Science.gov

Sample records for albicans parasexual cycle

  1. The Parasexual Cycle in Candida albicans Provides an Alternative Pathway to Meiosis for the Formation of Recombinant Strains

    PubMed Central

    Forche, Anja; Alby, Kevin; Schaefer, Dana; Johnson, Alexander D; Berman, Judith; Bennett, Richard J

    2008-01-01

    Candida albicans has an elaborate, yet efficient, mating system that promotes conjugation between diploid a and α strains. The product of mating is a tetraploid a/α cell that must undergo a reductional division to return to the diploid state. Despite the presence of several “meiosis-specific” genes in the C. albicans genome, a meiotic program has not been observed. Instead, tetraploid products of mating can be induced to undergo efficient, random chromosome loss, often producing strains that are diploid, or close to diploid, in ploidy. Using SNP and comparative genome hybridization arrays we have now analyzed the genotypes of products from the C. albicans parasexual cycle. We show that the parasexual cycle generates progeny strains with shuffled combinations of the eight C. albicans chromosomes. In addition, several isolates had undergone extensive genetic recombination between homologous chromosomes, including multiple gene conversion events. Progeny strains exhibited altered colony morphologies on laboratory media, demonstrating that the parasexual cycle generates phenotypic variants of C. albicans. In several fungi, including Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the conserved Spo11 protein is integral to meiotic recombination, where it is required for the formation of DNA double-strand breaks. We show that deletion of SPO11 prevented genetic recombination between homologous chromosomes during the C. albicans parasexual cycle. These findings suggest that at least one meiosis-specific gene has been re-programmed to mediate genetic recombination during the alternative parasexual life cycle of C. albicans. We discuss, in light of the long association of C. albicans with warm-blooded animals, the potential advantages of a parasexual cycle over a conventional sexual cycle. PMID:18462019

  2. Selective Advantages of a Parasexual Cycle for the Yeast Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ningxin; Magee, Beatrice B; Magee, Paul T; Holland, Barbara R; Rodrigues, Ely; Holmes, Ann R; Cannon, Richard D; Schmid, Jan

    2015-08-01

    The yeast Candida albicans can mate. However, in the natural environment mating may generate progeny (fusants) fitter than clonal lineages too rarely to render mating biologically significant: C. albicans has never been observed to mate in its natural environment, the human host, and the population structure of the species is largely clonal. It seems incapable of meiosis, and most isolates are diploid and carry both mating-type-like (MTL) locus alleles, preventing mating. Only chromosome loss or localized loss of heterozygosity can generate mating-competent cells, and recombination of parental alleles is limited. To determine if mating is a biologically significant process, we investigated if mating is under selection. The ratio of nonsynonymous to synonymous mutations in mating genes and the frequency of mutations abolishing mating indicated that mating is under selection. The MTL locus is located on chromosome 5, and when we induced chromosome 5 loss in 10 clinical isolates, most of the resulting MTL-homozygotes could mate with each other, producing fusants. In laboratory culture, a novel environment favoring novel genotypes, some fusants grew faster than their parents, in which loss of heterozygosity had reduced growth rates, and also faster than their MTL-heterozygous ancestors-albeit often only after serial propagation. In a small number of experiments in which co-inoculation of an oral colonization model with MTL-homozygotes yielded small numbers of fusants, their numbers declined over time relative to those of the parents. Overall, our results indicate that mating generates genotypes superior to existing MTL-heterozygotes often enough to be under selection. PMID:26063661

  3. Parasexual Ploidy Reduction Drives Population Heterogeneity Through Random and Transient Aneuploidy in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Hickman, Meleah A.; Paulson, Carsten; Dudley, Aimee; Berman, Judith

    2015-01-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Candida albicans has a large repertoire of mechanisms to generate genetic and phenotypic diversity despite the lack of meiosis in its life cycle. Its parasexual cycle enables shifts in ploidy, which in turn facilitate recombination, aneuploidy, and homozygosis of whole chromosomes to fuel rapid adaptation. Here we show that the tetraploid state potentiates ploidy variation and drives population heterogeneity. In tetraploids, the rate of losing a single heterozygous marker [loss of heterozygosity (LOH)] is elevated ∼30-fold higher than the rate in diploid cells. Furthermore, isolates recovered after selection for LOH of one, two, or three markers were highly aneuploid, with a broad range of karyotypes including strains with a combination of di-, tri-, and tetrasomic chromosomes. We followed the ploidy trajectories for these tetraploid- and aneuploid-derived isolates, using a combination of flow cytometry and double-digestion restriction-site-associated DNA analyzed with next-generation sequencing. Isolates derived from either tetraploid or aneuploid isolates predominately resolved to a stable euploid state. The majority of isolates reduced to the conventional diploid state; however, stable triploid and tetraploid states were observed in ∼30% of the isolates. Notably, aneuploid isolates were more transient than tetraploid isolates, resolving to a euploid state within a few passages. Furthermore, the likelihood that a particular isolate will resolve to the same ploidy state in replicate evolution experiments is only ∼50%, supporting the idea that the chromosome loss process of the parasexual cycle is random and does not follow trajectories involving specific combinations of chromosomes. Together, our results indicate that tetraploid progenitors can produce populations of progeny cells with a high degree of genomic diversity, from altered ploidy to homozygosis, providing an excellent source of genetic variation upon which selection can

  4. Genetics of Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Scherer, S; Magee, P T

    1990-01-01

    Candida albicans is among the most common fungal pathogens. Infections caused by C. albicans and other Candida species can be life threatening in individuals with impaired immune function. Genetic analysis of C. albicans pathogenesis is complicated by the diploid nature of the species and the absence of a known sexual cycle. Through a combination of parasexual techniques and molecular approaches, an effective genetic system has been developed. The close relationship of C. albicans to the more extensively studied Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been of great utility in the isolation of Candida genes and development of the C. albicans DNA transformation system. Molecular methods have been used for clarification of taxonomic relationships and more precise epidemiologic investigations. Analysis of the physical and genetic maps of C. albicans and the closely related Candida stellatoidea has provided much information on the highly fluid nature of the Candida genome. The genetic system is seeing increased application to biological questions such as drug resistance, virulence determinants, and the phenomenon of phenotypic variation. Although most molecular analysis to data has been with C. albicans, the same methodologies are proving highly effective with other Candida species. Images PMID:2215421

  5. Parasexuality in genitourinary investigations: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Genitourinary investigations are performed on a large proportion of middle-aged and older men and the majority undergo investigations for prostate issues. The effects that genitourinary disease can have on men depend on the type of problem, investigations required and treatment including impotence, gynaecomastia and urinary incontinence that have lasting devastating physical, social and psychological effects. The aim was to explore older men’s experience and views of intimate and intrusive genitourinary investigations and specifically to develop hypotheses and theories concerning gender and sexuality issues in intimate genitourinary investigations. Methods Written informed consent was obtained for this qualitative study. Data were collected through one-off, semi-structured interviews involving 15 men in the first year following patient’s last urological procedure. Initially, multiple themes were identified and when analysed further concepts were repeatedly present. As the urological investigations were limited to men, gender and sexuality became prominent issues in the data. Results On analysis, the term parasexuality appeared to explain the dynamic of the situation. Parasexuality is a modified form of sexuality which is channelled and limited to maintain propriety. This was not expressed as sexuality in its overt, explicit sense, but instead a type of covert sexuality where professional boundaries are maintained but nonetheless undercurrents remain. This managed version of sexuality created a common currency by which interactions between staff and patients could take place safely. Feeding into parasexuality were gender role stereotypes and for some of the participants this reflected their own experience, context, historical and cultural norms. Intimate contact in the form of exposure and handling of the participants' genitalia during the investigations particularly challenged the boundaries of parasexuality. In order to remain parasexual, many of

  6. Evidence of parasexual activity in "asexual amoebae" Cochliopodium spp. (Amoebozoa): extensive cellular and nuclear fusion.

    PubMed

    Tekle, Yonas I; Anderson, O Roger; Lecky, Ariel F

    2014-09-01

    The majority of microbial eukaryotes have long been considered asexual, though new evidence indicates sex, or sexual-like (parasexual) behaviors that deviate from the usual union of two gametes, among other variant aspects. Over a dozen amoebozoans are implicated to have sexual stages. However, the exact mechanism by which sex occurs in these lineages remains elusive. This is mainly due to the diverse quality and cryptic nature of their life cycle. In this study we present evidence of some previously unreported aspects of the life cycle of an amoeba, Cochliopodium, that undergoes unusual intraspecific interactions using light microscopy and immunocytochemistry. Similar to other amoebozoans, Cochliopodium, is considered asexual with no published reports of sex or parasexuality. We also investigated environmental conditions that govern the observed intraspecific interactions. Both light microscopic and immunocytochemistry evidence demonstrates Cochliopodium undergoes cellular fusion (plasmogamy) and nuclear fusion (karyogamy). Large plasmodia eventually undergo karyogamy and contain large fused, polyploid, nuclei. These are observed to fragment, subsequently, by karyotomy (nuclear fission) and cytoplasmic fission to yield uninucleated amoebae. This process could lead to a non-meiotic, parasexual exchange of chromosomes in Cochliopodium. These findings strongly suggest that Cochliopodium is involved in parasexual activity and should no longer be considered strictly asexual. PMID:25168314

  7. Terpenoids inhibit Candida albicans growth by affecting membrane integrity and arrest of cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Zore, Gajanan B; Thakre, Archana D; Jadhav, Sitaram; Karuppayil, S Mohan

    2011-10-15

    Anti-Candida potential of six terpenoids were evaluated in this study against various isolates of Candida albicans (n=39) and non-C. albicans (n=9) that are differentially susceptible to fluconazole. All the six terpenoids tested, showed excellent activity and were equally effective against isolates of Candida sps., tested in this study. Linalool and citral were the most effective ones, inhibiting all the isolates at ≤0.064% (v/v). Five among the six terpenoids tested were fungicidal. Time dependent kill curve assay showed that MFCs of linalool and eugenol were highly toxic to C. albicans, killing 99.9% inoculum within seven min of exposure, while that of citronellal, linalyl acetate and citral required 15min, 1h and 2h, respectively. FIC index values (Linalool - 0.140, benzyl benzoate - 0.156, eugenol - 0.265, citral - 0.281 and 0.312 for linalyl acetate and citronellal) and isobologram obtained by checker board assay showed that all the six terpenoids tested exhibit excellent synergistic activity with fluconazole against a fluconazole resistant strain of C. albicans. Terpenoids tested arrested C. albicans cells at different phases of the cell cycle i.e. linalool and LA at G1, citral and citronellal at S phase and benzyl benzoate at G2-M phase and induced apoptosis. Linalool, citral, citronellal and benzyl benzoate caused more than 50% inhibition of germ tube induction at 0.008%, while eugenol and LA required 0.032 and 0.016% (v/v) concentrations, respectively. MICs of all the terpenoids for the C. albicans growth were non toxic to HeLa cells. Terpenoids tested exhibited excellent activity against C. albicans yeast and hyphal form growth at the concentrations that are non toxic to HeLa cells. Terpenoids tested in this study may find use in antifungal chemotherapy, not only as antifungal agents but also as synergistic agents along with conventional drugs like fluconazole. PMID:21596542

  8. Role of a Candida albicans Nrm1/Whi5 homologue in cell cycle gene expression and DNA replication stress response.

    PubMed

    Ofir, Ayala; Hofmann, Kay; Weindling, Esther; Gildor, Tsvia; Barker, Katherine S; Rogers, P David; Kornitzer, Daniel

    2012-05-01

    To explore cell cycle regulation in the dimorphic fungus Candida albicans, we identified and characterized CaNrm1, a C. albicans homologue of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Whi5 and Nrm1 transcription inhibitors that, analogous to mammalian Rb, regulate the cell cycle transcription programme during the G1 phase. CaNRM1 is able to complement the phenotypes of both whi5 and nrm1 mutants in S. cerevisiae. In C. albicans, global transcription analysis of the CaNRM1 deletion mutant reveals a preferential induction of G1- and G1/S-specific genes. CaNrm1 interacts genetically with the C. albicans MBF functional homologue, and physically with its subunit CaSwi4. Similar to S. cerevisiae Whi5, CaNrm1 subcellular localization oscillates with the cell cycle between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. Deletion of CaNRM1 further results in increased resistance to hydroxyurea, an inhibitor of DNA replication; analysis of the expression of ribonucleotide reductase, the target of hydroxyurea, suggests that its transcriptional induction in response to hydroxyurea is regulated via CaNrm1, and biochemical analysis shows that hydroxyurea causes disruption of the interaction of CaNrm1 with CaSwi4. Furthermore, induction of the hyphal-specific genes is dampened under certain conditions in the Canrm1(-/-) mutant, suggesting that the cell cycle transcription programme can influence the morphogenetic transcription programme of C. albicans. PMID:22463761

  9. SLA2 mutations cause SWE1-mediated cell cycle phenotypes in Candida albicans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Gale, Cheryl A; Leonard, Michelle D; Finley, Kenneth R; Christensen, Leah; McClellan, Mark; Abbey, Darren; Kurischko, Cornelia; Bensen, Eric; Tzafrir, Iris; Kauffman, Sarah; Becker, Jeff; Berman, Judith

    2009-12-01

    The early endocytic patch protein Sla2 is important for morphogenesis and growth rates in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans, but the mechanism that connects these processes is not clear. Here we report that growth defects in cells lacking CaSLA2 or ScSLA2 are associated with a cell cycle delay that is influenced by Swe1, a morphogenesis checkpoint kinase. To establish how Swe1 monitors Sla2 function, we compared actin organization and cell cycle dynamics in strains lacking other components of early endocytic patches (Sla1 and Abp1) with those in strains lacking Sla2. Only sla2 strains had defects in actin cables, a known trigger of the morphogenesis checkpoint, yet all three strains exhibited Swe1-dependent phenotypes. Thus, Swe1 appears to monitor actin patch in addition to actin cable function. Furthermore, Swe1 contributed to virulence in a mouse model of disseminated candidiasis, implying a role for the morphogenesis checkpoint during the pathogenesis of C. albicans infections. PMID:19778960

  10. Parasexual Genetic Analysis of the Cellular Slime Mold DICTYOSTELIUM DISCOIDEUM A3

    PubMed Central

    Rothman, Frank G.; Alexander, Ellen T.

    1975-01-01

    Haploid strain A3 of the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum is valuable for biochemical studies because it is capable of axenic growth. Mutants of A3 temperature-sensitive for growth and resistant to the drugs cycloheximide, acriflavin, or methanol were isolated.—Heterozygous diploid recombinants, formed at low frequency by cell and nuclear fusion, were isolated by selecting temperature-resistant progeny of mixed cultures of two nonallelic temperature-sensitive haploids (Loomis 1969). Each drug-resistant mutation was found to be recessive. Two independently isolated methanol-resistant mutants were in one complementation group.—Diploids of A3 heterozygous for drug resistance formed drug-resistant segregants with a frequency of approximately 10-4. Segregants selected for resistance to a single drug were either haploid or diploid; the fraction which was haploid varied from 0.11 to 0.86, depending on the selected marker. Segregants selected for resistance to two or three drugs were almost all haploid.—Using this parasexual cycle of diploid formation and haploidization, linkage of these temperature-sensitive and drug-resistance mutations to each other and to mutations studied by Katz and Sussman (1972) and by Williams, Kessin and Newell (1974b) was analyzed. The methanol-resistant mutants were found to be partially resistant to acriflavin, and unlinked to the mutant selected for acriflavin resistance, which was methanol-sensitive. Of the expected seven linkage groups in D. discoideum, five, and a possible sixth, have been marked.—Linkage analysis of a mutant abnormal in morphogenesis showed that its phenotype results from two unlinked chromosomal mutations. PMID:1238305

  11. Mechanism of antifungal activity of antimicrobial peptide APP, a cell-penetrating peptide derivative, against Candida albicans: intracellular DNA binding and cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Li, Lirong; Sun, Jin; Xia, Shufang; Tian, Xu; Cheserek, Maureen Jepkorir; Le, Guowei

    2016-04-01

    We investigated the antifungal properties and anti-candidal mechanism of antimicrobial peptide APP. The minimum inhibitory concentration of APP was 8 μM against Candida albicans and Aspeogillus flavus, the concentration against Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Cryptococcus neoformans was 16 μM, while 32 μM inhibited Aspergilla niger and Trichopyton rubrum. APP caused slight depolarization (12.32 ± 0.87%) of the membrane potential of intact C. albicans cells when it exerted its anti-candidal activity and only caused 21.52 ± 0.48% C. albicans cell membrane damage. APP interacted with cell wall membrane, caused potassium efflux and nucleotide leakage. However, confocal fluorescence microscopy experiment and flow cytometry confirmed that FITC-labeled APP penetrated C. albicans cell membrane with 52.31 ± 1.88% cell-penetrating efficiency and accumulated in the cytoplasm. Then, APP interact with C. albicans genomic DNA and completely suppressed DNA migration above weight ratio (peptide/DNA) of 2, and significantly arrested cell cycles during the S-phase (S-phase cell population was 27.09 ± 0.73%, p < 0.05) after penetrating the cell membrane. Results indicated that APP kills C. albicans for efficient cell-penetrating efficiency, strong DNA-binding affinity and significant physiological changes inducing S-phase arrest in intracellular environment. PMID:26743655

  12. Cell Cycle-Independent Phospho-Regulation of Fkh2 during Hyphal Growth Regulates Candida albicans Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Greig, Jamie A.; Sudbery, Ian M.; Richardson, Jonathan P.; Naglik, Julian R.; Wang, Yue; Sudbery, Peter E.

    2015-01-01

    The opportunistic human fungal pathogen, Candida albicans, undergoes morphological and transcriptional adaptation in the switch from commensalism to pathogenicity. Although previous gene-knockout studies have identified many factors involved in this transformation, it remains unclear how these factors are regulated to coordinate the switch. Investigating morphogenetic control by post-translational phosphorylation has generated important regulatory insights into this process, especially focusing on coordinated control by the cyclin-dependent kinase Cdc28. Here we have identified the Fkh2 transcription factor as a regulatory target of both Cdc28 and the cell wall biosynthesis kinase Cbk1, in a role distinct from its conserved function in cell cycle progression. In stationary phase yeast cells 2D gel electrophoresis shows that there is a diverse pool of Fkh2 phospho-isoforms. For a short window on hyphal induction, far before START in the cell cycle, the phosphorylation profile is transformed before reverting to the yeast profile. This transformation does not occur when stationary phase cells are reinoculated into fresh medium supporting yeast growth. Mass spectrometry and mutational analyses identified residues phosphorylated by Cdc28 and Cbk1. Substitution of these residues with non-phosphorylatable alanine altered the yeast phosphorylation profile and abrogated the characteristic transformation to the hyphal profile. Transcript profiling of the phosphorylation site mutant revealed that the hyphal phosphorylation profile is required for the expression of genes involved in pathogenesis, host interaction and biofilm formation. We confirmed that these changes in gene expression resulted in corresponding defects in pathogenic processes. Furthermore, we identified that Fkh2 interacts with the chromatin modifier Pob3 in a phosphorylation-dependent manner, thereby providing a possible mechanism by which the phosphorylation of Fkh2 regulates its specificity. Thus, we have

  13. Baicalin prevents Candida albicans infections via increasing its apoptosis rate

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Shulong; Fu, Yingyuan Wu, Xiuzhen; Zhou, Zhixing; Xu, Jing; Zeng, Xiaoping; Kuang, Nanzhen; Zeng, Yurong

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • Baicalin increases the ratio of the G0/G1 stages and C. albicans apoptosis. • Baicalin decreases the proliferation index of C. albicans. • Baicalin inhibits the biosynthesis of DNA, RNA and protein in C. albicans. • Baicalin depresses Succinate Dehydrogenase and Ca{sup 2+}–Mg{sup 2+} ATPase in C. albicans. • Baicalin increases the endocytic free Ca{sup 2+} concentration in C. albicans. - Abstract: Background: These experiments were employed to explore the mechanisms underlying baicalin action on Candida albicans. Methodology and principal findings: We detected the baicalin inhibition effects on three isotope-labeled precursors of {sup 3}H-UdR, {sup 3}H-TdR and {sup 3}H-leucine incorporation into C. albicans using the isotope incorporation technology. The activities of Succinate Dehydrogenase (SDH), cytochrome oxidase (CCO) and Ca{sup 2+}–Mg{sup 2+} ATPase, cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} concentration, the cell cycle and apoptosis, as well as the ultrastructure of C.albicans were also tested. We found that baicalin inhibited {sup 3}H-UdR, {sup 3}H-TdR and {sup 3}H-leucine incorporation into C.albicans (P < 0.005). The activities of the SDH and Ca{sup 2+}–Mg{sup 2+} ATPase of C.albicans in baicalin groups were lower than those in control group (P < 0.05). Ca{sup 2+} concentrations of C. albicans in baicalin groups were much higher than those in control group (P < 0.05). The ratio of C.albicans at the G0/G1 stage increased in baicalin groups in dose dependent manner (P < 0.01). There were a significant differences in the apoptosis rate of C.albicans between baicalin and control groups (P < 0.01). After 12–48 h incubation with baicalin (1 mg/ml), C. albicans shown to be markedly damaged under transmission electron micrographs. Innovation and significance: Baicalin can increase the apoptosis rate of C. albicans. These effects of Baicalin may involved in its inhibiting the activities of the SDH and Ca{sup 2+}–Mg{sup 2+} ATPase, increasing

  14. Farnesol-induced apoptosis in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Shirtliff, Mark E; Krom, Bastiaan P; Meijering, Roelien A M; Peters, Brian M; Zhu, Jingsong; Scheper, Mark A; Harris, Megan L; Jabra-Rizk, Mary Ann

    2009-06-01

    Farnesol, a precursor in the isoprenoid/sterol pathway, was recently identified as a quorum-sensing molecule produced by the fungal pathogen Candida albicans. Farnesol is involved in the inhibition of germination and biofilm formation by C. albicans and can be cytotoxic at certain concentrations. In addition, we have shown that farnesol can trigger apoptosis in mammalian cells via the classical apoptotic pathways. In order to elucidate the mechanism behind farnesol cytotoxicity in C. albicans, the response to farnesol was investigated, using proteomic analysis. Global protein expression profiles demonstrated significant changes in protein expression resulting from farnesol exposure. Among the downregulated proteins were those involved in metabolism, glycolysis, protein synthesis, and mitochondrial electron transport and the respiratory chain, whereas proteins involved in folding, protection against environmental and oxidative stress, actin cytoskeleton reorganization, and apoptosis were upregulated. Cellular changes that accompany apoptosis (regulated cell death) were further analyzed using fluorescent microscopy and gene expression analysis. The results indicated reactive oxygen species accumulation, mitochondrial degradation, and positive terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL) in the farnesol-exposed cells concurrent with increased expression of antioxidant-encoding and drug response genes. More importantly, the results demonstrated farnesol-induced upregulation of the caspase gene MCA1 and the intracellular presence of activated caspases. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that farnesol promotes apoptosis in C. albicans through caspase activation, implying an important physiological role for farnesol in the fungal cell life cycle with important implications for adaptation and survival. PMID:19364863

  15. Candida albicans clades.

    PubMed

    Soll, David R; Pujol, Claude

    2003-10-24

    DNA fingerprinting with the complex probe Ca3 has revealed the following five Candida albicans clades: group I, group II, group III, group SA and group E. These groups exhibit geographical specificity. Group SA is relatively specific (i.e., highly enriched) to South Africa, group E is relatively specific to Europe, and group II is absent in the Southwest USA and South America. The maintenance of deep-rooted clades side by side in the same geographical locale and the apparent absence of subclade structure suggest little recombination between clades, but higher rates of recombination within clades. Exclusive 5-fluorocytosine resistance in the majority of group I isolates reinforces the above conclusions on recombination, and demonstrates that clades differ phenotypically. The ramifications of these findings with regard to pathogenesis are discussed. In particular, these findings lay to rest the idea that one strain represents all strains of C. albicans, support the need for a worldwide analysis of population structure and clade-specific phenotypic characteristics, and demonstrate that in the future, pathogenic characteristics must be analyzed in representatives from all five clades. PMID:14556989

  16. Candida albicans commensalism in the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Neville, B Anne; d'Enfert, Christophe; Bougnoux, Marie-Elisabeth

    2015-11-01

    Candida albicans is a polymorphic yeast species that often forms part of the commensal gastrointestinal mycobiota of healthy humans. It is also an important opportunistic pathogen. A tripartite interaction involving C. albicans, the resident microbiota and host immunity maintains C. albicans in its commensal form. The influence of each of these factors on C. albicans carriage is considered herein, with particular focus on the mycobiota and the approaches used to study it, models of gastrointestinal colonization by C. albicans, the C. albicans genes and phenotypes that are necessary for commensalism and the host factors that influence C. albicans carriage. PMID:26347504

  17. Skin Immunity to Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Kashem, Sakeen W; Kaplan, Daniel H

    2016-07-01

    Candida albicans is a dimorphic commensal fungus that colonizes healthy human skin, mucosa, and the reproductive tract. C. albicans is also a predominantly opportunistic fungal pathogen, leading to disease manifestations such as disseminated candidiasis and chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (CMC). The differing host susceptibilities for the sites of C. albicans infection have revealed tissue compartmentalization with tailoring of immune responses based on the site of infection. Furthermore, extensive studies of host genetics in rare cases of CMC have identified conserved genetic pathways involved in immune recognition and the response to the extracellular pathogen. We focus here on human and mouse skin as a site of C. albicans infection, and we review established and newly discovered insights into the cellular pathways that promote cutaneous antifungal immunity. PMID:27178391

  18. Mucosal biofilms of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Shantanu; Mitchell, Aaron P

    2011-08-01

    Biofilms are microbial communities that form on surfaces and are embedded in an extracellular matrix. C. albicans forms pathogenic mucosal biofilms that are evoked by changes in host immunity or mucosal ecology. Mucosal surfaces are inhabited by many microbial species; hence these biofilms are polymicrobial. Several recent studies have applied paradigms of biofilm analysis to study mucosal C. albicans infections. These studies reveal that the Bcr1 transcription factor is a master regulator of C. albicans biofilm formation under diverse conditions, though the most relevant Bcr1 target genes can vary with the biofilm niche. An important determinant of mucosal biofilm formation is the interaction with host defenses. Finally, studies of interactions between bacterial species and C. albicans provide insight into the communication mechanisms that endow polymicrobial biofilms with unique properties. PMID:21741878

  19. DNA content, kinetic complexity, and the ploidy question in Candida albicans

    SciTech Connect

    Riggsby, W.S.; Torres-Bauza, L.J.; Wills, J.W.; Townes, T.M.

    1982-07-01

    Candida albicans is a dimorphic fungus that is pathogenic for humans. No sexual cycle has been reported for this fungus, and earlier reports have differed on whether typical strains of C. albicans are haploid or diploid. Previous estimates of the DNA content of C. albicans varied by one order of magnitude. The authors used three independent methods to measure the kinetic complexity of the single-copy DNA from a typical strain of C. albicans (strain H317) to determine the DNA content per haploid genote; they obtained values of 15 and 20 fg per cell by using S1 nuclease and hydroxyapatite assays, respectively. Optical assays for DNA reassociation kinetics, although not definitive in themselves, yielded values in this range. Chemical measurements of the DNA content of several typical strains, including strain H317, yielded values clustered about a mean of 37 fg per cell. They concluded that these strains are diploid.

  20. Fluconazole Assists Berberine To Kill Fluconazole-Resistant Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Li, De-Dong; Xu, Yi; Zhang, Da-Zhi; Quan, Hua; Mylonakis, Eleftherios; Hu, Dan-Dan; Li, Ming-Bang; Zhao, Lan-Xue; Zhu, Liang-Hua

    2013-01-01

    It was found in our previous study that berberine (BBR) and fluconazole (FLC) used concomitantly exhibited a synergism against FLC-resistant Candida albicans in vitro. The aim of the present study was to clarify how BBR and FLC worked synergistically and the underlying mechanism. Antifungal time-kill curves indicated that the synergistic effect of the two drugs was BBR dose dependent rather than FLC dose dependent. In addition, we found that BBR accumulated in C. albicans cells, especially in the nucleus, and resulted in cell cycle arrest and significant change in the transcription of cell cycle-related genes. Besides BBR, other DNA intercalators, including methylene blue, sanguinarine, and acridine orange, were all found to synergize with FLC against FLC-resistant C. albicans. Detection of intracellular BBR accumulation by fluorescence measurement showed that FLC played a role in increasing intracellular BBR concentration, probably due to its effect in disrupting the fungal cell membrane. Similar to the case with FLC, other antifungal agents acting on the cell membrane were able to synergize with BBR. Interestingly, we found that the efflux of intracellular BBR was FLC independent but strongly glucose dependent and associated with the drug efflux pump Cdr2p. These results suggest that BBR plays a major antifungal role in the synergism of FLC and BBR, while FLC plays a role in increasing the intracellular BBR concentration. PMID:24060867

  1. Hyphal formation of Candida albicans is controlled by electron transfer system

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Toshihiko . E-mail: twatanab@tohoku-pharm.ac.jp; Ogasawara, Ayako; Mikami, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Tatsuji

    2006-09-15

    Most Candida albicans cells cultured in RPMI1640 medium at 37 deg. C grow in hyphal form in aerobic conditions, but they grow in yeast form in anaerobic conditions. The hyphal growth of C. albicans was inhibited in glucose-deficient conditions. Malonic acid, an inhibitor of succinate dehydrogenase, enhanced the yeast proliferation of C. albicans, indicating that the hyphal-formation signal was derived from the glycolysis system and the signal was transmitted to the electron transfer system via the citric acid cycle. Thenoyl trifluoro acetone (TTFA), an inhibitor of the signal transmission between complex II and Co Q, significantly inhibited the hyphal growth of C. albicans. Antimycin, KCN, and oligomycin, inhibitors of complex III, IV, and V, respectively, did not inhibit the hyphal growth of C. albicans. The production of mRNAs for the hyphal formation signal was completely inhibited in anaerobic conditions. These results indicate that the electron transfer system functions upstream of the RAS1 signal pathway and activates the expression of the hyphal formation signal. Since the electron transfer system is inactivated in anaerobic conditions, C. albicans grew in yeast form in this condition.

  2. Mixed biofilms formed by C. albicans and non-albicans species: a study of microbial interactions.

    PubMed

    Santos, Jéssica Diane dos; Piva, Elisabete; Vilela, Simone Furgeri Godinho; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso; Junqueira, Juliana Campos

    2016-01-01

    Most Candida infections are related to microbial biofilms often formed by the association of different species. The objective of this study was to evaluate the interactions between Candida albicans and non-albicans species in biofilms formed in vitro. The non-albicans species studied were:Candida tropicalis, Candida glabrata and Candida krusei. Single and mixed biofilms (formed by clinical isolates of C. albicans and non-albicans species) were developed from standardized suspensions of each strain (10(7) cells/mL), on flat-bottom 96-well microtiter plates for 48 hour. These biofilms were analyzed by counting colony-forming units (CFU/mL) in Candida HiChrome agar and by determining cell viability, using the XTT 2,3-bis (2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulphophenyl)-5-[(phenylamino) carbonyl]-2H-tetrazolium hydroxide colorimetric assay. The results for both the CFU/mL count and the XTT colorimetric assay showed that all the species studied were capable of forming high levels of in vitro biofilm. The number of CFU/mL and the metabolic activity of C. albicans were reduced in mixed biofilms with non-albicans species, as compared with a single C. albicans biofilm. Among the species tested, C. krusei exerted the highest inhibitory action against C. albicans. In conclusion, C. albicans established antagonistic interactions with non-albicans Candida species in mixed biofilms. PMID:26981754

  3. Endothelial Cell Stimulation by Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Quynh T.; Filler, Scott G.

    2013-01-01

    The opportunistic fungal pathogen, Candida albicans, enters the bloodstream and causes hematogenously disseminated infection in hospitalized patients. During the initiation of a hematogenously disseminated infection, endothelial cells are one of the first host cells to come in contact with C. albicans. Endothelial cells can significantly influence the local host response to C. albicans by expressing leukocyte adhesion molecules and pro-inflammatory cytokines. Thus, it is of interest to investigate the response of endothelial cells to C. albicans in vitro. We describe the use of real-time PCR and enzyme immunoassays to measure the effects of C. albicans on the endothelial cell production of E-selectin and tumor necrosis factor α in vitro. PMID:19089392

  4. Candida albicans, plasticity and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Poulain, Daniel

    2015-06-01

    The yeast Candida albicans has emerged as a major public health problem during the past two decades. The spectrum of diseases caused by this species ranges from vaginal infections, which affect up to 75% of the women at least once in their lifetime, to deep infections in hospitalized patients which lead to high morbidity and mortality rates. Candida albicans may also play a role in the persistence or worsening of some chronic inflammatory bowel diseases. Active research is now improving our understanding of the molecular mechanisms and genetic factors in the yeast and its host which influence the development of disease. Despite these advances and the availability of a more extensive therapeutic arsenal, current progress in the control of nosocomial infections due to Candida remains limited, mainly due to the difficulties in diagnosing these infections. The biologist has a key role to play in establishing a dialogue with the clinician in order to identify the saprophyte/pathogen transition in patients as early as possible. This review provides a quick synopsis of the modern concepts of Candida pathogenesis with some representative examples illustrating the specifics traits of this yeast in terms of pathogenic adaptation. PMID:23962107

  5. Mucins Suppress Virulence Traits of Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Kavanaugh, Nicole L.; Zhang, Angela Q.; Nobile, Clarissa J.; Johnson, Alexander D.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Candida albicans is the most prevalent fungal pathogen of humans, causing a variety of diseases ranging from superficial mucosal infections to deep-seated systemic invasions. Mucus, the gel that coats all wet epithelial surfaces, accommodates C. albicans as part of the normal microbiota, where C. albicans resides asymptomatically in healthy humans. Through a series of in vitro experiments combined with gene expression analysis, we show that mucin biopolymers, the main gel-forming constituents of mucus, induce a new oval-shaped morphology in C. albicans in which a range of genes related to adhesion, filamentation, and biofilm formation are downregulated. We also show that corresponding traits are suppressed, rendering C. albicans impaired in forming biofilms on a range of different synthetic surfaces and human epithelial cells. Our data suggest that mucins can manipulate C. albicans physiology, and we hypothesize that they are key environmental signals for retaining C. albicans in the host-compatible, commensal state. PMID:25389175

  6. Coaggregation of Candida albicans, Actinomyces naeslundii and Streptococcus mutans is Candida albicans strain dependent.

    PubMed

    Arzmi, Mohd Hafiz; Dashper, Stuart; Catmull, Deanne; Cirillo, Nicola; Reynolds, Eric C; McCullough, Michael

    2015-08-01

    Microbial interactions are necessarily associated with the development of polymicrobial oral biofilms. The objective of this study was to determine the coaggregation of eight strains of Candida albicans with Actinomyces naeslundii and Streptococcus mutans. In autoaggregation assays, C. albicans strains were grown in RPMI-1640 and artificial saliva medium (ASM) whereas bacteria were grown in heart infusion broth. C. albicans, A. naeslundii and S. mutans were suspended to give 10(6), 10(7) and 10(8) cells mL(-1) respectively, in coaggregation buffer followed by a 1 h incubation. The absorbance difference at 620 nm (ΔAbs) between 0 h and 1 h was recorded. To study coaggregation, the same protocol was used, except combinations of microorganisms were incubated together. The mean ΔAbs% of autoaggregation of the majority of RPMI-1640-grown C. albicans was higher than in ASM grown. Coaggregation of C. albicans with A. naeslundii and/or S. mutans was variable among C. albicans strains. Scanning electron microscopy images showed that A. naeslundii and S. mutans coaggregated with C. albicans in dual- and triculture. In conclusion, the coaggregation of C. albicans, A. naeslundii and S. mutans is C. albicans strain dependent. PMID:26054855

  7. Human salivary histatin 5 fungicidal action does not induce programmed cell death pathways in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Wunder, David; Dong, Jin; Baev, Didi; Edgerton, Mira

    2004-01-01

    Salivary histatins (Hsts) are potent candidacidal proteins that induce a nonlytic form of cell death in Candida albicans accompanied by loss of mean cell volume, cell cycle arrest, and elevation of intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Since these phenotypes are often markers of programmed cell death and apoptosis, we investigated whether other classical markers of apoptosis, including generation of intracellular ROS and protein carbonyl groups, chromosomal fragmentation (laddering), and cytochrome c release, are found in Hst 5-mediated cell death. Increased intracellular levels of ROS in C. albicans were detected in cells both following exogenous application of Hst 5 and following intracellular expression of Hst 5. However, Western blot analysis failed to detect specifically increased protein carbonylation in Hst 5-treated cells. There was no evidence of chromosomal laddering and no cytochrome c release was observed following treatment of C. albicans mitochondria with Hst 5. Superoxide dismutase enzymes of C. albicans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae provide essential protection against oxidative stress; therefore, we tested whether SOD mutants have increased susceptibility to Hst 5, as expected if ROS mediate fungicidal effects. Cell survival of S. cerevisiae SOD1/SOD2 mutants and C. albicans SOD1 mutants following Hst 5 treatment (31 micro M) was indistinguishable from the survival of wild-type cells treated with Hst 5. We conclude that ROS may not play a direct role in fungicidal activity and that Hst 5 does not initiate apoptosis or programmed cell death pathways. PMID:14693527

  8. GENETIC CONTROL OF CANDIDA ALBICANS BIOFILM DEVELOPMENT

    PubMed Central

    Finkel, Jonathan S.; Mitchell, Aaron P.

    2014-01-01

    Preface Candida species cause frequent infections due to their ability to form biofilms – surface-associated microbial communities – primarily on implanted medical devices. Increasingly, mechanistic studies have identified the gene products that participate directly in Candida albicans biofilm formation, as well as the regulatory circuitry and networks that control their expression and activity. These studies have revealed new mechanisms and signals that govern C. albicans biofilm formation and associated drug resistance, thus providing biological insight and therapeutic foresight. PMID:21189476

  9. Candida albicans Biofilms and Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nobile, Clarissa J.; Johnson, Alexander D.

    2016-01-01

    In humans, microbial cells (including bacteria, archaea, and fungi) greatly outnumber host cells. Candida albicans is the most prevalent fungal species of the human microbiota; this species asymptomatically colonizes many areas of the body, particularly the gastrointestinal and genitourinary tracts of healthy individuals. Alterations in host immunity, stress, resident microbiota, and other factors can lead to C. albicans overgrowth, causing a wide range of infections, from superficial mucosal to hematogenously disseminated candidiasis. To date, most studies of C. albicans have been carried out in suspension cultures; however, the medical impact of C. albicans (like that of many other microorganisms) depends on its ability to thrive as a biofilm, a closely packed community of cells. Biofilms are notorious for forming on implanted medical devices, including catheters, pacemakers, dentures, and prosthetic joints, which provide a surface and sanctuary for biofilm growth. C. albicans biofilms are intrinsically resistant to conventional antifungal therapeutics, the host immune system, and other environmental perturbations, making biofilm-based infections a significant clinical challenge. Here, we review our current knowledge of biofilms formed by C. albicans and closely related fungal species. PMID:26488273

  10. Beyond Candida albicans: Mechanisms of immunity to non-albicans Candida species.

    PubMed

    Whibley, Natasha; Gaffen, Sarah L

    2015-11-01

    The fungal genus Candida encompasses numerous species that inhabit a variety of hosts, either as commensal microbes and/or pathogens. Candida species are a major cause of fungal infections, yet to date there are no vaccines against Candida or indeed any other fungal pathogen. Our knowledge of immunity to Candida mainly comes from studies on Candida albicans, the most frequent species associated with disease. However, non-albicans Candida (NAC) species also cause disease and their prevalence is increasing. Although research into immunity to NAC species is still at an early stage, it is becoming apparent that immunity to C. albicans differs in important ways from non-albicans species, with important implications for treatment, therapy and predicted demographic susceptibility. This review will discuss the current understanding of immunity to NAC species in the context of immunity to C. albicans, and highlight as-yet unanswered questions. PMID:26276374

  11. Urinary tract infections and Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Behzadi, Payam; Behzadi, Elham

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Urinary tract candidiasis is known as the most frequent nosocomial fungal infection worldwide. Candida albicans is the most common cause of nosocomial fungal urinary tract infections; however, a rapid change in the distribution of Candida species is undergoing. Simultaneously, the increase of urinary tract candidiasis has led to the appearance of antifungal resistant Candida species. In this review, we have an in depth look into Candida albicans uropathogenesis and distribution of the three most frequent Candida species contributing to urinary tract candidiasis in different countries around the world. Material and methods For writing this review, Google Scholar –a scholarly search engine– (http://scholar.google.com/) and PubMed database (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/) were used. The most recently published original articles and reviews of literature relating to the first three Candida species causing urinary tract infections in different countries and the pathogenicity of Candida albicans were selected and studied. Results Although some studies show rapid changes in the uropathogenesis of Candida species causing urinary tract infections in some countries, Candida albicans is still the most important cause of candidal urinary tract infections. Conclusions Despite the ranking of Candida albicans as the dominant species for urinary tract candidiasis, specific changes have occurred in some countries. At this time, it is important to continue the surveillance related to Candida species causing urinary tract infections to prevent, control and treat urinary tract candidiasis in future. PMID:25914847

  12. A Candida albicans PeptideAtlas

    PubMed Central

    Vialas, Vital; Sun, Zhi; Penha, Carla Verónica Loureiro y; Carrascal, Montserrat; Abian, Joaquin; Monteoliva, Lucía; Deutsch, Eric W.; Aebersold, Ruedi; Moritz, Robert L.; Gil, Concha

    2013-01-01

    Candida albicans public proteomic data sets, though growing steadily in the last few years, still have a very limited presence in online repositories. We report here the creation of a C. albicans PeptideAtlas comprising near 22000 distinct peptides at a 0.24 % False Discovery Rate (FDR) that account for over 2500 canonical proteins at a 1.2% FDR. Based on data from 16 experiments, we attained coverage of 41% of the C.albicans open reading frame sequences (ORFs) in the database used for the searches. This PeptideAtlas provides several useful features, including comprehensive protein and peptide-centered search capabilities and visualization tools that establish a solid basis for the study of basic biological mechanisms key to virulence and pathogenesis such as dimorphism, adherence, and apoptosis. Further, it is a valuable resource for the selection of candidate proteotypic peptides for targeted proteomic experiments via selected reaction monitoring (SRM) or SWATH-MS. PMID:23811049

  13. Antifungal Activity of Fused Mannich Ketones Triggers an Oxidative Stress Response and Is Cap1-Dependent in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Rossignol, Tristan; Kocsis, Béla; Bouquet, Orsolya; Kustos, Ildikó; Kilár, Ferenc; Nyul, Adrien; Jakus, Péter B.; Rajbhandari, Kshitij; Prókai, László; d’Enfert, Christophe; Lóránd, Tamás

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the antifungal activity of fused Mannich ketone (FMK) congeners and two of their aminoalcohol derivatives. In particular, FMKs with five-membered saturated rings were shown to have minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC90s) ranging from 0.8 to 6 µg/mL toward C. albicans and the closely related C. parapsilosis and C. krusei while having reduced efficacy toward C. glabrata and almost no efficacy against Aspergillus sp. Transcript profiling of C. albicans cells exposed for 30 or 60 min to 2-(morpholinomethyl)-1-indanone, a representative FMK with a five-membered saturated ring, revealed a transcriptional response typical of oxidative stress and similar to that of a C. albicans Cap1 transcriptional activator. Consistently, C. albicans lacking the CAP1 gene was hypersensitive to this FMK, while C. albicans strains overexpressing CAP1 had decreased sensitivity to 2-(morpholinomethyl)-1-indanone. Quantitative structure–activity relationship studies revealed a correlation of antifungal potency and the energy of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of FMKs and unsaturated Mannich ketones thereby implicating redox cycling-mediated oxidative stress as a mechanism of action. This conclusion was further supported by the loss of antifungal activity upon conversion of representative FMKs to aminoalcohols that were unable to participate in redox cycles. PMID:23646117

  14. Comparison of albicans vs. non-albicans candidemia in French intensive care units

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Candidemia raises numerous therapeutic issues for intensive care physicians. Epidemiological data that could guide the choice of initial therapy are still required. This analysis sought to compare the characteristics of intensive care unit (ICU) patients with candidemia due to non-albicans Candida species with those of ICU patients with candidemia due to Candida albicans. Methods A prospective, observational, multicenter, French study was conducted from October 2005 to May 2006. Patients exhibiting candidemia developed during ICU stay and exclusively due either to one or more non-albicans Candida species or to C. albicans were selected. The data collected included patient characteristics on ICU admission and at the onset of candidemia. Results Among the 136 patients analyzed, 78 (57.4%) had candidemia caused by C. albicans. These patients had earlier onset of infection (11.1 ± 14.2 days after ICU admission vs. 17.4 ± 17.7, p = 0.02), higher severity scores on ICU admission (SOFA: 10.4 ± 4.7 vs. 8.6 ± 4.6, p = 0.03; SAPS II: 57.4 ± 22.8 vs. 48.7 ± 15.5, P = 0.015), and were less often neutropenic (2.6% vs. 12%, p = 0.04) than patients with candidemia due to non-albicans Candida species. Conclusions Although patients infected with Candida albicans differed from patients infected with non-albicans Candida species for a few characteristics, no clinical factor appeared pertinent enough to guide the choice of empirical antifungal therapy in ICU. PMID:20507569

  15. Antifungal activity, kinetics and molecular mechanism of action of garlic oil against Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Ru; Shi, Qing-Shan; Dai, Huan-Qin; Liang, Qing; Xie, Xiao-Bao; Huang, Xiao-Mo; Zhao, Guang-Ze; Zhang, Li-Xin

    2016-01-01

    The antifungal activity, kinetics, and molecular mechanism of action of garlic oil against Candida albicans were investigated in this study using multiple methods. Using the poisoned food technique, we determined that the minimum inhibitory concentration of garlic oil was 0.35 μg/mL. Observation by transmission electron microscopy indicated that garlic oil could penetrate the cellular membrane of C. albicans as well as the membranes of organelles such as the mitochondria, resulting in organelle destruction and ultimately cell death. RNA sequencing analysis showed that garlic oil induced differential expression of critical genes including those involved in oxidation-reduction processes, pathogenesis, and cellular response to drugs and starvation. Moreover, the differentially expressed genes were mainly clustered in 19 KEGG pathways, representing vital cellular processes such as oxidative phosphorylation, the spliceosome, the cell cycle, and protein processing in the endoplasmic reticulum. In addition, four upregulated proteins selected after two-dimensional fluorescence difference in gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) analysis were identified with high probability by mass spectrometry as putative cytoplasmic adenylate kinase, pyruvate decarboxylase, hexokinase, and heat shock proteins. This is suggestive of a C. albicans stress responses to garlic oil treatment. On the other hand, a large number of proteins were downregulated, leading to significant disruption of the normal metabolism and physical functions of C. albicans. PMID:26948845

  16. Antifungal activity, kinetics and molecular mechanism of action of garlic oil against Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wen-Ru; Shi, Qing-Shan; Dai, Huan-Qin; Liang, Qing; Xie, Xiao-Bao; Huang, Xiao-Mo; Zhao, Guang-Ze; Zhang, Li-Xin

    2016-01-01

    The antifungal activity, kinetics, and molecular mechanism of action of garlic oil against Candida albicans were investigated in this study using multiple methods. Using the poisoned food technique, we determined that the minimum inhibitory concentration of garlic oil was 0.35 μg/mL. Observation by transmission electron microscopy indicated that garlic oil could penetrate the cellular membrane of C. albicans as well as the membranes of organelles such as the mitochondria, resulting in organelle destruction and ultimately cell death. RNA sequencing analysis showed that garlic oil induced differential expression of critical genes including those involved in oxidation-reduction processes, pathogenesis, and cellular response to drugs and starvation. Moreover, the differentially expressed genes were mainly clustered in 19 KEGG pathways, representing vital cellular processes such as oxidative phosphorylation, the spliceosome, the cell cycle, and protein processing in the endoplasmic reticulum. In addition, four upregulated proteins selected after two-dimensional fluorescence difference in gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) analysis were identified with high probability by mass spectrometry as putative cytoplasmic adenylate kinase, pyruvate decarboxylase, hexokinase, and heat shock proteins. This is suggestive of a C. albicans stress responses to garlic oil treatment. On the other hand, a large number of proteins were downregulated, leading to significant disruption of the normal metabolism and physical functions of C. albicans. PMID:26948845

  17. Candida albicans binds to saliva proteins selectively adsorbed to silicone.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Ann R; van der Wielen, Pauline; Cannon, Richard D; Ruske, Dean; Dawes, Patrick

    2006-10-01

    Explanted voice prostheses obtained from 5 patients at the time of prosthesis replacement were consistently colonized by yeast, in particular Candida albicans. A simple, reproducible, in vitro model of C. albicans adherence to saliva-coated voice prosthesis silicone was developed. Whole saliva promoted adherence of C. albicans to silicone in a dose-dependent manner. Saliva rinses from voice prosthesis patients also promoted binding of C. albicans to silicone in vitro (mean adherence 14.9% +/- 2.8% of input C. albicans cells). This was significantly higher than C. albicans adherence to silicone in the absence of saliva (P < .001) or adherence promoted by saliva rinses from healthy volunteers (P < .005). Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis and a blot overlay adherence assay revealed that certain salivary proteins were selectively adsorbed to silicone and that C. albicans yeast cells adhered specifically to the adsorbed salivary proteins. PMID:16997116

  18. Effect of Tetrandrine against Candida albicans Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lan-Xue; Li, De-Dong; Hu, Dan-Dan; Hu, Gan-Hai; Yan, Lan; Wang, Yan; Jiang, Yuan-Ying

    2013-01-01

    Candida albicans is the most common human fungal pathogen and has a high propensity to develop biofilms that are resistant to traditional antifungal agents. In this study, we investigated the effect of tetrandrine (TET) on growth, biofilm formation and yeast-to-hypha transition of C. albicans. We characterized the inhibitory effect of TET on hyphal growth and addressed its possible mechanism of action. Treatment of TET at a low concentration without affecting fungal growth inhibited hyphal growth in both liquid and solid Spider media. Real-time RT-PCR revealed that TET down-regulated the expression of hypha-specific genes ECE1, ALS3 and HWP1, and abrogated the induction of EFG1 and RAS1, regulators of hyphal growth. Addition of cAMP restored the normal phenotype of the SC5314 strain. These results indicate that TET may inhibit hyphal growth through the Ras1p-cAMP-PKA pathway. In vivo, at a range of concentrations from 4 mg/L to 32 mg/L, TET prolonged the survival of C. albicans-infected Caenorhabditis elegans significantly. This study provides useful information for the development of new strategies to reduce the incidence of C. albicans biofilm-associated infections. PMID:24260276

  19. Adherence and receptor relationships of Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Calderone, R A; Braun, P C

    1991-01-01

    The cell surface of Candida albicans is composed of a variety of polysaccharides such as glucan, chitin, and mannan. The first two components primarily provide structure, while the mannan, often covalently linked to protein, constitutes the major antigen of the organism. Mannoproteins also have enzymatic activity (acid protease) and ligand-receptor functions. The complement receptors of C. albicans appear to be mannoproteins that are required for the adherence of the organism to endothelial cells. This is certainly true of the CR3-like protein of C. albicans. Proof that the CR3 is the Candida receptor for endothelial cells is derived from two observations. First, mutants lacking CR3 activity are less adherent in vitro and, in fact, less virulent. Second, the ligand recognized by the CR3 receptor (C3bi) as well as anti-CR3 antibodies blocks adherence of the organism to endothelial cells. The CR2 of C. albicans appears to promote the adherence of the organism to plastic substrates. Unlike the CR2 of mammalian cells, the Candida CR2 recognizes ligands containing the RGD sequence of amino acids in addition to the C3d ligand, which does not contain the RGD sequence. There is uncertainty as to whether the Candida CR2 and CR3 are, in fact, different proteins. A mannoprotein has also been described as the adhesin for epithelial cells. In this case, the receptor has a lectinlike activity and recognizes fucose- or glucosamine-containing glycoproteins of epithelial cells, depending on the strain of C. albicans. The oligosaccharide component of the receptor is probably not involved in ligand recognition and may serve to stabilize the receptor. However, the oligosaccharide factor 6 epitope of mannan may also provide adhesin activity in the recognition of epithelial cells. Mannoproteins can be extracted from cells by a number of reagents. Zymolyase, for instance, tends to remove structural mannoproteins, which contain relatively little protein and are linked to glucan. Reagents

  20. Germination of Candida albicans induced by proline.

    PubMed Central

    Dabrowa, N; Taxer, S S; Howard, D H

    1976-01-01

    Blastospores of Candida albicans germinated in proline-biotin-buffer medium incubated at 37 C. Certain other amino acids in the glatamate, asparate, and pyruvate families also fostered germinaton but generally to a lesser extent than did proline. L-Cysteine, D-proline, and certain structural analogues of L-proline inhibited proline-stimualted germination. The concentration of phosphate and glucose was crucial to amino acid-stimulated germination of C. albicans. Clinical isolates and stock cultures varied in their response to the germ tube-inducing activity of proline or other amino acids. The proline-buffer medium cannot be used in a diagnostic test for production of germ tubes by isolates of yeasts. PMID:5375

  1. Development of DNA probes for Candida albicans

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, L.L.; Hudson, J.B.

    1988-07-01

    An attempt was made to produce DNA probes that could be used as a rapid and efficient means of detecting candidiasis (invasive Candida infection) in immunocompromised patients. Whole DNA from Candida albicans was digested with restriction endonuclease, and the resulting fragments were randomly cloned into a plasmid vector. Several recombinant plasmids were evaluated for cross-hybridization to various other Candida species, other fungal DNAs, and to nonfungal DNAs. Cross reactions were observed between the probes and different yeasts, but none with unrelated DNAs. Some recombinants were genus-specific, and two of these were applied to the analysis of C. albicans growth curves. It became evident that, although both /sup 32/P- and biotin-labelled probes could be made quite sensitive, a possible limitation in their diagnostic potential was the poor liberation of Candida DNA from cells. Thus, better methods of treatment of clinical specimens will be required before such probes will be useful in routine diagnosis.

  2. Delicate Metabolic Control and Coordinated Stress Response Critically Determine Antifungal Tolerance of Candida albicans Biofilm Persisters

    PubMed Central

    Li, Peng; Alpi, Emanuele; Vizcaino, Juan A.

    2015-01-01

    Candida infection has emerged as a critical health care burden worldwide, owing to the formation of robust biofilms against common antifungals. Recent evidence shows that multidrug-tolerant persisters critically account for biofilm recalcitrance, but their underlying biological mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we first investigated the phenotypic characteristics of Candida biofilm persisters under consecutive harsh treatments of amphotericin B. The prolonged treatments effectively killed the majority of the cells of biofilms derived from representative strains of Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, and Candida tropicalis but failed to eradicate a small fraction of persisters. Next, we explored the tolerance mechanisms of the persisters through an investigation of the proteomic profiles of C. albicans biofilm persister fractions by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The C. albicans biofilm persisters displayed a specific proteomic signature, with an array of 205 differentially expressed proteins. The crucial enzymes involved in glycolysis, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and protein synthesis were markedly downregulated, indicating that major metabolic activities are subdued in the persisters. It is noteworthy that certain metabolic pathways, such as the glyoxylate cycle, were able to be activated with significantly increased levels of isocitrate lyase and malate synthase. Moreover, a number of important proteins responsible for Candida growth, virulence, and the stress response were greatly upregulated. Interestingly, the persisters were tolerant to oxidative stress, despite highly induced intracellular superoxide. The current findings suggest that delicate metabolic control and a coordinated stress response may play a crucial role in mediating the survival and antifungal tolerance of Candida biofilm persisters. PMID:26195524

  3. Function and Regulation of Cph2 in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Shelley; Di Lena, Pietro; Tormanen, Kati; Baldi, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is associated with humans as both a harmless commensal organism and a pathogen. Cph2 is a transcription factor whose DNA binding domain is similar to that of mammalian sterol response element binding proteins (SREBPs). SREBPs are master regulators of cellular cholesterol levels and are highly conserved from fungi to mammals. However, ergosterol biosynthesis is regulated by the zinc finger transcription factor Upc2 in C. albicans and several other yeasts. Cph2 is not necessary for ergosterol biosynthesis but is important for colonization in the murine gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Here we demonstrate that Cph2 is a membrane-associated transcription factor that is processed to release the N-terminal DNA binding domain like SREBPs, but its cleavage is not regulated by cellular levels of ergosterol or oxygen. Chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq) shows that Cph2 binds to the promoters of HMS1 and other components of the regulatory circuit for GI tract colonization. In addition, 50% of Cph2 targets are also bound by Hms1 and other factors of the regulatory circuit. Several common targets function at the head of the glycolysis pathway. Thus, Cph2 is an integral part of the regulatory circuit for GI colonization that regulates glycolytic flux. Transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) shows a significant overlap in genes differentially regulated by Cph2 and hypoxia, and Cph2 is important for optimal expression of some hypoxia-responsive genes in glycolysis and the citric acid cycle. We suggest that Cph2 and Upc2 regulate hypoxia-responsive expression in different pathways, consistent with a synthetic lethal defect of the cph2 upc2 double mutant in hypoxia. PMID:26342020

  4. Function and Regulation of Cph2 in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Lane, Shelley; Di Lena, Pietro; Tormanen, Kati; Baldi, Pierre; Liu, Haoping

    2015-11-01

    Candida albicans is associated with humans as both a harmless commensal organism and a pathogen. Cph2 is a transcription factor whose DNA binding domain is similar to that of mammalian sterol response element binding proteins (SREBPs). SREBPs are master regulators of cellular cholesterol levels and are highly conserved from fungi to mammals. However, ergosterol biosynthesis is regulated by the zinc finger transcription factor Upc2 in C. albicans and several other yeasts. Cph2 is not necessary for ergosterol biosynthesis but is important for colonization in the murine gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Here we demonstrate that Cph2 is a membrane-associated transcription factor that is processed to release the N-terminal DNA binding domain like SREBPs, but its cleavage is not regulated by cellular levels of ergosterol or oxygen. Chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq) shows that Cph2 binds to the promoters of HMS1 and other components of the regulatory circuit for GI tract colonization. In addition, 50% of Cph2 targets are also bound by Hms1 and other factors of the regulatory circuit. Several common targets function at the head of the glycolysis pathway. Thus, Cph2 is an integral part of the regulatory circuit for GI colonization that regulates glycolytic flux. Transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) shows a significant overlap in genes differentially regulated by Cph2 and hypoxia, and Cph2 is important for optimal expression of some hypoxia-responsive genes in glycolysis and the citric acid cycle. We suggest that Cph2 and Upc2 regulate hypoxia-responsive expression in different pathways, consistent with a synthetic lethal defect of the cph2 upc2 double mutant in hypoxia. PMID:26342020

  5. Non-albicans Candida Infection: An Emerging Threat

    PubMed Central

    Deorukhkar, Sachin C.; Saini, Santosh

    2014-01-01

    The very nature of infectious diseases has undergone profound changes in the past few decades. Fungi once considered as nonpathogenic or less virulent are now recognized as a primary cause of morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised and severely ill patients. Candida spp. are among the most common fungal pathogens. Candida albicans was the predominant cause of candidiasis. However, a shift toward non-albicans Candida species has been recently observed. These non-albicans Candida species demonstrate reduced susceptibility to commonly used antifungal drugs. In the present study, we investigated the prevalence of non-albicans Candida spp. among Candida isolates from various clinical specimens and analysed their virulence factors and antifungal susceptibility profile. A total of 523 Candida spp. were isolated from various clinical specimens. Non-albicans Candida species were the predominant pathogens isolated. Non-albicans Candida species also demonstrated the production of virulence factors once attributed to Candida albicans. Non-albicans Candida demonstrated high resistance to azole group of antifungal agents. Therefore, it can be concluded that non-albicans Candida species have emerged as an important cause of infections. Their isolation from clinical specimen can no longer be ignored as a nonpathogenic isolate nor can it be dismissed as a contaminant. PMID:25404942

  6. Analysis of Candida albicans adhesion to salivary mucin.

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, M P; Haidaris, C G

    1993-01-01

    Clearance of Candida albicans from the oral cavity is thought to be mediated via specific receptor-ligand interactions between salivary constituents and the fungus. Since surfaces in the oral cavity are normally coated with a saliva-derived pellicle, specific interactions between salivary constituents and C. albicans may also contribute to adhesion of C. albicans to the oral mucosa and dental prostheses. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to identify salivary constituents to which C. albicans is capable of binding. A solid-phase overlay assay was used in which electrophoretically separated rat and human salivary constituents bound to membrane filters were incubated with radiolabelled C. albicans cells. C. albicans adhered to a single salivary component from each host. Correlation of cell-binding activity with specific monoclonal antibody (MAb)-binding activity indicated that the constituent bound by C. albicans in human saliva was low-molecular-weight mucin (MG2) and that in rat saliva was rat submandibular gland (RSMG) mucin. Further studies showed an identical cell hybridization signal and MAb colocalization by using RSMG ductal saliva and an aqueous RSMG extract in the solid-phase overlay assay. Analysis of cell binding to the aqueous extract of RSMG fractionated by anion-exchange chromatography demonstrated that C. albicans binding was restricted to an acidic subfraction of the RSMG extract, which also bound the RSMG mucin-specific MAb. The Candida-binding fraction contained predominantly RSMG mucin glycoprotein and also a noncovalently associated, chloroform-extractable material. Furthermore, we identified two strains of C. albicans which differed severalfold in the ability to bind RSMG mucin in the overlay assay. These results suggest that C. albicans binds to only a specific subfraction of RSMG mucin and that the two C. albicans strains tested differ in the ability to bind RSMG mucin subfractions. Images PMID:8478083

  7. Gymnemic acids inhibit hyphal growth and virulence in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Vediyappan, Govindsamy; Dumontet, Vincent; Pelissier, Franck; d'Enfert, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic and polymorphic fungal pathogen that causes mucosal, disseminated and invasive infections in humans. Transition from the yeast form to the hyphal form is one of the key virulence factors in C. albicans contributing to macrophage evasion, tissue invasion and biofilm formation. Nontoxic small molecules that inhibit C. albicans yeast-to-hypha conversion and hyphal growth could represent a valuable source for understanding pathogenic fungal morphogenesis, identifying drug targets and serving as templates for the development of novel antifungal agents. Here, we have identified the triterpenoid saponin family of gymnemic acids (GAs) as inhibitor of C. albicans morphogenesis. GAs were isolated and purified from Gymnema sylvestre leaves, the Ayurvedic traditional medicinal plant used to treat diabetes. Purified GAs had no effect on the growth and viability of C. albicans yeast cells but inhibited its yeast-to-hypha conversion under several hypha-inducing conditions, including the presence of serum. Moreover, GAs promoted the conversion of C. albicans hyphae into yeast cells under hypha inducing conditions. They also inhibited conidial germination and hyphal growth of Aspergillus sp. Finally, GAs inhibited the formation of invasive hyphae from C. albicans-infected Caenorhabditis elegans worms and rescued them from killing by C. albicans. Hence, GAs could be useful for various antifungal applications due to their traditional use in herbal medicine. PMID:24040201

  8. Uptake and antifungal activity of oligonucleotides in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Disney, Matthew D.; Haidaris, Constantine G.; Turner, Douglas H.

    2003-01-01

    Candida albicans is a significant cause of disease in immunocompromised humans. Because the number of people infected by fungal pathogens is increasing, strategies are being developed to target RNAs in fungi. This work shows that oligonucleotides can serve as therapeutics against C. albicans. In particular, oligonucleotides are taken up from cell culture medium in an energy-dependent process. After uptake, oligonucleotides, including RNA, remain mostly intact after 12 h in culture. For culture conditions designed for mammalian cells, intracellular concentrations of oligonucleotides in C. albicans exceed those in COS-7 mammalian cells, suggesting that uptake can provide selective targeting of fungi over human cells. A 19-mer 2′OMe (oligonucleotide with a 2′-O-methyl backbone) hairpin is described that inhibits growth of a C. albicans strain at pH < 4.0. This pH is easily tolerated in some parts of the body subject to C. albicans infections. In vivo dimethyl sulfate modification of ribosomal RNA and the decreased rate of protein synthesis suggest that this hairpin's activity may be due to targeting the ribosome in a way that does not depend on base pairing. Addition of anti-C. albicans oligonucleotides to COS-7 mammalian cells has no effect on cell growth. Evidently, oligonucleotides can selectively serve as therapeutics toward C. albicans and, presumably, other pathogens. Information from genome sequencing and functional genomics studies on C. albicans and other pathogens should allow rapid design and testing of other approaches for oligonucleotide therapies. PMID:12552085

  9. Proinflammatory chemokines during Candida albicans keratitis.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiaoyong; Hua, Xia; Wilhelmus, Kirk R

    2010-03-01

    Chemotactic cytokines mediate the recruitment of leukocytes into infected tissues. This study investigated the profile of chemokines during experimental Candida albicans keratitis and determined the effects of chemokine inhibition on leukocyte infiltration and fungal growth during murine keratomycosis. Scarified corneas of BALB/c mice were topically inoculated with C. albicans and monitored daily over one week for fungal keratitis. After a gene microarray for murine chemokines compared infected corneas to controls, real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunostaining assessed chemokine expression in infected and mock-inoculated corneas. An anti-chemokine antibody was then administered subconjunctivally and evaluated for effects on clinical severity, corneal inflammation, fungal recovery, and cytokine expression. Of 33 chemokine genes examined by microarray, 6 CC chemokines and 6 CXC chemokines were significantly (P<0.05) upregulated more than two-fold. Chemokine (CC-motif) ligand 3 (CCL3) was upregulated 108-fold (P=0.03) by real-time RT-PCR within one day after fungal inoculation and remained increased 28-fold (P=0.02) at one week, and its in situ expression increased in the epithelium and stroma of infected corneas. Compared to the control antibody-treated group, eyes treated with anti-CCL3 antibody showed reduced clinical severity (P<0.05), less corneal neovascularization (P=0.02), and fewer inflammatory cells infiltrating corneal tissue, but the amount of recoverable fungi was not significantly (P=0.4) affected. Anti-CCL3 treatment significantly (P=0.01) reduced the expression of tumor necrosis factor and interleukin-1beta in infected corneas. These results indicate that chemokines, especially the CC chemokine CCL3, play important roles in the acute inflammatory response to C. albicans corneal infection. PMID:20005222

  10. Electron Microscopy of Young Candida albicans Chlamydospores

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Sara E.; Spurlock, Ben O.; Michaels, G. E.

    1974-01-01

    One- to three-day-old cultures of Candida albicans bearing chlamydospores were grown and harvested by a special technique, free of agar, and prepared for ultramicrotomy and electron microscopy. These young chlamydospores exhibited a subcellular structure similar to that of the yeast phase, e.g., cytoplasmic membrane, ribosomes, and mitochondria. Other structural characteristics unique to chlamydospores were a very thick, layered cell wall, the outer layer of which was continuous with the outer layer of the suspensor cell wall and was covered by hair-like projections; membrane bound organelles; and large lipoid inclusions. Only young chlamydospores less than 3 to 4 days old exhibited these ultrastructural characteristics. Images PMID:4368664

  11. Characterization of two aminotransferases from Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Rząd, Kamila; Gabriel, Iwona

    2015-01-01

    Aminoadipate aminotransferase (AmAA) is an enzyme of α-aminoadipate pathway (AAP) for L-lysine biosynthesis. AmAA may also participated in biosynthesis or degradation of aromatic amino acids and in D-tryptophan based pigment production. The AAP is unique for fungal microorganisms. Enzymes involved in this pathway have specific structures and properties. These features can be used as potential molecular markers. Enzymes catalyzing reactions of L-lysine biosynthesis in Candida albicans may also become new targets for antifungal chemotherapy. Search of the NCBI database resulted in identification of two putative aminoadipate aminotransferase genes from Candida albicans: ARO8 (ORFs 19.2098 and 19.9645) and YER152C (ORFs 19.1180 and 19.8771). ARO8 from C. albicans exhibits 53% identity to ARO8 from S. cerevisiae, while YER152C exhibits 30% identity to ARO8 and 45% to YER152C from S. cerevisiae. We amplified two genes from the C. albicans genome: ARO8 and YER152C. Both were cloned and expressed as His-tagged fusion proteins in E. coli. The purified Aro8CHp gene product revealed aromatic and α-aminoadipate aminotransferase activity. Basic molecular properties of the purified protein were determined. We obtained catalytic parameters of Aro8CHp with aromatic amino acids and aminoadipate (AA) (Km(L-Phe) 0.05±0.003 mM, Km(L-Tyr) 0.1±0.008 mM, Km(L-AA) 0.02±0.006 mM) and confirmed the enzyme broad substrate spectrum. The assays also demonstrated that this enzyme may use 2-oxoadipate and 2-oxoglutarate (2-OG) as amino acceptors. Aro8-CHp exhibited pH optima range of 8, which is similar to AmAA from S. cerevisiae. Our results also indicate that CaYer152Cp has a possible role only in aromatic amino acids degradation, in contrast to CaAro8CHp. PMID:26619256

  12. Candida albicans keratitis in an immunocompromised patient

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, H Mohammed J; Papanikolaou, Theocharis; Mariatos, Georgios; Hammad, Amany; Hassan, Hala

    2010-01-01

    Purpose When investigating a case of unexplained corneal ulceration, we need to think of fungal infection and any predisposing factors. Methods A case study of a corneal ulceration in a patient who was HIV positive with a devastating visual outcome. Results Therapeutic corneal graft was necessary due to corneal perforation. Immunocompromised state of patient was retrospectively diagnosed. Conclusions Candida albicans keratitis is an opportunistic infection of a compromised cornea, and sometimes unknowingly compromised host, which can be initially misdiagnosed. Despite intensive antifungal therapy, occasionally patients require corneal grafting to improve vision, and before it is possible to establish an accurate diagnosis. PMID:21060674

  13. Melittin induces apoptotic features in Candida albicans

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Cana; Lee, Dong Gun

    2010-03-26

    Melittin is a well-known antimicrobial peptide with membrane-active mechanisms. In this study, it was found that Melittin exerted its antifungal effect via apoptosis. Candida albicans exposed to Melittin showed the increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, measured by DHR-123 staining. Fluorescence microscopy staining with FITC-annexin V, TUNEL and DAPI further confirmed diagnostic markers of yeast apoptosis including phosphatidylserine externalization, and DNA and nuclear fragmentation. The current study suggests that Melittin possesses an antifungal effect with another mechanism promoting apoptosis.

  14. Sensitization of Candida albicans to terbinafine by berberine and berberrubine

    PubMed Central

    LAM, PIKLING; KOK, STANTON HON LUNG; LEE, KENNETH KA HO; LAM, KIM HUNG; HAU, DESMOND KWOK PO; WONG, WAI YEUNG; BIAN, ZHAOXIANG; GAMBARI, ROBERTO; CHUI, CHUNG HIN

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans (C. albicans) is an opportunistic fungal pathogen, particularly observed in immunocompromised patients. C. albicans accounts for 50–70% of cases of invasive candidiasis in the majority of clinical settings. Terbinafine, an allylamine antifungal drug, has been used to treat fungal infections previously. It has fungistatic activity against C. albicans. Traditional Chinese medicines can be used as complementary medicines to conventional drugs to treat a variety of ailments and diseases. Berberine is a quaternary alkaloid isolated from the traditional Chinese herb, Coptidis Rhizoma, while berberrubine is isolated from the medicinal plant Berberis vulgaris, but is also readily derived from berberine by pyrolysis. The present study demonstrates the possible complementary use of berberine and berberrubine with terbinafine against C. albicans. The experimental findings assume that the potential application of these alkaloids together with reduced dosage of the standard drug would enhance the resulting antifungal potency. PMID:27073630

  15. Effects of Mentha suaveolens Essential Oil Alone or in Combination with Other Drugs in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Stringaro, Annarita; Vavala, Elisabetta; Pepi, Federico; Mignogna, Giuseppina; Garzoli, Stefania; Angiolella, Letizia

    2014-01-01

    Candidosis is the most important cause of fungal infections in humans. The yeast Candida albicans can form biofilms, and it is known that microbial biofilms play an important role in human diseases and are very difficult to treat. The prolonged treatment with drugs has often resulted in failure and resistance. Due to the emergence of multidrug resistance, alternatives to conventional antimicrobial therapy are needed. This study aims to analyse the effects induced by essential oil of Mentha suaveolens Ehrh (EOMS) on Candida albicans and its potential synergism when used in combination with conventional drugs. Morphological differences between control and EOMS treated yeast cells or biofilms were observed by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM resp.,). In order to reveal the presence of cell cycle alterations, flow cytometry analysis was carried out as well. The synergic action of EOMS was studied with the checkerboard method, and the cellular damage induced by different treatments was analysed by TEM. The results obtained have demonstrated both the effects of EOMS on C. albicans yeast cells and biofilms and the synergism of EOMS when used in combination with conventional antifungal drugs as fluconazole (FLC) and micafungin (MCFG), and therefore we can hypothesize on its potential use in therapy. Further studies are necessary to know its mechanism of action. PMID:24719638

  16. Vacuole inheritance regulates cell size and branching frequency of Candida albicans hyphae

    PubMed Central

    Veses, Veronica; Richards, Andrea; Gow, Neil A R

    2008-01-01

    Hyphal growth of Candida albicans is characterized by asymmetric cell divisions in which the subapical mother cell inherits most of the vacuolar space and becomes cell cycle arrested in G1, while the apical daughter cell acquires most of the cell cytoplasm and progresses through G1 into the next mitotic cell cycle. Consequently, branch formation in hyphal compartments is delayed until sufficient cytoplasm is synthesized to execute the G1 ‘START’ function. To test the hypothesis that this mode of vacuole inheritance determines cell cycle progression and therefore the branching of hyphae, eight tetracycline-regulated conditional mutants were constructed that were affected at different stages of the vacuole inheritance pathway. Under repressing conditions, vac7, vac8 and fab1 mutants generated mycelial compartments with more symmetrically distributed vacuoles and increased branching frequencies. Repression of VAC1, VAM2 and VAM3 resulted in sparsely branched hyphae, with large vacuoles and enlarged hyphal compartments. Therefore, during hyphal growth of C. albicans the cell cycle, growth and branch formation can be uncoupled, resulting in the investment of cytoplasm to support hyphal extension at the expense of hyphal branching. PMID:19040629

  17. Portrait of Candida albicans Adherence Regulators

    PubMed Central

    Finkel, Jonathan S.; Xu, Wenjie; Huang, David; Hill, Elizabeth M.; Desai, Jigar V.; Woolford, Carol A.; Nett, Jeniel E.; Taff, Heather; Norice, Carmelle T.; Andes, David R.; Lanni, Frederick; Mitchell, Aaron P.

    2012-01-01

    Cell-substrate adherence is a fundamental property of microorganisms that enables them to exist in biofilms. Our study focuses on adherence of the fungal pathogen Candida albicans to one substrate, silicone, that is relevant to device-associated infection. We conducted a mutant screen with a quantitative flow-cell assay to identify thirty transcription factors that are required for adherence. We then combined nanoString gene expression profiling with functional analysis to elucidate relationships among these transcription factors, with two major goals: to extend our understanding of transcription factors previously known to govern adherence or biofilm formation, and to gain insight into the many transcription factors we identified that were relatively uncharacterized, particularly in the context of adherence or cell surface biogenesis. With regard to the first goal, we have discovered a role for biofilm regulator Bcr1 in adherence, and found that biofilm regulator Ace2 is a major functional target of chromatin remodeling factor Snf5. In addition, Bcr1 and Ace2 share several target genes, pointing to a new connection between them. With regard to the second goal, our findings reveal existence of a large regulatory network that connects eleven adherence regulators, the zinc-response regulator Zap1, and approximately one quarter of the predicted cell surface protein genes in this organism. This limited yet sensitive glimpse of mutant gene expression changes had thus defined one of the broadest cell surface regulatory networks in C. albicans. PMID:22359502

  18. [Candida albicans endocarditis after pulmonary artery banding].

    PubMed

    Talvard, M; Paranon, S; Dulac, Y; Mansir, T; Kreitmann, B; Acar, P

    2009-08-01

    Endocarditis is uncommon in infants and is exceptionally related to Candida albicans on pulmonary banding. We report on a case in a 7-month-old infant who had pulmonary artery banding for a ventricular septal defect and who presented with candidal endocarditis. Banding was chosen because of the patient's poor trophic and unstable status, which could be risky for surgery involving extracorporeal circulation. A few weeks after the banding, the patient developed systemic Candida infection, which was treated successfully. At 7 months, cardiac failure appeared without fever or inflammatory signs. Cardiac echography showed that the banding was not protective as well as a hyperechogenic image on the pulmonary bifurcation. The angioscan showed a hypodense thrombus. Emergency surgery was performed consisting of pulmonary artery exploration, thrombectomy, and ventricular septal defect closure. The exploration showed a pulmonary artery perforation caused by the infected pseudoaneurysm and the migration of the banding into the pulmonary artery. The anatomopathologic analysis of the vegetation identified multisensitive Candida albicans. After surgery and prolonged antifungal treatment, progression was satisfactory. PMID:19525096

  19. The effect of cryptolepine on the morphology and survival of Escherichia coli, Candida albicans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Sawer, I K; Berry, M I; Brown, M W; Ford, J L

    1995-09-01

    The antimicrobial activity of the indoloquinoline alkaloid, cryptolepine, isolated from Cryptolepis sanguinolenta (Fam. Periplocaceae) was determined against selected micro-organisms. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) ranges obtained, expressed as microgram ml-1, were: 5-10 for Saccharomyces cerevisiae NCPF 3139; 10-20 for S. cerevisiae NCPF 3178; 20-40 for Escherichia coli NCTC 10418; 40-80 for E. coli NCTC 11560, Candida albicans ATCC 10231 and C. tropicalis NCPF; and 80-160 for C. albicans NCPF 3242 and NCPF 3262. Biocidal effects were noted at concentrations 2-4 times those of the MIC of the alkaloid following challenge with 10(6) cfu ml-1 of micro-organisms. Time-kill studies showed a reduction in viable count from 10(6) to < 10 cfu ml-1 in 4 h in C. albicans ATCC 10231 exposed to 320 micrograms ml-1 of the agent; 3 log cycle reductions were recorded for the 6 h counts of E. coli NCTC 10418 and S. cerevisiae NCPF 3139 exposed to 40 micrograms ml-1 and 160 micrograms ml-1 of the alkaloid respectively. These results were consistent with findings using scanning electron microscopy. Exposure of cells to biocidal concentrations of cryptolepine produced filamentation prior to lysis in E. coli NCTC 10418 and extreme disturbance of surface structure, including partial and total collapse, followed by lysis in C. albicans ATCC 10231 and S. cerevisiae NCPF 3139. PMID:7592125

  20. In vitro activity of eugenol against Candida albicans biofilms.

    PubMed

    He, Miao; Du, Minquan; Fan, Mingwen; Bian, Zhuan

    2007-03-01

    Most manifestations of candidiasis are associated with biofilm formation occurring on the surfaces of host tissues and medical devices. Candida albicans is the most frequently isolated causative pathogen of candidiasis, and the biofilms display significantly increased levels of resistance to the conventional antifungal agents. Eugenol, the major phenolic component of clove essential oil, possesses potent antifungal activity. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of eugenol on preformed biofilms, adherent cells, subsequent biofilm formation and cell morphogenesis of C. albicans. Eugenol displayed in vitro activity against C. albicans cells within biofilms, when MIC(50) for sessile cells was 500 mg/L. C. albicans adherent cell populations (after 0, 1, 2 and 4 h of adherence) were treated with various concentrations of eugenol (0, 20, 200 and 2,000 mg/L). The extent of subsequent biofilm formation were then assessed with the tetrazolium salt reduction assay. Effect of eugenol on morphogenesis of C. albicans cells was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results indicated that the effect of eugenol on adherent cells and subsequent biofilm formation was dependent on the initial adherence time and the concentration of this compound, and that eugenol can inhibit filamentous growth of C. albicans cells. In addition, using human erythrocytes, eugenol showed low hemolytic activity. These results indicated that eugenol displayed potent activity against C. albicans biofilms in vitro with low cytotoxicity and therefore has potential therapeutic implication for biofilm-associated candidal infections. PMID:17356790

  1. Colonization of congenitally athymic, gnotobiotic mice by Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Balish, E; Balish, M J; Salkowski, C A; Lee, K W; Bartizal, K F

    1984-01-01

    Colony counts, scanning electron microscopy, and light microscopy were used to assess the capacity of Candida albicans to colonize (naturally) and infect the alimentary tract of adult and neonatal (athymic [nu/nu] or heterozygous [+/nu] littermates) germfree BALB/c mice. When exposed to yeast-phase C. albicans, the alimentary tract of adult germfree mice (nu/nu or +/nu) is quickly (within 24 to 48 h) colonized with yeast cells. Neither morbidity nor mortality was evident in any mice that were colonized with a pure culture of C. albicans for 6 months. Yeast cells of C. albicans predominated on mucosal surfaces in the oral cavities and vaginas of adult athymic and heterozygous mice. In both genotypes, C. albicans hyphae were observed in keratinized tissue on the dorsal posterior tongue surface and in the cardial-atrium section of the stomach. Conversely, neonatal athymic or heterozygous mice, born to germfree or C. albicans-colonized mothers, do not become heavily colonized or infected with C. albicans until 11 to 15 days after birth. Although yeast cells adhered to some mucosal surfaces in vivo, neither widespread mucocutaneous candidiasis, i.e., invasion of mucosal surfaces with C. albicans hyphae, nor overwhelming systemic candidiasis was evident in neonatal (nu/nu or +/nu) mice. Thus, even in the absence of functional T-cells and a viable bacterial flora, athymic and heterozygous littermate mice (adult or neonatal BALB/c) that are colonized with a pure culture of C. albicans manifest resistance to extensive mucocutaneous and systemic candidiasis. Images PMID:6372689

  2. An Optimized Lock Solution Containing Micafungin, Ethanol and Doxycycline Inhibits Candida albicans and Mixed C. albicans – Staphyloccoccus aureus Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Lown, Livia; Peters, Brian M.; Walraven, Carla J.; Noverr, Mairi C.; Lee, Samuel A.

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans is a major cause of catheter-related bloodstream infections and is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Due to the propensity of C. albicans to form drug-resistant biofilms, the current standard of care includes catheter removal; however, reinsertion may be technically challenging or risky. Prolonged exposure of an antifungal lock solution within the catheter in conjunction with systemic therapy has been experimentally attempted for catheter salvage. Previously, we demonstrated excellent in vitro activity of micafungin, ethanol, and high-dose doxycycline as single agents for prevention and treatment of C. albicans biofilms. Thus, we sought to investigate optimal combinations of micafungin, ethanol, and/or doxycycline as a lock solution. We performed two- and three-drug checkerboard assays to determine the in vitro activity of pairwise or three agents in combination for prevention or treatment of C. albicans biofilms. Optimal lock solutions were tested for activity against C. albicans clinical isolates, reference strains and polymicrobial C. albicans-S. aureus biofilms. A solution containing 20% (v/v) ethanol, 0.01565 μg/mL micafungin, and 800 μg/mL doxycycline demonstrated a reduction of 98% metabolic activity and no fungal regrowth when used to prevent fungal biofilm formation; however there was no advantage over 20% ethanol alone. This solution was also successful in inhibiting the regrowth of C. albicans from mature polymicrobial biofilms, although it was not fully bactericidal. Solutions containing 5% ethanol with low concentrations of micafungin and doxycycline demonstrated synergistic activity when used to prevent monomicrobial C. albicans biofilm formation. A combined solution of micafungin, ethanol and doxycycline is highly effective for the prevention of C. albicans biofilm formation but did not demonstrate an advantage over 20% ethanol alone in these studies. PMID:27428310

  3. Candida albicans Ethanol Stimulates Pseudomonas aeruginosa WspR-Controlled Biofilm Formation as Part of a Cyclic Relationship Involving Phenazines

    PubMed Central

    Okegbe, Chinweike; Harty, Colleen E.; Golub, Yuriy; Thao, Sandy; Ha, Dae Gon; Willger, Sven D.; O'Toole, George A.; Harwood, Caroline S.; Dietrich, Lars E. P.; Hogan, Deborah A.

    2014-01-01

    In chronic infections, pathogens are often in the presence of other microbial species. For example, Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common and detrimental lung pathogen in individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF) and co-infections with Candida albicans are common. Here, we show that P. aeruginosa biofilm formation and phenazine production were strongly influenced by ethanol produced by the fungus C. albicans. Ethanol stimulated phenotypes that are indicative of increased levels of cyclic-di-GMP (c-di-GMP), and levels of c-di-GMP were 2-fold higher in the presence of ethanol. Through a genetic screen, we found that the diguanylate cyclase WspR was required for ethanol stimulation of c-di-GMP. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that ethanol stimulates WspR signaling through its cognate sensor WspA, and promotes WspR-dependent activation of Pel exopolysaccharide production, which contributes to biofilm maturation. We also found that ethanol stimulation of WspR promoted P. aeruginosa colonization of CF airway epithelial cells. P. aeruginosa production of phenazines occurs both in the CF lung and in culture, and phenazines enhance ethanol production by C. albicans. Using a C. albicans adh1/adh1 mutant with decreased ethanol production, we found that fungal ethanol strongly altered the spectrum of P. aeruginosa phenazines in favor of those that are most effective against fungi. Thus, a feedback cycle comprised of ethanol and phenazines drives this polymicrobial interaction, and these relationships may provide insight into why co-infection with both P. aeruginosa and C. albicans has been associated with worse outcomes in cystic fibrosis. PMID:25340349

  4. Molecular genetic techniques for gene manipulation in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qiu-Rong; Yan, Lan; Lv, Quan-Zhen; Zhou, Mi; Sui, Xue; Cao, Yong-Bing; Jiang, Yuan-Ying

    2014-01-01

    Candida albicans is one of the most common fungal pathogen in humans due to its high frequency as an opportunistic and pathogenic fungus causing superficial as well as invasive infections in immunocompromised patients. An understanding of gene function in C. albicans is necessary to study the molecular basis of its pathogenesis, virulence and drug resistance. Several manipulation techniques have been used for investigation of gene function in C. albicans, including gene disruption, controlled gene expression, protein tagging, gene reintegration, and overexpression. In this review, the main cassettes containing selectable markers used for gene manipulation in C. albicans are summarized; the advantages and limitations of these cassettes are discussed concerning the influences on the target gene expression and the virulence of the mutant strains. PMID:24759671

  5. Innate immune cell response upon Candida albicans infection.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yulin; Zhang, Lulu; Xu, Zheng; Zhang, Jinyu; Jiang, Yuan-Ying; Cao, Yongbing; Yan, Tianhua

    2016-07-01

    Candida albicans is a polymorphic fungus which is the predominant cause of superficial and deep tissue fungal infections. This microorganism has developed efficient strategies to invade the host and evade host defense systems. However, the host immune system will be prepared for defense against the microbe by recognition of receptors, activation of signal transduction pathways and cooperation of immune cells. As a consequence, C. albicans could either be eliminated by immune cells rapidly or disseminate hematogenously, leading to life-threatening systemic infections. The interplay between Candida albicans and the host is complex, requiring recognition of the invaded pathogens, activation of intricate pathways and collaboration of various immune cells. In this review, we will focus on the effects of innate immunity that emphasize the first line protection of host defense against invaded C. albicans including the basis of receptor-mediated recognition and the mechanisms of cell-mediated immunity. PMID:27078171

  6. Cloning, purification, and properties of Candida albicans thymidylate synthase.

    PubMed Central

    Singer, S C; Richards, C A; Ferone, R; Benedict, D; Ray, P

    1989-01-01

    The thymidylate synthase (TS) gene was isolated from a genomic Candida albicans library by functional complementation of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain deficient in TS. The gene was localized on a 4-kilobase HindIII DNA fragment and was shown to be expressed in a Thy- strain of Escherichia coli. The nucleotide sequence of the TS gene predicted a protein of 315 amino acids with a molecular weight of 36,027. The gene was cloned into a T7 expression vector in E. coli, allowing purification of large amounts of C. albicans TS. It was also purified from a wild-type C. albicans strain. Comparison of several enzyme properties including analysis of amino-terminal amino acid sequences showed the native and cloned C. albicans TS to be the same. PMID:2646281

  7. Identification and Characterization of a Candida albicans Mating Pheromone

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Richard J.; Uhl, M. Andrew; Miller, Mathew G.; Johnson, Alexander D.

    2003-01-01

    Candida albicans, the most prevalent fungal pathogen of humans, has recently been shown to undergo mating. Here we describe a mating pheromone produced by C. albicans α cells and show that the gene which encodes it (MFα) is required for α cells, but not a cells, to mate. We also identify the receptor for this mating pheromone as the product of the STE2 gene and show that this gene is required for the mating of a cells, but not α cells. Cells of the a mating type respond to the α mating pheromone by producing long polarized projections, similar to those observed in bona fide mating mixtures of C. albicans a and α cells. During this process, transcription of approximately 62 genes is induced. Although some of these genes correspond to those induced in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by S. cerevisiae α-factor, most are specific to the C. albicans pheromone response. The most surprising class encode cell surface and secreted proteins previously implicated in virulence of C. albicans in a mouse model of disseminated candidiasis. This observation suggests that aspects of cell-cell communication in mating may have been evolutionarily adopted for host-pathogen interactions in C. albicans. PMID:14585977

  8. Heparin-Binding Motifs and Biofilm Formation by Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Green, Julianne V.; Orsborn, Kris I.; Zhang, Minlu; Tan, Queenie K. G.; Greis, Kenneth D.; Porollo, Alexey; Andes, David R.; Long Lu, Jason; Hostetter, Margaret K.

    2013-01-01

    Candida albicans is a leading pathogen in infections of central venous catheters, which are frequently infused with heparin. Binding of C. albicans to medically relevant concentrations of soluble and plate-bound heparin was demonstrable by confocal microscopy and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). A sequence-based search identified 34 C. albicans surface proteins containing ≥1 match to linear heparin-binding motifs. The virulence factor Int1 contained the most putative heparin-binding motifs (n = 5); peptides encompassing 2 of 5 motifs bound to heparin-Sepharose. Alanine substitution of lysine residues K805/K806 in 804QKKHQIHK811 (motif 1 of Int1) markedly attenuated biofilm formation in central venous catheters in rats, whereas alanine substitution of K1595/R1596 in 1593FKKRFFKL1600 (motif 4 of Int1) did not impair biofilm formation. Affinity-purified immunoglobulin G (IgG) recognizing motif 1 abolished biofilm formation in central venous catheters; preimmune IgG had no effect. After heparin treatment of C. albicans, soluble peptides from multiple C. albicans surface proteins were detected, such as Eno1, Pgk1, Tdh3, and Ssa1/2 but not Int1, suggesting that heparin changes candidal surface structures and may modify some antigens critical for immune recognition. These studies define a new mechanism of biofilm formation for C. albicans and a novel strategy for inhibiting catheter-associated biofilms. PMID:23904295

  9. Oxidative stress of photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy inhibits Candida albicans virulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Ilka Tiemy; Prates, Renato Araujo; Tegos, George P.; Hamblin, Michael R.; Simões Ribeiro, Martha

    2011-03-01

    Photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT) is based on the principal that microorganisms will be inactivated using a light source combined to a photosensitizing agent in the presence of oxygen. Oxidative damage of cell components occurs by the action of reactive oxygen species leading to cell death for microbial species. It has been demonstrated that PACT is highly efficient in vitro against a wide range of pathogens, however, there is limited information for its in vivo potential. In addition, it has been demonstrated that sublethal photodynamic inactivation may alter the virulence determinants of microorganisms. In this study, we explored the effect of sublethal photodynamic inactivation to the virulence factors of Candida albicans. Methylene Blue (MB) was used as photosensitizer for sublethal photodynamic challenge on C. albicans associated with a diode laser irradiation (λ=660nm). The parameters of irradiation were selected in causing no reduction of viable cells. The potential effects of PACT on virulence determinants of C. albicans cells were investigated by analysis of germ tube formation and in vivo pathogenicity assays. Systemic infection was induced in mice by the injection of fungal suspension in the lateral caudal vein. C. albicans exposed to sublethal photodynamic inactivation formed significantly less germ tube than untreated cells. In addition, mice infected with C. albicans submitted to sublethal PACT survived for a longer period of time than mice infected with untreated cells. The oxidative damage promoted by sublethal photodynamic inactivation inhibited virulence determinants and reduced in vivo pathogenicity of C. albicans.

  10. Induction of apoptosis in oral epithelial cells by Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Villar, C Cunha; Chukwuedum Aniemeke, J; Zhao, X-R; Huynh-Ba, G

    2012-12-01

    During infection, interactions between Candida albicans and oral epithelial cells result in oral epithelial cell death. This is clinically manifested by the development of oral mucosal ulcerations generally associated with discomfort. In vitro studies have shown that C. albicans induces early apoptotic alterations in oral epithelial cells; however, these studies have also shown that treatment of infected cells with caspase inhibitors does not prevent their death. The reasons for these contradictory results are unknown and it is still not clear if C. albicans stimulates oral epithelial signaling pathways that promote apoptotic cell death. Activation of specific death pathways in response to microbial organisms plays an essential role in modulating the pathogenesis of a variety of infectious diseases. The aim of this study was to (i) characterize C. albicans-induced apoptotic morphological alterations in oral epithelial cells, and (ii) investigate the activation of apoptotic signaling pathways and expression of apoptotic genes during infection. Candida albicans induced early apoptotic changes in over 50% of oral epithelial cells. However, only 15% of those showed mid-late apoptotic alterations. At the molecular level, C. albicans caused a loss of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential and translocation of mitochondrial cytochrome c. Caspase-3/9 activities increased only during the first hours of infection. Moreover, poly[ADP ribose] polymerase 1 was cleaved into apoptotic and necrotic-like fragments. Finally, five anti-apoptotic genes were significantly upregulated and two pro-apoptotic genes were downregulated during infection. Altogether, these findings indicate that epithelial apoptotic pathways are activated in response to C. albicans, but fail to progress and promote apoptotic cell death. PMID:23134609

  11. Spaceflight enhances cell aggregation and random budding in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Crabbé, Aurélie; Nielsen-Preiss, Sheila M; Woolley, Christine M; Barrila, Jennifer; Buchanan, Kent; McCracken, James; Inglis, Diane O; Searles, Stephen C; Nelman-Gonzalez, Mayra A; Ott, C Mark; Wilson, James W; Pierson, Duane L; Stefanyshyn-Piper, Heidemarie M; Hyman, Linda E; Nickerson, Cheryl A

    2013-01-01

    This study presents the first global transcriptional profiling and phenotypic characterization of the major human opportunistic fungal pathogen, Candida albicans, grown in spaceflight conditions. Microarray analysis revealed that C. albicans subjected to short-term spaceflight culture differentially regulated 452 genes compared to synchronous ground controls, which represented 8.3% of the analyzed ORFs. Spaceflight-cultured C. albicans-induced genes involved in cell aggregation (similar to flocculation), which was validated by microscopic and flow cytometry analysis. We also observed enhanced random budding of spaceflight-cultured cells as opposed to bipolar budding patterns for ground samples, in accordance with the gene expression data. Furthermore, genes involved in antifungal agent and stress resistance were differentially regulated in spaceflight, including induction of ABC transporters and members of the major facilitator family, downregulation of ergosterol-encoding genes, and upregulation of genes involved in oxidative stress resistance. Finally, downregulation of genes involved in actin cytoskeleton was observed. Interestingly, the transcriptional regulator Cap1 and over 30% of the Cap1 regulon was differentially expressed in spaceflight-cultured C. albicans. A potential role for Cap1 in the spaceflight response of C. albicans is suggested, as this regulator is involved in random budding, cell aggregation, and oxidative stress resistance; all related to observed spaceflight-associated changes of C. albicans. While culture of C. albicans in microgravity potentiates a global change in gene expression that could induce a virulence-related phenotype, no increased virulence in a murine intraperitoneal (i.p.) infection model was observed under the conditions of this study. Collectively, our data represent an important basis for the assessment of the risk that commensal flora could play during human spaceflight missions. Furthermore, since the low fluid

  12. Cellular Components Mediating Coadherence of Candida albicans and Fusobacterium nucleatum.

    PubMed

    Wu, T; Cen, L; Kaplan, C; Zhou, X; Lux, R; Shi, W; He, X

    2015-10-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic fungal pathogen found as part of the normal oral flora. It can be coisolated with Fusobacterium nucleatum, an opportunistic bacterial pathogen, from oral disease sites, such as those involved in refractory periodontitis and pulp necrosis. The physical coadherence between these 2 clinically important microbes has been well documented and suggested to play a role in facilitating their oral colonization and colocalization and contributing to polymicrobial pathogenesis. Previous studies indicated that the physical interaction between C. albicans and F. nucleatum was mediated by the carbohydrate components on the surface of C. albicans and the protein components on the Fusobaterium cell surface. However, the identities of the components involved still remain elusive. This study was aimed at identifying the genetic determinants involved in coaggregation between the 2 species. By screening a C. albicans SN152 mutant library and a panel of F. nucleatum 23726 outer membrane protein mutants, we identified FLO9, which encodes a putative adhesin-like cell wall mannoprotein of C. albicans and radD, an arginine-inhibitable adhesin-encoding gene in F. nucleatum that is involved in interspecies coadherence. Consistent with these findings, we demonstrated that the strong coaggregation between wild-type F. nucleatum 23726 and C. albicans SN152 in an in vitro assay could be greatly inhibited by arginine and mannose. Our study also suggested a complex multifaceted mechanism underlying physical interaction between C. albicans and F. nucleatum and for the first time revealed the identity of major genetic components involved in mediating the coaggregation. These observations provide useful knowledge for developing new targeted treatments for disrupting interactions between these 2 clinically relevant pathogens. PMID:26152186

  13. High-frequency switching in Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Soll, D R

    1992-01-01

    Most strains of Candida albicans are capable of switching frequently and reversibly between a number of phenotypes distinguishable by colony morphology. A number of different switching systems have been defined according to the limited set of phenotypes in each switching repertoire, and each strain appears to possess a single system. Switching can affect many aspects of cellular physiology and morphology and appears to be a second level of phenotypic variability superimposed upon the bud-hypha transition. The most dramatic switching system so far identified is the "white-opaque transition." This system dramatizes the extraordinary effects switching can have on the budding cell phenotype, including the synthesis of opaque-specific antigens, the expression of white-specific and opaque-specific genes, and the genesis of unique cell wall structures. Switching has been demonstrated to occur at sites of infection and between episodes of recurrent vaginitis, and it may function to generate variability in commensal and infecting populations for adaptive reasons. Although the molecular mechanisms involved in the switch event are not understood, recent approaches to its elucidation are discussed and an epigenetic mechanism is proposed. Images PMID:1576587

  14. A Monoclonal Antibody Directed against a Candida albicans Cell Wall Mannoprotein Exerts Three Anti-C. albicans Activities

    PubMed Central

    Moragues, María D.; Omaetxebarria, Miren J.; Elguezabal, Natalia; Sevilla, María J.; Conti, Stefania; Polonelli, Luciano; Pontón, José

    2003-01-01

    Antibodies are believed to play a role in the protection against Candida albicans infections by a number of mechanisms, including the inhibition of adhesion or germ tube formation, opsonization, neutralization of virulence-related enzymes, and direct candidacidal activity. Although some of these biological activities have been demonstrated individually in monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), it is not clear if all these anti-C. albicans activities can be displayed by a single antibody. In this report, we characterized a monoclonal antibody raised against the main target of salivary secretory immunoglobulin A in the cell wall of C. albicans, which exerts three anti-C. albicans activities: (i) inhibition of adherence to HEp-2 cells, (ii) inhibition of germination, and (iii) direct candidacidal activity. MAb C7 reacted with a proteinic epitope from a mannoprotein with a molecular mass of >200 kDa predominantly expressed on the C. albicans germ tube cell wall surface as well as with a number of antigens from Candida lusitaniae, Cryptococcus neoformans, Aspergillus fumigatus, and Scedosporium prolificans. MAb C7 caused a 31.1% inhibition in the adhesion of C. albicans to HEp-2 monolayers and a 55.3% inhibition in the adhesion of C. albicans to buccal epithelial cells, produced a 38.5% decrease in the filamentation of C. albicans, and exhibited a potent fungicidal effect against C. albicans, C. lusitaniae, Cryptococcus neoformans, A. fumigatus, and S. prolificans, showing reductions in fungal growth ranging from 34.2 to 88.7%. The fungicidal activity showed by MAb C7 seems to be related to that reported by antibodies mimicking the activity of a killer toxin produced by the yeast Pichia anomala, since one of these MAbs also reacted with the C. albicans mannoprotein with a molecular mass of >200 kDa. Results presented in this study support the concept of a family of microbicidal antibodies that could be useful in the treatment of a wide range of microbial infections when used

  15. Construction of an SfiI macrorestriction map of the Candida albicans genome.

    PubMed Central

    Chu, W S; Magee, B B; Magee, P T

    1993-01-01

    The opportunistic fungal pathogen, Candida albicans, is diploid as usually isolated and has no apparent sexual cycle. Genetic analysis has therefore been very difficult. Molecular genetics has yielded important information in the past few years, but it too is hampered by the lack of a good genetic map. Using the well-characterized strain 1006 and strain WO-1, which undergoes the white-opaque phenotypic transition, we have developed a genomic restriction map of C. albicans with the enzyme SfiI. There are approximately 34 SfiI restriction sites in the C. albicans genome. Restriction fragments were separated by pulsed-field electrophoresis and were assigned to chromosomes by hybridization of complete and partial digests with known chromosome-specific probes as well as by digestion of isolated chromosomes. Telomeric fragments were identified by hybridization with a telomere-specific probe (C. Sadhu, M.J. McEachern, E.P. Rustchenko-Bulgac, J. Schmid, D.R. Soll, and J.B. Hicks, J. Bacteriol. 173:842-850, 1991). WO-1 differs from 1006 in that it has undergone three reciprocal chromosomal translocations. Analysis of the translocation products indicates that each translocation has occurred at or near an SfiI site; thus, the SfiI fragments from the two strains are similar or identical. The tendency for translocation to occur at or near SfiI sites may be related to the repeated sequence RPS 1, which contains four such sites and could provide homology for ectopic pairing and crossing over. The genome size of both strains is about 16 to 17 megabases, in good agreement with previous determinations. Images PMID:8407841

  16. Anticandidal Effect and Mechanisms of Monoterpenoid, Perillyl Alcohol against Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Moiz A; Fatima, Zeeshan; Hameed, Saif

    2016-01-01

    This study explored the antifungal potential of perillyl alcohol (PA), a natural monoterpene alcohol, against most prevalent human fungal pathogen C. albicans, its clinical isolates and four non-albicans species of Candida. To resolve the potential mechanisms, we used whole genome transcriptome analyses of PA treated Candida cells to examine the affected cellular circuitry of this pathogen. The transcriptome data revealed a link between calcineurin signaling and PA as among the several categories of PA responsive genes the down regulation of calcineurin signaling gene CNB1 was noteworthy which was also confirmed by both molecular docking and susceptibility assays. We observed that PA treated Candida phenocopied compromised calcineurin pathway stress responses and turned sensitive to alkaline pH, ionic, membrane, salinity, endoplasmic reticulum and serum stresses. Indispensability of functional calcineurin was further confirmed as calcineurin mutant was hypersensitive to PA while constitutively expressed calcineurin strain remained resistant. We explored that PA leads to perturbed membrane integrity as depicted through depleted ergosterol levels and disrupted pH homeostasis. Moreover, PA caused cell wall damage which was evident from hypersensitivity against cell wall perturbing agents (congo red, calcoflour white), SEM and enhanced rate of cell sedimentation. Furthermore, PA inhibited potential virulence traits including morphological transition, biofilm formation and displayed diminished capacity to adhere both to the polystyrene surface and buccal epithelial cells. The study also revealed that PA leads to cell cycle arrest and mitochondrial dysfunction in C. albicans. Together, the present study provides enough evidence for further work on PA so that better strategies could be employed to treat Candida infections. PMID:27627759

  17. Baicalein induces programmed cell death in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Dai, Bao-Di; Cao, Ying-Ying; Huang, Shan; Xu, Yong-Gang; Gao, Ping-Hui; Wang, Yan; Jiang, Yuan-Ying

    2009-08-01

    Recent evidence has revealed the occurrence of an apoptotic phenotype in Candida albicans that is inducible with environmental stresses such as acetic acid, hydrogen peroxide, and amphotericin B. In the present study, we found that the Chinese herbal medicine Baicalein (BE), which was one of the skullcapflavones, can induce apoptosis in C. albicans. The apoptotic effects of BE were detected by flow cytometry using Annexin V-FITC and DAPI, and it was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy analysis. After exposure to 4 microg/ml BE for 12 h, about 10% of C. albicans cells were apoptotic. Both the increasing intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and upregulation of some redox-related genes (CAP1, SOD2, TRR1) were observed. Furthermore, we compared the survivals of CAP1 deleted, wild-type, and overexpressed strains and found that Cap1p attenuated BE-initiated cell death, which was coherent with a higher mRNA level of the CAP1 gene. In addition, the mitochondrial membrane potential of C. albicans cells changed significantly ( p<0.001) upon BE treatment compared with control. Taken together, our results indicate that BE treatment induces apoptosis in C.albicans cells, and the apoptosis was associated with the breakdown of mitochondrial membrane potential. PMID:19734718

  18. Candida albicans Quorum Sensing Molecules Stimulate Mouse Macrophage Migration

    PubMed Central

    Hargarten, Jessica C.; Moore, Tyler C.; Petro, Thomas M.; Nickerson, Kenneth W.

    2015-01-01

    The polymorphic commensal fungus Candida albicans causes life-threatening disease via bloodstream and intra-abdominal infections in immunocompromised and transplant patients. Although host immune evasion is a common strategy used by successful human fungal pathogens, C. albicans provokes recognition by host immune cells less capable of destroying it. To accomplish this, C. albicans white cells secrete a low-molecular-weight chemoattractive stimulant(s) of macrophages, a phagocyte that they are able to survive within and eventually escape from. C. albicans opaque cells do not secrete this chemoattractive stimulant(s). We report here a physiological mechanism that contributes to the differences in the interaction of C. albicans white and opaque cells with macrophages. E,E-Farnesol, which is secreted by white cells only, is a potent stimulator of macrophage chemokinesis, whose activity is enhanced by yeast cell wall components and aromatic alcohols. E,E-farnesol results in up to an 8.5-fold increase in macrophage migration in vitro and promotes a 3-fold increase in the peritoneal infiltration of macrophages in vivo. Therefore, modulation of farnesol secretion to stimulate host immune recognition by macrophages may help explain why this commensal is such a successful pathogen. PMID:26195556

  19. A Photonic Crystal Protein Hydrogel Sensor for Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Cai, Zhongyu; Kwak, Daniel H; Punihaole, David; Hong, Zhenmin; Velankar, Sachin S; Liu, Xinyu; Asher, Sanford A

    2015-10-26

    We report two-dimensional (2D) photonic crystal (PC) sensing materials that selectively detect Candida albicans (C. albicans). These sensors utilize Concanavalin A (Con A) protein hydrogels with a 2D PC embedded on the Con A protein hydrogel surface, that multivalently and selectively bind to mannan on the C. albicans cell surface to form crosslinks. The resulting crosslinks shrink the Con A protein hydrogel, reduce the 2D PC particle spacing, and blue-shift the light diffracted from the PC. The diffraction shifts can be visually monitored, measured with a spectrometer, or determined from the Debye diffraction ring diameter. Our unoptimized hydrogel sensor has a detection limit of around 32 CFU/mL for C. albicans. This sensor distinguishes between C. albicans and those microbes devoid of cell-surface mannan such as the gram-negative bacterium E. coli. This sensor provides a proof-of-concept for utilizing recognition between lectins and microbial cell surface carbohydrates to detect microorganisms in aqueous environments. PMID:26480336

  20. Candida albicans Quorum Sensing Molecules Stimulate Mouse Macrophage Migration.

    PubMed

    Hargarten, Jessica C; Moore, Tyler C; Petro, Thomas M; Nickerson, Kenneth W; Atkin, Audrey L

    2015-10-01

    The polymorphic commensal fungus Candida albicans causes life-threatening disease via bloodstream and intra-abdominal infections in immunocompromised and transplant patients. Although host immune evasion is a common strategy used by successful human fungal pathogens, C. albicans provokes recognition by host immune cells less capable of destroying it. To accomplish this, C. albicans white cells secrete a low-molecular-weight chemoattractive stimulant(s) of macrophages, a phagocyte that they are able to survive within and eventually escape from. C. albicans opaque cells do not secrete this chemoattractive stimulant(s). We report here a physiological mechanism that contributes to the differences in the interaction of C. albicans white and opaque cells with macrophages. E,E-Farnesol, which is secreted by white cells only, is a potent stimulator of macrophage chemokinesis, whose activity is enhanced by yeast cell wall components and aromatic alcohols. E,E-farnesol results in up to an 8.5-fold increase in macrophage migration in vitro and promotes a 3-fold increase in the peritoneal infiltration of macrophages in vivo. Therefore, modulation of farnesol secretion to stimulate host immune recognition by macrophages may help explain why this commensal is such a successful pathogen. PMID:26195556

  1. Oxidative stress responses in the human fungal pathogen, Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Dantas, Alessandra da Silva; Day, Alison; Ikeh, Mélanie; Kos, Iaroslava; Achan, Beatrice; Quinn, Janet

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is a major fungal pathogen of humans, causing approximately 400,000 life-threatening systemic infections world-wide each year in severely immunocompromised patients. An important fungicidal mechanism employed by innate immune cells involves the generation of toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as superoxide and hydrogen peroxide. Consequently, there is much interest in the strategies employed by C. albicans to evade the oxidative killing by macrophages and neutrophils. Our understanding of how C. albicans senses and responds to ROS has significantly increased in recent years. Key findings include the observations that hydrogen peroxide triggers the filamentation of this polymorphic fungus and that a superoxide dismutase enzyme with a novel mode of action is expressed at the cell surface of C. albicans. Furthermore, recent studies have indicated that combinations of the chemical stresses generated by phagocytes can actively prevent C. albicans oxidative stress responses through a mechanism termed the stress pathway interference. In this review, we present an up-date of our current understanding of the role and regulation of oxidative stress responses in this important human fungal pathogen. PMID:25723552

  2. Candida albicans and Enterococcus faecalis in the gut

    PubMed Central

    Garsin, Danielle A; Lorenz, Michael C

    2013-01-01

    The fungus Candida albicans and the gram-positive bacterium Enterococcus faecalis are both normal residents of the human gut microbiome and cause opportunistic disseminated infections in immunocompromised individuals. Using a nematode infection model, we recently showed that co-infection resulted in less pathology and less mortality than infection with either species alone and this was partly explained by an interkingdom signaling event in which a bacterial-derived product inhibits hyphal morphogenesis of C. albicans. In this addendum we discuss these findings in the contest of other described bacterial-fungal interactions and recent data suggesting a potentially synergistic relationship between these two species in the mouse gut as well. We suggest that E. faecalis and C. albicans promote a mutually beneficial association with the host, in effect choosing a commensal lifestyle over a pathogenic one. PMID:23941906

  3. Candida albicans, the opportunist. A cellular and molecular perspective.

    PubMed

    Dupont, P F

    1995-02-01

    Candida albicans causes the majority of opportunistic fungal infections. The yeast's commensualistic relationship with humans enables it, when environmental conditions are favorable, to multiply and replace much of the normal flora. Virulence factors of C. albicans, enabling the organism to adhere to and penetrate host tissues, involve specific molecular interactions between the cells of the fungus and the host. Localized disease, such as oral candidiasis, onychomycosis, and vaginitis, results. These infections are usually limited to surfaces of the host, and can be quickly and successfully controlled by the use of one of the available antifungal agents. Candida albicans infections typically become systemic and life threatening when the host is immunocompromised. Depending on the immune defect in the host, one of the spectrum of Candida diseases can develop. If successful treatment of these patients is to be achieved, modulation of the immune deficit, as well as the use of an appropriate antifungal drug, must become a routine part of therapeutic interventions. PMID:7877106

  4. Two unlike cousins: Candida albicans and C. glabrata infection strategies

    PubMed Central

    Brunke, Sascha; Hube, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    Candida albicans and C. glabrata are the two most common pathogenic yeasts of humans, yet they are phylogenetically, genetically and phenotypically very different. In this review, we compare and contrast the strategies of C. albicans and C. glabrata to attach to and invade into the host, obtain nutrients and evade the host immune response. Although their strategies share some basic concepts, they differ greatly in their outcome. While C. albicans follows an aggressive strategy to subvert the host response and to obtain nutrients for its survival, C. glabrata seems to have evolved a strategy which is based on stealth, evasion and persistence, without causing severe damage in murine models. However, both fungi are successful as commensals and as pathogens of humans. Understanding these strategies will help in finding novel ways to fight Candida, and fungal infections in general. PMID:23253282

  5. Interleukin 17-Mediated Host Defense against Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Sparber, Florian; LeibundGut-Landmann, Salomé

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is part of the normal microbiota in most healthy individuals. However, it can cause opportunistic infections if host defenses are breached, with symptoms ranging from superficial lesions to severe systemic disease. The study of rare congenital defects in patients with chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis led to the identification of interleukin-17 (IL-17) as a key factor in host defense against mucosal fungal infection. Experimental infections in mice confirmed the critical role of IL-17 in mucocutaneous immunity against C. albicans. Research on mouse models has also contributed importantly to our current understanding of the regulation of IL-17 production by different cellular sources and its effector functions in distinct tissues. In this review, we highlight recent findings on IL-17-mediated immunity against C. albicans in mouse and man. PMID:26274976

  6. A morphogenetic regulatory role for ethyl alcohol in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Nitin M; Raut, Jayant S; Karuppayil, S Mohan

    2011-11-01

    Regulation of morphogenesis through the production of chemical signalling molecules such as isoamyl alcohol, 2-phenylethyl alcohol, 1-dodecanol, E-nerolidol and farnesol is reported in Candida albicans. The present study focuses on the effect of ethyl alcohol on C. albicans dimorphism and biofilm development. Ethyl alcohol inhibited germ tube formation induced by the four standard inducers in a concentration-dependent manner. The germ tube inhibitory concentration (4%) did not have any effect on the growth and viability of C. albicans cells. Ethyl alcohol also inhibited the elongation of germ tubes. Four percentage of ethyl alcohol significantly inhibited biofilm development on polystyrene and silicone surfaces. We suggest a potential morphogenetic regulatory role for ethyl alcohol, which may influence dissemination, virulence and establishment of infection. PMID:21605190

  7. Coaggregation of Streptococcus sanguis and other streptococci with Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Jenkinson, H F; Lala, H C; Shepherd, M G

    1990-01-01

    Thirteen strains of viridans group streptococci and two strains of other streptococci were tested for coaggregation with Candida albicans. Streptococcus sanguis strains generally exhibited low levels of adherence to 28 degrees C-grown exponential-phase yeast cells, but starvation of yeast cells for glucose at 37 degrees C (or at 28 degrees C) increased their coaggregating activity with these streptococci by at least tenfold. This was a property common to four C. albicans strains tested, two of which were able to form mycelia (6406 and MEN) and two of which were not (MM2002 and CA2). The expression of the coaggregation adhesin during yeast cell starvation was inhibited by addition of trichodermin or amphotericin B. The strains of S. sanguis, Streptococcus gordonii, and Streptococcus oralis tested for coaggregating activity encompassed a diverse range of physiological and morphological types, yet all exhibited saturable coaggregation with starved C. albicans cells. There was no correlation of cell surface hydrophobicity, of either yeast or streptococcal cells, with their abilities to coaggregate. Strains of Streptococcus anginosus also coaggregated with starved yeast cells; Streptococcus salivarius and Streptococcus pyogenes coaggregated to a lesser degree with C. albicans, and the coaggregation with S. pyogenes was not promoted by yeast cell starvation; Streptococcus mutans and Enterococcus faecalis did not coaggregate with yeast. The coaggregation reactions of S. sanguis and S. gordonii with C. albicans were inhibited by EDTA and by heat or protease treatment of the yeast cells and were not reversible by the addition of lactose or other simple sugars. These observations extend the range of intergeneric coaggregations that are known to occur between oral microbes and suggest that coaggregations of C. albicans with viridans group streptococci may be important for colonization of oral surfaces by the yeast. PMID:2182544

  8. Doxorubicin induces drug efflux pumps in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Kofla, Grzegorz; Turner, Vincent; Schulz, Bettina; Storch, Ulrike; Froelich, Daniela; Rognon, Bénédicte; Coste, Alix T; Sanglard, Dominique; Ruhnke, Markus

    2011-02-01

    Candida albicans is one of the most important opportunistic fungal pathogens. It can cause serious fungal diseases in immunocompromised patients, including those with cancer. Treatment failures due to the emergence of drug-resistant C. albicans strains have become a serious clinical problem. Resistance incidents were often mediated by fungal efflux pumps which are closely related to the human ABC transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp). P-gp is often overexpressed in cancer cells and confers resistance to many cytotoxic drugs. We examined whether cytotoxic drugs commonly used for cancer treatment (doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide) could alter the expression of genes responsible for the development of fluconazole resistance in Candida cells in the way they can influence homologous genes in cancer cell lines. ABC transporters (CDR1 and CDR2) and other resistance genes (MDR1 and ERG11) were tested by real-time PCR for their expression in C. albicans cells at the mRNA level after induction by antineoplastic drugs. The results were confirmed by a lacZ gene reporter system and verified at the protein level using GFP and immunoblotting. We showed that doxorubicin is a potent inducer of CDR1/CDR2 expression in C. albicans at both the mRNA and protein level and thus causes an increase in fluconazole MIC values. However, cyclophosphamide, which is not a substrate of human P-gp, did not induce ABC transporter expression in C. albicans. Neither doxorubicin nor cyclophosphamide could influence the expression of the other resistance genes (MDR1 and ERG11). The induction of CDR1/CDR2 by doxorubicin in C. albicans and the resulting alteration of antifungal susceptibility might be of clinical relevance for the antifungal treatment of Candida infections occurring after anticancer chemotherapy with doxorubicin. PMID:20818920

  9. Spaceflight Enhances Cell Aggregation and Random Budding in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Woolley, Christine M.; Barrila, Jennifer; Buchanan, Kent; McCracken, James; Inglis, Diane O.; Searles, Stephen C.; Nelman-Gonzalez, Mayra A.; Ott, C. Mark; Wilson, James W.; Pierson, Duane L.; Stefanyshyn-Piper, Heidemarie M.; Hyman, Linda E.; Nickerson, Cheryl A.

    2013-01-01

    This study presents the first global transcriptional profiling and phenotypic characterization of the major human opportunistic fungal pathogen, Candida albicans, grown in spaceflight conditions. Microarray analysis revealed that C. albicans subjected to short-term spaceflight culture differentially regulated 452 genes compared to synchronous ground controls, which represented 8.3% of the analyzed ORFs. Spaceflight-cultured C. albicans–induced genes involved in cell aggregation (similar to flocculation), which was validated by microscopic and flow cytometry analysis. We also observed enhanced random budding of spaceflight-cultured cells as opposed to bipolar budding patterns for ground samples, in accordance with the gene expression data. Furthermore, genes involved in antifungal agent and stress resistance were differentially regulated in spaceflight, including induction of ABC transporters and members of the major facilitator family, downregulation of ergosterol-encoding genes, and upregulation of genes involved in oxidative stress resistance. Finally, downregulation of genes involved in actin cytoskeleton was observed. Interestingly, the transcriptional regulator Cap1 and over 30% of the Cap1 regulon was differentially expressed in spaceflight-cultured C. albicans. A potential role for Cap1 in the spaceflight response of C. albicans is suggested, as this regulator is involved in random budding, cell aggregation, and oxidative stress resistance; all related to observed spaceflight-associated changes of C. albicans. While culture of C. albicans in microgravity potentiates a global change in gene expression that could induce a virulence-related phenotype, no increased virulence in a murine intraperitoneal (i.p.) infection model was observed under the conditions of this study. Collectively, our data represent an important basis for the assessment of the risk that commensal flora could play during human spaceflight missions. Furthermore, since the low fluid

  10. Factors Supporting Cysteine Tolerance and Sulfite Production in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Hennicke, Florian; Grumbt, Maria; Lermann, Ulrich; Ueberschaar, Nico; Palige, Katja; Böttcher, Bettina; Jacobsen, Ilse D.; Staib, Claudia; Morschhäuser, Joachim; Monod, Michel; Hube, Bernhard; Hertweck, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The amino acid cysteine has long been known to be toxic at elevated levels for bacteria, fungi, and humans. However, mechanisms of cysteine tolerance in microbes remain largely obscure. Here we show that the human pathogenic yeast Candida albicans excretes sulfite when confronted with increasing cysteine concentrations. Mutant construction and phenotypic analysis revealed that sulfite formation from cysteine in C. albicans relies on cysteine dioxygenase Cdg1, an enzyme with similar functions in humans. Environmental cysteine induced not only the expression of the CDG1 gene in C. albicans, but also the expression of SSU1, encoding a putative sulfite efflux pump. Accordingly, the deletion of SSU1 resulted in enhanced sensitivity of the fungal cells to both cysteine and sulfite. To study the regulation of sulfite/cysteine tolerance in more detail, we screened a C. albicans library of transcription factor mutants in the presence of sulfite. This approach and subsequent independent mutant analysis identified the zinc cluster transcription factor Zcf2 to govern sulfite/cysteine tolerance, as well as cysteine-inducible SSU1 and CDG1 gene expression. cdg1Δ and ssu1Δ mutants displayed reduced hypha formation in the presence of cysteine, indicating a possible role of the newly proposed mechanisms of cysteine tolerance and sulfite secretion in the pathogenicity of C. albicans. Moreover, cdg1Δ mutants induced delayed mortality in a mouse model of disseminated infection. Since sulfite is toxic and a potent reducing agent, its production by C. albicans suggests diverse roles during host adaptation and pathogenicity. PMID:23417561

  11. Ocimum sanctum essential oil inhibits virulence attributes in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Khan, Amber; Ahmad, Aijaz; Xess, Immaculata; Khan, Luqman A; Manzoor, Nikhat

    2014-03-15

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic human fungal pathogen which causes disease mainly in immunocompromised patients. Activity of hydrolytic enzymes is essential for virulence of C. albicans and so is the capacity of these cells to undergo transition from yeast to mycelial form of growth. Ocimum sanctum is cultivated worldwide for its essential oil which exhibits medicinal properties. This work evaluates the anti-virulence activity of O. sanctum essential oil (OSEO) on 22 strains of C. albicans (including a standard strain ATCC 90028) isolated from both HIV positive and HIV negative patients. Candida isolates were exposed to sub-MICs of OSEO. In vitro secretion of proteinases and phospholipases was evaluated by plate assay containing BSA and egg yolk respectively. Morphological transition from yeast to filamentous form was monitored microscopically in LSM. For genetic analysis, respective genes associated with morphological transition (HWP1), proteinase (SAP1) and phospholipase (PLB2) were also investigated by Real Time PCR (qRT-PCR). Results were analyzed using Student's t-test. OSEO inhibits morphological transition in C. albicans and had a significant inhibitory effect on extracellular secretion of proteinases and phospholipases. Expression profile of respective selected genes associated with C. albicans virulence by qRT-PCR showed a reduced expression of HWP1, SAP1 and PLB2 genes in cells treated with sub-inhibitory concentrations of OSEO. This work suggests that OSEO inhibits morphological transition in C. albicans and decreases the secretion of hydrolytic enzymes involved in the early stage of infection as well as down regulates the associated genes. Further studies will assess the clinical application of OSEO and its constituents in the treatment of fungal infections. PMID:24252340

  12. Vulvovaginal Candida albicans infections: pathogenesis, immunity and vaccine prospects.

    PubMed

    Cassone, A

    2015-05-01

    Although a number of fungal species belonging to the genus Candida can cause acute vulvovaginal infection (VVC), Candida albicans is by far the most prevalent etiological agent, particularly for the most severe chronic condition known as recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis (RVVC). This review focuses on recent advances in pathogenic mechanisms and host immune responses to C. albicans and on the utilisation of this information in the development of a vaccine to prevent and/or treat vaginal candidiasis. Currently, two vaccines with main or sole RVVC as clinical indication have completed a phase 1 clinical trial, and one of them has entered a phase 2 trial. PMID:25052208

  13. The exocyst in Candida albicans polarized secretion and filamentation.

    PubMed

    Chavez-Dozal, Alba A; Bernardo, Stella M; Lee, Samuel A

    2016-05-01

    The exocyst is an octameric complex that orchestrates the docking and tethering of vesicles to the plasma membrane during exocytosis and is fundamental for key biological processes including growth and establishment of cell polarity. Although components of the exocyst are well conserved among fungi, the specific functions of each component of the exocyst complex unique to Candida albicans biology and pathogenesis are not fully understood. This commentary describes recent findings regarding the role of exocyst subunits Sec6 and Sec15 in C. albicans filamentation and virulence. PMID:26762634

  14. Farnesol-induced apoptosis in Candida albicans is mediated by Cdr1-p extrusion and depletion of intracellular glutathione.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jingsong; Krom, Bastiaan P; Sanglard, Dominique; Intapa, Chaidan; Dawson, Clinton C; Peters, Brian M; Shirtliff, Mark E; Jabra-Rizk, Mary Ann

    2011-01-01

    Farnesol is a key derivative in the sterol biosynthesis pathway in eukaryotic cells previously identified as a quorum sensing molecule in the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans. Recently, we demonstrated that above threshold concentrations, farnesol is capable of triggering apoptosis in C. albicans. However, the exact mechanism of farnesol cytotoxicity is not fully elucidated. Lipophilic compounds such as farnesol are known to conjugate with glutathione, an antioxidant crucial for cellular detoxification against damaging compounds. Glutathione conjugates act as substrates for ATP-dependent ABC transporters and are extruded from the cell. To that end, this current study was undertaken to validate the hypothesis that farnesol conjugation with intracellular glutathione coupled with Cdr1p-mediated extrusion of glutathione conjugates, results in total glutathione depletion, oxidative stress and ultimately fungal cell death. The combined findings demonstrated a significant decrease in intracellular glutathione levels concomitant with up-regulation of CDR1 and decreased cell viability. However, addition of exogenous reduced glutathione maintained intracellular glutathione levels and enhanced viability. In contrast, farnesol toxicity was decreased in a mutant lacking CDR1, whereas it was increased in a CDR1-overexpressing strain. Further, gene expression studies demonstrated significant up-regulation of the SOD genes, primary enzymes responsible for defense against oxidative stress, with no changes in expression in CDR1. This is the first study describing the involvement of Cdr1p-mediated glutathione efflux as a mechanism preceding the farnesol-induced apoptotic process in C. albicans. Understanding of the mechanisms underlying farnesol-cytotoxicity in C. albicans may lead to the development of this redox-cycling agent as an alternative antifungal agent. PMID:22205973

  15. Rsr1 Focuses Cdc42 Activity at Hyphal Tips and Promotes Maintenance of Hyphal Development in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Pulver, Rebecca; Heisel, Timothy; Gonia, Sara; Robins, Robert; Norton, Jennifer; Haynes, Paula

    2013-01-01

    The extremely elongated morphology of fungal hyphae is dependent on the cell's ability to assemble and maintain polarized growth machinery over multiple cell cycles. The different morphologies of the fungus Candida albicans make it an excellent model organism in which to study the spatiotemporal requirements for constitutive polarized growth and the generation of different cell shapes. In C. albicans, deletion of the landmark protein Rsr1 causes defects in morphogenesis that are not predicted from study of the orthologous protein in the related yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, thus suggesting that Rsr1 has expanded functions during polarized growth in C. albicans. Here, we show that Rsr1 activity localizes to hyphal tips by the differential localization of the Rsr1 GTPase-activating protein (GAP), Bud2, and guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF), Bud5. In addition, we find that Rsr1 is needed to maintain the focused localization of hyphal polarity structures and proteins, including Bem1, a marker of the active GTP-bound form of the Rho GTPase, Cdc42. Further, our results indicate that tip-localized Cdc42 clusters are associated with the cell's ability to express a hyphal transcriptional program and that the ability to generate a focused Cdc42 cluster in early hyphae (germ tubes) is needed to maintain hyphal morphogenesis over time. We propose that in C. albicans, Rsr1 “fine-tunes” the distribution of Cdc42 activity and that self-organizing (Rsr1-independent) mechanisms of polarized growth are not sufficient to generate narrow cell shapes or to provide feedback to the transcriptional program during hyphal morphogenesis. PMID:23223038

  16. Changes in glutathione-dependent redox status and mitochondrial energetic strategies are part of the adaptive response during the filamentation process in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Hala, Guedouari; Rachel, Gergondey; Arthur, Bourdais; Océane, Vanparis; Anne-Laure, Bulteau; Jean-Michel, Camadro; Françoise, Auchère

    2014-10-01

    Candia albicans is an opportunist pathogen responsible for a large spectrum of infections, from superficial mycosis to systemic diseases called candidiasis. Its ability to grow in various morphological forms, such as unicellular budding yeast, filamentous pseudohyphae and hyphae, contributes to its survival in the diverse microenvironments it encounters in the host. During infection in vivo, C. albicans is faced with high levels of ROS generated by phagocytes, and the thiol-dependent redox status of the cells reflects their levels of oxidative stress. We investigated the role of glutathione during the transition between the yeast and hyphal forms of the pathogen, in relation to possible changes in mitochondrial bioenergetic pathways. Using various growth media and selective mutations affecting the filamentation process, we showed that C. albicans filamentation was always associated with a depletion of intracellular glutathione levels. Moreover, the induction of hypha formation resulted in general changes in thiol metabolism, including the oxidation of cell surface -SH groups and glutathione excretion. Metabolic adaptation involved TCA cycle activation, acceleration of mitochondrial respiration and a redistribution of electron transfer pathways, with an increase in the contribution of the alternative oxidase and rotenone-insensitive dehydrogenase. Changes in redox status and apparent oxidative stress may be necessary to the shift to adaptive metabolic pathways, ensuring normal mitochondrial function and ATP levels. The consumption of intracellular glutathione levels during the filamentation process may thus be the price paid by C. albicans for survival in the conditions encountered in the host. PMID:26461308

  17. Intra-amniotic Candida albicans infection induces mucosal injury and inflammation in the ovine fetal intestine

    PubMed Central

    Nikiforou, Maria; Jacobs, Esmee M.R.; Kemp, Matthew W.; Hornef, Mathias W.; Payne, Matthew S.; Saito, Masatoshi; Newnham, John P.; Janssen, Leon E.W.; Jobe, Alan H.; Kallapur, Suhas G.; Kramer, Boris W.; Wolfs, Tim G.A.M.

    2016-01-01

    Chorioamnionitis is caused by intrauterine infection with microorganisms including Candida albicans (C.albicans). Chorioamnionitis is associated with postnatal intestinal pathologies including necrotizing enterocolitis. The underlying mechanisms by which intra-amniotic C.albicans infection adversely affects the fetal gut remain unknown. Therefore, we assessed whether intra-amniotic C.albicans infection would cause intestinal inflammation and mucosal injury in an ovine model. Additionally, we tested whether treatment with the fungistatic fluconazole ameliorated the adverse intestinal outcome of intra-amniotic C.albicans infection. Pregnant sheep received intra-amniotic injections with 107 colony-forming units C.albicans or saline at 3 or 5 days before preterm delivery at 122 days of gestation. Fetuses were given intra-amniotic and intra-peritoneal fluconazole treatments 2 days after intra-amniotic administration of C.albicans. Intra-amniotic C.albicans caused intestinal colonization and invasive growth within the fetal gut with mucosal injury and intestinal inflammation, characterized by increased CD3+ lymphocytes, MPO+ cells and elevated TNF-α and IL-17 mRNA levels. Fluconazole treatment in utero decreased intestinal C.albicans colonization, mucosal injury but failed to attenuate intestinal inflammation. Intra-amniotic C.albicans caused intestinal infection, injury and inflammation. Fluconazole treatment decreased mucosal injury but failed to ameliorate C.albicans-mediated mucosal inflammation emphasizing the need to optimize the applied antifungal therapeutic strategy. PMID:27411776

  18. Intra-amniotic Candida albicans infection induces mucosal injury and inflammation in the ovine fetal intestine.

    PubMed

    Nikiforou, Maria; Jacobs, Esmee M R; Kemp, Matthew W; Hornef, Mathias W; Payne, Matthew S; Saito, Masatoshi; Newnham, John P; Janssen, Leon E W; Jobe, Alan H; Kallapur, Suhas G; Kramer, Boris W; Wolfs, Tim G A M

    2016-01-01

    Chorioamnionitis is caused by intrauterine infection with microorganisms including Candida albicans (C.albicans). Chorioamnionitis is associated with postnatal intestinal pathologies including necrotizing enterocolitis. The underlying mechanisms by which intra-amniotic C.albicans infection adversely affects the fetal gut remain unknown. Therefore, we assessed whether intra-amniotic C.albicans infection would cause intestinal inflammation and mucosal injury in an ovine model. Additionally, we tested whether treatment with the fungistatic fluconazole ameliorated the adverse intestinal outcome of intra-amniotic C.albicans infection. Pregnant sheep received intra-amniotic injections with 10(7) colony-forming units C.albicans or saline at 3 or 5 days before preterm delivery at 122 days of gestation. Fetuses were given intra-amniotic and intra-peritoneal fluconazole treatments 2 days after intra-amniotic administration of C.albicans. Intra-amniotic C.albicans caused intestinal colonization and invasive growth within the fetal gut with mucosal injury and intestinal inflammation, characterized by increased CD3(+) lymphocytes, MPO(+) cells and elevated TNF-α and IL-17 mRNA levels. Fluconazole treatment in utero decreased intestinal C.albicans colonization, mucosal injury but failed to attenuate intestinal inflammation. Intra-amniotic C.albicans caused intestinal infection, injury and inflammation. Fluconazole treatment decreased mucosal injury but failed to ameliorate C.albicans-mediated mucosal inflammation emphasizing the need to optimize the applied antifungal therapeutic strategy. PMID:27411776

  19. Zebrafish Egg Infection Model for Studying Candida albicans Adhesion Factors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yin-Zhi; Yang, Yun-Liang; Chu, Wen-Li; You, May-Su; Lo, Hsiu-Jung

    2015-01-01

    Disseminated candidiasis is associated with 30-40% mortality in severely immunocompromised patients. Among the causal agents, Candida albicans is the dominant one. Various animal models have been developed for investigating gene functions in C. albicans. Zebrafish injection models have increasingly been applied in elucidating C. albicans pathogenesis because of the conserved immunity, prolific fecundity of the zebrafish and the low costs of care systems. In this study, we established a simple, noninvasive zebrafish egg bath infection model, defined its optimal conditions, and evaluated the model with various C. albicans mutant strains. The deletion of SAP6 did not have significant effect on the virulence. By contrast, the deletion of BCR1, CPH1, EFG1, or TEC1 significantly reduced the virulence under current conditions. Furthermore, all embryos survived when co-incubated with bcr1/bcr1, cph1/cph1 efg1/efg1, efg1/efg1, or tec1/tec1 mutant cells. The results indicated that our novel zebrafish model is time-saving and cost effective. PMID:26569623

  20. Disruption of Sphingolipid Biosynthesis Blocks Phagocytosis of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Tafesse, Fikadu G; Rashidfarrokhi, Ali; Schmidt, Florian I; Freinkman, Elizaveta; Dougan, Stephanie; Dougan, Michael; Esteban, Alexandre; Maruyama, Takeshi; Strijbis, Karin; Ploegh, Hidde L

    2015-10-01

    The ability of phagocytes to clear pathogens is an essential attribute of the innate immune response. The role of signaling lipid molecules such as phosphoinositides is well established, but the role of membrane sphingolipids in phagocytosis is largely unknown. Using a genetic approach and small molecule inhibitors, we show that phagocytosis of Candida albicans requires an intact sphingolipid biosynthetic pathway. Blockade of serine-palmitoyltransferase (SPT) and ceramide synthase-enzymes involved in sphingolipid biosynthesis- by myriocin and fumonisin B1, respectively, impaired phagocytosis by phagocytes. We used CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing to generate Sptlc2-deficient DC2.4 dendritic cells, which lack serine palmitoyl transferase activity. Sptlc2-/- DC2.4 cells exhibited a stark defect in phagocytosis, were unable to bind fungal particles and failed to form a normal phagocytic cup to engulf C. albicans. Supplementing the growth media with GM1, the major ganglioside present at the cell surface, restored phagocytic activity of Sptlc2-/- DC2.4 cells. While overall membrane trafficking and endocytic pathways remained functional, Sptlc2-/- DC2.4 cells express reduced levels of the pattern recognition receptors Dectin-1 and TLR2 at the cell surface. Consistent with the in vitro data, compromised sphingolipid biosynthesis in mice sensitizes the animal to C. albicans infection. Sphingolipid biosynthesis is therefore critical for phagocytosis and in vivo clearance of C. albicans. PMID:26431038

  1. Enhanced antibody responses induced by Candida albicans in mice.

    PubMed

    Cutler, J E; Lloyd, R K

    1982-12-01

    Candida albicans may immunopotentiate antibody responses in mice to antigens unrelated to the fungus. This effect occurred best with cell-associated, rather than soluble, antigens. When dead yeasts, cell walls, or a water-soluble candidal polysaccharide were used, immunopotentiation was most dramatic when the antigen and fungal materials were given concomitantly via an intraperitoneal injection. However, mice infected with viable yeasts several days before antigen administration also developed heightened responses to the antigen. The mechanism of the C. albicans-induced adjuvanticity was not defined, but the effect seemed to correlate with induction of inflammation. The presence of C. albicans or other inflammatory agents in the peritoneal cavity caused a more rapid uptake of particulate antigen by the liver. The relationship between this event and immunopotentiation is not known. These studies demonstrate that C. albicans may have profound effects on host immune responses. Because immunological aberrations are commonly found in patients with candidiasis it may be important to determine whether some of these aberrations result from, rather than precede candidiasis. PMID:6185421

  2. Blood group glycolipids as epithelial cell receptors for Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, B J; Douglas, L J

    1996-01-01

    The role of glycosphingolipids as possible epithelial cell receptors for Candida albicans was examined by investigating the binding of biotinylated yeasts to lipids extracted from human buccal epithelial cells and separated on thin-layer chromatograms. Binding was visualized by the addition of 125I-streptavidin followed by autoradiography. Five C. albicans strains thought from earlier work to have a requirement for fucose-containing receptors all bound to the same three components in the lipid extract. A parallel chromatogram overlaid with biotinylated Ulex europaeus lectin, which is a fucose-binding lectin with a specificity for the H blood group antigen, showed that two of these glycosphingolipids carried this antigenic determinant. Preparations of crude and purified adhesin (a protein with a size of 15.7 kDa which lacked cysteine residues) from one of the strains also bound to these same two components. The third glycosphingolipid, which bound whole cells but neither preparation of adhesin, was recognized by Helix pomatia lectin, indicating that it contained N-acetylgalactosamine, possibly in the form of the A blood group antigen. Overlay assays with a sixth strain of C. albicans (GDH 2023) revealed a completely different binding pattern of four receptors, each of which contained N-acetylglucosamine. These results confirm earlier predictions about the receptor specificity of the strains made on the basis of adhesion inhibition studies and indicate that blood group antigens can act as epithelial cell receptors for C. albicans. PMID:8641797

  3. Local Probiotic Therapy for Vaginal Candida albicans Infections.

    PubMed

    Kovachev, Stefan Miladinov; Vatcheva-Dobrevska, Rossitza Stefanova

    2015-03-01

    The high rate of vaginal Candida albicans recurrence is attributed to azole resistance rates as high as 15%. The aim of this study was to determine the clinical and microbiological efficacy of standard azole therapy for treatment of vaginal C. albicans infection alone and in combination with local probiotic as well as the effects on vaginal microbiota. This study included 436 women with vaginal candidiasis randomly assigned to two treatment groups. The first group, with 207 patients (12 dropouts), was administered 150 mg fluconazole and a single vaginal globule of fenticonazole (600 mg) on the same day. The second group of 209 patients (8 dropouts) followed the same treatment schedule; however, ten applications of a vaginal probiotic containing Lactobacillus acidophilus, L. rhamnosus, Streptococcus thermophilus, and L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus were also administered beginning the fifth day after azole treatment. Microbiological analysis of the therapy efficacy in the first treatment group showed C. albicans resistance in over 30% of patients. Clinical complaints persisted after treatment administration in 79.7% (n = 165) of women in this group. Clinical complaints in the second group decreased to 31.1% (n = 65) and microbiological efficacy also improved among investigated parameters, from 93.7% (n = 193) to 95.2% (n = 198). The local application of probiotics after administration of combined azoles for treatment of vaginal C. albicans infections increases therapy efficacy and could prevent relapse. PMID:25362524

  4. Chlorhexidine markedly potentiates the oxidants scavenging abilities of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Ginsburg, I; Koren, E; Feuerstein, O; Zogakis, I P; Shalish, M; Gorelik, S

    2015-10-01

    The oxidant scavenging ability (OSA) of catalase-rich Candida albicans is markedly enhanced by chlorhexidine digluconate (CHX), polymyxin B, the bile salt ursodeoxycholate and by lysophosphatidylcholine, which all act as detergents facilitating the penetration of oxidants and their intracellular decomposition. Quantifications of the OSA of Candida albicans were measured by a highly sensitive luminol-dependent chemiluminescence assay and by the Thurman's assay, to quantify hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The OSA enhancing activity by CHX depends to some extent on the media on which candida grew. The OSA of candida treated by CHX was modulated by whole human saliva, red blood cells, lysozyme, cationic peptides and by polyphenols. Concentrations of CHX, which killed over 95 % of Candida albicans cells, did not affect the cells' abilities to scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS). The OSA of Candida cells treated by CHX is highly refractory to H2O2 (50 mM) but is strongly inhibited by hypochlorous acid, lecithin, trypan blue and by heparin. We speculate that similarly to catalase-rich red blood cells, Candida albicans and additional catalase-rich microbiota may also have the ability to scavenge oxidants and thus can protect catalase-negative anaerobes and facultative anaerobes cariogenic streptococci against peroxide and thus secure their survival in the oral cavity. PMID:26223507

  5. Inhibition of Candida albicans virulence factors by novel levofloxacin derivatives.

    PubMed

    Shafreen, Raja Mohamed Beema; Raja Mohamed, Beema Shafreen; Muthamil, Subramanian; Subramanian, Muthamil; Pandian, Shunmugiah Karutha; Shunmugiah, Karutha Pandian

    2014-08-01

    Candida albicans is an important opportunistic fungal pathogen, responsible for biofilm associated infections in immunocompromised patients. The aim of the present study was to investigate the antibiofilm properties of novel levofloxacin derivatives on C. albicans biofilms. The levofloxacin derivatives at their Biofilm Inhibitory Concentrations (BIC) were able to inhibit the biofilms of C. albicans, the yeast-to-hyphal transition and were also able to disrupt their mature biofilms. Furthermore, Real-time PCR analysis showed that the expression of ergosterol biosynthesis pathway gene (ERG11) and the efflux pump-encoding genes (CDR1 and MDR1) was decreased upon treatment with the levofloxacin derivatives. The total ergosterol content quantified using UV spectrophotomer showed decrease in ergosterol in the presence of levofloxacin derivatives. Overall, levofloxacin derivatives (6a, 6c and 7d) are capable of inhibiting C. albicans virulence factors. Therefore, these compounds with potential therapeutic implications can be used as new strategy to treat biofilm-related candidal infections. PMID:24723295

  6. Transformations of inorganic mercury by Candida albicans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Yannai, S.; Berdicevsky, I.; Duek, L. )

    1991-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans were incubated with 0.25, 0.5, or 0.75 {mu}g of Hg (as HgCl{sub 2}) per ml of Nelson's medium in the presence of trace amounts of oxygen at 28{degree}C for 12 days. Two control media were used, one without added Hg and one without yeast inoculum. Yeast cell growth was estimated after 1, 2, 3, and 8 days of incubation. The contents of organomercury in the system and of elemental mercury released from the media and collected in traps were determined at the end of the experiments. The results were as follows: (1) C. albicans was the more mercury-resistant species, but both yeast species failed to grown in the media containing 0.75 {mu}g of Hg per ml.; (2) The amounts of organomercury produced by the two species were proportional to the amount of HgCl{sub 2} added to the medium. In all cases C. albicans produced considerably larger amounts of methylmercury than S. cerevisiae; (3) The amounts of elemental Hg produced were inversely proportional to the HgCl{sub 2} level added in the case of S. cerevisiae but were all similar in the case of C. albicans;and (4) Neither organomercury nor elemental Hg was produced in any of the control media.

  7. Disruption of Sphingolipid Biosynthesis Blocks Phagocytosis of Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Florian I.; Freinkman, Elizaveta; Dougan, Stephanie; Dougan, Michael; Esteban, Alexandre; Maruyama, Takeshi; Strijbis, Karin; Ploegh, Hidde L.

    2015-01-01

    The ability of phagocytes to clear pathogens is an essential attribute of the innate immune response. The role of signaling lipid molecules such as phosphoinositides is well established, but the role of membrane sphingolipids in phagocytosis is largely unknown. Using a genetic approach and small molecule inhibitors, we show that phagocytosis of Candida albicans requires an intact sphingolipid biosynthetic pathway. Blockade of serine-palmitoyltransferase (SPT) and ceramide synthase-enzymes involved in sphingolipid biosynthesis- by myriocin and fumonisin B1, respectively, impaired phagocytosis by phagocytes. We used CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing to generate Sptlc2-deficient DC2.4 dendritic cells, which lack serine palmitoyl transferase activity. Sptlc2-/- DC2.4 cells exhibited a stark defect in phagocytosis, were unable to bind fungal particles and failed to form a normal phagocytic cup to engulf C. albicans. Supplementing the growth media with GM1, the major ganglioside present at the cell surface, restored phagocytic activity of Sptlc2-/- DC2.4 cells. While overall membrane trafficking and endocytic pathways remained functional, Sptlc2-/- DC2.4 cells express reduced levels of the pattern recognition receptors Dectin-1 and TLR2 at the cell surface. Consistent with the in vitro data, compromised sphingolipid biosynthesis in mice sensitizes the animal to C. albicans infection. Sphingolipid biosynthesis is therefore critical for phagocytosis and in vivo clearance of C. albicans. PMID:26431038

  8. Two mechanisms of butenafine action in Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Iwatani, W; Arika, T; Yamaguchi, H

    1993-01-01

    The mechanism of action of a new benzylamine antimycotic, butenafine hydrochloride, was studied in Candida albicans by using the thiocarbamate antimycotic tolnaftate as a reference drug. Butenafine completely inhibited the growth of a test strain of C. albicans at 25 micrograms/ml and was cidal at 50 micrograms/ml. Tolnaftate did not show any growth-inhibitory activity up to 100 micrograms/ml. Both butenafine and tolnaftate inhibited squalene epoxidation in C. albicans, with 50% inhibitory concentrations being 0.57 and 0.17 microgram/ml, respectively. Butenafine, but not tolnaftate, induced the release of appreciable amounts of Pi from C. albicans cells at 12.5 micrograms/ml. This effect of butenafine was augmented when the cells were pretreated with tolnaftate. The results suggest that the direct membrane-damaging effect of butenafine may play a major role in its anticandidal activity and that the drug-induced alteration in the cellular sterol composition renders the cell membrane more susceptible to the membrane-damaging effect of this drug. PMID:8494375

  9. Two mechanisms of butenafine action in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Iwatani, W; Arika, T; Yamaguchi, H

    1993-04-01

    The mechanism of action of a new benzylamine antimycotic, butenafine hydrochloride, was studied in Candida albicans by using the thiocarbamate antimycotic tolnaftate as a reference drug. Butenafine completely inhibited the growth of a test strain of C. albicans at 25 micrograms/ml and was cidal at 50 micrograms/ml. Tolnaftate did not show any growth-inhibitory activity up to 100 micrograms/ml. Both butenafine and tolnaftate inhibited squalene epoxidation in C. albicans, with 50% inhibitory concentrations being 0.57 and 0.17 microgram/ml, respectively. Butenafine, but not tolnaftate, induced the release of appreciable amounts of Pi from C. albicans cells at 12.5 micrograms/ml. This effect of butenafine was augmented when the cells were pretreated with tolnaftate. The results suggest that the direct membrane-damaging effect of butenafine may play a major role in its anticandidal activity and that the drug-induced alteration in the cellular sterol composition renders the cell membrane more susceptible to the membrane-damaging effect of this drug. PMID:8494375

  10. Candida albicans in oral biofilms could prevent caries.

    PubMed

    Willems, Hubertine Marjoleine; Kos, Kevin; Jabra-Rizk, Mary Ann; Krom, Bastiaan P

    2016-07-01

    Streptococcus mutans is a Gram-positive bacterium involved in development to caries, the most common infectious disease of our time. Streptococcus mutans interacts with other microbes, like the fungus Candida albicans and both are commonly isolated from patients with caries. Since the role of C. albicans in caries remains unknown, our aim was to unravel this using an in vitro dual-species cariogenic oral biofilm model. Biofilms were grown for 24-72 h on glass cover slips or hydroxyapatite (HA) disks to mimic the surface of teeth. Medium pH, lactic acid production capacity and calcium release from HA disks were determined. All 24-h biofilms had external pH values below the critical pH of 5.5 where enamel dissolves. In contrast, 72-h dual-species biofilms had significantly higher pH (above the critical pH) and consequently decreased calcium release compared to single-species S. mutans biofilms. Counter intuitively, lactic acid production and growth of S. mutans were increased in 72-h dual-species biofilms. Candida albicans modulates the pH in dual-species biofilms to values above the critical pH where enamel dissolves. Our results suggest that C. albicans is not by definition a cariogenic microorganism; it could prevent caries by actively increasing pH preventing mineral loss. PMID:27129365

  11. Effects of ambroxol on Candida albicans growth and biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Rene, Hernandez-Delgadillo; José, Martínez-Sanmiguel Juan; Isela, Sánchez-Nájera Rosa; Claudio, Cabral-Romero

    2014-04-01

    Typically, the onset of candidiasis is characterised by the appearance of a biofilm of Candida albicans, which is associated with several diseases including oral candidiasis in young and elderly people. The objective of this work was to investigate the in vitro fungicidal activity as well as the antibiofilm activity of ambroxol (AMB) against C. albicans growth. In the present investigation, the fungicidal activity of AMB was established using the cell viability 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Also the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of AMB required to inhibit the fungal growth was determined. Simultaneously, the antibiofilm activity of AMB was evaluated using fluorescence microscopy. The study revealed that 2 mg ml(-1) of AMB exhibited higher fungicidal activity than 3.3 mg ml(-1) of terbinafine, one of most common commercial antifungals. A MIC of 1 mg ml(-1) was determined for AMB to interfere with C. albicans growth. Furthermore, AMB was found to be effective in inhibiting the biofilm formation of C. albicans and exerted its fungicidal activity against the fungal cells interspersed in the preformed biofilm. The study suggests a potential role of the mucolytic agent, AMB, as an interesting therapeutic alternative in the treatment of oral candidiasis. PMID:24224742

  12. Deltamethrin Increases Candida albicans infection susceptibility in mice.

    PubMed

    Rehman, H; Mohan, A; Tabassum, H; Ahmad, F; Rahman, S; Parvez, S; Raisuddin, S

    2011-05-01

    Deltamethrin, an alpha-cyano type II synthetic pyrethroid insecticide, is used to control a wide range of insects on a variety of crops and vectors of diseases. Deltamethrin has been previously reported for its immunotoxic effects and therefore its exposure may affect the host resistance to infection and tumour challenge. Effect of exposure of deltamethrin on host resistance to Candida albicans infection was examined in Swiss albino mice. The objective of this study was to investigate the modulatory action of deltamethrin in C. albicans infected mice. The dose of deltamethrin was initially tested and selected from our previous study (18 mg/kg). Percentage of infection in deltamethrin treated animals increased faster when compared to that of the controls. Deltamethrin exposure along with C. albicans infection caused alteration of humoral immune response. The number of colony forming unit in liver and spleen were also found to be significantly increased in the treated group. The results from our present study suggest that deltamethrin exhibits an immunosuppressive effect and has a negative impact on host resistance to C. albicans infection. PMID:21272049

  13. Hydrophobic polyoxins are resistant to intracellular degradation in Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, H A; Shenbagamurthi, P; Naider, F; Kundu, B; Becker, J M

    1986-01-01

    Two novel polyoxins, N-epsilon-(octanoyl)-lysyl-uracil polyoxin C (Oct-Lys-UPOC) and N-gamma-(octyl)-glutaminyluracil polyoxin C (Oct-Gln-UPOC), were synthesized by reacting uracil polyoxin C with the appropriate amino acid p-nitrophenyl ester. Oct-Lys-UPOC and Oct-Gln-UPOC were strong inhibitors (Kis = 1.7 X 10(-6)M) of chitin synthetase from Candida albicans membrane preparations. In a permeabilized-cell assay, Oct-Gln-UPOC had a 10-fold-lower inhibitory activity toward chitin synthetase than did the Oct-Lys-UPOC analog. Both compounds were resistant to hydrolysis by a cell extract of C. albicans H317; however, Oct-Gln-UPOC was hydrolyzed with a half-life of 23 min by a permeabilized-cell preparation. Oct-Lys-UPOC was resistant to hydrolysis by permeabilized cells. Oct-Gln-UPOC and Oct-Lys-UPOC did not compete with the transport of peptides or uridine into the cell. At concentrations up to 2 mM these two new polyoxins were ineffective in the inhibition of cell growth or reduction of cell viability, but they induced aberrant morphologies in C. albicans at a concentration of 0.25 mM. These data suggest that polyoxins containing hydrophobic amino acids retain strong chitin synthetase inhibitory activity and are resistant to cellular hydrolysis. They provide the first example of effective synthetic chitin synthetase inhibitors which are stable inside C. albicans. PMID:3524423

  14. Reduced inhibition of Candida albicans adhesion by saliva from patients receiving oral cancer therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Umazume, M; Ueta, E; Osaki, T

    1995-01-01

    The effect of saliva on the adhesion of Candida albicans to epithelial cells was examined in vitro by using saliva from healthy controls and patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma. The adhesion of C. albicans to established epithelial tumor cells was reduced by 40% by salivary treatment of the C. albicans or epithelial cells. The inhibitory activity of saliva was almost completely abolished by anti-secretory immunoglobulin A antibody, concanavalin A, and mannose. Compared with saliva from healthy individuals, that from patients who had received chemoradiotherapy for oral carcinoma showed reduced suppression of C. albicans adhesion, which accompanied decreased salivary secretory immunoglobulin A and lactoferrin concentrations. A greater number of C. albicans cells adhered to buccal cells obtained from patients who had received chemoradiotherapy than to those from healthy individuals. Treatment of either epithelial cells or C. albicans with anticancer drugs induced an increase in adherence of epithelial cells and yeast cells. In contrast, concanavalin A- and mannose-pretreated C. albicans exhibited reduced adhesion to epithelial cells. No further decrease of C. albicans adhesion was observed when both epithelial cells and yeast phase C. albicans were treated with mannose. In conclusion, the inhibition of C. albicans adhesion by saliva depends largely on mannose residues on salivary glycoproteins and mannose is one of the binding ligands on both C. albicans and epithelial cells. In addition, anticancer therapy may induce oral C. albicans overgrowth by decreasing salivation and the concentrations of glycoproteins in saliva inhibiting C. albicans adhesion and by increasing the adhesive properties of both C. albicans and oral epithelial cells. PMID:7714204

  15. Correlation of atherogenesis with an infection of Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Nurgeldiyeva, Maya J; Hojakuliyev, Bayram G; Muhammedov, Merdan B

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To study contents of atherosclerotic plaques for the presence of fungi of the genus Candida; and an analysis of some immunological and biochemical indices in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) that are positive for Candida albicans. Materials and methods: To test for the presence of fungi in an atherosclerotic plaque, we used a method developed by us (patent NO 531, a priority from 6/28/2010). A total of 47 atherosclerotic plaques were obtained during 20 autopsies. In addition, 80 individuals (58 male, 22 female; age range from 29 to 85) with acute coronary syndrome were subjected to a blood biochemical test, including quantification of TNF-α levels and IgG and IgM to Candida albicans was determined. Results: Fungi of the genus Candida were identified in 31.9% (15 out of 47) of atherosclerotic plaques. Particularly, Candida krusii and Candida grabrata were identified in overwhelming majority, although solitary colonies of Candida tropicalis and a single colony of Candida albicans were also detected. 80 (100%) patients were negative for IgM, but 30 (37.5%) were positive for IgG to Candida albicans. TNF-α was detected in a smaller quantity of IgG-negative patients (36.7%) relative to patients of IgG-positive group (70%), however its levels were considerably above in the first group (511.73±195.80 pg/ml) than in the second one (326.68±259.91 pg/ml, P < 0.05). Differences in the levels of ASAT and ALAT in patients positive to Candida albicans and negative for TNF-α were significantly higher than in the rest of patients. Conclusion: It is conceivable that fungi of the genus Candida are capable of inducing an inflammation of the vascular wall that in turn can lead to the development of atherosclerosis. PMID:25232398

  16. Candida/Candida biofilms. First description of dual-species Candida albicans/C. rugosa biofilm.

    PubMed

    Martins, Carlos Henrique Gomes; Pires, Regina Helena; Cunha, Aline Oliveira; Pereira, Cristiane Aparecida Martins; Singulani, Junya de Lacorte; Abrão, Fariza; Moraes, Thais de; Mendes-Giannini, Maria José Soares

    2016-04-01

    Denture liners have physical properties that favour plaque accumulation and colonization by Candida species, irritating oral tissues and causing denture stomatitis. To isolate and determine the incidence of oral Candida species in dental prostheses, oral swabs were collected from the dental prostheses of 66 patients. All the strains were screened for their ability to form biofilms; both monospecies and dual-species combinations were tested. Candida albicans (63 %) was the most frequently isolated microorganism; Candida tropicalis (14 %), Candida glabrata (13 %), Candida rugosa (5 %), Candida parapsilosis (3 %), and Candida krusei (2 %) were also detected. The XTT assay showed that C. albicans SC5314 possessed a biofilm-forming ability significantly higher (p < 0.001) than non-albicans Candida strains, after 6 h 37 °C. The total C. albicans CFU from a dual-species biofilm was less than the total CFU of a monospecies C. albicans biofilm. In contrast to the profuse hyphae verified in monospecies C. albicans biofilms, micrographies showed that the C. albicans/non-albicans Candida biofilms consisted of sparse yeast forms and profuse budding yeast cells that generated a network. These results suggested that C. albicans and the tested Candida species could co-exist in biofilms displaying apparent antagonism. The study provide the first description of C. albicans/C. rugosa mixed biofilm. PMID:27020154

  17. Candida glabrata Binding to Candida albicans Hyphae Enables Its Development in Oropharyngeal Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Tati, Swetha; Davidow, Peter; McCall, Andrew; Hwang-Wong, Elizabeth; Rojas, Isolde G.; Cormack, Brendan; Edgerton, Mira

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic mechanisms of Candida glabrata in oral candidiasis, especially because of its inability to form hyphae, are understudied. Since both Candida albicans and C. glabrata are frequently co-isolated in oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC), we examined their co-adhesion in vitro and observed adhesion of C. glabrata only to C. albicans hyphae microscopically. Mice were infected sublingually with C. albicans or C. glabrata individually, or with both species concurrently, to study their ability to cause OPC. Infection with C. glabrata alone resulted in negligible infection of tongues; however, colonization by C. glabrata was increased by co-infection or a pre-established infection with C. albicans. Furthermore, C. glabrata required C. albicans for colonization of tongues, since decreasing C. albicans burden with fluconazole also reduced C. glabrata. C. albicans hyphal wall adhesins Als1 and Als3 were important for in vitro adhesion of C. glabrata and to establish OPC. C. glabrata cell wall protein coding genes EPA8, EPA19, AWP2, AWP7, and CAGL0F00181 were implicated in mediating adhesion to C. albicans hyphae and remarkably, their expression was induced by incubation with germinated C. albicans. Thus, we found a near essential requirement for the presence of C. albicans for both initial colonization and establishment of OPC infection by C. glabrata. PMID:27029023

  18. Recurrent Candida albicans Ventriculitis Treated with Intraventricular Liposomal Amphotericin B

    PubMed Central

    Toprak, Demet; Öcal Demir, Sevliya; Kadayifci, Eda Kepenekli; Türel, Özden; Soysal, Ahmet; Bakir, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) infection with Candida is rare but significant because of its high morbidity and mortality. When present, it is commonly seen among immunocompromised and hospitalized patients. Herein, we describe a case of a four-year-old boy with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) who experienced recurrent Candida albicans meningitis. The patient was treated successfully with intravenous liposomal amphotericin B at first attack, but 25 days after discharge he was readmitted to hospital with symptoms of meningitis. Candida albicans was grown in CFS culture again and cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed ventriculitis. We administered liposomal amphotericin B both intravenously and intraventricularly and favorable result was achieved without any adverse effects. Intraventricular amphotericin B may be considered for the treatment of recurrent CNS Candida infections in addition to intravenous administration. PMID:26558119

  19. Th17 cells in immunity to Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Santos, Nydiaris; Gaffen, Sarah L.

    2012-01-01

    Our understanding of immunity to fungal pathogens has advanced considerably in recent years. Particularly significant have been the parallel discoveries in the C-type lectin receptor family and the Th effector arms of immunity, especially Th17 cells and their signature cytokine IL-17. Many of these studies have focused on the most common human fungal pathogen Candida albicans, which is typically a commensal microbe in healthy individuals but causes various disease manifestations in immunocompromised hosts, ranging from mild mucosal infections to lethal disseminated disease. Here, we discuss emerging fundamental discoveries with C. albicans that have informed our overall molecular understanding of fungal immunity. In particular, we focus on the importance of pattern recognition receptor-mediated fungal recognition and subsequent IL-17 responses in host defense against mucosal candidiasis. In light of these recent advances, we also discuss the implications for anti-cytokine biologic therapy and vaccine development. PMID:22607796

  20. IL-17 Signaling in Host Defense Against Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Gaffen, Sarah L.; Hernandez-Santos, Nydiaris; Peterson, Alanna C.

    2012-01-01

    The discovery of the Th17 lineage in 2005 triggered a major change in how immunity to infectious diseases is viewed. Fungal infections, in particular, have long been a relatively understudied area of investigation in terms of the host immune response. Candida albicans is a commensal yeast that colonizes mucosal sites and skin. In healthy individuals it is non-pathogenic, but in conditions of immune deficiency, this organism can cause a variety of infections associated with considerable morbidity. Candida can also cause disseminated infections that have a high mortality rate and are a major clinical problem in hospital settings. Although immunity to Candida albicans was long considered to be mediated by Th1 cells, new data in both rodent models and in humans have revealed an essential role for the Th17 lineage, and in particular its signature cytokine IL-17. PMID:21717069

  1. Imaging morphogenesis of Candida albicans during infection in a live animal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Soumya; Dolan, Kristy; Foster, Thomas H.; Wellington, Melanie

    2010-01-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic human fungal pathogen that requires an intact host immune response to prevent disease. Thus, studying host-pathogen interactions is critical to understanding and preventing this disease. We report a new model infection system in which ongoing C. albicans infections can be imaged at high spatial resolution in the ears of living mice. Intradermal inoculation into mouse ears with a C. albicans strain expressing green fluorescent protein results in systemic C. albicans infection that can be imaged in vivo using confocal microscopy. We observed filamentous growth of the organism in vivo as well as formation of microabscesses. This model system will allow us to gain significant new information about C. albicans pathogenesis through studies of host-C. albicans interactions in the native environment.

  2. Systematic Analysis of the Lysine Acetylome in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaowei; Qian, Guanyu; Yi, Xingling; Li, Xiaofang; Liu, Weida

    2016-08-01

    Candida albicans (C. albicans) is a worldwide cause of fungal infectious diseases. As a general post-translational modification (PTM), lysine acetylation of proteins play an important regulatory role in almost every cell. In our research, we used a high-resolution proteomic technique (LC-MS/MS) to present the comprehensive analysis of the acetylome in C. albicans. In general, we detected 477 acetylated proteins among all 9038 proteins (5.28%) in C. albicans, which had 1073 specific acetylated sites. The bioinformatics analysis of the acetylome showed a significant role in the regulation of metabolism. To be more precise, proteins involved in carbon metabolism and biosynthesis were the underlying objectives of acetylation. Besides, through the study of the acetylome, we found a universal rule in acetylated motifs: the +4, +5, or +6 position, which is an alkaline residue with a long side chain (K or R), and the +1 or +2 position, which is a residue with a long side chain (Y, H, W, or F). To the best of our knowledge, all screening acetylated histone sites of this study have not been previously reported. Moreover, protein-protein interaction network (PPI) study demonstrated that a variety of connections in glycolysis/gluconeogenesis, oxidative phosphorylation, and the ribosome were modulated by acetylation and phosphorylation, but the phosphorylated proteins in oxidative phosphorylation PPI network were not abundant, which indicated that acetylation may have a more significant effect than phosphorylation on oxidative phosphorylation. This is the first study of the acetylome in human pathogenic fungi, providing an important starting point for the in-depth discovery of the functional analysis of acetylated proteins in such fungal pathogens. PMID:27297460

  3. Mitochondrial two-component signaling systems in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Mavrianos, John; Berkow, Elizabeth L; Desai, Chirayu; Pandey, Alok; Batish, Mona; Rabadi, Marissa J; Barker, Katherine S; Pain, Debkumar; Rogers, P David; Eugenin, Eliseo A; Chauhan, Neeraj

    2013-06-01

    Two-component signal transduction pathways are one of the primary means by which microorganisms respond to environmental signals. These signaling cascades originated in prokaryotes and were inherited by eukaryotes via endosymbiotic lateral gene transfer from ancestral cyanobacteria. We report here that the nuclear genome of the pathogenic fungus Candida albicans contains elements of a two-component signaling pathway that seem to be targeted to the mitochondria. The C. albicans two-component response regulator protein Srr1 (stress response regulator 1) contains a mitochondrial targeting sequence at the N terminus, and fluorescence microscopy reveals mitochondrial localization of green fluorescent protein-tagged Srr1. Moreover, phylogenetic analysis indicates that C. albicans Srr1 is more closely related to histidine kinases and response regulators found in marine bacteria than are other two-component proteins present in the fungi. These data suggest conservation of this protein during the evolutionary transition from endosymbiont to a subcellular organelle. We used microarray analysis to determine whether the phenotypes observed with a srr1Δ/Δ mutant could be correlated with gene transcriptional changes. The expression of mitochondrial genes was altered in the srr1Δ/Δ null mutant in comparison to their expression in the wild type. Furthermore, apoptosis increased significantly in the srr1Δ/Δ mutant strain compared to the level of apoptosis in the wild type, suggesting the activation of a mitochondrion-dependent apoptotic cell death pathway in the srr1Δ/Δ mutant. Collectively, this study shows for the first time that a lower eukaryote like C. albicans possesses a two-component response regulator protein that has survived in mitochondria and regulates a subset of genes whose functions are associated with the oxidative stress response and programmed cell death (apoptosis). PMID:23584995

  4. Oxidant-specific regulation of protein synthesis in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Sundaram, Arunkumar; Grant, Chris M

    2014-06-01

    Eukaryotic cells typically respond to stress conditions by inhibiting global protein synthesis. The initiation phase is the main target of regulation and represents a key control point for eukaryotic gene expression. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae and mammalian cells this is achieved by phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (eIF2α). We have examined how the fungal pathogen Candida albicans responds to oxidative stress conditions and show that oxidants including hydrogen peroxide, the heavy metal cadmium and the thiol oxidant diamide inhibit translation initiation. The inhibition in response to hydrogen peroxide and cadmium largely depends on phosphorylation of eIF2α since minimal inhibition is observed in a gcn2 mutant. In contrast, translation initiation is inhibited in a Gcn2-independent manner in response to diamide. Our data indicate that all three oxidants inhibit growth of C. albicans in a dose-dependent manner, however, loss of GCN2 does not improve growth in the presence of hydrogen peroxide or cadmium. Examination of translational activity indicates that these oxidants inhibit translation at a post-initiation phase which may account for the growth inhibition in a gcn2 mutant. As well as inhibiting global translation initiation, phosphorylation of eIF2α also enhances expression of the GCN4 mRNA in yeast via a well-known translational control mechanism. We show that C. albicans GCN4 is similarly induced in response to oxidative stress conditions and Gcn4 is specifically required for hydrogen peroxide tolerance. Thus, the response of C. albicans to oxidative stress is mediated by oxidant-specific regulation of translation initiation and we discuss our findings in comparison to other eukaryotes including the yeast S. cerevisiae. PMID:24699161

  5. Mitochondrial Two-Component Signaling Systems in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Mavrianos, John; Berkow, Elizabeth L.; Desai, Chirayu; Pandey, Alok; Batish, Mona; Rabadi, Marissa J.; Barker, Katherine S.; Pain, Debkumar; Rogers, P. David; Eugenin, Eliseo A.

    2013-01-01

    Two-component signal transduction pathways are one of the primary means by which microorganisms respond to environmental signals. These signaling cascades originated in prokaryotes and were inherited by eukaryotes via endosymbiotic lateral gene transfer from ancestral cyanobacteria. We report here that the nuclear genome of the pathogenic fungus Candida albicans contains elements of a two-component signaling pathway that seem to be targeted to the mitochondria. The C. albicans two-component response regulator protein Srr1 (stress response regulator 1) contains a mitochondrial targeting sequence at the N terminus, and fluorescence microscopy reveals mitochondrial localization of green fluorescent protein-tagged Srr1. Moreover, phylogenetic analysis indicates that C. albicans Srr1 is more closely related to histidine kinases and response regulators found in marine bacteria than are other two-component proteins present in the fungi. These data suggest conservation of this protein during the evolutionary transition from endosymbiont to a subcellular organelle. We used microarray analysis to determine whether the phenotypes observed with a srr1Δ/Δ mutant could be correlated with gene transcriptional changes. The expression of mitochondrial genes was altered in the srr1Δ/Δ null mutant in comparison to their expression in the wild type. Furthermore, apoptosis increased significantly in the srr1Δ/Δ mutant strain compared to the level of apoptosis in the wild type, suggesting the activation of a mitochondrion-dependent apoptotic cell death pathway in the srr1Δ/Δ mutant. Collectively, this study shows for the first time that a lower eukaryote like C. albicans possesses a two-component response regulator protein that has survived in mitochondria and regulates a subset of genes whose functions are associated with the oxidative stress response and programmed cell death (apoptosis). PMID:23584995

  6. Binding of the extracellular matrix component entactin to Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    López-Ribot, J L; Chaffin, W L

    1994-01-01

    We have investigated the interaction between Candida albicans and entactin, a recently characterized glycoprotein present in the extracellular matrix, especially in the basement membrane. Organisms of both the yeast and the hyphal morphologies of the fungus had the ability to bind recombinant entactin, as detected by an indirect immunofluorescence assay. Material present in the 2-mercaptoethanol cell wall extracts from both C. albicans growth forms was capable of binding to immobilized recombinant entactin in a dose-dependent manner. Binding to entactin was approximately twice that observed for laminin. Binding of an extract component(s) to entactin was partially inhibited by an Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser peptide. A polyclonal antientactin antiserum, as well as a pooled antiserum preparation raised against components present in different C. albicans cell wall extracts, completely or almost completely abolished binding. The existence of morphology-specific receptor-like molecules which bind to different domains of the entactin molecule was ruled out in a competition binding assay. The entactin-binding material(s) in the cell wall also displayed some ability to bind laminin and fibronectin, since preadsorption in the presence of these extracellular matrix components resulted in reduction of binding to entactin. Moieties with a molecular mass of approximately 25, 44, and 65 kDa present in the 2-mercaptoethanol cell wall extracts from both blastoconidia and germ tubes were detected in a ligand affinity blotting experiment as having the ability to bind entactin. Interactions between C. albicans and entactin could be important in mediating adhesion of the fungus to the host tissues and may play a role in the establishment of the disseminated form of the disease. Images PMID:7927722

  7. Bax-induced cell death in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    De Smet, Kris; Eberhardt, Ines; Reekmans, Rieka; Contreras, Roland

    2004-12-01

    Bax is a pro-apoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family of proteins involved in the regulation of genetically programmed cell death in mammalian cells. It has been shown that heterologous expression of Bax in several yeast species, such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Pichia pastoris, also induces cell death. In this study we investigated the effects of Bax expression in the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans. Cell death inducing expression of Bax required a synthetic BAX gene that was codon-optimized for expression in Candida albicans. Expression of this BAX gene resulted in growth inhibition and cell death. By fusing Bax with the yeast enhanced green fluorescent protein of Aequoria victoria, the cell death-inducing effect of Bax was increased due to reduced proteolytic degradation of Bax. Using this fusion protein we showed that, upon expression in C. albicans, Bax co-localizes with the mitochondria. Furthermore, we showed for the first time that expression of Bax in yeast causes the mitochondria, which are normally distributed throughout the cell, to cluster in the perinuclear region. PMID:15565645

  8. Structural characterization of CA1462, the Candida albicans thiamine pyrophosphokinase

    PubMed Central

    Santini, Sébastien; Monchois, Vincent; Mouz, Nicolas; Sigoillot, Cécile; Rousselle, Tristan; Claverie, Jean-Michel; Abergel, Chantal

    2008-01-01

    Background In search of new antifungal targets of potential interest for pharmaceutical companies, we initiated a comparative genomics study to identify the most promising protein-coding genes in fungal genomes. One criterion was the protein sequence conservation between reference pathogenic genomes. A second criterion was that the corresponding gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae should be essential. Since thiamine pyrophosphate is an essential product involved in a variety of metabolic pathways, proteins responsible for its production satisfied these two criteria. Results We report the enzymatic characterization and the crystallographic structure of the Candida albicans Thiamine pyrophosphokinase. The protein was co-crystallized with thiamine or thiamine-PNP. Conclusion The presence of an inorganic phosphate in the crystallographic structure opposite the known AMP binding site relative to the thiamine moiety suggests that a second AMP molecule could be accommodated in the C. albicans structure. Together with the crystallographic structures of the enzyme/substrate complexes this suggests the existence of a secondary, less specific, nucleotide binding site in the Candida albicans thiamine pyrophosphokinase which could transiently serve during the release or the binding of ATP. The structures also highlight a conserved Glutamine residue (Q138) which could interact with the ATP α-phosphate and act as gatekeeper. Finally, the TPK/Thiamine-PNP complex is consistent with a one step mechanism of pyrophosphorylation. PMID:18652651

  9. Nanocapsules with glycerol monolaurate: Effects on Candida albicans biofilms.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Leonardo Quintana Soares; Santos, Cayane Genro; Vaucher, Rodrigo de Almeida; Raffin, Renata Platcheck; Santos, Roberto Christ Vianna

    2016-08-01

    Candida albicans does not only occur in the free living planktonic form but also grows in surface-attached biofilm communities. Moreover, these biofilms appear to be the most common lifestyle and are involved in the majority of human Candida infections. Nanoparticles can be used as an alternative to conventional antimicrobial agents and can also act as carriers for antibiotics and other drugs. In view of this, the aim of the study was develop, characterize and verify the anti-biofilm potential of GML Nanocapsules against C. albicans. The GML Nanocapsules showed mean diameter of 193.2 nm, polydispersion index of 0.044, zeta potential of -23.3 mV and pH 6.32. The microdilution assay showed MIC of 15.5 μg mL(-1) to GML Nanocapsules and 31.25 μg mL(-1) to GML. The anti-biofilm assay showed the significantly reduction of biomass of C. albicans biofilm treated with GML Nanocapsules while the GML does not exhibit effect. The kinetic assay demonstrated that at 48 h, the GML Nanocapsules reduce 94% of formed biofilm. The positive results suggest the promisor alternative for this public health problem that is biofilm infections. PMID:27241236

  10. Candida albicans repetitive elements display epigenetic diversity and plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Freire-Benéitez, Verónica; Price, R. Jordan; Tarrant, Daniel; Berman, Judith; Buscaino, Alessia

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptionally silent heterochromatin is associated with repetitive DNA. It is poorly understood whether and how heterochromatin differs between different organisms and whether its structure can be remodelled in response to environmental signals. Here, we address this question by analysing the chromatin state associated with DNA repeats in the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans. Our analyses indicate that, contrary to model systems, each type of repetitive element is assembled into a distinct chromatin state. Classical Sir2-dependent hypoacetylated and hypomethylated chromatin is associated with the rDNA locus while telomeric regions are assembled into a weak heterochromatin that is only mildly hypoacetylated and hypomethylated. Major Repeat Sequences, a class of tandem repeats, are assembled into an intermediate chromatin state bearing features of both euchromatin and heterochromatin. Marker gene silencing assays and genome-wide RNA sequencing reveals that C. albicans heterochromatin represses expression of repeat-associated coding and non-coding RNAs. We find that telomeric heterochromatin is dynamic and remodelled upon an environmental change. Weak heterochromatin is associated with telomeres at 30 °C, while robust heterochromatin is assembled over these regions at 39 °C, a temperature mimicking moderate fever in the host. Thus in C. albicans, differential chromatin states controls gene expression and epigenetic plasticity is linked to adaptation. PMID:26971880

  11. Genetic and phenotypic intra-species variation in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Hirakawa, Matthew P.; Martinez, Diego A.; Sakthikumar, Sharadha; Anderson, Matthew Z.; Berlin, Aaron; Gujja, Sharvari; Zeng, Qiandong; Zisson, Ethan; Wang, Joshua M.; Greenberg, Joshua M.; Berman, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is a commensal fungus of the human gastrointestinal tract and a prevalent opportunistic pathogen. To examine diversity within this species, extensive genomic and phenotypic analyses were performed on 21 clinical C. albicans isolates. Genomic variation was evident in the form of polymorphisms, copy number variations, chromosomal inversions, subtelomeric hypervariation, loss of heterozygosity (LOH), and whole or partial chromosome aneuploidies. All 21 strains were diploid, although karyotypic changes were present in eight of the 21 isolates, with multiple strains being trisomic for Chromosome 4 or Chromosome 7. Aneuploid strains exhibited a general fitness defect relative to euploid strains when grown under replete conditions. All strains were also heterozygous, yet multiple, distinct LOH tracts were present in each isolate. Higher overall levels of genome heterozygosity correlated with faster growth rates, consistent with increased overall fitness. Genes with the highest rates of amino acid substitutions included many cell wall proteins, implicating fast evolving changes in cell adhesion and host interactions. One clinical isolate, P94015, presented several striking properties including a novel cellular phenotype, an inability to filament, drug resistance, and decreased virulence. Several of these properties were shown to be due to a homozygous nonsense mutation in the EFG1 gene. Furthermore, loss of EFG1 function resulted in increased fitness of P94015 in a commensal model of infection. Our analysis therefore reveals intra-species genetic and phenotypic differences in C. albicans and delineates a natural mutation that alters the balance between commensalism and pathogenicity. PMID:25504520

  12. Germ tube-specific antigens of Candida albicans cell walls

    SciTech Connect

    Sundstrom, P.R.

    1986-01-01

    Studies were performed to characterize the surface differences between blastospores and germ tubes of the pathogenic, dimorphic yeast, Candida albicans, and to identify components of yeast cells responsible for these differences. Investigation of surfaces differences of the two growth forms was facilitated by the production of rabbit antiserum prepared against Formalin-treated yeast possessing germ tubes. To prepare antiserum specific for germ tubes, this serum was adsorbed with stationary phase blastospores. Whereas the unadsorbed antiserum reacted with both blastospore and germ tube forms by immunofluorescence and Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay, the adsorbed antiserum did not react with blastospores but detected germ tube-specific antigens in hyphal forms. The differences between blastospores and germ tubes of Candida albicans, were further studied by comparing enzymatic digests of cell walls of both growth forms in radiolabeled organisms. Organisms were labeled either on the surface with /sup 125/I, or metabolically with (/sup 35/S) methionine or (/sup 3/H) mannose. Three-surface-located components (as shown by antibody adsorption and elution experiments) were precipitated from Zymolase digests. All three components were mannoproteins as shown by their ability to bind Concanavalin A, and to be labeled in protein labeling procedures, and two of these (200,000 and 155,000 molecular weight) were germ tube specific, as shown by their ability to be precipitated by germ tube-specific antiserum. Monoclonal antibodies were prepared to C. albicans, using blastospores bearing germ tubes as immunogen.

  13. Inhibition of human natural killer (NK) cytotoxicity by Candida albicans

    SciTech Connect

    Zunino, S.; Hudig, D.

    1986-03-01

    Experiments were initiated to determine whether human NK cells are cytotoxic to C. albicans with similar activity observed for mouse NK cells against the yeast Paracoccidiodes brasiliensis. In 48 hour assays using limiting dilutions of C. albicans, strain 3153A, mononuclear leukocytes with NK activity had only marginal effects on yeast outgrowth, whereas granulocytes killed most of the yeast. However, these yeast were able to block NK activity in 4 hr /sup 51/Cr release assays with K562 cells, at yeast to K562 ratios of 10:1 and 100:1. Yeast pretreated with the serum of the majority of donors blocked the NK activity more than untreated yeast. Two of the 7 donors did not enhance NK inhibition after pretreatment of the yeast with their serum. Serum antibody to C. albicans and complement consumption by the yeast correlated with the relative efficiency of NK inhibition for most donors. This report suggests that there may be in vivo interactions between NK cells of the immune system and opportunistic fungal pathogens, which may compromise NK cell function.

  14. Distribution of Candida albicans genotypes among family members

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, S. K.; Stevens, D. A.; Mishra, S. K.; Feroze, F.; Pierson, D. L.

    1999-01-01

    Thirty-three families (71 subjects) were screened for the presence of Candida albicans in mouthwash or stool specimens; 12 families (28 subjects) were culture-positive for this yeast. An enrichment procedure provided a twofold increase in the recovery of C. albicans from mouthwash specimens. Nine of the twelve culture-positive families had two positive members each, two families had three positive members each, and one family had four positive members. Genetic profiles were obtained by three methods: pulsed-field gel electrophoresis; restriction endonuclease analysis, and random amplification of polymorphic DNA analysis. DNA fingerprinting of C. albicans isolated from one body site three consecutive times revealed that each of the 12 families carried a distinct genotype. No two families shared the same strain, and two or more members of a family commonly shared the same strain. Intrafamily genotypic identity (i.e., each member within the family harbored the same strain) was demonstrated in six families. Genotypes of isolates from husband and wife differed from one another in five families. All three methods were satisfactory in determining genotypes; however, we concluded that restriction endonuclease analysis provided adequate resolving power.

  15. A Human-Curated Annotation of the Candida albicans Genome

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Burkhard R; van het Hoog, Marco; d'Enfert, Christophe; Martchenko, Mikhail; Dungan, Jan; Kuo, Alan; Inglis, Diane O; Uhl, M. Andrew; Hogues, Hervé; Berriman, Matthew; Lorenz, Michael; Levitin, Anastasia; Oberholzer, Ursula; Bachewich, Catherine; Harcus, Doreen; Marcil, Anne; Dignard, Daniel; Iouk, Tatiana; Zito, Rosa; Frangeul, Lionel; Tekaia, Fredj; Rutherford, Kim; Wang, Edwin; Munro, Carol A; Bates, Steve; Gow, Neil A; Hoyer, Lois L; Köhler, Gerwald; Morschhäuser, Joachim; Newport, George; Znaidi, Sadri; Raymond, Martine; Turcotte, Bernard; Sherlock, Gavin; Costanzo, Maria; Ihmels, Jan; Berman, Judith; Sanglard, Dominique; Agabian, Nina; Mitchell, Aaron P; Johnson, Alexander D; Whiteway, Malcolm; Nantel, André

    2005-01-01

    Recent sequencing and assembly of the genome for the fungal pathogen Candida albicans used simple automated procedures for the identification of putative genes. We have reviewed the entire assembly, both by hand and with additional bioinformatic resources, to accurately map and describe 6,354 genes and to identify 246 genes whose original database entries contained sequencing errors (or possibly mutations) that affect their reading frame. Comparison with other fungal genomes permitted the identification of numerous fungus-specific genes that might be targeted for antifungal therapy. We also observed that, compared to other fungi, the protein-coding sequences in the C. albicans genome are especially rich in short sequence repeats. Finally, our improved annotation permitted a detailed analysis of several multigene families, and comparative genomic studies showed that C. albicans has a far greater catabolic range, encoding respiratory Complex 1, several novel oxidoreductases and ketone body degrading enzymes, malonyl-CoA and enoyl-CoA carriers, several novel amino acid degrading enzymes, a variety of secreted catabolic lipases and proteases, and numerous transporters to assimilate the resulting nutrients. The results of these efforts will ensure that the Candida research community has uniform and comprehensive genomic information for medical research as well as for future diagnostic and therapeutic applications. PMID:16103911

  16. Enhanced production of farnesol by Candida albicans treated with four azoles.

    PubMed

    Hornby, Jacob M; Nickerson, Kenneth W

    2004-06-01

    The dimorphic fungus Candida albicans excretes farnesol, which is produced enzymatically from the sterol biosynthetic intermediate farnesyl pyrophosphate. Inhibition of C. albicans by four azole antifungals, fluconazole, ketoconazole, miconazole, and clotrimazole, caused elevated farnesol production (10- to 45-fold). Furthermore, farnesol production occurs in both laboratory strains and clinical isolates (J. M. Hornby et al., Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 67:2982-2992, 2001) of C. albicans. PMID:15155241

  17. Altered hepatic clearance and killing of Candida albicans in the isolated perfused mouse liver model.

    PubMed Central

    Sawyer, R T; Horst, M N; Garner, R E; Hudson, J; Jenkins, P R; Richardson, A L

    1990-01-01

    The adherence of Candida albicans was studied in situ by using the perfused mouse liver model. After exhaustive washing, 10(6) C. albicans were infused into mouse livers. At the time of recovery, 62 +/- 5% (mean +/- standard error of the mean) of the infused C. albicans were recovered from the liver and 14 +/- 3% were recovered from the effluent for a total recovery of 76 +/- 4%. This indicates that 86 +/- 3% of the original inoculum was trapped by the liver and that 24 +/- 4% was killed within the liver. Chemical pretreatment of C. albicans with 8 M urea, 12 mM dithiothreitol, 2% beta-mercaptoethanol, 1% sodium dodecyl sulfate, 10% Triton X-100, or 3 M potassium chloride or enzyme pretreatment with alpha-mannosidase, alpha-chymotrypsin, subtilisin, beta-N-acetyl-glucosaminidase, pronase, trypsin, papain, or lipase did not alter adherence of C. albicans to hepatic tissue. By contrast, pepsin pretreatment significantly decreased hepatic trapping. Simultaneous perfusion with either 100 mg of C. albicans glycoprotein per liter or 100 mg of C. albicans mannan per liter also decreased trapping. Furthermore, both substances eluted previously trapped C. albicans from hepatic tissue. Chemical pretreatment with 8 M urea, 12 mM dithiothreitol, or 3 M KCI or enzymatic pretreatment with alpha-mannosidase, subtilisin, alpha-chymotrypsin, or papain increased killing of C. albicans three- to fivefold within hepatic tissue. The data suggest that mannose-containing structures on the surface of C. albicans, for example. mannans or glucomannoproteins, mediate adherence of C. albicans within the liver. Indirectly, chemical and enzymatic pretreatment renders C. albicans more susceptible to hepatic killing. PMID:2117571

  18. Candida albicans Shaving to Profile Human Serum Proteins on Hyphal Surface

    PubMed Central

    Marín, Elvira; Parra-Giraldo, Claudia M.; Hernández-Haro, Carolina; Hernáez, María L.; Nombela, César; Monteoliva, Lucía; Gil, Concha

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is a human opportunistic fungus and it is responsible for a wide variety of infections, either superficial or systemic. C. albicans is a polymorphic fungus and its ability to switch between yeast and hyphae is essential for its virulence. Once C. albicans obtains access to the human body, the host serum constitutes a complex environment of interaction with C. albicans cell surface in bloodstream. To draw a comprehensive picture of this relevant step in host-pathogen interaction during invasive candidiasis, we have optimized a gel-free shaving proteomic strategy to identify both, human serum proteins coating C. albicans cells and fungi surface proteins simultaneously. This approach was carried out with normal serum (NS) and heat inactivated serum (HIS). We identified 214 human and 372 C. albicans unique proteins. Proteins identified in C. albicans included 147 which were described as located at the cell surface and 52 that were described as immunogenic. Interestingly, among these C. albicans proteins, we identified 23 GPI-anchored proteins, Gpd2 and Pra1, which are involved in complement system evasion and 7 other proteins that are able to attach plasminogen to C. albicans surface (Adh1, Eno1, Fba1, Pgk1, Tdh3, Tef1, and Tsa1). Furthermore, 12 proteins identified at the C. albicans hyphae surface induced with 10% human serum were not detected in other hypha-induced conditions. The most abundant human proteins identified are involved in complement and coagulation pathways. Remarkably, with this strategy, all main proteins belonging to complement cascades were identified on the C. albicans surface. Moreover, we identified immunoglobulins, cytoskeletal proteins, metabolic proteins such as apolipoproteins and others. Additionally, we identified more inhibitors of complement and coagulation pathways, some of them serpin proteins (serine protease inhibitors), in HIS vs. NS. On the other hand, we detected a higher amount of C3 at the C. albicans surface in

  19. Gene expression profile of THP-1 cells treated with heat-killed Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhi-De; Wei, Ting-Ting; Tang, Qing-Qin; Ma, Ning; Wang, Li-Li; Qin, Bao-Dong; Yin, Jian-Rong

    2016-01-01

    Background Mechanisms under immune response against Candida albicans (C. albicans) remain largely unknown. To better understand the mechanisms of innate immune response against C. albicans, we analyzed the gene expression profile of THP-1 cells stimulated with heat-killed C. albicans. Methods THP-1 cells were stimulated with heat-killed C. albicans for 9 hours at a ratio of 1:1, and gene expression profile of the cells was analyzed using Whole Human Genome Oligo Microarray. Differentially expressed genes were defined as change folds more than 2 and with statistical significance. Gene ontology (GO) and pathway analysis were used to systematically identify biological connections of differentially expressed genes, as well as the pathways associated with the immune response against C. albicans. Results A total of 355 genes were up-regulated and 715 genes were down-regulated significantly. The up-regulated genes were particularly involved in biological process of RNA processing and pathway of the spliceosome. In case of down-regulated genes, the particularly involved immune-related pathways were G-protein coupled receptor signaling pathway, calcium signaling pathway, MAPK signaling pathway and Ras pathway. Conclusions We depict the gene expression profile of heat-killed C. albicans stimulated THP-1 cells, and identify the major pathways involved in immune response against C. albicans. These pathways are potential candidate targets for developing anti-C. albicans agent. PMID:27275483

  20. Upc2p-associated differential protein expression in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Hoehamer, Christopher F; Cummings, Edwin D; Hilliard, George M; Morschhäuser, Joachim; David Rogers, Phillip

    2009-10-01

    The gain-of-function mutation G648D in UPC2 causes ERG11 up-regulation and increased fluconazole resistance in Candida albicans. In this study, we performed 2-DE and PMF to identify proteomic alterations in an ERG11-overexpressing fluconazole-resistant C. albicans clinical isolate compared with its fluconazole-susceptible parent strain. We identified 23 differentially expressed proteins, and among them, seven became differentially expressed in a C. albicans wild-type strain after the introduction of a UPC2 allele carrying this mutation. These Upc2p-regulated proteins may contribute to fluconazole resistance in C. albicans. PMID:19750515

  1. Human Epithelial Cells Discriminate between Commensal and Pathogenic Interactions with Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Rast, Timothy J.; Kullas, Amy L.; Southern, Peter J.; Davis, Dana A.

    2016-01-01

    The commensal fungus, Candida albicans, can cause life-threatening infections in at risk individuals. C. albicans colonizes mucosal surfaces of most people, adhering to and interacting with epithelial cells. At low concentrations, C. albicans is not pathogenic nor does it cause epithelial cell damage in vitro; at high concentrations, C. albicans causes mucosal infections and kills epithelial cells in vitro. Here we show that while there are quantitative dose-dependent differences in exposed epithelial cell populations, these reflect a fundamental qualitative difference in host cell response to C. albicans. Using transcriptional profiling experiments and real time PCR, we found that wild-type C. albicans induce dose-dependent responses from a FaDu epithelial cell line. However, real time PCR and Western blot analysis using a high dose of various C. albicans strains demonstrated that these dose-dependent responses are associated with ability to promote host cell damage. Our studies support the idea that epithelial cells play a key role in the immune system by monitoring the microbial community at mucosal surfaces and initiating defensive responses when this community is dysfunctional. This places epithelial cells at a pivotal position in the interaction with C. albicans as epithelial cells themselves promote C. albicans stimulated damage. PMID:27088599

  2. Interplay between the Gastric Bacterial Microbiota and Candida albicans during Postantibiotic Recolonization and Gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Katie L.; Erb Downward, John R.; Falkowski, Nicole R.; Young, Vincent B.; Kao, John Y.

    2012-01-01

    The indigenous bacterial microbiome of the stomach, including lactobacilli, is vital in promoting colonization resistance against Candida albicans. However, there are gaps in our understanding about C. albicans gastric colonization versus disease, especially during the postantibiotic recovery phase. This study compared the gastric responses to C. albicans strains CHN1 and SC5314 in microbiome-disturbed and germfree mice to elucidate the contribution of the indigenous microbiota in C. albicans colonization versus disease and yeast-bacterium antagonism during the post-cefoperazone recolonization period. C. albicans can prevent the regrowth of Lactobacillus spp. in the stomach after cefoperazone and promote increased colonization by Enterococcus spp. Using a culture-independent analysis, the effects of oral cefoperazone on the gastric bacterial microbiota were observed to last at least 3 weeks after the cessation of the antibiotic. Disturbance of the gastric bacterial community by cefoperazone alone was not sufficient to cause gastritis, C. albicans colonization was also needed. Gastritis was not evident until after day 7 in cefoperazone-treated infected mice. In contrast, in germfree mice which lack a gastric microbiota, C. albicans induced gastric inflammation within 1 week of inoculation. Therefore, the gastric bacterial community in cefoperazone-treated mice during the first week of postantibiotic recolonization was sufficient to prevent the development of gastritis, despite being ineffective at conferring colonization resistance against C. albicans. Altogether, these data implicate a dichotomy between C. albicans colonization and gastric disease that is bacterial microbiome dependent. PMID:21986629

  3. Effect of Nitric Oxide on the Antifungal Activity of Oxidative Stress and Azoles Against Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Li, De-Dong; Yang, Chang-Chun; Liu, Ping; Wang, Yan; Sun, Yan

    2016-06-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a small molecule with a wide range of biological activities in mammalian and bacteria. However, the role of NO in fungi, especially Candida albicans, is not clear. In this study, we confirmed the generation of endogenous NO in C. albicans, and found that the production of endogenous NO in C. albicans was associated with nitric oxide synthase pathway. Our results further indicated that the production of endogenous NO in C. albicans was reduced under oxidative stress such as menadione or H2O2 treatment. Meanwhile, exogenous NO donor, sodium nitroprusside (SNP), synergized with H2O2 against C. albicans. Interestingly, SNP could inhibit the antifungal effect of azoles against C. albicans in vitro, suggesting that NO might be involved in the resistance of C. albicans to antifungals. Collectively, this study demonstrated the production of endogenous NO in C. albicans, and indicated that NO may play an important role in the response of C. albicans to oxidative stress and azoles. PMID:27570314

  4. Antimicrobial blue light therapy for Candida albicans burn infection in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yunsong; Wang, Yucheng; Murray, Clinton K.; Hamblin, Michael R.; Gu, Ying; Dai, Tianhong

    2015-05-01

    In this preclinical study, we investigated the utility of antimicrobial blue light therapy for Candida albicans infection in acutely burned mice. A bioluminescent strain of C. albicans was used. The susceptibilities to blue light inactivation were compared between C. albicans and human keratinocyte. In vitro serial passaging of C. albicans on blue light exposure was performed to evaluate the potential development of resistance to blue light inactivation. A mouse model of acute thermal burn injury infected with the bioluminescent strain of C. albicans was developed. Blue light (415 nm) was delivered to mouse burns for decolonization of C. albicans. Bioluminescence imaging was used to monitor in real time the extent of fungal infection in mouse burns. Experimental results showed that C. albicans was approximately 42-fold more susceptible to blue light inactivation in vitro than human keratinocyte (P=0.0022). Serial passaging of C. albicans on blue light exposure implied a tendency for the fungal susceptibility to blue light inactivation to decrease with the numbers of passages. Blue light reduced fungal burden by over 4-log10 (99.99%) in acute mouse burns infected with C. albicans in comparison to infected mouse burns without blue light therapy (P=0.015).

  5. Antimicrobial blue light inactivation of Candida albicans: In vitro and in vivo studies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunsong; Zhu, Yingbo; Chen, Jia; Wang, Yucheng; Sherwood, Margaret E; Murray, Clinton K; Vrahas, Mark S; Hooper, David C; Hamblin, Michael R; Dai, Tianhong

    2016-07-01

    Fungal infections are a common cause of morbidity, mortality and cost in critical care populations. The increasing emergence of antimicrobial resistance necessitates the development of new therapeutic approaches for fungal infections. In the present study, we investigated the effectiveness of an innovative approach, antimicrobial blue light (aBL), for inactivation of Candida albicans in vitro and in infected mouse burns. A bioluminescent strain of C. albicans was used. The susceptibilities to aBL (415 nm) were compared between C. albicans and human keratinocytes. The potential development of aBL resistance by C. albicans was investigated via 10 serial passages of C. albicans on aBL exposure. For the animal study, a mouse model of thermal burn infected with the bioluminescent C. albicans strain was used. aBL was delivered to mouse burns approximately 12 h after fungal inoculation. Bioluminescence imaging was performed to monitor in real time the extent of infection in mice. The results obtained from the studies demonstrated that C. albicans was approximately 42-fold more susceptible to aBL than human keratinocytes. Serial passaging of C. albicans on aBL exposure implied a tendency of reduced aBL susceptibility of C. albicans with increasing numbers of passages; however, no statistically significant difference was observed in the post-aBL survival rate of C. albicans between the first and the last passage (P>0.05). A single exposure of 432 J/cm(2) aBL reduced the fungal burden in infected mouse burns by 1.75-log10 (P=0.015). Taken together, our findings suggest aBL is a potential therapeutic for C. albicans infections. PMID:26909654

  6. Live Candida albicans Suppresses Production of Reactive Oxygen Species in Phagocytes▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Wellington, Melanie; Dolan, Kristy; Krysan, Damian J.

    2009-01-01

    Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is an important aspect of phagocyte-mediated host responses. Since phagocytes play a crucial role in the host response to Candida albicans, we examined the ability of Candida to modulate phagocyte ROS production. ROS production was measured in the murine macrophage cell line J774 and in primary phagocytes using luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence. J774 cells, murine polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN), human monocytes, and human PMN treated with live C. albicans produced significantly less ROS than phagocytes treated with heat-killed C. albicans. Live C. albicans also suppressed ROS production in murine bone marrow-derived macrophages from C57BL/6 mice, but not from BALB/c mice. Live C. albicans also suppressed ROS in response to external stimuli. C. albicans and Candida glabrata suppressed ROS production by phagocytes, whereas Saccharomyces cerevisiae stimulated ROS production. The cell wall is the initial point of contact between Candida and phagocytes, but isolated cell walls from both heat-killed and live C. albicans stimulated ROS production. Heat-killed C. albicans has increased surface exposure of 1,3-β-glucan, a cell wall component that can stimulate phagocytes. To determine whether surface 1,3-β-glucan exposure accounted for the difference in ROS production, live C. albicans cells were treated with a sublethal dose of caspofungin to increase surface 1,3-β-glucan exposure. Caspofungin-treated C. albicans was fully able to suppress ROS production, indicating that suppression of ROS overrides stimulatory signals from 1,3-β-glucan. These studies indicate that live C. albicans actively suppresses ROS production in phagocytes in vitro, which may represent an important immune evasion mechanism. PMID:18981256

  7. Thermochemical cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funk, J. E.; Soliman, M. A.; Carty, R. H.; Conger, W. L.; Cox, K. E.; Lawson, D.

    1975-01-01

    The thermochemical production of hydrogen is described along with the HYDRGN computer program which attempts to rate the various thermochemical cycles. Specific thermochemical cycles discussed include: iron sulfur cycle; iron chloride cycle; and hybrid sulfuric acid cycle.

  8. Dynamic Transcript Profiling of Candida albicans Infection in Zebrafish: A Pathogen-Host Interaction Study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fu-Chen; Hsu, Po-Chen; Chen, Hsueh-Fen; Peng, Shih-Chi; Chuang, Yung-Jen; Lan, Chung-Yu; Hsieh, Wen-Ping; Wong, David Shan Hill

    2013-01-01

    Candida albicans is responsible for a number of life-threatening infections and causes considerable morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients. Previous studies of C. albicans pathogenesis have suggested several steps must occur before virulent infection, including early adhesion, invasion, and late tissue damage. However, the mechanism that triggers C. albicans transformation from yeast to hyphae form during infection has yet to be fully elucidated. This study used a systems biology approach to investigate C. albicans infection in zebrafish. The surviving fish were sampled at different post-infection time points to obtain time-lapsed, genome-wide transcriptomic data from both organisms, which were accompanied with in sync histological analyses. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to analyze the dynamic gene expression profiles of significant variations in both C. albicans and zebrafish. The results categorized C. albicans infection into three progressing phases: adhesion, invasion, and damage. Such findings were highly supported by the corresponding histological analysis. Furthermore, the dynamic interspecies transcript profiling revealed that C. albicans activated its filamentous formation during invasion and the iron scavenging functions during the damage phases, whereas zebrafish ceased its iron homeostasis function following massive hemorrhage during the later stages of infection. Most of the immune related genes were expressed as the infection progressed from invasion to the damage phase. Such global, inter-species evidence of virulence-immune and iron competition dynamics during C. albicans infection could be crucial in understanding control fungal pathogenesis. PMID:24019870

  9. Cigarette smoke-exposed Candida albicans increased chitin production and modulated human fibroblast cell responses.

    PubMed

    Alanazi, Humidah; Semlali, Abdelhabib; Perraud, Laura; Chmielewski, Witold; Zakrzewski, Andrew; Rouabhia, Mahmoud

    2014-01-01

    The predisposition of cigarette smokers for development of respiratory and oral bacterial infections is well documented. Cigarette smoke can also contribute to yeast infection. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) on C. albicans transition, chitin content, and response to environmental stress and to examine the interaction between CSC-pretreated C. albicans and normal human gingival fibroblasts. Following exposure to CSC, C. albicans transition from blastospore to hyphal form increased. CSC-pretreated yeast cells became significantly (P < 0.01) sensitive to oxidation but significantly (P < 0.01) resistant to both osmotic and heat stress. CSC-pretreated C. albicans expressed high levels of chitin, with 2- to 8-fold recorded under hyphal conditions. CSC-pretreated C. albicans adhered better to the gingival fibroblasts, proliferated almost three times more and adapted into hyphae, while the gingival fibroblasts recorded a significantly (P < 0.01) slow growth rate but a significantly higher level of IL-1β when in contact with CSC-pretreated C. albicans. CSC was thus able to modulate both C. albicans transition through the cell wall chitin content and the interaction between C. albicans and normal human gingival fibroblasts. These findings may be relevant to fungal infections in the oral cavity in smokers. PMID:25302312

  10. Cigarette Smoke-Exposed Candida albicans Increased Chitin Production and Modulated Human Fibroblast Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Alanazi, Humidah; Semlali, Abdelhabib; Perraud, Laura; Chmielewski, Witold; Zakrzewski, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The predisposition of cigarette smokers for development of respiratory and oral bacterial infections is well documented. Cigarette smoke can also contribute to yeast infection. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) on C. albicans transition, chitin content, and response to environmental stress and to examine the interaction between CSC-pretreated C. albicans and normal human gingival fibroblasts. Following exposure to CSC, C. albicans transition from blastospore to hyphal form increased. CSC-pretreated yeast cells became significantly (P < 0.01) sensitive to oxidation but significantly (P < 0.01) resistant to both osmotic and heat stress. CSC-pretreated C. albicans expressed high levels of chitin, with 2- to 8-fold recorded under hyphal conditions. CSC-pretreated C. albicans adhered better to the gingival fibroblasts, proliferated almost three times more and adapted into hyphae, while the gingival fibroblasts recorded a significantly (P < 0.01) slow growth rate but a significantly higher level of IL-1β when in contact with CSC-pretreated C. albicans. CSC was thus able to modulate both C. albicans transition through the cell wall chitin content and the interaction between C. albicans and normal human gingival fibroblasts. These findings may be relevant to fungal infections in the oral cavity in smokers. PMID:25302312

  11. Plant-derived decapeptide OSIP108 interferes with Candida albicans biofilm formation without affecting cell viability.

    PubMed

    Delattin, Nicolas; De Brucker, Katrijn; Craik, David J; Cheneval, Olivier; Fröhlich, Mirjam; Veber, Matija; Girandon, Lenart; Davis, Talya R; Weeks, Anne E; Kumamoto, Carol A; Cos, Paul; Coenye, Tom; De Coninck, Barbara; Cammue, Bruno P A; Thevissen, Karin

    2014-05-01

    We previously identified a decapeptide from the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, OSIP108, which is induced upon fungal pathogen infection. In this study, we demonstrated that OSIP108 interferes with biofilm formation of the fungal pathogen Candida albicans without affecting the viability or growth of C. albicans cells. OSIP108 displayed no cytotoxicity against various human cell lines. Furthermore, OSIP108 enhanced the activity of the antifungal agents amphotericin B and caspofungin in vitro and in vivo in a Caenorhabditis elegans-C. albicans biofilm infection model. These data point to the potential use of OSIP108 in combination therapy with conventional antifungal agents. In a first attempt to unravel its mode of action, we screened a library of 137 homozygous C. albicans mutants, affected in genes encoding cell wall proteins or transcription factors important for biofilm formation, for altered OSIP108 sensitivity. We identified 9 OSIP108-tolerant C. albicans mutants that were defective in either components important for cell wall integrity or the yeast-to-hypha transition. In line with these findings, we demonstrated that OSIP108 activates the C. albicans cell wall integrity pathway and that its antibiofilm activity can be blocked by compounds inhibiting the yeast-to-hypha transition. Furthermore, we found that OSIP108 is predominantly localized at the C. albicans cell surface. These data point to interference of OSIP108 with cell wall-related processes of C. albicans, resulting in impaired biofilm formation. PMID:24566179

  12. Activation of HIF-1α and LL-37 by commensal bacteria inhibits Candida albicans colonization

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Di; Coughlin, Laura A.; Neubauer, Megan M.; Kim, Jiwoong; Kim, Minsoo; Zhan, Xiaowei; Simms-Waldrip, Tiffany R.; Xie, Yang; Hooper, Lora V.; Koh, Andrew Y.

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans colonization is required for invasive disease1-3. Unlike humans, adult mice with mature intact gut microbiota are resistant to C. albicans gastrointestinal (GI) colonization2,4. But the factors that promote C. albicans colonization resistance are unknown. Here we demonstrate that commensal anaerobic bacteria – specifically Clostridial Firmicutes (Clusters IV and XIVa) and Bacteroidetes – are critical for maintaining C. albicans colonization resistance in mice. Using Bacteroides thetaiotamicron as a model organism, we find that HIF-1α, a transcription factor important for activating innate immune effectors, and the antimicrobial peptide LL37-CRAMP are key determinants of C. albicans colonization resistance. While antibiotic treatment enables C. albicans colonization, pharmacologic activation of colonic Hif1a induces CRAMP expression and results in a significant reduction of C. albicans GI colonization and a 50% decrease in mortality from invasive disease. In the setting of antibiotics, Hif1a and Cramp are required for B. thetaiotamicron-induced protection against CA colonization of the gut. Thus, C. albicans GI colonization modulation by activation of gut mucosal immune effectors may represent a novel therapeutic approach for preventing invasive fungal disease in humans. PMID:26053625

  13. Manipulation of host diet to reduce gastrointestinal colonization by the opportunistic pathogen Candida albicans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Candida albicans, the most common human fungal pathogen, can cause systemic infections with a mortality rate of ~40%. Infections arise from colonization of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, where C. albicans is part of the normal microflora. Reducing colonization in at-risk patients using antifungal ...

  14. Functional diversity of complex I subunits in Candida albicans mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Li, Dongmei; She, Xiaodong; Calderone, Richard

    2016-02-01

    Our interest in the mitochondria of Candida albicans has progressed to the identification of several proteins that are critical to complex I (CI) activity. We speculated that there should be major functional differences at the protein level between mammalian and fungal mitochondria CI. In our pursuit of this idea, we were helped by published data of CI subunit proteins from a broad diversity of species that included two subunit proteins that are not found in mammals. These subunit proteins have been designated as Nuo1p and Nuo2p (NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductases). Since functional assignments of both C. albicans proteins were unknown, other than having a putative NADH-oxidoreductase activity, we constructed knock-out strains that could be compared to parental cells. The relevance of our research relates to the critical roles of both proteins in cell biology and pathogenesis and their absence in mammals. These features suggest they may be exploited in antifungal drug discovery. Initially, we characterized Goa1p that apparently regulates CI activity but is not a CI subunit protein. We have used the goa1∆ for comparisons to Nuo1p and Nuo2p. We have demonstrated the critical role of these proteins in maintaining CI activities, virulence, and prolonging life span. More recently, transcriptional profiling of the three mutants and an ndh51∆ (protein is a highly conserved CI subunit) has revealed that there are overlapping yet also different functional assignments that suggest subunit specificity. The differences and similarities of each are described below along with our hypotheses to explain these data. Our conclusion and perspective is that the C. albicans CI subunit proteins are highly conserved except for two that define non-mammalian functions. PMID:26373419

  15. Lemongrass-Incorporated Tissue Conditioner Against Candida albicans Culture

    PubMed Central

    Amornvit, Pokpong; Srithavaj, Theerathavaj

    2014-01-01

    Background: Tissue conditioner is applied popularly with dental prosthesis during wound healing process but it becomes a reservoir of oral microbiota, especially Candida species after long-term usage. Several antifungal drugs have been mixed with this material to control fungal level. In this study, lemongrass essential oil was added into COE-COMFORT tissue conditioner before being determined for anti-Candida efficacy. Materials and Methods: Lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus) essential oil was primarily determined for antifungal activity against C. albicans American type culture collection (ATCC) 10231 and MIC (minimum inhibitory concentration) value by agar disk diffusion and broth microdilution methods, respectively. COE-COMFORT tissue conditioner was prepared as recommended by the manufacturer after a fixed volume of the oil at its MIC or higher concentrations were mixed thoroughly in its liquid part. Antifungal efficacy of the tissue conditioner with/without herb was finally analyzed. Results: Lemongrass essential oil displayed potent antifungal activity against C. albicans ATCC 10231and its MIC value was 0.06% (v/v). Dissimilarly, the tissue conditioner containing the oil at MIC level did not cease the growth of the tested fungus. Both reference and clinical isolates of C. albicans were completely inhibited after exposed to the tissue conditioner containing at least 0.25% (v/v) of the oil (approximately 4-time MIC). The tissue conditioner without herb or with nystatin was employed as negative or positive control, respectively. Conclusion: COE-COMFORT tissue conditioner supplemented with lemongrass essential oil obviously demonstrated another desirable property as in vitro anti-Candida efficacy to minimize the risk of getting Candidal infection. PMID:25177638

  16. Early detection of Candida albicans biofilms at porous electrodes.

    PubMed

    Congdon, Robert B; Feldberg, Alexander S; Ben-Yakar, Natalie; McGee, Dennis; Ober, Christopher; Sammakia, Bahgat; Sadik, Omowunmi A

    2013-02-15

    We describe the development of an electrochemical sensor for early detection of biofilm using Candida albicans. The electrochemical sensor used the ability of biofilms to accept electrons from redox mediators relative to the number of metabolically active cells present. Cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry techniques were used to monitor the redox reaction of K(3)Fe(CN)(6) at porous reticulated vitreous carbon (RVC) (238.7 cm(2)) working electrodes versus Ag/AgCl reference. A shift in the peak potential occurred after 12 h of film growth, which is attributed to the presence of C. albicans. Moreover, the intensity of the ferricyanide reduction peak first increased as C. albicans deposited onto the porous electrodes at various growth times. The peak current subsequently decreased at extended periods of growth of 48 h. The reduction in peak current was attributed to the biofilm reaching its maximum growth thickness, which correlated with the maximum number of metabolically active cells. The observed diffusion coefficients for the bare RVC and biofilm-coated electrodes were 2.2 × 10(-3) and 7.0 × 10(-6) cm(2)/s, respectively. The increase in diffusivity from the bare electrode to the biofilm-coated electrode indicated some enhancement of electron transfer mediated by the biofilm to the porous electrode. Verification of the growth of biofilm was achieved using scanning electron microcopy and laser scanning confocal imaging microscopy. Validation with conventional plating techniques confirmed that the correlation (R(2) = 0.9392) could be achieved between the electrochemical sensors data and colony-forming units. PMID:23107627

  17. RAPID IDENTIFICATION OF CANDIDA ALBICANS DIRECTLY FROM YEAST POSITIVE BLOOD CULTURE BOTTLES BY FLUORESCENCE IN SITU HYBRIDIZATION USING PNA PROBES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) method using peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes for identification of Candida albicans directly from yeast-positive blood culture bottles is described. The test (C. albicans PNA FISH) is based on a fluorescein-labeled PNA probe targeting C. albicans 26...

  18. The adaptive metabolic response involves specific protein glutathionylation during the filamentation process in the pathogen Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Gergondey, R; Garcia, C; Serre, V; Camadro, J M; Auchère, F

    2016-07-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunist pathogen responsible for a large spectrum of infections, from superficial mycosis to the systemic disease candidiasis. Its ability to adopt various morphological forms, such as unicellular yeasts, filamentous pseudohyphae and hyphae, contributes to its ability to survive within the host. It has been suggested that the antioxidant glutathione is involved in the filamentation process. We investigated S-glutathionylation, the reversible binding of glutathione to proteins, and the functional consequences on C. albicans metabolic remodeling during the yeast-to-hyphae transition. Our work provided evidence for the specific glutathionylation of mitochondrial proteins involved in bioenergetics pathways in filamentous forms and a regulation of the main enzyme of the glyoxylate cycle, isocitrate lyase, by glutathionylation. Isocitrate lyase inactivation in the hyphal forms was reversed by glutaredoxin treatment, in agreement with a glutathionylation process, which was confirmed by proteomic data showing the binding of one glutathione molecule to the enzyme (data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD003685). We also assessed the effect of alternative carbon sources on glutathione levels and isocitrate lyase activity. Changes in nutrient availability led to morphological flexibility and were related to perturbations in glutathione levels and isocitrate lyase activity, confirming the key role of the maintenance of intracellular redox status in the adaptive metabolic strategy of the pathogen. PMID:27083931

  19. Interactions between amphotericin B and nitroimidazoles against Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Cury, A E; Hirschfeld, M P

    1997-10-01

    This work proved that nitroimidazole antiprotozoal agents, such as metronidazole, ornidazole, secnidazole and tinidazole, in concentrations of up to 64 micrograms ml-1 did not present any antifungal activity against 17 strains of Candida albicans. The combination of each drug with amphotericin B showed the occurrence of variable interactions according to the studied strain. Promising results were observed based on synergistic and additive interactions of the polyene with the metronidazole; the inhibitory and lethal activities of the drugs were potentiated against all strains in concentrations reachable in vivo. PMID:9476486

  20. Possible inhibition of N. gonnorrhoeae by C. albicans. A clinical study.

    PubMed

    Wallin, J; Gnarpe, H

    1975-06-01

    A probably sifnificant difference (p smaller that 0.05) in the occurrence of gonorrhoea was found between women with and without concomitant C. albicans infection. Although this difference could support the recently reported inhibitory effect by C. albicans on N. gonorrhoeae in vitro another explanation might be the possibility that too many women with vaginal candidiasis and no risk for a gonococcal infection were included in the material. There was nothing to support the in vivo effect of C. albicans on N. gonorrhoeae as negative gonococcal cultures in women known to have been exposed to N. gonorrhoeae could not be correlated with the presence of C. albicans. Until the clinical importance of the inhibitory factor of C. albicans has been studied further, the clinician has to be aware of the possibility of false negative gonococcal cultures from women with vaginal candidiasis. PMID:806326

  1. The Cell Wall Protein Ecm33 of Candida albicans is Involved in Chronological Life Span, Morphogenesis, Cell Wall Regeneration, Stress Tolerance, and Host-Cell Interaction.

    PubMed

    Gil-Bona, Ana; Reales-Calderon, Jose A; Parra-Giraldo, Claudia M; Martinez-Lopez, Raquel; Monteoliva, Lucia; Gil, Concha

    2016-01-01

    Ecm33 is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein in the human pathogen Candida albicans. This protein is known to be involved in fungal cell wall integrity (CWI) and is also critical for normal virulence in the mouse model of hematogenously disseminated candidiasis, but its function remains unknown. In this work, several phenotypic analyses of the C. albicans ecm33/ecm33 mutant (RML2U) were performed. We observed that RML2U displays the inability of protoplast to regenerate the cell wall, activation of the CWI pathway, hypersensitivity to temperature, osmotic and oxidative stresses and a shortened chronological lifespan. During the exponential and stationary culture phases, nuclear and actin staining revealed the possible arrest of the cell cycle in RML2U cells. Interestingly, a "veil growth," never previously described in C. albicans, was serendipitously observed under static stationary cells. The cells that formed this structure were also observed in cornmeal liquid cultures. These cells are giant, round cells, without DNA, and contain large vacuoles, similar to autophagic cells observed in other fungi. Furthermore, RML2U was phagocytozed more than the wild-type strain by macrophages at earlier time points, but the damage caused to the mouse cells was less than with the wild-type strain. Additionally, the percentage of RML2U apoptotic cells after interaction with macrophages was fewer than in the wild-type strain. PMID:26870022

  2. Candida albicans Kinesin Kar3 Depends on a Cik1-Like Regulatory Partner Protein for Its Roles in Mating, Cell Morphogenesis, and Bipolar Spindle Formation

    PubMed Central

    Frazer, Corey; Joshi, Monika; Delorme, Caroline; Davis, Darlene; Bennett, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is a major fungal pathogen whose virulence is associated with its ability to transition from a budding yeast form to invasive hyphal filaments. The kinesin-14 family member CaKar3 is required for transition between these morphological states, as well as for mitotic progression and karyogamy. While kinesin-14 proteins are ubiquitous, CaKar3 homologs in hemiascomycete fungi are unique because they form heterodimers with noncatalytic kinesin-like proteins. Thus, CaKar3-based motors may represent a novel antifungal drug target. We have identified and examined the roles of a kinesin-like regulator of CaKar3. We show that orf19.306 (dubbed CaCIK1) encodes a protein that forms a heterodimer with CaKar3, localizes CaKar3 to spindle pole bodies, and can bind microtubules and influence CaKar3 mechanochemistry despite lacking an ATPase activity of its own. Similar to CaKar3 depletion, loss of CaCik1 results in cell cycle arrest, filamentation defects, and an inability to undergo karyogamy. Furthermore, an examination of the spindle structure in cells lacking either of these proteins shows that a large proportion have a monopolar spindle or two dissociated half-spindles, a phenotype unique to the C. albicans kinesin-14 homolog. These findings provide new insights into mitotic spindle structure and kinesin motor function in C. albicans and identify a potentially vulnerable target for antifungal drug development. PMID:26024903

  3. The Cell Wall Protein Ecm33 of Candida albicans is Involved in Chronological Life Span, Morphogenesis, Cell Wall Regeneration, Stress Tolerance, and Host–Cell Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Gil-Bona, Ana; Reales-Calderon, Jose A.; Parra-Giraldo, Claudia M.; Martinez-Lopez, Raquel; Monteoliva, Lucia; Gil, Concha

    2016-01-01

    Ecm33 is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein in the human pathogen Candida albicans. This protein is known to be involved in fungal cell wall integrity (CWI) and is also critical for normal virulence in the mouse model of hematogenously disseminated candidiasis, but its function remains unknown. In this work, several phenotypic analyses of the C. albicans ecm33/ecm33 mutant (RML2U) were performed. We observed that RML2U displays the inability of protoplast to regenerate the cell wall, activation of the CWI pathway, hypersensitivity to temperature, osmotic and oxidative stresses and a shortened chronological lifespan. During the exponential and stationary culture phases, nuclear and actin staining revealed the possible arrest of the cell cycle in RML2U cells. Interestingly, a “veil growth,” never previously described in C. albicans, was serendipitously observed under static stationary cells. The cells that formed this structure were also observed in cornmeal liquid cultures. These cells are giant, round cells, without DNA, and contain large vacuoles, similar to autophagic cells observed in other fungi. Furthermore, RML2U was phagocytozed more than the wild-type strain by macrophages at earlier time points, but the damage caused to the mouse cells was less than with the wild-type strain. Additionally, the percentage of RML2U apoptotic cells after interaction with macrophages was fewer than in the wild-type strain. PMID:26870022

  4. Candida albicans exposures, sex specificity and cognitive deficits in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Severance, Emily G; Gressitt, Kristin L; Stallings, Catherine R; Katsafanas, Emily; Schweinfurth, Lucy A; Savage, Christina L; Adamos, Maria B; Sweeney, Kevin M; Origoni, Andrea E; Khushalani, Sunil; Leweke, F Markus; Dickerson, Faith B; Yolken, Robert H

    2016-01-01

    Immune aberrations in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder have led to the hypotheses that infectious agents or corresponding immune responses might contribute to psychiatric etiopathogeneses. We investigated case-control differences in exposure to the opportunistic fungal pathogen, Candida albicans, and examined associations with cognition, medication, lifestyle, and somatic conditions. We quantified C. albicans IgG antibodies in two cohorts totaling 947 individuals and evaluated odds ratios (OR) of exposure with psychiatric disorder using multivariate regressions. The case-control cohort included 261 with schizophrenia, 270 with bipolar disorder, and 277 non-psychiatric controls; the second included 139 with first-episode schizophrenia, 78 of whom were antipsychotic naive. No differences in C. albicans exposures were found until diagnostic groups were stratified by sex. In males, C. albicans seropositivity conferred increased odds for a schizophrenia diagnosis (OR 2.04-9.53, P⩽0.0001). In females, C. albicans seropositivity conferred increased odds for lower cognitive scores on Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS) in schizophrenia (OR 1.12, P⩽0.004), with significant decreases on memory modules for both disorders (P⩽0.0007-0.03). C. albicans IgG levels were not impacted by antipsychotic medications. Gastrointestinal (GI) disturbances were associated with elevated C. albicans in males with schizophrenia and females with bipolar disorder (P⩽0.009-0.02). C. albicans exposure was associated with homelessness in bipolar males (P⩽0.0015). In conclusion, sex-specific C. albicans immune responses were evident in psychiatric disorder subsets. Inquiry regarding C. albicans infection or symptoms may expedite amelioration of this treatable comorbid condition. Yeast exposure as a risk factor for schizophrenia and its associated cognitive and GI effects require further investigation including the possible contribution of gut

  5. Streptococcus mutans Can Modulate Biofilm Formation and Attenuate the Virulence of Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Júnia Oliveira; Rossoni, Rodnei Dennis; Vilela, Simone Furgeri Godinho; de Alvarenga, Janaína Araújo; Velloso, Marisol dos Santos; Prata, Márcia Cristina de Azevedo; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso; Junqueira, Juliana Campos

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans and Candida albicans are found together in the oral biofilms on dental surfaces, but little is known about the ecological interactions between these species. Here, we studied the effects of S. mutans UA159 on the growth and pathogencity of C. albicans. Initially, the effects of S. mutans on the biofilm formation and morphogenesis of C. albicans were tested in vitro. Next, we investigate the influence of S. mutans on pathogenicity of C. albicans using in vivo host models, in which the experimental candidiasis was induced in G. mellonella larvae and analyzed by survival curves, C. albicans count in hemolymph, and quantification of hyphae in the host tissues. In all the tests, we evaluated the direct effects of S. mutans cells, as well as the indirect effects of the subproducts secreted by this microorganism using a bacterial culture filtrate. The in vitro analysis showed that S. mutans cells favored biofilm formation by C. albicans. However, a reduction in biofilm viable cells and inhibition of hyphal growth was observed when C. albicans was in contact with the S. mutans culture filtrate. In the in vivo study, injection of S. mutans cells or S. mutans culture filtrate into G. mellonella larvae infected with C. albicans increased the survival of these animals. Furthermore, a reduction in hyphal formation was observed in larval tissues when C. albicans was associated with S. mutans culture filtrate. These findings suggest that S. mutans can secrete subproducts capable to inhibit the biofilm formation, morphogenesis and pathogenicity of C. albicans, attenuating the experimental candidiasis in G. mellonella model. PMID:26934196

  6. Effect of UV irradiation on lethal infection of mice with Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Denkins, Y M; Kripke, M L

    1993-02-01

    Exposure of mice to UV radiation inhibits the induction and elicitation of the delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response to Candida albicans. To determine whether UV irradiation also affects the pathogenesis of systemic C. albicans infection, C3H mice were exposed to a single dose of 48 kJ/m2 UV-B radiation from FS40 sunlamps 5 days before or 5 days after sensitization with formalin-fixed C. albicans and challenged intravenously (i.v.) with a lethal dose of viable fungi 6 days after sensitization (11 or 1 days after UV irradiation). Exposing unsensitized mice to UV radiation 11 days before lethal challenge had no effect on survival, but the survival time of mice exposed to UV radiation 1 day before challenge was reduced by more than 50%. In the latter group, decreased survival time correlated with persistence of C. albicans in the brain and progressive growth of C. albicans in the kidneys. Sensitization of unirradiated mice with formalin-fixed C. albicans extended their survival time following lethal i.v. challenge with viable C. albicans. Exposing the mice to UV radiation 5 days before sensitization did not abrogate this beneficial effect of sensitization on survival, even though it significantly reduced the DTH response. Thus, immunity to systemic infection did not depend on the ability of the mice to exhibit a DTH response to C. albicans. The beneficial effect of sensitization on survival after lethal infection was abrogated, however, in mice exposed to UV radiation 1 day before lethal challenge with C. albicans. Furthermore, these mice were unable to contain the progressive growth of C. albicans in the kidneys, in contrast to sensitized, unirradiated mice. PMID:8451288

  7. Candida albicans exposures, sex specificity and cognitive deficits in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Severance, Emily G; Gressitt, Kristin L; Stallings, Catherine R; Katsafanas, Emily; Schweinfurth, Lucy A; Savage, Christina L; Adamos, Maria B; Sweeney, Kevin M; Origoni, Andrea E; Khushalani, Sunil; Leweke, F Markus; Dickerson, Faith B; Yolken, Robert H

    2016-01-01

    Immune aberrations in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder have led to the hypotheses that infectious agents or corresponding immune responses might contribute to psychiatric etiopathogeneses. We investigated case–control differences in exposure to the opportunistic fungal pathogen, Candida albicans, and examined associations with cognition, medication, lifestyle, and somatic conditions. We quantified C. albicans IgG antibodies in two cohorts totaling 947 individuals and evaluated odds ratios (OR) of exposure with psychiatric disorder using multivariate regressions. The case–control cohort included 261 with schizophrenia, 270 with bipolar disorder, and 277 non-psychiatric controls; the second included 139 with first-episode schizophrenia, 78 of whom were antipsychotic naive. No differences in C. albicans exposures were found until diagnostic groups were stratified by sex. In males, C. albicans seropositivity conferred increased odds for a schizophrenia diagnosis (OR 2.04–9.53, P⩽0.0001). In females, C. albicans seropositivity conferred increased odds for lower cognitive scores on Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS) in schizophrenia (OR 1.12, P⩽0.004), with significant decreases on memory modules for both disorders (P⩽0.0007–0.03). C. albicans IgG levels were not impacted by antipsychotic medications. Gastrointestinal (GI) disturbances were associated with elevated C. albicans in males with schizophrenia and females with bipolar disorder (P⩽0.009–0.02). C. albicans exposure was associated with homelessness in bipolar males (P⩽0.0015). In conclusion, sex-specific C. albicans immune responses were evident in psychiatric disorder subsets. Inquiry regarding C. albicans infection or symptoms may expedite amelioration of this treatable comorbid condition. Yeast exposure as a risk factor for schizophrenia and its associated cognitive and GI effects require further investigation including the possible contribution of

  8. Effect of Candida albicans on Intestinal Ischemia-reperfusion Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Lei; Wu, Chun-Rong; Wang, Chen; Yang, Chun-Hui; Tong, Guang-Zhi; Tang, Jian-Guo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Inflammation is supposed to play a key role in the pathophysiological processes of intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury (IIRI), and Candida albicans in human gut commonly elevates inflammatory cytokines in intestinal mucosa. This study aimed to explore the effect of C. albicans on IIRI. Methods: Fifty female Wistar rats were divided into five groups according to the status of C. albicans infection and IIRI operation: group blank and sham; group blank and IIRI; group cefoperazone plus IIRI; group C. albicans plus cefoperazone and IIRI (CCI); and group C. albicans plus cefoperazone and sham. The levels of inflammatory factors tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1β, and diamine oxidase (DAO) measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were used to evaluate the inflammation reactivity as well as the integrity of small intestine. Histological scores were used to assess the mucosal damage, and the C. albicans blood translocation was detected to judge the permeability of intestinal mucosal barrier. Results: The levels of inflammatory factors TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β in serum and intestine were higher in rats undergone both C. albicans infection and IIRI operation compared with rats in other groups. The levels of DAO (serum: 44.13 ± 4.30 pg/ml, intestine: 346.21 ± 37.03 pg/g) and Chiu scores (3.41 ± 1.09) which reflected intestinal mucosal disruption were highest in group CCI after the operation. The number of C. albicans translocated into blood was most in group CCI ([33.80 ± 6.60] ×102 colony forming unit (CFU)/ml). Conclusion: Intestinal C. albicans infection worsened the IIRI-induced disruption of intestinal mucosal barrier and facilitated the subsequent C. albicans translocation and dissemination. PMID:27411459

  9. Hyphal Guidance and Invasive Growth in Candida albicans Require the Ras-Like GTPase Rsr1p and Its GTPase-Activating Protein Bud2p

    PubMed Central

    Hausauer, Danielle L.; Gerami-Nejad, Maryam; Kistler-Anderson, Cassandra; Gale, Cheryl A.

    2005-01-01

    Candida albicans, the most prevalent fungal pathogen of humans, causes superficial mycoses, invasive mucosal infections, and disseminated systemic disease. Many studies have shown an intriguing association between C. albicans morphogenesis and the pathogenesis process. For example, hyphal cells have been observed to penetrate host epithelial cells at sites of wounds and between cell junctions. Ras- and Rho-type GTPases regulate many morphogenetic processes in eukaryotes, including polarity establishment, cell proliferation, and directed growth in response to extracellular stimuli. We found that the C. albicans Ras-like GTPase Rsr1p and its predicted GTPase-activating protein Bud2p localized to the cell cortex, at sites of incipient daughter cell growth, and provided landmarks for the positioning of daughter yeast cells and hyphal cell branches, similar to the paradigm in the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, in contrast to S. cerevisiae, CaRsr1p and CaBud2p were important for morphogenesis: C. albicans strains lacking Rsr1p or Bud2p had abnormal yeast and hyphal cell shapes and frequent bends and promiscuous branching along the hypha and were unable to invade agar. These defects were associated with abnormal actin patch polarization, unstable polarisome localization at hyphal tips, and mislocalized septin rings, consistent with the idea that GTP cycling of Rsr1p stabilizes the axis of polarity primarily to a single focus, thus ensuring normal cell shape and a focused direction of polarized growth. We conclude that the Rsr1p GTPase functions as a polarity landmark for hyphal guidance and may be an important mediator of extracellular signals during processes such as host invasion. PMID:16002653

  10. Competitive Interactions between C. albicans, C. glabrata and C. krusei during Biofilm Formation and Development of Experimental Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Rossoni, Rodnei Dennis; Barbosa, Júnia Oliveira; Vilela, Simone Furgeri Godinho; dos Santos, Jéssica Diane; de Barros, Patrícia Pimentel; Prata, Márcia Cristina de Azevedo; Anbinder, Ana Lia; Fuchs, Beth Burgwyn; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso; Mylonakis, Eleftherios; Junqueira, Juliana Campos

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the interactions between Candida albicans, Candida krusei and Candida glabrata in mixed infections. Initially, these interactions were studied in biofilms formed in vitro. CFU/mL values of C. albicans were lower in mixed biofilms when compared to the single biofilms, verifying 77% and 89% of C. albicans reduction when this species was associated with C. glabrata and C. krusei, respectively. After that, we expanded this study for in vivo host models of experimental candidiasis. G. mellonella larvae were inoculated with monotypic and heterotypic Candida suspensions for analysis of survival rate and quantification of fungal cells in the haemolymph. In the groups with single infections, 100% of the larvae died within 18 h after infection with C. albicans. However, interaction groups achieved 100% mortality after 72 h of infection by C. albicans-C. glabrata and 96 h of infection by C. albicans-C. krusei. C. albicans CFU/mL values from larvae hemolymph were lower in the interacting groups compared with the monoespecies group after 12 h of infection. In addition, immunosuppressed mice were also inoculated with monotypic and heterotypic microbial suspensions to induce oral candidiasis. C. albicans CFU/mL values recovered from oral cavity of mice were higher in the group with single infection by C. albicans than the groups with mixed infections by C. albicans-C. glabrata and C. albicans-C. krusei. Moreover, the group with single infection by C. albicans had a higher degree of hyphae and epithelial changes in the tongue dorsum than the groups with mixed infections. We concluded that single infections by C. albicans were more harmful for animal models than mixed infections with non-albicans species, suggesting that C. albicans establish competitive interactions with C. krusei and C. glabrata during biofilm formation and development of experimental candidiasis. PMID:26146832

  11. Candida albicans Ultrastructure: Colonization and Invasion of Oral Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Howlett, Julie A.; Squier, Christopher A.

    1980-01-01

    The colonization and invasion of various animal oral mucosae by Candida albicans were examined in an organ culture model. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy of the oral epithelium between 12 and 30 h after inoculation with the fungus revealed the morphological relationships between host and parasite. Examination of the fungi in thin sections showed five distinct layers in the cell wall of C. albicans within the epithelium, but changes were evident in the organization and definition of the outer cell wall layers in budding hyphae and in hyphae participating in colonization and invasion of the epithelial cells. Adherence of the fungus to the superficial cells of the oral mucosa appeared to involve intimate contact between the epithelial cell surface and the deeper layers of the fungal cell wall. During invasion a close seal was maintained between the invading hyphae and the surrounding epithelial cell envelope, there being no other evidence of damage to the host cell surface except at the site of entry. Within the epithelial cells there was only occasional loss of cytoplasmic components in the vicinity of the invading hyphae. These findings would suggest that enzymatic lysis associated with the invasive process is localized and that the mechanical support provided by surface adherence and the intimate association between the fungus and the epithelial cell envelope may permit growth of Candida on through the epithelium. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 PMID:6995338

  12. The ABCs of Candida albicans Multidrug Transporter Cdr1

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Atanu; Khandelwal, Nitesh Kumar; Dhamgaye, Sanjiveeni

    2015-01-01

    In the light of multidrug resistance (MDR) among pathogenic microbes and cancer cells, membrane transporters have gained profound clinical significance. Chemotherapeutic failure, by far, has been attributed mainly to the robust and diverse array of these proteins, which are omnipresent in every stratum of the living world. Candida albicans, one of the major fungal pathogens affecting immunocompromised patients, also develops MDR during the course of chemotherapy. The pivotal membrane transporters that C. albicans has exploited as one of the strategies to develop MDR belongs to either the ATP binding cassette (ABC) or the major facilitator superfamily (MFS) class of proteins. The ABC transporter Candida drug resistance 1 protein (Cdr1p) is a major player among these transporters that enables the pathogen to outplay the battery of antifungals encountered by it. The promiscuous Cdr1 protein fulfills the quintessential need of a model to study molecular mechanisms of multidrug transporter regulation and structure-function analyses of asymmetric ABC transporters. In this review, we cover the highlights of two decades of research on Cdr1p that has provided a platform to study its structure-function relationships and regulatory circuitry for a better understanding of MDR not only in yeast but also in other organisms. PMID:26407965

  13. Chloroquine sensitizes biofilms of Candida albicans to antifungal azoles.

    PubMed

    Shinde, Ravikumar Bapurao; Raut, Jayant Shankar; Chauhan, Nitin Mahendra; Karuppayil, Sankunny Mohan

    2013-01-01

    Biofilms formed by Candida albicans, a human pathogen, are known to be resistant to different antifungal agents. Novel strategies to combat the biofilm associated Candida infections like multiple drug therapy are being explored. In this study, potential of chloroquine to be a partner drug in combination with four antifungal agents, namely fluconazole, voriconazole, amphotericin B, and caspofungin, was explored against biofilms of C. albicans. Activity of various concentrations of chloroquine in combination with a particular antifungal drug was analyzed in a checkerboard format. Growth of biofilm in presence of drugs was analyzed by XTT-assay, in terms of relative metabolic activity compared to that of drug free control. Results obtained by XTT-metabolic assay were confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. The interactions between chloroquine and four antifungal drugs were determined by calculating fractional inhibitory concentration indices. Azole resistance in biofilms was reverted significantly (p<0.05) in presence of 250μg/mL of chloroquine, which resulted in inhibition of biofilms at very low concentrations of antifungal drugs. No significant alteration in the sensitivity of biofilms to caspofungin and amphotericin B was evident in combination with chloroquine. This study for the first time indicates that chloroquine potentiates anti-biofilm activity of fluconazole and voriconazole. PMID:23602464

  14. The ABCs of Candida albicans Multidrug Transporter Cdr1.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Rajendra; Banerjee, Atanu; Khandelwal, Nitesh Kumar; Dhamgaye, Sanjiveeni

    2015-12-01

    In the light of multidrug resistance (MDR) among pathogenic microbes and cancer cells, membrane transporters have gained profound clinical significance. Chemotherapeutic failure, by far, has been attributed mainly to the robust and diverse array of these proteins, which are omnipresent in every stratum of the living world. Candida albicans, one of the major fungal pathogens affecting immunocompromised patients, also develops MDR during the course of chemotherapy. The pivotal membrane transporters that C. albicans has exploited as one of the strategies to develop MDR belongs to either the ATP binding cassette (ABC) or the major facilitator superfamily (MFS) class of proteins. The ABC transporter Candida drug resistance 1 protein (Cdr1p) is a major player among these transporters that enables the pathogen to outplay the battery of antifungals encountered by it. The promiscuous Cdr1 protein fulfills the quintessential need of a model to study molecular mechanisms of multidrug transporter regulation and structure-function analyses of asymmetric ABC transporters. In this review, we cover the highlights of two decades of research on Cdr1p that has provided a platform to study its structure-function relationships and regulatory circuitry for a better understanding of MDR not only in yeast but also in other organisms. PMID:26407965

  15. Attenuated virulence of chitin-deficient mutants of Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Bulawa, C E; Miller, D W; Henry, L K; Becker, J M

    1995-01-01

    We have analyzed the role of chitin, a cell-wall polysaccharide, in the virulence of Candida albicans. Mutants with a 5-fold reduction in chitin were obtained in two ways: (i) by selecting mutants resistant to Calcofluor, a fluorescent dye that binds to chitin and inhibits growth, and (ii) by disrupting CHS3, the C. albicans homolog of CSD2/CAL1/DIT101/KT12, a Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene required for synthesis of approximately 90% of the cell-wall chitin. Chitin-deficient mutants have no obvious alterations in growth rate, sugar assimilation, chlamydospore formation, or germ-tube formation in various media. When growing vegetatively in liquid media, the mutants tend to clump and display minor changes in morphology. Staining of cells with the fluorescent dye Calcofluor indicates that CHS3 is required for synthesis of the chitin rings found on the surface of yeast cells but not formation of septa in either yeast cells or germ tubes. Despite their relatively normal growth, the mutants are significantly less virulent than the parental strain in both immunocompetent and immunosuppressed mice; at 13 days after infection, survival was 95% in immunocompetent mice that received chs3/chs3 cells and 10% in immunocompetent mice that received an equal dose of chs3/CHS3 cells. Chitin-deficient strains can colonize the organs of infected mice, suggesting that the reduced virulence of the mutants is not due to accelerated clearing. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:7479842

  16. Polyketide Glycosides from Bionectria ochroleuca Inhibit Candida albicans Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    One of the challenges presented by Candida infections is that many of the isolates encountered in the clinic produce biofilms, which can decrease these pathogens’ susceptibilities to standard-of-care antibiotic therapies. Inhibitors of fungal biofilm formation offer a potential solution to counteracting some of the problems associated with Candida infections. A screening campaign utilizing samples from our fungal extract library revealed that a Bionectria ochroleuca isolate cultured on Cheerios breakfast cereal produced metabolites that blocked the in vitro formation of Candida albicans biofilms. A scale-up culture of the fungus was undertaken using mycobags (also known as mushroom bags or spawn bags), which afforded four known [TMC-151s C–F (1–4)] and three new [bionectriols B–D (5–7)] polyketide glycosides. All seven metabolites exhibited potent biofilm inhibition against C. albicans SC5314, as well as exerted synergistic antifungal activities in combination with amphotericin B. In this report, we describe the structure determination of the new metabolites, as well as compare the secondary metabolome profiles of fungi grown in flasks and mycobags. These studies demonstrate that mycobags offer a useful alternative to flask-based cultures for the preparative production of fungal secondary metabolites. PMID:25302529

  17. Modulation of Candida albicans Biofilm by Different Carbon Sources.

    PubMed

    Pemmaraju, Suma C; Pruthi, Parul A; Prasad, R; Pruthi, Vikas

    2016-06-01

    In the present investigation, the role of carbon sources (glucose, lactate, sucrose, and arabinose) on Candida albicans biofilm development and virulence factors was studied on polystyrene microtiter plates. Besides this, structural changes in cell wall component β-glucan in presence of different carbon sources have also been highlighted. Biofilm formation was analyzed by XTT (2,3-bis[2-Methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl]-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide) reduction assay. Glucose-grown cells exhibited the highest metabolic activity during adhesion among all carbon sources tested (p < 0.05). However, cells exposed to sucrose exhibited highest biofilm formation and matrix polysaccharides secretion after 48 h. The results also correlated with the biofilm height and roughness measurements by atomic force microscopy. Exposure to lactate induced hyphal structures with the highest proteinase activity while arabinose-grown cells formed pseudohyphal structures possessing the highest phospholipase activity. Structural changes in β-glucan characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy displayed characteristic band of β-glucan at 892 cm(-1) in all carbon sources tested. The β(1→6) to β(1→3) glucan ratio calculated as per the band area of the peak was less in lactate (1.15) as compared to glucose (1.73), sucrose (1.62), and arabinose (2.85). These results signify that carbon sources influence C. albicans biofilm development and modulate virulence factors and structural organization of cell wall component β-glucan. PMID:26899861

  18. Characterization of a fucoside-binding adhesin of Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Tosh, F D; Douglas, L J

    1992-01-01

    Candida albicans GDH 2346 produces extracellular polymeric material (EP) which contains a mannoprotein adhesin with a lectin-like affinity for fucose-containing glycosides. EP isolated from culture supernatants of this strain was used as starting material for purification of the adhesin. The purification protocol involved a stepwise treatment of EP with N-glycanase, papain, and dilute alkali to cleave the protein and carbohydrate portions of the mannoprotein molecule. Fucoside-binding protein fragments were then recovered by affinity adsorption with the trisaccharide determinant of the H (type 2) blood group antigen which terminates in a residue of L-fucose. The purified adhesin was devoid of carbohydrate and inhibited yeast adhesion to buccal epithelial cells 221 times more efficiently, on a protein weight basis, than did EP. Adhesion inhibition reached a maximum of 78 to 80% at an adhesin concentration of 10 micrograms ml-1. Our results indicate that this protein is the major adhesin of yeast-phase cells of C. albicans GDH 2346 but that one or more secondary adhesion mechanisms may operate. PMID:1398983

  19. SOME CYTOLOGICAL AND PATHOGENIC PROPERTIES OF SPHEROPLASTS OF CANDIDA ALBICANS

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, George S.; Friedman, Lorraine; Kofroth, Judith F.

    1964-01-01

    Kobayashi, George S. (Tulane University, New Orleans, La.), Lorraine Friedman, and Judith F. Kofroth. Some cytological and pathogenic properties of spheroplasts of Candida albicans. J. Bacteriol. 88:795–801. 1964.—Spheroplasts of Candida albicans were prepared by use of an enzymatic mixture from the digestive tract of the snail Helix pomatia. Untreated cells exhibited well-defined cell walls, whereas such structures were absent from spheroplasts. The intravenous inoculation of either spheroplasts or intact cells into rabbits produced a fever which was apparent within 30 min, the “immediate” fever response characteristic of microbial endotoxin. Cell-wall fragments of enzyme-treated cells did not induce a convincing pyrogenic response. When the inoculum was viable, body temperatures did not return to normal but remained elevated until death of the animal 1 or more days later, exhibiting the “delayed” fever of infection. The gross pathological picture in animals succumbing to infection by viable spheroplasts was similar to that obtained with untreated yeast cells. Images PMID:14208520

  20. Ultrastructural Analysis of Candida albicans When Exposed to Silver Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez-Muñoz, Roberto; Avalos-Borja, Miguel; Castro-Longoria, Ernestina

    2014-01-01

    Candida albicans is the most common fungal pathogen in humans, and recently some studies have reported the antifungal activity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) against some Candida species. However, ultrastructural analyses on the interaction of AgNPs with these microorganisms have not been reported. In this work we evaluated the effect of AgNPs on C. albicans, and the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was found to have a fungicidal effect. The IC50 was also determined, and the use of AgNPs with fluconazole (FLC), a fungistatic drug, reduced cell proliferation. In order to understand how AgNPs interact with living cells, the ultrastructural distribution of AgNPs in this fungus was determined. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis revealed a high accumulation of AgNPs outside the cells but also smaller nanoparticles (NPs) localized throughout the cytoplasm. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) analysis confirmed the presence of intracellular silver. From our results it is assumed that AgNPs used in this study do not penetrate the cell, but instead release silver ions that infiltrate into the cell leading to the formation of NPs through reduction by organic compounds present in the cell wall and cytoplasm. PMID:25290909

  1. Mechanism of iron uptake by the pathogenic yeast, Candida albicans

    SciTech Connect

    Ismail, A.

    1986-01-01

    C. albicans requires iron for growth and phenotypic development. When deprived of iron, mycelium and bud formation was suppressed. Survival of the organism was also reduced under iron-limiting conditions. The combination of elevated temperature and iron-deprivation further reduced phenotypic development and survival of the yeast. The combination of elevated temperature and iron starvation resulted in a decrease in both the growth rate and siderophore production. However, with time, the cells were able to show partial recovery in the growth rate which occurred concomitantly with an increase in siderophore production. In order for siderophores to be utilized, ferri-siderophore receptors must be produced. The receptor was shown to be located in the plasma membrane of the yeast. Scatchard analysis of the binding of ferri-siderophores to plasma membrane receptors showed an increase in receptor affinity and number of binding sites in iron-starved cells when compared to control cells. Autoradiograms of the /sup 58/Fe-siderophore-protein complex following SDS-PAGE separation of candidal proteins revealed the presence of a ferri-siderophore receptor of approximately 10,000 daltons. C. albicans strains which lacked the ability to synthesize phenolate siderophore maintained a phenolate receptor and bound candidal phenolate siderophore better than non-candidal phenolate siderophores.

  2. Scolopendin 2 leads to cellular stress response in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Lee, Heejeong; Hwang, Jae-Sam; Lee, Dong Gun

    2016-07-01

    Centipedes, a kind of arthropod, have been reported to produce antimicrobial peptides as part of an innate immune response. Scolopendin 2 (AGLQFPVGRIGRLLRK) is a novel antimicrobial peptide derived from the body of the centipede Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans by using RNA sequencing. To investigate the intracellular responses induced by scolopendin 2, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and glutathione accumulation and lipid peroxidation were monitored over sublethal and lethal doses. Intracellular ROS and antioxidant molecule levels were elevated and lipids were peroxidized at sublethal concentrations. Moreover, the Ca(2+) released from the endoplasmic reticulum accumulated in the cytosol and mitochondria. These stress responses were considered to be associated with yeast apoptosis. Candida albicans cells exposed to scolopendin 2 were identified using diagnostic markers of apoptotic response. Various responses such as phosphatidylserine externalization, chromatin condensation, and nuclear fragmentation were exhibited. Scolopendin 2 disrupted the mitochondrial membrane potential and activated metacaspase, which was mediated by cytochrome c release. In conclusion, treatment of C. albicans with scolopendin 2 induced the apoptotic response at sublethal doses, which in turn led to mitochondrial dysfunction, metacaspase activation, and cell death. The cationic antimicrobial peptide scolopendin 2 from the centipede is a potential antifungal peptide, triggering the apoptotic response. PMID:27207682

  3. Morphological and physiological changes induced by contact-dependent interaction between Candida albicans and Fusobacterium nucleatum.

    PubMed

    Bor, Batbileg; Cen, Lujia; Agnello, Melissa; Shi, Wenyuan; He, Xuesong

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans and Fusobacterium nucleatum are well-studied oral commensal microbes with pathogenic potential that are involved in various oral polymicrobial infectious diseases. Recently, we demonstrated that F. nucleatum ATCC 23726 coaggregates with C. albicans SN152, a process mainly mediated by fusobacterial membrane protein RadD and Candida cell wall protein Flo9. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential biological impact of this inter-kingdom interaction. We found that F. nucleatum ATCC 23726 inhibits growth and hyphal morphogenesis of C. albicans SN152 in a contact-dependent manner. Further analysis revealed that the inhibition of Candida hyphal morphogenesis is mediated via RadD and Flo9 protein pair. Using a murine macrophage cell line, we showed that the F. nucleatum-induced inhibition of Candida hyphal morphogenesis promotes C. albicans survival and negatively impacts the macrophage-killing capability of C. albicans. Furthermore, the yeast form of C. albicans repressed F. nucleatum-induced MCP-1 and TNFα production in macrophages. Our study suggests that the interaction between C. albicans and F. nucleatum leads to a mutual attenuation of virulence, which may function to promote a long-term commensal lifestyle within the oral cavity. This finding has significant implications for our understanding of inter-kingdom interaction and may impact clinical treatment strategies. PMID:27295972

  4. Candida albicans-induced agglutinin and immunoglobulin E responses in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Winterrowd, G E; Cutler, J E

    1983-01-01

    Mice varied in their ability to make detectable antibody responses to cell surface determinants of Candida albicans depending upon the antigen preparation and the immunization schedule used. Immunoglobulin M (IgM) appeared to be the major class of antibody responsible for the C. albicans-agglutinating activity of the immune sera. Various inbred strains of mice injected with a ribosomal fraction from C. albicans produced a low titer (average, 4 to 8) of yeast cell agglutinins and a higher titer (64 to 512) of IgE antibodies detected by passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) in rats. The two kinds of antibodies appeared to be specific for different antigens because the agglutinin, but not IgE, could be removed by absorbing the serum with a polysaccharide from the cell wall of C. albicans, but the polysaccharide did not provoke the PCA reaction. C. albicans-specific IgE antibodies showed cross-reactivity (PCA) with ribosomal antigens from a strain of C. albicans and C. tropicalis, but PCA reactions could not be elicited with similar antigen preparations from other yeast species. IgE responses were also detected in over 20% of the mice infected intravenously or intraperitoneally with live C. albicans. PMID:6190755

  5. Streptococcus gordonii comCDE (competence) operon modulates biofilm formation with Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Jack, Alison A.; Daniels, Debbie E.; Jepson, Mark A.; Vickerman, M. Margaret; Lamont, Richard J.; Jenkinson, Howard F.

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is a pleiomorphic fungus that forms mixed species biofilms with Streptococcus gordonii, an early colonizer of oral cavity surfaces. Activation of quorum sensing (QS; intercellular signalling) promotes monospecies biofilm development by these micro-organisms, but the role of QS in mixed species communities is not understood. The comCDE genes in S. gordonii encode a sensor–regulator system (ComDE), which is activated by the comC gene product (CSP, competence stimulating peptide) and modulates expression of QS-regulated genes. Dual species biofilms of S. gordonii ΔcomCDE or ΔcomC mutants with C. albicans showed increased biomass compared to biofilms of S. gordonii DL1 wild-type with C. albicans. The ΔcomCDE mutant dual species biofilms in particular contained more extracellular DNA (eDNA), and could be dispersed with DNase I or protease treatment. Exogenous CSP complemented the S. gordonii ΔcomC transformation deficiency, as well as the ΔcomC-C. albicans biofilm phenotype. Purified CSP did not affect C. albicans hyphal filament formation but inhibited monospecies biofilm formation by C. albicans. The results suggest that the S. gordonii comCDE QS-system modulates the production of eDNA and the incorporation of C. albicans into dual species biofilms. PMID:25505189

  6. Fluconazole Resistance Candida albicans in Females With Recurrent Vaginitis and Pir1 Overexpression

    PubMed Central

    Nasrollahi, Zahra; Yadegari, Mohammad Hossein; Roudbar Mohammadi, Shahla; Roudbary, Maryam; Hosseini Poor, Maryam; Nikoomanesh, Fatemeh; Rajabi Bazl, Masumeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Some genes may be associated with Candida albicans resistance to azoles. Pir1 gene is described as responsible to induce resistance in C. albicans. Objectives: The current study aimed to find the relationship between fluconazole resistance and Pir1 protein (Pir1p) overexpression in the females with recurrent C. albicans vaginitis requiring longer fluconazole therapy. Patients and Methods: A total of 52l vaginal samples were obtained from the females with C. albicans vaginitis. The azole susceptibility phenotype was determined according to the Clinical Laboratory for Standards Institute (CLSI) protocol for disk diffusion method and inhibition zone for fluconazole. Expression of pir1 gene and fluconazole -resistance were evaluated using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in C. albicans. Results: In the 52 isolates, 49 (94%) were resistant to fluconazole. Overexpression of Pir1 gene was detected in 47 (96%) fluconazole-resistant C. albicans isolates. Conclusions: The findings show fluconazole -resistance in C. albicans isolates with overexpression of Pir1p. PMID:26495107

  7. Presence of extracellular DNA in the Candida albicans biofilm matrix and its contribution to biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Margarida; Uppuluri, Priya; Thomas, Derek P.; Cleary, Ian A.; Henriques, Mariana; Lopez-Ribot, José L.; Oliveira, Rosário

    2014-01-01

    DNA has been described as a structural component of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in bacterial biofilms. In Candida albicans there is a scarce knowledge concerning the contribution of extracellular DNA (eDNA) to biofilm matrix and overall structure. This work examined the presence and quantified the amount of eDNA in C.albicans biofilm ECM and the effect of DNase treatment and the addition of exogenous DNA on C. albicans biofilm development as indicators of a role for eDNA in biofilm development. We were able to detect the accumulation of eDNA in biofilm ECM extracted from C. albicans biofilms formed under conditions of flow, although the quantity of eDNA detected differed according to growth conditions, in particular with regards to the medium used to grow the biofilms. Experiments with C. albicans biofilms formed statically using a microtiter plate model indicated that the addition of exogenous DNA (>160 ng/ml) increases biofilm biomass and, conversely, DNase treatment (>0.03 mg/ml) decreases biofilm biomass at later time points of biofilm development. We present evidence for the role of eDNA in C. albicans biofilm structure and formation, consistent with eDNA being a key element of the ECM in mature C. albicans biofilms and playing a predominant role in biofilm structural integrity and maintenance. PMID:20012895

  8. Adherence of Candida albicans to a cell surface polysaccharide receptor on Streptococcus gordonii.

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, A R; Gopal, P K; Jenkinson, H F

    1995-01-01

    Candida albicans ATCC 10261 and CA2 bound to cells of the oral bacteria Streptococcus gordonii, Streptococcus oralis, and Streptococcus sanguis when these bacteria were immobilized onto microtiter plate wells, but they did not bind to cells of Streptococcus mutans or Streptococcus salivarius. Cell wall polysaccharide was extracted with alkali from S. gordonii NCTC 7869, the streptococcal species to which C. albicans bound with highest affinity, and was effective in blocking the coaggregation of C. albicans and S. gordonii cells in the fluid phase. When fixed to microtiter plate wells, the S. gordonii polysaccharide was bound by all strains of C. albicans tested. The polysaccharide contained Rha, Glc, GalNAc, GlcNAc, and Gal and was related compositionally to previously characterized cell wall polysaccharides from strains of S. oralis and S. sanguis. The adherence of yeast cells to the immobilized polysaccharide was not inhibitable by a number of saccharides. Antiserum raised to the S. gordonii NCTC 7869 polysaccharide blocked adherence of C. albicans ATCC 10261 to the polysaccharide. The results identify a complex cell wall polysaccharide of S. gordonii as the coaggregation receptor for C. albicans. Adherent interactions of yeast cells with streptococci and other bacteria may be important for colonization of both hard and soft oral surfaces by C. albicans. PMID:7729891

  9. Essential Functional Modules for Pathogenic and Defensive Mechanisms in Candida albicans Infections

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, I-Chun; Lin, Che; Chuang, Yung-Jen

    2014-01-01

    The clinical and biological significance of the study of fungal pathogen Candida albicans (C. albicans) has markedly increased. However, the explicit pathogenic and invasive mechanisms of such host-pathogen interactions have not yet been fully elucidated. Therefore, the essential functional modules involved in C. albicans-zebrafish interactions were investigated in this study. Adopting a systems biology approach, the early-stage and late-stage protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks for both C. albicans and zebrafish were constructed. By comparing PPI networks at the early and late stages of the infection process, several critical functional modules were identified in both pathogenic and defensive mechanisms. Functional modules in C. albicans, like those involved in hyphal morphogenesis, ion and small molecule transport, protein secretion, and shifts in carbon utilization, were seen to play important roles in pathogen invasion and damage caused to host cells. Moreover, the functional modules in zebrafish, such as those involved in immune response, apoptosis mechanisms, ion transport, protein secretion, and hemostasis-related processes, were found to be significant as defensive mechanisms during C. albicans infection. The essential functional modules thus determined could provide insights into the molecular mechanisms of host-pathogen interactions during the infection process and thereby devise potential therapeutic strategies to treat C. albicans infection. PMID:24757665

  10. Regulation of Candida albicans Interaction with Macrophages through the Activation of HOG Pathway by Genistein.

    PubMed

    Cui, Shuna; Hassan, Rabeay Y A; Heintz-Buschart, Anna; Bilitewski, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    The severity of infections caused by Candida albicans, the most common opportunistic human fungal pathogen, needs rapid and effective antifungal treatments. One of the effective ways is to control the virulence factors of the pathogen. Therefore, the current study examined the effects of genistein, a natural isoflavone present in soybeans, on C. albicans. The genistein-treated C. albicans cells were then exposed to macrophages. Although no inhibition effect on the growth rates of C. albicans was noted an enhancement of the immune response to macrophages has been observed, indicated by phagocytosis and release of cytokines TNF-α and IL-10. The effect of genistein on the enhanced phagocytosis can be mimicked by the fungicides fludioxonil or iprodione, which inhibit the histidine kinase Cos1p and lead to activation of HOG pathway. The western blot results showed a clear phosphorylation of Hog1p in the wild type strain of C. albicans after incubation with genistein. In addition, effects of genistein on the phosphorylation of Hog1p in the histidine kinase mutants Δcos1 and Δsln1 were also observed. Our results thus indicate a new bio-activity of genistein on C. albicans by activation of the HOG pathway of the human pathogen C. albicans. PMID:26828477

  11. CX3CL1 expression induced by Candida albicans in oral fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Kouji; Nishi, Hiromi; Fukui, Akiko; Shigeishi, Hideo; Takechi, Masaaki; Kamata, Nobuyuki

    2010-11-01

    Oral fibroblasts as well as keratinocytes are thought to influence host inflammatory responses against Candida albicans. However, little is known about chemokine expressions in oral fibroblasts against C. albicans infection. We therefore examined whether C. albicans induced several chemokines including fractalkine/CX3CL1 (CX3CL1), a unique chemokine that has properties of both chemoattractants and adhesion molecules, in fibroblasts and keratinocytes. The addition of C. albicans live cells to human immortalized oral keratinocytes (RT7) resulted in increases in the mRNA levels of multiple chemokines, but not of CX3CL1. In contrast, live and heat-killed C. albicans caused an increase in CX3CL1 mRNA and protein expression in human immortalized oral fibroblasts (GT1). CX3CL1 mRNA expression in GT1 cells was also enhanced by stimulation with a nonalbicans species of Candida. Further, the CX3CL1 chemokine domain showed antifungal activity against C. albicans. CX3CL1 secreted by oral fibroblasts appears to play an important role in the oral immune response to C. albicans infection. PMID:20880200

  12. Antifungal activity of Rubus chingii extract combined with fluconazole against fluconazole-resistant Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Han, Bing; Chen, Jia; Yu, Yi-qun; Cao, Yong-bing; Jiang, Yuan-ying

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to investigate the antifungal activity of Rubus chingii extract in combination with fluconazole (FLC) against FLC-resistant Candida albicans 100 in vitro. A R. chingii extract and FLC-resistant C. albicans fungus suspension were prepared. The minimum inhibitory concentration and fractional inhibitory concentration index of R. chingii extract combined with FLC against C. albicans were determined, after which growth curves for C. albicans treated with R. chingii extract, FLC alone and a combination of these preparations were constructed. Additionally, the mechanisms of drug combination against C. albicans were explored by flow cytometry, gas chromatographic mass spectrometry and drug efflux pump function detection. R. chingii extract combined with FLC showed significant synergy. Flow cytometry suggested that C. albicans cells mainly arrest in G1 and S phases when they have been treated with the drug combination. The drug combination resulted in a marked decrease in the ergosterol content of the cell membrane. Additionally, efflux of Rhodamine 6G decreased with increasing concentrations of R. chingii extract. R. chingii extract combined with FLC has antifungal activity against FLC-resistant C. albicans. PMID:26891940

  13. Morphological and physiological changes induced by contact-dependent interaction between Candida albicans and Fusobacterium nucleatum

    PubMed Central

    Bor, Batbileg; Cen, Lujia; Agnello, Melissa; Shi, Wenyuan; He, Xuesong

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans and Fusobacterium nucleatum are well-studied oral commensal microbes with pathogenic potential that are involved in various oral polymicrobial infectious diseases. Recently, we demonstrated that F. nucleatum ATCC 23726 coaggregates with C. albicans SN152, a process mainly mediated by fusobacterial membrane protein RadD and Candida cell wall protein Flo9. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential biological impact of this inter-kingdom interaction. We found that F. nucleatum ATCC 23726 inhibits growth and hyphal morphogenesis of C. albicans SN152 in a contact-dependent manner. Further analysis revealed that the inhibition of Candida hyphal morphogenesis is mediated via RadD and Flo9 protein pair. Using a murine macrophage cell line, we showed that the F. nucleatum-induced inhibition of Candida hyphal morphogenesis promotes C. albicans survival and negatively impacts the macrophage-killing capability of C. albicans. Furthermore, the yeast form of C. albicans repressed F. nucleatum-induced MCP-1 and TNFα production in macrophages. Our study suggests that the interaction between C. albicans and F. nucleatum leads to a mutual attenuation of virulence, which may function to promote a long-term commensal lifestyle within the oral cavity. This finding has significant implications for our understanding of inter-kingdom interaction and may impact clinical treatment strategies. PMID:27295972

  14. Quantitative and qualitative analyses of the cell death process in Candida albicans treated by antifungal agents.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung Sook; Kim, Young-Sun; Han, Ihn; Kim, Mi-Hyun; Jung, Min Hyung; Park, Hun-Kuk

    2011-01-01

    The death process of Candida albicans was investigated after treatment with the antifungal agents flucytosine and amphotericin B by assessing morphological and biophysical properties associated with cell death. C. albicans was treated varying time periods (from 6 to 48 hours) and examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). SEM and AFM images clearly showed changes in morphology and biophysical properties. After drug treatment, the membrane of C. albicans was perforated, deformed, and shrunken. Compared to the control, C. albicans treated with flucytosine was softer and initially showed a greater adhesive force. Conversely, C. albicans treated with amphotericin B was harder and had a lower adhesive force. In both cases, the surface roughness increased as the treatment time increased. The relationships between morphological changes and the drugs were observed by AFM clearly; the surface of C. albicans treated with flucytosine underwent membrane collapse, expansion of holes, and shrinkage, while the membranes of cells treated with amphotericin B peeled off. According to these observations, the death process of C. albicans was divided into 4 phases, CDP(0), CDP(1), CDP(2), and CDP(4), which were determined based on morphological changes. Our results could be employed to further investigate the antifungal activity of compounds derived from natural sources. PMID:22174777

  15. Tpd3-Pph21 phosphatase plays a direct role in Sep7 dephosphorylation in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qizheng; Han, Qi; Wang, Na; Yao, Guangyin; Zeng, Guisheng; Wang, Yanming; Huang, Zhenxing; Sang, Jianli; Wang, Yue

    2016-07-01

    Septins are a component of the cytoskeleton and play important roles in diverse cellular processes including cell cycle control, cytokinesis and polarized growth. In fungi, septin organization, dynamics and function are regulated by phosphorylation, and several kinases responsible for the phosphorylation of several septins have been identified. However, little is known about the phosphatases that dephosphorylate septins. Here, we report the characterization of Tpd3, a structural subunit of the PP2A family of phosphatases, in the pathogenic fungus Candida albicans. We found that tpd3Δ/Δ cells are defective in hyphal growth and grow as pseudohyphae under yeast growth conditions with aberrant septin organization. Western blotting detected hyperphosphorylation of the septin Sep7 in cells lacking Tpd3. Tpd3 and Sep7 colocalize at the bud neck and can coimmunoprecipitate. Furthermore, we discovered similar defects in cells lacking Pph21, a catalytic subunit of the PP2A family, and its physical association with Tpd3. Importantly, purified Tpd3-Pph21 complexes can dephosphorylate Sep7 in vitro. Together, our findings strongly support the idea that the Tpd3-Pph21 complex dephosphorylates Sep7 and regulates morphogenesis and cytokinesis. The tpd3Δ/Δ mutant is greatly reduced in virulence in mice, providing a potential antifungal target. PMID:26991697

  16. Candida albicans biofilm inhibition by synergistic action of terpenes and fluconazole.

    PubMed

    Pemmaraju, Suma C; Pruthi, Parul A; Prasad, R; Pruthi, Vikas

    2013-11-01

    The current treatment options for Candida albicans biofilm-device related infections are very scarce due to their intrinsic increased tolerance to antimycotics. The aim of this work was to study synergistic action of terpenes (eugenol, menthol and thymol) with fluconazole (FLA) on C. albicans biofilm inhibition. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) assayed using CLSI M27-A3 broth micro-dilution method showed antifungal activity against C. albicans MTCC 227 at a concentration of 0.12 % (v/v) for both thymol and eugenol as compared to 0.25 % (v/v) for menthol. FLA was taken as positive control. The effect of these terpenes on metabolic activity of preformed C. albicans biofilm cells was evaluated using 2,3-bis (2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide (XTT) reduction assay in 96-well polystyrene microtiter plate. Thymol and eugenol were more effective at lower concentrations of > or = 1.0 % (v/v) than menthol. Synergistic studies using checkerboard micro-dilution assay showed fractional inhibitory concentration index (sigma FIC = 0.31) between thymol/FLA followed by eugenol/FLA (sigma FIC = 0.37) and menthol/FLA (sigma FIC < 0.5) against pre-formed C. albicans biofilms. Thymol with fluconazole showed highest synergy in reduction of biofilm formation than eugenol and menthol which was not observed when their activities were observed independently. Adherence assay showed 30% viability of C. albicans cells after 2 h of treatment with 0.05 % (v/v) thymol/FLA. Effect of thymol/FLA on C. albicans adhesion visualized by SEM micrographs showed disruption in number of candidal cells and alteration in structural design of C. albicans. Thus, the study demonstrated synergistic effect of terpenes with fluconazole on C. albicans biofilm, which could be future medications for biofilm infections. PMID:24416942

  17. Function and subcellular localization of Gcn5, a histone acetyltransferase in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Chang, Peng; Fan, Xueyi; Chen, Jiangye

    2015-08-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic fungal pathogen commonly found in humans. It has the ability to switch reversibly between three growth forms: budding yeast, pseudohypha, and hypha. The transition between yeast and hyphal growth forms is critical for the pathogenesis of C. albicans. During the yeast-to-hypha morphologic transition, gene expression is regulated by transcriptional regulators including histone modifying complexes and chromatin remodeling complexes. We previously reported that Esa1, a catalytic subunit in the histone acetyltransferase complex NuA4, is essential for the hyphal development of C. albicans. In this study, we analyzed the functional roles of Gcn5, a catalytic subunit in the histone acetyltransferase complex SAGA, in C. albicans. Gcn5 is required for the invasive and filamentous growth of C. albicans. Deletion of GCN5 impaired hyphal elongation in sensing serum and attenuated the virulence of C. albicans in a mouse systemic infection model. The C. albicans gcn5/gcn5 mutant cells also exhibited sensitivity to cell wall stress. Functional analysis showed that the HAT domain and Bromodomain in Gcn5 play distinct roles in morphogenesis and cell wall stress response of C. albicans. Our results show that the conserved residue Glu188 is crucial for the Gcn5 HAT activity and for Gcn5 function during filamentous growth. In addition, the subcellular distribution of ectopically expressed GFP-Gcn5 correlates with the different growth states of C. albicans. In stationary phase, Gcn5 accumulated in the nucleus, while during vegetative growth it localized in the cytoplasm in a morpha-independent manner. Our results suggest that the nuclear localization of Gcn5 depends on the existence of its N-terminal NLS and HAT domains. PMID:25656079

  18. Inhibitory Effect of Alpha-Mangostin on Adhesion of Candida albicans to Denture Acrylic

    PubMed Central

    Kaomongkolgit, Ruchadaporn; Jamdee, Kusuma

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Candida-associated denture stomatitis is a very common disease affecting denture wearers. It is characterized by the presence of yeast biofilm on the denture, primarily associated with C. albicans. The investigation of agents that can reduce C. albicans adhesion may represent a significant advancement in the prevention and treatment of this disease. This study aims to investigate the effect of alpha-mangostin on the in vitro adhesion of C. albicans to denture acrylic and germ tube formation by C. albicans and to compare its activity with clotrimazole which is a topical antifungal agent commonly used for the treatment of Candida-associated denture stomatitis. Materials and Methodology: Alpha-mangostin was extracted by thin layer chromatography. The effect of alpha-mangostin on adhesion of C. albicans to denture acrylic was determined by using a colorimetric tetrazolium assay and germ tube formation by C. albicans was determined by using the counting chamber. Results: A significant reduction of C. albicans adhesion to denture acrylic was evident after exposure to 2,000 µg/ml of alpha-mangostin for only 15 min. In addition, the 2,000 µg/ml of the alpha-mangostin-treated C. albicans had a reduced ability for germ tube formation. These inhibitory effects of alpha-mangostin were as effective as clotrimazole. Conclusion: Alpha-mangostin has antifungal property against C. albicans by inhibiting the adhesion to denture acrylic and germ tube formation in vitro. These results suggest the potential application of alpha-mangostin as a topical medication or a natural oral hygiene product for treatment of Candida-associated denture stomatitis. PMID:26962371

  19. Crystal structure of the Candida albicans Kar3 kinesin motor domain fused to maltose-binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Delorme, Caroline; Joshi, Monika; Allingham, John S.

    2012-11-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Candida albicans Kar3 motor domain structure was solved as a maltose-binding protein fusion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The electrostatic surface and part of the ATPase pocket of the motor domain differs markedly from other kinesins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The MBP-Kar3 interface highlights a new site for intramolecular or intermolecular interactions. -- Abstract: In the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans, the Kinesin-14 motor protein Kar3 (CaKar3) is critical for normal mitotic division, nuclear fusion during mating, and morphogenic transition from the commensal yeast form to the virulent hyphal form. As a first step towards detailed characterization of this motor of potential medical significance, we have crystallized and determined the X-ray structure of the motor domain of CaKar3 as a maltose-binding protein (MBP) fusion. The structure shows strong conservation of overall motor domain topology to other Kar3 kinesins, but with some prominent differences in one of the motifs that compose the nucleotide-binding pocket and the surface charge distribution. The MBP and Kar3 modules are arranged such that MBP interacts with the Kar3 motor domain core at the same site where the neck linker of conventional kinesins docks during the 'ATP state' of the mechanochemical cycle. This site differs from the Kar3 neck-core interface in the recent structure of the ScKar3Vik1 heterodimer. The position of MBP is also completely distinct from the Vik1 subunit in this complex. This may suggest that the site of MBP interaction on the CaKar3 motor domain provides an interface for the neck, or perhaps a partner subunit, at an intermediate state of its motile cycle that has not yet been observed for Kinesin-14 motors.

  20. Characterization of recombinant homocitrate synthase from Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Iwona; Milewski, Sławomir

    2016-09-01

    LYS21 and LYS22 genes from Candida albicans encoding isoforms of homocitrate synthase (HCS), an enzyme catalyzing the first committed step in the l-lysine biosynthetic pathway, were cloned and expressed as N-oligoHistagged fusion proteins in Escherichia coli. The purified gene products revealed HCS activity, i.e. catalyzed the condensation of α-ketoglutarate with acetyl-coenzyme A to yield homocitrate. The recombinant enzymes were purified to homogeneity and characterized for their physical properties and substrate specificities. As determined by size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) and native page electrophoresis, both isoenzymes adopt multiple quaternary structures, with the homotetrameric one being the most abundant. The KM (acetyl-CoA)=0.8±0.15mM and KM (α-ketoglutarate)=0.113±0.02mM for His6CaLys21p and KM (acetyl-CoA)=0.48±0.09mM and KM (α-ketoglutarate)=0.152±0.03mM values for His6CaLys22p were determined. Both enzyme versions were inhibited by l-Lys, i.e. the end product of the α-aminoadipate pathway but Lys22p was more sensitive than Lys21p, with Ki (L-Lys)=128±8μM for His6CaLys21p and Ki (L-Lys)=4.37±0.68μM for His6CaLys22p. The isoforms of C. albicans HCS exhibited differential sensitivity to several l-Lys analogues. Most notably, dl-α-difluoromethyllysine strongly inhibited His6CaLys22p (IC50 32±3μM) but was not inhibitory at all towards His6CaLys21p. Differential sensitivity of recombinant C. albicans Δlys21/LYS22, LYS21/Δlys22 and Δlys21/Δlys22 mutant strains to lysine analog, 2-aminoethyl-l-cysteine and biochemical properties of homocitrate synthase isoforms suggest different roles of two HCS isoenzymes in α-aminoadipate pathway. PMID:26363118

  1. C. albicans growth, transition, biofilm formation, and gene expression modulation by antimicrobial decapeptide KSL-W

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Antimicrobial peptides have been the focus of much research over the last decade because of their effectiveness and broad-spectrum activity against microbial pathogens. These peptides also participate in inflammation and the innate host defense system by modulating the immune function that promotes immune cell adhesion and migration as well as the respiratory burst, which makes them even more attractive as therapeutic agents. This has led to the synthesis of various antimicrobial peptides, including KSL-W (KKVVFWVKFK-NH2), for potential clinical use. Because this peptide displays antimicrobial activity against bacteria, we sought to determine its antifungal effect on C. albicans. Growth, hyphal form, biofilm formation, and degradation were thus examined along with EFG1, NRG1, EAP1, HWP1, and SAP 2-4-5-6 gene expression by quantitative RT-PCR. Results This study demonstrates that KSL-W markedly reduced C. albicans growth at both early and late incubation times. The significant effect of KSL-W on C. albicans growth was observed beginning at 10 μg/ml after 5 h of contact by reducing C. albicans transition and at 25 μg/ml by completely inhibiting C. albicans transition. Cultured C. albicans under biofilm-inducing conditions revealed that both KSL-W and amphotericin B significantly decreased biofilm formation at 2, 4, and 6 days of culture. KSL-W also disrupted mature C. albicans biofilms. The effect of KSL-W on C. albicans growth, transition, and biofilm formation/disruption may thus occur through gene modulation, as the expression of various genes involved in C. albicans growth, transition and biofilm formation were all downregulated when C. albicans was treated with KSL-W. The effect was greater when C. albicans was cultured under hyphae-inducing conditions. Conclusions These data provide new insight into the efficacy of KSL-W against C. albicans and its potential use as an antifungal therapy. PMID:24195531

  2. Phospholipid biosynthesis in Candida albicans: Regulation by the precursors inositol and choline

    SciTech Connect

    Klig, L.S.; Friedli, L.; Schmid, E. )

    1990-08-01

    Phospholipid metabolism in the pathogenic fungus Candida albicans was examined. The phospholipid biosynthetic pathways of C. albicans were elucidated and were shown to be similar to those of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, marked differences were seen between these two fungi in the regulation of the pathways in response to exogenously provided precursors inositol and choline. In S. cerevisiae, the biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine via methylation of phosphatidylethanolamine appears to be regulated in response to inositol and choline; provision of choline alone does not repress the activity of this pathway. The same pathway in C. albicans responds to the exogenous provision of choline. Possible explanations for the observed differences in regulation are discussed.

  3. Mechanisms of adherence of Candida albicans to cultured human epidermal keratinocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Ollert, M W; Söhnchen, R; Korting, H C; Ollert, U; Bräutigam, S; Bräutigam, W

    1993-01-01

    We established an in vitro adherence model with primarily cultured human keratinocytes as target cells which allows for the investigation of the molecular mechanisms that are responsible for Candida albicans host cell attachment in the initiation of cutaneous candidosis. The extent of C. albicans binding to cultured human keratinocytes was dependent on the yeast inoculum size and the incubation temperature. Heat and paraform-aldehyde treatment of yeasts completely abolished the binding activity of C. albicans. Of the different Candida species tested, C. albicans was by far the most adhesive species. C. albicans adherence was blocked by the acid protease inhibitor pepstatin A and the metabolic inhibitor sodium azide. The latter, however, was much less effective when yeasts were preincubated, suggesting that sodium azide was mainly acting on the keratinocytes. The extracellular matrix protein fibronectin was slightly inhibitory, whereas the fibronectin-derived peptides RGD and RGDS were not able to prevent attachment. PepTite-2000, another RGD-containing synthetic peptide, reduced C. albicans adherence by a margin of 25% (P < 0.005). CDPGYIGSR-NH2, which is a synthetic adhesive peptide derived from the laminin B chain, was much more efficient in its inhibitory activity than the RGD peptides and reduced C. albicans adherence to cultured human keratinocytes up to 76% (P < 0.001). Laminin itself and the synthetic pentapeptide YIGSR were less active. A dose-dependent reduction in adherence was also observed with collagen type III. Additionally, saccharides were tested for their potential to inhibit C. albicans attachment to keratinocytes. The most potent competitive saccharide inhibitors of C. albicans adherence to human keratinocytes were the amino sugars D-(+)-glucosamine and D-(+)-galactosamine with one isolate of C. albicans (4918) and D-(+)-glucosamine and alpha-D-(+)-fucose with another C. albicans isolate (Sp-1). Collectively, our data suggest the existence of

  4. Casein Agar: a Useful Medium for Differentiating Candida dubliniensis from Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Mosca, Christian O.; Moragues, María D.; Llovo, José; Al Mosaid, Asmaa; Coleman, David C.; Pontón, José

    2003-01-01

    Production of chlamydospores on casein agar at 24°C for 48 h provides a simple means for differentiating Candida dubliniensis from Candida albicans based on chlamydospore production. Of 109 C. dubliniensis isolates tested on this medium, 106 (97.2%) produced abundant chlamydospores and three produced few chlamydospores. In contrast, of the 120 C. albicans isolates tested, 111 (92.5%) failed to produce any chlamydospores, whereas the remaining nine isolates produced few chlamydospores. These findings indicate that abundant chlamydospore production on casein agar is a useful test for discriminating between C. dubliniensis and C. albicans. PMID:12624062

  5. Influence of radiation therapy on oral Candida albicans colonization: a quantitative assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Rossie, K.M.; Taylor, J.; Beck, F.M.; Hodgson, S.E.; Blozis, G.G.

    1987-12-01

    An increase in quantity of oral Candida albicans was documented in patients receiving head and neck radiation therapy during and after therapy, as assessed by an oral-rinse culturing technique. The amount of the increase was greater in denture wearers and directly related to increasing radiation dose and increasing volume of parotid gland included in the radiation portal. A significant number of patients who did not carry C. albicans prior to radiation therapy developed positive cultures by 1 month after radiation therapy. The percentage of patients receiving head and neck radiation therapy who carried C. albicans prior to radiation therapy did not differ significantly from matched dental patient controls.

  6. Antimicrobial effects of three tropical plant extracts on Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Okigbo, R N; Mmeka, E C

    2008-01-01

    Antimicrobial activities of the leaf extracts of Cymbopogon citatrus (lemongrass) and Vernonia amygdalina (bitter leaf) and the seed extracts of Garcinia kola (bitter kola) were carried out. G. kola had effect only on Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli with no inhibition on Candida albicans. Ethanol, cold water and hot water extracts of Vernonia amygdalina and Cymbopogon citratus showed inhibition on the three organism but G. kola ethanol, cold water and hot water extracts only inhibited S. aureus and E. coli with no inhibition on Candida albicans. The organism's susceptibility varied with more inhibition to S. aureus and least to Candida albicans. PMID:20161941

  7. Potential Targets for Antifungal Drug Discovery Based on Growth and Virulence in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiuyun; Hou, Yinglong; Yue, Longtao; Liu, Shuyuan; Du, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Fungal infections, especially infections caused by Candida albicans, remain a challenging problem in clinical settings. Despite the development of more-effective antifungal drugs, their application is limited for various reasons. Thus, alternative treatments with drugs aimed at novel targets in C. albicans are needed. Knowledge of growth and virulence in fungal cells is essential not only to understand their pathogenic mechanisms but also to identify potential antifungal targets. This article reviews the current knowledge of the mechanisms of growth and virulence in C. albicans and examines potential targets for the development of new antifungal drugs. PMID:26195510

  8. Use of immunoblotting to identify antigenic differences between the yeast and mycelial phases of Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Burnie, J P; Matthews, R C; Fox, A; Tabaqchali, S

    1985-01-01

    Western blotting was applied to the analysis of Candida albicans in the yeast and mycelial phases in an attempt to recognise mycelial specific antigens which might be of serodiagnostic value. The antisera were prepared in rabbits by immunising them with pressates of C albicans type A NCTC 3153 in the yeast phase or the mycelial phase. These were blotted against C albicans in the yeast and mycelial phases and the yeast phase of C parapsilosis, C krusei, C tropicalis, and Torulopsis glabrata. Cross reactivity was greatest against C parapsilosis. One yeast specific mannoprotein was identified with a molecular weight of 49 000. No mycelial specific antigens could be identified. Images PMID:3891792

  9. Gastrointestinal granuloma due to Candida albicans in an immunocompetent cat

    PubMed Central

    Duchaussoy, Anne-Claire; Rose, Annie; Talbot, Jessica J.; Barrs, Vanessa R.

    2015-01-01

    A 3.5 year-old cat was admitted to the University of Melbourne Veterinary Teaching Hospital for chronic vomiting. Abdominal ultrasonography revealed a focal, circumferential thickening of the wall of the duodenum extending from the pylorus aborally for 3 cm, and an enlarged gastric lymph node. Cytology of fine-needle aspirates of the intestinal mass and lymph node revealed an eosinophilic inflammatory infiltrate and numerous extracellular septate acute angle branching fungal-type hyphae. Occasional hyphae had globose terminal ends, as well as round to oval blastospores and germ tubes. Candida albicans was cultured from a surgical biopsy of the duodenal mass. No underlying host immunodeficiencies were identified. Passage of an abrasive intestinal foreign body was suspected to have caused intestinal mucosal damage resulting in focal intestinal candidiasis. The cat was treated with a short course of oral itraconazole and all clinical signs resolved. PMID:26862475

  10. Epithelial discrimination of commensal and pathogenic Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Tang, S X; Moyes, D L; Richardson, J P; Blagojevic, M; Naglik, J R

    2016-04-01

    All mucosal surfaces are lined by epithelial cells and are colonised by opportunistic microbes. In health, these opportunistic microbes remain commensal and are tolerated by the immune system. However, when the correct environmental conditions arise, these microbes can become pathogenic and need to be controlled or cleared by the immune system to prevent disease. The mechanisms that enable epithelial cells to initiate the 'danger' signals activated specifically by pathogenic microbes are critical to mucosal defence and homeostasis but are not well understood. Deciphering these mechanisms will provide essential understanding to how mucosal tissues maintain health and activate immunity, as well as how pathogens promote disease. This review focuses on the interaction of the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans with epithelial cells and the epithelial mechanisms that enable mucosal tissues to discriminate between the commensal and pathogenic state of this medically important fungus. PMID:26843519

  11. The Fungus Candida albicans Tolerates Ambiguity at Multiple Codons

    PubMed Central

    Simões, João; Bezerra, Ana R.; Moura, Gabriela R.; Araújo, Hugo; Gut, Ivo; Bayes, Mónica; Santos, Manuel A. S.

    2016-01-01

    The ascomycete Candida albicans is a normal resident of the gastrointestinal tract of humans and other warm-blooded animals. It occurs in a broad range of body sites and has high capacity to survive and proliferate in adverse environments with drastic changes in oxygen, carbon dioxide, pH, osmolarity, nutrients, and temperature. Its biology is unique due to flexible reassignment of the leucine CUG codon to serine and synthesis of statistical proteins. Under standard growth conditions, CUG sites incorporate leucine (3% of the times) and serine (97% of the times) on a proteome wide scale, but leucine incorporation fluctuates in response to environmental stressors and can be artificially increased up to 98%. In order to determine whether such flexibility also exists at other codons, we have constructed several serine tRNAs that decode various non-cognate codons. Expression of these tRNAs had minor effects on fitness, but growth of the mistranslating strains at different temperatures, in medium with different pH and nutrients composition was often enhanced relatively to the wild type (WT) strain, supporting our previous data on adaptive roles of CUG ambiguity in variable growth conditions. Parallel evolution of the recombinant strains (100 generations) followed by full genome resequencing identified various strain specific single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) and one SNP in the deneddylase (JAB1) gene in all strains. Since JAB1 is a subunit of the COP9 signalosome complex, which interacts with cullin (Cdc53p) to mediate degradation of a variety of cellular proteins, our data suggest that neddylation plays a key role in tolerance and adaptation to codon ambiguity in C. albicans. PMID:27065968

  12. The Fungus Candida albicans Tolerates Ambiguity at Multiple Codons.

    PubMed

    Simões, João; Bezerra, Ana R; Moura, Gabriela R; Araújo, Hugo; Gut, Ivo; Bayes, Mónica; Santos, Manuel A S

    2016-01-01

    The ascomycete Candida albicans is a normal resident of the gastrointestinal tract of humans and other warm-blooded animals. It occurs in a broad range of body sites and has high capacity to survive and proliferate in adverse environments with drastic changes in oxygen, carbon dioxide, pH, osmolarity, nutrients, and temperature. Its biology is unique due to flexible reassignment of the leucine CUG codon to serine and synthesis of statistical proteins. Under standard growth conditions, CUG sites incorporate leucine (3% of the times) and serine (97% of the times) on a proteome wide scale, but leucine incorporation fluctuates in response to environmental stressors and can be artificially increased up to 98%. In order to determine whether such flexibility also exists at other codons, we have constructed several serine tRNAs that decode various non-cognate codons. Expression of these tRNAs had minor effects on fitness, but growth of the mistranslating strains at different temperatures, in medium with different pH and nutrients composition was often enhanced relatively to the wild type (WT) strain, supporting our previous data on adaptive roles of CUG ambiguity in variable growth conditions. Parallel evolution of the recombinant strains (100 generations) followed by full genome resequencing identified various strain specific single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) and one SNP in the deneddylase (JAB1) gene in all strains. Since JAB1 is a subunit of the COP9 signalosome complex, which interacts with cullin (Cdc53p) to mediate degradation of a variety of cellular proteins, our data suggest that neddylation plays a key role in tolerance and adaptation to codon ambiguity in C. albicans. PMID:27065968

  13. Humoral Immunity Links Candida albicans Infection and Celiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fradin, Chantal; Salleron, Julia; Damiens, Sébastien; Moragues, Maria Dolores; Souplet, Vianney; Jouault, Thierry; Robert, Raymond; Dubucquoi, Sylvain; Sendid, Boualem; Colombel, Jean Fréderic; Poulain, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Objective The protein Hwp1, expressed on the pathogenic phase of Candida albicans, presents sequence analogy with the gluten protein gliadin and is also a substrate for transglutaminase. This had led to the suggestion that C. albicans infection (CI) may be a triggering factor for Celiac disease (CeD) onset. We investigated cross-immune reactivity between CeD and CI. Methods Serum IgG levels against recombinant Hwp1 and serological markers of CeD were measured in 87 CeD patients, 41 CI patients, and 98 healthy controls (HC). IgA and IgG were also measured in 20 individuals from each of these groups using microchips sensitized with 38 peptides designed from the N-terminal of Hwp1. Results CI and CeD patients had higher levels of anti-Hwp1 (p=0.0005 and p=0.004) and anti-gliadin (p=0.002 and p=0.0009) antibodies than HC but there was no significant difference between CeD and CI patients. CeD and CI patients had higher levels of anti-transglutaminase IgA than HC (p=0.0001 and p=0.0039). During CI, the increase in anti-Hwp1 paralleled the increase in anti-gliadin antibodies. Microchip analysis showed that CeD patients were more reactive against some Hwp1 peptides than CI patients, and that some deamidated peptides were more reactive than their native analogs. Binding of IgG from CeD patients to Hwp1 peptides was inhibited by γIII gliadin peptides. Conclusions Humoral cross-reactivity between Hwp1 and gliadin was observed during CeD and CI. Increased reactivity to Hwp1 deamidated peptide suggests that transglutaminase is involved in this interplay. These results support the hypothesis that CI may trigger CeD onset in genetically-susceptible individuals. PMID:25793717

  14. Functional characterization of Candida albicans Hos2 histone deacetylase

    PubMed Central

    Karthikeyan, G; Paul-Satyaseela, Maneesh; Dhatchana Moorthy, Nachiappan; Gopalaswamy, Radha; Narayanan, Shridhar

    2014-01-01

    Candida albicans is a mucosal commensal organism capable of causing superficial (oral and vaginal thrush) infections in immune normal hosts, but is a major pathogen causing systemic and mucosal infections in immunocompromised individuals. Azoles have been very effective anti-fungal agents and the mainstay in treating opportunistic mold and yeast infections. Azole resistant strains have emerged compromising the utility of this class of drugs. It has been shown that azole resistance can be reversed by the co-administration of a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, suggesting that resistance is mediated by epigenetic mechanisms possibly involving Hos2, a fungal deacetylase. We report here the cloning and functional characterization of  HOS2 (High Osmolarity  Sensitive) , a gene coding for fungal histone deacetylase from  C. albicans. Inhibition studies showed that Hos2 is susceptible to pan inhibitors such as trichostatin A (TSA) and suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), but is not inhibited by class I inhibitors such as MS-275. This  in  vitro enzymatic assay, which is amenable to high throughput could be used for screening potent fungal Hos2 inhibitors that could be a potential anti-fungal adjuvant. Purified Hos2 protein consistently deacetylated tubulins, rather than histones from TSA-treated cells. Hos2 has been reported to be a putative NAD+ dependent histone deacetylase, a feature of sirtuins. We assayed for sirtuin activation with resveratrol and purified Hos2 protein and did not find any sirtuin activity. PMID:25110576

  15. Sexual Reproduction of Human Fungal Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Heitman, Joseph; Carter, Dee A.; Dyer, Paul S.; Soll, David R.

    2014-01-01

    We review here recent advances in our understanding of sexual reproduction in fungal pathogens that commonly infect humans, including Candida albicans, Cryptococcus neoformans/gattii, and Aspergillus fumigatus. Where appropriate or relevant, we introduce findings on other species associated with human infections. In particular, we focus on rapid advances involving genetic, genomic, and population genetic approaches that have reshaped our view of how fungal pathogens evolve. Rather than being asexual, mitotic, and largely clonal, as was thought to be prevalent as recently as a decade ago, we now appreciate that the vast majority of pathogenic fungi have retained extant sexual, or parasexual, cycles. In some examples, sexual and parasexual unions of pathogenic fungi involve closely related individuals, generating diversity in the population but with more restricted recombination than expected from fertile, sexual, outcrossing and recombining populations. In other cases, species and isolates participate in global outcrossing populations with the capacity for considerable levels of gene flow. These findings illustrate general principles of eukaryotic pathogen emergence with relevance for other fungi, parasitic eukaryotic pathogens, and both unicellular and multicellular eukaryotic organisms. PMID:25085958

  16. A Coordinated Interdependent Protein Circuitry Stabilizes the Kinetochore Ensemble to Protect CENP-A in the Human Pathogenic Yeast Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Jitendra; Sanyal, Kaustuv

    2012-01-01

    Unlike most eukaryotes, a kinetochore is fully assembled early in the cell cycle in budding yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans. These kinetochores are clustered together throughout the cell cycle. Kinetochore assembly on point centromeres of S. cerevisiae is considered to be a step-wise process that initiates with binding of inner kinetochore proteins on specific centromere DNA sequence motifs. In contrast, kinetochore formation in C. albicans, that carries regional centromeres of 3–5 kb long, has been shown to be a sequence independent but an epigenetically regulated event. In this study, we investigated the process of kinetochore assembly/disassembly in C. albicans. Localization dependence of various kinetochore proteins studied by confocal microscopy and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays revealed that assembly of a kinetochore is a highly coordinated and interdependent event. Partial depletion of an essential kinetochore protein affects integrity of the kinetochore cluster. Further protein depletion results in complete collapse of the kinetochore architecture. In addition, GFP-tagged kinetochore proteins confirmed similar time-dependent disintegration upon gradual depletion of an outer kinetochore protein (Dam1). The loss of integrity of a kinetochore formed on centromeric chromatin was demonstrated by reduced binding of CENP-A and CENP-C at the centromeres. Most strikingly, Western blot analysis revealed that gradual depletion of any of these essential kinetochore proteins results in concomitant reduction in cellular protein levels of CENP-A. We further demonstrated that centromere bound CENP-A is protected from the proteosomal mediated degradation. Based on these results, we propose that a coordinated interdependent circuitry of several evolutionarily conserved essential kinetochore proteins ensures integrity of a kinetochore formed on the foundation of CENP-A containing centromeric chromatin. PMID:22536162

  17. Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 4356 inhibits biofilm formation by C. albicans and attenuates the experimental candidiasis in Galleria mellonella

    PubMed Central

    Vilela, Simone FG; Barbosa, Júnia O; Rossoni, Rodnei D; Santos, Jéssica D; Prata, Marcia CA; Anbinder, Ana Lia; Jorge, Antonio OC; Junqueira, Juliana C

    2015-01-01

    Probiotic strains of Lactobacillus have been studied for their inhibitory effects on Candida albicans. However, few studies have investigated the effect of these strains on biofilm formation, filamentation and C. albicans infection. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 4356 on C. albicans ATCC 18804 using in vitro and in vivo models. In vitro analysis evaluated the effects of L. acidophilus on the biofilm formation and on the capacity of C. albicans filamentation. For in vivo study, Galleria mellonella was used as an infection model to evaluate the effects of L. acidophilus on candidiasis by survival analysis, quantification of C. albicans CFU/mL, and histological analysis. The direct effects of L. acidophilus cells on C. albicans, as well as the indirect effects using only a Lactobacillus culture filtrate, were evaluated in both tests. The in vitro results showed that both L. acidophilus cells and filtrate were able to inhibit C. albicans biofilm formation and filamentation. In the in vivo study, injection of L. acidophilus into G. mellonella larvae infected with C. albicans increased the survival of these animals. Furthermore, the number of C. albicans CFU/mL recovered from the larval hemolymph was lower in the group inoculated with L. acidophilus compared to the control group. In conclusion, L. acidophilus ATCC 4356 inhibited in vitro biofilm formation by C. albicans and protected G. mellonella against experimental candidiasis in vivo. PMID:25654408

  18. Impact of oxidative and osmotic stresses on Candida albicans biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Pemmaraju, Suma C; Padmapriya, Kumar; Pruthi, Parul A; Prasad, R; Pruthi, Vikas

    2016-09-01

    Candida albicans possesses an ability to grow under different host-driven stress conditions by developing robust protective mechanisms. In this investigation the focus was on the impact of osmotic (2M NaCl) and oxidative (5 mM H2O2) stress conditions during C. albicans biofilm formation. Oxidative stress enhanced extracellular DNA secretion into the biofilm matrix, increased the chitin level, and reduced virulence factors, namely phospholipase and proteinase activity, while osmotic stress mainly increased extracellular proteinase and decreased phospholipase activity. Fourier transform infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy analysis of mannan isolated from the C. albicans biofilm cell wall revealed a decrease in mannan content and reduced β-linked mannose moieties under stress conditions. The results demonstrate that C. albicans adapts to oxidative and osmotic stress conditions by inducing biofilm formation with a rich exopolymeric matrix, modulating virulence factors as well as the cell wall composition for its survival in different host niches. PMID:27472386

  19. Increase of mouse resistance to Candida albicans infection by thymosin alpha 1.

    PubMed Central

    Bistoni, F; Marconi, P; Frati, L; Bonmassar, E; Garaci, E

    1982-01-01

    Studies were carried out to assess the ability of thymosin alpha 1 to prolong the survival of mice challenged with Candida albicans. Two- to four-month-old mice were treated with graded doses of thymosin alpha 1 before, after, or before and after intravenous challenge with C. albicans. Significant resistance ot lethal infection was afforded by 100 micrograms of thymosin alpha 1 per kg given before or before and after challenge, whereas no protection was found in mice treated with thymosin alpha 1 administered at any dose level after inoculation. Pretreatment with thymosin alpha 1 also prevented the increased susceptibility to C. albicans infection of mice pretreated with cyclophosphamide on day -6. The results showed that thymosin alpha 1 was capable of protecting untreated or cyclophosphamide-pretreated mice from C. albicans infection at an optimal dose and schedule of administration. PMID:7085074

  20. Correlation between virulence of Candida albicans mutants in mice and Galleria mellonella larvae.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Marc; Thomas, David Y; Whiteway, Malcolm; Kavanagh, Kevin

    2002-10-11

    Candida albicans is a dimorphic human pathogen in which the yeast to hyphal switch may be an important factor in virulence in mammals. This pathogen has recently been shown to also kill insects such as the Greater Wax Moth Galleria mellonella when injected into the haemocoel of the insect larvae. We have investigated the effect of previously characterised C. albicans mutations that influence the yeast to hyphal transition on virulence in G. mellonella larvae. There is a good correlation between the virulence of these mutants in the insect host and the virulence measured through systemic infection of mice. Although the predominant cellular species detected in G. mellonella infections is the yeast form of C. albicans, mutations that influence the hyphal transition also reduce pathogenicity in the insect. The correlation with virulence measured in the mouse infection system suggests that Galleria may provide a convenient and inexpensive model for the in vivo screening of mutants of C. albicans. PMID:12381467

  1. Manipulation of Host Diet To Reduce Gastrointestinal Colonization by the Opportunistic Pathogen Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Tornberg-Belanger, Stephanie N.; Matthan, Nirupa R.; Lichtenstein, Alice H.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Candida albicans, the most common human fungal pathogen, can cause systemic infections with a mortality rate of ~40%. Infections arise from colonization of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, where C. albicans is part of the normal microflora. Reducing colonization in at-risk patients using antifungal drugs prevents C. albicans-associated mortalities. C. albicans provides a clinically relevant system for studying the relationship between diet and the microbiota as it relates to commensalism and pathogenicity. As a first step toward a dietary intervention to reduce C. albicans GI colonization, we investigated the impact of dietary lipids on murine colonization by C. albicans. Coconut oil and its constituent fatty acids have antifungal activity in vitro; we hypothesized that dietary coconut oil would reduce GI colonization by C. albicans. Colonization was lower in mice fed a coconut oil-rich diet than in mice fed diets rich in beef tallow or soybean oil. Switching beef tallow-fed mice to a coconut oil diet reduced preexisting colonization. Coconut oil reduced colonization even when the diet also contained beef tallow. Dietary coconut oil also altered the metabolic program of colonizing C. albicans cells. Long-chain fatty acids were less abundant in the cecal contents of coconut oil-fed mice than in the cecal contents of beef tallow-fed mice; the expression of genes involved in fatty acid utilization was lower in C. albicans from coconut oil-fed mice than in C. albicans from beef tallow-fed mice. Extrapolating to humans, these findings suggest that coconut oil could become the first dietary intervention to reduce C. albicans GI colonization. IMPORTANCE Candida albicans, the most common human fungal pathogen, can cause infections with a mortality rate of ~40%. C. albicans is part of the normal gut flora, but when a patient’s immune system is compromised, it can leave the gut and cause infections. By reducing the amount of C. albicans in the gut of

  2. Effect of Marine Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids on Biofilm Formation of Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis

    PubMed Central

    Thibane, Vuyisile S.; Kock, Johan L. F.; Ells, Ruan; van Wyk, Pieter W. J.; Pohl, Carolina H.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of marine polyunsaturated fatty acids on biofilm formation by the human pathogens Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis was investigated. It was found that stearidonic acid (18:4 n-3), eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5 n-3), docosapentaenoic acid (22:5 n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (22:6 n-3) have an inhibitory effect on mitochondrial metabolism of both C. albicans and C. dubliniensis and that the production of biofilm biomass by C. dubliniensis was more susceptible to these fatty acids than C. albicans. Ultrastructural differences, which may be due to increased oxidative stress, were observed between treated and untreated cells of C. albicans and C. dubliniensis with formation of rough cell walls by both species and fibrillar structures in C. dubliniensis. These results indicate that marine polyunsaturated fatty acids may be useful in the treatment and/or prevention of biofilms formed by these pathogenic yeasts. PMID:21116408

  3. Manipulation of Host Diet To Reduce Gastrointestinal Colonization by the Opportunistic Pathogen Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Gunsalus, Kearney T W; Tornberg-Belanger, Stephanie N; Matthan, Nirupa R; Lichtenstein, Alice H; Kumamoto, Carol A

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans, the most common human fungal pathogen, can cause systemic infections with a mortality rate of ~40%. Infections arise from colonization of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, where C. albicans is part of the normal microflora. Reducing colonization in at-risk patients using antifungal drugs prevents C. albicans-associated mortalities. C. albicans provides a clinically relevant system for studying the relationship between diet and the microbiota as it relates to commensalism and pathogenicity. As a first step toward a dietary intervention to reduce C. albicans GI colonization, we investigated the impact of dietary lipids on murine colonization by C. albicans. Coconut oil and its constituent fatty acids have antifungal activity in vitro; we hypothesized that dietary coconut oil would reduce GI colonization by C. albicans. Colonization was lower in mice fed a coconut oil-rich diet than in mice fed diets rich in beef tallow or soybean oil. Switching beef tallow-fed mice to a coconut oil diet reduced preexisting colonization. Coconut oil reduced colonization even when the diet also contained beef tallow. Dietary coconut oil also altered the metabolic program of colonizing C. albicans cells. Long-chain fatty acids were less abundant in the cecal contents of coconut oil-fed mice than in the cecal contents of beef tallow-fed mice; the expression of genes involved in fatty acid utilization was lower in C. albicans from coconut oil-fed mice than in C. albicans from beef tallow-fed mice. Extrapolating to humans, these findings suggest that coconut oil could become the first dietary intervention to reduce C. albicans GI colonization. IMPORTANCE Candida albicans, the most common human fungal pathogen, can cause infections with a mortality rate of ~40%. C. albicans is part of the normal gut flora, but when a patient's immune system is compromised, it can leave the gut and cause infections. By reducing the amount of C. albicans in the gut of susceptible

  4. Influence of tumour condition on the macrophage activity in Candida albicans infection.

    PubMed

    Venturini, J; de Camargo, M R; Félix, M C; Vilani-Moreno, F R; de Arruda, M S P

    2009-07-01

    To better understand the interactions between opportunistic fungi and their hosts, we investigated hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), nitric oxide and TNF-alpha production by peritoneal macrophages from Ehrlich tumour-bearing mice (TBM) during microbial infections. For this purpose, TBM at days 7, 14 and 21 of tumour progression were inoculated intraperitoneally with C. albicans and evaluated after 24 and 72 h. We observed that TBM showed significant increases in H2O2, TNF-alpha levels and fungal clearance at day 7 after C. albicans infection. However, as the tumour advanced, there was a progressive decline in the release of H2O2 and TNF-alpha that was paired with the dissemination of C. albicans. These results demonstrate that protective macrophage activities against Candida albicans are limited to the initial stages of tumour growth; continued solid tumour growth weakened the macrophage response and as a consequence, weakened the host's susceptibility to opportunistic infections. PMID:19522762

  5. A patient with allergic bronchopulmonary mycosis caused by Aspergillus fumigatus and Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Wardhana; Datau, E A

    2012-10-01

    Allergic Bronchopulmonary Mycosis (ABPM) is an exagregated immunologic response to fungal colonization in the lower airways. It may cause by many kinds of fungal, but Aspergillus fumigatus is the most common cause of ABPM, although other Aspergillus and other fungal organisms, like Candida albicans, have been implicated. Aspergllus fumigatus and Candida albicans may be found as outdoor and indoor fungi, and cause the sensitization, elicitation of the disease pathology, and its clinical manifestations. Several diagnostic procedurs may be impicated to support the diagnosis of ABPM caused by Aspergillus fumigatus and Candida albicans. A case of allergic bronchopulmonary mycosis caused by Aspergillus fumigatus and Candida albicans in a 48 year old man was discussed. The patient was treated with antifungal, corticosteroids, and antibiotic for the secondary bacterial infection. The patient's condition is improved without any significant side effects. PMID:23314973

  6. Control of Candida albicans metabolism and biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa phenazines.

    PubMed

    Morales, Diana K; Grahl, Nora; Okegbe, Chinweike; Dietrich, Lars E P; Jacobs, Nicholas J; Hogan, Deborah A

    2013-01-01

    Candida albicans has developmental programs that govern transitions between yeast and filamentous morphologies and between unattached and biofilm lifestyles. Here, we report that filamentation, intercellular adherence, and biofilm development were inhibited during interactions between Candida albicans and Pseudomonas aeruginosa through the action of P. aeruginosa-produced phenazines. While phenazines are toxic to C. albicans at millimolar concentrations, we found that lower concentrations of any of three different phenazines (pyocyanin, phenazine methosulfate, and phenazine-1-carboxylate) allowed growth but affected the development of C. albicans wrinkled colony biofilms and inhibited the fungal yeast-to-filament transition. Phenazines impaired C. albicans growth on nonfermentable carbon sources and led to increased production of fermentation products (ethanol, glycerol, and acetate) in glucose-containing medium, leading us to propose that phenazines specifically inhibited respiration. Methylene blue, another inhibitor of respiration, also prevented the formation of structured colony biofilms. The inhibition of filamentation and colony wrinkling was not solely due to lowered extracellular pH induced by fermentation. Compared to smooth, unstructured colonies, wrinkled colony biofilms had higher oxygen concentrations within the colony, and wrinkled regions of these colonies had higher levels of respiration. Together, our data suggest that the structure of the fungal biofilm promotes access to oxygen and enhances respiratory metabolism and that the perturbation of respiration by bacterial molecules such as phenazines or compounds with similar activities disrupts these pathways. These findings may suggest new ways to limit fungal biofilms in the context of disease. IMPORTANCE Many of the infections caused by Candida albicans, a major human opportunistic fungal pathogen, involve both morphological transitions and the formation of surface-associated biofilms. Through the

  7. Structure and regulation of the HSP90 gene from the pathogenic fungus Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Swoboda, R K; Bertram, G; Budge, S; Gooday, G W; Gow, N A; Brown, A J

    1995-01-01

    Candida albicans HSP90 sequences were isolated by screening cDNA and genomic libraries with a probe derived from the Saccharomyces cerevisiae homolog, HSP82, which encodes a member of the heat shock protein 90 family of molecular chaperones. Identical sequences were obtained for the 2,197-bp overlap of the cDNA and gene sequences, which were derived from C. albicans 3153A and ATCC 10261, respectively. The C. albicans HSP90 gene contained no introns, and it showed strong homology (61 to 79% identity) to HSP90 sequences from other fungi, vertebrates, and plants. The C-terminal portion of the predicted Hsp90 amino acid sequence was identical to the 47-kDa protein which is thought to be immunoprotective during C. albicans infections (R. C. Matthews, J. Med. Microbiol. 36:367-370, 1992), confirming that this protein represents the C-terminal portion of the 81-kDa Hsp90 protein. Quantitative Northern (RNA) analyses revealed that C. albicans HSP90 mRNA was heat shock inducible and that its levels changed during batch growth, with its maximum levels being reached during the mid-exponential growth phase. HSP90 mRNA levels increased transiently during the yeast-to-hyphal transition but did not correlate directly with germ tube production per se. These data do not exclude a role for Hsp90 in the dimorphic transition. Southern blotting revealed only one HSP90 locus in the diploid C. albicans genome. Repeated attempts to disrupt both alleles and generate a homozygous C. albicans delta hsp90/delta hsp90 null mutant were unsuccessful. These observations suggest the existence of a single HSP90 locus which is essential for viability in C. albicans. PMID:7591093

  8. O-Mannosylation in Candida albicans Enables Development of Interkingdom Biofilm Communities

    PubMed Central

    Dutton, Lindsay C.; Nobbs, Angela H.; Jepson, Katy; Jepson, Mark A.; Vickerman, M. Margaret; Aqeel Alawfi, Sami; Munro, Carol A.; Lamont, Richard J.; Jenkinson, Howard F.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Candida albicans is a fungus that colonizes oral cavity surfaces, the gut, and the genital tract. Streptococcus gordonii is a ubiquitous oral bacterium that has been shown to form biofilm communities with C. albicans. Formation of dual-species S. gordonii-C. albicans biofilm communities involves interaction of the S. gordonii SspB protein with the Als3 protein on the hyphal filament surface of C. albicans. Mannoproteins comprise a major component of the C. albicans cell wall, and in this study we sought to determine if mannosylation in cell wall biogenesis of C. albicans was necessary for hyphal adhesin functions associated with interkingdom biofilm development. A C. albicans mnt1Δ mnt2Δ mutant, with deleted α-1,2-mannosyltransferase genes and thus defective in O-mannosylation, was abrogated in biofilm formation under various growth conditions and produced hyphal filaments that were not recognized by S. gordonii. Cell wall proteomes of hypha-forming mnt1Δ mnt2Δ mutant cells showed growth medium-dependent alterations, compared to findings for the wild type, in a range of protein components, including Als1, Als3, Rbt1, Scw1, and Sap9. Hyphal filaments formed by mnt1Δ mnt2Δ mutant cells, unlike wild-type hyphae, did not interact with C. albicans Als3 or Hwp1 partner cell wall proteins or with S. gordonii SspB partner adhesin, suggesting defective functionality of adhesins on the mnt1Δ mnt2Δ mutant. These observations imply that early stage O-mannosylation is critical for activation of hyphal adhesin functions required for biofilm formation, recognition by bacteria such as S. gordonii, and microbial community development. PMID:24736223

  9. Anaerobic bacteria grow within Candida albicans biofilms and induce biofilm formation in suspension cultures.

    PubMed

    Fox, Emily P; Cowley, Elise S; Nobile, Clarissa J; Hartooni, Nairi; Newman, Dianne K; Johnson, Alexander D

    2014-10-20

    The human microbiome contains diverse microorganisms, which share and compete for the same environmental niches. A major microbial growth form in the human body is the biofilm state, where tightly packed bacterial, archaeal, and fungal cells must cooperate and/or compete for resources in order to survive. We examined mixed biofilms composed of the major fungal species of the gut microbiome, Candida albicans, and each of five prevalent bacterial gastrointestinal inhabitants: Bacteroides fragilis, Clostridium perfringens, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Enterococcus faecalis. We observed that biofilms formed by C. albicans provide a hypoxic microenvironment that supports the growth of two anaerobic bacteria, even when cultured in ambient oxic conditions that are normally toxic to the bacteria. We also found that coculture with bacteria in biofilms induces massive gene expression changes in C. albicans, including upregulation of WOR1, which encodes a transcription regulator that controls a phenotypic switch in C. albicans, from the "white" cell type to the "opaque" cell type. Finally, we observed that in suspension cultures, C. perfringens induces aggregation of C. albicans into "mini-biofilms," which allow C. perfringens cells to survive in a normally toxic environment. This work indicates that bacteria and C. albicans interactions modulate the local chemistry of their environment in multiple ways to create niches favorable to their growth and survival. PMID:25308076

  10. Effect of emodin on Candida albicans growth investigated by microcalorimetry combined with chemometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Kong, W J; Wang, J B; Jin, C; Zhao, Y L; Dai, C M; Xiao, X H; Li, Z L

    2009-07-01

    Using the 3114/3115 thermal activity monitor (TAM) air isothermal microcalorimeter, ampoule mode, the heat output of Candida albicans growth at 37 degrees C was measured, and the effect of emodin on C. albicans growth was evaluated by microcalorimetry coupled with chemometric methods. The similarities between the heat flow power (HFP)-time curves of C. albicans growth affected by different concentrations of emodin were calculated by similarity analysis (SA). In the correspondence analysis (CA) diagram of eight quantitative parameters taken from the HFP-time curves, it could be deduced that emodin had definite dose-effect relationship as the distance between different concentrations of it increased along with the dosage and the effect. From the principal component analysis (PCA) on eight quantitative parameters, the action of emodin on C. albicans growth could be easily evaluated by analyzing the change of values of the main two parameters, growth rate constant k (2) and maximum power output P(2)(m). The coherent results of SA, CA, and PCA showed that emodin at different concentrations had different effects on C. albicans growth metabolism: A low concentration (0-10 microg ml(-1)) poorly inhibited the growth of C. albicans, and a high concentration (15-35 microg ml(-1)) could notably inhibit growth of this fungus. This work provided a useful idea of the combination of microcalorimetry and chemometric analysis for investigating the effect of drug and other compounds on microbes. PMID:19543891

  11. Candida albicans adapts to host copper during infection by swapping metal cofactors for superoxide dismutase

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cissy X.; Gleason, Julie E.; Zhang, Sean X.; Bruno, Vincent M.; Cormack, Brendan P.; Culotta, Valeria Cizewski

    2015-01-01

    Copper is both an essential nutrient and potentially toxic metal, and during infection the host can exploit Cu in the control of pathogen growth. Here we describe a clever adaptation to Cu taken by the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans. In laboratory cultures with abundant Cu, C. albicans expresses a Cu-requiring form of superoxide dismutase (Sod1) in the cytosol; but when Cu levels decline, cells switch to an alternative Mn-requiring Sod3. This toggling between Cu- and Mn-SODs is controlled by the Cu-sensing regulator Mac1 and ensures that C. albicans maintains constant SOD activity for cytosolic antioxidant protection despite fluctuating Cu. This response to Cu is initiated during C. albicans invasion of the host where the yeast is exposed to wide variations in Cu. In a murine model of disseminated candidiasis, serum Cu was seen to progressively rise over the course of infection, but this heightened Cu response was not mirrored in host tissue. The kidney that serves as the major site of fungal infection showed an initial rise in Cu, followed by a decline in the metal. C. albicans adjusted its cytosolic SODs accordingly and expressed Cu-Sod1 at early stages of infection, followed by induction of Mn-Sod3 and increases in expression of CTR1 for Cu uptake. Together, these studies demonstrate that fungal infection triggers marked fluctuations in host Cu and C. albicans readily adapts by modulating Cu uptake and by exchanging metal cofactors for antioxidant SODs. PMID:26351691

  12. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE PYROGENICITY OF CANDIDA ALBICANS, SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE, AND CRYPTOCOCCUS NEOFORMANS.

    PubMed

    KOBAYASHI, G S; FRIEDMAN, L

    1964-09-01

    Kobayashi, George S. (Tulane University, New Orleans, La.), and Lorraine Friedman. Characterization of the pyrogenicity of Candida albicans, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Cryptococcus neoformans. J. Bacteriol. 88:660-666. 1964.-The intravenous injection into rabbits of 10(9) yeast cells of Candida albicans, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, or Cryptococcus neoformans (both slightly and heavily encapsulated forms) induced a febrile response indistinguishable from that elicited by gram-negative bacterial endotoxin. There was a brisk rise in body temperature which began as early as 30 min after injection, peaked once or twice, and then returned to normal after about 10 hr. With viable C. albicans, the febrile response did not return to normal but remained elevated for several days and terminated at death of the animal. Of three extraction procedures employed in attempts to isolate the endotoxin-like pyrogenically active substances from C. albicans, only one, the phenol extraction method, was successful. Pyrogenic substances were more easily extractable from S. cerevisiae, but extracted cells of both species were still highly pyrogenic. It was concluded that the particulate nature of the yeast cell did not contribute to the induction of fever, for latex particles of a similar size were nonpyrogenic. Viable or heat-killed C. albicans, phenol extract of C. albicans, zymosan, and polystyrene latex particles all failed to induce in rabbits increased dermal reactivity to epinephrine. PMID:14208504

  13. Anti-fungal activity of cathelicidins and their potential role in Candida albicans skin infection.

    PubMed

    López-García, Belén; Lee, Phillip H A; Yamasaki, Kenshi; Gallo, Richard L

    2005-07-01

    Cathelicidins have broad anti-microbial capacity and are important for host defense against skin infections by some bacterial and viral pathogens. This study investigated the activity of cathelicidins against Candida albicans. The human cathelicidin LL-37, and mouse cathelicidin mCRAMP, killed C. albicans, but this fungicidal activity was dependent on culture conditions. Evaluation of the fungal membrane by fluorescent dye penetration after incubation with cathelicidins correlated membrane permeabilization and inhibition of fungal growth. Anti-fungal assays carried out in an ionic environment that mimicked human sweat and with the processed forms of cathelicidin such as are present in sweat found that the cleavage of LL-37 to forms such as RK-31 conferred additional activity against C. albicans. C. albicans also induced an increase in the expression of cathelicidin in mouse skin, but this induction did not confer systemic or subcutaneous resistance as mCRAMP-deficient mice were not more susceptible to C. albicans in blood-killing assays or in an intradermal infection model. Therefore, cathelicidins appear active against C. albicans, but may be most effective as a superficial barrier to infection. PMID:15982310

  14. Innate Immunity and Saliva in Candida albicans-mediated Oral Diseases.

    PubMed

    Salvatori, O; Puri, S; Tati, S; Edgerton, M

    2016-04-01

    The oral cavity is a unique niche where Candida albicans infections occur in immunocompetent as well as immunosuppressed individuals. Here we critically review the significance of human innate immune response in preventing oral candidiasis. One important line of defense against oropharyngeal candidiasis is the oral microbiota that prevents infection by competing for space and nutrients as well as by secreting antagonistic molecules and triggering local inflammatory responses. C. albicans is able to induce mucosal defenses through activation of immune cells and production of cytokines. Also, saliva contains various proteins that affect C. albicans growth positively by promoting mucosal adherence and negatively through immune exclusion and direct fungicidal activity. We further discuss the role of saliva in unifying host innate immune defenses against C. albicans as a communicating medium and how C. albicans overgrowth in the oral cavity may be a result of aberrations ranging from microbial dysbiosis and salivary dysfunction to epithelial damage. Last we underscore select oral diseases in which C. albicans is a contributory microorganism in immune-competent individuals. PMID:26747422

  15. Systemic Staphylococcus aureus infection mediated by Candida albicans hyphal invasion of mucosal tissue

    PubMed Central

    Schlecht, Lisa Marie; Peters, Brian M.; Krom, Bastiaan P.; Freiberg, Jeffrey A.; Hänsch, Gertrud M.; Filler, Scott G.

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans and Staphylococcus aureus are often co-isolated in cases of biofilm-associated infections. C. albicans can cause systemic disease through morphological switch from the rounded yeast to the invasive hyphal form. Alternatively, systemic S. aureus infections arise from seeding through breaks in host epithelial layers although many patients have no documented portal of entry. We describe a novel strategy by which S. aureus is able to invade host tissue and disseminate via adherence to the invasive hyphal elements of Candida albicans. In vitro and ex vivo findings demonstrate a specific binding of the staphylococci to the candida hyphal elements. The C. albicans cell wall adhesin Als3p binds to multiple staphylococcal adhesins. Furthermore, Als3p is required for C. albicans to transport S. aureus into the tissue and cause a disseminated infection in an oral co-colonization model. These findings suggest that C. albicans can facilitate the invasion of S. aureus across mucosal barriers, leading to systemic infection in co-colonized patients. PMID:25332378

  16. Genetic organization and mRNA expression of enolase genes of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Postlethwait, P; Sundstrom, P

    1995-04-01

    In previous work, we cloned a Candida albicans cDNA for the glycolytic enzyme enolase and found a single, abundant enolase transcript on Northern (RNA) blots and a single protein on immunoblots, using antiserum raised against a recombinant enolase fusion protein. Because C. albicans enolase is abundantly produced during infection and elicits strong host immune responses, the mechanisms regulating enolase production are important for understanding the growth of C. albicans in vivo. To obtain more information on enolase gene expression by C. albicans, we used the enolase cDNA clone to investigate the genetic organization of enolase genes and the steady-state levels of enolase mRNA under several growth conditions. Gene disruption techniques in combination with Southern blot analyses of genomic DNA showed the presence of two enolase gene loci that could be distinguished by the locations of ClaI and Mn/I sites in their 3' flanking regions. Enolase steady-state mRNA levels were greatest during the middle phase of the logarithmic growth curve and were low during stationary phase. Minimal differences in enolase mRNA levels between yeast cells and hyphae were found. Propagation of C. albicans in glucose did not cause increased enolase mRNA levels compared with growth in a nonfermentable carbon source (pyruvate). It was concluded that two gene loci exist for C. albicans enolase and that enolase mRNA is constitutively produced at high levels during active metabolism. PMID:7896700

  17. Person-to-person transfer of Candida albicans in the spacecraft environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, D. L.; Mehta, S. K.; Magee, B. B.; Mishra, S. K.

    1995-01-01

    We assessed the exchange of Candida albicans among crew members during 10 Space Shuttle missions. Throat, nasal, urine and faecal specimens were collected from 61 crew members twice before and once after space flights ranging from 7 to 10 days in duration; crews consisted of groups of five, six or seven men and women. Candida albicans was isolated at least once from 20 of the 61 subjects (33%). Candida strains were identified by restriction-fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) after digestion by the endonucleases EcoRI and HinfI; further discrimination was gained by Southern blot hybridization with the C. albicans repeat fragment 27A. Eighteen of the 20 Candida-positive crew members carried different strains of C. albicans in the specimens collected. Possible transfer of C. albicans between members of the same crew was demonstrated only once in the 10 missions studied. We conclude that the transfer of C. albicans among crew members during Space Shuttle flights is less frequent than had been predicted from earlier reports.

  18. Microbiologic Evaluation of Matricaria and Chlorhexidine against E. faecalis and C. albicans

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Hena; Chandra, Anil

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the antimicrobial activity of different concentrations of Matricaria chamomilla and Chlorhexidine gel against Candida albicans and Enterococcus faecalis. Materials and Methods: The agar diffusion test was used to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of 15%, 25% Matricaria chamomilla in aq. base and 2% chlorhexidine gel against C. albicans (ATCC 24433) and E. faecalis (ATCC 24212) strains. Vancomycin was used as the positive control for E. faecalis and fluconazole for C. albicans . The agar plates were incubated at 37°C for 48 h after which the zone of inhibition were measured separately for each material. Data thus obtained were statistically analyzed using the Wilcoxon rank–order test. Results: 2% chlorhexidine showed maximum inhibitory zone for C. albicans (33.26 mm) and E. faecalis (24.54 mm). 25% Matricaria showed zones of 24.16 mm and 20.62 mm for C. albicans and E. faecalis, respectively. 15% Matricaria did not show any antimicrobial activity (0 mm). Conclusion: The results of the current in vitro study suggest that 25% Matricaria can be used as an antimicrobial agent, but it is less effective than 2% chlorhexidine gluconate gel against C. albicans and E. faecalis. Matricaria at a lesser concentration of 15% aq. base is ineffective against both the microorganisms. PMID:26097333

  19. Metabolic Response of Candida albicans to Phenylethyl Alcohol under Hyphae-Inducing Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ting-Li; Tumanov, Sergey; Cannon, Richard D.; Villas-Boas, Silas G.

    2013-01-01

    Phenylethyl alcohol was one of the first quorum sensing molecules (QSMs) identified in C. albicans. This extracellular signalling molecule inhibits the hyphal formation of C. albicans at high cell density. Little is known, however, about the underlying mechanisms by which this QSM regulates the morphological switches of C. albicans. Therefore, we have applied metabolomics and isotope labelling experiments to investigate the metabolic changes that occur in C. albicans in response to phenylethyl alcohol under defined hyphae-inducing conditions. Our results showed a global upregulation of central carbon metabolism when hyphal development was suppressed by phenylethyl alcohol. By comparing the metabolic changes in response to phenylethyl alcohol to our previous metabolomic studies, we were able to short-list 7 metabolic pathways from central carbon metabolism that appear to be associated with C. albicans morphogenesis. Furthermore, isotope-labelling data showed that phenylethyl alcohol is indeed taken up and catabolised by yeast cells. Isotope-labelled carbon atoms were found in the majority of amino acids as well as in lactate and glyoxylate. However, isotope-labelled carbon atoms from phenylethyl alcohol accumulated mainly in the pyridine ring of NAD+/NADH and NADP−/NADPH molecules, showing that these nucleotides were the main products of phenylethyl alcohol catabolism. Interestingly, two metabolic pathways where these nucleotides play an important role, nitrogen metabolism and nicotinate/nicotinamide metabolism, were also short-listed through our previous metabolomics works as metabolic pathways likely to be closely associated with C. albicans morphogenesis. PMID:23951145

  20. Anaerobic Bacteria Grow within Candida albicans Biofilms and Induce Biofilm Formation in Suspension Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Emily P.; Cowley, Elise S.; Nobile, Clarissa J.; Hartooni, Nairi; Newman, Dianne K.; Johnson, Alexander D.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The human microbiome contains diverse microorganisms, which share and compete for the same environmental niches [1, 2]. A major microbial growth form in the human body is the biofilm state, where tightly packed bacterial, archaeal and fungal cells must cooperate and/or compete for resources in order to survive [3–6]. We examined mixed biofilms composed of the major fungal species of the gut microbiome, C. albicans, and each of five prevalent bacterial gastrointestinal inhabitants: Bacteroides fragilis, Clostridium perfringens, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Enterococcus faecalis [7–10]. We observed that biofilms formed by C. albicans provide a hypoxic microenvironment that supports the growth of two anaerobic bacteria, even when cultured in ambient oxic conditions that are normally toxic to the bacteria. We also found that co-culture with bacteria in biofilms induces massive gene expression changes in C. albicans, including upregulation of WOR1, which encodes a transcription regulator that controls a phenotypic switch in C. albicans, from the “white” cell type to the “opaque” cell type. Finally, we observed that in suspension cultures, C. perfringens induces aggregation of C. albicans into “mini-biofilms,” which allow C. perfringens cells to survive in a normally toxic environment. This work indicates that bacteria and C. albicans interactions modulate the local chemistry of their environment in multiple ways to create niches favorable to their growth and survival. PMID:25308076

  1. Opportunistic pathogen Candida albicans elicits a temporal response in primary human mast cells

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, José Pedro; Stylianou, Marios; Nilsson, Gunnar; Urban, Constantin F.

    2015-01-01

    Immunosuppressed patients are frequently afflicted with severe mycoses caused by opportunistic fungal pathogens. Besides being a commensal, colonizing predominantly skin and mucosal surfaces, Candida albicans is the most common human fungal pathogen. Mast cells are present in tissues prone to fungal colonization being expectedly among the first immune cells to get into contact with C. albicans. However, mast cell-fungus interaction remains a neglected area of study. Here we show that human mast cells mounted specific responses towards C. albicans. Collectively, mast cell responses included the launch of initial, intermediate and late phase components determined by the secretion of granular proteins and cytokines. Initially mast cells reduced fungal viability and occasionally internalized yeasts. C. albicans could evade ingestion by intracellular growth leading to cellular death. Furthermore, secreted factors in the supernatants of infected cells recruited neutrophils, but not monocytes. Late stages were marked by the release of cytokines that are known to be anti-inflammatory suggesting a modulation of initial responses. C. albicans-infected mast cells formed extracellular DNA traps, which ensnared but did not kill the fungus. Our results suggest that mast cells serve as tissue sentinels modulating antifungal immune responses during C. albicans infection. Consequently, these findings open new doors for understanding fungal pathogenicity. PMID:26192381

  2. Candida albicans adapts to host copper during infection by swapping metal cofactors for superoxide dismutase.

    PubMed

    Li, Cissy X; Gleason, Julie E; Zhang, Sean X; Bruno, Vincent M; Cormack, Brendan P; Culotta, Valeria Cizewski

    2015-09-22

    Copper is both an essential nutrient and potentially toxic metal, and during infection the host can exploit Cu in the control of pathogen growth. Here we describe a clever adaptation to Cu taken by the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans. In laboratory cultures with abundant Cu, C. albicans expresses a Cu-requiring form of superoxide dismutase (Sod1) in the cytosol; but when Cu levels decline, cells switch to an alternative Mn-requiring Sod3. This toggling between Cu- and Mn-SODs is controlled by the Cu-sensing regulator Mac1 and ensures that C. albicans maintains constant SOD activity for cytosolic antioxidant protection despite fluctuating Cu. This response to Cu is initiated during C. albicans invasion of the host where the yeast is exposed to wide variations in Cu. In a murine model of disseminated candidiasis, serum Cu was seen to progressively rise over the course of infection, but this heightened Cu response was not mirrored in host tissue. The kidney that serves as the major site of fungal infection showed an initial rise in Cu, followed by a decline in the metal. C. albicans adjusted its cytosolic SODs accordingly and expressed Cu-Sod1 at early stages of infection, followed by induction of Mn-Sod3 and increases in expression of CTR1 for Cu uptake. Together, these studies demonstrate that fungal infection triggers marked fluctuations in host Cu and C. albicans readily adapts by modulating Cu uptake and by exchanging metal cofactors for antioxidant SODs. PMID:26351691

  3. Candida albicans chronic colonisation in cystic fibrosis may be associated with inhaled antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Noni, Maria; Katelari, Anna; Kaditis, Athanasios; Theochari, Ioanna; Lympari, Ioulia; Alexandrou-Athanassoulis, Helen; Doudounakis, Stavros-Eleftherios; Dimopoulos, George

    2015-07-01

    Candida albicans is increasingly recognised as a coloniser of the respiratory tract in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Yet, the potential role, if any, of the micro-organism in the progress of the disease remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the association between inhaled antibiotics and C. albicans chronic colonisation in patients with CF. A cohort of 121 CF patients born from 1988 to 1996 was, respectively, studied. The medical records of each patient were reviewed from the first time they attended the CF Centre until the occurrence of C. albicans chronic colonisation or their last visit for the year 2010. Chronic colonisation was defined as the presence of C. albicans in more than 50% of cultures in a given year. A number of possible confounders were included in the multivariate logistic regression analysis to identify an independent association between inhaled antibiotics and C. albicans chronic colonisation. Fifty-four (44.6%) of the 121 patients enrolled in the study developed chronic colonisation by the micro-organism. Multivariate logistic regression analysis determined the independent effect of inhaled antibiotic treatment on the odds of chronic colonisation (OR 1.112, 95% CI [1.007-1.229], P = 0.036). Candida albicans chronic colonisation may be associated with the duration of inhaled antibiotic treatment. PMID:26058475

  4. Plasma-membrane Cnh1 Na+/H+ antiporter regulates potassium homeostasis in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Kinclova-Zimmermannova, Olga; Sychrová, Hana

    2007-08-01

    The physiological role of Candida albicans Cnh1, a member of the Na+/H+ antiporter family, was characterized. Though CaCnh1p had broad substrate specificity and mediated efflux of at least four alkali metal cations upon heterologous expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, its presence in C. albicans cells was important especially for potassium homeostasis. In C. albicans, CaCnh1p tagged with GFP was localized in the plasma membrane of cells growing as both yeasts and hyphae. Deletion of CNH1 alleles did not affect tolerance to NaCl, LiCl or CsCl, but resulted in increased sensitivity to high external concentrations of KCl and RbCl. The potassium and rubidium tolerance of a cnh1 homozygous mutant was fully restored by reintegration of CNH1 into the genome. The higher sensitivity of the cnh1/cnh1 mutant to external KCl was caused by a lower K+ efflux from these cells. Together, the functional characterization of the CaCnh1 antiporter in C. albicans revealed that this antiporter plays a significant role in C. albicans physiology. It ensures potassium and rubidium tolerance and participates in the regulation of intracellular potassium content of C. albicans cells. PMID:17660424

  5. In Vitro Antifungal Susceptibility Profiles of Candida albicans Complex Isolated from Patients with Respiratory Infections.

    PubMed

    Sharifynia, Somayeh; Badali, Hamid; Sharifi Sorkherizi, Mina; Shidfar, Mohammad Reza; Hadian, Atefe; Shahrokhi, Shadi; Ghandchi, Ghazale; Rezaie, Sassan

    2016-06-01

    Candidiasis, the main opportunistic fungal infection has been increased over the past decades. This study aimed to characterize C.albicans species complex (C.albicans, C.dubliniensis, and C.africana) isolated from patients with respiratory infections by molecular tools and in vitro antifungal susceptibilities by using broth microdilution method according to CLSI M27-A3 guidelines. Totally, 121 respiratory samples were collected from patients with respiratory infections. Of these, 83 strains were germ tube positive and green colonies on chromogenic media, so initially identified as C.albicans species complex and subsequently were classified as C.albicans (89.15%), C.dubliniensis (9.63%), and C.africana (1.2%) based on PCR-RFLP and amplification of hwp1 gene. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MICs) results showed that all tested isolates of C.albicans complex were highly susceptible to triazole drugs. However, caspofungin had highest activity against C.albicans, C.dubliniensis, and C.africana. Our findings indicated the variety of antifungal resistance of Candida strains in different areas. These results may increase the knowledge about the local distribution of the mentioned strains as well as their antifungal susceptibility pattern which play an important role in appropriate therapy. PMID:27306344

  6. Time-course proteomic profile of Candida albicans during adaptation to a fetal serum.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Wataru; Ueda, Tomomi; Tatsukami, Yohei; Kitahara, Nao; Morisaka, Hironobu; Kuroda, Kouichi; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2013-02-01

    Candida albicans is a commensal organism; however, it causes fatal diseases if the host immunity is compromised. The mortality rate is very high due to the lack of effective treatment, leading to ceaseless demand for novel pharmaceuticals. In this study, time-course proteomics of C. albicans during adaptation to fetal bovine serum (FBS) was described. Time-course proteomics is a promising way to understand the exact process of going adaptation in dynamically changing environments. Candida albicans was cultivated in yeast nitrogen base (YNB) ± FBS media, and we identified 1418 proteins in the endpoint samples incubated for 0 or 60 min by a LC-MS/MS system with a long monolithic silica capillary column. Next, we carried out time-course proteomics of the YNB + FBS samples to identify top-priority proteins for adaption to FBS. We identified 16 proteins as nascent/newly synthesized proteins, and they were recognized as candidates of important virulent factors. Gene ontology analysis revealed that transport-related proteins were enriched in the 16 proteins, indicating that C. albicans probably put priority in time on the acquisition of essential elements. Time-course proteomics of C. albicans revealed the order of priority to adapt to FBS. Depicting time-course dynamics will lead to profound understandings of virulence of C. albicans. PMID:23620121

  7. Genomic identification of potential targets unique to Candida albicans for the discovery of antifungal agents.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Himanshu; Luqman, Suaib; Meena, Abha; Khan, Feroz

    2014-01-01

    Despite of modern antifungal therapy, the mortality rates of invasive infection with human fungal pathogen Candida albicans are up to 40%. Studies suggest that drug resistance in the three most common species of human fungal pathogens viz., C. albicans, Aspergillus fumigatus (causing mortality rate up to 90%) and Cryptococcus neoformans (causing mortality rate up to 70%) is due to mutations in the target enzymes or high expression of drug transporter genes. Drug resistance in human fungal pathogens has led to an imperative need for the identification of new targets unique to fungal pathogens. In the present study, we have used a comparative genomics approach to find out potential target proteins unique to C. albicans, an opportunistic fungus responsible for severe infection in immune-compromised human. Interestingly, many target proteins of existing antifungal agents showed orthologs in human cells. To identify unique proteins, we have compared proteome of C. albicans [SC5314] i.e., 14,633 total proteins retrieved from the RefSeq database of NCBI, USA with proteome of human and non-pathogenic yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Results showed that 4,568 proteins were identified unique to C. albicans as compared to those of human and later when these unique proteins were compared with S. cerevisiae proteome, finally 2,161 proteins were identified as unique proteins and after removing repeats total 1,618 unique proteins (42 functionally known, 1,566 hypothetical and 10 unknown) were selected as potential antifungal drug targets unique to C. albicans. PMID:24102473

  8. Antifungal Activity of Bee Venom and Sweet Bee Venom against Clinically Isolated Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Bae

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate the antifungal effect of bee venom (BV) and sweet bee venom (SBV) against Candida albicans (C. albicans) clinical isolates. Methods: In this study, BV and SBV were examined for antifungal activities against the Korean Collection for Type Cultures (KCTC) strain and 10 clinical isolates of C. albicans. The disk diffusion method was used to measure the antifungal activity and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) assays were performed by using a broth microdilution method. Also, a killing curve assay was conducted to investigate the kinetics of the anti- fungal action. Results: BV and SBV showed antifungal activity against 10 clinical isolates of C. albicans that were cultured from blood and the vagina by using disk diffusion method. The MIC values obtained for clinical isolates by using the broth microdilution method varied from 62.5 μg/ mL to 125 μg/mL for BV and from 15.63 μg/mL to 62.5 μg/mL for SBV. In the killing-curve assay, SBV behaved as amphotericin B, which was used as positive control, did. The antifungal efficacy of SBV was much higher than that of BV. Conclusion: BV and SBV showed antifungal activity against C. albicans clinical strains that were isolated from blood and the vagina. Especially, SBV might be a candidate for a new antifungal agent against C. albicans clinical isolates. PMID:27280049

  9. Candida albicans morphology and dendritic cell subsets determine T helper cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kashem, Sakeen W; Igyártó, Botond Z; Gerami-Nejad, Maryam; Kumamoto, Yosuke; Mohammed, Javed; Jarrett, Elizabeth; Drummond, Rebecca A; Zurawski, Sandra M; Zurawski, Gerard; Berman, Judith; Iwasaki, Akiko; Brown, Gordon D; Kaplan, Daniel H

    2015-02-17

    Candida albicans is a dimorphic fungus responsible for chronic mucocutaneous and systemic infections. Mucocutaneous immunity to C. albicans requires T helper 17 (Th17) cell differentiation that is thought to depend on recognition of filamentous C. albicans. Systemic immunity is considered T cell independent. Using a murine skin infection model, we compared T helper cell responses to yeast and filamentous C. albicans. We found that only yeast induced Th17 cell responses through a mechanism that required Dectin-1-mediated expression of interleukin-6 (IL-6) by Langerhans cells. Filamentous forms induced Th1 without Th17 cell responses due to the absence of Dectin-1 ligation. Notably, Th17 cell responses provided protection against cutaneous infection while Th1 cell responses provided protection against systemic infection. Thus, C. albicans morphology drives distinct T helper cell responses that provide tissue-specific protection. These findings provide insight into compartmentalization of Th cell responses and C. albicans pathogenesis and have critical implications for vaccine strategies. PMID:25680275

  10. Mitochondrial Activity and Cyr1 Are Key Regulators of Ras1 Activation of C. albicans Virulence Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Grahl, Nora; Demers, Elora G.; Lindsay, Allia K.; Harty, Colleen E.; Willger, Sven D.; Piispanen, Amy E.; Hogan, Deborah A.

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is both a major fungal pathogen and a member of the commensal human microflora. The morphological switch from yeast to hyphal growth is associated with disease and many environmental factors are known to influence the yeast-to-hyphae switch. The Ras1-Cyr1-PKA pathway is a major regulator of C. albicans morphogenesis as well as biofilm formation and white-opaque switching. Previous studies have shown that hyphal growth is strongly repressed by mitochondrial inhibitors. Here, we show that mitochondrial inhibitors strongly decreased Ras1 GTP-binding and activity in C. albicans and similar effects were observed in other Candida species. Consistent with there being a connection between respiratory activity and GTP-Ras1 binding, mutants lacking complex I or complex IV grew as yeast in hypha-inducing conditions, had lower levels of GTP-Ras1, and Ras1 GTP-binding was unaffected by respiratory inhibitors. Mitochondria-perturbing agents decreased intracellular ATP concentrations and metabolomics analyses of cells grown with different respiratory inhibitors found consistent perturbation of pyruvate metabolism and the TCA cycle, changes in redox state, increased catabolism of lipids, and decreased sterol content which suggested increased AMP kinase activity. Biochemical and genetic experiments provide strong evidence for a model in which the activation of Ras1 is controlled by ATP levels in an AMP kinase independent manner. The Ras1 GTPase activating protein, Ira2, but not the Ras1 guanine nucleotide exchange factor, Cdc25, was required for the reduction of Ras1-GTP in response to inhibitor-mediated reduction of ATP levels. Furthermore, Cyr1, a well-characterized Ras1 effector, participated in the control of Ras1-GTP binding in response to decreased mitochondrial activity suggesting a revised model for Ras1 and Cyr1 signaling in which Cyr1 and Ras1 influence each other and, together with Ira2, seem to form a master-regulatory complex necessary to integrate

  11. Scanning electron and confocal scanning laser microscopy imaging of the ultrastructure and viability of vaginal Candida albicans and non- albicans species adhered to an intrauterine contraceptive device.

    PubMed

    Paiva, Luciene C Farias; Donatti, Lucélia; Patussi, Eliana V; Svizdinski, Terezinha I E; Lopes-Consolaro, Márcia E

    2010-10-01

    Although bacterial biofilms have been studied in detail, adhesion of Candida albicans and non-albicans species to an intrauterine contraceptive device (IUD) is not clear. The objective of this study was to evaluate aspects of imaging of the ultrastructure and viability of vaginal yeasts adhered to different parts of an IUD, through scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM). We studied yeasts isolated from different patients with vulvovaginal candidiasis: C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. guillermondii, C. parapsilosis, C. tropicalis, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A suspension of the each yeast was prepared and incubated with IUD parts (tail, without copper, and copper-covered). SEM and CSLM showed that all the vaginal yeasts adhered to all the parts of the IUD and demonstrated viability, including 30 days after contact for C. albicans. Possibly irregularities of IUD surface contribute to the adherence process. Although all of the IUD parts contribute to retention of yeasts in the genital tract, high concentration of yeast cells on the tail may indicate the importance of this segment in maintaining the colonization by yeast cells because the tail forms a bridge between the external environment, the vagina that is colonized by yeast cells, and the upper genital tract where there is no colonization. PMID:20804637

  12. Prostaglandin E2 from Candida albicans Stimulates the Growth of Staphylococcus aureus in Mixed Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Jan; Geginat, Gernot; Tammer, Ina

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous studies showed that Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans interact synergistically in dual species biofilms resulting in enhanced mortality in animal models. Methodology/Principal Findings The aim of the current study was to test possible candidate molecules which might mediate this synergistic interaction in an in vitro model of mixed biofilms, such as farnesol, tyrosol and prostaglandin (PG) E2. In mono-microbial and dual biofilms of C.albicans wild type strains PGE2 levels between 25 and 250 pg/mL were measured. Similar concentrations of purified PGE2 significantly enhanced S.aureus biofilm formation in a mode comparable to that observed in dual species biofilms. Supernatants of the null mutant deficient in PGE2 production did not stimulate the proliferation of S.aureus and the addition of the cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin blocked the S.aureus biofilm formation in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, S. aureus biofilm formation was boosted by low and inhibited by high farnesol concentrations. Supernatants of the farnesol-deficient C. albicans ATCC10231 strain significantly enhanced the biofilm formation of S. aureus but at a lower level than the farnesol producer SC5314. However, C. albicans ATCC10231 also produced PGE2 but amounts were significantly lower compared to SC5314. Conclusion/Significance In conclision, we identified C. albicans PGE2 as a key molecule stimulating the growth and biofilm formation of S. aureus in dual S. aureus/C. albicans biofilms, although C. albicans derived farnesol, but not tyrosol, may also contribute to this effect but to a lesser extent. PMID:26262843

  13. Evaluation of APR1 Gene Expression in Candida albicans Strains Isolated From Patients With Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Amri Saroukolaei, Shahla; Ghabaee, Mojdeh; Shokri, Hojjatollah; Khosravi, Alireza; Badiei, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Background Intracellular aspartic proteinase A enzyme is expressed by the APR1 gene and is one of the important factors in the development of systemic candidiasis caused by Candida albicans. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression of the APR1 gene in C. albicans isolates obtained from patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and from controls. Patients and Methods The samples were obtained from 135 MS patients with candidiasis and 100 matched controls of healthy individuals during 2010 - 2011. The clinical and control isolates of C. albicans obtained from individuals were cultured onto sabouraud dextrose agar (SDA). The evaluation of APR1 gene expression was performed using the reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method. Results There was a statistically significant difference in APR1 gene expression of C. albicans strains between MS patients (mean ± SD: 0.5208 ± 0.11518) and the control group (mean ± SD: 0.7603 ± 0.11405) (P = 0.000). Significant correlations were found between the APR1 gene expression of C. albicans strains from MS patients with regard to age and the expanded disability status scale (EDSS) (P = 0.000). The mean values of EDSS were 1.6074 ± 0.1081 after antifungal treatment and 2.2519 ± 0.1323 before antifungal treatment (P = 0.000). No significant correlation was observed between the APR1 gene expression with regard to sex and MS subtypes. Conclusions The results suggested that APR1 gene expression in C. albicans strains isolated from MS patients may be an important factor for invasive C. albicans strains in the progression of MS disease. PMID:27540458

  14. Comparative Phenotypic Analysis of the Major Fungal Pathogens Candida parapsilosis and Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Linda M.; Schröder, Markus S.; Turner, Siobhán A.; Taff, Heather; Andes, David; Grózer, Zsuzsanna; Gácser, Attila; Ames, Lauren; Haynes, Ken; Higgins, Desmond G.; Butler, Geraldine

    2014-01-01

    Candida parapsilosis and Candida albicans are human fungal pathogens that belong to the CTG clade in the Saccharomycotina. In contrast to C. albicans, relatively little is known about the virulence properties of C. parapsilosis, a pathogen particularly associated with infections of premature neonates. We describe here the construction of C. parapsilosis strains carrying double allele deletions of 100 transcription factors, protein kinases and species-specific genes. Two independent deletions were constructed for each target gene. Growth in >40 conditions was tested, including carbon source, temperature, and the presence of antifungal drugs. The phenotypes were compared to C. albicans strains with deletions of orthologous transcription factors. We found that many phenotypes are shared between the two species, such as the role of Upc2 as a regulator of azole resistance, and of CAP1 in the oxidative stress response. Others are unique to one species. For example, Cph2 plays a role in the hypoxic response in C. parapsilosis but not in C. albicans. We found extensive divergence between the biofilm regulators of the two species. We identified seven transcription factors and one protein kinase that are required for biofilm development in C. parapsilosis. Only three (Efg1, Bcr1 and Ace2) have similar effects on C. albicans biofilms, whereas Cph2, Czf1, Gzf3 and Ume6 have major roles in C. parapsilosis only. Two transcription factors (Brg1 and Tec1) with well-characterized roles in biofilm formation in C. albicans do not have the same function in C. parapsilosis. We also compared the transcription profile of C. parapsilosis and C. albicans biofilms. Our analysis suggests the processes shared between the two species are predominantly metabolic, and that Cph2 and Bcr1 are major biofilm regulators in C. parapsilosis. PMID:25233198

  15. Antifungal activity of clotrimazole against Candida albicans depends on carbon sources, growth phase and morphology.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Lydia; Miramón, Pedro; Jablonowski, Nadja; Wisgott, Stephanie; Wilson, Duncan; Brunke, Sascha; Hube, Bernhard

    2015-07-01

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis, a superficial infection caused predominantly by the pathogenic fungus Candida albicans, is frequently treated with clotrimazole. Some drug formulations contain lactate for improved solubility. Lactate may modify C. albicans physiology and drug sensitivity by serving as a carbon source for the fungus and/or affecting local pH. Here, we explored the effects of lactate, in combination with pH changes, on C. albicans proliferation, morphology and clotrimazole sensitivity. Moreover, we determined the influence of growth phase and morphology per se on drug sensitivity. We showed that utilization of lactate as a carbon source did not promote fast fungal proliferation or filamentation. Lactate had no influence on clotrimazole-mediated killing of C. albicans in standard fungal cultivation medium but had an additive effect on the fungicidal clotrimazole action under in vitro vagina-simulative conditions. Moreover, clotrimazole-mediated killing was growth-phase and morphology dependent. Post-exponential cells were resistant to the fungicidal action of clotrimazole, whilst logarithmic cells were sensitive, and hyphae showed the highest susceptibility. Finally, we showed that treatment of pre-formed C. albicans hyphae with sublethal concentrations of clotrimazole induced a reversion to yeast-phase growth. As C. albicans hyphae are considered the pathogenic morphology during mucosal infections, these data suggest that elevated fungicidal activity of clotrimazole against hyphae plus clotrimazole-induced hyphae-to-yeast reversion may help to dampen acute vaginal infections by reducing the relative proportion of hyphae and thus shifting to a non-invasive commensal-like population. In addition, lactate as an ingredient of clotrimazole formulations may potentiate clotrimazole killing of C. albicans in the vaginal microenvironment. PMID:25976001

  16. Postantifungal Effect of Micafungin against the Species Complexes of Candida albicans and Candida parapsilosis

    PubMed Central

    Gil-Alonso, Sandra; Jauregizar, Nerea; Eraso, Elena; Quindós, Guillermo

    2015-01-01

    Micafungin is an effective antifungal agent useful for the therapy of invasive candidiasis. Candida albicans is the most common cause of invasive candidiasis; however, infections due to non-C. albicans species, such as Candida parapsilosis, are rising. Killing and postantifungal effects (PAFE) are important factors in both dose interval choice and infection outcome. The aim of this study was to determinate the micafungin PAFE against 7 C. albicans strains, 5 Candida dubliniensis, 2 Candida Africana, 3 C. parapsilosis, 2 Candida metapsilosis and 2 Candida orthopsilosis. For PAFE studies, cells were exposed to micafungin for 1 h at concentrations ranging from 0.12 to 8 μg/ml. Time-kill experiments (TK) were conducted at the same concentrations. Samples were removed at each time point (0-48 h) and viable counts determined. Micafungin (2 μg/ml) was fungicidal (≥ 3 log10 reduction) in TK against 5 out of 14 (36%) strains of C. albicans complex. In PAFE experiments, fungicidal endpoint was achieved against 2 out of 14 strains (14%). In TK against C. parapsilosis, 8 μg/ml of micafungin turned out to be fungicidal against 4 out 7 (57%) strains. Conversely, fungicidal endpoint was not achieved in PAFE studies. PAFE results for C. albicans complex (41.83 ± 2.18 h) differed from C. parapsilosis complex (8.07 ± 4.2 h) at the highest tested concentration of micafungin. In conclusion, micafungin showed significant differences in PAFE against C. albicans and C. parapsilosis complexes, being PAFE for the C. albicans complex longer than for the C. parapsilosis complex. PMID:26168269

  17. Flavodoxin-Like Proteins Protect Candida albicans from Oxidative Stress and Promote Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lifang; Naseem, Shamoon; Sharma, Sahil; Konopka, James B.

    2015-01-01

    The fungal pathogen Candida albicans causes lethal systemic infections in humans. To better define how pathogens resist oxidative attack by the immune system, we examined a family of four Flavodoxin-Like Proteins (FLPs) in C. albicans. In agreement with previous studies showing that FLPs in bacteria and plants act as NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductases, a C. albicans quadruple mutant lacking all four FLPs (pst1Δ, pst2Δ, pst3Δ, ycp4Δ) was more sensitive to benzoquinone. Interestingly, the quadruple mutant was also more sensitive to a variety of oxidants. Quinone reductase activity confers important antioxidant effects because resistance to oxidation was restored in the quadruple mutant by expressing either Escherichia coli wrbA or mammalian NQO1, two distinct types of quinone reductases. FLPs were detected at the plasma membrane in C. albicans, and the quadruple mutant was more sensitive to linolenic acid, a polyunsaturated fatty acid that can auto-oxidize and promote lipid peroxidation. These observations suggested that FLPs reduce ubiquinone (coenzyme Q), enabling it to serve as an antioxidant in the membrane. In support of this, a C. albicans coq3Δ mutant that fails to synthesize ubiquinone was also highly sensitive to oxidative stress. FLPs are critical for survival in the host, as the quadruple mutant was avirulent in a mouse model of systemic candidiasis under conditions where infection with wild type C. albicans was lethal. The quadruple mutant cells initially grew well in kidneys, the major site of C. albicans growth in mice, but then declined after the influx of neutrophils and by day 4 post-infection 33% of the mice cleared the infection. Thus, FLPs and ubiquinone are important new antioxidant mechanisms that are critical for fungal virulence. The potential of FLPs as novel targets for antifungal therapy is further underscored by their absence in mammalian cells. PMID:26325183

  18. Flexible Survival Strategies of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Biofilms Result in Increased Fitness Compared with Candida albicans *

    PubMed Central

    Purschke, Frauke Gina; Hiller, Ekkehard; Trick, Iris; Rupp, Steffen

    2012-01-01

    The majority of microorganisms persist in nature as surface-attached communities often surrounded by an extracellular matrix, called biofilms. Most natural biofilms are not formed by a single species but by multiple species. Microorganisms not only cooperate as in some multispecies biofilms but also compete for available nutrients. The Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the polymorphic fungus Candida albicans are two opportunistic pathogens that are often found coexisting in a human host. Several models of mixed biofilms have been reported for these organisms showing antagonistic behavior. To investigate the interaction of P. aeruginosa and C. albicans in more detail, we analyzed the secretome of single and mixed biofilms of both organisms using MALDI-TOF MS/MS at several time points. Overall 247 individual proteins were identified, 170 originated from P. aeruginosa and 77 from C. albicans. Only 39 of the 131 in mixed biofilms identified proteins were assigned to the fungus whereby the remaining 92 proteins belonged to P. aeruginosa. In single-species biofilms, both organisms showed a higher diversity of proteins with 73 being assigned to C. albicans and 154 to P. aeruginosa. Most interestingly, P. aeruginosa in the presence of C. albicans secreted 16 proteins in significantly higher amounts or exclusively among other virulence factors such as exotoxin A and iron acquisition systems. In addition, the high affinity iron-binding siderophore pyoverdine was identified in mixed biofilms but not in bacterial biofilms, indicating that P. aeruginosa increases its capability to sequester iron in competition with C. albicans. In contrast, C. albicans metabolism was significantly reduced, including a reduction in detectable iron acquisition proteins. The results obtained in this study show that microorganisms not only compete with the host for essential nutrients but also strongly with the present microflora in order to gain a competitive advantage. PMID

  19. Assessing the potential of four cathelicidins for the management of mouse candidiasis and Candida albicans biofilms.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haining; Liu, Xuelian; Wang, Chen; Qiao, Xue; Wu, Sijin; Wang, Hui; Feng, Lan; Wang, Yipeng

    2016-02-01

    As the most common fungal pathogen of humans, severe drug resistance has emerged in the clinically isolated Candida albicans, which lead to the urgency to develop novel antifungal agents. Here, four our previously characterized cathelicidins (cathelicidin-BF, Pc-CATH1, Cc-CATH2, Cc-CATH3) were selected and their antifungal activities against C. albicans were evaluated in vitro and in vivo using amphotericin B and LL-37 as control. Results showed that all four cathelicidins could eradicate standard and clinically isolated C. albicans strains with most MIC values ranging from 1 to 16 μg/ml, in less than 0.5 h revealed by time-kill kinetic assay. Four peptides only exhibited slight hemolytic activity with most HC50 > 200 μg/ml, and retained potent anti-C. albicans activity at salt concentrations below and beyond physiological level. In animal experiment, 50 mg/kg administration of the four cathelicidins could significantly reduce the fungal counts in a murine oral candidiasis model induced by clinically isolated C. albicans. The antibiofilm activity of cathelicidin-BF, the most potent among the five peptides was evaluated, and result showed that cathelicidin-BF strongly inhibited C. albicans biofilm formation at 20 μg/ml. Furthermore, cathelicidin-BF also exhibited potent anti-C. albicans activity in established biofilms as measured by metabolic and fluorescent viability assays. Structure-function analyses suggest that they mainly adopt an α-helical conformations, which enable them to act as a membrane-active molecule. Altogether, the four cathelicidins display great potential for antifungal agent development against candidiasis. PMID:26656137

  20. Regulation of copper toxicity by Candida albicans GPA2.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Jennifer A; Olarte, Karen T; Michalek, Jamie L; Jandu, Gurjinder S; Michel, Sarah L J; Bruno, Vincent M

    2013-07-01

    Copper is an essential nutrient that is toxic to cells when present in excess. The fungal pathogen Candida albicans employs several mechanisms to survive in the presence of excess copper, but the molecular pathways that govern these responses are not completely understood. We report that deletion of GPA2, which specifies a G-protein α subunit, confers increased resistance to excess copper and propose that the increased resistance is due to a combination of decreased copper uptake and an increase in copper chelation by metallothioneins. This is supported by our observations that a gpa2Δ/Δ mutant has reduced expression of the copper uptake genes, CTR1 and FRE7, and a marked decrease in copper accumulation following exposure to high copper levels. Furthermore, deletion of GPA2 results in an increased expression of the copper metallothionein gene, CRD2. Gpa2p functions upstream in the cyclic AMP (cAMP)-protein kinase A (PKA) pathway to govern hyphal morphogenesis. The copper resistance phenotype of the gpa2Δ/Δ mutant can be reversed by artificially increasing the intracellular concentration of cAMP. These results provide evidence for a novel role of the PKA pathway in regulation of copper homeostasis. Furthermore, the connection between the PKA pathway and copper homeostasis appears to be conserved in the pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans but not in the nonpathogenic Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PMID:23584994

  1. Selective photoinactivation of C. albicans and C. dubliniensis with hypericin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernal, C.; Rodrigues, J. A. O.; Guimarães, A. P. P.; Ribeiro, A. O.; de Oliveira, K. T.; Imasato, H.; Perussi, J. R.

    2011-01-01

    The genus Candida includes different species that have the potential to invade and colonize the human body and C. albicans is the most common cause of skin, nail and mucous infections. The increasing resistance against antifungal drugs has renewed the search for new treatment procedures and antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation (PDI) is a propitious candidate. Hypericin (HY) has several wanted properties to be used as a photosensitizer in this technique including a high quantum yield of singlet oxygen generation, a high extinction coefficient near 600 nm, and a relatively low dark toxicity. Although the phototoxicity of HY on several tumor cells has been reported, the data concerning its photoactivity on microorganisms are scarce. The aim of this study was to obtain the experimental parameters to achieve an acceptable selective hypericinphotoinactivation of two species of Candida comparing with fibroblasts and epithelial cells which are the constituents of some potential host tissues, such mucosas, skin and cavities. Microorganisms and cells were incubated with the same HY concentrations and short incubation time followed by irradiation with equal dose of light. The best conditions to kill just Candida were very low HY concentration (0.1-0.4 μg ml-1) incubated by 10 min and irradiated with LED 590 nm with 6 J cm-2.

  2. Dynamics of the interlocked positive feedback loops explaining the robust epigenetic switching in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Sriram, K; Soliman, Sylvain; Fages, François

    2009-05-01

    The two element mutual activation and inhibitory positive feedback loops are a common motifs that occur in many biological systems in both isolated and interlocked form, as for example, in the cell division cycle and thymus differentiation in eukaryotes. The properties of three element interlocked positive feedback loops that embeds both mutual activation and inhibition are studied in depth for their bistable properties by performing bifurcation and stochastic simulations. Codimension one and two bifurcations reveal important properties like robustness to parameter variations and adaptability under various conditions by its ability to fine tune the threshold to a wide range of values and to maintain a wide bistable regime. Furthermore, we show that in the interlocked circuit, mutual inhibition controls the decision to switch from OFF to ON state, while mutual activation enforces the decision. This view is supported through a concrete biological example Candida albicans, a human fungal pathogen that can exist in two distinctive cell types; one in the default white state and the other in an opaque form. Stochastic switching between these two forms takes place due to the epigenetic alternation induced by the transcriptional regulators in the circuit, albeit without any rearrangement of the nuclear chromosomes. The transcriptional regulators constitute interlocked mutual activation and inhibition feedback circuits that provide adaptable threshold and wide bistable regime. These positive feedback loops are shown to be responsible for robust noise induced transitions without chattering, persistence of particular phenotypes for many generations and selective exhibition of one particular form of phenotype when mutated. Finally, we propose for synthetic biology constructs to use interlocked positive feedback loops instead of two element positive feedback loops because they are better controlled than isolated mutual activation and mutual inhibition feedback circuits. PMID

  3. Fragile cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonatti, Ch.; Díaz, L. J.

    We study diffeomorphisms f with heterodimensional cycles, that is, heteroclinic cycles associated to saddles p and q with different indices. Such a cycle is called fragile if there is no diffeomorphism close to f with a robust cycle associated to hyperbolic sets containing the continuations of p and q. We construct a codimension one submanifold of Diff(S×S) that consists of diffeomorphisms with fragile heterodimensional cycles. Our construction holds for any manifold of dimension ⩾4.

  4. Evaluation of anti-Candida potential of geranium oil constituents against clinical isolates of Candida albicans differentially sensitive to fluconazole: inhibition of growth, dimorphism and sensitization.

    PubMed

    Zore, Gajanan B; Thakre, Archana D; Rathod, V; Karuppayil, S Mohan

    2011-07-01

    Fluconazole (FLC) susceptibility of isolates of Candida spp., (n = 42) and efficacy as well as mechanism of anti-Candida activity of three constituents of geranium oil is evaluated in this study. No fluconazole resistance was observed among the clinical isolates tested, however 22% were susceptible-dose-dependent (S-DD) [minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) ≥ 16 μg ml(-1)] and a standard strain of C. albicans ATCC 10231 was resistant (≥ 64 μg ml(-1)). Geraniol and geranyl acetate were equally effective, fungicidal at 0.064% v/v concentrations i.e. MICs (561 μg ml(-1) and 584 μg ml(-1) respectively) and killed 99.9% inoculum within 15 and 30 min of exposures respectively. Citronellol was least effective and fungistatic. C. albicans dimorphism (Y → H) was highly sensitive to geranium oil constituents tested (IC50 approximately 0.008% v/v). Geraniol, geranyl acetate and citronellol brought down MICs of FLC by 16-, 32- and 64-fold respectively in a FLC-resistant strain. Citronellol and geraniol arrested cells in G1 phase while geranyl acetate in G2-M phase of cell cycle at MIC(50). In vitro cytotoxicity study revealed that geraniol, geranyl acetate and citronellol were non-toxic to HeLa cells at MICs of the C. albicans growth. Our results indicate that two of the three geranium oil constituents tested exhibit excellent anti-Candida activity and significant synergistic activity with fluconazole. PMID:20337938

  5. Molecular and Phenotypic Characterization of Genotypic Candida albicans Subgroups and Comparison with Candida dubliniensis and Candida stellatoidea

    PubMed Central

    McCullough, Michael J.; Clemons, Karl V.; Stevens, David A.

    1999-01-01

    There have been increased reports of the isolation of unusual genotypic groups of Candida albicans (groups C and D) based on a well-defined genotypic method; this method uses cellular DNA digested with the EcoRI enzyme and the restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) generated by agarose gel electrophoresis. The aim of the present study was to use additional molecular tools to characterize these unusual strains and to compare them with authentic strains of C. dubliniensis, a recently delineated species, and type I C. stellatoidea. The RFLPs of PCR products generated from the intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS) region did not differentiate among C. albicans genotypes A, B, and C and type I C. stellatoidea. However, this method did differentiate the C. albicans genotype D strains, which were identical to C. dubliniensis. The RFLPs generated by HaeIII digestion of the PCR products of the V3 region of the 25S rRNA gene (rDNA) could differentiate the same groups as RFLP analysis of the PCR amplicon of the ITS region. C. albicans genotype B isolates have been shown to have a transposable intron in the 25S rDNA, whereas genotype A isolates do not; C. dubliniensis strains also have an intron that is larger than that in genotype B C. albicans strains but that is in the same location. PCR designed to span this region resulted in a single product for C. albicans genotype A (450 bp), B (840 bp), type 1 C. stellatoidea (840 bp), and C. dubliniensis (1,080 bp), whereas the C. albicans genotype C isolates had two major products (450 and 840 bp). All C. albicans genotype D isolates gave a PCR product identical to that given by C. dubliniensis. These results indicate that those strains previously designated C. albicans genotype D are in fact C. dubliniensis, that no differences were found between type 1 C. stellatoidea and C. albicans genotype B strains, and that the C. albicans genotype C strains appear to have the transposable intron incompletely inserted throughout the

  6. Staphylococcus aureus adherence to Candida albicans hyphae is mediated by the hyphal adhesin Als3p

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Brian M.; Ovchinnikova, Ekaterina S.; Krom, Bastiaan P.; Schlecht, Lisa Marie; Zhou, Han; Hoyer, Lois L.; Busscher, Henk J.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Jabra-Rizk, Mary Ann

    2012-01-01

    The bacterium Staphylococcus (St.) aureus and the opportunistic fungus Candida albicans are currently among the leading nosocomial pathogens, often co-infecting critically ill patients, with high morbidity and mortality. Previous investigations have demonstrated preferential adherence of St. aureus to C. albicans hyphae during mixed biofilm growth. In this study, we aimed to characterize the mechanism behind this observed interaction. C. albicans adhesin-deficient mutant strains were screened by microscopy to identify the specific receptor on C. albicans hyphae recognized by St. aureus. Furthermore, an immunoassay was developed to validate and quantify staphylococcal binding to fungal biofilms. The findings from these experiments implicated the C. albicans adhesin agglutinin-like sequence 3 (Als3p) in playing a major role in the adherence process. This association was quantitatively established using atomic force microscopy, in which the adhesion force between single cells of the two species was significantly reduced for a C. albicans mutant strain lacking als3. Confocal microscopy further confirmed these observations, as St. aureus overlaid with a purified recombinant Als3 N-terminal domain fragment (rAls3p) exhibited robust binding. Importantly, a strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae heterologously expressing Als3p was utilized to further confirm this adhesin as a receptor for St. aureus. Although the parental strain does not bind bacteria, expression of Als3p on the cell surface conferred upon the yeast the ability to strongly bind St. aureus. To elucidate the implications of these in vitro findings in a clinically relevant setting, an ex vivo murine model of co-infection was designed using murine tongue explants. Fluorescent microscopic images revealed extensive hyphal penetration of the epithelium typical of C. albicans mucosal infection. Interestingly, St. aureus bacterial cells were only seen within the epithelial tissue when associated with the invasive

  7. Binding Force Dynamics of Streptococcus mutans-glucosyltransferase B to Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Hwang, G; Marsh, G; Gao, L; Waugh, R; Koo, H

    2015-09-01

    Candida albicans cells are often detected with Streptococcus mutans in plaque biofilms from children affected with early childhood caries. The coadhesion between these 2 organisms appears to be largely mediated by the S. mutans-derived exoenzyme glucosyltransferase B (GtfB); GtfB readily binds to C. albicans cells in an active form, producing glucans locally that provide enhanced binding sites for S. mutans. However, knowledge is limited about the mechanisms by which the bacterial exoenzyme binds to and functions on the fungal surface to promote this unique cross-kingdom interaction. In this study, we use atomic force microscopy to understand the strength and binding dynamics modulating GtfB-C. albicans adhesive interactions in situ. Single-molecule force spectroscopy with GtfB-functionalized atomic force microscopy tips demonstrated that the enzyme binds with remarkable strength to the C. albicans cell surface (~2 nN) and showed a low dissociation rate, suggesting a highly stable bond. Strikingly, the binding strength of GtfB to the C. albicans surface was ~2.5-fold higher and the binding stability, ~20 times higher, as compared with the enzyme adhesion to S. mutans. Furthermore, adhesion force maps showed an intriguing pattern of GtfB binding. GtfB adhered heterogeneously on the surface of C. albicans, showing a higher frequency of adhesion failure but large sections of remarkably strong binding forces, suggesting the presence of GtfB binding domains unevenly distributed on the fungal surface. In contrast, GtfB bound uniformly across the S. mutans cell surface with less adhesion failure and a narrower range of binding forces (vs. the C. albicans surface). The data provide the first insights into the mechanisms underlying the adhesive and mechanical properties governing GtfB interactions with C. albicans. The strong and highly stable GtfB binding to C. albicans could explain, at least in part, why this bacterially derived exoenzyme effectively modulates this

  8. Fimbria-mediated adherence of Candida albicans to glycosphingolipid receptors on human buccal epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, L; Lee, K K; Sheth, H B; Lane-Bell, P; Srivastava, G; Hindsgaul, O; Paranchych, W; Hodges, R S; Irvin, R T

    1994-01-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunist fungal pathogen that has the ability to adhere to host cell surface receptors via a number of adhesins. Yu et al. (L. Yu, K. K. Lee, K. Ens, P. C. Doig, M. R. Carpenter, W. Staddon, R. S. Hodges, W. Paranchych, and R. T. Irvin, Infect. Immun. 62:2834-2842, 1994) described the purification and initial characterization of a fimbrial adhesin from C. albicans. In this paper, we show that C. albicans fimbriae also bind to asialo-GM1 [gangliotetraosylceramide: beta Gal(1-3)beta GalNAc(1-4) beta Gal(1-4)beta Glc(1-1)Cer] immobilized on microtiter plates in a saturable and concentration-dependent manner. C. albicans fimbrial binding to exfoliated human buccal epithelial cells (BECs) was inhibited by asialo-GM1 in in vitro binding assays. The fimbriae interact with the glycosphingolipid receptors via the carbohydrate portion of the receptors, since fimbriae were observed to bind to synthetic beta GalNAc(1-4)beta Gal-protein conjugates and the disaccharide was able to inhibit binding of fimbriae to BECs in in vitro binding assays. We conclude from these results that the C. albicans yeast form expresses a fimbrial adhesin that binds to glycosphingolipids displayed on the surface of human BECs. Images PMID:8005674

  9. A comprehensive Candida albicans PeptideAtlas build enables deep proteome coverage.

    PubMed

    Vialas, Vital; Sun, Zhi; Reales-Calderón, Jose A; Hernáez, María L; Casas, Vanessa; Carrascal, Montserrat; Abián, Joaquín; Monteoliva, Lucía; Deutsch, Eric W; Moritz, Robert L; Gil, Concha

    2016-01-10

    To provide new and expanded proteome documentation of the opportunistically pathogen Candida albicans, we have developed new protein extraction and analysis routines to provide a new, extended and enhanced version of the C. albicans PeptideAtlas. Two new datasets, resulting from experiments consisting of exhaustive subcellular fractionations and different growing conditions, plus two additional datasets from previous experiments on the surface and the secreted proteomes, have been incorporated to increase the coverage of the proteome. High resolution precursor mass spectrometry (MS) and ion trap tandem MS spectra were analyzed with three different search engines using a database containing allele-specific sequences. This approach, novel for a large-scale C. albicans proteomics project, was combined with the post-processing and filtering implemented in the Trans Proteomic Pipeline consistently used in the PeptideAtlas project and resulted in 49,372 additional peptides (3-fold increase) and 1630 more proteins (1.6-fold increase) identified in the new C. albicans PeptideAtlas with respect to the previous build. A total of 71,310 peptides and 4174 canonical (minimal non-redundant set) proteins (4115 if one protein per pair of alleles is considered) were identified representing 66% of the 6218 proteins in the predicted proteome. This makes the new PeptideAtlas build the most comprehensive C. albicans proteomics resource available and the only large-scale one with detections of individual alleles. PMID:26493587

  10. In vivo evaluation of photodynamic inactivation using Photodithazine® against Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Carmello, J C; Dovigo, L N; Mima, E G; Jorge, J H; de Souza Costa, C A; Bagnato, V S; Pavarina, A C

    2015-07-01

    This study describes the photoinactivation of Candida albicans in a murine model of oral candidosis, mediated by Photodithazine® (PDZ). Six-week-old female Swiss mice were immunosuppressed, and inoculated with C. albicans to induce oral candidosis. After five days, photodynamic inactivation (PDI) mediated by PDZ at concentrations of 75, 100, 125 and 150 mg L(-1) was applied on the tongue of mice. Next, microbiological evaluation was performed by recovering C. albicans from the tongue via colony forming units (CFU mL(-1)). After 24 h of treatment, the animals were killed and the tongues were surgically removed for histological analysis. PDI was effective in reducing C. albicans on the tongue of mice using 100 mg L(-1) of PDZ, when compared to the positive control group (without treatment). No adverse effect on the tongue tissue was verified after PDI. Therefore, PDI was effective for inactivation of C. albicans without causing any harmful effects on host tissues, which is promising for future clinical trials. PMID:26069900

  11. Inhibitory Effect of Sophorolipid on Candida albicans Biofilm Formation and Hyphal Growth

    PubMed Central

    Haque, Farazul; Alfatah, Md.; Ganesan, K.; Bhattacharyya, Mani Shankar

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans causes superficial and life-threatening systemic infections. These are difficult to treat often due to drug resistance, particularly because C. albicans biofilms are inherently resistant to most antifungals. Sophorolipid (SL), a glycolipid biosurfactant, has been shown to have antimicrobial and anticancer properties. In this study, we investigated the effect of SL on C. albicans biofilm formation and preformed biofilms. SL was found to inhibit C. albicans biofilm formation as well as reduce the viability of preformed biofilms. Moreover, SL, when used along with amphotericin B (AmB) or fluconazole (FLZ), was found to act synergistically against biofilm formation and preformed biofilms. Effect of SL on C. albicans biofilm formation was further visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), which revealed absence of hyphae, typical biofilm architecture and alteration in the morphology of biofilm cells. We also found that SL downregulates the expression of hypha specific genes HWP1, ALS1, ALS3, ECE1 and SAP4, which possibly explains the inhibitory effect of SL on hyphae and biofilm formation. PMID:27030404

  12. Effect of surface treatments of porcelain on adhesion of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Lawaf, Shirin; Azizi, Arash; Farzad, Azin; Adimi, Parvaneh

    2016-01-01

    Surface treatment of porcelain is required to minimize the adhesion of microorganisms to surfaces of the restoration. This study sought to assess the effects of 3 different porcelain surface treatments on adhesion of Candida albicans. This in vitro experimental study was conducted on 60 porcelain disks (10 × 3 mm) randomly divided into 4 groups of 15. The nonglazed group received no surface treatment; specimens in the other 3 groups were glazed in the furnace, overglazed with liquid glaze, or polished using a polishing kit. The specimens were washed, sterilized, and separately incubated with 350 µL of Candida albicans suspension for 24 hours. Specimens were then rinsed for 20 seconds and shaken in 1 mL of saline solution for 1 minute, and 20 µL of this suspension was cultured in a plate and incubated at 37°C for 48 hours. Candida albicans colonies were counted to assess the number of microorganisms adhering to each disk. Data were analyzed with the Kruskal-Wallis test. Statistically significant differences were found among the 4 groups in terms of C albicans adherence (P = 0.001). The nonglazed porcelain had the highest and the overglazed porcelain had the lowest mean adherence value. No statistically significant difference was noted between glazed and polished specimens. Based on the obtained results, overglazing resulted in the least adhesion of C albicans, and polishing provided a surface as smooth as a glazed surface. PMID:27367639

  13. Beyond the wall: Candida albicans secret(e)s to survive.

    PubMed

    Sorgo, Alice G; Heilmann, Clemens J; Brul, Stanley; de Koster, Chris G; Klis, Frans M

    2013-01-01

    The opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida albicans occupies various niches of the human body such as the skin and the mucosal surfaces of the gastrointestinal and urogenital tracts. It can also enter the blood stream and cause deadly, systemic infections, especially in immunocompromised patients, but also in immunocompetent individuals through inserted medical devices. To survive in these diverse host environments, C. albicans has developed specialized virulence attributes and rapidly adapts itself to local growth conditions and defense mechanisms. Candida albicans secretes a considerable number of proteins that are involved in biofilm formation, tissue invasion, immune evasion, and wall maintenance, as well as acquisition of nutrients including metal ions. The secretome of C. albicans is predicted to comprise 225 proteins. On a proteomic level, however, analysis of the secretome of C. albicans is incomplete as many secreted proteins are only produced under certain conditions. Interestingly, glycosylphosphatidylinositol proteins and known cytoplasmic proteins are also consistently detected in the growth medium. Importantly, a core set of seven wall polysaccharide-processing enzymes seems to be consistently present, including the diagnostic marker Mp65. Overall, we discuss the importance of the secretome for virulence and suggest potential targets for better and faster diagnostic methods. PMID:23170918

  14. Transcriptional response to fluconazole and amphotericin B in Candida albicans biofilms.

    PubMed

    Nailis, Heleen; Vandenbosch, Davy; Deforce, Dieter; Nelis, Hans J; Coenye, Tom

    2010-05-01

    Biofilm formation is often associated with persistent Candida albicans infections. Treatment of these infections is difficult, since sessile C. albicans cells show increased resistance towards antifungal agents. The molecular mechanisms behind biofilm resistance in C. albicans are not yet understood. In the present study, we investigated the transcriptional response in young and mature in vitro-grown biofilms after a short and longer exposure time to high doses of fluconazole or amphotericin B. Treatment of biofilms with high doses of antifungal agents resulted in a drug-specific transcriptional response. Exposure of biofilms to fluconazole induced upregulation of genes encoding enzymes involved in ergosterol biosynthesis (ERG1, ERG3, ERG11 and ERG25). Treatment of biofilms with amphotericin B resulted in an overexpression of KRE1 and SKN1, two genes encoding proteins involved in beta-1,6-glucan biosynthesis. Our data indicate that sessile C. albicans cells show controlled regulation of gene expression, as they quickly mount a drug-specific transcriptional response in the presence of high doses of antifungal agents. These transcriptional changes suggest upregulation of ergosterol biosynthesis (fluconazole) and upregulation of beta-1,6-glucan biosynthesis (amphotericin B) in sessile C. albicans cells that might contribute to a resistant biofilm phenotype. PMID:20170727

  15. The antimicrobial effects of selenium nanoparticle-enriched probiotics and their fermented broth against Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Lactic acid bacteria are considered important probiotics for prevention of some infections. The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of selenium dioxide on the antifungal activity of Lactobacillus plantarum and L. johnsonii against Candida albicans. Methods Lactobacillus plantarum and L. johnsonii cells, grown in the presence and absence of selenium dioxide, and their cell-free spent culture media were tested for antifungal activity against C. albicans ATCC 14053 by a hole-plate diffusion method and a time-kill assay. Results Both L. plantarum and L. johnsonii reduced selenium dioxide to cell-associated elemental selenium nanoparticles. The cell-free spent culture media, from both Lactobacillus species that had been grown with selenium dioxide for 48 h, showed enhanced antifungal activity against C. albicans. Enhanced antifungal activity of cell biomass against C. albicans was also observed in cultures grown with selenium dioxide. Conclusions Selenium dioxide-treated Lactobacillus spp. or their cell-free spent broth inhibited the growth of C. albicans and should be investigated for possible use in anti-Candida probiotic formulations in future. PMID:24906455

  16. Candida albicans Primes TLR Cytokine Responses through a Dectin-1/Raf-1–Mediated Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ifrim, Daniela C.; Joosten, Leo A. B.; Kullberg, Bart-Jan; Jacobs, Liesbeth; Jansen, Trees; Williams, David L.; Gow, Neil A. R.; van der Meer, Jos W. M.; Netea, Mihai G.

    2013-01-01

    The immune system is essential to maintain homeostasis with resident microbial populations, ensuring that the symbiotic host–microbial relationship is maintained. In parallel, commensal microbes significantly shape mammalian immunity at the host mucosal surface, as well as systemically. Candida albicans is an opportunistic pathogen that lives as a commensal on skin and mucosa of healthy individuals. Little is known about its capacity to modulate responses toward other microorganisms, such as colonizing bacteria (e.g., intestinal microorganisms). The aim of this study was to assess the cytokine production of PBMCs induced by commensal bacteria when these cells were primed by C. albicans. We show that C. albicans and β-1,3-glucan induce priming of human primary mononuclear cells and this leads to enhanced cytokine production upon in vitro stimulation with TLR ligands and bacterial commensals. This priming requires the β-1,3-glucan receptor dectin-1 and the noncanonical Raf-1 pathway. In addition, although purified mannans cannot solely mediate the priming, the presence of mannosyl residues in the cell wall of C. albicans is nevertheless required. In conclusion, C. albicans is able to modify cytokine responses to TLR ligands and colonizing bacteria, which is likely to impact the inflammatory reaction during mucosal diseases. PMID:23475217

  17. In vivo photodynamic inactivation of Candida albicans using chloro-aluminum phthalocyanine.

    PubMed

    Carmello, J C; Alves, F; Ribeiro, Apd; Basso, F G; de Souza Costa, C A; Tedesco, A C; Primo, F L; Mima, E G; Pavarina, A C

    2016-07-01

    This study evaluated the photoinactivation of Candida albicans in a murine model of oral candidiasis using chloro-aluminum phthalocyanine (ClAlP) encapsulated in cationic nanoemulsions (NE) and chloro-aluminum phthalocyanine (ClAlP) diluted in DMSO (DMSO) as photosensitizer (PS). Seventy-five 6-week-old female Swiss mice were immunosuppressed and inoculated with C. albicans to induce oral candidiasis. PDT was performed on the tongue by the application of the photosensitizers and LED light (100 J cm(-2) -660 nm). Twenty-four hours and 7 days after treatments, microbiological evaluation was carried out by recovering C. albicans from the tongue of animals (CFU ml(-1) ). Then, mice were sacrificed and the tongues were surgically removed for histological and biomolecular analysis of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines. Data were analyzed by ANOVA followed by Tukey's post hoc test. ClAlP-NE-mediated PDT reduced 2.26 log10 of C. albicans recovered from the tongue when compared with the control group (P-L-) (P < 0.05). PDT did not promote adverse effects on the tongue tissue. Seven days after treatment, all animals were completely healthy. In summary, PDT mediated by chloro-aluminum phthalocyanine entrapped in cationic nanoemulsions was effective in reducing C. albicans recovered from the oral lesions of immunocompromised mice. PMID:26914185

  18. Stimulation of superoxide production increases fungicidal action of miconazole against Candida albicans biofilms

    PubMed Central

    De Cremer, Kaat; De Brucker, Katrijn; Staes, Ines; Peeters, Annelies; Van den Driessche, Freija; Coenye, Tom; Cammue, Bruno P. A.; Thevissen, Karin

    2016-01-01

    We performed a whole-transcriptome analysis of miconazole-treated Candida albicans biofilms, using RNA-sequencing. Our aim was to identify molecular pathways employed by biofilm cells of this pathogen to resist action of the commonly used antifungal miconazole. As expected, genes involved in sterol biosynthesis and genes encoding drug efflux pumps were highly induced in biofilm cells upon miconazole treatment. Other processes were affected as well, including the electron transport chain (ETC), of which eight components were transcriptionally downregulated. Within a diverse set of 17 inhibitors/inducers of the transcriptionally affected pathways, the ETC inhibitors acted most synergistically with miconazole against C. albicans biofilm cells. Synergy was not observed for planktonically growing C. albicans cultures or when biofilms were treated in oxygen-deprived conditions, pointing to a biofilm-specific oxygen-dependent tolerance mechanism. In line, a correlation between miconazole’s fungicidal action against C. albicans biofilm cells and the levels of superoxide radicals was observed, and confirmed both genetically and pharmacologically using a triple superoxide dismutase mutant and a superoxide dismutase inhibitor N-N′-diethyldithiocarbamate, respectively. Consequently, ETC inhibitors that result in mitochondrial dysfunction and affect production of reactive oxygen species can increase miconazole’s fungicidal activity against C. albicans biofilm cells. PMID:27272719

  19. Effect of Low-Level Laser therapy on the fungal proliferation of Candida albicans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carneiro, Vanda S. M.; Araújo, Natália C.; Menezes, Rebeca F. d.; Moreno, Lara M.; Santos-Neto, Alexandrino d. P.; Gerbi, Marleny Elizabeth M.

    2016-03-01

    Candida albicans plays an important role in triggering infections in HIV+ patients. The indiscriminate use of antifungals has led to resistance to Candida albicans, which requires new treatment alternatives for oral candidiasis. Low-level laser therapy promotes a considerable improvement in the healing of wounds and in curing illnesses caused by microorganisms. The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of laser radiation on the cell proliferation of Candida albicans in immunosuppressed patients. Six Candida albicans strains that had been isolated from immunosuppressed patients were divided into a control group and experimental groups, which received eight sessions of laser therapy (InGaAlP, λ685nm, P = 30mW, CW, Φ~6 mm and GaAlAs, λ830nm, P = 40mW, CW, Φ~6 mm) using dosimetries of 6J/cm2, 8J/cm2, 10J/cm2 and 12J/cm2 for each wavelength and power. The results were not statistically significant (Kruskal Wallis, p > 0.05), although the proliferation of Candida albicans was lower in some of the experimental groups. The dosimetry of 6J/cm2 (GaAlAs, λ830nm, P = 40mW) provided lower mean scores than the other groups for the growth of Candida. Further studies are required to confirm whetehr laser therapy is a viable option in the treatment of fungal infections.

  20. Endogenous nitric oxide accumulation is involved in the antifungal activity of Shikonin against Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Liao, Zebin; Yan, Yu; Dong, Huaihuai; Zhu, Zhenyu; Jiang, Yuanying; Cao, Yingying

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of nitric oxide (NO) in the antifungal activity of Shikonin (SK) against Candida albicans (C. albicans) and to clarify the underlying mechanism. The results showed that the NO donors S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) and L-arginine could enhance the antifungal activity of SK, whereas the NO production inhibitor Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) attenuated antifungal action. Using the fluorescent dye 3-amino,4-aminomethyl-2', 7-difluorescein, diacetate (DAF-FM DA), we found that the accumulation of NO in C. albicans was increased markedly by SK in a time- and dose-dependent manner. In addition, the results of real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) demonstrated that the transcription level of YHB1 in C. albicans was greatly increased upon incubation of SK. Consistently, the YHB1-null mutant (yhb1Δ/Δ) exhibited a higher susceptibility to SK than wild-type cells. In addition, although the transcription level of CTA4 in C. albicans was not significantly changed when exposed to SK, the CTA4-null mutant (cta4Δ/Δ) was more susceptible to SK. Collectively, SK is the agent found to execute its antifungal activity directly via endogenous NO accumulation, and NO-mediated damage is related to the suppression of YHB1 and the function of CTA4. PMID:27530748

  1. In vivo role of Candida albicans β-hexosaminidase (HEX1) in carbon scavenging

    PubMed Central

    Ruhela, Deepa; Kamthan, Mohan; Saha, Paramita; Majumdar, Subeer S; Datta, Kasturi; Abdin, Malik Zainul; Datta, Asis

    2015-01-01

    The capability to utilize of N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) as a carbon source is an important virulence attribute of Candida albicans. But there is a lack of information about the in vivo source of GlcNAc for the pathogen within the host environment. Here, we have characterized the GlcNAc-inducible β-hexosaminidase gene (HEX1) of C. albicans showing a role in carbon scavenging. In contrast to earlier studies, we have reported HEX1 to be a nonessential gene as shown by homozygous trisomy test. Virulence study in the systemic mouse murine model showed that Δhex1 strain is significantly less virulent in comparison to the wild-type strain. Moreover, Δhex1 strain also showed a higher susceptibility to peritoneal macrophages. In an attempt to determine possible substrates of Hex1, hyaluronic acid (HA) was treated with purified Hex1 enzyme. A significant release of GlcNAc was observed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis analysis suggesting HA degradation. Interestingly, immunohistochemistry analysis showed significant accumulation of HA in the mice kidney infected with the wild-type strain of C. albicans. Northern blot analysis showed that C. albicans HEX1 is expressed during mice renal colonization. Thus, C. albicans can obtain GlcNAc during organ colonization by secreting Hex1 via degradation of host HA. PMID:26177944

  2. Stimulation of superoxide production increases fungicidal action of miconazole against Candida albicans biofilms.

    PubMed

    De Cremer, Kaat; De Brucker, Katrijn; Staes, Ines; Peeters, Annelies; Van den Driessche, Freija; Coenye, Tom; Cammue, Bruno P A; Thevissen, Karin

    2016-01-01

    We performed a whole-transcriptome analysis of miconazole-treated Candida albicans biofilms, using RNA-sequencing. Our aim was to identify molecular pathways employed by biofilm cells of this pathogen to resist action of the commonly used antifungal miconazole. As expected, genes involved in sterol biosynthesis and genes encoding drug efflux pumps were highly induced in biofilm cells upon miconazole treatment. Other processes were affected as well, including the electron transport chain (ETC), of which eight components were transcriptionally downregulated. Within a diverse set of 17 inhibitors/inducers of the transcriptionally affected pathways, the ETC inhibitors acted most synergistically with miconazole against C. albicans biofilm cells. Synergy was not observed for planktonically growing C. albicans cultures or when biofilms were treated in oxygen-deprived conditions, pointing to a biofilm-specific oxygen-dependent tolerance mechanism. In line, a correlation between miconazole's fungicidal action against C. albicans biofilm cells and the levels of superoxide radicals was observed, and confirmed both genetically and pharmacologically using a triple superoxide dismutase mutant and a superoxide dismutase inhibitor N-N'-diethyldithiocarbamate, respectively. Consequently, ETC inhibitors that result in mitochondrial dysfunction and affect production of reactive oxygen species can increase miconazole's fungicidal activity against C. albicans biofilm cells. PMID:27272719

  3. Transcriptomics Analysis of Candida albicans Treated with Huanglian Jiedu Decoction Using RNA-seq.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qianqian; Gao, Lei; Tao, Maocan; Chen, Zhe; Yang, Xiaohong; Cao, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans is the major invasive fungal pathogen of humans, causing diseases ranging from superficial mucosal infections to disseminated, systemic infections that are often life-threatening. Resistance of C. albicans to antifungal agents and limited antifungal agents has potentially serious implications for management of infections. As a famous multiherb prescription in China, Huanglian Jiedu Decoction (HLJJD, Orengedokuto in Japan) is efficient against Trichophyton mentagrophytes and C. albicans. But the antifungal mechanism of HLJDD remains unclear. In this study, by using RNA-seq technique, we performed a transcriptomics analysis of gene expression changes for C. albicans under the treatment of HLJDD. A total of 6057 predicted protein-encoding genes were identified. By gene expression analysis, we obtained a total of 735 differentially expressed genes (DEGs), including 700 upregulated genes and 35 downregulated genes. Genes encoding multidrug transporters such as ABC transporter and MFS transporter were identified to be significantly upregulated. Meanwhile, by pathway enrichment analysis, we identified 26 significant pathways, in which pathways of DNA replication and transporter activity were mainly involved. These results might provide insights for the inhibition mechanism of HLJDD against C. albicans. PMID:27143984

  4. The Extracellular Matrix of Candida albicans Biofilms Impairs Formation of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Chad J; Cabezas-Olcoz, Jonathan; Kernien, John F; Wang, Steven X; Beebe, David J; Huttenlocher, Anna; Ansari, Hamayail; Nett, Jeniel E

    2016-09-01

    Neutrophils release extracellular traps (NETs) in response to planktonic C. albicans. These complexes composed of DNA, histones, and proteins inhibit Candida growth and dissemination. Considering the resilience of Candida biofilms to host defenses, we examined the neutrophil response to C. albicans during biofilm growth. In contrast to planktonic C. albicans, biofilms triggered negligible release of NETs. Time lapse imaging confirmed the impairment in NET release and revealed neutrophils adhering to hyphae and migrating on the biofilm. NET inhibition depended on an intact extracellular biofilm matrix as physical or genetic disruption of this component resulted in NET release. Biofilm inhibition of NETosis could not be overcome by protein kinase C activation via phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and was associated with suppression of neutrophil reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. The degree of impaired NET release correlated with resistance to neutrophil attack. The clinical relevance of the role for extracellular matrix in diminishing NET production was corroborated in vivo using a rat catheter model. The C. albicans pmr1Δ/Δ, defective in production of matrix mannan, appeared to elicit a greater abundance of NETs by scanning electron microscopy imaging, which correlated with a decreased fungal burden. Together, these findings show that C. albicans biofilms impair neutrophil response through an inhibitory pathway induced by the extracellular matrix. PMID:27622514

  5. Transcriptomics Analysis of Candida albicans Treated with Huanglian Jiedu Decoction Using RNA-seq

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qianqian; Gao, Lei; Tao, Maocan; Chen, Zhe; Yang, Xiaohong; Cao, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans is the major invasive fungal pathogen of humans, causing diseases ranging from superficial mucosal infections to disseminated, systemic infections that are often life-threatening. Resistance of C. albicans to antifungal agents and limited antifungal agents has potentially serious implications for management of infections. As a famous multiherb prescription in China, Huanglian Jiedu Decoction (HLJJD, Orengedokuto in Japan) is efficient against Trichophyton mentagrophytes and C. albicans. But the antifungal mechanism of HLJDD remains unclear. In this study, by using RNA-seq technique, we performed a transcriptomics analysis of gene expression changes for C. albicans under the treatment of HLJDD. A total of 6057 predicted protein-encoding genes were identified. By gene expression analysis, we obtained a total of 735 differentially expressed genes (DEGs), including 700 upregulated genes and 35 downregulated genes. Genes encoding multidrug transporters such as ABC transporter and MFS transporter were identified to be significantly upregulated. Meanwhile, by pathway enrichment analysis, we identified 26 significant pathways, in which pathways of DNA replication and transporter activity were mainly involved. These results might provide insights for the inhibition mechanism of HLJDD against C. albicans. PMID:27143984

  6. Menstrual Cycle

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pregnancy This information in Spanish ( en español ) The menstrual cycle Day 1 starts with the first day of ... drop around Day 25 . This signals the next menstrual cycle to begin. The egg will break apart and ...

  7. Reduced susceptibility of Candida albicans clinical isolates to azoles and detection of mutations in the ERG11 gene.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Yang, Hai-Fei; Liu, Yan-Yan; Xu, Xi-Hai; Ye, Ying; Li, Jia-Bin

    2013-12-01

    We investigated the susceptibility of Candida albicans isolated from clinic specimens to azole antifungal agents and estimated the association of the ERG11 mutations with azole resistance during recent 5years in China. In this study, novel mutations G346A, A434V, and L480F in ERG11 may be related to azole resistance in C. albicans. PMID:24070847

  8. Adherence of Candida albicans to human buccal epithelial cells: host-induced protein synthesis and signaling events.

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, A; Wadsworth, E; Calderone, R

    1995-01-01

    The synthesis of proteins by Candida albicans was studied following adherence of blastoconidia to human buccal epithelial cells (HBEC). Initially, labeling of HBEC, C. albicans, and HBEC-C. albicans with [35S]methionine was performed. After a 3-h incubation and prior to labeling with [35S]methionine, the cultures were treated with cycloheximide to prevent HBEC protein synthesis. The HBEC-C. albicans mixture as well as C. albicans and HBEC incubated separately were extracted with beta-mercaptoethanol (beta-ME). These extracts as well as the cell residue (solubilized by boiling with sodium dodecyl sulfate [SDS]) were examined by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. In comparison to cultures of C. albicans incubated without HBEC, proteins with molecular masses of approximately 52 to 56 kDa from beta-ME extracts and from SDS-solubilized cells were observed only from adhering cultures. In addition, unlabeled beta-ME extracts were electrotransferred to nitrocellulose and immunoblotted with antiphosphotyrosine antibodies to determine whether cell signaling events were occurring during adherence. Proteins with molecular masses of 54 and 60 kDa were recognized only in mixed cultures of C. albicans and HBEC. These data indicate that following adherence of C. albicans to HBEC, new Candida proteins are expressed. Further, these events are accompanied by the expression of signal proteins, presumably of Candida origin. PMID:7822023

  9. Farnesol biosynthesis in Candida albicans: cellular response to sterol inhibition by zaragozic acid B.

    PubMed

    Hornby, Jacob M; Kebaara, Bessie W; Nickerson, Kenneth W

    2003-07-01

    The dimorphic fungus Candida albicans produces farnesol as a quorum-sensing molecule that regulates cellular morphology. The biosynthetic origin of farnesol has been resolved by treating these cells with zaragozic acid B, a potent inhibitor of squalene synthase in the sterol biosynthetic pathway. Treatment with zaragozic acid B leads to an eightfold increase in the amount of farnesol produced by C. albicans. Furthermore, C. albicans cell extracts contain enzymatic activity to convert [(3)H]farnesyl pyrophosphate to [(3)H]farnesol. Many common antifungal antibiotics (e.g., zaragozic acids, azoles, and allylamines) target steps in sterol biosynthesis. We suggest that the fungicidal activity of zaragozic acid derives in large part from the accumulation of farnesol that accompanies the inhibition of sterol biosynthesis. PMID:12821501

  10. Oral Immunization Against Candidiasis Using Lactobacillus casei Displaying Enolase 1 from Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Shibasaki, Seiji; Karasaki, Miki; Tafuku, Senji; Aoki, Wataru; Sewaki, Tomomitsu; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Candidiasis is a common fungal infection that is prevalent in immunocompromised individuals. In this study, an oral vaccine against Candida albicans was developed by using the molecular display approach. Enolase 1 protein (Eno1p) of C. albicans was expressed on the Lactobacillus casei cell surface by using poly-gamma-glutamic acid synthetase complex A from Bacillus subtilis as an anchoring protein. The Eno1p-displaying L. casei cells were used to immunize mice, which were later challenged with a lethal dose of C. albicans. The data indicated that the vaccine elicited a strong IgG response and increased the survival rate of the vaccinated mice. Furthermore, L. casei acted as a potent adjuvant and induced high antibody titers that were comparable to those induced by strong adjuvants such as the cholera toxin. Overall, the molecular display method can be used to rapidly develop vaccines that can be conveniently administered and require minimal processing. PMID:25853077

  11. Modulation of Candida albicans attachment to human epithelial cells by bacteria and carbohydrates.

    PubMed Central

    Centeno, A; Davis, C P; Cohen, M S; Warren, M M

    1983-01-01

    The effects of carbohydrates (mannose and dextrose). Escherichia coli 07KL. and Klebsiella pneumoniae on Candida albicans attachment to epithelial cells was studied. Dextrose had no effect on yeast attachment to epithelial cells. Conversely, mannose significantly decreased both yeast and piliated bacterial attachment (E. coli 07KL, heavily piliated K. pneumoniae) whereas having no effect on nonpiliated K. pneumoniae attachment to epithelial cells. The number of yeasts attaching to epithelial cells was enhanced by preincubation of epithelial cells with piliated strains of bacteria, whereas preincubation with nonpiliated strains of bacteria had no effect on yeast attachment. Scanning electron microscopy showed that piliated bacteria and yeasts were juxtaposed on the epithelial cell surface. These data suggest that certain piliated strains of bacteria can enhance C. albicans attachment to epithelial cells and that type 1 pili of bacteria can be a factor in the enhanced attachment of C. albicans to epithelial cells. Images PMID:6132878

  12. The Role of Autophagy-Related Proteins in Candida albicans Infections.

    PubMed

    Tam, Jenny M; Mansour, Michael K; Acharya, Mridu; Sokolovska, Anna; Timmons, Allison K; Lacy-Hulbert, Adam; Vyas, Jatin M

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy plays an important role in maintaining cell homeostasis by providing nutrients during periods of starvation and removing damaged organelles from the cytoplasm. A marker in the autophagic process is the reversible conjugation of LC3, a membrane scaffolding protein, to double membrane autophagosomes. Recently, a role for LC3 in the elimination of pathogenic bacteria and fungi, including Candida albicans (C. albicans), was demonstrated, but these organisms reside in single membrane phagosomes. This process is distinct from autophagy and is termed LC3-associated phagocytosis (LAP). This review will detail the hallmarks of LAP that distinguish it from classical autophagy and review the role of autophagy proteins in host response to C. albicans and other pathogenic fungi. PMID:27043636

  13. Mice with persistent gastrointestinal Candida albicans as a model for antifungal therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, C; Guentzel, M N

    1982-01-01

    Persistent infection of the gastrointestinal tract of CFW mice with Candida albicans was produced by the oral-intragastric inoculation of 6-day-old infants. Other intraabdominal organs (liver, kidneys, and spleen) were usually free of the organism in survivors at 20 days of age. However, all survivors retained high levels of the organism in the stomach and intestinal tract at 30 days of age. The possible utility of these persisting C. albicans infections of the gastrointestinal tract for the study of the efficacy of short-term antifungal therapy was studied. Drug treatment was initiated for a 2-week period when the survivors were 15 to 19 days old. Some representative antifungal agents in current use (i.e., amphotericin B, 5-fluorocytosine, and miconazole) effected significant reductions in the numbers of C. albicans in homogenates of gastrointestinal organs. PMID:7044301

  14. Eugenol and thymol, alone or in combination, induce morphological alterations in the envelope of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Braga, P C; Sasso, M Dal; Culici, M; Alfieri, M

    2007-09-01

    The envelope of Candida albicans, with its outermost array of macromolecules protruding towards the environment, is pivotal to the expression of major virulence factors such as adhesiveness, and the morphological transition to hyphal form. We tested the anticandidal activity of eugenol, main component of clove oil, and thymol, main component of thyme oil, alone or in combination, by investigating their ability to interfere with the architecture of the envelope of C. albicans. Both molecules alterated the morphogenesis of the envelope, but the effects of thymol were more pronounced than those of eugenol. Certain combinations of the two molecules led to a synergistic effect, which is interesting in the view of potentiating their inhibition of C. albicans colonisation and infectiousness. PMID:17590533

  15. Novel Regulatory Mechanisms of Pathogenicity and Virulence to Combat MDR in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Hameed, Saif; Fatima, Zeeshan

    2013-01-01

    Continuous deployment of antifungals in treating infections caused by dimorphic opportunistic pathogen Candida albicans has led to the emergence of drug resistance resulting in cross-resistance to many unrelated drugs, a phenomenon termed multidrug resistance (MDR). Despite the current understanding of major factors which contribute to MDR mechanisms, there are many lines of evidence suggesting that it is a complex interplay of multiple factors which may be contributed by still unknown mechanisms. Coincidentally with the increased usage of antifungal drugs, the number of reports for antifungal drug resistance has also increased which further highlights the need for understanding novel molecular mechanisms which can be explored to combat MDR, namely, ROS, iron, hypoxia, lipids, morphogenesis, and transcriptional and signaling networks. Considering the worrying evolution of MDR and significance of C. albicans being the most prevalent human fungal pathogen, this review summarizes these new regulatory mechanisms which could be exploited to prevent MDR development in C. albicans as established from recent studies. PMID:24163696

  16. Effect of ferrocene-substituted porphyrin RL-91 on Candida albicans biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Lippert, Rainer; Vojnovic, Sandra; Mitrovic, Aleksandra; Jux, Norbert; Ivanović-Burmazović, Ivana; Vasiljevic, Branka; Stankovic, Nada

    2014-08-01

    Ferrocene-substituted porphyrin RL-91 exhibits antifungal activity against opportune human pathogen Candida albicans. RL-91 efficiently inhibits growth of both planktonic C. albicans cells and cells within biofilms without photoactivation. The minimal inhibitory concentration for plankton form (PMIC) was established to be 100 μg/mL and the same concentration killed 80% of sessile cells in the mature biofilm (SMIC80). Furthermore PMIC of RL-91 efficiently prevents C. albicans biofilm formation. RL-91 is cytotoxic for human fibroblasts in vitro in concentration of 10 μg/mL, however it does not cause hemolysis in concentrations of up to 50 μg/mL. These findings open possibility for application of RL-91 as an antifungal agent for external antibiofilm treatment of medical devices as well as a scaffold for further development of porphyrin based systemic antifungals. PMID:24929472

  17. Artemisinins, new miconazole potentiators resulting in increased activity against Candida albicans biofilms.

    PubMed

    De Cremer, Kaat; Lanckacker, Ellen; Cools, Tanne L; Bax, Marijke; De Brucker, Katrijn; Cos, Paul; Cammue, Bruno P A; Thevissen, Karin

    2015-01-01

    Mucosal biofilm-related fungal infections are very common, and the incidence of recurrent oral and vulvovaginal candidiasis is significant. As resistance to azoles (the preferred treatment) is occurring, we aimed at identifying compounds that increase the activity of miconazole against Candida albicans biofilms. We screened 1,600 compounds of a drug-repositioning library in combination with a subinhibitory concentration of miconazole. Synergy between the best identified potentiators and miconazole was characterized by checkerboard analyses and fractional inhibitory concentration indices. Hexachlorophene, pyrvinium pamoate, and artesunate act synergistically with miconazole in affecting C. albicans biofilms. Synergy was most pronounced for artesunate and structural homologues thereof. No synergistic effect could be observed between artesunate and fluconazole, caspofungin, or amphotericin B. Our data reveal enhancement of the antibiofilm activity of miconazole by artesunate, pointing to potential combination therapy consisting of miconazole and artesunate to treat C. albicans biofilm-related infections. PMID:25367916

  18. In vitro effects of glycyrrhetinic acid on the growth of clinical isolates of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Pellati, Donatella; Fiore, Cristina; Armanini, Decio; Rassu, Mario; Bertoloni, Giulio

    2009-04-01

    Compounds derived from Glycyrrhiza glabra L. root have been used widely for centuries for their numerous therapeutic properties. The present study aimed to test the in vitro activity against Candida albicans strains of the compound 18-beta glycyrrhetinic acid (18-beta GA), derived from the root of Glycyrrhiza species. This antimicrobial activity was assessed using the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS) method on C. albicans strains that were isolated from patients with recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis (RVVC). The in vitro growth of the C. albicans strains was markedly reduced, in a pH-dependent manner, by relatively low doses (6.2 microg/mL) of 18-beta GA. The results demonstrate that 18-beta GA is a promising biological alternative for the topical treatment of recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis (RVVC). PMID:19067381

  19. Candida arthritis: cellular immune responses of synovial fluid and peripheral blood lymphocytes to Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Hermann, E; Mayet, W J; Klein, O; Lohse, A W; Trautwein, C; Michiels, I; Poralla, T; Meyer zum Büschenfelde, K H

    1991-01-01

    A case of septic Candida albicans arthritis of the knee in a patient with systemic candidiasis is presented. Systemic and intra-articular cellular immune responses to C albicans and various bacterial antigens were monitored for 15 weeks. It is shown that the candida induced blastogenesis of synovial fluid lymphocytes was much more stimulated than that of peripheral blood lymphocytes, and that the proportion of activated cells expressing HLA class II antigens was markedly increased in the synovial fluid. Strong cellular immune responses to Candida albicans could still be shown many weeks after the synovial fluid aspirates had become sterile. For the first time synovial fluid derived, CD4 positive T lymphocyte clones with specificity for candida antigens were characterised and further propagated in vitro. Images PMID:1720301

  20. IL-33 Priming Enhances Peritoneal Macrophage Activity in Response to Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Tran, Vuvi G; Cho, Hong R; Kwon, Byungsuk

    2014-08-01

    IL-33 is a member of the IL-1 cytokine family and plays a role in the host defense against bacteria, viruses, and fungi. In this study, we investigated the function of IL-33 and its receptor in in vitro macrophage responses to Candida albicans. Our results demonstrate that pre-sensitization of isolated peritoneal macrophages with IL-33 enhanced their pro-inflammatory cytokine production and phagocytic activity in response to C. albicans. These macrophage activities were entirely dependent on the ST2-MyD88 signaling pathway. In addition, pre-sensitization with IL-33 also increased ROS production and the subsequent killing ability of macrophages following C. albicans challenge. These results indicate that IL-33 may increase anti-fungal activity against Candida through macrophage-mediated resistance mechanisms. PMID:25177252

  1. The Role of Autophagy-Related Proteins in Candida albicans Infections

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Jenny M.; Mansour, Michael K.; Acharya, Mridu; Sokolovska, Anna; Timmons, Allison K.; Lacy-Hulbert, Adam; Vyas, Jatin M.

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy plays an important role in maintaining cell homeostasis by providing nutrients during periods of starvation and removing damaged organelles from the cytoplasm. A marker in the autophagic process is the reversible conjugation of LC3, a membrane scaffolding protein, to double membrane autophagosomes. Recently, a role for LC3 in the elimination of pathogenic bacteria and fungi, including Candida albicans (C. albicans), was demonstrated, but these organisms reside in single membrane phagosomes. This process is distinct from autophagy and is termed LC3-associated phagocytosis (LAP). This review will detail the hallmarks of LAP that distinguish it from classical autophagy and review the role of autophagy proteins in host response to C. albicans and other pathogenic fungi. PMID:27043636

  2. Oral Immunization Against Candidiasis Using Lactobacillus casei Displaying Enolase 1 from Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Shibasaki, Seiji; Karasaki, Miki; Tafuku, Senji; Aoki, Wataru; Sewaki, Tomomitsu; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2014-09-01

    Candidiasis is a common fungal infection that is prevalent in immunocompromised individuals. In this study, an oral vaccine against Candida albicans was developed by using the molecular display approach. Enolase 1 protein (Eno1p) of C. albicans was expressed on the Lactobacillus casei cell surface by using poly-gamma-glutamic acid synthetase complex A from Bacillus subtilis as an anchoring protein. The Eno1p-displaying L. casei cells were used to immunize mice, which were later challenged with a lethal dose of C. albicans. The data indicated that the vaccine elicited a strong IgG response and increased the survival rate of the vaccinated mice. Furthermore, L. casei acted as a potent adjuvant and induced high antibody titers that were comparable to those induced by strong adjuvants such as the cholera toxin. Overall, the molecular display method can be used to rapidly develop vaccines that can be conveniently administered and require minimal processing. PMID:25853077

  3. Effects of simulated microgravity by RCCS on the biological features of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wenjun; Xu, Bingxin; Yi, Yong; Huang, Yuling; Li, Xiao-Ou; Jiang, Fuquan; Zhou, Jinlian; Zhang, Jianzhong; Cui, Yan

    2014-01-01

    During the spaceflight, a wide variety of microorganisms may be carried to the outer space by astronauts and aviation component. The yeast Candida albicans is an important opportunistic pathogen responsible for a variety of cutaneous and systemic human infections in human body, and the yeast cell itself could be affected by various stressful environmental factors including the weightless environment. We evaluated the effects of simulated microgravity on biological features of Candida albicans using the rotary cell culture system (RCCS). The growth curves of Candida albicans cultured in RCCS were recorded by spectrophotometer, the morphogenic switches were observed by optical microscope, and the viability of cells exposed to the various concentrations of fluconazole solution was assayed by flow cytometry at 7th, 14th and 21st day of experiment. The results showed that Candida albicans SC5314 under modeled microgravity were manifested as the growth curves leftward-shifted, lag phase shortened, along with logarithmic phase and stationary phase forwarded (P < 0.05). The simulated microgravity increased the growth rate and mycelia formation of Candida albicans. A statistically significant decrease in viability was detected in cells cultured for 7 d, 14 d and 21 d in group of simulated microgravity compared with the control group (P < 0.05). The increase of exposure time to simulate microgravity resulted in the decrease of viability of cells accordingly in same drug concentration compared with the control group. The study demonstrated that the three weeks' simulated microgravity in RCCS had a noticeable affect on the growth status of mycelia and spores and the morphogenic switches of Candida albicans, meanwhile, the yeast cells under simulated microgravity showed an increased antifungal susceptibility to fluconazole. PMID:25120754

  4. Rapid Detection of Candida albicans by Polymerase Spiral Reaction Assay in Clinical Blood Samples

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xiaoqun; Dong, Derong; Bian, Lihong; Zou, Dayang; He, Xiaoming; Ao, Da; Yang, Zhan; Huang, Simo; Liu, Ningwei; Liu, Wei; Huang, Liuyu

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans is the most common human yeast pathogen which causes mucosal infections and invasive fungal diseases. Early detection of this pathogen is needed to guide preventative and therapeutic treatment. The aim of this study was to establish a polymerase spiral reaction (PSR) assay that rapidly and accurately detects C. albicans and to assess the clinical applicability of PSR-based diagnostic testing. Internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2), a region between 5.8S and 28S fungal ribosomal DNA, was used as the target sequence. Four primers were designed for amplification of ITS2 with the PSR method, which was evaluated using real time turbidity monitoring and visual detection using a pH indicator. Fourteen non-C. albicans yeast strains were negative for detection, which indicated the specificity of PSR assay was 100%. A 10-fold serial dilution of C. albicans genomic DNA was subjected to PSR and conventional polimerase chain reaction (PCR) to compare their sensitivities. The detection limit of PSR was 6.9 pg/μl within 1 h, 10-fold higher than that of PCR (69.0 pg/μl). Blood samples (n = 122) were collected from intensive care unit and hematological patients with proven or suspected C. albicans infection at two hospitals in Beijing, China. Both PSR assay and the culture method were used to analyze the samples. Of the 122 clinical samples, 34 were identified as positive by PSR. The result was consistent with those obtained by the culture method. In conclusion, a novel and effective C. albicans detection assay was developed that has a great potential for clinical screening and point-of-care testing. PMID:27379048

  5. Sensitization of Candida albicans biofilms to fluconazole by terpenoids of plant origin.

    PubMed

    Doke, Sonali Kashinath; Raut, Jayant Shankar; Dhawale, Shashikant; Karuppayil, Sankunny Mohan

    2014-01-01

    Infections associated with the biofilms of Candida albicans are a challenge to antifungal treatment. Combinatorial therapy involving plant molecules with antifungal drugs would be an effective complementary approach against drug-resistant Candida biofilms. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of three bioactive terpenoids (carvacrol, eugenol and thymol) in combination with fluconazole against planktonic cells, biofilm development and mature biofilms of C. albicans. Activities of the selected molecules were tested using a microplate-based methodology, while their combinations with fluconazole were performed in a checkerboard format. Biofilms were quantitated by XTT-metabolic assay and confirmed by microscopic observations. Combinations of carvacrol and eugenol with fluconazole were found synergistic against planktonic growth of C. albicans, while that of thymol with fluconazole did not have any interaction. Biofilm development and mature biofilms were highly resistant to fluconazole, but susceptible to three terpenoids. Sensitization of cells by sub-inhibitory concentrations of carvacrol and eugenol resulted in prevention of biofilm formation at low fluconazole concentrations, i.e. 0.032 and 0.002 mg ml(-1), respectively. Addition of thymol could not potentiate activity of fluconazole against biofilm formation by C. albicans. Fractional inhibitory concentration indices (FICI) for carvacrol-fluconazole and eugenol-fluconazole combinations for biofilm formation were 0.311 and 0.25, respectively. The FICI value of 1.003 indicated a status of indifference for the combination of thymol and fluconazole against biofilm formation. Eugenol and thymol combinations with fluconazole did not have useful interaction against mature biofilms of C. albicans, but the presence of 0.5 mg ml(-1) of carvacrol caused inhibition of mature biofilms at a significantly low concentration (i.e. 0.032 mg ml(-1)) of fluconazole. The study indicated that carvacrol and eugenol

  6. Thiazolidinedione-8 Alters Symbiotic Relationship in C. albicans-S. mutans Dual Species Biofilm.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Mark; Ginsburg, Isaac; Al-Quntar, Abed; Steinberg, Doron

    2016-01-01

    The small molecule, thiazolidinedione-8 (S-8) was shown to impair biofilm formation of various microbial pathogens, including the fungus Candida albicans and Streptococcus mutans. Previously, we have evaluated the specific molecular mode of S-8 action against C. albicans biofilm-associated pathogenicity. In this study we investigated the influence of S-8 on dual species, C. albicans-S. mutans biofilm. We show that in the presence of S-8 a reduction of the co-species biofilm formation occurred with a major effect on C. albicans. Biofilm biomass and exopolysaccharide (EPS) production were significantly reduced by S-8. Moreover, the agent caused oxidative stress associated with a strong induction of reactive oxygen species and hydrogen peroxide uptake inhibition by a mixed biofilm. In addition, S-8 altered symbiotic relationship between these species by a complex mechanism. Streptococcal genes associated with quorum sensing (QS) (comDE and luxS), EPS production (gtfBCD and gbpB), as well as genes related to protection against oxidative stress (nox and sodA) were markedly upregulated by S-8. In contrast, fungal genes related to hyphae formation (hwp1), adhesion (als3), hydrophobicity (csh1), and oxidative stress response (sod1, sod2, and cat1) were downregulated in the presence of S-8. In addition, ywp1 gene associated with yeast form of C. albicans was induced by S-8, which is correlated with appearance of mostly yeast cells in S-8 treated dual species biofilms. We concluded that S-8 disturbs symbiotic balance between C. albicans and S. mutans in dual species biofilm. PMID:26904013

  7. In Vitro and In Vivo Antifungal Activity of Lichochalcone-A against Candida albicans Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Seleem, Dalia; Benso, Bruna; Noguti, Juliana; Pardi, Vanessa; Murata, Ramiro Mendonça

    2016-01-01

    Oral candidiasis (OC) is an opportunistic fungal infection with high prevalence among immunocompromised patients. Candida albicans is the most common fungal pathogen responsible for OC, often manifested in denture stomatitis and oral thrush. Virulence factors, such as biofilms formation and secretion of proteolytic enzymes, are key components in the pathogenicity of C. albicans. Given the limited number of available antifungal therapies and the increase in antifungal resistance, demand the search for new safe and effective antifungal treatments. Lichochalcone-A is a polyphenol natural compound, known for its broad protective activities, as an antimicrobial agent. In this study, we investigated the antifungal activity of lichochalcone-A against C. albicans biofilms both in vitro and in vivo. Lichochalcone-A (625 μM; equivalent to 10x MIC) significantly reduced C. albicans (MYA 2876) biofilm growth compared to the vehicle control group (1% ethanol), as indicated by the reduction in the colony formation unit (CFU)/ml/g of biofilm dry weight. Furthermore, proteolytic enzymatic activities of proteinases and phospholipases, secreted by C. albicans were significantly decreased in the lichochalcone-A treated biofilms. In vivo model utilized longitudinal imaging of OC fungal load using a bioluminescent-engineered C. albicans (SKCa23-ActgLUC) and coelenterazine substrate. Mice treated with lichochalcone-A topical treatments exhibited a significant reduction in total photon flux over 4 and 5 days post-infection. Similarly, ex vivo analysis of tongue samples, showed a significant decrease in CFU/ml/mg in tongue tissue sample of lichochalcone-A treated group, which suggest the potential of lichochalcone-A as a novel antifungal agent for future clinical use. PMID:27284694

  8. Transcriptional regulation of drug-resistance genes in Candida albicans biofilms in response to antifungals.

    PubMed

    Watamoto, T; Samaranayake, L P; Egusa, H; Yatani, H; Seneviratne, C J

    2011-09-01

    Biofilm formation is a major virulence attribute of Candida albicans and is directly associated with therapeutic failure. One method by which Candida acquires antifungal resistance is the expression of drug-resistance genes. This study aimed to evaluate the transcriptional regulation of several genes associated with antifungal resistance of C. albicans under planktonic, recently adhered and biofilm growth modes and in C. albicans biofilms in response to antifungal agents. Initially, the antifungal susceptibility of C. albicans cultures in different growth modes was evaluated by standard antifungal susceptibility testing. Next, to assess CDR1, CDR2, MDR1, ERG11, FKS1 and PIL1 expression, RNA was harvested from cells in each growth mode, and from biofilms after drug treatment, and subjected to quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR). Biofilm C. albicans was more resistant to antifungals than recently adhered cells and stationary-phase planktonic cultures. Transcriptional expression of CDR1, CDR2, MDR1, ERG11 and FKS1 was lower in recently adhered C. albicans than in the stationary-phase planktonic cultures. In contrast, PIL1 levels were significantly increased in recently adhered and biofilm modes of growth. The expression of MDR1 in biofilms greatly increased on challenge with amphotericin B but not with the other drugs tested (P<0.01). ERG11 was significantly upregulated by ketoconazole (P<0.01). Caspofungin and amphotericin B significantly upregulated FKS1 expression, whereas they significantly downregulated PIL1 expression (P<0.01). These results indicate that the expression of drug-resistance genes is associated with higher drug resistance of Candida biofilms, and lay a foundation for future large-scale genome-wide expression analysis. PMID:21474609

  9. In Vitro and In Vivo Activities of Pterostilbene against Candida albicans Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Li, De-Dong; Zhao, Lan-Xue; Mylonakis, Eleftherios; Hu, Gan-Hai; Zou, Yong; Huang, Tong-Kun; Yan, Lan

    2014-01-01

    Pterostilbene (PTE) is a stilbene-derived phytoalexin that originates from several natural plant sources. In this study, we evaluated the activity of PTE against Candida albicans biofilms and explored the underlying mechanisms. In 2,3-bis-(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide (XTT) reduction assays, biofilm biomass measurement, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy, we found that ≤16 μg/ml PTE had a significant effect against C. albicans biofilms in vitro, while it had no fungicidal effect on planktonic C. albicans cells, which suggested a unique antibiofilm effect of PTE. Then we found that PTE could inhibit biofilm formation and destroy the maintenance of mature biofilms. At 4 μg/ml, PTE decreased cellular surface hydrophobicity (CSH) and suppressed hyphal formation. Gene expression microarrays and real-time reverse transcription-PCR showed that exposure of C. albicans to 16 μg/ml PTE altered the expression of genes that function in morphological transition, ergosterol biosynthesis, oxidoreductase activity, and cell surface and protein unfolding processes (heat shock proteins). Filamentation-related genes, especially those regulated by the Ras/cyclic AMP (cAMP) pathway, including ECE1, ALS3, HWP1, HGC1, and RAS1 itself, were downregulated upon PTE treatment, indicating that the antibiofilm effect of PTE was related to the Ras/cAMP pathway. Then, we found that the addition of exogenous cAMP reverted the PTE-induced filamentous growth defect. Finally, with a rat central venous catheter infection model, we confirmed the in vivo activity of PTE against C. albicans biofilms. Collectively, PTE had strong activities against C. albicans biofilms both in vitro and in vivo, and these activities were associated with the Ras/cAMP pathway. PMID:24514088

  10. Human submandibular-sublingual saliva promotes adhesion of Candida albicans to polymethylmethacrylate.

    PubMed Central

    Edgerton, M; Scannapieco, F A; Reddy, M S; Levine, M J

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify components of saliva that interact with Candida albicans in solution and that may modulate adhesion to dental acrylic (polymethylmethacrylate [PMMA]) surfaces. Saliva-derived pellicles extracted from C. albicans blastoconidia and hyphal-form cells mixed with fresh human submandibular-sublingual saliva (HSMSL) contained predominantly high- and low-molecular-weight mucins (MG1 and MG2, respectively). In contrast, few components from fresh human parotid saliva were adsorbed to yeast cells. Coating PMMA beads with HSMSL significantly enhanced (10-fold) adhesion of both growth forms of C. albicans compared with human parotid saliva (2-fold), suggesting a role for mucins in adhesion. HSMSL-enhanced adhesion was completely abolished by preadsorbing HSMSL with either blastoconidia or hyphal-form cells prior to coating PMMA. However, coating PMMA with purified salivary mucins or the addition of mucin to preadsorbed saliva did not enhance or restore adhesion to levels found with fresh HSMSL. Adhesion assays employing guanidine-treated fresh HSMSL showed a complete lack of Candida binding, suggesting that subjecting HSMSL to dissociating conditions may alter a property of salivary mucins crucial for C. albicans adhesion. Protease and glycosidase treatment of yeast cells significantly reduced adhesion to HSMSL-coated PMMA. In addition, preincubation of C. albicans with mannose and galactose inhibited adhesion to HSMSL-coated PMMA. These results suggest that mucins may play a role in C. albicans adhesion to saliva-coated PMMA and that a glycoprotein on the yeast surface may be involved in these events. Images PMID:8500903

  11. Thiazolidinedione-8 Alters Symbiotic Relationship in C. albicans-S. mutans Dual Species Biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Mark; Ginsburg, Isaac; Al-Quntar, Abed; Steinberg, Doron

    2016-01-01

    The small molecule, thiazolidinedione-8 (S-8) was shown to impair biofilm formation of various microbial pathogens, including the fungus Candida albicans and Streptococcus mutans. Previously, we have evaluated the specific molecular mode of S-8 action against C. albicans biofilm-associated pathogenicity. In this study we investigated the influence of S-8 on dual species, C. albicans-S. mutans biofilm. We show that in the presence of S-8 a reduction of the co-species biofilm formation occurred with a major effect on C. albicans. Biofilm biomass and exopolysaccharide (EPS) production were significantly reduced by S-8. Moreover, the agent caused oxidative stress associated with a strong induction of reactive oxygen species and hydrogen peroxide uptake inhibition by a mixed biofilm. In addition, S-8 altered symbiotic relationship between these species by a complex mechanism. Streptococcal genes associated with quorum sensing (QS) (comDE and luxS), EPS production (gtfBCD and gbpB), as well as genes related to protection against oxidative stress (nox and sodA) were markedly upregulated by S-8. In contrast, fungal genes related to hyphae formation (hwp1), adhesion (als3), hydrophobicity (csh1), and oxidative stress response (sod1, sod2, and cat1) were downregulated in the presence of S-8. In addition, ywp1 gene associated with yeast form of C. albicans was induced by S-8, which is correlated with appearance of mostly yeast cells in S-8 treated dual species biofilms. We concluded that S-8 disturbs symbiotic balance between C. albicans and S. mutans in dual species biofilm. PMID:26904013

  12. Assessment of antifungal activity of herbal and conventional toothpastes against clinical isolates of Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Adwan, Ghaleb; Salameh, Yousef; Adwan, Kamel; Barakat, Ali

    2012-01-01

    Objective To detect the anticandidal activity of nine toothpastes containing sodium fluoride, sodium monofluorophosphate and herbal extracts as an active ingredients against 45 oral and non oral Candida albicans (C. albicans) isolates. Methods The antifungal activity of these toothpaste formulations was determined using a standard agar well diffusion method. Statistical analysis was performed using a statistical package, SPSS windows version 15, by applying mean values using one-way ANOVA with post-hoc least square differences (LSD) method. A P value of less than 0.05 was considered significant. Results All toothpastes studied in our experiments were effective in inhibiting the growth of all C. albicans isolates. The highest anticandidal activity was obtained from toothpaste that containing both herbal extracts and sodium fluoride as active ingredients, while the lowest activity was obtained from toothpaste containing sodium monofluorophosphate as an active ingredient. Antifungal activity of Parodontax toothpaste showed a significant difference (P< 0.001) against C. albicans isolates compared to toothpastes containing sodium fluoride or herbal products. Conclusions In the present study, it has been demonstrated that toothpaste containing both herbal extracts and sodium fluoride as active ingredients are more effective in control of C. albicans, while toothpaste that containing monofluorophosphate as an active ingredient is less effective against C. albicans. Some herbal toothpaste formulations studied in our experiments, appear to be equally effective as the fluoride dental formulations and it can be used as an alternative to conventional formulations for individuals who have an interest in naturally-based products. Our results may provide invaluable information for dental professionals. PMID:23569933

  13. Inhibition of Candida albicans biofilm formation and modulation of gene expression by probiotic cells and supernatant.

    PubMed

    James, K M; MacDonald, K W; Chanyi, R M; Cadieux, P A; Burton, J P

    2016-04-01

    Oral candidiasis is a disease caused by opportunistic species of Candida that normally reside on human mucosal surfaces. The transition of Candida from budding yeast to filamentous hyphae allows for covalent attachment to oral epithelial cells, followed by biofilm formation, invasion and tissue damage. In this study, combinations of Lactobacillus plantarum SD5870, Lactobacillus helveticus CBS N116411 and Streptococcus salivarius DSM 14685 were assessed for their ability to inhibit the formation of and disrupt Candida albicans biofilms. Co-incubation with probiotic supernatants under hyphae-inducing conditions reduced C. albicans biofilm formation by >75 % in all treatment groups. Likewise, combinations of live probiotics reduced biofilm formation of C. albicans by >67 %. When live probiotics or their supernatants were overlaid on preformed C. albicans biofilms, biofilm size was reduced by >63 and >65 % respectively. Quantitative real-time PCR results indicated that the combined supernatants of SD5870 and CBS N116411 significantly reduced the expression of several C. albicans genes involved in the yeast-hyphae transition: ALS3 (adhesin/invasin) by 70 % (P < 0.0001), EFG1 (hyphae-specific gene activator) by 47 % (P = 0.0061), SAP5 (secreted protease) by 49 % (P < 0.0001) and HWP1 (hyphal wall protein critical to biofilm formation) by >99 % (P < 0.0001). These findings suggest the combination of L. plantarum SD5870, L. helveticus CBS N116411 and S. salivarius DSM 14685 is effective at both preventing the formation of and removing preformed C. albicans biofilms. Our novel results point to the downregulation of several Candida genes critical to the yeast-hyphae transition, biofilm formation, tissue invasion and cellular damage. PMID:26847045

  14. In Vitro and In Vivo Antifungal Activity of Lichochalcone-A against Candida albicans Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Seleem, Dalia; Benso, Bruna; Noguti, Juliana; Pardi, Vanessa; Murata, Ramiro Mendonça

    2016-01-01

    Oral candidiasis (OC) is an opportunistic fungal infection with high prevalence among immunocompromised patients. Candida albicans is the most common fungal pathogen responsible for OC, often manifested in denture stomatitis and oral thrush. Virulence factors, such as biofilms formation and secretion of proteolytic enzymes, are key components in the pathogenicity of C. albicans. Given the limited number of available antifungal therapies and the increase in antifungal resistance, demand the search for new safe and effective antifungal treatments. Lichochalcone-A is a polyphenol natural compound, known for its broad protective activities, as an antimicrobial agent. In this study, we investigated the antifungal activity of lichochalcone-A against C. albicans biofilms both in vitro and in vivo. Lichochalcone-A (625 μM; equivalent to 10x MIC) significantly reduced C. albicans (MYA 2876) biofilm growth compared to the vehicle control group (1% ethanol), as indicated by the reduction in the colony formation unit (CFU)/ml/g of biofilm dry weight. Furthermore, proteolytic enzymatic activities of proteinases and phospholipases, secreted by C. albicans were significantly decreased in the lichochalcone-A treated biofilms. In vivo model utilized longitudinal imaging of OC fungal load using a bioluminescent-engineered C. albicans (SKCa23-ActgLUC) and coelenterazine substrate. Mice treated with lichochalcone-A topical treatments exhibited a significant reduction in total photon flux over 4 and 5 days post-infection. Similarly, ex vivo analysis of tongue samples, showed a significant decrease in CFU/ml/mg in tongue tissue sample of lichochalcone-A treated group, which suggest the potential of lichochalcone-A as a novel antifungal agent for future clinical use. PMID:27284694

  15. Rapid Detection of Candida albicans by Polymerase Spiral Reaction Assay in Clinical Blood Samples.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiaoqun; Dong, Derong; Bian, Lihong; Zou, Dayang; He, Xiaoming; Ao, Da; Yang, Zhan; Huang, Simo; Liu, Ningwei; Liu, Wei; Huang, Liuyu

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans is the most common human yeast pathogen which causes mucosal infections and invasive fungal diseases. Early detection of this pathogen is needed to guide preventative and therapeutic treatment. The aim of this study was to establish a polymerase spiral reaction (PSR) assay that rapidly and accurately detects C. albicans and to assess the clinical applicability of PSR-based diagnostic testing. Internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2), a region between 5.8S and 28S fungal ribosomal DNA, was used as the target sequence. Four primers were designed for amplification of ITS2 with the PSR method, which was evaluated using real time turbidity monitoring and visual detection using a pH indicator. Fourteen non-C. albicans yeast strains were negative for detection, which indicated the specificity of PSR assay was 100%. A 10-fold serial dilution of C. albicans genomic DNA was subjected to PSR and conventional polimerase chain reaction (PCR) to compare their sensitivities. The detection limit of PSR was 6.9 pg/μl within 1 h, 10-fold higher than that of PCR (69.0 pg/μl). Blood samples (n = 122) were collected from intensive care unit and hematological patients with proven or suspected C. albicans infection at two hospitals in Beijing, China. Both PSR assay and the culture method were used to analyze the samples. Of the 122 clinical samples, 34 were identified as positive by PSR. The result was consistent with those obtained by the culture method. In conclusion, a novel and effective C. albicans detection assay was developed that has a great potential for clinical screening and point-of-care testing. PMID:27379048

  16. Microsatellite typing identifies the major clades of the human pathogen Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Chávez-Galarza, Julio; Pais, Célia; Sampaio, Paula

    2010-07-01

    Candida albicans population studies showed that this species could be divided into sub-groups of closely related strains, designated by clades. Since the emergence of microsatellite analysis as a PCR based method, this technique has been successfully used as a tool to differentiate C. albicans isolates but has never been tested regarding clustering of the five major clades. In this study we tested microsatellite length polymorphism (MLP) ability to group 29 C. albicans strains previously defined as belonging to clades I, II, III, E and SA, nine atypical strains from Angola and Madagascar, and 78 Portuguese clinical isolates. MLP typing of the total 116 strains analyzed yielded 87 different multilocus allelic combinations which resulted in a high discriminatory power index, of 0.987, with only two markers, CA1 and CEF3. Cluster analysis of the 29 previously defined strains grouped them according to their clade designation with a matrix cophenetic correlation of r=0.963 after a normalized Mantel statistic. Clustering analysis of the 116 strains maintained the same groupings, clearly defining the five major C. albicans clades. The cophenetic value obtained was of r=0.839, and the one-tail probability of the normalized Mantel statistic out of 1000 random permutations was P=0.0020. The proportion of Portuguese isolates in the groups I, II, III and SA was of 2.7%, 15.4%, 3.8% and 0%, respectively. None of the isolates co-clustered with the atypical strains. These results confirm MLP typing as a good method both to type and differentiate C. albicans isolates and to group isolates, identifying the major C. albicans clades, similarly to Ca3 fingerprinting and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). PMID:20348035

  17. Clonal identity of Candida albicans in the oral cavity and the gastrointestinal tract of pre-school children.

    PubMed

    Hossain, H; Ansari, F; Schulz-Weidner, N; Wetzel, W-E; Chakraborty, T; Domann, E

    2003-10-01

    The clonal relationship between oral and fecal Candida albicans isolated from children of pre-school age was examined using RAPD analysis. Significantly higher levels of C. albicans were found in saliva, dental plaque, carious specimens and stools of 56 patients with severe caries as compared to 52 healthy control subjects. The highest prevalence was found in carious specimens and a strong correlation was observed between its presence in saliva, dental plaque, carious specimen and feces. RAPD analysis of isolates from 23 patients with simultaneous oral and fecal C. albicans revealed clonal counterparts present in both oral and stool samples in 15 cases; five patients harbored closely related strains; and three patients harbored unrelated strains. Our results demonstrate a strong correlation between oral and gastrointestinal C. albicans colonization. We assume that carious teeth may constitute an ecologic niche for C. albicans potentially responsible for recurrent oral and non-oral candidiasis. PMID:12930522

  18. Candida albicans-epithelial interactions and pathogenicity mechanisms: scratching the surface

    PubMed Central

    Moyes, David L; Richardson, Jonathan P; Naglik, Julian R

    2015-01-01

    Until recently, epithelial cells have been a largely ignored component of host responses to microbes. However, this has been largely overturned over the last decade as an ever increasing number of studies have highlighted the key role that these cells play in many of our interactions with our microbiota and pathogens. Interactions of these cells with Candida albicans have been shown to be critical not just in host responses, but also in fungal cell responses, regulating fungal morphology and gene expression profile. In this review, we will explore the interactions between C. albicans and epithelial cells, and discuss how these interactions affect our relationship with this fungus. PMID:25714110

  19. In vitro effects of Salvia officinalis L. essential oil on Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Sookto, Tularat; Srithavaj, Theerathavaj; Thaweboon, Sroisiri; Thaweboon, Boonyanit; Shrestha, Binit

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the anticandidal activities of Salvia officinalis L. (S. officinalis) essential oil against Candida albicans (C. albicans) and the inhibitory effects on the adhesion of C. albicans to polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) resin surface. Methods Disc diffusion method was first used to test the anticandidal activities of the S. officinalis L. essential oil against the reference strain (ATCC 90028) and 2 clinical strains of C. albicans. Then the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal lethal concentration (MLC) were determined by modified membrane method. The adhesion of C. albicans to PMMA resin surface was assessed after immersion with S. officinalis L. essential oil at various concentrations of 1×MIC, 0.5×MIC and 0.25×MIC at room temperature for 30 min. One-way ANOVA was used to compare the Candida cell adhesion with the pretreatment agents and Tukey's test was used for multiple comparisons. Results S. officinalis L. essential oil exhibited anticandidal activity against all strains of C. albicans with inhibition zone ranging from 40.5 mm to 19.5 mm. The MIC and MLC of the oil were determined as 2.780 g/L against all test strains. According to the effects on C. albicans adhesion to PMMA resin surface, it was found that immersion in the essential oil at concentrations of 1×MIC (2.780 g/L), 0.5×MIC (1.390 g/L) and 0.25×MIC (0.695 g/L) for 30 min significantly reduced the adhesion of all 3 test strains to PMMA resin surface in a dose dependent manner (P<0.05). Conclusions S. officinalis L. essential oil exhibited anticandidal activities against C. albicans and had inhibitory effects on the adhesion of the cells to PMMA resin surface. With further testing and development, S. officinalis essential oil may be used as an antifungal denture cleanser to prevent candidal adhesion and thus reduce the risk of candida-associated denture stomatitis. PMID:23646301

  20. Attachment of Candida albicans to denture base acrylic resin processed by three different methods.

    PubMed

    Young, Beth; Jose, Anto; Cameron, Donald; McCord, Fraser; Murray, Colin; Bagg, Jeremy; Ramage, Gordon

    2009-01-01

    Denture stomatitis is a debilitating disease associated with the presence of adherent Candida albicans. This study compared the attachment capacity of C. albicans to three different acrylic resin materials (self-curing [SC], conventional pressure-packed [CPP], and injection-molded [IM]) to determine whether the physical properties of the materials influenced candidal attachment. No significant differences in attachment between the isolates were observed for each acrylic resin. However, a comparison of the mean of all isolates showed significantly less attachment to SC than to CPP (P < .05). These data indicate that choice of denture acrylic resin material may influence the capacity for developing denture stomatitis. PMID:20095199

  1. Cerebral candidiasis: case report of brain abscess secondary to Candida albicans, and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Black, Joseph T.

    1970-01-01

    A patient with a brain abscess due to Candida albicans is reported. This patient had three episodes of systemic candidiasis in spite of the fact that she had no underlying debilitating disease and had never received prior antibiotic or adrenocortical steroid therapy. A review of the literature reveals 42 cases of central nervous system Candida albicans infection. The salient features of these cases are tabulated and discussed. The clinical features, pathology, pathogenesis, treatment, and aetiology of cerebral candidiasis are also discussed. Images PMID:5531906

  2. Comparative Analysis of Protein Glycosylation Pathways in Humans and the Fungal Pathogen Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Duncker, Iván; Díaz-Jímenez, Diana F.; Mora-Montes, Héctor M.

    2014-01-01

    Protein glycosylation pathways are present in all kingdoms of life and are metabolic pathways found in all the life kingdoms. Despite sharing commonalities in their synthesis, glycans attached to glycoproteins have species-specific structures generated by the presence of different sets of enzymes and acceptor substrates in each organism. In this review, we present a comparative analysis of the main glycosylation pathways shared by humans and the fungal pathogen Candida albicans: N-linked glycosylation, O-linked mannosylation and glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchorage. The knowledge of similarities and divergences between these metabolic pathways could help find new pharmacological targets for C. albicans infection. PMID:25104959

  3. Post-transcriptional gene regulation in the biology and virulence of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Verma-Gaur, Jiyoti; Traven, Ana

    2016-06-01

    In the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans, remodelling of gene expression drives host adaptation and virulence. Recent studies revealed that in addition to transcription, post-transcriptional mRNA control plays important roles in virulence-related pathways. Hyphal morphogenesis, biofilm formation, stress responses, antifungal drug susceptibility and virulence in animal models require post-transcriptional regulators. This includes RNA binding proteins that control mRNA localization, decay and translation, as well as the cytoplasmic mRNA decay pathway. Comprehensive understanding of how modulation of gene expression networks drives C. albicans virulence will necessitate integration of our knowledge on transcriptional and post-transcriptional mRNA control. PMID:26999710

  4. The synthesis and synergistic antifungal effects of chalcones against drug resistant Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan-Hua; Dong, Huai-Huai; Zhao, Fei; Wang, Jie; Yan, Fang; Jiang, Yuan-Ying; Jin, Yong-Sheng

    2016-07-01

    To identify effective and low toxicity synergistic antifungal compounds, 24 derivatives of chalcone were synthesized to restore the effectiveness of fluconazole against fluconazole-resistant Candida albicans. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC80) and the fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI) of the antifungal synergist fluconazole were measured against fluconazole-resistant Candida albicans. This was done via methods established by the clinical and laboratory standards institute (CLSI). Of the synthesized compounds, 2'-hydroxy-4'-methoxychalcone (8) exhibited the most potent in vitro (FICI=0.007) effects. The structure activity relationship of the compounds are then discussed. PMID:27210436

  5. Antagonism of Fluconazole and a Proton Pump Inhibitor against Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ning-Ning

    2015-01-01

    Hospitalized ill patients, at risk for invasive candidiasis, often receive multiple medications, including proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). The antifungal fluconazole perturbs the vacuolar proton ATPase. The PPI omeprazole antagonized Candida albicans growth inhibition by fluconazole. A C. albicans codon-adapted pHluorin, Ca.pHluorin, was generated to measure cytosolic pH. The fungal cytosol was acidified by omeprazole and realkalinized by coexposure to fluconazole. Vacuolar pH was alkalinized by fluconazole. Off-target effects of any medication on fungal pathogens may occur. PMID:26596946

  6. Roles of IL-33 in Resistance and Tolerance to Systemic Candida albicans Infections

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang Jun; Cho, Hong Rae

    2016-01-01

    IL-33 is a multifunctional cytokine that is released in response to a variety of intrinsic and extrinsic stimuli. The role of IL-33 in Candida albicans infections is just beginning to be revealed. This cytokine has beneficial effects on host defense against systemic C. albicans infections, and it promotes resistance mechanisms by which the immune system eliminates the invading fungal pathogens; and it also elevates host tolerance by reducing the inflammatory response and thereby, potentially, tissue damage. Thus, IL-33 is classified as a cytokine that has evolved functionally to protect the host from damage by pathogens and immunopathology. PMID:27340384

  7. Medical treatment of a pacemaker endocarditis due to Candida albicans and to Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Roger, P M; Boissy, C; Gari-Toussaint, M; Foucher, R; Mondain, V; Vandenbos, F; le Fichoux, Y; Michiels, J F; Dellamonica, P

    2000-09-01

    We describe a case of pacemaker infection due to two fungal species: Candida albicans and C. glabrata. Transthoracic echocardiography showed a large vegetation on the intraventricular wires. Because of severe underlying diseases, surgery was believed to be contraindicated. The patient was treated using high dose of fluconazole, resulting in clinical improvement and negative blood cultures. However, 2 months later, the patient underwent a fatal stroke. At autopsy, a large vegetation was found only all along the wires. Postmortem culture of the infected material was positive for both C. albicans and C. glabrata. PMID:11023765

  8. Role of specific determinants in mannan of Candida albicans serotype A in adherence to human buccal epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Miyakawa, Y; Kuribayashi, T; Kagaya, K; Suzuki, M; Nakase, T; Fukazawa, Y

    1992-01-01

    Candida albicans serotype A (C. albicans A) possesses a specific antigen, designated antigen 6, which resides in mannans on the cell surface. To determine the role of the mannan moiety of the C. albicans cell wall in adherence to buccal epithelial cells, we used antigen 6-deficient mutants which had been isolated by screening with an agglutinating monoclonal antibody against antigen 6 (MAb-6). 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectral analysis of the purified mannans from the mutants showed a loss of the signals related to that beta-linkage of the side chains. Moreover, acetolyzed fragments of the mutant mannans showed a decreased amount of mannohexaose and mannopentaose. The mutant yeast cells exhibited significantly reduced ability to adhere both to exfoliated buccal epithelial cells and to a human buccal cell line. A number of strains of C. albicans A, C. tropicalis, and C. glabrata, all of which bear antigen 6, showed significantly higher adherence to the cell line than did those of C. albicans serotype B, which lack antigen 6. The whole mannan from the C. albicans A parent inhibited the adherence of C. albicans A to epithelial cells dose dependently, whereas mannan from a mutant strains did not. Moreover, C. albicans A treated with MAb-6 or polyclonal factor 6 serum showed reduced adherence. A close correlation was found between adhesive ability and agglutinability with MAb-6 in the C. albicans A parent, the antigenic mutants, and their spontaneous revertants. These results suggest that so far as mannan adhesion is concerned, serotype A-specific determinants are largely involved in the mechanisms of adherence of C. albicans A to human buccal epithelial cells. PMID:1375200

  9. Novel Structural Features in Candida albicans Hyphal Glucan Provide a Basis for Differential Innate Immune Recognition of Hyphae Versus Yeast*

    PubMed Central

    Lowman, Douglas W.; Greene, Rachel R.; Bearden, Daniel W.; Kruppa, Michael D.; Pottier, Max; Monteiro, Mario A.; Soldatov, Dmitriy V.; Ensley, Harry E.; Cheng, Shih-Chin; Netea, Mihai G.; Williams, David L.

    2014-01-01

    The innate immune system differentially recognizes Candida albicans yeast and hyphae. It is not clear how the innate immune system effectively discriminates between yeast and hyphal forms of C. albicans. Glucans are major components of the fungal cell wall and key fungal pathogen-associated molecular patterns. C. albicans yeast glucan has been characterized; however, little is known about glucan structure in C. albicans hyphae. Using an extraction procedure that minimizes degradation of the native structure, we extracted glucans from C. albicans hyphal cell walls. 1H NMR data analysis revealed that, when compared with reference (1→3,1→6) β-linked glucans and C. albicans yeast glucan, hyphal glucan has a unique cyclical or “closed chain” structure that is not found in yeast glucan. GC/MS analyses showed a high abundance of 3- and 6-linked glucose units when compared with yeast β-glucan. In addition to the expected (1→3), (1→6), and 3,6 linkages, we also identified a 2,3 linkage that has not been reported previously in C. albicans. Hyphal glucan induced robust immune responses in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and macrophages via a Dectin-1-dependent mechanism. In contrast, C. albicans yeast glucan was a much less potent stimulus. We also demonstrated the capacity of C. albicans hyphal glucan, but not yeast glucan, to induce IL-1β processing and secretion. This finding provides important evidence for understanding the immune discrimination between colonization and invasion at the mucosal level. When taken together, these data provide a structural basis for differential innate immune recognition of C. albicans yeast versus hyphae. PMID:24344127

  10. Possible Inhibitory Molecular Mechanism of Farnesol on the Development of Fluconazole Resistance in Candida albicans Biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Li-hua; Ma, Ming; Chen, Xiao-jun; Xu, Shuang-bo

    2012-01-01

    Candida albicans biofilm infections are usually treated with azole antifungals such as fluconazole. However, the development of resistance to this drug in C. albicans biofilms is very common, especially in immunocompromised individuals. The upregulation of the sterol biosynthetic pathway gene ERG and the efflux pump genes CDR and MDR may contribute to this azole tolerance in Candida species. We hypothesize that farnesol, an endogenous quorum sensing molecule with possible antimicrobial properties which is also the precursor of ergosterols in C. albicans, may interfere with the development of fluconazole resistance in C. albicans biofilms. To test this hypothesis, MICs were compared and morphology changes were observed by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) for farnesol-treated and -untreated and fluconazole-resistant groups. The expression of possible target genes (ERG11, ERG25, ERG6, ERG5, ERG3, ERG1, MDR1, CDR1, and CDR2) in biofilms was analyzed by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) and quantitative PCR (qPCR) to investigate the molecular mechanisms of the inhibitory effects of farnesol. The results showed a decreased MIC of fluconazole and thinner biofilms for the farnesol-treated group, indicating that farnesol inhibited the development of fluconazole resistance. The sterol biosynthetic pathway may contribute to the inhibitory effects of farnesol, as the transcription levels of the ERG11, ERG25, ERG6, ERG3, and ERG1 genes decreased in the farnesol-treated group. PMID:22106223

  11. Increased phenotypic switching in strains of Candida albicans associated with invasive infections.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, S; White, G; Hunter, P R

    1994-01-01

    This study reports the rates of phenotypic switching in strains of Candida albicans isolated from superficial and invasive infections. Of 19 invasive strains, 68% showed switching activity, often at very high rates, compared with only 28% of 40 strains isolated from superficial sites (P = 0.004). PMID:7852592

  12. Drug Susceptibility of Matrix-Encapsulated Candida albicans Nano-Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Anand; Gupta, Celia Macias; Agrawal, C. Mauli; Leung, Kai P.; Lopez-Ribot, Jose L.; Ramasubramanian, Anand K.

    2015-01-01

    The rise in the use of biomedical devices and implants has seen a concomitant surge in the advent of device-related nosocomial (hospital-acquired) infections of bacterial and fungal origins. The most common nosocomial fungal infection is candidiasis caused mainly by Candida albicans biofilms. Candidiasis is associated with an unacceptably high mortality rate, and there is an urgent need for the discovery of new antifungal drugs that prevent or control biofilm formation. To this end, we recently developed an ultra-high-throughput microarray platform consisting of nano-scale biofilms of C. albicans encapsulated in collagen or alginate hydrogel matrices for antifungal drug screening. Here, we report that the choice of matrix influences the apparent susceptibility of C. albicans to the common anti-fungal drugs, amphotericin B and caspofungin. While amphotericin B is equally effective against biofilms grown in collagen and alginate matrices, caspofungin is effective only against biofilms grown only in alginate, but not in collagen. We demonstrate differences in the distribution of the drugs in the two matrices may contribute to the susceptibility of C. albicans nano-biofilms. In a larger context, our results highlight the importance of the choice of matrix as a parameter in 3D cell encapsulation, and suggest a screening strategy to predict drug performance in vivo. PMID:24114441

  13. Candida albicans Shed Msb2 and Host Mucins Affect the Candidacidal Activity of Salivary Hst 5

    PubMed Central

    Puri, Sumant; Friedman, Justin; Saraswat, Darpan; Kumar, Rohitashw; Li, Rui; Ruszaj, Donna; Edgerton, Mira

    2015-01-01

    Salivary Histatin 5 (Hst 5) is an antimicrobial peptide that exhibits potent antifungal activity towards Candida albicans, the causative agent of oral candidiasis. However, it exhibits limited activity in vivo, largely due to inactivation by salivary components of both host and pathogen origin. Proteins secreted by C. albicans during infection such as secreted aspartyl proteases (Saps) and shed mucin Msb2 can reduce Hst 5 activity; and human salivary mucins, while suggested to protect Hst 5 from proteolytic degradation, can entrap peptides into mucin gels, thereby reducing bioavailability. We show here that Sap6 that is secreted during hyphal growth reduces Hst 5 activity, most likely a result of proteolytic degradation of Hst 5 since this effect is abrogated with heat inactivated Sap 6. We further show that just like C. albicans shedding Msb2, mammalian mucins, fetuin and porcine gut mucin (that is related to salivary mucins), also reduce Hst 5 activity. However, we identify mucin-like protein-induced changes in C. albicans cell morphology and aggregation patterns, suggesting that the effect of such proteins on Hst 5 cannot be interpreted independently of their effect on yeast cells. PMID:26529023

  14. Comparison of the in vitro Effect of Chemical and Herbal Mouthwashes on Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Talebi, Somayeh; Sabokbar, Azar; Riazipour, Majid; Saffari, Mohsen

    2014-01-01

    Background: During the recent decades research has focused to find scientific evidence for the effects of herbal medicines. Researchers are interested in herbal remedies for medication and aim to substitute herbal material instead of chemical formula with limited side effects for human being. Objectives: The aim of the current study was to compare the in vitro effect of herbal and chemical mouthwashes against Candida albicans. Materials and Methods: In this research, we used a standard strain of C. albicans, PTCC 5027. The suspension was made by a fresh culture of C. albicans (24 hours) and the optical density (turbidity equating to a McFarland standard of 0.5) was read at 530 nm. The C. albicans suspension was cultured on Sabouraud dextrose agar plate. Next, two wells were filled with mouthwashes and after incubation at 30ºC for 24 hours, the inhibition zone was measured. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC) of mouthwashes were determined. Data were analyzed using the SPSS software, independent T-tests and one-sided variance analysis (ANOVA-one way). Results: Based on these findings on agar diffusion with (P = 0.764), MIC and MFC tests (P = 0.879), there were no significant differences between the antifungal effect of herbal and chemical mouthwashes. Conclusions: This study showed that, chemical mouthwashes acted better than herbal mouthwashes and among different chemical mouthwashes, Oral B was most effective. PMID:25741429

  15. Lipopeptides from Bacillus strain AR2 inhibits biofilm formation by Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Rautela, Ria; Singh, Anil Kumar; Shukla, Abha; Cameotra, Swaranjit Singh

    2014-05-01

    The ability of the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans to reversibly switch between different morphological forms and establish biofilms is crucial for establishing infection. Targeting phenotypic plasticity and biofilm formation in C. albicans represents a new concept for antifungal drug discovery. The present study evaluated the influence of cyclic lipopeptide biosurfactant produced by Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain AR2 on C. albicans biofilms. The biosurfactant was characterized as a mixture of iturin and fengycin by MALDI-TOF and amino acid analysis. The biosurfactant exhibited concentration dependent growth inhibition and fungicidal activity. The biosurfactant at sub-minimum growth inhibition concentration decreased cell surface hydrophobicity, hindered germ tube formation and reduced the mRNA expression of hyphae-specific gene HWP1 and ALS3 without exhibiting significant growth inhibition. The biosurfactants inhibited biofilm formation in the range of 46-100 % depending upon the concentration and Candida strains. The biosurfactant treatment dislodged 25-100 % of preformed biofilm from polystyrene plates. The biosurfactant retained its antifungal and antibiofilm activity even after exposure to extreme temperature. By virtue of the ability to inhibit germ tube and biofilm formation, two important traits of C. albicans involved in establishing infection, lipopeptides from strain AR2 may represent a potential candidate for developing heat stable anti-Candida drugs. PMID:24623107

  16. Effect of two monoterpene phenols on antioxidant defense system in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Khan, Amber; Ahmad, Aijaz; Ahmad Khan, Luqman; Padoa, Carolyn J; van Vuuren, Sandy; Manzoor, Nikhat

    2015-03-01

    Thymol and carvacrol from the class of monoterpene phenols are one of the most potent plant essential oil components possessing antimicrobial effects. Known for their wide bioactive spectrum, these positional isomers of isopropyl cresol deplete ergosterol content, compromise membrane permeability, block efflux pumps and restore antifungal susceptibility to fluconazole in resistant Candida strains. Exposure to these natural compounds induces a cascade of stress responses, which are important to comprehend their microbicidal mechanisms. This study evaluates the antioxidant defense response to lower concentrations of thymol and carvacrol in Candida albicans. The antioxidant defense responses in C. albicans are important for developmental mechanisms pertaining to resistance against the immune system, infection establishment and drug resistance. In this view, primary and secondary antioxidant defense enzymes, and oxidative stress markers including glutathione and lipid peroxidation were determined in C. albicans cells exposed to lower concentrations of thymol and carvacrol. These compounds were found to induce oxidative stress and compromised the antioxidant defense system in C. albicans at lower concentrations. This study helps in understanding the 'in cell' antifungal mechanisms of natural monoterpene phenols originating from oxidative stress. Thymol and carvacrol induced membrane deterioration reported earlier, is further explained as a result of a toxic radical cascade mediated by lipid peroxidation. Findings reinforce the observed toxic oxidizing effects of these compounds as a consequence of direct damage to antioxidant components and not to their genetic manipulations. PMID:25681060

  17. Top-down characterization data on the speciation of the Candida albicans immunome in candidemia

    PubMed Central

    Pitarch, Aida; Nombela, César; Gil, Concha

    2015-01-01

    The characterization of pathogen-specific antigenic proteins at the protein species level is crucial in the development and molecular optimization of novel immunodiagnostics, vaccines or immunotherapeutics for infectious diseases. The major requirements to achieve this molecular level are to obtain 100% sequence coverage and identify all post-translational modifications of each antigenic protein species. In this article, we show nearly complete sequence information for five discrete antigenic species of Candida albicans Tdh3 (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase), which have been reported to be differentially recognized both among candidemia patients and between candidemia and control patients. A comprehensive description of the top-down immunoproteomic strategy used for seroprofiling at the C. albicans protein species level in candidemia as well as for the chemical characterization of this immunogenic protein (based on high-resolution 2-DE, Western blotting, peptide mass fingerprinting, tandem mass spectrometry and de novo peptide sequencing) is also provided. The top-down characterization data on the speciation of the C. albicans immunome in candidemia presented here are related to our research article entitled “Seroprofiling at the Candida albicans protein species level unveils an accurate molecular discriminator for candidemia” (Pitarch et al., J. Proteomics, 2015, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jprot.2015.10.022). PMID:26862568

  18. CD4+ T-helper-cell responses in mice with low-level Candida albicans infection.

    PubMed Central

    Mencacci, A; Spaccapelo, R; Del Sero, G; Enssle, K H; Cassone, A; Bistoni, F; Romani, L

    1996-01-01

    Resistance and susceptibility to Candida albicans infection have been shown to be dependent upon the activation of CD4+ T helper (Th) type 1 or Th2 cells, respectively. To study the type, kinetics, and cytokine dependency of CD4+ Th-cell responses in low-level C. albicans infection, susceptible mice were infected with sublethal doses of C. albicans and assessed for parameters of CD4+ Th-dependent immunity. Interleukin (IL)-12 and gamma interferon were always produced early in infection regardless of the pathogen load. In contrast, production of IL-4, and hence Th2-cell reactivity, was strictly dose dependent, being induced at the higher dose of the fungus. Production of IL-12 correlated with a successful control of infection in mice exposed to the lower doses of C. albicans but not with the development of acquired immunity. An antigenic stimulus appeared to be required for IL-12 to induce a protective anticandidal response. Cytokine depletion in vivo revealed that neutralization of IL-4 was protective early but not late in infection, suggesting a different role for IL-4 in the induction versus maintenance of an ongoing anticandidal Th response. Late in infection, an exacerbative effect was also observed upon IL-12 neutralization. These results indicate that the fungal burden and timing of cytokine appearance greatly influence CD4+ Th induction and effector functions in mice with candidiasis. PMID:8945525

  19. Synergy Between Polyvinylpyrrolidone-Coated Silver Nanoparticles and Azole Antifungal Against Drug-Resistant Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lingmei; Liao, Kai; Li, Yiping; Zhao, Lei; Liang, Sai; Guo, Dan; Hu, Jun; Wang, Dayong

    2016-03-01

    In the clinical practice, resistance of Candida albicans to antifungal agents has frequently emerged. Silver-nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) have been demonstrated to have the antifungal property. We investigated the potential for synergy between polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)-coated Ag-NPs and azole antifungal, such as fluconazole or voriconazole, against drug-resistant C. albicans strain CA10. When antifungal agent was examined alone, fluconazole and voriconazole did not kill drug-resistant C. albicans, and PVP-coated Ag-NPs had only the moderate killing ability. In contrast, the combinational treatment of PVP-coated Ag-NPs with fluconazole or voriconazole was effective in being against the drug-resistant C. albicans. After the combinational treatment, we detected the disruption of cell membrane integrity, the tendency of PVP-coated Ag-NPs to adhere to cell membrane, and the inhibition of budding process. Moreover, after the combinational treatment, the defects in ergosterol signaling and efflux pump functions were detected. Our results suggest that the combinational use of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs), such as PVP-coated Ag-NPs, with the conventional antifungal may be a viable strategy to combat drug-resistant fungal infection. PMID:27455637

  20. Possible inhibitory molecular mechanism of farnesol on the development of fluconazole resistance in Candida albicans biofilm.

    PubMed

    Yu, Li-Hua; Wei, Xin; Ma, Ming; Chen, Xiao-Jun; Xu, Shuang-Bo

    2012-02-01

    Candida albicans biofilm infections are usually treated with azole antifungals such as fluconazole. However, the development of resistance to this drug in C. albicans biofilms is very common, especially in immunocompromised individuals. The upregulation of the sterol biosynthetic pathway gene ERG and the efflux pump genes CDR and MDR may contribute to this azole tolerance in Candida species. We hypothesize that farnesol, an endogenous quorum sensing molecule with possible antimicrobial properties which is also the precursor of ergosterols in C. albicans, may interfere with the development of fluconazole resistance in C. albicans biofilms. To test this hypothesis, MICs were compared and morphology changes were observed by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) for farnesol-treated and -untreated and fluconazole-resistant groups. The expression of possible target genes (ERG11, ERG25, ERG6, ERG5, ERG3, ERG1, MDR1, CDR1, and CDR2) in biofilms was analyzed by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) and quantitative PCR (qPCR) to investigate the molecular mechanisms of the inhibitory effects of farnesol. The results showed a decreased MIC of fluconazole and thinner biofilms for the farnesol-treated group, indicating that farnesol inhibited the development of fluconazole resistance. The sterol biosynthetic pathway may contribute to the inhibitory effects of farnesol, as the transcription levels of the ERG11, ERG25, ERG6, ERG3, and ERG1 genes decreased in the farnesol-treated group. PMID:22106223

  1. Mechanisms of azole resistance in Candida albicans clinical isolates from Shanghai, China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin-Yan; Shi, Ce; Wang, Ying; Li, Wen-Jing; Zhao, Yue; Xiang, Ming-Jie

    2015-04-01

    This study was undertaken to characterize the mechanism(s) of azole resistance in clinical isolates of Candida albicans collected in Shanghai, China, focusing on the role of efflux pumps, target enzymes of fluconazole (Erg11), respiratory status and the ergosterol biosynthetic pathway. Clinical isolates of C. albicans (n = 30) were collected from 30 different non-HIV-infected patients in four hospitals in Shanghai. All 30 C. albicans isolates were susceptible to amphotericin B and 5-fluorocytosine. Twelve C. albicans isolates showed resistance to at least one type of triazole antifungal. Flow cytometry analysis of rhodamine 6G efflux showed that azole-resistant isolates had greater efflux pump activity, which was consistent with elevated levels of CDR1 and CDR2 genes that code for ABC efflux pumps. However, we did not observe increased expression of ERG11 and MDR1 or respiratory deficiency. Several mutations of ERG11 and TAC1 genes were detected. The F964Y mutation in the TAC1 gene was identified for the first time. Two main sterols, ergosterol and lanosterol, were identified by GC-MS chromatogram, and no missense mutations were found in ERG3. Furthermore, seven amino acid substitutions in ERG11, A114S, Y132H, Y132F, K143Q, K143R, Y257H and G448E were found, by Type II spectral quantitative analysis, to contribute to low affinity binding between Erg11 and fluconazole. PMID:25748216

  2. Rapid and Accurate Identification of Candida albicans Isolates by Use of PNA FISHFlow▿

    PubMed Central

    Trnovsky, Jan; Merz, William; Della-Latta, Phyllis; Wu, Fann; Arendrup, Maiken Cavling; Stender, Henrik

    2008-01-01

    We developed the simple, rapid (1 h), and accurate PNA FISHFlow method for the identification of Candida albicans. The method exploits unique in solution in situ hybridization conditions under which the cells are simultaneously fixed and hybridized. This method facilitates the accurate identification of clinical yeast isolates using two scoring techniques: flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. PMID:18287325

  3. Application of surface plasmon resonance biosensor for the detection of Candida albicans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yodmongkol, Sirasa; Thaweboon, Sroisiri; Thaweboon, Boonyanit; Puttharugsa, Chokchai; Sutapun, Boonsong; Amarit, Ratthasart; Somboonkaew, Armote; Srikhirin, Toemsak

    2016-02-01

    In this study, surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPR imaging) was developed for the detection of Candida albicans which is a causal agent of oral infection. The detection was based on the sandwich assay. The capture antibody was covalently immobilized on the mixed self assemble monolayers (SAMs). The ratio of mixed SAMs between 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid and 3-mercaptopropanol was varied to find the optimal ratio for use as a sensor surface. The results showed that the suitable surface for C. albicans detection was SAM of carboxylic (mixed SAMs 1:0), even though mixed SAMs 1:40 had a high detection signal in comparison to mixed SAMs 1:0, but the non-specific signal was higher. The detection limit was 107 cells/ml for direct detection, and was increased to 106 cells/ml with sandwich antibody. The use of polyclonal C. albicans antibody as capture and sandwich antibody showed good selectivity against the relevant oral bacteria including Escherichia coli, Streptococcus mutan, Staphylococcus aureus, β-streptococci, and Lactobacillus casei. SPR platform in this study could detect C. albicans from the mixed microbial suspension without requirement of skillful technician. This SPR imaging biosensor could be applied for Candida identification after cultivation.

  4. Fungistatic activity of all-trans retinoic acid against Aspergillus fumigatus and Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Campione, Elena; Gaziano, Roberta; Marino, Daniele; Orlandi, Augusto

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Fungal infections are a major complication in hematologic and neoplastic patients causing severe morbidity and mortality. Aspergillus fumigatus and Candida albicans are among the most invasive opportunistic pathogens in immunocompromised patients, and classic antifungal drugs are frequently unsuccessful in these patients. Recent reports hypothesize that the antifungal efficacy of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) is mainly related to its strong capacity to stimulate monocyte-mediated immunity, but no consideration was given to its potential direct fungistatic activity. Moreover, ATRA offers the opportunity for systemic therapy. Methods and results We investigated the efficacy of ATRA at different concentrations for its antifungal activity against opportunistic A. fumigatus and C. albicans obtained from clinical samples according to standard protocols. A fungistatic activity of ATRA on A. fumigatus and C. albicans at 0.5–1 mM concentration was documented up to 7 days. Conclusion This is the first evidence of a direct and strong fungistatic activity of ATRA against A. fumigatus and C. albicans. The potential adjuvant therapeutic application of ATRA might be useful in the treatment and/or prevention of systemic mycoses in immunocompromised patients. The discovery of a direct fungistatic activity, in association with its reported immunomodulatory properties, makes ATRA an excellent candidate for new combined antifungal strategies for systemic mycoses in immunocompromised and cancer patients. PMID:27199548

  5. In vitro and ex vivo assays of virulence in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Calderone, Richard A

    2009-01-01

    The measurement of virulence using ex vivo and in vitro models is discussed in the context of the human pathogenic yeast, Candida albicans. The models described are of two types. First, reconstituted tissues of various sorts are used that are derived from human carcinomas. The tissues are grown in vitro in complex media, attain a three-dimensional tissue structure, and retain cell-surface antigens typical of the specific tissue. Both adherence and invasion of tissues can be studied following infection with strains of C. albicans (1, 2). Further, one can increase the level of complexity by providing infected tissues with host phagocytes or cytokines such that an immune contribution to protection can be followed (3-5). The second model employs Drosophila melanogaster larvae that are infected with C. albicans (6). In this model, the progression of virulence is followed after injection of strains of a pathogen of interest into the fly abdomen. Thus, in the case of human pathogenic fungi, the recognition of host tissues and invasion by the specific pathogen can be studied in vitro and correlations developed for human disease. The obvious advantage to using animal models (e.g., mice) is reduced cost, such that large numbers of C. albicans strains can be assessed for their virulence properties. Additionally, another application of these models is in drug discovery. It is clear that there are both advantages and disadvantages of the use of alternate models other than a murine model, to evaluate disease, and this is discussed below. PMID:19152042

  6. Effect of nonylphenol on growth of Neurospora crassa and Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Karley, A J; Powell, S I; Davies, J M

    1997-01-01

    The effects of the nonionic surfactant nonylphenol on the growth and morphologies of the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa and the diploid yeast Candida albicans have been examined. Nonylphenol inhibited respiration and growth of N. crassa, effecting a 10-fold decrease in organism yield at 25 microM. Severe morphological defects were also induced: cell shape was abnormal and apical dominance was lost. Nonylphenol monoethoxylate (the parent compound of nonylphenol) was a less potent growth inhibitor and morphogen. The growth of the yeast form of C. albicans was sensitive to nonylphenol (inducing an order of magnitude decrease in specific growth rate with a 10-fold increase in dose concentration) but not nonylphenol monoethoxylate. Similarly, C. albicans ATP content was reduced and glucose-induced extracellular acidification was inhibited only by nonylphenol. Although estrogens may induce the dimorphic transition of C. albicans, nonylphenol (as an environmental estrogen mimic) failed to trigger germ tube formation under nonpermissive conditions and inhibited it under permissive conditions. The effects of nonylphenol are most readily explained as the result of uncoupling of respiration, which produces multiple physiological effects. PMID:9097428

  7. Hairpin dsRNA does not trigger RNA interference in Candida albicans cells.

    PubMed

    Staab, Janet F; White, Theodore C; Marr, Kieren A

    2011-01-01

    RNA interference/silencing mechanisms triggered by double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) have been described in many eukaryotes, including fungi. These mechanisms have in common small RNA molecules (siRNAs or microRNAs) originating from dsRNAs that, together with the effector protein Argonaute, mediate silencing. The genome of the fungal pathogen Candida albicans harbours a well-conserved Argonaute and a non-canonical Dicer, essential members of silencing pathways. Prototypical siRNAs are detected as members of the C. albicans transcriptome, which is potential evidence of RNA interference/silencing pathways in this organism. Surprisingly, expression of a dsRNA a hairpin ADE2 dsRNA molecule to interfere with the endogenous ADE2 mRNA did not result in down-regulation of the message or produce adenine auxotrophic strains. Cell free assays showed that the hairpin dsRNA was a substrate for the putative C. albicans Dicer, discounting the possibility that the nature of the dsRNA trigger affects silencing functionality. Our results suggested that unknown cellular events govern the functionality of siRNAs originating from transgenes in RNA interference/silencing pathways in C. albicans. PMID:20737430

  8. [A case report of pulmonary infiltration with eosinophilia syndrome induced by Candida albicans].

    PubMed

    Miyagawa, H; Yokota, S; Kajimoto, K; Makimoto, K; Sato, K; Nabe, M; Tada, S; Kimura, I

    1992-01-01

    A sixty six-year-old female who had been treated for bronchial asthma for about 25 years was admitted to the hospital with complaints of episodes of dyspnea, eosinophilia and infiltrative shadows in the chest X-ray film. An infiltrative shadow appeared to move from the left to the right lung field and finally formed a shadow of atelectasis in the middle field of the right lung. A sputum culture showed only Candida albicans. Allergic and immunologic examination revealed high IgE serum levels with specific IgE against Candida albicans in high titer, and Aspergillus fumigatus in low titer. The precipitating antibody was shown only against Candida antigen. Additionally, the blastogenic response to Candida antigen was high in comparison with other fungal antigens including Aspergillus fumigatus. The clinical features and laboratory findings of this patient were found to satisfy Rosenberg's criteria for allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA), except for the existence of Candida albicans in place of Aspergillus species as the causative antigen. The pathogenesis of PIE syndrome has been studied and various allergic mechanisms against many antigens reported. In this patient Candida albicans could be playing the crucial role in the formation of PIE syndrome, which might be best described as allergic bronchopulmonary candidiasis (ABPC). PMID:1554325

  9. Epidemiology of Candida infection. II. Application of biochemical methods for typing of Candida albicans strains.

    PubMed

    Budak, A

    1990-01-01

    Biochemical profiles of 350 C. albicans isolates from five towns in Poland and from Freiburg in Germany were determined on the basis of nine biochemical tests of Odds and Abbott method. API 20 C AUX system and additionally a resistogram. The analysis of the strains according to Odds' and Abbotts's system showed that investigated strains can be typed into 9 profile codes of common biochemical patterns. There were some differences among the profiles according to their geographical origin and anatomical sources of the isolation. On the basis of the ability C. albicans strains to assimilate of carbon sources, 350 isolates were categorised into 13 separate auxotrophic profiles with the major one: 2,576,174 accounting for 81% of the total. The majority of the investigated isolates were susceptible to antifungal agents (83%). A disproportionate distribution of auxotrophic profiles limited the use of resistogram method and API 20 C AUX as systems for typing C. albicans strains. On the other hand, the method of Odds and Abbott provides valuable criteria for typing of C. albicans. PMID:2130802

  10. Host responses to Candida albicans: Th17 cells and mucosal candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Conti, Heather R.; Gaffen, Sarah L.

    2010-01-01

    Candida albicans causes mucosal and disseminated candidiasis, which represent serious problems for the rapidly expanding immunocompromised population. Until recently, Th1-mediated immunity was thought to confer the primary protection, particularly for oral candidiasis. However, emerging data indicate that the newly-defined Th17 compartment appears to play the predominant role in mucosal candidiasis. PMID:20381638

  11. Dynamics of Agglutinin-Like Sequence (ALS) Protein Localization on the Surface of Candida Albicans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, David Andrew

    2009-01-01

    The ALS gene family encodes large cell-surface glycoproteins associated with "C. albicans" pathogenesis. Als proteins are thought to act as adhesin molecules binding to host tissues. Wide variation in expression levels among the ALS genes exists and is related to cell morphology and environmental conditions. "ALS1," "ALS3," and "ALS4" are three of…

  12. Nanoscopic cell-wall architecture of an immunogenic ligand in Candida albicans during antifungal drug treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jia; Wester, Michael J.; Graus, Matthew S.; Lidke, Keith A.; Neumann, Aaron K.

    2016-01-01

    The cell wall of Candida albicans is composed largely of polysaccharides. Here we focus on β-glucan, an immunogenic cell-wall polysaccharide whose surface exposure is often restricted, or “masked,” from immune recognition by Dectin-1 on dendritic cells (DCs) and other innate immune cells. Previous research suggested that the physical presentation geometry of β-glucan might determine whether it can be recognized by Dectin-1. We used direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy to explore the fine structure of β-glucan exposed on C. albicans cell walls before and after treatment with the antimycotic drug caspofungin, which alters glucan exposure. Most surface-accessible glucan on C. albicans yeast and hyphae is limited to isolated Dectin-1–binding sites. Caspofungin-induced unmasking caused approximately fourfold to sevenfold increase in total glucan exposure, accompanied by increased phagocytosis efficiency of DCs for unmasked yeasts. Nanoscopic imaging of caspofungin-unmasked C. albicans cell walls revealed that the increase in glucan exposure is due to increased density of glucan exposures and increased multiglucan exposure sizes. These findings reveal that glucan exhibits significant nanostructure, which is a previously unknown physical component of the host–Candida interaction that might change during antifungal chemotherapy and affect innate immune activation. PMID:26792838

  13. A FACS-Optimized Screen Identifies Regulators of Genome Stability in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Loll-Krippleber, Raphaël; Feri, Adeline; Nguyen, Marie; Maufrais, Corinne; Yansouni, Jennifer; d'Enfert, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) plays important roles in genome dynamics, notably, during tumorigenesis. In the fungal pathogen Candida albicans, LOH contributes to the acquisition of antifungal resistance. In order to investigate the mechanisms that regulate LOH in C. albicans, we have established a novel method combining an artificial heterozygous locus harboring the blue fluorescent protein and green fluorescent protein markers and flow cytometry to detect LOH events at the single-cell level. Using this fluorescence-based method, we have confirmed that elevated temperature, treatment with methyl methanesulfonate, and inactivation of the Mec1 DNA damage checkpoint kinase triggered an increase in the frequency of LOH. Taking advantage of this system, we have searched for C. albicans genes whose overexpression triggered an increase in LOH and identified four candidates, some of which are known regulators of genome dynamics with human homologues contributing to cancer progression. Hence, the approach presented here will allow the implementation of new screens to identify genes that are important for genome stability in C. albicans and more generally in eukaryotic cells. PMID:25595446

  14. Waikialoid A suppresses hyphal morphogenesis and inhibits biofilm development in pathogenic Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoru; You, Jianlan; King, Jarrod B; Powell, Douglas R; Cichewicz, Robert H

    2012-04-27

    A chemically prolific strain of Aspergillus was isolated from a soil sample collected near Waikiki Beach, Honolulu, Hawaii. The fungus produced several secondary metabolites, which were purified and placed in our natural products library and were later screened for substances capable of inhibiting biofilm formation by Candida albicans. It was determined that one of the secondary metabolites from the Hawaiian fungal isolate, a new complex prenylated indole alkaloid named waikialoid A (1), inhibited biofilm formation with an IC(50) value of 1.4 μM. Another structurally unrelated, presumably polyketide metabolite, waikialide A (15), also inhibited C. albicans biofilm formation, but was much less potent (IC(50) value of 32.4 μM). Microscopy studies revealed that compound 1 also inhibited C. albicans hyphal morphogenesis. While metabolite 1 appears ineffective at disrupting preformed biofilms, the accumulated data indicate that the new compound may exert its activity against C. albicans during the early stages of surface colonization involving cell adherence, hyphal development, and/or biofilm assembly. Unlike some other stephacidin/notoamide compounds, metabolite 1 was not cytotoxic to fungi or human cells (up to 200 μM), which makes this an intriguing model compound for studying the adjunctive use of biofilm inhibitors in combination with standard antifungal antibiotics. PMID:22400916

  15. Top-down characterization data on the speciation of the Candida albicans immunome in candidemia.

    PubMed

    Pitarch, Aida; Nombela, César; Gil, Concha

    2016-03-01

    The characterization of pathogen-specific antigenic proteins at the protein species level is crucial in the development and molecular optimization of novel immunodiagnostics, vaccines or immunotherapeutics for infectious diseases. The major requirements to achieve this molecular level are to obtain 100% sequence coverage and identify all post-translational modifications of each antigenic protein species. In this article, we show nearly complete sequence information for five discrete antigenic species of Candida albicans Tdh3 (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase), which have been reported to be differentially recognized both among candidemia patients and between candidemia and control patients. A comprehensive description of the top-down immunoproteomic strategy used for seroprofiling at the C. albicans protein species level in candidemia as well as for the chemical characterization of this immunogenic protein (based on high-resolution 2-DE, Western blotting, peptide mass fingerprinting, tandem mass spectrometry and de novo peptide sequencing) is also provided. The top-down characterization data on the speciation of the C. albicans immunome in candidemia presented here are related to our research article entitled "Seroprofiling at the Candida albicans protein species level unveils an accurate molecular discriminator for candidemia" (Pitarch et al., J. Proteomics, 2015, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jprot.2015.10.022). PMID:26862568

  16. Candida albicans Hypha Formation and Mannan Masking of β-Glucan Inhibit Macrophage Phagosome Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Louw, Johanna; Lewis, Leanne E.; Okai, Blessing; Walls, Catriona A.; Ballou, Elizabeth R.; Walker, Louise A.; Reid, Delyth; Munro, Carol A.; Brown, Alistair J. P.; Brown, Gordon D.; Gow, Neil A. R.; Erwig, Lars P.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Candida albicans is a major life-threatening human fungal pathogen in the immunocompromised host. Host defense against systemic Candida infection relies heavily on the capacity of professional phagocytes of the innate immune system to ingest and destroy fungal cells. A number of pathogens, including C. albicans, have evolved mechanisms that attenuate the efficiency of phagosome-mediated inactivation, promoting their survival and replication within the host. Here we visualize host-pathogen interactions using live-cell imaging and show that viable, but not heat- or UV-killed C. albicans cells profoundly delay phagosome maturation in macrophage cell lines and primary macrophages. The ability of C. albicans to delay phagosome maturation is dependent on cell wall composition and fungal morphology. Loss of cell wall O-mannan is associated with enhanced acquisition of phagosome maturation markers, distinct changes in Rab GTPase acquisition by the maturing phagosome, impaired hyphal growth within macrophage phagosomes, profound changes in macrophage actin dynamics, and ultimately a reduced ability of fungal cells to escape from macrophage phagosomes. The loss of cell wall O-mannan leads to exposure of β-glucan in the inner cell wall, facilitating recognition by Dectin-1, which is associated with enhanced phagosome maturation. PMID:25467440

  17. Cerebral macroabscess caused by Candida albicans in an immunocompetent patient: A diagnostic challenge

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo, Sônia M.; Campolina, Sabrina; Rosa, Carlos A.; Gontijo, Marcus; Tirone, Thelma; Assunção, Claudia B.; Freire, Tarcísio F.A.; Christo, Paulo P.; Caligiorne, Rachel B.

    2014-01-01

    We describe the history of a 24-year-old immunocompetent man with an expansive lesion in the brainstem that, after many misdiagnoses, was found to be caused by a Candida albicans abscess. One year after surgery and 3 months of fluconazole treatment, the patient was asymptomatic and all image and laboratory tests were normal. PMID:24567895

  18. The Ess1 prolyl isomerase is required for growth and morphogenetic switching in Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Devasahayam, Gina; Chaturvedi, Vishnu; Hanes, Steven D

    2002-01-01

    Prolyl-isomerases (PPIases) are found in all organisms and are important for the folding and activity of many proteins. Of the 13 PPIases in Saccharomyces cerevisiae only Ess1, a parvulin-class PPIase, is essential for growth. Ess1 is required to complete mitosis, and Ess1 and its mammalian homolog, Pin1, interact directly with RNA polymerase II. Here, we isolate the ESS1 gene from the pathogenic fungus Candida albicans and show that it is functionally homologous to the S. cerevisiae ESS1. We generate conditional-lethal (ts) alleles of C. albicans ESS1 and use these mutations to demonstrate that ESS1 is essential for growth in C. albicans. We also show that reducing the dosage or activity of ESS1 blocks morphogenetic switching from the yeast to the hyphal and pseudohyphal forms under certain conditions. Analysis of double mutants of ESS1 and TUP1 or CPH1, two genes known to be involved in morphogenetic switching, suggests that ESS1 functions in the same pathway as CPH1 and upstream of or in parallel to TUP1. Given that switching is important for virulence of C. albicans, inhibitors of Ess1 might be useful as antifungal agents. PMID:11805043

  19. Effect of ethanolic extract of Ecballium elaterium against Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Adwan, Ghaleb; Salameh, Yousef; Adwan, Kamel

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the antimicrobial activity of ethanolic extract of Ecballium elaterium (E. elaterium) fruits alone against Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) strains and Candida albicans (C. albicans) strains, or in combination with penicillin against Staphylococcus areus strains. Methods Evaluation of the antimicrobial activity or synergy interaction was carried out using microdilution method. Results The results showed that ethanolic extract of E. elaterium fruits has antimicrobial activity against methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA), methicillin sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) and C. albicans. This extract showed a significant decrease in minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of penicillin against both MRSA and MSSA strains. Fractional inhibitory concentration index (FIC) between penicillin and ethanolic extract of E. elaterium fruits against these test strains was less than 0.5. Conclusions This study suggests that ethanolic extract of E. elaterium fruits has antimicrobial activity against S. aureus and C. albicans and there is a possibility of concurrent use of penicillin and E. elaterium extract in combination in the treatment of infections caused by MRSA and MSSA strains. A wider study is needed to identify the effective components, the mode of action and the possible toxic effect in vivo of these ingredients. PMID:23569813

  20. Candida albicans Mucin Msb2 Is a Broad-Range Protectant against Antimicrobial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Swidergall, Marc; Ernst, Andreas M.

    2013-01-01

    The human fungal pathogen Candida albicans releases a large glycofragment of the Msb2 surface protein (Msb2*) into the growth environment, which protects against the action of human antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) LL-37 and histatin-5. Quantitation of Msb2*/LL-37 interactions by microscale thermophoresis revealed high-affinity binding (dissociation constant [KD] = 73 nM), which was lost or greatly diminished by lack of O-glycosylation or by Msb2* denaturation. Msb2* also interacted with human α- and β-defensins and protected C. albicans against these AMPs. In addition, the lipopeptide antibiotic daptomycin was bound and inactivated by Msb2*, which prevented the killing of bacterial pathogens Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, and Corynebacterium pseudodiphtheriticum. In coculturings or mixed biofilms of S. aureus with C. albicans wild-type but not msb2 mutant strains, the protective effects of Msb2* on the bactericidal action of daptomycin were demonstrated. These results suggest that tight binding of shed Msb2* to AMPs that occurs during bacterial coinfections with C. albicans compromises antibacterial therapy by inactivating a relevant reserve antibiotic. PMID:23733470

  1. The Antifungal Plant Defensin HsAFP1 from Heuchera sanguinea Induces Apoptosis in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Aerts, An M.; Bammens, Leen; Govaert, Gilmer; Carmona-Gutierrez, Didac; Madeo, Frank; Cammue, Bruno P. A.; Thevissen, Karin

    2011-01-01

    Plant defensins are active against plant and human pathogenic fungi (such as Candida albicans) and baker's yeast. However, they are non-toxic to human cells, providing a possible source for treatment of fungal infections. In this study, we characterized the mode of action of the antifungal plant defensin HsAFP1 from coral bells by screening the Saccharomyces cerevisiae deletion mutant library for mutants with altered HsAFP1 sensitivity and verified the obtained genetic data by biochemical assays in S. cerevisiae and C. albicans. We identified 84 genes, which when deleted conferred at least fourfold hypersensitivity or resistance to HsAFP1. A considerable part of these genes were found to be implicated in mitochondrial functionality. In line, sodium azide, which blocks the respiratory electron transport chain, antagonized HsAFP1 antifungal activity, suggesting that a functional respiratory chain is indispensable for HsAFP1 antifungal action. Since mitochondria are the main source of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), we investigated the ROS-inducing nature of HsAFP1. We showed that HsAFP1 treatment of C. albicans resulted in ROS accumulation. As ROS accumulation is one of the phenotypic markers of apoptosis in yeast, we could further demonstrate that HsAFP1 induced apoptosis in C. albicans. These data provide novel mechanistic insights in the mode of action of a plant defensin. PMID:21993350

  2. Genome-Wide Synthetic Genetic Screening by Transposon Mutagenesis in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Horton, Brooke N.; Kumar, Anuj

    2016-01-01

    Transposon-based mutagenesis is an effective method for genetic screening on a genome-wide scale, with particular applicability in organisms possessing compact genomes where transforming DNA tends to integrate by homologous recombination. Methods for transposon mutagenesis have been applied with great success in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and in the related pathogenic yeast Candida albicans. In C. albicans, we have implemented transposon mutagenesis to generate heterozygous mutations for the analysis of complex haploinsufficiency, a type of synthetic genetic interaction wherein a pair of non-complementing heterozygous mutations results in a stronger phenotype then either individual mutation in isolation. Genes exhibiting complex haploinsufficiency typically function within a regulatory pathway, in parallel pathways, or in parallel branches within a single pathway. Here, we present protocols to implement transposon mutagenesis for complex haploinsufficiency screening in C. albicans, indicating methods for transposon construction, mutagenesis, phenotypic screening, and identification of insertion sites in strains of interest. In total, the approach is a useful means to implement large-scale synthetic genetic screening in the diploid C. albicans. PMID:25636616

  3. Chlamydospore formation in Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis--an enigmatic developmental programme.

    PubMed

    Staib, Peter; Morschhäuser, Joachim

    2007-01-01

    Chlamydospore formation has served for a long time for identification of the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans, but the biological function of these structures still remains a secret. They have been proposed to allow survival in harsh environmental conditions, but this assumption remains to be proven. Chlamydospores are produced only by the two closely related species C. albicans and Candida dubliniensis, whose natural habitats are humans and warm-blooded animals, but not by other Candida species that are also found outside animal hosts. However, no role in the pathogenesis of Candida infections has been assigned to these unusual cells and only a limited number of studies have been conducted in the past to unravel their function. The development of new molecular tools and the recent discovery of mating in C. albicans have also restimulated investigations to understand the morphogenesis and function of chlamydospores. The finding that chlamydospore formation is differentially controlled by certain environmental signals in C. albicans and C. dubliniensis has opened new approaches to study the regulation of this morphogenetic programme. These studies have already identified genes and signalling pathways that are required for chlamydospore production and should lead to a detailed understanding of this fascinating developmental process. PMID:17302741

  4. Kinetic Patterns of Candida albicans Germ Tube Antibody in Critically Ill Patients: Influence on Mortality▿

    PubMed Central

    Zaragoza, Rafael; Pemán, Javier; Quindós, Guillermo; Iruretagoyena, Jose R.; Cuétara, María S.; Ramírez, Paula; Gómez, Maria D.; Camarena, Juan J.; Viudes, Angel; Pontón, José

    2009-01-01

    The influence of kinetic patterns of Candida albicans germ tube antibodies (CAGTA) on mortality was analyzed in six intensive care units. Statistically significant lower mortality rates were found in patients with patterns of increasing CAGTA titers who had been treated with antifungal agents. Thus, antifungal treatment should be considered when CAGTA titers are increasing in critically ill patients. PMID:19675223

  5. Antifungal activity and pore-forming mechanism of astacidin 1 against Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyemin; Lee, Dong Gun

    2014-10-01

    In a previous report, a novel antibacterial peptide astacidin 1 (FKVQNQHGQVVKIFHH) was isolated from hemocyanin of the freshwater crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus. In this study, the antifungal activity and mechanism of astacidin 1 were evaluated. Astacidin 1 exhibited antifungal activity against Candida albicans, Trichosporon beigelii, Malassezia furfur, and Trichophyton rubrum. Also, astacidin 1 had fungal cell selectivity in human erythrocytes without causing hemolysis. To understand the antifungal mechanism, membrane studies were done against C. albicans and T. beigelii. Flow cytometric analysis and K(+) measurement showed membrane damage, resulting in membrane permeabilization and K(+) release-induced membrane depolarization. Furthermore, the calcein leakage from liposomes mimicking C. albicans membrane demonstrated that the membrane-active action was driven by pore-forming mechanism. Live cell imaging using fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled dextrans of various sizes suggested that the radii of pores formed in the C. albicans membrane were 1.4-2.3 nm. Therefore, the present study suggests that astacidin 1 exerts its antifungal effect by damaging the fungal membrane via pore formation. PMID:24955933

  6. Molecular Epidemiology of Candida albicans and Its Closely Related Yeasts Candida dubliniensis and Candida africana▿

    PubMed Central

    Romeo, Orazio; Criseo, Giuseppe

    2009-01-01

    We performed a molecular study to determine the occurrence of Candida albicans, Candida africana, and Candida dubliniensis in different clinical samples. The study provides new insights into the epidemiology of candidiasis in hospitalized patients in three hospitals in southern Italy. It also reports the first detailed epidemiological data concerning the occurrence of C. africana in clinical samples. PMID:18987171

  7. Molecular epidemiology of Candida albicans and its closely related yeasts Candida dubliniensis and Candida africana.

    PubMed

    Romeo, Orazio; Criseo, Giuseppe

    2009-01-01

    We performed a molecular study to determine the occurrence of Candida albicans, Candida africana, and Candida dubliniensis in different clinical samples. The study provides new insights into the epidemiology of candidiasis in hospitalized patients in three hospitals in southern Italy. It also reports the first detailed epidemiological data concerning the occurrence of C. africana in clinical samples. PMID:18987171

  8. Proteomics unravels extracellular vesicles as carriers of classical cytoplasmic proteins in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Gil-Bona, Ana; Llama-Palacios, Arancha; Parra, Claudia Marcela; Vivanco, Fernando; Nombela, César; Monteoliva, Lucía; Gil, Concha

    2015-01-01

    The commensal fungus Candida albicans secretes a considerable number of proteins and, as in different fungal pathogens, extracellular vesicles (EVs) have also been observed. Our report contains the first proteomic analysis of EVs in C. albicans and a comparative proteomic study of the soluble secreted proteins. With this purpose, cell-free culture supernatants from C. albicans were separated into EVs and EV-free supernatant and analyzed by LC-MS/MS. A total of 96 proteins were identified including 75 and 61 proteins in EVs and EV-free supernatant, respectively. Out of these, 40 proteins were found in secretome by proteomic analysis for the first time. The soluble proteins were enriched in cell wall and secreted pathogenesis related proteins. Interestingly, more than 90% of these EV-free supernatant proteins were classical secretory proteins with predicted N-terminal signal peptide, whereas all the leaderless proteins involved in metabolism, including some moonlighting proteins, or in the exocytosis and endocytosis process were exclusively cargo of the EVs. We propose a model of the different mechanisms used by C. albicans secreted proteins to reach the extracellular medium. Furthermore, we tested the potential of the Bgl2 protein, identified in vesicles and EV-free supernatant, to protect against a systemic candidiasis in a murine model. PMID:25367658

  9. EGFR and HER2 receptor kinase signaling mediate epithelial cell invasion by Candida albicans during oropharyngeal infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Weidong; Phan, Quynh T.; Boontheung, Pinmanee; Solis, Norma V.; Loo, Joseph A.; Filler, Scott G.

    2012-01-01

    The fungus Candida albicans is the major cause of oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC). A key feature of this disease is fungal invasion of oral epithelial cells, a process that can occur by active penetration and fungal-induced endocytosis. Two invasins, Als3 and Ssa1, induce epithelial cell endocytosis of C. albicans, in part by binding to E-cadherin. However, inhibition of E-cadherin function only partially reduces C. albicans endocytosis, suggesting that there are additional epithelial cell receptors for this organism. Here, we show that the EGF receptor (EGFR) and HER2 function cooperatively to induce the endocytosis of C. albicans hyphae. EGFR and HER2 interact with C. albicans in an Als3- and Ssa1-dependent manner, and this interaction induces receptor autophosphorylation. Signaling through both EGFR and HER2 is required for maximal epithelial cell endocytosis of C. albicans in vitro. Importantly, oral infection with C. albicans stimulates the phosphorylation of EGFR and HER2 in the oral mucosa of mice, and treatment with a dual EGFR and HER2 kinase inhibitor significantly decreases this phosphorylation and reduces the severity of OPC. These results show the importance of EGFR and HER2 signaling in the pathogenesis of OPC and indicate the feasibility of treating candidal infections by targeting the host cell receptors with which the fungus interacts. PMID:22891338

  10. A Versatile Overexpression Strategy in the Pathogenic Yeast Candida albicans: Identification of Regulators of Morphogenesis and Fitness

    PubMed Central

    Cabral, Vitor; Znaidi, Sadri; Goyard, Sophie; Bachellier-Bassi, Sophie; Firon, Arnaud; Legrand, Mélanie; Diogo, Dorothée; Naulleau, Claire; Rossignol, Tristan; d’Enfert, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    Candida albicans is the most frequently encountered human fungal pathogen, causing both superficial infections and life-threatening systemic diseases. Functional genomic studies performed in this organism have mainly used knock-out mutants and extensive collections of overexpression mutants are still lacking. Here, we report the development of a first generation C. albicans ORFeome, the improvement of overexpression systems and the construction of two new libraries of C. albicans strains overexpressing genes for components of signaling networks, in particular protein kinases, protein phosphatases and transcription factors. As a proof of concept, we screened these collections for genes whose overexpression impacts morphogenesis or growth rates in C. albicans. Our screens identified genes previously described for their role in these biological processes, demonstrating the functionality of our strategy, as well as genes that have not been previously associated to these processes. This article emphasizes the potential of systematic overexpression strategies to improve our knowledge of regulatory networks in C. albicans. The C. albicans plasmid and strain collections described here are available at the Fungal Genetics Stock Center. Their extension to a genome-wide scale will represent important resources for the C. albicans community. PMID:23049891

  11. A Candida albicans Strain Expressing Mammalian Interleukin-17A Results in Early Control of Fungal Growth during Disseminated Infection

    PubMed Central

    Huppler, Anna R.; Whibley, Natasha; Woolford, Carol A.; Childs, Erin E.; He, Jie; Biswas, Partha S.; McGeachy, Mandy J.; Mitchell, Aaron P.

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is normally a commensal fungus of the human mucosae and skin, but it causes life-threatening systemic infections in hospital settings in the face of predisposing conditions, such as indwelling catheters, abdominal surgery, or antibiotic use. Immunity to C. albicans involves various immune parameters, but the cytokine interleukin-17A (IL-17A) (also known as IL-17) has emerged as a centrally important mediator of immune defense against both mucosal and systemic candidiasis. Conversely, IL-17A has been suggested to enhance the virulence of C. albicans, indicating that it may exert detrimental effects on pathogenesis. In this study, we hypothesized that a C. albicans strain expressing IL-17A would exhibit reduced virulence in vivo. To that end, we created a Candida-optimized expression cassette encoding murine IL-17A, which was transformed into the DAY286 strain of C. albicans. Candida-derived IL-17A was indistinguishable from murine IL-17A in terms of biological activity and detection in standard enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). Expression of IL-17A did not negatively impact the growth of these strains in vitro. Moreover, the IL-17A-expressing C. albicans strains showed significantly reduced pathogenicity in a systemic model of Candida infection, mainly evident during the early stages of disease. Collectively, these findings suggest that IL-17A mitigates the virulence of C. albicans. PMID:26150537

  12. Secretion and filamentation are mediated by the Candida albicans t-SNAREs Sso2p and Sec9p

    PubMed Central

    Bernardo, Stella M.; Rane, Hallie S.; Chavez-Dozal, Alba; Lee, Samuel A.

    2014-01-01

    To study the role of late secretion in Candida albicans pathogenesis, we created conditional mutant C. albicans strains in which the t-SNARE-encoding genes SSO2 or SEC9 were placed under the control of a tetracycline-regulated promoter. In repressing conditions, C. albicans tetR-SSO2 and tetR-SEC9 mutant strains were defective in cytokinesis and secretion of aspartyl proteases and lipases. The mutant strains also exhibited a defect in filamentation compared to controls, and thus we followed the fate of the C. albicans Spitzenkörper, an assembly of secretory vesicles thought to act as a vesicle-supply center for the growing hyphae. In the absence of Ca Sso2p, the Spitzenkörper dissipated within 5 hours and thin-section electron microscopy revealed an accumulation of secretory vesicles. Moreover, the hyphal tip developed into a globular yeast-like structure rather than maintaining a typical narrow hyphae. These studies indicate that late secretory t-SNARE proteins in C. albicans are required for fundamental cellular processes and contribute to virulence-related attributes of C. albicans pathogenesis. Moreover, these results provide direct evidence for a key role of SNARE proteins in vesicle-mediated polarized hyphal growth of C. albicans. PMID:24911595

  13. The Functions of Mediator in Candida albicans Support a Role in Shaping Species-Specific Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Jelicic, Branka; Lo, Tricia L.; Beaurepaire, Cecile; Bantun, Farkad; Quenault, Tara; Boag, Peter R.; Ramm, Georg; Callaghan, Judy; Beilharz, Traude H.; Nantel, André; Peleg, Anton Y.; Traven, Ana

    2012-01-01

    The Mediator complex is an essential co-regulator of RNA polymerase II that is conserved throughout eukaryotes. Here we present the first study of Mediator in the pathogenic fungus Candida albicans. We focused on the Middle domain subunit Med31, the Head domain subunit Med20, and Srb9/Med13 from the Kinase domain. The C. albicans Mediator shares some roles with model yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe, such as functions in the response to certain stresses and the role of Med31 in the expression of genes regulated by the activator Ace2. The C. albicans Mediator also has additional roles in the transcription of genes associated with virulence, for example genes related to morphogenesis and gene families enriched in pathogens, such as the ALS adhesins. Consistently, Med31, Med20, and Srb9/Med13 contribute to key virulence attributes of C. albicans, filamentation, and biofilm formation; and ALS1 is a biologically relevant target of Med31 for development of biofilms. Furthermore, Med31 affects virulence of C. albicans in the worm infection model. We present evidence that the roles of Med31 and Srb9/Med13 in the expression of the genes encoding cell wall adhesins are different between S. cerevisiae and C. albicans: they are repressors of the FLO genes in S. cerevisiae and are activators of the ALS genes in C. albicans. This suggests that Mediator subunits regulate adhesion in a distinct manner between these two distantly related fungal species. PMID:22496666

  14. Design and evaluation of peptide nucleic acid probes for specific identification of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Joong; Brehm-Stecher, Byron F

    2015-02-01

    Candida albicans is an important cause of systemic fungal infections, and rapid diagnostics for identifying and differentiating C. albicans from other Candida species are critical for the timely application of appropriate antimicrobial therapy, improved patient outcomes, and pharmaceutical cost savings. In this work, two 28S rRNA-directed peptide nucleic acid-fluorescence in situ hybridization (PNA-FISH) probes, P-Ca726 (targeting a novel region of the ribosome) and P-CalB2208 (targeting a previously reported region), were evaluated. Hybridization conditions were optimized by using both fluorescence microscopy (FM) and flow cytometry (FCM), and probes were screened for specificity and discriminative ability against a panel of C. albicans and various nontarget Candida spp. The performance of these PNA probes was compared quantitatively against that of DNA probes or DNA probe/helper combinations directed against the same target regions. Ratiometric analyses of FCM results indicated that both the hybridization quality and yield of the PNA probes were higher than those of the DNA probes. In FCM-based comparisons of the PNA probes, P-Ca726 was found to be highly specific, showing 2.5- to 5.5-fold-higher discriminatory power for C. albicans than P-CalB2208. The use of formamide further improved the performance of the new probe. Our results reinforce the significant practical and diagnostic advantages of PNA probes over their DNA counterparts for FISH and indicate that P-Ca726 may be used advantageously for the rapid and specific identification of C. albicans in clinical and related applications, especially when combined with FCM. PMID:25428160

  15. Multilocus sequence typing of Candida albicans isolates from a burn intensive care unit in Iran.

    PubMed

    Afsarian, Mohammad H; Badali, Hamid; Boekhout, Teun; Shokohi, Tahereh; Katiraee, Farzad

    2015-03-01

    Burn intensive care unit (BICU) patients are specifically exposed to deep-seated nosocomial infections due to Candida albicans. Superficial carriage of C. albicans is a potential source of infection and dissemination, and typing methods could be useful to trace the different isolates. Multilocus sequence typing is a powerful genotyping method for pathogenic micro-organisms, including Candida albicans. Thirty clinical isolates of C. albicans obtained from 22 patients that were admitted to the BICU from a burn hospital at Sari, Mazandaran state, Iran, were studied epidemiologically by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Seventy-five variable nucleotide sites were found. Sixty-two alleles were identified among the seven loci of the C. albicans isolates and one new allele was obtained. Eighteen diploid sequence types (DSTs) were identified, and among those 10 were new. These isolates belonged to nine clonal clusters (CCs) while two isolates occurred as singletons. Eleven (36.7 %) isolates belonged to CC 124 after eBURST analysis and 13 isolates (43.3 %) were assigned to clade 4. Approximately 17 % of the 30 isolates belonged to clade 1 (CC 69 and CC 766). Isolates from several patients with burns were found to be related genetically. Some patients yielded multiple isolates with identical DSTs, suggesting colonization or infection caused by cross-contamination between patients. Isolates that show identical or similar allelic profiles are presumed to be identical or closely related and may be used to evaluate the genetic relationships between isolates from a specific environment such as the BICU. PMID:25596113

  16. Quercetin Sensitizes Fluconazole-Resistant Candida albicans To Induce Apoptotic Cell Death by Modulating Quorum Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Singh, B. R.; Pandey, G.; Verma, S.; Roy, S.; Naqvi, A. H.

    2015-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) regulates group behaviors of Candida albicans such as biofilm, hyphal growth, and virulence factors. The sesquiterpene alcohol farnesol, a QS molecule produced by C. albicans, is known to regulate the expression of virulence weapons of this fungus. Fluconazole (FCZ) is a broad-spectrum antifungal drug that is used for the treatment of C. albicans infections. While FCZ can be cytotoxic at high concentrations, our results show that at much lower concentrations, quercetin (QC), a dietary flavonoid isolated from an edible lichen (Usnea longissima), can be implemented as a sensitizing agent for FCZ-resistant C. albicans NBC099, enhancing the efficacy of FCZ. QC enhanced FCZ-mediated cell killing of NBC099 and also induced cell death. These experiments indicated that the combined application of both drugs was FCZ dose dependent rather than QC dose dependent. In addition, we found that QC strongly suppressed the production of virulence weapons—biofilm formation, hyphal development, phospholipase, proteinase, esterase, and hemolytic activity. Treatment with QC also increased FCZ-mediated cell death in NBC099 biofilms. Interestingly, we also found that QC enhances the anticandidal activity of FCZ by inducing apoptotic cell death. We have also established that this sensitization is reliant on the farnesol response generated by QC. Molecular docking studies also support this conclusion and suggest that QC can form hydrogen bonds with Gln969, Thr1105, Ser1108, Arg1109, Asn1110, and Gly1061 in the ATP binding pocket of adenylate cyclase. Thus, this QS-mediated combined sensitizer (QC)-anticandidal agent (FCZ) strategy may be a novel way to enhance the efficacy of FCZ-based therapy of C. albicans infections. PMID:25645848

  17. Selected mechanisms of molecular resistance of Candida albicans to azole drugs.

    PubMed

    Gołąbek, Karolina; Strzelczyk, Joanna Katarzyna; Owczarek, Aleksander; Cuber, Piotr; Ślemp-Migiel, Anna; Wiczkowski, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    A phenomenon of increasing resistance of Candida spp. to azoles has been observed for several years now. One of the mechanisms of lack of sensitivity to azoles is associated with CDR1, CDR2, MRD1 genes (their products are active transport pumps conditioning drug efflux from pathogen's cell), and ERG11 gene (encoding lanosterol 14α-demethylase). Test material was 120 strains of Candida albicans (60 resistant and 60 susceptible to azole drugs) obtained from clinical samples. The first stage of experiment assessed the expression of CDR1, CDR2, MDR1 and ERG11 genes by Q-PCR. The impact of ERG11 gene's mutations on the expression of this gene was analysed. The final stage of the experiment assessed the level of genome methylation of Candida albicans strains. An increase in the expression of CDR2, MDR1 and ERG11 was observed in azole-resistant strains of Candida albicans in comparison to strains sensitive to this class of drugs. Furthermore, 19 changes in the sequence of ERG11 were detected in tested strains. Four of the discovered mutations: T495A, A530C, G622A and A945C led to the following amino acid substitutions: D116E, K128T, V159I and E266D, respectively. It has also been found that statistically five mutations: T462C, G1309A, C216T, C1257T and A945C affected the expression of ERG11. The applied method of assessing the level of methylation of Candida albicans genome did not confirm its role in the development of resistance to azoles. The results indicate however, that resistance of Candida albicans strains to azole drugs is multifactorial. PMID:25901298

  18. In vitro Effects of Lemongrass Extract on Candida albicans Biofilms, Human Cells Viability, and Denture Surface

    PubMed Central

    Madeira, Petrus L. B.; Carvalho, Letícia T.; Paschoal, Marco A. B.; de Sousa, Eduardo M.; Moffa, Eduardo B.; da Silva, Marcos A. dos Santos; Tavarez, Rudys de Jesus Rodolfo; Gonçalves, Letícia M.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether immersion of a denture surface in lemongrass extract (LGE) has effects on C. albicans biofilms, human cell viability and denture surface. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal fungicidal concentration (MFC) were performed for LGE against C. albicans. For biofilm analysis, discs were fabricated using a denture acrylic resin with surface roughness standardization. C. albicans biofilms were developed on saliva-coated discs, and the effects of LGE at MIC, 5XMIC, and 10XMIC were investigated during biofilm formation and after biofilm maturation. Biofilms were investigated for cell counting, metabolic activity, and microscopic analysis. The cytotoxicity of different concentrations of LGE to peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) was analyzed using MTT. The effects of LGE on acrylic resin were verified by measuring changes in roughness, color and flexural strength after 28 days of immersion. Data were analyzed by ANOVA, followed by a Tukey test at a 5% significance level. The minimal concentration of LGE required to inhibit C. albicans growth was 0.625 mg/mL, while MFC was 2.5 mg/mL. The presence of LGE during biofilm development resulted in a reduction of cell counting (p < 0.05), which made the MIC sufficient to reduce approximately 90% of cells (p < 0.0001). The exposure of LGE after biofilm maturation also had a significant antifungal effect at all concentrations (p < 0.05). When compared to the control group, the exposure of PBMC to LGE at MIC resulted in similar viability (p > 0.05). There were no verified differences in color perception, roughness, or flexural strength after immersion in LGE at MIC compared to the control (p > 0.05). It could be concluded that immersion of the denture surface in LGE was effective in reducing C. albicans biofilms with no deleterious effects on acrylic properties at MIC. MIC was also an effective and safe concentration for use. PMID:27446818

  19. Niche-Specific Requirement for Hyphal Wall protein 1 in Virulence of Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Staab, Janet F.; Datta, Kausik; Rhee, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Specialized Candida albicans cell surface proteins called adhesins mediate binding of the fungus to host cells. The mammalian transglutaminase (TG) substrate and adhesin, Hyphal wall protein 1 (Hwp1), is expressed on the hyphal form of C. albicans where it mediates fungal adhesion to epithelial cells. Hwp1 is also required for biofilm formation and mating thus the protein functions in both fungal-host and self-interactions. Hwp1 is required for full virulence of C. albicans in murine models of disseminated candidiasis and of esophageal candidiasis. Previous studies correlated TG activity on the surface of oral epithelial cells, produced by epithelial TG (TG1), with tight binding of C. albicans via Hwp1 to the host cell surfaces. However, the contribution of other Tgs, specifically tissue TG (TG2), to disseminated candidiasis mediated by Hwp1 was not known. A newly created hwp1 null strain in the wild type SC5314 background was as virulent as the parental strain in C57BL/6 mice, and virulence was retained in C57BL/6 mice deleted for Tgm2 (TG2). Further, the hwp1 null strains displayed modestly reduced virulence in BALB/c mice as did strain DD27-U1, an independently created hwp1Δ/Δ in CAI4 corrected for its ura3Δ defect at the URA3 locus. Hwp1 was still needed to produce wild type biofilms, and persist on murine tongues in an oral model of oropharyngeal candidiasis consistent with previous studies by us and others. Finally, lack of Hwp1 affected the translocation of C. albicans from the mouse intestine into the bloodstream of mice. Together, Hwp1 appears to have a minor role in disseminated candidiasis, independent of tissue TG, but a key function in host- and self-association to the surface of oral mucosa. PMID:24260489

  20. The Role of Candida albicans SPT20 in Filamentation, Biofilm Formation and Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Xiaojiang; Fuchs, Beth Burgwyn; Wang, Yan; Chen, Weiping; J. Yuen, Grace; Chen, Rosalyn B.; Jayamani, Elamparithi; Anastassopoulou, Cleo; Pukkila-Worley, Read; Coleman, Jeffrey J.; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2014-01-01

    Candida albicans is a ubiquitous fungus, which can cause very serious and sometimes life-threatening infections in susceptible patients. We used Caenorhabditis elegans as a model host to screen a library of C. albicans mutants for decreased virulence and identified SPT20 as important for virulence. The transcription co-activator SPT20 was identified originally as a suppressor of Ty and solo δ insertion mutations, which can cause transcription defects in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It is resistant to the toxicity caused by overexpression of GAL4-VP16. We constructed a C. albicans spt20Δ/Δ mutant and found the spt20Δ/Δ strain was significantly less virulent than the wild-type strain SC5314 in C. elegans (p < 0.0001), Galleria mellonella (p < 0.01) and mice (p < 0.001). Morphologically, spt20Δ/Δ mutant cells demonstrated a “snow-flake” shape and clustered together; prolonged culture times resulted in increased size of the cluster. The clustered morphology was associated with defects in nuclei distribution, as the nuclei were not observed in many cellular compartments. In addition, the C. albicans spt20Δ/Δ mutant resulted in defects in hyphae and biofilm formation (compared to the wild-type strain, p < 0.05), and sensitivity to cell wall and osmotic stressors, and to antifungal agents. Thus our study demonstrated a role of C. albicans SPT20 in overall morphology and distribution of nuclear material, which may cause the defects in filamentation and biofilm formation directly when this gene is deleted. PMID:24732310

  1. Candida albicans Scavenges Host Zinc via Pra1 during Endothelial Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Citiulo, Francesco; Jacobsen, Ilse D.; Miramón, Pedro; Schild, Lydia; Brunke, Sascha; Zipfel, Peter; Brock, Matthias; Hube, Bernhard; Wilson, Duncan

    2012-01-01

    The ability of pathogenic microorganisms to assimilate essential nutrients from their hosts is critical for pathogenesis. Here we report endothelial zinc sequestration by the major human fungal pathogen, Candida albicans. We hypothesised that, analogous to siderophore-mediated iron acquisition, C. albicans utilises an extracellular zinc scavenger for acquiring this essential metal. We postulated that such a “zincophore” system would consist of a secreted factor with zinc-binding properties, which can specifically reassociate with the fungal cell surface. In silico analysis of the C. albicans secretome for proteins with zinc binding motifs identified the pH-regulated antigen 1 (Pra1). Three-dimensional modelling of Pra1 indicated the presence of at least two zinc coordination sites. Indeed, recombinantly expressed Pra1 exhibited zinc binding properties in vitro. Deletion of PRA1 in C. albicans prevented fungal sequestration and utilisation of host zinc, and specifically blocked host cell damage in the absence of exogenous zinc. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that PRA1 arose in an ancient fungal lineage and developed synteny with ZRT1 (encoding a zinc transporter) before divergence of the Ascomycota and Basidiomycota. Structural modelling indicated physical interaction between Pra1 and Zrt1 and we confirmed this experimentally by demonstrating that Zrt1 was essential for binding of soluble Pra1 to the cell surface of C. albicans. Therefore, we have identified a novel metal acquisition system consisting of a secreted zinc scavenger (“zincophore”), which reassociates with the fungal cell. Furthermore, functional similarities with phylogenetically unrelated prokaryotic systems indicate that syntenic zinc acquisition loci have been independently selected during evolution. PMID:22761575

  2. Design and Evaluation of Peptide Nucleic Acid Probes for Specific Identification of Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun-Joong

    2014-01-01

    Candida albicans is an important cause of systemic fungal infections, and rapid diagnostics for identifying and differentiating C. albicans from other Candida species are critical for the timely application of appropriate antimicrobial therapy, improved patient outcomes, and pharmaceutical cost savings. In this work, two 28S rRNA-directed peptide nucleic acid-fluorescence in situ hybridization (PNA-FISH) probes, P-Ca726 (targeting a novel region of the ribosome) and P-CalB2208 (targeting a previously reported region), were evaluated. Hybridization conditions were optimized by using both fluorescence microscopy (FM) and flow cytometry (FCM), and probes were screened for specificity and discriminative ability against a panel of C. albicans and various nontarget Candida spp. The performance of these PNA probes was compared quantitatively against that of DNA probes or DNA probe/helper combinations directed against the same target regions. Ratiometric analyses of FCM results indicated that both the hybridization quality and yield of the PNA probes were higher than those of the DNA probes. In FCM-based comparisons of the PNA probes, P-Ca726 was found to be highly specific, showing 2.5- to 5.5-fold-higher discriminatory power for C. albicans than P-CalB2208. The use of formamide further improved the performance of the new probe. Our results reinforce the significant practical and diagnostic advantages of PNA probes over their DNA counterparts for FISH and indicate that P-Ca726 may be used advantageously for the rapid and specific identification of C. albicans in clinical and related applications, especially when combined with FCM. PMID:25428160

  3. Integration of Posttranscriptional Gene Networks into Metabolic Adaptation and Biofilm Maturation in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Verma-Gaur, Jiyoti; Qu, Yue; Harrison, Paul F; Lo, Tricia L; Quenault, Tara; Dagley, Michael J; Bellousoff, Matthew; Powell, David R; Beilharz, Traude H; Traven, Ana

    2015-10-01

    The yeast Candida albicans is a human commensal and opportunistic pathogen. Although both commensalism and pathogenesis depend on metabolic adaptation, the regulatory pathways that mediate metabolic processes in C. albicans are incompletely defined. For example, metabolic change is a major feature that distinguishes community growth of C. albicans in biofilms compared to suspension cultures, but how metabolic adaptation is functionally interfaced with the structural and gene regulatory changes that drive biofilm maturation remains to be fully understood. We show here that the RNA binding protein Puf3 regulates a posttranscriptional mRNA network in C. albicans that impacts on mitochondrial biogenesis, and provide the first functional data suggesting evolutionary rewiring of posttranscriptional gene regulation between the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and C. albicans. A proportion of the Puf3 mRNA network is differentially expressed in biofilms, and by using a mutant in the mRNA deadenylase CCR4 (the enzyme recruited to mRNAs by Puf3 to control transcript stability) we show that posttranscriptional regulation is important for mitochondrial regulation in biofilms. Inactivation of CCR4 or dis-regulation of mitochondrial activity led to altered biofilm structure and over-production of extracellular matrix material. The extracellular matrix is critical for antifungal resistance and immune evasion, and yet of all biofilm maturation pathways extracellular matrix biogenesis is the least understood. We propose a model in which the hypoxic biofilm environment is sensed by regulators such as Ccr4 to orchestrate metabolic adaptation, as well as the regulation of extracellular matrix production by impacting on the expression of matrix-related cell wall genes. Therefore metabolic changes in biofilms might be intimately linked to a key biofilm maturation mechanism that ultimately results in untreatable fungal disease. PMID:26474309

  4. Evaluation of a rapid immunochromatographic assay for identification of Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis.

    PubMed

    Marot-Leblond, Agnes; Grimaud, Linda; David, Sandrine; Sullivan, Derek J; Coleman, David C; Ponton, Jose; Robert, Raymond

    2004-11-01

    Candida dubliniensis was first established as a novel yeast species in 1995. It is particularly associated with recurrent episodes of oral candidosis in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients, but it has also been detected at other anatomical sites and at a low incidence level in non-HIV-infected patients. It shares so many phenotypic characteristics with C. albicans that it is easily misidentified as such. No rapid, simple, and commercial test that allows differentiation between C. dubliniensis and C. albicans has been developed, until now. Accurate species identification requires the use of genotype-based techniques that are not routinely available in most clinical microbiology diagnostic laboratories. The present study was designed to evaluate the efficiency of a new test (the immunochromatographic membrane [ICM] albi-dubli test; SR2B, Avrille, France) to differentiate between C. albicans and C. dubliniensis. The organisms evaluated were strains whose identities had previously been confirmed by PCR tests and freshly isolated clinical strains and included 58 C. albicans isolates, 60 C. dubliniensis isolates, and 82 isolates belonging to other species of yeast. The ICM albi-dubli test is based on the principle of immunochromatographic analysis and involves the use of two distinct monoclonal antibodies that recognize two unrelated epitopes expressed by both species or specific to only one species. The assay requires no complex instrumentation for analysis and can be recommended for routine use in clinical microbiology laboratories. Results are obtained within 2 h and 30 min and are easy to interpret. This evaluation demonstrated the good performance of this immunochromatographic test for C. albicans and C. dubliniensis isolated on Sabouraud dextrose agar, CHOROMagar Candida, and CandidaSelect, with sensitivities and specificities ranging from 93.1 to 100%. These parameters decreased, however, to 91.4% when the test was performed with yeast isolated

  5. Evaluation of a Rapid Immunochromatographic Assay for Identification of Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis

    PubMed Central

    Marot-Leblond, Agnes; Grimaud, Linda; David, Sandrine; Sullivan, Derek J.; Coleman, David C.; Ponton, Jose; Robert, Raymond

    2004-01-01

    Candida dubliniensis was first established as a novel yeast species in 1995. It is particularly associated with recurrent episodes of oral candidosis in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients, but it has also been detected at other anatomical sites and at a low incidence level in non-HIV-infected patients. It shares so many phenotypic characteristics with C. albicans that it is easily misidentified as such. No rapid, simple, and commercial test that allows differentiation between C. dubliniensis and C. albicans has been developed, until now. Accurate species identification requires the use of genotype-based techniques that are not routinely available in most clinical microbiology diagnostic laboratories. The present study was designed to evaluate the efficiency of a new test (the immunochromatographic membrane [ICM] albi-dubli test; SR2B, Avrillé, France) to differentiate between C. albicans and C. dubliniensis. The organisms evaluated were strains whose identities had previously been confirmed by PCR tests and freshly isolated clinical strains and included 58 C. albicans isolates, 60 C. dubliniensis isolates, and 82 isolates belonging to other species of yeast. The ICM albi-dubli test is based on the principle of immunochromatographic analysis and involves the use of two distinct monoclonal antibodies that recognize two unrelated epitopes expressed by both species or specific to only one species. The assay requires no complex instrumentation for analysis and can be recommended for routine use in clinical microbiology laboratories. Results are obtained within 2 h and 30 min and are easy to interpret. This evaluation demonstrated the good performance of this immunochromatographic test for C. albicans and C. dubliniensis isolated on Sabouraud dextrose agar, CHOROMagar Candida, and CandidaSelect, with sensitivities and specificities ranging from 93.1 to 100%. These parameters decreased, however, to 91.4% when the test was performed with yeast isolated

  6. In Vitro Analysis of Finasteride Activity against Candida albicans Urinary Biofilm Formation and Filamentation

    PubMed Central

    Chavez-Dozal, Alba A.; Lown, Livia; Jahng, Maximillian; Walraven, Carla J.

    2014-01-01

    Candida albicans is the 3rd most common cause of catheter-associated urinary tract infections, with a strong propensity to form drug-resistant catheter-related biofilms. Due to the limited efficacy of available antifungals against biofilms, drug repurposing has been investigated in order to identify novel agents with activities against fungal biofilms. Finasteride is a 5-α-reductase inhibitor commonly used for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia, with activity against human type II and III isoenzymes. We analyzed the Candida Genome Database and identified a C. albicans homolog of type III 5-α-reductase, Dfg10p, which shares 27% sequence identity and 41% similarity to the human type III 5-α-reductase. Thus, we investigated finasteride for activity against C. albicans urinary biofilms, alone and in combination with amphotericin B or fluconazole. Finasteride alone was highly effective in the prevention of C. albicans biofilm formation at doses of ≥16 mg/liter and the treatment of preformed biofilms at doses of ≥128 mg/liter. In biofilm checkerboard analyses, finasteride exhibited synergistic activity in the prevention of biofilm formation in a combination of 4 mg/liter finasteride with 2 mg/liter fluconazole. Finasteride inhibited filamentation, thus suggesting a potential mechanism of action. These results indicate that finasteride alone is highly active in the prevention of C. albicans urinary biofilms in vitro and has synergistic activity in combination with fluconazole. Further investigation of the clinical utility of finasteride in the prevention of urinary candidiasis is warranted. PMID:25049253

  7. Multilocus Sequence Typing for Analyses of Clonality of Candida albicans Strains in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kuo-Wei; Chen, Yee-Chun; Lo, Hsiu-Jung; Odds, Frank C.; Wang, Tzu-Hui; Lin, Chi-Yang; Li, Shu-Ying

    2006-01-01

    Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) was used to characterize the genetic profiles of 51 Candida albicans isolates collected from 12 hospitals in Taiwan. Among the 51 isolates, 16 were epidemiologically unrelated, 28 were isolates from 11 critically ill, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-negative patients, and 7 were long-term serial isolates from 3 HIV-positive patients. Internal regions of seven housekeeping genes were sequenced. A total of 83 polymorphic nucleotide sites were identified. Ten to 20 different genotypes were observed at the different loci, resulting, when combined, in 45 unique genotype combinations or diploid sequence types (DSTs). Thirty (36.1%) of the 83 individual changes were synonymous and 53 (63.9%) were nonsynonymous. Due to the diploid nature of C. albicans, MLST was more discriminatory than the pulsed-field gel electrophoresis-BssHII-restricted fragment method in discriminating epidemiologically related strains. MLST is able to trace the microevolution over time of C. albicans isolates in the same patient. All but one of the DSTs of our Taiwanese strain collections were novel to the internet C. albicans DST database (http://test1.mlst.net/). The DSTs of C. albicans in Taiwan were analyzed together with those of the reference strains and of the strains from the United Kingdom and United States by unweighted-pair group method using average linkages and minimum spanning tree. Our result showed that the DNA type of each isolate was patient specific and associated with ABC type and decade of isolation but not associated with mating type, anatomical source of isolation, hospital origin, or fluconazole resistance patterns. PMID:16757617

  8. Synergistic mechanism for tetrandrine on fluconazole against Candida albicans through the mitochondrial aerobic respiratory metabolism pathway.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hui; Xie, Si Ming; Li, Shui Xiu; Song, Yan Jun; Lv, Xia Lin; Zhang, Hong

    2014-07-01

    We found that tetrandrine (TET) can reverse the resistance of Candida albicans to fluconazole (FLC) and that this interaction is associated with the inhibition of drug efflux pumps. Mitochondrial aerobic respiration, which plays a major role in C. albicans metabolism, is the primary source of ATP for cellular processes, including the activation of efflux pumps. However, it was unclear if TET exerts its synergistic action against C. albicans via its impact on the mitochondrial aerobic respiratory metabolism. To investigate this mechanism, we examined the impact of FLC in the presence or absence of TET on two C. albicans strains obtained from a single parental source (FLC-sensitive strain CA-1 and FLC-resistant strain CA-16). We analysed key measures of energy generation and conversion, including the activity of respiration chain complexes I and III (CI and CIII), ATP synthase (CV) activity, and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and studied intracellular ATP levels and the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), which has a critical impact on energy transport. Mitochondrial morphology was observed by confocal microscopy. Our functional analyses revealed that, compared with strains treated only with FLC, TET+FLC increased the ATP levels and decreased ΔΨm in CA-1, but decreased ATP levels and increased ΔΨm in CA-16 (P<0.05). Additionally, CI, CIII and CV activity decreased by 23-48%. The production of ROS increased by two- to threefold and mitochondrial morphology was altered in both strains. Our data suggested that TET impacted mitochondrial aerobic respiratory metabolism by influencing the generation and transport of ATP, reducing the utilization of ATP, and resulting in the inhibition of drug efflux pump activity. This activity contributed to the synergistic action of TET on FLC against C. albicans. PMID:24790082

  9. MIG1 Regulates Resistance of Candida albicans against the Fungistatic Effect of Weak Organic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Cottier, Fabien; Tan, Alrina Shin Min; Xu, Xiaoli; Wang, Yue

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is the leading cause of fungal infections; but it is also a member of the human microbiome, an ecosystem of thousands of microbial species potentially influencing the outcome of host-fungal interactions. Accordingly, antibacterial therapy raises the risk of candidiasis, yet the underlying mechanism is currently not fully understood. We hypothesize the existence of bacterial metabolites that normally control C. albicans growth and of fungal resistance mechanisms against these metabolites. Among the most abundant microbiota-derived metabolites found on human mucosal surfaces are weak organic acids (WOAs), such as acetic, propionic, butyric, and lactic acid. Here, we used quantitative growth assays to investigate the dose-dependent fungistatic properties of WOAs on C. albicans growth and found inhibition of growth to occur at physiologically relevant concentrations and pH values. This effect was conserved across distantly related fungal species both inside and outside the CTG clade. We next screened a library of transcription factor mutants and identified several genes required for the resistance of C. albicans to one or more WOAs. A single gene, MIG1, previously known for its role in glucose repression, conferred resistance against all four acids tested. Consistent with glucose being an upstream activator of Mig1p, the presence of this carbon source was required for WOA resistance in wild-type C. albicans. Conversely, a MIG1-complemented strain completely restored the glucose-dependent resistance against WOAs. We conclude that Mig1p plays a central role in orchestrating a transcriptional program to fight against the fungistatic effect of this class of highly abundant metabolites produced by the gastrointestinal tract microbiota. PMID:26297702

  10. In vitro Effects of Lemongrass Extract on Candida albicans Biofilms, Human Cells Viability, and Denture Surface.

    PubMed

    Madeira, Petrus L B; Carvalho, Letícia T; Paschoal, Marco A B; de Sousa, Eduardo M; Moffa, Eduardo B; da Silva, Marcos A Dos Santos; Tavarez, Rudys de Jesus Rodolfo; Gonçalves, Letícia M

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether immersion of a denture surface in lemongrass extract (LGE) has effects on C. albicans biofilms, human cell viability and denture surface. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal fungicidal concentration (MFC) were performed for LGE against C. albicans. For biofilm analysis, discs were fabricated using a denture acrylic resin with surface roughness standardization. C. albicans biofilms were developed on saliva-coated discs, and the effects of LGE at MIC, 5XMIC, and 10XMIC were investigated during biofilm formation and after biofilm maturation. Biofilms were investigated for cell counting, metabolic activity, and microscopic analysis. The cytotoxicity of different concentrations of LGE to peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) was analyzed using MTT. The effects of LGE on acrylic resin were verified by measuring changes in roughness, color and flexural strength after 28 days of immersion. Data were analyzed by ANOVA, followed by a Tukey test at a 5% significance level. The minimal concentration of LGE required to inhibit C. albicans growth was 0.625 mg/mL, while MFC was 2.5 mg/mL. The presence of LGE during biofilm development resulted in a reduction of cell counting (p < 0.05), which made the MIC sufficient to reduce approximately 90% of cells (p < 0.0001). The exposure of LGE after biofilm maturation also had a significant antifungal effect at all concentrations (p < 0.05). When compared to the control group, the exposure of PBMC to LGE at MIC resulted in similar viability (p > 0.05). There were no verified differences in color perception, roughness, or flexural strength after immersion in LGE at MIC compared to the control (p > 0.05). It could be concluded that immersion of the denture surface in LGE was effective in reducing C. albicans biofilms with no deleterious effects on acrylic properties at MIC. MIC was also an effective and safe concentration for use. PMID:27446818

  11. Candida albicans triggers the expression of inflammatory genes in human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jing; Feng, Wenli; Zhang, Jinyu; Xi, Zhiqin; Ma, Yan; Wang, Yanqing; Ji, Ying; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the pathogenesis of Candida albicans in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and to screen for aberrantly expressed genes during the process of infection. GSE7355 (accession no.) was downloaded from the National Center of Biotechnology Information Gene Expression Omnibus database and used to identify the differentially-expressed genes (DEGs) between the two groups, which included 4 samples from an untreated HUVEC control group, and 4 samples from HUVECs exposed to C. albicans. Subsequently, the gene ontology (GO) function package was used to perform GO and pathway enrichment analysis, prior to the extraction of DEG correlations in the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes. A protein-protein interaction (PPI) network was constructed using the String database. In total, 77 DEGs were identified, including 69 upregulated and 8 downregulated DEGs in the C. albicans-infected HUVEC samples. DEGs were significantly enriched in response to external stimuli and chemokine activity. In addition, DEG FBJ murine osteosarcoma viral oncogene homolog (FOS) and interleukin (IL)-6 were significantly enriched in the Toll-like receptor signaling pathway. Nuclear factor κ light polypeptide gene enhancer in B cells 2 (NFKB2) was significantly enriched in the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway. In the interaction network of DEGs, according data included in the KEGG database, FOS and NFKB2 had higher connectivity degrees. Notably, FOS, IL-6 and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 were demonstrated to have higher connectivity degrees in the PPI network. FOS, IL-6 and NFKB2 may be important genes for C. albicans infection in HUVECs, and these genes may act as therapeutic targets to treat patients infected with C. albicans. PMID:27602073

  12. Quercetin sensitizes fluconazole-resistant candida albicans to induce apoptotic cell death by modulating quorum sensing.

    PubMed

    Singh, B N; Upreti, D K; Singh, B R; Pandey, G; Verma, S; Roy, S; Naqvi, A H; Rawat, A K S

    2015-04-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) regulates group behaviors of Candida albicans such as biofilm, hyphal growth, and virulence factors. The sesquiterpene alcohol farnesol, a QS molecule produced by C. albicans, is known to regulate the expression of virulence weapons of this fungus. Fluconazole (FCZ) is a broad-spectrum antifungal drug that is used for the treatment of C. albicans infections. While FCZ can be cytotoxic at high concentrations, our results show that at much lower concentrations, quercetin (QC), a dietary flavonoid isolated from an edible lichen (Usnea longissima), can be implemented as a sensitizing agent for FCZ-resistant C. albicans NBC099, enhancing the efficacy of FCZ. QC enhanced FCZ-mediated cell killing of NBC099 and also induced cell death. These experiments indicated that the combined application of both drugs was FCZ dose dependent rather than QC dose dependent. In addition, we found that QC strongly suppressed the production of virulence weapons-biofilm formation, hyphal development, phospholipase, proteinase, esterase, and hemolytic activity. Treatment with QC also increased FCZ-mediated cell death in NBC099 biofilms. Interestingly, we also found that QC enhances the anticandidal activity of FCZ by inducing apoptotic cell death. We have also established that this sensitization is reliant on the farnesol response generated by QC. Molecular docking studies also support this conclusion and suggest that QC can form hydrogen bonds with Gln969, Thr1105, Ser1108, Arg1109, Asn1110, and Gly1061 in the ATP binding pocket of adenylate cyclase. Thus, this QS-mediated combined sensitizer (QC)-anticandidal agent (FCZ) strategy may be a novel way to enhance the efficacy of FCZ-based therapy of C. albicans infections. PMID:25645848

  13. Effect of Delta-9-Tetrahydrocannabinol on Mouse Resistance to Systemic Candida albicans Infection

    PubMed Central

    Blumstein, Gideon W.; Parsa, Arya; Park, Anthony K.; McDowell, Beverly L. P.; Arroyo-Mendoza, Melissa; Girguis, Marie; Adler-Moore, Jill P.; Olson, Jon; Buckley, Nancy E.

    2014-01-01

    Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC), the psychoactive component of marijuana, is known to suppress the immune responses to bacterial, viral and protozoan infections, but its effects on fungal infections have not been studied. Therefore, we investigated the effects of chronic Δ9-THC treatment on mouse resistance to systemic Candida albicans (C. albicans) infection. To determine the outcome of chronic Δ9-THC treatment on primary, acute systemic candidiasis, c57BL/6 mice were given vehicle or Δ9-THC (16 mg/kg) in vehicle on days 1–4, 8–11 and 15–18. On day 19, mice were infected with 5×105 C. albicans. We also determined the effect of chronic Δ9-THC (4–64 mg/kg) treatment on mice infected with a non-lethal dose of 7.5×104 C. albicans on day 2, followed by a higher challenge with 5×105 C. albicans on day 19. Mouse resistance to the infection was assessed by survival and tissue fungal load. Serum cytokine levels were determine to evaluate the immune responses. In the acute infection, chronic Δ9-THC treatment had no effect on mouse survival or tissue fungal load when compared to vehicle treated mice. However, Δ9-THC significantly suppressed IL-12p70 and IL-12p40 as well as marginally suppressed IL-17 versus vehicle treated mice. In comparison, when mice were given a secondary yeast infection, Δ9-THC significantly decreased survival, increased tissue fungal burden and suppressed serum IFN-γ and IL-12p40 levels compared to vehicle treated mice. The data showed that chronic Δ9-THC treatment decreased the efficacy of the memory immune response to candida infection, which correlated with a decrease in IFN-γ that was only observed after the secondary candida challenge. PMID:25057822

  14. Candida albicans Gene Deletion with a Transient CRISPR-Cas9 System

    PubMed Central

    Min, Kyunghun; Ichikawa, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) and CRISPR-associated gene 9 (CRISPR-Cas9) systems are used for a wide array of genome-editing applications in organisms ranging from fungi to plants and animals. Recently, a CRISPR-Cas9 system has been developed for the diploid fungal pathogen Candida albicans; the system accelerates genetic manipulation dramatically [V. K. Vyas, M. I. Barrasa, and G. R. Fink, Sci Adv 1(3):e1500248, 2015, http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/sciadv.1500248]. We show here that the CRISPR-Cas9 genetic elements can function transiently, without stable integration into the genome, to enable the introduction of a gene deletion construct. We describe a transient CRISPR-Cas9 system for efficient gene deletion in C. albicans. Our observations suggest that there are two mechanisms that lead to homozygous deletions: (i) independent recombination of transforming DNA into each allele and (ii) recombination of transforming DNA into one allele, followed by gene conversion of the second allele. Our approach will streamline gene function analysis in C. albicans, and our results indicate that DNA can function transiently after transformation of this organism. IMPORTANCE The fungus Candida albicans is a major pathogen. Genetic analysis of this organism has revealed determinants of pathogenicity, drug resistance, and other unique biological features, as well as the identities of prospective drug targets. The creation of targeted mutations has been greatly accelerated recently through the implementation of CRISPR genome-editing technology by Vyas et al. [Sci Adv 1(3):e1500248, 2015, http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/sciadv.1500248]. In this study, we find that CRISPR elements can be expressed from genes that are present only transiently, and we develop a transient CRISPR system that further accelerates C. albicans genetic manipulation. PMID:27340698

  15. Integration of Posttranscriptional Gene Networks into Metabolic Adaptation and Biofilm Maturation in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Paul F.; Lo, Tricia L.; Quenault, Tara; Dagley, Michael J.; Bellousoff, Matthew; Powell, David R.; Beilharz, Traude H.; Traven, Ana

    2015-01-01

    The yeast Candida albicans is a human commensal and opportunistic pathogen. Although both commensalism and pathogenesis depend on metabolic adaptation, the regulatory pathways that mediate metabolic processes in C. albicans are incompletely defined. For example, metabolic change is a major feature that distinguishes community growth of C. albicans in biofilms compared to suspension cultures, but how metabolic adaptation is functionally interfaced with the structural and gene regulatory changes that drive biofilm maturation remains to be fully understood. We show here that the RNA binding protein Puf3 regulates a posttranscriptional mRNA network in C. albicans that impacts on mitochondrial biogenesis, and provide the first functional data suggesting evolutionary rewiring of posttranscriptional gene regulation between the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and C. albicans. A proportion of the Puf3 mRNA network is differentially expressed in biofilms, and by using a mutant in the mRNA deadenylase CCR4 (the enzyme recruited to mRNAs by Puf3 to control transcript stability) we show that posttranscriptional regulation is important for mitochondrial regulation in biofilms. Inactivation of CCR4 or dis-regulation of mitochondrial activity led to altered biofilm structure and over-production of extracellular matrix material. The extracellular matrix is critical for antifungal resistance and immune evasion, and yet of all biofilm maturation pathways extracellular matrix biogenesis is the least understood. We propose a model in which the hypoxic biofilm environment is sensed by regulators such as Ccr4 to orchestrate metabolic adaptation, as well as the regulation of extracellular matrix production by impacting on the expression of matrix-related cell wall genes. Therefore metabolic changes in biofilms might be intimately linked to a key biofilm maturation mechanism that ultimately results in untreatable fungal disease. PMID:26474309

  16. Bilateral endogenous Candida albicans subretinal abscess with suspected mixed bacterial infection

    PubMed Central

    Arai, Yusuke; Sato, Yukihiro; Yoshida, Atsushi; Kawashima, Hidetoshi; Kaburaki, Toshikatsu; Gomi, Harumi

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Candida albicans subretinal abscess is extremely rare. To our knowledge, only one unilateral case has been reported. Herein, we report one bilateral case. Mixed bacterial infection was also suspected based on broad-range real-time polymerase chain reaction. Methods A 64-year-old man being treated with oral corticosteroids for interstitial pneumonia visited us for visual loss in the left eye. Best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was 20/20 in the right eye and 8/200 in the left eye. Funduscopy revealed round yellowish-white subretinal lesions with retinal hemorrhage in both eyes. Results Broad-range polymerase chain reaction of the vitreous fluid from the left eye showed a high copy count of bacterial 16s ribosome RNA. Despite large doses of antibiotics, the abscess expanded and vision decreased to light perception in the left eye. Exenteration of the left eye was performed followed by microscopic examination showing Gram-negative bacilli, and C. albicans was also cultured. Antibiotics and the maximum doses of antifungal drugs were administered. However, the abscess in the right eye expanded, and BCVA decreased to 2/200. Vitrectomy and silicone oil tamponade were performed. Vitreous fluid culture revealed C. albicans. At 16 months follow-up, BCVA was stable at 4/200 with healing of the subretinal abscess under silicone oil. Conclusion Since C. albicans subretinal abscess is extremely rare and there was a concurrent mixed bacterial infection, diagnostic procedures in our bilateral case were more complicated than usual. C. albicans infection should be included in the differential diagnosis of subretinal abscesses. PMID:25378901

  17. Genetic and phenotypic characterization of Candida albicans strains isolated from infectious disease patients in Shanghai.

    PubMed

    Hu, Lvyin; Du, Xin; Li, Tianming; Song, Yan; Zai, Shubei; Hu, Xiangnan; Zhang, Xiaonan; Li, Min

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans, as an opportunistic pathogen, can cause superficial and life-threatening candidiasis in immunocompromised individuals. The formation of surface-associated biofilms and the appearance of drug resistance pose a significant challenge for clinical intervention. In this study, a total of 104 hospital-acquired C. alibcans clinical isolates were collected from sterile sites and mucosal lesions of 92 infectious disease patients in the Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center and analysed. The resistance rates to fluconazole, itraconazole and voriconazole were 12.5 %, 15.4 % and 11.5 % respectively. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) analysis identified 63 diploid sequence types (DSTs) with a decentralized phylogeny, of which 37 DSTs (58.7 %) had not been reported in the online MLST database. Loss of heterozygosity was observed in ACC1 and ADP1 sequences obtained from six sequential isolates from a patient receiving antifungal treatment, which exemplified the effect of microevolution on C. albicans genetic alterations. Biofilm formation capability, an important virulence trait of C. albicans, was variable among strains isolated from different anatomical sites (P = 0.0302) and affected by genotypes (P = 0.0185). The mRNA levels of the azole antifungal target ERG11 gene and efflux pump genes (CDR1, CDR2 and MDR1) were detected in 9-18.1 % of azole-resistant and susceptible-dose dependent (S-DD) isolates. Twelve mutations encoding distinct amino acid substitutions in ERG11 were found in azole-resistant and S-DD isolates. Among them, A114S, Y132H and Y257H substitution in the ERG11 gene may be primarily related to azole resistance. Taken together, we observed a high level of diversity within C. albicans isolates. Multiple inter-related underlying mechanisms, including genetic and environmental factors, may account for high surface adhesion or azole resistance in clinical C. albicans infections. PMID:25351710

  18. Candida albicans Airway Colonization Facilitates Subsequent Acinetobacter baumannii Pneumonia in a Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiaojiang; Chen, Ruilan; Zhu, Song; Wang, Huijun; Yan, Dongxing; Zhang, Xiangdong; Farmakiotis, Dimitrios; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2016-06-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the effects of Candida albicans respiratory tract colonization on Acinetobacter baumannii pneumonia in a rat model. Rats were colonized with C. albicans by instillation of 3 × 10(6) CFU into their airways, while sterile saline was instilled in the control group. The colonized rats were further divided into two groups: treated with amphotericin B or not. The rats were subsequently infected with A. baumannii (10(8) CFU by tracheobronchial instillation). A. baumannii lung CFU counts, cytokine lung levels, and rates of A. baumannii pneumonia were compared between groups. In vitro expression of A. baumannii virulence genes was measured by reverse transcription (RT)-PCR after 24-hour incubation with C. albicans or with Mueller-Hinton (MH) broth alone. Rats with Candida colonization developed A. baumannii pneumonia more frequently and had higher A. baumannii CFU burdens and heavier lungs than controls. After A. baumannii infection, lung interleukin 17 (IL-17) concentrations were lower and gamma interferon (IFN-γ) concentrations were higher in Candida-colonized rats than in controls. Candida-colonized rats treated with amphotericin B had a decreased rate of A. baumannii pneumonia and lower IFN-γ levels but higher IL-17 levels than untreated rats. Expression of basC, barB, bauA, ptk, plc2, and pld2 was induced while expression of ompA and abaI was suppressed in A. baumannii cultured in the presence of C. albicans C. albicans colonization facilitated the development of A. baumannii pneumonia in a rat model. Among Candida-colonized rats, antifungal treatment lowered the incidence of A. baumannii pneumonia. These findings could be due to modification of the host immune response and/or expression of A. baumannii virulence genes by Candida spp. PMID:27001817

  19. Cycle Analysis

    2012-03-20

    1. The Cycle Analysis code is an Microsoft Excel code that performs many different types of thermodynamic cycle analysis for power producing systems. The code will calculate the temperature and pressure and all other thermodynamic properties at the inlet and outlet of each component. The code also calculates the power that is produced, the efficiency, and the heat transported in the heater, gas chiller and recuperators. The code provides a schematic of the loop andmore » provides the temperature and pressure at each location in the loop. The code also provides a T-S (temperature-entropy) diagram of the loop and often it provides an pressure enthalpy plot as well. 2. This version of the code concentrates on supercritical CO2 power cycles, but by simply changing the name of the working fluid many other types of fluids can be analyzed. The Cycle Analysis code provided here contains 18 different types of power cycles. Each cycle is contained in one worksheet or tab that the user can select. The user can change the yellow highlighted regions to perform different thermodynamic cycle analysis.« less

  20. Gold Nanoparticle-Photosensitizer Conjugate Based Photodynamic Inactivation of Biofilm Producing Cells: Potential for Treatment of C. albicans Infection in BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sherwani, Mohd. Asif; Tufail, Saba; Khan, Aijaz Ahmed; Owais, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been found to be effective in inhibiting biofilm producing organisms. We investigated the photodynamic effect of gold nanoparticle (GNP) conjugated photosensitizers against Candida albicans biofilm. We also examined the photodynamic efficacy of photosensitizer (PS) conjugated GNPs (GNP-PS) to treat skin and oral C. albicans infection in BALB/c mice. Methods The biomimetically synthesized GNPs were conjugated to photosensitizers viz. methylene blue (MB) or toluidine blue O (TB). The conjugation of PSs with GNPs was characterized by spectroscopic and microscopic techniques. The efficacy of gold nanoparticle conjugates against C. albicans biofilm was demonstrated by XTT assay and microscopic studies. The therapeutic efficacy of the combination of the GNP conjugates against cutaneous C. albicans infection was examined in mouse model by enumerating residual fungal burden and histopathological studies. Results The GNP-PS conjugate based PDT was found to effectively kill both C. albicans planktonic cells and biofilm populating hyphal forms. The mixture of GNPs conjugated to two different PSs significantly depleted the hyphal C. albicans burden against superficial skin and oral C. albicans infection in mice. Conclusion The GNP-PS conjugate combination exhibits synergism in photodynamic inactivation of C. albicans. The GNP conjugate based PDT can be employed effectively in treatment of cutaneous C. albicans infections in model animals. The antibiofilm potential of PDT therapy can also be exploited in depletion of C. albicans on medical appliances such as implants and catheters etc. PMID:26148012

  1. Cycling injuries.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, G. C.

    1993-01-01

    Bicycle-related injuries have increased as cycling has become more popular. Most injuries to recreational riders are associated with overuse or improper fit of the bicycle. Injuries to racers often result from high speeds, which predispose riders to muscle strains, collisions, and falls. Cyclists contact bicycles at the pedals, seat, and handlebars. Each is associated with particular cycling injuries. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8471908

  2. Streptococcus oralis and Candida albicans Synergistically Activate μ-Calpain to Degrade E-cadherin From Oral Epithelial Junctions.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hongbin; Sobue, Takanori; Bertolini, Martinna; Thompson, Angela; Dongari-Bagtzoglou, Anna

    2016-09-15

    Streptococcus oralis forms robust mucosal biofilms with Candida albicans that have increased pathogenic potential. In this study, using oral epithelial cultures, organotypic oral mucosal constructs, and a mouse model of oral infection, we demonstrated that S. oralis augmented C. albicans invasion through epithelial junctions. C. albicans and S. oralis decreased epithelial E-cadherin levels by synergistically increasing µ-calpain, a proteolytic enzyme that targets E-cadherin. In the mouse coinfection model this was accompanied by increased fungal kidney dissemination. Coinfection with a secreted aspartyl protease (sap) mutant sap2456 and S. oralis increased μ-calpain and triggered mucosal invasion and systemic dissemination, suggesting that fungal protease activity is not required for invasion during coinfection. We conclude that C. albicans and S. oralis synergize to activate host enzymes that cleave epithelial junction proteins and increase fungal invasion. PMID:27190184

  3. Nutrient cycling.

    PubMed

    Bormann, F H; Likens, G E

    1967-01-27

    The small-watershed approach to problems of nutrient cycling has these advantages. (i) The small watershed is a natural unit of suitable size for intensive study of nutrient cycling at the ecosystem level. (ii) It provides a means of reducing to a minimum, or virtually eliminating, the effect of the difficult-to-measure variables of geologic input and nutrient losses in deep seepage. Control of these variables makes possible accurate measurement of nutrient input and output (erosion) and therefore establishes the relationship of the smaller ecosystem to the larger biospheric cycles. (iii) The small-watershed approach provides a method whereby such important parameters as nutrient release from minerals (weathering) and annual nutrient budgets may be calculated. (iv) It provides a means of studying the interrelationships between the biota and the hydrologic cycle, various nutrient cycles, and energy flow in a single system. (v) Finally, with the small-watershed system we can test the effect of various land-management practices or environmental pollutants on nutrient cycling in natural systems. PMID:17737551

  4. Effect of lectins on hepatic clearance and killing of Candida albicans by the isolated perfused mouse liver.

    PubMed Central

    Sawyer, R T; Garner, R E; Hudson, J A

    1992-01-01

    The isolated perfused mouse liver model was used to study the effects of various lectins on hepatic trapping and killing of Candida albicans. After mouse livers were washed with 20 to 30 ml of perfusion buffer, 10(6) C. albicans CFU were infused into the livers. At the time of recovery, 63% +/- 2% (mean +/- standard error of the mean) of the infused C. albicans CFU were recovered from the liver and 14% +/- 1% were recovered from the effluent for a total recovery of 77% +/- 2%. This indicated that 86% +/- 9% of the original inoculum was trapped by the liver and that 23% +/- 2% was killed within the liver. When included in both preperfusion and postperfusion buffers (0.2 mg of lectin per ml), Ulex europeaus lectin (binding specificity for fucose) decreased hepatic trapping of C. albicans by 37% and eluted trapped C. albicans from the liver only when included in postperfusion buffer. By comparison, treatment of C. albicans with U. europeaus lectin before infusion had no effect on the trapping or killing of yeast cells. When Lens culinaris lectin (binding specificity for mannose) was included in the perfusion buffers, hepatic killing of C. albicans increased by 16% with no significant effect on hepatic killing when yeast cells were treated with L. culinaris lectin before infusion. Forty to 55% of the infused C. albicans were killed when concanavalin A (binding specificities for mannose and glucose), Glycine max (binding specificity for N-acetylgalactosamine), or Arachis hypogea (binding specificity for galactose) lectin was included in the perfusion buffer or when yeast cells were treated with these lectins before their infusion. When C. albicans was treated with concanavalin A at a concentration of less than 0.02 mg/ml, hepatic killing of yeast cells was not significantly increased. The data suggest that a fucose-containing receptor on the surface of either sinusoidal endothelial cells or Kupffer cells is involved in the trapping of C. albicans by the perfused mouse

  5. Mast cells phagocyte Candida albicans and produce nitric oxide by mechanisms involving TLR2 and Dectin-1.

    PubMed

    Pinke, Karen Henriette; Lima, Heliton Gustavo de; Cunha, Fernando Queiroz; Lara, Vanessa Soares

    2016-02-01

    Candida albicans (C. albicans) is a fungus commonly found in the human mucosa, which may cause superficial and systemic infections, especially in immunosuppression. Until now, the main actors in the defense against this fungus are the epithelial cells, neutrophils, macrophages/monocytes and dendritic cells. However, mast cells are strategically located to play a first line of anti-Candida defense and it has appropriate mechanisms to do it. As with other cells, the recognition of C. albicans occurs meanly via TLR2 and Dectin-1. We assess the TLR2/Dectin-1 involvement in phagocytosis and production of nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) by mast cells challenged with C. albicans. Bone marrow-derived mast cells (MC) from wild type (Wt) or knockout (TLR2-/-) mice C57BL/6 were subjected to in vitro Dectin-1 blockade. After challenged with FITC-labeled C. albicans or zymosan, phagocytosis was analyzed by microscopy. The intracellular production of NO and ROS was measured by DAF-FM diacetate and CellROX Deep/Red Reagent kits. The nitrite formation and hydrogen peroxide release were analyzed by Griess reaction and Amplex Red Hydrogen Peroxide/Peroxidase Assay Kit. Wt/MC phagocytose C. albicans with production of intracellular NO, but not ROS. Moreover, increased levels of nitrite were also observed. The absence and/or blockade of TLR2/Dectin-1 caused significant decreased in C. albicans phagocytosis and NO production. Our results showed that mast cells are able to phagocytose and produce NO against C. albicans via TLR2/Dectin-1. Therefore, mast cells could be important during the course of Candida infection and as a therapeutic target. PMID:26421959

  6. Acetylcholine Protects against Candida albicans Infection by Inhibiting Biofilm Formation and Promoting Hemocyte Function in a Galleria mellonella Infection Model.

    PubMed

    Rajendran, Ranjith; Borghi, Elisa; Falleni, Monica; Perdoni, Federica; Tosi, Delfina; Lappin, David F; O'Donnell, Lindsay; Greetham, Darren; Ramage, Gordon; Nile, Christopher

    2015-08-01

    Both neuronal acetylcholine and nonneuronal acetylcholine have been demonstrated to modulate inflammatory responses. Studies investigating the role of acetylcholine in the pathogenesis of bacterial infections have revealed contradictory findings with regard to disease outcome. At present, the role of acetylcholine in the pathogenesis of fungal infections is unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine whether acetylcholine plays a role in fungal biofilm formation and the pathogenesis of Candida albicans infection. The effect of acetylcholine on C. albicans biofilm formation and metabolism in vitro was assessed using a crystal violet assay and phenotypic microarray analysis. Its effect on the outcome of a C. albicans infection, fungal burden, and biofilm formation were investigated in vivo using a Galleria mellonella infection model. In addition, its effect on modulation of host immunity to C. albicans infection was also determined in vivo using hemocyte counts, cytospin analysis, larval histology, lysozyme assays, hemolytic assays, and real-time PCR. Acetylcholine was shown to have the ability to inhibit C. albicans biofilm formation in vitro and in vivo. In addition, acetylcholine protected G. mellonella larvae from C. albicans infection mortality. The in vivo protection occurred through acetylcholine enhancing the function of hemocytes while at the same time inhibiting C. albicans biofilm formation. Furthermore, acetylcholine also inhibited inflammation-induced damage to internal organs. This is the first demonstration of a role for acetylcholine in protection against fungal infections, in addition to being the first report that this molecule can inhibit C. albicans biofilm formation. Therefore, acetylcholine has the capacity to modulate complex host-fungal interactions and plays a role in dictating the pathogenesis of fungal infections. PMID:26092919

  7. The Hyphal-Associated Adhesin and Invasin Als3 of Candida albicans Mediates Iron Acquisition from Host Ferritin

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Ricardo S.; Brunke, Sascha; Albrecht, Antje; Thewes, Sascha; Laue, Michael; Edwards, John E.; Filler, Scott G.; Hube, Bernhard

    2008-01-01

    Iron sequestration by host iron-binding proteins is an important mechanism of resistance to microbial infections. Inside oral epithelial cells, iron is stored within ferritin, and is therefore not usually accessible to pathogenic microbes. We observed that the ferritin concentration within oral epithelial cells was directly related to their susceptibility to damage by the human pathogenic fungus, Candida albicans. Thus, we hypothesized that host ferritin is used as an iron source by this organism. We found that C. albicans was able to grow on agar at physiological pH with ferritin as the sole source of iron, while the baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae could not. A screen of C. albicans mutants lacking components of each of the three known iron acquisition systems revealed that only the reductive pathway is involved in iron utilization from ferritin by this fungus. Additionally, C. albicans hyphae, but not yeast cells, bound ferritin, and this binding was crucial for iron acquisition from ferritin. Transcriptional profiling of wild-type and hyphal-defective C. albicans strains suggested that the C. albicans invasin-like protein Als3 is required for ferritin binding. Hyphae of an Δals3 null mutant had a strongly reduced ability to bind ferritin and these mutant cells grew poorly on agar plates with ferritin as the sole source of iron. Heterologous expression of Als3, but not Als1 or Als5, two closely related members of the Als protein family, allowed S. cerevisiae to bind ferritin. Immunocytochemical localization of ferritin in epithelial cells infected with C. albicans showed ferritin surrounding invading hyphae of the wild-type, but not the Δals3 mutant strain. This mutant was also unable to damage epithelial cells in vitro. Therefore, C. albicans can exploit iron from ferritin via morphology dependent binding through Als3, suggesting that this single protein has multiple virulence attributes. PMID:19023418

  8. Acetylcholine Protects against Candida albicans Infection by Inhibiting Biofilm Formation and Promoting Hemocyte Function in a Galleria mellonella Infection Model

    PubMed Central

    Rajendran, Ranjith; Borghi, Elisa; Falleni, Monica; Perdoni, Federica; Tosi, Delfina; Lappin, David F.; O'Donnell, Lindsay; Greetham, Darren; Ramage, Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Both neuronal acetylcholine and nonneuronal acetylcholine have been demonstrated to modulate inflammatory responses. Studies investigating the role of acetylcholine in the pathogenesis of bacterial infections have revealed contradictory findings with regard to disease outcome. At present, the role of acetylcholine in the pathogenesis of fungal infections is unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine whether acetylcholine plays a role in fungal biofilm formation and the pathogenesis of Candida albicans infection. The effect of acetylcholine on C. albicans biofilm formation and metabolism in vitro was assessed using a crystal violet assay and phenotypic microarray analysis. Its effect on the outcome of a C. albicans infection, fungal burden, and biofilm formation were investigated in vivo using a Galleria mellonella infection model. In addition, its effect on modulation of host immunity to C. albicans infection was also determined in vivo using hemocyte counts, cytospin analysis, larval histology, lysozyme assays, hemolytic assays, and real-time PCR. Acetylcholine was shown to have the ability to inhibit C. albicans biofilm formation in vitro and in vivo. In addition, acetylcholine protected G. mellonella larvae from C. albicans infection mortality. The in vivo protection occurred through acetylcholine enhancing the function of hemocytes while at the same time inhibiting C. albicans biofilm formation. Furthermore, acetylcholine also inhibited inflammation-induced damage to internal organs. This is the first demonstration of a role for acetylcholine in protection against fungal infections, in addition to being the first report that this molecule can inhibit C. albicans biofilm formation. Therefore, acetylcholine has the capacity to modulate complex host-fungal interactions and plays a role in dictating the pathogenesis of fungal infections. PMID:26092919

  9. Oral administration of the broad-spectrum antibiofilm compound toremifene inhibits Candida albicans and Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation in vivo.

    PubMed

    De Cremer, Kaat; Delattin, Nicolas; De Brucker, Katrijn; Peeters, Annelies; Kucharíková, Soña; Gerits, Evelien; Verstraeten, Natalie; Michiels, Jan; Van Dijck, Patrick; Cammue, Bruno P A; Thevissen, Karin

    2014-12-01

    We here report on the in vitro activity of toremifene to inhibit biofilm formation of different fungal and bacterial pathogens, including Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida dubliniensis, Candida krusei, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and Staphylococcus epidermidis. We validated the in vivo efficacy of orally administered toremifene against C. albicans and S. aureus biofilm formation in a rat subcutaneous catheter model. Combined, our results demonstrate the potential of toremifene as a broad-spectrum oral antibiofilm compound. PMID:25288093

  10. Sequential Dysfunction and Progressive Depletion of Candida albicans-Specific CD4 T Cell Response in HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fengliang; Fan, Xiuzhen; Auclair, Sarah; Ferguson, Monique; Sun, Jiaren; Soong, Lynn; Hou, Wei; Redfield, Robert R.; Birx, Deborah L.; Ratto-Kim, Silvia; Robb, Merlin L.; Kim, Jerome H.; Michael, Nelson L.; Hu, Haitao

    2016-01-01

    Loss of immune control over opportunistic infections can occur at different stages of HIV-1 (HIV) disease, among which mucosal candidiasis caused by the fungal pathogen Candida albicans (C. albicans) is one of the early and common manifestations in HIV-infected human subjects. The underlying immunological basis is not well defined. We have previously shown that compared to cytomegalovirus (CMV)-specific CD4 cells, C. albicans-specific CD4 T cells are highly permissive to HIV in vitro. Here, based on an antiretroviral treatment (ART) naïve HIV infection cohort (RV21), we investigated longitudinally the impact of HIV on C. albicans- and CMV-specific CD4 T-cell immunity in vivo. We found a sequential dysfunction and preferential depletion for C. albicans-specific CD4 T cell response during progressive HIV infection. Compared to Th1 (IFN-γ, MIP-1β) functional subsets, the Th17 functional subsets (IL-17, IL-22) of C. albicans-specific CD4 T cells were more permissive to HIV in vitro and impaired earlier in HIV-infected subjects. Infection history analysis showed that C. albicans-specific CD4 T cells were more susceptible to HIV in vivo, harboring modestly but significantly higher levels of HIV DNA, than CMV-specific CD4 T cells. Longitudinal analysis of HIV-infected individuals with ongoing CD4 depletion demonstrated that C. albicans-specific CD4 T-cell response was preferentially and progressively depleted. Taken together, these data suggest a potential mechanism for earlier loss of immune control over mucosal candidiasis in HIV-infected patients and provide new insights into pathogen-specific immune failure in AIDS pathogenesis. PMID:27280548

  11. Characterization of Binding of Candida albicans to Small Intestinal Mucin and Its Role in Adherence to Mucosal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    de Repentigny, Louis; Aumont, Francine; Bernard, Karine; Belhumeur, Pierre

    2000-01-01

    In order to approximate and adhere to mucosal epithelial cells, Candida must traverse the overlying mucus layer. Interactions of Candida species with mucin and human buccal epithelial cells (BECs) were thus investigated in vitro. Binding of the Candida species to purified small intestinal mucin showed a close correlation with their hierarchy of virulence. Significant differences (P < 0.05) were found among three categories of Candida species adhering highly (C. dubliniensis, C. tropicalis, and C. albicans), moderately (C. parapsilosis and C. lusitaniae) or weakly (C. krusei and C. glabrata) to mucin. Adherence of C. albicans to BECs was quantitatively inhibited by graded concentrations of mucin. However, inhibition of adherence was reversed by pretreatment of mucin with pronase or C. albicans secretory aspartyl proteinase Sap2p but not with sodium periodate. Saturable concentration- and time-dependent binding of mucin to C. albicans was abrogated by pronase or Sap2p treatment of mucin but was unaffected by β-mercaptoethanol, sodium periodate, neuraminidase, lectins, or potentially inhibitory sugars. Probing of membrane blots of the mucin with C. albicans revealed binding of the yeast to the 66-kDa cleavage product of the 118-kDa C-terminal glycopeptide of mucin. Although no evidence was found for the participation of C. albicans cell surface mannoproteins in specific receptor-ligand binding to mucin, inhibition of binding by p-nitrophenol (1 mM) and tetramethylurea (0.36 M) revealed that hydrophobic interactions are involved in adherence of C. albicans to mucin. These results suggest that C. albicans may both adhere to and enzymatically degrade mucins by the action of Saps, and that both properties may act to modulate Candida populations in the oral cavity and gastrointestinal tract. PMID:10816460

  12. Sequential Dysfunction and Progressive Depletion of Candida albicans-Specific CD4 T Cell Response in HIV-1 Infection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fengliang; Fan, Xiuzhen; Auclair, Sarah; Ferguson, Monique; Sun, Jiaren; Soong, Lynn; Hou, Wei; Redfield, Robert R; Birx, Deborah L; Ratto-Kim, Silvia; Robb, Merlin L; Kim, Jerome H; Michael, Nelson L; Hu, Haitao

    2016-06-01

    Loss of immune control over opportunistic infections can occur at different stages of HIV-1 (HIV) disease, among which mucosal candidiasis caused by the fungal pathogen Candida albicans (C. albicans) is one of the early and common manifestations in HIV-infected human subjects. The underlying immunological basis is not well defined. We have previously shown that compared to cytomegalovirus (CMV)-specific CD4 cells, C. albicans-specific CD4 T cells are highly permissive to HIV in vitro. Here, based on an antiretroviral treatment (ART) naïve HIV infection cohort (RV21), we investigated longitudinally the impact of HIV on C. albicans- and CMV-specific CD4 T-cell immunity in vivo. We found a sequential dysfunction and preferential depletion for C. albicans-specific CD4 T cell response during progressive HIV infection. Compared to Th1 (IFN-γ, MIP-1β) functional subsets, the Th17 functional subsets (IL-17, IL-22) of C. albicans-specific CD4 T cells were more permissive to HIV in vitro and impaired earlier in HIV-infected subjects. Infection history analysis showed that C. albicans-specific CD4 T cells were more susceptible to HIV in vivo, harboring modestly but significantly higher levels of HIV DNA, than CMV-specific CD4 T cells. Longitudinal analysis of HIV-infected individuals with ongoing CD4 depletion demonstrated that C. albicans-specific CD4 T-cell response was preferentially and progressively depleted. Taken together, these data suggest a potential mechanism for earlier loss of immune control over mucosal candidiasis in HIV-infected patients and provide new insights into pathogen-specific immune failure in AIDS pathogenesis. PMID:27280548

  13. The plant defensin RsAFP2 induces cell wall stress, septin mislocalization and accumulation of ceramides in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Thevissen, Karin; de Mello Tavares, Patricia; Xu, Deming; Blankenship, Jill; Vandenbosch, Davy; Idkowiak-Baldys, Jolanta; Govaert, Gilmer; Bink, Anna; Rozental, Sonia; de Groot, Piet W.J.; Davis, Talya R.; Kumamoto, Carol A.; Vargas, Gabriele; Nimrichter, Leonardo; Coenye, Tom; Mitchell, Aaron; Roemer, Terry; Hannun, Yusuf A.; Cammue, Bruno P.A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The antifungal plant defensin RsAFP2 isolated from radish interacts with fungal glucosylceramides and induces apoptosis in Candida albicans. To further unravel the mechanism of RsAFP2 antifungal action and tolerance mechanisms, we screened a library of 2,868 heterozygous C. albicans deletion mutants and identified 30 RsAFP2-hypersensitive mutants. The most prominent group of RsAFP2 tolerance genes was involved in cell wall integrity and hyphal growth/septin ring formation. Consistent with these genetic data, we demonstrated that RsAFP2 interacts with the cell wall of C. albicans, which also contains glucosylceramides, and activates the cell wall integrity pathway. Moreover, we found that RsAFP2 induces mislocalization of septins and blocks the yeast-to-hypha transition in C. albicans. Increased ceramide levels have previously been shown to result in apoptosis and septin mislocalization. Therefore, ceramide levels in C. albicans membranes were analyzed following RsAFP2 treatment and, as expected, increased accumulation of phytoC24-ceramides in membranes of RsAFP2-treated C. albicans cells was detected. This is the first report on the interaction of a plant defensin with glucosylceramides in the fungal cell wall, causing cell wall stress, and on the effects of a defensin on septin localization and ceramide accumulation. PMID:22384976

  14. Comparative assessment of the effectiveness of different cleaning methods on the growth of Candida albicans over acrylic surface

    PubMed Central

    Gantait, Subhajit; Bhattacharyya, Jayanta; Das, Samiran; Biswas, Shibendu; Ghati, Amit; Ghosh, Soumitra; Goel, Preeti

    2016-01-01

    Context: This study evaluated the efficacy of denture adhesive, cleanser, chlorhexidine, and brushing against Candida albicans biofilm developed on an acrylic surface and predicted the most effective, simple, and inexpensive way to maintain denture health, thereby preventing denture stomatitis. Aims: To find the best possible method for maintaining denture hygiene. Settings and Design: This retrospective analysis was conducted in the Guru Nanak Institute of Dental Sciences and Research, Kolkata, and this in vitro study was designed to minimize denture stomatitis among denture wearing population. Subjects and Methods: Sixty acrylic discs of equal dimensions after exposure to C. albicans were treated for a duration of 24 h with denture adhesive, cleanser, 0.2% chlorhexidine individually, or in combinations simulating clinical conditions dividing in six groups, ten samples each (n = 10). Statistical Analysis Used: After treatment, colony count was evaluated and statistically analyzed by post hoc Tukey's test and Dunnett's test to determine the most effective way of prevention. Results: The statistical post hoc analysis (Tukey's test and Dunnett's test) showed high significance (P < 0.0001). The group treated with adhesive showed high fungal growth compared to the control group, whereas chlorhexidine showed high potency to prevent C. albicans, whereas adhesive increased the adhesion of C. albicans to acrylic surface. Conclusions: Denture adhesive increases the adherence of C. albicans to denture surface. Other cleaning chemicals such as cleanser and chlorhexidine decrease the adherence. Moreover, among the all denture cleaning protocol, chlorhexidine drastically inhibit the adherence, as well as growth of C. albicans over denture surface.

  15. Chitinase 3-Like 1 Promotes Candida albicans Killing and Preserves Corneal Structure and Function by Controlling Host Antifungal Responses.

    PubMed

    Gao, Nan; Yu, Fu-Shin X

    2015-10-01

    Chitinase 3-like 1 (CHI3L1) has been shown to play a role in promoting antibacterial responses, decreasing tissue injury, and enhancing pulmonary repair. This study sought to elucidate the role of CHI3L1 in augmenting the corneal innate immune response to Candida albicans infection in an animal model of fungal keratitis. Flagellin applied topically 24 h prior to C. albicans inoculation significantly protected the corneal from C. albicans and induced CHI3L1 expression in C57BL/6 mouse corneas. CHI3L1, however, played a detectable but minor role in flagellin-induced protection. While C. albicans keratitis was more severe in the corneas treated with Chi3l1 small interfering RNA (siRNA), corneas treated with recombinant CHI3L1 before C. albicans inoculation had markedly ameliorated keratitis, reduced fungal load, and decreased polymorphonucleocyte (PMN) infiltration in an interleukin 13 receptor α2 (IL-13Rα2)-dependent manner. CHI3L1 treatment resulted in the induction of the antimicrobial peptides β-defensin 3, CRAMP, and chemokine CXCL10 and its receptor CXCR3 in corneal epithelial cells. Importantly, CHI3L1 administered after C. albicans inoculation also had strong protection against fungal keratitis, suggesting a therapeutic window. This is the first report demonstrating that CHI3L1 is induced during fungal infection, where it acts as an immunomodulator to promote fungal clearance and to regulate antifungal innate immune responses in the cornea. PMID:26238714

  16. Immunoproteomic Analysis of Antibody Responses to Extracellular Proteins of Candida albicans Revealing the Importance of Glycosylation for Antigen Recognition.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ting; Krüger, Thomas; Knüpfer, Uwe; Kasper, Lydia; Wielsch, Natalie; Hube, Bernhard; Kortgen, Andreas; Bauer, Michael; Giamarellos-Bourboulis, Evangelos J; Dimopoulos, George; Brakhage, Axel A; Kniemeyer, Olaf

    2016-08-01

    During infection, the human pathogenic fungus Candida albicans undergoes a yeast-to-hypha transition, secretes numerous proteins for invasion of host tissues, and modulates the host's immune response. Little is known about the interplay of C. albicans secreted proteins and the host adaptive immune system. Here, we applied a combined 2D gel- and LC-MS/MS-based approach for the characterization of C. albicans extracellular proteins during the yeast-to-hypha transition, which led to a comprehensive C. albicans secretome map. The serological responses to C. albicans extracellular proteins were investigated by a 2D-immunoblotting approach combined with MS for protein identification. On the basis of the screening of sera from candidemia and three groups of noncandidemia patients, a core set of 19 immunodominant antibodies against secreted proteins of C. albicans was identified, seven of which represent potential diagnostic markers for candidemia (Xog1, Lip4, Asc1, Met6, Tsa1, Tpi1, and Prx1). Intriguingly, some secreted, strongly glycosylated protein antigens showed high cross-reactivity with sera from noncandidemia control groups. Enzymatic deglycosylation of proteins secreted from hyphae significantly impaired sera antibody recognition. Furthermore, deglycosylation of the recombinantly produced, secreted aspartyl protease Sap6 confirmed a significant contribution of glycan epitopes to the recognition of Sap6 by antibodies in patient's sera. PMID:27386892

  17. Molecular tracking of Candida albicans in a neonatal intensive care unit: long-term colonizations versus catheter-related infections.

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Diez, B; Martinez, V; Alvarez, M; Rodriguez-Tudela, J L; Martinez-Suarez, J V

    1997-01-01

    Nosocomial neonatal candidiasis is a major problem in infants requiring intensive therapy. The subjects of this retrospective study were nine preterm infants admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit of the Hospital Central de Asturias between March 1993 and August 1994. The infants were infected with or colonized by Candida albicans. Five patients developed C. albicans bloodstream infections. A total of 36 isolates (including isolates from catheters and parenteral nutrition) were examined for molecular relatedness by PCR fingerprinting and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. The core sequence of phage M13 was used as a single primer in the PCR-based fingerprinting procedure, and RFLP analysis was performed with C. albicans-specific DNA probe 27A. Both techniques were evaluated with a panel of eight C. albicans reference strains, and each technique showed eight different patterns. With the 36 isolates from neonates, each technique enabled us to identify by PCR and RFLP analysis seven and six different patterns, respectively. The combination of these two methods (composite DNA type) identified eight different profiles. A strain with one of these profiles was present in three patients and in their respective catheters. Patients infected with or colonized by this isolate profile were clustered in time. Among the other patients, each patient was infected over time and at multiple anatomic sites with a C. albicans strain with a distinct DNA type. We conclude that C. albicans was most commonly producing long-term colonizations, although horizontal transmission probably due to catheters also occurred. PMID:9399489

  18. Typing Candida albicans oral isolates from human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis and DNA fingerprinting.

    PubMed Central

    Boerlin, P; Boerlin-Petzold, F; Goudet, J; Durussel, C; Pagani, J L; Chave, J P; Bille, J

    1996-01-01

    A total of 189 Candida albicans isolates have been typed by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis. The results obtained confirm the clonal mode of reproduction of C. albicans. The C. albicans populations found in the oropharynx of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients, in the oropharynx of healthy carriers, or in association with invasive candidiasis could not be distinguished. No clone or group of clones could be associated with the appearance of clinical disorders or with a reduced in vitro susceptibility to the antifungal agent fluconazole. Multiple and sequential oral isolates from 24 HIV-infected patients were also typed by restriction enzyme analysis with the enzymes EcoRI and HinfI and by use of the Ca3 repetitive probe. The results obtained by the combination of all three typing methods show that all but one patient each carried a unique major C. albicans clone in their oropharynx. The 21 patients with sequential isolates had the same C. albicans clones in their throats during recurrent oropharyngeal candidiasis episodes, independently of clinical status or of changes of in vitro susceptibility to fluconazole. Finally, several isolates of the same C. albicans clone found simultaneously in the oropharynx of a patient may present different levels of susceptibility to fluconazole. PMID:8727910

  19. Probiotic lactobacilli inhibit early stages of Candida albicans biofilm development by reducing their growth, cell adhesion, and filamentation.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Victor Haruo; Wang, Yi; Bandara, H M H N; Mayer, Marcia Pinto Alves; Samaranayake, Lakshman P

    2016-07-01

    We evaluated the inhibitory effects of the probiotic Lactobacillus species on different phases of Candida albicans biofilm development. Quantification of biofilm growth and ultrastructural analyses were performed on C. albicans biofilms treated with Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Lactobacillus casei, and Lactobacillus acidophilus planktonic cell suspensions as well as their supernatants. Planktonic lactobacilli induced a significant reduction (p < 0.05) in the number of biofilm cells (25.5-61.8 %) depending on the probiotic strain and the biofilm phase. L. rhamnosus supernatants had no significant effect on the mature biofilm (p > 0.05), but significantly reduced the early stages of Candida biofilm formation (p < 0.01). Microscopic analyses revealed that L. rhamnosus suspensions reduced Candida hyphal differentiation, leading to a predominance of budding growth. All lactobacilli negatively impacted C. albicans yeast-to-hyphae differentiation and biofilm formation. The inhibitory effects of the probiotic Lactobacillus on C. albicans entailed both cell-cell interactions and secretion of exometabolites that may impact on pathogenic attributes associated with C. albicans colonization on host surfaces and yeast filamentation. This study clarifies, for the first time, the mechanics of how Lactobacillus species may antagonize C. albicans host colonization. Our data elucidate the inhibitory mechanisms that define the probiotic candicidal activity of lactobacilli, thus supporting their utility as an adjunctive therapeutic mode against mucosal candidal infections. PMID:27087525

  20. The synthesis, regulation, and functions of sterols in Candida albicans: Well-known but still lots to learn.

    PubMed

    Lv, Quan-Zhen; Yan, Lan; Jiang, Yuan-Ying

    2016-08-17

    Sterols are the basal components of the membranes of the fungal pathogen Candida albicans, and these membranes determine the susceptibility of C. albicans cells to a variety of stresses, such as ionic, osmotic and oxidative pressures, and treatment with antifungal drugs. The common antifungal azoles in clinical use are targeted to the biosynthesis of ergosterol. In the past years, the synthesis, storage and metabolism of ergosterol in Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been characterized in some detail; however, these processes has not been as well investigated in the human opportunistic pathogen C. albicans. In this review, we summarize the genes involved in ergosterol synthesis and regulation in C. albicans. As well, genes in S. cerevisiae implicated in ergosterol storage and conversions with other lipids are noted, as these provide us clues and directions for the study of the homologous genes in C. albicans. In this report we have particularly focused on the essential roles of ergosterol in the dynamic process of cell biology and its fundamental status in the biological membrane system that includes lipid rafts, lipid droplets, vacuoles and mitochondria. We believe that a thorough understanding of this classic and essential pathway will give us new ideas about drug resistance and morphological switching in C. albicans. PMID:27221657

  1. The anti-candidal activity of Satureja khuzistanica ethanol extract against clinical isolates of C. albicans.

    PubMed

    Mahboubi, M; Kazempour, N

    2016-03-01

    Candida albicans is the common cause of some infectious diseases such as vaginal candidiasis or candidemia. Due to the emergence of drug resistant isolates of C. albicans, finding a new anti-Candida agent is a new strategy for current treatments. This study evaluated the anti-candidal activity of Satureja khuzistanica ethanol extract against clinical isolates of C. albicans. S. khuzistanica ethanol extract from aerial parts of plant at full flowering stage was evaluated against 30 clinical isolates and two ATCC reference strains of C. albicans by disc diffusion and micro-broth dilution assay. Also, in this study we evaluated the synergistic effects of amphotericin B, clotrimazole and ketoconazole with S. khuzistanica ethanol extract. The means of MIC and MFC of S. khuzistanica ethanol extract against clinical isolates were 299.4 and 722.6 (μg/mL), respectively. S. khuzistanica ethanol extract increased the anti-candidal effect of amphotericin B and ketoconazole, while it had no synergistic effect on clotrimazole against clinical isolates of C. albicans. Therefore, S. khuzistanica ethanol extract can be introduced as a new source of anti-candidal agent against clinical isolates of C. albicans. PMID:26849903

  2. Differential Gene Expression of Heat Shock Protein 90 (Hsp90) of Candida albicans obtained from Malaysian and Iranian Patients

    PubMed Central

    Khalili, Vajihe; Shokri, Hojjatollah; Md Akim, Abdah; Khosravi, Ali Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background Candida albicans (C. albicans) has several virulence factors, in particular heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90), which is expressed by Hsp90 gene. The purposes of this study were to assess the expression of Hsp90 gene in clinical and control isolates of C. albicans obtained from different geographical regions (Malaysia and Iran), different temperatures (25°C, 37°C and 42°C) and mice with candidiasis. Methods C. albicans isolates were cultured onto sabouraud dextrose agar (SDA). The assessment of the expression of Hsp90 gene was performed using real time-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results The results showed a significant increase in the expression of C. albicans Hsp90 gene under high thermal shock (42°C) when compared to other temperatures tested (P-value = 0.001). The mean differences in the expression of Hsp90 gene at 37°C were 0.20 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.13–0.29) between Malaysian and Iranian controls (P-value = 0.040) and 0.47 (95% CI 0.27–0.60) between Malaysian and Iranian patients (P-value = 0.040). Conclusion The results demonstrated that the expression of C. albicans Hsp90 gene varied between Malaysian and Iranian subjects, representing the efficacy of geographical and thermal conditions on virulence gene expression.

  3. Vapor Compression Cycle Design Program (CYCLE_D)

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 49 NIST Vapor Compression Cycle Design Program (CYCLE_D) (PC database for purchase)   The CYCLE_D database package simulates the vapor compression refrigeration cycles. It is fully compatible with REFPROP 9.0 and covers the 62 single-compound refrigerants . Fluids can be used in mixtures comprising up to five components.

  4. The proteolytic potential of Candida albicans in human saliva supplemented with glucose.

    PubMed

    Samaranayake, L P; Hughes, A; MacFarlane, T W

    1984-02-01

    The production of proteases by Candida albicans in batch cultures of human saliva supplemented with glucose was investigated with two clinical strains of Candida and both individual and pooled samples of whole saliva from volunteers. Salivary proteolysis during a 48-h period was estimated by biochemical and isoelectric focusing techniques. Candidal growth in saliva was associated with acid production and salivary proteolysis and there was a highly significant positive correlation between these two activities. Neither candidal growth nor proteolysis was observed in glucose-free control samples and with one strain of Candida cultured in the saliva of one individual. Isotachophoretic analysis of culture liquor showed a significant increase in acetate and pyruvate ions. The oral cavity provides niches that have a low pH and are periodically supplemented with dietary carbohydrates. The acidic proteases of C. albicans may play a role in the pathogenesis of oral candidoses. PMID:6363704

  5. A Candida albicans CRISPR system permits genetic engineering of essential genes and gene families

    PubMed Central

    Vyas, Valmik K.; Barrasa, M. Inmaculada; Fink, Gerald R.

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is a pathogenic yeast that causes mucosal and systematic infections with high mortality. The absence of facile molecular genetics has been a major impediment to analysis of pathogenesis. The lack of meiosis coupled with the absence of plasmids makes genetic engineering cumbersome, especially for essential functions and gene families. We describe a C. albicans CRISPR system that overcomes many of the obstacles to genetic engineering in this organism. The high frequency with which CRISPR-induced mutations can be directed to target genes enables easy isolation of homozygous gene knockouts, even without selection. Moreover, the system permits the creation of strains with mutations in multiple genes, gene families, and genes that encode essential functions. This CRISPR system is also effective in a fresh clinical isolate of undetermined ploidy. Our method transforms the ability to manipulate the genome of Candida and provides a new window into the biology of this pathogen. PMID:25977940

  6. Effect of alcohols on filamentation, growth, viability and biofilm development in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Nitin M; Shinde, Ravikumar B; Karuppayil, S Mohan

    2013-12-01

    In this study we report the potential of alcohols as morphogenetic regulators in Candida albicans. All the alcohols tested influenced various modes of growth like planktonic as well as biofilm forms. Viability was affected at high concentrations. Among the alcohols, the response of C. albicans to amyl alcohol (pentanol) was noteworthy. Amyl alcohol at a concentration 0.5% which was not inhibitory to growth and viability specifically inhibited morphogenetic switching from yeast to hyphal forms. It also inhibited normal biofilm development favoring yeast dominated biofilms. Based on this study we hypothesize that alcohols produced under anaerobic conditions may not favor biofilm development and support dissemination of yeast cells. Since anaerobic conditions are not found to favor production of quorum sensing molecules like farnesol, the alcohols may play a role in morphogenetic regulation. PMID:24688528

  7. Chemosensitization of multidrug resistant Candida albicans by the oxathiolone fused chalcone derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Ła̧cka, Izabela; Konieczny, Marek T.; Bułakowska, Anita; Kodedová, Marie; Gašková, Dana; Maurya, Indresh K.; Prasad, Rajendra; Milewski, Sławomir

    2015-01-01

    Three structurally related oxathiolone fused chalcone derivatives appeared effective chemosensitizers, able to restore in part sensitivity to fluconazole of multidrug-resistant C. albicans strains. Compound 21 effectively chemosensitized cells resistant due to the overexpression of the MDR1 gene, compound 6 reduced resistance of cells overexpressing the ABC-type drug transporters CDR1/CDR2 and derivative 18 partially reversed fluconazole resistance mediated by both types of yeast drug efflux pumps. The observed effect of sensitization of resistant strains of Candida albicans to fluconazole activity in the presence of active compounds most likely resulted from inhibition of the pump-mediated efflux, as was revealed by the results of studies involving the fluorescent probes, Nile Red, Rhodamine 6G and diS-C3(3). PMID:26300857

  8. Thiamin Pyrimidine Biosynthesis in Candida albicans: A Remarkable Reaction between Histidine and Pyridoxal Phosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Rung-Yi; Huang, Siyu; Fenwick, Michael K.; Hazra, Amrita; Zhang, Yang; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta; Philmus, Benjamin; Kinsland, Cynthia; Sanders, Jennie Mansell; Ealick, Steven E.; Begley, Tadhg P.

    2012-06-26

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, thiamin pyrimidine is formed from histidine and pyridoxal phosphate (PLP). The origin of all of the pyrimidine atoms has been previously determined using labeling studies and suggests that the pyrimidine is formed using remarkable chemistry that is without chemical or biochemical precedent. Here we report the overexpression of the closely related Candida albicans pyrimidine synthase (THI5p) and the reconstitution and preliminary characterization of the enzymatic activity. A structure of the C. albicans THI5p shows PLP bound at the active site via an imine with Lys62 and His66 in close proximity to the PLP. Our data suggest that His66 of the THI5 protein is the histidine source for pyrimidine formation and that the pyrimidine synthase is a single-turnover enzyme.

  9. Synergistic action of starch and honey against Candida albicans in correlation with diastase number

    PubMed Central

    Boukraa, Laïd; Benbarek, Hama; Moussa, Ahmed

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the synergistic action of starch on the antifungal activity of honey, a comparative method of adding honey with and without starch to culture media was used. Candida albicans has been used to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of five varieties of honey. In a second step, lower concentrations of honey than the MIC were incubated with a set of concentrations of starch added to media to determine the minimum synergistic inhibitory concentration (MSIC). The MIC for the five varieties of honey without starch against C. albicans ranged between 40% and 45% (v/v). When starch was incubated with honey and then added to media, a MIC drop has been noticed with each variety. It ranged between 7% and 25%. A negative correlation has been established between the MIC drop and the diastase number (DN). PMID:24031175

  10. The effect of ultraviolet radiation on the pathogenesis of Candida albicans in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Denkins, Y.M.

    1991-01-01

    This dissertation addresses questions concerning the effects of UV radiation on the pathogenesis of opportunistic fungal pathogens such as Candida albicans. UV radiation decreased the survival of Candida-infected mice; however, no correlation was found between suppression of the delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) response and the course of lethal infection. This suggested that DTH was not protective against lethal disease with this organism. UV radiation also changed the persistence of the organism in the internal organs. UV-irradiated, infected animals had increased numbers of Candida in their kidneys compared to non-irradiated mice. Sensitization prior to UV irradiation aided clearance of the organism from the kidneys of UV-irradiated mice. These data show that UV radiation suppresses cell-mediated immunity to Candida albicans in mice and increases mortality of Candida-infected mice. Moreover, the data suggest that an increase in environmental UV radiation could increase the severity of pathogenic infections.

  11. Candida albicans--adriamycin interactions: ultrastructural and spectrofluorometric study of whole yeasts and spheroplasts.

    PubMed

    Bobichon, H; Bussy, V; Angiboust, J F; Manfait, M; Bouchet, P; Jardillier, J C

    1990-01-01

    The occurrence of candidiasis in cancer patients who undergo chemotherapy requires the interrelation of Candida albicans and the antimitotic drug Adriamycin (ADM) which is well known as an intercalating agent. The whole yeasts were not affected by 2 h of contact with the drug at 10(-4) M neither for their growth curve nor for their ultrastructure, despite the presence of free ADM on their surface. Spheroplasts displayed a delay in their growth and exhibited altered nucleoli with segregation of their granular and fibrillar components. The modified emission spectrum of ADM, determined by spectrofluorometry, corresponded neither to the free ADM nor to the DNA-bound drug, but it could be related to a metabolite of the drug. The cell wall appeared to be one of the main sites for ADM resistance of Candida albicans in vitro. PMID:2085691

  12. Dressed to impress: impact of environmental adaptation on the C andida albicans cell wall

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Summary C andida albicans is an opportunistic fungal pathogen of humans causing superficial mucosal infections and life‐threatening systemic disease. The fungal cell wall is the first point of contact between the invading pathogen and the host innate immune system. As a result, the polysaccharides that comprise the cell wall act as pathogen associated molecular patterns, which govern the host–pathogen interaction. The cell wall is dynamic and responsive to changes in the external environment. Therefore, the host environment plays a critical role in regulating the host–pathogen interaction through modulation of the fungal cell wall. This review focuses on how environmental adaptation modulates the cell wall structure and composition, and the subsequent impact this has on the innate immune recognition of C . albicans. PMID:25846717

  13. Effects of Ploidy and Mating Type on Virulence of Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Ashraf S.; Magee, B. B.; Sheppard, D. C.; Yang, Molly; Kauffman, Sarah; Becker, Jeff; Edwards, John E.; Magee, P. T.

    2005-01-01

    Candida albicans is the most common fungal pathogen of humans. The recent discovery of sexuality in this organism has led to the demonstration of a mating type locus which is usually heterozygous, although some isolates are homozygous. Tetraploids can be formed between homozygotes of the opposite mating type. However, the role of the mating process and tetraploid formation in virulence has not been investigated. We describe here experiments using a murine model of disseminated candidiasis which demonstrate that in three strains, including CAI-4, the most commonly used strain background, tetraploids are less virulent than diploids and can undergo changes in ploidy during infection. In contrast to reports with other strains, we find that MTL homozygotes are almost as virulent as the heterozygotes. These results show that the level of ploidy in Candida albicans can affect virulence, but the mating type configuration does not necessarily do so. PMID:16239535

  14. Quick Detection of FKS1 Mutations Responsible for Clinical Echinocandin Resistance in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Dudiuk, Catiana; Gamarra, Soledad; Jimenez-Ortigosa, Cristina; Leonardelli, Florencia; Macedo, Daiana; Perlin, David S; Garcia-Effron, Guillermo

    2015-07-01

    A rapid molecular-based assay for the detection of the Candida albicans FKS1 gene mutations responsible for resistance to echinocandin drugs was designed and evaluated. The assay consisted of a multiplexed PCR set of 5 tubes able to detect the most commonly described resistance mechanism, including FKS1 hot spot 1 and hot spot 2 mutations. The performance and specificity of the assay was evaluated using a double-blinded panel of 50 C. albicans strains. The assay showed a sensitivity of 96% and was able to detect all homozygous mutants included in the collection of strains, demonstrating that it is a robust, quick, and labor-saving method that is suitable for a routine clinical diagnostic laboratory. PMID:25878347

  15. Allyl alcohol and garlic (Allium sativum) extract produce oxidative stress in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Lemar, Katey M.; Passa, Ourania; Aon, Miguel A.; Cortassa, Sonia; Müller, Carsten T.; Plummer, Sue; O’Rourke, Brian; Lloyd, David

    2009-01-01

    Both the growth and respiration of Candida albicans are sensitive to extracts of Allium sativum and investigations into the anticandidal activities are now focussing on the purified constituents to determine the targets of inhibition. Of particular interest is allyl alcohol (AA), a metabolic product that accumulates after trituration of garlic cloves. Putative targets for AA were investigated by monitoring changes in intracellular responses after exposure of C. albicans cells to AA or a commercially available garlic extract. Two-photon laser scanning microscopy and other techniques were used. Changes typical of oxidative stress – NADH oxidation and glutathione depletion, and increased reactive oxygen species – were observed microscopically and by flow cytometry. Known targets for AA are alcohol dehydrogenases Adh1 and 2 (in the cytosol) and Adh3 (mitochondrial), although the significant decrease in NAD(P)H after addition of AA is indicative of another mechanism of action. PMID:16207909

  16. Effect of alcohols on filamentation, growth, viability and biofilm development in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Nitin M; Shinde, Ravikumar B; Karuppayil, S. Mohan

    2013-01-01

    In this study we report the potential of alcohols as morphogenetic regulators in Candida albicans. All the alcohols tested influenced various modes of growth like planktonic as well as biofilm forms. Viability was affected at high concentrations. Among the alcohols, the response of C. albicans to amyl alcohol (pentanol) was noteworthy. Amyl alcohol at a concentration 0.5% which was not inhibitory to growth and viability specifically inhibited morphogenetic switching from yeast to hyphal forms. It also inhibited normal biofilm development favoring yeast dominated biofilms. Based on this study we hypothesize that alcohols produced under anaerobic conditions may not favor biofilm development and support dissemination of yeast cells. Since anaerobic conditions are not found to favor production of quorum sensing molecules like farnesol, the alcohols may play a role in morphogenetic regulation. PMID:24688528

  17. 5-fluoro-orotic acid induces chromosome alterations in genetically manipulated strains of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Wellington, Melanie; Kabir, M Anaul; Rustchenko, Elena

    2006-01-01

    We previously reported the occurrence of chromosome alterations in a Candida albicans prototrophic strain 3153A treated with 5-fluoro-orotic acid (5-FOA). In this study we investigated the mutagenic properties of 5-FOA with two derivatives of C. albicans strain CAF4-2 (ura3/ura3), each containing an ectopic copy of URA3 gene (ura3/ ura3 URA3) on a different chromosome. As expected, after the ura3/ura3 URA3 constructs were applied to 5-FOA containing solid medium, the "pop-outs" that lost URA3 appeared. However most of the "pop-outs" acquired various chromosome alterations. Thus constructs exposed to 5-FOA should be examined for chromosome alterations or the use of 5-FOA should be avoided. PMID:17040068

  18. Plasma membrane organization promotes virulence of the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Lois M; Konopka, James B

    2016-03-01

    Candida albicans is a human fungal pathogen capable of causing lethal systemic infections. The plasma membrane plays key roles in virulence because it not only functions as a protective barrier, it also mediates dynamic functions including secretion of virulence factors, cell wall synthesis, invasive hyphal morphogenesis, endocytosis, and nutrient uptake. Consistent with this functional complexity, the plasma membrane is composed of a wide array of lipids and proteins. These components are organized into distinct domains that will be the topic of this review. Some of the plasma membrane domains that will be described are known to act as scaffolds or barriers to diffusion, such as MCC/eisosomes, septins, and sites of contact with the endoplasmic reticulum. Other zones mediate dynamic processes, including secretion, endocytosis, and a special region at hyphal tips that facilitates rapid growth. The highly organized architecture of the plasma membrane facilitates the coordination of diverse functions and promotes the pathogenesis of C. albicans. PMID:26920878

  19. Candida albicans osteomyelitis as a cause of chest pain and visual loss.

    PubMed

    Magano, Rita; Cortez, Joana; Ramos, Evelise; Trindade, Luís

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans osteomyelitis is a rare disease that occurs in immunocompromised individuals, sometimes with a late diagnosis related to the mismatch between symptoms and candidemia. This case refers to a 36-year-old male patient with a history of oesophageal surgery for achalasia with multiple subsequent surgeries and hospitalisation in the intensive care unit for oesophageal fistula complication. Four months after discharge, the patient was admitted to the infectious diseases department with pain in the 10th-12th left ribs, swelling of the 4th-6th costal cartilage and decreased visual acuity. An MRI study showed thickening and diffuse enhancement, with no defined borders in the cartilage and ribs, compatible with infection. After performing a CT-guided bone biopsy, isolated C. albicans sensitive to antifungal agents was detected. The patient started therapy with liposomal amphotericin B and maintenance fluconazole for 6 months and showed clinical and radiological improvement within this time. PMID:26475877

  20. High frame-rate resolution of cell division during Candida albicans filamentation.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Darren D; Berman, Judith; Brand, Alexandra C

    2016-03-01

    The commensal yeast, Candida albicans, is an opportunistic pathogen in humans and forms filaments called hyphae and pseudohyphae, in which cell division requires precise temporal and spatial control to produce mononuclear cell compartments. High-frame-rate live-cell imaging (1 frame/min) revealed that nuclear division did not occur across the septal plane. We detected the presence of nucleolar fragments that may be extrachromosomal molecules carrying the ribosomal RNA genes. Cells occasionally maintained multiple nucleoli, suggesting either polyploidy, multiple nuclei and/or aneuploidy of ChrR., while the migration pattern of sister nuclei differed between unbranched and branched hyphae. The presented movie challenges and extends previous concepts of C. albicans cell division. PMID:26854071

  1. In vitro antifungal activity of baicalin against Candida albicans biofilms via apoptotic induction.

    PubMed

    Wang, TianMing; Shi, GaoXiang; Shao, Jing; Wu, DaQiang; Yan, YuanYuan; Zhang, MengXiang; Cui, YanYan; Wang, ChangZhong

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the antifungal activity of baicalin and its potential mechanism of action against Candida albicans biofilms. The standard techniques including microdilution method and checkerboard assay were employed to evaluate the susceptibilities of baicalin alone and in combination with fluconazole against planktonic and biofilm cells of C. albicans. Transmission electron microscope (TEM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), fluorescent microscope and flow cytometry were used to assess the apoptotic incidences induced by baicalin in biofilm cells. The expressions of four genes (RAS1, CAP1, PDE2 and TPK1) related to Ras-cAMP-PKA pathway were also analyzed by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The results showed that minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and sessile minimum inhibitory concentration (SMIC50) of baicalin were 500 and 2000 μg/mL with fractional inhibitory concentration indexs (FICIs) ranging from 0.28 to 0.75. A series of events related to apoptosis were observed in baicalin-treated C. albicans biofilms, including extensive chromatin condensation along the nuclear envelope, ROS accumulation, MMP reduction, PS externalization, nuclear fragmentation, chromatin condensation, metacaspase activation and Cyt C release. Additionally, the expressions of RAS1 and TPK1 were up-regulated by 3.2 and 2.9 folds respectively, while those of CAP1 and PDE2 were down-regulated by 3.3 and 6.6 folds respectively after exposure to baicalin in biofilm cells. In conclusion, baicalin can suppress the development of C. albicans biofilms most likely due to inducing cell death via apoptosis. PMID:26169236

  2. Environmental alteration and phenotypic regulation of Candida albicans adhesion to plastic.

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, M J; Rogers, A L; Yancey, R J

    1989-01-01

    The adhesion of Candida albicans to plastic was examined after growth in two chemically defined media, Lee-Buckley-Campbell (LBC) and yeast nitrogen base (YNB), by binding isotherms, Langmuir isotherms, and Scatchard plots, and the number of binding sites (N) and the affinity constants (K) were calculated. K and N were twofold and fourfold higher, respectively, after growth in LBC compared with that in YNB. A comparison of adhesion in different assay solutions gave similar results, with the solution given to dehydrated patients (5% glucose in 0.45% NaCl [D5.45]) allowing for the highest K and the largest N. Scatchard curves for both LBC- and YNB-grown cells had negative slopes, which is supportive evidence for the view that negative cooperativity is involved in the binding process. Additional experiments to examine the role of cell surface hydrophobicity in adhesion to plastic were conducted with the white and opaque phenotypes of C. albicans. There was no significant difference in the adhesion of these phenotypes to plastic, although the opaque phenotype was significantly more hydrophobic. Adhesion, but not cell surface hydrophobicity, of both phenotypes was significantly greater in D5.45. Moreover, relatively hydrophilic mycelial forms of C. albicans were found to attach only when D5.45 was used as the assay medium and, in contrast to yeast-phase cells, were insensitive to reduced adhesion by nonionic detergents. These results suggest that the adhesion of C. albicans to plastic is regulated by environmental circumstances and the phenotypic state of the organism. PMID:2680985

  3. Ultrastructural and biochemical studies of two dynamically expressed cell surface determinants on Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Brawner, D L; Cutler, J E

    1986-01-01

    Variability in the expression of two different cell surface carbohydrate determinants was examined with two agglutinating immunoglobulin M monoclonal antibodies (H9 and C6) and immunoelectron microscopy during growth of three strains of Candida albicans. A single strain of Candida parapsilosis did not express either antigen at any time during growth. Antigens were detected on the surface of C. albicans by agglutination tests with either H9 or C6 over a 48-h growth period. The difference in specificities of the monoclonal antibodies was demonstrated by Ouchterlony double-diffusion tests with solubilized antigens and by variabilities in the reactivity of the agglutinins among yeast strains. The antigenic determinants were isolated by specific immunoprecipitation and protease digestion and characterized by methods including high-pressure liquid chromatography, gas-liquid chromatography, and mass spectroscopy with both chemical and electron ionization. These determinants both contain mannose and glucose. In the case of antigen H9, an additional carbohydrate was detected with gas chromatography and mass spectroscopy. The location of antigens on individual cells was determined by indirect labeling of the determinants, first reacting cells with H9 or C6 followed by goat anti-mouse antibody conjugated with 20-nm colloidal gold particles. Transmission electron microscopy was used to examine cells. The antigens that were reactive with the monoclonal antibodies were associated with a flocculent surface layer. Expression of this layer and expression of the antigens is a dynamic process which is growth phase and strain dependent. The antigens were not expressed on very young cells and disappeared from the cell surface of most C. albicans strains with age. The use of monoclonal antibody to cell surface determinants may allow characterization of cell surface antigens of C. albicans and be helpful in establishing receptors which mediate adherence. Images PMID:3510174

  4. Functional Analysis of the Exocyst Subunit Sec15 in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Chavez-Dozal, Alba A.; Bernardo, Stella M.; Rane, Hallie S.

    2015-01-01

    In prior studies of exocyst-mediated late secretion in Candida albicans, we have determined that Sec6 contributes to cell wall integrity, secretion, and filamentation. A conditional mutant lacking SEC6 expression exhibits markedly reduced lateral hyphal branching. In addition, lack of the related t-SNAREs Sso2 and Sec9 also leads to defects in secretion and filamentation. To further understand the role of the exocyst in the fundamental processes of polarized secretion and filamentation in C. albicans, we studied the exocyst subunit Sec15. Since Saccharomyces cerevisiae SEC15 is essential for viability, we generated a C. albicans conditional mutant strain in which SEC15 was placed under the control of a tetracycline-regulated promoter. In the repressed state, cell death occurred after 5 h in the tetR-SEC15 strain. Prior to this time point, the tetR-SEC15 mutant was markedly defective in Sap and lipase secretion and demonstrated increased sensitivity to Zymolyase and chitinase. Notably, tetR-SEC15 mutant hyphae were characterized by a hyperbranching phenotype, in direct contrast to strain tetR-SEC6, which had minimal lateral branching. We further studied the localization of the Spitzenkörper, polarisomes, and exocysts in the tetR-SEC15 and tetR-SEC6 mutants during filamentation. Mlc1-GFP (marking the Spitzenkörper), Spa2-GFP (the polarisome), and Exo70-GFP (exocyst) localizations were normal in the tetR-SEC6 mutant, whereas these structures were mislocalized in the tetR-SEC15 mutant. Following alleviation of gene repression by removing doxycycline, first Spitzenkörper, then polarisome, and finally exocyst localizations were recovered sequentially. These results indicate that the exocyst subunits Sec15 and Sec6 have distinct roles in mediating polarized secretion and filamentation in C. albicans. PMID:26453654

  5. Phenylpropanoids of plant origin as inhibitors of biofilm formation by Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Raut, Jayant Shankar; Shinde, Ravikumar Bapurao; Chauhan, Nitin Mahendra; Karuppayil, Sankunny Mohan

    2014-09-01

    Biofilm-related infections of Candida albicans are a frequent cause of morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients, especially those with immunocompromised status. Options of the antifungal drugs available for successful treatment of drug-resistant biofilms are very few, and as such, new strategies need to be explored against them. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of phenylpropanoids of plant origin against planktonic cells, important virulence factors, and biofilm forms of C. albicans. Standard susceptibility testing protocol was used to evaluate the activities of 13 phenylpropanoids against planktonic growth. Their effects on adhesion and yeast-to-hyphae morphogenesis were studied in microplate-based methodologies. An in vitro biofilm model analyzed the phenylpropanoid-mediated prevention of biofilm development and mature biofilms using XTT-metabolic assay, crystal violet assay, and light microscopy. Six molecules exhibited fungistatic activity at ≤0.5 mg/ml, of which four were fungicidal at low concentrations. Seven phenylpropanoids inhibited yeast-to-hyphae transition at low concentrations (0.031-0.5 mg/ml), whereas adhesion to the solid substrate was prevented in the range of 0.5-2 mg/ml. Treatment with ≤0.5 mg/ml concentrations of at least six small molecules resulted in significant (p < 0.05) inhibition of biofilm formation by C. albicans. Mature biofilms that are highly resistant to antifungal drugs were susceptible to low concentrations of 4 of the 13 molecules. This study revealed phenylpropanoids of plant origin as promising candidates to devise preventive strategies against drug-resistant biofilms of C. albicans. PMID:24851813

  6. Secretory Aspartyl Proteinases Cause Vaginitis and Can Mediate Vaginitis Caused by Candida albicans in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pericolini, Eva; Gabrielli, Elena; Amacker, Mario; Kasper, Lydia; Roselletti, Elena; Luciano, Eugenio; Sabbatini, Samuele; Kaeser, Matthias; Moser, Christian; Hube, Bernhard; Vecchiarelli, Anna

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Vaginal inflammation (vaginitis) is the most common disease caused by the human-pathogenic fungus Candida albicans. Secretory aspartyl proteinases (Sap) are major virulence traits of C. albicans that have been suggested to play a role in vaginitis. To dissect the mechanisms by which Sap play this role, Sap2, a dominantly expressed member of the Sap family and a putative constituent of an anti-Candida vaccine, was used. Injection of full-length Sap2 into the mouse vagina caused local neutrophil influx and accumulation of the inflammasome-dependent interleukin-1β (IL-1β) but not of inflammasome-independent tumor necrosis factor alpha. Sap2 could be replaced by other Sap, while no inflammation was induced by the vaccine antigen, the N-terminal-truncated, enzymatically inactive tSap2. Anti-Sap2 antibodies, in particular Fab from a human combinatorial antibody library, inhibited or abolished the inflammatory response, provided the antibodies were able, like the Sap inhibitor Pepstatin A, to inhibit Sap enzyme activity. The same antibodies and Pepstatin A also inhibited neutrophil influx and cytokine production stimulated by C. albicans intravaginal injection, and a mutant strain lacking SAP1, SAP2, and SAP3 was unable to cause vaginal inflammation. Sap2 induced expression of activated caspase-1 in murine and human vaginal epithelial cells. Caspase-1 inhibition downregulated IL-1β and IL-18 production by vaginal epithelial cells, and blockade of the IL-1β receptor strongly reduced neutrophil influx. Overall, the data suggest that some Sap, particularly Sap2, are proinflammatory proteins in vivo and can mediate the inflammasome-dependent, acute inflammatory response of vaginal epithelial cells to C. albicans. These findings support the notion that vaccine-induced or passively administered anti-Sap antibodies could contribute to control vaginitis. PMID:26037125

  7. Candida albicans-Derived β-1,2-Linked Mannooligosaccharides Induce Desensitization of Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Jouault, Thierry; Fradin, Chantal; Trinel, Pierre-André; Poulain, Daniel

    2000-01-01

    Candida albicans β-1,2-oligomannosides stimulate macrophage tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) but not NO release. This stimulation desensitized macrophages by altering β-1,2-oligomannoside-dependent TNF-α production and lipopolysaccharide-dependent TNF-α and NO secretion. Desensitization was not related to tyrosine phosphorylation signal transduction but was transferred by culture supernatants in which arachidonic acid derivatives were evidenced. PMID:10639473

  8. Cloning and characterization of the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase from Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Monk, B C; Kurtz, M B; Marrinan, J A; Perlin, D S

    1991-01-01

    The Candida albicans PMA1 gene was isolated from a genomic library by using a hybridization probe obtained from the PMA1 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The gene was localized to chromosome III of the Candida genome. An open reading frame of 2,685 nucleotides predicts an amino acid sequence of 895 amino acids that is 83% homologous at both the DNA and protein levels to its S. cerevisiae equivalent. A polyadenylated mRNA transcript of about 4,000 nucleotides contains a highly folded AU-rich leader of 242 nucleotides. The structure of the gene, codon bias, and levels of approximately 100-kDa H(+)-ATPase protein recovered in plasma membranes indicate a highly expressed gene. The plasma membrane ATPase was purified to about 90% homogeneity and appeared to be blocked at the amino terminus. Three hydrophobic membrane sector tryptic fragments from the partially digested ATPase provided internal sequence information for over 50 amino acids, which agrees with the sequence predicted by the cloned gene. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis indicated that the C. albicans enzyme is about 3 kDa smaller than its Saccharomyces counterpart and was consistent with a predicted Mr of 97,398. Antibodies to the S. cerevisiae whole ATPase or its carboxyl terminus bound to the C. albicans enzyme but with lower avidity. Kinetic analysis showed that the Candida and Saccharomyces ATPases respond to glucose activation-starvation in nonidentical fashions. The amino-terminal domain of the C. albicans ATPase is marked by a net deletion of 23 amino acids in comparison with the S. cerevisiae ATPase. These differences maintain net charge, occur in nonconserved regions of fungal ATPases, and are sufficient to account for the observed difference in electrophoretic mobility between the two yeast ATPases. Images FIG. 3 FIG. 4 FIG. 5 FIG. 6 FIG. 7 PMID:1834633

  9. Molecular mechanisms associated with Fluconazole resistance in clinical Candida albicans isolates from India.

    PubMed

    Mane, Arati; Vidhate, Pallavi; Kusro, Chanchal; Waman, Vaishali; Saxena, Vandana; Kulkarni-Kale, Urmila; Risbud, Arun

    2016-02-01

    Resistance to azole antifungals is a significant problem in Candida albicans. An understanding of resistance at molecular level is essential for the development of strategies to tackle resistance and rationale design of newer antifungals and target-based molecular approaches. This study presents the first evaluation of molecular mechanisms associated with fluconazole resistance in clinical C.albicans isolates from India. Target site (ERG11) alterations were determined by DNA sequencing, whereas real-time PCRs were performed to quantify target and efflux pump genes (CDR1, CDR2, MDR1) in 87 [Fluconazole susceptible (n = 30), susceptible-dose dependent (n = 30) and resistant (n = 27)] C.albicans isolates. Cross-resistance to fluconazole, ketoconazole and itraconazole was observed in 74.1% isolates. Six amino acid substitutions were identified, including 4 (E116D, F145L, E226D, I437V) previously reported ones and 2 (P406L, Q474H) new ones. CDR1 over-expression was seen in 77.7% resistant isolates. CDR2 was exclusively expressed with CDR1 and their concomitant over-expression was associated with azole cross-resistance. MDR1 and ERG11 over-expression did not seem to be associated with resistance. Our results show that drug efflux mediated by Adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette transporters, especially CDR1 is the predominant mechanism of fluconazole resistance and azole cross-resistance in C. albicans and indicate the need for research directed towards developing strategies to tackle efflux mediated resistance to salvage azoles. PMID:26648048

  10. Ibuprofen Potentiates the In Vivo Antifungal Activity of Fluconazole against Candida albicans Murine Infection

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Isabel M.; Silva-Dias, Ana; Silva, Ana P.; Rodrigues, Acácio G.; Pina-Vaz, Cidália

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is the most prevalent cause of fungemia worldwide. Its ability to develop resistance in patients receiving azole antifungal therapy is well documented. In a murine model of systemic infection, we show that ibuprofen potentiates fluconazole antifungal activity against a fluconazole-resistant strain, drastically reducing the fungal burden and morbidity. The therapeutic combination of fluconazole with ibuprofen may constitute a new approach for the management of antifungal therapeutics to reverse the resistance conferred by efflux pump overexpression. PMID:25845879

  11. Anion Exchanger 2 Regulates Dectin-1-Dependent Phagocytosis and Killing of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Urso, Katia; Charles, Julia F; Shull, Gary E; Aliprantis, Antonios O; Balestrieri, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Anion exchanger 2 (Ae2; gene symbol, Slc4a2) is a plasma membrane Cl-/HCO3- exchanger expressed in the gastrointestinal tract, kidney and bone. We have previously shown that Ae2 is required for the function of osteoclasts, bone resorbing cells of the macrophage lineage, to maintain homeostatic cytoplasmic pH and electroneutrality during acid secretion. Macrophages require endosomal acidification for pathogen killing during the process known as phagocytosis. Chloride is thought to be the principal ion responsible for maintaining electroneutrality during organelle acidification, but whether Cl-/HCO3- exchangers such as Ae2 contribute to macrophage function is not known. In this study we investigated the role of Ae2 in primary macrophages during phagocytosis. We find that Ae2 is expressed in macrophages where it regulates intracellular pH and the binding of Zymosan, a fungal cell wall derivative. Surprisingly, the transcription and surface expression of Dectin-1, the major phagocytic receptor for Candida albicans (C. albicans) and Zymosan, is reduced in the absence of Ae2. As a consequence, Zymosan-induced Tnfα expression is also impaired in Ae2-deficient macrophages. Similar to Ae2 deficiency, pharmacological alkalinization of lysosomal pH with bafilomycin A decreases both Dectin-1 mRNA and cell surface expression. Finally, Ae2-deficient macrophages demonstrate defective phagocytosis and killing of the human pathogenic fungus C. albicans. Our results strongly suggest that Ae2 is a critical factor in the innate response to C. albicans. This study represents an important contribution to a better understanding of how Dectin-1 expression and fungal clearance is regulated. PMID:27391897

  12. Candida albicans Inhibits Pseudomonas aeruginosa Virulence through Suppression of Pyochelin and Pyoverdine Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Medina, Eduardo; Fan, Di; Coughlin, Laura A.; Ho, Evi X.; Lamont, Iain L.; Reimmann, Cornelia; Hooper, Lora V.; Koh, Andrew Y.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial-fungal interactions have important physiologic and medical ramifications, but the mechanisms of these interactions are poorly understood. The gut is host to trillions of microorganisms, and bacterial-fungal interactions are likely to be important. Using a neutropenic mouse model of microbial gastrointestinal colonization and dissemination, we show that the fungus Candida albicans inhibits the virulence of the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa by inhibiting P. aeruginosa pyochelin and pyoverdine gene expression, which plays a critical role in iron acquisition and virulence. Accordingly, deletion of both P. aeruginosa pyochelin and pyoverdine genes attenuates P. aeruginosa virulence. Heat-killed C. albicans has no effect on P. aeruginosa, whereas C. albicans secreted proteins directly suppress P. aeruginosa pyoverdine and pyochelin expression and inhibit P. aeruginosa virulence in mice. Interestingly, suppression or deletion of pyochelin and pyoverdine genes has no effect on P. aeruginosa’s ability to colonize the GI tract but does decrease P. aeruginosa’s cytotoxic effect on cultured colonocytes. Finally, oral iron supplementation restores P. aeruginosa virulence in P. aeruginosa and C. albicans colonized mice. Together, our findings provide insight into how a bacterial-fungal interaction can modulate bacterial virulence in the intestine. Previously described bacterial-fungal antagonistic interactions have focused on growth inhibition or colonization inhibition/modulation, yet here we describe a novel observation of fungal-inhibition of bacterial effectors critical for virulence but not important for colonization. These findings validate the use of a mammalian model system to explore the complexities of polymicrobial, polykingdom infections in order to identify new therapeutic targets for preventing microbial disease. PMID:26313907

  13. The Candida albicans CDR3 gene codes for an opaque-phase ABC transporter.

    PubMed Central

    Balan, I; Alarco, A M; Raymond, M

    1997-01-01

    We report the cloning and functional analysis of a third member of the CDR gene family in Candida albicans, named CDR3. This gene codes for an ABC (ATP-binding cassette) transporter of 1,501 amino acids highly homologous to Cdr1p and Cdr2p (56 and 55% amino acid sequence identity, respectively), two transporters involved in fluconazole resistance in C. albicans. The predicted structure of Cdr3p is typical of the PDR/CDR family, with two similar halves, each comprising an N-terminal hydrophilic domain with consensus sequences for ATP binding and a C-terminal hydrophobic domain with six predicted transmembrane segments. Northern analysis showed that CDR3 expression is regulated in a cell-type-specific manner, with low levels of CDR3 mRNA in CAI4 yeast and hyphal cells, high levels in WO-1 opaque cells, and undetectable levels in WO-1 white cells. Disruption of both alleles of CDR3 in CAI4 resulted in no obvious changes in cell morphology, growth rate, or susceptibility to fluconazole. Overexpression of Cdr3p in C. albicans did not result in increased cellular resistance to fluconazole, cycloheximide, and 4-nitroquinoline-N-oxide, which are known substrates for different transporters of the PDR/CDR family. These results indicate that despite a high degree of sequence conservation with C. albicans Cdr1p and Cdr2p, Cdr3p does not appear to be involved in drug resistance, at least to the compounds tested which include the clinically relevant antifungal agent fluconazole. Rather, the high level of Cdr3p expression in WO-1 opaque cells suggests an opaque-phase-associated biological function which remains to be identified. PMID:9393682

  14. The Monoterpene Carvacrol Generates Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in the Pathogenic Fungus Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Chaillot, Julien; Tebbji, Faiza; Remmal, Adnane; Boone, Charlie; Brown, Grant W; Bellaoui, Mohammed; Sellam, Adnane

    2015-08-01

    The monoterpene carvacrol, the major component of oregano and thyme oils, is known to exert potent antifungal activity against the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans. This monoterpene has been the subject of a considerable number of investigations that uncovered extensive pharmacological properties, including antifungal and antibacterial effects. However, its mechanism of action remains elusive. Here, we used integrative chemogenomic approaches, including genome-scale chemical-genetic and transcriptional profiling, to uncover the mechanism of action of carvacrol associated with its antifungal property. Our results clearly demonstrated that fungal cells require the unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling pathway to resist carvacrol. The mutants most sensitive to carvacrol in our genome-wide competitive fitness assay in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressed mutations of the transcription factor Hac1 and the endonuclease Ire1, which is required for Hac1 activation by removing a nonconventional intron from the 3' region of HAC1 mRNA. Confocal fluorescence live-cell imaging revealed that carvacrol affects the morphology and the integrity of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Transcriptional profiling of pathogenic yeast C. albicans cells treated with carvacrol demonstrated a bona fide UPR transcriptional signature. Ire1 activity detected by the splicing of HAC1 mRNA in C. albicans was activated by carvacrol. Furthermore, carvacrol was found to potentiate antifungal activity of the echinocandin antifungal caspofungin and UPR inducers dithiothreitol and tunicamycin against C. albicans. This comprehensive chemogenomic investigation demonstrated that carvacrol exerts its antifungal activity by altering ER integrity, leading to ER stress and the activation of the UPR to restore protein-folding homeostasis. PMID:26014932

  15. Functional Analysis of the Exocyst Subunit Sec15 in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Chavez-Dozal, Alba A; Bernardo, Stella M; Rane, Hallie S; Lee, Samuel A

    2015-12-01

    In prior studies of exocyst-mediated late secretion in Candida albicans, we have determined that Sec6 contributes to cell wall integrity, secretion, and filamentation. A conditional mutant lacking SEC6 expression exhibits markedly reduced lateral hyphal branching. In addition, lack of the related t-SNAREs Sso2 and Sec9 also leads to defects in secretion and filamentation. To further understand the role of the exocyst in the fundamental processes of polarized secretion and filamentation in C. albicans, we studied the exocyst subunit Sec15. Since Saccharomyces cerevisiae SEC15 is essential for viability, we generated a C. albicans conditional mutant strain in which SEC15 was placed under the control of a tetracycline-regulated promoter. In the repressed state, cell death occurred after 5 h in the tetR-SEC15 strain. Prior to this time point, the tetR-SEC15 mutant was markedly defective in Sap and lipase secretion and demonstrated increased sensitivity to Zymolyase and chitinase. Notably, tetR-SEC15 mutant hyphae were characterized by a hyperbranching phenotype, in direct contrast to strain tetR-SEC6, which had minimal lateral branching. We further studied the localization of the Spitzenkörper, polarisomes, and exocysts in the tetR-SEC15 and tetR-SEC6 mutants during filamentation. Mlc1-GFP (marking the Spitzenkörper), Spa2-GFP (the polarisome), and Exo70-GFP (exocyst) localizations were normal in the tetR-SEC6 mutant, whereas these structures were mislocalized in the tetR-SEC15 mutant. Following alleviation of gene repression by removing doxycycline, first Spitzenkörper, then polarisome, and finally exocyst localizations were recovered sequentially. These results indicate that the exocyst subunits Sec15 and Sec6 have distinct roles in mediating polarized secretion and filamentation in C. albicans. PMID:26453654

  16. Pseudomonas aeruginosa lipopolysaccharide inhibits Candida albicans hyphae formation and alters gene expression during biofilm development.

    PubMed

    Bandara, H M H N; K Cheung, B P; Watt, R M; Jin, L J; Samaranayake, L P

    2013-02-01

    Elucidation of bacterial and fungal interactions in multispecies biofilms will have major impacts on understanding the pathophysiology of infections. The objectives of this study were to (i) evaluate the effect of Pseudomonas aeruginosa lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on Candida albicans hyphal development and transcriptional regulation, (ii) investigate protein expression during biofilm formation, and (iii) propose likely molecular mechanisms for these interactions. The effect of LPS on C. albicans biofilms was assessed by XTT-reduction and growth curve assays, light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Changes in candidal hypha-specific genes (HSGs) and transcription factor EFG1 expression were assessed by real-time polymerase chain reaction and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, respectively. Proteome changes were examined by mass spectrometry. Both metabolic activities and growth rates of LPS-treated C. albicans biofilms were significantly lower (P < 0.05). There were higher proportions of budding yeasts in test biofilms compared with the controls. SEM and CLSM further confirmed these data. Significantly upregulated HSGs (at 48 h) and EFG1 (up to 48 h) were noted in the test biofilms (P < 0.05) but cAMP levels remained unaffected. Proteomic analysis showed suppression of candidal septicolysin-like protein, potential reductase-flavodoxin fragment, serine hydroxymethyltransferase, hypothetical proteins Cao19.10301(ATP7), CaO19.4716(GDH1), CaO19.11135(PGK1), CaO19.9877(HNT1) by P. aeruginosa LPS. Our data imply that bacterial LPS inhibit C. albicans biofilm formation and hyphal development. The P. aeruginosa LPS likely target glycolysis-associated mechanisms during candidal filamentation. PMID:23194472

  17. Abolishing Cell Wall Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-Anchored Proteins in Candida albicans Enhances Recognition by Host Dectin-1.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hui; Chen, Si Min; Liu, Wei; Zhu, Fang; He, Li Juan; Zhang, Jun Dong; Zhang, Shi Qun; Yan, Lan; Xu, Zheng; Xu, Guo Tong; An, Mao Mao; Jiang, Yuan Ying

    2015-07-01

    Fungi can shield surface pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) for evading host immune attack. The most common and opportunistic human pathogen, Candida albicans, can shield β-(1 3)-glucan on the cell wall, one of the major PAMPs, to avoid host phagocyte Dectin-1 recognition. The way to interfere in the shielding process for more effective antifungal defense is not well established. In this study, we found that deletion of the C. albicans GPI7 gene, which was responsible for adding ethanolaminephosphate to the second mannose in glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) biosynthesis, could block the attachment of most GPI-anchored cell wall proteins (GPI-CWPs) to the cell wall and subsequently unmask the concealed β-(1,3)-glucan. Neutrophils could kill the uncloaked gpi7 mutant more efficiently with an augmented respiratory burst. The gpi7 mutant also stimulated Dectin-1-dependent immune responses of macrophages, including activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways and secretion of specific cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin 6 (IL-6), and IL-12p40. Furthermore, the gpi7 null mutant could induce an enhanced inflammatory response through promoting significant recruitment of neutrophils and monocytes and could stimulate stronger Th1 and Th17 cell responses to fungal infections in vivo. These in vivo phenotypes also were Dectin-1 dependent. Thus, we assume that GPI-CWPs are involved in the immune mechanism of C. albicans escaping from host recognition by Dectin-1. Our studies also indicate that the blockage of GPI anchor synthesis is a strategy to inhibit C. albicans evading host recognition. PMID:25895969

  18. Candida albicans Inhibits Pseudomonas aeruginosa Virulence through Suppression of Pyochelin and Pyoverdine Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Medina, Eduardo; Fan, Di; Coughlin, Laura A; Ho, Evi X; Lamont, Iain L; Reimmann, Cornelia; Hooper, Lora V; Koh, Andrew Y

    2015-08-01

    Bacterial-fungal interactions have important physiologic and medical ramifications, but the mechanisms of these interactions are poorly understood. The gut is host to trillions of microorganisms, and bacterial-fungal interactions are likely to be important. Using a neutropenic mouse model of microbial gastrointestinal colonization and dissemination, we show that the fungus Candida albicans inhibits the virulence of the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa by inhibiting P. aeruginosa pyochelin and pyoverdine gene expression, which plays a critical role in iron acquisition and virulence. Accordingly, deletion of both P. aeruginosa pyochelin and pyoverdine genes attenuates P. aeruginosa virulence. Heat-killed C. albicans has no effect on P. aeruginosa, whereas C. albicans secreted proteins directly suppress P. aeruginosa pyoverdine and pyochelin expression and inhibit P. aeruginosa virulence in mice. Interestingly, suppression or deletion of pyochelin and pyoverdine genes has no effect on P. aeruginosa's ability to colonize the GI tract but does decrease P. aeruginosa's cytotoxic effect on cultured colonocytes. Finally, oral iron supplementation restores P. aeruginosa virulence in P. aeruginosa and C. albicans colonized mice. Together, our findings provide insight into how a bacterial-fungal interaction can modulate bacterial virulence in the intestine. Previously described bacterial-fungal antagonistic interactions have focused on growth inhibition or colonization inhibition/modulation, yet here we describe a novel observation of fungal-inhibition of bacterial effectors critical for virulence but not important for colonization. These findings validate the use of a mammalian model system to explore the complexities of polymicrobial, polykingdom infections in order to identify new therapeutic targets for preventing microbial disease. PMID:26313907

  19. Candida albicans VPS4 contributes differentially to epithelial and mucosal pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Rane, Hallie S; Hardison, Sarah; Botelho, Claudia; Bernardo, Stella M; Wormley, Floyd; Lee, Samuel A

    2014-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that the C. albicans pre-vacuolar protein sorting gene VPS4 is required for extracellular secretion of the secreted aspartyl proteases Sap2p and Saps4–6p. Furthermore, the vps4Δ null mutant has been shown to be markedly hypovirulent in a murine tail vein model of disseminated candidiasis. In these experiments, we sought to further define the role of the pre-vacuolar secretion pathway mediated by the pre-vacuolar sorting gene VPS4 in the pathogenesis of epithelial and mucosal infection using a broad range of virulence models. The C. albicans vps4Δ mutant demonstrates reduced tolerance of cell wall stresses compared to its isogenic, complemented control strain. In an in vitro oral epithelial model (OEM) of tissue invasion, the vps4Δ mutant caused reduced tissue damage compared to controls. Further, the vps4Δ mutant was defective in macrophage killing in vitro, and was attenuated in virulence in an in vivo Caenorhabditis elegans model representative of intestinal epithelial infection. In contrast, the vps4Δ mutant caused a similar degree of tissue damage in an in vitro uroepithelial model of Candida infection compared with controls. Furthermore, in an in vivo murine model of vaginal candidiasis there was no reduction in fungal colony burden and no differences in vaginal histopathology compared to wild-type and complemented controls. These results suggest that VPS4 contributes to several key aspects of oral epithelial but not uroepithelial infection, and in contrast to systemic infection, plays no major role in the pathogenesis of Candida vaginitis. By using a wide range of virulence models, we demonstrate that C. albicans VPS4 contributes to virulence according to the specific tissue that is infected. Thus, in order to gain a full understanding of C. albicans virulence in relation to a particular gene or pathway of interest, a selected range of infection models may need to be utilized. PMID:25483774

  20. Differential activation of a Candida albicans virulence gene family during infection

    PubMed Central

    Staib, Peter; Kretschmar, Marianne; Nichterlein, Thomas; Hof, Herbert; Morschhäuser, Joachim

    2000-01-01

    The yeast Candida albicans is a harmless commensal in most healthy people, but it causes superficial as well as life-threatening systemic infections in immunocompromised patients. C. albicans can colonize or infect virtually all body sites because of its high adaptability to different host niches, which involves the activation of appropriate sets of genes in response to complex environmental signals. We have used an in vivo expression technology that is based on genetic recombination as a reporter of gene expression to monitor the differential activation of individual members of a gene family encoding secreted aspartic proteinases (Saps), which have been implicated in C. albicans virulence, at various stages of the infection process. Our results demonstrate that SAP expression depends on the type of infection, with different SAP isogenes being activated during systemic disease as compared with mucosal infection. In addition, the activation of individual SAP genes depends on the progress of the infection, some members of the gene family being induced immediately after contact with the host, whereas others are expressed only after dissemination into deep organs. In the latter case, the number of invading organisms determines whether induction of a virulence gene is necessary for successful infection. The in vivo expression technology allows the elucidation of gene expression patterns at different stages of the fungus–host interaction, thereby revealing regulatory adaptation mechanisms that make C. albicans the most successful fungal pathogen of humans and, at the same time, identifying the stage of an infection at which certain virulence genes may play a role. PMID:10811913

  1. Micafungin for Candida albicans pacemaker-associated endocarditis: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Tascini, Carlo; Bongiorni, Maria Grazia; Tagliaferri, Enrico; Di Paolo, Antonello; Flammini, Sarah; Soldati, Ezio; Leonildi, Alessandro; Di Cori, Andrea; Menichetti, Francesco

    2013-02-01

    We report on the treatment with micafungin of a pacemaker-associated endocarditis due to Candida albicans. Antifungal therapy was able to reduce vegetation size from 5 to 1 cm making possible the transvenous removal of the device without a high risk of pulmonary embolism. Noteworthy, a high micafungin concentration was documented into the lead vegetation (10 μg/g of vegetation tissue) and this may have contributed to the striking size reduction of vegetation. PMID:23073824

  2. Silver nanoparticles embedded mesoporous SiO₂ nanosphere: an effective anticandidal agent against Candida albicans 077.

    PubMed

    Qasim, M; Singh, Braj R; Naqvi, A H; Paik, P; Das, D

    2015-07-17

    Candida albicans is a diploid fungus that causes common infections such as denture stomatitis, thrush, urinary tract infections, etc. Immunocompromised patients can become severely infected by this fungus. Development of an effective anticandidal agent against this pathogenic fungus, therefore, will be very useful for practical application. In this work, Ag-embedded mesoporous silica nanoparticles (mSiO2@AgNPs) have successfully been synthesized and their anticandidal activities against C. albicans have been studied. The mSiO2@AgNPs nanoparticles (d ∼ 400 nm) were designed using pre-synthesized Ag nanoparticles and tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) as a precursor for SiO2 in the presence of cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) as an easily removable soft template. A simple, cost-effective, and environmentally friendly approach has been adopted to synthesize silver (Ag) nanoparticles using silver nitrate and leaf extract of Azadirachta indica. The mesopores, with size-equivalent diameter of the micelles (d = 4-6 nm), were generated on the SiO2 surface by calcination after removal of the CTAB template. The morphology and surface structure of mSiO2@AgNPs were characterized through x-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), particle size analysis (PSA), atomic force microscopy (AFM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The HRTEM micrograph reveals the well-ordered mesoporous structure of the SiO2 sphere. The antifungal activities of mSiO2@AgNPs on the C. albicans cell have been studied through microscopy and are seen to increase with increasing dose of mSiO2@AgNPs, suggesting mSiO2@AgNPs to be a potential antifungal agent for C. albicans 077. PMID:26119911

  3. Integrative Model of Oxidative Stress Adaptation in the Fungal Pathogen Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Komalapriya, Chandrasekaran; Yin, Zhikang; Herrero-de-Dios, Carmen; Jacobsen, Mette D.; Belmonte, Rodrigo C.; Cameron, Gary; Haynes, Ken; Grebogi, Celso; de Moura, Alessandro P. S.; Gow, Neil A. R.; Thiel, Marco; Quinn, Janet

    2015-01-01

    The major fungal pathogen of humans, Candida albicans, mounts robust responses to oxidative stress that are critical for its virulence. These responses counteract the reactive oxygen species (ROS) that are generated by host immune cells in an attempt to kill the invading fungus. Knowledge of the dynamical processes that instigate C. albicans oxidative stress responses is required for a proper understanding of fungus-host interactions. Therefore, we have adopted an interdisciplinary approach to explore the dynamical responses of C. albicans to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Our deterministic mathematical model integrates two major oxidative stress signalling pathways (Cap1 and Hog1 pathways) with the three major antioxidant systems (catalase, glutathione and thioredoxin systems) and the pentose phosphate pathway, which provides reducing equivalents required for oxidative stress adaptation. The model encapsulates existing knowledge of these systems with new genomic, proteomic, transcriptomic, molecular and cellular datasets. Our integrative approach predicts the existence of alternative states for the key regulators Cap1 and Hog1, thereby suggesting novel regulatory behaviours during oxidative stress. The model reproduces both existing and new experimental observations under a variety of scenarios. Time- and dose-dependent predictions of the oxidative stress responses for both wild type and mutant cells have highlighted the different temporal contributions of the various antioxidant systems during oxidative stress adaptation, indicating that catalase plays a critical role immediately following stress imposition. This is the first model to encapsulate the dynamics of the transcriptional response alongside the redox kinetics of the major antioxidant systems during H2O2 stress in C. albicans. PMID:26368573

  4. An expanded genetic code in Candida albicans to study protein-protein interactions in vivo.

    PubMed

    Palzer, Silke; Bantel, Yannick; Kazenwadel, Franziska; Berg, Michael; Rupp, Steffen; Sohn, Kai

    2013-06-01

    For novel insights into the pathogenicity of Candida albicans, studies on molecular interactions of central virulence factors are crucial. Since methods for the analysis of direct molecular interactions of proteins in vivo are scarce, we expanded the genetic code of C. albicans with the synthetic photo-cross-linking amino acid p-azido-L-phenylalanine (AzF). Interacting molecules in close proximity of this unnatural amino acid can be covalently linked by UV-induced photo-cross-link, which makes unknown interacting molecules available for downstream identification. Therefore, we applied an aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase and a suppressor tRNA pair (EcTyrtRNA(CUA)) derived from Escherichia coli, which was previously reported to be orthogonal in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We further optimized the aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase for AzF (AzF-RS) and EcTyrtRNA(CUA) for C. albicans and identified one AzF-RS with highest charging efficiency. Accordingly, incorporation of AzF into selected model proteins such as Tsa1p or Tup1p could be considerably enhanced. Immunologic detection of C-terminally tagged Tsa1p and Tup1p upon UV irradiation in a strain background containing suppressor tRNA and optimized AzF-RS revealed not only the mutant monomeric forms of these proteins but also higher-molecular-weight complexes, strictly depending on the specific position of incorporated AzF and UV excitation. By Western blotting and tandem mass spectrometry, we could identify these higher-molecular-weight complexes as homodimers consisting of one mutant monomer and a differently tagged, wild-type version of Tsa1p or Tup1p, respectively, demonstrating that expanding the genetic code of C. albicans with the unnatural photo-cross-linker amino acid AzF and applying it for in vivo binary protein interaction analyses is feasible. PMID:23543672

  5. A Novel Small Molecule Methyltransferase is Important for Virulence in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Lissina, Elena; Weiss, David; Young, Brian; Rella, Antonella; Cheung-Ong, Kahlin; Del Poeta, Maurizio; Clarke, Steven G.; Giaever, Guri; Nislow, Corey

    2014-01-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic pathogen capable of causing life-threatening infections in immunocompromised individuals. Despite its significant health impact, our understanding of C. albicans pathogenicity is limited, particularly at the molecular level. One of the largely understudied enzyme families in C. albicans is small molecule AdoMet-dependent methyltransferases (smMTases), which are important for maintenance of cellular homeostasis by clearing toxic chemicals, generating novel cellular intermediates and regulating intra- and interspecies interactions. Putative smMTase orf19.633 has little homology to any known protein and was previously identified based on its ability to functionally complement a baker’s yeast crg1 mutant in response to protein phosphatase inhibitor cantharidin. In this study, we demonstrated that C. albicans Crg1 (CaCrg1) is a bona fide smMTase that interacts with the toxin in vitro and in vivo. We report that CaCrg1 is important for virulence-related processes such as adhesion, hyphal elongation and membrane trafficking in response to this toxin. Using biochemical and genetic analysis we also found that CaCrg1 plays a role in complex sphingolipid pathway: it binds to exogenous short-chain ceramides in vitro, it interacts genetically with genes of glucosylceramide pathway and the deletion of CaCRG1 leads to significant changes in the abundance of phytoceramides. Finally we found that this novel lipid-related smMTase is required for virulence in the waxmoth Galleria mellonella, a model of infection. PMID:24083538

  6. Integrative Model of Oxidative Stress Adaptation in the Fungal Pathogen Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Komalapriya, Chandrasekaran; Kaloriti, Despoina; Tillmann, Anna T; Yin, Zhikang; Herrero-de-Dios, Carmen; Jacobsen, Mette D; Belmonte, Rodrigo C; Cameron, Gary; Haynes, Ken; Grebogi, Celso; de Moura, Alessandro P S; Gow, Neil A R; Thiel, Marco; Quinn, Janet; Brown, Alistair J P; Romano, M Carmen

    2015-01-01

    The major fungal pathogen of humans, Candida albicans, mounts robust responses to oxidative stress that are critical for its virulence. These responses counteract the reactive oxygen species (ROS) that are generated by host immune cells in an attempt to kill the invading fungus. Knowledge of the dynamical processes that instigate C. albicans oxidative stress responses is required for a proper understanding of fungus-host interactions. Therefore, we have adopted an interdisciplinary approach to explore the dynamical responses of C. albicans to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Our deterministic mathematical model integrates two major oxidative stress signalling pathways (Cap1 and Hog1 pathways) with the three major antioxidant systems (catalase, glutathione and thioredoxin systems) and the pentose phosphate pathway, which provides reducing equivalents required for oxidative stress adaptation. The model encapsulates existing knowledge of these systems with new genomic, proteomic, transcriptomic, molecular and cellular datasets. Our integrative approach predicts the existence of alternative states for the key regulators Cap1 and Hog1, thereby suggesting novel regulatory behaviours during oxidative stress. The model reproduces both existing and new experimental observations under a variety of scenarios. Time- and dose-dependent predictions of the oxidative stress responses for both wild type and mutant cells have highlighted the different temporal contributions of the various antioxidant systems during oxidative stress adaptation, indicating that catalase plays a critical role immediately following stress imposition. This is the first model to encapsulate the dynamics of the transcriptional response alongside the redox kinetics of the major antioxidant systems during H2O2 stress in C. albicans. PMID:26368573

  7. Anion Exchanger 2 Regulates Dectin-1-Dependent Phagocytosis and Killing of Candida albicans