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Sample records for albicans clinical isolate

  1. Variation of electrophoretic karyotypes among clinical isolates of Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Merz, W G; Connelly, C; Hieter, P

    1988-01-01

    Orthogonal-field-alternation gel electrophoresis was used to compare clinical isolates of Candida albicans by resolving chromosome-sized DNA molecules into an electrophoretic karyotype. Seven to nine bands were observed among isolates recovered from 17 patients. In addition, 14 distinct electrophoretic patterns were noted among the isolates from these patients. In a given individual, isolates were likely to have identical electrophoretic patterns. Therefore, the electrophoretic karyotype patterns demonstrated by orthogonal-field-alternation gel electrophoresis can be used to designate a strain for epidemiologic studies. Images PMID:3290238

  2. Antifungal Activity of Bee Venom and Sweet Bee Venom against Clinically Isolated Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Bae

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate the antifungal effect of bee venom (BV) and sweet bee venom (SBV) against Candida albicans (C. albicans) clinical isolates. Methods: In this study, BV and SBV were examined for antifungal activities against the Korean Collection for Type Cultures (KCTC) strain and 10 clinical isolates of C. albicans. The disk diffusion method was used to measure the antifungal activity and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) assays were performed by using a broth microdilution method. Also, a killing curve assay was conducted to investigate the kinetics of the anti- fungal action. Results: BV and SBV showed antifungal activity against 10 clinical isolates of C. albicans that were cultured from blood and the vagina by using disk diffusion method. The MIC values obtained for clinical isolates by using the broth microdilution method varied from 62.5 μg/ mL to 125 μg/mL for BV and from 15.63 μg/mL to 62.5 μg/mL for SBV. In the killing-curve assay, SBV behaved as amphotericin B, which was used as positive control, did. The antifungal efficacy of SBV was much higher than that of BV. Conclusion: BV and SBV showed antifungal activity against C. albicans clinical strains that were isolated from blood and the vagina. Especially, SBV might be a candidate for a new antifungal agent against C. albicans clinical isolates. PMID:27280049

  3. [Phospholipase, proteinase and hemolytic activities of Candida albicans isolates obtained from clinical specimens].

    PubMed

    Yenişehirli, Gülgün; Bulut, Yunus; Tunçoglu, Ebru

    2010-01-01

    This study was aimed to determine the phospholipase, proteinase and hemolytic activities of Candida albicans strains isolated from clinical specimens. A total of 147 C. albicans strains isolated from blood (n = 29), respiratory specimens (n = 44), urine (n = 52), pus (n = 17) and stool (n = 5) were included in the study. Proteinase and phospholipase activities were determined in 81% and 76% of C. albicans isolates, respectively. All C. albicans isolates revealed beta-hemolytic activity on Sabouraud dextrose agar supplemented with 7% fresh sheep blood and 3% glucose. Phospholipase and proteinase positivity were highest among the respiratory isolates. Proteinase activity of respiratory (93%) and blood (83%) isolates were statistically significantly higher than that of urine (77%; p = 0.032), pus (65%; p = 0.007) and stool isolates (60%; p = 0.026). While phospholipase activity showed statistically significant difference between respiratory (84%) and pus (53%) isolates (p = 0.014), no statistically significant difference was determined for blood (79%), urine (75%) and stool (80%) isolates (p > 0.05). Two blood isolates with 4+ proteinase activity and 3 urine isolates with 3+ proteinase activity were phospholipase negative. One urine isolate with 4+ phospholipase activity and 4 with 3+ phospholipase activity were proteinase negative. Phospholipase and proteinase negative 1 isolate from stool and 1 isolate from pus were found to have 4+ hemolytic activity. In conclusion, besides proteinase and phospholipase enzyme activities, hemolytic activity may play an important role for the C.albicans infections. The pathogenetic role of these virulence factors should be evaluated by further clinical studies.

  4. [Examination of the genetic variability among biofilm-forming Candida albicans clinical isolates].

    PubMed

    Durán, Estela Liliana; Mujica, Maria Teresa; Jewtuchowicz, Virginia Marta; Finquelievich, Jorge Luis; Pinoni, Maria Victoria; Iovannitti, Cristina Adela

    2007-12-31

    Biofilms are microbial communities encased in a self-produced polymeric matrix and represent a common mode of microbial growth. Candida albicans is able to colonize the surface of catheters, prostheses, and epithelia, forming biofilms that are highly resistant to antimicrobial drugs. The objective of this study was the genotypic characterization of biofilm-forming C. albicans clinical isolates using RAPD (Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA). We have studied 25 clinical isolates of C. albicans from oral cavities, blood, skin, nail, stool, oesophagus biopsy and vaginal fluids from patients suffering from candidiasis. For each strain biofilm formation was analysed by measuring the ability to adhere to and grow on polystyrene plastic surfaces using XTT [2,3-bis(2-methoxi-4nitro-5sulfophenil)-2H tetrazolium-5carboxanilide] reduction assay. The similarity coefficients generated by RAPD using four different primers varied from 49 to 91%, indicating a high degree of genetic variability between the clinical isolates. The dendrogram clustered the isolates in four related groups, all groups included strains with very different abilities to form biofilms. The isolates with similar genotypes often showed very different biofilm formation abilities. Strains were grouped into clusters independently of their clinical sources. Our results suggested that a direct correlation does not exist between the biofilm-forming ability of natural populations of C. albicans and the genotype as determined by RAPD.

  5. Candida species biofilm and Candida albicans ALS3 polymorphisms in clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Bruder-Nascimento, Ariane; Camargo, Carlos Henrique; Mondelli, Alessandro Lia; Sugizaki, Maria Fátima; Sadatsune, Terue; Bagagli, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decades, there have been important changes in the epidemiology of Candida infections. In recent years, Candida species have emerged as important causes of invasive infections mainly among immunocompromised patients. This study analyzed Candida spp. isolates and compared the frequency and biofilm production of different species among the different sources of isolation: blood, urine, vulvovaginal secretions and peritoneal dialysis fluid. Biofilm production was quantified in 327 Candida isolates obtained from patients attended at a Brazilian tertiary public hospital (Botucatu, Sao Paulo). C. albicans ALS3 gene polymorphism was also evaluated by determining the number of repeated motifs in the central domain. Of the 198 total biofilm-positive isolates, 72 and 126 were considered as low and high biofilm producers, respectively. Biofilm production by C. albicans was significantly lower than that by non-albicans isolates and was most frequently observed in C. tropicalis. Biofilm production was more frequent among bloodstream isolates than other clinical sources, in urine, the isolates displayed a peculiar distribution by presenting two distinct peaks, one containing biofilm-negative isolates and the other containing isolates with intense biofilm production. The numbers of tandem-repeat copies per allele were not associated with biofilm production, suggesting the evolvement of other genetic determinants.

  6. Cyclosporine A decreases the fluconazole minimum inhibitory concentration of Candida albicans clinical isolates but not biofilm formation and cell growth.

    PubMed

    Wibawa, T; Nurrokhman; Baly, I; Daeli, P R; Kartasasmita, G; Wijayanti, N

    2015-03-01

    Among the genus Candida, Candida albicans is the most abundant species in humans. One of the virulent factors of C. albicans is its ability to develop biofilm. Biofilm forming microbes are characterized by decreasing of its susceptibility to antibiotics and antifungal. The fungicidal effect of fluconazole may be enhanced by cyclosporine A in laboratory engineered C. albicans strains. The aim of this work is to analyze the synergistic effect of cyclosporine A with fluconazole in C. albicans clinical isolates and the effect of cycolsporine A alone in the biofilm formation. Six fluconazole resistant and six sensitive C. albicans clinical isolates were analyzed for its minimum inhibitory concentration (MICs), biofilm formation, and cell growths. A semi-quantitative XTT [2,3-bis(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5- sulfo-phenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide] reduction assay was conducted to measure the biofilm formation. Cyclosporine A has synergistic effect with fluconazole that was shown by decreasing MICs of both fluconazole resistant and sensitive C. albicans clinical isolates. However, cyclosporine A alone did not influence the biofilm formation and cell growth of both fluconazole resistant and sensitive C. albicans clinical isolates. These results indicated that cyclosporine A might be a promising candidate of adjuvant therapy for fluconazole against both fluconazole resistant and sensitive C. albicans clinical isolates.

  7. In vitro effects of glycyrrhetinic acid on the growth of clinical isolates of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Pellati, Donatella; Fiore, Cristina; Armanini, Decio; Rassu, Mario; Bertoloni, Giulio

    2009-04-01

    Compounds derived from Glycyrrhiza glabra L. root have been used widely for centuries for their numerous therapeutic properties. The present study aimed to test the in vitro activity against Candida albicans strains of the compound 18-beta glycyrrhetinic acid (18-beta GA), derived from the root of Glycyrrhiza species. This antimicrobial activity was assessed using the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS) method on C. albicans strains that were isolated from patients with recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis (RVVC). The in vitro growth of the C. albicans strains was markedly reduced, in a pH-dependent manner, by relatively low doses (6.2 microg/mL) of 18-beta GA. The results demonstrate that 18-beta GA is a promising biological alternative for the topical treatment of recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis (RVVC). PMID:19067381

  8. Molecular mechanisms associated with Fluconazole resistance in clinical Candida albicans isolates from India.

    PubMed

    Mane, Arati; Vidhate, Pallavi; Kusro, Chanchal; Waman, Vaishali; Saxena, Vandana; Kulkarni-Kale, Urmila; Risbud, Arun

    2016-02-01

    Resistance to azole antifungals is a significant problem in Candida albicans. An understanding of resistance at molecular level is essential for the development of strategies to tackle resistance and rationale design of newer antifungals and target-based molecular approaches. This study presents the first evaluation of molecular mechanisms associated with fluconazole resistance in clinical C.albicans isolates from India. Target site (ERG11) alterations were determined by DNA sequencing, whereas real-time PCRs were performed to quantify target and efflux pump genes (CDR1, CDR2, MDR1) in 87 [Fluconazole susceptible (n = 30), susceptible-dose dependent (n = 30) and resistant (n = 27)] C.albicans isolates. Cross-resistance to fluconazole, ketoconazole and itraconazole was observed in 74.1% isolates. Six amino acid substitutions were identified, including 4 (E116D, F145L, E226D, I437V) previously reported ones and 2 (P406L, Q474H) new ones. CDR1 over-expression was seen in 77.7% resistant isolates. CDR2 was exclusively expressed with CDR1 and their concomitant over-expression was associated with azole cross-resistance. MDR1 and ERG11 over-expression did not seem to be associated with resistance. Our results show that drug efflux mediated by Adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette transporters, especially CDR1 is the predominant mechanism of fluconazole resistance and azole cross-resistance in C. albicans and indicate the need for research directed towards developing strategies to tackle efflux mediated resistance to salvage azoles.

  9. Piperazinyl quinolines as chemosensitizers to increase fluconazole susceptibility of Candida albicans clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Youngsaye, Willmen; Vincent, Benjamin; Hartland, Cathy L; Morgan, Barbara J; Buhrlage, Sara J; Johnston, Stephen; Bittker, Joshua A; MacPherson, Lawrence; Dandapani, Sivaraman; Palmer, Michelle; Whitesell, Luke; Lindquist, Susan; Schreiber, Stuart L; Munoz, Benito

    2011-09-15

    The effectiveness of the potent antifungal drug fluconazole is being compromised by the rise of drug-resistant fungal pathogens. While inhibition of Hsp90 or calcineurin can reverse drug resistance in Candida, such inhibitors also impair the homologous human host protein and fungal-selective chemosensitizers remain rare. The MLPCN library was screened to identify compounds that selectively reverse fluconazole resistance in a Candida albicans clinical isolate, while having no antifungal activity when administered as a single agent. A piperazinyl quinoline was identified as a new small-molecule probe (ML189) satisfying these criteria.

  10. Effect of edible sesame oil on growth of clinical isolates of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Toshiko; Nishio, Junko; Okada, Shinobu

    2014-07-01

    Elderly individuals are at increased risk of oral thrush (oral candidiasis) due to decreased saliva secretion. Due to their antimicrobial properties, edible oils can be effective natural agents for oral care. The objective of the present study was to compare the effects of sesame oil, which is widely used for cooking in Asian countries, and two other edible oils on the growth of both mycelial and yeast forms of five clinical isolates of Candida albicans, a causative microorganism of oral thrush. We assessed the effect of each oil in concentrations of 0.078%, 0.156%, and 0.313% on growth of the mycelial forms of the clinical isolates over 24 hr using the crystal violet method. We also evaluated the effect of each oil on growth of the yeast forms by counting the number of viable yeast cells after culturing in the oils for 24 hr. Sesame oil inhibited the growth of both mycelial and yeast forms. Safflower and olive oil also inhibited the growth of both forms of C. albicans but to a lesser extent than sesame oil. The ability to inhibit the growth of the mycelial form correlated with sesame oil concentration. Roasting influenced growth inhibition ability and high-roasted sesame oil most effectively inhibited the yeast form. The growth inhibitory effect differed among the five isolates. We hypothesize that the sesamin and fatty acid components of sesame oil are involved in its antifungal activity.

  11. Mutations in transcription factor Mrr2p contribute to fluconazole resistance in clinical isolates of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Liu, Jin-Yan; Shi, Ce; Li, Wen-Jing; Zhao, Yue; Yan, Lan; Xiang, Ming-Jie

    2015-11-01

    The Candida albicans zinc cluster proteins are a family of transcription factors (TFs) that play essential roles in the development of antifungal drug resistance. Gain-of-function mutations in several TFs, such as Tac1p, Mrr1p and Upc2p, have been previously well documented in azole-resistant clinical C. albicans isolates. Mrr2p (multidrug resistance regulator 2) is a novel TF controlling expression of the ABC transporter gene CDR1 and mediating fluconazole resistance. In this study, the relationship between naturally occurring mutations in MRR2 and fluconazole resistance in clinical C. albicans isolates was investigated. Among a group of 20 fluconazole-resistant clinical C. albicans and 10 fluconazole-susceptible C. albicans, 12 fluconazole-resistant isolates overexpressed CDR1 by at least two-fold compared with the fluconazole-susceptible isolates. Of these 12 resistant isolates, three (C7, C9, C15) contained 11 identical missense mutations, 6 of which occurred only in the azole-resistant isolates. The contribution of these mutations to CDR1 overexpression and therefore to fluconazole resistance was further verified by generating recombinant strains containing the mutated MRR2 gene. The mutated MRR2 alleles from isolate C9 contributed to an almost six-fold increase in CDR1 expression and an eight-fold increase in fluconazole resistance; the missense mutations S466L and T470N resulted in an increase in CDR1 expression of more than two-fold and a four-fold increase in fluconazole resistance. In contrast, the other four missense mutations conferred only two- to four-fold increases in fluconazole resistance, with no significant increase in CDR1 expression. These findings provide some insight into the mechanism by which MRR2 regulates C. albicans multidrug resistance.

  12. Erg11 mutations associated with azole resistance in clinical isolates of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Ming-Jie; Liu, Jin-Yan; Ni, Pei-Hua; Wang, Shengzheng; Shi, Ce; Wei, Bing; Ni, Yu-Xing; Ge, Hai-Liang

    2013-06-01

    The widespread use of azoles has led to increasing azole resistance among Candida albicans strains. One mechanism of azole resistance involves point mutations in the ERG11 gene, which encodes the target enzyme (cytochrome P450 lanosterol 14α-demethylase). In the present study, we amplified and sequenced the ERG11 gene of 23 C. albicans clinical isolates. Seventeen mutations encoding distinct amino acid substitutions were found, of which seven (K143Q, Y205E, A255V, E260V, N435V, G472R, and D502E) were novel. We further verified the contribution of the amino acid substitutions to azole resistance using site-directed mutagenesis of the ERG11 gene to recreate these mutations for heterologous expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We observed that substitutions A114S, Y132H, Y132F, K143R, Y257H, and a new K143Q substitution contributed to significant increases (≧fourfold) in fluconazole and voriconazole resistance; changes in itraconazole resistance were not significant (≦twofold).

  13. The evolution of drug resistance in clinical isolates of Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Guiducci, Candace; Martinez, Diego A; Delorey, Toni; Li, Bi yu; White, Theodore C; Cuomo, Christina; Rao, Reeta P; Berman, Judith; Thompson, Dawn A; Regev, Aviv

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is both a member of the healthy human microbiome and a major pathogen in immunocompromised individuals. Infections are typically treated with azole inhibitors of ergosterol biosynthesis often leading to drug resistance. Studies in clinical isolates have implicated multiple mechanisms in resistance, but have focused on large-scale aberrations or candidate genes, and do not comprehensively chart the genetic basis of adaptation. Here, we leveraged next-generation sequencing to analyze 43 isolates from 11 oral candidiasis patients. We detected newly selected mutations, including single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), copy-number variations and loss-of-heterozygosity (LOH) events. LOH events were commonly associated with acquired resistance, and SNPs in 240 genes may be related to host adaptation. Conversely, most aneuploidies were transient and did not correlate with drug resistance. Our analysis also shows that isolates also varied in adherence, filamentation, and virulence. Our work reveals new molecular mechanisms underlying the evolution of drug resistance and host adaptation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00662.001 PMID:25646566

  14. Assessment of antifungal activity of herbal and conventional toothpastes against clinical isolates of Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Adwan, Ghaleb; Salameh, Yousef; Adwan, Kamel; Barakat, Ali

    2012-01-01

    Objective To detect the anticandidal activity of nine toothpastes containing sodium fluoride, sodium monofluorophosphate and herbal extracts as an active ingredients against 45 oral and non oral Candida albicans (C. albicans) isolates. Methods The antifungal activity of these toothpaste formulations was determined using a standard agar well diffusion method. Statistical analysis was performed using a statistical package, SPSS windows version 15, by applying mean values using one-way ANOVA with post-hoc least square differences (LSD) method. A P value of less than 0.05 was considered significant. Results All toothpastes studied in our experiments were effective in inhibiting the growth of all C. albicans isolates. The highest anticandidal activity was obtained from toothpaste that containing both herbal extracts and sodium fluoride as active ingredients, while the lowest activity was obtained from toothpaste containing sodium monofluorophosphate as an active ingredient. Antifungal activity of Parodontax toothpaste showed a significant difference (P< 0.001) against C. albicans isolates compared to toothpastes containing sodium fluoride or herbal products. Conclusions In the present study, it has been demonstrated that toothpaste containing both herbal extracts and sodium fluoride as active ingredients are more effective in control of C. albicans, while toothpaste that containing monofluorophosphate as an active ingredient is less effective against C. albicans. Some herbal toothpaste formulations studied in our experiments, appear to be equally effective as the fluoride dental formulations and it can be used as an alternative to conventional formulations for individuals who have an interest in naturally-based products. Our results may provide invaluable information for dental professionals. PMID:23569933

  15. Candida albicans isolates from a Malaysian hospital exhibit more potent phospholipase and haemolysin activities than non-albicans Candida isolates.

    PubMed

    Chin, V K; Foong, K J; Maha, A; Rusliza, B; Norhafizah, M; Ng, K P; Chong, P P

    2013-12-01

    This study was aimed at determining the phospholipase and haemolysin activity of Candida isolates in Malaysia. A total of 37 Candida clinical isolates representing seven species, Candida albicans (12), Candida tropicalis (8), Candida glabrata (4), Candida parapsilosis (1), Candida krusei (4), Candida orthopsilosis (1) and Candida rugosa (7) were tested. In vitro phospholipase activity was determined by using egg yolk plate assay whereas in vitro haemolysin activity was tested by using blood plate assay on sheep blood Sabouraud's dextrose agar (SDA) enriched with glucose. Phospholipase activity was detected in 75% (9 out of 12) of the C. albicans isolates. Among the 25 non- C. albicans Candida isolates, phospholipase activity was detected in only 24% of these isolates. The phospholipase activity of C. albicans was significantly higher than that of the non- C. albicans Candida isolates (P=0.002). Haemolysin activity was detected in 100% of the C. albicans, C. tropicalis, C. glabrata, C. krusei, C. parapsilosis, and C. orthopsilosis isolates while 75% of the C. krusei isolates and 12.3% of the C. rugosa isolates showed haemolysin activity. The haemolytic activity of C. albicans was significantly higher than that of the non- C. albicans Candida isolates (P=0.0001).The findings in this study indicate that C. albicans isolates in Malaysia may possess greater virulence potential than the non-albicans species.

  16. Comparative Lipidomics in Clinical Isolates of Candida albicans Reveal Crosstalk between Mitochondria, Cell Wall Integrity and Azole Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ashutosh; Yadav, Vipin; Prasad, Rajendra

    2012-01-01

    Prolonged usage of antifungal azoles which target enzymes involved in lipid biosynthesis invariably leads to the development of multi-drug resistance (MDR) in Candida albicans. We had earlier shown that membrane lipids and their fluidity are closely linked to the MDR phenomenon. In one of our recent studies involving comparative lipidomics between azole susceptible (AS) and azole resistant (AR) matched pair clinical isolates of C. albicans, we could not see consistent differences in the lipid profiles of AS and AR strains because they came from different patients and so in this study, we have used genetically related variant recovered from the same patient collected over a period of 2-years. During this time, the levels of fluconazole (FLC) resistance of the strain increased by over 200-fold. By comparing the lipid profiles of select isolates, we were able to observe gradual and statistically significant changes in several lipid classes, particularly in plasma membrane microdomain specific lipids such as mannosylinositolphosphorylceramides and ergosterol, and in a mitochondrial specific phosphoglyceride, phosphatidyl glycerol. Superimposed with these quantitative and qualitative changes in the lipid profiles, were simultaneous changes at the molecular lipid species levels which again coincided with the development of resistance to FLC. Reverse transcriptase-PCR of the key genes of the lipid metabolism validated lipidomic picture. Taken together, this study illustrates how the gradual corrective changes in Candida lipidome correspond to the development of FLC tolerance. Our study also shows a first instance of the mitochondrial membrane dysfunction and defective cell wall (CW) in clinical AR isolates of C. albicans, and provides evidence of a cross-talk between mitochondrial lipid homeostasis, CW integrity and azole tolerance. PMID:22761908

  17. Paradoxical antifungal activity and structural observations in biofilms formed by echinocandin-resistant Candida albicans clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Walraven, Carla J; Bernardo, Stella M; Wiederhold, Nathan P; Lee, Samuel A

    2014-02-01

    Echinocandin-resistant clinical isolates of Candida albicans have been reported, and key-hot spot mutations in the FKS1 gene, which encodes a major glucan synthase subunit, have been identified in these (caspofungin-resistant [CAS-R]) strains. Although these mutations result in phenotypic resistance to echinocandins in planktonic cells, there is little data on antifungal susceptibilities of CAS-R C. albicans strains within biofilms. Thus, we analyzed biofilms formed by 12 C. albicans CAS-R clinical strains in which we previously identified FKS1 hot-spot mutations and compared the sessile antifungal and paradoxical activity of anidulafungin (ANID), caspofungin (CAS), and micafungin (MICA). Biofilms were formed in a 96-well static microplate model and assayed using both tetrazolium-salt reduction and crystal violet assays, as well as examination by scanning electron microscopy. We first sought to assess biofilm formation and structure in these fks1 mutants and found that the biofilm mass and metabolic activities were reduced in most of the fks1 mutants as compared with reference strain SC5314. Structural analyses revealed that the fks1 mutant biofilms were generally less dense and had a clear predominance of yeast and pseudohyphae, with unusual "pit"-like cell surface structures. We also noted that sessile minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) to ANID, CAS, and MICA were higher than planktonic MICs of all but one strain. The majority of strains demonstrated a paradoxical effect (PE) to particular echinocandins, in either planktonic or sessile forms. Overall, biofilms formed by echinocandin-resistant clinical isolates demonstrated varied PEs to echinocandins and were structurally characterized by a preponderance of yeast, pseudohyphae, and pit-like structures. PMID:24576999

  18. Paradoxical antifungal activity and structural observations in biofilms formed by echinocandin-resistant Candida albicans clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Walraven, Carla J; Bernardo, Stella M; Wiederhold, Nathan P; Lee, Samuel A

    2014-02-01

    Echinocandin-resistant clinical isolates of Candida albicans have been reported, and key-hot spot mutations in the FKS1 gene, which encodes a major glucan synthase subunit, have been identified in these (caspofungin-resistant [CAS-R]) strains. Although these mutations result in phenotypic resistance to echinocandins in planktonic cells, there is little data on antifungal susceptibilities of CAS-R C. albicans strains within biofilms. Thus, we analyzed biofilms formed by 12 C. albicans CAS-R clinical strains in which we previously identified FKS1 hot-spot mutations and compared the sessile antifungal and paradoxical activity of anidulafungin (ANID), caspofungin (CAS), and micafungin (MICA). Biofilms were formed in a 96-well static microplate model and assayed using both tetrazolium-salt reduction and crystal violet assays, as well as examination by scanning electron microscopy. We first sought to assess biofilm formation and structure in these fks1 mutants and found that the biofilm mass and metabolic activities were reduced in most of the fks1 mutants as compared with reference strain SC5314. Structural analyses revealed that the fks1 mutant biofilms were generally less dense and had a clear predominance of yeast and pseudohyphae, with unusual "pit"-like cell surface structures. We also noted that sessile minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) to ANID, CAS, and MICA were higher than planktonic MICs of all but one strain. The majority of strains demonstrated a paradoxical effect (PE) to particular echinocandins, in either planktonic or sessile forms. Overall, biofilms formed by echinocandin-resistant clinical isolates demonstrated varied PEs to echinocandins and were structurally characterized by a preponderance of yeast, pseudohyphae, and pit-like structures.

  19. Comparison of E,E-Farnesol Secretion and the Clinical Characteristics of Candida albicans Bloodstream Isolates from Different Multilocus Sequence Typing Clades.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sook-In; Shin, Jong Hee; Kim, Soo Hyun; Kim, Jin; Kim, Joo Hee; Choi, Min Ji; Chung, Eun-Kyung; Lee, Kyungwon; Koo, Sun Hoe; Chang, Hyun Ha; Bougnoux, Marie-Elisabeth; d'Enfert, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Using multilocus sequence typing (MLST), Candida albicans can be subdivided into 18 different clades. Farnesol, a quorum-sensing molecule secreted by C. albicans, is thought to play an important role in the development of C. albicans biofilms and is also a virulence factor. This study evaluated whether C. albicans bloodstream infection (BSI) strains belonging to different MLST clades secrete different levels of E,E-farnesol (FOH) and whether they have different clinical characteristics. In total, 149 C. albicans BSI isolates from ten Korean hospitals belonging to clades 18 (n = 28), 4 (n = 23), 1 (n = 22), 12 (n = 17), and other clades (n = 59) were assessed. For each isolate, the FOH level in 24-hour biofilms was determined in filtered (0.45 μm) culture supernatant using high-performance liquid chromatography. Marked differences in FOH secretion from biofilms (0.10-6.99 μM) were observed among the 149 BSI isolates. Clade 18 isolates secreted significantly more FOH than did non-clade 18 isolates (mean ± SEM; 2.66 ± 0.22 vs. 1.69 ± 0.10 μM; P < 0.001). Patients with isolates belonging to clade 18 had a lower mean severity of illness than other patients, as measured using the "acute physiology and chronic health evaluation" (APACHE) III score (14.4 ± 1.1 vs. 18.0 ± 0.7; P < 0.05). This study provides evidence that C. albicans BSI isolates belonging to the most prevalent MLST clade (clade 18) in Korea are characterized by increased levels of FOH secretion and less severe illness.

  20. Rapid detection of ERG11 gene mutations in clinical Candida albicans isolates with reduced susceptibility to fluconazole by rolling circle amplification and DNA sequencing

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Amino acid substitutions in the target enzyme Erg11p of azole antifungals contribute to clinically-relevant azole resistance in Candida albicans. A simple molecular method for rapid detection of ERG11 gene mutations would be an advantage as a screening tool to identify potentially-resistant strains and to track their movement. To complement DNA sequencing, we developed a padlock probe and rolling circle amplification (RCA)-based method to detect a series of mutations in the C. albicans ERG11 gene using "reference" azole-resistant isolates with known mutations. The method was then used to estimate the frequency of ERG11 mutations and their type in 25 Australian clinical C. albicans isolates with reduced susceptibility to fluconazole and in 23 fluconazole-susceptible isolates. RCA results were compared DNA sequencing. Results The RCA assay correctly identified all ERG11 mutations in eight "reference" C. albicans isolates. When applied to 48 test strains, the RCA method showed 100% agreement with DNA sequencing where an ERG11 mutation-specific probe was used. Of 20 different missense mutations detected by sequencing in 24 of 25 (96%) isolates with reduced fluconazole susceptibility, 16 were detected by RCA. Five missense mutations were detected by both methods in 18 of 23 (78%) fluconazole-susceptible strains. DNA sequencing revealed that mutations in non-susceptible isolates were all due to homozygous nucleotide changes. With the exception of the mutations leading to amino acid substitution E266D, those in fluconazole-susceptible strains were heterozygous. Amino acid substitutions common to both sets of isolates were D116E, E266D, K128T, V437I and V488I. Substitutions unique to isolates with reduced fluconazole susceptibility were G464 S (n = 4 isolates), G448E (n = 3), G307S (n = 3), K143R (n = 3) and Y123H, S405F and R467K (each n = 1). DNA sequencing revealed a novel substitution, G450V, in one isolate. Conclusion The sensitive RCA assay described here

  1. Small-molecule suppressors of Candida albicans biofilm formation synergistically enhance the antifungal activity of amphotericin B against clinical Candida isolates.

    PubMed

    You, Jianlan; Du, Lin; King, Jarrod B; Hall, Brian E; Cichewicz, Robert H

    2013-04-19

    A new class of fungal biofilm inhibitors represented by shearinines D (3) and E (4) were obtained from a Penicillium sp. isolate. The inhibitory activities of 3 and 4 were characterized using a new imaging flow-cytometer technique, which enabled the rapid phenotypic analysis of Candida albicans cell types (budding yeast cells, germ tube cells, pseudohyphae, and hyphae) in biofilm populations. The results were confirmed by experimental data obtained from three-dimensional confocal laser scanning microscopy and 2,3-bis(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide (XTT) assays. These data indicate that 3 and 4 inhibited C. albicans biofilm formation by blocking the outgrowth of hyphae at a relatively late stage of biofilm development (IC50 = 8.5 and 7.6 μM, respectively). However, 3 and 4 demonstrated comparatively weak activity at disrupting existing biofilms. Compounds 3 and 4 also exhibited synergistic activities with amphotericin B against C. albicans and other clinical Candida isolates by enhancing the potency of amphotericin B up to 8-fold against cells in both developing and established biofilms. These data suggest that the Candida biofilm disruption and amphotericin B potentiating effects of 3 and 4 could be mediated through multiple biological targets. The shearinines are good tools for testing the potential advantages of using adjunctive therapies in combination with antifungals.

  2. Essential Oils, Silver Nanoparticles and Propolis as Alternative Agents Against Fluconazole Resistant Candida albicans, Candida glabrata and Candida krusei Clinical Isolates.

    PubMed

    Szweda, Piotr; Gucwa, Katarzyna; Kurzyk, Ewelina; Romanowska, Ewa; Dzierżanowska-Fangrat, Katarzyna; Zielińska Jurek, Anna; Kuś, Piotr Marek; Milewski, Sławomir

    2015-06-01

    Development of effective and safe therapeutic treatment of fungal infections remains one of the major challenge for modern medicine. The aim of presented investigation was to analyze the in vitro antifungal activity of selected essential oils, ethanolic extracts of propolis and silver nanoparticles dropped on TiO2 against azole-resistant C. albicans (n = 20), C. glabrata (n = 14) and C. krusei (n = 10) clinical isolates. Among tested essential oils, the highest activity has definitely been found in the case of the oil isolated from the bark of Cinnamomum cassia, with MIC and MFC values for all tested strains in the range of 0.0006-0.0097 % (v/v) and 0.0012-0.019 % (v/v), respectively. High activity was also observed for the Lemon, Basil, Thyme, Geranium and Clove (from buds) essential oils. Significant differences in fungicidal activity have been observed in the case of four tested propolis samples. Only one of them revealed high activity, with MFC values in the range from 0.156 to 1.25 % (v/v). Satisfactory fungicidal activity, against C. albicans and C. glabrata isolates, was also observed in the case of silver nanoparticles, however C. krusei isolates were mostly resistant. We also revealed that constituents of most of essential oils and propolis as well as silver nanoparticles are not substrates for drug transporters, which belong to the most important factors affecting resistance of Candida spp. clinical isolates to many of conventional antimycotics. To conclude, the results of our investigation revealed that essential oils, propolis and silver nanoparticles represent high potential for controlling and prevention candidiasis. PMID:25805904

  3. Essential Oils, Silver Nanoparticles and Propolis as Alternative Agents Against Fluconazole Resistant Candida albicans, Candida glabrata and Candida krusei Clinical Isolates.

    PubMed

    Szweda, Piotr; Gucwa, Katarzyna; Kurzyk, Ewelina; Romanowska, Ewa; Dzierżanowska-Fangrat, Katarzyna; Zielińska Jurek, Anna; Kuś, Piotr Marek; Milewski, Sławomir

    2015-06-01

    Development of effective and safe therapeutic treatment of fungal infections remains one of the major challenge for modern medicine. The aim of presented investigation was to analyze the in vitro antifungal activity of selected essential oils, ethanolic extracts of propolis and silver nanoparticles dropped on TiO2 against azole-resistant C. albicans (n = 20), C. glabrata (n = 14) and C. krusei (n = 10) clinical isolates. Among tested essential oils, the highest activity has definitely been found in the case of the oil isolated from the bark of Cinnamomum cassia, with MIC and MFC values for all tested strains in the range of 0.0006-0.0097 % (v/v) and 0.0012-0.019 % (v/v), respectively. High activity was also observed for the Lemon, Basil, Thyme, Geranium and Clove (from buds) essential oils. Significant differences in fungicidal activity have been observed in the case of four tested propolis samples. Only one of them revealed high activity, with MFC values in the range from 0.156 to 1.25 % (v/v). Satisfactory fungicidal activity, against C. albicans and C. glabrata isolates, was also observed in the case of silver nanoparticles, however C. krusei isolates were mostly resistant. We also revealed that constituents of most of essential oils and propolis as well as silver nanoparticles are not substrates for drug transporters, which belong to the most important factors affecting resistance of Candida spp. clinical isolates to many of conventional antimycotics. To conclude, the results of our investigation revealed that essential oils, propolis and silver nanoparticles represent high potential for controlling and prevention candidiasis.

  4. The monoamine oxidase A inhibitor clorgyline is a broad-spectrum inhibitor of fungal ABC and MFS transporter efflux pump activities which reverses the azole resistance of Candida albicans and Candida glabrata clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Ann R; Keniya, Mikhail V; Ivnitski-Steele, Irena; Monk, Brian C; Lamping, Erwin; Sklar, Larry A; Cannon, Richard D

    2012-03-01

    Resistance to the commonly used azole antifungal fluconazole (FLC) can develop due to overexpression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) and major facilitator superfamily (MFS) plasma membrane transporters. An approach to overcoming this resistance is to identify inhibitors of these efflux pumps. We have developed a pump assay suitable for high-throughput screening (HTS) that uses recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains hyperexpressing individual transporters from the opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida albicans. The recombinant strains possess greater resistance to azoles and other pump substrates than the parental host strain. A flow cytometry-based HTS, which measured increased intracellular retention of the fluorescent pump substrate rhodamine 6G (R6G) within yeast cells, was used to screen the Prestwick Chemical Library (PCL) of 1,200 marketed drugs. Nine compounds were identified as hits, and the monoamine oxidase A inhibitor (MAOI) clorgyline was identified as an inhibitor of two C. albicans ABC efflux pumps, CaCdr1p and CaCdr2p. Secondary in vitro assays confirmed inhibition of pump-mediated efflux by clorgyline. Clorgyline also reversed the FLC resistance of S. cerevisiae strains expressing other individual fungal ABC transporters (Candida glabrata Cdr1p or Candida krusei Abc1p) or the C. albicans MFS transporter Mdr1p. Recombinant strains were also chemosensitized by clorgyline to other azoles (itraconazole and miconazole). Importantly, clorgyline showed synergy with FLC against FLC-resistant C. albicans clinical isolates and a C. glabrata strain and inhibited R6G efflux from a FLC-resistant C. albicans clinical isolate. Clorgyline is a novel broad-spectrum inhibitor of two classes of fungal efflux pumps that acts synergistically with azoles against azole-resistant C. albicans and C. glabrata strains. PMID:22203607

  5. New aniline blue dye medium for rapid identification and isolation of Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Goldschmidt, M C; Fung, D Y; Grant, R; White, J; Brown, T

    1991-01-01

    Organic dyes have long been used in diagnostic microbiology to differentiate species by color reactions. We studied the ability of a new noninhibitory medium, YM agar containing 0.01% aniline blue WS dye, Colour Index 42780 (YMAB), to identify Candida albicans among 1,554 yeast specimens obtained from seven clinical laboratories. Appropriate American Type Culture Collection and other characterized strains served as controls. A total of 487 of the clinical strains were identified as C. albicans. The remainder were other Candida species and non-Candida yeasts. Clinical isolates and controls were grown on Sabouraud agar for 18 h at 30 degrees C and then transferred to YMAB. Plates were incubated for 12 to 18 h at 30 degrees C, and colonies were observed for yellow-green fluorescence under long-wave UV light (A365). All control strains of C. albicans and Candida stellatoidea fluoresced, as did 480 of the 490 isolates designated as C. albicans (which included 3 strains of C. stellatoidea). Cells of C. albicans grown on YMAB produced germ tubes in serum. Only five of the other 1,062 non-C. albicans yeasts fluoresced. The sensitivity and specificity were 98.0 and 99.5%, respectively, with a predictive value of 99.1%. A fluorescent metabolite was found in cell wall particulate fractions of C. albicans sonic extracts grown on YMAB but not in non-C. albicans yeasts. This metabolite showed the same spectral curve as those of metabolites from whole cells in a recording spectrofluorometer when it was excited at 400 nm and scanned from 420 to 550 nm. Thus, growth on YMAB generates the production of a fluorescent moiety that can be used to specifically identify C. albicans within 12 to 18 h. Images PMID:1864924

  6. Utilising polyphenols for the clinical management of Candida albicans biofilms.

    PubMed

    Shahzad, Muhammad; Sherry, Leighann; Rajendran, Ranjith; Edwards, Christine A; Combet, Emilie; Ramage, Gordon

    2014-09-01

    Polyphenols (PPs) are secondary metabolites abundant in plant-derived foods. They are reported to exhibit antimicrobial activity that may offer an alternative to existing antimicrobials. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antifungal potential of PPs against Candida albicans biofilms that are commonly recalcitrant to antifungal therapy. The antifungal activity of 14 PPs was assessed in terms of planktonic and sessile minimum inhibitory concentrations (PMICs and SMICs, respectively) against various C. albicans clinical isolates. The most active PPs were further tested for their effect on C. albicans adhesion and biofilm growth using standard biomass assays, microscopy and quantitative gene expression. Of the 14 PPs tested, 7 were effective inhibitors of planktonic growth, of which pyrogallol (PYG) was the most effective (PMIC₅₀=78 μg/mL), followed by curcumin (CUR) (PMIC₅₀=100 μg/mL) and pyrocatechol (PMIC₅₀=625 μg/mL). Both PYG and CUR displayed activity against C. albicans biofilms (SMIC₅₀=40 μg/mL and 50 μg/mL, respectively), although they did not disrupt the biofilm or directly affect the cellular structure. Overall, CUR displayed superior biofilm activity, significantly inhibiting initial cell adhesion following pre-coating (P<0.01), biofilm growth (P<0.05) and gene expression (P<0.05). This inhibitory effect diminished with prolonged CUR exposure, although it still inhibited by 50% after 4h adhesion. Overall, CUR exhibited positive antibiofilm properties that could be used at the basis for development of similar molecules, although further cellular and in vivo studies are required to explore its precise mechanism of action. PMID:25104135

  7. Antifungal susceptibility and molecular typing of 115 Candida albicans isolates obtained from vulvovaginal candidiasis patients in 3 Shanghai maternity hospitals.

    PubMed

    Ying, Chunmei; Zhang, Hongju; Tang, Zhenhua; Chen, Huifen; Gao, Jing; Yue, Chaoyan

    2016-05-01

    In our multicenter study, we studied the distribution of Candida species in vulvovaginal candidiasis patients and investigated antifungal susceptibility profile and genotype of Candida albicans in vaginal swab. A total of 115 Candida albicans strains were detected in 135 clinical isolates. Minimum inhibitory concentration determinations showed that 83% and 81% of the 115 Candida albicans strains were susceptible to fluconazole and voriconazole. Randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis (RAPD) was applied to identify clonally related isolates from different patients at the local level. All tested strains were classified into genotype A (77.4%), genotype B (18.3%), and genotype C (4.3%). Genotype A was further classified into five subtypes and genotype B into two subtypes.Candida albicans was the dominant pathogen of vulvovaginal candidiasis, the majority belonging to genotype A in this study. Exposure to azoles is a risk factor for the emergence of azole resistance among Candida albicans isolated from VVC patients.

  8. Low virulent oral Candida albicans strains isolated from smokers.

    PubMed

    de Azevedo Izidoro, Ana Claudia Santos; Semprebom, Andressa Marafon; Baboni, Fernanda Brasil; Rosa, Rosimeire Takaki; Machado, Maria Angela Naval; Samaranayake, Lakshman Perera; Rosa, Edvaldo Antonio Ribeiro

    2012-02-01

    It is widely accepted that tabagism is a predisposing factor to oral candidosis and cumulate data suggest that cigarette compounds may increase candidal virulence. To verify if enhanced virulence occurs in Candida albicans from chronic smokers, a cohort of 42 non-smokers and other of 58 smokers (all with excellent oral conditions and without signs of candidosis) were swabbed on tong dorsum and jugal mucosa. Results showed that oral candidal loads do not differ between smoker and non-smokers. Activities of secreted aspartyl-protease (Sap), phospholipase, chondroitinase, esterase-lipase, and haemolysin secretions were screened for thirty-two C. albicans isolates. There were detected significant increments in phospholipasic and chondroitinasic activities in isolates from non-smokers. For other virulence factors, no differences between both cohorts were achieved. PMID:21924704

  9. Association of KPC-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae colonization or infection with Candida isolation and selection of non-albicans species.

    PubMed

    Papadimitriou-Olivgeris, Matthaios; Spiliopoulou, Anastasia; Fligou, Fotini; Manolopoulou, Patroula; Spiliopoulou, Iris; Vrettos, Theofanis; Dodou, Vasiliki; Filos, Kriton S; Anastassiou, Evangelos D; Marangos, Markos; Christofidou, Myrto

    2014-11-01

    Clinical specimens from 565 patients hospitalized in 2 intensive care units (ICUs A and B) during a 28-month period were cultured on appropriate media for isolation of Candida. Forty-nine (9%) patients had at least a Candida spp.-positive sample. Candida albicans was the predominant species isolated from 26 (53%) patients. Seventeen patients (3%) developed candidemia. Multivariate analysis showed that obesity, female gender, hospitalization during summer months, admission at ICU B, parenteral nutrition, administration of metronidazole, transplantation, and KPC-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (KPC-Kp) infection were independently associated with Candida spp. isolation. Candidemia was associated with cortisone administration, KPC-Kp infection, and presence of colostomy or abdominal catheter. Administration of fluconazole was a protective factor for both Candida spp. isolation and infection, leading to selection of Candida non-albicans species. Among several risk factors, KPC-Kp infection and colonization are identified as statistically significant factors associated with Candida isolation, especially of non-albicans species.

  10. [25S intron analysis followed by restriction enzyme digestion performed for genotyping Candida albicans isolates].

    PubMed

    Karahan, Zeynep Ceren; Saran, Begüm; Yenice, Sevinç; Ağırbaşlı, Handan; Arıkan Akan, Ozay; Tekeli, Alper

    2012-04-01

    Candida albicans is the most frequently encountered fungal pathogen especially in the immunocompromised hosts. Genotyping clinical microbial isolates is important for obtaining epidemiological data and for establishing appropriate infection control strategies in the hospital setting. 25S intron analysis is an easy and reliable method used for genotyping C.albicans strains. As it has a low discriminatory power, its use is limited in epidemiological studies. In this study, our aim was to genotype clinical C.albicans isolates by using 25S intron analysis followed by restriction enzyme digestion in order to develop a more discriminative genotyping system for C.albicans. A total of 260 clinical C.albicans strains isolated from various infection sites (121 blood, 69 sputum, 36 vaginal discharge, 26 wound, 8 urine samples) were genotyped by 25S intron analysis, and all the products obtained by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were digested with HaeIII restriction enzyme. Discriminatory power of each method was calculated. Among the isolates 184 (70.8%) were classified as genotype A, 42 (16.2%) as genotype B, and 34 (13%) as genotype C by 25S intron analysis. Discriminatory power of the method was calculated as 0.46. HaeIII restriction of genotype A, B and C isolates produced ten, one, and five restriction patterns (genotypes), respectively. By the addition of restriction enzyme analysis, the number of genotypes obtained was increased to 16, and the discriminatory power of the method to 0.79. Combining different genotyping methods increases the discriminatory power by increasing the number of genotypes obtained. However, there is also a risk to split certain strains in different genotypes by the different methods used and this makes the genotypic evaluation more difficult. On the other hand, combining 25S intron analysis with restriction enzyme analysis increases the discriminatory power without introducing a totally different method, and makes the method more suitable for

  11. Isolation and characterization of yeast monomorphic mutants of Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Elorza, M V; Sentandreu, R; Ruiz-Herrera, J

    1994-01-01

    A method was devised for the isolation of yeast monomorphic (LEV) mutants of Candida albicans. By this procedure, about 20 stable yeast-like mutants were isolated after mutagenesis with ethyl methane sulfonate. The growth rate of the mutants in different carbon sources, both fermentable and not, was indistinguishable from that of the parental strain, but they were unable to grow as mycelial forms after application of any of the common effective inducers, i.e., heat shock, pH alterations, proline addition, or use of GlcNAc as the carbon source. Studies performed with one selected strain demonstrated that it had severe alterations in the chemical composition of the cell wall, mainly in the levels of chitin and glucans, and in specific mannoproteins, some of them recognizable by specific polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies. It is suggested that these structural alterations hinder the construction of a normal hyphal wall. Images PMID:8157600

  12. Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis types of Candida albicans isolates from an intensive care unit in a Tunisian hospital.

    PubMed

    Khadraoui, Nadia; Kallel, Kalthoum; Bouchami, Ons; Bouchakoua, Myriam; Kaouech, Amira; Belhadj, Slah; Ben Lakhal, Slah; Ben Hassen, Assia; Chaker, Emna

    2011-01-01

    Candida albicans is the most important cause of fungal infections in intensive care units. The aim of this work was to compare the profiles of C. albicans in order to specify their genetic polymorphism and to determine the origin of these infections. Thirty-five C. albicans strains were collected from different clinical samples of 12 patients and three health-workers in an intensive care unit (ICU) in Rabta hospital of Tunisia, between August 2007 and April 2008. After digestion with BssHII, the isolates were typed by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). The PFGE profiles were analyzed using a visual method, which showed three PFGE types (A, B and C) and the dendrogram generated three clusters (clusters I to III). An average similarity coefficient of 0.83, suggests that isolates are related.

  13. Candida albicans bloodstream isolates in a German university hospital are genetically heterogenous and susceptible to commonly used antifungals.

    PubMed

    Huyke, Johanna; Martin, Ronny; Walther, Grit; Weber, Michael; Kaerger, Kerstin; Bougnoux, Marie-Elisabeth; Elias, Johannes; Kurzai, Oliver

    2015-10-01

    From an eight-year-span, 99 Candida bloodstream isolates were collected at the University Hospital Wuerzburg, Germany. In this study, all strains were analyzed using molecular and phenotypic typing methods. Confirmatory species identification revealed three isolates that were initially diagnosed as C. albicans to be actually C. dubliniensis. Two isolates contained a mixed culture of C. albicans and C. glabrata, in one of the specimens both species could be separated while it was not possible to recover C. albicans in the other sample. The remaining 95 C. albicans isolates were profiled by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Phylogenetic analyses showed a highly heterogenous collection of strains, associated with many different clades and constituting a set of new diploid sequence types (DST). For all strains with identical DST, patient data were reviewed for potential nosocomial transmission. In addition, all isolates were tested for their susceptibility to amphotericin B, caspofungin, fluconazole, itraconazole, posaconazole and voriconazole. No clinically relevant resistance could be detected. Furthermore, these data underline that correlation between minimal inhibitory concentrations for caspofungin and anidulafungin is low.

  14. Susceptibilities of Candida albicans mouth isolates to antifungal agents, essentials oils and mouth rinses.

    PubMed

    Carvalhinho, Sara; Costa, Ana Margarida; Coelho, Ana Cláudia; Martins, Eugénio; Sampaio, Ana

    2012-07-01

    Forty Candida albicans strains isolated from patient's mouth with fixed orthodontic appliances were analyzed to their susceptibilities to antifungal agents, mouth rinses and essential oils. Susceptibility to fluconazole, econazole, miconazole and ketoconazole, amphotericin B and nystatin was assessed by the disk diffusion (DD) method based on the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute M44-A protocol, and by Etest (fluconazole and amphotericin B). The susceptibilities to mouth rinses and essential oils were also determined by the DD technique. All isolates tested were susceptible (S) to amphotericin B, nystatin and fluconazole. The overall concordance between the DD and the Etest was 100% for amphotericin and fluconazole. One isolate was resistant to econazole (2.5%) and the other to ketoconazole (2.5%). Econazole and ketoconazole had the highest percentages of susceptible dose dependent (SDD), 55 and 95%, respectively. Regarding to the susceptibility isolates profile, seven phenotypes were detected, and the 3 more represented (90% of the isolates) of them were SDD to one, two or three azoles. The study of mouth rinses showed a high variability of efficacy against C. albicans. The results showed that the isolates susceptibility to essential oils differed (P < 0.05). The profile activity was: cinnamon > laurel > mint > eucalyptus > rosemary > lemon > myrrh > tangerine. The main finding was that the susceptibility to cinnamon and laurel varied among the three more representative antifungal phenotypes (P < 0.05). The susceptibility of econazole-SDD isolates to cinnamon and lemon was higher than those of the econazole-S yeasts (P < 0.05). In contrast, econazole-SDD isolates were less affected by laurel than econazole-S counterparts (P < 0.05).

  15. Microsatellite-based genotyping of Candida albicans isolated from patients with superficial candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Kazue; Hattori, Hisao; Adachi, Hidesada; Oshima, Ryosuke; Horii, Toshinobu; Tanaka, Reiko; Yaguchi, Takashi; Tomita, Yasushi; Akiyama, Masashi; Kawamoto, Fumihiko; Kanbe, Toshio

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the genotype distribution of Candida albicans and the major genotypes involved in superficial candidiasis. The genotypes of C. albicans isolated from the infection sites of patients with superficial candidiasis (referred to as infection isolates) were analyzed by fragment analysis using 4 microsatellite markers (HIS3, CDC3, CAI and CAIII). Genotypes of the infection isolates were compared with those of C. albicans isolated from oral mucosa of non-candidiasis patients (referred to as oral isolates). Isolates of C. albicans showed 4 major genotypes for HIS3/CAI (" a " for 148 : 148 / 23 : 23," b " for 148 : 160 / 33 : 41," c " for 148 : 164 / 32 : 41 and " d " for 152 : 152 / 18 : 27). The genotypes " a "," b " and " d " were commonly found in oral (4.7, 8.8 and 7.6%, respectively) and infection (6.6, 9.2 and 15.4%, respectively) isolates. No isolates of genotype " c " were isolated from infection sites. The genotype " a " was found in the isolates from patients with genitalia candidiasis. Genotyping of multiple isolates from an individual patient showed that C. albicans from infection sites was genetically homogenous as compared with that of oral isolates, even in the same patient with candidiasis.

  16. Enzymatic activity profile of a Brazilian culture collection of Candida albicans isolated from diabetics and non-diabetics with oral candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Sanitá, Paula Volpato; Zago, Chaiene Evelin; Pavarina, Ana Cláudia; Jorge, Janaina Habib; Machado, Ana Lúcia; Vergani, Carlos Eduardo

    2014-06-01

    The secretion of hydrolytic enzymes is a fundamental virulence factor of Candida albicans to develop disease. The objective of this study was to characterise the virulence of 148 clinical isolates of C. albicans from oral candidiasis by assessing the expression of phospholipase (PL) and secreted aspartyl proteinase (SAP). Isolates were obtained from healthy subjects (HS) and diabetics (DOC) and non-diabetics with oral candidiasis (NDOC). An aliquot (5 μl) of each cell suspension was inoculated on PL and SAP agar plates and incubated. Enzymes secretion was detected by the formation of an opaque halo around the colonies and enzymatic activity (PZ) was determined by the ratio between colony diameter and colony diameter plus the halo zone. Statistical comparisons were made by a one-way anova followed by Tukey's post hoc test (α = 0.05). The clinical sources of C. albicans had significant effect (P < 0.001) on the PZ values of both enzymes. For PL, clinical isolates from NDOC and DOC had highest enzymatic activity than those from HS (P < 0.05), with no significant differences between them (P = 0.506). For SAP, C. albicans from NDOC showed the lower enzymatic activity (P < 0.001). There were no significant differences between isolates from HS and DOC (P = 0.7051). C. albicans isolates from NDOC and DOC patients showed an increased production of PL.

  17. Yeasts isolated from Algerian infants's feces revealed a burden of Candida albicans species, non-albicans Candida species and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Seddik, Hamza Ait; Ceugniez, Alexandre; Bendali, Farida; Cudennec, Benoit; Drider, Djamel

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at showing the yeast diversity in feces of Algerian infants, aged between 1 and 24 months, hospitalized at Bejaia hospital (northeast side of the country). Thus, 20 colonies with yeast characteristics were isolated and identified using biochemical (ID32C Api system) and molecular (sequencing of ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region) methods. Almost all colonies isolated (19 strains) were identified as Candida spp., with predominance of Candida albicans species, and one strain was identified as Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Screening of strains with inhibitory activities unveiled the potential of Candida parapsilosis P48L1 and Candida albicans P51L1 to inhibit the growth of Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923. Further studies performed with these two Candida strains revealed their susceptibility to clinically used antifungal compounds and were then characterized for their cytotoxicity and hemolytic properties. On the other hand, Saccharomyces cerevisiae P9L1 isolated as well in this study was shown to be devoid of antagonism but resulted safe and overall usable as probiotic.

  18. [Molecular epidemiologic surveillance and antifungal agent sensitivity of Candida albicans isolated from anesthesia intensive care units].

    PubMed

    Gülay, Zeynep; Ergon, Cem; Ozkütük, Aydan; Yücesoy, Mine; Biçmen, Meral

    2002-01-01

    Patients in intensive care units (ICU) are at risk of nosocomial infections. The incidence of nosocomial fungal infections has increased in parallel with the increase of nosocomial infections. Candida albicans is the most frequent pathogenic species among the fungi. The aim of this study was to make an epidemiological surveillance of C. albicans urine isolates which were isolated from patients who were hospitalized in ICU between June 2000 and October 2001 by antifungal susceptibility testing and Randomly Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis. For this purpose, 38 C. albicans which were isolated from 29 patients were investigated for amphotericin B and fluconazole susceptibility with the microdilution method. The range of minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of amphotericin B was between 0.25-1 microgram/ml and MIC50 value was 0.5 microgram/ml and none of the isolates had high (MIC > 1 microgram/ml) MIC values. The MIC values for fluconazole varied between 0.25-16 micrograms/ml and MIC50 value was 1 microgram/ml. While none of the isolates was resistant to fluconazole, two isolates were detected as dose dependent susceptible. RAPD analysis was performed with two different primers in order to investigate clonal relationship, and 22 patterns were detected with one of the primers and 24 patterns were detected with the other. In conclusion, it is thought that the origin of the C. albicans urine isolates were mostly endogenous but exogenous spread might also be considered as isolates that were clonally related were isolated from different patients at the same time interval.

  19. Genotypes of Candida albicans isolated from healthy individuals and their distribution in patients with oral candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Yuki; Fukano, Hideo; Shimozato, Kazuo; Tanaka, Reiko; Horii, Toshinobu; Kawamoto, Fumihiko; Kanbe, Toshio

    2013-12-01

    For the study of Candida albicans genotypes involved in development of candidiasis, Candida albicans isolates were collected from healthy volunteers and patients with oral candidiasis and genotyped on the basis of 25S rDNA and microsatellite polymorphisms. In the microsatellite analysis using two microsatellite markers (CDC3 and CAI), 63 healthy volunteer isolates were classified into 35 genotypes (allelic relations to CDC3 alleles 1:2/CAI alleles 1:2), among which genotypes II (115:119/23:23), III (115:123/18:27), and V (123:127/32:41) were found at frequencies of 12.7%, 7.9%, and 7.9%, respectively. In 68 oral candidiasis isolates classified into 39 genotypes, genotypes II and III were identified in 4.4% and 20.6% of the isolates, respectively. The frequency of genotype III was higher in the candidiasis isolates than in the healthy isolates (p < 0.05). These results suggest that genotype III C. albicans assigned by CDC3/CAI is related to the development of oral candidiasis.

  20. Rapid detection of Candida albicans in clinical samples by DNA amplification of common regions from C. albicans-secreted aspartic proteinase genes.

    PubMed

    Flahaut, M; Sanglard, D; Monod, M; Bille, J; Rossier, M

    1998-02-01

    Laboratory diagnosis based on genomic amplification methods such as PCR may provide an alternative and more sensitive method than conventional culture for the early detection of deep-seated candidiasis, an increasing cause of morbidity and mortality among immunocompromised patients. A novel method of DNA extraction from clinical samples based on treatment with proteinase K and isolation of DNA on a silica membrane was developed. The targets used for DNA amplification were the Candida albicans-secreted aspartic proteinase (SAP) genes, a multiple-gene family of at least seven members in C. albicans. A single pair of primers was designed in order to detect six of these SAP genes and, subsequently, to increase the sensitivity of the test. Detection of the PCR product by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was found to be as sensitive as Southern blotting with an SAP-labeled probe. The sensitivity of the assay was 1 cell/ml from serially diluted Candida cultures and 1 to 4 cells/ml from seeded blood specimens. The sensitivity and specificity of the present assay were tested in a retrospective study performed blindly with 156 clinical samples and were 100 and 98%, respectively, compared with the results of culture. For the subset of blood culture samples (n = 124), the sensitivity and the specificity were 100%. The two false-positive PCR samples came from patients treated with azole antifungal agents, indicating that PCR was probably able to detect damaged organisms that could not be recovered by culture.

  1. Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptides alter hepatic killing of Candida albicans in the isolated perfused mouse liver model.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, R T; Garner, R E; Hudson, J A

    1992-01-01

    The isolated perfused mouse liver model was used to study the effect of Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD)-containing peptides on hepatic trapping and killing of Candida albicans. After extensive washing, 10(6) C. albicans CFU were infused into mouse livers. At the time of recovery, 63% +/- 2% (mean +/- standard error of the mean) of the infused C. albicans CFU were recovered from the liver and 14% +/- 1% were recovered from the effluent for a total recovery of 77% +/- 2%. This indicates that 86% +/- 9% of the original inoculum was trapped by the liver and that 23% +/- 2% was killed within the liver. Prior to their infusion into livers, 10(7) CFU of C. albicans were incubated at 37 degrees C for 30 min in the presence of various RGD peptides (0.1 mg/ml). Repeatedly, more than 90% of the infused RGD-treated C. albicans was trapped by the perfused liver. In comparison with the 23% killing rate observed in control livers, perfused livers killed approximately 40 to 50% of the infused C. albicans treated either with fibronectin, PepTite 2000, RGD, or RGDS. Hepatic killing of C. albicans treated with PepTite 2000 or fibronectin was dose dependent. Treatment of C. albicans with GRGDTP, GRGDSP, GRADSP, or GRGESP did not alter the ability of the perfused liver to kill C. albicans, suggesting that a degree of specificity for RGD peptides is associated with an increased ability of liver to kill RGD-treated C. albicans. Together, the data suggest that RGD peptides bind to a receptor on the surface of C. albicans, thereby increasing hepatic, and presumably Kupffer cell, killing of C. albicans. Natural or synthetic RGD peptides may serve as opsonins promoting C. albicans killing by Kupffer cells.

  2. Biofilms formed by Candida albicans bloodstream isolates display phenotypic and transcriptional heterogeneity that are associated with resistance and pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Candida albicans infections have become increasingly recognised as being biofilm related. Recent studies have shown that there is a relationship between biofilm formation and poor clinical outcomes in patients infected with biofilm proficient strains. Here we have investigated a panel of clinical isolates in an attempt to evaluate their phenotypic and transcriptional properties in an attempt to differentiate and define levels of biofilm formation. Results Biofilm formation was shown to be heterogeneous; with isolates being defined as either high or low biofilm formers (LBF and HBF) based on different biomass quantification. These categories could also be differentiated using a cell surface hydrophobicity assay with 24 h biofilms. HBF isolates were more resistance to amphotericin B (AMB) treatment than LBF, but not voriconazole (VRZ). In a Galleria mellonella model of infection HBF mortality was significantly increased in comparison to LBF. Histological analysis of the HBF showed hyphal elements intertwined indicative of the biofilm phenotype. Transcriptional analysis of 23 genes implicated in biofilm formation showed no significant differential expression profiles between LBF and HBF, except for Cdr1 at 4 and 24 h. Cluster analysis showed similar patterns of expression for different functional classes of genes, though correlation analysis of the 4 h biofilms with overall biomass at 24 h showed that 7 genes were correlated with high levels of biofilm, including Als3, Eap1, Cph1, Sap5, Plb1, Cdr1 and Zap1. Conclusions Our findings show that biofilm formation is variable amongst C. albicans isolates, and categorising isolates depending on this can be used to predict how pathogenic the isolate will behave clinically. We have shown that looking at individual genes in less informative than looking at multiple genes when trying to categorise isolates at LBF or HBF. These findings are important when developing biofilm-specific diagnostics as these could be

  3. Virulence factors and antifungal susceptibility of Candida albicans isolates from oral candidosis patients and control individuals.

    PubMed

    Koga-Ito, Cristiane Yumi; Lyon, Juliana Pereira; Vidotto, Valerio; de Resende, Maria Aparecida

    2006-04-01

    Sixty isolates of Candida albicans, 30 obtained from the oral cavity of denture wearers presenting signs of candidosis and 30 obtained from the oral cavity of denture wearers with normal palatal mucosa were assayed for phospholipase and proteinase production, as well as for adherence to buccal epithelial cells. Likewise, susceptibility of the isolates to antifungals was determined by the NCCLS reference method and the E-test method. Proteinase activity was increased among the strains obtained from oral candidosis patients. In contrast, no significant differences between the two groups of isolates were observed in their adherence ability in vitro, in phospholipase production, and susceptibility to antifungal drugs.

  4. Evaluation of virulence factors of Candida albicans isolated from HIV-positive individuals using HAART.

    PubMed

    de Paula Menezes, Ralciane; de Melo Riceto, Érika Bezerra; Borges, Aércio Sebastião; de Brito Röder, Denise Von Dolingër; dos Santos Pedroso, Reginaldo

    2016-06-01

    The colonization by Candida species is one of the most important factors related to the development of oral candidiasis in HIV-infected individuals. The aim of the study was to evaluate and discuss the phospholipase, proteinase, DNAse and haemolytic activities of Candida albicans isolated from the oral cavity of HIV individuals with high efficiency antiretroviral therapy. Seventy-five isolates of C. albicans obtained from saliva samples of patients with HIV and 41 isolates from HIV-negative individuals were studied. Haemolytic activity was determined in Sabouraud dextrose agar plates containing 3% glucose and 7% sheep red cells. Culture medium containing DNA base-agar, egg yolk, and bovine albumin were used to determine DNase, phospholipase and proteinase activities, respectively. All isolates from the HIV patients group had haemolytic activity, 98% showed phospholipase activity, 92% were positive for proteinase and 32% DNAse activity. Regarding the group of indivídios HIV negative, all 41 isolates presented hemolytic activity, 90.2% showed phospholipase and proteinase activity and 12.2% were positive for DNAse. The phospholipase activity was more intense for the group of HIV positive individuals. DNase production was more frequently observed in the group of HIV-positive individuals. The percentage of isolates having DNAse activity was also significantly different between the groups of patients not using any antiretroviral therapy, those using transcriptase inhibitors and those using transcriptase inhibitor and protease inhibitor in combination. PMID:26913969

  5. [Killer toxin and enzyme production by Candida albicans isolated from buccal mucosa in patients with cancer].

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, E E; Silva, S C; Soares, A J; Attux, C; Cruvinel, B; Silva, M do R

    1998-01-01

    Opportunistic infections of the oral cavity are primarily caused by Candida and frequently occur in patients with cancer who are undergoing chemotherapy and antibiotic treatment. Of the specimens received from the oral mucosa of 44 patients with cancer, 25 (56.8%) yielded Candida on culture in Sabouraud agar. Twenty four of these isolates were identified as C. albicans (96%) and 1 as C. krusei (4%). The phenotypic characteristics of these isolates showed that all of them were strongly proteolytic, had a high ability to produce phospholipase, and presented the byotypes characterized as 811 (95.8%) and 511 (4.2%) in terms of susceptibility to killer toxins. PMID:9859695

  6. Azole resistance in oropharyngeal Candida albicans strains isolated from patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    He, X; Tiballi, R N; Zarins, L T; Bradley, S F; Sangeorzan, J A; Kauffman, C A

    1994-01-01

    For 212 oropharyngeal isolates of Candida albicans, the fluconazole MICs for 50 and 90% of strains tested were 0.5 and 16 micrograms/ml, respectively, and those of itraconazole were 0.05 and 0.2 micrograms/ml, respectively. Of 16 isolates for which fluconazole MICs were > 64 micrograms/ml, itraconazole MICs for 14 were < or = 0.8 micrograms/ml and for 2 were > 6.4 micrograms/ml. Most fluconazole-resistant strains remained susceptible to itraconazole; whether itraconazole will prove effective for refractory thrush remains to be shown. PMID:7840596

  7. Clinical and molecular characteristics of bloodstream infections caused by Candida albicans in children from 2003 to 2011.

    PubMed

    Tsai, M-H; Wang, S-H; Hsu, J-F; Lin, L-C; Chu, S-M; Huang, H-R; Chiang, M-C; Fu, R-H; Lu, J-J; Huang, Y-C

    2015-11-01

    We investigated the clinical and molecular characteristics of Candida albicans bloodstream infection (BSI) in children from a tertiary-level medical centre in Taiwan over a 9-year period from January 2003 to December 2011. We performed multilocus sequence typing (MLST) to investigate the genetic relatedness of these C. albicans BSI isolates. A total of 79 episodes of C. albicans BSI in 76 paediatric patients were identified, including 41 (51.9%) from the paediatric intensive care unit, 24 (30.4%) from the neonatal intensive care unit and 14 (17.7%) from general wards. More than half (59.5%) of these patients had underlying chronic co-morbidities, and the majority (94.9%) had a catheter or some other artificial device. All the isolates were susceptible to the antifungal agents tested. Only 32.9% (26/79) received effective antifungal agents within 24 h of onset of candidaemia. Twenty-five (31.6%) patients had persistent candidaemia (>3 days after the start of antifungal treatment) and candidaemia-attributable mortality rate was 22.8% (18/79). The 72 isolates available for MLST yielded 53 unique diploid sequence types (DSTs). Forty-five DSTs were singletons and eight DSTs were shared by 27 (37.5%) isolates. Seventy-one (98.6%) isolates were clustered within previously known clades. Based on the definition of two or more strains with shared DST occurring within a period of 90 days, 10.1% of the infections were categorized as nosocomial clusters, most commonly identified in the intensive care units. Although cluster-associated candidaemia was not associated with a higher mortality rate, none of the clusters were identified by the hospital infection control team.

  8. Isolation of the Candida albicans homologs of Saccharomyces cerevisiae KRE6 and SKN1: expression and physiological function.

    PubMed Central

    Mio, T; Yamada-Okabe, T; Yabe, T; Nakajima, T; Arisawa, M; Yamada-Okabe, H

    1997-01-01

    Cell wall beta-glucan in a pathogenic fungus, Candida albicans, is highly branched with beta-1,3 and beta-1,6 linkages. We have isolated the C. albicans cDNAs for KRE6 and SKN1, the genes required for beta-1,6-glucan synthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The results of Northern blot analysis revealed that C. albicans KRE6 was expressed at a higher level than SKN1 in the yeast phase, while SKN1 expression was strongly induced upon induction of hyphal formation. In addition, the C. albicans KRE6 and SKN1 mRNAs but not the actin mRNA were shortened during the yeast-hypha transition. Unlike S. cerevisiae, more than 50% of cell wall glucan was beta-1,6 linked in C. albicans. Neither beta-1,3-glucan nor beta-1,6-glucan was affected by the homozygous C. albicans skn1 delta null mutation. Although we never succeeded in generating the homozygous C. albicans kre6 delta null mutant, the hemizygous kre6 delta mutation decreased the KRE6 mRNA level by about 60% and also caused a more than 80% reduction of beta-1,6-glucan without affecting beta-1,3-glucan. The physiological function of KRE6 was further examined by studying gene regulation in C. albicans. When KRE6 transcription was suppressed by using the HEX1 promoter, C. albicans cells exhibited the partial defect in cell separation and increased susceptibility to Calcofluor White. These results demonstrate that KRE6 plays important roles in beta-1,6-glucan synthesis and budding in C. albicans. PMID:9079924

  9. [Evaluation of a new chromogenic medium (Candida ID) for the isolation and presumptive identification of Candida albicans and other medically important yeasts].

    PubMed

    Quindós, G; Alonso-Vargas, R; Helou, S; Arechavala, A; Martín-Mazuelos, E; Negroni, R

    2001-03-01

    Candidiasis is a frequent human infection caused mainly by Candida albicans. However, other species are emerging as important pathogens, as Candida glabrata, Candida parapsilosis, Candida tropicalis, Candida krusei or Candida guilliermondii. Rapid identification of clinical isolates could facilitate diagnosis and treatment. Candida ID (bioMerieux, Spain) is a new medium for the isolation and presumptive identification of yeasts: C. albicans grows as blue colonies, and C. tropicalis, C. guilliermondii, Candida kefyr and Candida lusitaniae as pink ones. The utility of Candida ID was evaluated with more than 700 clinical isolates and type culture collection strains from different genera including Candida, Cryptococcus, Saccharomyces, and Rhodotorula. Presumptive identification was confirmed by germ tube test, microscopic morphology and chlamydoconidia production on corn meal agar and carbohydrate assimilation on API-ATB ID 32C or Vitek (bioMerieux). Growth on Candida ID was rapid (18-24 h) for most of the yeast strains tested. Sensitivity and specificity of identification of C. albicans was significantly high (>98%), since a very low number of isolates were found to be false negative or false positive. A better result was obtained for species growing as pink colonies (>99.5%). Detection of different species of medical important yeasts was easy with Candida ID, as perfectly distinct colors and textures of colonies were observed on this medium. Candida ID allowed the discrimination between C. glabrata (creamy and smooth) and C. krusei (rough and white) colonies. Other species showed different colony textures and colours, white being the predominant colour. Candida ID was very useful for the presumptive identification C. albicans isolates.

  10. Clonal Strain Persistence of Candida albicans Isolates from Chronic Mucocutaneous Candidiasis Patients.

    PubMed

    Moorhouse, Alexander J; Rennison, Claire; Raza, Muhammad; Lilic, Desa; Gow, Neil A R

    2016-01-01

    Chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (CMC) is a primary immunodeficiency disorder characterised by susceptibility to chronic Candida and fungal dermatophyte infections of the skin, nails and mucous membranes. Molecular epidemiology studies of CMC infection are limited in number and scope and it is not clear whether single or multiple strains inducing CMC persist stably or are exchanged and replaced. We subjected 42 C. albicans individual single colony isolates from 6 unrelated CMC patients to multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Multiple colonies were typed from swabs taken from multiple body sites across multiple time points over a 17-month period. Among isolates from each individual patient, our data show clonal and persistent diploid sequence types (DSTs) that were stable over time, identical between multiple infection sites and exhibit azole resistant phenotypes. No shared origin or common source of infection was identified among isolates from these patients. Additionally, we performed C. albicans MLST SNP genotype frequency analysis to identify signatures of past loss of heterozygosity (LOH) events among persistent and azole resistant isolates retrieved from patients with autoimmune disorders including CMC. PMID:26849050

  11. Decolorization of textile dye by Candida albicans isolated from industrial effluents.

    PubMed

    Vitor, Vivian; Corso, Carlos Renato

    2008-11-01

    The aim of the present work was to observe microbial decolorization and biodegradation of the Direct Violet 51 azo dye by Candida albicans isolated from industrial effluents and study the metabolites formed after degradation. C. albicans was used in the removal of the dye in order to further biosorption and biodegradation at different pH values in aqueous solutions. A comparative study of biodegradation analysis was carried out using UV-vis and FTIR spectroscopy, which revealed significant changes in peak positions when compared to the dye spectrum. Theses changes in dye structure appeared after 72 h at pH 2.50; after 240 h at pH 4.50; and after 280 h at pH 6.50, indicating the different by-products formed during the biodegradation process. Hence, the yeast C. albicans was able to remove the color substance, demonstrating a potential enzymatic capacity to modify the chemical structure of pigments found in industrial effluents.

  12. Rapid Detection of Candida albicans by Polymerase Spiral Reaction Assay in Clinical Blood Samples.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiaoqun; Dong, Derong; Bian, Lihong; Zou, Dayang; He, Xiaoming; Ao, Da; Yang, Zhan; Huang, Simo; Liu, Ningwei; Liu, Wei; Huang, Liuyu

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans is the most common human yeast pathogen which causes mucosal infections and invasive fungal diseases. Early detection of this pathogen is needed to guide preventative and therapeutic treatment. The aim of this study was to establish a polymerase spiral reaction (PSR) assay that rapidly and accurately detects C. albicans and to assess the clinical applicability of PSR-based diagnostic testing. Internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2), a region between 5.8S and 28S fungal ribosomal DNA, was used as the target sequence. Four primers were designed for amplification of ITS2 with the PSR method, which was evaluated using real time turbidity monitoring and visual detection using a pH indicator. Fourteen non-C. albicans yeast strains were negative for detection, which indicated the specificity of PSR assay was 100%. A 10-fold serial dilution of C. albicans genomic DNA was subjected to PSR and conventional polimerase chain reaction (PCR) to compare their sensitivities. The detection limit of PSR was 6.9 pg/μl within 1 h, 10-fold higher than that of PCR (69.0 pg/μl). Blood samples (n = 122) were collected from intensive care unit and hematological patients with proven or suspected C. albicans infection at two hospitals in Beijing, China. Both PSR assay and the culture method were used to analyze the samples. Of the 122 clinical samples, 34 were identified as positive by PSR. The result was consistent with those obtained by the culture method. In conclusion, a novel and effective C. albicans detection assay was developed that has a great potential for clinical screening and point-of-care testing. PMID:27379048

  13. Rapid Detection of Candida albicans by Polymerase Spiral Reaction Assay in Clinical Blood Samples

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xiaoqun; Dong, Derong; Bian, Lihong; Zou, Dayang; He, Xiaoming; Ao, Da; Yang, Zhan; Huang, Simo; Liu, Ningwei; Liu, Wei; Huang, Liuyu

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans is the most common human yeast pathogen which causes mucosal infections and invasive fungal diseases. Early detection of this pathogen is needed to guide preventative and therapeutic treatment. The aim of this study was to establish a polymerase spiral reaction (PSR) assay that rapidly and accurately detects C. albicans and to assess the clinical applicability of PSR-based diagnostic testing. Internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2), a region between 5.8S and 28S fungal ribosomal DNA, was used as the target sequence. Four primers were designed for amplification of ITS2 with the PSR method, which was evaluated using real time turbidity monitoring and visual detection using a pH indicator. Fourteen non-C. albicans yeast strains were negative for detection, which indicated the specificity of PSR assay was 100%. A 10-fold serial dilution of C. albicans genomic DNA was subjected to PSR and conventional polimerase chain reaction (PCR) to compare their sensitivities. The detection limit of PSR was 6.9 pg/μl within 1 h, 10-fold higher than that of PCR (69.0 pg/μl). Blood samples (n = 122) were collected from intensive care unit and hematological patients with proven or suspected C. albicans infection at two hospitals in Beijing, China. Both PSR assay and the culture method were used to analyze the samples. Of the 122 clinical samples, 34 were identified as positive by PSR. The result was consistent with those obtained by the culture method. In conclusion, a novel and effective C. albicans detection assay was developed that has a great potential for clinical screening and point-of-care testing. PMID:27379048

  14. Genetic relatedness and antifungal susceptibility profile of Candida albicans isolates from fungaemia patients.

    PubMed

    Costa-de-Oliveira, Sofia; Sousa, Inês; Correia, Alexandra; Sampaio, Paula; Pais, Célia; Rodrigues, Acácio Gonçalves; Pina-Vaz, Cidália

    2011-04-01

    A prospective study to assess fungaemia was conducted for 12 months at a Portuguese University Hospital. A total of 35 Candida albicans isolates obtained from 12 patients with fungaemia were compared by a multiplex PCR system using four microsatellite loci. Blood isolates were evaluated against concomitant isolates from urine, lower respiratory secretions and central venous catheters, as well as with successive isolates recovered from recurrent episodes of fungaemia. The data analyzed included the department of admission, underlying diseases and antifungal therapy. The susceptibility phenotypes of all isolates to amphotericin B, fluconazole, itraconazole, voriconazole and caspofungin were determined according to the CLSI M27-A3 protocol. We observed a high degree of similarity between successive blood isolates and between blood and concomitant isolates from other sites of the same patient. This is suggestive of the recurrence of fungaemia and was due to the same strain, possibly as a result of the failure of antifungal therapy. The genetic similarity observed between some strains isolated from different patients suggested the likelihood that they were hospital acquired. Distinct patients were infected by the same strain at different time periods, and an increase in antifungal resistance was observed over time for some of these strains. Hospital-acquired exogenous nosocomial infections can be associated with higher risks of antifungal resistance and need to be closely monitored. Particular attention should also be given to endogenous non-blood Candida isolates which can be critical in high risk patients, as they often can become invasive in immunodeficient individuals.

  15. Study of the prevalence and association of ocular chlamydial conjunctivitis in women with genital infection by Chlamydia trachomatis, Mycoplasma genitalium and Candida albicans attending outpatient clinic

    PubMed Central

    Khattab, Rania Abdelmonem; Abdelfattah, Maha Mohssen

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine the association between chlamydial conjunctivitis and genital infection by Chlamydia trachomatis, Mycoplasma genitalium and Candida albicans, in addition to the possible relationship between cultured bacterial pathogens and oculogenital chlamydial infection. METHODS This study was performed on 100 (50 symptomatic and 50 asymptomatic) women attending the Gynecological and Obstetric outpatient clinic of Alzahra hospital, Alazhar University. Simultaneously a conjunctival swab was taken from these patients. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was done on DNA extracted from both vaginal and conjunctival swab samples. Culture for both vaginal and conjunctival swabs was also done. RESULTS Candida albicans was the predominant organism isolated by culture in 20% and 40% of conjunctival and vaginal swabs respectively. By the PCR method, ocular Chlamydia trachomatis was present in 60% of symptomatic women, while genital Chlamydia trachomatis infection was present in 30% of symptomatic women. The results of this method also indicated that 25/50 (50%) vaginal swabs were positive with PCR for Candida albicans versus 15/50 (30%) were PCR positive in conjunctival swab. Mycoplasma genitalium was present in only 10% of vaginal swabs. Concomitant oculogenital PCR positive results for Chlamydia trachomatis and Candida albicans were 30% and 28% respectively. CONCLUSION Ocular Chlamydia trachomatis was associated with genital Chlamydia trachomatis in a high percentage of women followed by Candida albicans. Cultured bacterial organisms do not play a role in enhancement of Chlamydia trachomatis infection. PMID:27588273

  16. Mixed biofilms formed by C. albicans and non-albicans species: a study of microbial interactions.

    PubMed

    Santos, Jéssica Diane dos; Piva, Elisabete; Vilela, Simone Furgeri Godinho; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso; Junqueira, Juliana Campos

    2016-01-01

    Most Candida infections are related to microbial biofilms often formed by the association of different species. The objective of this study was to evaluate the interactions between Candida albicans and non-albicans species in biofilms formed in vitro. The non-albicans species studied were:Candida tropicalis, Candida glabrata and Candida krusei. Single and mixed biofilms (formed by clinical isolates of C. albicans and non-albicans species) were developed from standardized suspensions of each strain (10(7) cells/mL), on flat-bottom 96-well microtiter plates for 48 hour. These biofilms were analyzed by counting colony-forming units (CFU/mL) in Candida HiChrome agar and by determining cell viability, using the XTT 2,3-bis (2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulphophenyl)-5-[(phenylamino) carbonyl]-2H-tetrazolium hydroxide colorimetric assay. The results for both the CFU/mL count and the XTT colorimetric assay showed that all the species studied were capable of forming high levels of in vitro biofilm. The number of CFU/mL and the metabolic activity of C. albicans were reduced in mixed biofilms with non-albicans species, as compared with a single C. albicans biofilm. Among the species tested, C. krusei exerted the highest inhibitory action against C. albicans. In conclusion, C. albicans established antagonistic interactions with non-albicans Candida species in mixed biofilms.

  17. Susceptibility testing of Candida albicans isolated from oropharyngeal mucosa of HIV+ patients to fluconazole, amphotericin B and Caspofungin. killing kinetics of caspofungin and amphotericin B against fluconazole resistant and susceptible isolates

    PubMed Central

    de Aquino Lemos, Janine; Costa, Carolina Rodrigues; de Araújo, Crystiane Rodrigues; Souza, Lúcia Kioko Hasimoto e; Silva, Maria do Rosário Rodrigues

    2009-01-01

    A clear understanding of the pharmacodynamic properties of antifungal agents is important for the adequate treatment of fungal infections like candidiasis. For certain antifungal agents, the determination of Minimal Fungicidal Concentration (MFC) and time kill curve could be clinically more relevant than the determination of the Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC). In this study, MIC and MFC to fluconazole, amphotericin B and caspofungin against C. albicans isolates and the killing patterns obtained with caspofungin and amphotericin B against susceptible and resistant strains to fluconazole were determined. The results of MICs showed that all C. albicans isolates were highly susceptible to amphotericin B, but two isolates were fluconazole resistant. The comparative analysis between MIC and MFC showed that MFC of fluconazole was fourfold higher than MIC in 41.9% of the C. albicans isolates. Same values of MFC and MIC of amphotericin B and caspofungin were found for 71% of the isolates. Correlation between time kill curves and MFC of amphotericin B and caspofungin against all 4 isolates tested was observed. The caspofungin killing effect was more evident at MFC in 6 hours of incubation than at MIC in this time, suggesting dependence of concentration. The similarity of results of time-kill curve and MFC values indicate that determination of MFC is an alternative for the detection of the fungicidal activity of these drugs. PMID:24031337

  18. Comparison of four molecular typing methods for evaluating genetic diversity among Candida albicans isolates from human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients with oral candidiasis.

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Guerra, T M; Martínez-Suárez, J V; Laguna, F; Rodríguez-Tudela, J L

    1997-01-01

    Candida albicans strain delineation by karyotyping. NotI restriction pattern analysis, hybridization with specific probe 27A, and PCR fingerprinting with the phage M13 core sequence were performed with 30 isolates from the oral cavities of 30 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients and 8 reference strains. Within the panel of clinical isolates, 20 were geographically related, although 10 isolates were susceptible to fluconazole and 10 isolates were resistant to fluconazole. The remaining isolates used in this study were fluconazole resistant and geographically unrelated. A composite DNA type was defined for each of the strains as the combination of types obtained by the four molecular methods. By this procedure, a great diversity of DNA types was found among isolates from the oropharynges of HIV-infected individuals with oral candidiasis. This diversity was not reduced when isolates were evaluated on the basis of whether they came from the same geographical locale and whether they were fluconazole resistant. These data refute the idea of a clonal origin for fluconazole-resistant strains among HIV-positive patients. Karyotyping was the least discriminatory method, yielding 19 DNA types among the 38 strains analyzed. Conversely, hybridization with the 27A probe showed a unique DNA pattern for each of the strains examined in this study. Our results demonstrate that at least two different molecular methods are needed for Candida albicans typing and that there is a great deal of strain variation within the species, irrespective of place of origin or antifungal resistance patterns. PMID:9157142

  19. In vitro activity of xanthorrhizol isolated from the rhizome of Javanese turmeric (Curcuma xanthorrhiza Roxb.) against Candida albicans biofilms.

    PubMed

    Rukayadi, Yaya; Hwang, Jae-Kwan

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the activity of xanthorrhizol isolated from Curcuma xanthorrhiza Roxb. on Candida albicans biofilms at adherent, intermediate, and mature phase of growth. C. albicans biofilms were formed in flat-bottom 96-well microtiter plates. The biofilms of C. albicans at different phases of development were exposed to xanthorrhizol at different concentrations (0.5 µg/mL-256 µg/mL) for 24 h. The metabolic activity of cells within the biofilms was quantified using the XTT reduction assay. Sessile minimum inhibitory concentrations (SMICs) were determined at 50% and 80% reduction in the biofilm OD₄₉₀ compared to the control wells. The SMIC₅₀ and SMIC₈₀ of xanthorrhizol against 18 C. albicans biofilms were 4--16 µg/mL and 8--32 µg/mL, respectively. The results demonstrated that the activity of xanthorrhizol in reducing C. albicans biofilms OD₄₉₀ was dependent on the concentration and the phase of growth of biofilm. Xanthorrhizol at concentration of 8 µg/mL completely reduced in biofilm referring to XTT-colorimetric readings at adherent phase, whereas 32 µg/mL of xanthorrhizol reduced 87.95% and 67.48 % of biofilm referring to XTT-colorimetric readings at intermediate and mature phases, respectively. Xanthorrhizol displayed potent activity against C. albicans biofilms in vitro and therefore might have potential therapeutic implication for biofilm-associated candidal infections.

  20. Effect of lectins on hepatic clearance and killing of Candida albicans by the isolated perfused mouse liver.

    PubMed Central

    Sawyer, R T; Garner, R E; Hudson, J A

    1992-01-01

    The isolated perfused mouse liver model was used to study the effects of various lectins on hepatic trapping and killing of Candida albicans. After mouse livers were washed with 20 to 30 ml of perfusion buffer, 10(6) C. albicans CFU were infused into the livers. At the time of recovery, 63% +/- 2% (mean +/- standard error of the mean) of the infused C. albicans CFU were recovered from the liver and 14% +/- 1% were recovered from the effluent for a total recovery of 77% +/- 2%. This indicated that 86% +/- 9% of the original inoculum was trapped by the liver and that 23% +/- 2% was killed within the liver. When included in both preperfusion and postperfusion buffers (0.2 mg of lectin per ml), Ulex europeaus lectin (binding specificity for fucose) decreased hepatic trapping of C. albicans by 37% and eluted trapped C. albicans from the liver only when included in postperfusion buffer. By comparison, treatment of C. albicans with U. europeaus lectin before infusion had no effect on the trapping or killing of yeast cells. When Lens culinaris lectin (binding specificity for mannose) was included in the perfusion buffers, hepatic killing of C. albicans increased by 16% with no significant effect on hepatic killing when yeast cells were treated with L. culinaris lectin before infusion. Forty to 55% of the infused C. albicans were killed when concanavalin A (binding specificities for mannose and glucose), Glycine max (binding specificity for N-acetylgalactosamine), or Arachis hypogea (binding specificity for galactose) lectin was included in the perfusion buffer or when yeast cells were treated with these lectins before their infusion. When C. albicans was treated with concanavalin A at a concentration of less than 0.02 mg/ml, hepatic killing of yeast cells was not significantly increased. The data suggest that a fucose-containing receptor on the surface of either sinusoidal endothelial cells or Kupffer cells is involved in the trapping of C. albicans by the perfused mouse

  1. Effect of lectins on hepatic clearance and killing of Candida albicans by the isolated perfused mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, R T; Garner, R E; Hudson, J A

    1992-03-01

    The isolated perfused mouse liver model was used to study the effects of various lectins on hepatic trapping and killing of Candida albicans. After mouse livers were washed with 20 to 30 ml of perfusion buffer, 10(6) C. albicans CFU were infused into the livers. At the time of recovery, 63% +/- 2% (mean +/- standard error of the mean) of the infused C. albicans CFU were recovered from the liver and 14% +/- 1% were recovered from the effluent for a total recovery of 77% +/- 2%. This indicated that 86% +/- 9% of the original inoculum was trapped by the liver and that 23% +/- 2% was killed within the liver. When included in both preperfusion and postperfusion buffers (0.2 mg of lectin per ml), Ulex europeaus lectin (binding specificity for fucose) decreased hepatic trapping of C. albicans by 37% and eluted trapped C. albicans from the liver only when included in postperfusion buffer. By comparison, treatment of C. albicans with U. europeaus lectin before infusion had no effect on the trapping or killing of yeast cells. When Lens culinaris lectin (binding specificity for mannose) was included in the perfusion buffers, hepatic killing of C. albicans increased by 16% with no significant effect on hepatic killing when yeast cells were treated with L. culinaris lectin before infusion. Forty to 55% of the infused C. albicans were killed when concanavalin A (binding specificities for mannose and glucose), Glycine max (binding specificity for N-acetylgalactosamine), or Arachis hypogea (binding specificity for galactose) lectin was included in the perfusion buffer or when yeast cells were treated with these lectins before their infusion. When C. albicans was treated with concanavalin A at a concentration of less than 0.02 mg/ml, hepatic killing of yeast cells was not significantly increased. The data suggest that a fucose-containing receptor on the surface of either sinusoidal endothelial cells or Kupffer cells is involved in the trapping of C. albicans by the perfused mouse

  2. Phospholipase, proteinase and haemolytic activities of Candida albicans isolated from oral cavities of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Tsang, C S P; Chu, F C S; Leung, W K; Jin, L J; Samaranayake, L P; Siu, S C

    2007-10-01

    The aim of this study was to biotype and characterize phospholipase, proteinase and haemolytic activities of oral Candida albicans isolates from 210 Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) and 210 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Seventy-six and 50 C. albicans isolates were obtained from type 2 DM patients and controls, respectively, using the oral rinse technique. The isolates were characterized with a biotyping system based on enzyme profiles, carbohydrate assimilation patterns and boric acid resistance of the yeasts, and the isolates were further tested for in vitro phospholipase, proteinase and haemolytic activities. The major biotypes of C. albicans isolates from the type 2 DM and control groups were A1R (42.1 %) and J1R (36.0 %), respectively. Significantly higher proteinase and haemolytic activities were found in the isolates from the type 2 DM group (P<0.05). Proteinase activity was higher in isolates from patients with > or =10 years of DM history than those with <10 years (P<0.05). Haemolytic activity was significantly higher in isolates from female DM patients than in those from male counterparts (P<0.05). These data provide evidence of increased extracellular enzyme activity in Candida isolates taken from DM patients.

  3. Quick Detection of FKS1 Mutations Responsible for Clinical Echinocandin Resistance in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Dudiuk, Catiana; Gamarra, Soledad; Jimenez-Ortigosa, Cristina; Leonardelli, Florencia; Macedo, Daiana; Perlin, David S.

    2015-01-01

    A rapid molecular-based assay for the detection of the Candida albicans FKS1 gene mutations responsible for resistance to echinocandin drugs was designed and evaluated. The assay consisted of a multiplexed PCR set of 5 tubes able to detect the most commonly described resistance mechanism, including FKS1 hot spot 1 and hot spot 2 mutations. The performance and specificity of the assay was evaluated using a double-blinded panel of 50 C. albicans strains. The assay showed a sensitivity of 96% and was able to detect all homozygous mutants included in the collection of strains, demonstrating that it is a robust, quick, and labor-saving method that is suitable for a routine clinical diagnostic laboratory. PMID:25878347

  4. Quick Detection of FKS1 Mutations Responsible for Clinical Echinocandin Resistance in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Dudiuk, Catiana; Gamarra, Soledad; Jimenez-Ortigosa, Cristina; Leonardelli, Florencia; Macedo, Daiana; Perlin, David S; Garcia-Effron, Guillermo

    2015-07-01

    A rapid molecular-based assay for the detection of the Candida albicans FKS1 gene mutations responsible for resistance to echinocandin drugs was designed and evaluated. The assay consisted of a multiplexed PCR set of 5 tubes able to detect the most commonly described resistance mechanism, including FKS1 hot spot 1 and hot spot 2 mutations. The performance and specificity of the assay was evaluated using a double-blinded panel of 50 C. albicans strains. The assay showed a sensitivity of 96% and was able to detect all homozygous mutants included in the collection of strains, demonstrating that it is a robust, quick, and labor-saving method that is suitable for a routine clinical diagnostic laboratory. PMID:25878347

  5. Identification and characterization of nine atypical Candida dubliniensis clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Albaina, Olatz; Sahand, Ismail H; Brusca, María I; Sullivan, Derek J; Fernández de Larrinoa, Iñigo; Moragues, María D

    2015-02-01

    Candida dubliniensis is a pathogenic yeast of the genus Candida closely related to Candida albicans. The phenotypic similarity of these two species often leads to misidentification of C. dubliniensis isolates in clinical samples. DNA-based methods continue to be the most effective means of discriminating accurately between the two species. Here, we report on the identification of nine unusual Candida isolates that showed ambiguous identification patterns on the basis of their phenotypic and immunological traits. The isolates were categorized into two groups. Group I isolates were unable to produce germ tubes and chlamydospores, and to agglutinate commercial latex particles coated with a mAb highly specific for C. dubliniensis. Group II isolates grew as pink and white colonies on CHROMagar Candida and ChromID Candida, respectively. Carbohydrate assimilation profiles obtained with API/ID32C together with PCR amplification with specific primers and DNA sequencing allowed reliable identification of the nine unusual clinical isolates as C. dubliniensis. PMID:25480879

  6. [Comparative study of the Candida albicans genotypes isolated from immunocompromised patients and health carriers].

    PubMed

    Carnovale, S; Elias Costa, M R; Relloso, S; Negroni, R; Negroni, M B; Iovannitti, C

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study is to compare Candida albicans strain genotype isolates from oral cavity of immunocompromised patients due to different immunologic impairments with apparently normal carriers. Four populations were studied: 1) HIV positive hospitalized patients, 2) HIV negative immunocompromised patients (leukemia, lymphoma, organ transplant recipients), 3) drug addicts prior to AIDS pandemia in Argentina, 4) apparently normal carriers. DNA extracted was digested with the enzyme Eco RI, electrophoresed, transferred to nitrocellulose membrane and hybridized with the 27A probe labelled with 32P. The comparison between the profiles obtained permitted the differentiation of 16 genotypes. The distribution of the strains led to the conclusion that: a) all the isolated strains from AIDS patients were closely related and distributed in only three genotypes (1, 3, 11); b) a major genetic relationship between the isolates from AIDS patients and HIV negative immunocompromised patients was observed; c) strains from carriers showed a minor genetic similarity with those obtained from AIDS patients; d) characteristic profiles belonging to any of the studied groups were not found; e) significant genomic changes have not been observed during the last twenty years.

  7. Evaluation of the new chromogenic medium Candida ID 2 for isolation and identification of Candida albicans and other medically important Candida species.

    PubMed

    Eraso, Elena; Moragues, María D; Villar-Vidal, María; Sahand, Ismail H; González-Gómez, Nagore; Pontón, José; Quindós, Guillermo

    2006-09-01

    The usefulness of Candida ID 2 (CAID2) reformulated medium (bioMérieux, France) has been compared with that of the former Candida ID (CAID; bioMérieux), Albicans ID 2 (ALB2; bioMérieux), and CHROMagar Candida (CAC; Chromagar, France) chromogenic media for the isolation and presumptive identification of clinically relevant yeasts. Three hundred forty-five stock strains from culture collections, and 103 fresh isolates from different clinical specimens were evaluated. CAID2 permitted differentiation based on colony color between Candida albicans (cobalt blue; sensitivity, 91.7%; specificity, 97.2%) and Candida dubliniensis (turquoise blue; sensitivity, 97.9%; specificity, 96.6%). Candida tropicalis gave distinguishable pink-bluish colonies in 97.4% of the strains in CAID2 (sensitivity, 97.4%; specificity, 100%); the same proportion was reached in CAC, where colonies were blue-gray (sensitivity, 97.4%; specificity, 98.7%). CAC and CAID2 showed 100% sensitivity values for the identification of Candida krusei. However, with CAID2, experience is required to differentiate the downy aspect of the white colonies of C. krusei from other white-colony-forming species. The new CAID2 medium is a good candidate to replace CAID and ALB2, and it compares well to CAC for culture and presumptive identification of clinically relevant Candida species. CAID2 showed better results than CAC in some aspects, such as quicker growth and color development of colonies from clinical specimens, detection of mixed cultures, and presumptive differentiation between C. albicans and C. dubliniensis.

  8. Evaluation of the new chromogenic medium Candida ID 2 for isolation and identification of Candida albicans and other medically important Candida species.

    PubMed

    Eraso, Elena; Moragues, María D; Villar-Vidal, María; Sahand, Ismail H; González-Gómez, Nagore; Pontón, José; Quindós, Guillermo

    2006-09-01

    The usefulness of Candida ID 2 (CAID2) reformulated medium (bioMérieux, France) has been compared with that of the former Candida ID (CAID; bioMérieux), Albicans ID 2 (ALB2; bioMérieux), and CHROMagar Candida (CAC; Chromagar, France) chromogenic media for the isolation and presumptive identification of clinically relevant yeasts. Three hundred forty-five stock strains from culture collections, and 103 fresh isolates from different clinical specimens were evaluated. CAID2 permitted differentiation based on colony color between Candida albicans (cobalt blue; sensitivity, 91.7%; specificity, 97.2%) and Candida dubliniensis (turquoise blue; sensitivity, 97.9%; specificity, 96.6%). Candida tropicalis gave distinguishable pink-bluish colonies in 97.4% of the strains in CAID2 (sensitivity, 97.4%; specificity, 100%); the same proportion was reached in CAC, where colonies were blue-gray (sensitivity, 97.4%; specificity, 98.7%). CAC and CAID2 showed 100% sensitivity values for the identification of Candida krusei. However, with CAID2, experience is required to differentiate the downy aspect of the white colonies of C. krusei from other white-colony-forming species. The new CAID2 medium is a good candidate to replace CAID and ALB2, and it compares well to CAC for culture and presumptive identification of clinically relevant Candida species. CAID2 showed better results than CAC in some aspects, such as quicker growth and color development of colonies from clinical specimens, detection of mixed cultures, and presumptive differentiation between C. albicans and C. dubliniensis. PMID:16954270

  9. Altered hepatic clearance and killing of Candida albicans in the isolated perfused mouse liver model.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, R T; Horst, M N; Garner, R E; Hudson, J; Jenkins, P R; Richardson, A L

    1990-09-01

    The adherence of Candida albicans was studied in situ by using the perfused mouse liver model. After exhaustive washing, 10(6) C. albicans were infused into mouse livers. At the time of recovery, 62 +/- 5% (mean +/- standard error of the mean) of the infused C. albicans were recovered from the liver and 14 +/- 3% were recovered from the effluent for a total recovery of 76 +/- 4%. This indicates that 86 +/- 3% of the original inoculum was trapped by the liver and that 24 +/- 4% was killed within the liver. Chemical pretreatment of C. albicans with 8 M urea, 12 mM dithiothreitol, 2% beta-mercaptoethanol, 1% sodium dodecyl sulfate, 10% Triton X-100, or 3 M potassium chloride or enzyme pretreatment with alpha-mannosidase, alpha-chymotrypsin, subtilisin, beta-N-acetyl-glucosaminidase, pronase, trypsin, papain, or lipase did not alter adherence of C. albicans to hepatic tissue. By contrast, pepsin pretreatment significantly decreased hepatic trapping. Simultaneous perfusion with either 100 mg of C. albicans glycoprotein per liter or 100 mg of C. albicans mannan per liter also decreased trapping. Furthermore, both substances eluted previously trapped C. albicans from hepatic tissue. Chemical pretreatment with 8 M urea, 12 mM dithiothreitol, or 3 M KCI or enzymatic pretreatment with alpha-mannosidase, subtilisin, alpha-chymotrypsin, or papain increased killing of C. albicans three- to fivefold within hepatic tissue. The data suggest that mannose-containing structures on the surface of C. albicans, for example. mannans or glucomannoproteins, mediate adherence of C. albicans within the liver. Indirectly, chemical and enzymatic pretreatment renders C. albicans more susceptible to hepatic killing.

  10. Biofilm-forming ability and adherence to poly-(methyl-methacrylate) acrylic resin materials of oral Candida albicans strains isolated from HIV positive subjects

    PubMed Central

    Uzunoglu, Emel; Dolapci, Istar; Dogan, Arife

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE This study evaluated the adhesion to acrylic resin specimens and biofilm formation capability of Candida albicans strains isolated from HIV positive subjects' oral rinse solutions. MATERIALS AND METHODS The material tested was a heat-cured acrylic resin (Acron Duo). Using the adhesion and crystal violet assays, 14 oral Candida albicans isolated from HIV-positive subjects and 2 references Candida strains (C. albicans ATCC 90028 and C. albicans ATCC 90128) were compared for their biofilm production and adhesion properties to acrylic surfaces in vitro. RESULTS There were no significant differences in adhesion (P=.52) and biofilm formation assays (P=.42) by statistical analysis with Mann-Whitney test. CONCLUSION Denture stomatitis and increased prevalence of candidal carriage in HIV infected patients is unlikely to be related to the biofilm formation and adhesion abilities of C. albicans to acrylic resin materials. PMID:24605203

  11. Emergence of Resistance of Candida albicans to Clotrimazole in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Children: In Vitro and Clinical Correlations

    PubMed Central

    Pelletier, René; Peter, Joanne; Antin, Cynthia; Gonzalez, Corina; Wood, Lauren; Walsh, Thomas J.

    2000-01-01

    Oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC) is a common opportunistic infection in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients and other immunocompromised hosts. Clotrimazole troches are widely used in the treatment of mucosal candidiasis. However, little is known about the potential contribution of clotrimazole resistance to the development of refractory mucosal candidiasis. We therefore investigated the potential emergence of resistance to clotrimazole in a prospectively monitored HIV-infected pediatric population receiving this azole. Adapting the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards M27-A reference method for broth antifungal susceptibility testing of yeasts to clotrimazole, we compared MICs in macrodilution and microdilution assays. We further analyzed the correlation between these in vitro findings and the clinical response to antifungal therapy. One isolate from each of 87 HIV-infected children was studied by the macrodilution and microdilution methods. Two inoculum sizes were tested by the macrodilution method (103 and 104 CFU/ml) in order to assess the effect of inoculum size on clotrimazole MICs. The same isolates also were tested using a noncolorimetric microdilution method. Clotrimazole concentrations ranged from 0.03 to 16 μg/ml. Readings were performed after incubation for 24 and 48 h at 35°C. For 62 (71.2%) of 87 clinical isolates, the MICs were low (≤0.06 μg/ml). The MIC for 90% of the strains tested was 0.5 μg/ml, and the highest MIC was 8 μg/ml. There was no significant difference between MICs at the two inoculum sizes. There was 89% agreement (±1 tube) between the microdilution method at 24 h and the macrodilution method at 48 h. If the MIC of clotrimazole for an isolate of C. albicans was ≥0.5 μg/ml, there was a significant risk (P < 0.001) of cross-resistance to other azoles: fluconazole, ≥64 μg/ml (relative risk [RR] = 8.9); itraconazole, ≥1 μg/ml (RR = 10). Resistance to clotrimazole was highly associated with

  12. Proteolytic activity and cytokine up-regulation by non-albicans Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Nawaz, Ali; Pärnänen, Pirjo; Kari, Kirsti; Meurman, Jukka H

    2015-05-01

    Mouth is an important source of infections and oral infections such as Candida infections increase the risk of mortality. Our purpose was to investigate differences in proteolytic activity of non-albicans Candida albicans (non-albicans Candida) between clinical isolates and laboratory samples. The second aim was to assess the concentration of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine levels IL-1β, IL-10, and TNF-α in saliva of patients with the non-albicans Candida and Candida-negative saliva samples. Clinical yeast samples from our laboratory were used for analyses. Candida strains were grown in YPG at 37 °C for 24 h in water bath with shaking. The activity of Candida proteinases of cell and cell-free fractions were analyzed by MDPF-gelatin zymography. The levels of IL-1β, IL-10, and TNF-α were measured from saliva with ELISA. The study showed differences in the proteolytic activity among the non-albicans Candida strains. C. tropicalis had higher proteolytic activity when compared to the other strains. Significant difference was found in salivary IL-1β levels between the non-albicans Candida and control strains (P < 0.002). The present findings showed differences in proteolytic activity among the non-albicans Candida strains. The increased IL-1β concentration may be one of the host response components associated with non-albicans Candida infection.

  13. Isolation and nucleotide sequence of an autonomously replicating sequence (ARS) element functional in Candida albicans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Cannon, R D; Jenkinson, H F; Shepherd, M G

    1990-04-01

    An 8.6-kb fragment was isolated from an EcoRI digest of Candida albicans ATCC 10261 genomic DNA which conferred the property of autonomous replication in Saccharomyces cervisiae on the otherwise non-replicative plasmid pMK155 (5.6 kb). The DNA responsible for the replicative function was subcloned as a 1.2-kb fragment onto a non-replicative plasmid (pRC3915) containing the C. albicans URA3 and LEU2 genes to form plasmid pRC3920. This plasmid was capable of autonomous replication in both S. cerevisiae and C. albicans and transformed S. cerevisiae AH22 (leu2-) to Leu+ at a frequency of 2.15 x 10(3) transformants per microgram DNA, and transformed C. albicans SGY-243 (delta ura3) to Ura+ at a frequency of 1.91 x 10(3) transformants per microgram DNA. Sequence analysis of the cloned DNA revealed the presence of two identical regions of eleven base pairs (5'TTTTATGTTTT3') which agreed with the consensus of autonomously replicating sequence (ARS) cores functional in S. cerevisiae. In addition there were two 10/11 and numerous 9/11 matches to the core consensus. The two 11/11 matches to the consensus, CaARS1 and CaARS2, were located on opposite strands in a non-coding AT-rich region and were separated by 107 bp. Also present on the C. albicans DNA, 538 bp from the ARS cores, was a gene for 5S rRNA which showed sequence homology with several other yeast 5S rRNA genes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2196431

  14. Isolation Frequency Characteristics of Candida Species from Clinical Specimens.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ga-Yeon; Jeon, Jae-Sik; Kim, Jae Kyung

    2016-06-01

    Candida spp. is an invasive infectious fungus, a major risk factor that can increase morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients. In this study, 2,508 Candida spp. were isolated from various clinical specimens collected from university hospitals from July 2011 to October 2014. They were identified in order to determine isolation frequencies and characteristics by specimen, gender, age group, year, season, and month. The strain-specific isolation rate of Candida spp. is in the order of Candida albicans (1,218 strains, 48.56%), Candida glabrata (416 strains, 16.59%), Candida utilis (305 strains, 12.16%), Candida tropicalis (304 strains, 12.12%), and Candida parapsilosis (116 strains, 4.63%) and these five species accounted for more than 94% of the total strains. Of the specimens, Candida spp. were most frequently isolated from urine-catheter, followed by urine-voided, blood, sputum, other, open pus, vaginal discharge, Tip, ear discharge, bronchial aspiration and bile, in that order. Looking at the age distribution, the detection rate of patients in their 60s and older was significantly higher at 75.8% (1,900/2,508). The detection rate of patients in their 20s and younger was shown to be very low at 2.55% (64/2,508). By year, the detection rate of non-albicans Candida spp. showed a tendency to gradually increase each year compared with C. albicans. As isolation of Candida spp. from clinical samples at the specie level can vary depending on characteristics of the patient, sample, season, etc., continual studies are required.

  15. Typing Candida albicans oral isolates from healthy brazilian schoolchildren using multilocus enzyme electrophoresis reveals two highly polymorphic taxa

    PubMed Central

    Boriollo, Marcelo Fabiano Gomes; Spolidorio, Denise Madalena Palomari; Barros, Letizia Monteiro; Bassi, Rodrigo Carlos; Garcia, José Antonio Dias; Costa, Ana Maria Duarte Dias; Rosa, Edvaldo Antonio Ribeiro; Höfling, José Francisco

    2011-01-01

    The genetic diversity of C. albicans oral isolates from 75 healthy schoolchildren from eight schools located in different geographic areas of Piracicaba city, São Paulo state, Brazil, was established using isoenzymes marker (Multilocus Enzyme Electrophoresis – MLEE) and cluster analysis. Patterns of monoclonal and polyclonal oral colonization by C. albicans within and between groups of schoolchildren were identified. However, significant divergence between the observed and the expected genotypic frequencies (Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium test) was not detected in the geographically adjacent groups, suggesting the hypothesis that populations of healthy schoolchildren do not correspond to the selection factor (differential survival) of strains. Two highly polymorphic and distantly genetically related taxa (A and B) were identified within the total population of yeasts, each contained subgroups (A1, A2, A3, A4, B1 and B2) and clusters of moderately related strains (from I to X), suggesting the existence of strains restricted or not to certain groups of geographically limited, healthy students. However, the coexistence of identical strains in healthy schoolchildren from the same school (geographically related) reinforces the hypothesis of oral transmission, where the sources of propagation could be explored. Furthermore, this could also be used in current and retrospective analyses of C. albicans isolated from immunocompetent and immunocompromised people, in order to detect commensal or potentially pathogenic yeast groups, predominantly in candidiasis, and in the development of strategies to prevent transmission or human propagation. PMID:24031720

  16. Differential expression of secretory aspartyl proteinase genes (SAP1-10) in oral Candida albicans isolates with distinct karyotypes.

    PubMed

    Tavanti, Arianna; Pardini, Giacomo; Campa, Daniele; Davini, Paola; Lupetti, Antonella; Senesi, Sonia

    2004-10-01

    Two karyotypes of oral Candida albicans isolates, named b and c, constituted >80% of a collection from healthy carriers (22 b and 16 c isolates) and oral candidiasis patients who were either infected (31 b and 16 c isolates) or uninfected (13 b and 38 c isolates) with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The prevalence of the b and c karyotypes within HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients, respectively, who were suffering from oral candidiasis (P < or = 0.0001) suggested that these two types possessed different virulence potentials. Since C. albicans proteinases (Saps) are virulence factors in oral candidiasis, we evaluated whether the b and c karyotypes secreted different levels of Saps and expressed different patterns of Sap-encoding genes (SAP1-10). We found that the mean value of Sap activity was significantly lower (P = 0.003) in the commensal type than in the infectious b karyotype, whereas Sap activity in the commensal c type was as high as that registered for the infectious c strains. Marked differences in SAP mRNA expression were observed in commensal strains under non-Sap-inducing conditions, with all SAP genes being expressed only by strains with the c karyotype; interestingly, none of the commensal b strains expressed SAP2. In addition, while all of the SAP1-10 genes were detectable under Sap-inducing conditions, the timing of their expression during growth differed significantly, with mRNAs of SAP1-10 genes detected at 8 and 24 h postinoculation in c and b commensal strains, respectively. This provides the first evidence that commensal oral C. albicans isolates with distinct karyotypes are characterized by different patterns of SAP1-10 gene expression and different levels of Sap secretion.

  17. Clinical Islet Isolation.

    PubMed

    Hawthorne, Wayne J; Williams, Lindy; Chew, Yi Vee

    2016-01-01

    The overarching success of islet transplantation relies on the success in the laboratory to isolate the islets. This chapter focuses on the processes of human islet cell isolation and the ways to optimally provide islet cells for transplantation. The major improvements in regards to the choice of enzyme type, way the digested pancreas tissue is handled to best separate islets from the acinar and surrounding tissues, the various methods of purification of the islets, their subsequent culture and quality assurance to improve outcomes to culminate in safe and effective islet transplantation will be discussed. After decades of improvements, islet cell isolation and transplantation now clearly offer a safe, effective and feasible therapeutic treatment option for an increasing number of patients suffering from type 1 diabetes specifically for those with severe hypoglycaemic unawareness. PMID:27586424

  18. Application of CHROMagar Candida for rapid screening of clinical specimens for Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis, Candida krusei, and Candida (Torulopsis) glabrata.

    PubMed Central

    Pfaller, M A; Houston, A; Coffmann, S

    1996-01-01

    CHROMagar Candida is a new differential culture medium that allows selective isolation of yeasts and simultaneously identifies colonies of Candida albicans, C. tropicalis, and C. krusei. We evaluated the use of this medium with 316 yeast isolates including 247 isolated directly on CHROMagar from clinical material. Over 95% of stock and clinical isolates of C. albicans, C. tropicalis, and C. krusei were correctly identified on the basis of colony morphology and pigmentation on CHROMagar. Additionally, CHROMagar also allowed the identification of C. (Torulopsis) glabrata at a similar level of accuracy. The overall agreement between two observers in reading the CHROMagar plates was 95%. Growth of Candida sp. isolates on CHROMagar had no adverse effect on antifungal MICs or Vitek identification results. In parallel, cultures of 548 stool and rectal swab specimens set up on CHROMagar and Sabouraud glucose agar (SGA) were positive in 234 instances. CHROMagar was positive and SGA was negative for 11 specimens, and CHROMagar was negative and SGA was positive for 18 specimens. A single yeast species was isolated on both media from 162 specimens, and in 146 (90%) of these specimens the same species was detected on both CHROMagar and SGA. A total of 43 of the 234 positive cultures contained mixtures of yeast species. Twenty (47%) of these mixed cultures were detected only on CHROMagar. CHROMagar is extremely useful in making a rapid presumptive identification of common yeast species. This capability plus the ability to detect mixed cultures of Candida spp. promises to improve and streamline the work flow in the mycology and clinical microbiology laboratory. PMID:8748273

  19. Sensitization of Candida albicans to terbinafine by berberine and berberrubine

    PubMed Central

    LAM, PIKLING; KOK, STANTON HON LUNG; LEE, KENNETH KA HO; LAM, KIM HUNG; HAU, DESMOND KWOK PO; WONG, WAI YEUNG; BIAN, ZHAOXIANG; GAMBARI, ROBERTO; CHUI, CHUNG HIN

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans (C. albicans) is an opportunistic fungal pathogen, particularly observed in immunocompromised patients. C. albicans accounts for 50–70% of cases of invasive candidiasis in the majority of clinical settings. Terbinafine, an allylamine antifungal drug, has been used to treat fungal infections previously. It has fungistatic activity against C. albicans. Traditional Chinese medicines can be used as complementary medicines to conventional drugs to treat a variety of ailments and diseases. Berberine is a quaternary alkaloid isolated from the traditional Chinese herb, Coptidis Rhizoma, while berberrubine is isolated from the medicinal plant Berberis vulgaris, but is also readily derived from berberine by pyrolysis. The present study demonstrates the possible complementary use of berberine and berberrubine with terbinafine against C. albicans. The experimental findings assume that the potential application of these alkaloids together with reduced dosage of the standard drug would enhance the resulting antifungal potency. PMID:27073630

  20. Direct identification and recognition of yeast species from clinical material by using albicans ID and CHROMagar Candida plates.

    PubMed Central

    Baumgartner, C; Freydiere, A M; Gille, Y

    1996-01-01

    Two chromogenic media, Albicans ID and CHROMagar Candida agar plates, were compared with a reference medium, Sabouraud-chloramphenicol agar, and standard methods for the identification of yeast species. This study involved 951 clinical specimens. The detection rates for the two chromogenic media for polymicrobial specimens were 20% higher than that for the Sabouraud-chloramphenicol agar plates. The rates of identification of Candida albicans for Albicans ID and CHROMagar Candida agar plates were, respectively, 37.0 and 6.0% after 24 h of incubation and 93.6 and 92.2% after 72 h of incubation, with specificities of 99.8 and 100%. Furthermore, CHROMagar Candida plates identified 13 of 14 Candida tropicalis and 9 of 12 Candida krusei strains after 48 h of incubation. PMID:8789038

  1. Isolation, characterization and mechanism of action of an antimicrobial peptide from Lecythis pisonis seeds with inhibitory activity against Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Maria Eliza Brambila; Vasconcelos, Ilka Maria; Machado, Olga Lima Tavares; Gomes, Valdirene Moreira; Carvalho, André de Oliveira

    2015-09-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are produced by a range of organisms as a first line of defense against invaders or competitors. Owing to their broad antimicrobial activity, AMPs have attracted attention as a potential source of chemotherapeutic drugs. The increasing prevalence of infections caused by Candida species as opportunistic pathogens in immunocompromised patients requires new drugs. Lecythis pisonis is a Lecythydaceae tree that grows in Brazil. The AMPs produced by this tree have not been described previously. We describe the isolation of 12 fractions enriched in peptides from L. pisonis seeds. Of the 12 fractions, at 10 μg/ml, the F4 fraction had the strongest growth inhibitory effect (53.7%) in Candida albicans, in addition to a loss of viability of 94.9%. The F4 fraction was separated into seven sub-fractions by reversed-phase chromatography. The F4.7' fraction had the strongest activity at 10 μg/ml, inhibiting C. albicans growth by 38.5% and a 69.3% loss of viability. The peptide in F4.7' was sequenced and was found to be similar to plant defensins. For this reason, the peptide was named L. pisonis defensin 1 (Lp-Def1). The mechanism of action that is responsible for C. albicans inhibition by Lp-Def1 includes a slight increase of reactive oxygen species induction and a significant loss of mitochondrial function. The results described here support the future development of plant defensins, specifically Lp-Def1, as new therapeutic substances against fungi, especially C. albicans. PMID:26245301

  2. Overexpression and mutation as a genetic mechanism of fluconazole resistance in Candida albicans isolated from human immunodeficiency virus patients in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Rosana, Yeva; Yasmon, Andi; Lestari, Delly Chipta

    2015-09-01

    Fluconazole is the standard treatment for oropharyngeal candidiasis, which is the third most common opportunistic infection in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS patients in Indonesia. Overuse of this drug could lead to the emergence of resistance. The objective of this study was to analyse the role of ERG11, CDR1, CDR2 and MDR1 gene overexpression and mutations in the ERG11 gene as a genetic mechanism of fluconazole resistance in Candida albicans isolated from HIV patients in Indonesia. Overexpression of ERG11, CDR1, CDR2 and MDR1 was analysed by real-time reverse transcription PCR, while ERG11 gene mutation analysis was performed using sequencing methods. Seventeen isolates out of 92 strains of C. albicans isolated from 108 HIV patients were found to be resistant to azole antifungals. The highest gene overexpression of ERG11 was found in C. albicans resistant to single fluconazole, while the highest gene overexpression of CDR2 was detected in all isolates of C. albicans resistant to multiple azoles. Amino acid substitutions were observed at six positions, i.e. D116E, D153E, I261V, E266D, V437I and V488I. The amino acid substitution I261V was identified in this study and was probably associated with fluconazole resistance. The combination of overexpression of CDR2 and ERG11 and mutation in the ERG11 gene was found to be a genetic mechanism of fluconazole resistance in C. albicans isolated from HIV patients in Indonesia.

  3. Comparing FTIR and RAPD techniques in the typing of C. albicans in a clinical set-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandt, Christophe L.; Sockalingum, Ganesh D.; Toubas, Dominique; Aubert, Dominique; Lepan, Herve; Lepouse, Claire; Jaussaud, Maryse; Leon, Alain; Pinon, Jean-Michel; Manfait, Michel

    2002-03-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic pathogen, generally though to be of endogenous origin, with however reported outbreaks. Epidemilogy of C. albicans has been studied so far by genotypic methods mainly, including the classical RAPD analysis. Albeit powerful, genotypic techniques are expensive, time consuming and complex to implement. FTIR spectroscopy is simple, rapid, inexpensive and an increasingly used technique for the identification of microorganisms. As a phenotypic method, it provides rapid whole cells 'fingerprinting' using few consumables and can detect very subtle differences between strains of the same species. In this study, C. albicans strains isolated from 50 patients from six hospital units were collected and studied by FTIR spectroscopy and RAPD-PCR. Discrimination of strains was computed using classification algorithms on selected features of the spectral data. Results from 10 patients, for whom iterative sampling was possible, are presented and discussed. Emphasis was laid on the reproducibility of dat for strain-level identification. FTIR analysis shows that (a) the C. albicans spectra were different from one patient to another, (b) seven patients exhibit each a homogeneous group while three patients display each two groups of strains. RAPD-PCR and FTIR analyses correlate quite well showing that FTIR spectroscopy could be a potential epidemiological tool in the control of nosocomial fungal infections.

  4. Effect of the volatile constituents isolated from Thymus albicans, Th. mastichina, Th. carnosus and Thymbra capitata in sunflower oil.

    PubMed

    Miguel, Maria G; Figueiredo, A Cristina; Costa, Monya M; Martins, Denise; Duarte, João; Barroso, José G; Pedro, Luis G

    2003-12-01

    The composition of essential oils isolated from Thymus albicans and Thymbra capitata collected in Algarve (Portugal), Th. mastichina collected in Algarve and Estremadura (Portugal) and Th. carnosus also collected in Algarve, during the flowering phase, was analysed by gas chromatography (GC) and GC coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The antioxidant capacity of the oils as well as some of their main components was determined by periodic evaluation of the peroxide values in sunflower oils stored at 60 degrees C. These peroxide values were compared to that of butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) and control (without adding antioxidants) under the same experimental conditions. The oils of Th. albicans and Th. mastichina, collected in Algarve, were dominated by 1,8-cineole (68% and 45%, respectively), whereas linalool (52%) was the main component from the oils isolated from Th. mastichina collected in Estremadura. Carvacrol (68%) was the major component present in the oils of Thymbra capitata while borneol (18%), terpinen-4-ol (11%) and camphene (9%) were the major ones in the essential oil of Th. carnosus. The essential oils as well as some of their main components showed higher antioxidant capacity than that of the synthetic antioxidant BHT. At the end of the experiment (57 days), BHT showed a percentage of inhibition of 20%, while that of the essential oils ranged from 46% for Th. carnosus, to 59% for Th. mastichina collected in Estremadura. PMID:14727767

  5. Evaluation of peptone glucose fluconazole agar as a selective medium for rapid and enhanced isolation of Aspergillus fumigatus from the respiratory tract of bronchopulmonary aspergillosis patients colonized by Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Randhawa, H S; Chowdhary, Anuradha; Preeti Sinha, K; Kowshik, T; Vijayan, V K

    2006-06-01

    We have reported earlier that Aspergillus fumigatus is inhibited in vitro by Candida albicans which also interferes in its isolation from sputum experimentally seeded with predetermined graded inocula of the two fungi. It was further shown that this interference was neutralized by employing peptone glucose agar with incorporation of fluconazole which is more inhibitory to C. albicans than to A. fumigatus. This communication embodies the results of evaluation of peptone glucose fluconazole agar (PGFA) as a selective culture medium for rapid and enhanced isolation of A. fumigatus from sputum of patients clinically suspected of aspergillosis with C. albicans colonization in the respiratory tract. Of the 23 sputum specimens and one broncho-alveolar lavage collected from 15 suspected aspergillosis patients, A. fumigatus was isolated from all (100%) on PGFA as against only 19 specimens (79%) that proved to be positive on the control PGA medium (P<0.05). The greater efficacy of PGFA than that of PGA was further evident from the 2-fold higher A. fumigatus mean colony count (8.2+/-1.87) on the former medium than on the latter (3.7+/-1.00), and this difference was found to be statistically significant (P<0.05). Besides, A. fumigatus colonies were macroscopically recognizable within 2-3 days on PGFA at 28 degrees C in strong contrast to 5-7 days required on PGA. Based upon these observations, PGFA is recommended for wider application as a selective medium for rapid and enhanced recovery of A. fumigatus from sputum of patients clinically suspected of aspergillosis with C. albicans colonization in their respiratory tract.

  6. Directed mutagenesis in Candida albicans: one-step gene disruption to isolate ura3 mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, R.; Miller, S.M.; Kurtz, M.B.; Kirsch, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    A method for introducing specific mutations into the diploid Candida albicans by one-step gene disruption and subsequent UV-induced recombination was developed. The cloned C. albicans URA3 gene was disrupted with the C. albicans ADE2 gene, and the linearized DNA was used for transformation of two ade2 mutants, SGY-129 and A81-Pu. Both an insertional inactivation of the URA3 gene and a disruption which results in a 4.0-kilobase deletion were made. Southern hybridization analyses demonstrated that the URA3 gene was disrupted on one of the chromosomal homologs in 15 of the 18 transformants analyzed. These analyses also revealed restriction site dimorphism of EcoRI at the URA3 locus which provides a unique marker to distinguish between chromosomal homologs. This enabled us to show that either homolog could be disrupted and that disrupted transformants of SGY-129 contained more than two copies of the URA3 locus. The A81-Pu transformants heterozygous for the ura3 mutations were rendered homozygous and Ura- by UV-induced recombination. The homozygosity of a deletion mutant and an insertion mutant was confirmed by Southern hybridization. Both mutants were transformed to Ura+ with plasmids containing the URA3 gene and in addition, were resistant to 5-fluoro-orotic acid, a characteristic of Saccharomyces cerevisiae ura3 mutants as well as of orotidine-5'-phosphate decarboxylase mutants of other organisms.

  7. Fluconazole susceptibility of 3,056 clinical isolates of Candida species from 2005 to 2009 in a tertiary-care hospital.

    PubMed

    Ying, Y; Zhang, J; Huang, S B; Liu, F D; Liu, J H; Zhang, J; Hu, X F; Zhang, Z Q; Liu, X; Huang, X T

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, Candida infections have been increasing significantly. This study was to investigate the distribution and fluconazole susceptibility of such infections. Totally, 3,056 clinical isolates were analysed, C. albicans was the most prevalent species from respiratory and vaginal specimens. However, non-albicans species constituted the majority of isolates from blood, urine, intensive care unit (ICU), organ transplant and burned patients. Similarly, Candida spp. from different specimens and clinical services had different degrees of susceptibility to fluconazole. Isolates from vagina and burned patients had the highest resistance rate, while all of the isolates from ascites and dermatological services were susceptible to fluconazole.

  8. Prevalence and antifungal susceptibility of Candida albicans and its related species Candida dubliniensis and Candida africana isolated from vulvovaginal samples in a hospital of Argentina.

    PubMed

    Theill, Laura; Dudiuk, Catiana; Morano, Susana; Gamarra, Soledad; Nardin, María Elena; Méndez, Emilce; Garcia-Effron, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Candida africana taxonomical status is controversial. It was proposed as a separate species within the Candida albicans species complex; however, phylogenetic analyses suggested that it is an unusual variety of C. albicans. The prevalence of C. albicans-related species (Candida dubliniensis and C. africana) as vulvovaginal pathogens is not known in Argentina. Moreover, data on antifungal susceptibility of isolates causing vulvovaginal candidiasis is scarce. The aims of this study were to establish the prevalence of C. dubliniensis and C. africana in vaginal samples and to evaluate the antifungal susceptibilities of vaginal C. albicans species complex strains. We used a molecular-based method coupled with a new pooled DNA extraction methodology to differentiate C. dubliniensis and C. africana in a collection of 287 strains originally identified as C. albicans isolated from an Argentinian hospital during 2013. Antifungal susceptibilities to fluconazole, clotrimazole, itraconazole, voriconazole, nystatin, amphotericin B and terbinafine were evaluated by using the CLSI M27-A3 and M27-S4 documents. Of the 287 isolates, 4 C. dubliniensis and one C. africana strains (1.39% and 0.35% prevalence, respectively) were identified. This is the first description of C. africana in Argentina and its identification was confirmed by sequencing the ITS2 region and the hwp1 gene. C. dubliniensis and C. africana strains showed very low MIC values for all the tested antifungals. Fluconazole-reduced-susceptibility and azole cross-resistance were observed in 3.55% and 1.41% of the C. albicans isolates, respectively. These results demonstrate that antifungal resistance is still a rare phenomenon in this kind of isolates.

  9. Prevalence and antifungal susceptibility of Candida albicans and its related species Candida dubliniensis and Candida africana isolated from vulvovaginal samples in a hospital of Argentina.

    PubMed

    Theill, Laura; Dudiuk, Catiana; Morano, Susana; Gamarra, Soledad; Nardin, María Elena; Méndez, Emilce; Garcia-Effron, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Candida africana taxonomical status is controversial. It was proposed as a separate species within the Candida albicans species complex; however, phylogenetic analyses suggested that it is an unusual variety of C. albicans. The prevalence of C. albicans-related species (Candida dubliniensis and C. africana) as vulvovaginal pathogens is not known in Argentina. Moreover, data on antifungal susceptibility of isolates causing vulvovaginal candidiasis is scarce. The aims of this study were to establish the prevalence of C. dubliniensis and C. africana in vaginal samples and to evaluate the antifungal susceptibilities of vaginal C. albicans species complex strains. We used a molecular-based method coupled with a new pooled DNA extraction methodology to differentiate C. dubliniensis and C. africana in a collection of 287 strains originally identified as C. albicans isolated from an Argentinian hospital during 2013. Antifungal susceptibilities to fluconazole, clotrimazole, itraconazole, voriconazole, nystatin, amphotericin B and terbinafine were evaluated by using the CLSI M27-A3 and M27-S4 documents. Of the 287 isolates, 4 C. dubliniensis and one C. africana strains (1.39% and 0.35% prevalence, respectively) were identified. This is the first description of C. africana in Argentina and its identification was confirmed by sequencing the ITS2 region and the hwp1 gene. C. dubliniensis and C. africana strains showed very low MIC values for all the tested antifungals. Fluconazole-reduced-susceptibility and azole cross-resistance were observed in 3.55% and 1.41% of the C. albicans isolates, respectively. These results demonstrate that antifungal resistance is still a rare phenomenon in this kind of isolates. PMID:26922471

  10. Molecular concordance of concurrent Candida albicans candidemia and candiduria.

    PubMed

    Huang, Po-Yen; Hung, Min-Hui; Shie, Shian-Sen; Su, Lin-Hui; Chen, Ke-Yuan; Ye, Jung-Jr; Chiang, Ping-Cheng; Leu, Hsieh-Shong; Huang, Ching-Tai

    2013-07-01

    The significance of candiduria remains unclear. We correlated Candida albicans candidemia with candiduria by molecular genotyping. 33 pairs of concurrent blood and urine C. albicans isolates from 31 adult (≥ 18 years) were genotyped with infrequent-restriction-site PCR. The molecular concordance rates of three major genotypes were 100% for I, 82% for II, and 71% for III. The molecular concordance between concurrent C. albicans candidemia and candiduria was frequent. Our findings substantiate the importance of candiduria in appropriate clinical context as the majority of our patients were from intensive care units.

  11. Genetic relationships between Candida albicans strains isolated from dental plaque, trachea, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from mechanically ventilated intensive care unit patients.

    PubMed

    Heo, Seok-Mo; Sung, Robert S; Scannapieco, Frank A; Haase, Elaine M

    2011-01-01

    Candida albicans often resides in the oral cavity of healthy humans as a harmless commensal organism. This opportunistic fungus can cause significant disease in critically ill patients, such as those undergoing mechanical ventilation in the intensive care unit (ICU) having compromised local airway defense mechanisms. The goal of this study was to determine the intra- and inter-patient genetic relationship between strains of C. albicans recovered from dental plaque, tracheal secretions, and the lower airway by bronchoalveolar lavage of patients undergoing mechanical ventilation. Three pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) typing methods were used to determine the genetic relatedness of the C. albicans strains, including electrophoretic karyotyping (EK) and restriction endonuclease analysis of the genome using SfiI (REAG-S) and BssHII (REAG-B). The C. albicans isolates from dental plaque and tracheo-bronchial sites from the same patient were genetically indistinguishable and retained over time, whereas strains from different patients usually separated into different genotypes. Among the three methods, REAG-B proved to be the most discriminatory method to differentiate isolates. The finding of genetically similar strains from the oral and tracheo-bronchial sites from the same patient supports the notion that the oral cavity may serve as an important source for C. albicans spread to the trachea and lung of mechanically ventilated patients.

  12. Candida albicans and C. tropicalis Isolates from the Expired Breathes of Captive Dolphins and Their Environments in an Aquarium.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hideo; Ueda, Keiichi; Itano, Eiko Nakagawa; Yanagisawa, Makio; Murata, Yoshiteru; Murata, Michiko; Yaguchi, Takashi; Murakami, Masaru; Kamei, Katsuhiko; Inomata, Tomo; Miyahara, Hirokazu; Sano, Ayako; Uchida, Senzo

    2010-12-22

    Genotypes of Candida spp. isolated from exhalation of 20 dolphins, 11 water samples from captive pools, and 24 oral cavities of staff members in an aquarium using a combination of multiple drug resistance 1 gene (MDR1) and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) 1 5.8s-ITS 2 regions of ribosomal RNA gene (ITS rDNA) sequences were studied. The holding ratios of the dolphins, captive pools, and staff members were 70, 90, and 29%, respectively. Isolated pathogenic yeast species common to the dolphins and environments were Candida albicans and C. tropicalis. Identical genotypes in both Candida spp. based on the combination of MDR1 and ITSrDNA were found in some dolphins, between a dolphin and a staff, among dolphins and environments, and among environments. The results indicated the diffusion and exchange of pathogenic yeasts at the aquarium among dolphins and environments. The isolates at the aquarium showed higher rates of resistance to azole antifungals compared to reference isolates.

  13. Overexpression and mutation as a genetic mechanism of fluconazole resistance in Candida albicans isolated from human immunodeficiency virus patients in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Rosana, Yeva; Yasmon, Andi; Lestari, Delly Chipta

    2015-09-01

    Fluconazole is the standard treatment for oropharyngeal candidiasis, which is the third most common opportunistic infection in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS patients in Indonesia. Overuse of this drug could lead to the emergence of resistance. The objective of this study was to analyse the role of ERG11, CDR1, CDR2 and MDR1 gene overexpression and mutations in the ERG11 gene as a genetic mechanism of fluconazole resistance in Candida albicans isolated from HIV patients in Indonesia. Overexpression of ERG11, CDR1, CDR2 and MDR1 was analysed by real-time reverse transcription PCR, while ERG11 gene mutation analysis was performed using sequencing methods. Seventeen isolates out of 92 strains of C. albicans isolated from 108 HIV patients were found to be resistant to azole antifungals. The highest gene overexpression of ERG11 was found in C. albicans resistant to single fluconazole, while the highest gene overexpression of CDR2 was detected in all isolates of C. albicans resistant to multiple azoles. Amino acid substitutions were observed at six positions, i.e. D116E, D153E, I261V, E266D, V437I and V488I. The amino acid substitution I261V was identified in this study and was probably associated with fluconazole resistance. The combination of overexpression of CDR2 and ERG11 and mutation in the ERG11 gene was found to be a genetic mechanism of fluconazole resistance in C. albicans isolated from HIV patients in Indonesia. PMID:26297039

  14. Antimicrobial Efficacy of Probiotic and Herbal Oral Rinses against Candida albicans in Children: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, Shobha; Rathore, Monika; Banerjee, Molay

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: A growing number of dentists are embracing the philosophy that natural agents are better for children’s oral health. Knowledge of probiotics on host immune system has entered a new phase of research, and progression in this field is likely to offer novel means by modulating host immunity for prevention and treatment of a wide variety of oral diseases. Aim: To compare the antimicrobial efficacy of probiotics in reducing salivary Candida albicans counts with commonly used antimicrobial agents like 0.2% chlorhexidine and herbal rinse. Materials and methods: A randomized clinical trial was conducted on 60 subjects aged between 6 and 14 years, for a period of 9 months. The subjects were randomly divided into three groups comprising 20 subjects in each group. Three oral agents were administered twice daily for a maximum period of 1 week. Candida albicans counts were recorded before and after intervention and the results were submitted for statistical analysis using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 15.0 software. Results: The change in mean log10 colony-forming unit (CFU)/ ml of C. albicans in groups A to C was 0.43 ± 0.72, 0.68 ± 1.05 and 0.22 ± 0.66 CFU/ml respectively. Conclusion: Data obtained from the study demonstrated that probiotic rinse was equally effective as 0.2% chlorhexidine digluconate rinse in reducing C. albicans counts after 1 week of intervention. Herbal oral rinse was least effective. Probiotic oral rinses have opened new horizons in improvement of oral health by maintaining healthy ecosystem. However, a longitudinal study with larger sample size needs to be undertaken to evaluate the therapeutic effects of probiotics and herbal agents. How to cite this article: Mishra R, Tandon S, Rathore M, Banerjee M. Antimicrobial Efficacy of Probiotic and Herbal Oral Rinses against Candida albicans in Children: A Randomized Clinical Trial. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(1):25-30. PMID:27274151

  15. Microbicidal activity of neutrophils is inhibited by isolates from recurrent vaginal candidiasis (RVVC) caused by Candida albicans through fungal thioredoxin reductase.

    PubMed

    Ratti, Bianca Altrão; Godoy, Janine Silva Ribeiro; de Souza Bonfim Mendonça, Patrícia; Bidóia, Danielle Lazarin; Nakamura, Tânia Ueda; Nakamura, Celso Vataru; Lopes Consolaro, Marcia Edilaine; Estivalet Svidzinski, Terezinha Inez; de Oliveira Silva, Sueli

    2015-01-01

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) is characterized by an infection of the vulva and vagina, mainly caused by Candida albicans, a commensal microorganism that inhabits the vaginal, digestive, and respiratory mucosae. Vulvovaginal candidiasis affects approximately 75% of women, and 5% develop the recurrent form (RVVC). The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether neutrophils microbicidal response is triggered when activated with RVVC isolates caused by C. albicans. Our results showed that RVVC isolates induced neutrophil migration but significantly decrease the microbicidal activity of neutrophils, compared with VVC and ASS isolates. The microbicidal activity of neutrophils is highly dependent on the production of reactive oxygen species/reactive nitrogen species (ROS/RNS). However, this isolate induced detoxification of ROS/RNS produced by neutrophils, reflected by the high level of thiol groups and by the oxygen consumption. Therefore, RVVC isolates induced biochemical changes in the inflammatory response triggered by neutrophils, and these effects were mainly related to the detoxification of ROS/RNS through the thioredoxin reductase (TR), a key antioxidant enzyme in fungi. This might be one of the resistance mechanisms triggered by RVVC caused by C. albicans. PMID:25497972

  16. Isolation and chemical characterization of plasma membranes from the yeast and mycelial forms of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Marriott, M S

    1975-01-01

    It has been possible to induce the yeast-mycelium transformation in Candida albicans by growth of the organism under completely defined conditions in batch culture. Protoplasts have been obtained from the two forms by using a lytic enzyme preparation from Streptomyces violaceus. A plasma membrane fraction was prepared by osmotic lysis of these protoplasts and fractionated by using a combination of differential and discontinuous sucrose density-gradient flotation centrifugation. The purity of this fraction was determined by radioactive dansylation and iodination of plasma membranes of intact protoplasts followed by localization of the radioactivity upon fractionation. This procedure demonstrated less than 4% contamination of the plasma membrane fraction with other cell membranes. Chemical analysis of this fraction revealed that the major components were protein and lipid. Membranes from the yeast form contained (w/w): 50% protein, 45% lipid, 9% carbohydrate and 0.3% nucleic acid. Plasma membranes from the mycelial form contained significantly more carbohydrate and were found to be composed of (w/w): 43% protein, 31% lipid, 25% carbohydrate and 0.5% nucleic acid. Marked differences were also observed between the phospholipid, free and esterified sterols, and total fatty acids of membranes from the two forms of the organism. PMID:1089750

  17. Clinical significance of the isolation of Candida species from hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Magalhães, Yankee C; Bomfim, Maria Rosa Q; Melônio, Luciane C; Ribeiro, Patrícia C S; Cosme, Lécia M; Rhoden, Cristianne R; Marques, Sirlei G

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we isolated and phenotypically identified 108 yeast strains from various clinical specimens collected from 100 hospitalized patients at three tertiary hospitals in São Luís-Maranhão, Brazil, from July to December 2010. The isolates were analyzed for their susceptibility to four of the most widely used antifungal agents in the surveyed hospitals, amphotericin B, fluconazole, 5-flucytosine and voriconazole. The species identified were Candida albicans (41.4%), Candida tropicalis (30.1%), C. glabrata (7.4%), Candida parapsilosis (5.5%), Candida krusei (4.6%), Cryptococcus neoformans (4.6%), Trichosporon spp . (3.7%), Candida norvegensis (0.9%), Rhodotorula glutinis (0.9%) and Pichia farinosa (0.9%). A higher isolation rate was observed in the following clinical specimens: urine (54 isolates; 50%), respiratory tract samples (21 isolates; 19.4%) and blood (20 isolates; 18.6%). Candida albicans isolates were 100% sensitive to all antifungal agents tested, whereas Candida krusei and Crytococcus neoformans displayed intermediate resistance to 5-flucytosine, with Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) values of 8 mg/mL and 16 mg/mL, respectively. Both strains were also S-DD to fluconazole with an MIC of 16 mg/mL. C. tropicalis was resistant to 5-flucytosine with an MIC of 32 μg/mL. This study demonstrates the importance of identifying the yeast species involved in community and nosocomial infections.

  18. Clinical significance of the isolation of Candida species from hospitalized patients

    PubMed Central

    Magalhães, Yankee C.; Bomfim, Maria Rosa Q.; Melônio, Luciane C.; Ribeiro, Patrícia C.S.; Cosme, Lécia M.; Rhoden, Cristianne R.; Marques, Sirlei G.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we isolated and phenotypically identified 108 yeast strains from various clinical specimens collected from 100 hospitalized patients at three tertiary hospitals in São Luís-Maranhão, Brazil, from July to December 2010. The isolates were analyzed for their susceptibility to four of the most widely used antifungal agents in the surveyed hospitals, amphotericin B, fluconazole, 5-flucytosine and voriconazole. The species identified were Candida albicans (41.4%), Candida tropicalis (30.1%), C. glabrata (7.4%), Candida parapsilosis (5.5%), Candida krusei (4.6%), Cryptococcus neoformans (4.6%), Trichosporon spp . (3.7%), Candida norvegensis (0.9%), Rhodotorula glutinis (0.9%) and Pichia farinosa (0.9%). A higher isolation rate was observed in the following clinical specimens: urine (54 isolates; 50%), respiratory tract samples (21 isolates; 19.4%) and blood (20 isolates; 18.6%). Candida albicans isolates were 100% sensitive to all antifungal agents tested, whereas Candida krusei and Crytococcus neoformans displayed intermediate resistance to 5-flucytosine, with Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) values of 8 mg/mL and 16 mg/mL, respectively. Both strains were also S-DD to fluconazole with an MIC of 16 mg/mL. C. tropicalis was resistant to 5-flucytosine with an MIC of 32 μg/mL. This study demonstrates the importance of identifying the yeast species involved in community and nosocomial infections. PMID:26221096

  19. Update on clinically isolated syndrome.

    PubMed

    Thouvenot, Éric

    2015-04-01

    Optic neuritis, myelitis and brainstem syndrome accompanied by a symptomatic MRI T2 or FLAIR hyperintensity and T1 hypointensity are highly suggestive of multiple sclerosis (MS) in young adults. They are called "clinically isolated syndrome" (CIS) and correspond to the typical first multiple sclerosis (MS) episode, especially when associated with other asymptomatic demyelinating lesions, without clinical, radiological and immunological sign of differential diagnosis. After a CIS, the delay of apparition of a relapse, which corresponds to the conversion to clinically definite MS (CDMS), varies from several months to more than 10 years (10-15% of cases, generally called benign RRMS). This delay is generally associated with the number and location of demyelinating lesions of the brain and spinal cord and the results of CSF analysis. Several studies comparing different MRI criteria for dissemination in space and dissemination in time of demyelinating lesions, two hallmarks of MS, provided enough substantial data to update diagnostic criteria for MS after a CIS. In the last revision of the McDonald's criteria in 2010, diagnostic criteria were simplified and now the diagnosis can be made by a single initial scan that proves the presence of active asymptomatic lesions (with gadolinium enhancement) and of unenhanced lesions. However, time to conversion remains highly unpredictable for a given patient and CIS can remain isolated, especially for idiopathic unilateral optic neuritis or myelitis. Univariate analyses of clinical, radiological, biological or electrophysiological characteristics of CIS patients in small series identified numerous risk factors of rapid conversion to MS. However, large series of CIS patients analyzing several characteristics of CIS patients and the influence of disease modifying therapies brought important information about the risk of CDMS or RRMS over up to 20 years of follow-up. They confirmed the importance of the initial MRI pattern of

  20. Molecular typing of Neisseria perflava clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Mechergui, Arij; Achour, Wafa; Giorgini, Dario; Baaboura, Rekaya; Taha, Muhamed-Kheir; Hassen, Assia Ben

    2013-09-01

    Multilocus sequence typing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis were used to type 22 commensal isolates of Neisseria perflava collected by swabbing from neutropenic patients. High genetic diversity was found among our N. perflava clinical isolates.

  1. CHROMagar Candida, a new differential isolation medium for presumptive identification of clinically important Candida species.

    PubMed Central

    Odds, F C; Bernaerts, R

    1994-01-01

    CHROMagar Candida is a novel, differential culture medium that is claimed to facilitate the isolation and presumptive identification of some clinically important yeast species. We evaluated the use of this medium with 726 yeast isolates, including 82 isolated directly on the medium from clinical material. After 2 days of incubation at 37 degrees C, 285 C. albicans isolates gave distinctive green colonies that were not seen with any of 441 other yeast isolates representing 21 different species. A total of 54 C. tropicalis isolates also developed distinctive dark blue-gray colonies with a halo of dark brownish purple in the surrounding agar. C. krusei isolates (n = 43) also formed highly characteristic rough, spreading colonies with pale pink centers and a white edge that was otherwise encountered only rarely with isolates of C. norvegensis. Trichosporon spp. (n = 34) formed small, pale colonies that became larger and characteristically rough with prolonged incubation. Most of the other 310 yeasts studied formed colonies with a color that ranged from white to pink to purple with a brownish tint. The only exceptions were found among isolates identified as Geotrichum sp. or Pichia sp., some of which formed colonies with a gray to blue color and which in two instances formed a green pigment or a dark halo in the agar. The specificity and sensitivity of the new medium for the presumptive identification of C. albicans, C. krusei, and C. tropicalis exceeded 99% for all three species. A blinded reading test involving four personnel and 57 yeast isolates representing nine clinically important species confirmed that colonial appearance after 48 h of incubation on CHROMagar Candida afforded the correct presumptive recognition of C. albicans, C. tropicalis, C, krusei, and Trichosporon spp. None of nine bacterial isolates grew on CHROMagar Candida within 72 h, and bacteria (Escherichia coli) grew from only 4 of 104 vaginal, 100 oral, and 99 anorectal swabs. The new medium

  2. Efficacy of the clinical agent VT-1161 against fluconazole-sensitive and -resistant Candida albicans in a murine model of vaginal candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Garvey, E P; Hoekstra, W J; Schotzinger, R J; Sobel, J D; Lilly, E A; Fidel, P L

    2015-09-01

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) and recurrent VVC (RVVC) remain major health problems for women. VT-1161, a novel fungal CYP51 inhibitor which has potent antifungal activity against fluconazole-sensitive Candida albicans, retained its in vitro potency (MIC50 of ≤0.015 and MIC90 of 0.12 μg/ml) against 10 clinical isolates from VVC or RVVC patients resistant to fluconazole (MIC50 of 8 and MIC90 of 64 μg/ml). VT-1161 pharmacokinetics in mice displayed a high volume of distribution (1.4 liters/kg), high oral absorption (73%), and a long half-life (>48 h) and showed rapid penetration into vaginal tissue. In a murine model of vaginal candidiasis using fluconazole-sensitive yeast, oral doses as low as 4 mg/kg VT-1161 significantly reduced the fungal burden 1 and 4 days posttreatment (P < 0.0001). Similar VT-1161 efficacy was measured when an isolate highly resistant to fluconazole (MIC of 64 μg/ml) but fully sensitive in vitro to VT-1161 was used. When an isolate partially sensitive to VT-1161 (MIC of 0.12 μg/ml) and moderately resistant to fluconazole (MIC of 8 μg/ml) was used, VT-1161 remained efficacious, whereas fluconazole was efficacious on day 1 but did not sustain efficacy 4 days posttreatment. Both agents were inactive in treating an infection with an isolate that demonstrated weaker potency (MICs of 2 and 64 μg/ml for VT-1161 and fluconazole, respectively). Finally, the plasma concentrations of free VT-1161 were predictive of efficacy when in excess of the in vitro MIC values. These data support the clinical development of VT-1161 as a potentially more efficacious treatment for VVC and RVVC.

  3. Effectiveness of Hexetidine 0.1% in Eliminating Candida albicans Colonizing Dentures: A Randomized Clinical In Vivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Aoun, Georges; Nasseh, Ibrahim; Saadeh, Maria; Cassia, Antoine; Berberi, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    Background: Effective cleaning of dentures is important to maintain a good oral hygiene for patients suffering from denture stomatitis (DS). This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of hexetidine 0.1% in eliminating C. albicans colonizing dentures. Materials and Methods: A total of 40 denture wearers (18 men, 22 women; age range 40-80 years) with clinical evidence of DS were randomly divided into 2 groups, 1 test, and 1 control. The dentures of the test group were treated by immersion in hexetidine 0.1% while those of the control group were immersed in distilled water. Swab samples from the palatal surfaces of the upper dentures were collected before and after of cleaner use and examined mycologically. Results: Reduction in the number of colony-forming units (CFU) of C. albicans after immersion of the dentures with hexetidine 0.1% was evaluated compared to those of the control group. Conclusion: Hexetidine 0.1% solution tested for the first time as a product of disinfection of the acrylic dentures showed average results after immersion of 8 night hours for 4 days. PMID:26225095

  4. An Optimized Lock Solution Containing Micafungin, Ethanol and Doxycycline Inhibits Candida albicans and Mixed C. albicans – Staphyloccoccus aureus Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Lown, Livia; Peters, Brian M.; Walraven, Carla J.; Noverr, Mairi C.; Lee, Samuel A.

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans is a major cause of catheter-related bloodstream infections and is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Due to the propensity of C. albicans to form drug-resistant biofilms, the current standard of care includes catheter removal; however, reinsertion may be technically challenging or risky. Prolonged exposure of an antifungal lock solution within the catheter in conjunction with systemic therapy has been experimentally attempted for catheter salvage. Previously, we demonstrated excellent in vitro activity of micafungin, ethanol, and high-dose doxycycline as single agents for prevention and treatment of C. albicans biofilms. Thus, we sought to investigate optimal combinations of micafungin, ethanol, and/or doxycycline as a lock solution. We performed two- and three-drug checkerboard assays to determine the in vitro activity of pairwise or three agents in combination for prevention or treatment of C. albicans biofilms. Optimal lock solutions were tested for activity against C. albicans clinical isolates, reference strains and polymicrobial C. albicans-S. aureus biofilms. A solution containing 20% (v/v) ethanol, 0.01565 μg/mL micafungin, and 800 μg/mL doxycycline demonstrated a reduction of 98% metabolic activity and no fungal regrowth when used to prevent fungal biofilm formation; however there was no advantage over 20% ethanol alone. This solution was also successful in inhibiting the regrowth of C. albicans from mature polymicrobial biofilms, although it was not fully bactericidal. Solutions containing 5% ethanol with low concentrations of micafungin and doxycycline demonstrated synergistic activity when used to prevent monomicrobial C. albicans biofilm formation. A combined solution of micafungin, ethanol and doxycycline is highly effective for the prevention of C. albicans biofilm formation but did not demonstrate an advantage over 20% ethanol alone in these studies. PMID:27428310

  5. An Optimized Lock Solution Containing Micafungin, Ethanol and Doxycycline Inhibits Candida albicans and Mixed C. albicans - Staphyloccoccus aureus Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Lown, Livia; Peters, Brian M; Walraven, Carla J; Noverr, Mairi C; Lee, Samuel A

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans is a major cause of catheter-related bloodstream infections and is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Due to the propensity of C. albicans to form drug-resistant biofilms, the current standard of care includes catheter removal; however, reinsertion may be technically challenging or risky. Prolonged exposure of an antifungal lock solution within the catheter in conjunction with systemic therapy has been experimentally attempted for catheter salvage. Previously, we demonstrated excellent in vitro activity of micafungin, ethanol, and high-dose doxycycline as single agents for prevention and treatment of C. albicans biofilms. Thus, we sought to investigate optimal combinations of micafungin, ethanol, and/or doxycycline as a lock solution. We performed two- and three-drug checkerboard assays to determine the in vitro activity of pairwise or three agents in combination for prevention or treatment of C. albicans biofilms. Optimal lock solutions were tested for activity against C. albicans clinical isolates, reference strains and polymicrobial C. albicans-S. aureus biofilms. A solution containing 20% (v/v) ethanol, 0.01565 μg/mL micafungin, and 800 μg/mL doxycycline demonstrated a reduction of 98% metabolic activity and no fungal regrowth when used to prevent fungal biofilm formation; however there was no advantage over 20% ethanol alone. This solution was also successful in inhibiting the regrowth of C. albicans from mature polymicrobial biofilms, although it was not fully bactericidal. Solutions containing 5% ethanol with low concentrations of micafungin and doxycycline demonstrated synergistic activity when used to prevent monomicrobial C. albicans biofilm formation. A combined solution of micafungin, ethanol and doxycycline is highly effective for the prevention of C. albicans biofilm formation but did not demonstrate an advantage over 20% ethanol alone in these studies. PMID:27428310

  6. Synergistic Effects of Honey and Propolis toward Drug Multi-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus, Escherichia Coli and Candida Albicans Isolates in Single and Polymicrobial Cultures

    PubMed Central

    AL-Waili, Noori; Al-Ghamdi, Ahmad; Ansari, Mohammad Javed; Al-Attal, Y.; Salom, Khelod

    2012-01-01

    Background: Propolis and honey are natural bee products with wide range of biological and medicinal properties. The study investigated antimicrobial activity of ethyl alcohol extraction of propolis collected from Saudi Arabia (EEPS) and from Egypt (EEPE), and their synergistic effect when used with honey. Single and polymicrobial cultures of antibiotic resistant human pathogens were tested. Material and methods; Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus),), Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Candida albicans (C.albicans) were cultured in 10-100% (v/v) honey diluted in broth, or 0.08-1.0% (weight/volume) EEPS and EEPE diluted in broth. Four types of polymicrobial cultures were prepared by culturing the isolates with each other in broth (control) and broth containing various concentrations of honey or propolis. Microbial growth was assessed on solid plate media after 24 h incubation. Results; EEPS and EEPE inhibited antibiotic resistant E.coli, and S.aureus, and C.albicans in single and polymicrobial cultures. S.aureus became more susceptible when it was cultured with E.coli or C.albicans or when all cultured together. C.albicans became more susceptible when it was cultured with S.aureus or with E.coli and S. aureus together. The presence of ethyl alcohol or honey potentiated antimicrobial effect of propolis toward entire microbes tested in single or polymicrobial cultures. EEPS had lower MIC toward E.coli and C.albicans than EEPE. When propolis was mixed with honey, EEPS showed lower MIC than EEPE. In addition, honey showed lower MIC toward entire microbes when mixed with EEPS than when it was mixed with EEPE. Conclusion; 1) propolis prevents the growth of the microorganisms in single and mixed microbial cultures, and has synergistic effect when used with honey or ethyl alcohol, 2) the antimicrobial property of propolis varies with geographical origin, and 3) this study will pave the way to isolate active ingredients from honey and propolis to be further tested individually or

  7. Germination of Candida albicans induced by proline.

    PubMed Central

    Dabrowa, N; Taxer, S S; Howard, D H

    1976-01-01

    Blastospores of Candida albicans germinated in proline-biotin-buffer medium incubated at 37 C. Certain other amino acids in the glatamate, asparate, and pyruvate families also fostered germinaton but generally to a lesser extent than did proline. L-Cysteine, D-proline, and certain structural analogues of L-proline inhibited proline-stimualted germination. The concentration of phosphate and glucose was crucial to amino acid-stimulated germination of C. albicans. Clinical isolates and stock cultures varied in their response to the germ tube-inducing activity of proline or other amino acids. The proline-buffer medium cannot be used in a diagnostic test for production of germ tubes by isolates of yeasts. PMID:5375

  8. Microbiological screening of Irish patients with autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy reveals persistence of Candida albicans strains, gradual reduction in susceptibility to azoles, and incidences of clinical signs of oral candidiasis without culture evidence.

    PubMed

    McManus, Brenda A; McGovern, Eleanor; Moran, Gary P; Healy, Claire M; Nunn, June; Fleming, Pádraig; Costigan, Colm; Sullivan, Derek J; Coleman, David C

    2011-05-01

    Patients with autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED) are prone to chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis, which is often treated with azoles. The purpose of this study was to characterize the oral Candida populations from 16 Irish APECED patients, who comprise approximately half the total number identified in Ireland, and to examine the effect of intermittent antifungal therapy on the azole susceptibility patterns of Candida isolates. Patients attended between one and four clinical evaluations over a 5-year period, providing oral rinses and/or oral swab samples each time. Candida was recovered from 14/16 patients, and Candida albicans was the only Candida species identified. Interestingly, clinical diagnosis of candidiasis did not correlate with microbiological evidence of Candida infection at 7/22 (32%) clinical assessments. Multilocus sequence typing analysis of C. albicans isolates recovered from the same patients on separate occasions identified the same sequence type each time. Fluconazole resistance was detected in isolates from one patient, and isolates exhibiting a progressive reduction in itraconazole and/or fluconazole susceptibility were identified in a further 3/16 patients, in each case correlating with the upregulation of CDR- and MDR-encoded efflux pumps. Mutations were also identified in the ERG11 and the TAC1 genes of isolates from these four patients; some of these mutations have previously been associated with azole resistance. The findings suggest that alternative Candida treatment options, other than azoles such as chlorhexidine, should be considered in APECED patients and that clinical diagnosis of oral candidiasis should be confirmed by culture prior to the commencement of anti-Candida therapy.

  9. High throughput multiplex-PCR for direct detection and diagnosis of dermatophyte species, Candida albicans and Candida parapsilosis in clinical specimen.

    PubMed

    Vahidnia, Ali; Bekers, Wouter; Bliekendaal, Harry; Spaargaren, Joke

    2015-06-01

    We have developed and validated a multiplex-PCR method for detection of dermatophyte spp., Candida albicans and parapsilosis for routine diagnostics. Our m-PCR showed excellent concordance with culture results in 475 clinical samples. Through the rapid diagnosis by our m-PCR, clinicians are able to initiate adequate antimycotic therapy much earlier.

  10. The genetic basis of fluconazole resistance development in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Morschhäuser, Joachim

    2002-07-18

    Infections by the opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida albicans are widely treated with the antifungal agent fluconazole that inhibits the biosynthesis of ergosterol, the major sterol in the fungal plasma membrane. The emergence of fluconazole-resistant C. albicans strains is a significant problem after long-term treatment of recurrent oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC) in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients. Resistance can be caused by alterations in sterol biosynthesis, by mutations in the drug target enzyme, sterol 14alpha-demethylase (14DM), which lower its affinity for fluconazole, by increased expression of the ERG11 gene encoding 14DM, or by overexpression of genes coding for membrane transport proteins of the ABC transporter (CDR1/CDR2) or the major facilitator (MDR1) superfamilies. Different mechanisms are frequently combined to result in a stepwise development of fluconazole resistance over time. The MDR1 gene is not or barely transcribed during growth in vitro in fluconazole-susceptible C. albicans strains, but overexpressed in many fluconazole-resistant clinical isolates, resulting in reduced intracellular fluconazole accumulation. The activation of the gene in resistant isolates is caused by mutations in as yet unknown trans-regulatory factors, and the resulting constitutive high level of MDR1 expression causes resistance to other toxic compounds in addition to fluconazole. Disruption of both alleles of the MDR1 gene in resistant C. albicans isolates abolishes their resistance to these drugs, providing genetic evidence that MDR1 mediates multidrug resistance in C. albicans. PMID:12084466

  11. Investigation of ERG11 gene expression among fluconazole-resistant Candida albicans: first report from an Iranian referral paediatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Teymuri, M; Mamishi, S; Pourakbari, B; Mahmoudi, S; Ashtiani, M T; Sadeghi, R H; Yadegari, M H

    2015-01-01

    The multiplicity of mechanisms of resistance to azole antifungal agents has been described. As fluconazole-resistant clinical Candida albicans isolates that constitutively over-express ERG11 have been identified in previous studies, the aim of this study is to investigate this molecular mechanism involved in fluconazole resistance of C. albicans clinical isolates. Fluconazole susceptibility testing was carried out on clinical isolates of Candida spp. obtained from hospitalised children in an Iranian referral children's hospital. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) technique was used to differentiate Candida spp. The resistant C. albicans isolates were subjected to RT-qPCR using primers that identify ERG11 gene expression. Of the 142 Candida spp. isolates studied, C. albicans was the most predominant isolate, occurring in 68.3% (97/142) of the patients. According to the CLSI method, the majority of the C. albicans isolates (91.7%, 89/97), categorised as susceptible (minimum inhibitory concentration [MIC] ≤8 μg/mL), five isolates were considered resistant (MIC ≤64 μg/mL) and three had dose-dependent susceptibility (MIC = 8.16-32 μg/mL). The ERG11 gene in the five fluconazole-resistant C. albicans isolates was upregulated 4.15-5.84-fold relative to the ATCC 10231 control strain. In this study, the expression of ERG11 was upregulated in all the fluconazole-resistant C. albicans isolates. There are limited data on the antifungal susceptibility of Candida spp. as well as the molecular mechanism of azole resistance in Iran, especially for isolates causing infections in children. Therefore, the surveillance of antifungal resistance patterns and investigation of other mechanisms of azole resistance in all Candida spp. isolates is recommended.

  12. Effect of Tyrosol and Farnesol on Virulence and Antibiotic Resistance of Clinical Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Hassan Abdel-Rhman, Shaymaa; Mostafa El-Mahdy, Areej; El-Mowafy, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Mixed-species biofilms could create a protected environment that allows for survival to external antimicrobials and allows different bacterial-fungal interactions. Pseudomonas aeruginosa-Candida albicans coexistence is an example for such mixed-species community. Numerous reports demonstrated how P. aeruginosa or its metabolites could influence the growth, morphogenesis, and virulence of C. albicans. In this study, we investigated how the C. albicans quorum sensing compounds, tyrosol and farnesol, might affect Egyptian clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa regarding growth, antibiotic sensitivity, and virulence. We could demonstrate that tyrosol possesses an antibacterial activity against P. aeruginosa (10 µM inhibited more than 50% of growth after 16 h cultivation). Moreover, we could show for the first time that tyrosol strongly inhibits the production of the virulence factors hemolysin and protease in P. aeruginosa, whereas farnesol inhibits, to lower extent, hemolysin production in this bacterial pathogen. Cumulatively, tyrosol is expected to strongly affect P. aeruginosa in mixed microbial biofilm. PMID:26844228

  13. Comparison of Antimicrobial Activity of Chlorhexidine, Coconut Oil, Probiotics, and Ketoconazole on Candida albicans Isolated in Children with Early Childhood Caries: An In Vitro Study.

    PubMed

    Shino, Beena; Peedikayil, Faizal C; Jaiprakash, Shyamala R; Ahmed Bijapur, Gufran; Kottayi, Soni; Jose, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Background. Early childhood caries (ECC) is associated with early colonisation and high levels of cariogenic microorganisms. With C. albicans being one of those, there is a need to determine the effectiveness of various chemotherapeutic agents against it. The study is aimed at isolating Candida species in children with ECC and at studying the antifungal effect of coconut oil, probiotics, Lactobacillus, and 0.2% chlorhexidine on C. albicans in comparison with ketoconazole. Materials and Methods. Samples were collected using sterile cotton swabs, swabbed on the tooth surfaces from children with ECC of 3 to 6 yrs and streaked on Sabouraud dextrose agar (HI Media) plates and incubated in a 5% CO2 enriched atmosphere at 37°C for 24 hours. Candida was isolated and its susceptibility to probiotics, chlorhexidine, ketoconazole, and coconut oil was determined using Disc Diffusion method. Results. The mean zone of inhibition for chlorhexidine was 21.8 mm, whereas for coconut oil it was 16.8 mm, for probiotics it was 13.5 mm, and for ketoconazole it was 22.3 mm. The difference between the groups was not statistically significant (Chi-square value 7.42, P value 0.06). Conclusion. Chlorhexidine and coconut oil have shown significant antifungal activity which is comparable with ketoconazole.

  14. Comparison of Antimicrobial Activity of Chlorhexidine, Coconut Oil, Probiotics, and Ketoconazole on Candida albicans Isolated in Children with Early Childhood Caries: An In Vitro Study.

    PubMed

    Shino, Beena; Peedikayil, Faizal C; Jaiprakash, Shyamala R; Ahmed Bijapur, Gufran; Kottayi, Soni; Jose, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Background. Early childhood caries (ECC) is associated with early colonisation and high levels of cariogenic microorganisms. With C. albicans being one of those, there is a need to determine the effectiveness of various chemotherapeutic agents against it. The study is aimed at isolating Candida species in children with ECC and at studying the antifungal effect of coconut oil, probiotics, Lactobacillus, and 0.2% chlorhexidine on C. albicans in comparison with ketoconazole. Materials and Methods. Samples were collected using sterile cotton swabs, swabbed on the tooth surfaces from children with ECC of 3 to 6 yrs and streaked on Sabouraud dextrose agar (HI Media) plates and incubated in a 5% CO2 enriched atmosphere at 37°C for 24 hours. Candida was isolated and its susceptibility to probiotics, chlorhexidine, ketoconazole, and coconut oil was determined using Disc Diffusion method. Results. The mean zone of inhibition for chlorhexidine was 21.8 mm, whereas for coconut oil it was 16.8 mm, for probiotics it was 13.5 mm, and for ketoconazole it was 22.3 mm. The difference between the groups was not statistically significant (Chi-square value 7.42, P value 0.06). Conclusion. Chlorhexidine and coconut oil have shown significant antifungal activity which is comparable with ketoconazole. PMID:27051559

  15. Comparison of Antimicrobial Activity of Chlorhexidine, Coconut Oil, Probiotics, and Ketoconazole on Candida albicans Isolated in Children with Early Childhood Caries: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed Bijapur, Gufran; Kottayi, Soni; Jose, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Background. Early childhood caries (ECC) is associated with early colonisation and high levels of cariogenic microorganisms. With C. albicans being one of those, there is a need to determine the effectiveness of various chemotherapeutic agents against it. The study is aimed at isolating Candida species in children with ECC and at studying the antifungal effect of coconut oil, probiotics, Lactobacillus, and 0.2% chlorhexidine on C. albicans in comparison with ketoconazole. Materials and Methods. Samples were collected using sterile cotton swabs, swabbed on the tooth surfaces from children with ECC of 3 to 6 yrs and streaked on Sabouraud dextrose agar (HI Media) plates and incubated in a 5% CO2 enriched atmosphere at 37°C for 24 hours. Candida was isolated and its susceptibility to probiotics, chlorhexidine, ketoconazole, and coconut oil was determined using Disc Diffusion method. Results. The mean zone of inhibition for chlorhexidine was 21.8 mm, whereas for coconut oil it was 16.8 mm, for probiotics it was 13.5 mm, and for ketoconazole it was 22.3 mm. The difference between the groups was not statistically significant (Chi-square value 7.42, P value 0.06). Conclusion. Chlorhexidine and coconut oil have shown significant antifungal activity which is comparable with ketoconazole. PMID:27051559

  16. Micafungin triggers caspase-dependent apoptosis in Candida albicans and Candida parapsilosis biofilms, including caspofungin non-susceptible isolates.

    PubMed

    Shirazi, F; Kontoyiannis, D P

    2015-01-01

    Candida biofilms play an important role in infections associated with medical devices and are resistant to antifungals. We hypothesized that the echinocandin micafungin (MICA) exerts an enhanced antifungal activity against caspofungin (CAS)-susceptible (CAS-S) and CAS-non-susceptible (CAS-NS) Candida albicans and Candida parapsilosis which is at least in part through apoptosis, even in the biofilm environment. Apoptosis was characterized by detecting reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), DNA fragmentation, lack of plasma membrane integrity, and metacaspase activation following exposure of Candida biofilm to MICA for 3h at 37°C in RPMI 1640 medium. The minimum inhibitory concentration was higher for CAS (2.0-16.0 μg/mL) than for MICA (1.0-8.0 μg/mL) for Candida biofilms. Elevated intracellular ROS levels and depolarization of MMP was evident in CAS-S C. albicans (3.0-4.2 fold) and C. parapsilosis (4.8-5.4 fold) biofilms compared with CAS-NS (1.2 fold) after exposure to MICA (0.25x-1xMIC). Elevated intracellular ROS levels and depolarization of MMP was evident in CAS-S C. albicans (3.0-4.2 fold) and C. parapsilosis (4.8-5.4 fold) biofilms compared with CAS-NS (1.2 fold) after exposure to MICA (0.25x-1xMIC). Finally higher ß-1, 3 glucan levels were seen in sessile cells compared to planktonic cells, especially in CAS-NS strains. MICA treatment might induce a metacaspase-dependent apoptotic process in biofilms of both CAS-S C. albicans and C. parapsilosis, and to some degree in CAS-NS strains.

  17. Isolation of the MIG1 Gene from Candida albicans and Effects of Its Disruption on Catabolite Repression

    PubMed Central

    Zaragoza, Oscar; Rodríguez, Cristina; Gancedo, Carlos

    2000-01-01

    We have cloned a Candida albicans gene (CaMIG1) that encodes a protein homologous to the DNA-binding protein Mig1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ScMig1). The C. albicans Mig1 protein (CaMig1) differs from ScMig1, in that, among other things, it lacks a putative phosphorylation site for Snf1 and presents several long stretches rich in glutamine or in asparagine, serine, and threonine and has the effector domain located at some distance (50 amino acids) from the carboxy terminus. Expression of CaMIG1 was low and was similar in glucose-, sucrose-, or ethanol-containing media. Disruption of the two CaMIG1 genomic copies had no effect in filamentation or infectivity. Levels of a glucose-repressible α-glucosidase, implicated in both sucrose and maltose utilization, were similar in wild-type or mig1/mig1 cells. Disruption of CaMIG1 had also no effect on the expression of the glucose-repressed gene CaGAL1. CaMIG1 was functional in S. cerevisiae, as judged by its ability to suppress the phenotypes produced by mig1 or tps1 mutations. In addition, CaMig1 formed specific complexes with the URS1 region of the S. cerevisiae FBP1 gene. The existence of a possible functional analogue of CaMIG1 in C. albicans was suggested by the results of band shift experiments. PMID:10629176

  18. Isolation of the MIG1 gene from Candida albicans and effects of its disruption on catabolite repression.

    PubMed

    Zaragoza, O; Rodríguez, C; Gancedo, C

    2000-01-01

    We have cloned a Candida albicans gene (CaMIG1) that encodes a protein homologous to the DNA-binding protein Mig1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ScMig1). The C. albicans Mig1 protein (CaMig1) differs from ScMig1, in that, among other things, it lacks a putative phosphorylation site for Snf1 and presents several long stretches rich in glutamine or in asparagine, serine, and threonine and has the effector domain located at some distance (50 amino acids) from the carboxy terminus. Expression of CaMIG1 was low and was similar in glucose-, sucrose-, or ethanol-containing media. Disruption of the two CaMIG1 genomic copies had no effect in filamentation or infectivity. Levels of a glucose-repressible alpha-glucosidase, implicated in both sucrose and maltose utilization, were similar in wild-type or mig1/mig1 cells. Disruption of CaMIG1 had also no effect on the expression of the glucose-repressed gene CaGAL1. CaMIG1 was functional in S. cerevisiae, as judged by its ability to suppress the phenotypes produced by mig1 or tps1 mutations. In addition, CaMig1 formed specific complexes with the URS1 region of the S. cerevisiae FBP1 gene. The existence of a possible functional analogue of CaMIG1 in C. albicans was suggested by the results of band shift experiments.

  19. Activity of Isavuconazole and Other Azoles against Candida Clinical Isolates and Yeast Model Systems with Known Azole Resistance Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Coste, Alix T.

    2015-01-01

    Isavuconazole is a novel, broad-spectrum, antifungal azole. In order to evaluate its interactions with known azole resistance mechanisms, isavuconazole susceptibility among different yeast models and clinical isolates expressing characterized azole resistance mechanisms was tested and compared to those of fluconazole, itraconazole, posaconazole, and voriconazole. Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing the Candida albicans and C. glabrata ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters (CDR1, CDR2, and CgCDR1), major facilitator (MDR1), and lanosterol 14-α-sterol-demethylase (ERG11) alleles with mutations were used. In addition, pairs of C. albicans and C. glabrata strains from matched clinical isolates with known azole resistance mechanisms were investigated. The expression of ABC transporters increased all azole MICs, suggesting that all azoles tested were substrates of ABC transporters. The expression of MDR1 did not increase posaconazole, itraconazole, and isavuconazole MICs. Relative increases of azole MICs (from 4- to 32-fold) were observed for fluconazole, voriconazole, and isavuconazole when at least two mutations were present in the same ERG11 allele. Upon MIC testing of azoles with clinical C. albicans and C. glabrata isolates with known resistance mechanisms, the MIC90s of C. albicans for fluconazole, voriconazole, itraconazole, posaconazole, and isavuconazole were 128, 2, 1, 0.5, and 2 μg/ml, respectively, while in C. glabrata they were 128, 2, 4, 4, and 16 μg/ml, respectively. In conclusion, the effects of azole resistance mechanisms on isavuconazole did not differ significantly from those of other azoles. Resistance mechanisms in yeasts involving ABC transporters and ERG11 decreased the activity of isavuconazole, while MDR1 had limited effect. PMID:26482310

  20. Comparison of a spectrophotometric microdilution method with RPMI-2% glucose with the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards reference macrodilution method M27-P for in vitro susceptibility testing of amphotericin B, flucytosine, and fluconazole against Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Tudela, J L; Berenguer, J; Martínez-Suárez, J V; Sanchez, R

    1996-01-01

    The National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards has proposed a reference broth macrodilution method for in vitro antifungal susceptibility testing of yeasts (the M27-P method). This method is cumbersome and time-consuming and includes MIC endpoint determination by visual and subjective inspection of growth inhibition after 48 h of incubation. An alternative microdilution procedure was compared with the M27-P method for determination of the amphotericin B, flucytosine, and fluconazole susceptibilities of 8 American Type Culture Collection strains (6 of them were quality control or reference strains) and 50 clinical isolates of candida albicans. This microdilution method uses as culture medium RPMI 1640 supplemented with 18 g of glucose per liter (RPMI-2% glucose). Preparation of drugs, basal medium, and inocula was done by following the recommendations of the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards. The MIC endpoint was calculated objectively from the turbidimetric data read at 24 h. Increased growth of C. albicans in RPMI-2% glucose and its spectrophotometric reading allowed for the rapid (24 h) and objective calculation of MIC endpoints compared with previous microdilution methods with standard RPMI 1640. Nevertheless, good agreement was shown between the M27-P method and this microdilution test. The MICs obtained for the quality control or reference strains by the microdilution method were in the ranges published for those strains. For clinical isolates, the percentages of agreement were 100% for amphotericin B and fluconazole and 98.1% for flucytosine. These data suggest that this microdilution method may serve as a less subjective and more rapid alternative to the M27-P method for antifungal susceptibility testing of yeasts. PMID:8878570

  1. Codetection of Trichomonas vaginalis and Candida albicans by PCR in Urine Samples in a Low-Risk Population Attended in a Clinic First Level in Central Veracruz, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    López-Monteon, A.; Gómez-Figueroa, F. S.; Ramos-Poceros, G.; Guzmán-Gómez, D.; Ramos-Ligonio, A.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to estimate the prevalence of Trichomonas vaginalis and Candida albicans in low-risk patients treated at a first level clinic (primary health care represents the first level of contact of individuals, families, and the community with the system national health). Using a cross-sectional study in patients treated in clinical laboratory of the Sanitary District no. 7 of the city of Orizaba during the months June-July, 252 urine samples were collected for the identification of T. vaginalis and C. albicans by PCR. Furthermore, we analyzed the sociodemographic characteristics of the studied population. We observed an overall prevalence of 23.41% (95% CI 22.10–24.72) for T. vaginalis and 38.88% (95% CI 37.73–40.03) for C. albicans. There was also presence of coinfection in 14.28% (95% CI 13.10–15.46), which was associated with the presence of pain. Most of the positive cases were observed in women house-maker (80%, 95% CI 50.36–48.98). The results of this study provide evidence that the majority of positive cases observed in the studied population are presented in an asymptomatic form and usually are not associated with any risk factor. PMID:24069593

  2. Codetection of Trichomonas vaginalis and Candida albicans by PCR in urine samples in a low-risk population attended in a clinic first level in central Veracruz, Mexico.

    PubMed

    López-Monteon, A; Gómez-Figueroa, F S; Ramos-Poceros, G; Guzmán-Gómez, D; Ramos-Ligonio, A

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to estimate the prevalence of Trichomonas vaginalis and Candida albicans in low-risk patients treated at a first level clinic (primary health care represents the first level of contact of individuals, families, and the community with the system national health). Using a cross-sectional study in patients treated in clinical laboratory of the Sanitary District no. 7 of the city of Orizaba during the months June-July, 252 urine samples were collected for the identification of T. vaginalis and C. albicans by PCR. Furthermore, we analyzed the sociodemographic characteristics of the studied population. We observed an overall prevalence of 23.41% (95% CI 22.10-24.72) for T. vaginalis and 38.88% (95% CI 37.73-40.03) for C. albicans. There was also presence of coinfection in 14.28% (95% CI 13.10-15.46), which was associated with the presence of pain. Most of the positive cases were observed in women house-maker (80%, 95% CI 50.36-48.98). The results of this study provide evidence that the majority of positive cases observed in the studied population are presented in an asymptomatic form and usually are not associated with any risk factor.

  3. Prevalence and Fluconazole Susceptibility Profile of Candida spp. Clinical Isolates in a Brazilian Tertiary Hospital in Minas Gerais, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Neves-Junior, Athayde; Cartágenes-Pinto, Ana Carolina; Rocha, Débora A S; de Sá, Leandro F Reis; Junqueira, Maria de Lourdes; Ferreira-Pereira, Antonio

    2015-08-01

    Candidiasis has become an important concern for clinical practice, especially with the increasing incidence of immunocompromised patients. In this scenario, the development resistance to fluconazole presents a challenge for treating these opportunistic infections. The aim of this study was to evaluate some epidemiology features of Candida infections in a Brazilian University Hospital using data, previously unavailable. We observed that 44% of the 93 clinical isolates tested, belonged to Candida albicans species and 56% belonged to non-Candida albicans species (mainly Candida tropicalis and Candida glabrata). Most strains were isolated from urine samples where C. albicans was predominantly detected. 29 strains presented a fluconazole resistance phenotype and of these, 22 were chemosensitised by FK506, a classical inhibitor of ABC transporters related to azoles resistance. These data suggest the probable role of efflux pumps in this resistance phenotype. Our study highlights the need for developing effective control measures for fungal infections, rational use of antifungal drugs and development of new molecules able to abrogate the active transport of antifungals.

  4. Ocimum sanctum essential oil inhibits virulence attributes in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Khan, Amber; Ahmad, Aijaz; Xess, Immaculata; Khan, Luqman A; Manzoor, Nikhat

    2014-03-15

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic human fungal pathogen which causes disease mainly in immunocompromised patients. Activity of hydrolytic enzymes is essential for virulence of C. albicans and so is the capacity of these cells to undergo transition from yeast to mycelial form of growth. Ocimum sanctum is cultivated worldwide for its essential oil which exhibits medicinal properties. This work evaluates the anti-virulence activity of O. sanctum essential oil (OSEO) on 22 strains of C. albicans (including a standard strain ATCC 90028) isolated from both HIV positive and HIV negative patients. Candida isolates were exposed to sub-MICs of OSEO. In vitro secretion of proteinases and phospholipases was evaluated by plate assay containing BSA and egg yolk respectively. Morphological transition from yeast to filamentous form was monitored microscopically in LSM. For genetic analysis, respective genes associated with morphological transition (HWP1), proteinase (SAP1) and phospholipase (PLB2) were also investigated by Real Time PCR (qRT-PCR). Results were analyzed using Student's t-test. OSEO inhibits morphological transition in C. albicans and had a significant inhibitory effect on extracellular secretion of proteinases and phospholipases. Expression profile of respective selected genes associated with C. albicans virulence by qRT-PCR showed a reduced expression of HWP1, SAP1 and PLB2 genes in cells treated with sub-inhibitory concentrations of OSEO. This work suggests that OSEO inhibits morphological transition in C. albicans and decreases the secretion of hydrolytic enzymes involved in the early stage of infection as well as down regulates the associated genes. Further studies will assess the clinical application of OSEO and its constituents in the treatment of fungal infections. PMID:24252340

  5. Rapid detection and identification of Candida albicans and Torulopsis (Candida) glabrata in clinical specimens by species-specific nested PCR amplification of a cytochrome P-450 lanosterol-alpha-demethylase (L1A1) gene fragment.

    PubMed

    Burgener-Kairuz, P; Zuber, J P; Jaunin, P; Buchman, T G; Bille, J; Rossier, M

    1994-08-01

    PCR of a Candida albicans cytochrome P-450 lanosterol-alpha-demethylase (P450-L1A1) gene segment is a rapid and sensitive method of detection in clinical specimens. This enzyme is a target for azole antifungal action. In order to directly detect and identify the clinically most important species of Candida, we cloned and sequenced 1.3-kbp fragments of the cytochrome P450-L1A1 genes from Torulopsis (Candida) glabrata and from Candida krusei. These segments were compared with the published sequences from C. albicans and Candida tropicalis. Amplimers for gene sequences highly conserved throughout the fungal kingdom were first used; positive PCR results were obtained for C. albicans, T. glabrata, C. krusei, Candida parapsilosis, C. tropicalis, Cryptococcus neoformans, and Trichosporon beigelii DNA extracts. Primers were then selected for a highly variable region of the gene, allowing the species-specific detection from purified DNA of C. albicans, T. glabrata, C. krusei, and C. tropicalis. The assay sensitivity as tested for C. albicans in seeded clinical specimens such as blood, peritoneal fluid, or urine was 10 to 20 cells per 0.1 ml. Compared with results obtained by culture, the sensitivity, specificity, and efficiency of the species-specific nested PCR tested with 80 clinical specimens were 71, 95, and 83% for C. albicans and 100, 97, and 98% for T. glabrata, respectively.

  6. Activity of 2,4-Di-tert-butylphenol produced by a strain of Streptomyces mutabilis isolated from a Saharan soil against Candida albicans and other pathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Belghit, S; Driche, E H; Bijani, C; Zitouni, A; Sabaou, N; Badji, B; Mathieu, F

    2016-06-01

    In a search for new antifungal antibiotics active against Candida albicans and others pathogenic fungi, a strain of actinobacteria, designated G61, was isolated from a Saharan soil and tested for its activity against these microorganisms. The analysis of its 16S rDNA sequence showed a similarity level of 100% with Streptomyces mutabilis NBRC 12800(T). The highest anticandidal activities produced by the strain G61 were obtained on Bennett medium in the fourth day of incubation. The active product, extracted by n-butanol, contained one bioactive spot detected on thin layer chromatography plates. It was purified by HPLC and its chemical structure was determined by spectroscopic analyses as 2,4-Di-tert-butylphenol. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of this product against several strains of pathogenic microorganisms are interesting. PMID:27107984

  7. Assessing the potential of four cathelicidins for the management of mouse candidiasis and Candida albicans biofilms.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haining; Liu, Xuelian; Wang, Chen; Qiao, Xue; Wu, Sijin; Wang, Hui; Feng, Lan; Wang, Yipeng

    2016-02-01

    As the most common fungal pathogen of humans, severe drug resistance has emerged in the clinically isolated Candida albicans, which lead to the urgency to develop novel antifungal agents. Here, four our previously characterized cathelicidins (cathelicidin-BF, Pc-CATH1, Cc-CATH2, Cc-CATH3) were selected and their antifungal activities against C. albicans were evaluated in vitro and in vivo using amphotericin B and LL-37 as control. Results showed that all four cathelicidins could eradicate standard and clinically isolated C. albicans strains with most MIC values ranging from 1 to 16 μg/ml, in less than 0.5 h revealed by time-kill kinetic assay. Four peptides only exhibited slight hemolytic activity with most HC50 > 200 μg/ml, and retained potent anti-C. albicans activity at salt concentrations below and beyond physiological level. In animal experiment, 50 mg/kg administration of the four cathelicidins could significantly reduce the fungal counts in a murine oral candidiasis model induced by clinically isolated C. albicans. The antibiofilm activity of cathelicidin-BF, the most potent among the five peptides was evaluated, and result showed that cathelicidin-BF strongly inhibited C. albicans biofilm formation at 20 μg/ml. Furthermore, cathelicidin-BF also exhibited potent anti-C. albicans activity in established biofilms as measured by metabolic and fluorescent viability assays. Structure-function analyses suggest that they mainly adopt an α-helical conformations, which enable them to act as a membrane-active molecule. Altogether, the four cathelicidins display great potential for antifungal agent development against candidiasis. PMID:26656137

  8. Etiological significance of Candida albicans in otitis externa.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, Vijay J; Pal, M; Mishra, G S

    2003-01-01

    A study covering 79 patients (42 males, 37 females) of different age groups clinically diagnosed as otomycosis were investigated mycologically to elucidate the role of Candia albicans, an opportunistic polymorphic yeast, in otitis externa. C. albicans was diagnosed as the sole pathogen in two patients (1 male and 1 female) aged 18 and 20 years, respectively. The organism was repeatedly demonstrated in the aural specimens both by direct microscopy as well as culture isolation. Both the patients had unilateral otomycosis and used antibiotic solution and removed wax with wooden stick. The topical application of one per cent clotrimazole lotion showed good response both clinically as well as mycologically. The growing significance of opportunistic fungi emphasizes on comprehensive studies to establish the etiologic role in various clinical disorders in human and animal medicine.

  9. Comparative Susceptibility of Candida albicans to Amphotericin B and Amphotericin B Methyl Ester

    PubMed Central

    Bannatyne, Robert M.; Cheung, Rose

    1977-01-01

    The in vitro antifungal activities of amphotericin B (AMB) and amphotericin B methyl ester (AME) were compared against 465 clinical isolates of Candida albicans. AMB and AME possessed comparable activity against half of the strains, but against the remainder of the strains the activity of AME was slightly lower than that of AMB. Rarely did AME show superior antifungal activity to AMB. PMID:335958

  10. Acid production by oral strains of Candida albicans and lactobacilli.

    PubMed

    Klinke, T; Kneist, S; de Soet, J J; Kuhlisch, E; Mauersberger, S; Forster, A; Klimm, W

    2009-01-01

    Both Candida albicans and lactobacilli are common colonizers of carious lesions in children and adolescents. The purpose of this study is to compare the velocity of acid production between C. albicans and several Lactobacillus species at different pH levels and concentrations of glucose. Washed, pure resting-cell suspensions were obtained by culturing a total of 28 oral isolates comprising the species C. albicans, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Lactobacillus paracasei paracasei, Lactobacillus paracasei tolerans and Lactobacillus delbrueckii lactis. Acid production from glucose was determined at a constant pH of 7.0, 5.5, 5.0 and 4.0 by repeated titrations with NaOH in an automated pH-stat system. Acid formation rates of yeast and lactobacilli proved to be similar at both neutral and low pH, while in a moderately acidic environment C. albicans produced less acid than the lactobacilli. Ion chromatographic analysis of the cell-free medium after titration revealed pyruvate to be the predominant organic acid anion secreted by C. albicans. The proportion of organic acids to overall acid production by the yeast was below 10% at neutral conditions, in contrast to 42-66% at pH 4.0. Compared to lactobacilli, yeast required a concentration of glucose that was about 50 times higher to allow acid production at half the maximum speed. Considering the clinical data in the literature about the frequency and proportions of microorganisms present in early childhood caries lesions, the contribution of oral lactobacilli as well as C. albicans to overall microbial acid formation appears to be important. PMID:19246906

  11. Acid production by oral strains of Candida albicans and lactobacilli.

    PubMed

    Klinke, T; Kneist, S; de Soet, J J; Kuhlisch, E; Mauersberger, S; Forster, A; Klimm, W

    2009-01-01

    Both Candida albicans and lactobacilli are common colonizers of carious lesions in children and adolescents. The purpose of this study is to compare the velocity of acid production between C. albicans and several Lactobacillus species at different pH levels and concentrations of glucose. Washed, pure resting-cell suspensions were obtained by culturing a total of 28 oral isolates comprising the species C. albicans, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Lactobacillus paracasei paracasei, Lactobacillus paracasei tolerans and Lactobacillus delbrueckii lactis. Acid production from glucose was determined at a constant pH of 7.0, 5.5, 5.0 and 4.0 by repeated titrations with NaOH in an automated pH-stat system. Acid formation rates of yeast and lactobacilli proved to be similar at both neutral and low pH, while in a moderately acidic environment C. albicans produced less acid than the lactobacilli. Ion chromatographic analysis of the cell-free medium after titration revealed pyruvate to be the predominant organic acid anion secreted by C. albicans. The proportion of organic acids to overall acid production by the yeast was below 10% at neutral conditions, in contrast to 42-66% at pH 4.0. Compared to lactobacilli, yeast required a concentration of glucose that was about 50 times higher to allow acid production at half the maximum speed. Considering the clinical data in the literature about the frequency and proportions of microorganisms present in early childhood caries lesions, the contribution of oral lactobacilli as well as C. albicans to overall microbial acid formation appears to be important.

  12. Potent antifungal activity of extracts and pure compound isolated from pomegranate peels and synergism with fluconazole against Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Endo, Eliana Harue; Cortez, Diógenes Aparício Garcia; Ueda-Nakamura, Tânia; Nakamura, Celso Vataru; Dias Filho, Benedito Prado

    2010-09-01

    Activity-guided repeated fractionation of crude hydro alcoholic extract prepared from the fruit peel of Punica granatum on a silica-gel column yielded a compound that exhibited strong antifungal activity against Candida spp. Based on spectral analyses, the compound was identified as punicalagin. Punicalagin showed strong activity against Candida albicans and Candida parapsilosis, with MICs of 3.9 and 1.9 microg/ml, respectively. The combination of punicalagin and fluconazole showed a synergistic interaction. MIC for fluconazole decreased twofold when combined with the extract. The FIC index was 0.25. The synergism observed in disk-diffusion and checkerboard assays was confirmed in time-kill curves. The effect of punicalagin on the morphology and ultrastructure in treated yeast cells was examined by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. An irregular budding pattern and pseudohyphae were seen in treated yeasts. By transmission electron microscopy, treated cells showed a thickened cell wall, changes in the space between cell wall and the plasma membrane, vacuoles, and a reduction in cytoplasmic content. Since the punicalagin concentration effective in vitro is achievable in vivo, the combination of this agent with fluconazole represents an attractive prospect for the development of new management strategies for candidiasis, and should be investigated further in in vivo models. PMID:20541606

  13. Investigation of minor species Candida africana, Candida stellatoidea and Candida dubliniensis in the Candida albicans complex among Yaoundé (Cameroon) HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Ngouana, Thierry K; Krasteva, Donika; Drakulovski, Pascal; Toghueo, Rufin K; Kouanfack, Charles; Ambe, Akaba; Reynes, Jacques; Delaporte, Eric; Boyom, Fabrice F; Mallié, Michèle; Bertout, Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    Minor species of the Candida albicans complex may cause overestimation of the epidemiology of C. albicans, and misidentifications could mask their implication in human pathology. Authors determined the occurrence of minor species of the C. albicans complex (C. africana, C. dubliniensis and C. stellatoidea) among Yaoundé HIV-infected patients, Cameroon. Stool, vaginal discharge, urine and oropharyngeal samples were analysed by mycological diagnosis. Isolates were identified by conventional methods and mass spectrometry (MS; carried out by the matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionisation time-of-flight MS protocol). Candida albicans isolates were thereafter submitted to the PCR amplification of the Hwp1 gene. The susceptibility of isolates to antifungal drugs was tested using the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute M27-A3 protocol. From 115 C. albicans obtained isolates, neither C. dubliniensis nor C. stellatoidea was observed; two strains of C. africana (422PV and 448PV) were identified by PCR electrophoretic profiles at 700 bp. These two C. africana strains were vaginal isolates. The isolate 448PV was resistant to ketoconazole at the minimal inhibitory concentration of 2 μg ml(-1), and showed reduced susceptibility to amphotericin B at 1 μg ml(-1). This first report on C. africana occurrence in Cameroon brings clues for the understanding of the global epidemiology of this yeast as well as that of minor species of the C. albicans complex.

  14. The isolation of Candida rugosa and Candida mesorugosa from clinical samples in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Adjapong, Gloria; Bartlett, Michael; Hale, Marie; Garrill, Ashley

    2016-03-01

    Members of the Candida rugosa species complex have been described as emerging fungal pathogens and are responsible for a growing number of Candida infections. In this communication we report the isolation of Candida rugosa and Candida mesorugosa in Ghana. To the best of our knowledge this is the first description of this species complex from a clinical setting in Africa.The isolates were identified on the basis of their rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences. For one isolate, obtained from sputum, the sequence grouped well with that of C. rugosa. Two other isolates from urine had sequences that grouped with Candida mesorugosa. Morphologically, C. rugosa formed white, wrinkled, and flat colonies on Sabouraud Dextrose Agar (SDA), whereas C. mesorugosa formed white, smooth colonies. On chromogenic medium, the isolates formed small, dry greenish-blue colonies with a pale or white border, similar to C. albicans. The C. rugosa isolate produced pseudohyphae in human serum and on CMA-Tween 80 agar. In contrast, the C. mesorugosa isolates did not generate pseudohyphae in human serum, but generated a few pseudohyphae with abundant blastoconidia on CMA-Tween 80 agar. Growth was observed at 37 °C and 42 °C but not at 45 °C.The two C. mesorugosa isolates had Minimum Inhibitory Concentrations (MICs) of 6 and 48 μg ml(-1) for fluconazole and are thus resistant. The C. rugosa isolate had an MIC of 24 μg ml(-1), indicative of resistance. All three isolates were susceptible to itraconazole and voriconazole (with respective MICs of < 0.125 μg ml(-1)).

  15. Candidiasis in Pediatrics; Identification and In vitro Antifungal Susceptibility of the Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, R; Ataei, B

    2016-01-01

    Background Candida species are normal microflora of oral cavity, vagina, and gastrointestinal tract. They are the third most prevalent cause of pediatric health care–associated bloodstream fungal infection. This study aimed to provide an epidemiological feature of candidiasis and also presents an antifungal susceptibility profile of clinical Candida isolates among children. Materials and Methods During July 2013 to February 2015, 105 patients from different hospitals of Isfahan, Iran, were examined for candidiasis by phenotypic tests. Samples were obtained from nail clippings, blood, thrush, BAL, urine, oropharynx, skin, and eye discharge. The age range of patients was between 18 days to 16 years. Genomic DNA of isolates was extracted and ITS1-5.8SrDNA-ITS2 region was amplified by ITS1 and ITS2 primers. The PCR products were digested using the restriction enzyme MspI. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MICs) was determined using microdilution broth method according to the clinical and laboratory standards institute (CLSI) M27-A3 and M27-S4 documents. Results Forty-three patients (40.9%) had Candida infection.The most clinical strains were isolated from nail infections (39.5%), and candidemia (13.9%). Candida albicans was the most prevalent species (46.5%). MICs ranges for amphotericin B, fluconazole, and itraconazole were (0.025-0.75 µg/ml), (0.125-16 µg/ml), and (0.094-2 µg/ml), respectively. Conclusion Due to high incidence of Candida infections among children, increasing of fatal infection like candidemia, and emersion of antifungal resistance Candida isolates, early and precise identification of the Candida species and determination of antifungal susceptibility patterns of clinical isolates may lead to better management of the infection. PMID:27222702

  16. Phenotypic diversity and correlation between white-opaque switching and the CAI microsatellite locus in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jian; Guan, Guobo; Dai, Yu; Tao, Li; Zhang, Jianzhong; Li, Houmin; Huang, Guanghua

    2016-08-01

    Candida albicans is a commensal fungal pathogen that is often found as part of the human microbial flora. The aim of the present study was to establish a relationship between diverse genotypes and phenotypes of clinical isolates of C. albicans. Totally 231 clinical isolates were collected and used for genotyping and phenotypic switching analysis. Based on the microsatellite locus (CAI) genotyping assay, 65 different genotypes were identified, and some dominant types were found in certain human niches. For example, the genotypes of 30-44 and 30-45 were enriched in vaginal infection samples. C. albicans has a number of morphological forms including the single-celled yeasts, multicellular filaments, white, and opaque cell types. The relationship between the CAI genotype and the ability to undergo phenotypic switching was examined in the clinical isolates. We found that the strains with longer CAA/G repeats in both alleles of the CAI locus were more opaque competent. We also discovered that some MTL heterozygous (a/alpha) isolates could undergo white-opaque switching when grown on regular culture medium (containing glucose as the sole carbon source). Our study establishes a link between phenotypic switching and genotypes of the CAI microsatellite locus in clinical isolates of C. albicans. PMID:26832141

  17. Effectiveness of Hexetidine 0.1% Compared to Chlorhexidine Digluconate 0.12% in Eliminating Candida Albicans Colonizing Dentures: A Randomized Clinical In Vivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Aoun, Georges; Saadeh, Maria; Berberi, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    Background: Denture hygiene is an important factor in the prevention and treatment of denture stomatitis (DS). This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of two different mouthwashes (chlorhexidine digluconate 0.12% and hexetidine 0.1%) in eliminating Candida albicans on dentures. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 denture wearers (20 men, 40 women; age range 40-80 years) with clinical evidence of DS were randomly divided into 2 test groups and 1 control group. The dentures of each test group were treated by immersion in one of the two mouthwashes while those of the control group were immersed in distilled water. Swab samples from the palatal surfaces of the upper dentures were collected before and after of cleaner use and examined mycologically. Results: Reduction in the number of colony-forming units of Candida albicans after immersion of the dentures with chlorhexidine digluconate 0.12% was significantly greater than that of the group using hexetidine 0.1% and those of the control group. Conclusion: Hexetidine 0.1% solution tested for the first time as a product of disinfection of the acrylic dentures showed average results after immersion of 8 night hours for 4 days and was less effective than chlorhexidine digluconate 0.12%. PMID:26464531

  18. Polymicrobial biofilms by diabetic foot clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Mottola, Carla; Mendes, João J; Cristino, José Melo; Cavaco-Silva, Patrícia; Tavares, Luís; Oliveira, Manuela

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a major chronic disease that continues to increase significantly. One of the most important and costly complications of diabetes is foot ulceration that may be colonized by pathogenic and antimicrobial resistant bacteria, which may express several virulence factors that could impair treatment success. These bacterial communities can be organized in polymicrobial biofilms, which may be responsible for diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) chronicity. We evaluated the influence of polymicrobial communities in the ability of DFU isolates to produce biofilm, using a microtiter plate assay and a multiplex fluorescent in situ hybridization, at three time points (24, 48, 72 h), after evaluating biofilm formation by 95 DFU isolates belonging to several bacterial genera (Staphylococcus, Corynebacterium, Enterococcus, Pseudomonas and Acinetobacter). All isolates were biofilm-positive at 24 h, and the amount of biofilm produced increased with incubation time. Pseudomonas presented the higher biofilm production, followed by Corynebacterium, Acinetobacter, Staphylococcus and Enterococcus. Significant differences were found in biofilm formation between the three time points. Polymicrobial communities produced higher biofilm values than individual species. Pseudomonas + Enterococcus, Acinetobacter + Staphylococcus and Corynebacterium + Staphylococcus produced higher biofilm than the ones formed by E. faecalis + Staphylococcus and E. faecalis + Corynebacterium. Synergy between bacteria present in dual or multispecies biofilms has been described, and this work represents the first report on time course of biofilm formation by polymicrobial communities from DFUs including several species. The biological behavior of different bacterial species in polymicrobial biofilms has important clinical implications for the successful treatment of these infections.

  19. Nuclear fusion occurs during mating in Candida albicans and is dependent on the KAR3 gene.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Richard J; Miller, Mathew G; Chua, Penelope R; Maxon, Mary E; Johnson, Alexander D

    2005-02-01

    It is now well established that mating can occur between diploid a and alpha cells of Candida albicans. There is, however, controversy over when, and with what efficiency, nuclear fusion follows cell fusion to create stable tetraploid a/alpha cells. In this study, we have analysed the mating process between C. albicans strains using both cytological and genetic approaches. Using strains derived from SC5314, we used a number of techniques, including time-lapse microscopy, to demonstrate that efficient nuclear fusion occurs in the zygote before formation of the first daughter cell. Consistent with these observations, zygotes micromanipulated from mating mixes gave rise to mononuclear tetraploid cells, even when no selection for successful mating was applied to them. Mating between different clinical isolates of C. albicans revealed that while all isolates could undergo nuclear fusion, the efficiency of nuclear fusion varied in different crosses. We also show that nuclear fusion in C. albicans requires the Kar3 microtubule motor protein. Deletion of the CaKAR3 gene from both mating partners had little or no effect on zygote formation but reduced the formation of stable tetraploids more than 600-fold, as determined by quantitative mating assays. These findings demonstrate that nuclear fusion is an active process that can occur in C. albicans at high frequency to produce stable, mononucleate mating products.

  20. Differential Gene Expression of Heat Shock Protein 90 (Hsp90) of Candida albicans obtained from Malaysian and Iranian Patients

    PubMed Central

    Khalili, Vajihe; Shokri, Hojjatollah; Md Akim, Abdah; Khosravi, Ali Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background Candida albicans (C. albicans) has several virulence factors, in particular heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90), which is expressed by Hsp90 gene. The purposes of this study were to assess the expression of Hsp90 gene in clinical and control isolates of C. albicans obtained from different geographical regions (Malaysia and Iran), different temperatures (25°C, 37°C and 42°C) and mice with candidiasis. Methods C. albicans isolates were cultured onto sabouraud dextrose agar (SDA). The assessment of the expression of Hsp90 gene was performed using real time-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results The results showed a significant increase in the expression of C. albicans Hsp90 gene under high thermal shock (42°C) when compared to other temperatures tested (P-value = 0.001). The mean differences in the expression of Hsp90 gene at 37°C were 0.20 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.13–0.29) between Malaysian and Iranian controls (P-value = 0.040) and 0.47 (95% CI 0.27–0.60) between Malaysian and Iranian patients (P-value = 0.040). Conclusion The results demonstrated that the expression of C. albicans Hsp90 gene varied between Malaysian and Iranian subjects, representing the efficacy of geographical and thermal conditions on virulence gene expression. PMID:27418871

  1. Multilocus sequence typing for the analysis of clonality among Candida albicans strains from a neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Song, Eun Song; Shin, Jong Hee; Jang, Hee-Chang; Choi, Min Ji; Kim, Soo Hyun; Bougnoux, Marie-Elisabeth; d'Enfert, Christophe; Choi, Young Youn

    2014-08-01

    Nosocomial Candida albicans infections are a significant problem in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). We investigated the clonality of C. albicans isolates recovered over an 8-year period from neonates at a NICU. We also validated multilocus sequence typing (MLST) compared with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) for the genotyping of C. albicans strains from the same NICU. A total of 43 clinical isolates (10 blood, 19 urine, and 14 other) were obtained from 43 neonates between 2005 and 2012. Clonal strains were defined as the isolation of two or more strains with identical or similar genotypes as determined with both MLST and PFGE. Using MLST, the 43 isolates yielded 25 diploid sequence types (DSTs) and 10 DSTs were shared by 28 isolates (65.1%). Among the 28 isolates sharing 10 DSTs, isolates from each of seven DSTs had the same or similar PFGE pattern. In addition, two sets of isolates that differed by MLST at only one locus had the same or similar PFGE pattern. Overall, when the MLST and PFGE results were combined, 22 isolates (51.2%) shared eight genotypes, suggesting clonal strains. Strains from each of seven genotypes (total, 19 isolates) were isolated among the 22 clonal strains within a 6-month period, whereas three strains of one genotype were obtained over a 3-year interval. Our findings suggest that horizontal transmission of C. albicans may occur more frequently than vertical transmission among NICU patients and that MLST appears to be a useful method for genotyping C. albicans strains isolated from NICU patients.

  2. Genetic relatedness of Trichomonas vaginalis reference and clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Cornelius, Denise C; Mena, Leandro; Lushbaugh, William B; Meade, John C

    2010-12-01

    We have determined the metronidazole susceptibility status of 20 Trichomonas vaginalis isolates from American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) and assessed the level of genetic relatedness in these isolates using 32 additional T. vaginalis clinical isolates for comparison. These ATCC isolates are commonly used as reference strains in T. vaginalis research and this information provides a rational basis for selection of reference strains for use in comparative studies of T. vaginalis phenotypic and clinical characteristics. PMID:21118935

  3. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and Bayesian phylogenetic analysis to characterize Candida clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Angeletti, Silvia; Lo Presti, Alessandra; Cella, Eleonora; Dicuonzo, Giordano; Crea, Francesca; Palazzotti, Bernardetta; Dedej, Etleva; Ciccozzi, Massimo; De Florio, Lucia

    2015-12-01

    Clinical Candida isolates from two different hospitals in Rome were identified and clustered by MALDI-TOF MS system and their origin and evolution estimated by Bayesian phylogenetic analysis. The different species of Candida were correctly identified and clustered separately, confirming the ability of these techniques to discriminate between different Candida species. Focusing MALDI-TOF analysis on a single Candida species, Candida albicans and Candida parapsilosis strains clustered differently for hospital setting as well as for period of isolation than Candida glabrata and Candida tropicalis isolates. The evolutionary rates of C. albicans and C. parapsilosis (1.93×10(-2) and 1.17×10(-2)substitutions/site/year, respectively) were in agreement with a higher rate of mutation of these species, even in a narrow period, than what was observed in C. glabrata and C. tropicalis strains (6.99×10(-4) and 7.52×10(-3)substitutions/site/year, respectively). C. albicans resulted as the species with the highest between and within clades genetic distance values in agreement with the temporal-related clustering found by MALDI-TOF and the high evolutionary rate 1.93×10(-2)substitutions/site/year.

  4. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry for rapid identification of clinical fungal isolates based on ribosomal protein biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Panda, Ashutosh; Ghosh, Anup K; Mirdha, Bijay R; Xess, Immaculata; Paul, Saikat; Samantaray, Jyotish C; Srinivasan, Alagiri; Khalil, Shehla; Rastogi, Neha; Dabas, Yubhisha

    2015-02-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the identification of clinical fungal isolates (yeast and molds) by protein profiling using Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS). A total of 125 clinical fungal culture isolates (yeast and filamentous fungi) were collected. The test set included 88 yeast isolates (Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida guilliermondii, Candida kefyr, Candida krusei, Candida parapsilosis, Candida rugosa, Candida tropicalis and Cryptococcus neoformans) and 37 isolates of molds (Alternaria spp., Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus niger, Cunninghamella spp., Histoplasma capsulatum, Microsporum gypseum, Microsporum nanum, Rhizomucor spp. and Trichophyton spp.). The correlation between MALDI TOF MS and conventional identification for all these 125 fungal isolates included in the study was 87.2% at the species level and 90.4% at the genus level. MALDI TOF MS results revealed that the correlation in yeast (n=88) identification was 100% both at the genus and species levels whereas, the correlation in mold (n=37) identification was more heterogeneous i.e. 10.81% isolates had correct identification up to the genus level, 56.7% isolates had correct identification both at the genus and species levels, whereas 32.42% isolates were deemed Not Reliable Identification (NRI). But, with the modification in sample preparation protocol for molds, there was a significant improvement in identification. 86.4% isolates had correct identification till the genus and species levels whereas, only 2.7% isolates had Not Reliable Identification. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that MALDI-TOF MS could be a possible alternative to conventional techniques both for the identification and differentiation of clinical fungal isolates. However, the main limitation of this technique is that MS identification could be more precise only if the reference spectrum of the fungal species is available in the

  5. Population Structure of Candida albicans from Three Teaching Hospitals in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Adjapong, Gloria; Hale, Marie; Garrill, Ashley

    2016-02-01

    Previous studies on Candida species in a clinical setting in Ghana have shown a prevalence of Candida albicans. Despite this, very little is known about the various strain types and their population genetic structure. In this study three microsatellite loci, CAI, CAIII and CAVI, were used to investigate the population genetic structure of C. albicans from clinical isolates in Ghana. In all, 240 clinically unrelated C. albicans isolates were recovered from patients reporting at three teaching hospitals. All the isolates were heterozygous for at least one of the three loci, except for one isolate, which was homozygous for all three loci. Sixty-seven unique alleles and 240 different genotypes were generated by the three polymorphic microsatellite loci, resulting in a very high discriminatory potential of approximately 0.98. There was no significant difference in allele frequencies from the small number of anatomical sites sampled, regardless of the host conditions although high genotypic diversities were observed among the isolates. There was evidence for clonal reproduction, including over-expression of observed heterozygotes across the populations. The populations deviated significantly from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and pair-wise genotypic linkage disequilibria comparisons across the three loci were significant, also suggesting a clonal population. The overall Wright FIS for the three loci was negative, and the overall FST value was not significantly different from zero for the three loci analyzed, indicating a clonal and homogeneous population across the three sampling locations from Ghana.

  6. First Draft Genome Sequence of a Mycobacterium gordonae Clinical Isolate

    PubMed Central

    Smirnova, T.; Blagodatskikh, K.; Varlamov, D.; Sochivko, D.; Larionova, E.; Andreevskaya, S.; Andrievskaya, I.; Chernousova, L.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the first draft genome sequence of the clinically relevant species Mycobacterium gordonae. The clinical isolate Mycobacterium gordonae 14-8773 was obtained from the sputum of a patient with mycobacteriosis. PMID:27365356

  7. First Draft Genome Sequence of a Mycobacterium gordonae Clinical Isolate.

    PubMed

    Ustinova, V; Smirnova, T; Blagodatskikh, K; Varlamov, D; Sochivko, D; Larionova, E; Andreevskaya, S; Andrievskaya, I; Chernousova, L

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the first draft genome sequence of the clinically relevant species Mycobacterium gordonae The clinical isolate Mycobacterium gordonae 14-8773 was obtained from the sputum of a patient with mycobacteriosis. PMID:27365356

  8. Diversity and antifungal susceptibility of Norwegian Candida glabrata clinical isolates

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Kari-Mette; Kristoffersen, Anne Karin; Ingebretsen, André; Vikholt, Katharina Johnsen; Örtengren, Ulf Thore; Olsen, Ingar; Enersen, Morten; Gaustad, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background Increasing numbers of immunocompromised patients have resulted in greater incidence of invasive fungal infections with high mortality. Candida albicans infections dominate, but during the last decade, Candida glabrata has become the second highest cause of candidemia in the United States and Northern Europe. Reliable and early diagnosis, together with appropriate choice of antifungal treatment, is needed to combat these challenging infections. Objectives To confirm the identity of 183 Candida glabrata isolates from different human body sites using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) and VITEK®2, and to analyze isolate protein profiles and antifungal susceptibility. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of seven antifungal drugs was determined for the isolates to elucidate susceptibility. Design A total of 183 C. glabrata isolates obtained between 2002 and 2012 from Norwegian health-care units were analyzed. For species verification and differentiation, biochemical characterization (VITEK®2) and mass spectrometry (MALDI–TOF) were used. MIC determination for seven antifungal drugs was undertaken using E-tests®. Results Using VITEK®2, 92.9% of isolates were identified as C. glabrata, while all isolates (100%) were identified as C. glabrata using MALDI-TOF. Variation in protein spectra occurred for all identified C. glabrata isolates. The majority of isolates had low MICs to amphotericin B (≤1 mg/L for 99.5%) and anidulafungin (≤0.06 mg/L for 98.9%). For fluconazole, 18% of isolates had MICs >32 mg/L and 82% had MICs in the range ≥0.016 mg/L to ≤32 mg/L. Conclusions Protein profiles and antifungal susceptibility characteristics of the C. glabrata isolates were diverse. Clustering of protein profiles indicated that many azole resistant isolates were closely related. In most cases, isolates had highest susceptibility to amphotericin B and anidulafungin. The results confirmed previous observations of high

  9. Epidemiology and Changes in Patient-Related Factors from 1997 to 2009 in Clinical Yeast Isolates Related to Dermatology, Gynaecology, and Paediatrics

    PubMed Central

    Czaika, Viktor; Nenoff, Pietro; Glöckner, Andreas; Fegeler, Wolfgang; Schmalreck, Arno F.

    2013-01-01

    From 1997 to 2009, 1,862 dermatology, gynaecology, and paediatrics (DGP) associated clinical yeast isolates were analysed for species occurrence, specimen origin and type, (multi-) resistance pattern, and testing period. The top seven of the isolated DGP-associated species remained the same as compared to total medical wards, with Candida albicans (45%) as most frequent pathogen. However, the DGP wards and DGP ICUs showed species-specific profiles; that is, the species distribution is clinic-specific similar and however differs in their percentage from ward to ward. By applying the “one fungus one name” principle, respectively, the appropriate current taxonomic species denominations, it has been shown that no trend to emerging species from 1998 to 2008 could be detected. In particular the frequently isolated non-Candida albicans species isolated in the DGP departments have already been detected in or before 1997. As yeasts are part of the cutaneous microbiota and play an important role as opportunistic pathogens for superficial infections, proper identification of the isolates according to the new nomenclature deems to be essential for specific and calculated antifungal therapy for yeast-like DGP-related infectious agents. PMID:24391669

  10. Genetic relatedness of commensal strains of Candida albicans carried in the oral cavity of patients' dental prosthesis users in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Pires-Gonçalves, Regina Helena; Miranda, Elaine Toscano; Baeza, Lilian Cristiane; Matsumoto, Marcelo Teruyuki; Zaia, José Eduardo; Mendes-Giannini, Maria José Soares

    2007-12-01

    The aim of this study is to describe the degree of yeast-colonization in diabetic and hemodialysed-users of dental prostheses. Individuals (306) were examined using an oral rinse technique in order to evaluate the incidence of yeast-carriage, and genotype of C. albicans. Yeasts were isolated from 68.4% (91/133) individual's dental prostheses users. Dental prostheses were found to be a significant factor for the yeast colonization (P < 0.05). Overall, the intensity of carriage was higher in diabetic patients as compared with health and hemodialysed individuals (P < 0.05). The isolation rates were: C. albicans (51.7%), C. parapsilosis (20.9%), C. tropicalis (14.3%), C. glabrata (6.6%), C. krusei (3.3%), C. rugosa (1.1%), and Pichia (Pichia ohmeri, 2.2%). Ready-To-Go RAPD Analysis Beads were used and primer OPJ 6 distinguished the C. albicans isolates found in prostheses users. All the isolates were grouped into 11 RAPD profiles in four main clusters and, the average S (AB) for the entire collection of 47 C. albicans isolates were 0.779 +/- 0.178. Over 85% of isolates had a similarity level higher than or equal to 0.8 reinforcing the idea that the use of dental prostheses, independently of the host's clinical condition, probably provides the necessary conditions for these strains to gain a growth-specific advantage over others.

  11. A novel renal epithelial cell in vitro assay to assess Candida albicans virulence

    PubMed Central

    Szabo, Edina K; MacCallum, Donna M

    2014-01-01

    Candida albicans, an opportunistic fungal pathogen, can cause severe systemic infections in susceptible patient groups. Systemic candidiasis is mainly studied in the mouse intravenous challenge model, where progressive infection correlates with increased early renal chemokine levels. To develop a new in vitro assay to assess C. albicans virulence, which reflects the events occurring in the murine infection model, renal M-1 cortical collecting duct epithelial cells were evaluated as the early producers of cytokines in response to C. albicans. We show that renal epithelial cells respond only to live C. albicans cells capable of forming hyphae, producing chemokines KC and MIP-2, with levels correlating with epithelial cell damage. By assaying epithelial cell responses to strains of known virulence in the murine intravenous challenge model we demonstrate that renal epithelial cells can discriminate between virulent and attenuated strains. This simple, novel assay is a useful initial screen for altered virulence of C. albicans mutants or clinical isolates in vitro and provides an alternative to the mouse systemic infection model. PMID:24225657

  12. Specific Gene Loci of Clinical Pseudomonas putida Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Lázaro; Udaondo, Zulema; Duque, Estrella; Fernández, Matilde; Bernal, Patricia; Roca, Amalia; de la Torre, Jesús; Ramos, Juan Luis

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida are ubiquitous inhabitants of soils and clinical isolates of this species have been seldom described. Clinical isolates show significant variability in their ability to cause damage to hosts because some of them are able to modulate the host’s immune response. In the current study, comparisons between the genomes of different clinical and environmental strains of P. putida were done to identify genetic clusters shared by clinical isolates that are not present in environmental isolates. We show that in clinical strains specific genes are mostly present on transposons, and that this set of genes exhibit high identity with genes found in pathogens and opportunistic pathogens. The set of genes prevalent in P. putida clinical isolates, and absent in environmental isolates, are related with survival under oxidative stress conditions, resistance against biocides, amino acid metabolism and toxin/antitoxin (TA) systems. This set of functions have influence in colonization and survival within human tissues, since they avoid host immune response or enhance stress resistance. An in depth bioinformatic analysis was also carried out to identify genetic clusters that are exclusive to each of the clinical isolates and that correlate with phenotypical differences between them, a secretion system type III-like was found in one of these clinical strains, a determinant of pathogenicity in Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:26820467

  13. Identification of local clinical Candida isolates using CHROMagar Candida™ as a primary identification method for various Candida species.

    PubMed

    Madhavan, P; Jamal, F; Chong, P P; Ng, K P

    2011-08-01

    The objective of our study was to study the effectiveness of CHROMagar Candida™ as the primary identification method for various clinical Candida isolates, other than the three suggested species by the manufacturer. We studied 34 clinical isolates which were isolated from patients in a local teaching hospital and 7 ATCC strains. These strains were first cultured in Sabouraud dextrose broth (SDB) for 36 hours at 35ºC, then on CHROMagar plates at 30ºC, 35ºC and 37ºC. The sensitivity of this agar to identify Candida albicans, Candida dubliniensis, Candida tropicalis, Candida glabrata, Candida rugosa, Candida krusei and Candida parapsilosis ranged between 25 and 100% at 30ºC, 14% and 100% at 35ºC, 56% and 100% at 37ºC. The specificity of this agar was 100% at 30ºC, between 97% and 100% at 35ºC, 92% and 100% at 37ºC. The efficiency of this agar ranged between 88 and 100% at 30ºC, 83% and 100% at 35ºC, 88% and 100% at 37ºC. Each species also gave rise to a variety of colony colours ranging from pink to green to blue of different colony characteristics. Therefore, the chromogenic agar was found to be useful in our study for identifying clinical Candida isolates. PMID:22041745

  14. Candida albicans escapes from mouse neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Ermert, David; Niemiec, Maria J; Röhm, Marc; Glenthøj, Andreas; Borregaard, Niels; Urban, Constantin F

    2013-08-01

    Candida albicans, the most commonly isolated human fungal pathogen, is able to grow as budding yeasts or filamentous forms, such as hyphae. The ability to switch morphology has been attributed a crucial role for the pathogenesis of C. albicans. To mimic disseminated candidiasis in humans, the mouse is the most widely used model organism. Neutrophils are essential immune cells to prevent opportunistic mycoses. To explore potential differences between the rodent infection model and the human host, we compared the interactions of C. albicans with neutrophil granulocytes from mice and humans. We revealed that murine neutrophils exhibited a significantly lower ability to kill C. albicans than their human counterparts. Strikingly, C. albicans yeast cells formed germ tubes upon internalization by murine neutrophils, eventually rupturing the neutrophil membrane and thereby, killing the phagocyte. On the contrary, growth and subsequent escape of C. albicans are blocked inside human neutrophils. According to our findings, this blockage in human neutrophils might be a result of higher levels of MPO activity and the presence of α-defensins. We therefore outline differences in antifungal immune defense between humans and mouse strains, which facilitates a more accurate interpretation of in vivo results.

  15. Antibiotic susceptibility of clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Cervantes-Vega, C; Chavez, J; Rodriguez, M G

    1986-01-01

    Three hundred and twenty two clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa collected in Morelia, México, were analyzed for in vitro susceptibility to five antibiotics by agar dilution tests. Antibiotic resistance was shown by 50% of total isolates. Frequencies of resistance were: streptomycin, 47%; gentamicin, 13%; tobramycin, 8%; and carbenicillin, 7%; no amikacin resistance was found. The more common resistance patterns were streptomycin, gentamicin-streptomycin, and tobramycin-gentamicin-streptomycin. Resistance to either tobramycin, gentamicin or carbenicillin was found mainly in pyocin type 10 isolates. The proportion of antibiotic resistant isolates ranged from 37 to 75% in four hospitals, and amounted 24% in three clinical laboratories.

  16. Viability and growth of clinical isolates of Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Flournoy, D J; Jones, J B

    1985-08-01

    Studies were done on clinical isolates of Haemophilus influenzae to investigate viability and determine the effects of disc-agar diffusion (DAD) medium modification on antimicrobial susceptibility results. Most isolates were viable for two days in distilled water, up to a week on chocolate agar and months when frozen in skim milk at -70 degrees C. Differences in viability were not related to biotype, serotype, beta-lactamase production or site of isolation of isolates. Several medium modifications resulted in better growth of isolates for antimicrobial susceptibility testing by DAD, but the zone sizes of inhibition differed from those of the recommended medium.

  17. Candida albicans Biofilms and Human Disease.

    PubMed

    Nobile, Clarissa J; Johnson, Alexander D

    2015-01-01

    In humans, microbial cells (including bacteria, archaea, and fungi) greatly outnumber host cells. Candida albicans is the most prevalent fungal species of the human microbiota; this species asymptomatically colonizes many areas of the body, particularly the gastrointestinal and genitourinary tracts of healthy individuals. Alterations in host immunity, stress, resident microbiota, and other factors can lead to C. albicans overgrowth, causing a wide range of infections, from superficial mucosal to hematogenously disseminated candidiasis. To date, most studies of C. albicans have been carried out in suspension cultures; however, the medical impact of C. albicans (like that of many other microorganisms) depends on its ability to thrive as a biofilm, a closely packed community of cells. Biofilms are notorious for forming on implanted medical devices, including catheters, pacemakers, dentures, and prosthetic joints, which provide a surface and sanctuary for biofilm growth. C. albicans biofilms are intrinsically resistant to conventional antifungal therapeutics, the host immune system, and other environmental perturbations, making biofilm-based infections a significant clinical challenge. Here, we review our current knowledge of biofilms formed by C. albicans and closely related fungal species. PMID:26488273

  18. Seven consecutive successful clinical islet isolations with pancreatic ductal injection.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Shinichi; Noguichi, Hirofumi; Shimoda, Masayuki; Ikemoto, Tetsuya; Naziruddin, Bashoo; Jackson, Andrew; Tamura, Yoshiko; Olson, Greg; Fujita, Yasutaka; Chujo, Daisuke; Takita, Morihito; Kobayashi, Naoya; Onaca, Nicholas; Levy, Marlon

    2010-01-01

    Inconsistent islet isolation is one of the issues of clinical islet transplantation. In the current study, we applied ductal injection to improve the consistency of islet isolation. Seven islet isolations were performed with the ductal injection of ET-Kyoto solution (DI group) and eight islet isolations were performed without the ductal injection (standard group) using brain-dead donor pancreata. Isolated islets were evaluated based on the Edmonton protocol for transplantation. The DI group had significantly higher islet yields (588,566 +/- 64,319 vs. 354,836 +/- 89,649 IE, p < 0.01) and viability (97.3 +/- 1.2% vs. 92.6 +/- 1.2%, p < 0.02) compared with the standard group. All seven isolated islet preparations in the DI group (100%), versus only three out of eight isolated islet preparations (38%) in the standard group met transplantation criteria. The islets from the DI group were transplanted into three type 1 diabetic patients and all three patients became insulin independent. Ductal injection significantly improved quantity and quality of isolated islets and resulted in high success rate of clinical islet transplantation. This simple modification will reduce the risk of failure of clinical islet isolation.

  19. The influence of tea tree oil (Melaleuca alternifolia) on fluconazole activity against fluconazole-resistant Candida albicans strains.

    PubMed

    Mertas, Anna; Garbusińska, Aleksandra; Szliszka, Ewelina; Jureczko, Andrzej; Kowalska, Magdalena; Król, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the activity of fluconazole against 32 clinical strains of fluconazole-resistant Candida albicans, and C. albicans ATCC 10231 reference strain, after their exposure to sublethal concentrations of tea tree oil (TTO) or its main bioactive component terpinen-4-ol. For all tested fluconazole-resistant C. albicans strains TTO and terpinen-4-ol minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were low, ranging from 0.06% to 0.5%. The 24-hour exposure of fluconazole-resistant C. albicans strains to fluconazole with sublethal dose of TTO enhanced fluconazole activity against these strains. Overall, 62.5% of isolates were classified as susceptible, 25.0% exhibited intermediate susceptibility, and 12.5% were resistant. For all of the tested clinical strains the fluconazole MIC decreased from an average of 244.0 μg/mL to an average of 38.46 μg/mL, and the fluconazole minimal fungicidal concentrations (MFC) decreased from an average of 254.67 μg/mL to an average of 66.62 μg/mL. Terpinen-4-ol was found to be more active than TTO, and strongly enhanced fluconazole activity against fluconazole-resistant C. albicans strains. The results of this study demonstrate that combining natural substances such as TTO and conventional drug such as fluconazole, may help treat difficult yeast infections. PMID:25722982

  20. Chitinase 3-like 1: prognostic biomarker in clinically isolated syndromes.

    PubMed

    Cantó, Ester; Tintoré, Mar; Villar, Luisa M; Costa, Carme; Nurtdinov, Ramil; Álvarez-Cermeño, José C; Arrambide, Georgina; Reverter, Ferran; Deisenhammer, Florian; Hegen, Harald; Khademi, Mohsen; Olsson, Tomas; Tumani, Hayrettin; Rodríguez-Martín, Eulalia; Piehl, Fredrik; Bartos, Ales; Zimova, Denisa; Kotoucova, Jolana; Kuhle, Jens; Kappos, Ludwig; García-Merino, Juan Antonio; Sánchez, Antonio José; Saiz, Albert; Blanco, Yolanda; Hintzen, Rogier; Jafari, Naghmeh; Brassat, David; Lauda, Florian; Roesler, Romy; Rejdak, Konrad; Papuc, Ewa; de Andrés, Clara; Rauch, Stefan; Khalil, Michael; Enzinger, Christian; Galimberti, Daniela; Scarpini, Elio; Teunissen, Charlotte; Sánchez, Alex; Rovira, Alex; Montalban, Xavier; Comabella, Manuel

    2015-04-01

    Chitinase 3-like 1 (CHI3L1) has been proposed as a biomarker associated with the conversion to clinically definite multiple sclerosis in patients with clinically isolated syndromes, based on the finding of increased cerebrospinal fluid CHI3L1 levels in clinically isolated syndrome patients who later converted to multiple sclerosis compared to those who remained as clinically isolated syndrome. Here, we aimed to validate CHI3L1 as a prognostic biomarker in a large cohort of patients with clinically isolated syndrome. This is a longitudinal cohort study of clinically isolated syndrome patients with clinical, magnetic resonance imaging, and cerebrospinal fluid data prospectively acquired. A total of 813 cerebrospinal fluid samples from patients with clinically isolated syndrome were recruited from 15 European multiple sclerosis centres. Cerebrospinal fluid CHI3L1 levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Multivariable Cox regression models were used to investigate the association between cerebrospinal fluid CHI3L1 levels and time to conversion to multiple sclerosis and time to reach Expanded Disability Status Scale 3.0. CHI3L1 levels were higher in patients who converted to clinically definite multiple sclerosis compared to patients who continued as clinically isolated syndrome (P = 8.1 × 10(-11)). In the Cox regression analysis, CHI3L1 levels were a risk factor for conversion to multiple sclerosis (hazard ratio = 1.7; P = 1.1 × 10(-5) using Poser criteria; hazard ratio = 1.6; P = 3.7 × 10(-6) for McDonald criteria) independent of other covariates such as brain magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities and presence of cerebrospinal fluid oligoclonal bands, and were the only significant independent risk factor associated with the development of disability (hazard ratio = 3.8; P = 2.5 × 10(-8)). High CHI3L1 levels were associated with shorter time to multiple sclerosis (P = 3.2 × 10(-9) using Poser criteria; P = 5.6 × 10(-11) for McDonald criteria

  1. The antimicrobial efficacy of a silver alginate dressing against a broad spectrum of clinically relevant wound isolates.

    PubMed

    Percival, Steven L; Slone, Will; Linton, Sara; Okel, Tyler; Corum, Linda; Thomas, John G

    2011-06-01

    Wound dressings impregnated with silver have a role to play in aiding to reduce both the dressing and wound microbial bioburden. It is therefore imperative that antimicrobial wound dressings have efficacy on a broad range of clinical significant microorganisms. Accordingly, this study aimed to determine the antimicrobial efficacy of a silver alginate dressing against 115 wound isolates that had been isolated routinely from patients at West Virginia University Hospital. Standardised corrected zones of inhibition (CZOIs) were performed on all clinical isolates. It was found that the silver alginate dressing was able to inhibit the growth of all microorganisms tested. In particular, the silver alginate dressing inhibited the growth of Candida albicans and yeasts with CZOI of 3-11·5 mm. All meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains were found to be sensitive to the silver alginate dressing with a CZOI range calculated at 3-7·8 mm. Sensitivity to the silver alginate dressing was also evident for S. aureus and vancomycin-resistant Enterococci. CZOIs of 4·25 mm were calculated for Enterococcus faecium and 9·8 mm for viridans streptococcus. The bacteria which demonstrated the highest tolerance to ionic silver included Enterobacter cloacae and Acinetobacter baumannii. Contrary to this the most responsive microorganisms to ionic silver included strains of staphylococci, viridans streptococcus and Candida albicans. No antibiotic-resistant isolates, as identified by Kirby Bauer Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute classification system, were found to be resistant to ionic silver. When a selected number of microorganisms were grown in the biofilm phenotypic state enhanced tolerance to silver was observed, compared to their non biofilm counterparts. Overall, this study has demonstrated the broad antimicrobial activity of a silver alginate dressing on wound isolates grown in the non biofilm and biofilm state. This finding is clinically relevant as both the

  2. Ribotype differences between clinical and environmental isolates of Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    PubMed

    Trakulsomboon, S; Dance, D A; Smith, M D; White, N J; Pitt, T L

    1997-07-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is isolated frequently from the soil in regions where the disease melioidosis occurs. However, recent surveys in Thailand have shown that the frequency of isolation of the organism from soil samples is not directly related to the incidence of melioidosis in an area. To determine whether strain populations of B. pseudomallei prevalent in soil are gentypically related to strains causing clinical disease, rRNA BamHI restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP) of 139 soil environmental isolates and 228 human isolates were compared. Two groups of ribotype patterns were found. Group I comprised 37 different ribotype patterns which were characterised by five to eight hybridisation bands of 2.8- > 23 kb. All of these ribotypes were identified among the clinical isolates, and 18 of them were also found in 59 environmental isolates. Group II was represented by 12 ribotypes found only in environmental strains. These ribotype patterns comprised one to five bands in the size range 9- > 23 kb. All but one of the 73 isolates in this group grew on a minimal medium supplemented with L-arabinose. In contrast, only 3% of the 66 isolates from the environment with group I ribotype patterns could utilise this sugar as their sole energy source. These findings suggest that B. pseudomallei strains that utilise arabinose constitute a population that is genetically distinct from other environmental and clinical strains.

  3. Chromosome length polymorphism in clinical isolates of Candida parapsilosis.

    PubMed

    Fernando, P H; Samaranayake, L P

    1998-10-01

    Chromosome length polymorphism among 24 clinical isolates of Candida parapsilosis obtained from several human sources was analysed using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. The isolates, from both superficial and deep infections, comprised a miscellaneous collection from the oral cavity, blood cultures, ear infections, wound secrete, a venous catheter and peritoneal dialysis fluid. Contour-clamped homogenous field electrophoresis using a hexagonal electrode was used for pulsed field gel electrophoresis. The chromosome numbers varied from seven to nine and their sizes ranged from 0.75 to 2.6 Mb. According to the electrophoretic karyotype patterns the 24 isolates could be divided into 9 profiles. However, the majority (18 isolates) fell into 3 groups comprising 7, 8 and 9 chromosomes, containing 5, 11, and 2 isolates, respectively. The remaining six isolates, all of which were from either an oral or another superficial site of isolation, could be categorized into a further six groups. These data confirm previous observations on the genomic heterogeneity of clinical isolates of C. parapsilosis, and illustrate the possible commonality in strains from related clinical habitats.

  4. Isolation of Aeromonas species from clinical sources

    PubMed Central

    McCracken, A. W.; Barkley, R.

    1972-01-01

    In a period of one year, in a general hospital, Aeromonas hydrophila was isolated from 13 patients and Aeromonas shigelloides from one patient. Eight of the patients had superficial infections, two had urinary tract infections, and four had bacteriaemia. The association of Aeromonas bacteriaemia with cirrhosis of the liver and malignant disease, which has been previously reported, was observed in three of the four bacteriaemic patients. The key to laboratory diagnosis of this genus is the routine performance of the oxidase test in bacteriological procedures for the identification of Gram-negative bacilli. PMID:4567553

  5. Isolated right ventricular failure in hyperthyroidism: a clinical dilemma

    PubMed Central

    McDonough, Ryan J.; Moul, Marvin S.; Beckman, Darrick; Slim, Ahmad M.

    2011-01-01

    We present a unique case of a 42-year-old gentleman with newly diagnosed Graves’ disease and isolated right ventricular failure. Extensive evaluation to include echocardiogram and cardiac catheterization were negative for significant pulmonary hypertension or coronary artery disease as potential etiologies. Hyperthyroid induced vasospasm is a rare but reported clinical entity that serves to be a clinical and diagnostic dilemma. PMID:22049310

  6. Molecular characterisation of clinical and environmental isolates of Mycobacterium kansasii isolates from South African gold mines.

    PubMed

    Kwenda, Geoffrey; Churchyard, Gavin J; Thorrold, Catherine; Heron, Ian; Stevenson, Karen; Duse, Adriano G; Marais, Elsé

    2015-03-01

    Mycobacterium kansasii (M. kansasii) is a major cause of non-tuberculous mycobacterial pulmonary disease in the South African gold-mining workforce, but the source of infection and molecular epidemiology are unknown. This study investigated the presence of M. kansasii in gold and coal mine and associated hostel water supplies and compared the genetic diversity of clinical and environmental isolates of M. kansasii. Five M. kansasii and ten other potentially pathogenic mycobacteria were cultured mainly from showerhead biofilms. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction analysis of the hsp65 gene on 196 clinical and environmental M. kansasii isolates revealed 160 subtype I, eight subtype II and six subtype IV strains. Twenty-two isolates did not show the typical M. kansasii restriction patterns, suggesting that these isolates may represent new subtypes of M. kansasii. In contrast to the clonal population structure found amongst the subtype I isolates from studies in other countries, DNA fingerprinting of 114 clinical and three environmental subtype I isolates demonstrated genetic diversity amongst the isolates. This study demonstrated that showerheads are possible sources of M. kansasii and other pathogenic non-tuberculous mycobacterial infection in a gold-mining region, that subtype I is the major clinical isolate of M. kansasii strain and that this subtype exhibits genetic diversity. PMID:25719478

  7. Comparison of the hemolytic activity between C. albicans and non-albicans Candida species.

    PubMed

    Rossoni, Rodnei Dennis; Barbosa, Júnia Oliveira; Vilela, Simone Furgeri Godinho; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso; Junqueira, Juliana Campos

    2013-01-01

    The ability to produce enzymes, such as hemolysins, is an important virulence factor for the genus Candida.The objective of this study was to compare the hemolytic activity between C. albicansand non-albicans Candida species. Fifty strains of Candida species, isolated from the oral cavity of patients infected with HIV were studied. The isolates included the following species: C. albicans, C. dubliniensis, C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, C. krusei, C. parapsilosis, C. dubliniensis, C. norvegensis, C. lusitaniae, and C. guilliermondii. Hemolysin production was evaluated on Sabouraud dextrose agar containing chloramphenicol, blood, and glucose. A loop-full of pure Candidaculture was spot-inoculated onto plates and incubated at 37 ºC for 24 h in a 5% CO2 atmosphere. Hemolytic activity was defined as the formation of a translucent halo around the colonies. All C. albicansstrains that were studied produced hemolysins. Among the non-albicans Candidaspecies, 86% exhibited hemolytic activity. Only C. guilliermondiiand some C. parapsilosis isolates were negative for this enzyme. In conclusion, most non-albicans Candidaspecies had a similar ability to produce hemolysins when compared to C. albicans.

  8. In vitro antimicrobial activity of ten medicinal plants against clinical isolates of oral cancer cases

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Suppression of immune system in treated cancer patients may lead to secondary infections that obviate the need of antibiotics. In the present study, an attempt was made to understand the occurrence of secondary infections in immuno-suppressed patients along with herbal control of these infections with the following objectives to: (a) isolate the microbial species from the treated oral cancer patients along with the estimation of absolute neutrophile counts of patients (b) assess the in vitro antimicrobial activity medicinal plants against the above clinical isolates. Methods Blood and oral swab cultures were taken from 40 oral cancer patients undergoing treatment in the radiotherapy unit of Regional Cancer Institute, Pt. B.D.S. Health University, Rohtak, Haryana. Clinical isolates were identified by following general microbiological, staining and biochemical methods. The absolute neutrophile counts were done by following the standard methods. The medicinal plants selected for antimicrobial activity analysis were Asphodelus tenuifolius Cav., Asparagus racemosus Willd., Balanites aegyptiaca L., Cestrum diurnum L., Cordia dichotoma G. Forst, Eclipta alba L., Murraya koenigii (L.) Spreng. , Pedalium murex L., Ricinus communis L. and Trigonella foenum graecum L. The antimicrobial efficacy of medicinal plants was evaluated by modified Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. MIC and MFC were investigated by serial two fold microbroth dilution method. Results Prevalent bacterial pathogens isolated were Staphylococcus aureus (23.2%), Escherichia coli (15.62%), Staphylococcus epidermidis (12.5%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (9.37%), Klebsiella pneumonia (7.81%), Proteus mirabilis (3.6%), Proteus vulgaris (4.2%) and the fungal pathogens were Candida albicans (14.6%), Aspergillus fumigatus (9.37%). Out of 40 cases, 35 (87.5%) were observed as neutropenic. Eight medicinal plants (A. tenuifolius, A. racemosus, B. aegyptiaca, E. alba, M. koenigii, P. murex R. communis and T

  9. Ethanolic extracts of Tinospora cordifolia and Alstonia scholaris show antimicrobial activity towards clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant and carbapenemase-producing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Bonvicini, Francesca; Mandrone, Manuela; Antognoni, Fabiana; Poli, Ferruccio; Gentilomi, Giovanna Angela

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the in vitro antimicrobial activity of crude extracts of three plants from Ayurveda tradition (Tinospora cordifolia, Alstonia scholaris, Crataeva nurvala) against reference microbial strains and clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and carbapenemase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae. IC50 values were obtained by micro-dilution methods meeting the requirements of the NCCLS standard. The cytotoxicity of the extracts was also investigated on a mammalian cell line. Extracts displayed a variable degree of antimicrobial activity and did not interfere with mammalian cell proliferation. T. cordifolia and A. scholaris exhibited a higher inhibitory activity against clinical isolates of MRSA and carbapenemase-producing K. pneumoniae compared with reference strains, while C. nurvala exhibited a different behaviour. An antifungal activity towards Candida albicans was observed for A. scholaris extract. Results indicate that constituents from T. cordifolia and A. scholaris may be a potential source of new therapeutic strategies for infectious diseases. PMID:24749692

  10. In vitro activities of terbinafine in combination with fluconazole and itraconazole against isolates of Candida albicans with reduced susceptibility to azoles.

    PubMed Central

    Barchiesi, F; Falconi Di Francesco, L; Scalise, G

    1997-01-01

    A checkerboard microdilution method was applied to study the in vitro interaction of terbinafine with either fluconazole and itraconazole against 30 strains of Candida albicans. Synergy was observed in 40% of the terbinafine-fluconazole interactions and in 43% of the terbinafine-itraconazole interactions, while antagonism was not observed. Even when only additivity was achieved, the combinations still showed beneficial effects since at least twofold reductions in the MICs of both drugs were found in 100% of the terbinafine-fluconazole interactions and in 76% of the terbinafine-itraconazole interactions. PMID:9257768

  11. Antifungal Action of Methylene Blue Involves Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Disruption of Redox and Membrane Homeostasis in C. albicans

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Moiz A.; Fatima, Zeeshan; Hameed, Saif

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans is known to cause infections ranging from superficial and systemic in immunocompromised person. In this study, we explored that the antifungal action of Methylene blue (MB) is mediated through mitochondrial dysfunction and disruption of redox and membrane homeostasis against C. albicans. We demonstrated that MB displayed its antifungal potential against C. albicans and two clinical isolates tested. We also showed that MB is effective against two non- albicans species as well. Notably, the antifungal effect of MB seems to be independent of the major drug efflux pumps transporter activity. We explored that MB treated Candida cells were sensitive on non-fermentable carbon source leading us to propose that MB inhibits mitochondria. This sensitive phenotype was reinforced with the fact that sensitivity of Candida cells to MB could be rescued upon the supplementation of ascorbic acid, an antioxidant. This clearly suggests that disturbances in redox status are linked with MB action. We further demonstrated that Candida cells were susceptible to membrane perturbing agent viz. SDS which was additionally confirmed by transmission electron micrographs showing disruption of membrane integrity. Moreover, the ergosterol levels were significantly decreased by 66% suggesting lipid compositional changes due to MB. Furthermore, we could demonstrate that MB inhibits the yeast to hyphal transition in C. albicans which is one of the major virulence attribute in most of the hyphal inducing conditions. Taken together, the data generated from present study clearly establishes MB as promising antifungal agent that could be efficiently employed in strategies to treat Candida infections. PMID:27006725

  12. Genetic analysis of human clinical isolates of Lactococcus garvieae: Relatedness with isolates from foods.

    PubMed

    Reguera-Brito, Mercedes; Galán-Sánchez, Fátima; Blanco, M Mar; Rodríguez-Iglesias, Manuel; Domínguez, Lucas; Fernández-Garayzábal, José F; Gibello, Alicia

    2016-01-01

    Lactococcus garvieae is a Gram-positive bacterium well-known as an important pathogen in aquaculture, and it is also a human pathogen of increasing clinical significance. Forty-three human L. garvieae isolates from clinical specimens were characterized by Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST). Twenty-six different sequence types (STs) were identified among the human isolates, of which 20 were novel STs. Most human isolates clustered into four clonal complexes, with a predominance of CC3. Within CC3, ST10 was the most common genotype, indicating the existence of a circulating genetic lineage among the human isolates analyzed. The four CCs also grouped L. garvieae strains isolated from meat, dairy and fish, indicating a genetic overlap between isolates from human and these foods. Genetic relatedness among human and food L. garvieae isolates was confirmed by phylogenetic analysis based on the concatenated sequences of the seven MLST genes. These results represent the first evidence of genetic relatedness between isolates of L. garvieae of human and those isolated meat, milk and dairy products and suggest that, in addition to fish and seafood, these foods might represent important sources of human L. garvieae infections.

  13. Analysis of Repair Mechanisms following an Induced Double-Strand Break Uncovers Recessive Deleterious Alleles in the Candida albicans Diploid Genome

    PubMed Central

    Feri, Adeline; Loll-Krippleber, Raphaël; Commere, Pierre-Henri; Maufrais, Corinne; Sertour, Natacha; Schwartz, Katja; Sherlock, Gavin; Bougnoux, Marie-Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The diploid genome of the yeast Candida albicans is highly plastic, exhibiting frequent loss-of-heterozygosity (LOH) events. To provide a deeper understanding of the mechanisms leading to LOH, we investigated the repair of a unique DNA double-strand break (DSB) in the laboratory C. albicans SC5314 strain using the I-SceI meganuclease. Upon I-SceI induction, we detected a strong increase in the frequency of LOH events at an I-SceI target locus positioned on chromosome 4 (Chr4), including events spreading from this locus to the proximal telomere. Characterization of the repair events by single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) typing and whole-genome sequencing revealed a predominance of gene conversions, but we also observed mitotic crossover or break-induced replication events, as well as combinations of independent events. Importantly, progeny that had undergone homozygosis of part or all of Chr4 haplotype B (Chr4B) were inviable. Mining of genome sequencing data for 155 C. albicans isolates allowed the identification of a recessive lethal allele in the GPI16 gene on Chr4B unique to C. albicans strain SC5314 which is responsible for this inviability. Additional recessive lethal or deleterious alleles were identified in the genomes of strain SC5314 and two clinical isolates. Our results demonstrate that recessive lethal alleles in the genomes of C. albicans isolates prevent the occurrence of specific extended LOH events. While these and other recessive lethal and deleterious alleles are likely to accumulate in C. albicans due to clonal reproduction, their occurrence may in turn promote the maintenance of corresponding nondeleterious alleles and, consequently, heterozygosity in the C. albicans species. PMID:27729506

  14. Effect of serum and surface characteristics on Candida albicans biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Frade, João Pedro; Arthington-Skaggs, Beth A

    2011-07-01

    Candida spp. biofilms can be established on a wide range of materials, including implanted medical devices, and can display a resistant phenotype to antifungal drugs. Several factors, including host and surface properties, may influence the establishment and the development of Candida albicans biofilms on biotic and abiotic surfaces. We therefore selected a collection of C. albicans clinical isolates to evaluate the effect of surface and serum on biofilm attachment and development. Disc coupons from the CDC biofilm reactor were used in a well plate assay to study biofilm production on six different surfaces with or without the addition of serum: polycarbonate, polystyrene, stainless steel, Teflon, polyvinyl chloride or hydroxyapatite. Our results showed that serum increases in vitro C. albicans biofilm formation on a wide range of distinct surfaces including metallic and non-metallic materials, and that roughness and hydrophobicity can modulate C. albicans biofilm formation. These findings were also confirmed by scanning electron microscopy and it revealed the deposition of extracellular material on hyphae attached to a solid surface. Interestingly, adhesion can be significantly increased in the early stages of colonisation when serum is provided as a conditioning film in a surface-dependent manner.

  15. Polyketide Glycosides from Bionectria ochroleuca Inhibit Candida albicans Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    One of the challenges presented by Candida infections is that many of the isolates encountered in the clinic produce biofilms, which can decrease these pathogens’ susceptibilities to standard-of-care antibiotic therapies. Inhibitors of fungal biofilm formation offer a potential solution to counteracting some of the problems associated with Candida infections. A screening campaign utilizing samples from our fungal extract library revealed that a Bionectria ochroleuca isolate cultured on Cheerios breakfast cereal produced metabolites that blocked the in vitro formation of Candida albicans biofilms. A scale-up culture of the fungus was undertaken using mycobags (also known as mushroom bags or spawn bags), which afforded four known [TMC-151s C–F (1–4)] and three new [bionectriols B–D (5–7)] polyketide glycosides. All seven metabolites exhibited potent biofilm inhibition against C. albicans SC5314, as well as exerted synergistic antifungal activities in combination with amphotericin B. In this report, we describe the structure determination of the new metabolites, as well as compare the secondary metabolome profiles of fungi grown in flasks and mycobags. These studies demonstrate that mycobags offer a useful alternative to flask-based cultures for the preparative production of fungal secondary metabolites. PMID:25302529

  16. Prospective evaluation of the chromogenic medium CandiSelect 4 for differentiation and presumptive identification of non-Candida albicans Candida species.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Liang; de Hoog, G Sybren; Cornelissen, Akke; Lyu, Qian; Mou, Lili; Liu, Taohua; Cao, Yu; Vatanshenassan, Mansoureh; Kang, Yingqian

    2016-02-01

    Rapid identification of pathogenic yeasts is a crucial step in timely and appropriate antifungal therapy. For diagnostics in the clinical laboratory, simplified alternatives to barcoding are needed. CandiSelect 4 (CS4) medium, a chromogenic medium for isolation of clinical yeasts, allows routine recognition of Candida albicans and presumptive identification of Candida tropicalis, Candida glabrata, and Candida krusei. We evaluated an extension of this method with 46 non-Candida albicans Candida (NCAC) and 7 Malassezia species. The medium supported growth of all species tested and a wide diversity of cultural types were observed. Colony colours were in violet, turquoise (including green and blue), or white tinges. Eight NCAC species produced violet pigmentation similar to that of C. albicans. Most NCAC species, including C. glabrata and C. tropicalis were distributed in the turquoise group. Malassezia species were invariably blue.

  17. Prospective evaluation of the chromogenic medium CandiSelect 4 for differentiation and presumptive identification of non-Candida albicans Candida species.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Liang; de Hoog, G Sybren; Cornelissen, Akke; Lyu, Qian; Mou, Lili; Liu, Taohua; Cao, Yu; Vatanshenassan, Mansoureh; Kang, Yingqian

    2016-02-01

    Rapid identification of pathogenic yeasts is a crucial step in timely and appropriate antifungal therapy. For diagnostics in the clinical laboratory, simplified alternatives to barcoding are needed. CandiSelect 4 (CS4) medium, a chromogenic medium for isolation of clinical yeasts, allows routine recognition of Candida albicans and presumptive identification of Candida tropicalis, Candida glabrata, and Candida krusei. We evaluated an extension of this method with 46 non-Candida albicans Candida (NCAC) and 7 Malassezia species. The medium supported growth of all species tested and a wide diversity of cultural types were observed. Colony colours were in violet, turquoise (including green and blue), or white tinges. Eight NCAC species produced violet pigmentation similar to that of C. albicans. Most NCAC species, including C. glabrata and C. tropicalis were distributed in the turquoise group. Malassezia species were invariably blue. PMID:26781374

  18. [Clinical and genetic characterization of FIPA (familial isolated pituitary adenomas)].

    PubMed

    Beckers, A; Apetrii, P; Daly, A; Tichomirova, M; Vanbellingen, J F; Georges, M; Bours, V

    2009-01-01

    Pituitary adenomas are common brain tumours at autopsy and radiological series of unselected population. Historically, few epidemiologic data regarding the prevalence of clinically apparent pituitary adenomas have been available. Recently, a cross-sectional study conducted in Liège, Belgium, noted that clinically-apparent pituitary adenomas occurred with a prevalence of 1:1064 inhabitants, which is 3.5-5 times the previously reported prevalence. Pituitary adenomas occur predominantly as sporadic tumors, but also in a familial setting or associated to some familial/isolated tumoral syndromes. The recent characterization of the novel clinical entity FIPA (Familial Isolated Pituitary Adenomas) increased the prevalence of familial pituitary adenomas which account now for about 5% of pituitary tumors. Distinct genetic mechanisms are continuously identified and increase our understanding of the complex clinical presentation and sometimes unpredictable evolution of pituitary adenomas.

  19. RESPONSES OF OYSTER (CRASSOSTREA VIRGINICA) HEMOCYTES TO NONPATHOGENIC AND CLINICAL ISOLATES OF VIBRIO PARAHAEMOLYTICUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bacterial uptake by oysters (Crassostrea virginica) and bactericidal activity of oyster hemocytes were studied using four environmental isolates and three clinical isolates of Vibrio parahaemolyticus. Clinical isolates (2030, 2062, 2107) were obtained from gastroenteritis patien...

  20. In Vitro Antibacterial Activity of Rhodanine Derivatives against Pathogenic Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    AbdelKhalek, Ahmed; Ashby, Charles R.; Patel, Bhargav A.; Talele, Tanaji T.; Seleem, Mohamed N.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial infections present a serious challenge to healthcare practitioners due to the emergence of resistance to numerous conventional antibacterial drugs. Therefore, new bacterial targets and new antimicrobials are unmet medical needs. Rhodanine derivatives have been shown to possess potent antimicrobial activity via a novel mechanism. However, their potential use as antibacterials has not been fully examined. In this study, we determined the spectrum of activity of seven rhodanine derivatives (compounds Rh 1–7) against clinical isolates of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strains and Candida albicans. We also synthesized and tested three additional compounds, ethyl ester and amide of rhodanine 2 (Rh 8 and Rh 10, respectively) and ethyl ester of rhodanine 3 (Rh 9) to determine the significance of the carboxyl group modification towards antibacterial activity and human serum albumin binding. A broth microdilution assay confirmed Rh 1–7 exhibit bactericidal activity against Gram-positive pathogens. Rh 2 had significant activity against various vancomycin-resistant (MIC90 = 4 μM) and methicillin-resistant (MIC90 = 4 μM) Staphylococcus aureus (VRSA and MRSA), Staphylococcus epidermidis (MIC = 4 μM) and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) strains (MIC90 = 8 μM). The rhodanine compounds exhibited potent activity against Bacillus spp., including Bacillus anthracis, with MIC range of 2–8 μM. In addition, they had potent activity against Clostridium difficile. The most potent compound, Rh 2, at 4 and 8 times its MIC, significantly decreased S. epidermidis biofilm mass by more than 35% and 45%, respectively. None of the rhodanine compounds showed antimicrobial activity (MIC > 128 μM) against various 1) Gram-negative pathogens (Acinetobacter baumannii, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumonia, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Salmonella Typhimurium) or 2) strains of Candida albicans (MIC > 64 μM). The MTS assay confirmed that rhodanines were not toxic to

  1. Comparison of albicans vs. non-albicans candidemia in French intensive care units

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Candidemia raises numerous therapeutic issues for intensive care physicians. Epidemiological data that could guide the choice of initial therapy are still required. This analysis sought to compare the characteristics of intensive care unit (ICU) patients with candidemia due to non-albicans Candida species with those of ICU patients with candidemia due to Candida albicans. Methods A prospective, observational, multicenter, French study was conducted from October 2005 to May 2006. Patients exhibiting candidemia developed during ICU stay and exclusively due either to one or more non-albicans Candida species or to C. albicans were selected. The data collected included patient characteristics on ICU admission and at the onset of candidemia. Results Among the 136 patients analyzed, 78 (57.4%) had candidemia caused by C. albicans. These patients had earlier onset of infection (11.1 ± 14.2 days after ICU admission vs. 17.4 ± 17.7, p = 0.02), higher severity scores on ICU admission (SOFA: 10.4 ± 4.7 vs. 8.6 ± 4.6, p = 0.03; SAPS II: 57.4 ± 22.8 vs. 48.7 ± 15.5, P = 0.015), and were less often neutropenic (2.6% vs. 12%, p = 0.04) than patients with candidemia due to non-albicans Candida species. Conclusions Although patients infected with Candida albicans differed from patients infected with non-albicans Candida species for a few characteristics, no clinical factor appeared pertinent enough to guide the choice of empirical antifungal therapy in ICU. PMID:20507569

  2. Diversity of clinical isolates of Entamoeba histolytica in Japan.

    PubMed

    Nozaki, Tomoyoshi; Kobayashi, Seiki; Takeuchi, Tsutomu; Haghighi, Ali

    2006-02-01

    In Japan, amebiasis is domestically transmitted by two major populations: male homosexuals and mentally handicapped persons, which is remarkably different from most other developed countries where Entamoeba dispar infection is predominantly observed. Here we briefly summarize epidemiology of amebiasis in Japan. We also review our current understanding of the diversity of Entamoeba histolytica clinical isolates in Japan, based on polymorphic genetic markers, clinical representations, and in vivo virulence, using an animal model.

  3. A simple and reliable PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism assay to identify Candida albicans and its closely related Candida dubliniensis

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Yi Ping; Wang, Le; Lu, Gui Xia; Shen, Yong Nian; Liu, Wei Da

    2012-01-01

    Candida dubliniensis is an emerging pathogen capable of causing superficial as well as systemic infections. Due to its close similarity to C. albcians, conventional methods based on phenotypic traits are not always reliable in identification of C. dubliniensis. In this study, we developed a PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) assay to identify and discriminate between the two closely related species. The D1/D2 region of 28S rDNA was amplified by PCR and enzymatically digested by ApaI and BsiEI respectively. PCR products of both species were digested into two fragments by ApaI, but those of other yeast species were undigested. BsiEI cut the PCR products of C. albicans into two fragments but not those of C. dubliniensis. Thus two species were differentiated. We evaluated 10 reference strains representing 10 yeast species, among which C. albicans and C. dubliniensis were successfully identified. A total of 56 phenotypically characterized clinical isolates (42 C. albicans isolates and 14 C. dubliniensis isolates) were also investigated for intra-species variability. All tested isolates produced identical RFLP patterns to their respective reference strains except one initially misidentified isolate. Our method offers a simple, rapid and reliable molecular method for the identification of C. albicans and C. dubliniensis. PMID:24031901

  4. A simple and reliable PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism assay to identify Candida albicans and its closely related Candida dubliniensis.

    PubMed

    Ge, Yi Ping; Wang, Le; Lu, Gui Xia; Shen, Yong Nian; Liu, Wei Da

    2012-07-01

    Candida dubliniensis is an emerging pathogen capable of causing superficial as well as systemic infections. Due to its close similarity to C. albcians, conventional methods based on phenotypic traits are not always reliable in identification of C. dubliniensis. In this study, we developed a PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) assay to identify and discriminate between the two closely related species. The D1/D2 region of 28S rDNA was amplified by PCR and enzymatically digested by ApaI and BsiEI respectively. PCR products of both species were digested into two fragments by ApaI, but those of other yeast species were undigested. BsiEI cut the PCR products of C. albicans into two fragments but not those of C. dubliniensis. Thus two species were differentiated. We evaluated 10 reference strains representing 10 yeast species, among which C. albicans and C. dubliniensis were successfully identified. A total of 56 phenotypically characterized clinical isolates (42 C. albicans isolates and 14 C. dubliniensis isolates) were also investigated for intra-species variability. All tested isolates produced identical RFLP patterns to their respective reference strains except one initially misidentified isolate. Our method offers a simple, rapid and reliable molecular method for the identification of C. albicans and C. dubliniensis. PMID:24031901

  5. Asperger syndrome, violent thoughts and clinically isolated syndrome.

    PubMed

    Vanderbruggen, N; Van Geit, N; Bissay, V; Zeeuws, D; Santermans, L; Baeken, C

    2010-12-01

    A young man, 23 years old, with a clinically isolated syndrome (CIS), presented violent thoughts during a neurological consultation. He was diagnosed with Asperger Syndrome based on a psychiatric and (neuro)psychological examination. Possible risk factors for acting-out and the implications for treatment, if CIS would evolve to MS, are discussed based on a review of the literature.

  6. Isolation of Bacteroides ureolyticus (B corrodens) from clinical infections.

    PubMed Central

    Duerden, B; Bennet, K W; Faulkner, J

    1982-01-01

    The introduction of an improved anaerobic system resulted in the isolation of Bacteroides ureolyticus (B corrodens) in numbers that suggested a pathogenic role from many more clinical specimens. During a three-year period B ureolyticus was isolated from 103 fairly superficial necrotic or gangrenous lesions all of which showed evidence of active infection. These included 27 perineal or genital infections, 15 perianal abscesses, 15 other soft tissue infections such as pilonidal abscesses and infected sebaceous cysts and 16 ulcers or gangrenous lesions of the lower limb. B ureolyticus was rarely isolated in pure culture but was usually one of the predominant organisms; the other organisms were mostly anaerobes and the combination of B ureolyticus with anaerobic Gram-positive cocci was particularly noticeable. The isolation and identification of B ureolyticus is not difficult but depends upon a reliable anaerobic system and the incubation of primary cultures for at least 72 h. PMID:7068922

  7. Smqnr VARIANTS IN CLINICAL ISOLATES OF Stenotrophomonas maltophilia IN BRAZIL

    PubMed Central

    Gracia-Paez, Jorge Isaac; Ferraz, Juliana Rosa; França E Silva, Ivan Avelino; Rossi, Flávia; Levin, Anna Sara; Costa, Silvia Figueiredo

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Stenotrophomonas maltophilia contains a novel chromosomally-encoded qnr gene named Smqnr that contributes to low intrinsic resistance to quinolone. We described Smqnr in 13 clinical isolates of S. maltophilia from two Brazilian hospitals, over a 2-year period. The strains were identified by API 20 NE (bioMérieux, France). Susceptibility by microdilution method to trimetroprim/sulfamethoxazole, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, minocycline, ceftazidime, chloramphenicol and ticarcillin/clavulanate was performed according to CLSI. PCR detection of Smqnr gene was carried out. The sequence of Smqnr was compared with those deposited in GenBank. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) of all strains was performed. Thirteen Smqnr positives isolates were sequenced and three novel variants of Smqnr were identified. All 13 Smqnr isolates had distinguishable patterns by PFGE. This is the first report of Smqnr in S. maltophilia isolated in Brazil. PMID:24213195

  8. Antifungal Susceptibility in Serum and Virulence Determinants of Candida Bloodstream Isolates from Hong Kong

    PubMed Central

    Seneviratne, Chaminda J.; Rajan, Suhasini; Wong, Sarah S. W.; Tsang, Dominic N. C.; Lai, Christopher K. C.; Samaranayake, Lakshman P.; Jin, Lijian

    2016-01-01

    Candida bloodstream infections (CBI) are one of the most common nosocomial infections globally, and they account for a high mortality rate. The increasing global prevalence of drug-resistant Candida strains has also been posing a challenge to clinicians. In this study, we comprehensively evaluated the biofilm formation and production of hemolysin and proteinase of 63 CBI isolates derived from a hospital setting in Hong Kong as well as their antifungal susceptibility both in the presence and in the absence of human serum, using standard methodology. Candida albicans was the predominant species among the 63 CBI isolates collected, and non-albicans Candida species accounted for approximately one third of the isolates (36.5%). Of them, Candida tropicalis was the most common non-albicans Candida species. A high proportion (31.7%) of the CBI isolates (40% of C. albicans isolates, 10% of C. tropicalis isolates, 11% of C. parapsilosis isolates, and 100% of C. glabrata isolates) were found to be resistant to fluconazole. One of the isolates (C. tropicalis) was resistant to amphotericin B. A rising prevalence of drug-resistance CBI isolates in Hong Kong was observed with reference to a previous study. Notably, all non-albicans Candida species, showed increased hemolytic activity relative to C. albicans, whilst C. albicans, C. tropicalis, and C. parapsilosis exhibited proteinase activities. Majority of the isolates were capable of forming mature biofilms. Interestingly, the presence of serum distorted the yeast sensitivity to fluconazole, but not amphotericin B. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that CBI isolates of Candida have the potential to express to varying extent their virulence attributes (e.g., biofilm formation, hemolysin production, and proteinase activity) and these, together with perturbations in their antifungal sensitivity in the presence of serum, may contribute to treatment complication in candidemia. The effect of serum on antifungal activity

  9. Characterization of a New Clinical Yeast Species, Candida tunisiensis sp. nov., Isolated from a Strain Collection from Tunisian Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Eddouzi, Jamel; Hofstetter, Valérie; Groenewald, Marizeth; Manai, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    From a collection of yeast isolates isolated from patients in Tunisian hospitals between September 2006 and July 2010, the yeast strain JEY63 (CBS 12513), isolated from a 50-year-old male that suffered from oral thrush, could not be identified to the species level using conventional methods used in clinical laboratories. These methods include matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), germ tube formation, and the use of CHROMagar Candida and metabolic galleries. Sequence analysis of the nuclear rRNA (18S rRNA, 5.8S rRNA, and 26S rRNA) and internal transcribed spacer regions (ITS1 and ITS2) indicated that the ribosomal DNA sequences of this species were not yet reported. Multiple gene phylogenic analyses suggested that this isolate clustered at the base of the Dipodascaceae (Saccharomycetales, Saccharomycetes, and Ascomycota). JEY63 was named Candida tunisiensis sp. nov. according to several phenotypic criteria and its geographical origin. C. tunisiensis was able to grow at 42°C and does not form chlamydospores and hyphae but could grow as yeast and pseudohyphal forms. C. tunisiensis exhibited most probably a haploid genome with an estimated size of 10 Mb on at least three chromosomes. Using European Committee for Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) and Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) Candida albicans susceptibility breakpoints as a reference, C. tunisiensis was resistant to fluconazole (MIC = 8 μg/ml), voriconazole (MIC = 0.5 μg/ml), itraconazole (MIC = 16 μg/ml), and amphotericin B (MIC = 4 μg/ml) but still susceptible to posaconazole (MIC = 0.008 μg/ml) and caspofungin (MIC = 0.5 μg/ml). In conclusion, MALDI-TOF MS permitted the early selection of an unusual isolate, which was still unreported in molecular databases but could not be unambiguously classified based on phylogenetic approaches. PMID:23077122

  10. In Vitro Activity of Miltefosine against Candida albicans under Planktonic and Biofilm Growth Conditions and In Vivo Efficacy in a Murine Model of Oral Candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Vila, Taissa Vieira Machado; Chaturvedi, Ashok K; Rozental, Sonia; Lopez-Ribot, Jose L

    2015-12-01

    The generation of a new antifungal against Candida albicans biofilms has become a major priority, since biofilm formation by this opportunistic pathogenic fungus is usually associated with an increased resistance to azole antifungal drugs and treatment failures. Miltefosine is an alkyl phospholipid with promising antifungal activity. Here, we report that, when tested under planktonic conditions, miltefosine displays potent in vitro activity against multiple fluconazole-susceptible and -resistant C. albicans clinical isolates, including isolates overexpressing efflux pumps and/or with well-characterized Erg11 mutations. Moreover, miltefosine inhibits C. albicans biofilm formation and displays activity against preformed biofilms. Serial passage experiments confirmed that miltefosine has a reduced potential to elicit resistance, and screening of a library of C. albicans transcription factor mutants provided additional insight into the activity of miltefosine against C. albicans growing under planktonic and biofilm conditions. Finally, we demonstrate the in vivo efficacy of topical treatment with miltefosine in the murine model of oropharyngeal candidiasis. Overall, our results confirm the potential of miltefosine as a promising antifungal drug candidate, in particular for the treatment of azole-resistant and biofilm-associated superficial candidiasis. PMID:26416861

  11. In Vitro Activity of Miltefosine against Candida albicans under Planktonic and Biofilm Growth Conditions and In Vivo Efficacy in a Murine Model of Oral Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Ashok K.; Rozental, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    The generation of a new antifungal against Candida albicans biofilms has become a major priority, since biofilm formation by this opportunistic pathogenic fungus is usually associated with an increased resistance to azole antifungal drugs and treatment failures. Miltefosine is an alkyl phospholipid with promising antifungal activity. Here, we report that, when tested under planktonic conditions, miltefosine displays potent in vitro activity against multiple fluconazole-susceptible and -resistant C. albicans clinical isolates, including isolates overexpressing efflux pumps and/or with well-characterized Erg11 mutations. Moreover, miltefosine inhibits C. albicans biofilm formation and displays activity against preformed biofilms. Serial passage experiments confirmed that miltefosine has a reduced potential to elicit resistance, and screening of a library of C. albicans transcription factor mutants provided additional insight into the activity of miltefosine against C. albicans growing under planktonic and biofilm conditions. Finally, we demonstrate the in vivo efficacy of topical treatment with miltefosine in the murine model of oropharyngeal candidiasis. Overall, our results confirm the potential of miltefosine as a promising antifungal drug candidate, in particular for the treatment of azole-resistant and biofilm-associated superficial candidiasis. PMID:26416861

  12. In Vitro Activity of Miltefosine against Candida albicans under Planktonic and Biofilm Growth Conditions and In Vivo Efficacy in a Murine Model of Oral Candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Vila, Taissa Vieira Machado; Chaturvedi, Ashok K; Rozental, Sonia; Lopez-Ribot, Jose L

    2015-12-01

    The generation of a new antifungal against Candida albicans biofilms has become a major priority, since biofilm formation by this opportunistic pathogenic fungus is usually associated with an increased resistance to azole antifungal drugs and treatment failures. Miltefosine is an alkyl phospholipid with promising antifungal activity. Here, we report that, when tested under planktonic conditions, miltefosine displays potent in vitro activity against multiple fluconazole-susceptible and -resistant C. albicans clinical isolates, including isolates overexpressing efflux pumps and/or with well-characterized Erg11 mutations. Moreover, miltefosine inhibits C. albicans biofilm formation and displays activity against preformed biofilms. Serial passage experiments confirmed that miltefosine has a reduced potential to elicit resistance, and screening of a library of C. albicans transcription factor mutants provided additional insight into the activity of miltefosine against C. albicans growing under planktonic and biofilm conditions. Finally, we demonstrate the in vivo efficacy of topical treatment with miltefosine in the murine model of oropharyngeal candidiasis. Overall, our results confirm the potential of miltefosine as a promising antifungal drug candidate, in particular for the treatment of azole-resistant and biofilm-associated superficial candidiasis.

  13. Salmonella enterica serovar Senftenberg human clinical isolates lacking SPI-1.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qinghua; Coburn, Bryan; Deng, Wanyin; Li, Yuling; Shi, Xiaolu; Lan, Quanxue; Wang, Bing; Coombes, Brian K; Finlay, B Brett

    2008-04-01

    Nontyphoidal Salmonella species cause gastrointestinal disease worldwide. The prevailing theory of Salmonella enteropathogenesis is that bacterial invasion of the intestinal epithelium is essential for virulence and that this requires the virulence-associated genomic region Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1). Recent studies of Salmonella enterica infection models have demonstrated that enterocolitis and diarrhea in mice and cows can occur independently of SPI-1. In this study, we sought to confirm whether two S. enterica serovar Senftenberg clinical isolates lacked genes essential for SPI-1 function. Two clinical strains were isolated and identified as being S. enterica serovar Senftenberg from four stool samples from a food-borne disease outbreak affecting seven individuals in Shenzhen, Guangdong Province, China, using conventional methods, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and multilocus sequence typing. The possibility of coinfection with other potential bacteria or usual viruses was excluded. Two isolates were analyzed for the presence of invA, sipA, ssaR, sifA, and sopE2 by PCR and Southern blotting and were then assayed for the presence of SPI-1 by PCR and long-range PCR for fhlA-hilA, hilA-spaP, and spaP-invH and Southern blot analysis. A long-range PCR fragment from fhlA to mutS covering the 5' and 3' flanks of SPI-1 was also amplified from the two clinical isolates and sequenced. In addition, the two clinical isolates were assayed for enteroinvasiveness in vitro. Murine infection models were also examined. Biochemical tests and serotyping confirmed that the two clinical isolates are S. enterica serovar Senftenberg. However, they lacked genes critical for SPI-1 function but contained SPI-2 genes and were attenuated for the invasion of cultured intestinal epithelial cells. In conclusion, clinical S. enterica serovar Senftenberg strains isolated from a food-borne disease outbreak lack the invasion-associated locus SPI-1, indicating that SPI-1 is not

  14. Isolated cardiac sarcoidosis: clinical characteristics, diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Isobe, Mitsuaki; Tezuka, Daisuke

    2015-03-01

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic disease characterized by the development of noncaseating epithelioid granulomas in multiple organs. Despite extensive investigations over a long period of time, the etiology of this disease remains unknown. Cardiac involvement of this disease is the most ominous complication leading to fatal outcome. Recently, attention has been focused on isolated cardiac sarcoidosis, which exists without clinically apparent sarcoidosis elsewhere. One of the critical issues of isolated cardiac sarcoidosis is difficulty in diagnosis, since existence of the cardiac lesion should be detected from cardiac manifestations alone. Because specificity of biomarkers or sensitivity of histological examination of biopsied sample is very low, diagnosis of isolated cardiac sarcoidosis mainly depends on imaging modalities. In this review article we summarized current knowledge on the pathogenesis of sarcoidosis, clinical features of cardiac sarcoidosis especially that isolated to the heart by showing some typical cases. Utilities and problems of diagnostic imaging tests for this condition including echocardiography, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, and fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography are discussed. Advances in pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatment for cardiac sarcoidosis have improved the prognosis of cardiac sarcoidosis to a great deal; however, there are many issues that remain to be solved in the management of isolated cardiac sarcoidosis.

  15. Method for microRNA isolation from clinical serum samples.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu; Kowdley, Kris V

    2012-12-01

    MicroRNAs are a group of intracellular noncoding RNA molecules that have been implicated in a variety of human diseases. Because of their high stability in blood, microRNAs released into circulation could be potentially utilized as noninvasive biomarkers for diagnosis or prognosis. Current microRNA isolation protocols are specifically designed for solid tissues and are impractical for biomarker development utilizing small-volume serum samples on a large scale. Thus, a protocol for microRNA isolation from serum is needed to accommodate these conditions in biomarker development. To establish such a protocol, we developed a simplified approach to normalize sample input by using single synthetic spike-in microRNA. We evaluated three commonly used commercial microRNA isolation kits for the best performance by comparing RNA quality and yield. The manufacturer's protocol was further modified to improve the microRNA yield from 200μl of human serum. MicroRNAs isolated from a large set of clinical serum samples were tested on the miRCURY LNA real-time PCR panel and confirmed to be suitable for high-throughput microRNA profiling. In conclusion, we have established a proven method for microRNA isolation from clinical serum samples suitable for microRNA biomarker development.

  16. Candida albicans osteomyelitis as a cause of chest pain and visual loss.

    PubMed

    Magano, Rita; Cortez, Joana; Ramos, Evelise; Trindade, Luís

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans osteomyelitis is a rare disease that occurs in immunocompromised individuals, sometimes with a late diagnosis related to the mismatch between symptoms and candidemia. This case refers to a 36-year-old male patient with a history of oesophageal surgery for achalasia with multiple subsequent surgeries and hospitalisation in the intensive care unit for oesophageal fistula complication. Four months after discharge, the patient was admitted to the infectious diseases department with pain in the 10th-12th left ribs, swelling of the 4th-6th costal cartilage and decreased visual acuity. An MRI study showed thickening and diffuse enhancement, with no defined borders in the cartilage and ribs, compatible with infection. After performing a CT-guided bone biopsy, isolated C. albicans sensitive to antifungal agents was detected. The patient started therapy with liposomal amphotericin B and maintenance fluconazole for 6 months and showed clinical and radiological improvement within this time. PMID:26475877

  17. A microRNA isolation method from clinical samples

    PubMed Central

    Zununi Vahed, Sepideh; Barzegari, Abolfazl; Rahbar Saadat, Yalda; Mohammadi, Somayeh; Samadi, Nasser

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: microRNAs (miRNAs) are considered to be novel molecular biomakers that could be exploited in the diagnosis and treatment of different diseases. The present study aimed to develop an efficient miRNA isolation method from different clinical specimens. Methods: Total RNAs were isolated by Trizol reagent followed by precipitation of the large RNAs with potassium acetate (KCH3COOH), polyethylene glycol (PEG) 4000 and 6000, and lithium chloride (LiCl). Then, small RNAs were enriched and recovered from the supernatants by applying a combination of LiCl and ethanol. The efficiency of the method was evaluated through the quality, quantity, and integrity of the recovered RNAs using the A260/280 absorbance ratio, reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR), and quantitative real-time PCR (q-PCR). Results: Comparison of different RNA isolation methods based on the precipitation of DNA and large RNAs, high miRNA recovery and PCR efficiency revealed that applying potassium acetate with final precipitation of small RNAs using 2.5 M LiCl plus ethanol can provide high yield and quality small RNAs that can be exploited for clinical purposes. Conclusion: The current isolation method can be applied for most clinical samples including cells, formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues and even body fluids with a wide applicability in molecular biology investigations. PMID:27340621

  18. Molecular Screening of Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B Gene in Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Ataee, Ramezan Ali; Karami, Ali; Izadi, Morteza; Aghania, Aref; Ataee, Mohammad Hossein

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The role of staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) in food poisoning is well known, however its role in other diseases remains to be explored. The aim of this study is the molecular screening and characterization of the SEB gene in clinically isolated strains. Materials and Methods: In this experimentally study, 300 Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) strains isolated from clinical samples were assayed. The isolated strains were confirmed by conventional bacteriological methods. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to determine the enterotoxin B (ent B) gene. Assessment of toxin production in all strains that contained the ent B gene was then performed. Finally, using specific antibody against SEB, a Western-blot was applied to confirm detection of enterotoxin B production. Results: Results indicated that only 5% of the 300 clinically isolated S. aureus contained the ent B gene. All strains which contained the ent B gene produced a proteinous enterotoxin B. The results of sequence determination of the PCR product were compared with the gene bank database and 98% similarity was achieved. The results of the Western-blot confirmed that enterotoxin B was produced in strains that contained the ent B gene. Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that 5% of clinically isolated S. aureus strains produce enterotoxin B. Considering that the enterotoxin B is an important superantigen, it is possible that a delay in diagnosis and lack of early proper treatment can cause an incidence of late complications, particularly in staphylococcal chronic infections. For this reason, it is suggested that in addition to detecting bacteria, an enterotoxin B detection test should be performed to control its toxigenicity. PMID:23508641

  19. Echinocandin and triazole antifungal susceptibility profiles for clinical opportunistic yeast and mold isolates collected from 2010 to 2011: application of new CLSI clinical breakpoints and epidemiological cutoff values for characterization of geographic and temporal trends of antifungal resistance.

    PubMed

    Pfaller, Michael A; Messer, Shawn A; Woosley, Leah N; Jones, Ronald N; Castanheira, Mariana

    2013-08-01

    The SENTRY Antimicrobial Surveillance Program monitors global susceptibility and resistance rates of newer and established antifungal agents. We report the echinocandin and triazole antifungal susceptibility patterns for 3,418 contemporary clinical isolates of yeasts and molds. The isolates were obtained from 98 laboratories in 34 countries during 2010 and 2011. Yeasts not presumptively identified by CHROMagar, the trehalose test, or growth at 42°C and all molds were sequence identified using internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and 28S (yeasts) or ITS, translation elongation factor (TEF), and 28S (molds) genes. Susceptibility testing was performed against 7 antifungals (anidulafungin, caspofungin, micafungin, fluconazole, itraconazole, posaconazole, and voriconazole) using CLSI methods. Rates of resistance to all agents were determined using the new CLSI clinical breakpoints and epidemiological cutoff value criteria, as appropriate. Sequencing of fks hot spots was performed for echinocandin non-wild-type (WT) strains. Isolates included 3,107 from 21 Candida spp., 146 from 9 Aspergillus spp., 84 from Cryptococcus neoformans, 40 from 23 other mold species, and 41 from 9 other yeast species. Among Candida spp., resistance to the echinocandins was low (0.0 to 1.7%). Candida albicans and Candida glabrata that were resistant to anidulafungin, caspofungin, or micafungin were shown to have fks mutations. Resistance to fluconazole was low among the isolates of C. albicans (0.4%), Candida tropicalis (1.3%), and Candida parapsilosis (2.1%); however, 8.8% of C. glabrata isolates were resistant to fluconazole. Among echinocandin-resistant C. glabrata isolates from 2011, 38% were fluconazole resistant. Voriconazole was active against all Candida spp. except C. glabrata (10.5% non-WT), whereas posaconazole showed decreased activity against C. albicans (4.4%) and Candida krusei (15.2% non-WT). All agents except for the echinocandins were active against C. neoformans, and the

  20. Lemongrass-Incorporated Tissue Conditioner Against Candida albicans Culture

    PubMed Central

    Amornvit, Pokpong; Srithavaj, Theerathavaj

    2014-01-01

    Background: Tissue conditioner is applied popularly with dental prosthesis during wound healing process but it becomes a reservoir of oral microbiota, especially Candida species after long-term usage. Several antifungal drugs have been mixed with this material to control fungal level. In this study, lemongrass essential oil was added into COE-COMFORT tissue conditioner before being determined for anti-Candida efficacy. Materials and Methods: Lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus) essential oil was primarily determined for antifungal activity against C. albicans American type culture collection (ATCC) 10231 and MIC (minimum inhibitory concentration) value by agar disk diffusion and broth microdilution methods, respectively. COE-COMFORT tissue conditioner was prepared as recommended by the manufacturer after a fixed volume of the oil at its MIC or higher concentrations were mixed thoroughly in its liquid part. Antifungal efficacy of the tissue conditioner with/without herb was finally analyzed. Results: Lemongrass essential oil displayed potent antifungal activity against C. albicans ATCC 10231and its MIC value was 0.06% (v/v). Dissimilarly, the tissue conditioner containing the oil at MIC level did not cease the growth of the tested fungus. Both reference and clinical isolates of C. albicans were completely inhibited after exposed to the tissue conditioner containing at least 0.25% (v/v) of the oil (approximately 4-time MIC). The tissue conditioner without herb or with nystatin was employed as negative or positive control, respectively. Conclusion: COE-COMFORT tissue conditioner supplemented with lemongrass essential oil obviously demonstrated another desirable property as in vitro anti-Candida efficacy to minimize the risk of getting Candidal infection. PMID:25177638

  1. Complete Genome Sequences of a Clinical Isolate and an Environmental Isolate of Vibrio parahaemolyticus.

    PubMed

    Lüdeke, Catharina H M; Kong, Nguyet; Weimer, Bart C; Fischer, Markus; Jones, Jessica L

    2015-03-26

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is the leading cause of seafood-borne infections in the United States. We report complete genome sequences for two V. parahaemolyticus strains isolated in 2007, CDC_K4557 and FDA_R31 of clinical and oyster origin, respectively. These two sequences might assist in the investigation of differential virulence of this organism.

  2. [In vitro antifungal resistance in Candida albicans from HIV-infected patients with and without oral candidosis.].

    PubMed

    Ceballos Salobreña, A; Gaitán Cepeda, L A; Orihuela Cañada, F; Olea Barrionuevo, D; Ceballos García, L; Quindós, G

    1999-12-01

    The main purpose of this study has been to determine the in vitro antifungal susceptibility of clinical isolates from HIV-infected or AIDS patients, depending on the presence of oral candidosis. The oral cavity of 307 HIV-infected or AIDS patients was examined and an oral swab was cultured on Sabouraud glucose agar and studied by conventional mycological methods. In vitro antifungal susceptibility to amphotericin B, nystatin, fluconazole, itraconazole and ketoconazole was tested by disk diffusion with Neo-Sensitabs tablets (Rosco Diagnostica, Dinamarca). One hundred and thirty five Candida albicans isolates (91 serotype A, 38 serotype B, three C. albicans variety stellatoidea and three untyped isolates), three Candida krusei and two Candida glabrata were obtained. All the isolates were susceptible to nystatin and amphotericin B. However, 7.9% isolates were resistant to fluconazole and 2.9% isolates were resistant to ketoconazole or itraconazole. Nearly all C. krusei and C. glabrata isolates, 31% patients with candidosis and 20% Candida-colonized patients showed decreased susceptibility to azoles. This study shows that polyenes had a great in vitro efficacy against clinical isolates from HIV-infected patients and that in vitro resistance to azoles is not as high as observed in other countries.

  3. In vitro activity of eugenol against Candida albicans biofilms.

    PubMed

    He, Miao; Du, Minquan; Fan, Mingwen; Bian, Zhuan

    2007-03-01

    Most manifestations of candidiasis are associated with biofilm formation occurring on the surfaces of host tissues and medical devices. Candida albicans is the most frequently isolated causative pathogen of candidiasis, and the biofilms display significantly increased levels of resistance to the conventional antifungal agents. Eugenol, the major phenolic component of clove essential oil, possesses potent antifungal activity. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of eugenol on preformed biofilms, adherent cells, subsequent biofilm formation and cell morphogenesis of C. albicans. Eugenol displayed in vitro activity against C. albicans cells within biofilms, when MIC(50) for sessile cells was 500 mg/L. C. albicans adherent cell populations (after 0, 1, 2 and 4 h of adherence) were treated with various concentrations of eugenol (0, 20, 200 and 2,000 mg/L). The extent of subsequent biofilm formation were then assessed with the tetrazolium salt reduction assay. Effect of eugenol on morphogenesis of C. albicans cells was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results indicated that the effect of eugenol on adherent cells and subsequent biofilm formation was dependent on the initial adherence time and the concentration of this compound, and that eugenol can inhibit filamentous growth of C. albicans cells. In addition, using human erythrocytes, eugenol showed low hemolytic activity. These results indicated that eugenol displayed potent activity against C. albicans biofilms in vitro with low cytotoxicity and therefore has potential therapeutic implication for biofilm-associated candidal infections. PMID:17356790

  4. Molecular identification of Sporothrix clinical isolates in China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ting-ting; Zhang, Ke; Zhou, Xun

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the molecular phylogeny of 64 clinical isolates which were identified as Sporothrix schenckii sensu lato by morphological identification. All of the strains were isolates from patients from several provinces in China. The phylogeny was inferred by DNA sequence analyses based on datasets of the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and a combined ITS and partial β-tubulin region. Reference sequences were retrieved from GenBank. Results showed that all of the isolates were clustered in a distinct clade with a type of Sporothrix globosa. Our analysis showed that S. globosa is the causal agent of the tested sporotrichosis in China, rather than S. schenckii that was generally believed to be the case. The existence of S. schenckii in China remains to be confirmed. This study improved our understanding of the distribution of the species in S. schenckii complex.

  5. Revisited distribution of nonfermenting Gram-negative bacilli clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Jacquier, H; Carbonnelle, E; Corvec, S; Illiaquer, M; Le Monnier, A; Bille, E; Zahar, J R; Beretti, J L; Jauréguy, F; Fihman, V; Tankovic, J; Cattoir, V

    2011-12-01

    Nonfermenting Gram-negative bacilli (NF-GNB) are ubiquitous environmental opportunistic bacteria frequently misidentified by conventional phenotypic methods. The aim of this study was to determine the distribution of NF-GNB species by 16 S rRNA gene sequencing (used as reference method) and to compare performances of biochemical tests and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). From nine French hospitals, 188 NF-GNB isolates (except P. aeruginosa and A. baumannii) were prospectively collected from 187 clinical samples between December 2008 and May 2009. By using the genotypic approach, 173 (92%) and 188 (100%) isolates were identified to the species and genus level, respectively. They covered 35 species and 20 genera, with a predominance of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Achromobacter xylosoxidans, and Pseudomonas putida group bacteria. Of the 173 species-level identified strains, concordant identification to the species-level was obtained for 75.1%, 83% and 88.9% of isolates with API 20 NE strip, the VITEK-2 (ID-GN card) system and MALDI-TOF-MS, respectively. By excluding S. maltophilia isolates accurately identified by the three methods, genus-level identification was much higher for MALDI-TOF-MS (92.9%), compared with API 20 NE and VITEK-2 (76.2% and 80.8%, respectively). In conclusion, MALDI-TOF-MS represents a rapid, inexpensive, and accurate tool for routine identification of NF-GNB in human clinical samples.

  6. Identification and Pathogenic Potential of Clinical Bacillus and Paenibacillus Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Celandroni, Francesco; Salvetti, Sara; Gueye, Sokhna Aissatou; Mazzantini, Diletta; Lupetti, Antonella; Senesi, Sonia; Ghelardi, Emilia

    2016-01-01

    The soil-related Bacillus and Paenibacillus species have increasingly been implicated in various human diseases. Nevertheless, their identification still poses problems in the clinical microbiology laboratory and, with the exception of Bacillus anthracis and Bacillus cereus, little is known on their pathogenicity for humans. In this study, we evaluated the use of matrix-assisted laser desorption—ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) in the identification of clinical isolates of these genera and conducted genotypic and phenotypic analyses to highlight specific virulence properties. Seventy-five clinical isolates were subjected to biochemical and MALDI-TOF MS identification. 16S rDNA sequencing and supplemental tests were used to solve any discrepancies or failures in the identification results. MALDI-TOF MS significantly outperformed classical biochemical testing for correct species identification and no misidentification was obtained. One third of the collected strains belonged to the B. cereus species, but also Bacillus pumilus and Bacillus subtilis were isolated at high rate. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing showed that all the B. cereus, B. licheniformis, B. simplex, B. mycoides, Paenibacillus glucanolyticus and Paenibacillus lautus isolates are resistant to penicillin. The evaluation of toxin/enzyme secretion, toxin-encoding genes, motility, and biofilm formation revealed that B. cereus displays the highest virulence potential. However, although generally considered nonpathogenic, most of the other species were shown to swim, swarm, produce biofilms, and secrete proteases that can have a role in bacterial virulence. In conclusion, MALDI-TOF MS appears useful for fast and accurate identification of Bacillus and Paenibacillus strains whose virulence properties make them of increasing clinical relevance. PMID:27031639

  7. Identification and Pathogenic Potential of Clinical Bacillus and Paenibacillus Isolates.

    PubMed

    Celandroni, Francesco; Salvetti, Sara; Gueye, Sokhna Aissatou; Mazzantini, Diletta; Lupetti, Antonella; Senesi, Sonia; Ghelardi, Emilia

    2016-01-01

    The soil-related Bacillus and Paenibacillus species have increasingly been implicated in various human diseases. Nevertheless, their identification still poses problems in the clinical microbiology laboratory and, with the exception of Bacillus anthracis and Bacillus cereus, little is known on their pathogenicity for humans. In this study, we evaluated the use of matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) in the identification of clinical isolates of these genera and conducted genotypic and phenotypic analyses to highlight specific virulence properties. Seventy-five clinical isolates were subjected to biochemical and MALDI-TOF MS identification. 16S rDNA sequencing and supplemental tests were used to solve any discrepancies or failures in the identification results. MALDI-TOF MS significantly outperformed classical biochemical testing for correct species identification and no misidentification was obtained. One third of the collected strains belonged to the B. cereus species, but also Bacillus pumilus and Bacillus subtilis were isolated at high rate. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing showed that all the B. cereus, B. licheniformis, B. simplex, B. mycoides, Paenibacillus glucanolyticus and Paenibacillus lautus isolates are resistant to penicillin. The evaluation of toxin/enzyme secretion, toxin-encoding genes, motility, and biofilm formation revealed that B. cereus displays the highest virulence potential. However, although generally considered nonpathogenic, most of the other species were shown to swim, swarm, produce biofilms, and secrete proteases that can have a role in bacterial virulence. In conclusion, MALDI-TOF MS appears useful for fast and accurate identification of Bacillus and Paenibacillus strains whose virulence properties make them of increasing clinical relevance. PMID:27031639

  8. Identification and Pathogenic Potential of Clinical Bacillus and Paenibacillus Isolates.

    PubMed

    Celandroni, Francesco; Salvetti, Sara; Gueye, Sokhna Aissatou; Mazzantini, Diletta; Lupetti, Antonella; Senesi, Sonia; Ghelardi, Emilia

    2016-01-01

    The soil-related Bacillus and Paenibacillus species have increasingly been implicated in various human diseases. Nevertheless, their identification still poses problems in the clinical microbiology laboratory and, with the exception of Bacillus anthracis and Bacillus cereus, little is known on their pathogenicity for humans. In this study, we evaluated the use of matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) in the identification of clinical isolates of these genera and conducted genotypic and phenotypic analyses to highlight specific virulence properties. Seventy-five clinical isolates were subjected to biochemical and MALDI-TOF MS identification. 16S rDNA sequencing and supplemental tests were used to solve any discrepancies or failures in the identification results. MALDI-TOF MS significantly outperformed classical biochemical testing for correct species identification and no misidentification was obtained. One third of the collected strains belonged to the B. cereus species, but also Bacillus pumilus and Bacillus subtilis were isolated at high rate. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing showed that all the B. cereus, B. licheniformis, B. simplex, B. mycoides, Paenibacillus glucanolyticus and Paenibacillus lautus isolates are resistant to penicillin. The evaluation of toxin/enzyme secretion, toxin-encoding genes, motility, and biofilm formation revealed that B. cereus displays the highest virulence potential. However, although generally considered nonpathogenic, most of the other species were shown to swim, swarm, produce biofilms, and secrete proteases that can have a role in bacterial virulence. In conclusion, MALDI-TOF MS appears useful for fast and accurate identification of Bacillus and Paenibacillus strains whose virulence properties make them of increasing clinical relevance.

  9. Candida/Candida biofilms. First description of dual-species Candida albicans/C. rugosa biofilm.

    PubMed

    Martins, Carlos Henrique Gomes; Pires, Regina Helena; Cunha, Aline Oliveira; Pereira, Cristiane Aparecida Martins; Singulani, Junya de Lacorte; Abrão, Fariza; Moraes, Thais de; Mendes-Giannini, Maria José Soares

    2016-04-01

    Denture liners have physical properties that favour plaque accumulation and colonization by Candida species, irritating oral tissues and causing denture stomatitis. To isolate and determine the incidence of oral Candida species in dental prostheses, oral swabs were collected from the dental prostheses of 66 patients. All the strains were screened for their ability to form biofilms; both monospecies and dual-species combinations were tested. Candida albicans (63 %) was the most frequently isolated microorganism; Candida tropicalis (14 %), Candida glabrata (13 %), Candida rugosa (5 %), Candida parapsilosis (3 %), and Candida krusei (2 %) were also detected. The XTT assay showed that C. albicans SC5314 possessed a biofilm-forming ability significantly higher (p < 0.001) than non-albicans Candida strains, after 6 h 37 °C. The total C. albicans CFU from a dual-species biofilm was less than the total CFU of a monospecies C. albicans biofilm. In contrast to the profuse hyphae verified in monospecies C. albicans biofilms, micrographies showed that the C. albicans/non-albicans Candida biofilms consisted of sparse yeast forms and profuse budding yeast cells that generated a network. These results suggested that C. albicans and the tested Candida species could co-exist in biofilms displaying apparent antagonism. The study provide the first description of C. albicans/C. rugosa mixed biofilm.

  10. Genetic diversity of multidrug resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolated from clinical and non clinical samples in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Bendary, M M; Solyman, S M; Azab, M M; Mahmoud, N F; Hanora, A M

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the increasing incidence of diseases caused by Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) has been noted in the university hospitals of El-Sharkia and Assuit governorates - Egypt. Therefore, we studied the genetic relatedness of multidrug resistant S. aureus isolates from different sources in the above mentioned governorates. One hundred and fifty six S. aureus isolates were divided into 5 different groups, 1 non clinical isolates from different food products and 4 different clinical isolates of human and animal sources in the 2 different governorates. Epidemiological characteristics of 156 S. aureus isolates were determined by phenotypic methods including quantitative antibiogram typing and biofilm production. Genetic typing of 35 multidrug resistant (MDR) isolates (7 from each group) based on 16S rRNA gene sequence, virulence and antimicrobial resistance gene profiles was done. The genetic relatedness of the highest virulent strain from each group was detected based on different single locus sequence typing and multi-locus sequence typing (MLST). S. aureus strains isolated from different sources and geographical areas showed high diversity. The genetic typing revealed different sequence types and different sequences of coa and spa genes. S. aureus isolates were found highly diverse in Egypt. PMID:27609475

  11. Prevalence of hypermutators among clinical Acinetobacter baumannii isolates

    PubMed Central

    Komp Lindgren, Patricia; Higgins, Paul G.; Seifert, Harald; Cars, Otto

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The objectives of this study were to study the presence of mutators in a set of Acinetobacter baumannii isolates and to explore whether there is a correlation between mutation rates and antibiotic resistance. Methods The variation in mutation rate was evaluated for 237 clinical A. baumannii isolates by determining the frequency of their mutation to rifampicin resistance. For each isolate, the antibiotic resistance profile was determined by disc diffusion and/or Etest. Isolates were divided into susceptible, resistant and MDR groups according to their resistance to five groups of different antibiotics. A comparison between differences in mutation frequency (f) and strain-specific factors was performed. Results Of the 237 isolates 32%, 18% and 50% were classified as susceptible, resistant and MDR, respectively. The f of rifampicin resistance varied between 2.2 × 10−10 and 1.2 × 10−6. Of the strains under investigation, 16% had an ≥2.5- to 166-fold higher f. The presence of mutators (definition ≥2.5-fold increase in f compared with ATCC 19606) in the MDR group (22%) was significantly higher (P < 0.05) than that in the susceptible and resistant groups (11% and 7%, respectively). Furthermore, f was significantly higher in the MDR group compared with that in the susceptible and resistant groups. Conclusions The facts that 26 of 37 mutator isolates (70%) in the population were MDR and that there was a significantly higher general f in isolates exhibiting an MDR profile suggest that hypermutability can be of advantage for the organism in a selective environment with extensive exposure to antimicrobials. PMID:26660878

  12. Liposomal thymoquinone effectively combats fluconazole-resistant Candida albicans in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Khan, Masood Alam; Aljarbou, Ahmad N; Khan, Arif; Younus, Hina

    2015-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop a novel liposomal formulation of thymoquinone (TQ) to treat fluconazole-susceptible and -resistant Candida albicans (C. albicans) infections. The liposomal preparation of TQ (Lip-TQ) was used against a fluconazole-susceptible or -resistant isolate of C. albicans. Various doses of fluconazole (0, 5, 10, 20 and 40 mg/kg) or free TQ or Lip-TQ (0, 1, 2 and 5mg/kg) were used to treat C. albicans infected mice. Mice were observed for 40 days post C. albicans infection, and their kidneys were assessed for the fungal load. Fluconazole showed anti-fungal activity against the drug-susceptible, but not against the -resistant isolate of C. albicans. Free TQ showed its activity against both fluconazole-susceptible or -resistant C. albicans, however, Lip-TQ was found to be the most effective and imparted ∼ 100% and ∼ 90% survival of mice infected with fluconazole-susceptible and -resistant isolates of C. albicans, respectively. Mice treated with Lip-TQ showed highly reduced severity of infection in their tissue homogenates. Therefore, Lip-TQ may effectively be used in the treatment of C. albicans infections, including those which are not responding to fluconazole.

  13. [Comparison of microdilution and disk diffusion methods for the detection of fluconazole and voriconazole susceptibility against clinical Candida glabrata isolates and determination of changing susceptibility with new CLSI breakpoints].

    PubMed

    Hazırolan, Gülşen; Sarıbaş, Zeynep; Arıkan Akdağlı, Sevtap

    2016-07-01

    Candida albicans is the most frequently isolated species as the causative agent of Candida infections. However, in recent years, the isolation rate of non-albicans Candida species have increased. In many centers, Candida glabrata is one of the commonly isolated non-albicans species of C.glabrata infections which are difficult-to-treat due to decreased susceptibility to fluconazole and cross-resistance to other azoles. The aims of this study were to determine the in vitro susceptibility profiles of clinical C.glabrata isolates against fluconazole and voriconazole by microdilution and disk diffusion methods and to evaluate the results with both the previous (CLSI) and current species-specific CLSI (Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute) clinical breakpoints. A total of 70 C.glabrata strains isolated from clinical samples were included in the study. The identification of the isolates was performed by morphologic examination on cornmeal Tween 80 agar and assimilation profiles obtained by using ID32C (BioMérieux, France). Broth microdilution and disk diffusion methods were performed according to CLSI M27-A3 and CLSI M44-A2 documents, respectively. The results were evaluated according to CLSI M27-A3 and M44-A2 documents and new vs. species-specific CLSI breakpoints. By using both previous and new CLSI breakpoints, broth microdilution test results showed that voriconazole has greater in vitro activity than fluconazole against C.glabrata isolates. For the two drugs tested, very major error was not observed with disk diffusion method when microdilution method was considered as the reference method. Since "susceptible" category no more exists for fluconazole vs. C.glabrata, the isolates that were interpreted as susceptible by previous breakpoints were evaluated as susceptible-dose dependent by current CLSI breakpoints. Since species-specific breakpoints remain yet undetermined for voriconazole, comparative analysis was not possible for this agent. The results obtained

  14. Demonstration of synergy with fluconazole and either ibuprofen, sodium salicylate, or propylparaben against Candida albicans in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Scott, E M; Tariq, V N; McCrory, R M

    1995-01-01

    The combination of fluconazole with either ibuprofen, sodium salicylate, or propylparaben resulted in synergistic activity (fractional inhibitory index, < 0.5) against Candida albicans NCYC 620 in a microdilution checkerboard assay. Synergism between miconazole and ibuprofen was also demonstrated. In three or four clinical isolates of C. albicans from AIDS patients, the combination of fluconazole and ibuprofen was synergistic. Preparation of the inoculum and the growth conditions used were those recommended by the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards for susceptibility testing. A visual estimation of total inhibition of growth and determination of an 80% reduction in the optical density at 492 nm compared with those for the control were taken as endpoints for the calculation of synergy, and a good correlation between both estimates was demonstrated. PMID:8592988

  15. Flavimonas oryzihabitans bacteremia: clinical features and microbiological characteristics of isolates.

    PubMed

    Lin, R D; Hsueh, P R; Chang, J C; Teng, L J; Chang, S C; Ho, S W; Hsieh, W C; Luh, K T

    1997-05-01

    Flavimonas oryzihabitans is rarely reported as a pathogen in humans. Twelve cases of F. oryzihabitans bacteremia were diagnosed at National Taiwan University Hospital over a 3-year period. The clinical features of these patients were analyzed, and antimicrobial susceptibilities and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) patterns of the 12 isolates were studied. Among these 12 patients, eight (67%) had underlying neoplastic diseases and all acquired F. oryzihabitans bacteremia while hospitalized. The clinical syndromes included primary bacteremia in 5 patients (42%), biliary tract infection in 3 (25%), and peritonitis, subdural empyema, infusion-related bacteremia, and pneumonia in 1 each. Polymicrobial bacteremia or concomitant fungemia was seen in three patients (25%). All the patients survived after antibiotic treatment. All isolates were susceptible to piperacillin, third-generation cephalosporins, aminoglycosides, and quinolones but resistant to cephalothin, cefuroxime, and trimethoprim. Susceptibility to aztreonam was variable (25%). The RAPD patterns differed among the isolates, indicating the epidemiological unrelatedness of these infections. F. oryzihabitans should be included as an etiology of severe nosocomial infection in patients with underlying debilitating diseases.

  16. Flavimonas oryzihabitans bacteremia: clinical features and microbiological characteristics of isolates.

    PubMed

    Lin, R D; Hsueh, P R; Chang, J C; Teng, L J; Chang, S C; Ho, S W; Hsieh, W C; Luh, K T

    1997-05-01

    Flavimonas oryzihabitans is rarely reported as a pathogen in humans. Twelve cases of F. oryzihabitans bacteremia were diagnosed at National Taiwan University Hospital over a 3-year period. The clinical features of these patients were analyzed, and antimicrobial susceptibilities and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) patterns of the 12 isolates were studied. Among these 12 patients, eight (67%) had underlying neoplastic diseases and all acquired F. oryzihabitans bacteremia while hospitalized. The clinical syndromes included primary bacteremia in 5 patients (42%), biliary tract infection in 3 (25%), and peritonitis, subdural empyema, infusion-related bacteremia, and pneumonia in 1 each. Polymicrobial bacteremia or concomitant fungemia was seen in three patients (25%). All the patients survived after antibiotic treatment. All isolates were susceptible to piperacillin, third-generation cephalosporins, aminoglycosides, and quinolones but resistant to cephalothin, cefuroxime, and trimethoprim. Susceptibility to aztreonam was variable (25%). The RAPD patterns differed among the isolates, indicating the epidemiological unrelatedness of these infections. F. oryzihabitans should be included as an etiology of severe nosocomial infection in patients with underlying debilitating diseases. PMID:9142784

  17. Combined Biochemical and Serological Typing of Clinical Isolates of Klebsiella

    PubMed Central

    Rennie, R. P.; Duncan, I. B. R.

    1974-01-01

    In a series of 640 strains of Klebsiella isolated from clinical specimens over a 7-month period, there were sufficient biochemical differences between strains to allow a biochemical typing system to be established. Biochemical tests were done in solid media inoculated with a modified Steers inocula replicator. Biotypes were designated by a numerical coding system; 29 distinct biotypes were found among the 640 strains of Klebsiella. Serotyping of 270 of the strains was done by the Quellung reaction, and 40 capsular types were identified. Numerical biotypes and serotypes of strains appeared to vary independently. When used in conjunction, the two methods subdivided the strains into many more distinct types than either used alone. With the combined method over 100 types of Klebsiella were distinguished among the 270 isolates. PMID:4608362

  18. A New Endogenous Overexpression System of Multidrug Transporters of Candida albicans Suitable for Structural and Functional Studies

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Atanu; Khandelwal, Nitesh K.; Sanglard, Dominique; Prasad, Rajendra

    2016-01-01

    Fungal pathogens have a robust array of multidrug transporters which aid in active expulsion of drugs and xenobiotics to help them evade toxic effects of drugs. Thus, these transporters impose a major impediment to effective chemotherapy. Although the Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain AD1-8u− has catered well to the need of an overexpression system to study drug transport by multidrug transporters of Candida albicans, artifacts associated with a heterologous system could not be excluded. To avoid the issue, we exploited a azole-resistant clinical isolate of C. albicans to develop a new system devoid of three major multidrug transporters (Cdr1p, Cdr2p, and Mdr1p) for the overexpression of multidrug transporters under native hyperactive CDR1 promoter due to gain of function (GOF) mutation in TAC1. The study deals with overexpression and functional characterization of representatives of two major classes of multidrug transporters, Cdr1p and Mdr1p, to prove the functionality of this newly developed endogenous expression system. Expression of native Cdr1 and Mdr1 protein in C. albicans cells was confirmed by confocal microscopy and immunodetection and resulted in increased resistance to the putative substrates as compared to control. The system was further validated by overexpressing a few key mutant variants of Cdr1p and Mdr1p. Together, our data confirms the utility of new endogenous overexpression system which is devoid of artifactual factors as most suited for functional characterization of multidrug transporter proteins of C. albicans. PMID:26973635

  19. Echinocandin to fluconazole step-down therapy in critically ill patients with invasive, susceptible Candida albicans infections.

    PubMed

    van der Geest, Patrick J; Rijnders, Bart J A; Vonk, Alieke G; Groeneveld, A B Johan

    2016-03-01

    Invasive Candida spp. infections are increasingly diagnosed in critically ill patients. For initial treatment, an echinocandin is recommended with a possible step-down to fluconazole when the patients' condition is improving and the isolate appears susceptible, but there are no data to support such policy. We studied the safety and efficacy of step-down therapy in critically ill patients with culture proven deep seated or bloodstream infections by C. albicans susceptible to fluconazole. All patients admitted into the intensive care unit from January 2010 to December 2014, who had a culture proven invasive C. albicans infection and received initial treatment with an echinocandin for at least 4 days were included. Data on patient characteristics, treatment and vital outcomes were assessed. Of the 56 patients, 32 received step-down fluconazole therapy, at median day 5, whereas the echinocandin was continued in the other 24. No differences where seen in baseline characteristics or risk factors for invasive C. albicans infection between the two groups. Response rates were similar and no difference where seen in 28-day or 90-day mortality between the groups. Step-down therapy to fluconazole may be safe and effective in critically ill patients with invasive infections by C. albicans, susceptible to fluconazole, who have clinically improved as early as 4 days after start of treatment with an echinocandin.

  20. [Taxonomic study of clinic isolates of Trichophyton in Rosario, Argentina].

    PubMed

    Tartabini, Mirta L; Bonino, Guillermo S; Racca, Liliana; Luque, Alicia G

    2013-01-01

    Due to the pleomorphism and cultural variability displayed by species of the genus Trichophyton, the identification methods based solely on morphological features are usually insufficient for their classification. The goal of the present work was to test a set of phenotypic methods in order to identify fungal isolates that belong to the aforementioned genus. These methods were based on a molecular taxonomic technique used as standard. Clinical isolates (56) were used as samples along with 6 reference strains. Macro and micromorphological studies were performed as well as biochemical and physiological tests such as in vitro hair perforation, nutritional requirements in Trichophyton agar media, urease production and growth on bromocresol purple-milk. solids-glucose (BCP-MS-G) agar. Additionally, PCR fingerprinting using the (GACA)4 primer was employed. As a result of the PCR method, specific profiles were observed for Microsporum canis, Epidermophyton floccosum, Trichophyton rubrum and Trichophyton interdigitale. Identical profiles were obtained for Arthroderma benhamiae y Trichophyton erinacei. Of the total number of clinical isolates, 39 matched the T. rubrum profile while 13 corresponded to A. benhamiae and 4 to T. interdigitale. The most useful phenotypic test to differentiate between T. rubrum and T. mentagrophytes complex strains was alkalinization of the BCP-MS-G medium. Phenotypic tests did not allow differentiation among the T. mentagrophytes complex species. On the other hand, the molecular technique allowed characterization of T. rubrum isolates as well as of those observed in our study and included in the T. mentagrophytes complex: T. interdigitale and Trichophyton sp., the anamorph of A. benhamiae.

  1. Candida glabrata Binding to Candida albicans Hyphae Enables Its Development in Oropharyngeal Candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Tati, Swetha; Davidow, Peter; McCall, Andrew; Hwang-Wong, Elizabeth; Rojas, Isolde G; Cormack, Brendan; Edgerton, Mira

    2016-03-01

    Pathogenic mechanisms of Candida glabrata in oral candidiasis, especially because of its inability to form hyphae, are understudied. Since both Candida albicans and C. glabrata are frequently co-isolated in oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC), we examined their co-adhesion in vitro and observed adhesion of C. glabrata only to C. albicans hyphae microscopically. Mice were infected sublingually with C. albicans or C. glabrata individually, or with both species concurrently, to study their ability to cause OPC. Infection with C. glabrata alone resulted in negligible infection of tongues; however, colonization by C. glabrata was increased by co-infection or a pre-established infection with C. albicans. Furthermore, C. glabrata required C. albicans for colonization of tongues, since decreasing C. albicans burden with fluconazole also reduced C. glabrata. C. albicans hyphal wall adhesins Als1 and Als3 were important for in vitro adhesion of C. glabrata and to establish OPC. C. glabrata cell wall protein coding genes EPA8, EPA19, AWP2, AWP7, and CAGL0F00181 were implicated in mediating adhesion to C. albicans hyphae and remarkably, their expression was induced by incubation with germinated C. albicans. Thus, we found a near essential requirement for the presence of C. albicans for both initial colonization and establishment of OPC infection by C. glabrata.

  2. Candida glabrata Binding to Candida albicans Hyphae Enables Its Development in Oropharyngeal Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Tati, Swetha; Davidow, Peter; McCall, Andrew; Hwang-Wong, Elizabeth; Rojas, Isolde G.; Cormack, Brendan; Edgerton, Mira

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic mechanisms of Candida glabrata in oral candidiasis, especially because of its inability to form hyphae, are understudied. Since both Candida albicans and C. glabrata are frequently co-isolated in oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC), we examined their co-adhesion in vitro and observed adhesion of C. glabrata only to C. albicans hyphae microscopically. Mice were infected sublingually with C. albicans or C. glabrata individually, or with both species concurrently, to study their ability to cause OPC. Infection with C. glabrata alone resulted in negligible infection of tongues; however, colonization by C. glabrata was increased by co-infection or a pre-established infection with C. albicans. Furthermore, C. glabrata required C. albicans for colonization of tongues, since decreasing C. albicans burden with fluconazole also reduced C. glabrata. C. albicans hyphal wall adhesins Als1 and Als3 were important for in vitro adhesion of C. glabrata and to establish OPC. C. glabrata cell wall protein coding genes EPA8, EPA19, AWP2, AWP7, and CAGL0F00181 were implicated in mediating adhesion to C. albicans hyphae and remarkably, their expression was induced by incubation with germinated C. albicans. Thus, we found a near essential requirement for the presence of C. albicans for both initial colonization and establishment of OPC infection by C. glabrata. PMID:27029023

  3. Candida Virulence Properties and Adverse Clinical Outcomes in Neonatal Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Bliss, Joseph M.; Wong, Angela Y.; Bhak, Grace; Laforce-Nesbitt, Sonia S.; Taylor, Sarah; Tan, Sylvia; Stoll, Barbara J.; Higgins, Rosemary D.; Shankaran, Seetha; Benjamin, Daniel K.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine if premature infants with invasive Candida infection caused by strains with increased virulence properties have worse clinical outcomes than those infected with less virulent strains. Study design Clinical isolates were studied from 2 populations; premature infants colonized with Candida (commensal, n=27), and those with invasive candidiasis (n=81). Individual isolates of C. albicans and C. parapsilosis were tested for virulence in each of 3 assays: phenotypic switching, adhesion, and cytotoxicity. Invasive isolates were considered to have enhanced virulence if they measured more than 1 SD above the mean for the commensal isolates in at least 1 assay. Outcomes of patients with invasive isolates with enhanced virulence were compared with those with invasive isolates lacking enhanced virulence characteristics. Results 61% of invasive isolates of C. albicans and 42% of invasive isolates of C. parapsilosis had enhanced virulence. All C. albicans cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) isolates (n=6) and 90% of urine isolates (n=10) had enhanced virulence, compared with 48% of blood isolates (n=40). Infants with more virulent isolates were younger at the time of positive culture and had higher serum creatinine. Conclusions Individual isolates of Candida species vary in their virulence properties. Strains with higher virulence are associated with certain clinical outcomes. PMID:22504098

  4. [Meningitis to Candida albicans at the adult, use of the new diagnosis methods].

    PubMed

    Duclos, G; Dumont, J-C; Ranque, S; Zieleskiewicz, L; Bruder, N

    2014-01-01

    Candida albicans or non-albicans are a frequent source of infection but seldom displayed in cerebrospinal fluid although responsible of an important number of nosocomial meningitis. Diagnosis is difficult which often delays treatment, which in turn hinders prognostic. This clinical case shows a patient afflicted with a deadly C. albicans meningitis and allows us to focus on new diagnostic tools and advice against this infection. PMID:25127852

  5. Acute isolated capsular stroke. A clinical study of 148 cases.

    PubMed

    Arboix, Adrià; Martínez-Rebollar, María; Oliveres, Montserrat; García-Eroles, Luis; Massons, Joan; Targa, Cecilia

    2005-02-01

    The objectives of the study were to assess differential features between capsular stroke of ischemic and hemorrhagic origin, and to compare capsular strokes with all other (non-capsular) strokes. Data of 148 patients with isolated capsular stroke were collected from a prospective hospital-based stroke registry in which 2000 consecutive acute stroke patients were included. Isolated capsular stroke accounted for 8.4% of strokes included in the registry (8.4% of ischemic strokes and 10.5% of intracerebral hemorrhages). Capsular stroke of hemorrhagic origin (n = 24) was more severe than ischemic capsular stroke (n = 124) as determined by a significantly higher in-hospital mortality, length of stay, and lower number of patients free of functional deficit at discharge. After multivariate analysis, limb weakness, sudden onset, and sensory symptoms were independently associated with capsular hemorrhage, whereas pure motor hemiparesis appeared to be associated with capsular infarction. In summary, one of each 12 patients with acute ischemic stroke and one of each 10 patients with acute intracerebral hemorrhage had an isolated capsular stroke. Lacunar syndrome was the most frequent clinical presentation being more common (particularly pure motor hemiparesis) in ischemic than in hemorrhagic capsular stroke. Capsular hemorrhage and capsular infarction showed identical risk factor profiles suggesting the same underlying vascular pathology for both conditions.

  6. Cilofungin (LY121019), an antifungal agent with specific activity against Candida albicans and Candida tropicalis.

    PubMed Central

    Hall, G S; Myles, C; Pratt, K J; Washington, J A

    1988-01-01

    Cilofungin (LY121019) is an antifungal agent that interferes with beta-glucan synthesis in the cells walls of fungi. The activity of this agent against 256 clinical isolates of yeasts was determined. It was found to be very active in vitro against Candida albicans (MIC for 90% of isolates [MIC90], less than or equal to 0.31 microgram/ml; minimal fungicidal concentration for 90% of isolates [MFC90], less than or equal to 0.31 micrograms/ml) and C. tropicalis (MIC90, less than or equal to 0.31 microgram/ml; MFC90, less than or equal to 0.31 microgram/ml) and moderately active against Torulopsis glabrata (MIC90 and MFC90, less than or equal to 20 micrograms/ml). All C. parapsilosis, Cryptococcus, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains were resistant. The activity of cilofungin was affected by medium and inoculum size. Antibiotic medium no. 3 was used as the standard medium. Isolates of C. albicans and C. tropicalis demonstrated a paradoxical effect in Sabouraud dextrose broth and yeast nitrogen base broth in that growth was partially inhibited at MICs equivalent to those in antibiotic medium no. 3, but growth continued, in many instances, throughout all concentrations tested. There was decreased activity of cilofungin with inocula greater than 10(5) CFU/ml. The temperature and duration of incubation did not affect its activity. Images PMID:3058017

  7. Synergistic Interactions of Eugenol-tosylate and Its Congeners with Fluconazole against Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Aijaz; Wani, Mohmmad Younus; Khan, Amber; Manzoor, Nikhat; Molepo, Julitha

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported the antifungal properties of a monoterpene phenol "Eugenol" against different Candida strains and have observed that the addition of methyl group to eugenol drastically increased its antimicrobial potency. Based on the results and the importance of medicinal synthetic chemistry, we synthesized eugenol-tosylate and its congeners (E1-E6) and tested their antifungal activity against different clinical fluconazole (FLC)- susceptible and FLC- resistant C. albicans isolates alone and in combination with FLC by determining fractional inhibitory concentration indices (FICIs) and isobolograms calculated from microdilution assays. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) results confirmed that all the tested C. albicans strains were variably susceptible to the semi-synthetic derivatives E1-E6, with MIC values ranging from 1-62 μg/ml. The test compounds in combination with FLC exhibited either synergy (36%), additive (41%) or indifferent (23%) interactions, however, no antagonistic interactions were observed. The MICs of FLC decreased 2-9 fold when used in combination with the test compounds. Like their precursor eugenol, all the derivatives showed significant impairment of ergosterol biosynthesis in all C. albicans strains coupled with down regulation of the important ergosterol biosynthesis pathway gene-ERG11. The results were further validated by docking studies, which revealed that the inhibitors snugly fitting the active site of the target enzyme, mimicking fluconazole, may well explain their excellent inhibitory activity. Our results suggest that these compounds have a great potential as antifungals, which can be used as chemosensitizing agents with the known antifungal drugs.

  8. Investigation of biofilm formation in clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Cassat, James E; Smeltzer, Mark S; Lee, Chia Y

    2014-01-01

    Invasive methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections are often characterized by recalcitrance to antimicrobial therapy, which is a function not only of widespread antimicrobial resistance among clinical isolates, but also the capacity to form biofilms. Biofilms consist of ordered populations of bacterial colonies encased in a polysaccharide and/or proteinaceous matrix. This unique physiologic adaptation limits penetration of antimicrobial molecules and innate immune effectors to the infectious focus, increasing the likelihood of treatment failure and progression to chronic infection. Investigation of mechanisms of biofilm formation and dispersal, as well as the physiologic adaptations to the biofilm lifestyle, is therefore critical to developing new therapies to combat MRSA infections. In this chapter, we describe two in vitro methods for the investigation of staphylococcal biofilm formation, a microtiter plate-based assay of biofilm formation under static conditions and a flow cell-based assay of biofilm formation under fluid shear. We also detail an in vivo murine model of catheter-associated biofilm formation that is amenable to imaging and microbiologic analyses. Special consideration is given to the conditions necessary to support biofilm formation by clinical isolates of S. aureus. PMID:24085698

  9. Molecular characterization of clinical multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Klebsiella pneumoniae is a frequent nosocomial pathogen, with the multidrug-resistant (MDR) K. pneumoniae being a major public health concern, frequently causing difficult-to-treat infections worldwide. The aim of this study was to investigate the molecular characterization of clinical MDR Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates. Methods A total of 27 non-duplicate MDR K. pneumoniae isolates with a CTX-CIP-AK resistance pattern were investigated for the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance genes including extended spectrum β-lactamase genes (ESBLs), plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes, 16S rRNA methylase (16S-RMTase) genes, and integrons by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification and DNA sequencing. Plasmid replicons were typed by PCR-based replicon typing (PBRT). Multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) were carried out to characterize the strain relatedness. Results All the isolates co-harbored 3 or more resistance determinants. OqxAB, CTX-M-type ESBLs and RmtB were the most frequent determinants, distributed among19 (70.4%),18 (66.7%) and 8 (29.6%) strains. Fourteen isolates harbored class 1 integrons, with orfD-aacA4 being the most frequent gene cassette array. Class 3 integrons were less frequently identified and contained the gene cassette array of blaGES-1-blaOXA-10-aac(6′)-Ib. IncFII replicon was most commonly found in this collection. One cluster was observed with ≥80% similarity among profiles obtained by PFGE, and one sequence type (ST) by MLST, namely ST11, was observed in the cluster. Conclusion K. pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC)–producing ST11 was the main clone detected. Of particular concern was the high prevalence of multiple resistance determinants, classs I integrons and IncFII plasmid replicon among these MDR strains, which provide advantages for the rapid development of MDR strains. PMID:24884610

  10. The polymorphism of protein phosphatase Z1 gene in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Kovács, László; Farkas, Ilona; Majoros, László; Miskei, Márton; Pócsi, István; Dombrádi, Viktor

    2010-12-01

    The gene of protein phosphatase Z1 (CaPPZ1) that codes a fungus specific regulatory enzyme was investigated in Candida albicans. After cloning and sequencing CaPPZ1 we revealed the heterozygous nature of the ATCC 10231 reference strain, and identified two new alleles termed CaPPZ1-2 and CaPPZ1-3. The genetic polymorphism in CaPPZ1 was extended by finding a fourth allele CaPPZ1-4 in a clinical isolate. Single nucleotide replacements and short in/del mutations were identified in the gene, some of which resulted in amino acid changes in the protein. The analysis of the hypervariable 3'-noncoding gene region in 27 DNA sequences obtained from reference strains and clinical samples confirmed the presence of four distinct DNA sequence-groups that correspond to the four main alleles of CaPPZ1. In addition to the allelic combinations, we detected individual mutations elevating genetic variability of the opportunistic pathogen. We utilized the hypervariable gene region for genotyping C. albicans in clinical isolates by sequencing the cloned amplified region, by direct sequencing of the PCR products, or by RFLP analysis. The comparison of the genotypes of the strains originating from different body parts of the same patient proved to be useful in delineating the origin of the infection. PMID:20473966

  11. Virulence attributes in Brazilian clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Silva, Lívia V; Galdino, Anna Clara M; Nunes, Ana Paula F; dos Santos, Kátia R N; Moreira, Beatriz M; Cacci, Luciana C; Sodré, Cátia L; Ziccardi, Mariangela; Branquinha, Marta H; Santos, André L S

    2014-11-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen responsible for causing a huge variety of acute and chronic infections with significant levels of morbidity and mortality. Its success as a pathogen comes from its genetic/metabolic plasticity, intrinsic/acquired antimicrobial resistance, capacity to form biofilm and expression of numerous virulence factors. Herein, we have analyzed the genetic variability, antimicrobial susceptibility as well as the production of metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs) and virulence attributes (elastase, pyocyanin and biofilm) in 96 strains of P. aeruginosa isolated from different anatomical sites of patients attended at Brazilian hospitals. Our results revealed a great genetic variability, in which 86 distinct RAPD types (89.6% of polymorphisms) were detected. Regarding the susceptibility profile, 48 strains (50%) were resistant to the antimicrobials, as follows: 22.92% to the three tested antibiotics, 12.5% to both imipenem and meropenem, 11.46% to ceftazidime only, 2.08% to imipenem only and 1.04% to both ceftazidime and meropenem. Out of the 34 clinical strains of P. aeruginosa resistant to both imipenem and meropenem, 25 (73.53%) were MBL producers by phenotypic method while 12 (35.29%) were PCR positive for the MBL gene SPM-1. All P. aeruginosa strains produced pyocyanin, elastase and biofilm, although in different levels. Some associations were demonstrated among the susceptibility and/or production of these virulence traits with the anatomical site of strain isolation. For instance, almost all strains isolated from urine (85.71%) were resistant to the three antibiotics, while the vast majority of strains isolated from rectum (95%) and mouth (66.67%) were susceptible to all tested antibiotics. Urine isolates produced the highest pyocyanin concentration (20.15±5.65 μg/ml), while strains isolated from pleural secretion and mouth produced elevated elastase activity (1441.43±303.08 FAU) and biofilm formation (OD590 0.676±0

  12. Development of DNA probes for Candida albicans

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, L.L.; Hudson, J.B.

    1988-07-01

    An attempt was made to produce DNA probes that could be used as a rapid and efficient means of detecting candidiasis (invasive Candida infection) in immunocompromised patients. Whole DNA from Candida albicans was digested with restriction endonuclease, and the resulting fragments were randomly cloned into a plasmid vector. Several recombinant plasmids were evaluated for cross-hybridization to various other Candida species, other fungal DNAs, and to nonfungal DNAs. Cross reactions were observed between the probes and different yeasts, but none with unrelated DNAs. Some recombinants were genus-specific, and two of these were applied to the analysis of C. albicans growth curves. It became evident that, although both /sup 32/P- and biotin-labelled probes could be made quite sensitive, a possible limitation in their diagnostic potential was the poor liberation of Candida DNA from cells. Thus, better methods of treatment of clinical specimens will be required before such probes will be useful in routine diagnosis.

  13. Resistance Surveillance in Candida albicans: A Five-Year Antifungal Susceptibility Evaluation in a Brazilian University Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Peron, Isabela Haddad; Reichert-Lima, Franqueline; Busso-Lopes, Ariane Fidelis; Nagasako, Cristiane Kibune; Lyra, Luzia; Moretti, Maria Luiza

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans caused 44% of the overall candidemia episodes from 2006 to 2010 in our university tertiary care hospital. As different antifungal agents are used in therapy and also immunocompromised patients receive fluconazole prophylaxis in our institution, this study aimed to perform an antifungal susceptibility surveillance with the C.albicans bloodstream isolates and to characterize the fluconazole resistance in 2 non-blood C.albicans isolates by sequencing ERG11 gene. The study included 147 C. albicans bloodstream samples and 2 fluconazole resistant isolates: one from oral cavity (LIF 12560 fluconazole MIC: 8μg/mL) and one from esophageal cavity (LIF-E10 fluconazole MIC: 64μg/mL) of two different patients previously treated with oral fluconazole. The in vitro antifungal susceptibility to amphotericin B (AMB), 5-flucytosine (5FC), fluconazole (FLC), itraconazole (ITC), voriconazole (VRC), caspofungin (CASP) was performed by broth microdilution methodology recommended by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute documents (M27-A3 and M27-S4, CLSI). All blood isolates were classified as susceptible according to CLSI guidelines for all evaluated antifungal agents (MIC range: 0,125–1.00 μg/mL for AMB, ≤0.125–1.00 μg/mL for 5FC, ≤0.125–0.5 μg/mL for FLC, ≤0.015–0.125 μg/mL for ITC, ≤0.015–0.06 μg/mL for VRC and ≤0.015–0.125 μg/mL for CASP). In this study, we also amplified and sequenced the ERG11 gene of LIF 12560 and LIF-E10 C.albicans isolates. Six mutations encoding distinct amino acid substitutions were found (E116D, T128K, E266D, A298V, G448V and G464S) and these mutations were previously described as associated with fluconazole resistance. Despite the large consumption of antifungals in our institution, resistant blood isolates were not found over the trial period. Further studies should be conducted, but it may be that the very prolonged direct contact with the oral antifungal agent administered to the patient from which

  14. Clinical resistance and decreased susceptibility in Streptococcus suis isolates from clinically healthy fattening pigs.

    PubMed

    Callens, Bénédicte F; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Maes, Dominiek; Butaye, Patrick; Dewulf, Jeroen; Boyen, Filip

    2013-04-01

    Streptococcus suis (S. suis) has often been reported as an important swine pathogen and is considered as a new emerging zoonotic agent. Consequently, it is important to be informed on its susceptibility to antimicrobial agents. In the current study, the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) population distribution of nine antimicrobial agents has been determined for nasal S. suis strains, isolated from healthy pigs at the end of the fattening period from 50 closed or semiclosed pig herds. The aim of the study was to report resistance based on both clinical breakpoints (clinical resistance percentage) and epidemiological cutoff values (non-wild-type percentage). Non-wild-type percentages were high for tetracycline (98%), lincomycin (92%), tilmicosin (72%), erythromycin (70%), tylosin (66%), and low for florfenicol (0%) and enrofloxacin (0.3%). Clinical resistance percentages were high for tetracycline (95%), erythromycin (66%), tylosin (66%), and low for florfenicol (0.3%) and enrofloxacin (0.3%). For tiamulin, for which no clinical breakpoint is available, 57% of the isolates did not belong to the wild-type population. Clinical resistance and non-wild-type percentages differed substantially for penicillin. Only 1% of the tested S. suis strains was considered as clinically resistant, whereas 47% of the strains showed acquired resistance when epidemiological cutoff values were used. In conclusion, MIC values for penicillin are gradually increasing, compared to previous reports, although pigs infected with strains showing higher MICs may still respond to treatment with penicillin. The high rate of acquired resistance against tiamulin has not been reported before. Results from this study clearly demonstrate that the use of different interpretive criteria contributes to the extent of differences in reported antimicrobial resistance results. The early detection of small changes in the MIC population distribution of isolates, while clinical failure may not yet be

  15. [Isolated yeast species in urine samples in a Spanish regional hospital].

    PubMed

    Heras-Cañas, Victor; Ros, Luis; Sorlózano, Antonio; Gutiérrez-Soto, Blanca; Navarro-Marí, José María; Gutiérrez-Fernández, José

    2015-01-01

    Candiduria detection in hospitalized or immunocompromised patients is of great clinical significance. The aim of our study was to describe the isolation frequency of significant species of yeasts in urine samples processed in our hospital during the period 2010- 2013, and to analyze their susceptibility to commonly used antifungal agents. Species identification was performed by seeding on a chromogenic medium, the filamentation test and automated systems (ASM Vitek and MALDI Biotyper), while susceptibility was determined using the ASM Vitek system. Of the 632 yeast isolates in urine, 371 were Candida albicans species and 261 non-C. albicans Candida spp. The species with the highest number of resistant isolates were Candida glabrata and Candida krusei. Based on the results obtained, we believe that species identification and the susceptibility study should be current practice in the laboratories when species other than C. albicans are isolated.

  16. High-Frequency, In Vitro Reversible Switching of Candida lusitaniae Clinical Isolates from Amphotericin B Susceptibility to Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Stephanie A.; Vazquez, Jose A.; Steffan, Paul E.; Sobel, Jack D.; Akins, Robert A.

    1999-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed an increase in the incidence of serious infections caused by non-albicans Candida species. Candida lusitaniae is of special interest because of its sporadic resistance to amphotericin B (AmB). The present in vitro study demonstrated that, unlike other Candida species, C. lusitaniae isolates frequently generated AmB-resistant lineages form previously susceptible colonies. Cells switching from a resistant colony to a susceptible phenotype were also detected after treatment with either UV light, heat shock, or exposure to whole blood, all of which increased the frequency of switching. In some C. lusitaniae lineages, after a cell switched to a resistant phenotype, the resistant phenotype was stable; in other lineages, colonies were composed primarily of AmB-susceptible cells. Although resistant and susceptible lineages were identical in many aspects, their cellular morphologies were dramatically different. Switching mechanisms that involve exposure to antifungals may have an impact on antifungal therapeutic strategies as well as on standardized susceptibility testing of clinical yeast specimens. PMID:10103188

  17. Phytochemical Analysis and Modulation of Antibiotic Activity by Luehea paniculata Mart. & Zucc. (Malvaceae) in Multiresistant Clinical Isolates of Candida Spp.

    PubMed Central

    Calixto Júnior, João T.; Morais, Selene M.; Martins, Clécio G.; Vieira, Larissa G.; Morais-Braga, Maria Flaviana B.; Carneiro, Joara N. P.; Machado, Antonio J. P.; Menezes, Irwin R. A.; Tintino, Saulo R.; Coutinho, Henrique D. M.

    2015-01-01

    The high incidence of fungal infections has led to the continuous search for new drugs. Extracts of Luehea paniculata, a tree of multiple medicinal uses, were evaluated for anti-Candida activity, as well as its modulator potential of the Fluconazole antibiotic. Chemical prospecting of ethanol extracts of leaf and bark was carried out, the quantification of total phenols and flavonoids, characterized by the HPLC-DAD technique. The rosmarinic acid and the vitexin flavonoid were observed as major constituents in ELELP and ESWELP, respectively. Antioxidant activity was also evaluated by the method of scavenging the free radical DPPH, and quercetin was used as standard, obtaining IC50 values: 0.341 (mg/mL) for ELELP and 0.235 (mg/mL) for ESWELP. The microdilution assay was performed for antifungal activity against strains of Candida albicans, C. krusei, and C. tropicalis and showed minimum inhibitory concentrations values ≥1024 μg/mL. In the modulator action of extracts on Fluconazole against multiresistant clinical isolates of Candida (subinhibitory concentration minimum of 128 μg/mL), a significant synergism was observed, indicating that the extracts potentiated the antifungal effect against C. tropicalis, where antioxidant flavonoids could be responsible. This is the first report about modifying activity of the antibiotic action of a species of the genus Luehea. PMID:25821822

  18. Phytochemical analysis and modulation of antibiotic activity by Luehea paniculata Mart. & Zucc. (Malvaceae) in multiresistant clinical isolates of Candida spp.

    PubMed

    Calixto Júnior, João T; Morais, Selene M; Martins, Clécio G; Vieira, Larissa G; Morais-Braga, Maria Flaviana B; Carneiro, Joara N P; Machado, Antonio J P; Menezes, Irwin R A; Tintino, Saulo R; Coutinho, Henrique D M

    2015-01-01

    The high incidence of fungal infections has led to the continuous search for new drugs. Extracts of Luehea paniculata, a tree of multiple medicinal uses, were evaluated for anti-Candida activity, as well as its modulator potential of the Fluconazole antibiotic. Chemical prospecting of ethanol extracts of leaf and bark was carried out, the quantification of total phenols and flavonoids, characterized by the HPLC-DAD technique. The rosmarinic acid and the vitexin flavonoid were observed as major constituents in ELELP and ESWELP, respectively. Antioxidant activity was also evaluated by the method of scavenging the free radical DPPH, and quercetin was used as standard, obtaining IC50 values: 0.341 (mg/mL) for ELELP and 0.235 (mg/mL) for ESWELP. The microdilution assay was performed for antifungal activity against strains of Candida albicans, C. krusei, and C. tropicalis and showed minimum inhibitory concentrations values ≥1024 μg/mL. In the modulator action of extracts on Fluconazole against multiresistant clinical isolates of Candida (subinhibitory concentration minimum of 128 μg/mL), a significant synergism was observed, indicating that the extracts potentiated the antifungal effect against C. tropicalis, where antioxidant flavonoids could be responsible. This is the first report about modifying activity of the antibiotic action of a species of the genus Luehea. PMID:25821822

  19. RESPONSES OF OYSTERS AND THEIR HEMOCYTES TO CLINICAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL ISOLATES OF VIBRIO PARAHAEMOLYTICUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Interactions of Vibrio parahaemolyticus with oysters and oyster hemocytes were studied using three environmental isolates (1094, 1163 and ATCC 17802) and three clinical isolates (2030, 2062, 2107). Clinical isolates were from patients who became ill during the June 1998 food pois...

  20. Serotyping of Cryptococcus neoformans Isolates from Clinical and Environmental Sources in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Baró, Teresa; Torres-Rodríguez, Josep M.; Morera, Yolanda; Alía, Concepción; López, Olga; Méndez, Raul

    1999-01-01

    We determined biovars and serotypes of 154 isolates of Cryptococcus neoformans from clinical and environmental sources from different areas of Spain. All clinical isolates belonged to C. neoformans var. neoformans. Serotypes showed an irregular distribution. C. neoformans var. gattii serotype B was isolated from necropsy specimens from goats with pulmonary disease. PMID:10074545

  1. Genomes of Two Clinical Isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from Odisha, India

    PubMed Central

    Majid, Mohammad; Qureshi, Asifa; Yerra, Priyadarshini; Kumar, Ashutosh; Kumar, Mandala Kiran; Tiruvayipati, Suma; Baddam, Ramani; Shaik, Sabiha; Srikantam, Aparna

    2014-01-01

    We report whole-genome sequences of two clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolated from patients in Odisha, India. The sequence analysis revealed that these isolates are of an ancestral type and might represent some of the “pristine” isolates in India that have not admixed with other lineages. PMID:24652981

  2. Candida albicans commensalism in the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Neville, B Anne; d'Enfert, Christophe; Bougnoux, Marie-Elisabeth

    2015-11-01

    Candida albicans is a polymorphic yeast species that often forms part of the commensal gastrointestinal mycobiota of healthy humans. It is also an important opportunistic pathogen. A tripartite interaction involving C. albicans, the resident microbiota and host immunity maintains C. albicans in its commensal form. The influence of each of these factors on C. albicans carriage is considered herein, with particular focus on the mycobiota and the approaches used to study it, models of gastrointestinal colonization by C. albicans, the C. albicans genes and phenotypes that are necessary for commensalism and the host factors that influence C. albicans carriage.

  3. Antibiotic resistance and virulence traits in clinical and environmental Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium isolates.

    PubMed

    Rathnayake, I U; Hargreaves, M; Huygens, F

    2012-07-01

    This study compared virulence and antibiotic resistance traits in clinical and environmental Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium isolates. E. faecalis isolates harboured a broader spectrum of virulence determinants compared to E. faecium isolates. The virulence traits Cyl-A, Cyl-B, Cyl-M, gel-E, esp and acm were tested and environmental isolates predominantly harboured gel-E (80% of E. faecalis and 31.9% of E. faecium) whereas esp was more prevalent in clinical isolates (67.8% of E. faecalis and 70.4% of E. faecium). E. faecalis and E. faecium isolated from water had different antibiotic resistance patterns compared to those isolated from clinical samples. Linezolid resistance was not observed in any isolates tested and vancomycin resistance was observed only in clinical isolates. Resistance to other antibiotics (tetracycline, gentamicin, ciprofloxacin and ampicillin) was detected in both clinical and water isolates. Clinical isolates were more resistant to all the antibiotics tested compared to water isolates. Multi-drug resistance was more prevalent in clinical isolates (71.2% of E. faecalis and 70.3% of E. faecium) compared to water isolates (only 5.7% E. faecium). tet L and tet M genes were predominantly identified in tetracycline-resistant isolates. All water and clinical isolates resistant to ciprofloxacin and ampicillin contained mutations in the gyrA, parC and pbp5 genes. A significant correlation was found between the presence of virulence determinants and antibiotic resistance in all the isolates tested in this study (p<0.05). The presence of antibiotic resistant enterococci, together with associated virulence traits, in surface recreational water could be a public health risk.

  4. Nontuberculous mycobacteria: Reports of clinical laboratory isolation in a three county area, North Carolina, 2006 -2010

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Laboratory reports of mycobacteria isolation and identification are created during the clinical diagnostic process to differentiate Mycobacterium tuberculosis from nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM). NTM isolation rates are expected to exceed rates of true NTM infectio...

  5. Designer antibacterial peptides kill fluoroquinolone-resistant clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Otvos, Laszlo; Wade, John D; Lin, Feng; Condie, Barry A; Hanrieder, Joerg; Hoffmann, Ralf

    2005-08-11

    A significant number of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae bacterial strains in urinary tract infections are resistant to fluoroquinolones. Peptide antibiotics are viable alternatives although these are usually either toxic or insufficiently active. By applying multiple alignment and sequence optimization steps, we designed multifunctional proline-rich antibacterial peptides that maintained their DnaK-binding ability in bacteria and low toxicity in eukaryotes, but entered bacterial cells much more avidly than earlier peptide derivatives. The resulting chimeric and statistical analogues exhibited 8-32 microg/mL minimal inhibitory concentration efficacies in Muller-Hinton broth against a series of clinical pathogens. Significantly, the best peptide, compound 5, A3-APO, retained full antibacterial activity in the presence of mouse serum. Across a set of eight fluoroquinolone-resistant clinical isolates, peptide 5 was 4 times more potent than ciprofloxacin. On the basis of the in vitro efficacy, toxicity, and pharmacokinetics data, we estimate that peptide 5 will be suitable for treating infections in the 3-5 mg/kg dose range.

  6. The correlation of virulence, pathogenicity, and itraconazole resistance with SAP activity in Candida albicans strains.

    PubMed

    Feng, Wenli; Yang, Jing; Pan, Yanwei; Xi, Zhiqin; Qiao, Zusha; Ma, Yan

    2016-02-01

    The relationship between SAP2 activity and drug resistance in Candida albicans was investigated by using itraconazole-resistant and itraconazole-sensitive C. albicans isolates. The precipitation zones were measured to analyze SAP2 activity. Mice were classified into itraconazole-resistant and -sensitive C. albicans isolate groups, and a control group, with their survival and mortality rate being observed over 30 days. The relative expression levels of CDR1, CDR2, MDR1, and SAP2 were measured using RT-PCR. It was found that the secreted aspartyl proteinase activity of itraconazole-resistant C. albicans strains was significantly higher than that of itraconazole-sensitive C. albicans strains (P < 0.001). A significantly higher mortality rate was recorded for mice treated with itraconazole-resistant C. albicans than for mice treated with itraconazole-sensitive C. albicans. In regards to the CDR1, CDR2, and MDR1 genes, there was no significant difference between the 2 groups of mice. Positive correlations between SAP2 and MDR1 and between CDR1 and CDR2 were found. The high expression level of SAP2 may relate to the virulence, pathogenicity, and resistance of C. albicans.

  7. Cellular Components Mediating Coadherence of Candida albicans and Fusobacterium nucleatum.

    PubMed

    Wu, T; Cen, L; Kaplan, C; Zhou, X; Lux, R; Shi, W; He, X

    2015-10-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic fungal pathogen found as part of the normal oral flora. It can be coisolated with Fusobacterium nucleatum, an opportunistic bacterial pathogen, from oral disease sites, such as those involved in refractory periodontitis and pulp necrosis. The physical coadherence between these 2 clinically important microbes has been well documented and suggested to play a role in facilitating their oral colonization and colocalization and contributing to polymicrobial pathogenesis. Previous studies indicated that the physical interaction between C. albicans and F. nucleatum was mediated by the carbohydrate components on the surface of C. albicans and the protein components on the Fusobaterium cell surface. However, the identities of the components involved still remain elusive. This study was aimed at identifying the genetic determinants involved in coaggregation between the 2 species. By screening a C. albicans SN152 mutant library and a panel of F. nucleatum 23726 outer membrane protein mutants, we identified FLO9, which encodes a putative adhesin-like cell wall mannoprotein of C. albicans and radD, an arginine-inhibitable adhesin-encoding gene in F. nucleatum that is involved in interspecies coadherence. Consistent with these findings, we demonstrated that the strong coaggregation between wild-type F. nucleatum 23726 and C. albicans SN152 in an in vitro assay could be greatly inhibited by arginine and mannose. Our study also suggested a complex multifaceted mechanism underlying physical interaction between C. albicans and F. nucleatum and for the first time revealed the identity of major genetic components involved in mediating the coaggregation. These observations provide useful knowledge for developing new targeted treatments for disrupting interactions between these 2 clinically relevant pathogens.

  8. Cellular Components Mediating Coadherence of Candida albicans and Fusobacterium nucleatum

    PubMed Central

    Wu, T.; Cen, L.; Kaplan, C.; Zhou, X.; Lux, R.; Shi, W.; He, X.

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic fungal pathogen found as part of the normal oral flora. It can be coisolated with Fusobacterium nucleatum, an opportunistic bacterial pathogen, from oral disease sites, such as those involved in refractory periodontitis and pulp necrosis. The physical coadherence between these 2 clinically important microbes has been well documented and suggested to play a role in facilitating their oral colonization and colocalization and contributing to polymicrobial pathogenesis. Previous studies indicated that the physical interaction between C. albicans and F. nucleatum was mediated by the carbohydrate components on the surface of C. albicans and the protein components on the Fusobaterium cell surface. However, the identities of the components involved still remain elusive. This study was aimed at identifying the genetic determinants involved in coaggregation between the 2 species. By screening a C. albicans SN152 mutant library and a panel of F. nucleatum 23726 outer membrane protein mutants, we identified FLO9, which encodes a putative adhesin-like cell wall mannoprotein of C. albicans and radD, an arginine-inhibitable adhesin-encoding gene in F. nucleatum that is involved in interspecies coadherence. Consistent with these findings, we demonstrated that the strong coaggregation between wild-type F. nucleatum 23726 and C. albicans SN152 in an in vitro assay could be greatly inhibited by arginine and mannose. Our study also suggested a complex multifaceted mechanism underlying physical interaction between C. albicans and F. nucleatum and for the first time revealed the identity of major genetic components involved in mediating the coaggregation. These observations provide useful knowledge for developing new targeted treatments for disrupting interactions between these 2 clinically relevant pathogens. PMID:26152186

  9. Genomic Features of Environmental and Clinical Vibrio parahaemolyticus Isolates Lacking Recognized Virulence Factors Are Dissimilar.

    PubMed

    Ronholm, J; Petronella, N; Chew Leung, C; Pightling, A W; Banerjee, S K

    2015-12-04

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a bacterial pathogen that can cause illness after the consumption or handling of contaminated seafood. The primary virulence factors associated with V. parahaemolyticus illness are thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH) and Tdh-related hemolysin (TRH). However, clinical strains lacking tdh and trh have recently been isolated, and these clinical isolates are poorly understood. To help understand the emergence of clinical tdh- and trh-negative isolates, a genomic approach was used to comprehensively compare 4 clinical tdh- and trh-negative isolates with 16 environmental tdh- and trh-negative isolates and 34 clinical isolates positive for tdh or trh, or both, with the objective of identifying genomic features that are unique to clinical tdh- and trh-negative isolates. The prevalence of pathogenicity islands (PAIs) common to clinical isolates was thoroughly examined in each of the clinical tdh- and trh-negative isolates. The tdh PAI was not present in any clinical or environmental tdh- and trh-negative isolates. The trh PAI was not present in any environmental isolates; however, in clinical tdh- and trh-negative isolate 10-4238, the majority of the trh PAI including a partial trh1 gene was present, which resulted in reclassification of this isolate as a tdh-negative and trh-positive isolate. In the other clinical tdh- and trh-negative isolates, neither the trh gene nor the trh PAI was present. We identified 862 genes in clinical tdh- and trh-negative isolates but not in environmental tdh- and trh-negative isolates. Many of these genes are highly homologous to genes found in common enteric bacteria and included genes encoding a number of chemotaxis proteins and a novel putative type VI secretion system (T6SS) effector and immunity protein (T6SS1). The availability of genome sequences from clinical V. parahaemolyticus tdh- and trh-negative isolates and the comparative analysis may help provide an understanding of how this pathotype is able to

  10. Genetic acquisition of NDM gene offers sustainability among clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in clinical settings.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Shweta; Upadhyay, Supriya; Sen, Malay Ranjan; Maurya, Anand Prakash; Choudhury, Debarati; Bhattacharjee, Amitabha

    2015-01-01

    New Delhi metallo β-lactamases are one of the most significant emerging resistance determinants towards carbapenem drugs. Their persistence and adaptability often depends on their genetic environment and linkage. This study reports a unique and novel arrangement of blaNDM-1 gene within clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from a tertiary referral hospital in north India. Three NDM positive clonally unrelated clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa were recovered from hospital patients. Association of integron with blaNDM-1 and presence of gene cassettes were assessed by PCR. Genetic linkage of NDM gene with ISAba125 was determined and in negative cases linkage in upstream region was mapped by inverse PCR. In which only one isolate's NDM gene was linked with ISAba125 for mobility, while other two reveals new genetic arrangement and found to be inserted within DNA directed RNA polymerase gene of the host genome detected by inverse PCR followed by sequencing analysis. In continuation significance of this novel linkage was further analyzed wherein promoter site detected by Softberry BPROM software and activity were assessed by cloning succeeding semi-quantitative RT-PCR indicating the higher expression level of NDM gene. This study concluded out that the unique genetic makeup of NDM gene with DNA-dependent-RNA-polymerase favours adaptability to the host in hospital environment against huge antibiotic pressure. PMID:25635921

  11. Genetic acquisition of NDM gene offers sustainability among clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in clinical settings.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Shweta; Upadhyay, Supriya; Sen, Malay Ranjan; Maurya, Anand Prakash; Choudhury, Debarati; Bhattacharjee, Amitabha

    2015-01-01

    New Delhi metallo β-lactamases are one of the most significant emerging resistance determinants towards carbapenem drugs. Their persistence and adaptability often depends on their genetic environment and linkage. This study reports a unique and novel arrangement of blaNDM-1 gene within clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from a tertiary referral hospital in north India. Three NDM positive clonally unrelated clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa were recovered from hospital patients. Association of integron with blaNDM-1 and presence of gene cassettes were assessed by PCR. Genetic linkage of NDM gene with ISAba125 was determined and in negative cases linkage in upstream region was mapped by inverse PCR. In which only one isolate's NDM gene was linked with ISAba125 for mobility, while other two reveals new genetic arrangement and found to be inserted within DNA directed RNA polymerase gene of the host genome detected by inverse PCR followed by sequencing analysis. In continuation significance of this novel linkage was further analyzed wherein promoter site detected by Softberry BPROM software and activity were assessed by cloning succeeding semi-quantitative RT-PCR indicating the higher expression level of NDM gene. This study concluded out that the unique genetic makeup of NDM gene with DNA-dependent-RNA-polymerase favours adaptability to the host in hospital environment against huge antibiotic pressure.

  12. Decontamination efficacy of erbium:yttrium-aluminium-garnet and diode laser light on oral Candida albicans isolates of a 5-day in vitro biofilm model.

    PubMed

    Sennhenn-Kirchner, Sabine; Schwarz, Peter; Schliephake, Henning; Konietschke, Frank; Brunner, Edgar; Borg-von Zepelin, Margarete

    2009-05-01

    The different forms of superficial and systemic candidiasis are often associated with biofilm formation on surfaces of host tissues or medical devices. The biofilm formation of Candida spp., in general, necessitates significantly increased amounts of antifungal agents for therapy. Often the therapeutic effect is doubtful. A 5-day biofilm model with oral Candida isolates was established according to Chandra et al. (J Dent Res 80:903-908, 2001) on glass and titanium surfaces and was modified by Sennhenn-Kirchner et al. (Z Zahnärztl Implantol 3:45-51, 2007) to investigate different aspects unanswered in the field of dentistry. In this model, the efficacy of erbium:yttrium-aluminium-garnet (Er:YAG) light (2940 nm, 100 mJ, 10 Hz, 300 micros pulsed mode applied for 80 s) and diode laser light (810 nm, 1 W, continuous wave mode applied for 20 s with four repetitions after 30 s pauses each) was evaluated and compared to untreated controls. The photometric evaluation of the samples was completed by observations on morphological changes of yeast cells grown in the biofilm. Compared to the untreated controls Candida cells grown in mature in vitro biofilms were significantly reduced by both wavelengths investigated. Comparison between the different methods of laser treatment additionally revealed a significantly greater effect of the Er:YAG over the diode laser. Scanning electron microscopy findings proved that the diode laser light was effective in direct contact mode. In contrast, in the areas without direct contact, the fungal cells were left almost unchanged. The Er:YAG laser damaged the fungal cells to a great extent wherever it was applied.

  13. Response of gonococcal clinical isolates to acidic conditions.

    PubMed

    Pettit, R K; McAllister, S C; Hamer, T A

    1999-02-01

    This study examined the response to acidic conditions of four gonococcal isolates -NRL38874 (Proto/IB-2), NRL38884 (Pro/IA-2), NRL38953 (Proto/IB-3) and NRL39029 (Pro/IA-3) - obtained from various sites in patients in whom a diagnosis of pelvic inflammatory disease had been made by laparoscopic examination. Acid tolerance of the clinical isolates was strain and growth phase dependent. Growth of the four strains on solid media was undetectable below pH 5.8. In liquid culture, strain NRL38884 did not survive below pH 5.2; strains NRL38874, NRL38953 and NRL39029 survived to pH 4.5. Between pH 4.2 and pH 5.1, the latter three strains exhibited a peak in survival at pH 4.6-4.7 during log phase, suggesting that there may be a distinct acid tolerance system operating at this pH. SDS-PAGE of whole-cell, total membrane and outer-membrane fractions of the four strains prepared from pH 7.2 and pH 6.1 plate cultures revealed numerous differences in protein composition. Acidic conditions reduced the expression of the reduction modifiable outer-membrane protein Rmp, and induced the expression of many membrane proteins, including gonococcal hsp63. Immunoblotting studies with matched serum samples and strains from patients with pelvic inflammatory disease indicated that IgG recognition of outer-membrane components from strains cultured in acidic and neutral conditions was quite different. The results suggest that the immune system interacts with unique outer-membrane constituents on gonococci colonising sites at different pH.

  14. Characterization of Listeria monocytogenes isolated from Ganges water, human clinical and milk samples at Varanasi, India.

    PubMed

    Soni, Dharmendra K; Singh, Rakesh K; Singh, Durg V; Dubey, Suresh K

    2013-03-01

    Listeria monocytogenes isolated from Ganges water, human clinical and milk samples were characterized by antibiotic susceptibility, serotype identification, detection of virulence genes and ERIC- and REP-PCR fingerprint analyses. All isolates were uniformly resistant to ampicillin, except two isolates, and showed variable resistance to gentamicin, cotrimoxazole, ofloxacin, rifampicin and tetracycline. Of the 20 isolates found positive for pathogens, seven (four human and three water isolates) belong to serogroups 4b, 4d and 4e; six (one human and five water isolates) belong to serogroups 1/2c and 3c; four milk isolates belong to serogroups 1/2b and 3b; and three milk isolates belong to serogroups 1/2a and 3a. Two water isolates, all human isolates, except one (Pb1) lacking inlJ gene, and three milk isolates possess inlA, inlC, plcA, prfA, actA, hlyA and iap genes. The remaining water and milk isolates showed variable presence of inlJ, plcA, prfA, and iap genes. ERIC- and REP-PCR based analyses collectively indicated that isolates of human clinical samples belong to identical or similar clone and isolates of water and milk samples belong to different clones. Overall study demonstrates the prevalence of pathogenic L. monocytogenes species in the environmental and clinical samples. Most of the isolates were resistant to commonly used antibiotics. PMID:23201044

  15. Characterization of Pathogenic Vibrio parahaemolyticus Isolates from Clinical Sources in Spain and Comparison with Asian and North American Pandemic Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Urtaza, Jaime; Lozano-Leon, Antonio; DePaola, Angelo; Ishibashi, Masanori; Shimada, Kanae; Nishibuchi, Mitsuaki; Liebana, Ernesto

    2004-01-01

    In spite of the potential risk involved with contamination of seafood with Vibrio parahaemolyticus, there is a lack of information on the occurrence of pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus in Europe. This organism was isolated in 1999 from a large outbreak (64 cases admitted to a single hospital) associated with raw oyster consumption in Galicia, Spain, one of the most important regions in shellfish production worldwide. Two V. parahaemolyticus isolates from the 1999 Galicia outbreak, three additional clinical isolates obtained in the same period from hospitals in Spain, two reference strains from clinical sources, and five Spanish environmental isolates were examined. Seventeen isolates belonging to the pandemic clone isolated in Asia and North America were included in the study for comparison. All isolates were characterized by serotyping, PCR for virulence-related genes, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and plasmid analysis. Four of the five clinical isolates from hospitals in Spain belonged to serotype O4:K11; the remaining isolate was O4:K untypeable (KUT). All five isolates were positive for V. parahaemolyticus toxR and tlh (species-specific genes) and tdh and negative for trh and group-specific PCR (a PCR method for detection of the pandemic clone). PFGE analysis with NotI and SfiI discriminated the European isolates in two closely related PFGE types included in a homogeneous cluster, clearly differentiated from the Asian and North American isolates. The five environmental isolates belonged to serotypes O2:K28, O2:KUT, O3:K53, O4:KUT, and O8:K22 and were negative for all virulence genes. The five isolates were discriminated into five different PFGE types unrelated to any other isolate included in the study. While the virulence characteristics (tdh positive, trh negative) of the Spanish clinical isolates matched those of the O3:K6 clone from Asia and North America, they were clearly excluded from this clone by group-specific PCR, PFGE, and serotyping. The

  16. Biotyping of Candida albicans: results of an international collaborative survey.

    PubMed Central

    Odds, F C; Auger, P; Krogh, P; Neely, A N; Segal, E

    1989-01-01

    An agar plate system for biotyping isolates of Candida albicans was evaluated in four laboratories for 18 coded yeast isolates, each tested in triplicate on duplicate series of agar plates. The results showed that the biotyping system gave excellent intralaboratory reproducibility. However, because the concordance of data among laboratories was poor, the method must be regarded as suitable only for research applications and not for routine use. PMID:2671015

  17. DIFFERENTIAL EFFECTS OF OYSTER (CRASSOSTREA VIRGINICA) DEFENSES ON CLINICAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL ISOLATES OF VIBRIO PARAHEMOLYTICUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three clinical (2030, 2062, and 2107) and three environmental (1094, 1163, and ATCC 17802) isolates of Vibrio parahaemolyticus were exposed to hemocytes and plasma collected from oysters (Crassostrea virginica) to determine their susceptibility to putative oyster defenses. Clinic...

  18. Integrating Candida albicans metabolism with biofilm heterogeneity by transcriptome mapping

    PubMed Central

    Rajendran, Ranjith; May, Ali; Sherry, Leighann; Kean, Ryan; Williams, Craig; Jones, Brian L.; Burgess, Karl V.; Heringa, Jaap; Abeln, Sanne; Brandt, Bernd W.; Munro, Carol A.; Ramage, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans biofilm formation is an important virulence factor in the pathogenesis of disease, a characteristic which has been shown to be heterogeneous in clinical isolates. Using an unbiased computational approach we investigated the central metabolic pathways driving biofilm heterogeneity. Transcripts from high (HBF) and low (LBF) biofilm forming isolates were analysed by RNA sequencing, with 6312 genes identified to be expressed in these two phenotypes. With a dedicated computational approach we identified and validated a significantly differentially expressed subnetwork of genes associated with these biofilm phenotypes. Our analysis revealed amino acid metabolism, such as arginine, proline, aspartate and glutamate metabolism, were predominantly upregulated in the HBF phenotype. On the contrary, purine, starch and sucrose metabolism was generally upregulated in the LBF phenotype. The aspartate aminotransferase gene AAT1 was found to be a common member of these amino acid pathways and significantly upregulated in the HBF phenotype. Pharmacological inhibition of AAT1 enzyme activity significantly reduced biofilm formation in a dose-dependent manner. Collectively, these findings provide evidence that biofilm phenotype is associated with differential regulation of metabolic pathways. Understanding and targeting such pathways, such as amino acid metabolism, is potentially useful for developing diagnostics and new antifungals to treat biofilm-based infections. PMID:27765942

  19. Efficacy of sodium hypochlorite and coconut soap used as disinfecting agents in the reduction of denture stomatitis, Streptococcus mutans and Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Barnabé, W; de Mendonça Neto, T; Pimenta, F C; Pegoraro, L F; Scolaro, J M

    2004-05-01

    This study evaluated the reduction of denture stomatitis and the antimicrobial activity of 0.05% sodium hypochlorite opposed to Candida albicans and Streptococcus mutans (SGM) when associated with brushing complete dentures with coconut soap. The mucosal characteristics were evaluated according to Newton's classification at baseline, after cleansing the dentures with coconut soap for 15 days in group 1 (nine patients). In the other group (19 patients) the analysis were made before and after cleansing the dentures with coconut soap and with disinfection in a soak solution of 0.05% sodium hypochlorite for 10 min during 15 days. Microbiological tests were used to isolate C. albicans and SGM. Mann-Whitney and Wilcoxon tests were used to compare the mucosal characteristics and Fisher test and McNemar test to compare C. albicans and SGM levels. Statistical analysis at the 95% confidence level (P < 0.05) showed that: (i) the association of coconut soap and 0.05% sodium hypochlorite significantly reduced clinical signs of denture stomatitis, (ii) C. albicans did not reduce in counts, (iii) SGM were reduced but not significantly and (iv) the association of coconut soap and 0.5% sodium hypochlorite was effective in controlling denture biofilm.

  20. Aspergillus pragensis sp. nov. discovered during molecular reidentification of clinical isolates belonging to Aspergillus section Candidi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The identity of nine clinical isolates from Czech patients presumably belonging to Aspergillus section Candidi based on morphology of colonies was revised using sequences of ß-tubulin, calmodulin, and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) rDNA. The set of isolates included six isolates from suspected (n...

  1. Draft Genome Sequences of Two Methicillin-Resistant Clinical Staphylococcus aureus Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Kidon; Iram, Saira; Nawaz, Mohamed; Xu, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequences of two methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) clinical isolates, hospital-associated perirectal isolate 32S (ST 239) from a colitis tracheostomy patient and community-associated MRSA isolate 42S (ST 772) from a hepatic-splenomegaly patient in Rawalpindi, Pakistan. PMID:26868381

  2. The genetic diversity of clinical isolates of Malassezia pachydermatis from dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Aizawa, T; Kano, R; Nakamura, Y; Watanabe, S; Hasegawa, A

    2001-08-01

    Molecular investigation of 110 clinical isolates of non-lipid-dependent Malassezia pachydermatis from dogs and cats was carried out by random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and chitin synthase 2 (CHS2) gene sequence analyses. The RAPD analysis indicated that the clinical isolates of M. pachydermatis constituted four distinct genetic types (A, B, C and D). Moreover, the results from CHS2 gene analysis completely agreed with those from the RAPD analyses. The clinical isolates of M. pachydermatis were obtained from normal external ears, lesions of atopic dermatitis, flea allergic dermatitis, otitis externa, pyoderma and seborrheic dermatitidis in dogs and cats. Type A consisted of 93 clinical isolates as well as the ex-neotype strain of M. pachydermatis. The isolates of type A M. pachydermatis originated from lesions of all kinds of diseases. They were predominant on dog and cat skin. The other types, B, C, and D were isolated mainly from otitis externa. PMID:11556762

  3. Prevalence of Toxin Genes among the Clinical Isolates of Staphylococcus aureus and its Clinical Impact

    PubMed Central

    Deodhar, Divya; Varghese, George; Balaji, Veeraraghavan; John, James; Rebekah, Grace; Janardhanan, Jeshina; Jeyaraman, Ranjith; Jasmine, Sudha; Mathews, Prasad

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) causes a variety of infections, ranging from a mild skin infection to blood stream infections and deep seated infections. As Stapylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB) has the tendency to cause endovascular and metastatic infections, complications can occur at almost all sites of the body. Hence, SAB is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in spite of appropriate antimicrobial treatment. The virulence in S. aureus is determined by the presence of adhesins and toxins, which behave like superantigens (SAgs) and leads to a massive release of proinflammatory cytokines causing overwhelming inflammatory response leading to endothelial leakage, hemodynamic shock, multiorgan failure, and possibly death. Materials and Methods: One year prospective study conducted in a tertiary care hospital in southern part of India included all patients with SAB. Clinical details were filled according to. All isolates were subjected to polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for enterotoxin profiling. Results: A total of 101 patients of SAB were identified which comprises of 61 (60.4%) patients with methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) and 40 (39.6%) patients with methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Most common predictors of mortality were prior hospitalization and antibiotic intake, severe organ dysfunction, shock, tachycardia, and leukocytosis. Two-third of the isolates had at least one enterotoxin, most prevalent was sea; 28% and 27% (P - value = 0.001) MSSA isolates had seg and sei; whereas, 38.6% (P - value < 0.001) of MRSA isolates were found to have sea. The most common enterotoxin associated with mortality was sei, which comprised of 38% of all mortality. Conclusion: In SAB, the significant predictors of mortality were prior hospitalization and antibiotic intake, presence of multiorgan dysfunction, and shock. Although overall significance between the enterotoxin and shock could not be demonstrated, it successfully demonstrated

  4. Biochemical, serological, and virulence characterization of clinical and oyster Vibrio parahaemolyticus isolates.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jessica L; Lüdeke, Catharina H M; Bowers, John C; Garrett, Nancy; Fischer, Markus; Parsons, Michele B; Bopp, Cheryl A; DePaola, Angelo

    2012-07-01

    In this study, 77 clinical and 67 oyster Vibrio parahaemolyticus isolates from North America were examined for biochemical profiles, serotype, and the presence of potential virulence factors (tdh, trh, and type III secretion system [T3SS] genes). All isolates were positive for oxidase, indole, and glucose fermentation, consistent with previous reports. The isolates represented 35 different serotypes, 9 of which were shared by clinical and oyster isolates. Serotypes associated with pandemic strains (O1:KUT, O1:K25, O3:K6, and O4:K68) were observed for clinical isolates, and 7 (9%) oyster isolates belonged to serotype O1:KUT. Of the clinical isolates, 27% were negative for tdh and trh, while 45% contained both genes. Oyster isolates were preferentially selected for the presence of tdh and/or trh; 34% contained both genes, 42% had trh but not tdh, and 3% had tdh but not trh. All but 1 isolate (143/144) had at least three of the four T3SS1 genes examined. The isolates lacking both tdh and trh contained no T3SS2α or T3SS2β genes. All clinical isolates positive for tdh and negative for trh possessed all T3SS2α genes, and all isolates negative for tdh and positive for trh possessed all T3SS2β genes. The two oyster isolates containing tdh but not trh possessed all but the vopB2 gene of T3SS2α, as reported previously. In contrast to the findings of previous studies, all strains examined that were positive for both tdh and trh also carried T3SS2β genes. This report identifies the serotype as the most distinguishing feature between clinical and oyster isolates. Our findings raise concerns about the reliability of the tdh, trh, and T3SS genes as virulence markers and highlight the need for more-detailed pathogenicity investigations of V. parahaemolyticus.

  5. Oral Contraceptives and Multiple Sclerosis/Clinically Isolated Syndrome Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Hellwig, Kerstin; Chen, Lie H.; Stancyzk, Frank Z.; Langer-Gould, Annette M.

    2016-01-01

    Background The incidence of multiple sclerosis (MS) is rising in women. Objective To determine whether the use of combined oral contraceptives (COCs) are associated with MS risk and whether this varies by progestin content. Methods We conducted a nested case-control study of females ages 14–48 years with incident MS or clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) 2008–2011 from the membership of Kaiser Permanente Southern California. Controls were matched on age, race/ethnicity and membership characteristics. COC use up to ten years prior to symptom onset was obtained from the complete electronic health record. Results We identified 400 women with incident MS/CIS and 3904 matched controls. Forty- percent of cases and 32% of controls had used COCs prior to symptom onset. The use of COCs was associated with a slightly increased risk of MS/CIS (adjusted OR = 1.52, 95%CI = 1.21–1.91; p<0.001). This risk did not vary by duration of COC use. The association varied by progestin content being more pronounced for levenorgestrol (adjusted OR = 1.75, 95%CI = 1.29–2.37; p<0.001) than norethindrone (adjusted OR = 1.57, 95%CI = 1.16–2.12; p = 0.003) and absent for the newest progestin, drospirenone (p = 0.95). Conclusions Our findings should be interpreted cautiously. While the use of some combination oral contraceptives may contribute to the rising incidence of MS in women, an unmeasured confounder associated with the modern woman’s lifestyle is a more likely explanation for this weak association. PMID:26950301

  6. Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Population Divergence and Resistance to Oxidative Stress in Clinical, Domesticated and Wild Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Diezmann, Stephanie; Dietrich, Fred S.

    2009-01-01

    Background Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been associated with human life for millennia in the brewery and bakery. Recently it has been recognized as an emerging opportunistic pathogen. To study the evolutionary history of S. cerevisiae, the origin of clinical isolates and the importance of a virulence-associated trait, population genetics and phenotypic assays have been applied to an ecologically diverse set of 103 strains isolated from clinics, breweries, vineyards, fruits, soil, commercial supplements and insect guts. Methodology/Principal Findings DNA sequence data from five nuclear DNA loci were analyzed for population structure and haplotype distribution. Additionally, all strains were tested for survival of oxidative stress, a trait associated with microbial pathogenicity. DNA sequence analyses identified three genetic subgroups within the recombining S. cerevisiae strains that are associated with ecology, geography and virulence. Shared alleles suggest that the clinical isolates contain genetic contribution from the fruit isolates. Clinical and fruit isolates exhibit high levels of recombination, unlike the genetically homogenous soil isolates in which no recombination was detected. However, clinical and soil isolates were more resistant to oxidative stress than any other population, suggesting a correlation between survival in oxidative stress and yeast pathogenicity. Conclusions/Significance Population genetic analyses of S. cerevisiae delineated three distinct groups, comprising primarily the (i) human-associated brewery and vineyard strains, (ii) clinical and fruit isolates (iii) and wild soil isolates from eastern U.S. The interactions between S. cerevisiae and humans potentiate yeast evolution and the development of genetically, ecologically and geographically divergent groups. PMID:19390633

  7. Phenotypic characterization of mononuclear cells and class II antigen expression in angular cheilitis infected by Candida albicans or Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Ohman, S C; Jontell, M; Jonsson, R

    1989-04-01

    In the present study we characterized the phenotypes of infiltrating mononuclear cells in angular cheilitis lesions to further explore the pathogenesis of this disorder. Frozen sections from lesions infected by Candida albicans and/or Staphylococcus aureus were subjected to immunohistochemical analysis utilizing monoclonal antibodies directed to subsets of T-lymphocytes, B-lymphocytes, and macrophages. In addition, the expression of Class II antigens (HLA-DP, -DQ, -DR), the interleukin 2- and transferrin-receptors was studied on resident and infiltrating cells. An intense infiltration of T-lymphocytes was accompanied by expression of Class II antigens on the epidermal keratinocytes in lesion infected by Candida albicans. The Staphylococcus aureus infected lesions displayed a diffuse infiltration of T-lymphocytes but virtually no expression of Class II antigen by epidermal keratinocytes. These observations suggest that the cell-mediated arm of the immune system is involved in the inflammatory reaction of lesions infected by Candida albicans. In addition, the present study confirms that epidermal expression of Class II antigens is closely related to the type and magnitude of the infiltrating T-lymphocyte. Finally, these findings indicate that the type of inflammatory reaction in angular cheilitis is primarily dependent on the isolated microorganism, although the clinical pictures of the disorder are virtually identical. PMID:2468179

  8. Isolation of nuc mutant isolates of Staphylococcus aureus from bovine clinical mastitis.

    PubMed

    Zastempowska, E; Orczykowska-Kotyna, M; Lassa, H

    2014-06-01

    Isolates of Staphylococcus aureus with a mutation in the nuclease (nuc) gene were recovered from cases of bovine mastitis in Poland. Three S. aureus isolates from cows in one herd had a 42 base pair duplication in the nuc gene. These isolates belonged to sequence type 97 (ST97) and clonal complex 97 (CC97). They had a different spa type and multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat fingerprinting (MLVF) subtype than a S. aureus isolate without the nuc mutation from the same herd. Isolation of nuc mutant S. aureus strains from cases of bovine mastitis may confound diagnostic PCRs based on detection of the nuc gene.

  9. Patient experience of source isolation: lessons for clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Barratt, Ruth Linda; Shaban, Ramon; Moyle, Wendy

    2011-10-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is now the leading antimicrobial-resistant organism of concern to clinicians worldwide. Preventing and controlling the increase and spread of MRSA within the health-care environment is therefore an important function of the infection control team. The prevention and control of MRSA requires strict use of both Standard and Additional Precautions, which include good hand hygiene practices, judicious antimicrobial prescribing, and source isolation. While few would dispute the need for these precautions for preventing the spread of MRSA and other infections, their use may result in adverse physical and psychological effects for the patient. In an age of quality and safety of health care, ensuring infection control practice such as source isolation and contact precautions adhere to fundamental human rights is paramount. This paper presents a review of the literature on the patient experience of source isolation for MRSA or other infectious diseases. The review yielded five major interconnected themes: (1) psychological effects of isolation; (2) coping with isolation; (3) social isolation; (4) communication and information provision; and (5) physical environment and quality of care. It found that the experience of isolation by patients has both negative and positive elements. Isolation may result in detrimental psychological effects including anxiety, stress and depression, but may also result in the patient receiving less or substandard care. However, patients may also benefit from the quietness and privacy of single rooms. Nurses and other healthcare workers must look for ways to improve the experience of isolation and contact precautions of patients in source isolation. Opportunities exist in particular in improving the environment and the patient's self-control of the situation and in providing adequate information.

  10. Antifungal susceptibility of 175 Aspergillus isolates from various clinical and environmental sources.

    PubMed

    Sabino, Raquel; Carolino, Elisabete; Veríssimo, Cristina; Martinez, Marife; Clemons, Karl V; Stevens, David A

    2016-10-01

    Some environmental Aspergillus spp. isolates have been described as resistant to antifungals, potentially causing an emerging medical problem. In the present work, the antifungal susceptibility profile of 41 clinical and 134 environmental isolates of Aspergillus was determined using the CLSI microdilution method. The aim of this study was to compare environmental and clinical isolates with respect to their susceptibility, and assess the potential implications for therapy of isolates encountered in different environments. To our knowledge, this is the first report comparing antifungal susceptibility profiles of Aspergillus collected from different environmental sources (poultries, swineries, beach sand, and hospital environment). Significant differences were found in the distribution of the different species sections for the different sources. Significant differences were also found in the susceptibility profile of the different Aspergillus sections recovered from the various sources. Clear differences were found between the susceptibility of clinical and environmental isolates for caspofungin, amphotericin B and posaconazole, with clinical isolates showing overall greater susceptibility, except for caspofungin. In comparison to clinical isolates, hospital environmental isolates showed significantly less susceptibility to amphotericin B and posaconazole. These data indicate that species section identity and the site from which the isolate was recovered influence the antifungal susceptibility profile, which may affect initial antifungal choices.

  11. The utility of Caco-2 cells in isolation of enteroviruses from environmental and clinical material.

    PubMed

    Wieczorek, Magdalena; Ciaćka, Agnieszka; Witek, Agnieszka; Litwińska, Bogumiła

    2014-01-01

    The work presented here demonstrates the utility of Caco-2 cells in the isolation of enteroviruses (EVs) from environmental and clinical materials. Thirty-two samples of cerebrospinal fluid positive in Pan-entero RT-PCR were taken for EV strain isolation in cell culture. Out of the 32 samples analysed, 22 (68.75%) were positive for enteroviruses by isolation in Caco-2 cells, and 10 (31.25%) were positive by isolation in RD cells. High viral titre in clinical specimens resulted in rate increase for isolation in Caco-2 cells and RD cells (87.5% and 50%, respectively). Also, the probability of isolation of enteroviruses from sewage in Caco-2 cells was 20 times higher that in RD cells. We proved that Caco-2 cells were more effective than RD cells in enterovirus isolation, irrespective of the material used in the inoculation process.

  12. A comparative study of clinical and food isolates of Listeria monocytogenes and related species.

    PubMed Central

    Szabo, E. A.; Desmarchelier, P. M.

    1990-01-01

    Ninety-six isolates of presumptive or confirmed Listeria monocytogenes were obtained from local clinical (30 isolates) or food laboratories (66 isolates). Minimal biochemical analysis identified only 80% of these isolates as L. monocytogenes the remaining included L. seeligeri, 1%, or the non-haemolytic L. innocua, 19%. The 27 clinical and 50 food isolates, mainly from meat products, frozen confectionaries, and cheeses, confirmed as L. monocytogenes were compared biochemically and serologically. Twenty-one isolates, including some strains of L. innocua and L. seeligeri, were examined for pathogenicity in immunocompromized mice and 44 typed using bacterial restriction endonuclease DNA analysis (BRENDA). Only isolates of L. monocytogenes were found to be pathogenic. Biovar-typing of the isolates was unreliable and provided poor discrimination. Serogroups 1/2 and 4 predominated among clinical and food isolates and BRENDA provided better discrimination among isolates. Ten stable and reproducible restriction patterns were observed among the Listeria sp. isolates studied. Overall, a combination of techniques gave the best discrimination and indicated their potential for use as epidemiological tools. Images Fig. 1 PMID:2120079

  13. Dystonia and Tremor: The Clinical Syndromes with Isolated Tremor

    PubMed Central

    Albanese, Alberto; Sorbo, Francesca Del

    2016-01-01

    Background Dystonia and tremor share many commonalities. Isolated tremor is part of the phenomenological spectrum of isolated dystonia and of essential tremor. The occurrence of subtle features of dystonia may allow one to differentiate dystonic tremor from essential tremor. Diagnostic uncertainty is enhanced when no features of dystonia are found in patients with a tremor syndrome, raising the question whether the observed phenomenology is an incomplete form of dystonia. Methods Known forms of syndromes with isolated tremor are reviewed. Diagnostic uncertainties between tremor and dystonia are put into perspective. Results The following isolated tremor syndromes are reviewed: essential tremor, head tremor, voice tremor, jaw tremor, and upper-limb tremor. Their varied phenomenology is analyzed and appraised in the light of a possible relationship with dystonia. Discussion Clinicians making a diagnosis of isolated tremor should remain vigilant for the detection of features of dystonia. This is in keeping with the recent view that isolated tremor may be an incomplete phenomenology of dystonia. PMID:27152246

  14. Isolation and molecular characterization of Salmonella enterica serovar Javiana from food, environmental and clinical samples.

    PubMed

    Mezal, Ezat H; Stefanova, Rossina; Khan, Ashraf A

    2013-06-01

    A total of 50 Salmonella enterica serovar Javiana isolates, isolated from food, environmental and clinical samples, were analyzed for antibiotic resistance, presence of virulence genes, plasmids and plasmid replicon types. To assess the genetic diversity, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) fingerprinting and plasmid profiles were performed. All of the isolates were sensitive to chloramphenicol, nalidixic acid, and sulfisoxazole, and four isolates showed intermediate resistance to gentamicin or kanamycin. Eleven isolates, including representatives from each of the source types, were resistant to ampicillin. Four isolates from either clinical or environmental sources were resistant to tetracycline, while an additional 20 isolates showed intermediate resistance to this drug. Fourteen isolates, primarily from food sources, showed intermediate resistance to streptomycin. The S. Javiana isolates were screened by PCR for 17 virulence genes (spvB, spiA, pagC, msgA, invA, sipB, prgH, spaN, orgA, tolC, iroN, sitC, IpfC, sifA, sopB, cdtB, and pefA). All isolates were positive for nine to fourteen of these genes, but none were positive for pefA, spvB and lpfC, which are typically present on the Salmonella virulence plasmid. Seven of the virulence genes including cdtB were found in all 50 isolates, suggesting that S. Javiana from food and environmental sources had virulence similar to clinical isolates. Four clinical isolates and two food isolates carried one or more plasmids of approximately 30, 38, and 58 kb, with the 58 kb plasmids belonging to incompatibility group IncFIIA. Two clinical isolates carried IncI1 type mega plasmid (80 kb), and one clinical isolate carried plasmids of 4.5 and 7 kb. The PFGE profiles resulted 34 patterns in five clusters at a 90% similarity threshold. Our results indicate that S. Javiana isolates have a diverse clonal population among the clinical, food and environmental samples and this serotype possesses several virulent genes and plasmids

  15. Antifungal susceptibilities of Candida species isolated from the patients with vaginal candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Masahito; Yamagishi, Yuka; Mikamo, Hiroshige

    2016-02-01

    There have been the current Japanese data on susceptibility testing for Candida isolates from vaginal candidiasis. The in vitro activities of therapeutic antifungal drugs for vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC); miconazole (MCZ), itraconazole (ITCZ), fluconazole (FLCZ), clotrimazole (CTZ), oxiconazole (OCZ), isoconazole (ICZ) and bifonazole (BFZ) against vaginal isolates. Fifty-four strains Candida albicans and 19 strains of Candida glabrata were evaluated using a broth microdilution method specified by Clinical Laboratories Standard Institute (CLSI) document M27-A3. The MIC90 of each drug, MCZ, ITCZ, FLCZ, CTZ, OCZ, ICZ and BFZ, against C. albicans and C. glabrata isolates were 0.25, 0.12, 1, 0.06, 0.12, 0.12 and 1 μg/ml and 1, 1, 8, 0.5, 0.25, 0.5 and 1 μg/ml respectively. The activities of these drugs, except for BFZ, against C. glabrata were lower than that of C. albicans. There was one azole-resistant isolate in C. glabrata of which MIC of FLCZ is > 64 μg/ml and this isolate had cross resistance to other antifungal drugs tested. These results suggest that antifungal drugs for treatment of VVC continues to have potent antifungal activities against C. albicans and C. glabrata isolates from vaginitis. CTZ, OCZ and ICZ susceptibility of FLCZ low susceptibility C. glabrata are relatively higher than MCZ, ITCZ and FLCZ.

  16. Antimicrobial Susceptibility and Clonality of Clinical Ureaplasma Isolates in the United States.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Javier; Karau, Melissa J; Cunningham, Scott A; Greenwood-Quaintance, Kerryl E; Patel, Robin

    2016-08-01

    Ureaplasma urealyticum and Ureaplasma parvum are pathogens involved in urogenital tract and intrauterine infections and also in systemic diseases in newborns and immunosuppressed patients. There is limited information on the antimicrobial susceptibility and clonality of these species. In this study, we report the susceptibility of 250 contemporary isolates of Ureaplasma (202 U. parvum and 48 U. urealyticum isolates) recovered at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN. MICs of doxycycline, azithromycin, ciprofloxacin, tetracycline, erythromycin, and levofloxacin were determined by broth microdilution, with MICS of the last three interpreted according to CLSI guidelines. Levofloxacin resistance was found in 6.4% and 5.2% of U. parvum and U. urealyticum isolates, respectively, while 27.2% and 68.8% of isolates, respectively, showed ciprofloxacin MICs of ≥4 μg/ml. The resistance mechanism of levofloxacin-resistant isolates was due to mutations in parC, with the Ser83Leu substitution being most frequent, followed by Glu87Lys. No macrolide resistance was found among the 250 isolates studied; a single U. parvum isolate was tetracycline resistant. tet(M) was found in 10 U. parvum isolates, including the single tetracycline-resistant isolate, as well as in 9 isolates which had low tetracycline and doxycycline MICs. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) performed on a selection of 46 isolates showed high diversity within the clinical Ureaplasma isolates studied, regardless of antimicrobial susceptibility. The present work extends previous knowledge regarding susceptibility to antimicrobial agents, resistance mechanisms, and clonality of Ureaplasma species in the United States. PMID:27246773

  17. In vitro susceptibilities of clinical and environmental isolates of Cryptococcus neoformans to five antifungal drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Franzot, S P; Hamdan, J S

    1996-01-01

    A total of 53 Cryptococcus neoformans strains, including clinical and environmental Brazilian isolates, were tested for their susceptibilities to amphotericin B, 5-flucytosine, ketoconazole, fluconazole, and itraconazole. The tests were performed according to the National Committee of Clinical Laboratory Standards recommendations (document M27-P). In general, there was a remarkable homogeneity of results for all strains, and comparable MICs were found for environmental and clinical isolates. This paper represents the first contribution in which susceptibility data for Brazilian C. neoformans isolates are provided. PMID:8851624

  18. Mixed Infections and Rifampin Heteroresistance among Mycobacterium tuberculosis Clinical Isolates.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Chao; Li, Song; Luo, Zhongyue; Pi, Rui; Sun, Honghu; He, Qingxia; Tang, Ke; Luo, Mei; Li, Yuqing; Couvin, David; Rastogi, Nalin; Sun, Qun

    2015-07-01

    Mixed infections and heteroresistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis contribute to the difficulty of diagnosis, treatment, and control of tuberculosis. However, there is still no proper solution for these issues. This study aimed to investigate the potential relationship between mixed infections and heteroresistance and to determine the high-risk groups related to these factors. A total of 499 resistant and susceptible isolates were subjected to spoligotyping and 24-locus variable-number tandem repeat methods to analyze their genotypic lineages and the occurrence of mixed infections. Two hundred ninety-two randomly selected isolates were sequenced on their rpoB gene to examine mutations and heteroresistance. The results showed that 12 patients had mixed infections, and the corresponding isolates belonged to Manu2 (n = 8), Beijing (n = 2), T (n = 1), and unknown (n = 1) lineages. Manu2 was found to be significantly associated with mixed infections (odds ratio, 47.72; confidence interval, 9.68 to 235.23; P < 0.01). Four isolates (1.37%) were confirmed to be heteroresistant, which was caused by mixed infections in three (75%) isolates; these belonged to Manu2. Additionally, 3.8% of the rifampin-resistant isolates showing no mutation in the rpoB gene were significantly associated with mixed infections (χ(2), 56.78; P < 0.01). This study revealed for the first time that Manu2 was the predominant group in the cases of mixed infections, and this might be the main reason for heteroresistance and a possible mechanism for isolates without any mutation in the rpoB gene to become rifampin resistant. Further studies should focus on this lineage to clarify its relevance to mixed infections.

  19. Mixed Infections and Rifampin Heteroresistance among Mycobacterium tuberculosis Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Chao; Li, Song; Luo, Zhongyue; Pi, Rui; Sun, Honghu; He, Qingxia; Tang, Ke; Luo, Mei; Li, Yuqing; Couvin, David; Rastogi, Nalin

    2015-01-01

    Mixed infections and heteroresistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis contribute to the difficulty of diagnosis, treatment, and control of tuberculosis. However, there is still no proper solution for these issues. This study aimed to investigate the potential relationship between mixed infections and heteroresistance and to determine the high-risk groups related to these factors. A total of 499 resistant and susceptible isolates were subjected to spoligotyping and 24-locus variable-number tandem repeat methods to analyze their genotypic lineages and the occurrence of mixed infections. Two hundred ninety-two randomly selected isolates were sequenced on their rpoB gene to examine mutations and heteroresistance. The results showed that 12 patients had mixed infections, and the corresponding isolates belonged to Manu2 (n = 8), Beijing (n = 2), T (n = 1), and unknown (n = 1) lineages. Manu2 was found to be significantly associated with mixed infections (odds ratio, 47.72; confidence interval, 9.68 to 235.23; P < 0.01). Four isolates (1.37%) were confirmed to be heteroresistant, which was caused by mixed infections in three (75%) isolates; these belonged to Manu2. Additionally, 3.8% of the rifampin-resistant isolates showing no mutation in the rpoB gene were significantly associated with mixed infections (χ2, 56.78; P < 0.01). This study revealed for the first time that Manu2 was the predominant group in the cases of mixed infections, and this might be the main reason for heteroresistance and a possible mechanism for isolates without any mutation in the rpoB gene to become rifampin resistant. Further studies should focus on this lineage to clarify its relevance to mixed infections. PMID:25903578

  20. Frequency, pathogenicity and microbiologic outcome of non-Candida albicans candiduria.

    PubMed

    Occhipinti, D J; Gubbins, P O; Schreckenberger, P; Danziger, L H

    1994-06-01

    A retrospective review of urine cultures obtained from patients at the University of Illinois Hospital revealed that the frequency of isolation of non-albicans Candida species increased significantly from 1990 to 1991 (p = 0.0003), while the frequency of isolation of Candida albicans species decreased significantly (p = 0.0006). Patients with urine cultures positive for non-albicans Candida species of Torulopsis glabrata during 1991 were identified for review. Sixty-seven patients were eligible for evaluation. Non-albicans candiduria developed in an average of 12 days. Identical fungal species were isolated from the blood following a positive urine culture in only two patients. Twenty patients were treated; candiduria persisted in 9 (45%), while resolution occurred in 11 (55%). The remaining 47 patients were not treated. Non-albicans candiduria persisted in 30 (64%) of these patients and resolved in 15 (32%); in the remaining two patients (4%) the microbiologic outcome was undetermined. The difference in microbiologic outcomes between treated and untreated patients was not significant using the Chi-square test (p = 0.170). Non-albicans candiduria developed rapidly, frequently persisted whether treated or untreated, and rarely progressed to candidemia.

  1. Isolation and clinical sample typing of human leptospirosis cases in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Chiani, Yosena; Jacob, Paulina; Varni, Vanina; Landolt, Noelia; Schmeling, María Fernanda; Pujato, Nazarena; Caimi, Karina; Vanasco, Bibiana

    2016-01-01

    Leptospira typing is carried out using isolated strains. Because of difficulties in obtaining them, direct identification of infective Leptospira in clinical samples is a high priority. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) proved highly discriminatory for seven pathogenic species of Leptospira, allowing isolate characterization and robust assignment to species, in addition to phylogenetic evidence for the relatedness between species. In this study we characterized Leptospira strains circulating in Argentina, using typing methods applied to human clinical samples and isolates. Phylogenetic studies based on 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequences enabled typing of 8 isolates (6 Leptospira interrogans, one Leptospira wolffii and one Leptospira broomii) and 58 out of 85 (68.2%) clinical samples (55 L. interrogans, 2 Leptospira meyeri, and one Leptospira kirschneri). MLST results for the L. interrogans isolates indicated that five were probably Canicola serogroup (ST37) and one was probably Icterohaemorrhagiae serogroup (ST17). Eleven clinical samples (21.6%), provided MLST interpretable data: five were probably Pyrogenes serogroup (ST13), four Sejroe (ST20), one Autumnalis (ST22) and one Canicola (ST37). To the best of our knowledge this study is the first report of the use of an MLST typing scheme with seven loci to identify Leptospira directly from clinical samples in Argentina. The use of clinical samples presents the advantage of the possibility of knowing the infecting strain without resorting to isolates. This study also allowed, for the first time, the characterization of isolates of intermediate pathogenicity species (L. wolffii and L. broomii) from symptomatic patients. PMID:26658064

  2. Isolation and clinical sample typing of human leptospirosis cases in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Chiani, Yosena; Jacob, Paulina; Varni, Vanina; Landolt, Noelia; Schmeling, María Fernanda; Pujato, Nazarena; Caimi, Karina; Vanasco, Bibiana

    2016-01-01

    Leptospira typing is carried out using isolated strains. Because of difficulties in obtaining them, direct identification of infective Leptospira in clinical samples is a high priority. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) proved highly discriminatory for seven pathogenic species of Leptospira, allowing isolate characterization and robust assignment to species, in addition to phylogenetic evidence for the relatedness between species. In this study we characterized Leptospira strains circulating in Argentina, using typing methods applied to human clinical samples and isolates. Phylogenetic studies based on 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequences enabled typing of 8 isolates (6 Leptospira interrogans, one Leptospira wolffii and one Leptospira broomii) and 58 out of 85 (68.2%) clinical samples (55 L. interrogans, 2 Leptospira meyeri, and one Leptospira kirschneri). MLST results for the L. interrogans isolates indicated that five were probably Canicola serogroup (ST37) and one was probably Icterohaemorrhagiae serogroup (ST17). Eleven clinical samples (21.6%), provided MLST interpretable data: five were probably Pyrogenes serogroup (ST13), four Sejroe (ST20), one Autumnalis (ST22) and one Canicola (ST37). To the best of our knowledge this study is the first report of the use of an MLST typing scheme with seven loci to identify Leptospira directly from clinical samples in Argentina. The use of clinical samples presents the advantage of the possibility of knowing the infecting strain without resorting to isolates. This study also allowed, for the first time, the characterization of isolates of intermediate pathogenicity species (L. wolffii and L. broomii) from symptomatic patients.

  3. Anticandidal Effect and Mechanisms of Monoterpenoid, Perillyl Alcohol against Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Moiz A; Fatima, Zeeshan; Hameed, Saif

    2016-01-01

    This study explored the antifungal potential of perillyl alcohol (PA), a natural monoterpene alcohol, against most prevalent human fungal pathogen C. albicans, its clinical isolates and four non-albicans species of Candida. To resolve the potential mechanisms, we used whole genome transcriptome analyses of PA treated Candida cells to examine the affected cellular circuitry of this pathogen. The transcriptome data revealed a link between calcineurin signaling and PA as among the several categories of PA responsive genes the down regulation of calcineurin signaling gene CNB1 was noteworthy which was also confirmed by both molecular docking and susceptibility assays. We observed that PA treated Candida phenocopied compromised calcineurin pathway stress responses and turned sensitive to alkaline pH, ionic, membrane, salinity, endoplasmic reticulum and serum stresses. Indispensability of functional calcineurin was further confirmed as calcineurin mutant was hypersensitive to PA while constitutively expressed calcineurin strain remained resistant. We explored that PA leads to perturbed membrane integrity as depicted through depleted ergosterol levels and disrupted pH homeostasis. Moreover, PA caused cell wall damage which was evident from hypersensitivity against cell wall perturbing agents (congo red, calcoflour white), SEM and enhanced rate of cell sedimentation. Furthermore, PA inhibited potential virulence traits including morphological transition, biofilm formation and displayed diminished capacity to adhere both to the polystyrene surface and buccal epithelial cells. The study also revealed that PA leads to cell cycle arrest and mitochondrial dysfunction in C. albicans. Together, the present study provides enough evidence for further work on PA so that better strategies could be employed to treat Candida infections. PMID:27627759

  4. Synergistic Interactions of Eugenol-tosylate and Its Congeners with Fluconazole against Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Amber; Manzoor, Nikhat; Molepo, Julitha

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported the antifungal properties of a monoterpene phenol “Eugenol” against different Candida strains and have observed that the addition of methyl group to eugenol drastically increased its antimicrobial potency. Based on the results and the importance of medicinal synthetic chemistry, we synthesized eugenol-tosylate and its congeners (E1-E6) and tested their antifungal activity against different clinical fluconazole (FLC)- susceptible and FLC- resistant C. albicans isolates alone and in combination with FLC by determining fractional inhibitory concentration indices (FICIs) and isobolograms calculated from microdilution assays. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) results confirmed that all the tested C. albicans strains were variably susceptible to the semi-synthetic derivatives E1-E6, with MIC values ranging from 1–62 μg/ml. The test compounds in combination with FLC exhibited either synergy (36%), additive (41%) or indifferent (23%) interactions, however, no antagonistic interactions were observed. The MICs of FLC decreased 2–9 fold when used in combination with the test compounds. Like their precursor eugenol, all the derivatives showed significant impairment of ergosterol biosynthesis in all C. albicans strains coupled with down regulation of the important ergosterol biosynthesis pathway gene-ERG11. The results were further validated by docking studies, which revealed that the inhibitors snugly fitting the active site of the target enzyme, mimicking fluconazole, may well explain their excellent inhibitory activity. Our results suggest that these compounds have a great potential as antifungals, which can be used as chemosensitizing agents with the known antifungal drugs. PMID:26694966

  5. Anticandidal Effect and Mechanisms of Monoterpenoid, Perillyl Alcohol against Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Moiz A.; Fatima, Zeeshan; Hameed, Saif

    2016-01-01

    This study explored the antifungal potential of perillyl alcohol (PA), a natural monoterpene alcohol, against most prevalent human fungal pathogen C. albicans, its clinical isolates and four non-albicans species of Candida. To resolve the potential mechanisms, we used whole genome transcriptome analyses of PA treated Candida cells to examine the affected cellular circuitry of this pathogen. The transcriptome data revealed a link between calcineurin signaling and PA as among the several categories of PA responsive genes the down regulation of calcineurin signaling gene CNB1 was noteworthy which was also confirmed by both molecular docking and susceptibility assays. We observed that PA treated Candida phenocopied compromised calcineurin pathway stress responses and turned sensitive to alkaline pH, ionic, membrane, salinity, endoplasmic reticulum and serum stresses. Indispensability of functional calcineurin was further confirmed as calcineurin mutant was hypersensitive to PA while constitutively expressed calcineurin strain remained resistant. We explored that PA leads to perturbed membrane integrity as depicted through depleted ergosterol levels and disrupted pH homeostasis. Moreover, PA caused cell wall damage which was evident from hypersensitivity against cell wall perturbing agents (congo red, calcoflour white), SEM and enhanced rate of cell sedimentation. Furthermore, PA inhibited potential virulence traits including morphological transition, biofilm formation and displayed diminished capacity to adhere both to the polystyrene surface and buccal epithelial cells. The study also revealed that PA leads to cell cycle arrest and mitochondrial dysfunction in C. albicans. Together, the present study provides enough evidence for further work on PA so that better strategies could be employed to treat Candida infections. PMID:27627759

  6. Tetracycline alters drug susceptibility in Candida albicans and other pathogenic fungi

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, Brian G.; Silver, Peter M.; Marie, Chelsea; Hoot, Samantha J.; Leyde, Sarah E.; White, Theodore C.

    2008-01-01

    Summary The tetracycline (TET) promoter has been used in several systems as an inducible regulator of gene expression. In control analyses, the standard Candida albicans laboratory strain SC5314 was found to have altered susceptibility to a variety of antifungal drugs in the presence of relatively high concentrations (50 to 200 μg/ml) of TET. Altered susceptibility was most notable with exposure to amphotericin B (AMB) with a 32 fold increase in susceptibility, and terbinafine (TRB) with a 32 fold decrease in susceptibility. The TET/AMB synergy was observed in several clinical isolates of C. albicans and in distantly related species Aspergillus fumigatus, and Cryptococcus neoformans. The TET/AMB synergy is not related to efflux pump activity, as determined by FACS analyses and by analysis of a strain containing efflux pump deletions. Gene expression analyses by luciferase and by quantitative real time reverse transcriptase PCR failed to identify significant alterations in expression of any genes associated with resistance. C. albicans grown in TET for 48 h does show a reduction in total cellular ergosterol. Analysis of growth curves suggests that the TET effect is associated with lack of a diauxic shift, which is related to a loss of mitochondrial function. MitoTracker fluorescent dye was used to demonstrate that TET has a direct effect on mitochondrial function. These results demonstrate the need for careful analysis of TET effects when using a TET-inducible promoter, especially in studies that involve antifungal drugs. This study defines some limits to the use of the TET inducible promoter, and identifies effects on cells that are the result of TET exposure alone, not the result of expression of a targeted gene. PMID:18310042

  7. Disruption of the transcriptional regulator Cas5 results in enhanced killing of Candida albicans by Fluconazole.

    PubMed

    Vasicek, Erin M; Berkow, Elizabeth L; Bruno, Vincent M; Mitchell, Aaron P; Wiederhold, Nathan P; Barker, Katherine S; Rogers, P David

    2014-11-01

    Azole antifungal agents such as fluconazole exhibit fungistatic activity against Candida albicans. Strategies to enhance azole antifungal activity would be therapeutically appealing. In an effort to identify transcriptional pathways that influence the killing activity of fluconazole, we sought to identify transcription factors (TFs) involved in this process. From a collection of C. albicans strains disrupted for genes encoding TFs (O. R. Homann, J. Dea, S. M. Noble, and A. D. Johnson, PLoS Genet. 5:e1000783, 2009, http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pgen.1000783), four strains exhibited marked reductions in minimum fungicidal concentration (MFCs) in both RPMI and yeast extract-peptone-dextrose (YPD) media. One of these genes, UPC2, was previously characterized with regard to its role in azole susceptibility. Of mutants representing the three remaining TF genes of interest, one (CAS5) was unable to recover from fluconazole exposure at concentrations as low as 2 μg/ml after 72 h in YPD medium. This mutant also showed reduced susceptibility and a clear zone of inhibition by Etest, was unable to grow on solid medium containing 10 μg/ml fluconazole, and exhibited increased susceptibility by time-kill analysis. CAS5 disruption in highly azole-resistant clinical isolates exhibiting multiple resistance mechanisms did not alter susceptibility. However, CAS5 disruption in strains with specific resistance mutations resulted in moderate reductions in MICs and MFCs. Genome-wide transcriptional analysis was performed in the presence of fluconazole and was consistent with the suggested role of CAS5 in cell wall organization while also suggesting a role in iron transport and homeostasis. These findings suggest that Cas5 regulates a transcriptional network that influences the response of C. albicans to fluconazole. Further delineation of this transcriptional network may identify targets for potential cotherapeutic strategies to enhance the activity of the azole class of antifungals.

  8. Synthetic arylquinuclidine derivatives exhibit antifungal activity against Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis and Candida parapsilopsis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Sterol biosynthesis is an essential pathway for fungal survival, and is the biochemical target of many antifungal agents. The antifungal drugs most widely used to treated fungal infections are compounds that inhibit cytochrome P450-dependent C14α-demethylase (CYP51), but other enzymes of this pathway, such as squalene synthase (SQS) which catalyses the first committed step in sterol biosynthesis, could be viable targets. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antifungal activity of SQS inhibitors on Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis and Candida parapsilopsis strains. Methods Ten arylquinuclidines that act as SQS inhibitors were tested as antiproliferative agents against three ATCC strains and 54 clinical isolates of Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis and Candida parapsilopsis. Also, the morphological alterations induced in the yeasts by the experimental compounds were evaluated by fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy. Results The most potent arylquinuclidine derivative (3-[1'-{4'-(benzyloxy)-phenyl}]-quinuclidine-2-ene) (WSP1267) had a MIC50 of 2 μg/ml for all species tested and MIC90 varying from 4 μg/ml to 8 μg/ml. Ultrathin sections of C. albicans treated with 1 μg/ml of WSP1267 showed several ultrastructural alterations, including (a) loss of cell wall integrity, (b) detachment of the plasma membrane from the fungal cell wall, (c) accumulation of small vesicles in the periplasmic region, (d) presence of large electron-dense vacuoles and (e) significantly increased cell size and cell wall thickness. In addition, fluorescence microscopy of cells labelled with Nile Red showed an accumulation of lipid droplets in the cytoplasm of treated yeasts. Nuclear staining with DAPI revealed the appearance of uncommon yeast buds without a nucleus or with two nuclei. Conclusion Taken together, our data demonstrate that arylquinuclidine derivatives could be useful as lead compounds for the rational synthesis of new antifungal drugs. PMID

  9. Beyond semantics: a clinical and theoretical study of isolation.

    PubMed

    Killingmo, B

    1990-01-01

    Theories of Freud, Piaget, Fonagy and Kristeva have been drawn on to argue that the concept of isolation should not be restricted to a delimited defence mechanism associated with obsessional/compulsive neurosis, as is the usual psychoanalytic conception. From a semiological point of view isolation may be seen as a disturbance of the relationship between signifier and the signified embracing affective communication ranging from the most primitive bodily expression via sound and intonation to a semantic level where affects are expressed through the content of words and ideas. As affects isolated on a pre-verbal level are deprived of expression on a semantic-symbolic level, they are not likely to be modified by content of interpretations alone. They can only be fully activated and brought into therapeutic dialogue through the quality of the speech sound of the analyst.

  10. Biofilm formation is a risk factor for mortality in patients with Candida albicans bloodstream infection—Scotland, 2012–2013

    PubMed Central

    Rajendran, R.; Sherry, L.; Nile, C.J.; Sherriff, A.; Johnson, E.M.; Hanson, M.F.; Williams, C.; Munro, C.A.; Jones, B.J.; Ramage, G.

    2016-01-01

    Bloodstream infections caused by Candida species remain a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients. Biofilm formation by Candida species is an important virulence factor for disease pathogenesis. A prospective analysis of patients with Candida bloodstream infection (n = 217) in Scotland (2012–2013) was performed to assess the risk factors associated with patient mortality, in particular the impact of biofilm formation. Candida bloodstream isolates (n = 280) and clinical records for 157 patients were collected through 11 different health boards across Scotland. Biofilm formation by clinical isolates was assessed in vitro with standard biomass assays. The role of biofilm phenotype on treatment efficacy was also evaluated in vitro by treating preformed biofilms with fixed concentrations of different classes of antifungal. Available mortality data for 134 patients showed that the 30-day candidaemia case mortality rate was 41%, with predisposing factors including patient age and catheter removal. Multivariate Cox regression survival analysis for 42 patients showed a significantly higher mortality rate for Candida albicans infection than for Candida glabrata infection. Biofilm-forming ability was significantly associated with C. albicans mortality (34 patients). Finally, in vitro antifungal sensitivity testing showed that low biofilm formers and high biofilm formers were differentially affected by azoles and echinocandins, but not by polyenes. This study provides further evidence that the biofilm phenotype represents a significant clinical entity, and that isolates with this phenotype differentially respond to antifungal therapy in vitro. Collectively, these findings show that greater clinical understanding is required with respect to Candida biofilm infections, and the implications of isolate heterogeneity. PMID:26432192

  11. Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from single outpatient clinic in Panama City exhibit wide genetic diversity.

    PubMed

    Sambrano, Dilcia; Correa, Ricardo; Almengor, Pedro; Domínguez, Amada; Vega, Silvio; Goodridge, Amador

    2014-08-01

    Understanding Mycobacterium tuberculosis biodiversity and transmission is significant for tuberculosis control. This short report aimed to determine the genetic diversity of M. tuberculosis isolates from an outpatient clinic in Panama City. A total of 62 M. tuberculosis isolates were genotyped by 12 loci mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number of tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTR) and Spoligotyping. Forty-five (72.6%) of the isolates showed unique MIRU-VNTR genotypes, and 13 (21%) of the isolates were grouped into four clusters. Four isolates showed polyclonal MIRU-VNTR genotypes. The MIRU-VNTR Hunter-Gaston discriminatory index reached 0.988. The Spoligotyping analysis revealed 16 M. tuberculosis families, including Latin American-Mediterranean, Harlem, and Beijing. These findings suggest a wide genetic diversity of M. tuberculosis isolates at one outpatient clinic. A detailed molecular epidemiology survey is now warranted, especially following second massive immigration for local Panama Canal expansion activities. PMID:24865686

  12. Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis C2, a Cerebrospinal Fluid Clinical Isolate from Central India

    PubMed Central

    Bhullar, Shradha S.; More, Ravi P.; Puranik, Sampada; Taori, Girdhar M.; Daginawala, Hatim F.

    2014-01-01

    We report the annotated genome sequence of a Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolate from the cerebrospinal fluid of a tuberculous meningitis patient admitted to the Central India Institute of Medical Sciences, Nagpur, India. PMID:25146143

  13. Identification of syncytial mutations in a clinical isolate of herpes simplex virus 2

    SciTech Connect

    Muggeridge, Martin I. . E-mail: mmugge@lsuhsc.edu; Grantham, Michael L.; Johnson, F. Brent

    2004-10-25

    Small polykaryocytes resulting from cell fusion are found in herpes simplex virus (HSV) lesions in patients, but their significance for viral spread and pathogenesis is unclear. Although syncytial variants causing extensive fusion in tissue culture can be readily isolated from laboratory strains, they are rarely found in clinical isolates, suggesting that extensive cell fusion may be deleterious in vivo. Syncytial mutations have previously been identified for several laboratory strains, but not for clinical isolates of HSV type 2. To address this deficiency, we studied a recent syncytial clinical isolate, finding it to be a mixture of two syncytial and one nonsyncytial strain. The two syncytial strains have novel mutations in glycoprotein B, and in vitro cell fusion assays confirmed that they are responsible for syncytium formation. This panel of clinical strains may be ideal for examining the effect of increased cell fusion on pathogenesis.

  14. Antimicrobial susceptibility of clinical isolates from earthquake victims in Wenchuan.

    PubMed

    Kang, M; Xie, Y; Mintao, C; Chen, Z; Chen, H; Fan, H; Chen, W; Guo, X

    2009-01-01

    On 12 May 2008, an earthquake measuring 8.0 on the Richter scale struck Wenchuan County, Sichuan, China. Between 12 May and 11 June, 1823 victims were hospitalized in West China Hospital. These patients were severely injured, and most of their wounds were contaminated. Here, the results of bacteriological identification and antibiotic susceptibility testing of 725 non-duplicate isolates from earthquake victims are presented. Gram-negative bacilli were most frequently isolated (71.3%). Only 18.9% of isolates were Gram-positive bacteria; Candida spp. accounted for 9.7%, and Gram-negative cocci for 0.1%. After anaerobic culture, four Clostridium sordellii strains and one Clostridium bifermentans strain were isolated from deep wounds. Specimen culture from earthquake victims revealed a spectrum of pathogens and antibiotic susceptibilities that was different from that usually encountered in West China Hospital, especially concerning methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, extended-spectrum beta-lactamase producers, and multidrug-resistant (MDR) non-fermenting Gram-negative bacilli. The pathophysiology of the injuries in earthquake victims was different from that in the patients who were not earthquake victims. A combination of environmental bacteria with a high proportion of Gram-negative bacteria was often observed in the earthquake victims. Approximately 26% of all earthquake victims were shown to be carriers of MDR microorganisms. Therefore, appropriate microbiological assessment upon admission, and identification of patients to be put in quarantine, is of paramount importance.

  15. Isolation and Characterization of Enteroviruses from Clinical Samples.

    PubMed

    Blomqvist, Soile; Roivainen, Merja

    2016-01-01

    Enterovirus infections are common in humans worldwide. Enteroviruses are excreted in feces during infection and can be detected from stool specimens by isolation in continuous laboratory cell lines. Characterization of enteroviruses is based on their antigenic and/or genetic properties.

  16. Complete Genome Sequence of a Clinical Isolate of Enterobacter asburiae

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Feng; Yang, Jian; Xiao, Yan; Li, Li; Jin, Qi

    2016-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequence of Enterobacter asburiae strain ENIPBJ-CG1, isolated from a bone marrow transplant patient. The size of the genome sequence is approximately 4.65 Mb, with a G+C content of 55.76%, and it is predicted to contain 4,790 protein-coding genes. PMID:27284137

  17. Antimicrobial susceptibility of clinical isolates from earthquake victims in Wenchuan.

    PubMed

    Kang, M; Xie, Y; Mintao, C; Chen, Z; Chen, H; Fan, H; Chen, W; Guo, X

    2009-01-01

    On 12 May 2008, an earthquake measuring 8.0 on the Richter scale struck Wenchuan County, Sichuan, China. Between 12 May and 11 June, 1823 victims were hospitalized in West China Hospital. These patients were severely injured, and most of their wounds were contaminated. Here, the results of bacteriological identification and antibiotic susceptibility testing of 725 non-duplicate isolates from earthquake victims are presented. Gram-negative bacilli were most frequently isolated (71.3%). Only 18.9% of isolates were Gram-positive bacteria; Candida spp. accounted for 9.7%, and Gram-negative cocci for 0.1%. After anaerobic culture, four Clostridium sordellii strains and one Clostridium bifermentans strain were isolated from deep wounds. Specimen culture from earthquake victims revealed a spectrum of pathogens and antibiotic susceptibilities that was different from that usually encountered in West China Hospital, especially concerning methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, extended-spectrum beta-lactamase producers, and multidrug-resistant (MDR) non-fermenting Gram-negative bacilli. The pathophysiology of the injuries in earthquake victims was different from that in the patients who were not earthquake victims. A combination of environmental bacteria with a high proportion of Gram-negative bacteria was often observed in the earthquake victims. Approximately 26% of all earthquake victims were shown to be carriers of MDR microorganisms. Therefore, appropriate microbiological assessment upon admission, and identification of patients to be put in quarantine, is of paramount importance. PMID:19220339

  18. Antifungal Effect of Lavender Essential Oil (Lavandula angustifolia) and Clotrimazole on Candida albicans: An In Vitro Study.

    PubMed

    Behmanesh, Fereshteh; Pasha, Hajar; Sefidgar, Ali Asghar; Taghizadeh, Mohsen; Moghadamnia, Ali Akbar; Adib Rad, Hajar; Shirkhani, Leyla

    2015-01-01

    Background. The treatment of candidiasis infections is an important problem in the health care system. This study aimed to investigate the in vitro effect of lavender essential oil and clotrimazole on isolated C. albicans from vaginal candidiasis. Materials and Methods. In this clinical trial, C. albicans isolated from the vaginal discharge samples was obtained. Results. The pairwise comparison showed that lavender and clotrimazole had a significant difference; this difference in the lavender group was lower than clotrimazole. But, after 48 hours, there was no difference seen between groups. There was a significant difference between clotrimazole and DMSO groups. Comparing the changes between groups based on the same dilution, at 24 h and 48 h in clotrimazole group, showed a significant difference two times in the fungal cell count that its average during 48 h was less than 24 h. A significant difference was observed between the two periods in lavender group, only at the dilutions of 1/20 and 1/80. The average fungal cell count after 48 h was also lower in lavender group. Conclusions. Given that the lavender has antifungal activity, this can be used as an antifungal agent. However, more clinical studies are necessary to validate its use in candida infection. PMID:26550521

  19. Antifungal Effect of Lavender Essential Oil (Lavandula angustifolia) and Clotrimazole on Candida albicans: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Behmanesh, Fereshteh; Pasha, Hajar; Sefidgar, Ali Asghar; Taghizadeh, Mohsen; Moghadamnia, Ali Akbar; Adib Rad, Hajar; Shirkhani, Leyla

    2015-01-01

    Background. The treatment of candidiasis infections is an important problem in the health care system. This study aimed to investigate the in vitro effect of lavender essential oil and clotrimazole on isolated C. albicans from vaginal candidiasis. Materials and Methods. In this clinical trial, C. albicans isolated from the vaginal discharge samples was obtained. Results. The pairwise comparison showed that lavender and clotrimazole had a significant difference; this difference in the lavender group was lower than clotrimazole. But, after 48 hours, there was no difference seen between groups. There was a significant difference between clotrimazole and DMSO groups. Comparing the changes between groups based on the same dilution, at 24 h and 48 h in clotrimazole group, showed a significant difference two times in the fungal cell count that its average during 48 h was less than 24 h. A significant difference was observed between the two periods in lavender group, only at the dilutions of 1/20 and 1/80. The average fungal cell count after 48 h was also lower in lavender group. Conclusions. Given that the lavender has antifungal activity, this can be used as an antifungal agent. However, more clinical studies are necessary to validate its use in candida infection. PMID:26550521

  20. A comparative study of coastal and clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Nair, Anusree V; Joseph, Neetha; Krishna, Kiran; Sneha, K G; Tom, Neenu; Jangid, Kamlesh; Nair, Shanta

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a ubiquitous Gram-negative bacterium having a versatile metabolic potential and great ecological and clinical significance. The geographical distribution of P. aeruginosahas revealed the existence of an unbiased genetic arrangement in terrestrial isolates. In contrast, there are very few reports about P. aeruginosa strains from marine environments. The present work was aimed at studying the distribution of P. aeruginosa in coastal waters along the Indian Peninsula and understanding the environmental influence on genotypic, metabolic and phenotypic characteristics by comparing marine and clinical isolates. Of the 785 marine isolates obtained on selective media, only 32 (~4.1%) were identified as P. aeruginosa, based on their fatty acid methyl ester profiles. A low Euclidian distance value (< 2.5) obtained from chemotaxonomic analysis suggested that all the environmental (coastal and marine) isolates originated from a single species. While UPGMA analyses of AP-PCR and phenotypic profiles separated the environmental and clinical isolates, fatty acid biotyping showed overlapping between most clinical and environmental isolates. Our study revealed the genetic diversity among different environmental isolates of P. aeruginosa. While biogeographical separation was not evident based solely on phenotypic and metabolic typing, genomic and metatranscriptomic studies are more likely to show differences between these isolates. Thus, newer and more insightful methods are required to understand the ecological distribution of this complex group of bacteria. PMID:26413053

  1. Complete genome sequence of the Campylobacter ureolyticus clinical isolate RIGS 9880

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The emerging pathogen Campylobacter ureolyticus has been isolated from human and animal genital infections, human periodontal infections, domestic and food animals, and from cases of human gastroenteritis. We report the whole-genome sequence of the human clinical isolate RIGS 9880, which is the firs...

  2. Draft Genome of the Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Strain A155 Clinical Isolate

    PubMed Central

    Arivett, Brock A.; Fiester, Steven E.; Ream, David C.; Centrón, Daniela; Ramírez, Maria S.; Tolmasky, Marcelo E.

    2015-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a bacterial pathogen with serious implications on human health, due to increasing reports of multidrug-resistant strains isolated from patients. Total DNA from the multidrug-resistant A. baumannii strain A155 clinical isolate was sequenced to greater than 65× coverage, providing high-quality contig assemblies. PMID:25814610

  3. In Vitro Activities of Garenoxacin (BMS 284756) against 108 Clinical Isolates of Gardnerella vaginalis

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Ellie J. C.; Citron, Diane M.; Merriam, C. Vreni; Warren, Yumi A.; Tyrrell, Kerin L.; Fernandez, Helen T.

    2002-01-01

    Garenoxacin (BMS 284756) was active against 105 of 108 (97%) recent clinical Gardnerella vaginalis isolates at ≤2 μg/ml by using the reference agar dilution method for anaerobes. Twenty-eight percent of isolates (31 of 108) were resistant to metronidazole, and 44% were resistant to doxycycline. All were susceptible to clindamycin and ampicillin-sulbactam. PMID:12435709

  4. A comparative study of coastal and clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Anusree V.; Joseph, Neetha; Krishna, Kiran; Sneha, K. G.; Tom, Neenu; Jangid, Kamlesh; Nair, Shanta

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a ubiquitous Gram-negative bacterium having a versatile metabolic potential and great ecological and clinical significance. The geographical distribution of P. aeruginosahas revealed the existence of an unbiased genetic arrangement in terrestrial isolates. In contrast, there are very few reports about P. aeruginosa strains from marine environments. The present work was aimed at studying the distribution of P. aeruginosa in coastal waters along the Indian Peninsula and understanding the environmental influence on genotypic, metabolic and phenotypic characteristics by comparing marine and clinical isolates. Of the 785 marine isolates obtained on selective media, only 32 (~4.1%) were identified as P. aeruginosa, based on their fatty acid methyl ester profiles. A low Euclidian distance value (< 2.5) obtained from chemotaxonomic analysis suggested that all the environmental (coastal and marine) isolates originated from a single species. While UPGMA analyses of AP-PCR and phenotypic profiles separated the environmental and clinical isolates, fatty acid biotyping showed overlapping between most clinical and environmental isolates. Our study revealed the genetic diversity among different environmental isolates of P. aeruginosa. While biogeographical separation was not evident based solely on phenotypic and metabolic typing, genomic and metatranscriptomic studies are more likely to show differences between these isolates. Thus, newer and more insightful methods are required to understand the ecological distribution of this complex group of bacteria. PMID:26413053

  5. Mycobacterium arupense flexor tenosynovitis: case report and review of antimicrobial susceptibility profiles for 40 clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Beam, Elena; Vasoo, Shawn; Simner, Patricia J; Rizzo, Marco; Mason, Erin L; Walker, Randall C; Deml, Sharon M; Brown-Elliott, Barbara A; Wallace, Richard J; Wengenack, Nancy L; Sia, Irene G

    2014-07-01

    We describe a case of chronic tenosynovitis in the hand of a 58-year-old cattle farmer. Surgical biopsy specimens grew Mycobacterium arupense. The patient responded to surgery and antimicrobial therapy based on in vitro susceptibility testing. The antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of the isolate from this patient and 39 additional clinical isolates are presented.

  6. Resistance of Klebsiella Pneumoniae clinical isolates: linkage of outer membrane proteins (omps) with production esbls

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Lívia Érika Carlos; de Oliveira, Danielle Ferreira; Marques, Márcia Maria Mendes; da Silva, Ana Raquel Araújo; Alves, Carlucio Roberto; Guedes, Maria Izabel Florindo

    2011-01-01

    Three isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae, collected from the University Hospital in Fortaleza, Brazil, were analyzed to determine their resistance to multiple antibiotics. The results of this study showed that the resistance of the clinically isolated bacteria is associated with the production of extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESLBs) and loss of outer membrane proteins. PMID:24031656

  7. Diorcinol D Exerts Fungicidal Action against Candida albicans through Cytoplasm Membrane Destruction and ROS Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Chang, Wenqiang; Zhang, Ming; Li, Xiaobin; Jiao, Yang; Lou, Hongxiang

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans, which is the most common human fungal pathogen, causes high mortality among immunocompromised patients. Antifungal drug resistance becomes a major challenge for the management of Candida infection. Diorcinol D (DD), a diphenyl ether derivative isolated from an endolichenic fungus, exerted fungicidal action against Candida species. In this study, we investigated the possible mechanism of its antifungal activity. The change of membrane dynamics and permeability suggested that the cell membrane was disrupted by the treatment of DD. This was further supported by the evidences of intracellular glycerol accumulation, alteration of cell ultrastructure, and down-regulation of genes involved in cell membrane synthesis. In addition, the treatment of C. albicans with DD resulted in the elevation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which caused the dysfunction of mitochondria. These altogether suggested that DD exerted its antifungal activity through cytoplasmic membrane destruction and ROS accumulation. This finding is helpful to uncover the underlying mechanisms for the diphenyl ether derivatives and provides a potential application in fighting clinical fungal infections. PMID:26047493

  8. Potential Targets for Antifungal Drug Discovery Based on Growth and Virulence in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiuyun; Hou, Yinglong; Yue, Longtao; Liu, Shuyuan; Du, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Fungal infections, especially infections caused by Candida albicans, remain a challenging problem in clinical settings. Despite the development of more-effective antifungal drugs, their application is limited for various reasons. Thus, alternative treatments with drugs aimed at novel targets in C. albicans are needed. Knowledge of growth and virulence in fungal cells is essential not only to understand their pathogenic mechanisms but also to identify potential antifungal targets. This article reviews the current knowledge of the mechanisms of growth and virulence in C. albicans and examines potential targets for the development of new antifungal drugs. PMID:26195510

  9. First Record of Isolation and Characterization of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus lugdunensis from Clinical Samples in Iraq

    PubMed Central

    Al-Charrakh, Alaa H.; Obayes, Mohammed H.

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the frequency of Staphylococcus lugdunensis in different clinical samples. Out of 690 clinical samples, a total of 178 coagulase negative staphylococci (CoNS) isolates were recovered. CoNS were identified as 10 different species; 22 isolates belonged to Staphylococcus lugdunensis. Two specific genes for S. lugdunensis were used ( tanA gene and fbl gene) to confirm identification. Both of these specific genes were detected in 15 (68.1%) of 22 isolates that were identified phenotypically. The results of oxacillin MIC showed that 7 of the 15 (46.6%) S. lugdunensis isolates were oxacillin resistant. The antibiotic susceptibility testing against 16 antibiotics showed that resistance rates were variable towards these antibiotics. Eight of fifteen S. lugdunensis isolates (53.3%) were β-lactamase producer. Results of molecular detection of mecA gene found that mecA gene was detected in 6 (40%) of 15 S. lugdunensis. All of these 6 isolates (S1, S2, S3, S4, S5, and S6) were resistant to oxacillin. One isolate (S7) was resistant to oxacillin but mecA was not detected in this isolate. This study is a first record of isolation and characterization of methicillin resistant S. lugdunensis (MRSL) from clinical samples in Iraq. PMID:25126573

  10. OA03.03. A clinical study on effect of yoni prakshalan with pancha valkal kwatha in the management of kaphaja yonivapada w.s.r. to candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Bhattar, Prabhavati

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Ayurved has elaborated Gynecological disorders under the entity of yoni vapadas. Kaphaj yoni vapat is one among the twenty yonivapadas, which shoes the symptoms of picchila yonisrava along with yoni kandu. All females of reproductive age group are prone for kaphaj yoni vapat at some time or other and is important Gynecological disorders now a days, in spite of several researches done and plenty of medicines in various forms being available now a days. Pancha valkal kawatha is used for stanika chikitsa(yoni prakshalan), these drug having the qualities of stambhana,kashay rasa, sotha hara and kapha shama beneficial for yonirogas. In this clinical study pancha valkal kwatha has shown significant improvement in white discharge, itching and backache. Method: Research conducted on 10 patients from IPD & OPD of Prasuti Tantra & Stree Roga of SDM College of Ayurveda, Hassan. The selection was done on the basis of chief complaints of Kaphaj yonivyapat such as vaginal discharge, itching associated with backache and presence of Candida albicans was proved by vaginal smear. Sthanik chikitsa with Panch valkal kwatha was given for duration of 7 days and patients were asked to maintain local hygiene. Follow up was for 1 week. Result: Out of 10 patients, 6 patients were totally cured from the symptoms and mild improvement was observed in the remaining 4 patients at the end of treatment. Conclusion: The drug Pancha valkal kawatha is kapha shamaka, stambhaka and having the properties like astringent, antiseptic (kashaya rasa) and wound healing (vrana ropana). Because of these properties it helps in increasing local cell immunity and prevent recurrence of symptoms in patients.

  11. Isolation of Corynebacterium xerosis from animal clinical specimens.

    PubMed

    Vela, A I; Gracía, E; Fernández, A; Domínguez, L; Fernández-Garayzábal, J F

    2006-06-01

    This article describes the first identification of Corynebacterium xerosis from animal clinical specimens, which was confirmed by microbiological and molecular genetic (16S rRNA gene sequencing) methods.

  12. In vitro antimicrobial susceptibility of Mycoplasma bovis clinical isolates recovered from bison (Bison bison).

    PubMed

    Suleman, Muhammad; Prysliak, Tracy; Windeyer, Claire; Perez-Casal, Jose

    2016-03-01

    Mycoplasma bovis is a pathogen globally affecting cattle and bison herds, causing pneumonia, arthritis, mastitis, abortions, and other symptoms, leading to huge economic losses. Many studies have been done regarding the antimicrobial susceptibility of M. bovis isolated from cattle, but no such study is available for isolates recovered from bison. For the first time, in vitro susceptibilities of 40 M. bovis clinical isolates collected from bison herds in Canada are reported here. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values were determined using Sensititre® plates. The most effective MIC50 and MIC90 were for spectinomycin (1 and >64 μg/mL), tiamulin (1 and >32 μg/mL), and tulathromycin (16 and 64 μg/mL), whereas tetracyclines, fluoroquinolones, and florfenicol failed to inhibit growth of M. bovis bison isolates. Isolates were nonsusceptible to tetracyclines (100%), fluoroquinolones (97.5%), and tilmicosin (100%), whereas the highest susceptibility of bison clinical isolates was seen with spectinomycin (95%) and tulathromycin (67.5%). Two lung isolates (Mb283 and 348) were found resistant to both spectinomycin and tulathromycin. These results show a marked difference in antimicrobial susceptibility of bison isolates as compared with previously reported and laboratory reference cattle isolates, emphasizing the necessity of testing antimicrobial susceptibility of M. bovis bison isolates and to generate better therapeutic regime for improved recovery chances for infected bison herds across North America. PMID:26854525

  13. Molecular and epidemiological study of Salmonella clinical isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, M J; Rivera, N; Castillo, J; Rubio, M C; Gómez-Lus, R

    1991-01-01

    A survey of Salmonella infections was carried out over a 1-year period in the rural community covered by the Hospital Reina Sofía (Tudela, Spain). The 255 strains that were collected were studied by serotyping, antimicrobial resistance, and plasmid profile analysis. The predominant serotype was S. enteritidis (85.90%), followed by S. typhimurium (7.06%) and S. virchow (2.36%). Only 7.84% of the strains were resistant to antimicrobial agents. The most common resistance was to beta-lactam antibiotics. This resistance was due to the presence of one of two types of beta-lactamases, TEM-1 or TEM-2. Resistance to kanamycin was associated with the synthesis of a 3'-O-phosphotransferase. The resistance to streptomycin and chloramphenicol was either not enzymatic or was due to a 3"-O-phosphotransferase and a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase, respectively. Analysis of total plasmid DNA content revealed the presence of plasmids in 96.08% of the isolates. According to their plasmid profile, the strains could be classified into different groups. The three main groups, which accounted for 50.19, 20.78, and 4.70% of the isolates, respectively, corresponded to the antimicrobial-susceptible S. enteritidis serotype. These results suggested that plasmid profile analysis in conjunction with antimicrobial resistance determination can be useful for subtyping resistant Salmonella isolates. Images PMID:2056061

  14. Effect of Denture-Related Stomatitis Fluconazole Treatment on Oral Candida albicans Susceptibility Profile and Genotypic Variability.

    PubMed

    Figueiral, Maria Helena; Fonseca, Patrícia; Lopes, Maria Manuel; Pinto, Eugénia; Pereira-Leite, Teresa; Sampaio-Maia, Benedita

    2015-01-01

    Denture-related stomatitis (DRS) is the most common condition affecting removable-denture wearers, and Candida albicans the most frequent pathogenic agent. Systemic antifungal treatment is indicated but recurrences are frequent. The aim of this study was to characterize the oral load, fluconazole susceptibility profile and genotypic variability of oral C. albicans isolates from patients with DRS before (T0), immediately after fluconazole treatment (Tat) and after 6-months follow-up (T6m). Eighteen patients presenting DRS and treated with fluconazole were followed at the Faculty of Dentistry of Oporto University. Seventy C. albicans isolates were obtained and identified using standard cultural and biochemical multi-testing. Fluconazole susceptibility was tested by E-test(®). Microsatellite-primed PCR was performed to assess the genotypic variability of C. albicans isolates. The patients' mean age was 58.0±3.2 years, and 55.6%/44.4% had total/partial dentures. Before treatment, 22.2%, 44.4% and 33.3% of the patients presented DRS type I, II or III, respectively. Fluconazole treatment healed or improved DRS in 77.8% of the patients, accompanied by an 83.5% reduction in oral C. albicans load. However, after 6-months, oral C. albicans load increased significantly and DRS severity was similar to the one observed before treatment. Moreover, the prevalence of patients presenting fluconazole resistant isolates of C. albicans increased significantly throughout the study: T0-5.6%, Tat-10.0% and T6m-42.9%. A change in the genotypic variability of C. albicans isolates was also verified, being mostly associated to fluconazole susceptibility profile change. In conclusion, fluconazole presents a good short-term DRS treatment efficiency, but may be associated to a long-term emergence of C. albicans fluconazole resistance.

  15. Effect of Denture-Related Stomatitis Fluconazole Treatment on Oral Candida albicans Susceptibility Profile and Genotypic Variability

    PubMed Central

    Figueiral, Maria Helena; Fonseca, Patrícia; Lopes, Maria Manuel; Pinto, Eugénia; Pereira-Leite, Teresa; Sampaio-Maia, Benedita

    2015-01-01

    Denture-related stomatitis (DRS) is the most common condition affecting removable-denture wearers, and Candida albicans the most frequent pathogenic agent. Systemic antifungal treatment is indicated but recurrences are frequent. The aim of this study was to characterize the oral load, fluconazole susceptibility profile and genotypic variability of oral C. albicans isolates from patients with DRS before (T0), immediately after fluconazole treatment (Tat) and after 6-months follow-up (T6m). Eighteen patients presenting DRS and treated with fluconazole were followed at the Faculty of Dentistry of Oporto University. Seventy C. albicans isolates were obtained and identified using standard cultural and biochemical multi-testing. Fluconazole susceptibility was tested by E-test®. Microsatellite-primed PCR was performed to assess the genotypic variability of C. albicans isolates. The patients’ mean age was 58.0±3.2 years, and 55.6%/44.4% had total/partial dentures. Before treatment, 22.2%, 44.4% and 33.3% of the patients presented DRS type I, II or III, respectively. Fluconazole treatment healed or improved DRS in 77.8% of the patients, accompanied by an 83.5% reduction in oral C. albicans load. However, after 6-months, oral C. albicans load increased significantly and DRS severity was similar to the one observed before treatment. Moreover, the prevalence of patients presenting fluconazole resistant isolates of C. albicans increased significantly throughout the study: T0-5.6%, Tat-10.0% and T6m-42.9%. A change in the genotypic variability of C. albicans isolates was also verified, being mostly associated to fluconazole susceptibility profile change. In conclusion, fluconazole presents a good short-term DRS treatment efficiency, but may be associated to a long-term emergence of C. albicans fluconazole resistance. PMID:25674171

  16. Avian pox infection with secondary Candida albicans encephalitis in a juvenile golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos).

    PubMed

    Shrubsole-Cockwill, Alana N; Millins, Caroline; Jardine, Claire; Kachur, Kelti; Parker, Dennilyn L

    2010-03-01

    Abstract: A juvenile golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos) was presented with proliferative epithelial lesions, consistent with avian poxvirus infection, around the eyes, on commissures of the beak, and on both feet. Despite treatment, the eagle declined clinically, and, 15 days after presentation, the eagle began seizuring and was euthanatized because of a poor prognosis. On postmortem examination, avian poxvirus infection was confirmed in the nodular skin lesions, and Candida albicans was cultured from the skin, lungs, and brain. Breaks in the skin barrier from poxvirus infection likely led to secondary infection with C albicans. Systemic vascular dissemination of C albicans to the brain resulted in thrombosis, hemorrhage, local hypoxia, and the clinically observed seizures. The combination of the breach in the primary immune system, immunosuppression, and a prolonged course of antibiotics were contributory factors to the opportunistic fungal infection in this eagle. Candida albicans should be considered as a differential diagnosis for encephalitis in an immunocompromised avian patient. PMID:20496607

  17. [Comparison of Phoenix™ Yeast ID Panel and API® ID 32C commercial systems for the identification of Candida species isolated from clinical samples].

    PubMed

    Gayibova, Ülkü; Dalyan Cılo, Burcu; Ağca, Harun; Ener, Beyza

    2014-07-01

    Opportunistic fungal pathogens are one of the important causes of nosocomial infections, and several different types of yeasts, especially Candida species are increasingly recovered from immunocompromised patients. Since many of the yeasts are resistant to the commonly used antifungal agents, the introduction of appropriate therapy depends on rapid and accurate identification. The aims of this study were to compare the commercial identification systems namely API® ID 32C (bioMerieux, France) and Phoenix™ Yeast ID Panel (Becton Dickinson Diagnostics, USA) for the identification of Candida species and to evaluate the effect of morphological findings in the identification process. A total of 211 yeast strains isolated from different clinical samples (111 urine, 34 blood/vascular catheter, 27 upper/lower respiratory tract, 16 abscess/pus, 13 throat/vagina swabs and 10 sterile body fluids) of 137 patients hospitalized in Uludag University Health and Research Center between October 2013 to January 2014, were included in the study. Samples were cultured on blood agar, chromogenic agar (CHROMagar Candida, BD, USA) and Saboraud's dextrose agar (SDA), and isolated yeast colonies were evaluated with germ tube test and morphological examination by microscopy on cornmeal/Tween-80 agar. The isolates were identified as well by two commercial systems according to the manufacturers' recommendations. Discrepant results between the systems were tried to be resolved by using morphological characteristics of the yeasts. Of the isolates 159 were identified identical by both of the systems, and the concordance between those systems were estimated as 75.4%. According to the concordant identification, the most frequently isolated species was C.albicans (44.1%) followed by C.tropicalis (9.9%), C.glabrata (9.5%), C.parapsilosis (8.5%) and C.kefyr (8.1%). The concordance rate was 81.7% in identification of frequently isolated species (C.albicans, C.tropicalis, C.parapsilosis, C.glabrata, C

  18. [Comparison of Phoenix™ Yeast ID Panel and API® ID 32C commercial systems for the identification of Candida species isolated from clinical samples].

    PubMed

    Gayibova, Ülkü; Dalyan Cılo, Burcu; Ağca, Harun; Ener, Beyza

    2014-07-01

    Opportunistic fungal pathogens are one of the important causes of nosocomial infections, and several different types of yeasts, especially Candida species are increasingly recovered from immunocompromised patients. Since many of the yeasts are resistant to the commonly used antifungal agents, the introduction of appropriate therapy depends on rapid and accurate identification. The aims of this study were to compare the commercial identification systems namely API® ID 32C (bioMerieux, France) and Phoenix™ Yeast ID Panel (Becton Dickinson Diagnostics, USA) for the identification of Candida species and to evaluate the effect of morphological findings in the identification process. A total of 211 yeast strains isolated from different clinical samples (111 urine, 34 blood/vascular catheter, 27 upper/lower respiratory tract, 16 abscess/pus, 13 throat/vagina swabs and 10 sterile body fluids) of 137 patients hospitalized in Uludag University Health and Research Center between October 2013 to January 2014, were included in the study. Samples were cultured on blood agar, chromogenic agar (CHROMagar Candida, BD, USA) and Saboraud's dextrose agar (SDA), and isolated yeast colonies were evaluated with germ tube test and morphological examination by microscopy on cornmeal/Tween-80 agar. The isolates were identified as well by two commercial systems according to the manufacturers' recommendations. Discrepant results between the systems were tried to be resolved by using morphological characteristics of the yeasts. Of the isolates 159 were identified identical by both of the systems, and the concordance between those systems were estimated as 75.4%. According to the concordant identification, the most frequently isolated species was C.albicans (44.1%) followed by C.tropicalis (9.9%), C.glabrata (9.5%), C.parapsilosis (8.5%) and C.kefyr (8.1%). The concordance rate was 81.7% in identification of frequently isolated species (C.albicans, C.tropicalis, C.parapsilosis, C.glabrata, C

  19. A single strain of Candida albicans associated with separate episodes of fungemia and meningitis.

    PubMed Central

    Porter, S D; Noble, M A; Rennie, R

    1996-01-01

    Four isolates of Candida albicans recovered from the blood and cerebral spinal fluid of a 66-year-old man during episodes of systemic infection separated by 3 months and antifungal therapy were analyzed by a variety of molecular typing methods. All four isolates were shown to represent the same strain, indicating a relapse of infection rather than reinfection. PMID:8784598

  20. Detection of Candida albicans by mass spectrometric fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Zehm, Sarah; Schweinitz, Simone; Würzner, Reinhard; Colvin, Hans Peter; Rieder, Josef

    2012-03-01

    Candida albicans is one of the most frequent causes of fungal infections in humans. Significant correlation between candiduria and invasive candidiasis has previously been described. The existing diagnostic methods are often time-consuming, cost-intensive and lack in sensitivity and specificity. In this study, the profile of low-molecular weight volatile compounds in the headspace of C. albicans-urine suspensions of four different fungal cell concentrations compared to nutrient media and urine without C. albicans was determined using proton-transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). At fungal counts of ≥1.5 × 10(5) colony forming units (CFU)/ml signals at 45, 47 and 73 atomic mass units (amu) highly significantly increased. At fungal counts of <1.5 × 10(5) CFU/ml signals at 47 and 73 amu also increased, but only at 45 amu a statistically significant increase was seen. Time course alterations of signal intensities dependent on different cell concentrations and after addition of Sabouraud nutrient solution were analysed. Recommendations for measurement conditions are given. Our study is the first to describe headspace profiling of C. albicans-urine suspensions of different fungal cell concentrations. PTR-MS represents a promising approach to rapid, highly sensitive and non-invasive clinical diagnostics allowing qualitative and quantitative analysis.

  1. Trends in frequency and in vitro antifungal susceptibility patterns of Candida isolates from women attending the STD outpatients clinic of a tertiary care hospital in Northern Italy during the years 2002-2007.

    PubMed

    Asticcioli, Sara; Sacco, Laura; Daturi, Rossana; Matti, Cecilia; Nucleo, Elisabetta; Zara, Francesca; Pagani, Laura

    2009-04-01

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis is a common mucosal infection caused by saprophytic and opportunistic yeasts belonging to the Candida genus. 518 vaginal swabs, with positive fungal culture were collected from unselected women attending the Sexually Transmitted Disease clinic of an Italian tertiary care hospital over a six year period to determine the pathogen prevalence in vulvovaginal candidiasis and to evaluate in vitro the antifungal susceptibilities of yeast recovered by Sensititre YeastOne antifungal panel plates according to CLSI document M27-A2. The isolates belonging to the genus Candida were 495 (95.5%) with Candida albicans percentage equal to 61.2%. Voriconazole was highly active (MIC50 0.008; MIC90 0.5 microg/ml), regardless of the species tested. On the contrary, fluconazole susceptibility was based upon the species. The intrinsic resistance to fluconazole of C. krusei was confirmed.

  2. Characterization of Toxin-Antitoxin (TA) Systems in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Clinical Isolates in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Savari, Mohammad; Rostami, Soodabeh; Ekrami, Alireza; Bahador, Abbas

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is among the most problematic hospital and community-acquired pathogens. Toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems are maintenance regulatory systems in bacteria and have recently been considered new targets for antimicrobial therapy. The prevalence and transcription of these systems in clinical isolates are still unknown. Objectives: The aim of this study was to characterize three types of TA systems (parDE, relBE, and higBA) among P. aeruginosa clinical isolates. Materials and Methods: We typed our clinical isolates by ERIC-PCR (enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus sequence-based polymerase chain reaction) and BOX-PCR. We then investigated 174 P. aeruginosa clinical isolates from three hospitals in Ahvaz, Iran, for the presence of TA system genes, and determined whether these systems were encoded on chromosomes or plasmids by amplification of the flanking regions. Results: Our results showed that in the 174 P. aeruginosa isolates, relBE and higBA were universal, but parDE was less prevalent. Both of the flanking regions of the parDE genes in all positive isolates were amplified. The flanking regions of nearly all relBE genes were amplified. Amplification was observed for the downstream sequence of every higBA locus, as well as for the region upstream of higBA, except in 14 strains. Conclusions: Based on the presence of TA systems in the majority of P. aeruginosa isolates, these could be used as a novel target for antimicrobial therapy. PMID:27099681

  3. Phenotypic and Genotypic Characterization of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Clinical Isolates from Northern Colombia, South America

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, Julio A.; Romero-Herazo, Yesenia C.; Arzuza, Octavio; Gómez-Duarte, Oscar G.

    2014-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are major causes of childhood diarrhea in low and middle income countries including Colombia, South America. To understand the diversity of ETEC strains in the region, clinical isolates obtained from northern Colombia children were evaluated for multiple locus sequencing typing, serotyping, classical and nonclassical virulence genes, and antibiotic susceptibility. Among 40 ETEC clinical isolates evaluated, 21 (52.5%) were positive for LT gene, 13 (32.5%) for ST gene, and 6 (15%) for both ST and LT. The most prevalent colonization surface antigens (CS) were CS21 and CFA/I identified in 21 (50%) and 13 (32.5%) isolates, respectively. The eatA, irp2, and fyuA were the most common nonclassical virulence genes present in more than 60% of the isolates. Ampicillin resistance (80% of the strains) was the most frequent phenotype among ETEC strains followed by trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole resistance (52.5%). Based on multiple locus sequencing typing (MLST), we recognize that 6 clonal groups of ETEC clinical isolates circulate in Colombia. ETEC clinical isolates from children in northern Colombia are highly diverse, yet some isolates circulating in the community belong to well-defined clonal groups that share a unique set of virulence factors, serotypes, and MLST sequence types. PMID:24877071

  4. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli clinical isolates from northern Colombia, South America.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Julio A; Romero-Herazo, Yesenia C; Arzuza, Octavio; Gómez-Duarte, Oscar G

    2014-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are major causes of childhood diarrhea in low and middle income countries including Colombia, South America. To understand the diversity of ETEC strains in the region, clinical isolates obtained from northern Colombia children were evaluated for multiple locus sequencing typing, serotyping, classical and nonclassical virulence genes, and antibiotic susceptibility. Among 40 ETEC clinical isolates evaluated, 21 (52.5%) were positive for LT gene, 13 (32.5%) for ST gene, and 6 (15%) for both ST and LT. The most prevalent colonization surface antigens (CS) were CS21 and CFA/I identified in 21 (50%) and 13 (32.5%) isolates, respectively. The eatA, irp2, and fyuA were the most common nonclassical virulence genes present in more than 60% of the isolates. Ampicillin resistance (80% of the strains) was the most frequent phenotype among ETEC strains followed by trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole resistance (52.5%). Based on multiple locus sequencing typing (MLST), we recognize that 6 clonal groups of ETEC clinical isolates circulate in Colombia. ETEC clinical isolates from children in northern Colombia are highly diverse, yet some isolates circulating in the community belong to well-defined clonal groups that share a unique set of virulence factors, serotypes, and MLST sequence types. PMID:24877071

  5. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli clinical isolates from northern Colombia, South America.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Julio A; Romero-Herazo, Yesenia C; Arzuza, Octavio; Gómez-Duarte, Oscar G

    2014-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are major causes of childhood diarrhea in low and middle income countries including Colombia, South America. To understand the diversity of ETEC strains in the region, clinical isolates obtained from northern Colombia children were evaluated for multiple locus sequencing typing, serotyping, classical and nonclassical virulence genes, and antibiotic susceptibility. Among 40 ETEC clinical isolates evaluated, 21 (52.5%) were positive for LT gene, 13 (32.5%) for ST gene, and 6 (15%) for both ST and LT. The most prevalent colonization surface antigens (CS) were CS21 and CFA/I identified in 21 (50%) and 13 (32.5%) isolates, respectively. The eatA, irp2, and fyuA were the most common nonclassical virulence genes present in more than 60% of the isolates. Ampicillin resistance (80% of the strains) was the most frequent phenotype among ETEC strains followed by trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole resistance (52.5%). Based on multiple locus sequencing typing (MLST), we recognize that 6 clonal groups of ETEC clinical isolates circulate in Colombia. ETEC clinical isolates from children in northern Colombia are highly diverse, yet some isolates circulating in the community belong to well-defined clonal groups that share a unique set of virulence factors, serotypes, and MLST sequence types.

  6. No Polymorphism in Plasmodium falciparum K13 Propeller Gene in Clinical Isolates from Kolkata, India

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Moytrey; Ganguly, Swagata; Saha, Pabitra; Bankura, Biswabandhu; Basu, Nandita; Das, Madhusudan; Guha, Subhasish K.; Maji, Ardhendu K.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular markers associated with artemisinin resistance in Plasmodium falciparum are yet to be well defined. Recent studies showed that polymorphisms in K13 gene are associated with artemisinin resistance. The present study was designed to know the pattern of polymorphisms in propeller region of K13 gene among the clinical isolates collected from urban Kolkata after five years of ACT implementation. We collected 59 clinical isolates from urban Kolkata and sequenced propeller region of K13 gene in 51 isolates successfully. We did not find any mutation in any isolate. All patients responded to the ACT, a combination of artesunate + sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine. The drug regimen is still effective in the study area and there is no sign of emergence of resistance against artemisinin as evidenced by wild genotype of K13 gene in all isolates studied. PMID:26688755

  7. Use of MALDI-TOF MS for Identification of Nontuberculous Mycobacterium Species Isolated from Clinical Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Mediavilla-Gradolph, María Concepción; De Toro-Peinado, Inmaculada; Bermúdez-Ruiz, María Pilar; García-Martínez, María de los Ángeles; Ortega-Torres, María; Montiel Quezel-Guerraz, Natalia; Palop-Borrás, Begoña

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the results obtained for identification by MALDI-TOF of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) isolated in clinical samples with those obtained by GenoType Mycobacterium CM/AS (common mycobacteria/additional species). A total of 66 Mycobacterium isolates from various clinical specimens (mainly respiratory) were tested in this study. They were identified using MALDI-TOF Bruker from strains isolated in Lowenstein, following the recommended protocol of heat inactivation and extraction, and were simultaneously analyzed through hybridization by GenoType Mycobacterium from liquid culture MGIT. Our results showed that identification by MALDI-TOF was correct in 98.4% (65/66) of NTM isolated in our clinical practice (M. avium, M. intracellulare, M. abscessus, M. chelonae, M. fortuitum, M. mucogenicum, M. kansasii, and M. scrofulaceum). MALDI-TOF was found to be an accurate, rapid, and cost-effective system for identification of mycobacteria species. PMID:26106617

  8. Morphological and physiological changes induced by contact-dependent interaction between Candida albicans and Fusobacterium nucleatum.

    PubMed

    Bor, Batbileg; Cen, Lujia; Agnello, Melissa; Shi, Wenyuan; He, Xuesong

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans and Fusobacterium nucleatum are well-studied oral commensal microbes with pathogenic potential that are involved in various oral polymicrobial infectious diseases. Recently, we demonstrated that F. nucleatum ATCC 23726 coaggregates with C. albicans SN152, a process mainly mediated by fusobacterial membrane protein RadD and Candida cell wall protein Flo9. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential biological impact of this inter-kingdom interaction. We found that F. nucleatum ATCC 23726 inhibits growth and hyphal morphogenesis of C. albicans SN152 in a contact-dependent manner. Further analysis revealed that the inhibition of Candida hyphal morphogenesis is mediated via RadD and Flo9 protein pair. Using a murine macrophage cell line, we showed that the F. nucleatum-induced inhibition of Candida hyphal morphogenesis promotes C. albicans survival and negatively impacts the macrophage-killing capability of C. albicans. Furthermore, the yeast form of C. albicans repressed F. nucleatum-induced MCP-1 and TNFα production in macrophages. Our study suggests that the interaction between C. albicans and F. nucleatum leads to a mutual attenuation of virulence, which may function to promote a long-term commensal lifestyle within the oral cavity. This finding has significant implications for our understanding of inter-kingdom interaction and may impact clinical treatment strategies. PMID:27295972

  9. Essential Functional Modules for Pathogenic and Defensive Mechanisms in Candida albicans Infections

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, I-Chun; Lin, Che; Chuang, Yung-Jen

    2014-01-01

    The clinical and biological significance of the study of fungal pathogen Candida albicans (C. albicans) has markedly increased. However, the explicit pathogenic and invasive mechanisms of such host-pathogen interactions have not yet been fully elucidated. Therefore, the essential functional modules involved in C. albicans-zebrafish interactions were investigated in this study. Adopting a systems biology approach, the early-stage and late-stage protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks for both C. albicans and zebrafish were constructed. By comparing PPI networks at the early and late stages of the infection process, several critical functional modules were identified in both pathogenic and defensive mechanisms. Functional modules in C. albicans, like those involved in hyphal morphogenesis, ion and small molecule transport, protein secretion, and shifts in carbon utilization, were seen to play important roles in pathogen invasion and damage caused to host cells. Moreover, the functional modules in zebrafish, such as those involved in immune response, apoptosis mechanisms, ion transport, protein secretion, and hemostasis-related processes, were found to be significant as defensive mechanisms during C. albicans infection. The essential functional modules thus determined could provide insights into the molecular mechanisms of host-pathogen interactions during the infection process and thereby devise potential therapeutic strategies to treat C. albicans infection. PMID:24757665

  10. Morphological and physiological changes induced by contact-dependent interaction between Candida albicans and Fusobacterium nucleatum

    PubMed Central

    Bor, Batbileg; Cen, Lujia; Agnello, Melissa; Shi, Wenyuan; He, Xuesong

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans and Fusobacterium nucleatum are well-studied oral commensal microbes with pathogenic potential that are involved in various oral polymicrobial infectious diseases. Recently, we demonstrated that F. nucleatum ATCC 23726 coaggregates with C. albicans SN152, a process mainly mediated by fusobacterial membrane protein RadD and Candida cell wall protein Flo9. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential biological impact of this inter-kingdom interaction. We found that F. nucleatum ATCC 23726 inhibits growth and hyphal morphogenesis of C. albicans SN152 in a contact-dependent manner. Further analysis revealed that the inhibition of Candida hyphal morphogenesis is mediated via RadD and Flo9 protein pair. Using a murine macrophage cell line, we showed that the F. nucleatum-induced inhibition of Candida hyphal morphogenesis promotes C. albicans survival and negatively impacts the macrophage-killing capability of C. albicans. Furthermore, the yeast form of C. albicans repressed F. nucleatum-induced MCP-1 and TNFα production in macrophages. Our study suggests that the interaction between C. albicans and F. nucleatum leads to a mutual attenuation of virulence, which may function to promote a long-term commensal lifestyle within the oral cavity. This finding has significant implications for our understanding of inter-kingdom interaction and may impact clinical treatment strategies. PMID:27295972

  11. Occurrence of qnrA-positive clinical isolates in French teaching hospitals during 2002-2005.

    PubMed

    Cambau, E; Lascols, C; Sougakoff, W; Bébéar, C; Bonnet, R; Cavallo, J-D; Gutmann, L; Ploy, M-C; Jarlier, V; Soussy, C-J; Robert, J

    2006-10-01

    Bacteria harbouring the novel qnrA plasmid-mediated mechanism of quinolone resistance have been described in different countries, but the frequency of their occurrence has not been investigated. In total, 1,468 clinical isolates of Enterobacteriaceae with quinolone resistance or extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) phenotypes were collected from eight teaching hospitals in France during 2002-2005 and screened for qnrA. Overall, 28 isolates (22 Enterobacter cloacae, three Klebsiella pneumoniae, one Citrobacter freundii, one Klebsiella oxytoca and one Proteus mirabilis) were positive for qnrA, representing 1.9% of all isolates, 3.3% of ESBL-producing isolates (22% of the E. cloacae isolates) and 0% of non-ESBL-producing isolates. The prevalence of qnrA among consecutive ESBL-producing isolates in 2004 from the eight hospitals was 2.8% (18/639). Of the qnrA-positive isolates, 100% were intermediately-resistant or resistant to nalidixic acid, and 75% to ciprofloxacin. Twenty-one of the 22 qnrA-positive E. cloacae isolates were obtained from two hospitals in the Paris area, and molecular typing and plasmid content analysis showed clonal relationships for five, three and two isolates, respectively. The qnrA genetic environment was similar to that of the In36 integron. The remaining two isolates had qnrA variants (30 and 29 nucleotide differences, respectively, compared with the original sequence) and an unknown genetic environment. The ESBL gene associated with qnrA was bla(SHV-12) in most of the isolates, but bla(PER-1) and bla(SHV-2a) were found in two isolates. In France, it appears that qnrA-positive isolates are predominantly E. cloacae isolates producing SHV-12, and may be associated with the dissemination of an In36-like integron. PMID:16961639

  12. Prevalence and Antifungal Susceptibility of 442 Candida Isolates from Blood and Other Normally Sterile Sites: Results of a 2-Year (1996 to 1998) Multicenter Surveillance Study in Quebec, Canada

    PubMed Central

    St-Germain, G.; Laverdière, M.; Pelletier, R.; Bourgault, A.-M.; Libman, M.; Lemieux, C.; Noël, G.

    2001-01-01

    During a 2-year surveillance program (1996 to 1998) in Quebec, Canada, 442 strains of Candida species were isolated from 415 patients in 51 hospitals. The distribution of species was as follows: Candida albicans, 54%; C. glabrata, 15%; C. parapsilosis, 12%; C. tropicalis, 9%; C. lusitaniae, 3%; C. krusei, 3%; and Candida spp., 3%. These data, compared to those of a 1985 survey, indicate variations in species distribution, with the proportions of C. glabrata and C. parapsilosis increasing by 9 and 4%, respectively, and those of C. albicans and C. tropicalis decreasing by 10 and 7%, respectively. However, these differences are statistically significant for C. glabrata and C. tropicalis only. MICs of amphotericin B were ≥4 μg/ml for 3% of isolates, all of which were non-C. albicans species. Three percent of C. albicans isolates were resistant to flucytosine (≥32 μg/ml). Resistance to itraconazole (≥1 μg/ml) and fluconazole (≥64 μg/ml) was observed, respectively, in 1 and 1% of C. albicans, 14 and 9% of C. glabrata, 5 and 0% of C. tropicalis, and 0% of C. parapsilosis and C. lusitaniae isolates. Clinical data were obtained for 343 patients. The overall crude mortality rate was 38%, reflecting the multiple serious underlying illnesses found in these patients. Bloodstream infections were documented for 249 patients (73%). Overall, systemic triazoles had been administered to 10% of patients before the onset of candidiasis. The frequency of isolation of non-C. albicans species was significantly higher in this group of patients. Overall, only two C. albicans isolates were found to be resistant to fluconazole. These were obtained from an AIDS patient and a leukemia patient, both of whom had a history of previous exposure to fluconazole. At present, it appears that resistance to fluconazole in Quebec is rare and is restricted to patients with prior prolonged azole treatment. PMID:11230409

  13. Genetic diversity of clinical Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates in a public hospital in Spain

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important nosocomial pathogen that exhibits multiple resistances to antibiotics with increasing frequency, making patient treatment more difficult. The aim of the study is to ascertain the population structure of this clinical pathogen in the Hospital Son Llàtzer, Spain. Results A significant set (56) of randomly selected clinical P. aeruginosa isolates, including multidrug and non-multidrug resistant isolates, were assigned to sequence types (STs) and compared them with their antibiotic susceptibility profile classified as follows: extensively drug resistant (XDR), multidrug resistant (MDR) and non-multidrug resistant (non-MDR). The genetic diversity was assessed by applying the multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme developed by Curran and collaborators, and by the phylogenetic analysis of a concatenated tree. The analysis of seven loci, acsA, aroE, guaA, mutL, nuoD, ppsA and trpE, demonstrated that the prevalent STs were ST-175, ST-235 and ST-253. The majority of the XDR and MDR isolates were included in ST-175 and ST-235. ST-253 is the third in frequency and included non-MDR isolates. The 26 singleton sequence types corresponded mainly to non-MDR isolates. Twenty-two isolates corresponded to new sequence types (not previously defined) of which 12 isolates were non-MDR and 10 isolates were MDR or XDR. Conclusions The population structure of clinical P. aeruginosa present in our hospital indicates the coexistence of nonresistant and resistant isolates with the same sequence type. The multiresistant isolates studied are grouped in the prevalent sequence types found in other Spanish hospitals and at the international level, and the susceptible isolates correspond mainly to singleton sequence types. PMID:23773707

  14. Isolation and characterization of small qnrS1-carrying plasmids from imported seafood isolates of Salmonella enterica that are highly similar to plasmids of clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Tatsuya; Khan, Ashraf A

    2012-04-01

    Dissemination of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance among pathogenic bacteria is a concern for public health because of decreased sensitivity to fluoroquinolones and increased potentials to develop high fluoroquinolone resistance. Two qnrS1-positive isolates of Salmonella enterica Corvallis (468) and Typhimurium (484) from imported seafood (Thailand and Vietnam) were tested for quinolone sensitivity using disk agar diffusion and the Sensititre system. The presence of qnr genes, qnr-carrying plasmids, and mutations in the quinolone resistance determining regions were also determined. Minimal inhibitory concentrations of nalidixic acid for isolates 468 and 484 were 8 and 16 μg mL(-1) , respectively, and those of ciprofloxacin were 1 and 2 μg mL(-1), respectively. Disk agar diffusion indicated that isolate 468 was moderately resistant to moxifloxacin, and isolate 484 was resistant to moxifloxacin and moderately resistant to norfloxacin. Isolates 468 and 484 carried a mutation on parC, but not on gyrA, gyrB, or parE. Sequences of qnrS1-carrying plasmids from isolates 468 and 484, sized 10,039 and 10,047 bp, were nearly identical (> 99% similarity) to each other and to published sequences of plasmids from clinical isolates of Salmonella Typhimurium isolated in the United Kingdom and Taiwan, indicating a dissemination of qnrS1-carrying plasmids among different serovars of Salmonella from geographically separated sources. This is the first complete sequence of a qnrS1-carrying plasmid from imported seafood isolate of S. enterica.

  15. Distribution of Candida albicans genotypes among family members

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, S. K.; Stevens, D. A.; Mishra, S. K.; Feroze, F.; Pierson, D. L.

    1999-01-01

    Thirty-three families (71 subjects) were screened for the presence of Candida albicans in mouthwash or stool specimens; 12 families (28 subjects) were culture-positive for this yeast. An enrichment procedure provided a twofold increase in the recovery of C. albicans from mouthwash specimens. Nine of the twelve culture-positive families had two positive members each, two families had three positive members each, and one family had four positive members. Genetic profiles were obtained by three methods: pulsed-field gel electrophoresis; restriction endonuclease analysis, and random amplification of polymorphic DNA analysis. DNA fingerprinting of C. albicans isolated from one body site three consecutive times revealed that each of the 12 families carried a distinct genotype. No two families shared the same strain, and two or more members of a family commonly shared the same strain. Intrafamily genotypic identity (i.e., each member within the family harbored the same strain) was demonstrated in six families. Genotypes of isolates from husband and wife differed from one another in five families. All three methods were satisfactory in determining genotypes; however, we concluded that restriction endonuclease analysis provided adequate resolving power.

  16. Biofilm Formation and Motility Depend on the Nature of the Acinetobacter baumannii Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakumar, Saranya; Rajenderan, Sangeetha; Laishram, Shakti; Anandan, Shalini; Balaji, Veeraraghavan; Biswas, Indranil

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a nosocomial pathogen involved in various infections ranging from minor soft-tissue infections to more severe infections such as ventilator-associated pneumonia and bacteremia. The severity and the type of infections depend on the genetic and phenotypic variations of the strains. In this study, we compared the extent of biofilm formation and motility displayed by 60 multidrug-resistant A. baumannii clinical strains isolated from blood and sputum samples from patients from Southern India. Our results showed that isolates from the sputum samples formed significantly more robust biofilm compared to the blood isolates. On the other hand, we observed that the blood isolates were more motile than the sputum isolates. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study that systematically evaluated the correlation between these two phenotypic traits and the nature of the isolates. PMID:27252939

  17. Clotrimazole Drug Resistance in Candida glabrata Clinical Isolates Correlates with Increased Expression of the Drug:H(+) Antiporters CgAqr1, CgTpo1_1, CgTpo3, and CgQdr2.

    PubMed

    Costa, Catarina; Ribeiro, Jonathan; Miranda, Isabel M; Silva-Dias, Ana; Cavalheiro, Mafalda; Costa-de-Oliveira, Sofia; Rodrigues, Acácio G; Teixeira, Miguel C

    2016-01-01

    For years, antifungal drug resistance in Candida species has been associated to the expression of ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) multidrug transporters. More recently, a few drug efflux pumps from the Drug:H(+) Antiporter (DHA) family have also been shown to play a role in this process, although to date only the Candida albicans Mdr1 transporter has been demonstrated to be relevant in the clinical acquisition of antifungal drug resistance. This work provides evidence to suggest the involvement of the C. glabrata DHA transporters CgAqr1, CgQdr2, CgTpo1_1, and CgTpo3 in the clinical acquisition of clotrimazole drug resistance. A screening for azole drug resistance in 138 C. glabrata clinical isolates, from patients attending two major Hospitals in Portugal, was performed. Based on this screening, 10 clotrimazole susceptible and 10 clotrimazole resistant isolates were selected for further analysis. The transcript levels of CgAQR1, CgQDR2, CgTPO1_1, and CgTPO3 were found to be significantly up-regulated in resistant isolates when compared to the susceptible ones, with a level of correlation that was found to be similar to that of CgCDR2, an ABC gene known to be involved in the clinical acquisition of resistance. As a proof-of-concept experiment, the CgTPO3 gene was deleted in an azole resistant C. glabrata isolate, exhibiting high levels of expression of this gene. The deletion of CgTPO3 in this isolate was found to lead to decreased resistance to clotrimazole and fluconazole, and increased accumulation of azole drugs, thus suggesting the involvement of this transporter in the manifestation of azole resistance.

  18. Clotrimazole Drug Resistance in Candida glabrata Clinical Isolates Correlates with Increased Expression of the Drug:H+ Antiporters CgAqr1, CgTpo1_1, CgTpo3, and CgQdr2

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Catarina; Ribeiro, Jonathan; Miranda, Isabel M.; Silva-Dias, Ana; Cavalheiro, Mafalda; Costa-de-Oliveira, Sofia; Rodrigues, Acácio G.; Teixeira, Miguel C.

    2016-01-01

    For years, antifungal drug resistance in Candida species has been associated to the expression of ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) multidrug transporters. More recently, a few drug efflux pumps from the Drug:H+ Antiporter (DHA) family have also been shown to play a role in this process, although to date only the Candida albicans Mdr1 transporter has been demonstrated to be relevant in the clinical acquisition of antifungal drug resistance. This work provides evidence to suggest the involvement of the C. glabrata DHA transporters CgAqr1, CgQdr2, CgTpo1_1, and CgTpo3 in the clinical acquisition of clotrimazole drug resistance. A screening for azole drug resistance in 138 C. glabrata clinical isolates, from patients attending two major Hospitals in Portugal, was performed. Based on this screening, 10 clotrimazole susceptible and 10 clotrimazole resistant isolates were selected for further analysis. The transcript levels of CgAQR1, CgQDR2, CgTPO1_1, and CgTPO3 were found to be significantly up-regulated in resistant isolates when compared to the susceptible ones, with a level of correlation that was found to be similar to that of CgCDR2, an ABC gene known to be involved in the clinical acquisition of resistance. As a proof-of-concept experiment, the CgTPO3 gene was deleted in an azole resistant C. glabrata isolate, exhibiting high levels of expression of this gene. The deletion of CgTPO3 in this isolate was found to lead to decreased resistance to clotrimazole and fluconazole, and increased accumulation of azole drugs, thus suggesting the involvement of this transporter in the manifestation of azole resistance. PMID:27148215

  19. Nontuberculous Mycobacteria Isolation from Clinical and Environmental Samples in Iran: Twenty Years of Surveillance.

    PubMed

    Velayati, Ali Akbar; Farnia, Parissa; Mozafari, Mohadese; Mirsaeidi, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are opportunistic pathogens that are widely distributed in the environment. There is a lack of data on species distribution of these organisms from Iran. This study consists of a review of NTM articles published in Iran between the years 1992 and 2014. In this review, 20 articles and 14 case reports were identified. Among the 20 articles, 13 (65%) studies focused on NTM isolates from clinical specimens, 6 (30%) studies examined NTM isolates from environmental samples, and one (5%) article included both clinical and environmental isolates. M. fortuitum (229/997; 23%) was recorded as the most prevalent and rapid growing mycobacteria (RGM) species in both clinical (28%) and environmental (19%) isolated samples (P < 0.05). Among slow growing mycobacteria (SGM), M. simiae (103/494; 21%) demonstrated a higher frequency in clinical samples whereas in environmental samples it was M. flavescens (44/503; 9%). These data represent information from 14 provinces out of 31 provinces of Iran. No information is available in current published data on clinical or environmental NTM from the remaining 17 provinces in Iran. These results emphasize the potential importance of NTM as well as the underestimation of NTM frequency in Iran. NTM is an important clinical problem associated with significant morbidity and mortality in Iran. Continued research is needed from both clinical and environmental sources to help clinicians and researchers better understand and address NTM treatment and prevention.

  20. Comparison of atypical Brachyspira spp. clinical isolates and classic strains in a mouse model of swine dysentery.

    PubMed

    Burrough, Eric; Strait, Erin; Kinyon, Joann; Bower, Leslie; Madson, Darin; Schwartz, Kent; Frana, Timothy; Songer, J Glenn

    2012-12-01

    Multiple Brachyspira spp. can colonize the porcine colon, and the presence of the strongly beta-hemolytic Brachyspira hyodysenteriae is typically associated with clinical swine dysentery. Recently, several Brachyspira spp. have been isolated from the feces of pigs with clinical disease suggestive of swine dysentery, yet these isolates were not identified as B. hyodysenteriae by genotypic or phenotypic methods. This study used a mouse model of swine dysentery to compare the pathogenic potential of seventeen different Brachyspira isolates including eight atypical clinical isolates, six typical clinical isolates, the standard strain of B. hyodysenteriae (B204), and reference strains of Brachyspira intermedia and Brachyspira innocens. Results revealed that strongly beta-hemolytic isolates induced significantly greater cecal inflammation than weakly beta-hemolytic isolates regardless of the genetic identification of the isolate, and that strongly beta-hemolytic isolates identified as 'Brachyspira sp. SASK30446' and B. intermedia by PCR produced lesions indistinguishable from those caused by B. hyodysenteriae in this model.

  1. Enzyme polymorphism, prodigiosin production, and plasmid fingerprints in clinical and naturally occurring isolates of Serratia marcescens.

    PubMed

    Gargallo-Viola, D

    1989-05-01

    Enzyme polymorphism and genetic relationship among 99 Serratia marcescens isolates obtained from clinical and environmental sources were determined by analysis of electromorphs in nine enzyme loci encoded by chromosomal genes. Seven of the loci were polymorphic, and 33 distinctive electrophoretic types (ETs) representing multilocus genotypes were identified. Cluster analysis, based on the proportion of mismatches between multilocus genotypes, revealed two clearly differentiated groups of ETs in S. marcescens. One was represented exclusively by isolates with nonchromogenic biotypes recovered almost entirely (97.3%) from clinical samples. The other group comprised all isolates characterized by the production of prodigiosin or by belonging to a chromogenic biotype. Absolute correlation was found between the ability to produce prodigiosin and the absence of plasmids. In contrast, 24% of the nonchromogenic isolates contained plasmids. Results obtained by analysis of multilocus genotypes were related to those obtained by biotyping and plasmid fingerprinting. However, more groups could be distinguished by analysis of ETs than by biotyping. Plasmid fingerprinting was a limited typing system because many isolates lacked plasmids. Although the results of this study did not permit a definitive correlation between ETs and pathogenicity of the isolates, more detailed studies of these groups will help to understand the different clinical significances of the nonchromogenic and chromogenic isolates of S. marcescens.

  2. Antifungal activities of origanum oil against Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Manohar, V; Ingram, C; Gray, J; Talpur, N A; Echard, B W; Bagchi, D; Preuss, H G

    2001-12-01

    The antimicrobial properties of volatile aromatic oils from medicinal as well as other edible plants has been recognized since antiquity. Origanum oil, which is used as a food flavoring agent, possesses a broad spectrum of in vitro antimicrobial activities attributed to the high content of phenolic derivatives such as carvacrol and thymol. In the present study, antifungal properties of origanum oil were examined both in vitro and in vivo. Using Candida albicans in broth cultures and a micro dilution method, comparative efficacy of origanum oil, carvacrol, nystatin and amphotericin B were examined in vitro. Origanum oil at 0.25 mg/ml was found to completely inhibit the growth of C. albicans in culture. Growth inhibitions of 75% and >50% were observed at 0.125 mg/ml and 0.0625 mg/ml level, respectively. In addition, both the germination and the mycelial growth of C. albicans were found to be inhibited by origanum oil and carvacrol in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, the therapeutic efficacy of origanum oil was examined in an experimental murine systemic candidiasis model. Groups of mice (n = 6) infected with C. albicans (5 x LD50) were fed varying amounts of origanum oil in a final vol. of 0.1 ml of olive oil (vehicle). The daily administration of 8.6 mg of origanum oil in 100 microl of olive oil/kg body weight for 30 days resulted in 80% survivability, with no renal burden of C. albicans as opposed to the group of mice fed olive oil alone, who died within 10 days. Similar results were obtained with carvacrol. However, mice fed origanum oil exhibited cosmetically better clinical appearance compared to those cured with carvacrol. The results from our study encourage examination of the efficacy of origanum oil in other forms of systemic and superficial fungal infections and exploration of its broad spectrum effect against other pathogenic manifestations including malignancy. PMID:11855736

  3. Candida albicans Carriage in Children with Severe Early Childhood Caries (S-ECC) and Maternal Relatedness

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jin; Moon, Yonghwi; Li, Lihua; Rustchenko, Elena; Wakabayashi, Hironao; Zhao, Xiaoyi; Feng, Changyong; Gill, Steven R.; McLaren, Sean; Malmstrom, Hans; Ren, Yanfang; Quivey, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Candida albicans has been detected together with Streptococcus mutans in high numbers in plaque-biofilm from children with early childhood caries (ECC). The goal of this study was to examine the C. albicans carriage in children with severe early childhood caries (S-ECC) and the maternal relatedness. Methods Subjects in this pilot cross-sectional study were recruited based on a convenient sample. DMFT(S)/dmft(s) caries and plaque scores were assessed during a comprehensive oral exam. Social-demographic and related background information was collected through a questionnaire. Saliva and plaque sample from all children and mother subjects were collected. C. albicans were isolated by BBL™ CHROMagar™ and also identified using germ tube test. S. mutans was isolated using Mitis Salivarius with Bacitracin selective medium and identified by colony morphology. Genetic relatedness was examined using restriction endonuclease analysis of the C. albicans genome using BssHII (REAG-B). Multilocus sequence typing was used to examine the clustering information of isolated C. albicans. Spot assay was performed to examine the C. albicans Caspofungin susceptibility between S-ECC children and their mothers. All statistical analyses (power analysis for sample size, Spearman’s correlation coefficient and multiple regression analyses) were implemented with SAS 9.4 Results A total of 18 S-ECC child-mother pairs and 17 caries free child-mother pairs were enrolled in the study. Results indicated high C. albicans carriage rate in the oral cavity (saliva and plaque) of both S-ECC children and their mothers (>80%). Spearman’s correlation coefficient also indicated a significant correlation between salivary and plaque C. albicans and S. mutans carriage (p<0.01) and caries severity (p<0.05). The levels of C. albicans in the prepared saliva and plaque sample (1ml resuspension) of S-ECC children were 1.3 ± 4.5 x104 cfu/ml and 1.2 ± 3.5 x104 cfu/ml (~3-log higher vs. caries

  4. Differential expression of putative drug resistance genes in Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    González-Escalante, Laura; Peñuelas-Urquides, Katia; Said-Fernández, Salvador; Silva-Ramírez, Beatriz; Bermúdez de León, Mario

    2015-12-01

    Understanding drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis requires an integrated analysis of strain lineages, mutations and gene expression. Previously, we reported the differential expression of esxG, esxH, infA, groES, rpmI, rpsA and lipF genes in a sensitive M. tuberculosis strain and in a multidrug-resistant clinical isolate. Here, we have evaluated the expression of these genes in 24 clinical isolates that belong to different lineages and have different drug resistance profiles. In vitro, growth kinetics analysis showed no difference in the growth of the clinical isolates, and thus drug resistance occurred without a fitness cost. However, a quantitative reverse transcription PCR analysis of gene expression revealed high variability among the clinical isolates, including those with similar drug resistance profiles. Due to the complexity of gene regulation pathways and the wide diversity of M. tuberculosis lineages, the use of gene expression as a molecular signature for drug resistance is not straightforward. Therefore, we recommend that the expression of M. tuberculosis genes be performed individually, and baseline expression levels should be verified among several different clinical isolates, before any further applications of these findings.

  5. First Report of an Extensively Drug-Resistant VIM-2 Metallo-β-Lactamase-Producing Brevundimonas diminuta Clinical Isolate

    PubMed Central

    Almuzara, Marisa N.; Barberis, Claudia M.; Rodríguez, Carlos H.; Famiglietti, Angela M. R.; Ramirez, Maria S.

    2012-01-01

    In the literature, only three Brevundimonas diminuta environmental isolates carrying metallo-β-lactamase genes were recently published. However, so far, no B. diminuta clinical isolates carrying these carbapenem resistance genes have been described. Here we report the first VIM-2 metallo-β-lactamase-producing B. diminuta clinical isolate obtained from an immunocompromised patient. PMID:22692741

  6. Aspergillus pragensis sp. nov. discovered during molecular reidentification of clinical isolates belonging to Aspergillus section Candidi.

    PubMed

    Hubka, Vit; Lyskova, Pavlina; Frisvad, Jens C; Peterson, Stephen W; Skorepova, Magdalena; Kolarik, Miroslav

    2014-08-01

    The identity of nine clinical isolates recovered from Czech patients and presumptively identified as Aspergillus sp. section Candidi based on colony morphology was revised using sequences of β-tubulin, calmodulin gene sequence, and internal transcribed spacer rDNA. Six isolates were from suspected and proven onychomycosis, one from otitis externa, and two associated with probable invasive aspergillosis. The results showed that one Aspergillus candidus isolate was the cause of otitis externa, and both isolates obtained from sputa of patients with probable invasive aspergillosis were reidentified as A. carneus (sect. Terrei) and A. flavus (sect. Flavi). Three isolates from nail scrapings were identified as A. tritici, a verified agent of nondermatophyte onychomycosis. One isolate from toenail was determined to be A. candidus and the two isolates belonged to a hitherto undescribed species, Aspergillus pragensis sp. nov. This species is well supported by phylogenetic analysis based on β-tubulin and calmodulin gene and is distinguishable from other members of sect. Candidi by red-brown reverse on malt extract agar, slow growth on Czapek-Dox agar and inability to grow at 37°C. A secondary metabolite analysis was also provided with comparison of metabolite spectrum to other species. Section Candidi now encompasses five species for which a dichotomous key based on colony characteristics is provided. All clinical isolates were tested for susceptibilities to selected antifungal agents using the Etest and disc diffusion method. Overall sect. Candidi members are highly susceptible to common antifungals.

  7. Production of slime by coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) isolated from clinical and subclinical mastitis in cows.

    PubMed

    Bochniarz, M; Wawron, W; Szczubiał, M

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the slime-producing ability of coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) isolated from clinical and subclinical mastitis in cows. The study was carried out on 100 isolates of CNS obtained from milk of 86 cows from farms located in the Lublin region (Poland). Slime-producing ability was observed in over half of coagulase-negative staphylococci (54.0% of isolated CNS), including 19 isolates of methicillin-resistant staphylococci (95.5% of all MRCNS). Of 22 isolates of CNS responsible for the clinical form of mastitis, 20 isolates (90.9%) produced slime: S. xylosus (7 isolates), S. haemolyticus (6 isolates), S. chromogenes (4 isolates), and S. sciuri (3 isolates), including 9 isolates of MRCNS (45.0%). The remaining 34 isolates of CNS (43.6%) with the ability to produce this exopolysaccharide were isolated from the milk of cows with subclinical form of mastitis: S. xylosus (12 isolates), S. sciuri (9 isolates), S. chromogenes (6 isolates), S. haemolyticus (3 isolates), S. warneri (3 isolates) and S. saprophyticus (1 isolate), including 10 isolates of MRCNS (12.8%).

  8. Production of slime by coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) isolated from clinical and subclinical mastitis in cows.

    PubMed

    Bochniarz, M; Wawron, W; Szczubiał, M

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the slime-producing ability of coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) isolated from clinical and subclinical mastitis in cows. The study was carried out on 100 isolates of CNS obtained from milk of 86 cows from farms located in the Lublin region (Poland). Slime-producing ability was observed in over half of coagulase-negative staphylococci (54.0% of isolated CNS), including 19 isolates of methicillin-resistant staphylococci (95.5% of all MRCNS). Of 22 isolates of CNS responsible for the clinical form of mastitis, 20 isolates (90.9%) produced slime: S. xylosus (7 isolates), S. haemolyticus (6 isolates), S. chromogenes (4 isolates), and S. sciuri (3 isolates), including 9 isolates of MRCNS (45.0%). The remaining 34 isolates of CNS (43.6%) with the ability to produce this exopolysaccharide were isolated from the milk of cows with subclinical form of mastitis: S. xylosus (12 isolates), S. sciuri (9 isolates), S. chromogenes (6 isolates), S. haemolyticus (3 isolates), S. warneri (3 isolates) and S. saprophyticus (1 isolate), including 10 isolates of MRCNS (12.8%). PMID:25286652

  9. Cytotoxic effect of acriflavine against clinical isolates of Acanthamoeba spp.

    PubMed

    Polat, Zubeyda Akin; Karakus, Gulderen

    2013-02-01

    Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK) is a potentially devastating and sight-threatening infection of the cornea caused by the ubiquitous free-living amoebae, Acanthamoeba species. Its eradication is difficult because the amoebas encyst, making it highly resistant to anti-amoebic drugs. Acriflavine neutral (ACF) has been used for treatment of microbial infections for humans and fishes. The aim of our study was to evaluate the time-dependent cytotoxicities of ACF against Acanthamoeba spp. Trophozoites and cysts of three different strains (strain PAT06 Acanthamoeba castellanii, strain 2HH Acanthamoeba hatchetti, and strain 11DS A. hatchetti) of Acanthamoeba spp. were tested. All strains had been isolated from patients suffering from a severe AK. The effects of the ACF with the concentrations ranging from 15 to 500 mg mL(-1) on the cytotoxicity of Acanthamoeba strains were examined. ACF showed a time- and dose-dependent amebicidal action on the trophozoites and cysts. Pat06 (A. castellanii) was the most resistant, while strain 11DS (A. hatchetti) was the most sensitive. As a result, ACF could be concluded as a new agent for the treatment of Acanthamoeba infections. On the other hand, it still needs to be further evaluated by in vivo test systems to confirm the efficiency of its biological effect. PMID:23052789

  10. Detection of Polyclonality among Clinical Isolates from Prosthetic Joint Infections

    PubMed Central

    De-la-Fuente, Marta; Martinez-Perez, Marta; Gonzalez-Pallares, Iris

    2015-01-01

    Prosthetic joint infection (PJI) is an increasingly important health concern in the Western world due to the rising number of joint arthroplasties. Although most infections are considered to be monomicrobial, the introduction of sonication procedures has led to an increase in the detection of polymicrobial infections. To date, no published studies have investigated the presence of different clones of the same species in the infected patient. The objective of this study was to analyze whether the phenomenon of polyclonality, or the appearance of different clones in the same sample, occurs in PJI. Bacteria isolated by sonication of the retrieved implant from patients with theoretically monomicrobial PJI were included in the study. Two techniques (random amplified polymorphic DNA [RAPD] and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight [MALDI-TOF] mass spectrometry) were used to determine the presence of several clones in the same sample. Results were analyzed to determine bacterial species and infection type (acute versus chronic). RAPD showed a predominance of polyclonal cases (16 of 19). However, when performing the analysis with MALDI-TOF, all cases were shown to be polyclonal. We were unable to establish any relationship between the two methodologies. Polyclonality is a common phenomenon in acute and chronic PJI. Further studies are needed to establish the potential implications of this phenomenon on patient outcomes. PMID:26378278

  11. A Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Uncovers a Novel Function for the Transcription Factor Ace2 during Candida albicans Hyphal Development

    PubMed Central

    Orellana-Muñoz, Sara; Gutiérrez-Escribano, Pilar; Arnáiz-Pita, Yolanda; Dueñas-Santero, Encarnación; Suárez, M. Belén; Bougnoux, Marie-Elisabeth; del Rey, Francisco; Sherlock, Gavin; d’Enfert, Christophe; Correa-Bordes, Jaime; de Aldana, Carlos R. Vázquez

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is a major invasive fungal pathogen in humans. An important virulence factor is its ability to switch between the yeast and hyphal forms, and these filamentous forms are important in tissue penetration and invasion. A common feature for filamentous growth is the ability to inhibit cell separation after cytokinesis, although it is poorly understood how this process is regulated developmentally. In C. albicans, the formation of filaments during hyphal growth requires changes in septin ring dynamics. In this work, we studied the functional relationship between septins and the transcription factor Ace2, which controls the expression of enzymes that catalyze septum degradation. We found that alternative translation initiation produces two Ace2 isoforms. While full-length Ace2, Ace2L, influences septin dynamics in a transcription-independent manner in hyphal cells but not in yeast cells, the use of methionine-55 as the initiation codon gives rise to Ace2S, which functions as the nuclear transcription factor required for the expression of cell separation genes. Genetic evidence indicates that Ace2L influences the incorporation of the Sep7 septin to hyphal septin rings in order to avoid inappropriate activation of cell separation during filamentous growth. Interestingly, a natural single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) present in the C. albicans WO-1 background and other C. albicans commensal and clinical isolates generates a stop codon in the ninth codon of Ace2L that mimics the phenotype of cells lacking Ace2L. Finally, we report that Ace2L and Ace2S interact with the NDR kinase Cbk1 and that impairing activity of this kinase results in a defect in septin dynamics similar to that of hyphal cells lacking Ace2L. Together, our findings identify Ace2L and the NDR kinase Cbk1 as new elements of the signaling system that modify septin ring dynamics in hyphae to allow cell-chain formation, a feature that appears to have evolved in specific C. albicans lineages

  12. Terpenoids inhibit Candida albicans growth by affecting membrane integrity and arrest of cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Zore, Gajanan B; Thakre, Archana D; Jadhav, Sitaram; Karuppayil, S Mohan

    2011-10-15

    Anti-Candida potential of six terpenoids were evaluated in this study against various isolates of Candida albicans (n=39) and non-C. albicans (n=9) that are differentially susceptible to fluconazole. All the six terpenoids tested, showed excellent activity and were equally effective against isolates of Candida sps., tested in this study. Linalool and citral were the most effective ones, inhibiting all the isolates at ≤0.064% (v/v). Five among the six terpenoids tested were fungicidal. Time dependent kill curve assay showed that MFCs of linalool and eugenol were highly toxic to C. albicans, killing 99.9% inoculum within seven min of exposure, while that of citronellal, linalyl acetate and citral required 15min, 1h and 2h, respectively. FIC index values (Linalool - 0.140, benzyl benzoate - 0.156, eugenol - 0.265, citral - 0.281 and 0.312 for linalyl acetate and citronellal) and isobologram obtained by checker board assay showed that all the six terpenoids tested exhibit excellent synergistic activity with fluconazole against a fluconazole resistant strain of C. albicans. Terpenoids tested arrested C. albicans cells at different phases of the cell cycle i.e. linalool and LA at G1, citral and citronellal at S phase and benzyl benzoate at G2-M phase and induced apoptosis. Linalool, citral, citronellal and benzyl benzoate caused more than 50% inhibition of germ tube induction at 0.008%, while eugenol and LA required 0.032 and 0.016% (v/v) concentrations, respectively. MICs of all the terpenoids for the C. albicans growth were non toxic to HeLa cells. Terpenoids tested exhibited excellent activity against C. albicans yeast and hyphal form growth at the concentrations that are non toxic to HeLa cells. Terpenoids tested in this study may find use in antifungal chemotherapy, not only as antifungal agents but also as synergistic agents along with conventional drugs like fluconazole.

  13. Comparison of Flagellin Genes from Clinical and Environmental Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, J. Alun W.; Bellingham, Nessa F.; Winstanley, Craig; Ousley, Margaret A.; Hart, C. Anthony; Saunders, Jon R.

    1999-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an important opportunistic pathogen, was isolated from environmental samples and compared to clinically derived strains. While P. aeruginosa was isolated readily from an experimental mushroom-growing unit, it was found only rarely in other environmental samples. A flagellin gene PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the isolates revealed that environmental and clinical P. aeruginosa strains are not readily distinguishable. The variation in the central regions of the flagellin genes of seven of the isolates was investigated further. The strains used included two strains with type a genes (998 bp), four strains with type b genes (1,258 bp), and one strain, K979, with a novel flagellin gene (2,199 bp). The route by which flagellin gene variation has occurred in P. aeruginosa is discussed. PMID:10049879

  14. Specific interactions between the Candida albicans ABC transporter Cdr1p ectodomain and a D-octapeptide derivative inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Niimi, Kyoko; Harding, David R K; Holmes, Ann R; Lamping, Erwin; Niimi, Masakazu; Tyndall, Joel D A; Cannon, Richard D; Monk, Brian C

    2012-08-01

    Overexpression of the Candida albicans ATP-binding cassette transporter CaCdr1p causes clinically significant resistance to azole drugs including fluconazole (FLC). Screening of a ~1.89 × 10(6) member D-octapeptide combinatorial library that concentrates library members at the yeast cell surface identified RC21v3, a 4-methoxy-2,3,6-trimethylbenzenesulphonyl derivative of the D-octapeptide D-NH(2) -FFKWQRRR-CONH(2) , as a potent and stereospecific inhibitor of CaCdr1p. RC21v3 chemosensitized Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains overexpressing CaCdr1p but not other fungal ABC transporters, the C. albicans MFS transporter CaMdr1p or the azole target enzyme CaErg11p, to FLC. RC21v3 also chemosensitized clinical C. albicans isolates overexpressing CaCDR1 to FLC, even when CaCDR2 was overexpressed. Specific targeting of CaCdr1p by RC21v3 was confirmed by spontaneous RC21v3 chemosensitization-resistant suppressor mutants of S. cerevisiae expressing CaCdr1p. The suppressor mutations introduced a positive charge beside, or within, extracellular loops 1, 3, 4 and 6 of CaCdr1p or an aromatic residue near the extracytoplasmic end of transmembrane segment 5. The mutations did not affect CaCdr1p localization or CaCdr1p ATPase activity but some increased susceptibility to the CaCdr1p substrates FLC, rhodamine 6G, rhodamine 123 and cycloheximide. The suppressor mutations showed that the drug-like CaCdr1p inhibitors FK506, enniatin, milbemycin α11 and milbemycin β9 have modes of action similar to RC21v3. PMID:22788839

  15. Phenotyping and Genotyping of Sporothrix schenckii Isolates According to Geographic Origin and Clinical Form of Sporotrichosis

    PubMed Central

    Mesa-Arango, Ana Cecilia; del Rocío Reyes-Montes, María; Pérez-Mejía, Amelia; Navarro-Barranco, Hortensia; Souza, Valeria; Zúñiga, Gerardo; Toriello, Conchita

    2002-01-01

    Sporothrix schenckii isolates of fixed and lymphocutaneous clinical forms from Mexico (MX), Guatemala (GT), and Colombia (CO) as well as environmental isolates from MX were studied by analyzing their phenotypic characteristics (conidial length, thermotolerance by percent growth inhibition [GI] at 35 and 37°C, median lethal dose [LD50]) and genotypic characteristics (by random amplified polymorphic DNA [RAPD] analysis-PCR). A significant difference (P < 0.01) in the mean conidial length of S. schenckii clinical isolates from CO (\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}\\overline{{\\mathit{x}}}\\end{equation*}\\end{document} = 4.03 ± 1.04 μm) compared with those of clinical isolates from MX (\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}\\overline{{\\mathit{x}}}\\end{equation*}\\end{document} = 2.06 ± 0.53 μm) and GT (\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}\\overline{{\\mathit{x}}}\\end{equation*}\\end{document} = 2.68 ± 0.83 μm) was observed. The lowest thermotolerance, as determined by measurement of percent GI, was exhibited by isolates from CO at 35°C (\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}\\overline{{\\mathit{x}}}\\end{equation*}\\end{document} = 50.1% ± 15.9%) and 37°C (\\documentclass

  16. A patient with allergic bronchopulmonary mycosis caused by Aspergillus fumigatus and Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Wardhana; Datau, E A

    2012-10-01

    Allergic Bronchopulmonary Mycosis (ABPM) is an exagregated immunologic response to fungal colonization in the lower airways. It may cause by many kinds of fungal, but Aspergillus fumigatus is the most common cause of ABPM, although other Aspergillus and other fungal organisms, like Candida albicans, have been implicated. Aspergllus fumigatus and Candida albicans may be found as outdoor and indoor fungi, and cause the sensitization, elicitation of the disease pathology, and its clinical manifestations. Several diagnostic procedurs may be impicated to support the diagnosis of ABPM caused by Aspergillus fumigatus and Candida albicans. A case of allergic bronchopulmonary mycosis caused by Aspergillus fumigatus and Candida albicans in a 48 year old man was discussed. The patient was treated with antifungal, corticosteroids, and antibiotic for the secondary bacterial infection. The patient's condition is improved without any significant side effects. PMID:23314973

  17. Characterization of biofilm formation by clinical isolates of Mycobacterium avium.

    PubMed

    Carter, George; Wu, Martin; Drummond, Daryl C; Bermudez, Luiz E

    2003-09-01

    Mycobacterium avium is an environmental organism encountered in natural and urban water sources as well as soil. M. avium biofilm has recently been identified on sauna walls and in city water pipes and might have a role in the survival of virulent strains in the environment and in the host. To characterize the M. avium biofilm, an in vitro model was adapted wherein biofilm develops on a PVC surface. Biofilm was detected by staining with crystal violet and visualization by optical microscopy and quantified by A(570). M. avium strains MAC 101, MAC 100, MAC 104, MAC 109, MAC A5 and MAC 5501 (all isolated from the blood of AIDS patients) were used in the assays. Biofilm formation was dependent on the presence of Ca(2+), Mg(2+) or Zn(2+) ions in the water, with the maximal effect seen at a concentration of 1 micro M. The presence of 2 % glucose and peptone as sources of carbon increased the formation of biofilm, while this was partially inhibited by humic acid. Since sliding motility has been associated with the amount of glycopeptidolipid (GPL), TLC was used to determine the presence of GPL. The supernatant of a biofilm-forming culture induced formation of a stable biofilm and amikacin blocked the establishment of biofilm by M. avium strains at subinhibitory concentrations. Bacteria in the biofilm were more resistant to chlorine as well as to exposure to potassium monopersulfate and chloroheximide acetate than were planktonic bacteria. Identification of M. avium genes involved in biofilm formation and further studies of the effect of antimicrobials on the establishment of biofilm may identify approaches for inhibiting M. avium biofilm formation and colonization.

  18. Karyotyping of Candida albicans and Candida glabrata from patients with Candida sepsis.

    PubMed

    Klempp-Selb, B; Rimek, D; Kappe, R

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the relatedness of Candida strains from patients suffering from Candida septicaemia by typing of Candida isolates from blood cultures and different body sites by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE using a contour-clamped homogenous electric field, CHEF). We studied 17 isolates of Candida albicans and 10 isolates of Candida glabrata from six patients. Four patients suffered from a C. albicans septicaemia, one patient from a C. glabrata septicaemia, and one patient had a mixed septicaemia with C. albicans and C. glabrata. Eight isolates from blood cultures were compared with 19 isolates of other sites (stool six, urine four, genital swab four, tip of central venous catheter three, tracheal secretion one, sputum one). PFGE typing resulted in 10 different patterns, four with C. albicans and six with C. glabrata. Five of the six patients had strains of identical PFGE patterns in the blood and at other sites. Seven isolates of a 58-year-old female with a C. glabrata septicaemia fell into five different PFGE patterns. However, they showed minor differences only, which may be due to chromosomal rearrangements within a single strain. Thus it appears, that the colonizing Candida strains were identical to the circulating strains in the bloodstream in at least five of six patients.

  19. Interactions with lectins and agglutination profiles of clinical, food, and environmental isolates of Listeria.

    PubMed Central

    Facinelli, B; Giovanetti, E; Casolari, C; Varaldo, P E

    1994-01-01

    On the basis of preliminary trials with 14 collection strains of Listeria, five lectins (Canavalia ensiformis, concanavalin A; Griffonia simplicifolia lectin I; Helix pomatia agglutinin; Ricinus communis agglutinin; and Triticum vulgaris wheat germ agglutinin) were selected to set up a microtiter agglutination assay. The lectin agglutination profiles of 174 clinical, food, and environmental strains of Listeria monocytogenes, Listeria innocua, and Listeria seeligeri were investigated. Data on the standard determination of the antigenic structure were available for clinical strains; nonclinical isolates were assigned to serogroup 1 or 4 with commercial antisera. The listeria-lectin interaction was related to serological type rather than species; in particular, the strains assigned to serogroup 1 or belonging to serovars 1/2a, 1/2b, 1/2c, 3a, 3b, and 7 were never agglutinated by G. simplicifolia lectin I. The five-lectin set proved to be capable of detecting differences between serologically identical isolates of L. monocytogenes. Of the 150 isolates of this species, 144 were distributed over 15 different lectin agglutination profiles and 6 autoagglutinated, the overall typeability being 96%. However, the profiles encountered among L. monocytogenes isolates were not randomly distributed. With strains assigned to serogroup 1 or belonging to serovars 1/2a, 1/2b, 1/2c, and 3b, the clinical isolates fell into only two of the eight patterns recorded overall; with strains of serogroup 4 and serovar 4b, food and environmental isolates were distributed over eight of the nine patterns found in total, while clinical isolates were distributed over five patterns. In a comparative study of 15 epidemiologically relevant isolates of L. monocytogenes from five distinct outbreaks, strains with identical phage types and/or DNA fingerprints displayed identical lectin profiles. The heterogeneity of agglutination profiles may form the basis of a new approach to L. monocytogenes typing

  20. Production of bacteriocin-like antagonism by clinical isolates of Yersinia enterocolitica.

    PubMed Central

    Cafferkey, M T; McClean, K; Drumm, M E

    1989-01-01

    Fourteen clinical isolates of Yersinia enterocolitica serotype O:3 and four well-documented virulent strains of serotypes O:3, O:8, and O:9 were biotyped and examined for plasmid-associated autoagglutination and calcium dependency and for epithelial cell adherence. These strains were tested for the production of bacteriocin-like antagonism by using tryptone soya blood agar at room temperature and at 37 degrees C. By using the cross-streaking method, three clinical isolates produced inhibitory substances at room temperature. These substances were active against a variety of clinical isolates and their plasmid-cured derivatives at both room temperature and 37 degrees C. The inhibition was easier to read after incubation of the cross-streaked plate at 37 degrees C. The inhibition patterns indicate that two of the three producer strains appear to recognize potentially virulent O:3 strains, with or without the virulence plasmid. Images PMID:2723036

  1. Population Relationship of Vibrio parahaemolyticus Isolates Derived from Aquaculture Ponds, a Seafood Market, Restaurants, and Clinical Samples.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lei; Deng, Yi Qin; Chen, Chang; Ke, Chang Wen; Li, Bo Sheng; Long, Yun Ying; Liu, Zhu Hong; Wei, Lu

    2016-06-01

    To study the relationship between environmental and clinical populations of Vibrio parahaemolyticus, we collected in total 86 isolates from Southern China during one and a half years. Sixty-eight isolates were recovered from aquaculture ponds, a seafood market, and restaurants, and 18 isolates were recovered from clinical samples. Virulence gene analysis revealed that 25 isolates (14 clinical and 11 environmental) tested positive for tdh, but only 4 carried trh. Interestingly, none of the tdh(+) environmental isolates was recovered from ponds. Both environmental and clinical tdh(+) isolates, except for one clinical isolate, harbor type III secretion system 2α (T3SS2α) and T3SS2β-related genes, including vopB2α, which was previously suggested to be absent from environmental strains. More than 70% of clinical isolates carried the pandemic marker of new toxRS (GS-PCR(+)), which was not present in the environmental isolates. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and multilocus sequence typing analysis showed a high degree of genetic diversity within the environmental isolates. In contrast, the clinical population formed a tight cluster that differed from the environmental isolates. These findings suggest that the pandemic strains of V. parahaemolyticus may not directly originate from marine animals. Rather the environments where they are maintained could serve as reservoirs for toxigenic, but not pandemic strains. These environments provide an ideal place for generation of new toxigenic strains through DNA exchange, which was revealed by extensive recombination events in recA sequences of the environmental isolates.

  2. In Vitro Susceptibility and Trailing Growth Effect of Clinical Isolates of Candida Species to Azole Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Zomorodian, Kamiar; Bandegani, Azadeh; Mirhendi, Hossein; Pakshir, Keyvan; Alinejhad, Navvab; Poostforoush Fard, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background: Emergence of resistance to respective antifungal drugs is a primary concern for the treatment of candidiasis. Hence, determining antifungal susceptibility of the isolated yeasts is of special importance for effective therapy. For this purpose, the clinical laboratory standard institute (CLSI) has introduced a broth microdilution method to determine minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). However, the so-called “Trailing effect” phenomenon might sometimes pose ambiguity in the interpretation of the results. Objectives: The present study aimed to determine the in vitro susceptibility of clinical isolates of Candida against azoles and the frequency of the Trailing effect. Materials and Methods: A total of 193 Candida isolates were prospectively collected and identified through the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method. Using a broth microdilution test, according to the guidelines of CLSI M27-A3, antifungal susceptibilities of the isolated yeasts against Fluconazole (FLU), Itraconazole (ITR), Ketoconazole (KET) and Voriconazole (VOR) were assessed. Moreover, trailing growth was determined when a susceptible MIC was incubated for 24 hours, and turned into a resistant one after 48 hours of incubation. Results: Among the tested antifungal drugs in this study, the highest rate of resistance was observed against ITR (28.5%) followed by VOR (26.4%), FLU (20.8%) and KET (1.5%). The trailing effect was induced in 27 isolates (14.0%) by VOR, in 26 isolates (13.5%) by ITR, in 24 isolates (12.4%) by FLU, and in 19 isolates (9.8%) by KET. Conclusions: The monitoring of antifungal susceptibilities of Candida species isolated from clinical sources is highly recommended for the efficient management of patients. Moreover, the trailing effect should be taken into consideration once the interpretation of the results is intended. PMID:27127587

  3. Antimicrobial resistance of Salmonella enterica isolates from apparently healthy and clinically ill finishing pigs in Spain.

    PubMed

    García-Feliz, C; Collazos, J A; Carvajal, A; Herrera, S; Echeita, M A; Rubio, P

    2008-05-01

    This study was the first conducted in Spain to evaluate the occurrence of antimicrobial resistance and multi-resistance in Salmonella isolates recovered from finishing pigs from Spanish swine farms distributed over the whole country. For this purpose, 290 Salmonella isolates recovered from apparently healthy finishing pigs in a farm-based cross-sectional study and 192 Salmonella isolates recovered from faecal samples of finishing pigs suffering from diarrhoea were investigated. Resistance to a panel of 17 antimicrobials was determined using a broth microdilution technique. Resistance was a common finding and was detected in 90.3% of the Salmonella isolates from apparently healthy finishing pigs and 95.3% of the Salmonella isolates from clinically diseased finishing pigs. Resistance was particularly high among isolates of serogroup B and serovars Typhimurium and its monophasic variant S. 4,5,12:i:-. Higher frequencies of resistance were found to tetracycline, sulphamethoxazole, streptomycin, spectinomycin, ampicillin, chloramphenicol and trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole. Less than 10% of the isolates were resistant to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, neomycin, cephalotin, apramycin and gentamicin. Resistance to ciprofloxacin, colistin and ceftiofur was rare (under 1%). Multi-resistance, defined as resistance to four or more drugs, was detected in more than 50% of the isolates. Although multi-resistance was particularly frequent among isolates of S. Typhimurium, it was also high among other serovars as Bredeney and the S. Typhimurium monophasic variant. 4,5,12:i:-.

  4. Person-to-person transfer of Candida albicans in the spacecraft environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, D. L.; Mehta, S. K.; Magee, B. B.; Mishra, S. K.

    1995-01-01

    We assessed the exchange of Candida albicans among crew members during 10 Space Shuttle missions. Throat, nasal, urine and faecal specimens were collected from 61 crew members twice before and once after space flights ranging from 7 to 10 days in duration; crews consisted of groups of five, six or seven men and women. Candida albicans was isolated at least once from 20 of the 61 subjects (33%). Candida strains were identified by restriction-fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) after digestion by the endonucleases EcoRI and HinfI; further discrimination was gained by Southern blot hybridization with the C. albicans repeat fragment 27A. Eighteen of the 20 Candida-positive crew members carried different strains of C. albicans in the specimens collected. Possible transfer of C. albicans between members of the same crew was demonstrated only once in the 10 missions studied. We conclude that the transfer of C. albicans among crew members during Space Shuttle flights is less frequent than had been predicted from earlier reports.

  5. Systemic Staphylococcus aureus infection mediated by Candida albicans hyphal invasion of mucosal tissue

    PubMed Central

    Schlecht, Lisa Marie; Peters, Brian M.; Krom, Bastiaan P.; Freiberg, Jeffrey A.; Hänsch, Gertrud M.; Filler, Scott G.

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans and Staphylococcus aureus are often co-isolated in cases of biofilm-associated infections. C. albicans can cause systemic disease through morphological switch from the rounded yeast to the invasive hyphal form. Alternatively, systemic S. aureus infections arise from seeding through breaks in host epithelial layers although many patients have no documented portal of entry. We describe a novel strategy by which S. aureus is able to invade host tissue and disseminate via adherence to the invasive hyphal elements of Candida albicans. In vitro and ex vivo findings demonstrate a specific binding of the staphylococci to the candida hyphal elements. The C. albicans cell wall adhesin Als3p binds to multiple staphylococcal adhesins. Furthermore, Als3p is required for C. albicans to transport S. aureus into the tissue and cause a disseminated infection in an oral co-colonization model. These findings suggest that C. albicans can facilitate the invasion of S. aureus across mucosal barriers, leading to systemic infection in co-colonized patients. PMID:25332378

  6. Listeria Monocytogenes – characterization of strains isolated from clinical severe cases

    PubMed Central

    Borcan, AM; Huhulescu, S; Munteanu, A; Rafila, A

    2014-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes became an increasing pathogen involved more frequently in sporadic severe illnesses and outbreaks of foodborne infections. This study investigates in vitro susceptibility of 26 strains of Listeria monocytogenes isolated from the clinical specimens collected between March 2009 and November 2013, from 24 patients hospitalized in three medical institutions in Bucharest. All isolates were tested by disk diffusion method to 15 antimicrobial agents, by using disk diffusion tests. Among the 26 clinical L. monocytogenes isolates tested, no multidrug resistant strains were detected, but 18 (72%) were found to be resistant to at least one clinically relevant antibiotic. Among them, 18 clinical isolates were resistant against ciprofloxacin also. Resistance to Ciprofloxacin was particularly noticed to the strains in Romania. Serological and molecular typing by Multiplex PCR method detected two molecular types 1/2 a, 3a and 1/2 b, 3b, as to the more frequent isolated among studied cases. These types of L. monocytogenes could be associated to the higher pathogenic activity of immunodeficient patients. PMID:25870672

  7. Biochemical and Molecular Analysis of Staphylococcus aureus Clinical Isolates from Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Karmakar, Amit; Dua, Parimal; Ghosh, Chandradipa

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is opportunistic human as well as animal pathogen that causes a variety of diseases. A total of 100 Staphylococcus aureus isolates were obtained from clinical samples derived from hospitalized patients. The presumptive Staphylococcus aureus clinical isolates were identified phenotypically by different biochemical tests. Molecular identification was done by PCR using species specific 16S rRNA primer pairs and finally 100 isolates were found to be positive as Staphylococcus aureus. Screened isolates were further analyzed by several microbiological diagnostics tests including gelatin hydrolysis, protease, and lipase tests. It was found that 78%, 81%, and 51% isolates were positive for gelatin hydrolysis, protease, and lipase activities, respectively. Antibiogram analysis of isolated Staphylococcus aureus strains with respect to different antimicrobial agents revealed resistance pattern ranging from 57 to 96%. Our study also shows 70% strains to be MRSA, 54.3% as VRSA, and 54.3% as both MRSA and VRSA. All the identified isolates were subjected to detection of mecA, nuc, and hlb genes and 70%, 84%, and 40% were found to harbour mecA, nuc, and hlb genes, respectively. The current investigation is highly important and informative for the high level multidrug resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections inclusive also of methicillin and vancomycin. PMID:27366185

  8. Shared Mycobacterium avium Genotypes Observed among Unlinked Clinical and Environmental Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Weigel, Kris M.; Yakrus, Mitchell A.; Becker, Annie L.; Chen, Hui-Ling; Fridley, Gina; Sikora, Arthur; Speake, Cate; Hilborn, Elizabeth D.; Pfaller, Stacy

    2013-01-01

    Our understanding of the sources of Mycobacterium avium infection is partially based on genotypic matching of pathogen isolates from cases and environmental sources. These approaches assume that genotypic identity is rare in isolates from unlinked cases or sources. To test this assumption, a high-resolution PCR-based genotyping approach, large-sequence polymorphism (LSP)-mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit–variable-number tandem repeat (MIRU-VNTR), was selected and used to analyze clinical and environmental isolates of M. avium from geographically diverse sources. Among 127 clinical isolates from seven locations in North America, South America, and Europe, 42 genotypes were observed. Among 12 of these genotypes, matches were seen in isolates from apparently unlinked patients in two or more geographic locations. Six of the 12 were also observed in environmental isolates. A subset of these isolates was further analyzed by alternative strain genotyping methods, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and MIRU-VNTR, which confirmed the existence of geographically dispersed strain genotypes. These results suggest that caution should be exercised in interpreting high-resolution genotypic matches as evidence for an acquisition event. PMID:23851084

  9. Rapid Emergence of Daptomycin Resistance in Clinical Isolates of Corynebacterium striatum… A Cautionary Tale

    PubMed Central

    TeKippe, Erin McElvania; Thomas, Benjamin S.; Ewald, Gregory A.; Lawrence, Steven J.; Burnham, Carey-Ann D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this study was to investigate the observation of daptomycin resistance in Corynebacterium striatum, both in vivo and in vitro. We describe a case of C. striatum bacteremia in a patient with a left ventricular assist device (LVAD); the initial isolate recovered was daptomycin susceptible with a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 0.125 μg/ml. Two months later, and after daptomycin therapy, the individual became bacteremic with an isolate of C. striatum with a daptomycin MIC of >256 μg/ml. Methods To study the prevalence of daptomycin resistance in C. striatum, clinical isolates of C. striatum were grown in broth culture containing daptomycin to investigate emergence of resistance to this antimicrobial. Molecular typing was used to evaluate serial isolates from the index patient and the clinical isolates of C. striatum we assayed. Results In vitro analysis of isolates from the index patient and seven of eleven additional C. striatum isolates exhibited emergence of high level daptomycin resistance, despite initially demonstrating low MICs to this antimicrobial agent. This phenotype was persistent even after serial subculture in the absence of daptomycin. Conclusions Together, these data demonstrate that caution should be taken when using daptomycin to treat high-inoculum infections and/or infections of indwelling medical devices with C. striatum. To our knowledge, this is the first report characterizing emergence of daptomycin resistance in C. striatum. PMID:24973133

  10. Molecular tracking of Candida albicans in a neonatal intensive care unit: long-term colonizations versus catheter-related infections.

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Diez, B; Martinez, V; Alvarez, M; Rodriguez-Tudela, J L; Martinez-Suarez, J V

    1997-01-01

    Nosocomial neonatal candidiasis is a major problem in infants requiring intensive therapy. The subjects of this retrospective study were nine preterm infants admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit of the Hospital Central de Asturias between March 1993 and August 1994. The infants were infected with or colonized by Candida albicans. Five patients developed C. albicans bloodstream infections. A total of 36 isolates (including isolates from catheters and parenteral nutrition) were examined for molecular relatedness by PCR fingerprinting and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. The core sequence of phage M13 was used as a single primer in the PCR-based fingerprinting procedure, and RFLP analysis was performed with C. albicans-specific DNA probe 27A. Both techniques were evaluated with a panel of eight C. albicans reference strains, and each technique showed eight different patterns. With the 36 isolates from neonates, each technique enabled us to identify by PCR and RFLP analysis seven and six different patterns, respectively. The combination of these two methods (composite DNA type) identified eight different profiles. A strain with one of these profiles was present in three patients and in their respective catheters. Patients infected with or colonized by this isolate profile were clustered in time. Among the other patients, each patient was infected over time and at multiple anatomic sites with a C. albicans strain with a distinct DNA type. We conclude that C. albicans was most commonly producing long-term colonizations, although horizontal transmission probably due to catheters also occurred. PMID:9399489

  11. Structure and regulation of the HSP90 gene from the pathogenic fungus Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Swoboda, R K; Bertram, G; Budge, S; Gooday, G W; Gow, N A; Brown, A J

    1995-01-01

    Candida albicans HSP90 sequences were isolated by screening cDNA and genomic libraries with a probe derived from the Saccharomyces cerevisiae homolog, HSP82, which encodes a member of the heat shock protein 90 family of molecular chaperones. Identical sequences were obtained for the 2,197-bp overlap of the cDNA and gene sequences, which were derived from C. albicans 3153A and ATCC 10261, respectively. The C. albicans HSP90 gene contained no introns, and it showed strong homology (61 to 79% identity) to HSP90 sequences from other fungi, vertebrates, and plants. The C-terminal portion of the predicted Hsp90 amino acid sequence was identical to the 47-kDa protein which is thought to be immunoprotective during C. albicans infections (R. C. Matthews, J. Med. Microbiol. 36:367-370, 1992), confirming that this protein represents the C-terminal portion of the 81-kDa Hsp90 protein. Quantitative Northern (RNA) analyses revealed that C. albicans HSP90 mRNA was heat shock inducible and that its levels changed during batch growth, with its maximum levels being reached during the mid-exponential growth phase. HSP90 mRNA levels increased transiently during the yeast-to-hyphal transition but did not correlate directly with germ tube production per se. These data do not exclude a role for Hsp90 in the dimorphic transition. Southern blotting revealed only one HSP90 locus in the diploid C. albicans genome. Repeated attempts to disrupt both alleles and generate a homozygous C. albicans delta hsp90/delta hsp90 null mutant were unsuccessful. These observations suggest the existence of a single HSP90 locus which is essential for viability in C. albicans. PMID:7591093

  12. In Vitro Activities of Amphotericin B, Terbinafine, and Azole Drugs against Clinical and Environmental Isolates of Aspergillus terreus Sensu Stricto

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Mariana S.; Rojas, Florencia D.; Cattana, María E.; Sosa, María de los Ángeles; Iovannitti, Cristina A.; Giusiano, Gustavo E.

    2015-01-01

    The antifungal susceptibilities of 40 clinical and environmental isolates of A. terreus sensu stricto to amphotericin B, terbinafine, itraconazole, and voriconazole were determined in accordance with CLSI document M38-A2. All isolates had itraconazole and voriconazole MICs lower than epidemiologic cutoff values, and 5% of the isolates had amphotericin B MICs higher than epidemiologic cutoff values. Terbinafine showed the lowest MICs. No significant differences were found when MICs of clinical and environmental isolates were compared. PMID:25824228

  13. Antifungal Susceptibility Profiles of Bloodstream Yeast Isolates by Sensititre YeastOne over Nine Years at a Large Italian Teaching Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Posteraro, Brunella; Spanu, Teresa; Fiori, Barbara; De Maio, Flavio; De Carolis, Elena; Giaquinto, Alessia; Prete, Valentina; De Angelis, Giulia; Torelli, Riccardo; D'Inzeo, Tiziana; Vella, Antonietta; De Luca, Alessio; Tumbarello, Mario; Ricciardi, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Sensititre YeastOne (SYO) is an affordable alternative to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) reference method for antifungal susceptibility testing. In this study, the MICs of yeast isolates from 1,214 bloodstream infection episodes, generated by SYO during hospital laboratory activity (January 2005 to December 2013), were reanalyzed using current CLSI clinical breakpoints/epidemiological cutoff values to assign susceptibility (or the wild-type [WT] phenotype) to systemic antifungal agents. Excluding Candida albicans (57.4% of all isolates [n = 1,250]), the most predominant species were Candida parapsilosis complex (20.9%), Candida tropicalis (8.2%), Candida glabrata (6.4%), Candida guilliermondii (1.6%), and Candida krusei (1.3%). Among the non-Candida species (1.9%), 7 were Cryptococcus neoformans and 17 were other species, mainly Rhodotorula species. Over 97% of Candida isolates were susceptible (WT phenotype) to amphotericin B and flucytosine. Rates of susceptibility (WT phenotype) to fluconazole, itraconazole, and voriconazole were 98.7% in C. albicans, 92.3% in the C. parapsilosis complex, 96.1% in C. tropicalis, 92.5% in C. glabrata, 100% in C. guilliermondii, and 100% (excluding fluconazole) in C. krusei. The fluconazole-resistant isolates consisted of 6 C. parapsilosis complex isolates, 3 C. glabrata isolates, 2 C. albicans isolates, 2 C. tropicalis isolates, and 1 Candida lusitaniae isolate. Of the non-Candida isolates, 2 C. neoformans isolates had the non-WT phenotype for susceptibility to fluconazole, whereas Rhodotorula isolates had elevated azole MICs. Overall, 99.7% to 99.8% of Candida isolates were susceptible (WT phenotype) to echinocandins, but 3 isolates were nonsusceptible (either intermediate or resistant) to caspofungin (C. albicans, C. guilliermondii, and C. krusei), anidulafungin (C. albicans and C. guilliermondii), and micafungin (C. albicans). However, when the intrinsically resistant non-Candida isolates were included

  14. Candida albicans and non-albicans species as etiological agent of vaginitis in pregnant and non-pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Babic, Mirela; Hukic, Mirsada

    2010-02-01

    Pregnancy represents a risk factor in the occurrence of vaginal candidosis. The objectives of our study were: to make determination of the microscopic findings of vaginal swab, frequency of Candida species in the culture of pregnant women and patients who are not pregnant, determine the Candida species in all cultures, and to determine the frequency and differences in the frequency of C. albicans and other non-albicans species. In one year study performed during 2006 year, we tested patients of Gynaecology and Obstetrics clinic of the Clinical Centre in Sarajevo and Gynaecology department of the General hospital in Sarajevo. 447 woman included in the study were separated in two groups: 203 pregnant (in the last trimester of pregnancy), and 244 non-pregnant woman in period of fertility. Each vaginal swab was examined microscopically. The yeast, number of colonies, and the species of Candida were determined on Sabouraud dextrose agar with presence of antibiotics. For determination of Candida species, we used germ tube test for detection of C. albicans, and cultivation on the selective medium and assimilation tests for detection of non-albicans species. The results indicated positive microscopic findings in the test group (40,9%), as well as greater number of positive cultures (46,8%). The most commonly detected species for both groups was C. albicans ( test group 40.9% and control group 23,0%). The most commonly detected non-albicans species for the test group were C. glabrata (4,2 %) and C. krusei (3,2%), and for the control group were C. glabrata (3,2%) and C. parapsilosis (3,2%). The microscopic findings correlated with the number of colonies in positive cultures. In the test group, we found an increased number of yeasts (64,3%), and the pseudopyphae and blastopores by microscopic examination as an indication of infection. In the control group, we found a small number of yeasts (64,6%) , in the form of blastopores, as an indication of the candida colonisation. Our

  15. An adaptive response of Enterobacter aerogenes to imipenem: regulation of porin balance in clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Lavigne, Jean-Philippe; Sotto, Albert; Nicolas-Chanoine, Marie-Hélène; Bouziges, Nicole; Pagès, Jean-Marie; Davin-Regli, Anne

    2013-02-01

    Imipenem (IPM) is a carbapenem antibiotic frequently used in severe hospital infections. Several reports have mentioned the emergence of resistant isolates exhibiting membrane modifications. A study was conducted between September 2005 and August 2007 to survey infections due to Enterobacter aerogenes in patients hospitalised in a French university hospital. Resistant E. aerogenes clinical isolates obtained from patients treated with IPM and collected during the 3 months following initiation of treatment were phenotypically and molecularly characterised for β-lactamases, efflux pumps activity and outer membrane proteins. Among the 339 patients infected with E. aerogenes during the study period, 41 isolates (12.1%) were resistant to extended-spectrum cephalosporins and 17 patients (5.0%) were treated with IPM. The isolates from these 17 patients presented TEM-24 and basal efflux expression. Following IPM treatment, an IPM-intermediate-susceptible (IPM-I) isolate emerged in 11 patients and an IPM-resistant (IPM-R) isolate in 6 patients. A change in the porin balance (Omp35/Omp36) was observed in IPM-I isolates exhibiting ertapenem resistance. Finally, a porin deficiency (Omp35 and Omp36 absence) was detected in IPM-R isolates associated with efflux pump expression. This study indicates that the alteration in porin expression, including the shift of porin expression and lack of porins, contribute to the E. aerogenes adaptive response to IPM treatment.

  16. Species distribution and susceptibility profile to fluconazole, voriconazole and MXP-4509 of 551 clinical yeast isolates from a Romanian multi-centre study.

    PubMed

    Minea, B; Nastasa, V; Moraru, R F; Kolecka, A; Flonta, M M; Marincu, I; Man, A; Toma, F; Lupse, M; Doroftei, B; Marangoci, N; Pinteala, M; Boekhout, T; Mares, M

    2015-02-01

    This is the first multi-centre study regarding yeast infections in Romania. The aim was to determine the aetiological spectrum and susceptibility pattern to fluconazole, voriconazole and the novel compound MXP-4509. The 551 isolates were identified using routine laboratory methods, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and DNA sequence analysis. Susceptibility testing was performed using the European Committee for Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) method and breakpoints. The yeasts originated from superficial infections (SUP, 51.5 %), bloodstream infections (BSI, 31.6 %) and deep-seated infections (DEEP, 16.9 %), from patients of all ages. Nine genera and 30 species were identified. The 20 Candida species accounted for 94.6 % of all isolates. C. albicans was the overall leading pathogen (50.5 %). Lodderomyces elongisporus is reported for the first time as a fungaemia cause in Europe. C. glabrata and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, as well as the non-Candida spp. and non-albicans Candida spp. groups, showed decreased fluconazole susceptibility (<75 %). The overall fluconazole resistance was 10.2 %. C. krusei accounted for 27 of the 56 fluconazole-resistant isolates. The overall voriconazole resistance was 2.5 % and was due mainly to C. glabrata and C. tropicalis isolates. Fluconazole resistance rates for the three categories of infection were similar to the overall value; voriconazole resistance rates differed: 4 % for BSI, 3.2 % for DEEP and 1.4 % for SUP. The antifungal activity of MXP-4509 was superior to voriconazole against C. glabrata and many fluconazole-resistant isolates. There was a large percentage of non-albicans Candida isolates. A large part of the high fluconazole resistance was not acquired but intrinsic, resulting from the high percentage of C. krusei.

  17. Comparison of Hemagglutination and Hemolytic Activity of Various Bacterial Clinical Isolates Against Different Human Blood Groups

    PubMed Central

    HRV, Rajkumar; Devaki, Ramakrishna

    2016-01-01

    Among the various pathogenic determinants shown by microorganisms hemagglutination and hemolysin production assume greater significance in terms of laboratory identification. This study evaluated the hemagglutination and hemolytic activity of various bacterial isolates against different blood groups. One hundred and fifty bacterial strains, isolated from clinical specimens like urine, pus, blood, and other body fluids were tested for their hemagglutinating and hemolytic activity against human A, B, AB, and O group red blood cells. Among the 150 isolates 81 were Escherichia coli, 18 were Klebsiella pneumoniae, 19 were Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 10 were Pseudomonas spp, six were Proteus mirabilis, and the rest 16 were Staphylococcus aureus. Nearly 85% of the isolates agglutinated A group cells followed by B and AB group (59.3% and 60.6% respectively). Least number of isolates agglutinated O group cells (38.0%). When the hemolytic activity was tested, out of these 150 isolates 79 (52.6%) hemolyzed A group cells, 61 (40.6%) hemolyzed AB group cells, 46 (30.6%) hemolyzed B group cells, and 57 (38.6%) isolates hemolyzed O group cells. Forty-six percent of the isolates exhibited both hemagglutinating and hemolytic property against A group cells, followed by B and AB group cells (28.6% and 21.3% respectively). Least number of isolates i.e., 32 (21.3%) showed both the properties against O group cells. The isolates showed wide variation in their hemagglutination and hemolytic properties against different combinations of human blood group cells. The study highlights the importance of selection of the type of cells especially when human RBCs are used for studying the hemagglutination and hemolytic activity of bacterial isolates because these two properties are considered as characteristic of pathogenic strains. PMID:27014523

  18. Protein-Based Classifier to Predict Conversion from Clinically Isolated Syndrome to Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Borràs, Eva; Cantó, Ester; Choi, Meena; Maria Villar, Luisa; Álvarez-Cermeño, José Carlos; Chiva, Cristina; Montalban, Xavier; Vitek, Olga; Comabella, Manuel; Sabidó, Eduard

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is an inflammatory, demyelinating, and neurodegenerative disease of the central nervous system. In most patients, the disease initiates with an episode of neurological disturbance referred to as clinically isolated syndrome, but not all patients with this syndrome develop multiple sclerosis over time, and currently, there is no clinical test that can conclusively establish whether a patient with a clinically isolated syndrome will eventually develop clinically defined multiple sclerosis. Here, we took advantage of the capabilities of targeted mass spectrometry to establish a diagnostic molecular classifier with high sensitivity and specificity able to differentiate between clinically isolated syndrome patients with a high and a low risk of developing multiple sclerosis. Based on the combination of abundances of proteins chitinase 3-like 1 and ala-β-his-dipeptidase in cerebrospinal fluid, we built a statistical model able to assign to each patient a precise probability of conversion to clinically defined multiple sclerosis. Our results are of special relevance for patients affected by multiple sclerosis as early treatment can prevent brain damage and slow down the disease progression.

  19. Exploring the contribution of efflux on the resistance to fluoroquinolones in clinical isolates of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Paltansing, Sunita; Tengeler, Anouk C; Kraakman, Margriet E M; Claas, Eric C J; Bernards, Alexandra T

    2013-12-01

    Resistance to ciprofloxacin in Escherichia coli is increasing parallel to increased use of fluoroquinolones both in The Netherlands and in other European countries. The objective was to investigate the contribution of active efflux and expression of outer membrane proteins (OMPs) in a collection of clinical E. coli isolates collected at a clinical microbiology department in a Dutch hospital. Forty-seven E. coli isolates a wide range of ciprofloxacin minimum inhibitory concentrations and known mutations in the quinolone resistance determining region were included. A fluorometric determination of bisbenzimide efflux was used two different efflux pump inhibitors and compared to quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) for the expression levels of acrA, acrB, tolC, yhiV, and mdfA efflux pump genes and the OMPs ompF and ompX. Six isolates (12.7%) showed increased efflux. Although in 35 isolates (76%), overexpression of ≥1 efflux pump genes using qRT-PCR was present. Only the combined overexpression of acrAB-TolC and mdfA correlated with the phenotypic efflux assay using glucose/carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone with glucose. Thus, efflux was involved in ciprofloxacin resistance in a limited number of E. coli isolates collected at a clinical microbiology department in a Dutch hospital complementing other resistance mechanisms.

  20. Antifungal Susceptibility Analysis of Clinical Isolates of Candida parapsilosis in Iran

    PubMed Central

    LOTFALI, Ensieh; KORDBACHEH, Parivash; MIRHENDI, Hossein; ZAINI, Farideh; GHAJARI, Ali; MOHAMMADI, Rasoul; NOORBAKHSH, Fatemeh; MOAZENI, Maryam; FALLAHI, Aliakbar; REZAIE, Sassan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Candida parapsilosis is an emergent agent of invasive fungal infections. This yeast is one of the five most widespread yeasts concerned in invasive candidiasis. C. parapsilosis stands out as the second most common yeast species isolated from patients with bloodstream infections especially in neonates with catheter. Recently several reports suggested that its reduced susceptibility to azoles and polyene might become a cause for clinical concern, although C. parapsilosis is not believed to be intensely prone to the development of antifungal resistance. Methods: In the present report, One hundred and twenty clinical isolates of C. parapsilosis complex were identified and differentiated by using PCR-RFLP analysis. The isolates were then analyzed to determine their susceptibility profile to fluconazole (FLU), itraconazole (ITC) and amphotericin B. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) results were analyzed according to the standard CLSI guide. Results: All of isolates were identified as C. parapsilosis. No C. metapsilosis and C. orthopsilosis strains were found. Evaluation of the antifungal susceptibility profile showed that only three (2.5%) C. parapsilosis were resistant to fluconazole, three (2.5%) C. parapsilosis were resistant to itraconazole and two (1.7%) C. parapsilosis were amphotericin B resistant. Conclusion: Profiles in clinical isolates of C. parapsilosis can provide important information for the control of antifungal resistance as well as distribution and susceptibility profiles in populations. PMID:27141494

  1. Verruculogen production in airborne and clinical isolates of Aspergillus fumigatus Fres.

    PubMed

    Kosalec, Ivan; Klarić, Maja Segvić; Pepeljnjak, Stjepan

    2005-12-01

    Among airborne aspergilli sampled in outdoor air of the Zagreb area (2002/2003), Aspergillus niger (v. Teigh.) and A. fumigatus (Fres.) were the most abundant species (20-30%), with low mean annual concentrations (0.21-1.04 CFU m-3). Higher concentrations of A. fumigatus were observed in autumn and winter (0.5-1.05 CFU m-3) than in spring and summer (0-0.4 CFU m-3). On the other hand, A. fumigatus was found to be the most frequent isolate from upper and/or lower respiratory tracts of imunocompromised patients in many studies. This species produces several mycotoxins, including the tremorgenic mycotoxin verruculogen that can be found in spores and during myceliar growth. Verruculogen production ability was tested on 30 airborne and 33 clinical isolates of A. fumigatus. In both groups, high percentage of verruculogen-producing strains was noticed (84% of airborne and 91% of clinical isolates). Verruculogen production was not significantly different in the groups of airborne isolates (0.34+/-0.16 mg mL-1), and clinical isolates (0.26+/-0.19 mg mL-1). PMID:16375825

  2. New Multiplex PCR for Rapid Detection of Isoniazid-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Herrera-León, Laura; Molina, Tamara; Saíz, Pilar; Sáez-Nieto, Juan Antonio; Soledad Jiménez, Maria

    2005-01-01

    In this study, we describe a multiplex PCR to detect a AGC→ACC (serine to threonine) mutation in the katG gene and a −15 C-to-T substitution (inhAC−15T) at the 5′ end of a presumed ribosome binding site in the promoter of the mabA-inhA operon. These mutations have been reported in the majority of previous studies as the most frequent mutations involved in the resistance to isoniazid (INH) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical strains with high levels of resistance. The method was optimized and validated after an analysis of 30 M. tuberculosis clinical isolates with known sequences of the relevant part of the katG gene and the regulatory region of the mabA-inhA operon. We analyzed 297 INH-resistant M. tuberculosis isolates collected in Spain from 1996 to 2003 by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (using the katG gene), DNA sequencing, and the newly developed multiplex PCR. The results were concordant for all 297 isolates tested. The analysis revealed that 204 (68.7%) of the isolates carried one or both of the mutations. This finding suggests that with further development this multiplex PCR will be able to detect the majority of the INH-resistant M. tuberculosis clinical isolates from Spain and other countries where a high frequency of similar mutations occur. PMID:15616288

  3. Novel point mutations in the ERG11 gene in clinical isolates of azole resistant Candida species.

    PubMed

    Silva, Danielly Beraldo dos Santos; Rodrigues, Luana Mireli Carbonera; Almeida, Adriana Araújo de; Oliveira, Kelly Mari Pires de; Grisolia, Alexéia Barufatti

    2016-03-01

    The azoles are the class of medications most commonly used to fight infections caused by Candida sp. Typically, resistance can be attributed to mutations in ERG11 gene (CYP51) which encodes the cytochrome P450 14α-demethylase, the primary target for the activity of azoles. The objective of this study was to identify mutations in the coding region of theERG11 gene in clinical isolates of Candida species known to be resistant to azoles. We identified three new synonymous mutations in the ERG11 gene in the isolates of Candida glabrata (C108G, C423T and A1581G) and two new nonsynonymous mutations in the isolates of Candida krusei--A497C (Y166S) and G1570A (G524R). The functional consequence of these nonsynonymous mutations was predicted using evolutionary conservation scores. The G524R mutation did not have effect on 14α-demethylase functionality, while the Y166S mutation was found to affect the enzyme. This observation suggests a possible link between the mutation and dose-dependent sensitivity to voriconazole in the clinical isolate of C. krusei. Although the presence of the Y166S in phenotype of reduced azole sensitivity observed in isolate C. krusei demands investigation, it might contribute to the search of new therapeutic agents against resistant Candida isolates. PMID:26982177

  4. Novel point mutations in the ERG11 gene in clinical isolates of azole resistant Candida species.

    PubMed

    Silva, Danielly Beraldo dos Santos; Rodrigues, Luana Mireli Carbonera; Almeida, Adriana Araújo de; Oliveira, Kelly Mari Pires de; Grisolia, Alexéia Barufatti

    2016-03-01

    The azoles are the class of medications most commonly used to fight infections caused by Candida sp. Typically, resistance can be attributed to mutations in ERG11 gene (CYP51) which encodes the cytochrome P450 14α-demethylase, the primary target for the activity of azoles. The objective of this study was to identify mutations in the coding region of theERG11 gene in clinical isolates of Candida species known to be resistant to azoles. We identified three new synonymous mutations in the ERG11 gene in the isolates of Candida glabrata (C108G, C423T and A1581G) and two new nonsynonymous mutations in the isolates of Candida krusei--A497C (Y166S) and G1570A (G524R). The functional consequence of these nonsynonymous mutations was predicted using evolutionary conservation scores. The G524R mutation did not have effect on 14α-demethylase functionality, while the Y166S mutation was found to affect the enzyme. This observation suggests a possible link between the mutation and dose-dependent sensitivity to voriconazole in the clinical isolate of C. krusei. Although the presence of the Y166S in phenotype of reduced azole sensitivity observed in isolate C. krusei demands investigation, it might contribute to the search of new therapeutic agents against resistant Candida isolates.

  5. Analysis of quorum sensing-deficient clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Schaber, J Andy; Carty, Nancy L; McDonald, Naomi A; Graham, Eric D; Cheluvappa, Rajkumar; Griswold, John A; Hamood, Abdul N

    2004-09-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces multiple virulence factors and causes different types of infections. Previous clinical studies identified P. aeruginosa isolates that lack individual virulence factors. However, the impact of losing several virulence factors simultaneously on the in vivo virulence of P. aeruginosa is not completely understood. The P. aeruginosa cell-to-cell communication system, or quorum sensing (QS), controls the production of several virulence factors. Animal studies using constructed QS mutants indicated that loss of the QS system severely impacts the virulence of P. aeruginosa. In this study, we tried to determine if deficiency within the QS system compromises the ability of P. aeruginosa to establish infections in humans. We have identified five QS-deficient strains through screening 200 isolates from patients with urinary tract, lower respiratory tract and wound infections. These strains lacked LasB and LasA activities and produced either no or very low levels of the autoinducers N-(3-oxododecanoyl) homoserine lactone and N-butyryl homoserine lactone. PCR analysis revealed that three isolates contained all four QS genes (lasI, lasR, rhlI and rhlR) while two isolates lacked both the lasR and rhlR genes. We also examined the five isolates for other virulence factors. The isolates produced variable levels of exotoxin A and, with one exception, were deficient in pyocyanin production. One isolate produced the type III secretion system (TTSS) effector proteins ExoS and ExoT, two isolates produced ExoT only and two isolates produced no TTSS proteins. The isolates produced weak to moderate biofilms on abiotic surfaces. Analysis of the patients' data revealed that two of the isolates represented a single strain that was isolated twice from the same patient within a 1 month interval. One QS-deficient clinical isolate (CI-1) lacked all tested virulence factors and produced a weak biofilm. These results suggest that naturally occurring QS

  6. Clinical Features of Group B Streptococcus Prosthetic Joint Infections and Molecular Characterization of Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Corvec, S.; Illiaquer, M.; Touchais, S.; Boutoille, D.; van der Mee-Marquet, N.; Quentin, R.; Reynaud, A.; Lepelletier, D.; Bémer, P.

    2011-01-01

    Twelve group B Streptococcus (GBS) prosthetic joint infection (PJI) cases are reported. The mean patient age was 55 years. Eleven infections were caused by GBS alone. The associated isolates belonged to phylogenetic lineages different from those that cause neonatal meningitis. The clinical outcome was favorable for the eight patients for whom follow-up data were available. PMID:21068273

  7. Clinical features of group B Streptococcus prosthetic joint infections and molecular characterization of isolates.

    PubMed

    Corvec, S; Illiaquer, M; Touchais, S; Boutoille, D; van der Mee-Marquet, N; Quentin, R; Reynaud, A; Lepelletier, D; Bémer, P

    2011-01-01

    Twelve group B Streptococcus (GBS) prosthetic joint infection (PJI) cases are reported. The mean patient age was 55 years. Eleven infections were caused by GBS alone. The associated isolates belonged to phylogenetic lineages different from those that cause neonatal meningitis. The clinical outcome was favorable for the eight patients for whom follow-up data were available.

  8. [A selective nutrient medium for isolating clinical strains of Escherichia coli O157:H7].

    PubMed

    Sultanov, Z Z; Stepanova, E D; Kakulina, E A

    2000-01-01

    A dried selective culture medium, electrolyte-deficient sorbitol agar (EDS agar), for the isolation and preliminary identification of E. coli O157:H7 from clinical material has been developed. The medium is not inferior in its quality to analogous foreign media and requires no scarce ingredients for its manufacture.

  9. Genome Sequence of the Historical Clinical Isolate Burkholderia pseudomallei PHLS 6

    DOE PAGES

    D’haeseleer, Patrik; Johnson, Shannon L.; Davenport, Karen W.; Chain, Patrick S.; Schoeniger, Joe; Ray, Debjit; Sinha, Anupama; Williams, Kelly P.; Peña, José; Branda, Steven S.; et al

    2016-06-30

    We present the draft genome sequence ofBurkholderia pseudomalleiPHLS 6, a virulent clinical strain isolated from a melioidosis patient in Bangladesh in 1960. This draft genome consists of 39 contigs and is 7,322,181 bp long.

  10. Characterization of clinical and environmental Mycobacterium avium spp. isolates and their interaction with human macrophages

    EPA Science Inventory

    Members of the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) are naturally occurring bacteria in the environment. A link has been suggested between M. avium strains in drinking water and clinical isolates from infected individuals. There is a need to develop new screening methodologies tha...

  11. Severe hypoglycaemia in isolated 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase deficiency; a rare, severe clinical presentation.

    PubMed

    Oude Luttikhuis, H G M; Touati, G; Rabier, D; Williams, M; Jakobs, C; Saudubray, J M

    2005-01-01

    Since the introduction of neonatal screening for branched-chain organic acidurias, it has been noted that isolated 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase deficiency is probably one of the most frequent organic acidurias. Only a few cases with severe clinical presentation have been described. Profound hypoglycaemia is an uncommon but life-threatening complication.

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of a Mycobacterium africanum Clinical Isolate from Antioquia, Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Hurtado, U. A.; Solano, J. S.; Rodriguez, A.; Rouzaud, F.

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium africanum is a member of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. Most commonly found in West African countries, it has scarcely been described in South America. Here, we report the first genome sequence of a Colombian M. africanum clinical isolate. It is composed of 4,493,502 bp, with 4,069 genes. PMID:27257203

  13. Draft genome sequences of two Campylobacter jejuni clinical isolates, NW and D2600.

    PubMed

    Jerome, John P; Klahn, Brian D; Bell, Julia A; Barrick, Jeffrey E; Brown, C Titus; Mansfield, Linda S

    2012-10-01

    The Campylobacter jejuni human clinical isolates NW and D2600 colonized C57BL/6 interleukin-10-deficient (IL-10(-/-)) mice without inducing a robust inflammatory response (J. A. Bell et al., BMC Microbiol. 9:57, 2009). We announce draft genome sequences of NW and D2600 to facilitate comparisons with strains that induce gastrointestinal inflammation in this mouse model.

  14. Genome Sequence of the Historical Clinical Isolate Burkholderia pseudomallei PHLS 6

    PubMed Central

    Davenport, Karen W.; Chain, Patrick S.; Schoeniger, Joe; Ray, Debjit; Sinha, Anupama; Williams, Kelly P.; Peña, José; El-Etr, Sahar

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present the draft genome sequence of Burkholderia pseudomallei PHLS 6, a virulent clinical strain isolated from a melioidosis patient in Bangladesh in 1960. The draft genome consists of 39 contigs and is 7,322,181 bp long. PMID:27365360

  15. Clinical features of group B Streptococcus prosthetic joint infections and molecular characterization of isolates.

    PubMed

    Corvec, S; Illiaquer, M; Touchais, S; Boutoille, D; van der Mee-Marquet, N; Quentin, R; Reynaud, A; Lepelletier, D; Bémer, P

    2011-01-01

    Twelve group B Streptococcus (GBS) prosthetic joint infection (PJI) cases are reported. The mean patient age was 55 years. Eleven infections were caused by GBS alone. The associated isolates belonged to phylogenetic lineages different from those that cause neonatal meningitis. The clinical outcome was favorable for the eight patients for whom follow-up data were available. PMID:21068273

  16. Genome Sequence of the Historical Clinical Isolate Burkholderia pseudomallei PHLS 6.

    PubMed

    D'haeseleer, Patrik; Johnson, Shannon L; Davenport, Karen W; Chain, Patrick S; Schoeniger, Joe; Ray, Debjit; Sinha, Anupama; Williams, Kelly P; Peña, José; Branda, Steven S; El-Etr, Sahar

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present the draft genome sequence of Burkholderia pseudomallei PHLS 6, a virulent clinical strain isolated from a melioidosis patient in Bangladesh in 1960. The draft genome consists of 39 contigs and is 7,322,181 bp long. PMID:27365360

  17. Distribution of virulence genes in clinical and environmental isolates of Aeromonas spp.

    PubMed

    Chacón, M R; Figueras, M J; Castro-Escarpulli, G; Soler, L; Guarro, J

    2003-01-01

    The distribution and phenotypic activity of the genes encoding for serine protease, glycerophospholipid-cholesterol acyltransferase, lipases, aerolysin/hemolysin and DNases were investigated in 234 isolates identified by 16S rDNA-RFLP representing all the species of Aeromonas. The former three genes were found to be highly conserved among the genus. Aerolysin/hemolysin and DNase genes and beta-hemolytic activity were significantly more frequent in clinical than in environmental isolates. Aerolysin/hemolysin and serine protease genes were present in all beta-hemolytic strains supporting serine protease as possibly important for the activation of the former gene. The high prevalence of virulence factors in clinical isolates indicates that they may play a role in the mechanisms of pathogenesis of these microorganisms.

  18. Commensal Protection of Staphylococcus aureus against Antimicrobials by Candida albicans Biofilm Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Eric F.; Tsui, Christina; Kucharíková, Sona; Andes, David

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Biofilm-associated polymicrobial infections, particularly those involving fungi and bacteria, are responsible for significant morbidity and mortality and tend to be challenging to treat. Candida albicans and Staphylococcus aureus specifically are considered leading opportunistic fungal and bacterial pathogens, respectively, mainly due to their ability to form biofilms on catheters and indwelling medical devices. However, the impact of mixed-species biofilm growth on therapy remains largely understudied. In this study, we investigated the influence of C. albicans secreted cell wall polysaccharides on the response of S. aureus to antibacterial agents in biofilm. Results demonstrated significantly enhanced tolerance for S. aureus to drugs in the presence of C. albicans or its secreted cell wall polysaccharide material. Fluorescence confocal time-lapse microscopy revealed impairment of drug diffusion through the mixed biofilm matrix. Using C. albicans mutant strains with modulated cell wall polysaccharide expression, exogenous supplementation, and enzymatic degradation, the C. albicans-secreted β-1,3-glucan cell wall component was identified as the key matrix constituent providing the bacteria with enhanced drug tolerance. Further, antibody labeling demonstrated rapid coating of the bacteria by the C. albicans matrix material. Importantly, via its effect on the fungal biofilm matrix, the antifungal caspofungin sensitized the bacteria to the drugs. Understanding such symbiotic interactions with clinical relevance between microbial species in biofilms will greatly aid in overcoming the limitations of current therapies and in defining potential new targets for treating polymicrobial infections. PMID:27729510

  19. The inhibitory activity of linalool against the filamentous growth and biofilm formation in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chih-Chieh; Lai, Wen-Lin; Chuang, Kuei-Chin; Lee, Meng-Hwan; Tsai, Ying-Chieh

    2013-07-01

    Candida spp. are part of the natural human microbiota, but they also represent important opportunistic human pathogens. Biofilm-associated Candida albicans infections are clinically relevant due to their high levels of resistance to traditional antifungal agents. In this study, we investigated the ability of linalool to inhibit the formation of C. albicans biofilms and reduce existing C. albicans biofilms. Linalool exhibited antifungal activity against C. albicans ATCC 14053, with a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 8 mM. Sub-MIC concentrations of linalool also inhibited the formation of germ tubes and biofilms in that strain. The defective architecture composition of C. albicans biofilms exposed to linalool was characterized by scanning electron microscopy. The expression levels of the adhesin genes HWP1 and ALS3 were downregulated by linalool, as assessed by real-time RT-PCR. The expression levels of CYR1 and CPH1, which encode components of the cAMP-PKA and MAPK hyphal formation regulatory pathways, respectively, were also suppressed by linalool, as was the gene encoding their upstream regulator, Ras1. The expression levels of long-term hyphae maintenance associated genes, including UME6, HGC1, and EED1, were all suppressed by linalool. These results indicate that linalool may have therapeutic potential in the treatment of candidiasis associated with medical devices because it interferes with the morphological switch and biofilm formation of C. albicans.

  20. Antifungal Activity of Cinnamon Oil and Olive Oil against Candida Spp. Isolated from Blood Stream Infections

    PubMed Central

    Rohilla, Hina; Singh, Gajender; Punia, Parul

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Recently non-albicans Candida has emerged as a major cause of morbidity and mortality in blood stream infections. Some species of the Candida are becoming increasingly resistant to first line and second line antifungals such as echinocandins and fluconazole. In view of increasing global antifungal resistance, role of alternative and better antifungals like natural plant products need to be explored. Essential oils are known to exhibit antimicrobial activity against various fungi. Hence, we evaluated the efficacy of cinnamon oil and olive oil against Candida spp. Aim To evaluate the invitro antifungal activity of olive oil and cinnamon oil against blood stream Candida isolates. Materials and Methods The present prospective observational study was conducted in the Department of Microbiology at a tertiary care teaching hospital during one year June 2011-July 2012. Blood samples were collected from 1376 patients clinically suspected to have fungal septicaemia, out of which 100 (7.2%) Candida isolates obtained, were speciated by conventional methods. Antifungal susceptibility testing of all the isolates was done against fluconazole, voriconazole as per NCCL (M27-A2) and against olive oil and cinnamon oil by agar well diffusion method. Results Prevalence of Candidemia was 7.26%. C. albicans (85.3%) and C. parapsilosis (85.7%) were most sensitive to fluconazole followed by C. tropicalis (67.4%). All isolates were 100% sensitive to voriconazole. Both oils were found to be effective against nearly 50% of the Candida isolates. About 55.5% of fluconazole resistant C. krusei strains were sensitive to olive and cinnamon oil. Conclusion Fluconazole resistant non-albicans Candida has emerged as major cause of Candidemia. Cinnamon and olive oil show marked sensitivity against albicans and non-albicans spp. PMID:27656437

  1. Molecular screening of 246 Portuguese Aspergillus isolates among different clinical and environmental sources.

    PubMed

    Sabino, Raquel; Veríssimo, Cristina; Parada, Helena; Brandão, João; Viegas, Carla; Carolino, Elisabete; Clemons, Karl V; Stevens, David A

    2014-07-01

    Clinical and environmental samples from Portugal were screened for the presence of Aspergillus and the distributions of the species complexes were determined in order to understand how their distributions differ based on their source. Fifty-seven Aspergillus isolates from clinical samples were collected from 10 health institutions. Six species complexes were detected by internal transcribed spacer sequencing; Fumigati, Flavi, and Nigri were found most frequently (50.9%, 21.0%, and 15.8%, respectively). β-tubulin and calmodulin sequencing resulted in seven cryptic species (A. awamorii, A. brasiliensis, A. fructus, A. lentulus, A. sydowii, A. tubingensis, Emericella echinulata) being identified among the 57 isolates. Thirty-nine isolates of Aspergillus were recovered from beach sand and poultry farms, 31 from swine farms, and 80 from hospital environments, for a total 189 isolates. Eleven species complexes were found in these 189 isolates, and those belonging to the Versicolores species complex were found most frequently (23.8%). There was a significant association between the different environmental sources and distribution of the species complexes; the hospital environment had greater variability of species complexes than other environmental locations. A high prevalence of cryptic species within the Circumdati complex was detected in several environments; from the isolates analyzed, at least four cryptic species were identified, most of them growing at 37ºC. Because Aspergillus species complexes have different susceptibilities to antifungals, knowing the species-complex epidemiology for each setting, as well as the identification of cryptic species among the collected clinical isolates, is important. This may allow preventive and corrective measures to be taken, which may result in decreased exposure to those organisms and a better prognosis.

  2. Phenotypic and Genotypic Characterization of Canadian Clinical Isolates of Vibrio parahaemolyticus Collected from 2000 to 2009

    PubMed Central

    Kearney, Ashley K.; Nadon, Celine A.; Peterson, Christy-Lynn; Tyler, Kevin; Bakouche, Laurene; Clark, Clifford G.; Hoang, Linda; Gilmour, Matthew W.; Farber, Jeffrey M.

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is the leading bacterial cause of food-borne illness due to the consumption of contaminated seafood. The aim of the present study was to determine the population of its subtypes and establish a better understanding of the various types of V. parahaemolyticus strains that are causing human illness in Canada. The subtypes for 100 human clinical isolates of V. parahaemolyticus collected between 2000 and 2009 were determined by performing serotyping, ribotyping, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and multilocus sequence typing. Within this panel of strains, there was a high level of diversity (between 22 and 53 subtypes per method), but the presence of predominant clones with congruent subtypes between the various methods was also observed. For example, all 32 isolates belonging to sequence type 36 (ST36) were from serogroup O4, while 31 of them were ribotype EcoVib235-287, and 24 of the 32 were SfiI pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) pattern VPSF1.0001. With regard to the presence of known virulence genes, 74 of the 100 isolates were PCR positive for the presence of the thermostable direct hemolysin (tdh); and 59 of these 74 strains also contained the second virulence marker, the tdh-related hemolysin (trh). The detection of trh was more predominant (81%) among the clinical isolates, and only four (4%) of the clinical isolates tested negative for the presence of both tdh and trh. This database, comprising 100 clinical isolates of V. parahaemolyticus strains from Canada, forms a baseline understanding of subtype diversity for future source attribution and other epidemiologic studies. PMID:24452166

  3. Influence of the isolation method on the 10-year clinical behaviour of posterior resin composite restorations.

    PubMed

    Raskin, A; Setcos, J C; Vreven, J; Wilson, N H

    2000-09-01

    The aims of this prospective randomised clinical study were to clinically evaluate a radiopaque, highly filled, hybrid, light-activated resin-based composite for posterior teeth (Occlusin, ICI Dental, Macclesfield, UK and GC Dental, Tokyo, Japan) and compare the performance of restorations placed using rubber dam or cotton roll isolation. One clinician placed 100 (42 Class I and 58 Class II) restorations of the material under investigation. The isolation mode for each restoration was determined randomly: 52 preparations were protected from contamination with cotton rolls and aspiration, and 48 preparations were isolated under rubber dam. At baseline and periodically thereafter (0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 10 years), each composite was evaluated by two practitioners using a modified (USPHS) rating system. After 10 years, 37 restorations were reviewed. The results showed satisfactory clinical performance with and without rubber dam after 10 years. A concern was the number of failures at 10 years due to unsatisfactory proximal contact. The evaluations for the surviving restorations were acceptable but with a large reduction in the percentage with ideal occlusal and proximal anatomy. The 10-year comparison of isolation modes showed no statistically significant differences (Kruskal-Wallis test) for each of the evaluation criteria. Furthermore, survival analysis showed no significant difference between the groups (Mantel-Haenszel method). It was concluded that the 10-year clinical behaviour of the restorations of a posterior composite placed under well-controlled, effective isolation with cotton rolls and aspiration, was not significantly different from the behaviour of restorations placed using rubber dam isolation.

  4. Frequency, virulence genes and antimicrobial resistance of Listeria spp. isolated from bovine clinical mastitis.

    PubMed

    Jamali, Hossein; Radmehr, Behrad

    2013-11-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence, characteristics and antimicrobial resistance of Listeria spp. isolated from bovine clinical mastitis in Iran. Listeria spp. were detected in 21/207 bovine mastitic milk samples from dairy farms in Iran, comprising L. monocytogenes (n=17), L. innocua (n=3) and L. ivanovii (n=1). L. monocytogenes isolates were grouped into serogroups '4b, 4d, 4e', '1/2a, 3a', '1/2b, 3b, 7' and '1/2c, 3c'; all harboured inlA, inlC and inlJ virulence genes. Listeria spp. were most frequently resistant to penicillin G (14/21 isolates, 66.7%) and tetracyclines (11/21 isolates, 52.4%).

  5. Clinical and veterinary isolates of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis defective in lipopolysaccharide O-chain polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Guard-Petter, J.; Parker, C.T.; Asokan, K.; Carlson, R.W.

    1999-05-01

    Twelve human and chicken isolates of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis belonging to phage types 4, 8, 13a, and 23 were characterized for variability in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) composition. Isolates were differentiated into two groups, i.e., those that lacked immunoreactive O-chain, termed rough isolates, and those that had immunoreactive O-chain, termed smooth isolates. Isolates within these groups could be further differentiated by LPS compositional differences as detected by gel electrophoresis and gas liquid chromatography of samples extracted with water, which yielded significantly more LPS in comparison to phenol-chloroform extraction. The rough isolates were of two types, the O-antigen synthesis mutants and the O-antigen polymerization (wzy) mutants. Smooth isolates were also of two types, one producing low-molecular-weight (LMW) LPS and the other producing high-molecular-weight (HMW) LPS. To determine the genetic basis for the O-chain variability of the smooth isolates, the authors analyzed the effects of a null mutation in the O-chain length determinant gene, wzz (cld) of serovar Typhimurium. This mutation results in a loss of HMW LPS; however, the LMW LPS of this mutant was longer and more glucosylated than that from clinical isolates of serovar Enteritidis. Cluster analysis of these data and of those from two previously characterized isogenic strains of serovar Enteritidis that had different virulence attributes indicated that glucosylation of HMW LPS (via oafR function) is variable and results in two types of HMW structures, one that is highly glucosylated and one that is minimally glucosylated. These results strongly indicate that naturally occurring variability in wzy, wzz, and oafR function can be used to subtype isolates of serovar Enteritidis during epidemiological investigations.

  6. Adhesive properties and antibiotic resistance of Klebsiella, Enterobacter, and Serratia clinical isolates involved in nosocomial infections.

    PubMed Central

    Livrelli, V; De Champs, C; Di Martino, P; Darfeuille-Michaud, A; Forestier, C; Joly, B

    1996-01-01

    Intestinal colonization by Klebsiella, Enterobacter, and Serratia (KES) strains is a crucial step in the development of nosocomial infections. We studied the adhesive properties, antibiotic resistance, and involvement in colonization or infection of 103 KES clinical isolates: 30 Klebsiella pneumoniae (29%), 16 Klebsiella oxytoca (15%), 30 Enterobacter aerogenes (29%), 14 Enterobacter cloacae (14%), and 13 Serratia sp. (13%) isolates. Half of them were resistant to several antimicrobial agents, including aminoglycosides and beta-lactam antibiotics. A total of 27 of 30 K. pneumoniae isolates (90%) adhered to the human cell line Intestine-407 (Int-407), while none of the K. oxytoca or E. aerogenes isolates and only 2 of the E. cloacae isolates adhered. Three adhesive patterns were observed for K. pneumoniae: an aggregative adhesion in 57% of the isolates, a diffuse adhesion in only one isolate, and a new pattern, localized adhesion, in 30% of the isolates. While most of the sensitive strains adhered with the aggregative phenotype, the localized pattern was associated with resistant K. pneumoniae isolates producing the CAZ-5 beta-lactamase. Furthermore, 45% of such localized-adhesion isolates were involved in severe infections. The distributions of type 1 and type 3 fimbriae, enteroaggregative E. coli, and cf29, pap, and afa/Dr adhesin-encoding genes were determined by using specific DNA probes. No relationship was found between the adhesive pattern and the production of specific fimbriae, suggesting that several unrecognized adhesive factors are involved. Our study indicates that special adhesive properties associated with resistance to antimicrobial agents could account for the pathogenicity of certain nosocomial strains. PMID:8818891

  7. Evaluation of gene expression SAP5, LIP9, and PLB2 of Candida albicans biofilms after photodynamic inactivation.

    PubMed

    Freire, Fernanda; de Barros, Patrícia Pimentel; da Silva Ávila, Damara; Brito, Graziella Nuernberg Back; Junqueira, Juliana Campos; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso

    2015-07-01

    With the increasing number of strains of Candida ssp. resistant to antifungal agents, the accomplishment of researches that evaluate the effects of new therapeutic methods, like photodynamic inactivation (PDI), becomes important and necessary. Thus, the objective of this study was to verify the effects of the PDI on Candida albicans biofilms, evaluating their effects on the expression of the gene hydrolytic enzymes aspartyl proteinase (SAP5), lipase (LIP9), and phospholipase (PLB2). Clinical strains of C. albicans (n = 9) isolated from patient bearers of the virus HIV and a pattern strain ATCC 18804 were used. The quantification of gene expression was related to the production of hydrolytic enzymes using the quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay. For PDI, we used laser-aluminum-gallium arsenide low power (red visible, 660 nm) as a light source and the methylene blue at 300 μM as a photosensitizer. We assessed two experimental groups for each strain: (a) PDI: sensitization with methylene blue and laser irradiation and (b) control: without sensitization with methylene blue and light absence. The PDI decreased gene expression in 60 % of samples for gene SAP5 and 50 % of the samples decreased expression of LIP9 and PLB2. When we compared the expression profile for of each gene between the treated and control group, a decrease in all gene expression was observed, however no statistically significant difference (Tukey's test/p = 0.12). It could be concluded that PDI (photosensitization with methylene blue followed by low-level laser irradiation) showed a slight reduction on the expression of hydrolytic enzymes of C. albicans, without statistical significance.

  8. Identification, clinical distribution, and susceptibility to methicillin and 18 additional antibiotics of clinical Staphylococcus isolates: nationwide investigation in Italy.

    PubMed

    Varaldo, P E; Cipriani, P; Focá, A; Geraci, C; Giordano, A; Madeddu, M A; Orsi, A; Pompei, R; Prenna, M; Repetto, A

    1984-06-01

    A multicentric study of clinical Staphylococcus isolates was performed by seven operative units working in different areas of Italy. Over a 6-month period, a total of 3,226 staphylococci, isolated from in- and outpatients, were identified and tested for antimicrobial susceptibility by a protocol agreed upon by all units. On the basis of their bacteriolytic-activity patterns and other conventional tests, the isolates were identified by lyogroups , which closely correlate with human Staphylococcus species. Lyogroup I (Staphylococcus aureus) and lyogroup III (Staphylococcus capitis) were the most and the least frequently isolated staphylococci, respectively. Significant differences depending on strain origin from in- or outpatients were only observed with lyogroup IV (i.e., novobiocin- resistant staphylococci), whose isolation from outpatients was three times greater than from inpatients. Lyogroup I was predominant among isolates from most clinical sources. Lyogroup IV predominated in strains isolated from the urinary tract; lyogroup V (Staphylococcus epidermidis) predominated in strains from blood, cerebrospinal fluid, and indwelling artificial devices; and lyogroup VI ( Staphylococcus hominis, Staphylococcus haemolyticus, and Staphylococcus warneri ) predominated in strains from bile and the male genital tract. The incidence of methicillin resistance within the different lyogroups varied from unit to unit, suggesting epidemiological differences among different hospitals and different geographical areas. On the whole, methicillin resistance was more frequent in coagulase-negative staphylococci than in S. aureus and ranged from 19% for lyogroups I and III to 30% for lyogroup II (Staphylococcus simulans). Laboratory testing with 18 additional antibiotics suggested the occurrence of some specific differences in susceptibility among the different lyogroups . The rate of organisms resistant to the various antibiotics was greater among methicillin-resistant than among

  9. Identification, clinical distribution, and susceptibility to methicillin and 18 additional antibiotics of clinical Staphylococcus isolates: nationwide investigation in Italy.

    PubMed

    Varaldo, P E; Cipriani, P; Focá, A; Geraci, C; Giordano, A; Madeddu, M A; Orsi, A; Pompei, R; Prenna, M; Repetto, A

    1984-06-01

    A multicentric study of clinical Staphylococcus isolates was performed by seven operative units working in different areas of Italy. Over a 6-month period, a total of 3,226 staphylococci, isolated from in- and outpatients, were identified and tested for antimicrobial susceptibility by a protocol agreed upon by all units. On the basis of their bacteriolytic-activity patterns and other conventional tests, the isolates were identified by lyogroups , which closely correlate with human Staphylococcus species. Lyogroup I (Staphylococcus aureus) and lyogroup III (Staphylococcus capitis) were the most and the least frequently isolated staphylococci, respectively. Significant differences depending on strain origin from in- or outpatients were only observed with lyogroup IV (i.e., novobiocin- resistant staphylococci), whose isolation from outpatients was three times greater than from inpatients. Lyogroup I was predominant among isolates from most clinical sources. Lyogroup IV predominated in strains isolated from the urinary tract; lyogroup V (Staphylococcus epidermidis) predominated in strains from blood, cerebrospinal fluid, and indwelling artificial devices; and lyogroup VI ( Staphylococcus hominis, Staphylococcus haemolyticus, and Staphylococcus warneri ) predominated in strains from bile and the male genital tract. The incidence of methicillin resistance within the different lyogroups varied from unit to unit, suggesting epidemiological differences among different hospitals and different geographical areas. On the whole, methicillin resistance was more frequent in coagulase-negative staphylococci than in S. aureus and ranged from 19% for lyogroups I and III to 30% for lyogroup II (Staphylococcus simulans). Laboratory testing with 18 additional antibiotics suggested the occurrence of some specific differences in susceptibility among the different lyogroups . The rate of organisms resistant to the various antibiotics was greater among methicillin-resistant than among

  10. Molecular epidemiology of Candida albicans and its closely related yeasts Candida dubliniensis and Candida africana.

    PubMed

    Romeo, Orazio; Criseo, Giuseppe

    2009-01-01

    We performed a molecular study to determine the occurrence of Candida albicans, Candida africana, and Candida dubliniensis in different clinical samples. The study provides new insights into the epidemiology of candidiasis in hospitalized patients in three hospitals in southern Italy. It also reports the first detailed epidemiological data concerning the occurrence of C. africana in clinical samples.

  11. Molecular Epidemiology of Candida albicans and Its Closely Related Yeasts Candida dubliniensis and Candida africana▿

    PubMed Central

    Romeo, Orazio; Criseo, Giuseppe

    2009-01-01

    We performed a molecular study to determine the occurrence of Candida albicans, Candida africana, and Candida dubliniensis in different clinical samples. The study provides new insights into the epidemiology of candidiasis in hospitalized patients in three hospitals in southern Italy. It also reports the first detailed epidemiological data concerning the occurrence of C. africana in clinical samples. PMID:18987171

  12. Heterogeneity in extracellular nucleotide hydrolysis among clinical isolates of Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Tasca, T; Bonan, C D; De Carli, G A; Sarkis, J J F; Alderete, J F

    2005-07-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is a parasitic protozoan that causes trichomonosis, a sexually-transmitted disease, with serious sequelae to women and men. As the host-parasite relationship is complex, it is important to investigate biochemical aspects of the parasite that contribute to our understanding of trichomonal biology and pathogenesis. Nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase 1 (NTPDase 1), which hydrolyses extracellular ATP and ADP, and ecto-5'-nucleotidase, which hyrolyses AMP, have been characterized in laboratory isolates of T. vaginalis. Here we show that the extracellular ATP: ADP hydrolysis ratio varies among fresh clinical isolates, which presented higher ATPase and ADPase activities than long-term-grown isolates. Growth of parasites in iron-replete and iron-depleted medium resulted in different, albeit minor, patterns in extracellular ATP and ADP hydrolysis among isolates. Importantly, some isolates had low or absent ecto-5'-nucleotidase activity, regardless of environmental conditions tested. For isolates with ecto-5'-nucleotidase activity, high- and low-iron trichomonads had increased and decreased levels of activity, respectively, compared to organisms grown in normal TYM-serum medium. This suggests a regulation in expression of either the enzyme amounts and/or activity under the control of iron. Finally, we found no correlation between the presence or absence of dsRNA virus infection among trichomonad isolates and NTPDase and ecto-5'-nucleotidase activities. PMID:16038398

  13. Biofilm formation and genetic diversity of Salmonella isolates recovered from clinical, food, poultry and environmental sources.

    PubMed

    Nair, Amruta; Rawool, Deepak B; Doijad, Swapnil; Poharkar, Krupali; Mohan, Vysakh; Barbuddhe, Sukhadeo B; Kolhe, Rahul; Kurkure, Nitin V; Kumar, Ashok; Malik, S V S; Balasaravanan, T

    2015-12-01

    In the present study, Salmonella isolates (n=40) recovered from clinical, food, poultry and environmental sources were characterized for serotype identification, genetic diversity and biofilm formation capability. Serotype identification using multiplex PCR assay revealed six isolates to be Salmonella Typhimurium, 14 as Salmonella Enteritidis, 11 as Salmonella Typhi, and the remaining nine isolates unidentified were considered as other Salmonella spp. Most of the Salmonella isolates (85%) produced biofilm on polystyrene surfaces as assessed by microtitre plate assay. About 67.5% isolates were weak biofilm producers and 17.5% were moderate biofilm producers. There was no significant difference in biofilm-forming ability among the Salmonella isolates recovered from different geographical regions or different sources. Among the genetic methods, Enterobacterial Repetitive Intergenic Consensus (ERIC) PCR revealed greater discriminatory power (DI, 0.943) followed by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) (DI, 0.899) and random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) PCR (DI, 0.873). However, composite analysis revealed the highest discrimination index (0.957). Greater discrimination of S. Typhimurium and S. Typhi was achieved using PFGE, while ERIC PCR was better for S. Enteritidis and other Salmonella serotypes. A strong positive correlation (r=0.992) was observed between biofilm formation trait and clustered Salmonella isolates in composite genetic analysis.

  14. Diallyl disulphide depletes glutathione in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Lemar, Katey M.; Aon, Miguel A.; Cortassa, Sonia; O’Rourke, Brian; T. Müller, Carsten; Lloyd, David

    2008-01-01

    Using two-photon scanning laser microscopy, we investigated the effect of an Allium sativum (garlic) constituent, diallyl disulphide (DADS), on key physiological functions of the opportunistic pathogen Candida albicans. A short 30 min exposure to 0.5 mm DADS followed by removal induced 70% cell death (50% necrotic, 20% apoptotic) within 2 h, increasing to 75% after 4 h. The early intracellular events associated with DADS-induced cell death were monitored with two-photon fluorescence microscopy to track mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), reactive oxygen species (ROS) and NADH or reduced glutathione (GSH) under aerobic conditions. DADS treatment decreased intracellular GSH and elevated intracellular ROS levels. Additionally, DADS induced a marked decrease of ΔΨm and lowered respiration in cell suspensions and isolated mitochondria. In vitro kinetic experiments in cell-free extracts suggest that glutathione-S-transferase (GST) is one of the intracellular targets of DADS. Additional targets were also identified, including inhibition of a site or sites between complexes II-IV in the electron transport chain, as well as the mitochondrial ATP-synthase. The results indicate that DADS is an effective antifungal agent able to trigger cell death in Candida, most probably by eliciting oxidative stress as a consequence of thiol depletion and impaired mitochondrial function. PMID:17534841

  15. Application of MALDI-TOF MS for requalification of a Candida clinical isolates culture collection

    PubMed Central

    Lima-Neto, Reginaldo; Santos, Cledir; Lima, Nelson; Sampaio, Paula; Pais, Célia; Neves, Rejane P.

    2014-01-01

    Microbial culture collections underpin biotechnology applications and are important resources for clinical microbiology by supplying reference strains and/or performing microbial identifications as a service. Proteomic profiles by MALDI-TOF MS have been used for Candida spp. identification in clinical laboratories and demonstrated to be a fast and reliable technique for the routine identification of pathogenic yeasts. The main aim of this study was to apply MALDI-TOF MS combined with classical phenotypic and molecular approaches to identify Candida clinical isolates preserved from 1 up to 52 years in a Brazilian culture collection and assess its value for the identification of yeasts preserved in this type of collections. Forty Candida spp. clinical isolates were identified by morphological and biochemical analyses. Identifications were also performed by the new proteomic approach based on MALDI-TOF MS. Results demonstrated 15% discordance when compared with morphological and biochemical analyses. Discordant isolates were analysed by ITS sequencing, which confirmed the MALDI-TOF MS identifications and these strains were renamed in the culture collection catalogue. In conclusion, proteomic profiles by MALDI-TOF MS represents a rapid and reliable method for identifying clinical Candida species preserved in culture collections and may present clear benefits when compared with the performance of existing daily routine methods applied at health centres and hospitals. PMID:25242936

  16. Bacteremia with Streptococcus bovis and Streptococcus salivarius: clinical correlates of more accurate identification of isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Ruoff, K L; Miller, S I; Garner, C V; Ferraro, M J; Calderwood, S B

    1989-01-01

    Two biotypes of Streptococcus bovis can be identified by laboratory testing and can be distinguished from the phenotypically similar organism Streptococcus salivarius. We assessed the clinical relevance of careful identification of these organisms in 68 patients with streptococcal bacteremia caused by these similar species. S. bovis was more likely to be clinically significant when isolated from blood (89%) than was S. salivarius (23%). There was a striking association between S. bovis I bacteremia and underlying endocarditis (94%) compared with that of S. bovis II bacteremia (18%). Bacteremia with S. bovis I was also highly correlated with an underlying colonic neoplasm (71% of patients overall, 100% of those with thorough colonic examinations) compared with bacteremia due to S. bovis II or S. salivarius (17% overall, 25% of patients with thorough colonic examinations). We conclude that careful identification of streptococcal bacteremic isolates as S. bovis biotype I provides clinically important information and should be more widely applied. PMID:2915024

  17. Manipulation of Host Diet To Reduce Gastrointestinal Colonization by the Opportunistic Pathogen Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Tornberg-Belanger, Stephanie N.; Matthan, Nirupa R.; Lichtenstein, Alice H.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Candida albicans, the most common human fungal pathogen, can cause systemic infections with a mortality rate of ~40%. Infections arise from colonization of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, where C. albicans is part of the normal microflora. Reducing colonization in at-risk patients using antifungal drugs prevents C. albicans-associated mortalities. C. albicans provides a clinically relevant system for studying the relationship between diet and the microbiota as it relates to commensalism and pathogenicity. As a first step toward a dietary intervention to reduce C. albicans GI colonization, we investigated the impact of dietary lipids on murine colonization by C. albicans. Coconut oil and its constituent fatty acids have antifungal activity in vitro; we hypothesized that dietary coconut oil would reduce GI colonization by C. albicans. Colonization was lower in mice fed a coconut oil-rich diet than in mice fed diets rich in beef tallow or soybean oil. Switching beef tallow-fed mice to a coconut oil diet reduced preexisting colonization. Coconut oil reduced colonization even when the diet also contained beef tallow. Dietary coconut oil also altered the metabolic program of colonizing C. albicans cells. Long-chain fatty acids were less abundant in the cecal contents of coconut oil-fed mice than in the cecal contents of beef tallow-fed mice; the expression of genes involved in fatty acid utilization was lower in C. albicans from coconut oil-fed mice than in C. albicans from beef tallow-fed mice. Extrapolating to humans, these findings suggest that coconut oil could become the first dietary intervention to reduce C. albicans GI colonization. IMPORTANCE Candida albicans, the most common human fungal pathogen, can cause infections with a mortality rate of ~40%. C. albicans is part of the normal gut flora, but when a patient’s immune system is compromised, it can leave the gut and cause infections. By reducing the amount of C. albicans in the gut of

  18. Manipulation of Host Diet To Reduce Gastrointestinal Colonization by the Opportunistic Pathogen Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Gunsalus, Kearney T W; Tornberg-Belanger, Stephanie N; Matthan, Nirupa R; Lichtenstein, Alice H; Kumamoto, Carol A

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans, the most common human fungal pathogen, can cause systemic infections with a mortality rate of ~40%. Infections arise from colonization of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, where C. albicans is part of the normal microflora. Reducing colonization in at-risk patients using antifungal drugs prevents C. albicans-associated mortalities. C. albicans provides a clinically relevant system for studying the relationship between diet and the microbiota as it relates to commensalism and pathogenicity. As a first step toward a dietary intervention to reduce C. albicans GI colonization, we investigated the impact of dietary lipids on murine colonization by C. albicans. Coconut oil and its constituent fatty acids have antifungal activity in vitro; we hypothesized that dietary coconut oil would reduce GI colonization by C. albicans. Colonization was lower in mice fed a coconut oil-rich diet than in mice fed diets rich in beef tallow or soybean oil. Switching beef tallow-fed mice to a coconut oil diet reduced preexisting colonization. Coconut oil reduced colonization even when the diet also contained beef tallow. Dietary coconut oil also altered the metabolic program of colonizing C. albicans cells. Long-chain fatty acids were less abundant in the cecal contents of coconut oil-fed mice than in the cecal contents of beef tallow-fed mice; the expression of genes involved in fatty acid utilization was lower in C. albicans from coconut oil-fed mice than in C. albicans from beef tallow-fed mice. Extrapolating to humans, these findings suggest that coconut oil could become the first dietary intervention to reduce C. albicans GI colonization. IMPORTANCE Candida albicans, the most common human fungal pathogen, can cause infections with a mortality rate of ~40%. C. albicans is part of the normal gut flora, but when a patient's immune system is compromised, it can leave the gut and cause infections. By reducing the amount of C. albicans in the gut of susceptible

  19. Cronobacter sakazakii clinical isolates overcome host barriers and evade the immune response.

    PubMed

    Almajed, Faisal S; Forsythe, Stephen J

    2016-01-01

    Cronobacter sakazakii is the most frequently clinically isolated species of the Cronobacter genus. However the virulence factors of C. sakazakii including their ability to overcome host barriers remains poorly studied. In this study, ten clinical isolates of C. sakazakii were assessed for their ability to invade and translocate through human colonic carcinoma epithelial cells (Caco-2) and human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC). Their ability to avoid phagocytosis in human macrophages U937 and human brain microglial cells was investigated. Additionally, they were tested for serum sensitivity and the presence of the Cronobacter plasminogen activation gene (cpa) gene, which is reported to confer serum resistance. Our data showed that the clinical C. sakazakii strains invaded and translocated through Caco-2 and HBMEC cell lines and some strains showed significantly higher levels of invasion and translocation. Moreover, C. sakazakii was able to persist and even multiply in phagocytic macrophage and microglial cells. All strains, except one, were able to withstand human serum exposure, the single serum sensitive strain was also the only one which did not encode for the cpa gene. These results demonstrate that C. sakazakii clinical isolates are able to overcome host barriers and evade the host immune response indicating their capacity to cause diseases such as necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) and meningitis. Our data showed for the first time the ability of C. sakazakii clinical isolates to survive and multiply within human microglial cells. Additionally, it was shown that C. sakazakii clinical strains have the capacity to translocate through the Caco-2 and HBMEC cell lines paracellularly.

  20. Epidemiology of Candida infection. II. Application of biochemical methods for typing of Candida albicans strains.

    PubMed

    Budak, A

    1990-01-01

    Biochemical profiles of 350 C. albicans isolates from five towns in Poland and from Freiburg in Germany were determined on the basis of nine biochemical tests of Odds and Abbott method. API 20 C AUX system and additionally a resistogram. The analysis of the strains according to Odds' and Abbotts's system showed that investigated strains can be typed into 9 profile codes of common biochemical patterns. There were some differences among the profiles according to their geographical origin and anatomical sources of the isolation. On the basis of the ability C. albicans strains to assimilate of carbon sources, 350 isolates were categorised into 13 separate auxotrophic profiles with the major one: 2,576,174 accounting for 81% of the total. The majority of the investigated isolates were susceptible to antifungal agents (83%). A disproportionate distribution of auxotrophic profiles limited the use of resistogram method and API 20 C AUX as systems for typing C. albicans strains. On the other hand, the method of Odds and Abbott provides valuable criteria for typing of C. albicans. PMID:2130802

  1. Differentiation of Candida dubliniensis from Candida albicans on rosemary extract agar and oregano extract agar.

    PubMed

    de Loreto, Erico Silva; Pozzatti, Patrícia; Alves Scheid, Liliane; Santurio, Deise; Morais Santurio, Janio; Alves, Sydney Hartz

    2008-01-01

    Candida dubliniensis is a recently described pathogenic species which shares many phenotypic features with Candida albicans and therefore, may be misidentified in microbiological laboratories. Because molecular methods can be onerous and unfeasible in routine mycological laboratories with restricted budgets such as those in developing countries, phenotypic techniques have been encouraged in the development of differential media for the presumptive identification of these species. We examined the colony morphology and chlamydospore production of 30 C. dubliniensis isolates and 100 C. albicans isolates on two new proposed media: rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) extract agar (REA) and oregano (Origanum vulgare) extract agar (OEA). These substrates are traditionally used as spices and medicinal herbs. In both of these media, all C. dubliniensis isolates (100%) showed rough colonies with peripheral hyphal fringes and abundant chlamydospores after 24 to 48 hr of incubation at 25 degrees C. In contrast, under the same conditions, all isolates of C. albicans (100%) showed smooth colonies without hyphal fringes or chlamydospores. In conclusion, REA and OEA offer a simple, rapid, and inexpensive screening media for the differentiation of C. albicans and C. dubliniensis.

  2. Genetic diversity and evolutionary relationships among Legionella pneumophila clinical isolates, Portugal, 1987 to 2012.

    PubMed

    Chasqueira, M J; Rodrigues, L; Nascimento, M; Ramos, M; Marques, T

    2014-11-20

    The genetic diversity of 89 clinical Legionella isolates, collected between 1987 and 2012, in 22 hospitals from the five regions of Portugal, was analysed in this study using monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) of the Dresden panel and the sequence-based typing (SBT) protocol. The eBURST algorithm was used to infer levels of relatedness between isolates. All isolates collected were Legionella pneumophila, which were further characterised into four subgroups by MAbs, and 30 sequence types (STs) by SBT. Twelve of the STs were unique to Portugal; one of them (ST100) was represented by 32 epidemiologically related isolates. The ST44 was the profile with the highest number of epidemiologically unrelated isolates. The eBURST analyses indicate that, within the group formed by the 30 STs identified in this study, 17 STs were genetically close to at least another ST in the group. The comparison between the eBURST diagrams obtained with the STs from this study and the entire SBT database of the European Working Group for Legionella, showed that 24 (seven of them unique to Portugal) of our 30 STs were related with STs identified in others countries. These results suggest that the population of L. pneumophila clinical strains in Portugal includes both worldwide and local strains.

  3. Molecular typing of clinical isolates of Cryptococcus neoformans/Cryptococcus gattii species complex from Northeast Mexico.

    PubMed

    González, Gloria M; Casillas-Vega, Néstor; Garza-González, Elvira; Hernández-Bello, Romel; Rivera, Gildardo; Rodríguez, Jesús Ancer; Bocanegra-Garcia, Virgilio

    2016-01-01

    Cryptococcosis is caused by members of the Cryptococcus neoformans/Cryptococcus gattii species complex. Based on molecular identification, these two species have been further differentiated into molecular types. The aim of this work was to characterize clinical cryptococcal isolates recovered from six hospitals in Northeast Mexico from 1995 to 2011. One hundred and sixty-six isolates, which were characterized by biochemical tests and in vitro susceptibility to amphotericin B, fluconazole, and voriconazole, and M13 PCR fingerprinting, were included in this study. Utilizing phenotypic tests, 153 isolates (92.16 %) were identified as C. neoformans and 13 (7.83 %) as C. gattii. All isolates were susceptible to all antifungals tested. Employing M13 PCR fingerprinting, eight molecular types were detected. VNI was the most common genotype (124 cases; 74.6 %), followed by VNII (15 cases; 9 %), VNIII (8 cases; 4.8 %), VNIV (6 cases; 3.6 %), VGI (6 cases; 3.6 %), VGII (3 cases; 1.8 %), and VGIII and VGIV (2 cases, 1.2 % each). We confirm the presence of C. gattii in clinical isolates in Northeast Mexico, and a high clonal diversity in the studied strains of C. neoformans/C. gattii species complex.

  4. Prevalence and Clinical Impact of Heterogeneous Vancomycin-Intermediate Staphylococcus aureus Isolated From Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Young Rae; Kim, Kye-Hyung; Chang, Chulhun L.

    2016-01-01

    Background We estimated the prevalence and clinical impact of heterogeneous vancomycin-intermediate Staphylococcus aureus (hVISA). The concordance between macromethod and glycopeptide resistance detection (GRD) E tests was determined. In addition, predictors of clinical outcomes in hospitalized patients with S. aureus bacteremia (SAB) or pneumonia (SAP) were evaluated. Methods We obtained 229 consecutive S. aureus isolates from all hospitalized patients at two university hospitals located in Busan and Yangsan, Korea. Standard, macromethod, and GRD E tests were performed. Additionally, we reviewed the medical records of all patients. Among the 229 patients, predictors of clinical outcomes were analyzed for 107 patients with SAB and 39 with SAP. Results Among the 229 isolates, 34.5% of S. aureus isolates and 50.7% of methicillin-resistant S. aureus isolates exhibited the hVISA phenotype based on the macromethod E test. hVISA was nearly associated with treatment failure in patients with SAB (P=0.054) and was significantly associated with treatment failure in patients with SAP (P=0.014). However, hVISA was not associated with 30-day mortality in patients with SAB or SAP. The concordance between the macromethod and GRD E tests was 84.2%. Conclusions hVISA is quite common in the southeastern part of Korea. hVISA is associated with treatment failure in patients with SAP. PMID:26915612

  5. A Secreted Ankyrin-Repeat Protein from Clinical Stenotrophomonas maltophilia Isolates Disrupts Actin Cytoskeletal Structure.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Logan C; O'Keefe, Sean; Parnes, Mei-Fan; MacDonald, Hanlon; Stretz, Lindsey; Templer, Suzanne J; Wong, Emily L; Berger, Bryan W

    2016-01-01

    Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is an emerging, multidrug-resistant pathogen of increasing importance for the immunocompromised, including cystic fibrosis patients. Despite its significance as an emerging pathogen, relatively little is known regarding the specific factors and mechanisms that contribute to its pathogenicity. We identify and characterize a putative ankyrin-repeat protein (Smlt3054) unique to clinical S. maltophilia isolates that binds F-actin in vitro and co-localizes with actin in transfected HEK293a cells. Smlt3054 is endogenously expressed and secreted from clinical S. maltophilia isolates, but not an environmental isolate (R551-3). The in vitro binding of Smlt3054 to F-actin resulted in a thickening of the filaments as observed by TEM. Ectopic expression of Smlt3054-GFP exhibits strong co-localization with F-actin, with distinct, retrograde F-actin waves specifically associated with Smlt3054 in individual cells as well as formation of dense, internal inclusions at the expense of retrograde F-actin waves. Collectively, our results point to an interaction between Smlt3054 and F-actin. Furthermore, as a potentially secreted protein unique to clinical S. maltophilia isolates, Smlt3054 may serve as a starting point for understanding the mechanisms by which S. maltophilia has become an emergent pathogen. PMID:27622948

  6. Occurrence of an environmental Acinetobacter baumannii strain similar to a clinical isolate in paleosol from Croatia.

    PubMed

    Hrenovic, Jasna; Durn, Goran; Goic-Barisic, Ivana; Kovacic, Ana

    2014-05-01

    Over the past decade, bacteria of the genus Acinetobacter have emerged as a leading cause of hospital-acquired infections. Outbreaks of Acinetobacter infections are considered to be caused exclusively by contamination and transmission in hospital environments. The natural habitats of clinically important multiresistant Acinetobacter spp. remain to be defined. In this paper, we report an incidental finding of a viable multidrug-resistant strain of Acinetobacter baumannii, related to clinical isolates, in acid paleosol from Croatia. The environmental isolate of A. baumannii showed 87% similarity to a clinical isolate originating from a hospital in this geographic area and was resistant to gentamicin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, ciprofloxacin, and levofloxacin. In paleosol, the isolate was able to survive a low pH (3.37), desiccation, and a high temperature (50°C). The probable source of A. baumannii in paleosol is illegally disposed waste of external origin situated in the abandoned quarry near the sampling site. The bacteria could have been leached from waste by storm water and thus infiltrated the paleosol.

  7. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and ribotype profiles of clinical and environmental Vibrio vulnificus isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Tamplin, M L; Jackson, J K; Buchrieser, C; Murphree, R L; Portier, K M; Gangar, V; Miller, L G; Kaspar, C W

    1996-01-01

    Vibrio vulnificus belongs to the autochthonous bacterial flora of warm estuarine waters. It can cause life-threatening extraintestinal disease in persons who have underlying illness and who consume raw shellfish or contact wounds with estuarine water. Currently, very little is known about genetic diversity within this species. In this report, we describe high-level variation in restriction fragment length polymorphism profiles among 53 clinical and 78 environmental isolates, as determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. In contrast, ribotype profiles showed greater similarity. When combined ribotype profiles of clinical and environmental isolates were analyzed, four predominant clusters were observed. Interestingly, a low number (16%) of clinical isolates were found in cluster C, compared with clusters A, B, and D (range, 50 to 83%). In addition, 83% of all Hawaiian isolates were located in a single cluster, indicating a possible relationship between geography and genotype. We also report that spontaneous translucent colonial morphotypes were distinct by both restriction fragment length polymorphism and biochemical profiles, compared with opaque parent strains. PMID:8837412

  8. Occurrence of an Environmental Acinetobacter baumannii Strain Similar to a Clinical Isolate in Paleosol from Croatia

    PubMed Central

    Durn, Goran; Goic-Barisic, Ivana; Kovacic, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, bacteria of the genus Acinetobacter have emerged as a leading cause of hospital-acquired infections. Outbreaks of Acinetobacter infections are considered to be caused exclusively by contamination and transmission in hospital environments. The natural habitats of clinically important multiresistant Acinetobacter spp. remain to be defined. In this paper, we report an incidental finding of a viable multidrug-resistant strain of Acinetobacter baumannii, related to clinical isolates, in acid paleosol from Croatia. The environmental isolate of A. baumannii showed 87% similarity to a clinical isolate originating from a hospital in this geographic area and was resistant to gentamicin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, ciprofloxacin, and levofloxacin. In paleosol, the isolate was able to survive a low pH (3.37), desiccation, and a high temperature (50°C). The probable source of A. baumannii in paleosol is illegally disposed waste of external origin situated in the abandoned quarry near the sampling site. The bacteria could have been leached from waste by storm water and thus infiltrated the paleosol. PMID:24584245

  9. Antimicrobial susceptibility survey of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains isolated from clinical sources.

    PubMed Central

    Orrett, Fitzroy A.

    2004-01-01

    A two-year prospective study of 554 Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates was recovered from various clinical sources throughout Trinidad, and their resistance patterns to antipseudomonal antimicrobial agents were determined. Of the 554 P. aeruginosa isolates, 20.6% (114/554) were community isolates, 17.3% (96/554) from the intensive care unit (ICU), 10.1% (56/554) from the nursery, and the remaining 52% (288/554) were from other hospital inpatient services. Respiratory tract infections were the predominant source of P. aeruginosa isolates from the ICU--46.9% (45/96)--and nursery--21.4% (12/56), whereas wounds were the principal source of P. aeruginosa from the surgical services--77.0% (141/183). Community isolates of P. aeruginosa were predominantly from ear--100% (51/51)--and urinary tract infections--35.5%, (33/93). The overall prevalence of resistance was low for both hospital isolates (13.9%) and community isolates (3.8%). All community isolates were fully sensitive to four of the nine antimicrobials tested. Resistance rates among community strains ranged from 2.6% (ciprofloxacin and ceftazidime) to 12.3% for piperacillin. All isolates from hospital were fully sensitive to imipenem, but resistance rates for the other drugs ranged between 2.5% and 27.3%. The study showed that the overall resistance pattern of P. aeruginosa was relatively low. This is an encouraging observation but invites caution since resistance to the newly introduced drug, cefepime, has now emerged within the hospital environment and may present serious therapeutic problems within the near future. Policies governing the use of antimicrobials in many institutions are lacking. Such policies must be instituted in order to limit the spread of resistance and also to reduce the emergence of resistance to newly commissioned drugs within the country. PMID:15303411

  10. Detection of Carbapenemases in Clinical Enterobacteriaceae Isolates Using the VITEK AST-N202 Card

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Il Kwon; Kang, Hyun-Kyung; Jang, In-Ho; Lee, Woonhyoung; Kim, Keonhan; Jeong, Seok Hoon; Lee, Kyungwon

    2015-01-01

    Background The rapid and accurate detection of carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE) in clinical microbiology laboratories is essential for the treatment and control of infections caused by these microorganisms. This study was performed to evaluate the ability of the VITEK AST-N202 card to detect CPE isolates. Materials and Methods A total of 43 (Klebsiella pneumoniae, n = 37; Escherichia coli, n = 3; and Enterobacter cloacae, n = 3) CPE isolates and 79 carbapenemase-non-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CNE) isolates were included in this study. The CPE isolates harbored KPC-2 (n = 11), KPC-3 (n = 20), GES-5 (n = 5), VIM-2 (n = 2), IMP-1 (n = 1), NDM-1 (n = 2), or OXA-232 (n = 2). Of the 79 CNE isolates, eight K. pneumoniae isolates were resistant to ertapenem, imipenem, and meropenem, while the remaining 71 isolates were susceptible to the carbapenems. Antimicrobial susceptibilities were tested using the VITEK AST-N202 card, and the results were interpreted as positive when the isolates showed resistant or intermediate results. Modified-Hodge tests (MHTs) were performed using ertapenem or meropenem disks for the screening of carbapenemase production. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and direct sequencing were used to identify β-lactamase genes. Results Sensitivity of MHT with ertapenem and meropenem disks for the detection of carbapenemase was 81.4% (35/43) and 81.4% (35/43), respectively, and a combination with both antibiotic disks increased the sensitivity to 88.4% (38/43). Specificity of the MHT was 100% (79/79) for the CNE isolates. Sensitivity of ertapenem, imipenem, and meropenem as assessed by the VITEK AST-N202 card was 100% (43/43), 93% (40/43), and 95.3% (41/43), respectively. Specificity (89.8%, 71/79) of the test with each carbapenem was improved to 100% (71/71) when eight carbapenem-resistant CNE isolates were excluded from the testing. Conclusion The VITEK AST-N202 card showed high sensitivity for the detection of carbapenemases in

  11. A study on the characterization of Propionibacterium acnes isolated from ocular clinical specimens

    PubMed Central

    Sowmiya, Murali; Malathi, Jambulingam; Swarnali, Sen; Priya, Jeyavel Padma; Therese, Kulandai Lily; Madhavan, Hajib N.

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: There are only a few reports available on characterization of Propionibacterium acnes isolated from various ocular clinical specimens. We undertook this study to evaluate the role of P. acnes in ocular infections and biofilm production, and also do the phylogenetic analysis of the bacilli. Methods: One hundred isolates of P. acnes collected prospectively from ocular clinical specimens at a tertiary care eye hospital between January 2010 and December 2011, were studied for their association with various ocular disease conditions. The isolates were also subjected to genotyping and phylogenetic analysis, and were also tested for their ability to produce biofilms. Results: Among preoperative conjunctival swabs, P. acnes was a probably significant pathogen in one case; a possibly significant pathogen in two cases. In other clinical conditions, 13 per cent isolates were probably significant pathogens and 38 per cent as possibly significant pathogens. The analysis of 16S rRNA gene revealed four different phylogenies whereas analysis of recA gene showed two phylogenies confirming that recA gene was more reliable than 16S rRNA with less sequence variation. Results of polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) had 100 per cent concordance with phylogenetic results. No association was seen between P. acnes subtypes and biofilm production. Interpretation & conclusions: RecA gene phylogenetic studies revealed two different phylogenies. RFLP technique was found to be cost-effective with high sensitivity and specificity in phylogenetic analysis. No association between P. acnes subtypes and pathogenetic ability was observed. Biofilm producing isolates showed increased antibiotic resistance compared with non-biofilm producing isolates. PMID:26609036

  12. Exploring the contribution of efflux on the resistance to fluoroquinolones in clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Antimicrobial resistance mediated by efflux systems is still poorly characterized in Staphylococcus aureus, despite the description of several efflux pumps (EPs) for this bacterium. In this work we used several methodologies to characterize the efflux activity of 52 S. aureus isolates resistant to ciprofloxacin collected in a hospital in Lisbon, Portugal, in order to understand the role played by these systems in the resistance to fluoroquinolones. Results Augmented efflux activity was detected in 12 out of 52 isolates and correlated with increased resistance to fluoroquinolones. Addition of efflux inhibitors did not result in the full reversion of the fluoroquinolone resistance phenotype, yet it implied a significant decrease in the resistance levels, regardless of the type(s) of mutation(s) found in the quinolone-resistance determining region of grlA and gyrA genes, which accounted for the remaining resistance that was not efflux-mediated. Expression analysis of the genes coding for the main efflux pumps revealed increased expression only in the presence of inducing agents. Moreover, it showed that not only different substrates can trigger expression of different EP genes, but also that the same substrate can promote a variable response, according to its concentration. We also found isolates belonging to the same clonal type that showed different responses towards drug exposure, thus evidencing that highly related clinical isolates may diverge in the efflux-mediated response to noxious agents. The data gathered by real-time fluorometric and RT-qPCR assays suggest that S. aureus clinical isolates may be primed to efflux antimicrobial compounds. Conclusions The results obtained in this work do not exclude the importance of mutations in resistance to fluoroquinolones in S. aureus, yet they underline the contribution of efflux systems for the emergence of high-level resistance. All together, the results presented in this study show the potential role

  13. [Investigation of mutations in transcription factors of efflux pump genes in fluconazole-resistant Candida albicans strains overexpressing the efflux pumps].

    PubMed

    Kalkandelen, Kemal Turan; Doluca Dereli, Mine

    2015-10-01

    In recent years, a significant rise in the number of immunocompromised patients have been observed due to cancer chemotherapy, organ transplantation and HIV infection. As a result of this, the frequency of Candida albicans infections in the clinics have been increased. Fluconazole, as being a well tolerated, easy to use drug with minor side effects, is often the first choice antifungal agent for this patient group, both for therapy and prophylaxis. Especially the long-term use of this drug, causes the selection of resistant strains and leads to the development of fluconazole resistance. The most frequently observed resistance mechanism against fluconazole in C.albicans strains is the transportation of the drug out of the cell via efflux pumps. The efflux pumps mainly involved are Cdr1, Cdr2 ve Mdr1 encoded by CDR1, CDR2 and MDR1 genes. It has been shown that, the overexpression of these efflux pump genes was caused by functional mutations in TAC1 and MRR1 genes which encode the transcription factors Tac1p and Mrr1p. This study was aimed to analyze TAC1 and MRR1 genes of 15 C.albicans strains which consist of six fluconazole-susceptible, four susceptible with trailing effect and five fluconazole-resistant isolates plus one resistant strain (DSY292), known to overexpress Mdr1 efflux pump due to P683H mutation in MRR1 gene and one fluconazole-sensitive ATCC 14053 C.albicans strain in terms of mutations with polymerase chain reaction and sequence analysis. Two of the fluconazole-resistant isolates which had overexpression of Cdr1 and Cdr2 pumps known to have overexpression of TAC1 gene, revealed R673Q and A736V mutations. A P683H point mutation, that overexpressed the Mdr1 pump was detected in a fluconazole-resistant strain, which was known to cause MRR1 overexpression. In conclusion, mutations in the transcription factors of the efflux pump genes may play an important role in the resistance against fluconazole among our selected C.albicans strains. PMID:26649419

  14. [Investigation of mutations in transcription factors of efflux pump genes in fluconazole-resistant Candida albicans strains overexpressing the efflux pumps].

    PubMed

    Kalkandelen, Kemal Turan; Doluca Dereli, Mine

    2015-10-01

    In recent years, a significant rise in the number of immunocompromised patients have been observed due to cancer chemotherapy, organ transplantation and HIV infection. As a result of this, the frequency of Candida albicans infections in the clinics have been increased. Fluconazole, as being a well tolerated, easy to use drug with minor side effects, is often the first choice antifungal agent for this patient group, both for therapy and prophylaxis. Especially the long-term use of this drug, causes the selection of resistant strains and leads to the development of fluconazole resistance. The most frequently observed resistance mechanism against fluconazole in C.albicans strains is the transportation of the drug out of the cell via efflux pumps. The efflux pumps mainly involved are Cdr1, Cdr2 ve Mdr1 encoded by CDR1, CDR2 and MDR1 genes. It has been shown that, the overexpression of these efflux pump genes was caused by functional mutations in TAC1 and MRR1 genes which encode the transcription factors Tac1p and Mrr1p. This study was aimed to analyze TAC1 and MRR1 genes of 15 C.albicans strains which consist of six fluconazole-susceptible, four susceptible with trailing effect and five fluconazole-resistant isolates plus one resistant strain (DSY292), known to overexpress Mdr1 efflux pump due to P683H mutation in MRR1 gene and one fluconazole-sensitive ATCC 14053 C.albicans strain in terms of mutations with polymerase chain reaction and sequence analysis. Two of the fluconazole-resistant isolates which had overexpression of Cdr1 and Cdr2 pumps known to have overexpression of TAC1 gene, revealed R673Q and A736V mutations. A P683H point mutation, that overexpressed the Mdr1 pump was detected in a fluconazole-resistant strain, which was known to cause MRR1 overexpression. In conclusion, mutations in the transcription factors of the efflux pump genes may play an important role in the resistance against fluconazole among our selected C.albicans strains.

  15. Triangular gold nanoparticles conjugated with peptide ligands: a new class of inhibitor for Candida albicans secreted aspartyl proteinase.

    PubMed

    Jebali, Ali; Hajjar, Farzaneh Haji Esmaeil; Hekmatimoghaddam, Seyedhossein; Kazemi, Bahram; De La Fuente, Jesus M; Rashidi, Mohsen

    2014-08-15

    The aim of this study was to find the peptide ligands to inhibit Candida albicans secreted aspartyl proteinase 2 (Sap2). First, a ligand library, containing 300 different peptides, was constructed, and their interaction with Sap2 was separately calculated by molecular dynamic software. Second, 10 peptide ligands with the lowest intermolecular energy were selected. Then, triangular gold nanoparticles were synthesized, and separately conjugated with the peptide ligands. After synthesis, antifungal property and Sap inactivation of conjugated triangular gold nanoparticles, peptide ligands, and naked triangular gold nanoparticle were separately assessed, against thirty clinical isolates of C. albicans. In this study, we measured the uptake of conjugated and naked nanoparticles by atomic adsorption spectroscopy. This study showed that naked triangular gold nanoparticle and all conjugated triangular gold nanoparticles had high antifungal activity, but no peptide ligands had such activity. Of 300 peptide ligands, the peptide containing N-Cys-Lys-Lys-Arg-Met-Met-Lys-Ser-Met-Cys-C and its conjugate had the highest capability to inhibit Sap. Moreover, the uptake assay demonstrated that triangular gold nanoparticles conjugated with the peptide ligand had the highest uptake.

  16. AQU-1, a chromosomal class C β-lactamase, among clinical Aeromonas dhakensis isolates: distribution and clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chi-Jung; Wang, Hsuan-Chen; Chen, Po-Lin; Chang, Ming-Chung; Sunny Sun, H; Chou, Pei-Hsin; Ko, Wen-Chien

    2013-11-01

    Aeromonas dhakensis, a recently described Aeromonas sp. formerly called Aeromonas aquariorum, is associated with human infections. In this study, a chromosomal gene, blaAQU-1, was identified in A. dhakensis AAK1 that constitutes a 1143-bp open reading frame and is 87% identical to the gene encoding CepH in Aeromonas hydrophila. An Escherichia coli TOP10 cell transformant harbouring blaAQU-1 was resistant to cefotaxime but not to cefepime. mRNA expression of blaAQU-1 in the cefotaxime-resistant mutant strain AAK1m was 70-fold higher than in the wild strain AAK1. In all 16 A. dhakensis isolates (the major species of 51 consecutive Aeromonas blood isolates collected from June 1999 to June 2001) as well as in A. aquariorum MDC47(T) and A. hydrophila subsp. dhakensis LMG 19562(T), but not in the reference strains or clinical isolates of other A. hydrophila subspecies, Aeromonas caviae, Aeromonas veronii or Aeromonas enteropelogenes, blaAQU-1-related genes were detected by PCR. Overall, 13 (81%) of the 16 A. dhakensis blood isolates exhibited either cefotaxime resistance or the in vitro emergence of derepressed cefotaxime-resistant mutants. In vivo selection of an A. dhakensis resistant mutant was noted in a burn patient undergoing cefotaxime monotherapy. These observations suggest that AQU-1 is a chromosomal cephalosporinase in A. dhakensis. Cefotaxime monotherapy for severe A. dhakensis infections should be used cautiously.

  17. Novel katG mutations causing isoniazid resistance in clinical M. tuberculosis isolates

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Jessica N; Paul, Lynthia V; Rodwell, Timothy C; Victor, Thomas C; Amallraja, Anu M; Elghraoui, Afif; Goodmanson, Amy P; Ramirez-Busby, Sarah M; Chawla, Ashu; Zadorozhny, Victoria; Streicher, Elizabeth M; Sirgel, Frederick A; Catanzaro, Donald; Rodrigues, Camilla; Gler, Maria Tarcela; Crudu, Valeru; Catanzaro, Antonino; Valafar, Faramarz

    2015-01-01

    We report the discovery and confirmation of 23 novel mutations with previously undocumented role in isoniazid (INH) drug resistance, in catalase-peroxidase (katG) gene of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) isolates. With these mutations, a synonymous mutation in fabG1g609a, and two canonical mutations, we were able to explain 98% of the phenotypic resistance observed in 366 clinical Mtb isolates collected from four high tuberculosis (TB)-burden countries: India, Moldova, Philippines, and South Africa. We conducted overlapping targeted and whole-genome sequencing for variant discovery in all clinical isolates with a variety of INH-resistant phenotypes. Our analysis showed that just two canonical mutations (katG 315AGC-ACC and inhA promoter-15C-T) identified 89.5% of resistance phenotypes in our collection. Inclusion of the 23 novel mutations reported here, and the previously documented point mutation in fabG1, increased the sensitivity of these mutations as markers of INH resistance to 98%. Only six (2%) of the 332 resistant isolates in our collection did not harbor one or more of these mutations. The third most prevalent substitution, at inhA promoter position -8, present in 39 resistant isolates, was of no diagnostic significance since it always co-occurred with katG 315. 79% of our isolates harboring novel mutations belong to genetic group 1 indicating a higher tendency for this group to go down an uncommon evolutionary path and evade molecular diagnostics. The results of this study contribute to our understanding of the mechanisms of INH resistance in Mtb isolates that lack the canonical mutations and could improve the sensitivity of next generation molecular diagnostics. PMID:26251830

  18. Zinc Salts Inactivate Clinical Isolates of Herpes Simplex Virus In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Arens, Max; Travis, Sharon

    2000-01-01

    Using a standard plaque assay and clinical isolates of herpes simplex virus (HSV), we have tested the ability of zinc salts to inactivate HSV. Virus was treated by incubation at 37°C with zinc salts in morpholinepropanesulfonic acid-buffered culture medium and was then diluted and plated onto CV-1 cells for detection and quantitation of remaining infectious virus. Of 10 randomly chosen clinical isolates (five HSV type 1 [HSV-1] isolates and five HSV-2 isolates), seven were inactivated >98% by treatment in vitro with 50 mM zinc gluconate for 2 h and nine were inactivated >97% by treatment with zinc lactate. The effect was concentration dependent. With an HSV-1 isolate, 50 mM zinc gluconate or zinc lactate caused 100% inactivation, 15 mM caused 98 to 99% inactivation, and 5 mM caused 63 to 86% inactivation. With an HSV-2 isolate, 50 and 15 mM zinc gluconate caused 30% inactivation and 5 and 1 mM caused less than 9% inactivation, whereas 50 and 15 mM zinc lactate caused greater than 92% inactivation and 5 and 1 mM caused 37 and 26% inactivation, respectively. The ability of the zinc salts to inactivate HSV was not related to pH in the pH range of 6.1 to 7.6 since inactivation by zinc gluconate or zinc lactate in that pH range was 99.7 to 100% with a 2-h treatment with 50 mM zinc salt. Short (5-min) treatments of selected isolates with zinc gluconate, zinc lactate, zinc acetate, or zinc sulfate yielded inactivation rates of 0 to 55%. PMID:10790094

  19. Novel katG mutations causing isoniazid resistance in clinical M. tuberculosis isolates.

    PubMed

    Torres, Jessica N; Paul, Lynthia V; Rodwell, Timothy C; Victor, Thomas C; Amallraja, Anu M; Elghraoui, Afif; Goodmanson, Amy P; Ramirez-Busby, Sarah M; Chawla, Ashu; Zadorozhny, Victoria; Streicher, Elizabeth M; Sirgel, Frederick A; Catanzaro, Donald; Rodrigues, Camilla; Gler, Maria Tarcela; Crudu, Valeru; Catanzaro, Antonino; Valafar, Faramarz

    2015-07-01

    We report the discovery and confirmation of 23 novel mutations with previously undocumented role in isoniazid (INH) drug resistance, in catalase-peroxidase (katG) gene of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) isolates. With these mutations, a synonymous mutation in fabG1 (g609a), and two canonical mutations, we were able to explain 98% of the phenotypic resistance observed in 366 clinical Mtb isolates collected from four high tuberculosis (TB)-burden countries: India, Moldova, Philippines, and South Africa. We conducted overlapping targeted and whole-genome sequencing for variant discovery in all clinical isolates with a variety of INH-resistant phenotypes. Our analysis showed that just two canonical mutations (katG 315AGC-ACC and inhA promoter-15C-T) identified 89.5% of resistance phenotypes in our collection. Inclusion of the 23 novel mutations reported here, and the previously documented point mutation in fabG1, increased the sensitivity of these mutations as markers of INH resistance to 98%. Only six (2%) of the 332 resistant isolates in our collection did not harbor one or more of these mutations. The third most prevalent substitution, at inhA promoter position -8, present in 39 resistant isolates, was of no diagnostic significance since it always co-occurred with katG 315. 79% of our isolates harboring novel mutations belong to genetic group 1 indicating a higher tendency for this group to go down an uncommon evolutionary path and evade molecular diagnostics. The results of this study contribute to our understanding of the mechanisms of INH resistance in Mtb isolates that lack the canonical mutations and could improve the sensitivity of next generation molecular diagnostics.

  20. In Vitro Susceptibility of Filamentous Fungal Isolates From a Corneal Ulcer Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lalitha, Prajna; Sun, Catherine Q.; Prajna, N. Venkatesh; Karpagam, Rajarathinam; Manoharan, Geetha; O’Brien, Kieran S.; Cevallos, Vicky; McLeod, Stephen D.; Acharya, Nisha R.; Lietman, Thomas M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To describe the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of fungal isolates to natamycin and voriconazole, and to compare these MICs to previous ocular susceptibility studies. Design Experimental laboratory study using isolates from a randomized clinical trial. Methods The Mycotic Ulcer Treatment Trial I was a randomized, double-masked, multicenter trial comparing topical natamycin and voriconazole for fungal keratitis treatment. Susceptibility testing to natamycin and voriconazole were performed according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute methods. The relationship between organism and MIC was assessed. A literature review was performed to compare results to previous ocular susceptibility studies. Results Of the 323 patients enrolled in the trial, MICs were available for 221 (68%). Fusarium (N=126) and Aspergillus species (N=52) were the most commonly isolated organisms. MICs to natamycin and voriconazole were significantly different across all genera (P<0.001). The MIC median (MIC50) and 90th percentile (MIC90) for natamycin were equal to or higher than voriconazole for all organisms, except Curvularia species. Compared to other organisms, Fusarium species isolates had the highest MICs to voriconazole and A. flavus isolates had the highest MICs to natamycin. Our results were similar to previous reports except the voriconazole MIC90 against Aspergillus species was 2-fold higher and the natamycin MIC90 against A. fumigatus was 4-fold higher in our study. Conclusion In this large susceptibility study, Fusarium isolates were least susceptible to voriconazole and A. flavus isolates were least susceptible to natamycin when compared to other filamentous fungi. In the future, susceptibility testing may help guide therapy if performed in a timely manner. PMID:24439440

  1. Penicillin-susceptible group B streptococcal clinical isolates with reduced cephalosporin susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Nagano, Noriyuki; Nagano, Yukiko; Toyama, Masami; Kimura, Kouji; Shibayama, Keigo; Arakawa, Yoshichika

    2014-09-01

    We characterized penicillin-susceptible group B streptococcal (PSGBS) clinical isolates exhibiting no growth inhibition zone around a ceftibuten disk (CTB(r) PSGBS). The CTB(r) PSGBS isolates, for which augmented MICs of cefaclor and ceftizoxime were found, shared a T394A substitution in penicillin-binding protein 2X (PBP 2X) and a T567I substitution in PBP 2B, together with an additional G429S substitution in PBP 2X or a T145A substitution in PBP 1A, although the T145A substitution in the transglycosidase domain of PBP 1A would have no effect on the level of resistance to ceftibuten.

  2. Molecular epidemiology of orf513-bearing class 1 integrons in multiresistant clinical isolates from Argentinean hospitals.

    PubMed

    Arduino, Sonia M; Catalano, Mariana; Orman, Betina E; Roy, Paul H; Centrón, Daniela

    2003-12-01

    The spread of orf513-bearing class 1 integrons is associated with bla(CTX-M-2) in gram-negative clinical isolates in Argentina, with In35 being the most frequently found integron (74%). Among 65 isolates without bla(CTX-M-2), only one harbored a novel orf513-bearing class 1 integron with the dfrA3b gene. The finding of orf513 not associated with class 1 integrons in two gram-positive strains indicates the widespread occurrence of this putative site-specific recombinase.

  3. Coaggregation of Candida albicans, Actinomyces naeslundii and Streptococcus mutans is Candida albicans strain dependent.

    PubMed

    Arzmi, Mohd Hafiz; Dashper, Stuart; Catmull, Deanne; Cirillo, Nicola; Reynolds, Eric C; McCullough, Michael

    2015-08-01

    Microbial interactions are necessarily associated with the development of polymicrobial oral biofilms. The objective of this study was to determine the coaggregation of eight strains of Candida albicans with Actinomyces naeslundii and Streptococcus mutans. In autoaggregation assays, C. albicans strains were grown in RPMI-1640 and artificial saliva medium (ASM) whereas bacteria were grown in heart infusion broth. C. albicans, A. naeslundii and S. mutans were suspended to give 10(6), 10(7) and 10(8) cells mL(-1) respectively, in coaggregation buffer followed by a 1 h incubation. The absorbance difference at 620 nm (ΔAbs) between 0 h and 1 h was recorded. To study coaggregation, the same protocol was used, except combinations of microorganisms were incubated together. The mean ΔAbs% of autoaggregation of the majority of RPMI-1640-grown C. albicans was higher than in ASM grown. Coaggregation of C. albicans with A. naeslundii and/or S. mutans was variable among C. albicans strains. Scanning electron microscopy images showed that A. naeslundii and S. mutans coaggregated with C. albicans in dual- and triculture. In conclusion, the coaggregation of C. albicans, A. naeslundii and S. mutans is C. albicans strain dependent.

  4. Clinical significance, antimicrobial susceptibility and molecular identification of Nocardia species isolated from children with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Betrán, Ana; Villuendas, M Cruz; Rezusta, Antonio; Pereira, Javier; Revillo, M José; Rodríguez-Nava, Verónica

    2016-01-01

    Nocardia is an opportunistic pathogen that causes respiratory infections in immunocompromised patients. The aim of this study was to analyze the epidemiology, clinical significance and antimicrobial susceptibility of Nocardia species isolated from eight children with cystic fibrosis. The isolated species were identified as Nocardia farcinica, Nocardia transvalensis, Nocardia pneumoniae, Nocardia veterana and Nocardia wallacei. N. farcinica was isolated in three patients and all of them presented lung affectation with a chronic colonization and pneumonia. N. farcinica showed resistance against gentamicin, tobramycin, cefotaxime, but was susceptible to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and amikacin. N. transvalensis, which was isolated from two patients, showed an association with chronic colonization. N. transvalensis was resistant to tobramycin and amikacin, but susceptible to ciprofloxacin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and cefotaxime. N. veterana, N. pneumoniae and N. wallacei were isolated from three different patients and appeared in transitory lung colonization. N. veterana and N. pneumoniae were susceptible to imipenem, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, amikacin, tobramycin, and cefotaxime. N. wallacei was resistant to amikacin, tobramycin, imipenem, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and susceptible to ciprofloxacin and cefotaxime. All the isolates were identified up to species level by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The presence of Nocardia in the sputum of patients with cystic fibrosis is not always an indication of an active infection; therefore, the need for a treatment should be evaluated on an individual basis. The detection of multidrug-resistant species needs molecular identification and susceptibility testing, and should be performed for all Nocardia infections. PMID:27155949

  5. Clinical significance, antimicrobial susceptibility and molecular identification of Nocardia species isolated from children with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Betrán, Ana; Villuendas, M Cruz; Rezusta, Antonio; Pereira, Javier; Revillo, M José; Rodríguez-Nava, Verónica

    2016-01-01

    Nocardia is an opportunistic pathogen that causes respiratory infections in immunocompromised patients. The aim of this study was to analyze the epidemiology, clinical significance and antimicrobial susceptibility of Nocardia species isolated from eight children with cystic fibrosis. The isolated species were identified as Nocardia farcinica, Nocardia transvalensis, Nocardia pneumoniae, Nocardia veterana and Nocardia wallacei. N. farcinica was isolated in three patients and all of them presented lung affectation with a chronic colonization and pneumonia. N. farcinica showed resistance against gentamicin, tobramycin, cefotaxime, but was susceptible to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and amikacin. N. transvalensis, which was isolated from two patients, showed an association with chronic colonization. N. transvalensis was resistant to tobramycin and amikacin, but susceptible to ciprofloxacin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and cefotaxime. N. veterana, N. pneumoniae and N. wallacei were isolated from three different patients and appeared in transitory lung colonization. N. veterana and N. pneumoniae were susceptible to imipenem, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, amikacin, tobramycin, and cefotaxime. N. wallacei was resistant to amikacin, tobramycin, imipenem, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and susceptible to ciprofloxacin and cefotaxime. All the isolates were identified up to species level by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The presence of Nocardia in the sputum of patients with cystic fibrosis is not always an indication of an active infection; therefore, the need for a treatment should be evaluated on an individual basis. The detection of multidrug-resistant species needs molecular identification and susceptibility testing, and should be performed for all Nocardia infections.

  6. Prevalence of Virulence-Related Determinants in Clinical Isolates of Staphylococcus epidermidis

    PubMed Central

    Najar Peerayeh, Shahin; Jazayeri Moghadas, Ali; Behmanesh, Mehrdad

    2016-01-01

    Background Staphylococcus epidermidis, a member of the human flora, is recognized as an opportunistic pathogen and cause of nosocomial infections. Staphylococcus epidermidis surface components are able to establish bacteria on the host surface, and cause infection. Objectives The frequency of icaA, IS256, aap, fbe and bhp in clinical isolates of S. epidermidis were investigated in this study. Materials and Methods Fifty-nine S. epidermidis isolates were collected from blood (50), wound (1), urine (4) and tracheal (4) samples (Tehran, Iran). Staphylococcus epidermidis isolates were identified with conventional bacteriological tests. Virulence-associated genes were detected by specific polymerase chain reactions (PCRs). Results Of the 59 S. epidermidis, fbe was found in 89.8%, while aap and bhp were observed in 64.4% and 15.3% of the samples, respectively. Coexistence of aap and fbe was found in 32 isolates, while coexistence of bhp and fbe was observed in five isolates. Two isolates were negative for the investigated genes. Conclusions Prevalence of fbe and aap was significantly different from similar studies, yet frequency of bhp was in accordance with other studies. Prevalence of icaA and IS256 was not significantly different from some studies while a significant difference was observed when results were compared with some other studies. PMID:27800129

  7. Unprecedented Silver Resistance in Clinically Isolated Enterobacteriaceae: Major Implications for Burn and Wound Management

    PubMed Central

    Norton, Rhy; Austin, Cindy; Mitchell, Amber; Zank, Sara; Durham, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Increased utilization of inorganic silver as an adjunctive to many medical devices has raised concerns of emergent silver resistance in clinical bacteria. Although the molecular basis for silver resistance has been previously characterized, to date, significant phenotypic expression of these genes in clinical settings is yet to be observed. Here, we identified the first strains of clinical bacteria expressing silver resistance at a level that could significantly impact wound care and the use of silver-based dressings. Screening of 859 clinical isolates confirmed 31 harbored at least 1 silver resistance gene. Despite the presence of these genes, MIC testing revealed most of the bacteria displayed little or no increase in resistance to ionic silver (200 to 300 μM Ag+). However, 2 isolates (Klebsiella pneumonia and Enterobacter cloacae) were capable of robust growth at exceedingly high silver concentrations, with MIC values reaching 5,500 μM Ag+. DNA sequencing of these two strains revealed the presence of genes homologous to known genetic determinants of heavy metal resistance. Darkening of the bacteria's pigment was observed after exposure to high silver concentrations. Scanning electron microscopy images showed the presence of silver nanoparticles embedded in the extracellular polymeric substance of both isolates. This finding suggested that the isolates may neutralize ionic silver via reduction to elemental silver. Antimicrobial testing revealed both organisms to be completely resistant to many commercially available silver-impregnated burn and wound dressings. Taken together, these findings provide the first evidence of clinical bacteria capable of expressing silver resistance at levels that could significantly impact wound management. PMID:26014954

  8. Use of the paraffin wax baiting system for identification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Massengale, A R; Ollar, R A; Giordano, S J; Felder, M S; Aronoff, S C

    1999-11-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the primary pathogen among the Pseudomonads and is known for its minimal nutritional requirements, capacity to use paraffin as a sole carbon source, and biofilm formation. Because the ability of Pseudomonads to grow on paraffin is not commonly found among human pathogens and the primary Pseudomonas human pathogen is P. aeruginosa, we studied the adaptation of the paraffin baiting system for the growth and identification of clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa. We also studied the effectiveness of combining a fluorescence assay measuring fluorescein (pyoverdin) production and oxidase test with the paraffin baiting assay for P. aeruginosa speciation. Strains were tested for the capacity to use paraffin as a sole carbon source using the paraffin baiting system with Czapek's minimal salt medium. Of 111 P. aeruginosa clinical isolates tested for using paraffin as a sole carbon source, 45% exhibited growth on paraffin at 24 h and 76.6% exhibited growth on paraffin at 48 h. The ability of the reference strains and clinical isolates were then tested for their ability to associate with the paraffin slide in the presence of an additional carbon source. Of 111 P. aeruginosa clinical isolates tested, 85 strains (76.6%), and 102 (93%) were associated with the paraffin surface at 24 and 48 h. We successfully combined fluorescence and oxidase assays with the paraffin baiting system for identification of P. aeruginosa. The simple and inexpensive paraffin baiting system is a useful method for the identification and study of P. aeruginosa suitable for both the clinical and research laboratory.

  9. Unprecedented Silver Resistance in Clinically Isolated Enterobacteriaceae: Major Implications for Burn and Wound Management.

    PubMed

    Finley, Phillip J; Norton, Rhy; Austin, Cindy; Mitchell, Amber; Zank, Sara; Durham, Paul

    2015-08-01

    Increased utilization of inorganic silver as an adjuncti