molecular mechanism of fluoroquinolone resistance in clinical isolates of MH was reported in this study. The single amino acid mutation in ParC of MH may relate to the resistance to OFX and LVX and the high-level resistance to fluoroquinolones for MH is likely associated with mutations in both DNA gyrase and the ParC subunit of topoisomerase IV.

  5. Comparison of albicans vs. non-albicans candidemia in French intensive care units

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Candidemia raises numerous therapeutic issues for intensive care physicians. Epidemiological data that could guide the choice of initial therapy are still required. This analysis sought to compare the characteristics of intensive care unit (ICU) patients with candidemia due to non-albicans Candida species with those of ICU patients with candidemia due to Candida albicans. Methods A prospective, observational, multicenter, French study was conducted from October 2005 to May 2006. Patients exhibiting candidemia developed during ICU stay and exclusively due either to one or more non-albicans Candida species or to C. albicans were selected. The data collected included patient characteristics on ICU admission and at the onset of candidemia. Results Among the 136 patients analyzed, 78 (57.4%) had candidemia caused by C. albicans. These patients had earlier onset of infection (11.1 ± 14.2 days after ICU admission vs. 17.4 ± 17.7, p = 0.02), higher severity scores on ICU admission (SOFA: 10.4 ± 4.7 vs. 8.6 ± 4.6, p = 0.03; SAPS II: 57.4 ± 22.8 vs. 48.7 ± 15.5, P = 0.015), and were less often neutropenic (2.6% vs. 12%, p = 0.04) than patients with candidemia due to non-albicans Candida species. Conclusions Although patients infected with Candida albicans differed from patients infected with non-albicans Candida species for a few characteristics, no clinical factor appeared pertinent enough to guide the choice of empirical antifungal therapy in ICU. PMID:20507569

  6. Prospective evaluation of the chromogenic medium CandiSelect 4 for differentiation and presumptive identification of non-Candida albicans Candida species.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Liang; de Hoog, G Sybren; Cornelissen, Akke; Lyu, Qian; Mou, Lili; Liu, Taohua; Cao, Yu; Vatanshenassan, Mansoureh; Kang, Yingqian

    2016-02-01

    Rapid identification of pathogenic yeasts is a crucial step in timely and appropriate antifungal therapy. For diagnostics in the clinical laboratory, simplified alternatives to barcoding are needed. CandiSelect 4 (CS4) medium, a chromogenic medium for isolation of clinical yeasts, allows routine recognition of Candida albicans and presumptive identification of Candida tropicalis, Candida glabrata, and Candida krusei. We evaluated an extension of this method with 46 non-Candida albicans Candida (NCAC) and 7 Malassezia species. The medium supported growth of all species tested and a wide diversity of cultural types were observed. Colony colours were in violet, turquoise (including green and blue), or white tinges. Eight NCAC species produced violet pigmentation similar to that of C. albicans. Most NCAC species, including C. glabrata and C. tropicalis were distributed in the turquoise group. Malassezia species were invariably blue.

  7. Nocardia isolation from clinical samples with the paraffin baiting technique

    PubMed Central

    Bafghi, Mehdi Fatahi; Heidarieh, Parvin; Soori, Tahereh; Saber, Sasan; Meysamie, Alipasha; Gheitoli, Khavar; Habibnia, Shadi; Rasouli Nasab, Masoumeh; Eshraghi, Seyyed Saeed

    2015-01-01

    Background The genus Nocardia is a cause of infection in the lungs, skin, brain, cerebrospinal fluid, eyes, joints and kidneys. Nocardia isolation from polymicrobial specimens is difficult due to its slow growth. Several methods have been reported for Nocardia isolation from clinical samples. In the current study, we used three methods: paraffin baiting technique, paraffin agar, and conventional media for Nocardia isolation from various clinical specimens from Iranian patients. Methods In this study, we examined 517 samples from various clinical specimens such as: sputum of patients with suspected tuberculosis, bronchoalveolar lavage, sputum of patients with cystic fibrosis, tracheal aspirate, cutaneous and subcutaneous abscesses, cerebrospinal fluid, dental abscess, mycetoma, wound, bone marrow biopsy, and gastric lavage. All collected specimens were cultured on carbon-free broth tubes (paraffin baiting technique), paraffin agar, Sabouraud dextrose agar, and Sabouraud dextrose agar with cycloheximide and were incubated at 35°C for one month. Results Seven Nocardia spp. were isolated with paraffin baiting technique, compared with 5 positive results with the paraffin agar technique and 3 positive results with Sabouraud dextrose agar with and without cycloheximide. The prevalence of nocardial infections in our specimens was 5.28%. Conclusion In the present study, the use of the paraffin baiting technique appeared to be more effective than other methods for Nocardia isolation from various clinical specimens. PMID:25763363

  8. Candida albicans pathogenicity mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, François L.; Wilson, Duncan; Hube, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    The polymorphic fungus Candida albicans is a member of the normal human microbiome. In most individuals, C. albicans resides as a lifelong, harmless commensal. Under certain circumstances, however, C. albicans can cause infections that range from superficial infections of the skin to life-threatening systemic infections. Several factors and activities have been identified which contribute to the pathogenic potential of this fungus. Among them are molecules which mediate adhesion to and invasion into host cells, the secretion of hydrolases, the yeast-to-hypha transition, contact sensing and thigmotropism, biofilm formation, phenotypic switching and a range of fitness attributes. Our understanding of when and how these mechanisms and factors contribute to infection has significantly increased during the last years. In addition, novel virulence mechanisms have recently been discovered. In this review we present an update on our current understanding of the pathogenicity mechanisms of this important human pathogen. PMID:23302789

  9. [Effect of Mexican propolis extracts from Apis mellifera on Candida albicans in vitro growth].

    PubMed

    Quintero-Mora, María Leonor; Londoño-Orozco, Amparo; Hernández-Hernández, Francisca; Manzano-Gayosso, Patricia; López-Martínez, Rubén; Soto-Zárate, Carlos Ignacio; Carrillo-Miranda, Liborio; Penieres-Carrillo, Guillermo; García-Tovar, Carlos Gerardo; Cruz-Sánchez, Tonatiuh A

    2008-03-01

    Propolis is a resinous substance collected by bees (Apis mellifera) from different trees and bushes. Due to its antifungal, antibacterial, antiviral and antiparasitic properties, it has continued to be very popular throughout the time showing variable activity depending on its geographical origin. In Mexico, information about this product is very limited. The aim of this work was to evaluate the antifungal activity of four propolis ethanolic extracts from three different Mexican states, and four commercial extracts on Candida albicans growth. A reference strain (ATCC 10231) and 36 clinical isolates of C. albicans were used. The Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) was determined by the dilution on agar method. Growth curves on Sabouraud Dextrose broth with and without different propolis ethanolic extracts concentrations were performed. In addition, whether the effect was fungistatic or fungicide was determined. The propolis ethanolic extract obtained from Cuautitlán Izcalli, State of Mexico, showed the best biological activity, inhibiting 94.4% from the clinical isolates at 0.8 mg/ml; the reference strain was inhibited at 0.6 mg/ml. The propolis effect was fungistatic in low concentrations and fungicide in concentrations higher to MIC. The Mexican propolis ethanolic extract could be further investigated for its alternative use for the treatment of some C. albicans infections.

  10. In Vitro Antibacterial Activity of Rhodanine Derivatives against Pathogenic Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    AbdelKhalek, Ahmed; Ashby, Charles R.; Patel, Bhargav A.; Talele, Tanaji T.; Seleem, Mohamed N.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial infections present a serious challenge to healthcare practitioners due to the emergence of resistance to numerous conventional antibacterial drugs. Therefore, new bacterial targets and new antimicrobials are unmet medical needs. Rhodanine derivatives have been shown to possess potent antimicrobial activity via a novel mechanism. However, their potential use as antibacterials has not been fully examined. In this study, we determined the spectrum of activity of seven rhodanine derivatives (compounds Rh 1–7) against clinical isolates of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strains and Candida albicans. We also synthesized and tested three additional compounds, ethyl ester and amide of rhodanine 2 (Rh 8 and Rh 10, respectively) and ethyl ester of rhodanine 3 (Rh 9) to determine the significance of the carboxyl group modification towards antibacterial activity and human serum albumin binding. A broth microdilution assay confirmed Rh 1–7 exhibit bactericidal activity against Gram-positive pathogens. Rh 2 had significant activity against various vancomycin-resistant (MIC90 = 4 μM) and methicillin-resistant (MIC90 = 4 μM) Staphylococcus aureus (VRSA and MRSA), Staphylococcus epidermidis (MIC = 4 μM) and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) strains (MIC90 = 8 μM). The rhodanine compounds exhibited potent activity against Bacillus spp., including Bacillus anthracis, with MIC range of 2–8 μM. In addition, they had potent activity against Clostridium difficile. The most potent compound, Rh 2, at 4 and 8 times its MIC, significantly decreased S. epidermidis biofilm mass by more than 35% and 45%, respectively. None of the rhodanine compounds showed antimicrobial activity (MIC > 128 μM) against various 1) Gram-negative pathogens (Acinetobacter baumannii, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumonia, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Salmonella Typhimurium) or 2) strains of Candida albicans (MIC > 64 μM). The MTS assay confirmed that rhodanines were not toxic to

  11. RESPONSES OF OYSTER (CRASSOSTREA VIRGINICA) HEMOCYTES TO NONPATHOGENIC AND CLINICAL ISOLATES OF VIBRIO PARAHAEMOLYTICUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bacterial uptake by oysters (Crassostrea virginica) and bactericidal activity of oyster hemocytes were studied using four environmental isolates and three clinical isolates of Vibrio parahaemolyticus. Clinical isolates (2030, 2062, 2107) were obtained from gastroenteritis patien...

  12. Molecular mechanisms of carbapenem resistance in Enterobacter cloacae clinical isolates from Korea and clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yangsoon; Choi, Heekyeong; Yum, Jong Hwa; Kang, Girung; Bae, Il Kwon; Jeong, Seok Hoon; Lee, Kyungwon

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the molecular mechanisms of carbapenem resistance in clinical isolates of Enterobacter cloacae and their clinical characteristics. Nonreplicable E. cloacae isolates were recovered from six cancer patients and one patient with liver cirrhosis at a tertiary-care hospital in Korea between 2002 and 2009. Two patients who were considered to have a true infection caused by these microorganisms have died. All isolates produced AmpC β-lactamases, including ACT-1, ACT-2, MIR-3 and DHA-1, and CTX-M- or SHV-type extended-spectrum β-lactamase. Two isolates produced plasmid-borne VIM-2 carbapenemase. All probes specific for bla(AmpC) genes hybridized with I-CeuI chromosomal fragments were also recognized by a probe specific for 16S rDNA, suggesting a chromosomal location. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that a major outer membrane protein, OmpF, was absent in all isolates. PFGE of XbaI-digested DNA were considered to be unrelated. The results of our study suggest that the chromosomal AmpC β-lactamase with impermeability in E. cloacae clinical isolates implicated in reduced carbapenem susceptibility. Although carbapenem-resistant E. cloacae isolates were isolated in a few patients in our study, the clinical outcomes were grave. Therefore, the patients colonized or infected by carbapenem-resistant E. cloacae isolates should gain attention of antibiotic therapy.

  13. Whole genome sequencing of clinical isolates of Giardia lamblia.

    PubMed

    Hanevik, K; Bakken, R; Brattbakk, H R; Saghaug, C S; Langeland, N

    2015-02-01

    Clinical isolates from protozoan parasites such as Giardia lamblia are at present practically impossible to culture. By using simple cyst purification methods, we show that Giardia whole genome sequencing of clinical stool samples is possible. Immunomagnetic separation after sucrose gradient flotation gave superior results compared to sucrose gradient flotation alone. The method enables detailed analysis of a wide range of genes of interest for genotyping, virulence and drug resistance.

  14. Antifungal Susceptibility in Serum and Virulence Determinants of Candida Bloodstream Isolates from Hong Kong

    PubMed Central

    Seneviratne, Chaminda J.; Rajan, Suhasini; Wong, Sarah S. W.; Tsang, Dominic N. C.; Lai, Christopher K. C.; Samaranayake, Lakshman P.; Jin, Lijian

    2016-01-01

    Candida bloodstream infections (CBI) are one of the most common nosocomial infections globally, and they account for a high mortality rate. The increasing global prevalence of drug-resistant Candida strains has also been posing a challenge to clinicians. In this study, we comprehensively evaluated the biofilm formation and production of hemolysin and proteinase of 63 CBI isolates derived from a hospital setting in Hong Kong as well as their antifungal susceptibility both in the presence and in the absence of human serum, using standard methodology. Candida albicans was the predominant species among the 63 CBI isolates collected, and non-albicans Candida species accounted for approximately one third of the isolates (36.5%). Of them, Candida tropicalis was the most common non-albicans Candida species. A high proportion (31.7%) of the CBI isolates (40% of C. albicans isolates, 10% of C. tropicalis isolates, 11% of C. parapsilosis isolates, and 100% of C. glabrata isolates) were found to be resistant to fluconazole. One of the isolates (C. tropicalis) was resistant to amphotericin B. A rising prevalence of drug-resistance CBI isolates in Hong Kong was observed with reference to a previous study. Notably, all non-albicans Candida species, showed increased hemolytic activity relative to C. albicans, whilst C. albicans, C. tropicalis, and C. parapsilosis exhibited proteinase activities. Majority of the isolates were capable of forming mature biofilms. Interestingly, the presence of serum distorted the yeast sensitivity to fluconazole, but not amphotericin B. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that CBI isolates of Candida have the potential to express to varying extent their virulence attributes (e.g., biofilm formation, hemolysin production, and proteinase activity) and these, together with perturbations in their antifungal sensitivity in the presence of serum, may contribute to treatment complication in candidemia. The effect of serum on antifungal activity

  15. In Vitro Activity of Miltefosine against Candida albicans under Planktonic and Biofilm Growth Conditions and In Vivo Efficacy in a Murine Model of Oral Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Ashok K.; Rozental, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    The generation of a new antifungal against Candida albicans biofilms has become a major priority, since biofilm formation by this opportunistic pathogenic fungus is usually associated with an increased resistance to azole antifungal drugs and treatment failures. Miltefosine is an alkyl phospholipid with promising antifungal activity. Here, we report that, when tested under planktonic conditions, miltefosine displays potent in vitro activity against multiple fluconazole-susceptible and -resistant C. albicans clinical isolates, including isolates overexpressing efflux pumps and/or with well-characterized Erg11 mutations. Moreover, miltefosine inhibits C. albicans biofilm formation and displays activity against preformed biofilms. Serial passage experiments confirmed that miltefosine has a reduced potential to elicit resistance, and screening of a library of C. albicans transcription factor mutants provided additional insight into the activity of miltefosine against C. albicans growing under planktonic and biofilm conditions. Finally, we demonstrate the in vivo efficacy of topical treatment with miltefosine in the murine model of oropharyngeal candidiasis. Overall, our results confirm the potential of miltefosine as a promising antifungal drug candidate, in particular for the treatment of azole-resistant and biofilm-associated superficial candidiasis. PMID:26416861

  16. In Vitro Activity of Miltefosine against Candida albicans under Planktonic and Biofilm Growth Conditions and In Vivo Efficacy in a Murine Model of Oral Candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Vila, Taissa Vieira Machado; Chaturvedi, Ashok K; Rozental, Sonia; Lopez-Ribot, Jose L

    2015-12-01

    The generation of a new antifungal against Candida albicans biofilms has become a major priority, since biofilm formation by this opportunistic pathogenic fungus is usually associated with an increased resistance to azole antifungal drugs and treatment failures. Miltefosine is an alkyl phospholipid with promising antifungal activity. Here, we report that, when tested under planktonic conditions, miltefosine displays potent in vitro activity against multiple fluconazole-susceptible and -resistant C. albicans clinical isolates, including isolates overexpressing efflux pumps and/or with well-characterized Erg11 mutations. Moreover, miltefosine inhibits C. albicans biofilm formation and displays activity against preformed biofilms. Serial passage experiments confirmed that miltefosine has a reduced potential to elicit resistance, and screening of a library of C. albicans transcription factor mutants provided additional insight into the activity of miltefosine against C. albicans growing under planktonic and biofilm conditions. Finally, we demonstrate the in vivo efficacy of topical treatment with miltefosine in the murine model of oropharyngeal candidiasis. Overall, our results confirm the potential of miltefosine as a promising antifungal drug candidate, in particular for the treatment of azole-resistant and biofilm-associated superficial candidiasis.

  17. Asperger syndrome, violent thoughts and clinically isolated syndrome.

    PubMed

    Vanderbruggen, N; Van Geit, N; Bissay, V; Zeeuws, D; Santermans, L; Baeken, C

    2010-12-01

    A young man, 23 years old, with a clinically isolated syndrome (CIS), presented violent thoughts during a neurological consultation. He was diagnosed with Asperger Syndrome based on a psychiatric and (neuro)psychological examination. Possible risk factors for acting-out and the implications for treatment, if CIS would evolve to MS, are discussed based on a review of the literature.

  18. Complete genome sequence of Providencia stuartii clinical isolate MRSN 2154.

    PubMed

    Clifford, Robert J; Hang, Jun; Riley, Matthew C; Onmus-Leone, Fatma; Kuschner, Robert A; Lesho, Emil P; Waterman, Paige E

    2012-07-01

    Here we present the complete genome sequence of Providencia stuartii MRSN 2154, isolated from an Afghan national. P. stuartii is a Gram-negative bacillus capable of causing infections in a wide variety of human tissues. Because Providencia readily acquires plasmids bearing drug resistance loci, it is of growing clinical significance.

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of Tannerella forsythia Clinical Isolate 9610

    PubMed Central

    Hanson-Drury, Sesha; Liu, Quanhui; Vo, Anh T.; Kim, Michelle; Watling, Michael; Bumgarner, Roger S.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We present here the draft genome sequence of Tannerella forsythia 9610, a clinical isolate obtained from a periodontitis patient. The genome is composed of 79 scaffolds with 82 contigs, for a length of 3,201,941 bp and a G+C of 47.3%. PMID:28336586

  20. Activity of coumermycin against clinical isolates of staphylococci.

    PubMed Central

    Guillemin, M N; Miles, H M; McDonald, M I

    1986-01-01

    Staphylococci, particularly methicillin-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus, are major nosocomial pathogens in large hospitals in eastern Australia. At present vancomycin is the drug of choice for the treatment of life-threatening methicillin-resistant S. aureus infections. A possible alternative drug is coumermycin, a bis-hydroxy coumarin which inhibits DNA gyrase. Coumermycin activity was determined against clinical isolates from the Royal Melbourne Hospital. MICs of 639 staphylococcal isolates were determined by agar dilution. MICs and MBCs of 100 staphylococcal isolates were also determined by microdilution methods. The results showed that coumermycin was bactericidal, with MBCs of less than or equal to 4 micrograms/ml against all isolates tested. The results indicate that coumermycin is a potential alternative to vancomycin in the treatment of severe staphylococcal infections. PMID:3707109

  1. In vitro susceptibility of oral Candida albicans strains to different pH levels and calcium hydroxide saturated aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Weckwerth, Paulo Henrique; Carnietto, Cristiane; Weckwerth, Ana Carolina Villas Boas; Duarte, Marco Antonio Hungaro; Kuga, Milton Carlos; Vivan, Rodrigo Ricci

    2012-01-01

    Candida albicans is present in the oral cavity and in the whole digestive tract of humans and other animals, being frequently related to endodontic treatment failure. The present study determined the incidence of C. albicans in the oral cavity and the susceptibility of isolates to different pH values and saturated calcium hydroxide aqueous solution at pH 12.5. Sixty-five patients attending the Endodontic Clinic at the Sagrado Coração University participated in the study. The collected samples were cultivated in selective media for C. albicans and the isolates were tested in terms of resistance to both alkaline pH and saturated aqueous solution of calcium hydroxide. In relation to time variables, yeast viability was assessed by the Sabouraud's agar culture and fluorescein diacetate and ethidium bromide fluorescent staining method. Results from the different pHs and experimental times, including those from different techniques measuring fungal viability, were compared using the chi-square and Fisher's exact tests (α=0.05). The yeasts became completely inviable after 48 h of contact with the calcium hydroxide solution. On the other hand, when exposed to the alkaline culture broth, the yeasts were found to be viable at pHs 9.5 and 10.5 for up to 7 days. In conclusion, C. albicans can only be completely inhibited by direct contact with saturated calcium hydroxide aqueous solution after 48 h of exposure.

  2. Identification of a cell death pathway in Candida albicans during the response to pheromone.

    PubMed

    Alby, Kevin; Schaefer, Dana; Sherwood, Racquel Kim; Jones, Stephen K; Bennett, Richard J

    2010-11-01

    Mating in hemiascomycete yeasts involves the secretion of pheromones that induce sexual differentiation in cells of the opposite mating type. Studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have revealed that a subpopulation of cells experiences cell death during exposure to pheromone. In this work, we tested whether the phenomenon of pheromone-induced death (PID) also occurs in the opportunistic pathogen Candida albicans. Mating in C. albicans is uniquely regulated by white-opaque phenotypic switching; both cell types respond to pheromone, but only opaque cells undergo the morphological transition and cell conjugation. We show that approximately 20% of opaque cells, but not white cells, of laboratory strain SC5314 experience pheromone-induced death. Furthermore, analysis of mutant strains revealed that PID was significantly reduced in strains lacking Fig1 or Fus1 transmembrane proteins that are induced during the mating process and, we now show, are necessary for efficient mating in C. albicans. The level of PID was also Ca(2+) dependent, as chelation of Ca(2+) ions increased cell death to almost 50% of the population. However, in contrast to S. cerevisiae PID, pheromone-induced killing of C. albicans cells was largely independent of signaling via the Ca(2+)-dependent protein phosphatase calcineurin, even when combined with the loss of Cmk1 and Cmk2 proteins. Finally, we demonstrate that levels of PID vary widely between clinical isolates of C. albicans, with some strains experiencing close to 70% cell death. We discuss these findings in light of the role of prodeath and prosurvival pathways operating in yeast cells undergoing the morphological response to pheromone.

  3. Echinocandin and triazole antifungal susceptibility profiles for clinical opportunistic yeast and mold isolates collected from 2010 to 2011: application of new CLSI clinical breakpoints and epidemiological cutoff values for characterization of geographic and temporal trends of antifungal resistance.

    PubMed

    Pfaller, Michael A; Messer, Shawn A; Woosley, Leah N; Jones, Ronald N; Castanheira, Mariana

    2013-08-01

    The SENTRY Antimicrobial Surveillance Program monitors global susceptibility and resistance rates of newer and established antifungal agents. We report the echinocandin and triazole antifungal susceptibility patterns for 3,418 contemporary clinical isolates of yeasts and molds. The isolates were obtained from 98 laboratories in 34 countries during 2010 and 2011. Yeasts not presumptively identified by CHROMagar, the trehalose test, or growth at 42°C and all molds were sequence identified using internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and 28S (yeasts) or ITS, translation elongation factor (TEF), and 28S (molds) genes. Susceptibility testing was performed against 7 antifungals (anidulafungin, caspofungin, micafungin, fluconazole, itraconazole, posaconazole, and voriconazole) using CLSI methods. Rates of resistance to all agents were determined using the new CLSI clinical breakpoints and epidemiological cutoff value criteria, as appropriate. Sequencing of fks hot spots was performed for echinocandin non-wild-type (WT) strains. Isolates included 3,107 from 21 Candida spp., 146 from 9 Aspergillus spp., 84 from Cryptococcus neoformans, 40 from 23 other mold species, and 41 from 9 other yeast species. Among Candida spp., resistance to the echinocandins was low (0.0 to 1.7%). Candida albicans and Candida glabrata that were resistant to anidulafungin, caspofungin, or micafungin were shown to have fks mutations. Resistance to fluconazole was low among the isolates of C. albicans (0.4%), Candida tropicalis (1.3%), and Candida parapsilosis (2.1%); however, 8.8% of C. glabrata isolates were resistant to fluconazole. Among echinocandin-resistant C. glabrata isolates from 2011, 38% were fluconazole resistant. Voriconazole was active against all Candida spp. except C. glabrata (10.5% non-WT), whereas posaconazole showed decreased activity against C. albicans (4.4%) and Candida krusei (15.2% non-WT). All agents except for the echinocandins were active against C. neoformans, and the

  4. [In vitro antifungal resistance in Candida albicans from HIV-infected patients with and without oral candidosis.].

    PubMed

    Ceballos Salobreña, A; Gaitán Cepeda, L A; Orihuela Cañada, F; Olea Barrionuevo, D; Ceballos García, L; Quindós, G

    1999-12-01

    The main purpose of this study has been to determine the in vitro antifungal susceptibility of clinical isolates from HIV-infected or AIDS patients, depending on the presence of oral candidosis. The oral cavity of 307 HIV-infected or AIDS patients was examined and an oral swab was cultured on Sabouraud glucose agar and studied by conventional mycological methods. In vitro antifungal susceptibility to amphotericin B, nystatin, fluconazole, itraconazole and ketoconazole was tested by disk diffusion with Neo-Sensitabs tablets (Rosco Diagnostica, Dinamarca). One hundred and thirty five Candida albicans isolates (91 serotype A, 38 serotype B, three C. albicans variety stellatoidea and three untyped isolates), three Candida krusei and two Candida glabrata were obtained. All the isolates were susceptible to nystatin and amphotericin B. However, 7.9% isolates were resistant to fluconazole and 2.9% isolates were resistant to ketoconazole or itraconazole. Nearly all C. krusei and C. glabrata isolates, 31% patients with candidosis and 20% Candida-colonized patients showed decreased susceptibility to azoles. This study shows that polyenes had a great in vitro efficacy against clinical isolates from HIV-infected patients and that in vitro resistance to azoles is not as high as observed in other countries.

  5. Homogeneity of Danish environmental and clinical isolates of Shewanella algae.

    PubMed

    Vogel, B F; Holt, H M; Gerner-Smidt, P; Bundvad, A; Sogaard, P; Gram, L

    2000-01-01

    Danish isolates of Shewanella algae constituted by whole-cell protein profiling a very homogeneous group, and no clear distinction was seen between strains from the marine environment and strains of clinical origin. Although variation between all strains was observed by ribotyping and random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis, no clonal relationship between infective strains was found. From several patients, clonally identical strains of S. algae were reisolated up to 8 months after the primary isolation, indicating that the same strain may be able to maintain the infection.

  6. Antifungal peptides: a potential new class of antifungals for treating vulvovaginal candidiasis caused by fluconazole-resistant Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Ng, Siew Mei Samantha; Yap, Yi Yong Alvin; Cheong, Jin Wei Darryl; Ng, Fui Mee; Lau, Qiu Ying; Barkham, Timothy; Teo, Jeanette Woon Pei; Hill, Jeffrey; Chia, Cheng San Brian

    2017-03-01

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis/candidosis is a common fungal infection afflicting approximately 75% of women globally caused primarily by the yeast Candida albicans. Fluconazole is widely regarded as the antifungal drug of choice since its introduction in 1990 due to its high oral bioavailability, convenient dosing regimen and favourable safety profile. However, its widespread use has led to the emergence of fluconazole-resistant C. albicans, posing a universal clinical concern. Coupled to the dearth of new antifungal drugs entering the market, it is imperative to introduce new drug classes to counter this threat. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are potential candidates due to their membrane-disrupting mechanism of action. By specifically targeting fungal membranes and being rapidly fungicidal, they can reduce the chances of resistance development and treatment duration. Towards this goal, we conducted a head-to-head comparison of 61 short linear AMPs from the literature to identify the peptide with the most potent activity against fluconazole-resistant C. albicans. The 11-residue peptide, P11-6, was identified and assayed against a panel of clinical C. albicans isolates followed by fungicidal/static determination and a time-kill assay to gauge its potential for further drug development. Copyright © 2017 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Rapid flow cytometric susceptibility testing of Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Ramani, R; Ramani, A; Wong, S J

    1997-01-01

    A rapid flow cytometric assay for in vitro antifungal drug susceptibility testing was developed by adapting the proposed reference method for broth macrodilution testing of yeasts. Membrane permeability changes caused by the antifungal agent were measured by flow cytometry using propidium iodide, a nucleic acid-binding fluorochrome largely excluded by the intact cell membrane. We determined the in vitro susceptibility of 31 Candida albicans isolates and two quality control strains (Candida parapsilosis ATCC 22019 and Candida krusei ATCC 6258) to amphotericin B and fluconazole. Amphotericin B MICs ranged from 0.03 to 2.0 microg/ml, while fluconazole MICs ranged from 0.125 to 128 microg/ml. This method results in clear-cut endpoints that were reproducible. Four-hour incubation was required for fluconazole, whereas a 2-h incubation was sufficient for amphotericin B to provide MICs comparable to the reference macrodilution method developed by the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards Subcommittee on Antifungal Susceptibility Tests. Results of these studies show that flow cytometry provides a rapid and sensitive in vitro method for antifungal susceptibility testing of C. albicans. PMID:9276410

  8. Candida/Candida biofilms. First description of dual-species Candida albicans/C. rugosa biofilm.

    PubMed

    Martins, Carlos Henrique Gomes; Pires, Regina Helena; Cunha, Aline Oliveira; Pereira, Cristiane Aparecida Martins; Singulani, Junya de Lacorte; Abrão, Fariza; Moraes, Thais de; Mendes-Giannini, Maria José Soares

    2016-04-01

    Denture liners have physical properties that favour plaque accumulation and colonization by Candida species, irritating oral tissues and causing denture stomatitis. To isolate and determine the incidence of oral Candida species in dental prostheses, oral swabs were collected from the dental prostheses of 66 patients. All the strains were screened for their ability to form biofilms; both monospecies and dual-species combinations were tested. Candida albicans (63 %) was the most frequently isolated microorganism; Candida tropicalis (14 %), Candida glabrata (13 %), Candida rugosa (5 %), Candida parapsilosis (3 %), and Candida krusei (2 %) were also detected. The XTT assay showed that C. albicans SC5314 possessed a biofilm-forming ability significantly higher (p < 0.001) than non-albicans Candida strains, after 6 h 37 °C. The total C. albicans CFU from a dual-species biofilm was less than the total CFU of a monospecies C. albicans biofilm. In contrast to the profuse hyphae verified in monospecies C. albicans biofilms, micrographies showed that the C. albicans/non-albicans Candida biofilms consisted of sparse yeast forms and profuse budding yeast cells that generated a network. These results suggested that C. albicans and the tested Candida species could co-exist in biofilms displaying apparent antagonism. The study provide the first description of C. albicans/C. rugosa mixed biofilm.

  9. Molecular distinctions among clinical isolates of Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Su, C J; Dallo, S F; Baseman, J B

    1990-01-01

    Restriction enzyme fingerprinting of genomic DNA and Southern blots probed with subclones of the Mycoplasma pneumoniae cytadhesin P1 gene were used to characterize clinical isolates of M. pneumoniae. On the basis of the examination of 29 individual M. pneumoniae isolates, two distinct groups were established. Group 1, which displayed a 12-kilobase band following DNA digestion with HindIII, consisted of strain M129-B16 and three others obtained in the state of Washington during the 1960s. The remaining M. pneumoniae strains belonged to group 2, which lacked the 12-kilobase band and included samples from the 1940s, 1970s, and 1980s. This category also included the only M. pneumoniae strain isolated from the synovial fluid of an arthritic patient. Images PMID:2166088

  10. Antimicrobial Activity of Few Medicinal Plants against Clinically Isolated Human Cariogenic Pathogens—An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Jebashree, H. Shyla; Kingsley, S. Jayasurya; Sathish, Emmanuel S.; Devapriya, D.

    2011-01-01

    Hexane, ethyl acetate, ethanol and methanol extracts of Psidium guajava, Terminalia chebula, Mimusops elengi and Achyranthes aspera were tested against the dental caries causing bacteria Streptococcus mutans and fungus Candida albicans isolated from caries infected patients. All the four extracts of P. guajava showed activity against both S. mutans and C. albicans. Maximum zone of inhibition was observed in ethyl acetate of P. guajava. The four extracts of T. chebula and M. elengi showed antibacterial activity against S. mutans. M. elengi extracts and ethanol extract of T. chebula did not show any antifungal activity against C. albicans. Except for the hexane extract of A. aspera, the other three extracts showed activity against the tested microbes. The ethyl acetate P. guajava leaf extract showed the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) against S. mutans to be <0.076 mg/mL in both MHB and BHI. The P. guajava ethyl acetate extract was subjected to GC-MS. PMID:21991479

  11. [Antibiotic susceptibility and identification of clinical Pseudomonas fulva isolates].

    PubMed

    Sivolodsky, E P; Gorelova, G V; Bogoslovskaya, S P; Zueva, E V

    2014-01-01

    The earliest eight clinical strains of Pseudomonas fulva were identified in the culture collection of pseudomonads isolated in St. Petersburg in 1995-2005, that confirmed the medical importance of the species. A high level of the species identification of all the strains of P. fulva by MALDI-TOF mass-spectrometry with the use of Microflex device with database MALDI Biotyper (Bruker Daltonics Inc.) was shown. Tests for routine studies providing identification of P. fulva without the use of genetic methods were approved. The profile of the antibiotic susceptibility of the clinical strains of P. fulva was described. Acquired resistance of two P. fulva isolates to the 3rd generation cephalosporins and chloramphenicol was detected.

  12. Chemotaxonomy and molecular taxonomy of some coryneform clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Carlotti, A; Meugnier, H; Pommier, M T; Villard, J; Freney, J

    1993-02-01

    Six reference strains of the genus Brevibacterium as well as fifteen clinical isolates tentatively assigned to the genus using conventional biochemical methods, were the subject of chemotaxonomic and DNA similarity studies. Five of these clinical isolates were assigned either to the genera Aureobacterium, Mycobacterium, Gordona or to Rhodococcus on the basis of their DNA mol% G+C, mycolic acid, amino-acid, sugar and menaquinone contents. Among the ten remaining strains, six were not brevibacteria and only four conformed to the description of the genus Brevibacterium sensu stricto. These strains showed low values of DNA relatedness with Brevibacterium epidermidis ATCC 35514T and Brevibacterium linens ATCC 9174, and could only be described as Brevibacterium spp. The results indicate that studies of chemical markers are essential for the correct identification of brevibacteria.

  13. Budding off: bringing functional genomics to Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Matthew Z; Bennett, Richard J

    2016-03-01

    Candida species are the most prevalent human fungal pathogens, with Candida albicans being the most clinically relevant species. Candida albicans resides as a commensal of the human gastrointestinal tract but is a frequent cause of opportunistic mucosal and systemic infections. Investigation of C. albicans virulence has traditionally relied on candidate gene approaches, but recent advances in functional genomics have now facilitated global, unbiased studies of gene function. Such studies include comparative genomics (both between and within Candida species), analysis of total RNA expression, and regulation and delineation of protein-DNA interactions. Additionally, large collections of mutant strains have begun to aid systematic screening of clinically relevant phenotypes. Here, we will highlight the development of functional genomics in C. albicans and discuss the use of these approaches to addressing both commensalism and pathogenesis in this species.

  14. Identification and Pathogenic Potential of Clinical Bacillus and Paenibacillus Isolates.

    PubMed

    Celandroni, Francesco; Salvetti, Sara; Gueye, Sokhna Aissatou; Mazzantini, Diletta; Lupetti, Antonella; Senesi, Sonia; Ghelardi, Emilia

    2016-01-01

    The soil-related Bacillus and Paenibacillus species have increasingly been implicated in various human diseases. Nevertheless, their identification still poses problems in the clinical microbiology laboratory and, with the exception of Bacillus anthracis and Bacillus cereus, little is known on their pathogenicity for humans. In this study, we evaluated the use of matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) in the identification of clinical isolates of these genera and conducted genotypic and phenotypic analyses to highlight specific virulence properties. Seventy-five clinical isolates were subjected to biochemical and MALDI-TOF MS identification. 16S rDNA sequencing and supplemental tests were used to solve any discrepancies or failures in the identification results. MALDI-TOF MS significantly outperformed classical biochemical testing for correct species identification and no misidentification was obtained. One third of the collected strains belonged to the B. cereus species, but also Bacillus pumilus and Bacillus subtilis were isolated at high rate. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing showed that all the B. cereus, B. licheniformis, B. simplex, B. mycoides, Paenibacillus glucanolyticus and Paenibacillus lautus isolates are resistant to penicillin. The evaluation of toxin/enzyme secretion, toxin-encoding genes, motility, and biofilm formation revealed that B. cereus displays the highest virulence potential. However, although generally considered nonpathogenic, most of the other species were shown to swim, swarm, produce biofilms, and secrete proteases that can have a role in bacterial virulence. In conclusion, MALDI-TOF MS appears useful for fast and accurate identification of Bacillus and Paenibacillus strains whose virulence properties make them of increasing clinical relevance.

  15. A clinical Acanthamoeba isolate harboring two distinct bacterial endosymbionts.

    PubMed

    Müller, Anneliese; Walochnik, Julia; Wagner, Martin; Schmitz-Esser, Stephan

    2016-10-01

    Acanthamoebae feed on bacteria but are also frequent hosts of bacterial symbionts. Here, we describe the stable co-occurrence of two symbionts, one affiliated to the genus Parachlamydia and the other to the candidate genus Paracaedibacter (Alphaproteobacteria), within a clinical isolate of Acanthamoeba hatchetti genotype T4. We performed fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to describe this symbiosis. Our study adds to other reports of simultaneous co-occurrence of two symbionts within one Acanthamoeba cell.

  16. Identification and Pathogenic Potential of Clinical Bacillus and Paenibacillus Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Celandroni, Francesco; Salvetti, Sara; Gueye, Sokhna Aissatou; Mazzantini, Diletta; Lupetti, Antonella; Senesi, Sonia; Ghelardi, Emilia

    2016-01-01

    The soil-related Bacillus and Paenibacillus species have increasingly been implicated in various human diseases. Nevertheless, their identification still poses problems in the clinical microbiology laboratory and, with the exception of Bacillus anthracis and Bacillus cereus, little is known on their pathogenicity for humans. In this study, we evaluated the use of matrix-assisted laser desorption—ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) in the identification of clinical isolates of these genera and conducted genotypic and phenotypic analyses to highlight specific virulence properties. Seventy-five clinical isolates were subjected to biochemical and MALDI-TOF MS identification. 16S rDNA sequencing and supplemental tests were used to solve any discrepancies or failures in the identification results. MALDI-TOF MS significantly outperformed classical biochemical testing for correct species identification and no misidentification was obtained. One third of the collected strains belonged to the B. cereus species, but also Bacillus pumilus and Bacillus subtilis were isolated at high rate. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing showed that all the B. cereus, B. licheniformis, B. simplex, B. mycoides, Paenibacillus glucanolyticus and Paenibacillus lautus isolates are resistant to penicillin. The evaluation of toxin/enzyme secretion, toxin-encoding genes, motility, and biofilm formation revealed that B. cereus displays the highest virulence potential. However, although generally considered nonpathogenic, most of the other species were shown to swim, swarm, produce biofilms, and secrete proteases that can have a role in bacterial virulence. In conclusion, MALDI-TOF MS appears useful for fast and accurate identification of Bacillus and Paenibacillus strains whose virulence properties make them of increasing clinical relevance. PMID:27031639

  17. Liposomal thymoquinone effectively combats fluconazole-resistant Candida albicans in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Khan, Masood Alam; Aljarbou, Ahmad N; Khan, Arif; Younus, Hina

    2015-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop a novel liposomal formulation of thymoquinone (TQ) to treat fluconazole-susceptible and -resistant Candida albicans (C. albicans) infections. The liposomal preparation of TQ (Lip-TQ) was used against a fluconazole-susceptible or -resistant isolate of C. albicans. Various doses of fluconazole (0, 5, 10, 20 and 40 mg/kg) or free TQ or Lip-TQ (0, 1, 2 and 5mg/kg) were used to treat C. albicans infected mice. Mice were observed for 40 days post C. albicans infection, and their kidneys were assessed for the fungal load. Fluconazole showed anti-fungal activity against the drug-susceptible, but not against the -resistant isolate of C. albicans. Free TQ showed its activity against both fluconazole-susceptible or -resistant C. albicans, however, Lip-TQ was found to be the most effective and imparted ∼ 100% and ∼ 90% survival of mice infected with fluconazole-susceptible and -resistant isolates of C. albicans, respectively. Mice treated with Lip-TQ showed highly reduced severity of infection in their tissue homogenates. Therefore, Lip-TQ may effectively be used in the treatment of C. albicans infections, including those which are not responding to fluconazole.

  18. Genetic diversity of multidrug resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolated from clinical and non clinical samples in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Bendary, M M; Solyman, S M; Azab, M M; Mahmoud, N F; Hanora, A M

    2016-08-31

    In recent years, the increasing incidence of diseases caused by Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) has been noted in the university hospitals of El-Sharkia and Assuit governorates - Egypt. Therefore, we studied the genetic relatedness of multidrug resistant S. aureus isolates from different sources in the above mentioned governorates. One hundred and fifty six S. aureus isolates were divided into 5 different groups, 1 non clinical isolates from different food products and 4 different clinical isolates of human and animal sources in the 2 different governorates. Epidemiological characteristics of 156 S. aureus isolates were determined by phenotypic methods including quantitative antibiogram typing and biofilm production. Genetic typing of 35 multidrug resistant (MDR) isolates (7 from each group) based on 16S rRNA gene sequence, virulence and antimicrobial resistance gene profiles was done. The genetic relatedness of the highest virulent strain from each group was detected based on different single locus sequence typing and multi-locus sequence typing (MLST). S. aureus strains isolated from different sources and geographical areas showed high diversity. The genetic typing revealed different sequence types and different sequences of coa and spa genes. S. aureus isolates were found highly diverse in Egypt.

  19. Investigation of biofilm formation in clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Cassat, James E; Lee, Chia Y; Smeltzer, Mark S

    2007-01-01

    As with many other bacterial species, the most commonly used method to assess staphylococcal biofilm formation in vitro is the microtiter plate assay. This assay is particularly useful for comparison of multiple strains including large-scale screens of mutant libraries. When such screens are applied to the coagulase-negative staphylococci in general, and Staphylococcus epidermidis in particular, they are relatively straightforward by comparison with microtiter plate assays used to assess biofilm formation in other bacterial species. However, in the case of clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus, we have found it necessary to employ specific modifications including precoating of the wells of the microtiter plate with plasma proteins and supplementation of the medium with both salt and glucose. In this chapter, we describe the microtiter plate assay in the specific context of clinical isolates of S. aureus and the use of these modifications. A second in vitro method, which also is generally dependent on coating with plasma proteins and supplementation of the growth medium, is the use of flow cells. In this method, bacteria are allowed to attach to a surface and then monitored with respect to their ability to remain attached to the substrate and differentiate into mature biofilms under the constant pressure of fluid shear force. Although flow cells are not applicable to large-scale screens, we have found that they provide a more reproducible and accurate assessment of the capacity of S. aureus clinical isolates to form a biofilm. They also provide a means of analyzing structural differences in biofilm architecture and isolating bacteria and/or spent media for analysis of physiological and metabolic changes associated with the adaptive response to growth in a biofilm. While a primary focus of this chapter is on the use of in vitro assays to assess biofilm formation in clinical isolates of S. aureus, it is important to

  20. Demonstration of synergy with fluconazole and either ibuprofen, sodium salicylate, or propylparaben against Candida albicans in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Scott, E M; Tariq, V N; McCrory, R M

    1995-01-01

    The combination of fluconazole with either ibuprofen, sodium salicylate, or propylparaben resulted in synergistic activity (fractional inhibitory index, < 0.5) against Candida albicans NCYC 620 in a microdilution checkerboard assay. Synergism between miconazole and ibuprofen was also demonstrated. In three or four clinical isolates of C. albicans from AIDS patients, the combination of fluconazole and ibuprofen was synergistic. Preparation of the inoculum and the growth conditions used were those recommended by the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards for susceptibility testing. A visual estimation of total inhibition of growth and determination of an 80% reduction in the optical density at 492 nm compared with those for the control were taken as endpoints for the calculation of synergy, and a good correlation between both estimates was demonstrated. PMID:8592988

  1. Caspofungin-induced in-vitro post-antifungal effect and its impact on adhesion related traits of oral Candida dubliniensis and Candida albicans isolates.

    PubMed

    Ellepola, Arjuna Nishantha Bandara; Chandy, Rachel; Khan, Zia Uddin; Samaranayake, Lakshman Perera

    2016-03-01

    Adhesion to buccal epithelial cells (BEC) and denture acrylic surfaces (DAS), germ tube (GT) formation and cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH) are all virulence traits involved in the pathogenicity of Candida. Post-antifungal effect (PAFE) also have a bearing on pathogenicity and virulence of Candida. Candida dubliniensis is associated with oral and systemic candidosis, which can be managed with caspofungin. There is no published information on caspofungin-induced PAFE and its impact on adhesion traits of C. dubliniensis isolates. Thus, the purpose of this investigation was to determine the in vitro duration of PAFE on 20 C. dubliniensis isolates following transient exposure to caspofungin. Furthermore the impacts of caspofungin-induced PAFE on adhesion to BEC and DAS, GT formation and CSH of these isolates were also determined. After establishing the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of caspofungin, C. dubliniensis isolates were exposed to sub-lethal concentrations (×3 MIC) of caspofungin for 1 hr. Thereafter the duration of PAFE, adhesion to BEC and DAS, GT formation and CSH were determined by previously described in-vitro assays. MIC (μg/mL) of C. dubliniensis isolates to caspofungin ranged from 0.004 to 0.19. Caspofungin-induced mean PAFE on C. dubliniensis isolates was 2.17 hr. Exposure to caspofungin suppressed the ability of C. dubliniensis isolates to adhere to BEC and DAS, form GT and CSH by 69.97%, 71.95%, 90.06% and 32.29% (P < 0.001 for all), respectively. Thus, transient exposure of C. dubliniensis isolates to caspofungin produces an antifungal effect not only by suppressing its growth but also by altering its adhesion traits.

  2. Molecular epidemiology of Italian clinical Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii isolates.

    PubMed

    Cogliati, Massimo; Zamfirova, Ralika R; Tortorano, Anna Maria; Viviani, Maria Anna

    2013-07-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans variety grubii is the major etiological agent of cryptococcal meningitis in both immunocompromised and immunocompetent patients. The current PCR-based molecular methods are not sufficient to discriminate among the different populations of this yeast. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the genotypes of the Italian clinical C. neoformans var. grubii isolates by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). A total of 53 isolates, each representative of a single case, were studied. Genotyping was performed using the ISHAM Cryptococcus MLST consensus scheme and the results were compared to the publically available global C. neoformans var. grubii MLST dataset. A total of 16 genotypes were identified; 14 were new genotypes, one was identical to sequence type (ST) ST81, which had been previously reported from Thailand, and one to ST23 already identified in Uganda, the USA and Korea. Sequence type ST61 was the most numerous, including 16 isolates. Network phylogenetic analysis showed that the Italian isolates could be divided into at least three clusters with similarities with those recovered in Africa, Asia and Americas. Distribution of the STs among the isolates could not be correlated to the hospital in which they were recovered or to the HIV status of the patients. The majority of the isolates belonged to the molecular type VNI; three belonged to the rare molecular type VNII and one to the VNB group, which until now had not been described in Europe. The results reveal that the Italian C. neoformans var. grubii population presents a distinct variability, displaying a high number of new genotypes, and probably recombines sexually.

  3. Echinocandin to fluconazole step-down therapy in critically ill patients with invasive, susceptible Candida albicans infections.

    PubMed

    van der Geest, Patrick J; Rijnders, Bart J A; Vonk, Alieke G; Groeneveld, A B Johan

    2016-03-01

    Invasive Candida spp. infections are increasingly diagnosed in critically ill patients. For initial treatment, an echinocandin is recommended with a possible step-down to fluconazole when the patients' condition is improving and the isolate appears susceptible, but there are no data to support such policy. We studied the safety and efficacy of step-down therapy in critically ill patients with culture proven deep seated or bloodstream infections by C. albicans susceptible to fluconazole. All patients admitted into the intensive care unit from January 2010 to December 2014, who had a culture proven invasive C. albicans infection and received initial treatment with an echinocandin for at least 4 days were included. Data on patient characteristics, treatment and vital outcomes were assessed. Of the 56 patients, 32 received step-down fluconazole therapy, at median day 5, whereas the echinocandin was continued in the other 24. No differences where seen in baseline characteristics or risk factors for invasive C. albicans infection between the two groups. Response rates were similar and no difference where seen in 28-day or 90-day mortality between the groups. Step-down therapy to fluconazole may be safe and effective in critically ill patients with invasive infections by C. albicans, susceptible to fluconazole, who have clinically improved as early as 4 days after start of treatment with an echinocandin.

  4. The role of nutrient regulation and the Gpa2 protein in the mating pheromone response of C. albicans.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Richard J; Johnson, Alexander D

    2006-10-01

    Although traditionally classified as asexual, the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans can undergo highly efficient mating. A key component of this mating is the response to pheromone, which is mediated by a conserved kinase cascade that transduces the signal from the pheromone receptor to a transcriptional response in the nucleus. In this paper we show (i) that the detailed response of C. albicans to the alpha pheromone differs among clinical isolates, (ii) that the response depends critically on nutritional conditions, (iii) that the entire response is mediated by the Ste2 receptor, and (iv) that, in terms of genes induced, the response to alpha pheromone in C. albicans shows only marginal overlap with the response in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We further investigated the nutritional control of pheromone induction and identify the GPA2 gene as a critical component. We found that Deltagpa2/Deltagpa2 mutants are hypersensitive to pheromone and, unlike wild-type strains, show efficient cell cycle arrest (including the formation of characteristic halos on solid medium) in response to mating pheromone. These results indicate that C. albicans, like several other fungal species but unlike S. cerevisiae, integrates signals from a nutrient-sensing pathway with those of the pheromone response MAP kinase pathway to generate the final transcriptional response.

  5. Synergistic effect of doxycycline and fluconazole against Candida albicans biofilms and the impact of calcium channel blockers.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yuan; Zhang, Caiqing; Lu, Chunyan; Liu, Ping; Li, Yan; Li, Hui; Sun, Shujuan

    2013-08-01

    Candida albicans is a clinically important fungus and is capable of forming biofilms, which contributes to the emergence of fluconazole resistance. Here, sessile minimum inhibitory concentrations (SMICs) of fluconazole combined with doxycycline against biofilms of C. albicans were determined, and the results of SMICs were compared with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of planktonic cells. SMICs and MICs were determined by microdilution checkerboard method, and the interactions between two drugs were interpreted by two models of fractional inhibitory concentration index and the percentage of growth difference (ΔE). For the biofilms formed over 4, 8, and 12 h, synergism was displayed by the combination of doxycycline(1-64 mg L(-1)) and fluconazole, and the fluconazole SMIC reduced from 64-512 mg L(-1) to 1-16 mg L(-1) against all the tested isolates. Calcium homeostasis is an important factor in growth of C. albicans. In this study, the impact of calcium channel blocker on the drug combination was observed by plate streaking and determined by liquid methods quantitatively. Obvious enhancement of antifungal effect appeared by combination of three drugs. These results show us that fluconazole combined with doxycycline could be effective against C. albicans biofilm, and the combined antifungal mechanism is associated with calcium.

  6. Genotyping of clinical isolates of Acanthamoeba genus in Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Carolina; Reyes-Batlle, María; Ysea, María Alejandra Vethencourt; Pérez, Mónica V Galindo; de Rondón, Carmen Guzmán; Paduani, Anaibeth J Nessi; Pérez, Angelyseb Dorta; López-Arencibia, Atteneri; Sifaoui, Ines; de Galindo, María Virginia Pérez; de Suárez, Eva Pérez; Martínez-Carretero, Enrique; Valladares, Basilio; Piñero, José E; Lorenzo-Morales, Jacob

    2016-12-01

    Free-living amoebae of Acanthamoeba genus are opportunistic pathogens distributed worldwide. Strains included in this genus are causative agents of a fatal encephalitis and a sight-threating keratitis in humans and other animals. In this study, 550 clinical samples which were collected between 1984 and 2014 from different patients with suspected infections due to Acanthamoeba were initially screened for the presence of this amoebic genus at the Laboratorio de Amibiasis-Escuela de Bioanálisis at the Universidad Central de Venezuela. Samples were cultured in 2% Non-Nutrient agar plates seeded with a layer of heat killed Escherichia coli. From the 550 clinical samples included in this study, 18 of them were positive for Acanthamoeba genus after culture identification. Moreover, positive samples were confirmed after amplification of the Diagnostic Fragment 3 (DF3) of the Acanthamoeba18S rDNA genus and sequencing was carried out in order to genotype the isolated strains of Acanthamoeba. Furthermore, the pathogenic potential of the strains was checked by performing thermotolerance and osmotolerance assays. Sequencing of the DF3 region resulted in the identification of genotype T4 in all the isolated strains. Moreover, most isolates were thermotolerant or both thermotolerant and osmotolerant and thus were classified as potentially pathogenic strains. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the molecular characterization at the genotype level of Acanthamoeba strains in Venezuela.

  7. Candida glabrata Binding to Candida albicans Hyphae Enables Its Development in Oropharyngeal Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Tati, Swetha; Davidow, Peter; McCall, Andrew; Hwang-Wong, Elizabeth; Rojas, Isolde G.; Cormack, Brendan; Edgerton, Mira

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic mechanisms of Candida glabrata in oral candidiasis, especially because of its inability to form hyphae, are understudied. Since both Candida albicans and C. glabrata are frequently co-isolated in oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC), we examined their co-adhesion in vitro and observed adhesion of C. glabrata only to C. albicans hyphae microscopically. Mice were infected sublingually with C. albicans or C. glabrata individually, or with both species concurrently, to study their ability to cause OPC. Infection with C. glabrata alone resulted in negligible infection of tongues; however, colonization by C. glabrata was increased by co-infection or a pre-established infection with C. albicans. Furthermore, C. glabrata required C. albicans for colonization of tongues, since decreasing C. albicans burden with fluconazole also reduced C. glabrata. C. albicans hyphal wall adhesins Als1 and Als3 were important for in vitro adhesion of C. glabrata and to establish OPC. C. glabrata cell wall protein coding genes EPA8, EPA19, AWP2, AWP7, and CAGL0F00181 were implicated in mediating adhesion to C. albicans hyphae and remarkably, their expression was induced by incubation with germinated C. albicans. Thus, we found a near essential requirement for the presence of C. albicans for both initial colonization and establishment of OPC infection by C. glabrata. PMID:27029023

  8. Candida glabrata Binding to Candida albicans Hyphae Enables Its Development in Oropharyngeal Candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Tati, Swetha; Davidow, Peter; McCall, Andrew; Hwang-Wong, Elizabeth; Rojas, Isolde G; Cormack, Brendan; Edgerton, Mira

    2016-03-01

    Pathogenic mechanisms of Candida glabrata in oral candidiasis, especially because of its inability to form hyphae, are understudied. Since both Candida albicans and C. glabrata are frequently co-isolated in oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC), we examined their co-adhesion in vitro and observed adhesion of C. glabrata only to C. albicans hyphae microscopically. Mice were infected sublingually with C. albicans or C. glabrata individually, or with both species concurrently, to study their ability to cause OPC. Infection with C. glabrata alone resulted in negligible infection of tongues; however, colonization by C. glabrata was increased by co-infection or a pre-established infection with C. albicans. Furthermore, C. glabrata required C. albicans for colonization of tongues, since decreasing C. albicans burden with fluconazole also reduced C. glabrata. C. albicans hyphal wall adhesins Als1 and Als3 were important for in vitro adhesion of C. glabrata and to establish OPC. C. glabrata cell wall protein coding genes EPA8, EPA19, AWP2, AWP7, and CAGL0F00181 were implicated in mediating adhesion to C. albicans hyphae and remarkably, their expression was induced by incubation with germinated C. albicans. Thus, we found a near essential requirement for the presence of C. albicans for both initial colonization and establishment of OPC infection by C. glabrata.

  9. Synthesis of melanin pigment by Candida albicans in vitro and during infection.

    PubMed

    Morris-Jones, Rachael; Gomez, Beatriz L; Diez, Soraya; Uran, Martha; Morris-Jones, Stephen D; Casadevall, Arturo; Nosanchuk, Joshua D; Hamilton, Andrew J

    2005-09-01

    Melanins are implicated in the pathogenesis of several important human diseases. This study confirmed the presence of melanin particles in Candida albicans in vitro and during infection. Dark particles were isolated from the digestion of C. albicans cultures and from infected tissue, as established by electron microscopy and immunofluorescence techniques.

  10. Synthesis of Melanin Pigment by Candida albicans In Vitro and during Infection

    PubMed Central

    Morris-Jones, Rachael; Gomez, Beatriz L.; Diez, Soraya; Uran, Martha; Morris-Jones, Stephen D.; Casadevall, Arturo; Nosanchuk, Joshua D.; Hamilton, Andrew J.

    2005-01-01

    Melanins are implicated in the pathogenesis of several important human diseases. This study confirmed the presence of melanin particles in Candida albicans in vitro and during infection. Dark particles were isolated from the digestion of C. albicans cultures and from infected tissue, as established by electron microscopy and immunofluorescence techniques. PMID:16113337

  11. Clinical significance of Aeromonas species isolated from patients with diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Moyer, N P

    1987-11-01

    A total of 248 strains of Aeromonas spp. were isolated from 3,334 human fecal specimens submitted to a state public health laboratory over a 2-year period to be cultured for enteric pathogens. Cary-Blair transport medium, blood ampicillin agar, and alkaline peptone water enrichment provided optimal recovery of Aeromonas spp. A questionnaire requesting clinical and epidemiological information was sent to physicians, who submitted stool samples for testing, with each laboratory report for 107 consecutive stool isolates of Aeromonas spp. The 56 questionnaires which were completed and returned were analyzed to determine the seasonal distribution of illness and the age and sex distribution of patients; characteristic symptoms; and predisposing factors for gastrointestinal disease caused by Aeromonas spp. It was concluded that some A. hydrophila, A. sobria, and A. caviae strains are capable of causing diarrhea and that antibiotic therapy and the drinking of untreated water are significant risk factors for susceptible hosts.

  12. Clinical significance of Aeromonas species isolated from patients with diarrhea.

    PubMed Central

    Moyer, N P

    1987-01-01

    A total of 248 strains of Aeromonas spp. were isolated from 3,334 human fecal specimens submitted to a state public health laboratory over a 2-year period to be cultured for enteric pathogens. Cary-Blair transport medium, blood ampicillin agar, and alkaline peptone water enrichment provided optimal recovery of Aeromonas spp. A questionnaire requesting clinical and epidemiological information was sent to physicians, who submitted stool samples for testing, with each laboratory report for 107 consecutive stool isolates of Aeromonas spp. The 56 questionnaires which were completed and returned were analyzed to determine the seasonal distribution of illness and the age and sex distribution of patients; characteristic symptoms; and predisposing factors for gastrointestinal disease caused by Aeromonas spp. It was concluded that some A. hydrophila, A. sobria, and A. caviae strains are capable of causing diarrhea and that antibiotic therapy and the drinking of untreated water are significant risk factors for susceptible hosts. PMID:3693537

  13. [Taxonomic study of clinic isolates of Trichophyton in Rosario, Argentina].

    PubMed

    Tartabini, Mirta L; Bonino, Guillermo S; Racca, Liliana; Luque, Alicia G

    2013-01-01

    Due to the pleomorphism and cultural variability displayed by species of the genus Trichophyton, the identification methods based solely on morphological features are usually insufficient for their classification. The goal of the present work was to test a set of phenotypic methods in order to identify fungal isolates that belong to the aforementioned genus. These methods were based on a molecular taxonomic technique used as standard. Clinical isolates (56) were used as samples along with 6 reference strains. Macro and micromorphological studies were performed as well as biochemical and physiological tests such as in vitro hair perforation, nutritional requirements in Trichophyton agar media, urease production and growth on bromocresol purple-milk. solids-glucose (BCP-MS-G) agar. Additionally, PCR fingerprinting using the (GACA)4 primer was employed. As a result of the PCR method, specific profiles were observed for Microsporum canis, Epidermophyton floccosum, Trichophyton rubrum and Trichophyton interdigitale. Identical profiles were obtained for Arthroderma benhamiae y Trichophyton erinacei. Of the total number of clinical isolates, 39 matched the T. rubrum profile while 13 corresponded to A. benhamiae and 4 to T. interdigitale. The most useful phenotypic test to differentiate between T. rubrum and T. mentagrophytes complex strains was alkalinization of the BCP-MS-G medium. Phenotypic tests did not allow differentiation among the T. mentagrophytes complex species. On the other hand, the molecular technique allowed characterization of T. rubrum isolates as well as of those observed in our study and included in the T. mentagrophytes complex: T. interdigitale and Trichophyton sp., the anamorph of A. benhamiae.

  14. Effectiveness of magnetic fluid hyperthermia against Candida albicans cells.

    PubMed

    Chudzik, Barbara; Miaskowski, Arkadiusz; Surowiec, Zbigniew; Czernel, Grzegorz; Duluk, Tomasz; Marczuk, Andrzej; Gagoś, Mariusz

    2016-12-01

    Candida albicans is one of the most frequently isolated fungal pathogens causing opportunistic infections in humans. Targeted magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) is a promising method in thermal therapy facilitating selective heating of pathogen cells like C. albicans. In the paper, we used meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA)-coated magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and functionalised anti-C. albicans immunomagnetic nanoparticles (IMNPs) to investigate the potential of MFH in combating C. albicans cells in vitro. Using Mössbauer spectroscopy it was found that synthesised MNPs exhibited superparamagnetic phenomena. On the basis of calorimetric experiments, the maximum SAR (specific absorption rate) was found and a proper concentration of MNPs was established to control the temperature. MFH based on both DMSA-coated MNPs and functionalised anti-C. albicans IMNPs was more effective in combating C. albicans cells in vitro than thermostat hyperthermia. Especially promising results were obtained using functionalised IMNPs, which eradicated most of the pathogen colonies at the temperature of 43 °C.

  15. Comparison of in vitro and vivo efficacy of caspofungin against Candida parapsilosis, C. orthopsilosis, C. metapsilosis and C. albicans.

    PubMed

    Földi, Richárd; Kovács, Renátó; Gesztelyi, Rudolf; Kardos, Gábor; Berényi, Réka; Juhász, Béla; Szilágyi, Judit; Mózes, Julianna; Majoros, László

    2012-10-01

    Caspofungin activity was determined in vitro and in vivo against three Candida orthopsilosis, three C. metapsilosis, two C. parapsilosis sensu stricto and two C. albicans isolates. MIC values and killing activity were determined in RPMI-1640 plus 50 % human serum. Neutropenic (cyclophosphamide-treated) mice were infected intravenously. Five-day intraperitoneal treatment with caspofungin was started after 24 h postinfection. Kidney burden was analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis test with Dunn's post-test. In killing studies, caspofungin was fungistatic and fungicidal against C. albicans at ≥0.25 and ≥2 μg/ml concentrations, respectively. Caspofungin was fungistatic at ≥8-16, ≥2-8 and at ≥2-8 μg/ml against C. parapsilosis, C. orthopsilosis and C. metapsilosis, respectively. In the murine model, C. albicans was inhibited by 1, 2 and 5 mg/kg of caspofungin (P < 0.001 compared to the controls). Against C. parapsilosis, only 5 mg/kg caspofungin was effective against both isolates (P < 0.05). Two and five mg/kg of caspofungin was effective against all C. orthopsilosis and C. metapsilosis isolates (P < 0.05 to <0.001). Serum-based killing tests proved to be useful in predicting in vivo efficacy of caspofungin against four Candida species. Caspofungin at clinically attainable concentrations proved to be effective against all four species.

  16. Experience of isolated sleep paralysis in clinical practice in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ohaeri, J U

    1992-06-01

    The supernatural fears associated with the experience of isolated sleep paralysis in the culture of developing countries is sometimes associated with the evolution of somatic symptoms of psychological origin in patients predisposed to neurotic illness. Patients rarely spontaneously volunteer these fears and doctors pay them scant attention. Illustrative case histories that demonstrate the dynamics of the clinical presentation, as well as the treatment approach, are highlighted. It is hoped that doctors in general medical practice and in psychological medicine in developing countries where belief in supernatural causation of illness is rife will consider these factors in order to provide more effective treatment.

  17. Synergistic Interactions of Eugenol-tosylate and Its Congeners with Fluconazole against Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Aijaz; Wani, Mohmmad Younus; Khan, Amber; Manzoor, Nikhat; Molepo, Julitha

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported the antifungal properties of a monoterpene phenol "Eugenol" against different Candida strains and have observed that the addition of methyl group to eugenol drastically increased its antimicrobial potency. Based on the results and the importance of medicinal synthetic chemistry, we synthesized eugenol-tosylate and its congeners (E1-E6) and tested their antifungal activity against different clinical fluconazole (FLC)- susceptible and FLC- resistant C. albicans isolates alone and in combination with FLC by determining fractional inhibitory concentration indices (FICIs) and isobolograms calculated from microdilution assays. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) results confirmed that all the tested C. albicans strains were variably susceptible to the semi-synthetic derivatives E1-E6, with MIC values ranging from 1-62 μg/ml. The test compounds in combination with FLC exhibited either synergy (36%), additive (41%) or indifferent (23%) interactions, however, no antagonistic interactions were observed. The MICs of FLC decreased 2-9 fold when used in combination with the test compounds. Like their precursor eugenol, all the derivatives showed significant impairment of ergosterol biosynthesis in all C. albicans strains coupled with down regulation of the important ergosterol biosynthesis pathway gene-ERG11. The results were further validated by docking studies, which revealed that the inhibitors snugly fitting the active site of the target enzyme, mimicking fluconazole, may well explain their excellent inhibitory activity. Our results suggest that these compounds have a great potential as antifungals, which can be used as chemosensitizing agents with the known antifungal drugs.

  18. Candida Virulence Properties and Adverse Clinical Outcomes in Neonatal Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Bliss, Joseph M.; Wong, Angela Y.; Bhak, Grace; Laforce-Nesbitt, Sonia S.; Taylor, Sarah; Tan, Sylvia; Stoll, Barbara J.; Higgins, Rosemary D.; Shankaran, Seetha; Benjamin, Daniel K.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine if premature infants with invasive Candida infection caused by strains with increased virulence properties have worse clinical outcomes than those infected with less virulent strains. Study design Clinical isolates were studied from 2 populations; premature infants colonized with Candida (commensal, n=27), and those with invasive candidiasis (n=81). Individual isolates of C. albicans and C. parapsilosis were tested for virulence in each of 3 assays: phenotypic switching, adhesion, and cytotoxicity. Invasive isolates were considered to have enhanced virulence if they measured more than 1 SD above the mean for the commensal isolates in at least 1 assay. Outcomes of patients with invasive isolates with enhanced virulence were compared with those with invasive isolates lacking enhanced virulence characteristics. Results 61% of invasive isolates of C. albicans and 42% of invasive isolates of C. parapsilosis had enhanced virulence. All C. albicans cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) isolates (n=6) and 90% of urine isolates (n=10) had enhanced virulence, compared with 48% of blood isolates (n=40). Infants with more virulent isolates were younger at the time of positive culture and had higher serum creatinine. Conclusions Individual isolates of Candida species vary in their virulence properties. Strains with higher virulence are associated with certain clinical outcomes. PMID:22504098

  19. Development of DNA probes for Candida albicans

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, L.L.; Hudson, J.B.

    1988-07-01

    An attempt was made to produce DNA probes that could be used as a rapid and efficient means of detecting candidiasis (invasive Candida infection) in immunocompromised patients. Whole DNA from Candida albicans was digested with restriction endonuclease, and the resulting fragments were randomly cloned into a plasmid vector. Several recombinant plasmids were evaluated for cross-hybridization to various other Candida species, other fungal DNAs, and to nonfungal DNAs. Cross reactions were observed between the probes and different yeasts, but none with unrelated DNAs. Some recombinants were genus-specific, and two of these were applied to the analysis of C. albicans growth curves. It became evident that, although both /sup 32/P- and biotin-labelled probes could be made quite sensitive, a possible limitation in their diagnostic potential was the poor liberation of Candida DNA from cells. Thus, better methods of treatment of clinical specimens will be required before such probes will be useful in routine diagnosis.

  20. Resistance Surveillance in Candida albicans: A Five-Year Antifungal Susceptibility Evaluation in a Brazilian University Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Peron, Isabela Haddad; Reichert-Lima, Franqueline; Busso-Lopes, Ariane Fidelis; Nagasako, Cristiane Kibune; Lyra, Luzia; Moretti, Maria Luiza

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans caused 44% of the overall candidemia episodes from 2006 to 2010 in our university tertiary care hospital. As different antifungal agents are used in therapy and also immunocompromised patients receive fluconazole prophylaxis in our institution, this study aimed to perform an antifungal susceptibility surveillance with the C.albicans bloodstream isolates and to characterize the fluconazole resistance in 2 non-blood C.albicans isolates by sequencing ERG11 gene. The study included 147 C. albicans bloodstream samples and 2 fluconazole resistant isolates: one from oral cavity (LIF 12560 fluconazole MIC: 8μg/mL) and one from esophageal cavity (LIF-E10 fluconazole MIC: 64μg/mL) of two different patients previously treated with oral fluconazole. The in vitro antifungal susceptibility to amphotericin B (AMB), 5-flucytosine (5FC), fluconazole (FLC), itraconazole (ITC), voriconazole (VRC), caspofungin (CASP) was performed by broth microdilution methodology recommended by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute documents (M27-A3 and M27-S4, CLSI). All blood isolates were classified as susceptible according to CLSI guidelines for all evaluated antifungal agents (MIC range: 0,125–1.00 μg/mL for AMB, ≤0.125–1.00 μg/mL for 5FC, ≤0.125–0.5 μg/mL for FLC, ≤0.015–0.125 μg/mL for ITC, ≤0.015–0.06 μg/mL for VRC and ≤0.015–0.125 μg/mL for CASP). In this study, we also amplified and sequenced the ERG11 gene of LIF 12560 and LIF-E10 C.albicans isolates. Six mutations encoding distinct amino acid substitutions were found (E116D, T128K, E266D, A298V, G448V and G464S) and these mutations were previously described as associated with fluconazole resistance. Despite the large consumption of antifungals in our institution, resistant blood isolates were not found over the trial period. Further studies should be conducted, but it may be that the very prolonged direct contact with the oral antifungal agent administered to the patient from which

  1. [Isolated yeast species in urine samples in a Spanish regional hospital].

    PubMed

    Heras-Cañas, Victor; Ros, Luis; Sorlózano, Antonio; Gutiérrez-Soto, Blanca; Navarro-Marí, José María; Gutiérrez-Fernández, José

    2015-01-01

    Candiduria detection in hospitalized or immunocompromised patients is of great clinical significance. The aim of our study was to describe the isolation frequency of significant species of yeasts in urine samples processed in our hospital during the period 2010- 2013, and to analyze their susceptibility to commonly used antifungal agents. Species identification was performed by seeding on a chromogenic medium, the filamentation test and automated systems (ASM Vitek and MALDI Biotyper), while susceptibility was determined using the ASM Vitek system. Of the 632 yeast isolates in urine, 371 were Candida albicans species and 261 non-C. albicans Candida spp. The species with the highest number of resistant isolates were Candida glabrata and Candida krusei. Based on the results obtained, we believe that species identification and the susceptibility study should be current practice in the laboratories when species other than C. albicans are isolated.

  2. Molecular characterization of Acanthamoeba isolated in water treatment plants and comparison with clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Magnet, A; Galván, A L; Fenoy, S; Izquierdo, F; Rueda, C; Fernandez Vadillo, C; Pérez-Irezábal, J; Bandyopadhyay, K; Visvesvara, G S; da Silva, A J; del Aguila, C

    2012-07-01

    A total of 116 samples (44 clinical specimens and 72 environmental samples) have been analyzed for the presence of Acanthamoeba. The environmental samples (ESs) were collected from four drinking water treatment plants (DWTP, n=32), seven wastewater treatment plants (n=28), and six locations of influence (n=12) on four river basins from the central area of Spain (winter-spring 2008). Water samples were concentrated by using the IDEXX Filta-Max(®) system. Acanthamoeba was identified in 65 of the 72 ESs by culture isolation (90.3%) and 63 by real-time PCR (87.5%), resulting in all sampling points (100%) positive for Acanthamoeba when considering both techniques and all the time period analyzed. Nine of the 44 clinical specimens were positive for Acanthamoeba. Seventeen Acanthamoeba strains (eight from four DWTP and nine from clinical samples) were also established in axenic-PYG medium. Twenty-four of the ESs and the 17 Acanthamoeba sp. strains were genotyped as T4/1, T4/8, and T4/9. The eight strains isolated from the DWTP samples were inoculated in nude mouse to ascertain their potential pathogenicity in this model. Animals that were inoculated died or showed central nervous system symptoms 9 days post-inoculation. Examination of immunofluorescence-stained brain and lung tissue sections showed multiple organisms invading both tissues, and re-isolation of throphozoites was successful in these tissues of all infected animals. For the first time, potentially pathogenic Acanthamoeba T4 has been detected in 100% of different types of water samples including tap water and sewage effluents in the central area of Spain suggesting a potential health threat for humans especially for the contact lens wearers.

  3. A Case Report of Penile Infection Caused by Fluconazole- and Terbinafine-Resistant Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yongxuan; Hu, Yanqing; Lu, Yan; Huang, Shiyun; Liu, Kangxing; Han, Xue; Mao, Zuhao; Wu, Zhong; Zhou, Xianyi

    2017-04-01

    Candida albicans is the most common pathogen that causes balanoposthitis. It often causes recurrence of symptoms probably due to its antifungal resistance. A significant number of balanitis Candida albicans isolates are resistant to azole and terbinafine antifungal agents in vitro. However, balanoposthitis caused by fluconazole- and terbinafine-resistant Candida albicans has rarely been reported. Here, we describe a case of a recurrent penile infection caused by fluconazole- and terbinafine-resistant Candida albicans, as well as the treatments administered to this patient. The isolate from the patient was tested for drug susceptibility in vitro. It was sensitive to itraconazole, voriconazole, clotrimazole and amphotericin B, but not to terbinafine and fluconazole. Thus, oral itraconazole was administrated to this patient with resistant Candida albicans penile infection. The symptoms were improved, and mycological examination result was negative. Follow-up treatment of this patient for 3 months showed no recurrence.

  4. Candida albicans and non-Candida albicans fungemia in an institutional hospital during a decade.

    PubMed

    Parmeland, Laurence; Gazon, Mathieu; Guerin, Claude; Argaud, Laurent; Lehot, Jean-Jacques; Bastien, Olivier; Allaouchiche, Bernard; Michallet, Mauricette; Picot, Stephane; Bienvenu, Anne-Lise

    2013-01-01

    Since the outcomes of patients with candidemia is poor and Candida spp. with increased resistance to antifungal therapy may be associated with these results, the emergence of these blood infections caused by non-C. albicans Candida spp. was explored prospectively over a two-year period (2009-2010). Candidemia was defined as the recovery of Candida spp. in culture from a patient's blood sample. The in vitro susceptibility of each isolate to amphotericin B, caspofungin, fluconazole and voriconazole was determined. In addition, characteristics of patients and outcomes were investigated in real-time. The Candida distribution was compared to that observed in a similar study 10 years earlier in the same hospital. A total of 182 patients with candidemia were included in the study. While C. albicans was the most frequently isolated species (n = 102), non-C. albicans Candida spp. included; C. glabrata (n = 32), C. parapsilosis (n = 21), C. tropicalis (n = 13), C. krusei (n = 8), C. kefyr (n = 3), C. lusitaniae (n = 2), C. lipolytica (n = 2), C. famata (n = 1), C. guilliermondii (n = 1), C. inconspicua (n = 1), C. dubliniensis (n = 1), C. sake (n = 1) and C. nivariensis (n = 1). In seven patients, C. albicans was associated with another Candida spp. Surprisingly, this prospective study demonstrated that regardless of the department (intensive care unit or hematological department), Candida spp. distribution was no different from that found in the 1998-2001 survey, except for C. krusei. A reduction in the proportion of C. krusei isolates was observed from 2000-2010 (P = 0.028) as a result of its decreased recovery in the hematological department.

  5. In vitro damage of Candida albicans biofilms by chitosan

    PubMed Central

    PU, YU; LIU, AIBO; ZHENG, YUQIANG; YE, BIN

    2014-01-01

    With the increasing usage of indwelling medical devices in clinical practice, the frequency of fungal infections has increased, such as that of Candida albicans (C. albicans). Biofilms, a protected niche for microorganisms, are resistant to a range of current antifungal agents. Chitosan is a polyatomic biopolymer with advantageous biocompatibility, biodegradation, nontoxicity and antibacterial properties. To investigate the inhibitory effect of chitosan on biofilms formed by C. albicans, cell viability, 2,3-bis(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-caboxanilide reduction, and morphological assays, including fluorescence microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), were employed. As assessed by cell viability assay, chitosan showed significant inhibitory effects on the planktonic cells and the biofilm of C. albicans in a dose-dependent manner. Fluorescence microscopy and SEM assays confirmed that the chitosan-treated group showed delayed C. albicans biofilm formation with defect morphological features, due to the inhibitory effects of the vast majority of fungal cell growth. In conclusion, C. albicans biofilms were compromised by the treatment with chitosan, providing an alternative therapeutic strategy against the fungal biofilms in the medical devices. PMID:25120626

  6. Lactobacillus paracasei modulates the immune system of Galleria mellonella and protects against Candida albicans infection.

    PubMed

    Rossoni, Rodnei Dennis; Fuchs, Beth Burgwyn; de Barros, Patrícia Pimentel; Velloso, Marisol Dos Santos; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso; Junqueira, Juliana Campos; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2017-01-01

    Probiotics have been described as a potential strategy to control opportunistic infections due to their ability to stimulate the immune system. Using the non-vertebrate model host Galleria mellonella, we evaluated whether clinical isolates of Lactobacillus spp. are able to provide protection against Candida albicans infection. Among different strains of Lactobacillus paracasei, Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Lactobacillus fermentum, we verified that L. paracasei 28.4 strain had the greatest ability to prolong the survival of larvae infected with a lethal dose of C. albicans. We found that the injection of 107 cells/larvae of L. paracasei into G. mellonella larvae infected by C. albicans increased the survival of these insects compared to the control group (P = 0.0001). After that, we investigated the immune mechanisms involved in the protection against C. albicans infection, evaluating the number of hemocytes and the gene expression of antifungal peptides. We found that L. paracasei increased the hemocyte quantity (2.38 x 106 cells/mL) in relation to the control group (1.29 x 106 cells/mL), indicating that this strain is capable of raising the number of circulating hemocytes into the G. mellonella hemolymph. Further, we found that L. paracasei 28.4 upregulated genes that encode the antifungal peptides galiomicin and gallerymicin. In relation to the control group, L. paracasei 28.4 increased gene expression of galiomicin by 6.67-fold and 17.29-fold for gallerymicin. Finally, we verified that the prophylactic provision of probiotic led to a significant reduction of the number of fungal cells in G. mellonella hemolymph. In conclusion, L. paracasei 28.4 can modulate the immune system of G. mellonella and protect against candidiasis.

  7. Lactobacillus paracasei modulates the immune system of Galleria mellonella and protects against Candida albicans infection

    PubMed Central

    Rossoni, Rodnei Dennis; Fuchs, Beth Burgwyn; de Barros, Patrícia Pimentel; Velloso, Marisol dos Santos; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso; Junqueira, Juliana Campos; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2017-01-01

    Probiotics have been described as a potential strategy to control opportunistic infections due to their ability to stimulate the immune system. Using the non-vertebrate model host Galleria mellonella, we evaluated whether clinical isolates of Lactobacillus spp. are able to provide protection against Candida albicans infection. Among different strains of Lactobacillus paracasei, Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Lactobacillus fermentum, we verified that L. paracasei 28.4 strain had the greatest ability to prolong the survival of larvae infected with a lethal dose of C. albicans. We found that the injection of 107 cells/larvae of L. paracasei into G. mellonella larvae infected by C. albicans increased the survival of these insects compared to the control group (P = 0.0001). After that, we investigated the immune mechanisms involved in the protection against C. albicans infection, evaluating the number of hemocytes and the gene expression of antifungal peptides. We found that L. paracasei increased the hemocyte quantity (2.38 x 106 cells/mL) in relation to the control group (1.29 x 106 cells/mL), indicating that this strain is capable of raising the number of circulating hemocytes into the G. mellonella hemolymph. Further, we found that L. paracasei 28.4 upregulated genes that encode the antifungal peptides galiomicin and gallerymicin. In relation to the control group, L. paracasei 28.4 increased gene expression of galiomicin by 6.67-fold and 17.29-fold for gallerymicin. Finally, we verified that the prophylactic provision of probiotic led to a significant reduction of the number of fungal cells in G. mellonella hemolymph. In conclusion, L. paracasei 28.4 can modulate the immune system of G. mellonella and protect against candidiasis. PMID:28267809

  8. Phytochemical Analysis and Modulation of Antibiotic Activity by Luehea paniculata Mart. & Zucc. (Malvaceae) in Multiresistant Clinical Isolates of Candida Spp.

    PubMed Central

    Calixto Júnior, João T.; Morais, Selene M.; Martins, Clécio G.; Vieira, Larissa G.; Morais-Braga, Maria Flaviana B.; Carneiro, Joara N. P.; Machado, Antonio J. P.; Menezes, Irwin R. A.; Tintino, Saulo R.; Coutinho, Henrique D. M.

    2015-01-01

    The high incidence of fungal infections has led to the continuous search for new drugs. Extracts of Luehea paniculata, a tree of multiple medicinal uses, were evaluated for anti-Candida activity, as well as its modulator potential of the Fluconazole antibiotic. Chemical prospecting of ethanol extracts of leaf and bark was carried out, the quantification of total phenols and flavonoids, characterized by the HPLC-DAD technique. The rosmarinic acid and the vitexin flavonoid were observed as major constituents in ELELP and ESWELP, respectively. Antioxidant activity was also evaluated by the method of scavenging the free radical DPPH, and quercetin was used as standard, obtaining IC50 values: 0.341 (mg/mL) for ELELP and 0.235 (mg/mL) for ESWELP. The microdilution assay was performed for antifungal activity against strains of Candida albicans, C. krusei, and C. tropicalis and showed minimum inhibitory concentrations values ≥1024 μg/mL. In the modulator action of extracts on Fluconazole against multiresistant clinical isolates of Candida (subinhibitory concentration minimum of 128 μg/mL), a significant synergism was observed, indicating that the extracts potentiated the antifungal effect against C. tropicalis, where antioxidant flavonoids could be responsible. This is the first report about modifying activity of the antibiotic action of a species of the genus Luehea. PMID:25821822

  9. Evaluation of latex reagents for rapid identification of Candida albicans and C. krusei colonies.

    PubMed Central

    Freydiere, A M; Buchaille, L; Guinet, R; Gille, Y

    1997-01-01

    A total of 322 yeast strains and yeastlike organisms belonging to the genera Candida, Cryptococcus, Geotrichum, Saccharomyces, and Trichosporon were tested with the new monoclonal antibody-based Bichro-latex albicans and Krusei color latex tests. Comparison of results with those obtained by conventional identification methods showed 100% sensitivity for both latex tests and 100% and 95% specificity for the Bichro-latex albicans and Krusei color tests, respectively. Because the test is easy to read and quick to perform, the Bichro-latex albicans test may be useful for rapid identification of Candida albicans colonies in the clinical laboratory. PMID:9157146

  10. Clinical resistance and decreased susceptibility in Streptococcus suis isolates from clinically healthy fattening pigs.

    PubMed

    Callens, Bénédicte F; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Maes, Dominiek; Butaye, Patrick; Dewulf, Jeroen; Boyen, Filip

    2013-04-01

    Streptococcus suis (S. suis) has often been reported as an important swine pathogen and is considered as a new emerging zoonotic agent. Consequently, it is important to be informed on its susceptibility to antimicrobial agents. In the current study, the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) population distribution of nine antimicrobial agents has been determined for nasal S. suis strains, isolated from healthy pigs at the end of the fattening period from 50 closed or semiclosed pig herds. The aim of the study was to report resistance based on both clinical breakpoints (clinical resistance percentage) and epidemiological cutoff values (non-wild-type percentage). Non-wild-type percentages were high for tetracycline (98%), lincomycin (92%), tilmicosin (72%), erythromycin (70%), tylosin (66%), and low for florfenicol (0%) and enrofloxacin (0.3%). Clinical resistance percentages were high for tetracycline (95%), erythromycin (66%), tylosin (66%), and low for florfenicol (0.3%) and enrofloxacin (0.3%). For tiamulin, for which no clinical breakpoint is available, 57% of the isolates did not belong to the wild-type population. Clinical resistance and non-wild-type percentages differed substantially for penicillin. Only 1% of the tested S. suis strains was considered as clinically resistant, whereas 47% of the strains showed acquired resistance when epidemiological cutoff values were used. In conclusion, MIC values for penicillin are gradually increasing, compared to previous reports, although pigs infected with strains showing higher MICs may still respond to treatment with penicillin. The high rate of acquired resistance against tiamulin has not been reported before. Results from this study clearly demonstrate that the use of different interpretive criteria contributes to the extent of differences in reported antimicrobial resistance results. The early detection of small changes in the MIC population distribution of isolates, while clinical failure may not yet be

  11. Candida albicans commensalism in the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Neville, B Anne; d'Enfert, Christophe; Bougnoux, Marie-Elisabeth

    2015-11-01

    Candida albicans is a polymorphic yeast species that often forms part of the commensal gastrointestinal mycobiota of healthy humans. It is also an important opportunistic pathogen. A tripartite interaction involving C. albicans, the resident microbiota and host immunity maintains C. albicans in its commensal form. The influence of each of these factors on C. albicans carriage is considered herein, with particular focus on the mycobiota and the approaches used to study it, models of gastrointestinal colonization by C. albicans, the C. albicans genes and phenotypes that are necessary for commensalism and the host factors that influence C. albicans carriage.

  12. Polymicrobial Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia: Fighting In Vitro Candida albicans-Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms with Antifungal-Antibacterial Combination Therapy.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Maria E; Lopes, Susana P; Pereira, Cláudia R; Azevedo, Nuno F; Lourenço, Anália; Henriques, Mariana; Pereira, Maria O

    2017-01-01

    The polymicrobial nature of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is now evident, with mixed bacterial-fungal biofilms colonizing the VAP endotracheal tube (ETT) surface. The microbial interplay within this infection may contribute for enhanced pathogenesis and exert impact towards antimicrobial therapy. Consequently, the high mortality/morbidity rates associated to VAP and the worldwide increase in antibiotic resistance has promoted the search for novel therapeutic strategies to fight VAP polymicrobial infections. Under this scope, this work aimed to assess the activity of mono- vs combinational antimicrobial therapy using one antibiotic (Polymyxin B; PolyB) and one antifungal (Amphotericin B; AmB) agent against polymicrobial biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida albicans. The action of isolated antimicrobials was firstly evaluated in single- and polymicrobial cultures, with AmB being more effective against C. albicans and PolyB against P. aeruginosa. Mixed planktonic cultures required equal or higher antimicrobial concentrations. In biofilms, only PolyB at relatively high concentrations could reduce P. aeruginosa in both monospecies and polymicrobial populations, with C. albicans displaying only punctual disturbances. PolyB and AmB exhibited a synergistic effect against P. aeruginosa and C. albicans mixed planktonic cultures, but only high doses (256 mg L-1) of PolyB were able to eradicate polymicrobial biofilms, with P. aeruginosa showing loss of cultivability (but not viability) at 2 h post-treatment, whilst C. albicans only started to be inhibited after 14 h. In conclusion, combination therapy involving an antibiotic and an antifungal agent holds an attractive therapeutic option to treat severe bacterial-fungal polymicrobial infections. Nevertheless, optimization of antimicrobial doses and further clinical pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics and toxicodynamics studies underpinning the optimal use of these drugs are urgently required to improve therapy

  13. Polymicrobial Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia: Fighting In Vitro Candida albicans-Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms with Antifungal-Antibacterial Combination Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Cláudia R.; Azevedo, Nuno F.; Lourenço, Anália; Henriques, Mariana; Pereira, Maria O.

    2017-01-01

    The polymicrobial nature of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is now evident, with mixed bacterial-fungal biofilms colonizing the VAP endotracheal tube (ETT) surface. The microbial interplay within this infection may contribute for enhanced pathogenesis and exert impact towards antimicrobial therapy. Consequently, the high mortality/morbidity rates associated to VAP and the worldwide increase in antibiotic resistance has promoted the search for novel therapeutic strategies to fight VAP polymicrobial infections. Under this scope, this work aimed to assess the activity of mono- vs combinational antimicrobial therapy using one antibiotic (Polymyxin B; PolyB) and one antifungal (Amphotericin B; AmB) agent against polymicrobial biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida albicans. The action of isolated antimicrobials was firstly evaluated in single- and polymicrobial cultures, with AmB being more effective against C. albicans and PolyB against P. aeruginosa. Mixed planktonic cultures required equal or higher antimicrobial concentrations. In biofilms, only PolyB at relatively high concentrations could reduce P. aeruginosa in both monospecies and polymicrobial populations, with C. albicans displaying only punctual disturbances. PolyB and AmB exhibited a synergistic effect against P. aeruginosa and C. albicans mixed planktonic cultures, but only high doses (256 mg L-1) of PolyB were able to eradicate polymicrobial biofilms, with P. aeruginosa showing loss of cultivability (but not viability) at 2 h post-treatment, whilst C. albicans only started to be inhibited after 14 h. In conclusion, combination therapy involving an antibiotic and an antifungal agent holds an attractive therapeutic option to treat severe bacterial-fungal polymicrobial infections. Nevertheless, optimization of antimicrobial doses and further clinical pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics and toxicodynamics studies underpinning the optimal use of these drugs are urgently required to improve therapy

  14. RESPONSES OF OYSTERS AND THEIR HEMOCYTES TO CLINICAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL ISOLATES OF VIBRIO PARAHAEMOLYTICUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Interactions of Vibrio parahaemolyticus with oysters and oyster hemocytes were studied using three environmental isolates (1094, 1163 and ATCC 17802) and three clinical isolates (2030, 2062, 2107). Clinical isolates were from patients who became ill during the June 1998 food pois...

  15. The Clinical Spectrum of Isolated Peripheral Motor Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Sanderson, Alan B.; Arnold, W. David; Elsheikh, Bakri; Kissel, John T.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Isolated peripheral motor dysfunction due to lower motor neuron or peripheral nerve disorders presents an interesting challenge to clinicians because of the diverse differential diagnosis with a broad range of prognoses. Methods We retrospectively reviewed clinical data of adults who presented over 12 years with muscle weakness, atrophy, or fasciculations, but without hyperreflexia or sensory involvement. Results In 119 patients, 52% had a motor neuron disease (MND), 13% had immune neuropathies, 11% had genetic neuronopathies, 10% had residual or post-polio syndrome, 5% had benign fasciculation, 1% had an infectious etiology, and 8% were not given a final diagnosis. Only MND patients had cognitive dysfunction or frontal release signs. Bulbar and respiratory symptoms virtually excluded consideration of immune neuropathy. Conclusions Only half of the patients were diagnosed with MND. A significant minority have treatable conditions. Cognitive involvement, frontal release signs, and bulbar or respiratory symptoms are strongly suggestive of MND. PMID:25042002

  16. Diversity of polymyxin resistance mechanisms among Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Girardello, Raquel; Visconde, Marina; Cayô, Rodrigo; Figueiredo, Regina Célia Bressan Queiroz de; Mori, Marcelo Alves da Silva; Lincopan, Nilton; Gales, Ana Cristina

    2017-01-01

    Polymyxins have become drugs of last resort for treatment of multi-drug resistant (MDR) Gram-negative infections. However, the mechanisms of resistance to this compound have not been completely elucidated. In this study, we evaluated the mechanisms of resistance to this antimicrobial in two A. baumannii clinical isolates, respectively, susceptible (A027) and resistant (A009) to polymyxin B before and after polymyxin B exposure (A027(ind) and A009(ind)). The pmrAB and lpxACD were sequenced and their transcriptional levels were analyzed by qRT-PCR. The bacterial cell morphology was evaluated by transmission electronic microscopy (TEM) and the membrane potential was measured using Zeta-potential analyzer. The virulence of strains was studied using a Caenorhabditis elegans model. Both clinical isolates exhibited an elevation of the polymyxin B MIC after exposure to this compound. On the other hand, A027(ind) showed decreased values of MIC for β-lactams, aminoglycosides, vancomycin, teicoplanin, oxacillin and erythromycin. A027(ind) harbored two mutations in pmrB and the ISAba125 disrupting the lpxA. In contrast, A009(ind) strain exhibited increase of pmrB transcriptional level, after polymyxin B exposure, despite the absence of mutations in the pmrAB genes. The TEM images revealed a thicker and more electron-dense peptidoglycan layer for A009 than that of A027. The exposure to polymyxin B induced a strong condensation and darkening of intracellular material, mainly in A009(ind). In addition, the surface charge of A009 was significantly less negative than the one of A027. Using the C. elegans model, only A027(ind) strain showed a reduction on virulence. The diversity of polymyxin B resistance mechanisms among A. baumannii strains evaluated in this study confirms the complexity of these mechanisms, which may vary depending of the background of each strain.

  17. The correlation of virulence, pathogenicity, and itraconazole resistance with SAP activity in Candida albicans strains.

    PubMed

    Feng, Wenli; Yang, Jing; Pan, Yanwei; Xi, Zhiqin; Qiao, Zusha; Ma, Yan

    2016-02-01

    The relationship between SAP2 activity and drug resistance in Candida albicans was investigated by using itraconazole-resistant and itraconazole-sensitive C. albicans isolates. The precipitation zones were measured to analyze SAP2 activity. Mice were classified into itraconazole-resistant and -sensitive C. albicans isolate groups, and a control group, with their survival and mortality rate being observed over 30 days. The relative expression levels of CDR1, CDR2, MDR1, and SAP2 were measured using RT-PCR. It was found that the secreted aspartyl proteinase activity of itraconazole-resistant C. albicans strains was significantly higher than that of itraconazole-sensitive C. albicans strains (P < 0.001). A significantly higher mortality rate was recorded for mice treated with itraconazole-resistant C. albicans than for mice treated with itraconazole-sensitive C. albicans. In regards to the CDR1, CDR2, and MDR1 genes, there was no significant difference between the 2 groups of mice. Positive correlations between SAP2 and MDR1 and between CDR1 and CDR2 were found. The high expression level of SAP2 may relate to the virulence, pathogenicity, and resistance of C. albicans.

  18. Fluconazole Susceptibility and Genotypic Heterogeneity of Oral Candida albicans Colonies from the Patients with Cancer Receiving Chemotherapy in China

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jing; Qi, Cheng; Lafleur, Micheal D; Qi, Qing-guo

    2009-01-01

    Aim To identify heterogeneity of Candida albicans (C. albicans) isolated from the population with cancer in China by using identification medium, subculture molecular typing, and antifungal susceptibility test. Methodology Oral cheek mucosal specimens from 52 cancer patients receiving chemotherapy were cultured on CHROMagar CandidaTM plates for Candida identification. All the C. albicans colonies on the plates were subcultured and reconfirmed by API20C, then submitted to the antifungal drug susceptibility test with fluconazole and molecular typing using randomly amplified polymorphic DNA-PCR (RAPD) with primers RSD6 and RSD12. Results 54% (28/52) patients were oral yeast carriage in which C. albicans predominated. More than 7 C. albicans colonies were isolated from each of 12 patients (Group A), while less than 5 colonies were isolated from each of 16 patients (Group B). RSD6 and RSD12 were successful in eliciting 17 (A1-A17) and 2 (B1-B2) genotypes, respectively from among the 205 isolates. The two primers were combined to generate 21 genotypes. The C. albicans isolates obtained from the same patient and episode showed a diversity for fluconazole revealed by MIC50 and MIC90. Conclusion The heterogeneity of the C. albicans colonies isolated from the same patients can be detected. C. albicans with varied fluconazole susceptibility and genotypic characteristics may coexist in the same oral Candida population. PMID:20695081

  19. Ecto-ATPases of clinical and non-clinical isolates of Acanthamoeba.

    PubMed

    Sissons, James; Alsam, Selwa; Jayasekera, Samantha; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2004-11-01

    Acanthamoeba are opportunistic protozoan parasites that can cause fatal granulomatous amoebic encephalitis and eye keratitis, however the pathogenic mechanisms of Acanthamoeba remain unclear. In this study, we described the ability of live Acanthamoeba to hydrolyse extracellular ATP. Both clinical and non-clinical isolates belonging to genotypes, T1, T2, T3, T4 and T7 exhibited ecto-ATPase activities in vitro. Using non-denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, ecto-ATPases were further characterized. All Acanthamoeba isolates tested, exhibited a single ecto-ATPase band (approximate molecular weight of 272 kDa). However, clinical isolates exhibited additional bands suggesting that ecto-ATPases may play a role in the pathogenesis of Acanthamoeba. This was supported using suramin (ecto-ATPase inhibitor), which inhibited Acanthamoeba-induced host cell cytotoxicity. Previously, we and others have shown that Acanthamoeba binds to host cells using their mannose-binding protein and binding can be blocked using exogenous alpha-mannose. In this study, we observed that alpha-mannose significantly increased ecto-ATPase activities of pathogenic Acanthamoeba belonging to T1, T2, T3 and T4 genotypes but had no effect on non-pathogenic Acanthamoeba (belonging to T7 genotype). Overall, we have shown, for the first time, that Acanthamoeba exhibit ecto-ATPase activities, which may play a role in the pathogenesis of Acanthamoeba as well as their potential role in the differentiation of pathogenic Acanthamoeba.

  20. Cellular Components Mediating Coadherence of Candida albicans and Fusobacterium nucleatum

    PubMed Central

    Wu, T.; Cen, L.; Kaplan, C.; Zhou, X.; Lux, R.; Shi, W.; He, X.

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic fungal pathogen found as part of the normal oral flora. It can be coisolated with Fusobacterium nucleatum, an opportunistic bacterial pathogen, from oral disease sites, such as those involved in refractory periodontitis and pulp necrosis. The physical coadherence between these 2 clinically important microbes has been well documented and suggested to play a role in facilitating their oral colonization and colocalization and contributing to polymicrobial pathogenesis. Previous studies indicated that the physical interaction between C. albicans and F. nucleatum was mediated by the carbohydrate components on the surface of C. albicans and the protein components on the Fusobaterium cell surface. However, the identities of the components involved still remain elusive. This study was aimed at identifying the genetic determinants involved in coaggregation between the 2 species. By screening a C. albicans SN152 mutant library and a panel of F. nucleatum 23726 outer membrane protein mutants, we identified FLO9, which encodes a putative adhesin-like cell wall mannoprotein of C. albicans and radD, an arginine-inhibitable adhesin-encoding gene in F. nucleatum that is involved in interspecies coadherence. Consistent with these findings, we demonstrated that the strong coaggregation between wild-type F. nucleatum 23726 and C. albicans SN152 in an in vitro assay could be greatly inhibited by arginine and mannose. Our study also suggested a complex multifaceted mechanism underlying physical interaction between C. albicans and F. nucleatum and for the first time revealed the identity of major genetic components involved in mediating the coaggregation. These observations provide useful knowledge for developing new targeted treatments for disrupting interactions between these 2 clinically relevant pathogens. PMID:26152186

  1. Mucosal biofilms of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Shantanu; Mitchell, Aaron P

    2011-08-01

    Biofilms are microbial communities that form on surfaces and are embedded in an extracellular matrix. C. albicans forms pathogenic mucosal biofilms that are evoked by changes in host immunity or mucosal ecology. Mucosal surfaces are inhabited by many microbial species; hence these biofilms are polymicrobial. Several recent studies have applied paradigms of biofilm analysis to study mucosal C. albicans infections. These studies reveal that the Bcr1 transcription factor is a master regulator of C. albicans biofilm formation under diverse conditions, though the most relevant Bcr1 target genes can vary with the biofilm niche. An important determinant of mucosal biofilm formation is the interaction with host defenses. Finally, studies of interactions between bacterial species and C. albicans provide insight into the communication mechanisms that endow polymicrobial biofilms with unique properties.

  2. Decontamination efficacy of erbium:yttrium-aluminium-garnet and diode laser light on oral Candida albicans isolates of a 5-day in vitro biofilm model.

    PubMed

    Sennhenn-Kirchner, Sabine; Schwarz, Peter; Schliephake, Henning; Konietschke, Frank; Brunner, Edgar; Borg-von Zepelin, Margarete

    2009-05-01

    The different forms of superficial and systemic candidiasis are often associated with biofilm formation on surfaces of host tissues or medical devices. The biofilm formation of Candida spp., in general, necessitates significantly increased amounts of antifungal agents for therapy. Often the therapeutic effect is doubtful. A 5-day biofilm model with oral Candida isolates was established according to Chandra et al. (J Dent Res 80:903-908, 2001) on glass and titanium surfaces and was modified by Sennhenn-Kirchner et al. (Z Zahnärztl Implantol 3:45-51, 2007) to investigate different aspects unanswered in the field of dentistry. In this model, the efficacy of erbium:yttrium-aluminium-garnet (Er:YAG) light (2940 nm, 100 mJ, 10 Hz, 300 micros pulsed mode applied for 80 s) and diode laser light (810 nm, 1 W, continuous wave mode applied for 20 s with four repetitions after 30 s pauses each) was evaluated and compared to untreated controls. The photometric evaluation of the samples was completed by observations on morphological changes of yeast cells grown in the biofilm. Compared to the untreated controls Candida cells grown in mature in vitro biofilms were significantly reduced by both wavelengths investigated. Comparison between the different methods of laser treatment additionally revealed a significantly greater effect of the Er:YAG over the diode laser. Scanning electron microscopy findings proved that the diode laser light was effective in direct contact mode. In contrast, in the areas without direct contact, the fungal cells were left almost unchanged. The Er:YAG laser damaged the fungal cells to a great extent wherever it was applied.

  3. First Draft Genome Sequences of Malaysian Clinical Isolates of Corynebacterium diphtheriae

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Norazah; Mohd Khalid, Mohd Khairul Nizam; Abd Wahab, Muhammad Adib; Hashim, Rohaidah; Tang, Soo Nee; Liow, Yii Ling; Hamzah, Hazwani; Dahalan, Nurul Ain; Seradja, Valentinus

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Corynebacterium diphtheriae has caused multiple isolated diphtheria cases in Malaysia over the years. Here, we report the first draft genome sequences of 15 Malaysia C. diphtheriae clinical isolates collected from the years 1981 to 2016. PMID:28254972

  4. First Draft Genome Sequences of Malaysian Clinical Isolates of Corynebacterium diphtheriae.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Norazah; Hii, Shirley Yi Fen; Mohd Khalid, Mohd Khairul Nizam; Abd Wahab, Muhammad Adib; Hashim, Rohaidah; Tang, Soo Nee; Liow, Yii Ling; Hamzah, Hazwani; Dahalan, Nurul Ain; Seradja, Valentinus

    2017-03-02

    Corynebacterium diphtheriae has caused multiple isolated diphtheria cases in Malaysia over the years. Here, we report the first draft genome sequences of 15 Malaysia C. diphtheriae clinical isolates collected from the years 1981 to 2016.

  5. Nontuberculous mycobacteria: Reports of clinical laboratory isolation in a three county area, North Carolina, 2006 -2010

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Laboratory reports of mycobacteria isolation and identification are created during the clinical diagnostic process to differentiate Mycobacterium tuberculosis from nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM). NTM isolation rates are expected to exceed rates of true NTM infectio...

  6. [Evolution of antimicrobial susceptibility of Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolates].

    PubMed

    López-Hernández, S; Alarcón, T; López-Brea, M

    2000-12-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a microorganism frequently implicated in colonization and infection in hospitalized patients. An increase of resistance has been observed in recent years making these infections difficult to treat. The in vitro activity of 24 antibiotics, 15 betalactam agents and nine nonbetalactams, was studied in 156 A. baumannii clinical isolates. The strains were collected from different clinical samples obtained from inpatients (92%) and 8% were from outpatients. Evolution of susceptibility from January 1995 to December 1997 was studied. MIC of the following antibiotics was determined by the agar dilution method: ampicillin, ticarcillin, piperacillin, ampicillin-sulbactam, amoxicillin- clavulanic acid, ticarcillin-clavulanic acid, piperacillin-tazobactam, cefotaxime, ceftazidime, cefepime, imipenem, meropenem, clavulanic acid, sulbactam, tazobactam, amikacin, gentamicin, tobramycin, ofloxacin, doxycycline, fosfomycin, rifampin, azithromycin and colistin. Low antimicrobial susceptibility was observed in most A. baumannii strains. Colistin, imipenem, meropenem and ampicillin-sulbactam showed the greatest susceptibility (100, 88.4, 88.4 and 84.6%, respectively). A. baumannii strains from inpatients showed a lower antimicrobial susceptibility than strains from outpatients, who showed a high percentage of susceptibility to most antibiotics. Rifampin and azithromycin showed certain in vitro activity against the most susceptible A. baumannii strains. A progressive decrease in susceptibility to most antibiotics was observed during the period studied. Carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii emerged in 1996 and increased in 1997.

  7. Molecular cloning and characterization of the Candida albicans enolase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Mason, A B; Buckley, H R; Gorman, J A

    1993-01-01

    A DNA clone containing the putative Candida albicans enolase gene (ENO1) was isolated from a genomic DNA library. The sequenced insert contained a continuous open reading frame of 1,320 bp. The predicted 440-amino-acid protein is 78 and 76% identical, respectively, to Saccharomyces cerevisiae enolase proteins 1 and 2. Only one enolase gene could be detected in C. albicans genomic DNA by Southern analysis with a homologous probe. Northern (RNA) analysis detected a single, abundant C. albicans ENO1 transcript of approximately 1,600 nucleotides. When cells were grown on glucose, levels of ENO1 mRNA were markedly increased by comparison with ENO1 mRNA levels in cells grown on ethanol, a gluconeogenic carbon source. In contrast to this glucose-mediated transcriptional induction, the carbon source had no dramatic effect on the levels of enolase protein or enzyme activity in the C. albicans strains tested. These results suggest that posttranscriptional mechanisms are responsible for modulating expression of the C. albicans enolase gene. Images PMID:8478328

  8. Genomic Features of Environmental and Clinical Vibrio parahaemolyticus Isolates Lacking Recognized Virulence Factors Are Dissimilar.

    PubMed

    Ronholm, J; Petronella, N; Chew Leung, C; Pightling, A W; Banerjee, S K

    2015-12-04

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a bacterial pathogen that can cause illness after the consumption or handling of contaminated seafood. The primary virulence factors associated with V. parahaemolyticus illness are thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH) and Tdh-related hemolysin (TRH). However, clinical strains lacking tdh and trh have recently been isolated, and these clinical isolates are poorly understood. To help understand the emergence of clinical tdh- and trh-negative isolates, a genomic approach was used to comprehensively compare 4 clinical tdh- and trh-negative isolates with 16 environmental tdh- and trh-negative isolates and 34 clinical isolates positive for tdh or trh, or both, with the objective of identifying genomic features that are unique to clinical tdh- and trh-negative isolates. The prevalence of pathogenicity islands (PAIs) common to clinical isolates was thoroughly examined in each of the clinical tdh- and trh-negative isolates. The tdh PAI was not present in any clinical or environmental tdh- and trh-negative isolates. The trh PAI was not present in any environmental isolates; however, in clinical tdh- and trh-negative isolate 10-4238, the majority of the trh PAI including a partial trh1 gene was present, which resulted in reclassification of this isolate as a tdh-negative and trh-positive isolate. In the other clinical tdh- and trh-negative isolates, neither the trh gene nor the trh PAI was present. We identified 862 genes in clinical tdh- and trh-negative isolates but not in environmental tdh- and trh-negative isolates. Many of these genes are highly homologous to genes found in common enteric bacteria and included genes encoding a number of chemotaxis proteins and a novel putative type VI secretion system (T6SS) effector and immunity protein (T6SS1). The availability of genome sequences from clinical V. parahaemolyticus tdh- and trh-negative isolates and the comparative analysis may help provide an understanding of how this pathotype is able to

  9. Genomic Features of Environmental and Clinical Vibrio parahaemolyticus Isolates Lacking Recognized Virulence Factors Are Dissimilar

    PubMed Central

    Petronella, N.; Chew Leung, C.; Pightling, A. W.; Banerjee, S. K.

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a bacterial pathogen that can cause illness after the consumption or handling of contaminated seafood. The primary virulence factors associated with V. parahaemolyticus illness are thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH) and Tdh-related hemolysin (TRH). However, clinical strains lacking tdh and trh have recently been isolated, and these clinical isolates are poorly understood. To help understand the emergence of clinical tdh- and trh-negative isolates, a genomic approach was used to comprehensively compare 4 clinical tdh- and trh-negative isolates with 16 environmental tdh- and trh-negative isolates and 34 clinical isolates positive for tdh or trh, or both, with the objective of identifying genomic features that are unique to clinical tdh- and trh-negative isolates. The prevalence of pathogenicity islands (PAIs) common to clinical isolates was thoroughly examined in each of the clinical tdh- and trh-negative isolates. The tdh PAI was not present in any clinical or environmental tdh- and trh-negative isolates. The trh PAI was not present in any environmental isolates; however, in clinical tdh- and trh-negative isolate 10-4238, the majority of the trh PAI including a partial trh1 gene was present, which resulted in reclassification of this isolate as a tdh-negative and trh-positive isolate. In the other clinical tdh- and trh-negative isolates, neither the trh gene nor the trh PAI was present. We identified 862 genes in clinical tdh- and trh-negative isolates but not in environmental tdh- and trh-negative isolates. Many of these genes are highly homologous to genes found in common enteric bacteria and included genes encoding a number of chemotaxis proteins and a novel putative type VI secretion system (T6SS) effector and immunity protein (T6SS1). The availability of genome sequences from clinical V. parahaemolyticus tdh- and trh-negative isolates and the comparative analysis may help provide an understanding of how this pathotype is able to

  10. [Clinical consideration of coagulase negative Staphylococci isolated in blood culture].

    PubMed

    Oshitani, Yohei; Ishikawa, Tomoyuki; Murata, Ken; Aoyagi, Yoshiki; Yabe, Yasuyo; Aoshima, Masahiro

    2012-01-01

    Despite blood culture's usefulness in antimicrobial therapy, fewer blood cultures and the infrequency of more than 1 set in cultures appear to be problems in Japan. Since June 2007 infection control team (ICT) recommended more than 1 set in blood sampling and intervention in positive blood culture, coagulase negative Staphylococci (CNS) has frequently been isolated from blood culture and its clinical significance is often difficult to judge. To determine the effect of ICT intervention, we evaluated the number of blood culture specimens, the frequency of more than 1 set in all blood culture specimens, and decision-making on antimicrobial treatment for CNS isolated retrospectively from blood. The study was divided into term I in August 2007 to July 2008, term II in August 2008 to July 2009, and term III in August 2009 to February 2010. We also analyzed how physicians treated infection or its suspicion after CNS and its drug susceptibility. The monthly number of blood culture specimens increased from 40.3 to 51.6 between terms I and III. The frequency of more than 1 set in a single blood culture session rose significantly from 67% to 89% between these terms (p < 0.001). The number of indeterminate also dropped cases significantly during these 2 terms from 27% to 6% (p = 0.017). Infection or suspected infection cases--45 of 49--had central vein catheter implantation. Inappropriate treatment by physicians in these cases also dropped significantly from 85% (11/13) to 45% (5/11) (p = 0.043) during the same 2 terms. ICT Intervention may thus increase the number of blood culture specimens, enable more than 1 set in blood sampling, make it easier to judge the presence of infection, and increase appropriate treatment by physicians. We thus believe that the quality of antimicrobial treatment could be improved through education such as ICT action.

  11. Discrimination between Candida albicans and Other Pathogenic Species of the Genus Candida by Their Differential Sensitivities to Toxins of a Panel of Killer Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Buzzini, P.; Martini, A.

    2001-01-01

    The differential sensitivities to toxins produced by a short panel of four killer yeasts allowed discrimination between 91 strains of the yeast Candida albicans and 223 non-C. albicans Candida strains. One hundred percent of C. albicans isolates exhibited negative results to the toxin panel, while 100% of non-C. albicans cultures gave well-defined and reproducible positive results to at least one of the four killer toxins. Among C. albicans strains only 96 and 87% gave germ tube (GT)- and chlamydospore-positive results, respectively. In addition a few GT-false-positive strains were detected among non-C. albicans isolates. Susceptibility to the toxin panel is apparently expressed more consistently than either GT or chlamydospore production and may constitute a promising basis for a new simple and easy-to-use procedure for routine discrimination between the species C. albicans and other species of the genus Candida. PMID:11526179

  12. Integrating Candida albicans metabolism with biofilm heterogeneity by transcriptome mapping

    PubMed Central

    Rajendran, Ranjith; May, Ali; Sherry, Leighann; Kean, Ryan; Williams, Craig; Jones, Brian L.; Burgess, Karl V.; Heringa, Jaap; Abeln, Sanne; Brandt, Bernd W.; Munro, Carol A.; Ramage, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans biofilm formation is an important virulence factor in the pathogenesis of disease, a characteristic which has been shown to be heterogeneous in clinical isolates. Using an unbiased computational approach we investigated the central metabolic pathways driving biofilm heterogeneity. Transcripts from high (HBF) and low (LBF) biofilm forming isolates were analysed by RNA sequencing, with 6312 genes identified to be expressed in these two phenotypes. With a dedicated computational approach we identified and validated a significantly differentially expressed subnetwork of genes associated with these biofilm phenotypes. Our analysis revealed amino acid metabolism, such as arginine, proline, aspartate and glutamate metabolism, were predominantly upregulated in the HBF phenotype. On the contrary, purine, starch and sucrose metabolism was generally upregulated in the LBF phenotype. The aspartate aminotransferase gene AAT1 was found to be a common member of these amino acid pathways and significantly upregulated in the HBF phenotype. Pharmacological inhibition of AAT1 enzyme activity significantly reduced biofilm formation in a dose-dependent manner. Collectively, these findings provide evidence that biofilm phenotype is associated with differential regulation of metabolic pathways. Understanding and targeting such pathways, such as amino acid metabolism, is potentially useful for developing diagnostics and new antifungals to treat biofilm-based infections. PMID:27765942

  13. Integrating Candida albicans metabolism with biofilm heterogeneity by transcriptome mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajendran, Ranjith; May, Ali; Sherry, Leighann; Kean, Ryan; Williams, Craig; Jones, Brian L.; Burgess, Karl V.; Heringa, Jaap; Abeln, Sanne; Brandt, Bernd W.; Munro, Carol A.; Ramage, Gordon

    2016-10-01

    Candida albicans biofilm formation is an important virulence factor in the pathogenesis of disease, a characteristic which has been shown to be heterogeneous in clinical isolates. Using an unbiased computational approach we investigated the central metabolic pathways driving biofilm heterogeneity. Transcripts from high (HBF) and low (LBF) biofilm forming isolates were analysed by RNA sequencing, with 6312 genes identified to be expressed in these two phenotypes. With a dedicated computational approach we identified and validated a significantly differentially expressed subnetwork of genes associated with these biofilm phenotypes. Our analysis revealed amino acid metabolism, such as arginine, proline, aspartate and glutamate metabolism, were predominantly upregulated in the HBF phenotype. On the contrary, purine, starch and sucrose metabolism was generally upregulated in the LBF phenotype. The aspartate aminotransferase gene AAT1 was found to be a common member of these amino acid pathways and significantly upregulated in the HBF phenotype. Pharmacological inhibition of AAT1 enzyme activity significantly reduced biofilm formation in a dose-dependent manner. Collectively, these findings provide evidence that biofilm phenotype is associated with differential regulation of metabolic pathways. Understanding and targeting such pathways, such as amino acid metabolism, is potentially useful for developing diagnostics and new antifungals to treat biofilm-based infections.

  14. Comparative in vitro activity of antimycotic agents against pathogenic vaginal yeast isolates.

    PubMed

    Lynch, M E; Sobel, J D

    1994-01-01

    Although numerous antimycotic agents are available for the treatment of yeast vaginitis there is little comparative data on the in vitro activity of these drugs. In the present two-part study, in vitro macro-broth dilution sensitivity tests were performed on a total of 377 clinical vaginal yeast isolates of nine different species. Antimycotics surveyed included amphotericin B, 5-fluorocytosine and eight azole derivatives. Results show that all vaginal Candida albicans isolates were uniformly sensitive at low concentration to all 10 antimycotics tested. However, non-albicans species, especially Candida glabrata and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, manifested several-fold increases in minimal inhibitory concentrations to all azoles tested except butoconazole. In particular, the in vitro potency of fluconazole and terconazole against species other than C. albicans was relatively poor, whereas the drugs demonstrating the best activity were itraconazole, butoconazole and saperconazole. Susceptibility testing of vaginal C. albicans isolates is not routinely indicated, even in patients with recurrent vaginitis and should be reserved for selected organisms, especially non-albicans species, in patients with clinical failure only.

  15. Predictors of disability worsening in clinically isolated syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jokubaitis, Vilija G; Spelman, Tim; Kalincik, Tomas; Izquierdo, Guillermo; Grand'Maison, François; Duquette, Pierre; Girard, Marc; Lugaresi, Alessandra; Grammond, Pierre; Hupperts, Raymond; Cabrera-Gomez, José; Oreja-Guevara, Celia; Boz, Cavit; Giuliani, Giorgio; Fernández-Bolaños, Ricardo; Iuliano, Gerardo; Lechner-Scott, Jeannette; Verheul, Freek; van Pesch, Vincent; Petkovska-Boskova, Tatjana; Fiol, Marcela; Moore, Fraser; Cristiano, Edgardo; Alroughani, Raed; Bergamaschi, Roberto; Barnett, Michael; Slee, Mark; Vella, Norbert; Herbert, Joseph; Shaw, Cameron; Saladino, Maria Laura; Amato, Maria Pia; Liew, Danny; Paolicelli, Damiano; Butzkueven, Helmut; Trojano, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess demographic, clinical, magnetic resonance imaging, and treatment exposure predictors of time to 3 or 12-month confirmed disability worsening in clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) and early multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods We utilized the MSBase Incident Study (MSBasis), a prospective cohort study of outcome after CIS. Predictors of time to first 3 and 12-month confirmed expanded disability status scale worsening were analyzed using Cox proportional hazards regression. Results About 1989 patients were analyzed, the largest seen-from-onset cohort reported to-date. A total of 391 patients had a first 3-month confirmed disability worsening event, of which 307 were sustained for 12 months. Older age at CIS onset (adjusted hazard ratio: aHR 1.17, 95% 1.06, 1.30), pyramidal (aHR 1.45, 95% CI 1.13, 1.89) and ambulation (HR 1.60, 95% CI 1.09, 2.34) system dysfunction, annualized relapse rate (aHR 1.20, 95% CI 1.18, 1.22), and lower proportion of observation time on treatment were associated with 3-month confirmed worsening. Predictors of time to 12-month sustained worsening included pyramidal system dysfunction (Hazard ratio: aHR 1.38, 95% CI 1.05, 1.83), and older age at CIS onset (aHR 1.17, 95% CI 1.04, 1.31). Greater proportion of follow-up time exposed to treatment was associated with greater reductions in the rate of worsening. Interpretation This study provides class IV evidence for a strong protective effect of disease-modifying treatment to reduce disability worsening events in patients with CIS and early MS, and confirms age and pyramidal dysfunction at onset as risk factors. PMID:26000321

  16. DIFFERENTIAL EFFECTS OF OYSTER (CRASSOSTREA VIRGINICA) DEFENSES ON CLINICAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL ISOLATES OF VIBRIO PARAHEMOLYTICUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three clinical (2030, 2062, and 2107) and three environmental (1094, 1163, and ATCC 17802) isolates of Vibrio parahaemolyticus were exposed to hemocytes and plasma collected from oysters (Crassostrea virginica) to determine their susceptibility to putative oyster defenses. Clinic...

  17. Molecular characterisation of clinical Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii isolates from Sichuan province, China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Si-Ying; Lei, Yao; Kang, Mei; Xiao, Yu-Ling; Chen, Zhi-Xing

    2015-05-01

    Previous reports on the molecular characteristics of clinical isolates of Cryptococcus species in China have focused on isolates from southeast China. To obtain a more detailed molecular epidemiology, a total of 92 cryptococcal isolates were collected from Sichuan province. A total of 24 isolates from 12 other provinces were collected for comparative study. Genotypes and mating types of 116 Cryptococcus isolates were determined. Among the 116 isolates, 43 isolates (19 isolates from Sichuan and 24 isolates outside of Sichuan) were analysed by multi-locus sequence typing (MLST). All 116 clinical isolates were mating type α. Most isolates (114/116) were molecular type VNI and the remaining two isolates were VGI and VGII respectively. MLST results revealed five sequence types (STs) of C. neoformans including two novel STs, with most isolates identified as ST5. The two C. gattii isolates identified in our study were ST44 and ST159. Based on our report and previous studies, there are 15 C. neoformans STs in China which can be divided into three subgroups. The C. gattii isolate from Sichuan could be a scattered subtype of VGII (ST44). Our findings demonstrated that C. neoformans isolates in Sichuan are genetically homogeneous, and ST5 is the epidemic clone of C. neoformans in China.

  18. Killing Rates of Caspofungin in 50 Percent Serum Correlate with Caspofungin Efficacy Against Candida albicans in a Neutropenic Murine Model.

    PubMed

    Domán, Marianna; Kovács, Renátó; Kardos, Gábor; Gesztelyi, Rudolf; Juhász, Béla; Bozó, Aliz; Kardos, Tamás; Saleh, Qasem; Majoros, László

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies suggested that caspofungin dose escalation against Candida species is more beneficial than currently used lower daily doses. Thus, we determined in vitro and in vivo activity of caspofungin against six wild-type C. albicans clinical isolates, the ATCC 10231 strain and an echinocandin resistant strain. MIC ranges of clinical isolates in RPMI-1640 with and without 50% serum were 0.125-0.25 and 0.015-0.06 mg/L, respectively. Two and three isolates showed paradoxical growth in MIC and time-kill tests, respectively, in RPMI-1640 but not in 50% serum. Caspofungin killing rate (k) in RPMI-1640 at 1 mg/L was higher than at 16 and 32 mg/L for all isolates (p<0.001). Killing rates for five of six isolates were concentration independent between 1-32 mg/L in 50% serum (p>0.05 for all comparisons), but for one isolate k value at 32 mg/L was significantly lower than at 1-16 mg/L. Although k values at 1-32 mg/L showed a great variability in 50% serum (the lowest and highest k value ranges were 0.085-0.109 and 0.882-0.985 1/h, respectively), daily 3, 5 and 15 mg/kg caspofungin was effective in a neutropenic murine model against all isolates, without significant differences between the effective doses. This study confirms that paradoxical growth does not affect the in vivo efficacy of caspofungin. We demonstrated that dose escalation did not increase the efficacy of caspofungin against C. albicans either in vitro or in vivo. These results are in concordance with the clinical experience that efficacy of echinocandins does not increase at larger doses.

  19. MRI criteria for MS in patients with clinically isolated syndromes.

    PubMed

    Montalban, X; Tintoré, M; Swanton, J; Barkhof, F; Fazekas, F; Filippi, M; Frederiksen, J; Kappos, L; Palace, J; Polman, C; Rovaris, M; de Stefano, N; Thompson, A; Yousry, T; Rovira, A; Miller, D H

    2010-02-02

    In recent years, criteria for the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) have changed, mainly due to the incorporation of new MRI criteria. While the new criteria are a logical step forward, they are complex and-not surprisingly-a good working knowledge of them is not always evident among neurologists and neuroradiologists. In some circumstances, several MRI examinations are needed to achieve an accurate and prompt diagnosis. This provides an incentive for continued efforts to refine the incorporation of MRI-derived information into the diagnostic workup of patients presenting with a clinically isolated syndrome. Within the European multicenter collaborative research network that studies MRI in MS (MAGNIMS), a workshop was held in London in November 2007 to review information that may simplify the existing MS diagnostic criteria, while maintaining a high specificity that is essential to minimize false positive diagnoses. New data that are now published were reviewed and discussed and together with a new proposal are integrated in this position paper.

  20. Efficacy of sodium hypochlorite and coconut soap used as disinfecting agents in the reduction of denture stomatitis, Streptococcus mutans and Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Barnabé, W; de Mendonça Neto, T; Pimenta, F C; Pegoraro, L F; Scolaro, J M

    2004-05-01

    This study evaluated the reduction of denture stomatitis and the antimicrobial activity of 0.05% sodium hypochlorite opposed to Candida albicans and Streptococcus mutans (SGM) when associated with brushing complete dentures with coconut soap. The mucosal characteristics were evaluated according to Newton's classification at baseline, after cleansing the dentures with coconut soap for 15 days in group 1 (nine patients). In the other group (19 patients) the analysis were made before and after cleansing the dentures with coconut soap and with disinfection in a soak solution of 0.05% sodium hypochlorite for 10 min during 15 days. Microbiological tests were used to isolate C. albicans and SGM. Mann-Whitney and Wilcoxon tests were used to compare the mucosal characteristics and Fisher test and McNemar test to compare C. albicans and SGM levels. Statistical analysis at the 95% confidence level (P < 0.05) showed that: (i) the association of coconut soap and 0.05% sodium hypochlorite significantly reduced clinical signs of denture stomatitis, (ii) C. albicans did not reduce in counts, (iii) SGM were reduced but not significantly and (iv) the association of coconut soap and 0.5% sodium hypochlorite was effective in controlling denture biofilm.

  1. Whole-Genome Sequences of 80 Environmental and Clinical Isolates of Burkholderia pseudomallei

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Anthony L.; Chain, Patrick S.; Currie, Bart J.; Daligault, Hajnalka E.; Davenport, Karen W.; Davis, Christopher B.; Inglis, Timothy J. J.; Kaestli, Mirjam; Koren, Sergey; Mayo, Mark; Merritt, Adam J.; Sarovich, Derek S.; Warner, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Here, we present the draft genome sequences of 80 isolates of Burkholderia pseudomallei. The isolates represent clinical cases of melioidosis and environmental isolates from regions in Australia and Papua New Guinea where B. pseudomallei is endemic. The genomes provide further context for the diversity of the pathogen. PMID:25676747

  2. Whole-Genome Sequences of 80 Environmental and Clinical Isolates of Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Shannon L; Baker, Anthony L; Chain, Patrick S; Currie, Bart J; Daligault, Hajnalka E; Davenport, Karen W; Davis, Christopher B; Inglis, Timothy J J; Kaestli, Mirjam; Koren, Sergey; Mayo, Mark; Merritt, Adam J; Price, Erin P; Sarovich, Derek S; Warner, Jeffrey; Rosovitz, M J

    2015-02-12

    Here, we present the draft genome sequences of 80 isolates of Burkholderia pseudomallei. The isolates represent clinical cases of melioidosis and environmental isolates from regions in Australia and Papua New Guinea where B. pseudomallei is endemic. The genomes provide further context for the diversity of the pathogen.

  3. Evaluation of Vitek MS for rapid classification of clinical isolates belonging to Mycobacterium avium complex.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Daniel P; Zembower, Teresa R; Qi, Chao

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the ability of the Vitek MS system to classify clinical pulmonary Mycobacterium avium complex isolates compared to multilocus sequence analysis. Vitek MS accurately identified 55% of the isolates as M. avium and 18% as M. intracellulare, but misidentified 24 (27%) Mycobacterium chimaera isolates as Mycobacterium intracellulare.

  4. Antimicrobial resistance profiles of dairy and clinical isolates and type strains of enterococci.

    PubMed

    de Fátima Silva Lopes, Maria; Ribeiro, Tânia; Abrantes, Marta; Figueiredo Marques, José Joaquim; Tenreiro, Rogério; Crespo, Maria Teresa Barreto

    2005-08-25

    The susceptibility to 30 antimicrobial agents was determined by the disk diffusion method for a collection of 172 enterococcal strains, including 96 isolates from dairy sources, 50 isolates of human and veterinary origin, and 26 reference strains from 24 different enterococcal species. Results were analysed by hierarchic numerical methods to cluster strains and to group antimicrobials according to similarity profiles. Resistance to 17 of the 30 antimicrobials showed to be correlated, leading to four groups reflecting the mode of action: quinolones (ofloxacin, enrofloxacin, ciprofloxacin and norfloxacin); macrolides (erythromycin, spiramycin), phenicols (cloramphenicol) and tetracyclins (tetracycline, oxytetracyclin); aminoglycosides (gentamicin, kanamycin) and lincosamides (clindamycin); penicillins (amoxicillin, ampicillin, penicillin G, piperacillin) and carbapenems (imipenem). Overall, the genus Enterococcus behaved as resistant to lincomycin, colistin, polimixin B and, with a few exceptions in dairy isolates, to methicillin. In general, all isolates were susceptible to vancomycin, cloramphenicol and fusidic acid. Clusters containing only dairy isolates were susceptible to the majority of antimicrobials tested, as opposed to clusters constituted only by clinical enterococcal isolates. Among the clinical isolates, 62% were highly multiresistant. Low level gentamicin resistance was found to be associated with clinical enterococci. Among dairy isolates, those that clustered with clinical isolates were both resistant to gentamicin and identified as Enterococcus faecalis. Resistance to macrolides, quinolones, penicillins and imipenem was found to be associated also with clinical environments, mainly with multiresistant isolates, contrary to what is generally agreed as a characteristic of the genus. Veterinary clinical isolates were mainly grouped with the multiresistant clinical human isolates. The 26 reference enterococcal strains were distributed in clusters with

  5. Biochemical, serological, and virulence characterization of clinical and oyster Vibrio parahaemolyticus isolates.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jessica L; Lüdeke, Catharina H M; Bowers, John C; Garrett, Nancy; Fischer, Markus; Parsons, Michele B; Bopp, Cheryl A; DePaola, Angelo

    2012-07-01

    In this study, 77 clinical and 67 oyster Vibrio parahaemolyticus isolates from North America were examined for biochemical profiles, serotype, and the presence of potential virulence factors (tdh, trh, and type III secretion system [T3SS] genes). All isolates were positive for oxidase, indole, and glucose fermentation, consistent with previous reports. The isolates represented 35 different serotypes, 9 of which were shared by clinical and oyster isolates. Serotypes associated with pandemic strains (O1:KUT, O1:K25, O3:K6, and O4:K68) were observed for clinical isolates, and 7 (9%) oyster isolates belonged to serotype O1:KUT. Of the clinical isolates, 27% were negative for tdh and trh, while 45% contained both genes. Oyster isolates were preferentially selected for the presence of tdh and/or trh; 34% contained both genes, 42% had trh but not tdh, and 3% had tdh but not trh. All but 1 isolate (143/144) had at least three of the four T3SS1 genes examined. The isolates lacking both tdh and trh contained no T3SS2α or T3SS2β genes. All clinical isolates positive for tdh and negative for trh possessed all T3SS2α genes, and all isolates negative for tdh and positive for trh possessed all T3SS2β genes. The two oyster isolates containing tdh but not trh possessed all but the vopB2 gene of T3SS2α, as reported previously. In contrast to the findings of previous studies, all strains examined that were positive for both tdh and trh also carried T3SS2β genes. This report identifies the serotype as the most distinguishing feature between clinical and oyster isolates. Our findings raise concerns about the reliability of the tdh, trh, and T3SS genes as virulence markers and highlight the need for more-detailed pathogenicity investigations of V. parahaemolyticus.

  6. Enzymatic characterisation of clinical isolates of Cryptococcus neoformans, Cryptococcus gattii and other environmental Cryptococcus spp.

    PubMed

    Chan, M Y; Tay, S T

    2010-01-01

    This study compared the enzymatic activity of clinical isolates of Cryptococcus neoformans, Cryptococcus gattii, environmental isolates of C. neoformans and non-neoformans Cryptococcus. Most of the cryptococcal isolates investigated in this study exhibited proteinase and phospholipase activities. Laccase activity was detected from all the C. neoformans and C. gattii isolates, but not from the non-neoformans Cryptococcus isolates. There was no significant difference in the proteinase, phospholipase and laccase activities of C. neoformans and C. gattii. However, significant difference in the enzymatic activities of beta-glucuronidase, alpha-glucosidase, beta-glucosidase and N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminidase between C. neoformans and C. gattii isolates was observed in this study. Environmental isolates of C. neoformans exhibited similar enzymatic profiles as the clinical isolates of C. neoformans, except for lower proteinase and laccase activities.

  7. Candida albicans Mycofilms Support Staphylococcus aureus Colonization and Enhances Miconazole Resistance in Dual-Species Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Kean, Ryan; Rajendran, Ranjith; Haggarty, Jennifer; Townsend, Eleanor M.; Short, Bryn; Burgess, Karl E.; Lang, Sue; Millington, Owain; Mackay, William G.; Williams, Craig; Ramage, Gordon

    2017-01-01

    Polymicrobial inter-kingdom biofilm infections represent a clinical management conundrum. The presence of co-isolation of bacteria and fungi complicates the ability to routinely administer single antimicrobial regimens, and synergy between the microorganisms influences infection severity. We therefore investigated the nosocomial pathogens Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans with respect to antimicrobial intervention. We characterized the interaction using biofilm assays and evaluated the effect of miconazole treatment using in vitro and in vivo assays. Finally, we assessed the impact of biofilm extracellular matrix (ECM) on these interactions. Data indicated that the C. albicans mycofilms supported adhesion and colonization by S. aureus through close interactions with hyphal elements, significantly increasing S. aureus biofilm formation throughout biofilm maturation. Miconazole sensitivity was shown to be reduced in both mono- and dual-species biofilms compared to planktonic cells. Within a three-dimensional biofilm model sensitivity was also hindered. Galleria mellonella survival analysis showed both enhanced pathogenicity of the dual-species infection, which was concomitantly desensitized to miconazole treatment. Analysis of the ECM revealed the importance of extracellular DNA, which supported the adhesion of S. aureus and the development of the dual-species biofilm structures. Collectively, these data highlight the clinical importance of dual-species inter-kingdom biofilm infections, though also provides translational opportunities to manage them more effectively. PMID:28280487

  8. Virulence factors in clinical and food isolates of Aeromonas species.

    PubMed

    Pin, C; Marín, M L; Selgas, M D; García, M L; Tormo, J; Casas, C

    1994-01-01

    Virulence factors were compared in 15 Aeromonas spp. isolated from faeces of patients with Aeromonas-associated gastroenteritis and in 81 strains isolated from food. Strains from food did not show differences in the distribution of virulence factors when compared with strains isolated from faeces. However, 88.8% of Aeromonas strains isolated from food were capable of producing possible virulence factors. Characterization of 28 autoagglutinating (AA+) Aeromonas spp. indicated that the human strains differed from the food strains in hemagglutinating and hemolytic capacities. These results suggest that autoagglutination associated with hemagglutinating and hemolytic capacities in food strains may be a helpful indicator of potential pathogenicity.

  9. Phenotypic characterization of mononuclear cells and class II antigen expression in angular cheilitis infected by Candida albicans or Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Ohman, S C; Jontell, M; Jonsson, R

    1989-04-01

    In the present study we characterized the phenotypes of infiltrating mononuclear cells in angular cheilitis lesions to further explore the pathogenesis of this disorder. Frozen sections from lesions infected by Candida albicans and/or Staphylococcus aureus were subjected to immunohistochemical analysis utilizing monoclonal antibodies directed to subsets of T-lymphocytes, B-lymphocytes, and macrophages. In addition, the expression of Class II antigens (HLA-DP, -DQ, -DR), the interleukin 2- and transferrin-receptors was studied on resident and infiltrating cells. An intense infiltration of T-lymphocytes was accompanied by expression of Class II antigens on the epidermal keratinocytes in lesion infected by Candida albicans. The Staphylococcus aureus infected lesions displayed a diffuse infiltration of T-lymphocytes but virtually no expression of Class II antigen by epidermal keratinocytes. These observations suggest that the cell-mediated arm of the immune system is involved in the inflammatory reaction of lesions infected by Candida albicans. In addition, the present study confirms that epidermal expression of Class II antigens is closely related to the type and magnitude of the infiltrating T-lymphocyte. Finally, these findings indicate that the type of inflammatory reaction in angular cheilitis is primarily dependent on the isolated microorganism, although the clinical pictures of the disorder are virtually identical.

  10. Human serum potentiates the expression of genes associated with antifungal drug resistance in C. albicans biofilms on central venous catheters.

    PubMed

    Samaranayake, L P; Anil, S; Hashem, M; Vellappally, S; Cheung, B P K

    2015-04-01

    Candida albicans is a major agent of fungaemias and frequently causes systemic disease through seeded, blood stream dissemination. These infections, particularly common in hospitalized patients with central venous catheters (CVCs), appear to persevere due to biofilm reservoirs of the yeast that tend to develop on the device. Although it is known that candidal biofilms are intrinsically resistant to antifungals compared with their planktonic counterparts, there is a paucity of data on the expression of antifungal drug resistance genes (DRGs) in candidal biofilms in CVC reservoirs. Furthermore, notwithstanding the fact that CVCs are constantly bathed in human serum, there are no studies on the effect of the latter on the DRG expression in candidal biofilms. Hence, we developed in vitro biofilms of three different C. albicans strains on silicone CVC discs immersed in human serum and evaluated the temporal expression of nine antifungal DRGs. In an attempt to evaluate the effect of hyphal elements on DRG expression, we incorporated a hyphal mutant (HM) and its wild-type (WT) counterpart, as well as a fresh clinical isolate in the studies. Human serum significantly up-regulated DRG transcripts in Candida biofilms on CVCs, at different stages of biofilm growth, while the WT strain over-expressed more DRGs than the HM strain. Here, we report, for the first time, that both human serum and the hyphal elements of the yeast have a profound modulatory effect on DRG expression in C. albicans biofilms on CVCs.

  11. Mutant prevention concentrations of daptomycin for Enterococcus faecium clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Sinel, Clara; Jaussaud, Clara; Auzou, Michel; Giard, Jean-Christophe; Cattoir, Vincent

    2016-10-01

    Owing to the emergence of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium, treatment of enterococcal infections has become challenging. Although spontaneous in vitro resistance frequencies are low, the emergence of resistance is increasingly reported during daptomycin therapy. The mutant selection window (MSW), comprised between the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and the mutant prevention concentration (MPC), corresponds to the concentration range within which resistant mutants may be selected. Since no data are available for enterococci, the aim of this study was to determine MPCs and MSWs for 12 representative E. faecium clinical isolates. MICs and MPCs were determined by broth microdilution and agar dilution methods, respectively. A basic MSW-derived pharmacodynamic analysis was also performed using mean maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) values obtained with dosages from 4 to 12 mg/kg. MICs and MPCs of daptomycin ranged from 0.5 to 4 mg/L and from 2 to 32 mg/L, respectively, with no correlation between them. The wideness of MSWs ranged from 2× to 32× MIC. Mean plasma Cmax values of daptomycin were calculated from 55 to 174.5 mg/L when using a dosage from 4 to 12 mg/kg. All Cmax values were above the MPCs whatever the dosage. Taking into account the protein binding of daptomycin (ca. 90%), the unbound fraction Cmax was just within the MSW in 67-92% of strains at recommended dosages (4-6 mg/kg) and was above the MPC for the majority of strains only with the highest dosage (12 mg/kg). This study shows that free daptomycin Cmax values usually fell into MSWs when using lower dosages (<10 mg/kg).

  12. Oral Contraceptives and Multiple Sclerosis/Clinically Isolated Syndrome Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Hellwig, Kerstin; Chen, Lie H.; Stancyzk, Frank Z.; Langer-Gould, Annette M.

    2016-01-01

    Background The incidence of multiple sclerosis (MS) is rising in women. Objective To determine whether the use of combined oral contraceptives (COCs) are associated with MS risk and whether this varies by progestin content. Methods We conducted a nested case-control study of females ages 14–48 years with incident MS or clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) 2008–2011 from the membership of Kaiser Permanente Southern California. Controls were matched on age, race/ethnicity and membership characteristics. COC use up to ten years prior to symptom onset was obtained from the complete electronic health record. Results We identified 400 women with incident MS/CIS and 3904 matched controls. Forty- percent of cases and 32% of controls had used COCs prior to symptom onset. The use of COCs was associated with a slightly increased risk of MS/CIS (adjusted OR = 1.52, 95%CI = 1.21–1.91; p<0.001). This risk did not vary by duration of COC use. The association varied by progestin content being more pronounced for levenorgestrol (adjusted OR = 1.75, 95%CI = 1.29–2.37; p<0.001) than norethindrone (adjusted OR = 1.57, 95%CI = 1.16–2.12; p = 0.003) and absent for the newest progestin, drospirenone (p = 0.95). Conclusions Our findings should be interpreted cautiously. While the use of some combination oral contraceptives may contribute to the rising incidence of MS in women, an unmeasured confounder associated with the modern woman’s lifestyle is a more likely explanation for this weak association. PMID:26950301

  13. Killing rates for caspofungin against Candida albicans after brief and continuous caspofungin exposure in the presence and absence of serum.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Renátó; Gesztelyi, Rudolf; Perlin, David S; Kardos, Gábor; Domán, Marianna; Berényi, Réka; Majoros, László

    2014-10-01

    It was previously demonstrated that brief (≤1 h) exposures to echinocandins are as effective to kill Candida albicans cells as continuous 24-h exposure. However, killing rates after continuous and short (1 h) echinocandin exposures to C. albicans have not yet been evaluated in RPMI-1640 with and without 50 % serum. We evaluated four echinocandin susceptible C. albicans bloodstream isolates, ATCC 10231 type strain and an echinocandin-resistant isolate (DPL20, FKS F645P). Caspofungin MICs, time-kill and postantifungal effect (PAFE) tests were performed in RPMI-1640 with and without 50 % serum. Killing rates (k values) in time-kill and PAFE experiments were determined for each strain and concentration. In time-kill experiments, colony count decreases were isolate- and concentration-dependent at 0.25, 1, 4, 8, 16 and 32 mg/L in RPMI-1640, but concentration-independent at 1, 4, 8, 16 and 32 mg/L in 50 % serum. One-hour caspofungin exposure at 4, 16 and 32 mg/L resulted in CFU decreases comparable with the results obtained in time-kill experiments in RPMI-1640, but 50 % serum at 4, 16 and 32 mg/L allowed growth of all isolates (k values were negative) (P < 0.05-0.001). PAFE in 50 % serum decreased markedly at 4, 16 and 32 mg/L. Killing rates remained high and concentration-independent in 50 % serum in case of continuous but not in case of brief caspofungin exposure. As only a short growth inhibition without killing was observed in 50 % serum, clinical relevance of caspofungin PAFE in vivo is questionable.

  14. Synergistic Effects and Mechanisms of Budesonide in Combination with Fluconazole against Resistant Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiuyun; Yu, Cuixiang; Huang, Xin; Sun, Shujuan

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans is an important opportunistic pathogen, causing both superficial mucosal infections and life-threatening systemic diseases in the clinic. The emergence of drug resistance in Candida albicans has become a noteworthy phenomenon due to the extensive use of antifungal agents and the development of biofilms. This study showed that budesonide potentiates the antifungal effect of fluconazole against fluconazole-resistant Candida albicans strains both in vitro and in vivo. In addition, our results demonstrated, for the first time, that the combination of fluconazole and budesonide can reverse the resistance of Candida albicans by inhibiting the function of drug transporters, reducing the formation of biofilms, promoting apoptosis and inhibiting the activity of extracellular phospholipases. This is the first study implicating the effects and mechanisms of budesonide against Candida albicans alone or in combination with fluconazole, which may ultimately lead to the identification of new potential antifungal targets. PMID:28006028

  15. Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Population Divergence and Resistance to Oxidative Stress in Clinical, Domesticated and Wild Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Diezmann, Stephanie; Dietrich, Fred S.

    2009-01-01

    Background Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been associated with human life for millennia in the brewery and bakery. Recently it has been recognized as an emerging opportunistic pathogen. To study the evolutionary history of S. cerevisiae, the origin of clinical isolates and the importance of a virulence-associated trait, population genetics and phenotypic assays have been applied to an ecologically diverse set of 103 strains isolated from clinics, breweries, vineyards, fruits, soil, commercial supplements and insect guts. Methodology/Principal Findings DNA sequence data from five nuclear DNA loci were analyzed for population structure and haplotype distribution. Additionally, all strains were tested for survival of oxidative stress, a trait associated with microbial pathogenicity. DNA sequence analyses identified three genetic subgroups within the recombining S. cerevisiae strains that are associated with ecology, geography and virulence. Shared alleles suggest that the clinical isolates contain genetic contribution from the fruit isolates. Clinical and fruit isolates exhibit high levels of recombination, unlike the genetically homogenous soil isolates in which no recombination was detected. However, clinical and soil isolates were more resistant to oxidative stress than any other population, suggesting a correlation between survival in oxidative stress and yeast pathogenicity. Conclusions/Significance Population genetic analyses of S. cerevisiae delineated three distinct groups, comprising primarily the (i) human-associated brewery and vineyard strains, (ii) clinical and fruit isolates (iii) and wild soil isolates from eastern U.S. The interactions between S. cerevisiae and humans potentiate yeast evolution and the development of genetically, ecologically and geographically divergent groups. PMID:19390633

  16. The global regulator Ncb2 escapes from the core promoter and impacts transcription in response to drug stress in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Shariq, Mohd; Dhamgaye, Sanjiveeni; Nair, Remya; Goyal, Neha; Jain, Vaibhav; Mukhopadhyay, Arnab; Mondal, Alok K; Mukhopadhyay, Gauranga; Prasad, Rajendra

    2017-04-06

    Ncb2, the β subunit of NC2 complex, a heterodimeric regulator of transcription was earlier shown to be involved in the activated transcription of CDR1 gene in azole resistant isolate (AR) of Candida albicans. This study examines its genome-wide role by profiling Ncb2 occupancy between genetically matched pair of azole sensitive (AS) and AR clinical isolates. A comparison of Ncb2 recruitment between the two isolates displayed that 29 genes had higher promoter occupancy of Ncb2 in the AR isolate. Additionally, a host of genes exhibited exclusive occupancy of Ncb2 at promoters of either AR or AS isolate. The analysis also divulged new actors of multi-drug resistance, whose transcription was activated owing to the differential occupancy of Ncb2. The conditional, sequence-specific positional escape of Ncb2 from the core promoter in AS isolate and its preferential recruitment to the core promoter of certain genes in AR isolates was most noteworthy means of transcription regulation. Together, we show that positional rearrangement of Ncb2 resulting in either activation or repression of gene expression in response to drug-induced stress, represents a novel regulatory mechanism that opens new opportunities for therapeutic intervention to prevent development of drug tolerance in C. albicans cells.

  17. The global regulator Ncb2 escapes from the core promoter and impacts transcription in response to drug stress in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Shariq, Mohd; Dhamgaye, Sanjiveeni; Nair, Remya; Goyal, Neha; Jain, Vaibhav; Mukhopadhyay, Arnab; Mondal, Alok K.; Mukhopadhyay, Gauranga; Prasad, Rajendra

    2017-01-01

    Ncb2, the β subunit of NC2 complex, a heterodimeric regulator of transcription was earlier shown to be involved in the activated transcription of CDR1 gene in azole resistant isolate (AR) of Candida albicans. This study examines its genome-wide role by profiling Ncb2 occupancy between genetically matched pair of azole sensitive (AS) and AR clinical isolates. A comparison of Ncb2 recruitment between the two isolates displayed that 29 genes had higher promoter occupancy of Ncb2 in the AR isolate. Additionally, a host of genes exhibited exclusive occupancy of Ncb2 at promoters of either AR or AS isolate. The analysis also divulged new actors of multi-drug resistance, whose transcription was activated owing to the differential occupancy of Ncb2. The conditional, sequence-specific positional escape of Ncb2 from the core promoter in AS isolate and its preferential recruitment to the core promoter of certain genes in AR isolates was most noteworthy means of transcription regulation. Together, we show that positional rearrangement of Ncb2 resulting in either activation or repression of gene expression in response to drug-induced stress, represents a novel regulatory mechanism that opens new opportunities for therapeutic intervention to prevent development of drug tolerance in C. albicans cells. PMID:28383050

  18. Patient experience of source isolation: lessons for clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Barratt, Ruth Linda; Shaban, Ramon; Moyle, Wendy

    2011-10-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is now the leading antimicrobial-resistant organism of concern to clinicians worldwide. Preventing and controlling the increase and spread of MRSA within the health-care environment is therefore an important function of the infection control team. The prevention and control of MRSA requires strict use of both Standard and Additional Precautions, which include good hand hygiene practices, judicious antimicrobial prescribing, and source isolation. While few would dispute the need for these precautions for preventing the spread of MRSA and other infections, their use may result in adverse physical and psychological effects for the patient. In an age of quality and safety of health care, ensuring infection control practice such as source isolation and contact precautions adhere to fundamental human rights is paramount. This paper presents a review of the literature on the patient experience of source isolation for MRSA or other infectious diseases. The review yielded five major interconnected themes: (1) psychological effects of isolation; (2) coping with isolation; (3) social isolation; (4) communication and information provision; and (5) physical environment and quality of care. It found that the experience of isolation by patients has both negative and positive elements. Isolation may result in detrimental psychological effects including anxiety, stress and depression, but may also result in the patient receiving less or substandard care. However, patients may also benefit from the quietness and privacy of single rooms. Nurses and other healthcare workers must look for ways to improve the experience of isolation and contact precautions of patients in source isolation. Opportunities exist in particular in improving the environment and the patient's self-control of the situation and in providing adequate information.

  19. Pathogenetic characterization of Vibrio parahaemolyticus isolates from clinical and seafood sources.

    PubMed

    Vongxay, Khamphouth; Wang, Shuna; Zhang, Xiaofeng; Wu, Beibei; Hu, Hongxia; Pan, Zijiang; Chen, Suyun; Fang, Weihuan

    2008-08-15

    A total of 216 Vibrio parahaemolyticus isolates from seafood and clinical samples in eastern China were investigated for their hemolytic and urea-producing phenotypes, presence of putative virulence genes tdh and trh. Twenty-one clinical isolates (84%, 21/25) and 3 seafood isolates (1.57%, 3/191) were tdh-positive while only 3 clinical isolates (12%) and 7 seafood isolates (3.66%) were positive for trh gene. We further examined the pathogenicity of selected V. parahaemolyticus isolates in in vitro and in vivo systems. The clinical isolates were apparently more enteropathogenic (74.26 per thousand vs 62.07 per thousand expressed as intestine/body weight ratio, P<0.01) and more virulent than their seafood counterparts to mice (log LD(50) 6.86 vs 7.40 via orogastric route, P<0.05). They were also more adherent to in vitro cultured cells and of higher cytotoxicity as measured by LDH release of the HeLa cells although there were no statistical differences. The tdh-positive V. parahaemolyticus isolates were of higher enteropathogenicity (P<0.05, 74.24 per thousand vs 60.55 per thousand) and more virulent (log LD(50) 6.55 vs 7.21 via intraperitoneal route, P<0.05) than tdh-negative isolates. The tdh-positive isolates were generally more cytotoxic and adhesive to the cultured cell lines as well. From the in vitro and in vivo pathogenicity profiles, trh-positive isolates seemed to line between tdh-positive isolates and those without tdh and trh. There were two isolates H8 and H10 from clinical cases having moderate enteropathogenicity and virulence to mice, but were tdh-negative yet trh-positive. These results seem to suggest that hemolysins TDH and/or TRH may not be necessarily the only virulence factors of pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus isolates.

  20. Clinical distribution and antibiotic sensitivities of staphylococcal strains isolated over an eight-month period.

    PubMed Central

    Varaldo, P E; Soro, O; Grazi, G; Biavasco, F

    1981-01-01

    A total of 842 staphylococci isolated from clinical material over an eight-month period and regarded as probable pathogens were identified according to lyogroup. Almost half the isolates belonged to lyogroups other than lyogroup I (Staphylococcus aureus), suggesting that coagulase-negative staphylococci are increasingly involved in human infections. All isolates were tested for sensitivity to 12 antibiotics. A greater resistance was observed in non-lyogroup I isolates, which again suggests a pathogenic significance of coagulase-negative staphylococci. Only lyogroup I strains, however, were obtained more frequently from clinical isolates than from healthy human skin. The distribution of the isolates in each lyogroup according to their clinical source is reported. PMID:7240433

  1. Antifungal susceptibility of 175 Aspergillus isolates from various clinical and environmental sources.

    PubMed

    Sabino, Raquel; Carolino, Elisabete; Veríssimo, Cristina; Martinez, Marife; Clemons, Karl V; Stevens, David A

    2016-10-01

    Some environmental Aspergillus spp. isolates have been described as resistant to antifungals, potentially causing an emerging medical problem. In the present work, the antifungal susceptibility profile of 41 clinical and 134 environmental isolates of Aspergillus was determined using the CLSI microdilution method. The aim of this study was to compare environmental and clinical isolates with respect to their susceptibility, and assess the potential implications for therapy of isolates encountered in different environments. To our knowledge, this is the first report comparing antifungal susceptibility profiles of Aspergillus collected from different environmental sources (poultries, swineries, beach sand, and hospital environment). Significant differences were found in the distribution of the different species sections for the different sources. Significant differences were also found in the susceptibility profile of the different Aspergillus sections recovered from the various sources. Clear differences were found between the susceptibility of clinical and environmental isolates for caspofungin, amphotericin B and posaconazole, with clinical isolates showing overall greater susceptibility, except for caspofungin. In comparison to clinical isolates, hospital environmental isolates showed significantly less susceptibility to amphotericin B and posaconazole. These data indicate that species section identity and the site from which the isolate was recovered influence the antifungal susceptibility profile, which may affect initial antifungal choices.

  2. Antifungal susceptibilities of Candida species isolated from the patients with vaginal candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Masahito; Yamagishi, Yuka; Mikamo, Hiroshige

    2016-02-01

    There have been the current Japanese data on susceptibility testing for Candida isolates from vaginal candidiasis. The in vitro activities of therapeutic antifungal drugs for vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC); miconazole (MCZ), itraconazole (ITCZ), fluconazole (FLCZ), clotrimazole (CTZ), oxiconazole (OCZ), isoconazole (ICZ) and bifonazole (BFZ) against vaginal isolates. Fifty-four strains Candida albicans and 19 strains of Candida glabrata were evaluated using a broth microdilution method specified by Clinical Laboratories Standard Institute (CLSI) document M27-A3. The MIC90 of each drug, MCZ, ITCZ, FLCZ, CTZ, OCZ, ICZ and BFZ, against C. albicans and C. glabrata isolates were 0.25, 0.12, 1, 0.06, 0.12, 0.12 and 1 μg/ml and 1, 1, 8, 0.5, 0.25, 0.5 and 1 μg/ml respectively. The activities of these drugs, except for BFZ, against C. glabrata were lower than that of C. albicans. There was one azole-resistant isolate in C. glabrata of which MIC of FLCZ is > 64 μg/ml and this isolate had cross resistance to other antifungal drugs tested. These results suggest that antifungal drugs for treatment of VVC continues to have potent antifungal activities against C. albicans and C. glabrata isolates from vaginitis. CTZ, OCZ and ICZ susceptibility of FLCZ low susceptibility C. glabrata are relatively higher than MCZ, ITCZ and FLCZ.

  3. Predominance of Clostridium difficile Ribotypes 017 and 078 among Toxigenic Clinical Isolates in Southern Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Yuan-Pin; Huang, I-Hsiu; Lin, Hsiao-Ju; Tsai, Bo-Yang; Liu, Hsiao-Chieh; Liu, Hsiu-Chuan; Lee, Jen-Chieh; Wu, Yi-Hui; Tsai, Pei-Jane; Ko, Wen-Chien

    2016-01-01

    Ribotypes and toxin genotypes of clinical C. difficile isolates in Taiwan are rarely reported. A prospective surveillance study from January 2011 to January 2013 was conducted at the medical wards of a district hospital in southern Taiwan. Of the first toxigenic isolates from 120 patients, 68 (56.7%) of 120 isolates possessed both tcdA and tcdB. Of 52 (43.3%) with tcdB and truncated tcdA (tcdA-/tcdB+), all were ribotype 017 and none had binary toxin or tcdC deletion. Eighteen (15%) toxigenic isolates harbored binary toxins (cdtA and cdtB) and all had tcdC deletion, including Δ39 (C184T) deletion (14 isolates), Δ18 in-frame deletion (3 isolates), and Δ18 (Δ117A) deletion (1 isolate). Eleven of 14 isolates with Δ39 (C184T) deletion belonged to the ribotype 078 family, including ribotype 127 (6 isolates), ribotype 126 (4 isolates), and ribotype 078 (1 isolate). Among 8 patients with consecutive C. difficile isolates, these isolates from 6 (75%) patients were identical, irrespective of the presence or absence of diarrhea, suggestive of persistent fecal carriage or colonization. In conclusion in southern Taiwan, ribotype 017 isolates with a tcdA-/tcdB+ genotype were not uncommon and of C. difficile isolates with binary toxin, the ribotype 078 family was predominant. PMID:27861606

  4. Genotypes of Clinical and Environmental Isolates of Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Park, So Hae; Choi, Seok Cheol; Lee, Kyung Won; Kim, Mi-Na

    2015-01-01

    Multilocus sequence typing analysis was applied to determine the genotypes of 147 (137 clinical and 10 environmental) Cryptococcus neoformans and three clinical Cryptococcus gattii isolates from 1993 to 2014 in Korea. Among the 137 clinical isolates of C. neoformans, the most prevalent genotype was ST5 (n = 131), followed by ST31 (n = 5) and ST127 (n = 1). Three C. gattii strains were identified as ST57, ST7, and ST113. All environmental isolates were identified as C. neoformans with two genotypes, ST5 (n = 7) and ST31 (n = 3). Our results show that C. neoformans isolates in Korea are genetically homogeneous, and represent a close genetic relationship between clinical and environmental isolates. PMID:26539057

  5. Candida albicans: adapting to succeed.

    PubMed

    Kadosh, David; Lopez-Ribot, Jose L

    2013-11-13

    In this issue of Cell Host & Microbe, Lu et al. (2013) report on the redundancy of signaling pathways controlling Candida albicans filamentation and pathogenicity. In the process, they provide important insight into how this normal commensal of humans adapts to different host microenvironments to become a highly successful opportunistic pathogen.

  6. A comparative study of clinical and food isolates of Listeria monocytogenes and related species.

    PubMed Central

    Szabo, E. A.; Desmarchelier, P. M.

    1990-01-01

    Ninety-six isolates of presumptive or confirmed Listeria monocytogenes were obtained from local clinical (30 isolates) or food laboratories (66 isolates). Minimal biochemical analysis identified only 80% of these isolates as L. monocytogenes the remaining included L. seeligeri, 1%, or the non-haemolytic L. innocua, 19%. The 27 clinical and 50 food isolates, mainly from meat products, frozen confectionaries, and cheeses, confirmed as L. monocytogenes were compared biochemically and serologically. Twenty-one isolates, including some strains of L. innocua and L. seeligeri, were examined for pathogenicity in immunocompromized mice and 44 typed using bacterial restriction endonuclease DNA analysis (BRENDA). Only isolates of L. monocytogenes were found to be pathogenic. Biovar-typing of the isolates was unreliable and provided poor discrimination. Serogroups 1/2 and 4 predominated among clinical and food isolates and BRENDA provided better discrimination among isolates. Ten stable and reproducible restriction patterns were observed among the Listeria sp. isolates studied. Overall, a combination of techniques gave the best discrimination and indicated their potential for use as epidemiological tools. Images Fig. 1 PMID:2120079

  7. Dystonia and Tremor: The Clinical Syndromes with Isolated Tremor

    PubMed Central

    Albanese, Alberto; Sorbo, Francesca Del

    2016-01-01

    Background Dystonia and tremor share many commonalities. Isolated tremor is part of the phenomenological spectrum of isolated dystonia and of essential tremor. The occurrence of subtle features of dystonia may allow one to differentiate dystonic tremor from essential tremor. Diagnostic uncertainty is enhanced when no features of dystonia are found in patients with a tremor syndrome, raising the question whether the observed phenomenology is an incomplete form of dystonia. Methods Known forms of syndromes with isolated tremor are reviewed. Diagnostic uncertainties between tremor and dystonia are put into perspective. Results The following isolated tremor syndromes are reviewed: essential tremor, head tremor, voice tremor, jaw tremor, and upper-limb tremor. Their varied phenomenology is analyzed and appraised in the light of a possible relationship with dystonia. Discussion Clinicians making a diagnosis of isolated tremor should remain vigilant for the detection of features of dystonia. This is in keeping with the recent view that isolated tremor may be an incomplete phenomenology of dystonia. PMID:27152246

  8. Isolation and molecular characterization of Salmonella enterica serovar Javiana from food, environmental and clinical samples.

    PubMed

    Mezal, Ezat H; Stefanova, Rossina; Khan, Ashraf A

    2013-06-03

    A total of 50 Salmonella enterica serovar Javiana isolates, isolated from food, environmental and clinical samples, were analyzed for antibiotic resistance, presence of virulence genes, plasmids and plasmid replicon types. To assess the genetic diversity, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) fingerprinting and plasmid profiles were performed. All of the isolates were sensitive to chloramphenicol, nalidixic acid, and sulfisoxazole, and four isolates showed intermediate resistance to gentamicin or kanamycin. Eleven isolates, including representatives from each of the source types, were resistant to ampicillin. Four isolates from either clinical or environmental sources were resistant to tetracycline, while an additional 20 isolates showed intermediate resistance to this drug. Fourteen isolates, primarily from food sources, showed intermediate resistance to streptomycin. The S. Javiana isolates were screened by PCR for 17 virulence genes (spvB, spiA, pagC, msgA, invA, sipB, prgH, spaN, orgA, tolC, iroN, sitC, IpfC, sifA, sopB, cdtB, and pefA). All isolates were positive for nine to fourteen of these genes, but none were positive for pefA, spvB and lpfC, which are typically present on the Salmonella virulence plasmid. Seven of the virulence genes including cdtB were found in all 50 isolates, suggesting that S. Javiana from food and environmental sources had virulence similar to clinical isolates. Four clinical isolates and two food isolates carried one or more plasmids of approximately 30, 38, and 58 kb, with the 58 kb plasmids belonging to incompatibility group IncFIIA. Two clinical isolates carried IncI1 type mega plasmid (80 kb), and one clinical isolate carried plasmids of 4.5 and 7 kb. The PFGE profiles resulted 34 patterns in five clusters at a 90% similarity threshold. Our results indicate that S. Javiana isolates have a diverse clonal population among the clinical, food and environmental samples and this serotype possesses several virulent genes and plasmids

  9. Anticandidal Effect and Mechanisms of Monoterpenoid, Perillyl Alcohol against Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Moiz A.; Fatima, Zeeshan; Hameed, Saif

    2016-01-01

    This study explored the antifungal potential of perillyl alcohol (PA), a natural monoterpene alcohol, against most prevalent human fungal pathogen C. albicans, its clinical isolates and four non-albicans species of Candida. To resolve the potential mechanisms, we used whole genome transcriptome analyses of PA treated Candida cells to examine the affected cellular circuitry of this pathogen. The transcriptome data revealed a link between calcineurin signaling and PA as among the several categories of PA responsive genes the down regulation of calcineurin signaling gene CNB1 was noteworthy which was also confirmed by both molecular docking and susceptibility assays. We observed that PA treated Candida phenocopied compromised calcineurin pathway stress responses and turned sensitive to alkaline pH, ionic, membrane, salinity, endoplasmic reticulum and serum stresses. Indispensability of functional calcineurin was further confirmed as calcineurin mutant was hypersensitive to PA while constitutively expressed calcineurin strain remained resistant. We explored that PA leads to perturbed membrane integrity as depicted through depleted ergosterol levels and disrupted pH homeostasis. Moreover, PA caused cell wall damage which was evident from hypersensitivity against cell wall perturbing agents (congo red, calcoflour white), SEM and enhanced rate of cell sedimentation. Furthermore, PA inhibited potential virulence traits including morphological transition, biofilm formation and displayed diminished capacity to adhere both to the polystyrene surface and buccal epithelial cells. The study also revealed that PA leads to cell cycle arrest and mitochondrial dysfunction in C. albicans. Together, the present study provides enough evidence for further work on PA so that better strategies could be employed to treat Candida infections. PMID:27627759

  10. Disruption of the transcriptional regulator Cas5 results in enhanced killing of Candida albicans by Fluconazole.

    PubMed

    Vasicek, Erin M; Berkow, Elizabeth L; Bruno, Vincent M; Mitchell, Aaron P; Wiederhold, Nathan P; Barker, Katherine S; Rogers, P David

    2014-11-01

    Azole antifungal agents such as fluconazole exhibit fungistatic activity against Candida albicans. Strategies to enhance azole antifungal activity would be therapeutically appealing. In an effort to identify transcriptional pathways that influence the killing activity of fluconazole, we sought to identify transcription factors (TFs) involved in this process. From a collection of C. albicans strains disrupted for genes encoding TFs (O. R. Homann, J. Dea, S. M. Noble, and A. D. Johnson, PLoS Genet. 5:e1000783, 2009, http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pgen.1000783), four strains exhibited marked reductions in minimum fungicidal concentration (MFCs) in both RPMI and yeast extract-peptone-dextrose (YPD) media. One of these genes, UPC2, was previously characterized with regard to its role in azole susceptibility. Of mutants representing the three remaining TF genes of interest, one (CAS5) was unable to recover from fluconazole exposure at concentrations as low as 2 μg/ml after 72 h in YPD medium. This mutant also showed reduced susceptibility and a clear zone of inhibition by Etest, was unable to grow on solid medium containing 10 μg/ml fluconazole, and exhibited increased susceptibility by time-kill analysis. CAS5 disruption in highly azole-resistant clinical isolates exhibiting multiple resistance mechanisms did not alter susceptibility. However, CAS5 disruption in strains with specific resistance mutations resulted in moderate reductions in MICs and MFCs. Genome-wide transcriptional analysis was performed in the presence of fluconazole and was consistent with the suggested role of CAS5 in cell wall organization while also suggesting a role in iron transport and homeostasis. These findings suggest that Cas5 regulates a transcriptional network that influences the response of C. albicans to fluconazole. Further delineation of this transcriptional network may identify targets for potential cotherapeutic strategies to enhance the activity of the azole class of antifungals.

  11. Synergistic Interactions of Eugenol-tosylate and Its Congeners with Fluconazole against Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Amber; Manzoor, Nikhat; Molepo, Julitha

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported the antifungal properties of a monoterpene phenol “Eugenol” against different Candida strains and have observed that the addition of methyl group to eugenol drastically increased its antimicrobial potency. Based on the results and the importance of medicinal synthetic chemistry, we synthesized eugenol-tosylate and its congeners (E1-E6) and tested their antifungal activity against different clinical fluconazole (FLC)- susceptible and FLC- resistant C. albicans isolates alone and in combination with FLC by determining fractional inhibitory concentration indices (FICIs) and isobolograms calculated from microdilution assays. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) results confirmed that all the tested C. albicans strains were variably susceptible to the semi-synthetic derivatives E1-E6, with MIC values ranging from 1–62 μg/ml. The test compounds in combination with FLC exhibited either synergy (36%), additive (41%) or indifferent (23%) interactions, however, no antagonistic interactions were observed. The MICs of FLC decreased 2–9 fold when used in combination with the test compounds. Like their precursor eugenol, all the derivatives showed significant impairment of ergosterol biosynthesis in all C. albicans strains coupled with down regulation of the important ergosterol biosynthesis pathway gene-ERG11. The results were further validated by docking studies, which revealed that the inhibitors snugly fitting the active site of the target enzyme, mimicking fluconazole, may well explain their excellent inhibitory activity. Our results suggest that these compounds have a great potential as antifungals, which can be used as chemosensitizing agents with the known antifungal drugs. PMID:26694966

  12. Synthetic arylquinuclidine derivatives exhibit antifungal activity against Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis and Candida parapsilopsis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Sterol biosynthesis is an essential pathway for fungal survival, and is the biochemical target of many antifungal agents. The antifungal drugs most widely used to treated fungal infections are compounds that inhibit cytochrome P450-dependent C14α-demethylase (CYP51), but other enzymes of this pathway, such as squalene synthase (SQS) which catalyses the first committed step in sterol biosynthesis, could be viable targets. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antifungal activity of SQS inhibitors on Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis and Candida parapsilopsis strains. Methods Ten arylquinuclidines that act as SQS inhibitors were tested as antiproliferative agents against three ATCC strains and 54 clinical isolates of Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis and Candida parapsilopsis. Also, the morphological alterations induced in the yeasts by the experimental compounds were evaluated by fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy. Results The most potent arylquinuclidine derivative (3-[1'-{4'-(benzyloxy)-phenyl}]-quinuclidine-2-ene) (WSP1267) had a MIC50 of 2 μg/ml for all species tested and MIC90 varying from 4 μg/ml to 8 μg/ml. Ultrathin sections of C. albicans treated with 1 μg/ml of WSP1267 showed several ultrastructural alterations, including (a) loss of cell wall integrity, (b) detachment of the plasma membrane from the fungal cell wall, (c) accumulation of small vesicles in the periplasmic region, (d) presence of large electron-dense vacuoles and (e) significantly increased cell size and cell wall thickness. In addition, fluorescence microscopy of cells labelled with Nile Red showed an accumulation of lipid droplets in the cytoplasm of treated yeasts. Nuclear staining with DAPI revealed the appearance of uncommon yeast buds without a nucleus or with two nuclei. Conclusion Taken together, our data demonstrate that arylquinuclidine derivatives could be useful as lead compounds for the rational synthesis of new antifungal drugs. PMID

  13. Antifungal Efficacy of Green Tea Extract against Candida Albicans Biofilm on Tooth Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Farhad Mollashahi, Narges; Bokaeian, Mohammad; Afrougheh, Arezoo

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Biomechanical preparation and irrigation with antimicrobial solutions are necessary to disinfect the root canal space. This in vitro study aimed to examine the antifungal effect of green tea extract on Candida albicans biofilm formed on tooth substrate. Materials and Methods: Minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC) and minimum inhibitory concentration at which 90% of the isolates were inhibited (MIC90) were studied using green tea extract and sodium hypochlorite with the broth macro-dilution method. Then, anti-candida effects of this extract were tested on tooth substrates of 45 extracted single-canal premolar teeth. After biomechanical cleaning of the root canals, the teeth were sectioned vertically and randomly divided into three groups of 30. All the samples were infected with C. albicans (PTCC 5027) and exposed to the test solutions (sodium hypochlorite, green tea, normal saline) for five, 10 and 15 minutes. Data analyses of the samples were performed using two-way ANOVA. Results: The average number of microorganisms showed a significant decrease after five, 10 and 15 minutes of exposure to green tea extract and sodium hypochlorite. The average number of C. albicans in green tea extract and sodium hypochlorite groups decreased to 1/3 and 1/2 of the initial values, respectively. Conclusion: Antifungal activity of green tea extract was time-dependent and its inhibitory action did not decrease significantly over time. It is recommended to consider other properties of green tea such as tissue solubility, impact on dentin structure and use as an intracanal medicament or for smear layer removal in the clinical setting. PMID:27123019

  14. Molecular typing and antifungal susceptibility of clinical and environmental Cryptococcus neoformans species complex isolates in Goiania, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Souza, L K H; Souza Junior, A H; Costa, C R; Faganello, J; Vainstein, M H; Chagas, A L B; Souza, A C M; Silva, M R R

    2010-01-01

    A total of 124 Cryptococcus isolates, including 84 clinical strains obtained from cerebrospinal fluid from AIDS patients and 40 environmental isolates from pigeon excreta and from Eucalyptus trees, were studied. The varieties, serotypes, phospholipase activity and molecular profile of these isolates were determined. Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii serotype A was identified in 120 isolates and Cryptococcus gattii serotype B in four isolates. The clinical isolates showed higher phospholipase activity than environmental isolates. Similar patterns of in vitro susceptibility to amphotericin B, fluconazole, itraconazole and voriconazole and no resistance were found for all isolates. Molecular type VNI (C. neoformans var. grubii) was recovered in 80 clinical and 40 environmental isolates while the type VGIII (C. gattii) was found in four clinical isolates. This study demonstrated for the first time the molecular types of clinical and environmental Cryptococcus isolates in the midwest Brazil region.

  15. Candida albicans in oral biofilms could prevent caries.

    PubMed

    Willems, Hubertine Marjoleine; Kos, Kevin; Jabra-Rizk, Mary Ann; Krom, Bastiaan P

    2016-07-01

    Streptococcus mutans is a Gram-positive bacterium involved in development to caries, the most common infectious disease of our time. Streptococcus mutans interacts with other microbes, like the fungus Candida albicans and both are commonly isolated from patients with caries. Since the role of C. albicans in caries remains unknown, our aim was to unravel this using an in vitro dual-species cariogenic oral biofilm model. Biofilms were grown for 24-72 h on glass cover slips or hydroxyapatite (HA) disks to mimic the surface of teeth. Medium pH, lactic acid production capacity and calcium release from HA disks were determined. All 24-h biofilms had external pH values below the critical pH of 5.5 where enamel dissolves. In contrast, 72-h dual-species biofilms had significantly higher pH (above the critical pH) and consequently decreased calcium release compared to single-species S. mutans biofilms. Counter intuitively, lactic acid production and growth of S. mutans were increased in 72-h dual-species biofilms. Candida albicans modulates the pH in dual-species biofilms to values above the critical pH where enamel dissolves. Our results suggest that C. albicans is not by definition a cariogenic microorganism; it could prevent caries by actively increasing pH preventing mineral loss.

  16. Assessment of pheromone response in biofilm forming clinical isolates of high level gentamicin resistant Enterococcus faecalis.

    PubMed

    Jayanthi, S; Ananthasubramanian, M; Appalaraju, B

    2008-01-01

    Twenty five clinical isolates of high level gentamicin resistant Enterococcus faecalis were tested for their biofilm formation and pheromone responsiveness. The biofilm assay was carried out using microtiter plate method. Two isolates out of the 25 (8%) were high biofilm formers and 19 (76%) and four (16%) isolates were moderate and weak biofilm formers respectively. All the isolates responded to pheromones of E. faecalis FA2-2 strain. On addition of pheromone producing E. faecalis FA2-2 strain to these isolates, seven of 19 (37%) moderate biofilm formers developed into high biofilm formers. Similarly one of the 4 (25%) weak biofilm formers developed into high level biofilm former. Twelve (48%) of the 25 isolates were transconjugated by cross streak method using gentamicin as selective marker. This proves that the genetic factor for gentamicin resistance is present in the pheromone responsive plasmid. Among these twelve transaconjugants, seven isolates and one isolate were high biofilm formers on addition of E. faecalis FA2-2 and prior to its addition respectively. Out of the total 25 isolates, eight transconjugants for gentamicin resistance could turn to high biofilm formers on addition of the pheromone producing strain. All the isolates were resistant to more than two antibiotics tested. All the isolates were sensitive to vancomycin. The results indicate the significance of this nosocomial pathogen in biofilm formation and the role of pheromone responding clinical isolates of E. faecalis in spread of multidrug resistance genes.

  17. Molecular identification, antifungal susceptibility profile, and biofilm formation of clinical and environmental Rhodotorula species isolates.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Jorge Meneses; Bizerra, Fernando César; Ferreira, Renata Carmona E; Colombo, Arnaldo Lopes

    2013-01-01

    Rhodotorula species are emergent fungal pathogens capable of causing invasive infections, primarily fungemia. They are particularly problematic in immunosuppressed patients when using a central venous catheter. In this study, we evaluated the species distribution of 51 clinical and 8 environmental Rhodotorula species isolates using the ID32C system and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequencing. Antifungal susceptibility testing and biofilm formation capability using a crystal violet staining assay were performed. Using ITS sequencing as the gold standard, the clinical isolates were identified as follows: 44 R. mucilaginosa isolates, 2 R. glutinis isolates, 2 R. minuta isolates, 2 R. dairenensis isolates, and 1 Rhodosporidium fluviale isolate. The environmental isolates included 7 R. mucilaginosa isolates and 1 R. slooffiae isolate. Using the ID32C system, along with a nitrate assimilation test, only 90.3% of the isolates tested were correctly identified. In the biofilm formation assay, R. mucilaginosa and R. minuta exhibited greater biofilm formation ability compared to the other Rhodotorula species; the clinical isolates of R. mucilaginosa showed greater biofilm formation compared to the environmental isolates (P = 0.04). Amphotericin B showed good in vitro activity (MIC ≤ 1 μg/ml) against planktonic cells, whereas voriconazole and posaconazole showed poor activity (MIC(50)/MIC(90), 2/4 μg/ml). Caspofungin and fluconazole MICs were consistently high for all isolates tested (≥64 μg/ml and ≥ 4 μg/ml, respectively). In this study, we emphasized the importance of molecular methods to correctly identify Rhodotorula species isolates and non-R. mucilaginosa species in particular. The antifungal susceptibility profile reinforces amphotericin B as the antifungal drug of choice for the treatment of Rhodotorula infections. To our knowledge, this is the first study evaluating putative differences in the ability of biofilm formation among different Rhodotorula

  18. Molecular Identification, Antifungal Susceptibility Profile, and Biofilm Formation of Clinical and Environmental Rhodotorula Species Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Jorge Meneses; Bizerra, Fernando César; Ferreira, Renata Carmona e

    2013-01-01

    Rhodotorula species are emergent fungal pathogens capable of causing invasive infections, primarily fungemia. They are particularly problematic in immunosuppressed patients when using a central venous catheter. In this study, we evaluated the species distribution of 51 clinical and 8 environmental Rhodotorula species isolates using the ID32C system and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequencing. Antifungal susceptibility testing and biofilm formation capability using a crystal violet staining assay were performed. Using ITS sequencing as the gold standard, the clinical isolates were identified as follows: 44 R. mucilaginosa isolates, 2 R. glutinis isolates, 2 R. minuta isolates, 2 R. dairenensis isolates, and 1 Rhodosporidium fluviale isolate. The environmental isolates included 7 R. mucilaginosa isolates and 1 R. slooffiae isolate. Using the ID32C system, along with a nitrate assimilation test, only 90.3% of the isolates tested were correctly identified. In the biofilm formation assay, R. mucilaginosa and R. minuta exhibited greater biofilm formation ability compared to the other Rhodotorula species; the clinical isolates of R. mucilaginosa showed greater biofilm formation compared to the environmental isolates (P = 0.04). Amphotericin B showed good in vitro activity (MIC ≤ 1 μg/ml) against planktonic cells, whereas voriconazole and posaconazole showed poor activity (MIC50/MIC90, 2/4 μg/ml). Caspofungin and fluconazole MICs were consistently high for all isolates tested (≥64 μg/ml and ≥ 4 μg/ml, respectively). In this study, we emphasized the importance of molecular methods to correctly identify Rhodotorula species isolates and non-R. mucilaginosa species in particular. The antifungal susceptibility profile reinforces amphotericin B as the antifungal drug of choice for the treatment of Rhodotorula infections. To our knowledge, this is the first study evaluating putative differences in the ability of biofilm formation among different Rhodotorula species

  19. In vitro susceptibilities of clinical and environmental isolates of Cryptococcus neoformans to five antifungal drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Franzot, S P; Hamdan, J S

    1996-01-01

    A total of 53 Cryptococcus neoformans strains, including clinical and environmental Brazilian isolates, were tested for their susceptibilities to amphotericin B, 5-flucytosine, ketoconazole, fluconazole, and itraconazole. The tests were performed according to the National Committee of Clinical Laboratory Standards recommendations (document M27-P). In general, there was a remarkable homogeneity of results for all strains, and comparable MICs were found for environmental and clinical isolates. This paper represents the first contribution in which susceptibility data for Brazilian C. neoformans isolates are provided. PMID:8851624

  20. Typing of feline calicivirus isolates from different clinical groups by virus neutralisation tests.

    PubMed

    Dawson, S; McArdle, F; Bennett, M; Carter, M; Milton, I P; Turner, P; Meanger, J; Gaskell, R M

    1993-07-03

    One hundred and thirteen isolates of feline calicivirus originating from seven different clinical groups were typed by virus neutralisation tests using eight different cat antisera. The clinical groups comprised 'healthy' cats, cases of acute oral/respiratory disease, chronic stomatitis, acute febrile lameness syndrome, vaccine reactions (clinical disease seen within 21 days of vaccination) and vaccine breakdowns (clinical disease seen more than 21 days after but within one year of vaccination). Isolates from the vaccine reaction cases were grouped into those associated with acute oral/respiratory disease alone and those associated with the lameness syndrome, and the latter group was further subdivided according to the vaccine used. Two groups appeared significantly different from others with some of the antisera. Thus the lameness vaccine reaction isolates associated with vaccine B were significantly different from the isolates from all the other clinical groups, including other lameness isolates, with a number of the antisera. In addition, the chronic stomatitis isolates were significantly different from those from the 'healthy' and the acute oral/respiratory disease groups with one or two of the antisera. Eighty-five to 88 per cent of the isolates were neutralised by antisera raised against F9 or F9-like vaccine strains at a dilution of 1 in 2. Twenty antibody units of such antisera neutralised 42 to 80 per cent of the isolates. A bivalent antiserum raised against a vaccine F9 strain and field strain LS015 neutralised 96 per cent of the isolates at a dilution of 1 in 2, and 20 antibody units neutralised 68 per cent of isolates. Antisera to field strain F65 neutralised all the remaining isolates at a dilution of 1 in 2 and 44 per cent of the remaining isolates at a dilution of 20 antibody units. Therefore, strains LS015 and F65 may be of use in the production of a polyvalent feline calicivirus vaccine, together with the widely used strain F9.

  1. Antifungal Activity of the Ethanol Extract from Flos Rosae Chinensis with Activity against Fluconazole-Resistant Clinical Candida

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hui; Liu, Wei; Dai, Baodi; Yan, Lan

    2017-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the antifungal activity of a hydroalcoholic extract from Flos Rosae Chinensis (FRC) combined with fluconazole (FCZ) against clinical isolates of Candida albicans resistant to FCZ. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of FRC was determined using a checkerboard microdilution assay. The synergistic effects of the combination of FRC and FCZ against clinical isolates of C. albicans resistant to FCZ were further confirmed by constructing time-growth curves and performing an agar diffusion test. FRC alone exerted efficient antifungal activities against C. albicans within a MIC80 ranging from 20 μg/ml to 40 μg/ml. FRC failed to enhance the effects of FCZ against sensitive C. albicans strains, although it rendered FCZ-resistant C. albicans more sensitive. These results were further confirmed by the result of in vivo study. Our study is the first to discover that FRC can inhibit the growth of C. albicans to a certain degree. An FRC antifungal mechanism study showed that FRC strengthens FCZ to inhibit the action of ergosterol biosynthesis by promoting the transformation of lanosterol to eburicol, suggesting that the antifungal mechanism of FRC involves the inhibition of ergosterol biosynthesis. PMID:28303159

  2. Evaluation of epidemiological cut-off values indicates that biocide resistant subpopulations are uncommon in natural isolates of clinically-relevant microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Morrissey, Ian; Oggioni, Marco Rinaldo; Knight, Daniel; Curiao, Tania; Coque, Teresa; Kalkanci, Ayse; Martinez, Jose Luis

    2014-01-01

    To date there are no clear criteria to determine whether a microbe is susceptible to biocides or not. As a starting point for distinguishing between wild-type and resistant organisms, we set out to determine the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC) distributions for four common biocides; triclosan, benzalkonium chloride, chlorhexidine and sodium hypochlorite for 3319 clinical isolates, with a particular focus on Staphylococcus aureus (N = 1635) and Salmonella spp. (N = 901) but also including Escherichia coli (N = 368), Candida albicans (N = 200), Klebsiella pneumoniae (N = 60), Enterobacter spp. (N = 54), Enterococcus faecium (N = 53), and Enterococcus faecalis (N = 56). From these data epidemiological cut-off values (ECOFFs) are proposed. As would be expected, MBCs were higher than MICs for all biocides. In most cases both values followed a normal distribution. Bimodal distributions, indicating the existence of biocide resistant subpopulations were observed for Enterobacter chlorhexidine susceptibility (both MICs and MBCs) and the susceptibility to triclosan of Enterobacter (MBC), E. coli (MBC and MIC) and S. aureus (MBC and MIC). There is a concern on the potential selection of antibiotic resistance by biocides. Our results indicate however that resistance to biocides and, hence any potential association with antibiotic resistance, is uncommon in natural populations of clinically relevant microorganisms.

  3. Antifungal Effect of Lavender Essential Oil (Lavandula angustifolia) and Clotrimazole on Candida albicans: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Behmanesh, Fereshteh; Pasha, Hajar; Sefidgar, Ali Asghar; Taghizadeh, Mohsen; Moghadamnia, Ali Akbar; Adib Rad, Hajar; Shirkhani, Leyla

    2015-01-01

    Background. The treatment of candidiasis infections is an important problem in the health care system. This study aimed to investigate the in vitro effect of lavender essential oil and clotrimazole on isolated C. albicans from vaginal candidiasis. Materials and Methods. In this clinical trial, C. albicans isolated from the vaginal discharge samples was obtained. Results. The pairwise comparison showed that lavender and clotrimazole had a significant difference; this difference in the lavender group was lower than clotrimazole. But, after 48 hours, there was no difference seen between groups. There was a significant difference between clotrimazole and DMSO groups. Comparing the changes between groups based on the same dilution, at 24 h and 48 h in clotrimazole group, showed a significant difference two times in the fungal cell count that its average during 48 h was less than 24 h. A significant difference was observed between the two periods in lavender group, only at the dilutions of 1/20 and 1/80. The average fungal cell count after 48 h was also lower in lavender group. Conclusions. Given that the lavender has antifungal activity, this can be used as an antifungal agent. However, more clinical studies are necessary to validate its use in candida infection. PMID:26550521

  4. Antifungal Effect of Lavender Essential Oil (Lavandula angustifolia) and Clotrimazole on Candida albicans: An In Vitro Study.

    PubMed

    Behmanesh, Fereshteh; Pasha, Hajar; Sefidgar, Ali Asghar; Taghizadeh, Mohsen; Moghadamnia, Ali Akbar; Adib Rad, Hajar; Shirkhani, Leyla

    2015-01-01

    Background. The treatment of candidiasis infections is an important problem in the health care system. This study aimed to investigate the in vitro effect of lavender essential oil and clotrimazole on isolated C. albicans from vaginal candidiasis. Materials and Methods. In this clinical trial, C. albicans isolated from the vaginal discharge samples was obtained. Results. The pairwise comparison showed that lavender and clotrimazole had a significant difference; this difference in the lavender group was lower than clotrimazole. But, after 48 hours, there was no difference seen between groups. There was a significant difference between clotrimazole and DMSO groups. Comparing the changes between groups based on the same dilution, at 24 h and 48 h in clotrimazole group, showed a significant difference two times in the fungal cell count that its average during 48 h was less than 24 h. A significant difference was observed between the two periods in lavender group, only at the dilutions of 1/20 and 1/80. The average fungal cell count after 48 h was also lower in lavender group. Conclusions. Given that the lavender has antifungal activity, this can be used as an antifungal agent. However, more clinical studies are necessary to validate its use in candida infection.

  5. Azole drugs are imported by facilitated diffusion in Candida albicans and other pathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Mansfield, Bryce E; Oltean, Hanna N; Oliver, Brian G; Hoot, Samantha J; Leyde, Sarah E; Hedstrom, Lizbeth; White, Theodore C

    2010-09-30

    Despite the wealth of knowledge regarding the mechanisms of action and the mechanisms of resistance to azole antifungals, very little is known about how the azoles are imported into pathogenic fungal cells. Here the in-vitro accumulation and import of Fluconazole (FLC) was examined in the pathogenic fungus, Candida albicans. In energized cells, FLC accumulation correlates inversely with expression of ATP-dependent efflux pumps. In de-energized cells, all strains accumulate FLC, suggesting that FLC import is not ATP-dependent. The kinetics of import in de-energized cells displays saturation kinetics with a K(m) of 0.64 μM and V(max) of 0.0056 pmol/min/10⁸ cells, demonstrating that FLC import proceeds via facilitated diffusion through a transporter rather than passive diffusion. Other azoles inhibit FLC import on a mole/mole basis, suggesting that all azoles utilize the same facilitated diffusion mechanism. An analysis of related compounds indicates that competition for azole import depends on an aromatic ring and an imidazole or triazole ring together in one molecule. Import of FLC by facilitated diffusion is observed in other fungi, including Cryptococcus neoformans, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Candida krusei, indicating that the mechanism of transport is conserved among fungal species. FLC import was shown to vary among Candida albicans resistant clinical isolates, suggesting that altered facilitated diffusion may be a previously uncharacterized mechanism of resistance to azole drugs.

  6. RNA sequencing revealed novel actors of the acquisition of drug resistance in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Drug susceptible clinical isolates of Candida albicans frequently become highly tolerant to drugs during chemotherapy, with dreadful consequences to patient health. We used RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) to analyze the transcriptomes of a CDR (Candida Drug Resistance) strain and its isogenic drug sensitive counterpart. Results RNA-seq unveiled differential expression of 228 genes including a) genes previously identified as involved in CDR, b) genes not previously associated to the CDR phenotype, and c) novel transcripts whose function as a gene is uncharacterized. In particular, we show for the first time that CDR acquisition is correlated with an overexpression of the transcription factor encoding gene CZF1. CZF1 null mutants were susceptible to many drugs, independently of known multidrug resistance mechanisms. We show that CZF1 acts as a repressor of β-glucan synthesis, thus negatively regulating cell wall integrity. Finally, our RNA-seq data allowed us to identify a new transcribed region, upstream of the TAC1 gene, which encodes the major CDR transcriptional regulator. Conclusion Our results open new perspectives of the role of Czf1 and of our understanding of the transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms that lead to the acquisition of drug resistance in C. albicans, with potential for future improvements of therapeutic strategies. PMID:22897889

  7. Potential Targets for Antifungal Drug Discovery Based on Growth and Virulence in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiuyun; Hou, Yinglong; Yue, Longtao; Liu, Shuyuan; Du, Juan; Sun, Shujuan

    2015-10-01

    Fungal infections, especially infections caused by Candida albicans, remain a challenging problem in clinical settings. Despite the development of more-effective antifungal drugs, their application is limited for various reasons. Thus, alternative treatments with drugs aimed at novel targets in C. albicans are needed. Knowledge of growth and virulence in fungal cells is essential not only to understand their pathogenic mechanisms but also to identify potential antifungal targets. This article reviews the current knowledge of the mechanisms of growth and virulence in C. albicans and examines potential targets for the development of new antifungal drugs.

  8. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates from Single Outpatient Clinic in Panama City Exhibit Wide Genetic Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Sambrano, Dilcia; Correa, Ricardo; Almengor, Pedro; Domínguez, Amada; Vega, Silvio; Goodridge, Amador

    2014-01-01

    Understanding Mycobacterium tuberculosis biodiversity and transmission is significant for tuberculosis control. This short report aimed to determine the genetic diversity of M. tuberculosis isolates from an outpatient clinic in Panama City. A total of 62 M. tuberculosis isolates were genotyped by 12 loci mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number of tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTR) and Spoligotyping. Forty-five (72.6%) of the isolates showed unique MIRU-VNTR genotypes, and 13 (21%) of the isolates were grouped into four clusters. Four isolates showed polyclonal MIRU-VNTR genotypes. The MIRU-VNTR Hunter-Gaston discriminatory index reached 0.988. The Spoligotyping analysis revealed 16 M. tuberculosis families, including Latin American-Mediterranean, Harlem, and Beijing. These findings suggest a wide genetic diversity of M. tuberculosis isolates at one outpatient clinic. A detailed molecular epidemiology survey is now warranted, especially following second massive immigration for local Panama Canal expansion activities. PMID:24865686

  9. Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from single outpatient clinic in Panama City exhibit wide genetic diversity.

    PubMed

    Sambrano, Dilcia; Correa, Ricardo; Almengor, Pedro; Domínguez, Amada; Vega, Silvio; Goodridge, Amador

    2014-08-01

    Understanding Mycobacterium tuberculosis biodiversity and transmission is significant for tuberculosis control. This short report aimed to determine the genetic diversity of M. tuberculosis isolates from an outpatient clinic in Panama City. A total of 62 M. tuberculosis isolates were genotyped by 12 loci mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number of tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTR) and Spoligotyping. Forty-five (72.6%) of the isolates showed unique MIRU-VNTR genotypes, and 13 (21%) of the isolates were grouped into four clusters. Four isolates showed polyclonal MIRU-VNTR genotypes. The MIRU-VNTR Hunter-Gaston discriminatory index reached 0.988. The Spoligotyping analysis revealed 16 M. tuberculosis families, including Latin American-Mediterranean, Harlem, and Beijing. These findings suggest a wide genetic diversity of M. tuberculosis isolates at one outpatient clinic. A detailed molecular epidemiology survey is now warranted, especially following second massive immigration for local Panama Canal expansion activities.

  10. Detection of piluslike structures on clinical and environmental isolates of Vibrio vulnificus.

    PubMed Central

    Gander, R M; LaRocco, M T

    1989-01-01

    Twenty clinical isolates of Vibrio vulnificus were compared with 10 environmental strains by using electron microscopy and agglutination assays with human erythrocytes, guinea pig erythrocytes, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In addition, the isolates were tested for ability to adhere to the human epithelial cell lines HEp-2 and A549. When examined by electron microscopy, 16 (80%) of the 20 clinical isolates demonstrated the presence of piluslike structures; the composition of the bacterial populations ranged from 0 to 68% piliated cells. In contrast, only 3 (30%) of the 10 environmental isolates were piliated, with a range from 0 to 16% piliated cells. A significant association between the presence of piliated cells and the isolate source was found (P less than 0.05). None of the 30 strains agglutinated erythrocytes or yeast cells. V. vulnificus adherence results obtained with HEp-2 cells showed 10 (50%) of 20 clinical isolates and 0 (0%) of 10 environmental isolates with averages of greater than 10 adherent bacteria per cell, demonstrating a correlation between attachment and the isolate source (P less than 0.05). Selected strains were tested to determine whether methyl alpha-D-mannopyranoside, fructose, or alpha-L-(-)-fucose would inhibit bacterial adherence to HEp-2 cells. Multiple patterns of adherence inhibition were observed. Adherence to A549 cells showed 8 (40%) of 20 clinical isolates and 0 (0%) of 10 environmental strains with averages of greater than 10 adherent bacteria per cell. A statistical association between attachment and the isolate source was demonstrated (P less than 0.05). These data suggest that the presence of piluslike structures and the ability to adhere to human epithelial cell lines may be more closely associated with V. vulnificus isolates from clinical specimens than with environmental strains. Images PMID:2568368

  11. Isolation and Characterization of Enteroviruses from Clinical Samples.

    PubMed

    Blomqvist, Soile; Roivainen, Merja

    2016-01-01

    Enterovirus infections are common in humans worldwide. Enteroviruses are excreted in feces during infection and can be detected from stool specimens by isolation in continuous laboratory cell lines. Characterization of enteroviruses is based on their antigenic and/or genetic properties.

  12. Identification of syncytial mutations in a clinical isolate of herpes simplex virus 2

    SciTech Connect

    Muggeridge, Martin I. . E-mail: mmugge@lsuhsc.edu; Grantham, Michael L.; Johnson, F. Brent

    2004-10-25

    Small polykaryocytes resulting from cell fusion are found in herpes simplex virus (HSV) lesions in patients, but their significance for viral spread and pathogenesis is unclear. Although syncytial variants causing extensive fusion in tissue culture can be readily isolated from laboratory strains, they are rarely found in clinical isolates, suggesting that extensive cell fusion may be deleterious in vivo. Syncytial mutations have previously been identified for several laboratory strains, but not for clinical isolates of HSV type 2. To address this deficiency, we studied a recent syncytial clinical isolate, finding it to be a mixture of two syncytial and one nonsyncytial strain. The two syncytial strains have novel mutations in glycoprotein B, and in vitro cell fusion assays confirmed that they are responsible for syncytium formation. This panel of clinical strains may be ideal for examining the effect of increased cell fusion on pathogenesis.

  13. Complete genome sequence of the Campylobacter ureolyticus clinical isolate RIGS 9880

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The emerging pathogen Campylobacter ureolyticus has been isolated from human and animal genital infections, human periodontal infections, domestic and food animals, and from cases of human gastroenteritis. We report the whole-genome sequence of the human clinical isolate RIGS 9880, which is the firs...

  14. CTX-M-12 β-Lactamase in a Klebsiella pneumoniae Clinical Isolate in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Villegas, Maria Virginia; Correa, Adriana; Perez, Federico; Zuluaga, Tania; Radice, Marcela; Gutkind, Gabriel; Casellas, José María; Ayala, Juan; Lolans, Karen; Quinn, John P.

    2004-01-01

    We describe the detection of the CTX-M-12 β-lactamase from a clinical isolate of Klebsiella pneumoniae in Colombia. Screening of nosocomial Klebsiella spp. and Escherichia coli isolates from a network of teaching hospitals revealed the presence of CTX-M enzymes in multiple cities. This is the first description of CTX-M in Colombia. PMID:14742223

  15. CTX-M-12 beta-lactamase in a Klebsiella pneumoniae clinical isolate in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Villegas, Maria Virginia; Correa, Adriana; Perez, Federico; Zuluaga, Tania; Radice, Marcela; Gutkind, Gabriel; Casellas, José María; Ayala, Juan; Lolans, Karen; Quinn, John P

    2004-02-01

    We describe the detection of the CTX-M-12 beta-lactamase from a clinical isolate of Klebsiella pneumoniae in Colombia. Screening of nosocomial Klebsiella spp. and Escherichia coli isolates from a network of teaching hospitals revealed the presence of CTX-M enzymes in multiple cities. This is the first description of CTX-M in Colombia.

  16. Triazole Resistance in Aspergillus fumigatus Clinical Isolates Obtained in Nanjing, China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ming; Feng, Chun-Lai; Chen, Fei; He, Qian; Su, Xin; Shi, Yi

    2017-01-01

    Background: During the past decades, the incidence of invasive aspergillosis (IA) caused by Aspergillus fumigatus has increased dramatically. The aims of this study were to investigate the susceptibility of clinical isolates of A. fumigatus to triazole and the underlying cyp51A mutations in triazole-resistant A. fumigatus. Methods: A total of 126 A. fumigatus clinical isolates from 126 patients with proven or probable IA were obtained from four large tertiary hospitals in Nanjing, China, between August 2012 and July 2015. The determination of minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) for itraconazole, voriconazole, and posaconazole was performed by broth microdilution according to the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing reference method. Results: A total of 4 A. fumigatus isolates (3.17%) were confirmed to be itraconazole resistant, with MICs of ≥8 mg/L, and one isolate (0.8%) was confirmed to be voriconazole resistant and posaconazole resistant, with MICs of 4 mg/L and 0.5 mg/L, respectively. We found that two of the 4 isolates of triazole-resistant A. fumigatus had the L98H amino acid substitution in combination with a 34-base pair tandem repeat in the promoter region, one isolate had an M220I mutation, and another itraconazole-resistant isolate did not have a substitution in the cyp51A gene. Conclusions: This study shows that triazole-resistant A. fumigatus clinical isolates are present in Nanjing, China, which is a new challenge to the clinical management of IA. PMID:28303848

  17. Biologic Activity of Type I and Type II Fusobacterium nucleatum Isolates from Clinically Characterized Sites,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-07-26

    journal of choice is the Journal of Periodontology . 1 ncl JACK W. VINCENT as COL, DC Microbiology Branch SGRD-UDZ (19 Jul 84) TO COL Jack W. Vincent...Activitity of Type I and Type II Manuscript for Publication Fusobacterium nucleatum Isolates From Clinically Chatacterized Sites. 6. PERFORMING ONG...120) were obtained from subgingival plaque samples taken from 27 clinically characterized sites utilizing a selec- tive culture medium. All isolates

  18. Integron mediated multidrug resistance in extended spectrum beta-lactamase producing clinical isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Mobarak-Qamsari, Maryam; Ashayeri-Panah, Mitra; Eftekhar, Freshteh; Feizabadi, Mohammad Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    The present study describes integron mediated multiple antibiotic resistance in extended-spectrum β-lactamase producing clinical isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae. One hundred and four clinical isolates of K. pneumoniae from two Iranian hospitals were screened for extended-spectrum β-lactamase production and susceptibility of the extended-spectrum β-lactamase producing isolates was determined to 17 antibiotics by disc diffusion. Presence of integron classes 1, 2 and 3 was detected by PCR and integrase specific primers. Isolates harboring class 1 integron were then screened for variable regions using PCR. Fifty isolates (48%) produced extended-spectrum β-lactamases among which, 22 (44%) harbored class 1, 3 (6%) carried class 2 and none contained class 3 integons. Integron carriage was significantly associated with higher rates of multiple antibiotic resistance in extended-spectrum β-lactamase producing clinical isolates of K. pneumoniae. Integron harboring isolates were more resistant to aztreonam (51.3%), ceftazidime (42.6%), cefotaxime (43.3%), cefepime (24.6%), kanamycin (43.2%), tobramycin (30.7%), norfloxcacin (32%) and spectinomycin (25.6%) compared to the organisms without integrons. On the other hand, resistance to nitrofurantoin and streptomycin was significantly higher among the integron negative isolates. PCR amplification of class1 integron variable regions revealed 9 different sized DNA fragments and isolates with similar profiles for class 1 integron variable regions showed the same antibiotic resistance phenotypes. PMID:24516451

  19. In vitro antimicrobial susceptibility of Mycoplasma bovis clinical isolates recovered from bison (Bison bison).

    PubMed

    Suleman, Muhammad; Prysliak, Tracy; Windeyer, Claire; Perez-Casal, Jose

    2016-03-01

    Mycoplasma bovis is a pathogen globally affecting cattle and bison herds, causing pneumonia, arthritis, mastitis, abortions, and other symptoms, leading to huge economic losses. Many studies have been done regarding the antimicrobial susceptibility of M. bovis isolated from cattle, but no such study is available for isolates recovered from bison. For the first time, in vitro susceptibilities of 40 M. bovis clinical isolates collected from bison herds in Canada are reported here. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values were determined using Sensititre® plates. The most effective MIC50 and MIC90 were for spectinomycin (1 and >64 μg/mL), tiamulin (1 and >32 μg/mL), and tulathromycin (16 and 64 μg/mL), whereas tetracyclines, fluoroquinolones, and florfenicol failed to inhibit growth of M. bovis bison isolates. Isolates were nonsusceptible to tetracyclines (100%), fluoroquinolones (97.5%), and tilmicosin (100%), whereas the highest susceptibility of bison clinical isolates was seen with spectinomycin (95%) and tulathromycin (67.5%). Two lung isolates (Mb283 and 348) were found resistant to both spectinomycin and tulathromycin. These results show a marked difference in antimicrobial susceptibility of bison isolates as compared with previously reported and laboratory reference cattle isolates, emphasizing the necessity of testing antimicrobial susceptibility of M. bovis bison isolates and to generate better therapeutic regime for improved recovery chances for infected bison herds across North America.

  20. Clinical and molecular epidemiology of hospital Enterococcus faecalis isolates in eastern France.

    PubMed

    Mulin, Blandine; Bailly, Pascale; Thouverez, Michelle; Cailleaux, Vincent; Cornette, Christian; Dupont, Marie-Jeanne; Talon, Daniel

    1999-03-01

    OBJECTIVE: To report on the occurrence of Enterococcus faecalis hospital isolates obtained during 1 year in hospitals in the Franche-Comté region of France. METHODS: Clinical isolates of E. faecalis of different antibiotic susceptibility phenotypes from hospitalized patients were characterized by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Patients with positive cultures were investigated by three case-control studies to identify risk factors for colonization/infection. RESULTS: The crude incidence of colonization/infection was 2.37%, and 4-day and 7-day colonization rates after admission were 10.0% and 6.36%, respectively. The rates of high-level resistance to kanamycin (HLKR) and to gentamicin (HLGR) were 47.1% and 7.1%, respectively. No isolate was resistant to glycopeptides or produced beta-lactamase. The 209 hospital isolates obtained during the study yielded 98 major DNA patterns, of which two were major epidemic patterns including HLKR isolates. No single factor was significantly associated with colonization/infection by HLKR isolates. The length of hospitalization before isolation was associated with colonization by HLGR isolates. CONCLUSIONS: The isolation frequency of E. faecalis strains with acquired resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics, and the wide dissemination of resistant strains with characteristics that allow them to persist and spread, argue for further large prospective surveys of clinical isolates of E. faecalis in hospitals.

  1. Molecular and epidemiological study of Salmonella clinical isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, M J; Rivera, N; Castillo, J; Rubio, M C; Gómez-Lus, R

    1991-01-01

    A survey of Salmonella infections was carried out over a 1-year period in the rural community covered by the Hospital Reina Sofía (Tudela, Spain). The 255 strains that were collected were studied by serotyping, antimicrobial resistance, and plasmid profile analysis. The predominant serotype was S. enteritidis (85.90%), followed by S. typhimurium (7.06%) and S. virchow (2.36%). Only 7.84% of the strains were resistant to antimicrobial agents. The most common resistance was to beta-lactam antibiotics. This resistance was due to the presence of one of two types of beta-lactamases, TEM-1 or TEM-2. Resistance to kanamycin was associated with the synthesis of a 3'-O-phosphotransferase. The resistance to streptomycin and chloramphenicol was either not enzymatic or was due to a 3"-O-phosphotransferase and a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase, respectively. Analysis of total plasmid DNA content revealed the presence of plasmids in 96.08% of the isolates. According to their plasmid profile, the strains could be classified into different groups. The three main groups, which accounted for 50.19, 20.78, and 4.70% of the isolates, respectively, corresponded to the antimicrobial-susceptible S. enteritidis serotype. These results suggested that plasmid profile analysis in conjunction with antimicrobial resistance determination can be useful for subtyping resistant Salmonella isolates. Images PMID:2056061

  2. [Comparison of Phoenix™ Yeast ID Panel and API® ID 32C commercial systems for the identification of Candida species isolated from clinical samples].

    PubMed

    Gayibova, Ülkü; Dalyan Cılo, Burcu; Ağca, Harun; Ener, Beyza

    2014-07-01

    Opportunistic fungal pathogens are one of the important causes of nosocomial infections, and several different types of yeasts, especially Candida species are increasingly recovered from immunocompromised patients. Since many of the yeasts are resistant to the commonly used antifungal agents, the introduction of appropriate therapy depends on rapid and accurate identification. The aims of this study were to compare the commercial identification systems namely API® ID 32C (bioMerieux, France) and Phoenix™ Yeast ID Panel (Becton Dickinson Diagnostics, USA) for the identification of Candida species and to evaluate the effect of morphological findings in the identification process. A total of 211 yeast strains isolated from different clinical samples (111 urine, 34 blood/vascular catheter, 27 upper/lower respiratory tract, 16 abscess/pus, 13 throat/vagina swabs and 10 sterile body fluids) of 137 patients hospitalized in Uludag University Health and Research Center between October 2013 to January 2014, were included in the study. Samples were cultured on blood agar, chromogenic agar (CHROMagar Candida, BD, USA) and Saboraud's dextrose agar (SDA), and isolated yeast colonies were evaluated with germ tube test and morphological examination by microscopy on cornmeal/Tween-80 agar. The isolates were identified as well by two commercial systems according to the manufacturers' recommendations. Discrepant results between the systems were tried to be resolved by using morphological characteristics of the yeasts. Of the isolates 159 were identified identical by both of the systems, and the concordance between those systems were estimated as 75.4%. According to the concordant identification, the most frequently isolated species was C.albicans (44.1%) followed by C.tropicalis (9.9%), C.glabrata (9.5%), C.parapsilosis (8.5%) and C.kefyr (8.1%). The concordance rate was 81.7% in identification of frequently isolated species (C.albicans, C.tropicalis, C.parapsilosis, C.glabrata, C

  3. The development of fluconazole resistance in Candida albicans - an example of microevolution of a fungal pathogen.

    PubMed

    Morschhäuser, Joachim

    2016-03-01

    The yeast Candida albicans is a member of the microbiota in the gastrointestinal and urogenital tracts of most healthy persons, but it can also cause symptomatic infections, especially in immunocompromised patients. During the life-long association with its human host, C. albicans generates genetically altered variants that are better adapted to changes in their environment. A prime example of this microevolution is the development of resistance to the commonly used drug fluconazole, which inhibits ergosterol biosynthesis, during antimycotic therapy. Fluconazole resistance can be caused by mutations in the drug target, by changes in the sterol biosynthesis pathway, and by gain-of-function mutations in transcription factors that result in the constitutive upregulation of ergosterol biosynthesis genes and multidrug efflux pumps. Fluconazole also induces genomic rearrangements that result in gene amplification and loss of heterozygosity for resistance mutations, which further increases drug resistance. These genome alterations may affect extended chromosomal regions and have additional phenotypic consequences. A striking case is the loss of heterozygosity for the mating type locus MTL in many fluconazole-resistant clinical isolates, which allows the cells to switch to the mating-competent opaque phenotype. This, in turn, raises the possibility that sexual recombination between different variants of an originally clonal, drug-susceptible population may contribute to the generation of highly fluconazole-resistant strains with multiple resistance mechanisms. The gain-of-function mutations in transcription factors, which result in deregulated gene expression, also cause reduced fitness. In spite of this, many clinical isolates that contain such mutations do not exhibit fitness defects, indicating that they have overcome the costs of drug resistance with further evolution by still unknown mechanisms.

  4. Essential Functional Modules for Pathogenic and Defensive Mechanisms in Candida albicans Infections

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, I-Chun; Lin, Che; Chuang, Yung-Jen

    2014-01-01

    The clinical and biological significance of the study of fungal pathogen Candida albicans (C. albicans) has markedly increased. However, the explicit pathogenic and invasive mechanisms of such host-pathogen interactions have not yet been fully elucidated. Therefore, the essential functional modules involved in C. albicans-zebrafish interactions were investigated in this study. Adopting a systems biology approach, the early-stage and late-stage protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks for both C. albicans and zebrafish were constructed. By comparing PPI networks at the early and late stages of the infection process, several critical functional modules were identified in both pathogenic and defensive mechanisms. Functional modules in C. albicans, like those involved in hyphal morphogenesis, ion and small molecule transport, protein secretion, and shifts in carbon utilization, were seen to play important roles in pathogen invasion and damage caused to host cells. Moreover, the functional modules in zebrafish, such as those involved in immune response, apoptosis mechanisms, ion transport, protein secretion, and hemostasis-related processes, were found to be significant as defensive mechanisms during C. albicans infection. The essential functional modules thus determined could provide insights into the molecular mechanisms of host-pathogen interactions during the infection process and thereby devise potential therapeutic strategies to treat C. albicans infection. PMID:24757665

  5. Emergence of Metallo-β-Lactamase GIM-1 in a Clinical Isolate of Serratia marcescens

    PubMed Central

    Frontzek, Andre; Pfeifer, Yvonne

    2012-01-01

    The metallo-β-lactamase GIM-1 (German imipenemase) has been found so far only in clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from Germany. Here we report the detection of blaGIM-1 in a clinical strain of Serratia marcescens that was isolated from urine, blood, and wound samples over a period of 20 months. The strain was repeatedly isolated from one patient in two German hospitals and an outpatient department located in the region in which all previously described GIM-1-producing P. aeruginosa strains were identified. PMID:22710114

  6. Distribution of Candida albicans genotypes among family members

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, S. K.; Stevens, D. A.; Mishra, S. K.; Feroze, F.; Pierson, D. L.

    1999-01-01

    Thirty-three families (71 subjects) were screened for the presence of Candida albicans in mouthwash or stool specimens; 12 families (28 subjects) were culture-positive for this yeast. An enrichment procedure provided a twofold increase in the recovery of C. albicans from mouthwash specimens. Nine of the twelve culture-positive families had two positive members each, two families had three positive members each, and one family had four positive members. Genetic profiles were obtained by three methods: pulsed-field gel electrophoresis; restriction endonuclease analysis, and random amplification of polymorphic DNA analysis. DNA fingerprinting of C. albicans isolated from one body site three consecutive times revealed that each of the 12 families carried a distinct genotype. No two families shared the same strain, and two or more members of a family commonly shared the same strain. Intrafamily genotypic identity (i.e., each member within the family harbored the same strain) was demonstrated in six families. Genotypes of isolates from husband and wife differed from one another in five families. All three methods were satisfactory in determining genotypes; however, we concluded that restriction endonuclease analysis provided adequate resolving power.

  7. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli clinical isolates from northern Colombia, South America.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Julio A; Romero-Herazo, Yesenia C; Arzuza, Octavio; Gómez-Duarte, Oscar G

    2014-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are major causes of childhood diarrhea in low and middle income countries including Colombia, South America. To understand the diversity of ETEC strains in the region, clinical isolates obtained from northern Colombia children were evaluated for multiple locus sequencing typing, serotyping, classical and nonclassical virulence genes, and antibiotic susceptibility. Among 40 ETEC clinical isolates evaluated, 21 (52.5%) were positive for LT gene, 13 (32.5%) for ST gene, and 6 (15%) for both ST and LT. The most prevalent colonization surface antigens (CS) were CS21 and CFA/I identified in 21 (50%) and 13 (32.5%) isolates, respectively. The eatA, irp2, and fyuA were the most common nonclassical virulence genes present in more than 60% of the isolates. Ampicillin resistance (80% of the strains) was the most frequent phenotype among ETEC strains followed by trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole resistance (52.5%). Based on multiple locus sequencing typing (MLST), we recognize that 6 clonal groups of ETEC clinical isolates circulate in Colombia. ETEC clinical isolates from children in northern Colombia are highly diverse, yet some isolates circulating in the community belong to well-defined clonal groups that share a unique set of virulence factors, serotypes, and MLST sequence types.

  8. Phenotypic and Genotypic Characterization of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Clinical Isolates from Northern Colombia, South America

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, Julio A.; Romero-Herazo, Yesenia C.; Arzuza, Octavio; Gómez-Duarte, Oscar G.

    2014-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are major causes of childhood diarrhea in low and middle income countries including Colombia, South America. To understand the diversity of ETEC strains in the region, clinical isolates obtained from northern Colombia children were evaluated for multiple locus sequencing typing, serotyping, classical and nonclassical virulence genes, and antibiotic susceptibility. Among 40 ETEC clinical isolates evaluated, 21 (52.5%) were positive for LT gene, 13 (32.5%) for ST gene, and 6 (15%) for both ST and LT. The most prevalent colonization surface antigens (CS) were CS21 and CFA/I identified in 21 (50%) and 13 (32.5%) isolates, respectively. The eatA, irp2, and fyuA were the most common nonclassical virulence genes present in more than 60% of the isolates. Ampicillin resistance (80% of the strains) was the most frequent phenotype among ETEC strains followed by trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole resistance (52.5%). Based on multiple locus sequencing typing (MLST), we recognize that 6 clonal groups of ETEC clinical isolates circulate in Colombia. ETEC clinical isolates from children in northern Colombia are highly diverse, yet some isolates circulating in the community belong to well-defined clonal groups that share a unique set of virulence factors, serotypes, and MLST sequence types. PMID:24877071

  9. Characterization of Toxin-Antitoxin (TA) Systems in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Clinical Isolates in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Savari, Mohammad; Rostami, Soodabeh; Ekrami, Alireza; Bahador, Abbas

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is among the most problematic hospital and community-acquired pathogens. Toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems are maintenance regulatory systems in bacteria and have recently been considered new targets for antimicrobial therapy. The prevalence and transcription of these systems in clinical isolates are still unknown. Objectives: The aim of this study was to characterize three types of TA systems (parDE, relBE, and higBA) among P. aeruginosa clinical isolates. Materials and Methods: We typed our clinical isolates by ERIC-PCR (enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus sequence-based polymerase chain reaction) and BOX-PCR. We then investigated 174 P. aeruginosa clinical isolates from three hospitals in Ahvaz, Iran, for the presence of TA system genes, and determined whether these systems were encoded on chromosomes or plasmids by amplification of the flanking regions. Results: Our results showed that in the 174 P. aeruginosa isolates, relBE and higBA were universal, but parDE was less prevalent. Both of the flanking regions of the parDE genes in all positive isolates were amplified. The flanking regions of nearly all relBE genes were amplified. Amplification was observed for the downstream sequence of every higBA locus, as well as for the region upstream of higBA, except in 14 strains. Conclusions: Based on the presence of TA systems in the majority of P. aeruginosa isolates, these could be used as a novel target for antimicrobial therapy. PMID:27099681

  10. Genotypic characterization of Malaysian human isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae from carriage and clinical sources.

    PubMed

    Shakrin, Nik Noorul Shakira Mohamed; Masri, Siti Norbaya; Taib, Niazlin Mohd; Nordin, Syafinaz Amin; Jamal, Farida; Desa, Mohd Nasir Mohd

    2014-12-01

    This study characterized carriage and clinical pneumococcal isolates for serotypes, penicillin susceptibility, virulence genes and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) pattern of penicillin binding protein (PBP) genes. DNA fingerprint of isolates was generated by BOX-PCR. Majority of serotypes were 23F followed by 19F, 19A and 6A. Twenty-four percent of isolates were penicillin non-susceptible (PNSP). All of the targeted virulence genes were detected in all isolates with the exception of pili; 20.6% (n=22) for PI-1 and 14.0% (n=15) for PI-2. Of the 13 isolates which carried both PI-1 and PI-2, 10 were of clinical origin. Digested pbp-DNA produced three PBP-RFLP profiles for pbp1a (A1 to A3), six profiles for pbp2b (B1 to B6) and seven for pbp2x (X1 to X7) mostly in PNSPs. Based on BOX-PCR analysis, the majority of isolates were genetically diverse with a small number of potentially related isolates carrying pili genes. No obvious genotypic association was observed pertaining to carriage and clinical origin of isolates.

  11. Serological and antigenic profiles of clinical isolates of Paracoccidioides spp. from Central Western Brazil.

    PubMed

    Queiroz Júnior, Luiz de Pádua; de Camargo, Zoilo Pires; Tadano, Tomoko; Rodrigues, Anderson Messias; Takarara, Doracilde Terumi; Gegembauer, Gregory; Araujo, Leticia Mendes; Hahn, Rosane Christine

    2014-08-01

    Clinical Paracoccidioides spp. isolates from patients with paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM) in Mato Grosso, Brazil exhibit different patterns of serologic reactivity. The results observed for reactions of radial immunodiffusion against the commonly used exoantigens containing a 43-kDa glycoprotein (gp43) suggest that this fungus exhibits major antigenic variability by geographic region. There is a phylogenetic gap between Paracoccidioides spp. isolates among different regions of Latin America. In particular, those from the central region of Brazil (i.e. Mato Grosso state) exhibit a lower rate of genetic similarity. We aimed at investigating the phylogenetic classification of clinical isolates of Paracoccidioides spp. in Central Brazil and the different antigenic profiles that produce. Exoantigens were obtained from five clinical isolates: two P. brasiliensis (Pb166 and Pb2880) and three P. lutzii (PL2875, PL9840, and PL2912). The protein/glycoprotein profiles of P. lutzii exoantigens were different from each other. Isolate PL9840 exhibited the most distinct bands, and isolates PL2875 and PL2912 exhibited more diffuse bands and a very intense band between 50 and 60 kDa. P. brasiliensis isolates had similar protein profiles, exhibiting a low-intensity band at 220 kDa and a diffuse band between 50 and 60 kDa. P. lutzii isolates exhibit high species-specific antigen variability, which we have already been assessed in proteomic studies.

  12. Resistance to apramycin in two enterobacterial clinical isolates: detection of a 3-N-acetyltransferase IV.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Lus, R; Rivera, M J; Gómez-Lus, M L; Gil, J; Gómez-Lus, S; Castillo, J; Goñi, P; Madero, P; Rubio, M C

    1990-08-01

    Considering the possible role of farm animals in the contamination of human consumers by plasmid-mediated apramycin-resistant enterobacteria strains, this type of resistance should be tested more systematically in human isolates. Very recently we isolated in Zaragoza one apramycin-resistant Escheria coli strain obtained from the blood of a hospitalized patient; this clinical isolate produced a plasmid-mediated 3-N-aminoglycoside acetyltransferase IV. We describe also the isolation in Madrid of one multiresistant Klebsiella pneumoniae clinical strain. This isolate harbored a single plasmid and carried determinants for apramycin, gentamicin, tobramycin, hygromycin B, streptomycin, and ampicillin, which could be transferred en bloc to E. coli K-12 J62. Extracts from donor and transconjugant strains carrying pUZ6776 plasmid produce acetyltransferase activity AAC(3)-IV and double phosphotransferase activity (HPH and APH(3'')).

  13. Isolation and generation of clinical-grade dendritic cells using the CliniMACS system.

    PubMed

    Campbell, John D M; Piechaczek, Christoph; Winkels, Gregor; Schwamborn, Edith; Micheli, Daniela; Hennemann, Sonja; Schmitz, Jürgen

    2005-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) can either be generated from progenitors such as stem cells or CD14+ monocytes, or isolated directly from the blood. Blood-derived DC are present as at least two distinct populations-myeloid and plasmacytoid DC. Here we describe methods for the clinical-grade isolation of blood DC and DC precursors using the CliniMACS. We describe the isolation of ultra-pure monocytes in order to generate large numbers of monocyte-derived DC, and also new methods for the direct isolation of blood DC. Isolation of blood DC in large numbers means that natural DC with different properties can be investigated for their clinical function for the first time.

  14. Microbiological and Clinical Characteristics of Hypermucoviscous Klebsiella pneumoniae Isolates Associated with Invasive Infections in China

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yinjuan; Wang, Shanshan; Zhan, Lingling; Jin, Ye; Duan, Jingjing; Hao, Zhihao; Lv, Jingnan; Qi, Xiuqin; Chen, Liang; Kreiswirth, Barry N.; Wang, Liangxing; Yu, Fangyou

    2017-01-01

    A distinctive syndrome caused by hypermucoviscous Klebsiella pneumoniae (HMKP) including pyogenic liver abscess (PLA) is now becoming a globally emerging disease. In the present study, 22.8% (84/369) of K. pneumoniae clinical isolates associated with various types of invasive infections were identified as HMKP, with 45.2% associated with PLA. Multivariate regression analysis showed that male patients with 41–50 years, PLA, diabetes mellitus, and hypertension were independent risk factors for HMKP infections. K2 (42.9%, 36/84) was the most common capsular serotype among HMKP isolates, followed by K1 (23.8%, 20/84). Seventy-five percentage of K1 HMKP isolates were associated with PLA, while K2 HMKP isolates accounted for more types of invasive infections. The positive rates of iutA, mrkD, aerobactin, iroN, and rmpA among HMKP isolates were significantly higher than those among non-HMKP isolates (p < 0.05). There was a correlation between magA, ybtS, alls, and wcaG and K1 isolates. Interestingly, mrkD was exclusively detected among HMKP (32.1%, 27/84) and K2 isolates (65.9%, 27/41). All K1 and K2 HMKP and non-HMKP isolates were positive for rmpA. Aerobactin was found among 95.0 and 97.5% of K1 and K2 isolates. ST23 was found to be the most prevalent ST among 69 HMKP isolates with K1, K2, K5, K20, and K57 (27.5%, 19/69) and was only found among K1 isolates. ST65 was the second most prevalent ST (26.1%, 18/69) and was also only found among K2 isolates. ST23-K1 HMKP isolates (84.2%, 16/19) were associated with PLA, while ST65-K2 isolates were correlated with more types of infections relative to ST23-K1 isolates. PFGE results showed that the homology of 84 HMKP isolates was diverse. Only five PFGE clusters with more than 75% similarity accounted for more than three isolates. These five PFGE clusters only accounted for 35 (41.7%, 35/84) isolates. In conclusion, our study first found that hypertension and male patients with 41–50 years old were independent risk factors

  15. Frequency of clinically isolated strains of oral Candida species at Kagoshima University Hospital, Japan, and their susceptibility to antifungal drugs in 2006–2007 and 2012–2013

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The isolation frequency and susceptibility to antifungal agents of oral Candida isolates from patients with oral candidiasis (OC) were compared between studies conducted in 2006–2007 and 2012–2013. Methods A total158 strains was isolated from 112 patients who visited Kagoshima University Hospital for the treatment of OC during the 14-month period from February 2012 and March 2013, and evaluated on the isolation frequency of each Candida strain and the susceptibility against antifungal drugs as compared to those evaluated in 2006–2007. Results There was a higher frequency of xerostomia as a chief complaint and of autoimmune disease in the 2012–2013 study than in the 2006–2007 study. More than 95% of Candida isolates were C. albicans and C. glabrata. In addition, the proportion of the latter increased from 12.3% in the 2006–2007 study to 23.4% in the 2012–2013 study, while the proportion of the former decreased from 86.2% to 72.8%, respectively. C. albicans was isolated in almost all patients, while C. glabrata was only isolated concomitantly with C. albicans. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were not significantly different between groups with a few exceptions. Candida isolates, of which MICs surpassed break points, apparently increased for miconazole and itraconazole against C. glabrata in the 2012–2013 study, but this was not statistically significant. As a result, more cases of autoimmune disease, a greater number of C. glabrata isolates, and higher resistance to azoles were seen in the 2012–2013 study than in the 2006–2007 study. Conclusion These data indicate that with recent increases in C. glabrata infection, a causative fungus of OC, and in C. glabrata resistance to azoles, caution is needed in the selection of antifungal drugs for the treatment of OC. PMID:24552136

  16. Use of MALDI-TOF MS for Identification of Nontuberculous Mycobacterium Species Isolated from Clinical Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Mediavilla-Gradolph, María Concepción; De Toro-Peinado, Inmaculada; Bermúdez-Ruiz, María Pilar; García-Martínez, María de los Ángeles; Ortega-Torres, María; Montiel Quezel-Guerraz, Natalia; Palop-Borrás, Begoña

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the results obtained for identification by MALDI-TOF of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) isolated in clinical samples with those obtained by GenoType Mycobacterium CM/AS (common mycobacteria/additional species). A total of 66 Mycobacterium isolates from various clinical specimens (mainly respiratory) were tested in this study. They were identified using MALDI-TOF Bruker from strains isolated in Lowenstein, following the recommended protocol of heat inactivation and extraction, and were simultaneously analyzed through hybridization by GenoType Mycobacterium from liquid culture MGIT. Our results showed that identification by MALDI-TOF was correct in 98.4% (65/66) of NTM isolated in our clinical practice (M. avium, M. intracellulare, M. abscessus, M. chelonae, M. fortuitum, M. mucogenicum, M. kansasii, and M. scrofulaceum). MALDI-TOF was found to be an accurate, rapid, and cost-effective system for identification of mycobacteria species. PMID:26106617

  17. Borrelia burgdorferi clinical isolates induce human innate immune responses that are not dependent on genotype.

    PubMed

    Mason, Lauren M K; Herkes, Eduard A; Krupna-Gaylord, Michelle A; Oei, Anneke; van der Poll, Tom; Wormser, Gary P; Schwartz, Ira; Petzke, Mary M; Hovius, Joppe W R

    2015-10-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi can be categorized based on restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis into ribosomal spacer type (RST) 1, 2 and 3. A correlation between RST type and invasiveness of Borrelia isolates has been demonstrated in clinical studies and experimental models, and RST 1 isolates are more likely to cause disseminated disease than RST 3 isolates. We hypothesized that this could partially be due to increased susceptibility of RST 3 isolates to killing by the innate immune system early in infection. Thus, we investigated the interaction of five RST 1 and five RST 3 isolates with various components of the human innate immune system in vitro. RST 3 isolates induced significantly greater upregulation of activation markers in monocyte-derived dendritic cells compared to RST 1 isolates at a low multiplicity of infection. However, RST 1 isolates stimulated greater interleukin-6 production. At a high multiplicity of infection no differences in dendritic cell activation or cytokine production were observed. In addition, we observed no differences in the ability of RST 1 and RST 3 isolates to activate monocytes or neutrophils and all strains were phagocytosed at a comparable rate. Finally, all isolates tested were equally resistant to complement-mediated killing, as determined by dark-field microscopy and a growth inhibition assay. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the RST 1 and 3 isolates showed no distinction in their susceptibility to the various components of the human immune system studied here, suggesting that other factors are responsible for their differential invasiveness.

  18. Experimental arthritis induced by a clinical Mycoplasma fermentans isolate

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Antonio; Yáñez, Antonio; León-Tello, Gloria; Gil, Constantino; Giono, Silvia; Barba, Eduardo; Cedillo, Lilia

    2002-01-01

    Background Mycoplasma fermentans has been associated with rheumatoid arthritis. Recently, it was detected in the joints and blood of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, but it is not clear yet how the bacteria enter the body and reach the joints. The purpose of this study was to determine the ability of M. fermentans to induce experimental arthritis in rabbits following inoculation of the bacteria in the trachea and knee joints. Methods P-140 and PG-18 strains were each injected in the knee joints of 14 rabbits in order to evaluate and compare their arthritogenicity. P-140 was also injected in the trachea of 14 rabbits in order to test the ability of the bacteria to reach the joints and induce arthritis. Results M. fermentans produced an acute arthritis in rabbits. Joint swelling appeared first in rabbits injected with P-140, which caused a more severe arthritis than PG-18. Both strains were able to migrate to the uninoculated knee joints and they were detected viable in the joints all along the duration of the experiment. Changes in the synovial tissue were more severe by the end of the experiment and characterized by the infiltration of neutrophils and substitution of adipose tissue by connective tissue. Rabbits intracheally injected with P-140 showed induced arthritis and the bacteria could be isolated from lungs, blood, heart, kidney, spleen, brain and joints. Conclusion M. fermentans induced arthritis regardless of the inoculation route. These findings may help explain why mycoplasmas are commonly isolated from the joints of rheumatic patients. PMID:12057023

  19. Genetic diversity of clinical Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates in a public hospital in Spain

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important nosocomial pathogen that exhibits multiple resistances to antibiotics with increasing frequency, making patient treatment more difficult. The aim of the study is to ascertain the population structure of this clinical pathogen in the Hospital Son Llàtzer, Spain. Results A significant set (56) of randomly selected clinical P. aeruginosa isolates, including multidrug and non-multidrug resistant isolates, were assigned to sequence types (STs) and compared them with their antibiotic susceptibility profile classified as follows: extensively drug resistant (XDR), multidrug resistant (MDR) and non-multidrug resistant (non-MDR). The genetic diversity was assessed by applying the multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme developed by Curran and collaborators, and by the phylogenetic analysis of a concatenated tree. The analysis of seven loci, acsA, aroE, guaA, mutL, nuoD, ppsA and trpE, demonstrated that the prevalent STs were ST-175, ST-235 and ST-253. The majority of the XDR and MDR isolates were included in ST-175 and ST-235. ST-253 is the third in frequency and included non-MDR isolates. The 26 singleton sequence types corresponded mainly to non-MDR isolates. Twenty-two isolates corresponded to new sequence types (not previously defined) of which 12 isolates were non-MDR and 10 isolates were MDR or XDR. Conclusions The population structure of clinical P. aeruginosa present in our hospital indicates the coexistence of nonresistant and resistant isolates with the same sequence type. The multiresistant isolates studied are grouped in the prevalent sequence types found in other Spanish hospitals and at the international level, and the susceptible isolates correspond mainly to singleton sequence types. PMID:23773707

  20. Candida albicans Carriage in Children with Severe Early Childhood Caries (S-ECC) and Maternal Relatedness

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jin; Moon, Yonghwi; Li, Lihua; Rustchenko, Elena; Wakabayashi, Hironao; Zhao, Xiaoyi; Feng, Changyong; Gill, Steven R.; McLaren, Sean; Malmstrom, Hans; Ren, Yanfang; Quivey, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Candida albicans has been detected together with Streptococcus mutans in high numbers in plaque-biofilm from children with early childhood caries (ECC). The goal of this study was to examine the C. albicans carriage in children with severe early childhood caries (S-ECC) and the maternal relatedness. Methods Subjects in this pilot cross-sectional study were recruited based on a convenient sample. DMFT(S)/dmft(s) caries and plaque scores were assessed during a comprehensive oral exam. Social-demographic and related background information was collected through a questionnaire. Saliva and plaque sample from all children and mother subjects were collected. C. albicans were isolated by BBL™ CHROMagar™ and also identified using germ tube test. S. mutans was isolated using Mitis Salivarius with Bacitracin selective medium and identified by colony morphology. Genetic relatedness was examined using restriction endonuclease analysis of the C. albicans genome using BssHII (REAG-B). Multilocus sequence typing was used to examine the clustering information of isolated C. albicans. Spot assay was performed to examine the C. albicans Caspofungin susceptibility between S-ECC children and their mothers. All statistical analyses (power analysis for sample size, Spearman’s correlation coefficient and multiple regression analyses) were implemented with SAS 9.4 Results A total of 18 S-ECC child-mother pairs and 17 caries free child-mother pairs were enrolled in the study. Results indicated high C. albicans carriage rate in the oral cavity (saliva and plaque) of both S-ECC children and their mothers (>80%). Spearman’s correlation coefficient also indicated a significant correlation between salivary and plaque C. albicans and S. mutans carriage (p<0.01) and caries severity (p<0.05). The levels of C. albicans in the prepared saliva and plaque sample (1ml resuspension) of S-ECC children were 1.3 ± 4.5 x104 cfu/ml and 1.2 ± 3.5 x104 cfu/ml (~3-log higher vs. caries

  1. [Viridans streptococci isolated from cerebrospinal fluid. Clinical significance of 9 cases].

    PubMed

    Alba, D; Guerra, A; Peña, P; Molina, F

    1997-02-01

    Viridans streptococci (VS) are often isolated from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). However, the significance of such isolates is poorly understood. In the present study we carry out a retrospective analysis of 9 patients in whom VS were isolated from CSF during a 1-year period at La Paz Hospital. Two patients (22.2%) had meningitis diagnosed through clinical, laboratory and bacteriologic findings. Both patients had predisposition diseases (previous difficult spinal tap, ventriculo-peritoneal shunt). The other isolations were considered as contaminants. Three patients (33.3%) with no VS meningitis had other different serious disease (sepsis without bacteriologic confirmation). VS are isolated with relative frequency from CSF, although they cause meningitis in less than one-quarter of the cases (those who have a predisposition disease). In the other cases, VS are isolated as contaminants of CSF and other disease should be search as cause of patient symptoms.

  2. Different Candida parapsilosis clinical isolates and lipase deficient strain trigger an altered cellular immune response

    PubMed Central

    Tóth, Renáta; Alonso, Maria F.; Bain, Judith M.; Vágvölgyi, Csaba; Erwig, Lars-Peter; Gácser, Attila

    2015-01-01

    Numerous human diseases can be associated with fungal infections either as potential causative agents or as a result of changed immune status due to a primary disease. Fungal infections caused by Candida species can vary from mild to severe dependent upon the site of infection, length of exposure, and past medical history. Patients with impaired immune status are at increased risk for chronic fungal infections. Recent epidemiologic studies have revealed the increasing incidence of candidiasis caused by non-albicans species such as Candida parapsilosis. Due to its increasing relevance we chose two distinct C. parapsilosis strains, to describe the cellular innate immune response toward this species. In the first section of our study we compared the interaction of CLIB 214 and GA1 cells with murine and human macrophages. Both strains are commonly used to investigate C. parapsilosis virulence properties. CLIB 214 is a rapidly pseudohyphae-forming strain and GA1 is an isolate that mainly exists in a yeast form. Our results showed, that the phagocyte response was similar in terms of overall uptake, however differences were observed in macrophage migration and engulfment of fungal cells. As C. parapsilosis releases extracellular lipases in order to promote host invasion we further investigated the role of these secreted components during the distinct stages of the phagocytic process. Using a secreted lipase deficient mutant strain and the parental strain GA1 individually and simultaneously, we confirmed that fungal secreted lipases influence the fungi's virulence by detecting altered innate cellular responses. In this study we report that two isolates of a single species can trigger markedly distinct host responses and that lipase secretion plays a role on the cellular level of host–pathogen interactions. PMID:26528256

  3. Clotrimazole Drug Resistance in Candida glabrata Clinical Isolates Correlates with Increased Expression of the Drug:H+ Antiporters CgAqr1, CgTpo1_1, CgTpo3, and CgQdr2

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Catarina; Ribeiro, Jonathan; Miranda, Isabel M.; Silva-Dias, Ana; Cavalheiro, Mafalda; Costa-de-Oliveira, Sofia; Rodrigues, Acácio G.; Teixeira, Miguel C.

    2016-01-01

    For years, antifungal drug resistance in Candida species has been associated to the expression of ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) multidrug transporters. More recently, a few drug efflux pumps from the Drug:H+ Antiporter (DHA) family have also been shown to play a role in this process, although to date only the Candida albicans Mdr1 transporter has been demonstrated to be relevant in the clinical acquisition of antifungal drug resistance. This work provides evidence to suggest the involvement of the C. glabrata DHA transporters CgAqr1, CgQdr2, CgTpo1_1, and CgTpo3 in the clinical acquisition of clotrimazole drug resistance. A screening for azole drug resistance in 138 C. glabrata clinical isolates, from patients attending two major Hospitals in Portugal, was performed. Based on this screening, 10 clotrimazole susceptible and 10 clotrimazole resistant isolates were selected for further analysis. The transcript levels of CgAQR1, CgQDR2, CgTPO1_1, and CgTPO3 were found to be significantly up-regulated in resistant isolates when compared to the susceptible ones, with a level of correlation that was found to be similar to that of CgCDR2, an ABC gene known to be involved in the clinical acquisition of resistance. As a proof-of-concept experiment, the CgTPO3 gene was deleted in an azole resistant C. glabrata isolate, exhibiting high levels of expression of this gene. The deletion of CgTPO3 in this isolate was found to lead to decreased resistance to clotrimazole and fluconazole, and increased accumulation of azole drugs, thus suggesting the involvement of this transporter in the manifestation of azole resistance. PMID:27148215

  4. Inhibition of Nucleic Acid Biosynthesis Makes Little Difference to Formation of Amphotericin B-Tolerant Persisters in Candida albicans Biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jing; Liu, Xiaohua

    2014-01-01

    Candida albicans persisters constitute a small subpopulation of biofilm cells and play a major role in recalcitrant chronic candidiasis; however, the mechanism underlying persister formation remains unclear. Persisters are often described as dormant, multidrug-tolerant, nongrowing cells. Persister cells are difficult to isolate and study not only due to their low levels in C. albicans biofilms but also due to their transient, reversible phenotype. In this study, we tried to induce persister formation by inducing C. albicans cells into a dormant state. C. albicans cells were pretreated with 5-fluorocytosine (planktonic cells, 0.8 μg ml−1; biofilm cells, 1 μg ml−1) for 6 h at 37°C, which inhibits nucleic acid and protein synthesis. Biofilms and planktonic cultures of eight C. albicans strains were surveyed for persisters after amphotericin B treatment (100 μg ml−1 for 24 h) and CFU assay. None of the planktonic cultures, with or without 5-fluorocytosine pretreatment, contained persisters. Persister cells were found in biofilms of all tested C. albicans strains, representing approximately 0.01 to 1.93% of the total population. However, the persister levels were not significantly increased in C. albicans biofilms pretreated with 5-fluorocytosine. These results suggest that inhibition of nucleic acid synthesis did not seem to increase the formation of amphotericin B-tolerant persisters in C. albicans biofilms. PMID:25547355

  5. [High molecular weight chitosan and sodium alginate effect on secretory acid proteinase of Candida albicans].

    PubMed

    Calamari, Silvia; Bojanich, Alejandra; Barembaum, Silvina; Azcurra, Ana; Virga, Carolina; Dorronsoro, Susana

    2004-12-01

    The effect of high molecular weight chitosan (HMWCh) and sodium alginate (NaAL) on acid proteinase secretion of Candida albicans (one of culture collection and five isolates) was evaluated. The secretion of acid proteinase was induced in the presence and the absence of these polymers in different concentrations and their enzymatic activity was determined. HMWCh and NaAL significantly diminished the enzymatic activity (>76% for the collection strains and > 89% for the isolates, p < 0.05). HMWCh did not modify protein concentrations, but NaAL did. It can be concluded that both polymers can inhibit the proteinase activity of Candida albicans.

  6. Uncommonly isolated clinical Pseudomonas: identification and phylogenetic assignation.

    PubMed

    Mulet, M; Gomila, M; Ramírez, A; Cardew, S; Moore, E R B; Lalucat, J; García-Valdés, E

    2017-02-01

    Fifty-two Pseudomonas strains that were difficult to identify at the species level in the phenotypic routine characterizations employed by clinical microbiology laboratories were selected for genotypic-based analysis. Species level identifications were done initially by partial sequencing of the DNA dependent RNA polymerase sub-unit D gene (rpoD). Two other gene sequences, for the small sub-unit ribosonal RNA (16S rRNA) and for DNA gyrase sub-unit B (gyrB) were added in a multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) study to confirm the species identifications. These sequences were analyzed with a collection of reference sequences from the type strains of 161 Pseudomonas species within an in-house multi-locus sequence analysis database. Whole-cell matrix-assisted laser-desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) analyses of these strains complemented the DNA sequenced-based phylogenetic analyses and were observed to be in accordance with the results of the sequence data. Twenty-three out of 52 strains were assigned to 12 recognized species not commonly detected in clinical specimens and 29 (56 %) were considered representatives of at least ten putative new species. Most strains were distributed within the P. fluorescens and P. aeruginosa lineages. The value of rpoD sequences in species-level identifications for Pseudomonas is emphasized. The correct species identifications of clinical strains is essential for establishing the intrinsic antibiotic resistance patterns and improved treatment plans.

  7. Terpenoids inhibit Candida albicans growth by affecting membrane integrity and arrest of cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Zore, Gajanan B; Thakre, Archana D; Jadhav, Sitaram; Karuppayil, S Mohan

    2011-10-15

    Anti-Candida potential of six terpenoids were evaluated in this study against various isolates of Candida albicans (n=39) and non-C. albicans (n=9) that are differentially susceptible to fluconazole. All the six terpenoids tested, showed excellent activity and were equally effective against isolates of Candida sps., tested in this study. Linalool and citral were the most effective ones, inhibiting all the isolates at ≤0.064% (v/v). Five among the six terpenoids tested were fungicidal. Time dependent kill curve assay showed that MFCs of linalool and eugenol were highly toxic to C. albicans, killing 99.9% inoculum within seven min of exposure, while that of citronellal, linalyl acetate and citral required 15min, 1h and 2h, respectively. FIC index values (Linalool - 0.140, benzyl benzoate - 0.156, eugenol - 0.265, citral - 0.281 and 0.312 for linalyl acetate and citronellal) and isobologram obtained by checker board assay showed that all the six terpenoids tested exhibit excellent synergistic activity with fluconazole against a fluconazole resistant strain of C. albicans. Terpenoids tested arrested C. albicans cells at different phases of the cell cycle i.e. linalool and LA at G1, citral and citronellal at S phase and benzyl benzoate at G2-M phase and induced apoptosis. Linalool, citral, citronellal and benzyl benzoate caused more than 50% inhibition of germ tube induction at 0.008%, while eugenol and LA required 0.032 and 0.016% (v/v) concentrations, respectively. MICs of all the terpenoids for the C. albicans growth were non toxic to HeLa cells. Terpenoids tested exhibited excellent activity against C. albicans yeast and hyphal form growth at the concentrations that are non toxic to HeLa cells. Terpenoids tested in this study may find use in antifungal chemotherapy, not only as antifungal agents but also as synergistic agents along with conventional drugs like fluconazole.

  8. Comparison of anidulafungin MICs determined by the clinical and laboratory standards institute broth microdilution method (M27-A3 document) and Etest for Candida species isolates.

    PubMed

    Espinel-Ingroff, Ana; Canton, E; Peman, J; Martín-Mazuelo, E

    2010-03-01

    Anidulafungin Etest and CLSI MICs were compared for 143 Candida sp. isolates to assess essential (within 2 log(2) dilutions) and categorical agreements (according to three susceptibility breakpoints). Based on agreement percentages, our data indicated that Etest is not suitable to test anidulafungin against Candida parapsilosis and C. guilliermondii (54.4 to 82.4% essential and categorical agreements) but is more suitable for C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. krusei, and C. tropicalis (87.9 to 100% categorical agreement).

  9. PKC signaling regulates drug resistance of the fungal pathogen Candida albicans via circuitry comprised of Mkc1, calcineurin, and Hsp90.

    PubMed

    LaFayette, Shantelle L; Collins, Cathy; Zaas, Aimee K; Schell, Wiley A; Betancourt-Quiroz, Marisol; Gunatilaka, A A Leslie; Perfect, John R; Cowen, Leah E

    2010-08-26

    Fungal pathogens exploit diverse mechanisms to survive exposure to antifungal drugs. This poses concern given the limited number of clinically useful antifungals and the growing population of immunocompromised individuals vulnerable to life-threatening fungal infection. To identify molecules that abrogate resistance to the most widely deployed class of antifungals, the azoles, we conducted a screen of 1,280 pharmacologically active compounds. Three out of seven hits that abolished azole resistance of a resistant mutant of the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and a clinical isolate of the leading human fungal pathogen Candida albicans were inhibitors of protein kinase C (PKC), which regulates cell wall integrity during growth, morphogenesis, and response to cell wall stress. Pharmacological or genetic impairment of Pkc1 conferred hypersensitivity to multiple drugs that target synthesis of the key cell membrane sterol ergosterol, including azoles, allylamines, and morpholines. Pkc1 enabled survival of cell membrane stress at least in part via the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade in both species, though through distinct downstream effectors. Strikingly, inhibition of Pkc1 phenocopied inhibition of the molecular chaperone Hsp90 or its client protein calcineurin. PKC signaling was required for calcineurin activation in response to drug exposure in S. cerevisiae. In contrast, Pkc1 and calcineurin independently regulate drug resistance via a common target in C. albicans. We identified an additional level of regulatory control in the C. albicans circuitry linking PKC signaling, Hsp90, and calcineurin as genetic reduction of Hsp90 led to depletion of the terminal MAPK, Mkc1. Deletion of C. albicans PKC1 rendered fungistatic ergosterol biosynthesis inhibitors fungicidal and attenuated virulence in a murine model of systemic candidiasis. This work establishes a new role for PKC signaling in drug resistance, novel circuitry through which Hsp90 regulates drug

  10. Biofilms of non-Candida albicans Candida species: quantification, structure and matrix composition.

    PubMed

    Silva, Sónia; Henriques, Mariana; Martins, António; Oliveira, Rosário; Williams, David; Azeredo, Joana

    2009-11-01

    Most cases of candidiasis have been attributed to C. albicans, but recently, non- Candida albicans Candida (NCAC) species have been identified as common pathogens. The ability of Candida species to form biofilms has important clinical repercussions due to their increased resistance to antifungal therapy and the ability of yeast cells within the biofilms to withstand host immune defenses. Given this clinical importance of the biofilm growth form, the aim of this study was to characterize biofilms produced by three NCAC species, namely C. parapsilosis, C. tropicalis and C. glabrata. The biofilm forming ability of clinical isolates of C. parapsilosis, C. tropicalis and C. glabrata recovered from different sources, was evaluated by crystal violet staining. The structure and morphological characteristics of the biofilms were also assessed by scanning electron microscopy and the biofilm matrix composition analyzed for protein and carbohydrate content. All NCAC species were able to form biofilms although these were less extensive for C. glabrata compared with C. parapsilosis and C. tropicalis. It was evident that C. parapsilosis biofilm production was highly strain dependent, a feature not evident with C. glabrata and C. tropicalis. Scanning electron microscopy revealed structural differences for biofilms with respect to cell morphology and spatial arrangement. Candida parapsilosis biofilm matrices had large amounts of carbohydrate with less protein. Conversely, matrices extracted from C. tropicalis biofilms had low amounts of carbohydrate and protein. Interestingly, C. glabrata biofilm matrix was high in both protein and carbohydrate content. The present work demonstrates that biofilm forming ability, structure and matrix composition are highly species dependent with additional strain variability occurring with C. parapsilosis.

  11. A Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Uncovers a Novel Function for the Transcription Factor Ace2 during Candida albicans Hyphal Development

    PubMed Central

    Orellana-Muñoz, Sara; Gutiérrez-Escribano, Pilar; Arnáiz-Pita, Yolanda; Dueñas-Santero, Encarnación; Suárez, M. Belén; Bougnoux, Marie-Elisabeth; del Rey, Francisco; Sherlock, Gavin; d’Enfert, Christophe; Correa-Bordes, Jaime; de Aldana, Carlos R. Vázquez

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is a major invasive fungal pathogen in humans. An important virulence factor is its ability to switch between the yeast and hyphal forms, and these filamentous forms are important in tissue penetration and invasion. A common feature for filamentous growth is the ability to inhibit cell separation after cytokinesis, although it is poorly understood how this process is regulated developmentally. In C. albicans, the formation of filaments during hyphal growth requires changes in septin ring dynamics. In this work, we studied the functional relationship between septins and the transcription factor Ace2, which controls the expression of enzymes that catalyze septum degradation. We found that alternative translation initiation produces two Ace2 isoforms. While full-length Ace2, Ace2L, influences septin dynamics in a transcription-independent manner in hyphal cells but not in yeast cells, the use of methionine-55 as the initiation codon gives rise to Ace2S, which functions as the nuclear transcription factor required for the expression of cell separation genes. Genetic evidence indicates that Ace2L influences the incorporation of the Sep7 septin to hyphal septin rings in order to avoid inappropriate activation of cell separation during filamentous growth. Interestingly, a natural single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) present in the C. albicans WO-1 background and other C. albicans commensal and clinical isolates generates a stop codon in the ninth codon of Ace2L that mimics the phenotype of cells lacking Ace2L. Finally, we report that Ace2L and Ace2S interact with the NDR kinase Cbk1 and that impairing activity of this kinase results in a defect in septin dynamics similar to that of hyphal cells lacking Ace2L. Together, our findings identify Ace2L and the NDR kinase Cbk1 as new elements of the signaling system that modify septin ring dynamics in hyphae to allow cell-chain formation, a feature that appears to have evolved in specific C. albicans lineages

  12. Comparison of atypical Brachyspira spp. clinical isolates and classic strains in a mouse model of swine dysentery.

    PubMed

    Burrough, Eric; Strait, Erin; Kinyon, Joann; Bower, Leslie; Madson, Darin; Schwartz, Kent; Frana, Timothy; Songer, J Glenn

    2012-12-07

    Multiple Brachyspira spp. can colonize the porcine colon, and the presence of the strongly beta-hemolytic Brachyspira hyodysenteriae is typically associated with clinical swine dysentery. Recently, several Brachyspira spp. have been isolated from the feces of pigs with clinical disease suggestive of swine dysentery, yet these isolates were not identified as B. hyodysenteriae by genotypic or phenotypic methods. This study used a mouse model of swine dysentery to compare the pathogenic potential of seventeen different Brachyspira isolates including eight atypical clinical isolates, six typical clinical isolates, the standard strain of B. hyodysenteriae (B204), and reference strains of Brachyspira intermedia and Brachyspira innocens. Results revealed that strongly beta-hemolytic isolates induced significantly greater cecal inflammation than weakly beta-hemolytic isolates regardless of the genetic identification of the isolate, and that strongly beta-hemolytic isolates identified as 'Brachyspira sp. SASK30446' and B. intermedia by PCR produced lesions indistinguishable from those caused by B. hyodysenteriae in this model.

  13. Nontuberculous Mycobacteria Isolation from Clinical and Environmental Samples in Iran: Twenty Years of Surveillance.

    PubMed

    Velayati, Ali Akbar; Farnia, Parissa; Mozafari, Mohadese; Mirsaeidi, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are opportunistic pathogens that are widely distributed in the environment. There is a lack of data on species distribution of these organisms from Iran. This study consists of a review of NTM articles published in Iran between the years 1992 and 2014. In this review, 20 articles and 14 case reports were identified. Among the 20 articles, 13 (65%) studies focused on NTM isolates from clinical specimens, 6 (30%) studies examined NTM isolates from environmental samples, and one (5%) article included both clinical and environmental isolates. M. fortuitum (229/997; 23%) was recorded as the most prevalent and rapid growing mycobacteria (RGM) species in both clinical (28%) and environmental (19%) isolated samples (P < 0.05). Among slow growing mycobacteria (SGM), M. simiae (103/494; 21%) demonstrated a higher frequency in clinical samples whereas in environmental samples it was M. flavescens (44/503; 9%). These data represent information from 14 provinces out of 31 provinces of Iran. No information is available in current published data on clinical or environmental NTM from the remaining 17 provinces in Iran. These results emphasize the potential importance of NTM as well as the underestimation of NTM frequency in Iran. NTM is an important clinical problem associated with significant morbidity and mortality in Iran. Continued research is needed from both clinical and environmental sources to help clinicians and researchers better understand and address NTM treatment and prevention.

  14. Enzyme polymorphism, prodigiosin production, and plasmid fingerprints in clinical and naturally occurring isolates of Serratia marcescens.

    PubMed Central

    Gargallo-Viola, D

    1989-01-01

    Enzyme polymorphism and genetic relationship among 99 Serratia marcescens isolates obtained from clinical and environmental sources were determined by analysis of electromorphs in nine enzyme loci encoded by chromosomal genes. Seven of the loci were polymorphic, and 33 distinctive electrophoretic types (ETs) representing multilocus genotypes were identified. Cluster analysis, based on the proportion of mismatches between multilocus genotypes, revealed two clearly differentiated groups of ETs in S. marcescens. One was represented exclusively by isolates with nonchromogenic biotypes recovered almost entirely (97.3%) from clinical samples. The other group comprised all isolates characterized by the production of prodigiosin or by belonging to a chromogenic biotype. Absolute correlation was found between the ability to produce prodigiosin and the absence of plasmids. In contrast, 24% of the nonchromogenic isolates contained plasmids. Results obtained by analysis of multilocus genotypes were related to those obtained by biotyping and plasmid fingerprinting. However, more groups could be distinguished by analysis of ETs than by biotyping. Plasmid fingerprinting was a limited typing system because many isolates lacked plasmids. Although the results of this study did not permit a definitive correlation between ETs and pathogenicity of the isolates, more detailed studies of these groups will help to understand the different clinical significances of the nonchromogenic and chromogenic isolates of S. marcescens. PMID:2663918

  15. Candida albicans and Candida tropicalis in oral candidosis: quantitative analysis, exoenzyme activity, and antifungal drug sensitivity.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Karen Regina Carim; Ferreira, Joseane Cristina; Komesu, Marilena Chinali; Candido, Regina Celia

    2009-02-01

    Candida albicans and C. tropicalis obtained from whole saliva of patients presenting signs of oral candidosis were assayed for quantification of colony forming units, exoenzyme activity (phospholipase and proteinase) and antifungal drug sensitivity (amphotericin B, fluconazole and itraconazole) by the reference method of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. The number of colony forming units per milliliter varied according to the Candida species involved and whether a single or mixed infection was present. Proteinase activity was observed in both C. albicans and C. tropicalis, but phospholipase activity was noted only in C. albicans. In vitro resistance to antifungals was verified in both species, but C. tropicalis appears to be more resistant to the tested antifungals than C. albicans.

  16. Neutralisation patterns among recent British and North American feline calicivirus isolates from different clinical origins.

    PubMed

    Knowles, J O; Dawson, S; Gaskell, R M; Gaskell, C J; Harvey, C E

    1990-08-11

    The neutralisation patterns of 103 recent isolates of feline calicivirus from cats with chronic stomatitis or acute feline calicivirus disease, and from cats with neither oral nor respiratory disease were compared. There were no statistically significant differences between the proportions of isolates from each clinical source neutralised by individual feline calicivirus cat antisera. Different antisera showed widely differing degrees of cross reactivity; antisera to the most widely used vaccine strain F9 being the most cross reactive, neutralising 54 per cent of all the field isolates, and antisera to a field isolate LS015 the next most cross reactive, neutralising 29 per cent of the field isolates. However, the cross reactivity of antisera to early British isolates (A4, 68/40 and 69/1112) was much reduced (overall less than 10 per cent) whereas in the early 1970s 65 per cent of 117 field isolates from clinically normal cats were neutralised by A4 antiserum, and 40 per cent by each of 68/40 and 69/1112 antisera. This suggests a change in the spectrum of antigenicity among feline calicivirus isolates over the past 15 years. However, the cross reactivity of F9 antisera appeared to be similar to that in earlier studies. The relevance of these findings to vaccination is discussed.

  17. Differential expression of putative drug resistance genes in Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    González-Escalante, Laura; Peñuelas-Urquides, Katia; Said-Fernández, Salvador; Silva-Ramírez, Beatriz; Bermúdez de León, Mario

    2015-12-01

    Understanding drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis requires an integrated analysis of strain lineages, mutations and gene expression. Previously, we reported the differential expression of esxG, esxH, infA, groES, rpmI, rpsA and lipF genes in a sensitive M. tuberculosis strain and in a multidrug-resistant clinical isolate. Here, we have evaluated the expression of these genes in 24 clinical isolates that belong to different lineages and have different drug resistance profiles. In vitro, growth kinetics analysis showed no difference in the growth of the clinical isolates, and thus drug resistance occurred without a fitness cost. However, a quantitative reverse transcription PCR analysis of gene expression revealed high variability among the clinical isolates, including those with similar drug resistance profiles. Due to the complexity of gene regulation pathways and the wide diversity of M. tuberculosis lineages, the use of gene expression as a molecular signature for drug resistance is not straightforward. Therefore, we recommend that the expression of M. tuberculosis genes be performed individually, and baseline expression levels should be verified among several different clinical isolates, before any further applications of these findings.

  18. Clinical Significance of Nontuberculous Mycobacteria Isolated From Respiratory Specimens in a Chinese Tuberculosis Tertiary Care Center

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Hongfei; Han, Xiqin; Wang, Qingfeng; Wang, Jing; Wang, Jun; Chu, Naihui; Huang, Hairong

    2016-01-01

    The clinical relevance of non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) has been reported to be different dramatically by species or by regions, however, no such evaluation has been performed in China.A retrospective study was performed in Beijing Chest Hospital. All the NTM strains isolated from respiratory specimens in the past 5 years, and patients’ clinical records (symptoms and radiographic information etc.) were investigated. The clinical relevance was evaluated according to the criteria recommended by the American Thoracic society. Totally 232 NTM strains were recruited, among them, M. intracellulare was the dominant species (40.5%), followed by M. abscessus (28.4%). 109 patients, with 185 total isolates, had full clinical records available for review. 84.4% (38/45), 85.7% (24/28%) and 63.6% (7/11) of patients with isolation of M. intracellulare, M. abscessus and M. kansasii, respectively, were categorized as definite NTM disease. Whereas all the 10 patients with isolation of M. gordonae were defined as unlikely NTM disease. The majority of NTMs isolates yielded from respiratory specimens in Beijing Chest Hospital were clinically significant, and M. intracellulare and M. abscessus was the dominated species of NTM lung disease. NTM lung infections demonstrated some specific chest radiograph characteristics. PMID:27808247

  19. Person-to-person transfer of Candida albicans in the spacecraft environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, D. L.; Mehta, S. K.; Magee, B. B.; Mishra, S. K.

    1995-01-01

    We assessed the exchange of Candida albicans among crew members during 10 Space Shuttle missions. Throat, nasal, urine and faecal specimens were collected from 61 crew members twice before and once after space flights ranging from 7 to 10 days in duration; crews consisted of groups of five, six or seven men and women. Candida albicans was isolated at least once from 20 of the 61 subjects (33%). Candida strains were identified by restriction-fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) after digestion by the endonucleases EcoRI and HinfI; further discrimination was gained by Southern blot hybridization with the C. albicans repeat fragment 27A. Eighteen of the 20 Candida-positive crew members carried different strains of C. albicans in the specimens collected. Possible transfer of C. albicans between members of the same crew was demonstrated only once in the 10 missions studied. We conclude that the transfer of C. albicans among crew members during Space Shuttle flights is less frequent than had been predicted from earlier reports.

  20. Systemic Staphylococcus aureus infection mediated by Candida albicans hyphal invasion of mucosal tissue

    PubMed Central

    Schlecht, Lisa Marie; Peters, Brian M.; Krom, Bastiaan P.; Freiberg, Jeffrey A.; Hänsch, Gertrud M.; Filler, Scott G.

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans and Staphylococcus aureus are often co-isolated in cases of biofilm-associated infections. C. albicans can cause systemic disease through morphological switch from the rounded yeast to the invasive hyphal form. Alternatively, systemic S. aureus infections arise from seeding through breaks in host epithelial layers although many patients have no documented portal of entry. We describe a novel strategy by which S. aureus is able to invade host tissue and disseminate via adherence to the invasive hyphal elements of Candida albicans. In vitro and ex vivo findings demonstrate a specific binding of the staphylococci to the candida hyphal elements. The C. albicans cell wall adhesin Als3p binds to multiple staphylococcal adhesins. Furthermore, Als3p is required for C. albicans to transport S. aureus into the tissue and cause a disseminated infection in an oral co-colonization model. These findings suggest that C. albicans can facilitate the invasion of S. aureus across mucosal barriers, leading to systemic infection in co-colonized patients. PMID:25332378

  1. C. albicans growth, transition, biofilm formation, and gene expression modulation by antimicrobial decapeptide KSL-W

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Antimicrobial peptides have been the focus of much research over the last decade because of their effectiveness and broad-spectrum activity against microbial pathogens. These peptides also participate in inflammation and the innate host defense system by modulating the immune function that promotes immune cell adhesion and migration as well as the respiratory burst, which makes them even more attractive as therapeutic agents. This has led to the synthesis of various antimicrobial peptides, including KSL-W (KKVVFWVKFK-NH2), for potential clinical use. Because this peptide displays antimicrobial activity against bacteria, we sought to determine its antifungal effect on C. albicans. Growth, hyphal form, biofilm formation, and degradation were thus examined along with EFG1, NRG1, EAP1, HWP1, and SAP 2-4-5-6 gene expression by quantitative RT-PCR. Results This study demonstrates that KSL-W markedly reduced C. albicans growth at both early and late incubation times. The significant effect of KSL-W on C. albicans growth was observed beginning at 10 μg/ml after 5 h of contact by reducing C. albicans transition and at 25 μg/ml by completely inhibiting C. albicans transition. Cultured C. albicans under biofilm-inducing conditions revealed that both KSL-W and amphotericin B significantly decreased biofilm formation at 2, 4, and 6 days of culture. KSL-W also disrupted mature C. albicans biofilms. The effect of KSL-W on C. albicans growth, transition, and biofilm formation/disruption may thus occur through gene modulation, as the expression of various genes involved in C. albicans growth, transition and biofilm formation were all downregulated when C. albicans was treated with KSL-W. The effect was greater when C. albicans was cultured under hyphae-inducing conditions. Conclusions These data provide new insight into the efficacy of KSL-W against C. albicans and its potential use as an antifungal therapy. PMID:24195531

  2. Cytotoxic effect of acriflavine against clinical isolates of Acanthamoeba spp.

    PubMed

    Polat, Zubeyda Akin; Karakus, Gulderen

    2013-02-01

    Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK) is a potentially devastating and sight-threatening infection of the cornea caused by the ubiquitous free-living amoebae, Acanthamoeba species. Its eradication is difficult because the amoebas encyst, making it highly resistant to anti-amoebic drugs. Acriflavine neutral (ACF) has been used for treatment of microbial infections for humans and fishes. The aim of our study was to evaluate the time-dependent cytotoxicities of ACF against Acanthamoeba spp. Trophozoites and cysts of three different strains (strain PAT06 Acanthamoeba castellanii, strain 2HH Acanthamoeba hatchetti, and strain 11DS A. hatchetti) of Acanthamoeba spp. were tested. All strains had been isolated from patients suffering from a severe AK. The effects of the ACF with the concentrations ranging from 15 to 500 mg mL(-1) on the cytotoxicity of Acanthamoeba strains were examined. ACF showed a time- and dose-dependent amebicidal action on the trophozoites and cysts. Pat06 (A. castellanii) was the most resistant, while strain 11DS (A. hatchetti) was the most sensitive. As a result, ACF could be concluded as a new agent for the treatment of Acanthamoeba infections. On the other hand, it still needs to be further evaluated by in vivo test systems to confirm the efficiency of its biological effect.

  3. Molecular tracking of Candida albicans in a neonatal intensive care unit: long-term colonizations versus catheter-related infections.

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Diez, B; Martinez, V; Alvarez, M; Rodriguez-Tudela, J L; Martinez-Suarez, J V

    1997-01-01

    Nosocomial neonatal candidiasis is a major problem in infants requiring intensive therapy. The subjects of this retrospective study were nine preterm infants admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit of the Hospital Central de Asturias between March 1993 and August 1994. The infants were infected with or colonized by Candida albicans. Five patients developed C. albicans bloodstream infections. A total of 36 isolates (including isolates from catheters and parenteral nutrition) were examined for molecular relatedness by PCR fingerprinting and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. The core sequence of phage M13 was used as a single primer in the PCR-based fingerprinting procedure, and RFLP analysis was performed with C. albicans-specific DNA probe 27A. Both techniques were evaluated with a panel of eight C. albicans reference strains, and each technique showed eight different patterns. With the 36 isolates from neonates, each technique enabled us to identify by PCR and RFLP analysis seven and six different patterns, respectively. The combination of these two methods (composite DNA type) identified eight different profiles. A strain with one of these profiles was present in three patients and in their respective catheters. Patients infected with or colonized by this isolate profile were clustered in time. Among the other patients, each patient was infected over time and at multiple anatomic sites with a C. albicans strain with a distinct DNA type. We conclude that C. albicans was most commonly producing long-term colonizations, although horizontal transmission probably due to catheters also occurred. PMID:9399489

  4. Isolation of a toxigenic and clinical genotype of clostridium difficile in retail meats in Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Quesada-Gómez, Carlos; Mulvey, Michael R; Vargas, Pablo; Gamboa-Coronado, María del Mar; Rodríguez, César; Rodríguez-Cavillini, Evelyn

    2013-02-01

    We isolated a regional toxigenic genotype of Clostridium difficile, previously found in human infection in 4 of 200 (2%) samples of retail meats for human consumption: 1 of 67 samples of beef, 2 of 66 of pork, and 1 of 67 of poultry meat. These four isolates were positive for the tcdA and tcdB genes but negative for deletion of the tcdC and cdtB genes. All strains induced cytopathic effects in HeLa cells. However, they were susceptible to some antibiotics to which clinical isolates are often resistant. All strains were susceptible to vancomycin, metronidazole, moxifloxacin, and rifampicin but resistant to clindamycin and ciprofloxacin. This first report of isolation of C. difficile in foodstuff from Latin America lends support to the notion that animal products serve as a reservoir for clinical strains of this pathogen in the community.

  5. Comparative analyses of canine distemper viral isolates from clinical cases of canine distemper in vaccinated dogs.

    PubMed

    Lan, N T; Yamaguchi, R; Inomata, A; Furuya, Y; Uchida, K; Sugano, S; Tateyama, S

    2006-06-15

    Sequence and phylogenetic analyses of three isolates of canine distemper virus (CDV) isolated from three dogs with a vaccination history were compared with the same analyses of vaccine virus isolated from a vaccine used for dogs. The three dogs showed clinical signs of a recent major type of CD in Japan, including oculonasal discharge and diarrhea, and pathological findings including non-suppurative encephalitis, pneumonia, mild gastroenteritis and lymphoid depletion. Inclusion bodies were in the stomach without inflammation and encephalitis was without clinical signs. One of the highest titers of CDV in different organs of the three dogs was commonly systemic lymphatic organs, including the spleen, lymph nodes and tonsils. New isolates of CDV joined to the clades of the Asia 1 group that is far from the vaccine group. These results surely indicate that wild strains of CDV from dogs with a vaccination history were not reversed vaccine virus, and that the dogs showed characteristics of recent CD in Japan.

  6. Isolated Persistent Left Superior Vena Cava: A Case Report and its Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Bisoyi, Samarjit; Jagannathan, Usha; Dash, Anjan Kumar; Tripathy, Sabyasachi; Mohapatra, Raghunath; Pattnaik, Naba Kumar; Sahu, Satyajit; Nayak, Debashish

    2017-01-01

    The venous anomaly of a persistent left superior vena cava (PLSVC) affects 0.3%–0.5% of the general population. PLSVC with absent right superior vena cava, also termed as “isolated PLSVC,” is an extremely rare venous anomaly. Almost half of the patients with isolated PLSVC have cardiac anomalies in the form of atrial septal defect, endocardial cushion defects, or tetralogy of Fallot. Isolated PLSVC is usually innocuous. Its discovery, however, has important clinical implications. It can pose clinical difficulties with central venous access, cardiothoracic surgeries, and pacemaker implantation. When it drains to the left atrium, it may create a right to left shunt. In this case report, we present the incidental finding of isolated PLSVC in a patient who underwent aortic valve replacement. Awareness about this condition and its variations is important to avoid complications. PMID:28074807

  7. Characterization of DNA topoisomerase I from Candida albicans as a target for drug discovery.

    PubMed Central

    Fostel, J M; Montgomery, D A; Shen, L L

    1992-01-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic pathogen responsible for life-threatening infections in persons with impaired immune systems. Topoisomerase I is a potential target for novel antifungal agents; however, in order for this enzyme to be a therapeutically useful target, it needs to be demonstrated that the fungal and human topoisomerases differ sufficiently as to allow the fungal topoisomerase to be selectively targeted. To address this question, we isolated the topoisomerase I from C. albicans and compared its biochemical properties with those of the mammalian enzyme. Similar to other eukaryotic type I topoisomerases, the C. albicans type I topoisomerase has an apparent molecular mass of 102 kDa and covalently links to the 3' end of DNA, as shown after the reaction is interrupted by sodium dodecyl sulfate. Topoisomerase poisons such as camptothecin act by stabilizing the cleavage complex formed by the topoisomerase I and DNA. We observed that the C. albicans and mammalian type I topoisomerases differ in that the C. albicans cleavage complex is approximately 10-fold less sensitive to camptothecin than the mammalian cleavage complex is. In addition, we found that the antifungal agent eupolauridine can stabilize the cleavage complex formed by both the C. albicans and human topoisomerases and that the response of the C. albicans topoisomerase I to this drug is greater than that of the human enzyme. Thus, the topoisomerase I from C. albicans is sufficiently distinct from the human enzyme as to allow differential chemical targeting and will therefore make a good target for antifungal drug discovery. Images PMID:1332588

  8. [Clinically isolated discharges from the nipples. Apropos of 74 cases].

    PubMed

    Granger, M; Fetissof, F; Jallais, L; Sam Giao, M; Lansac, J

    1985-01-01

    74 cases with discharge from the breasts were treated surgically by pyramidectomy and histology. The histology was studied. The causes were: 1) ectasia (55%), 2) papilloma (30%) and 3), much more rare, cancer (8%). A blood-stained discharge (31 cases, 42%) could be due to these three causes, but the 4 cancers and the 2 borderline lesions belonged to the group of blood-stained discharges. A serious discharge (17 cases, 23%) could be due to ectasia or a papilloma. A thick discharge (16 cases, 21.5%) is always due to ectasia. The lactiferous duct is treated clinically and using X-rays to outline it. X-ray diagnostic methods and cytology are used in making the diagnosis. Clusters of papillae show that there is intra-canular proliferation. The literature is reviewed and a scheme of treatment is outlined.

  9. Clinical Significance of Commensal Gram-Positive Rods Routinely Isolated from Patient Samples.

    PubMed

    Leal, Sixto M; Jones, Melissa; Gilligan, Peter H

    2016-12-01

    Commensal bacteria from the skin and mucosal surfaces are routinely isolated from patient samples and considered contaminants. The majority of these isolates are catalase-positive Gram-positive rods from multiple genera routinely classified as diphtheroids. These organisms can be seen upon Gram staining of clinical specimens or can be isolated as the predominant or pure species in culture, raising a priori suspicion of a possible involvement in infection. With the development and adoption of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), suspicious isolates are now routinely identified to the species level. In this study, we performed a retrospective data review (2012 to 2015) and utilized site-specific laboratory criteria and chart reviews to identify species within the diphtheroid classification representative of true infection versus contamination. Our data set included 762 isolates from 13 genera constituting 41 bacterial species. Only 18% represented true infection, and 82% were deemed contaminants. Clinically significant isolates were identified in anaerobic wounds (18%), aerobic wounds (30%), blood (5.5%), urine (22%), cerebrospinal fluid (24%), ophthalmologic cultures (8%), and sterile sites (20%). Organisms deemed clinically significant included multiple Actinomyces species in wounds, Propionibacterium species in joints and cerebrospinal fluid associated with central nervous system hardware, Corynebacterium kroppenstedtii (100%) in breast, and Corynebacterium striatum in multiple sites. Novel findings include clinically significant urinary tract infections by Actinomyces neuii (21%) and Corynebacterium aurimucosum (21%). Taken together, these findings indicate that species-level identification of diphtheroids isolated with a priori suspicion of infection is essential to accurately determine whether an isolate belongs to a species associated with specific types of infection.

  10. Interactions with lectins and agglutination profiles of clinical, food, and environmental isolates of Listeria.

    PubMed Central

    Facinelli, B; Giovanetti, E; Casolari, C; Varaldo, P E

    1994-01-01

    On the basis of preliminary trials with 14 collection strains of Listeria, five lectins (Canavalia ensiformis, concanavalin A; Griffonia simplicifolia lectin I; Helix pomatia agglutinin; Ricinus communis agglutinin; and Triticum vulgaris wheat germ agglutinin) were selected to set up a microtiter agglutination assay. The lectin agglutination profiles of 174 clinical, food, and environmental strains of Listeria monocytogenes, Listeria innocua, and Listeria seeligeri were investigated. Data on the standard determination of the antigenic structure were available for clinical strains; nonclinical isolates were assigned to serogroup 1 or 4 with commercial antisera. The listeria-lectin interaction was related to serological type rather than species; in particular, the strains assigned to serogroup 1 or belonging to serovars 1/2a, 1/2b, 1/2c, 3a, 3b, and 7 were never agglutinated by G. simplicifolia lectin I. The five-lectin set proved to be capable of detecting differences between serologically identical isolates of L. monocytogenes. Of the 150 isolates of this species, 144 were distributed over 15 different lectin agglutination profiles and 6 autoagglutinated, the overall typeability being 96%. However, the profiles encountered among L. monocytogenes isolates were not randomly distributed. With strains assigned to serogroup 1 or belonging to serovars 1/2a, 1/2b, 1/2c, and 3b, the clinical isolates fell into only two of the eight patterns recorded overall; with strains of serogroup 4 and serovar 4b, food and environmental isolates were distributed over eight of the nine patterns found in total, while clinical isolates were distributed over five patterns. In a comparative study of 15 epidemiologically relevant isolates of L. monocytogenes from five distinct outbreaks, strains with identical phage types and/or DNA fingerprints displayed identical lectin profiles. The heterogeneity of agglutination profiles may form the basis of a new approach to L. monocytogenes typing

  11. [Acute cerebral ischemia: an unusual clinical presentation of isolated left ventricular noncompaction in an adult patient].

    PubMed

    Fiorencis, Andrea; Quadretti, Laura; Bacich, Daniela; Chiodi, Elisabetta; Mele, Donato; Fiorencis, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Isolated left ventricular noncompaction in adults is uncommon. The most frequent clinical manifestations are heart failure due to left ventricular systolic dysfunction and supraventricular and ventricular arrhythmias, which may be sustained and associated with sudden death. Thromboembolic complications are also possible. We report the case of an adult patient with isolated left ventricular noncompaction who came to our observation because of acute cerebral ischemia, an initial presentation of the disease only rarely described.

  12. Pathogenic Nocardia isolated from clinical specimens including those of AIDS patients in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Poonwan, N; Kusum, M; Mikami, Y; Yazawa, K; Tanaka, Y; Gonoi, T; Hasegawa, S; Konyama, K

    1995-10-01

    Forty strains of nocardioform microorganisms were isolated as clinical specimens including several from AIDS patients in Thailand. Among them, 37 strains were found to belong to the genus Nocardia. Our identification studies revealed that most of the strains (25 strains) belong to the N. asteroides group, i.e., N. asteroides sensu stricto and N. farcinica. Three strains were identified as N. otitidiscaviarum and two strains N. brasiliensis. In addition, 7 strains of rare pathogenic N. transvalensis were also isolated.

  13. Antimicrobial resistance of Salmonella enterica isolates from apparently healthy and clinically ill finishing pigs in Spain.

    PubMed

    García-Feliz, C; Collazos, J A; Carvajal, A; Herrera, S; Echeita, M A; Rubio, P

    2008-05-01

    This study was the first conducted in Spain to evaluate the occurrence of antimicrobial resistance and multi-resistance in Salmonella isolates recovered from finishing pigs from Spanish swine farms distributed over the whole country. For this purpose, 290 Salmonella isolates recovered from apparently healthy finishing pigs in a farm-based cross-sectional study and 192 Salmonella isolates recovered from faecal samples of finishing pigs suffering from diarrhoea were investigated. Resistance to a panel of 17 antimicrobials was determined using a broth microdilution technique. Resistance was a common finding and was detected in 90.3% of the Salmonella isolates from apparently healthy finishing pigs and 95.3% of the Salmonella isolates from clinically diseased finishing pigs. Resistance was particularly high among isolates of serogroup B and serovars Typhimurium and its monophasic variant S. 4,5,12:i:-. Higher frequencies of resistance were found to tetracycline, sulphamethoxazole, streptomycin, spectinomycin, ampicillin, chloramphenicol and trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole. Less than 10% of the isolates were resistant to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, neomycin, cephalotin, apramycin and gentamicin. Resistance to ciprofloxacin, colistin and ceftiofur was rare (under 1%). Multi-resistance, defined as resistance to four or more drugs, was detected in more than 50% of the isolates. Although multi-resistance was particularly frequent among isolates of S. Typhimurium, it was also high among other serovars as Bredeney and the S. Typhimurium monophasic variant. 4,5,12:i:-.

  14. In Vitro Susceptibility and Trailing Growth Effect of Clinical Isolates of Candida Species to Azole Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Zomorodian, Kamiar; Bandegani, Azadeh; Mirhendi, Hossein; Pakshir, Keyvan; Alinejhad, Navvab; Poostforoush Fard, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background: Emergence of resistance to respective antifungal drugs is a primary concern for the treatment of candidiasis. Hence, determining antifungal susceptibility of the isolated yeasts is of special importance for effective therapy. For this purpose, the clinical laboratory standard institute (CLSI) has introduced a broth microdilution method to determine minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). However, the so-called “Trailing effect” phenomenon might sometimes pose ambiguity in the interpretation of the results. Objectives: The present study aimed to determine the in vitro susceptibility of clinical isolates of Candida against azoles and the frequency of the Trailing effect. Materials and Methods: A total of 193 Candida isolates were prospectively collected and identified through the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method. Using a broth microdilution test, according to the guidelines of CLSI M27-A3, antifungal susceptibilities of the isolated yeasts against Fluconazole (FLU), Itraconazole (ITR), Ketoconazole (KET) and Voriconazole (VOR) were assessed. Moreover, trailing growth was determined when a susceptible MIC was incubated for 24 hours, and turned into a resistant one after 48 hours of incubation. Results: Among the tested antifungal drugs in this study, the highest rate of resistance was observed against ITR (28.5%) followed by VOR (26.4%), FLU (20.8%) and KET (1.5%). The trailing effect was induced in 27 isolates (14.0%) by VOR, in 26 isolates (13.5%) by ITR, in 24 isolates (12.4%) by FLU, and in 19 isolates (9.8%) by KET. Conclusions: The monitoring of antifungal susceptibilities of Candida species isolated from clinical sources is highly recommended for the efficient management of patients. Moreover, the trailing effect should be taken into consideration once the interpretation of the results is intended. PMID:27127587

  15. Candidal urinary tract infections caused by non-albicans Candida species.

    PubMed

    Dorko, E; Pilipcinec, E; Tkáciková, L

    2002-01-01

    The incidence of non-albicans Candida and non-Candida species isolated from the urine of patients admitted to various departments of the Faculty Hospital of the Medical Faculty of Safárik University in Kosice was examined. From a total of 94 samples of analyzed urine 58 strains of C. albicans and 36 strains of yeasts belonging to 6 species of non-albicans Candida and non-Candida spp. were detected: C. parapsilosis (n = 23), C. tropicalis (6), C. krusei (3), C. robusta (2), C. catenulata (1) and Cryptococcus neoformans (1). In relation to the diagnosis, the yeasts were isolated from patients suffering from a kidneys disease, epididymitis, diabetes, neoplastic diseases, urogenital anomalies, obstructive uropathy, cystitis, prostatitis, hemolytic-uremic syndrome, and others.

  16. Molecular Epidemiology and Characterization of Multiple-Drug Resistant (MDR) Clinical Isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    El-Shazly, Sherief; Dashti, Ali; Vali, Leila; Bolaris, Michael; Ibrahim, Ashraf S.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We aimed to identify the genetic relatedness of multiple-drug resistance (MDR) in Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolates recovered from a hospital in Los Angeles. Methods Twenty one MDR A. baumannii isolates were collected and their antibiotic susceptibility were determined according to the CLSI guidelines. Genes coding for antibiotic resistance were identified by PCR and their identities were confirmed by DNA sequencing. Clonal relationships were studied by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multi-locus sequence typing (MLST). Results MDR consistently correlated with the presence of oxacillinases, mostly in the form of plasmid-mediated OXA-23 enzyme which were detected in 12 (57.1%) isolates. GES-type carbapenemases were found in 20 (95.2%) strains, AAC in all 21 (100%) strains, PER in 7 (33.3%) strains and ISAba1 has been detected in 16 (76.2%) isolates. The association between ISAba1 and resistant genes confirms insertion elements as a source of β-lactamase production. Of the 21 clinical isolates, 5 were found to be related to sequence type-1 (ST1) and 16 to ST2 as analyzed by MLST. PFGE demonstrated that the majority of clinical isolates are highly related (>85%). Conclusions This study supports a more complete understanding of genotyping of antibiotic resistance for better assessment of MDR strains transmission. PMID:26518066

  17. Antifungal activity of itraconazole and voriconazole against clinical isolates obtained from animals with mycoses.

    PubMed

    Okabayashi, Ken; Imaji, Mashio; Osumi, Takafumi; Murakami, Yoshihiko; Maruyama, Haruhiko; Kano, Rui; Hasegawa, Atsuhiko; Watanabe, Toshi

    2009-01-01

    Animal mycosis, particularly deep mycosis, is one of the most challenging conditions encountered by veterinarians. Pathogens causing mycotic infections in animals include fungi such as Cryptococcus neoformans, Candida spp., and Aspergillus spp. The antifungal drugs used for the treatment of deep mycoses in animals as well as humans are polyenes and azoles. However, the sensitivity of clinical isolates obtained from animals toward these drugs has rarely been assayed. In this study, the antifungal activities of itraconazole and voriconazole against clinical isolates of C. neoformans, Candida spp., and A. fumigatus isolated from animals with mycoses were examined using the broth microdilution method performed according to the guidelines provided by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of itraconazole toward the C. neoformans, Candida spp., and A. fumigatus isolates were 0.125 - 1, 0.125 - 2, and 0.25 - 2 microg/ml, respectively, and those of voriconazole were 0.0625 - 0.5, < or =0.0313 - 0.0625, and 0.0625 - 1 microg/ml, respectively. The results of the MIC analyses implied that the fungal isolates obtained from infected animals exhibit an equivalent degree of susceptibility to itraconazole and voriconazole, as is observed in the case of isolates obtained from humans. The appropriate antifungal therapeutic strategy for the treatment of mycoses in animals must be selected taking into consideration the host immune status and organ function as well as the in vitro sensitivity of the pathogens to antifungal drugs.

  18. Recent advances on Candida albicans biology and virulence

    PubMed Central

    Sellam, Adnane; Whiteway, Malcolm

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans is an important human fungal pathogen, in terms of both its clinical significance and its use as an experimental model for scientific investigation. Although this opportunistic pathogen is a natural component of the human flora, it can cause life-threatening infections in immunosuppressed patients. There are currently a limited number of antifungal molecules and drug targets, and increasing resistance to the front-line therapeutics, demonstrating a clear need for new antifungal drugs. Understanding the biology of this pathogen is an important prerequisite for identifying new drug targets for antifungal therapeutics. In this review, we highlight some recent developments that help us to understand how virulence traits are regulated at the molecular level, in addition to technical advances that improve the ability of genome editing in C. albicans. PMID:27853524

  19. Host response to Candida albicans bloodstream infection and sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Duggan, Seána; Leonhardt, Ines; Hünniger, Kerstin; Kurzai, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is a major cause of bloodstream infection which may present as sepsis and septic shock - major causes of morbidity and mortality world-wide. After invasion of the pathogen, innate mechanisms govern the early response. Here, we outline the models used to study these mechanisms and summarize our current understanding of innate immune responses during Candida bloodstream infection. This includes protective immunity as well as harmful responses resulting in Candida induced sepsis. Neutrophilic granulocytes are considered principal effector cells conferring protection and recognize C. albicans mainly via complement receptor 3. They possess a range of effector mechanisms, contributing to elimination of the pathogen. Neutrophil activation is closely linked to complement and modulated by activated mononuclear cells. A thorough understanding of these mechanisms will help in creating an individualized approach to patients suffering from systemic candidiasis and aid in optimizing clinical management. PMID:25785541

  20. Serotype, virulence, and genetic traits of foodborne and clinical Vibrio parahaemolyticus isolates in Shanghai, China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongzhi; Sun, Shuangfu; Shi, Weimin; Cui, Lin; Gu, Qifang

    2013-09-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a major foodborne pathogen in China and other countries. In this study, a total of 578 clinical V. parahaemolyticus strains and 51 foodborne strains were isolated during the period from 2009 to 2011 in the eastern coastal city of Shanghai, China. Their serotypes, virulence genes, pandemic traits, and genotyping were investigated. A total of nine O groups and 20 K types were identified by serological analysis of all isolates. Six different O groups and 14 different K types were detected among the 578 clinical strains. Eight different O groups and five K types were detected among the 51 foodborne strains. The O3:K6 serotype was the dominant serotype. A total of 200 representative clinical strains and 51 foodborne isolates were analyzed for virulence genes, pandemic traits, and genotyping. Of the clinical strains, 92.5% had the virulence genes tdh and/or trh. Four foodborne isolates had virulence genes; one trh-positive strain was O3:K6 and three tdh-positive strains were either O4:KUT or O3:KUT. Molecular typing by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis also showed divergence among the nonpandemic strains, although the pandemic strains formed a cluster. These results suggest high serodiversity and genetic diversity of V. parahaemolyticus. Pathogenic isolates were present in food, thus representing a public health risk and warranting epidemiological and ecological monitoring to ensure safety.

  1. Antifungal Susceptibility Profiles of Bloodstream Yeast Isolates by Sensititre YeastOne over Nine Years at a Large Italian Teaching Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Posteraro, Brunella; Spanu, Teresa; Fiori, Barbara; De Maio, Flavio; De Carolis, Elena; Giaquinto, Alessia; Prete, Valentina; De Angelis, Giulia; Torelli, Riccardo; D'Inzeo, Tiziana; Vella, Antonietta; De Luca, Alessio; Tumbarello, Mario; Ricciardi, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Sensititre YeastOne (SYO) is an affordable alternative to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) reference method for antifungal susceptibility testing. In this study, the MICs of yeast isolates from 1,214 bloodstream infection episodes, generated by SYO during hospital laboratory activity (January 2005 to December 2013), were reanalyzed using current CLSI clinical breakpoints/epidemiological cutoff values to assign susceptibility (or the wild-type [WT] phenotype) to systemic antifungal agents. Excluding Candida albicans (57.4% of all isolates [n = 1,250]), the most predominant species were Candida parapsilosis complex (20.9%), Candida tropicalis (8.2%), Candida glabrata (6.4%), Candida guilliermondii (1.6%), and Candida krusei (1.3%). Among the non-Candida species (1.9%), 7 were Cryptococcus neoformans and 17 were other species, mainly Rhodotorula species. Over 97% of Candida isolates were susceptible (WT phenotype) to amphotericin B and flucytosine. Rates of susceptibility (WT phenotype) to fluconazole, itraconazole, and voriconazole were 98.7% in C. albicans, 92.3% in the C. parapsilosis complex, 96.1% in C. tropicalis, 92.5% in C. glabrata, 100% in C. guilliermondii, and 100% (excluding fluconazole) in C. krusei. The fluconazole-resistant isolates consisted of 6 C. parapsilosis complex isolates, 3 C. glabrata isolates, 2 C. albicans isolates, 2 C. tropicalis isolates, and 1 Candida lusitaniae isolate. Of the non-Candida isolates, 2 C. neoformans isolates had the non-WT phenotype for susceptibility to fluconazole, whereas Rhodotorula isolates had elevated azole MICs. Overall, 99.7% to 99.8% of Candida isolates were susceptible (WT phenotype) to echinocandins, but 3 isolates were nonsusceptible (either intermediate or resistant) to caspofungin (C. albicans, C. guilliermondii, and C. krusei), anidulafungin (C. albicans and C. guilliermondii), and micafungin (C. albicans). However, when the intrinsically resistant non-Candida isolates were included

  2. Association of biofilm production with colonization among clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Seong Yeol; Baek, Won-Ki; Kim, Hyun Ah

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims The pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii is increasingly causing healthcare-associated infections worldwide, particularly in intensive care units. Biofilm formation, a factor contributing to the virulence of A. baumannii, is associated with long-term persistence in hospital environments. The present study investigates the clinical impact of biofilm production on colonization and acquisition after patient admission. Methods Forty-nine A. baumannii isolates were obtained between August and November 2013 from Keimyung University Dongsan Medical Center, Daegu, Korea. All isolates were obtained from sputum samples of new patients infected or colonized by A. baumannii. The microtiter plate assay was used to determine biofilm formation. Results Twenty-four A. baumannii isolates (48%) demonstrated enhanced biofilm formation capacity than that of the standard A. baumannii strain (ATCC 19606). All isolates were resistant to carbapenem, 38 isolates (77%) were collected from patients in an intensive care unit, and 47 isolates (95%) were from patients who had been exposed to antibiotics in the previous month. The median duration of colonization was longer for biofilm-producing isolates than that of the biofilm non-biofilm producing isolates (18 days vs. 12 days, p < 0.05). Simultaneous colonization with other bacteria was more common for biofilm-producing isolates than that for the non-biofilm producing isolates. The most prevalent co-colonizing bacteria was Staphylococcus aureus. Conclusions Biofilm-producing isolates seem to colonize the respiratory tract for longer durations than the non-biofilm producing isolates. During colonization, biofilm producers promote co-colonization by other bacteria, particularly S. aureus. Additional research is required to determine possible links between biofilm formation and nosocomial infection. PMID:27653617

  3. Biochemical and Molecular Analysis of Staphylococcus aureus Clinical Isolates from Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Karmakar, Amit; Dua, Parimal; Ghosh, Chandradipa

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is opportunistic human as well as animal pathogen that causes a variety of diseases. A total of 100 Staphylococcus aureus isolates were obtained from clinical samples derived from hospitalized patients. The presumptive Staphylococcus aureus clinical isolates were identified phenotypically by different biochemical tests. Molecular identification was done by PCR using species specific 16S rRNA primer pairs and finally 100 isolates were found to be positive as Staphylococcus aureus. Screened isolates were further analyzed by several microbiological diagnostics tests including gelatin hydrolysis, protease, and lipase tests. It was found that 78%, 81%, and 51% isolates were positive for gelatin hydrolysis, protease, and lipase activities, respectively. Antibiogram analysis of isolated Staphylococcus aureus strains with respect to different antimicrobial agents revealed resistance pattern ranging from 57 to 96%. Our study also shows 70% strains to be MRSA, 54.3% as VRSA, and 54.3% as both MRSA and VRSA. All the identified isolates were subjected to detection of mecA, nuc, and hlb genes and 70%, 84%, and 40% were found to harbour mecA, nuc, and hlb genes, respectively. The current investigation is highly important and informative for the high level multidrug resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections inclusive also of methicillin and vancomycin. PMID:27366185

  4. Rapid emergence of daptomycin resistance in clinical isolates of Corynebacterium striatum… a cautionary tale.

    PubMed

    McElvania TeKippe, E; Thomas, B S; Ewald, G A; Lawrence, S J; Burnham, C-A D

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the observation of daptomycin resistance in Corynebacterium striatum, both in vivo and in vitro. We describe a case of C. striatum bacteremia in a patient with a left ventricular assist device (LVAD); the initial isolate recovered was daptomycin susceptible with a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 0.125 μg/ml. Two months later, and after daptomycin therapy, the individual became bacteremic with an isolate of C. striatum with a daptomycin MIC of >256 μg/ml. To study the prevalence of daptomycin resistance in C. striatum, clinical isolates of C. striatum were grown in broth culture containing daptomycin to investigate the emergence of resistance to this antimicrobial. Molecular typing was used to evaluate serial isolates from the index patient and the clinical isolates of C. striatum we assayed. In vitro analysis of isolates from the index patient and 7 of 11 additional C. striatum isolates exhibited the emergence of high-level daptomycin resistance, despite initially demonstrating low MICs to this antimicrobial agent. This phenotype was persistent even after serial subculture in the absence of daptomycin. Together, these data demonstrate that caution should be taken when using daptomycin to treat high-inoculum infections and/or infections of indwelling medical devices with C. striatum. To our knowledge, this is the first report characterizing the emergence of daptomycin resistance in C. striatum.

  5. Identification of Clinical Isolates of Actinomyces Species by Amplified 16S Ribosomal DNA Restriction Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Val; Talbot, P. R.; Stubbs, S. L.; Duerden, B. I.

    2001-01-01

    Amplified 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) restriction analysis (ARDRA), using enzymes HaeIII and HpaII, was applied to 176 fresh and 299 stored clinical isolates of putative Actinomyces spp. referred to the Anaerobe Reference Unit of the Public Health Laboratory Service for confirmation of identity. Results were compared with ARDRA results obtained previously for reference strains and with conventional phenotypic reactions. Identities of some strains were confirmed by analysis of partial 16S rDNA sequences. Of the 475 isolates, 331 (70%) were clearly assigned to recognized Actinomyces species, including 94 isolates assigned to six recently described species. A further 52 isolates in 12 ARDRA profiles were designated as apparently resembling recognized species, and 44 isolates, in 18 novel profiles, were confirmed as members of genera other than Actinomyces. The identities of 48 isolates in nine profiles remain uncertain, and they may represent novel species of Actinomyces. For the majority of species, phenotypic results, published reactions for the species, and ARDRA profiles concurred. However, of 113 stored isolates originally identified as A. meyeri or resembling A. meyeri by phenotypic tests, only 21 were confirmed as A. meyeri by ARDRA; 63 were reassigned as A. turicensis, 7 as other recognized species, and 22 as unidentified actinomycetes. Analyses of incidence and clinical associations of Actinomyces spp. add to the currently sparse knowledge of some recently described species. PMID:11574572

  6. A Snapshot of Co-Resistance to Carbapenems and Tigecycline in Clinical Isolates of Enterobacter cloacae.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ling-Fu; Lee, Chao-Tai; Su, Lin-Hui; Chang, Chin-Lu

    2017-01-01

    Enterobacter cloacae is one of the most common carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) global wide. Resistance to tigecycline, one of the few therapeutic options for CRE infections, in carbapenem-resistant E. cloacae is of clinical significance. Fourteen E. cloacae clinical isolates (EC1-EC14) co-resistant to tigecycline and carbapenems were studied. Two tigecycline-susceptible/carbapenem-resistant isolates (TS1-TS2) were used for comparison. Genotyping by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and multilocus sequence typing identified seven pulsotypes and three sequence types (STs). All three STs belonged to the published international clones. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequence analysis revealed the coexistence of blaSHV-12 and blaIMP-8 in 11 EC isolates from five pulsotypes/two STs. Reverse transcription PCR demonstrated overexpression of the chromosomal AmpC-like β-lactamase in seven EC isolates (four pulsotypes/two STs) and TS1 (pulsotype F/ST78). Reduced expression of outer membrane protein C (OmpC) was found in three EC isolates (all pulsotype C/ST204), whereas reduced expression of OmpF was found in nine EC isolates (three pulsotypes/two STs) and TS2 (pulsotype G/ST114). Overexpression of the efflux pump AcrB was found in all EC isolates although three showed borderline significance. Multiple mechanisms jointly contributed to the observed co-resistance to tigecycline and carbapenems. Some international clones have infiltrated into Taiwan and acquired various resistance traits independently.

  7. Candida albicans and non-albicans species as etiological agent of vaginitis in pregnant and non-pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Babic, Mirela; Hukic, Mirsada

    2010-02-01

    Pregnancy represents a risk factor in the occurrence of vaginal candidosis. The objectives of our study were: to make determination of the microscopic findings of vaginal swab, frequency of Candida species in the culture of pregnant women and patients who are not pregnant, determine the Candida species in all cultures, and to determine the frequency and differences in the frequency of C. albicans and other non-albicans species. In one year study performed during 2006 year, we tested patients of Gynaecology and Obstetrics clinic of the Clinical Centre in Sarajevo and Gynaecology department of the General hospital in Sarajevo. 447 woman included in the study were separated in two groups: 203 pregnant (in the last trimester of pregnancy), and 244 non-pregnant woman in period of fertility. Each vaginal swab was examined microscopically. The yeast, number of colonies, and the species of Candida were determined on Sabouraud dextrose agar with presence of antibiotics. For determination of Candida species, we used germ tube test for detection of C. albicans, and cultivation on the selective medium and assimilation tests for detection of non-albicans species. The results indicated positive microscopic findings in the test group (40,9%), as well as greater number of positive cultures (46,8%). The most commonly detected species for both groups was C. albicans ( test group 40.9% and control group 23,0%). The most commonly detected non-albicans species for the test group were C. glabrata (4,2 %) and C. krusei (3,2%), and for the control group were C. glabrata (3,2%) and C. parapsilosis (3,2%). The microscopic findings correlated with the number of colonies in positive cultures. In the test group, we found an increased number of yeasts (64,3%), and the pseudopyphae and blastopores by microscopic examination as an indication of infection. In the control group, we found a small number of yeasts (64,6%) , in the form of blastopores, as an indication of the candida colonisation. Our

  8. In Vitro Activities of Amphotericin B, Terbinafine, and Azole Drugs against Clinical and Environmental Isolates of Aspergillus terreus Sensu Stricto

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Mariana S.; Rojas, Florencia D.; Cattana, María E.; Sosa, María de los Ángeles; Iovannitti, Cristina A.; Giusiano, Gustavo E.

    2015-01-01

    The antifungal susceptibilities of 40 clinical and environmental isolates of A. terreus sensu stricto to amphotericin B, terbinafine, itraconazole, and voriconazole were determined in accordance with CLSI document M38-A2. All isolates had itraconazole and voriconazole MICs lower than epidemiologic cutoff values, and 5% of the isolates had amphotericin B MICs higher than epidemiologic cutoff values. Terbinafine showed the lowest MICs. No significant differences were found when MICs of clinical and environmental isolates were compared. PMID:25824228

  9. Role of specific determinants in mannan of Candida albicans serotype A in adherence to human buccal epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Miyakawa, Y; Kuribayashi, T; Kagaya, K; Suzuki, M; Nakase, T; Fukazawa, Y

    1992-01-01

    Candida albicans serotype A (C. albicans A) possesses a specific antigen, designated antigen 6, which resides in mannans on the cell surface. To determine the role of the mannan moiety of the C. albicans cell wall in adherence to buccal epithelial cells, we used antigen 6-deficient mutants which had been isolated by screening with an agglutinating monoclonal antibody against antigen 6 (MAb-6). 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectral analysis of the purified mannans from the mutants showed a loss of the signals related to that beta-linkage of the side chains. Moreover, acetolyzed fragments of the mutant mannans showed a decreased amount of mannohexaose and mannopentaose. The mutant yeast cells exhibited significantly reduced ability to adhere both to exfoliated buccal epithelial cells and to a human buccal cell line. A number of strains of C. albicans A, C. tropicalis, and C. glabrata, all of which bear antigen 6, showed significantly higher adherence to the cell line than did those of C. albicans serotype B, which lack antigen 6. The whole mannan from the C. albicans A parent inhibited the adherence of C. albicans A to epithelial cells dose dependently, whereas mannan from a mutant strains did not. Moreover, C. albicans A treated with MAb-6 or polyclonal factor 6 serum showed reduced adherence. A close correlation was found between adhesive ability and agglutinability with MAb-6 in the C. albicans A parent, the antigenic mutants, and their spontaneous revertants. These results suggest that so far as mannan adhesion is concerned, serotype A-specific determinants are largely involved in the mechanisms of adherence of C. albicans A to human buccal epithelial cells. PMID:1375200

  10. Species distribution and susceptibility profile to fluconazole, voriconazole and MXP-4509 of 551 clinical yeast isolates from a Romanian multi-centre study.

    PubMed

    Minea, B; Nastasa, V; Moraru, R F; Kolecka, A; Flonta, M M; Marincu, I; Man, A; Toma, F; Lupse, M; Doroftei, B; Marangoci, N; Pinteala, M; Boekhout, T; Mares, M

    2015-02-01

    This is the first multi-centre study regarding yeast infections in Romania. The aim was to determine the aetiological spectrum and susceptibility pattern to fluconazole, voriconazole and the novel compound MXP-4509. The 551 isolates were identified using routine laboratory methods, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and DNA sequence analysis. Susceptibility testing was performed using the European Committee for Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) method and breakpoints. The yeasts originated from superficial infections (SUP, 51.5 %), bloodstream infections (BSI, 31.6 %) and deep-seated infections (DEEP, 16.9 %), from patients of all ages. Nine genera and 30 species were identified. The 20 Candida species accounted for 94.6 % of all isolates. C. albicans was the overall leading pathogen (50.5 %). Lodderomyces elongisporus is reported for the first time as a fungaemia cause in Europe. C. glabrata and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, as well as the non-Candida spp. and non-albicans Candida spp. groups, showed decreased fluconazole susceptibility (<75 %). The overall fluconazole resistance was 10.2 %. C. krusei accounted for 27 of the 56 fluconazole-resistant isolates. The overall voriconazole resistance was 2.5 % and was due mainly to C. glabrata and C. tropicalis isolates. Fluconazole resistance rates for the three categories of infection were similar to the overall value; voriconazole resistance rates differed: 4 % for BSI, 3.2 % for DEEP and 1.4 % for SUP. The antifungal activity of MXP-4509 was superior to voriconazole against C. glabrata and many fluconazole-resistant isolates. There was a large percentage of non-albicans Candida isolates. A large part of the high fluconazole resistance was not acquired but intrinsic, resulting from the high percentage of C. krusei.